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Sample records for optimise occupational radiological

  1. Work management to optimise occupational radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahier, B.

    2009-01-01

    Although work management is no longer a new concept, continued efforts are still needed to ensure that good performance, outcomes and trends are maintained in the face of current and future challenges. The ISOE programme thus created an Expert Group on Work Management in 2007 to develop an updated report reflecting the current state of knowledge, technology and experience in the occupational radiological protection of workers at nuclear power plants. Published in 2009, the new ISOE report on Work Management to Optimise Occupational Radiological Protection in the Nuclear Power Industry provides up-to-date practical guidance on the application of work management principles. Work management measures aim at optimising occupational radiological protection in the context of the economic viability of the installation. Important factors in this respect are measures and techniques influencing i) dose and dose rate, including source- term reduction; ii) exposure, including amount of time spent in controlled areas for operations; and iii) efficiency in short- and long-term planning, worker involvement, coordination and training. Equally important due to their broad, cross-cutting nature are the motivational and organisational arrangements adopted. The responsibility for these aspects may reside in various parts of an installation's organisational structure, and thus, a multi-disciplinary approach must be recognised, accounted for and well-integrated in any work. Based on the operational experience within the ISOE programme, the following key areas of work management have been identified: - regulatory aspects; - ALARA management policy; - worker involvement and performance; - work planning and scheduling; - work preparation; - work implementation; - work assessment and feedback; - ensuring continuous improvement. The details of each of these areas are elaborated and illustrated in the report through examples and case studies arising from ISOE experience. They are intended to

  2. Work management to optimise occupational radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahier, B.

    2009-01-01

    Occupational exposures at nuclear power plants worldwide have steadily decreased since the early 1990's. Regulatory pressures, technological advances, improved plant designs and operational procedures, as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) culture and information exchange have contributed to this downward trend. However, with the continued ageing and possible life extensions of nuclear power plants, ongoing economic pressures, regulatory, social and political evolutions, and the potential of new nuclear build, the task of ensuring that occupational exposures are kept as low as reasonably achievable continues to present challenges to radiological protection professionals

  3. Operational Radiological Protection and Aspects of Optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, E.; Lindvall, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    Since 1992, the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), along with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), has sponsored the Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE). ISOE collects and analyses occupational exposure data and experience from over 400 nuclear power plants around the world and is a forum for radiological protection experts from both nuclear power plants and regulatory authorities to share lessons learned and best practices in the management of worker radiation exposures. In connection to the ongoing work of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to develop new recommendations, the ISOE programme has been interested in how the new recommendations would affect operational radiological protection application at nuclear power plants. Bearing in mind that the ICRP is developing, in addition to new general recommendations, a new recommendation specifically on optimisation, the ISOE programme created a working group to study the operational aspects of optimisation, and to identify the key factors in optimisation that could usefully be reflected in ICRP recommendations. In addition, the Group identified areas where further ICRP clarification and guidance would be of assistance to practitioners, both at the plant and the regulatory authority. The specific objective of this ISOE work was to provide operational radiological protection input, based on practical experience, to the development of new ICRP recommendations, particularly in the area of optimisation. This will help assure that new recommendations will best serve the needs of those implementing radiation protection standards, for the public and for workers, at both national and international levels. (author)

  4. Optimisation of occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.; Fleishman, A.B.

    1982-01-01

    The general concept of the optimisation of protection of the public is briefly described. Some ideas being developed for extending the cost benefit framework to include radiation workers with full implementation of the ALARA criterion are described. The role of cost benefit analysis in radiological protection and the valuation of health detriment including the derivation of monetary values and practical implications are discussed. Cost benefit analysis can lay out for inspection the doses, the associated health detriment costs and the costs of protection for alternative courses of action. However it is emphasised that the cost benefit process is an input to decisions on what is 'as low as reasonably achievable' and not a prescription for making them. (U.K.)

  5. Recent perspectives on optimisation of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robb, J.D.; Croft, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    The ALARA principle as a requirement in radiological protection has evolved from its theoretical roots. Based on several years work, this paper provides a backdrop to practical approaches to ALARA for the 1990s. The key step, developing ALARA thinking so that it becomes an integral part of radiological protection programmes, is discussed using examples from the UK and France, as is the role of tools to help standardise judgements for decision-making. In its latest recommendations, ICRP have suggested that the optimisation of protection should be constrained by restrictions on the doses to individuals. This paper also considers the function of such restrictions for occupational, public and medical exposure, and in the design process. (author)

  6. Occupational radiological protection in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, H.C.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: occupational expossure (the ALARA principle, dose-equivalent limit, ICRP justification); radiological protection planning (general aspects, barrier estimation) and determination of the occupational expossures (individual monitoring). (M.A.) [pt

  7. Occupational exposure in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, H.J.; Lee, K.Y.; Cha, S.H.; Kang, Y.K.; Kim, H.J.; Oh, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to survey of radiation safety control and to measure occupational radiation exposure dose of staff in interventional radiology in Korea. Interventioanl radiology requires the operator and assisting personnel to remain close to the patient, and thus close to primary beams of radiation. Therefore exposure doses of these personnel are significant from a radiological protection point of view. We surveyed the status of radiation safety on interventional radiology of 72 hospitals. The result were that 119 radiation equipments are using in interventional radiology and 744 staffs are composed of 307 radiologists, 116 residents of radiology, 5 general physicians, 171 radiologic technologists and 145 nurses. 81.4% and 20.2 % of operating physicians are using neck collar protector and goggle respectively. The average radiation dose was measured 0.46±0.15 mSv/10 hours fluoroscopy inside examination room in radiation protection facilities. Occupational radiation exposure data on the staff were assessed in interventional radiology procedures from 8 interventional radiology equipments of 6 university hospitals. The dose measurements were made by placing a thermoluminesent dosimeter(TLD) on various body surface of operation and assistant staff during actual interventional radiology. The measured points were the corner of the eyes, neck(on the thyroid) , wrists, chest(outside and inside of the protector), and back. Average radiation equivalent dose of the corner of left eye and left wrist of operating physicians were 1.19 mSv(0.11∼4.13 mSv)/100 minutes fluoroscopy and 4.32 mSv(0.16∼11.0 mSv)/100 minutes fluoroscopy respectively. Average exposure dose may vary depending on the type of procedure, personal skills and the quality of equipment. These results will be contributed to prepare the guide line in interventional radiology in Korea

  8. Action research regarding the optimisation of radiological protection for nurses during vascular interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroshige

    2015-01-01

    The optimisation and decision-making processes for radiological protection have been broadened by the introduction of re-examination or feedback after introducing protective measures. In this study, action research was used to reduce the occupational exposure of vascular interventional radiology (IR) nurses. Four radiological protection improvement measures were continuously performed in cooperation with the researchers, nurses and stakeholders, and the nurses’ annual effective doses were compared before and after the improvements. First, the dosimetry equipment was changed from one electronic personal dosimeter (EPD) to two silver-activated phosphate glass dosimeters (PGDs). Second, the nurses were educated regarding maintaining a safe distance from the sources of scattered and leakage radiation. Third, portable radiation shielding screens were placed in the IR rooms. Fourth, the x-ray units’ pulse rates were reduced by half. On changing the dosimetry method, the two PGDs recorded a 4.4 fold greater dose than the single EPD. Educating nurses regarding radiological protection and reducing the pulse rates by half decreased their effective doses to one-third and two-fifths of the baseline dose, respectively. No significant difference in their doses was detected after the placement of the shielding screens. Therefore, the action research effectively decreased the occupational doses of the vascular IR nurses. (practical matter)

  9. Action research regarding the optimisation of radiological protection for nurses during vascular interventional radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hiroshige

    2015-06-01

    The optimisation and decision-making processes for radiological protection have been broadened by the introduction of re-examination or feedback after introducing protective measures. In this study, action research was used to reduce the occupational exposure of vascular interventional radiology (IR) nurses. Four radiological protection improvement measures were continuously performed in cooperation with the researchers, nurses and stakeholders, and the nurses' annual effective doses were compared before and after the improvements. First, the dosimetry equipment was changed from one electronic personal dosimeter (EPD) to two silver-activated phosphate glass dosimeters (PGDs). Second, the nurses were educated regarding maintaining a safe distance from the sources of scattered and leakage radiation. Third, portable radiation shielding screens were placed in the IR rooms. Fourth, the x-ray units' pulse rates were reduced by half. On changing the dosimetry method, the two PGDs recorded a 4.4 fold greater dose than the single EPD. Educating nurses regarding radiological protection and reducing the pulse rates by half decreased their effective doses to one-third and two-fifths of the baseline dose, respectively. No significant difference in their doses was detected after the placement of the shielding screens. Therefore, the action research effectively decreased the occupational doses of the vascular IR nurses.

  10. Role of radiology in occupational medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vehmas, T.

    2004-01-01

    This review discusses the contribution of radiology to occupational medicine as well as work-related problems in radiology dept.s. Research issues are emphasized. Radiology has been used especially when diagnosing occupational respiratory and locomotive system problems and solvent-induced encephalo- and hepatopathy. The aim of research in these areas is usually to characterize occupational diseases and to identify physico-chemical hazards in the work place by comparing between groups of workers and non-exposed controls. Radiological imaging allows an objective characterization of the disease, and it may clarify the pathogenesis of the process and provide a useful epidemiological tool. Advanced statistical methods are often needed to adjust analyses for confounding variables. As the diagnostic requirements are increasing, more sensitive and sophisticated radiological methods, such as high-resolution computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy, may be required for the early recognition of occupational health risks. This necessitates good cooperation between occupational health units and well-equipped imaging dept.s. Considering occupational problems in radiology departments, the increasing use of digital radiology requires ergonomic measures to control and prevent locomotive problems caused by work with computers. Radiation protection measures are still worth concern, especially in interventional radiology

  11. Concepts of optimisation and justification consequences for radiological mass screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmichael, J.H.E.

    1987-01-01

    Mass radiological screening campaigns have been mounted in many countries for different conditions and the needs of one country are not necessarily those of another. However, in the European community there is a reasonable uniformity about disease patterns and therefore, a mass screening situation applicable to one country is probably equally applicable throughout the Community. In radiation protection terms, all these potential surveys must be looked at under the same factors. In radiation protection, one thinks first of all justification of the practice. Then one follows it by optimisation of the technique used, so as to obtain the best balance between benefit and detriment, and at this point one must remember that the radiation protection concept of optimisation includes a financial element as well as a purely clinical element and this must lead us on eventually to touch on cost effectiveness. The last portion of the ICRP system is the actual setting of dose limits. Now these are really only applicable to workers not to patients. One cannot set an upper limit on the dose one is prepared to use in a diagnostic radiological examination, but one can say that the dose per examination, should be examined and that the dose range of that examination between various institutions should be ascertained. This should enable any one institution to see where their dose range lies in the larger dose range, and to see that their radiological practice is giving as low a dose as is reasonably achievable

  12. Worker radiological protection: occupational medical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas Herrera, Juan; Fernandez Gomez, Isis Maria

    2008-01-01

    Radiation exposures experienced by workers are widely explained. The first evidences of biological effects, the implications for human health and the radiological protection have been covered. The conceptual structure that covers the radiological protection and adequate protection without limiting benefits, the scientific basis of radiology, the benefits and risks of the radiological protection are specified. The effective per capita doses are exposed in medical uses both for Latin America and for other regions in the average radiology, dental radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. The manners of occupational exposures in the medicine are presented. Industrial uses have also its average effective dose in the industrial irradiation, industrial radiography and radioisotopes production. Within the natural radiation the natural sources can significantly contribute to occupational exposure and have their average effective dose. Occupational medical surveillance to be taken into industrial sites is detailed. In addition, the plan of international action for the solution of dilemmas of occupational exposures is mentioned and the different dilemmas of radioactive exposure are showed. The external irradiation, the acute diseases by radiations, the cutaneous syndrome of the chronic radiation, the radioactive contamination, the internal radioactive contamination, the combined lesion and accidental exposures are also treated [es

  13. Radiological procedures: Quality criteria and dose optimisation: French status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, Ph.; Marshall-Depommier, E.; Bourguignon, M.; Beauvais-March, H.; Valero, M.; Lacronique, J.F.; Frijal, G.

    2001-01-01

    The Council Directive 97/43/Euratom of June 30 1997 on health protection of individuals against the dangers of ionising radiation in relation to medical exposure has come into force on May, 13 th 2000. French health directorate has entrusted the 'Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants (OPRI)' together with the 'Societe Francaise de Radiologie' (SFR) to implement article 6 related to radiological procedures, in order to bring into operation the principle of optimisation. The most frequent diagnostic radiology and interventional procedures (120 protocols) have been standardised in writing. Corresponding patient dosimetry has been determined from measurements on site, calculations and literature review. The criteria for optimisation have been highlighted for each protocols. With the help of the French Society of Medical Physicists (SFPM), measurements are being collected on a large scale in France. Then, knowing more precisely the patient dosimetry of each protocol, referral criteria will be reviewed and prioritised to implement the principle of justification. The authors will present and explain the chosen methodology (methodology of the Accreditation and Evaluation in Health Agency: ANAES) for completing this two years workload program, and will demonstrate clinical examples as well. (author)

  14. Occupational and Radiological Protection Department - DEPRO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report presents the activities and purposes of the Occupational and Radiological Dept. of the Institute of Radioprotection and Dosimetry of Brazilian CNEN. A critical analysis of its situation and expectations are also presented, besides personnel list. (J.A.M.M.)

  15. Radiological protection worker: occupational medical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora Ramirez, Erick

    2008-01-01

    International Organizations involved with radiation protection are presented in the first part. Also some documents related to the radiation that have been published by these organizations. Among the analyzed contents are the radiation and their patients, how to avoid the damage of radiation, pregnancy and exposure to medical radiation, effects of radiation, recommendations for the protection and safety standards. Occupational exposure is defined as the exposure received and understood by a worker during a period of work. In addition, it shows the types of occupational exposure, the protection that workers must have with the radiation, regulations, laws and the regulatory authority that protects the medical personnel in the uses of radiology [es

  16. The optimisation of occupational potential exposures - preliminary considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouail, P. [Centre d`Etude sur l`Evaluation de la Protection dans le domaine Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Guimaraes, L. [Cidade Universitaria Armando de Salles Oliveira (Brazil)

    1995-03-01

    One of the major innovation brought about the ICRP 60 recommendations and emphasized by the ICRP 64 publication, is the introduction of the concept of potential exposures into the system of radiological protection. Potential exposures are characterized by {open_quotes}probability of occurrence lesser than unity{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}radiological risks exceeding normal levels{close_quotes} where normal must be interpreted as not exceeding the planned routine exposures. It is then necessary to develop consensual methods to look for and choose the optimum scenarios (i.e. those for which probability of events and possible consequences have been reduced as low as reasonably achievable). Moreover, the boundaries for the unacceptable levels of risks for workers should be defined, as well as reasonable risk indicators. The aim of this paper is to discuss the actual changes in the field of occupational radiological protection, induced by the potential exposure concept with particular emphasize on the optimization of protection.

  17. Optimisation of occupational exposures during site remediation at WISMUT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, P.; Wolf, F.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1991 the national corporation WISMUT GmbH has been charged with the rehabilitation of the sites of former Uranium mining and milling in East Germany. Since decommissioning and site remediation are carried out at places with enhanced dose rates and high concentrations of airborne radioactivity (Rn-222, long-lived alpha emitters), a large part of the employees is classified as occupationally exposed radiation workers. Thus, in 2002, 1,073 workers were engaged with relevant works in radiation protection areas aboveground (radiation exposed workers of category B; mean effective dose: 0.3 mSv; maximum dose: 2.2 mSv), and 514 workers still prepared by underground activities the flooding of the Uranium mines (category A; mean effective dose: 0.9 mSv; maximum effective dose: 4.9 mSv). The paper presents the measures taken by WISMUT to optimise the occupational exposure. The need for implementing appropriate ALARA methods in the field of occupational exposure is last but not least caused by the fact that for a number of employees the integral exposure over the total working life time has exceeded already the 400 mSv figure. (orig.)

  18. ICRP Publication 139: Occupational Radiological Protection in Interventional Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, P Ortiz; Dauer, L T; Loose, R; Martin, C J; Miller, D L; Vañó, E; Doruff, M; Padovani, R; Massera, G; Yoder, C

    2018-03-01

    In recent publications, such as Publications 117 and 120, the Commission provided practical advice for physicians and other healthcare personnel on measures to protect their patients and themselves during interventional procedures. These measures can only be effective if they are encompassed by a framework of radiological protection elements, and by the availability of professionals with responsibilities in radiological protection. This framework includes a radiological protection programme with a strategy for exposure monitoring, protective garments, education and training, and quality assurance of the programme implementation. Professionals with responsibilities in occupational radiological protection for interventional procedures include: medical physicists; radiological protection specialists; personnel working in dosimetry services; clinical applications support personnel from the suppliers and maintenance companies; staff engaged in training, standardisation of equipment, and procedures; staff responsible for occupational health; hospital administrators responsible for providing financial support; and professional bodies and regulators. This publication addresses these elements and these audiences, and provides advice on specific issues, such as assessment of effective dose from dosimeter readings when an apron is worn, estimation of exposure of the lens of the eye (with and without protective eyewear), extremity monitoring, selection and testing of protective garments, and auditing the interventional procedures when occupational doses are unusually high or low (the latter meaning that the dosimeter may not have been worn).

  19. Occupational rdiation exposure and anthropometric indices among radiologic technologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Sun Bi; Moon, Eun Kyeong; Cha, Eun Shill; Lee, Won Jin [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Worldwide increase in the prevalence of abnormal anthropometric indices (i.e., body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference (WC)) are associated with increased risk of death and adverse health outcomes which causes great burden in public health. Studies on the association between radiation exposure and altered anthropometric indices reported both positive and negative associations in atomic bomb and childhood cancer survivors. We have initiated a radiologic technologists health study to investigate occupational radiation exposure and their health effects. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the association between occupational radiation dose with BMI and WC in radiologic technologists in South Korea. These results explain that occupational radiation exposure can possibly alter BMI and WC. Therefore, further study is required to verify the prospective causal effect of radiation exposure on anthropometric indices.

  20. Transition in occupational radiation exposure monitoring methods in diagnostic and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loennroth, N.; Hirvonen-Kari, M.; Timonen, M.; Savolainen, S.; Kortesniemi, M.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation exposure monitoring is a traditional keystone of occupational radiation safety measures in medical imaging. The aim of this study was to review the data on occupational exposures in a large central university hospital radiology organisation and propose changes in the radiation worker categories and methods of exposure monitoring. An additional objective was to evaluate the development of electronic personal dosimeters and their potential in the digitised radiology environment. The personal equivalent dose of 267 radiation workers (116 radiologists and 151 radiographers) was monitored using personal dosimeters during the years 2006-2010. Accumulated exposure monitoring results exceeding the registration threshold were observed in the personal dosimeters of 73 workers (59 radiologists' doses ranged from 0.1 to 45.1 mSv; 14 radiographers' doses ranged from 0.1 to 1.3 mSv). The accumulated personal equivalent doses are generally very small, only a few angiography radiologists have doses >10 mSv per 5 y. The typical effective doses are -1 and the highest value was 0.3 mSv (single interventional radiologist). A revised categorisation of radiation workers based on the working profile of the radiologist and observed accumulated doses is justified. Occupational monitoring can be implemented mostly with group dosimeters. An active real-time dosimetry system is warranted to support radiation protection strategy where optimisation aspects, including improving working methods, are essential. (authors)

  1. Optimisation and decisions in radiological protection - A report of the work of an ICRP task group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.

    1988-01-01

    In 1984 the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) established a Task Group of Committee 4 to produce a report on methods for optimisation of protection other than cost-benefit analysis. As the work of the task group progressed it became clear that it would be more useful to produce a report on the entire field of application of optimisation, mainly to show how the various techniques including cost-benefit analysis could be applied appropriately to problems at different levels of complexity. This paper reports on the main ideas that have been developed by the task group. It must be emphasised that these ideas have not been endorsed by Committee 4 nor approved by the Commission so they can not yet be considered as recommendations

  2. Occupational Lung Disease: Clinical-Pathological-Radiological Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo Bayona, Jorge Alberto; Rivera Bernal, Aura Lucia; Ojeda Paulina; Paez Garcia, Diana Sofia

    2008-01-01

    People are exposed to hundreds of substances daily, some of which may induce pulmonary injury. Occupational Lung Disease diagnosis requires 4 elements: Exposure to the harmful agent, adequate latency between exposure and beginning of the symptoms, syndrome with post-exposure abnormalities, and exclusion of other conditions which may otherwise explain signs and symptoms. Several occupational lung disease classifications based on structural or functional injury, type of agent, or both have been proposed. Generally, 5 groups are considered: Pneumoconiosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, toxic fumes exposure, asthma, and occupational lung infections. Conventional radiographs and in specific situations, CT, are crucial elements for the diagnosis of Occupational Lung Disease. In the patient with respiratory symptoms and altered imaging studies, the possibility of Occupational Lung Disease should be considered. Radiologist should be familiar the variety of substances that cause these entities and their radiological features. In this article Occupational Lung diseases are reviewed, including diagnostic criteria, classification, physiopathology, clinical and radiological manifestations as well as their corresponding histopathological features.

  3. Managing 'Generation Y' occupational therapists: optimising their potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Caroline; Ryan, Susan; Warren-Forward, Helen; Smith, Derek R

    2013-08-01

    'Generation Y' is a descriptor of those therapists born between 1982 and 2000. According to generational theory, each generation have unique characteristics due to the social and historical factors they have experienced during their formative years. Occupational therapy educators have reported on 'Generation Y' characteristics observed in occupational therapy students. This study aimed to investigate if managers considered there was a 'Generation Y' therapist and their observed characteristics in practice, as well as successful management strategies used to maximise their potential in the workplace. A hard copy survey based on the 'Generation Y' literature was sent to all managers listed on an Australian University database. Almost all respondents considered there was a 'Generation Y' therapist. Overall, managers reported characteristics of this staff group as being hard working, confident with technology, needing positive feedback and demanding professional development opportunities. Managers also reported that this group may be a challenge to retain in work positions. Managers also viewed 'Generation Y' staff as a positive energy and considered that in the future they will be of benefit to the profession. While there may be generational differences between therapists in the workplace, inclusive management styles may be the most appropriate management approach. Career guidance, facilitating creativity, increasing work responsibility and integrating new technologies like social networking into practice may be appropriate strategies for this staff group, to facilitate both their professional development and to retain them in the profession. © 2013 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  4. Occupational exposures from selected interventional radiological procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeczek, J.; Beal, A.; James, D.

    2001-01-01

    The number of radiology and cardiology interventional procedures has significantly increased in recent years due to better diagnostic equipment resulting in an increase in radiation dose to the staff and patients. The assessment of staff doses was performed for cardiac catheterization and for three other non-cardiac procedures. The scattered radiation distribution resulting from the cardiac catheterization procedure was measured prior to the staff dose measurements. Staff dose measurements included those of the left shoulder, eye, thyroid and hand doses of the cardiologist. In non-cardiac procedures doses to the hands of the radiologist were measured for nephrostomy, fistulogram and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty procedures. Doses to the radiologist or cardiologist were found to be relatively high if correct protection was not observed. (author)

  5. Occupational hand doses in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spasic Jokic, V.; Djurovic, B.; Lukac, S.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we present the case of a radiologist performing interventional procedures. The radiologist works for number of interventional procedures, but we reported only percutaneous nephrostomy and percutaneous biliary drainage which represent about 30% of his occupational exposure. The radiologist is occupationally exposed for eighteen years and from 1995 has radiation injuries. From 1999, art. hypertension, cataract complicata incip.ou., onychodystrophia and hyperceratosis mani bill. The most important are hands skin injuries. In ordinary dosimetric control low doses less than 10 mGy per year were recorded, so personal dosimetry results and biological results are not in accordance. For that reason we performed additional measurements during many procedures and in this paper we present results for two chosen procedures. Radiation exposure of the radiologist's hands during 200 percutaneous nephrostomy and 63 percutaneous biliary drainage per year are reported. Exposures were measured with thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD) type CaF 2 :Mn. Hand doses of equivalent of 221 μSv in average per drainage and 31 μSv in average per nephrostomy were recorded. (author)

  6. DIMOND II: Measures for optimising radiological information content and dose in digital imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, A.; Malone, J.; Marsh, D.

    2001-01-01

    The European Commission concerted action on 'Digital Imaging: Measures for Optimising Radiological Information Content and Dose', DIMOND II, was conducted by 12 European partners over the period January 1997 to June 1999. The objective of the concerted action was to initiate a project in the area of digital medical imaging where practice was evolving without structured research in radiation protection, optimisation or justification. The main issues addressed were patient and staff dosimetry, image quality, quality criteria and technical issues. The scope included computed radiography (CR), image intensifier radiography and fluoroscopy, cardiology and interventional procedures. The concerted action was based on the consolidation of work conducted in the partner's institutions together with elective new work. Protocols and approaches to dosimetry, radiological information content/image quality measurement and quality criteria were established and presented at an international workshop held in Dublin in June 1999. Details of the work conducted during the DIMOND II concerted action and a summary of the main findings and conclusions are presented in this contribution. (author)

  7. Radiation dose to children in diagnostic radiology. Measurements and methods for clinical optimisation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almen, A.J.

    1995-09-01

    A method for estimating mean absorbed dose to different organs and tissues was developed for paediatric patients undergoing X-ray investigations. The absorbed dose distribution in water was measured for the specific X-ray beam used. Clinical images were studied to determine X-ray beam positions and field sizes. Size and position of organs in the patient were estimated using ORNL phantoms and complementary clinical information. Conversion factors between the mean absorbed dose to various organs and entrance surface dose for five different body sizes were calculated. Direct measurements on patients estimating entrance surface dose and energy imparted for common X-ray investigations were performed. The examination technique for a number of paediatric X-ray investigations used in 19 Swedish hospitals was studied. For a simulated pelvis investigation of a 1-year old child the entrance surface dose was measured and image quality was estimated using a contrast-detail phantom. Mean absorbed doses to organs and tissues in urography, lung, pelvis, thoracic spine, lumbar spine and scoliosis investigations was calculated. Calculations of effective dose were supplemented with risk calculations for special organs e g the female breast. The work shows that the examination technique in paediatric radiology is not yet optimised, and that the non-optimised procedures contribute to a considerable variation in radiation dose. In order to optimise paediatric radiology there is a need for more standardised methods in patient dosimetry. It is especially important to relate measured quantities to the size of the patient, using e g the patient weight and length. 91 refs, 17 figs, 8 tabs

  8. Radiation dose to children in diagnostic radiology. Measurements and methods for clinical optimisation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almen, A J

    1995-09-01

    A method for estimating mean absorbed dose to different organs and tissues was developed for paediatric patients undergoing X-ray investigations. The absorbed dose distribution in water was measured for the specific X-ray beam used. Clinical images were studied to determine X-ray beam positions and field sizes. Size and position of organs in the patient were estimated using ORNL phantoms and complementary clinical information. Conversion factors between the mean absorbed dose to various organs and entrance surface dose for five different body sizes were calculated. Direct measurements on patients estimating entrance surface dose and energy imparted for common X-ray investigations were performed. The examination technique for a number of paediatric X-ray investigations used in 19 Swedish hospitals was studied. For a simulated pelvis investigation of a 1-year old child the entrance surface dose was measured and image quality was estimated using a contrast-detail phantom. Mean absorbed doses to organs and tissues in urography, lung, pelvis, thoracic spine, lumbar spine and scoliosis investigations was calculated. Calculations of effective dose were supplemented with risk calculations for special organs e g the female breast. The work shows that the examination technique in paediatric radiology is not yet optimised, and that the non-optimised procedures contribute to a considerable variation in radiation dose. In order to optimise paediatric radiology there is a need for more standardised methods in patient dosimetry. It is especially important to relate measured quantities to the size of the patient, using e g the patient weight and length. 91 refs, 17 figs, 8 tabs.

  9. Global nuclear industry views: challenges arising from the evolution of the optimisation principle in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint-Pierre, S.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few decades, the steady progress achieved in reducing planned exposures of both workers and the public has been admirable in the nuclear sector. However, the disproportionate focus on tiny public exposures and radioactive discharges associated with normal operations came at a high price, and the quasi-denial of a risk of major accident and related weaknesses in emergency preparedness and response came at an even higher price. Fukushima has unfortunately taught us that radiological protection (RP) for emergency and post-emergency situations can be much more than a simple evacuation that lasts 24–48 h, with people returning safely to their homes soon afterwards. On optimisation of emergency and post-emergency exposures, the only ‘show in town’ in terms of international RP policy improvements has been the issuance of the 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). However, no matter how genuine these improvements are, they have not been ‘road tested’ on the practical reality of severe accidents. Post-Fukushima, there is a compelling case to review the practical adequacy of key RP notions such as optimisation, evacuation, sheltering, and reference levels for workers and the public, and to amend these notions with a view to making the international RP system more useful in the event of a severe accident. On optimisation of planned exposures, the reality is that, nowadays, margins for further reductions of public doses in the nuclear sector are very small, and the smaller the dose, the greater the extra effort needed to reduce the dose further. If sufficient caution is not exercised in the use of RP notions such as dose constraints, there is a real risk of challenging nuclear power technologies beyond safety reasons. For nuclear new build, it is the optimisation of key operational parameters of nuclear power technologies (not RP) that is of paramount importance to improve their overall efficiency. In

  10. Global nuclear industry views: challenges arising from the evolution of the optimisation principle in radiological protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Pierre, S

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few decades, the steady progress achieved in reducing planned exposures of both workers and the public has been admirable in the nuclear sector. However, the disproportionate focus on tiny public exposures and radioactive discharges associated with normal operations came at a high price, and the quasi-denial of a risk of major accident and related weaknesses in emergency preparedness and response came at an even higher price. Fukushima has unfortunately taught us that radiological protection (RP) for emergency and post-emergency situations can be much more than a simple evacuation that lasts 24-48 h, with people returning safely to their homes soon afterwards. On optimisation of emergency and post-emergency exposures, the only 'show in town' in terms of international RP policy improvements has been the issuance of the 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). However, no matter how genuine these improvements are, they have not been 'road tested' on the practical reality of severe accidents. Post-Fukushima, there is a compelling case to review the practical adequacy of key RP notions such as optimisation, evacuation, sheltering, and reference levels for workers and the public, and to amend these notions with a view to making the international RP system more useful in the event of a severe accident. On optimisation of planned exposures, the reality is that, nowadays, margins for further reductions of public doses in the nuclear sector are very small, and the smaller the dose, the greater the extra effort needed to reduce the dose further. If sufficient caution is not exercised in the use of RP notions such as dose constraints, there is a real risk of challenging nuclear power technologies beyond safety reasons. For nuclear new build, it is the optimisation of key operational parameters of nuclear power technologies (not RP) that is of paramount importance to improve their overall efficiency. In pursuing

  11. Occupational radiation exposure of the personnel due to interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wucherer, M.; Schmidt, T.; Loose, R.

    2000-01-01

    Applications of interventional radiology continue to be on an upward trend, some countries reporting a 100% increase within 2-4 years, so that the resulting radiation exposure of both patients and personnel is an issue of increasing importance. Whereas those applications in general are of advantage for the patients, they mean just a further health hazard for the medical personnel. It is therefore necessary to exploit all available means to reduce the occupational doses. Modern interventional radiology systems offer a range of measures for this purpose, as e.g. last-image-hold, or pulsed modes. Special attention has to be given to the exposure of hand and head. Particularly the hand is closest to the useful beam, and it should be a mandatory requirement to wear film rings. (orig./CB) [de

  12. MO-DE-204-03: Radiology Dose Optimisation - An Australian Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schick, D.

    2016-01-01

    The main topic of the session is to show how dose optimization is being implemented in various regions of the world, including Europe, Australia, North America and other regions. A multi-national study conducted under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) across more than 50 less resourced countries gave insight into patient radiation doses and safety practices in CT, mammography, radiography and interventional procedures, both for children and adults. An important outcome was the capability development on dose assessment and management. An overview of recent European projects related to CT radiation dose and optimization both to adults and children will be presented. Existing data on DRLs together with a European methodology proposed on establishing and using DRLs for paediatric radiodiagnostic imaging and interventional radiology practices will be shown. Compared with much of Europe at least, many Australian imaging practices are relatively new to the task of diagnostic imaging dose optimisation. In 2008 the Australian Government prescribed a requirement to periodically compare patient radiation doses with diagnostic reference levels (DRLs), where DRLs have been established. Until recently, Australia had only established DRLs for computed tomography (CT). Regardless, both professional society and individual efforts to improved data collection and develop optimisation strategies across a range of modalities continues. Progress in this field, principally with respect to CT and interventional fluoroscopy will be presented. In the US, dose reduction and optimization efforts for computed tomography have been promoted and mandated by several organizations and accrediting entities. This presentation will cover the general motivation, implementation, and implications of such efforts. Learning Objectives: Understand importance of the dose optimization in Diagnostic Radiology. See how this goal is achieved in different regions of the World. Learn about the global trend

  13. MO-DE-204-03: Radiology Dose Optimisation - An Australian Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schick, D. [Princess Alexandra Hospital (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The main topic of the session is to show how dose optimization is being implemented in various regions of the world, including Europe, Australia, North America and other regions. A multi-national study conducted under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) across more than 50 less resourced countries gave insight into patient radiation doses and safety practices in CT, mammography, radiography and interventional procedures, both for children and adults. An important outcome was the capability development on dose assessment and management. An overview of recent European projects related to CT radiation dose and optimization both to adults and children will be presented. Existing data on DRLs together with a European methodology proposed on establishing and using DRLs for paediatric radiodiagnostic imaging and interventional radiology practices will be shown. Compared with much of Europe at least, many Australian imaging practices are relatively new to the task of diagnostic imaging dose optimisation. In 2008 the Australian Government prescribed a requirement to periodically compare patient radiation doses with diagnostic reference levels (DRLs), where DRLs have been established. Until recently, Australia had only established DRLs for computed tomography (CT). Regardless, both professional society and individual efforts to improved data collection and develop optimisation strategies across a range of modalities continues. Progress in this field, principally with respect to CT and interventional fluoroscopy will be presented. In the US, dose reduction and optimization efforts for computed tomography have been promoted and mandated by several organizations and accrediting entities. This presentation will cover the general motivation, implementation, and implications of such efforts. Learning Objectives: Understand importance of the dose optimization in Diagnostic Radiology. See how this goal is achieved in different regions of the World. Learn about the global trend

  14. Laboratory evaluation of an optimised internet-based speech-in-noise test for occupational high-frequency hearing loss screening: Occupational Earcheck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheikh Rashid, Marya; Leensen, Monique C. J.; de Laat, Jan A. P. M.; Dreschler, Wouter A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The "Occupational Earcheck'' (OEC) is a Dutch onlineself-screening speech-in-noise test developed for the detection of occupational high-frequency hearing loss (HFHL). This study evaluates an optimised version of the test and determines the most appropriate masking noise. Design: The

  15. Work practices and occupational radiation dose among radiologic technologists in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin; Ha, Mina; Hwang, Seung Sik; Lee, Kyoung Mu; Jeong, Mee Seon

    2013-01-01

    Radiologic technologists are one of the occupational groups exposed to the highest dose of radiation worldwide. In Korea, radiologic technologists occupy the largest group (about 33%) among medical radiation workers and they are exposed to the highest dose of occupational dose of radiation as well (1). Although work experience with diagnostic radiation procedure of U.S. radiologic technologists was reported roughly (2), few studies have been conducted for description of overall work practices and the change by calendar year and evaluation of related factors on occupational radiation dose. The aims of the study are to describe work practices and to assess risk factors for occupational radiation dose among radiologic technologists in Korea. This study showed the work practices and occupational radiation dose among representative sample of radiologic technologists in Korea. The annual effective dose among radiologic technologists in Korea remains higher compared with those of worldwide average and varied according to demographic factors, year began working, and duration of working

  16. Occupational exposure for workers in interventional radiological examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suliman, E.E.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: An interventional radiological examination is a diagnostic or therapeutic in any organ or anatomical region using images acquired with ionizing radiation. Compared to other radiological acquisition, personnel who perform interventional procedures, which involve long fluoroscopy times and a high workload may receive radiation doses comparable to the dose limits. Therefore to ensure that no person be subjected to an unacceptable risk from radiation, that need for accurate individual monitoring has arisen. In this work, the doses received by physician in cardiac angiography were evaluated and the results of two months were presented. Only 7 physicians were monitored. Hence the data available is presented, and it is hoped to provide some information on the assessment of occupational exposure in interventional radiological examination. Measurements were done using Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) and a calibrated Harshaw Reader. Two TLDs were used by each physician, one worn under a protective apron at the waist (H W ) and the other worn outside and above the apron at the neck (H N ). The effective dose E was estimated from the formula: E (estimated) = 0.5 H W + 0.025 H N . From the result obtained it was concluded that, the weak point of radiation protection philosophy in medical application is in the work of interventional physicians who have no full time decision like the radiologist physicians and therefore haven't enough knowledge about the radiation and radiation protection. So they are the highest risk group among physicians and to whom the efforts must be directed. (author)

  17. Lifetime attributable risk for cancer from occupational radiation exposure among radiologic technologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Eun Kyeong; Lee, Won Jin [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Medical radiation workers were among the earliest occupational groups exposed to external ionizing radiation due to their administration of a range of medical diagnostic procedures. Ionizing radiation is a confirmed human carcinogen for most organ sites. This study, therefore, was aimed to estimate lifetime cancer risk from occupational exposure among radiologic technologists that has been recruited in 2012-2013. Our findings showed a small increased cancer risk in radiologic technologists from their occupational radiation exposure in Korea. However, continuous dose monitoring and strict regulation on occupational safety at the government level should be emphasized to prevent any additional health hazards from occupational radiation exposure. Our findings showed a small increased cancer risk in radiologic technologists from their occupational radiation exposure in Korea. However, continuous dose monitoring and strict regulation on occupational safety at the government level should be emphasized to prevent any additional health hazards from occupational radiation exposure.

  18. Lifetime attributable risk for cancer from occupational radiation exposure among radiologic technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Eun Kyeong; Lee, Won Jin

    2016-01-01

    Medical radiation workers were among the earliest occupational groups exposed to external ionizing radiation due to their administration of a range of medical diagnostic procedures. Ionizing radiation is a confirmed human carcinogen for most organ sites. This study, therefore, was aimed to estimate lifetime cancer risk from occupational exposure among radiologic technologists that has been recruited in 2012-2013. Our findings showed a small increased cancer risk in radiologic technologists from their occupational radiation exposure in Korea. However, continuous dose monitoring and strict regulation on occupational safety at the government level should be emphasized to prevent any additional health hazards from occupational radiation exposure. Our findings showed a small increased cancer risk in radiologic technologists from their occupational radiation exposure in Korea. However, continuous dose monitoring and strict regulation on occupational safety at the government level should be emphasized to prevent any additional health hazards from occupational radiation exposure.

  19. Analysis of occupational doses in interventional radiology and cardiology installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.; Gonzalez, L.; Ten, J.I.; Guibelalde, E.; Fernandez, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between patient dose (PD) and occupational dose (OD) is not easily predictable in interventional radiology installations due to a large number of factors which can modify the occupational risk (OR). In the present work an analysis is made of the four main aspects which influence OR, namely, x-ray beam used, radiation protection (RP) tools available (aprons, thyroid protectors, gloves, screens, etc) and their regular use, type and number of procedures performed (diagnostic or therapeutic, complexity level, etc), and RP training level of the specialists. High filtration x-ray beams can entail a decrease of 20% in OD. A regular use of ceiling mounted faceplates can involve dose savings up to 65%. Mean values of dose per procedure for interventional radiologists are something greater (about 15%) than those recorded for cardiologists, except for the dosimeters placed on left forearm and shoulder. The ratio between OD and PD range around 100 μSv/1,000 cGy.cm 2 . The influence of the staff RP training level on OD is difficult to assess. In the IC Service from the Madrid San Carlos University Hospital (SCUH), PD have been reduced in above 30% and OD in a factor of 3, after running some training programmes. (author)

  20. Suitability of monitoring methods for the optimisation of Radiological Protection in the case of internal exposure through inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degrange, J.P.; Gibert, B.; Basire, D.

    2000-01-01

    The radiological protection system recommended by the International Commission for Radiological Protection (ICRP) for justified practices relied pn the limitation and optimisation principles. The monitoring of internal exposure is most often based on the periodic assessment of individual exposure in order to essentially insure the simple compliance with the annual dose limits. Optimisation of protection implies a realistic, sensitive and analytical assessment of individual and collective exposures in order to allow the indentification of the main sources of exposure (main sources of contamination, most exposed operators, work activities contributing the most to the exposure) and the selection of the optimal protection options. Therefore the monitoring methods must allow the realistic assessment of individual dose levels far lower than annual limits together with measurements as frequent as possible. The aim of this presentation is to discuss the ability of various monitoring methods (collective and individual air sampling, in vivo and in vitro bioassays) to fulfil those needs. This discussion is illustrated by the particular case of the internal exposure to natural uranium compounds through inhalation. Firstly, the sensitivity and the degree to which each monitoring method is realistic are quantified and discussed on the basis of the application of the new ICRP dosimetric model, and their analytical capability for the optimisation of radiological protection is then indicated. Secondly, a case study is presented which shows the capability of individual air sampling techniques to analyse the exposure of the workers and the inadequacy of static air sampling to accurately estimate the exposures when contamination varies significantly over time and space in the workstations. As far as exposure to natural uranium compounds through inhalation is concerned, the study for assessing the sensitivity, analytic ability and accuracy of the different measuring systems shows that

  1. Cost-benefit analysis in optimising the radiological protection of the public: a provisional framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    The advice given is concerned solely with the application of a quantitative framework to the optimisation of protection of members of the public, exposed as a result of routine releases of radionuclides to the environment or emissions of radiation in normal operating conditions. (author)

  2. Laboratory evaluation of an optimised internet-based speech-in-noise test for occupational high-frequency hearing loss screening: Occupational Earcheck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh Rashid, Marya; Leensen, Monique C J; de Laat, Jan A P M; Dreschler, Wouter A

    2017-11-01

    The "Occupational Earcheck" (OEC) is a Dutch online self-screening speech-in-noise test developed for the detection of occupational high-frequency hearing loss (HFHL). This study evaluates an optimised version of the test and determines the most appropriate masking noise. The original OEC was improved by homogenisation of the speech material, and shortening the test. A laboratory-based cross-sectional study was performed in which the optimised OEC in five alternative masking noise conditions was evaluated. The study was conducted on 18 normal-hearing (NH) adults, and 15 middle-aged listeners with HFHL. The OEC in a low-pass (LP) filtered stationary background noise (test version LP 3: with a cut-off frequency of 1.6 kHz, and a noise floor of -12 dB) was the most accurate version tested. The test showed a reasonable sensitivity (93%), and specificity (94%) and test reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient: 0.84, mean within-subject standard deviation: 1.5 dB SNR, slope of psychometric function: 13.1%/dB SNR). The improved OEC, with homogenous word material in a LP filtered noise, appears to be suitable for the discrimination between younger NH listeners and older listeners with HFHL. The appropriateness of the OEC for screening purposes in an occupational setting will be studied further.

  3. The impact of education on occupational radiation exposure reduction in a diagnostic radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetter, R.J.; Gray, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Patient load, number of radiographic exams, complexity of some exams, and associated potential occupational radiation exposure of medical personnel have increased significantly in the past decade. Efforts to reduce exposure through employee education and awareness have resulted in significant reduction in occupational exposure for most diagnostic radiographic areas at Mayo Clinic. This paper reviews trends in occupational radiation exposure from diagnostic x- rays at Mayo Clinic over the past ten years. Changes in employee radiation dose equivalents are correlated with patient workload, complexity of exams, increased interventional radiology and cardiology, and efforts to reduce employee radiation exposure

  4. Medical radiation exposure and its impact on occupational practices in Korean radiologic technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Seul Ki; Lee, Won Jin

    2016-01-01

    The use of radiology examinations in medicine has been growing worldwide. Annually an estimated 3.1 billion radiologic exams are performed. According to this expansion of medical radiation exposure, it has been hard to pay no attention to the effects of medical radiation exposures in the exposure from different types of radiation source. This study, therefore, was aimed to assess the association of medical and occupational radiation exposure in Korean radiologic technologists and evaluate necessity for its consideration in occupational studies. This study did not show the strong association between medical radiation exposure and occupational radiation exposure except several modalities with specific frequency. These results are preliminary but certainly meaningful for interpretation of epidemiologic finding, therefore, we need further evaluation specially for the repeatedly exposed imaging tests and high dose procedures that presented somewhat weak relationship in this study linked with health outcomes of radiation exposure. This study did not show the strong association between medical radiation exposure and occupational radiation exposure except several modalities with specific frequency. These results are preliminary but certainly meaningful for interpretation of epidemiologic finding, therefore, we need further evaluation specially for the repeatedly exposed imaging tests and high dose procedures that presented somewhat weak relationship in this study linked with health outcomes of radiation exposure.

  5. Occupational Exposure to Diagnostic Radiology in Workers without Training in Radiation Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, Enrique; Enriquez, Jesus G. Franco

    2004-01-01

    The physicians, technicians, nurses, and others involved in radiation areas constitute the largest group of workers occupationally exposed to man-made sources of radiation. Personnel radiation exposure must be monitored for safety and regulatory considerations, this assessment may need to be made over a period of one month or several months. The purpose of this study was to carry out an exploratory survey of occupational exposures associated with diagnostic radiology. The personnel dosimeters used in this study were thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The reported number of monitored workers was 110 of different departments of radiology of the Mexican Republic without education in radiation safety, included general fluoscopic/radiographic imaging, computed tomography and mammography procedures. Physicians and X-ray technologist in diagnostic radiology receive an average annual effective dose of 2.9 mSv with range from 0.18 to 5.64 mSv. The average level of occupational exposures is generally similar to the global average level of natural radiation exposure. The annual global per capita effective dose due to natural radiation sources is 2.4 mSv (UNSCEAR 2000 Report). There is not significant difference between average occupational exposures and natural radiation exposure for p < 0.05

  6. Medical radiation exposure and its impact on occupational practices in Korean radiologic technologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Seul Ki; Lee, Won Jin [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The use of radiology examinations in medicine has been growing worldwide. Annually an estimated 3.1 billion radiologic exams are performed. According to this expansion of medical radiation exposure, it has been hard to pay no attention to the effects of medical radiation exposures in the exposure from different types of radiation source. This study, therefore, was aimed to assess the association of medical and occupational radiation exposure in Korean radiologic technologists and evaluate necessity for its consideration in occupational studies. This study did not show the strong association between medical radiation exposure and occupational radiation exposure except several modalities with specific frequency. These results are preliminary but certainly meaningful for interpretation of epidemiologic finding, therefore, we need further evaluation specially for the repeatedly exposed imaging tests and high dose procedures that presented somewhat weak relationship in this study linked with health outcomes of radiation exposure. This study did not show the strong association between medical radiation exposure and occupational radiation exposure except several modalities with specific frequency. These results are preliminary but certainly meaningful for interpretation of epidemiologic finding, therefore, we need further evaluation specially for the repeatedly exposed imaging tests and high dose procedures that presented somewhat weak relationship in this study linked with health outcomes of radiation exposure.

  7. Radiological interference from personal articles in occupational radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnakumar, P.; Jayan, M.P; Pawar, V.J; Patil, S.L; Selvamani, N.; Vedram; Sureshkumar, M.K.; Chinnaesakki, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the presence of radioactivity in some personal articles worn on sacred thread and the related difficulties faced by health physicists during occupational radiation monitoring in nuclear facilities. In an incident, the portal monitor installed at the exit gate of a nuclear facility indicated contamination on self of a radiation worker while passing through it. The worker was therefore, subjected to thorough check for external contamination by the plant health physicist, using a pan-cake contamination monitor. All the clothing of the person was also checked for contamination. On further detailed examination, a dark brownish personal article hanging on a sacred thread from his neck was found to be the source of contamination. This presentation aims at giving information to the health physics community on the possibility of such interferences during personal monitoring in nuclear facilities

  8. Occupational safety and health textbook for radiological personnel employed in structural material testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, J.

    1981-01-01

    The comprehensive textbook for X-ray and radiological testing personnel includes requirements and rules of occupational safety and health on the basis of Hungarian and international (mainly German) literature. In the chapter Fundamentals, X-ray and radioactive radiations, their measurements and biological effects, doses etc are described. In the chapter Occupational safety and health, the jobs representing radiation hazards are listed and safety regulations for them are reported. Finally, information for prevention and first aid is presented. Control questions are added to each part. The Appendix contains safety standards and regulations, information on legal aspects of safety and radiation protection as well as recommendations. (Sz.J.)

  9. Evaluation of medical and occupational exposures in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekoshi, Hisashi; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo; Tsuzaka, Masatoshi; Tamiya, Tadashi; Nakamura, Kiyoko.

    1992-01-01

    Absorbed radiation doses received by patients and personnel during interventional procedures were estimated in this study. An Angiostar, a fluoroscopy x-ray unit, made by Siemens Co. Ltd. was used. Fluoroscopic conditions were 82 to 112 kV of tube voltage and 2.5 to 4.3 mA of tube current. The absorbed doses to the ovaries were measured in a Mix-Dp phantom after the image intensifier's field size was changed from 40 cm to 14 cm in diameter. X-ray scattering dose distributions in the vicinity of the fluoroscopy table were measured by an ionization survey meter. This measurement was carried out concurrently with the above x-ray exposure conditions. Patient and personnel exposure increased in relation to the decreased field size. These medical and occupational exposures increases were the result of the x-ray output gradually increasing as the image intensifier's field was progressively decreased. This condition was caused by the automatic brightness control circuits of the x-ray unit. When the smallest field size of the image intensifier (I.I.) was employed the exposure doses absorbed by both patients and personnel were about three times larger than the doses received in the largest field size. (author)

  10. Feasibility of the use of optimisation techniques to calibrate the models used in a post-closure radiological assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laundy, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    This report addresses the feasibility of the use of optimisation techniques to calibrate the models developed for the impact assessment of a radioactive waste repository. The maximum likelihood method for improving parameter estimates is considered in detail, and non-linear optimisation techniques for finding solutions are reviewed. Applications are described for the calibration of groundwater flow, radionuclide transport and biosphere models. (author)

  11. A national survey of occupational radiation exposure among diagnostic radiologic technologists in South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeeyoung; Cha, Eun Shil; Jeong, Meeseon; Lee, Won Jin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate representative occupational characteristics and radiation exposure for South Korean radiologic technologists. The authors conducted a national survey by stratified sampling of South Korean administrative districts and types of medical facilities. A total of 585 technologists were surveyed, and survey data were linked with dosimetry data from the National Dose Registry. A total of 73 % of radiologic technologists sampled were male, 62 % were younger than age 40 and 86.5 % began employment after 1990. The most frequent practices among radiologic technologists were diagnostic routine X-ray followed by computed tomography (CT) and portable X-ray. Male workers were more frequently involved in CT, portable X-ray and interventional radiology whereas female workers carried out most mammography procedures. The average annual effective dose was 2.3 mSv for male and 1.3 mSv for female workers. The dose was significantly higher for workers in the provinces and those who had recently started work. (authors)

  12. Reliability of self-reported questionnaire on occupational radiation work of radiologic technologists in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon Jung [Graduate School of Public Health, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Self-completed questionnaires were used to obtain information on exposures and otherb factors necessary to evaluated disease risks. Although reliability of lifetime sun exposure of U.S. radiologic technologists and life-style factors, medical exams, and disease history of Korean nuclear power plants workers (2) were reported, few studies have evaluated the reliability of information obtained on radiation-related work in epidemiologic investigations. The aims of the study is to assess reliability of self-reported questionnaire for occupational radiation work in the radiologic technologists in Korea. Overall agreement and kappa regarding radiation work procedure, work practice, and work history were similar to those generally found for factors typically used in epidemiologic studies such as smoking (98% and 0.95) and alcohol consumption (88% and 0.67), and higher than physical activity (76% and 0.51).

  13. Reliability of self-reported questionnaire on occupational radiation work of radiologic technologists in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Moon Jung; Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin

    2016-01-01

    Self-completed questionnaires were used to obtain information on exposures and otherb factors necessary to evaluated disease risks. Although reliability of lifetime sun exposure of U.S. radiologic technologists and life-style factors, medical exams, and disease history of Korean nuclear power plants workers (2) were reported, few studies have evaluated the reliability of information obtained on radiation-related work in epidemiologic investigations. The aims of the study is to assess reliability of self-reported questionnaire for occupational radiation work in the radiologic technologists in Korea. Overall agreement and kappa regarding radiation work procedure, work practice, and work history were similar to those generally found for factors typically used in epidemiologic studies such as smoking (98% and 0.95) and alcohol consumption (88% and 0.67), and higher than physical activity (76% and 0.51).

  14. Occupational Radiological Protection Principles and Criteria for Designing New Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Global demand for electricity continues to grow and numerous new nuclear power plants (NPPs) are being planned or constructed in NEA member countries. Most of these new NPPs will be of the third generation, and will be designed for as long as 80 years of operation. The successful design, construction and operation of these plants will depend broadly on appropriately implementing the lessons from experience accumulated to date. This case study introduces a policy and technical framework that may be used when formulating technical assistance and guidance for senior managers of NPPs, designers, manufacturers, contractors and authorities responsible for regulating occupational radiation exposure. It is aimed in particular at assisting design and license assessments of new NPPs. Although not targeting the needs of countries introducing nuclear power for the first time, this case study can also provide valuable input on occupational radiological protection issues for the implementation of new nuclear energy programmes

  15. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, J.M.; Moreau, J.F.; Nahum, H.; Bellet, M.

    1990-01-01

    The 17th International Congress of Radiology was conducted in two separate scientific sessions, one for radiodiagnosis and one for radiation oncology. Topics covered are: Radiobiology -radioprotection; imaging and data processing; contrast media; MRI; nuclear medicine; radiology and disasters; radiology of tropical diseases; cardiovascular radiology; interventional radiology; imaging of trauma; imaging of chest, gastro-intestinal tract, breast and genito-urinary tract; imaging in gynecology;imaging in oncology; bone and joint radiology; head and neck-radiology; neuro-radiology. (H.W.). refs.; fig.; tabs

  16. ISOE: an international occupational exposure database and communications network for dose optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, I.F.; Lazo, E.

    1995-01-01

    The Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE) was launched by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) on 1 January 1992 to facilitate the communication of dosimetry and ALARA implementation data among nuclear facilities around the world. Members of ISOE include 51 utilities from 17 countries and regulators from 11 countries, with four regional technical centres administering the system and a Steering Group which manages the work. ISOE includes three databases and a communications network at several levels. The three databases NEA1, NEA2 and NEA3 include varying levels of details, with NEA3 being the most detailed giving task and site specific ALARA practices and experiences. Utility membership of ISOE gives full access to the databases whereas regulators have more limited access. This paper reviews the current status of participation, describes the three databases and the communications network. Some dose data showing trends in particular countries are presented as well as dose data relating to operation cycle length and outage length. The advantages of membership are described, and it is concluded that ISOE holds the potential for both dose and cost savings. (author)

  17. Occupational radiological aspects related to the presence of natural radionuclides at extraction and production petroleum facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matta, Luiz Ernesto Santos de Carvalho

    2001-01-01

    This work presents an evaluation of exposure to natural radiation, after samples collected at the Campos Basin region, incurred to workers involved in the actions of exploration and production of petroleum, E and P, may be submitted to. It also evaluates the national standards of controlling and registration of practices involving radioactive and nuclear material, leading to the conclusion that it is not possible to classify the practice of exploration and production of petroleum, following the controlling criteria proposed by the standards. An occupational radiological protection program is made available to be immediately applied to E and P facilities. This program intends that in spite of the high values of activity of mass unity obtained from the samples, it is possible to maintain the occupational doses to levels lower than those proposed by the Safety Series 115. Moreover, it adds that the workers must be considered as occupationally exposed and not as member of the public. A proposal of standard so that the regulatory authority may classify and control a practice of E and P petroleum is also done. (author)

  18. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edholm, P.R.

    1990-01-01

    This is a report describing diagnostic techniques used in radiology. It describes the equipment necessary for, and the operation of a radiological department. Also is described the standard methods used in radiodiagnosis. (K.A.E.)

  19. Implementation of an occupational monitoring program in diagnostic radiology at the 'Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Sergio Ricardo de; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Azevedo, Ana Cecilia Pedrosa de

    2003-01-01

    An occupational monitoring program in diagnostic radiology was implemented at the Hospital Clementino Fraga Filho of the Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UFRJ), Brazil, in accordance with the Brazilian legislation. Previously, a survey of all personnel involved with ionizing radiation was performed. Many problems were observed: the great majority of the workers were not properly monitored; only three departments of the hospital kept an independent survey of the occupational doses; there was not a follow-up control of the high doses. With the implementation of the program, a new laboratory was chosen to read the dosemeters and this initiative resulted in reduction of the hospital costs. The inclusion of seven more departments in the program represented an increase of 60% in the number of monitored workers. The program also provided a system to control the high doses, especially in the Hemodynamics department, which presented the highest mean dose value (0.32 mSv/month). An area survey program was performed during different periods in places considered of high risk for the workers and for the public as well. At the same time, a software was used to build a database with the aim of controlling all personnel data. The implementation of the program provided all personnel involved a better knowledge of the risks associated with ionizing radiation and of radioprotection, and also awareness of the need of correct use of the personal dose monitors. (author)

  20. Double dosimetry procedures for the determination of occupational effective dose in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaervinen, H.; Buls, N.; Clerinx, P.; Miljanic, S.; Ranogajec-Komor, M.; Nikodemova, D.; D'Errico, F.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In interventional radiology, for an accurate determination of occupational effective dose, measurements with two dosemeters ('double dosimetry', DD) have been recommended, one dosemeter located above and one under the protective apron. In this paper, based on an extensive literature search, the most recent algorithms developed for the determination of effective dose from the dosimeter readings have been compared for a few practical interventional procedures. Recommendations on the practices and algorithms are given on the basis of the results. For the comparison of algorithms, dosemeter readings and the effective dose were obtained both experimentally and by calculation. Further, data from published Monte Carlo calculations have been applied. The literature review has indicated that very few regulations for DD exist and the DD practices have not been harmonized. There is no firm consensus on the most suitable calculation algorithms. Single dosemeter (SD) measurements are still mostly used for the calculation of effective dose. Most DD and SD algorithms overestimate effective dose significantly, sometimes by over ten times. However, SD algorithms can significantly underestimate effective dose in certain interventional radiology conditions. Due to the possibility of underestimating effective dose, DD is generally recommended. The results suggest that there might not be a single DD algorithm which would be optimum for all interventional radiology procedures. However, the selection of a precise DD algorithm for each individual condition is not practical and compromises must be made. For accurate personnel dosimetry, the accuracy of the algorithm selected should be tested for typical local interventional radiology condition. Personnel dosemeters should be used in the recommended positions. The dosemeter above the apron should be on a collar and its reading also used to assess the risk of lens injuries. The dosemeter under the apron can be on the chest or

  1. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this text-book basic knowledge about radiology, biomedical diagnostic methods (radiography, computer tomography), nuclear medicine and safety and radiation protection of personnel on the radiodiagnostic place of work are presented

  2. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on disease processes originating within the alimentary tract, may extend through the extraperitoneal spaces, and abnormalities primarily arising within other extraperitoneal sites may significantly affect the bowel. Symptoms and signs may be obscure, delayed, or nonspecific, and the area is generally not accessible to auscultation, palpation, or percussion. Radiologic evaluation thus plays a critical role

  3. Occupational exposure of diagnostic radiology staff in Israel during 1994-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biran, T.; Malchi, S.; Shamai, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Personnel who perform interventional radiological procedures which involve long fluoroscopy times and with a high workload, may receive radiation doses comparable to one of the dose limits suggested by the International Commission on Radiological protection. It is therefore important to monitor accurately the radiation dose to every staff member. who is involved in fluoroscopy procedures. (authors)

  4. Optimization of radiological surveillance of occupationally-exposed workers in the Republic of Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This works analyzes the results of the dosimetric control to occupationally-exposed workers. during the 1987-1990 period. It states a criterium for knowing when it will be necessary to give or not an individual dosimeter to occupationally-exposed workers. It also proposes to take the dosimeter away to a number of workers as a result of such criterium

  5. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lissner, J.

    1985-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology is still the foremost of all innovative medical disciplines. This has many advantages but also some handicaps, e.g. the siting problem of medical equipment whose clinical potential is not fully known. This applies in particular to nuclear spin tomography, where the Laender governments and the Scientific Council seen to agree that all universities should have the appropriate equipment as soon as possible in order to intensify interdisciplinary research. Formerly, in the case of computerized tomography, there was less readiness. As a result, the siting of CT equipment is less organically structured. A special handicap of innovative fields is the problem of training and advanced training. The Chamber of Medicine and the Association of Doctors Participating in the Health Insurance Plan have issued regulations aimed at a better standardisation in this field. (orig.) [de

  6. Expanding the Functionality of Speech Recognition in Radiology: Creating a Real-Time Methodology for Measurement and Analysis of Occupational Stress and Fatigue

    OpenAIRE

    Reiner, Bruce I.

    2012-01-01

    While occupational stress and fatigue have been well described throughout medicine, the radiology community is particularly susceptible due to declining reimbursements, heightened demands for service deliverables, and increasing exam volume and complexity. The resulting occupational stress can be variable in nature and dependent upon a number of intrinsic and extrinsic stressors. Intrinsic stressors largely account for inter-radiologist stress variability and relate to unique attributes of th...

  7. Occupational Analysis: Hospital Radiologic Technologist. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, Glenn D.; And Others

    In an effort to meet the growing demand for skilled radiologic technologists and other supportive personnel educated through the associate degree level, a national survey was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project to determine the tasks performed by personnel in the field and lay the groundwork for development of…

  8. Proposal of a system of signalling of security in occupational radiological protection for radiactives and nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambises, P.; Sanchez, A.; Almeida, C.

    2004-01-01

    After five years of implantation of a program for classification and signalling of restricted areas in the IPEN-CNEN-SP, we noticed that the applied measures of radio protection contributed for the improvement of the system of occupational radiological protection, promoting an improvement in the security of the workers, towards the planning in the execution of the activities involving the use of sources of ionizing radiation. Later, during the implantation of this program, the service of occupational radiological protection, there was great difficulty to conciliate its necessities in terms of security signalling, face the absence of existing standardisation in the country for the minimum disposals on the subject in question. Nowadays there are different interpretations of the specific criteria and many effective normative documents that exist in the country. This work presents as proposal the elaboration of a technical guide whose objective is to display the criteria and recommendations that can facilitate to the companies and the responsible ones for the safety to interpret and to apply the national laws and norms. As consequence, the specifics characteristics and the necessary disposals for the implantation for a implantation of a standardised system of signalling of security in the those areas, where labour risks for the workers involving the use of ionizing radiations are established, according to previous classification in terms of the national and international established recommendations. The noticeable aspects considered in the proposal of the technical guide try to attend to the criteria and recommendations presented in national and international laws and norms consulted and currently effective laws in our country, referring to the areas, places, ways of access, routes of circulation, and to danger carried through activities or to the proper installation of radiation sources, and theirs ways of protection. (Author)

  9. Occupational exposure of apprentices in radiology in the field of professional training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, R. F.

    2014-08-01

    The good economic moment of our country has been providing an increase of courses in technical and technological area mainly in the field of radiology, which has raised the number of apprentices in the field of stage in clinics and hospitals. However, the shortage of placements and the fact that many of these students are workers, has forced the institutions of technical education to seek alternatives for the students to meet the workload of the stage in a time as short as possible. For this reason, often the students are obliged to comply with up to 10 hours of internship in a single day, in companies that often are not in accordance with the standards of radiological protection. What has worried the authorities of Goiania, because they believe that this exposure can raise the dose received. It is known that every person who works with X-ray diagnostics should use, during their work day and while stay in controlled area, individual dosimeter reading indirect, changed monthly. However, in practice these apprentices do not use the meter for monitoring of doses in probationary period. In This way, we measure the doses received us trainees using monitors TLDs in the thoracic region with and without plumbiferous apron on stage with total workload of 150 hours, performed daily from Monday to Friday for 6 hours per day during 5 weeks and performed to Saturday and Sunday for 10 hours daily in 7.5 weekends, with X-ray equipment conventional. The results reveal that in none of the cases the dose reached the value of 0.2 mSv, which is the minimum limit of reading dosimeter. We conclude then that the stages of weekends, taken the preventive measures of radiological protection are safe and can be performed without any prejudice with regard to the dose received, when compared to those of lower daily hourly load. (Author)

  10. Occupational exposure of apprentices in radiology in the field of professional training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, R. F., E-mail: rogercosta1@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Goias, Unidade Universitaria de Morrinhos, Rua 14, 625, Jardim das Americas, Cep 75650-000, Morrinhos, Goias (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The good economic moment of our country has been providing an increase of courses in technical and technological area mainly in the field of radiology, which has raised the number of apprentices in the field of stage in clinics and hospitals. However, the shortage of placements and the fact that many of these students are workers, has forced the institutions of technical education to seek alternatives for the students to meet the workload of the stage in a time as short as possible. For this reason, often the students are obliged to comply with up to 10 hours of internship in a single day, in companies that often are not in accordance with the standards of radiological protection. What has worried the authorities of Goiania, because they believe that this exposure can raise the dose received. It is known that every person who works with X-ray diagnostics should use, during their work day and while stay in controlled area, individual dosimeter reading indirect, changed monthly. However, in practice these apprentices do not use the meter for monitoring of doses in probationary period. In This way, we measure the doses received us trainees using monitors TLDs in the thoracic region with and without plumbiferous apron on stage with total workload of 150 hours, performed daily from Monday to Friday for 6 hours per day during 5 weeks and performed to Saturday and Sunday for 10 hours daily in 7.5 weekends, with X-ray equipment conventional. The results reveal that in none of the cases the dose reached the value of 0.2 mSv, which is the minimum limit of reading dosimeter. We conclude then that the stages of weekends, taken the preventive measures of radiological protection are safe and can be performed without any prejudice with regard to the dose received, when compared to those of lower daily hourly load. (Author)

  11. Radiologic technologists versus X-ray-assistance. The differences of an occupational family in health organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblattl, M.

    2015-01-01

    This article is an information for radiation protection experts. In Austria 2013, seven new jobs were enshrined in ''medical assistance law''. One is the X-ray assistant (Radiographic Assistant). The X-ray assistant may perform simple standardized radiographs. It represents the lowest common denominator to the profession ''Radiologic Technology''. This post will serve experts for radiation protection and employers to inform objectively about which profession has the competences and in which field of work X-ray assistants can be deployed. This article deals with the course content and the classification in the European Qualifications Framework and the legal anchorages.

  12. Optimisation of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Optimisation of radiation protection is one of the key elements in the current radiation protection philosophy. The present system of dose limitation was issued in 1977 by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and includes, in addition to the requirements of justification of practices and limitation of individual doses, the requirement that all exposures be kept as low as is reasonably achievable, taking social and economic factors into account. This last principle is usually referred to as optimisation of radiation protection, or the ALARA principle. The NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) organised an ad hoc meeting, in liaison with the NEA committees on the safety of nuclear installations and radioactive waste management. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual papers presented at the meeting

  13. Is it necessary to adopt measures in occupational radiological protection in Spanish NORM industries devoted to the processing of minerals and raw materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Bolivar, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    In this work it is documented why is quite limited the number os Spanish NORM industries devoted to the processing of minerals and/or raw materials where it is necessary to adopt occupational radiological protection countermeasures. These countermeasures are coincident in some cases with OHS countermeasures historically applied in the affected industries and in most cases can be only needed in working situations associated with maintenance operations. (Author) 6 refs.

  14. Radiological Control Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  15. Radiological Control Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records

  16. Simulation optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade there has been a significant advance in flotation circuit optimisation through performance benchmarking using metallurgical modelling and steady-state computer simulation. This benchmarking includes traditional measures, such as grade and recovery, as well as new flotation measures, such as ore floatability, bubble surface area flux and froth recovery. To further this optimisation, Outotec has released its HSC Chemistry software with simulation modules. The flotation model developed by the AMIRA P9 Project, of which Outotec is a sponsor, is regarded by industry as the most suitable flotation model to use for circuit optimisation. This model incorporates ore floatability with flotation cell pulp and froth parameters, residence time, entrainment and water recovery. Outotec's HSC Sim enables you to simulate mineral processes in different levels, from comminution circuits with sizes and no composition, through to flotation processes with minerals by size by floatability components, to full processes with true particles with MLA data.

  17. Coefficients calculations of conversion of cancer risk for occupational exposure using Monte Carlo simulations in cardiac procedures of interventionist radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, William S.; Neves, Lucio P.; Perini, Ana P.; Caldas, Linda V.E.; Maia, Ana F.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac procedures are among the most common procedures in interventional radiology (IR), and can lead to high medical and occupational exposures, as in most cases are procedures complex and long lasting. In this work, conversion coefficients (CC) for the risk of cancer, normalized by kerma area product (KAP) to the patient, cardiologist and nurse were calculated using Monte Carlo simulation. The patient and the cardiologist were represented by anthropomorphic simulators MESH, and the nurse by anthropomorphic phantom FASH. Simulators were incorporated into the code of Monte Carlo MCNPX. Two scenarios were created: in the first (1), lead curtain and protective equipment suspended were not included, and in the second (2) these devices were inserted. The radiographic parameters employed in Monte Carlo simulations were: tube voltage of 60 kVp and 120 kVp; filtration of the beam and 3,5 mmAl beam area of 10 x 10 cm 2 . The average values of CCs to eight projections (in 10 -4 / Gy.cm 2 were 1,2 for the patient, 2,6E-03 (scenario 1) and 4,9E-04 (scenario 2) for cardiologist and 5,2E-04 (scenario 1) and 4,0E-04 (Scenario 2) to the nurse. The results show a significant reduction in CCs for professionals, when the lead curtain and protective equipment suspended are employed. The evaluation method used in this work can provide important information on the risk of cancer patient and professional, and thus improve the protection of workers in cardiac procedures of RI

  18. The cost of occupational dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleishman, A.B.; Clark, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    The optimization of radiological protection will routinely involve the balancing of public and occupational exposure, particularly within the nuclear fuel cycle. For example the reduction of public exposure from an effluent stream could lead to increases in occupational exposure from treatment, storage and disposal operations. A methodology is propased for the estimation of the cost of occupational exposure in the UK (Pound man-Sv -1 ) based on valuations of changes in risk. A variable value for the cost of the occupational man-Sv is obtained depending on per caput dose levels. The values at particular per caput dose levels are different for occupational workers and the general public, because of different demography and assumptions on risk perception and aversion. They are however approximately the same when the per caput doses are expressed as percentages of the dose limits for workers and the general public respectively. An example of the application of the derived cost of the occupational man-Sv to an optimisation problem is given. (author)

  19. A program for occupational radiological protection in a nuclear installation linked to a NORM/TENORM phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner de S.; Py Junior, Delcy de A.; Kelecom, Alphonse; Mortagua, Valter

    2009-01-01

    Mining that has natural radionuclides associated with the ore is known as NORM mining. The Santa Quiteria Unit (USQ) is included in this category. It is a NORM phosphate mine that belongs to the Nuclear Industries of Brazil. This unit is divided into two areas: the phosphate mining and production (conventional mining facility, CMF-USQ) and a production of uranium diuranate (nuclear facility, NF-USQ). The NF-USQ must follow the Brazilian legislation for nuclear installation (NF). This legislation is under the responsibility of the Nuclear Energy National Commission - CNEN, the nuclear regulatory agency in Brazil. Brazilian law on NF requires the facility to have a system of radioprotection and also requires the existence of a radiation protection service (RPS), composed of trained professionals and coordinated by a radioprotection supervisor (RS), accredited by CNEN, which manages the implementation of the occupational radiation protection program (ORPP). This work reports on the design of the ORPP for the NF-USQ associated with CMF-USQ, and on the minimum requirements for a RPS and the kinds of monitoring to be carried out. It also aims to classify the areas as for radioprotection aspects, and to indicate the number and qualifications of the radioprotection staff. Moreover, the work also informs the equipment necessary to the operation of the RPS and other relevant parameters. Finally, it explains the models used in estimating doses for occupationally exposed individuals (OEI) and for individuals of the public (IP), and also the derived limits proposed by the operator for the NFUSQ. The NF-USQ will have 51 OEI, of which 11 belonging to the RS, one being the RPS accredited by CNEN. The NF will be composed of 12 areas, 10 being free areas, one will be supervised and one will be a controlled area. Individual and area monitoring will be carried out. The derived limits proposed by the operator are shown in table 1. These derived limits are calculated based on the limit

  20. Some Current Problems in Optimisation of Radiation Protection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franic, Z.; Prlic, I.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The current system of radiation protection is generally based on recommendations promulgated in the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) publication 60. These principles and recommendations were subsequently adopted by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionising Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS). However, in recent years certain problems have arisen such as application of risk factors at low doses, use and interpretation of a collective dose, concept of dose commitment, optimisation of all types of occupational exposure and practices, implementation of ALARA approach in the common occupational as well as in quite complex situations etc. In this paper are presented some of the issues that have to be addressed in the development of the new ICRP Recommendations that are planned to be developed in next four or five years. As the new radiation protection philosophy shifts from society-based control of stochastic risks to an individual-based policy, consequently it will require introduction of modified approach to optimisation process and probably introduction of some new dosimetric quantities. (author)

  1. Expanding the functionality of speech recognition in radiology: creating a real-time methodology for measurement and analysis of occupational stress and fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Bruce I

    2013-02-01

    While occupational stress and fatigue have been well described throughout medicine, the radiology community is particularly susceptible due to declining reimbursements, heightened demands for service deliverables, and increasing exam volume and complexity. The resulting occupational stress can be variable in nature and dependent upon a number of intrinsic and extrinsic stressors. Intrinsic stressors largely account for inter-radiologist stress variability and relate to unique attributes of the radiologist such as personality, emotional state, education/training, and experience. Extrinsic stressors may account for intra-radiologist stress variability and include cumulative workload and task complexity. The creation of personalized stress profiles creates a mechanism for accounting for both inter- and intra-radiologist stress variability, which is essential in creating customizable stress intervention strategies. One viable option for real-time occupational stress measurement is voice stress analysis, which can be directly implemented through existing speech recognition technology and has been proven to be effective in stress measurement and analysis outside of medicine. This technology operates by detecting stress in the acoustic properties of speech through a number of different variables including duration, glottis source factors, pitch distribution, spectral structure, and intensity. The correlation of these speech derived stress measures with outcomes data can be used to determine the user-specific inflection point at which stress becomes detrimental to clinical performance.

  2. A feasibility randomised controlled trial of pre-operative occupational therapy to optimise recovery for patients undergoing primary total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (PROOF-THR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepson, Paul; Sands, Gina; Beswick, Andrew D; Davis, Edward T; Blom, Ashley W; Sackley, Catherine M

    2016-02-01

    To assess the feasibility of a pre-operative occupational therapy intervention for patients undergoing primary total hip replacement. Single blinded feasibility randomised controlled trial, with data collection prior to the intervention, and at 4, 12, and 26 weeks following surgery. Recruitment from two NHS orthopaedic outpatient centres in the West Midlands, UK. Patients awaiting primary total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis were recruited. Following pre-operative assessment, patients were individually randomised to intervention or control by a computer-generated block randomisation algorithm stratified by age and centre. The intervention group received a pre-surgery home visit by an occupational therapist who discussed expectations, assessed home safety, and provided appropriate adaptive equipment. The control group received treatment as usual. The study assessed the feasibility of recruitment procedures, delivery of the intervention, appropriateness of outcome measures and data collection methods. Health related quality of life and resource use were recorded at 4, 12 and 26 weeks. Forty-four participants were recruited, 21 were randomised to the occupational therapy intervention and 23 to usual care. Analysis of 26 week data included 18 participants in the intervention group and 21 in the control. The intervention was delivered successfully with no withdrawals or crossovers; 5/44 were lost to follow-up with further missing data for participation and resource use. The feasibility study provided the information required to conduct a definitive trial. Burden of assessment would need to be addressed. A total of 219 patients would be required in an efficacy trial. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Information System on Occupational Exposure: Future Developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean-Yves Gagnon; Waturu Mizumachi; Brian Ahier; Ted Lazo; Khammar Mrabit

    2006-01-01

    In response to pressures from deregulation and from ageing of the global nuclear power plant fleet, radiation protection personnel have found that occupational exposures are best managed through proper job planning, implementation and review to ensure that exposures are 'as low as reasonably achievable'(ALARA). A prerequisite for applying the principle of optimisation to occupational radiation protection is the timely exchange of data and information on dose reduction methods. To facilitate this global approach to work management, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (Nea) launched the Information System on Occupational Exposure (I.S.O.E.) in 1992. The objective of I.S.O.E. is to provide a forum for radiation protection experts from both utilities and national regulatory authorities to discuss, promote and coordinate international cooperative undertakings for the radiological protection of workers at nuclear power plants.The I.S.O.E. programme offers a variety of products in the occupational exposure area, such as: the world largest database on occupational exposure from nuclear power plants, a yearly analysis of dose trends and an overview of current developments, through I.S.O.E. Annual Reports, detailed studies, analyses, and information on current issues in operational radiation protection, through I.S.O.E. Information Sheets, a system for rapid communication of radiation protection-related information, such as effective dose reduction approaches and implementation of work management principles. A forum for discussing occupational exposure management issues through I.S.O.E. workshops, symposia and newsletters. (N.C.)

  4. Assessment of occupational exposure and provision of recommendations and guidance on measures for the radiological protection of occupationally exposed persons in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    311 X-ray installations including 14 therapeutic machines were surveyed all over Bangladesh. It was noted that most of the installations had no shielded control booths, required wall thickness of X-ray rooms, radiation protection measures and shielding arrangements for patients and occupational workers with particular reference to gonads, eyes, thyroid glands and warning indicators. The direct exposure per sec was found to range from 11 mR to 417 mR which is abnormally high for the attendants or occupational workers holding the patients. The mA and kV indicators of many X-ray machines did not function at all, the therapy machines were not properly calibrated and as a result, doses delivered to patients were sometimes erroneous. Several cases of abnormal burning of healthy tissues of patients due to improper exposure were observed. Most of the hospitals had no health physicist or competent person to look after the potential risks of radiation. At present there is no suitable arrangement for training, education and proper motivation of X-ray technicians and radiologists on the protection against ionizing radiation in the country. A considerable number (42%) of X-ray machines had no shutter/collimator and collimators of some of the machines did not function properly. Almost all the X-ray rooms were not planned according to the standard structural specifications. In most of the hospitals/clinics, the dark room facilities were not adequate. Even some dark rooms and film stores were found to receive unnecessarily high doses. There is no legal framework on radiation protection in Bangladesh and therefore it is not possible to impose radiation protection and safety rules at the X-ray installations of the country. Recommendations were made to cover radiation protection of the occupational worker, and special recommendations with respect to fluoroscopy and radiography, dental radiography, radiotherapy, X-ray film processing, personnel monitoring and medical care and

  5. Optimisation: how to develop stake holder involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, W.

    2003-01-01

    The Precautionary Principle is an internationally recognised approach for dealing with risk situations characterised by uncertainties and potential irreversible damages. Since the late fifties, ICRP has adopted this prudent attitude because of the lack of scientific evidence concerning the existence of a threshold at low doses for stochastic effects. The 'linear, no-threshold' model and the 'optimisation of protection' principle have been developed as a pragmatic response for the management of the risk. The progress in epidemiology and radiobiology over the last decades have affirmed the initial assumption and the optimisation remains the appropriate response for the application of the precautionary principle in the context of radiological protection. The basic objective of optimisation is, for any source within the system of radiological protection, to maintain the level of exposure as low as reasonably achievable, taking into account social and economical factors. Methods tools and procedures have been developed over the last two decades to put into practice the optimisation principle with a central role given to the cost-benefit analysis as a means to determine the optimised level of protection. However, with the advancement in the implementation of the principle more emphasis was progressively given to good practice, as well as on the importance of controlling individual levels of exposure through the optimisation process. In the context of the revision of its present recommendations, the Commission is reenforcing the emphasis on protection of the individual with the adoption of an equity-based system that recognizes individual rights and a basic level of health protection. Another advancement is the role that is now recognised to 'stakeholders involvement' in the optimisation process as a mean to improve the quality of the decision aiding process for identifying and selecting protection actions considered as being accepted by all those involved. The paper

  6. Standardised approach to optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren-Forward, Helen M.; Beckhaus, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Optimisation of radiographic images is said to have been obtained if the patient has achieved an acceptable level of dose and the image is of diagnostic value. In the near future, it will probably be recommended that radiographers measure patient doses and compare them to reference levels. The aim of this paper is to describe a standardised approach to optimisation of radiographic examinations in a diagnostic imaging department. A three-step approach is outlined with specific examples for some common examinations (chest, abdomen, pelvis and lumbar spine series). Step One: Patient doses are calculated. Step Two: Doses are compared to existing reference levels and the technique used compared to image quality criteria. Step Three: Appropriate action is taken if doses are above the reference level. Results: Average entrance surface doses for two rooms were as follows AP Abdomen (6.3mGy and 3.4mGy); AP Lumbar Spine (6.4mGy and 4.1mGy) for AP Pelvis (4.8mGy and 2.6mGy) and PA chest (0.19mGy and 0.20mGy). Comparison with the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) recommended techniques identified large differences in the applied potential. The kVp values in this study were significantly lower (by up to lOkVp) than the CEC recommendations. The results of this study have indicated that there is a need to monitor radiation doses received by patients undergoing diagnostic radiography examinations. Not only has the assessment allowed valuable comparison with International Diagnostic Reference Levels and Radiography Good Practice but has demonstrated large variations in mean doses being delivered from different rooms of the same radiology department. Following the simple 3-step approach advocated in this paper should either provide evidence that department are practising the ALARA principle or assist in making suitable changes to current practice. Copyright (2004) Australian Institute of Radiography

  7. Radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin N, J.; Azorin V, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    This work is directed to all those people related with the exercise of the radiological protection and has the purpose of providing them a base of knowledge in this discipline so that they can make decisions documented on technical and scientist factors for the protection of the personnel occupationally exposed, the people in general and the environment during the work with ionizing radiations. Before de lack of a text on this matter, this work seeks to cover the specific necessities of our country, providing a solid presentation of the radiological protection, included the bases of the radiations physics, the detection and radiation dosimetry, the radiobiology, the normative and operational procedures associates, the radioactive wastes, the emergencies and the transport of the radioactive material through the medical and industrial applications of the radiations, making emphasis in the relative particular aspects to the radiological protection in Mexico. The book have 16 chapters and with the purpose of supplementing the given information, are included at the end four appendixes: 1) the radioactive waste management in Mexico, 2-3) the Mexican official standards related with the radiological protection, 4) a terms glossary used in radiological protection. We hope this book will be of utility for those people that work in the investigation and the applications of the ionizing radiations. (Author)

  8. From a regulatory to a cultural approach in the field of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehler, M.-C.

    1995-01-01

    A radiological protection culture, which is seen to be a 'management' approach to individual and collective doses, based on the principle of optimisation is described with particular reference to the nuclear industry. The article discusses the fundamental role of the principle of optimisation, the legal nature of the principle of optimisation and the implementation of a radiological protection culture. (UK)

  9. Occupational exposure trend and the radiological protection optimization criteria in Spanish nuclear power plants in operation: present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donnell, P.

    1992-01-01

    Occupational collective dose per reactor evolution in the operating nuclear power plants in Spain has shown in the last years a tendency to stability, within a range of values similar to the average of the OECD countries. On the other hand, the last ICRP's recommendations will support a further effort for utilities and external contractors in order to adapt to the new individual dose limits. The lecturer considers that Spain must not accommodate to the present situation and should continue developing the ALARA criteria in its nuclear power plants. In this presentation the main indicators to assess the present development level of this criteria are reviewed and the basis to improve the effectiveness of the practical application of it is proposed. (author)

  10. Optimisation of the LHCb detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hierck, R H

    2003-01-01

    This thesis describes a comparison of the LHCb classic and LHCb light concept from a tracking perspective. The comparison includes the detector occupancies, the various pattern recognition algorithms and the reconstruction performance. The final optimised LHCb setup is used to study the physics performance of LHCb for the Bs->DsK and Bs->DsPi decay channels. This includes both the event selection and a study of the sensitivity for the Bs oscillation frequency, delta m_s, the Bs lifetime difference, DGamma_s, and the CP parameter gamma-2delta gamma.

  11. The responsible by the radiological safety in the industry. Between the occupational environment and the today technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truppa, Walter A.

    2006-01-01

    In industrial applications of the sealed radioactive sources, there are two clearly definite branches for which these materials are utilized: radioactive sources utilized in fixed and in portable equipment. These devices are utilized in an endless number of applications and each time with more advanced technological systems. This requires a permanent improvement in the training of the responsible, and at the same time introduces an obligatory change to other intervention groups during the useful life of the device. The risks of accident, to the ones associated with the use of these equipment, though their rate of occurrence is low, they are errors during the operation, undue use, maintenance by personnel without knowledge, human type failures or carelessness and incidents occurred during the transportation. All these risks are surrounded by different groups of factors that influence during the sure use of the radioactive material inside the installation. Therefore the importance to establish aspects of Safety Culture, aptitude evaluations of the radiological security responsible, improvements introduction in quality and risks communication aspects, in agreement with the Argentine Republic regulations and the international requests, is emphasized. In the present paper all concepts about the radioactive material responsible election, the training, the factors that intervene during the operation, the installation obligations, insecurity situations and the changes or improvements that technology introduces, are referenced. (author) [es

  12. Optimisation of staff protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Marshall, N.W.; Rawlings, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    It is important to minimize the radiation dose received by staff, but it is particularly important in interventional radiology. Staff doses may be reduced by minimizing the fluoroscopic screening time and number of images, compatible with the clinical objective of the procedure. Staff may also move to different positions in the room in an attempt to reduce doses. Finally, staff should wear appropriate protective clothing to reduce their occupational doses. This paper will concentrate on the optimization of personal shielding in interventional radiology. The effect of changing the lead equivalence of various protective devices on effective dose to staff has been studied by modeling the exposure of staff to realistic scattered radiation. Both overcouch x-ray tube/undercouch image intensified and overcouch image intensifier/undercouch x-ray tube geometries were simulated. It was deduced from this simulation that increasing the lead apron thickness from 0.35 mm lead to 0.5 mm lead had only a small reducing effect. By contrast, wearing a lead rubber thyroid shield or face mask is a superior means of reducing the effective dose to staff. Standing back from the couch when the x-ray tube is emitting radiation is another good method of reducing doses, being better than exchanging a 0.35 mm lead apron for a 0.5 mm apron. In summary, it is always preferable to shield more organs than to increase the thickness of the lead apron. (author)

  13. Evaluation of the impact of a system for real-time visualisation of occupational radiation dose rate during fluoroscopically guided procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandblom, V; Almén, A; Cederblad, A.; Båth, M; Lundh, C; Mai, T; Rystedt, H

    2013-01-01

    Optimisation of radiological protection for operators working with fluoroscopically guided procedures has to be performed during the procedure, under varying and difficult conditions. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of a system for real-time visualisation of radiation dose rate on optimisation of occupational radiological protection in fluoroscopically guided procedures. Individual radiation dose measurements, using a system for real-time visualisation, were performed in a cardiology laboratory for three cardiologists and ten assisting nurses. Radiation doses collected when the radiation dose rates were not displayed to the staff were compared to radiation doses collected when the radiation dose rates were displayed. When the radiation dose rates were displayed to the staff, one cardiologist and the assisting nurses (as a group) significantly reduced their personal radiation doses. The median radiation dose (H p (10)) per procedure decreased from 68 to 28 μSv (p = 0.003) for this cardiologist and from 4.3 to 2.5 μSv (p = 0.001) for the assisting nurses. The results of the present study indicate that a system for real-time visualisation of radiation dose rate may have a positive impact on optimisation of occupational radiological protection. In particular, this may affect the behaviour of staff members practising inadequate personal radiological protection. (paper)

  14. Radiological assessment occupational radionuclides in a phosphoric acid plant; Evaluacion radiologica ocupacional y distribucion de radionucleidos en una planta de acido fosforico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolivar, J. P.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

    2008-07-01

    On the frame of a research project devoted to the control of the exposure due to natural radiation in several NORM industries located at the South of Spain, a detailed to the production of phosphoric acid has been performed. In addition, the behaviour along the mentioned process of the different radionuclides involved has been analysed. It has been concluded that the effective dose which can be received by the workers of the plant is clearly below 1 mSv/year. And it has been demonstrated that the main route of occupational exposure corresponds to the external radiation due mainly to the permanent presence of a radioactive contamination source in different zones of the plant. This contamination source is associated to the presence of scales in the inner surfaces of pipes and equipment as well as to the presence of sludges in the phosphoric acid storage tanks, which in both cases contain elevated concentrations of 226{sup R}a. Moreover, the 222{sup R}n concentrations inside the plant do not overpass 100 Bq/m{sup 3}, which not constitutes a radiological problem. (Author) 9 refs.

  15. Radiological Control Manual. Revision 0, January 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  16. Computer Based Optimisation Rutines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Birgitte; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1996-01-01

    In this paper the need for optimisation methods for the laser cutting process has been identified as three different situations. Demands on the optimisation methods for these situations are presented, and one method for each situation is suggested. The adaptation and implementation of the methods...

  17. Optimal Optimisation in Chemometrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    The use of global optimisation methods is not straightforward, especially for the more difficult optimisation problems. Solutions have to be found for items such as the evaluation function, representation, step function and meta-parameters, before any useful results can be obtained. This thesis aims

  18. Automatic optimisation of gamma dose rate sensor networks: The DETECT Optimisation Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, K.B.; Müller, T.O.; Astrup, Poul

    2014-01-01

    of the EU FP 7 project DETECT. It evaluates the gamma dose rates that a proposed set of sensors might measure in an emergency and uses this information to optimise the sensor locations. The gamma dose rates are taken from a comprehensive library of simulations of atmospheric radioactive plumes from 64......Fast delivery of comprehensive information on the radiological situation is essential for decision-making in nuclear emergencies. Most national radiological agencies in Europe employ gamma dose rate sensor networks to monitor radioactive pollution of the atmosphere. Sensor locations were often...... source locations. These simulations cover the whole European Union, so the DOT allows evaluation and optimisation of sensor networks for all EU countries, as well as evaluation of fencing sensors around possible sources. Users can choose from seven cost functions to evaluate the capability of a given...

  19. Radiological protection report 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-06-01

    In the radiological protection report 2016, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) provides an overview of the radiological protection in its area of supervision. Part A of the report deals with protecting the staff of nuclear power plants from the dangers of ionising radiation. It also includes a list of the personal doses accumulated by the staff, broken down using various parameters. Applying the optimisation imperative, it has been proved possible to significantly reduce the annual collective doses in Switzerland's nuclear power plants since they came on stream thanks to major efforts by the operators. In 2016, a total of 6,153 people measured accumulated 2,877 person-mSv. The collective doses have reached a low level corresponding to the radiological condition of the plants and the scope of the work required to be performed in controlled zones (e.g. non-destructive materials testing). ENSI will continue to follow the trend for collective doses and assess the reasons for local variances as well as for measures initiated. The individual doses for people employed in ENSI's area of supervision in 2016 showed a maximum figure of 10 mSv and a mean value of 0.5 mSv which was significantly below the dose limit of 20 mSv for occupational radiation exposure. The discharge of radioactive substances with the exhaust air and waste water from nuclear power plants are dealt with in Part B of the report. In 2016, nuclear power plant operators again met the admissible release limits set by the authorities, in some cases by a considerable margin. The emissions of Swiss nuclear power plants led to a dose of less than 0.01 mSv per year in the direct neighbourhood. A comparison with the average annual radiation dose for the Swiss population of 5.5 mSv shows that the relevant contribution from nuclear power plants lies in the area of one percent of this figure. Effluents from Swiss nuclear power plants were also below the target of 1 GBq per year set by ENSI

  20. Optimised Renormalisation Group Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Litim, Daniel F

    2001-01-01

    Exact renormalisation group (ERG) flows interpolate between a microscopic or classical theory and the corresponding macroscopic or quantum effective theory. For most problems of physical interest, the efficiency of the ERG is constrained due to unavoidable approximations. Approximate solutions of ERG flows depend spuriously on the regularisation scheme which is determined by a regulator function. This is similar to the spurious dependence on the ultraviolet regularisation known from perturbative QCD. Providing a good control over approximated ERG flows is at the root for reliable physical predictions. We explain why the convergence of approximate solutions towards the physical theory is optimised by appropriate choices of the regulator. We study specific optimised regulators for bosonic and fermionic fields and compare the optimised ERG flows with generic ones. This is done up to second order in the derivative expansion at both vanishing and non-vanishing temperature. An optimised flow for a ``proper-time ren...

  1. Development and trends in radiological protection and the NEA programme in this field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilari, O.; Wallauschek, E.

    1980-01-01

    The evolution of radiological protection problems and achievements during the more than twenty years of existence of the Nuclear Energy Agency, are reviewed in the light of the Agency's involvement and activities in this field. Some current problems of specific concern to public health aithorities in Member countries are discussed. The areas covered include the application of the ICRP optimisation principle to practical cases, the occupational exposure trends in the nuclear industry, the protection of workers and the public and the measurement and dosimetry problems associated with the front-end of the uranium fuel cycle, the radiological implications of dumping low-level radioactive wastes into the oceans, and the long-term detriment associated with the geological disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. (H.K.)

  2. Trends of the effective dose distribution of occupational exposures in medical and research departments for KIRAMS in Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, M.; Kim, G. S.; Ji, Y. H.; Jung, M. S.; Kim, K. B.; Jung, H.

    2014-01-01

    This work proposes the basic reference data of occupational dose management and statistical dose distribution with the classification of radiation work groups though analysis of occupational dose distribution. Data on occupational radiation exposure from medical and scientific usage of radiation in Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences for the years 2002-11 are presented and evaluated with the characteristic tendency of radiation working groups. The results of occupational radiation exposure were measured by personal dosemeters. The monitored occupational exposure dose data were evaluated according to the average effective dose and collective dose. The most annual average effective dose for all occupational radiation workers was under 1 mSv. Considering the dose distribution of each department, most overexposure workers worked in radiopharmaceutical product facilities, nuclear medicine department and radiation oncology department. In addition, no monitored workers were found to have received an occupational exposure over 50 mSv in single year or 100 mSv in this period. Although the trend of occupational exposure was controlled <1 mSv after 2007 and the radiation protection status was sufficient, it was consistently necessary to optimise and reduce the occupational radiation exposure. (authors)

  3. Radiology today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donner, M.W.; Heuck, F.H.W.

    1981-01-01

    The book encompasses the proceedings of a postgraduate course held in Salzburg in June 1980. 230 radiologists from 17 countries discussed here the important and practical advances of diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and ultrasound as they contribute to gastrointestinal, urologic, skeletal, cardiovascular, pediatric, and neuroradiology. The book contains 55 single contributions of different authors to the following main themes: Cardiovascular, Radiology, pulmonary radiology, gastrointestinal radiology, urinary tract radiology, skeletal radiology, mammography, lymphography, ultrasound, ENT radiology, and neuroradiology. (orig./MG)

  4. The principle of optimisation: reasons for success and legal criticism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Regalado, Luis

    2008-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has adopted new recommendations in 2007. In broad outlines they fundamentally continue the recommendations already approved in 1990 and later on. The principle of optimisation of protection, together with the principles of justification and dose limits, remains playing a key role of the ICRP recommendations, and it has so been for the last few years. This principle, somehow reinforced in the 2007 ICRP recommendations, has been incorporated into norms and legislation which have peacefully been in force in many countries all over the world. There are three main reasons to explain the success in the application of the principle of optimisation in radiological protection: First, the subjectivity of the sentence that embraces the principle of optimisation, 'As low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA), that allows different valid interpretations under different circumstances. Second, the pragmatism and adaptability of ALARA to all exposure situations. And third, the scientific humbleness which is behind the principle of optimisation, which makes a clear contrast with the old fashioned scientific positivism that enshrined scientist opinions. Nevertheless, from a legal point of view, there is some criticism cast over the principle of optimisation in radiological protection, where it has been transformed in compulsory norm. This criticism is based on two arguments: The lack of democratic participation in the process of elaboration of the norm, and the legal uncertainty associated to its application. Both arguments are somehow known by the ICRP which, on the one hand, has broadened the participation of experts, associations and the professional radiological protection community, increasing the transparency on how decisions on recommendations have been taken, and on the other hand, the ICRP has warned about the need for authorities to specify general criteria to develop the principle of optimisation in national

  5. Radiological health aspects of uranium milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1983-05-01

    This report describes the operation of conventional and unconventional uranium milling processes, the potential for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation at the mill, methods for radiological safety, methods of evaluating occupational radiation exposures, and current government regulations for protecting workers and ensuring that standards for radiation protection are adhered to. In addition, a survey of current radiological health practices is summarized

  6. Radiological health aspects of uranium milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1983-05-01

    This report describes the operation of conventional and unconventional uranium milling processes, the potential for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation at the mill, methods for radiological safety, methods of evaluating occupational radiation exposures, and current government regulations for protecting workers and ensuring that standards for radiation protection are adhered to. In addition, a survey of current radiological health practices is summarized.

  7. Networking as an efficient, modern way of favouring stakeholders' involvement in implementing good radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaure, Ch.; Janssens, A.; Mrabit, K.; Ahier, B.

    2006-01-01

    Since the publication of ICRP 22 and ICRP 26 in 1973 and 1977 respectively, the understanding and practical implementation of the concept of Optimisation of Radiation Protection known as ALARA ('as low as reasonably achievable') has developed considerably globally and particularly in Europe. In the 1990 ICRP 60 publication, ALARA was re-emphasised as the cornerstone of the radiological protection system. This is also an explicit requirement of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (International BSS) and EC Directive laying down the Basic Safety Standards for radiological protection (EURATOM Directive 96/29), as well as of most of the national regulations. Throughout the 1980's and early 1990's ALARA was integrated into many organisations' radiation protection programmes, particularly in the nuclear industry and mainly for managing occupational exposure. One of the main lessons identified from that period was that it was not possible to implement good radiological protection by relying only on technical rules and procedures summarised in the three words: 'Time-Distance-Shielding'. A fourth word, 'Commitment', was to be added as no radiological protection programme would be successful without the commitment of all concerned stakeholders: regulatory bodies, managers, workers, etc. The scope of this presentation is, through different international feedback experiences, to demonstrate how networking is an efficient, modern way of fostering stakeholders involvement in implementing good radiological protection. (authors)

  8. Optimisation of patient and staff exposure in interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padovani, R.; Malisan, M.R.; Bernardi, G.; Vano, E.; Neofotistou, V.

    2001-01-01

    The Council Directive of the European Community 97/43/Euratom (MED) deals with the health protection of individuals against dangers of ionising radiation in relation to medical exposure, and also focuses attention on some special practices (Art. 9), including interventional radiology, a technique involving high doses to the patient. The paper presents the European approach to optimisation of exposure in interventional cardiology. The DIMOND research consortium (DIMOND: Digital Imaging: Measures for Optimising Radiological Information Content and Dose) is working to develop quality criteria for cineangiographic images, to develop procedures for the classification of complexity of therapeutic and diagnostic procedures and to derive reference levels, related also to procedure complexity. DIMOND project also includes aspects of equipment characteristics and performance and content of training in radiation protection of personnel working in interventional radiology field. (author)

  9. Optimising Magnetostatic Assemblies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Insinga, Andrea Roberto; Smith, Anders

    theorem. This theorem formulates an energy equivalence principle with several implications concerning the optimisation of objective functionals that are linear with respect to the magnetic field. Linear functionals represent different optimisation goals, e.g. maximising a certain component of the field...... approached employing a heuristic algorithm, which led to new design concepts. Some of the procedures developed for linear objective functionals have been extended to non-linear objectives, by employing iterative techniques. Even though most the optimality results discussed in this work have been derived...

  10. Establishing Local Reference Dose Values and Optimisation Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, P.; Moores, B.M.

    2000-01-01

    The revised EC Patient Directive 97/43 EURATOM introduces the concepts of clinical audit, diagnostic reference levels and optimisation of radiation protection in diagnostic radiology. The application of reference dose levels in practice involves the establishment of reference dose values as actual measurable operational quantities. These values should then form part of an ongoing optimisation and audit programme against which routine performance can be compared. The CEC Quality Criteria for Radiographic Images provides guidance reference dose values against which local performance can be compared. In many cases these values can be improved upon quite considerably. This paper presents the results of a local initiative in the North West of the UK aimed at establishing local reference dose values for a number of major hospital sites. The purpose of this initiative is to establish a foundation for both optimisation strategies and clinical audit as an ongoing and routine practice. The paper presents results from an ongoing trial involving patient dose measurements for several radiological examinations upon the sites. The results of an attempt to establish local reference dose values from measured dose values and to employ them in optimisation strategies are presented. In particular emphasis is placed on the routine quality control programmes necessary to underpin this strategy including the effective data management of results from such programmes and how they can be employed to optimisation practices. (author)

  11. Paediatric interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, Clare

    2014-01-01

    Paediatric interventional radiology (PIR) is a rapidly-growing subspecialty, which offers a wide range of procedures applicable to almost all areas of hospital paediatrics. There are many important differences between paediatric and adult practice in interventional radiology, including disease processes and treatment goals, anatomical considerations, periprocedural patient management, radiation exposure optimisation and legal aspects. The use of retrievable or absorbable interventional devices such as stents will probably become more widespread in PIR practice. Recent advances in the technology of imaging equipment have been accompanied by an increase in the complexity of the work done by the radiographer. These developments present challenges and opportunities related to training and maintenance of skills, staffing arrangements, and the potential for advanced practice. It is likely that specialisation in PIR will become a more common role for radiographers in the future

  12. Optimisation by hierarchical search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zintchenko, Ilia; Hastings, Matthew; Troyer, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Finding optimal values for a set of variables relative to a cost function gives rise to some of the hardest problems in physics, computer science and applied mathematics. Although often very simple in their formulation, these problems have a complex cost function landscape which prevents currently known algorithms from efficiently finding the global optimum. Countless techniques have been proposed to partially circumvent this problem, but an efficient method is yet to be found. We present a heuristic, general purpose approach to potentially improve the performance of conventional algorithms or special purpose hardware devices by optimising groups of variables in a hierarchical way. We apply this approach to problems in combinatorial optimisation, machine learning and other fields.

  13. Radiological characterization and dose assessment in different scenarios of occupational and public exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials in the Republic of Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Gomez, Isis Maria

    2012-01-01

    Cuba has identified situations where there working environments with the presence of natural radioactivity. Dose estimates in these environments could exceed the measured values for occupationally exposed workers, without there existed so far, with regulatory requirements for programs of radiation protection. In light of these situations, it has been necessary to assess the potential impact on these working groups of radiational load that they are subjected and establish regulatory criteria for protection in cases that require it. (author) [es

  14. Current NRPB recommendations on optimisation of protection of workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrixon, A.D.

    1994-01-01

    The National Radiological Protection Board is required by Ministerial Direction to provide advice on the relevance of the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection to the UK. Its advice was published in the Spring of 1993 after a period of consultation. In this article, which formed the basis of a presentation at an SRP Meeting on 29 April 1994, the Board's advice on the optimisation of protection of workers is explored and presented in the context of the developments in the understanding of the principle that have taken place in recent years. The most significant developments are the realisation that implementation of the principle is an essential function of good management and the recognition that the interests of the individual are not sufficiently taken into account by the dose limits alone but doses to individuals should be both constrained and optimised. (author)

  15. Advanced optimisation - coal fired power plant operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turney, D.M.; Mayes, I. [E.ON UK, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this unit optimization project is to develop an integrated approach to unit optimisation and develop an overall optimiser that is able to resolve any conflicts between the individual optimisers. The individual optimisers have been considered during this project are: on-line thermal efficiency package, GNOCIS boiler optimiser, GNOCIS steam side optimiser, ESP optimisation, and intelligent sootblowing system. 6 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Optimisation in radiotherapy II: Programmed and inversion optimisation algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, M.

    1997-01-01

    This is the second article in a three part examination of optimisation in radiotherapy. The previous article established the bases of optimisation in radiotherapy, and the formulation of the optimisation problem. This paper outlines several algorithms that have been used in radiotherapy, for searching for the best irradiation strategy within the full set of possible strategies. Two principle classes of algorithm are considered - those associated with mathematical programming which employ specific search techniques, linear programming type searches or artificial intelligence - and those which seek to perform a numerical inversion of the optimisation problem, finishing with deterministic iterative inversion. (author)

  17. Radiological Risk Assessments for Occupational Exposure at Fuel Fabrication Facility in AlTuwaitha Site Baghdad – Iraq by using RESRAD Computer Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ziadoon H.; Ibrahim, S. A.; Mohammed, M. K.; Shaban, A. H.

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the radiological risks for workers for one year of their activities at Fuel Fabrication Facility (FFF) so as to make the necessary protection to prevent or minimize risks resulted from these activities this site now is under the Iraqi decommissioning program (40). Soil samples surface and subsurface were collected from different positions of this facility and analyzed by gamma rays spectroscopy technique High Purity Germanium detector (HPGe) was used. It was found out admixture of radioactive isotopes (232Th 40K 238U 235U137Cs) according to the laboratory results the highest values were (975758) for 238U (21203) for 235U (218) for 232Th (4046) for 40K and (129) for 137Cs in (Bqkg1) unit. The annual total radiation dose and risks were estimated by using RESRAD (onsite) 70 computer code. The highest total radiation dose was (5617μSv/year) in area that represented by soil sample (S7) and the radiological risks morbidity and mortality (118E02 8661E03) respectively in the same area

  18. Radiological English

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribes, R. [Hospital Reina Sofia, Cordoba (Spain). Servicio de Radiologia; Ros, P.R. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Div. of Radiology

    2007-07-01

    The book is an introductory book to radiological English on the basis that there are a lot of radiologists, radiology residents, radiology nurses, radiology students, and radiographers worldwide whose English level is indeterminate because their reading skills are much higher than their fluency. It is intended to help those health care professionals who need English for their work but do not speak English on a day-to-day basis. (orig.)

  19. Radiological English

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribes, R.; Ros, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    The book is an introductory book to radiological English on the basis that there are a lot of radiologists, radiology residents, radiology nurses, radiology students, and radiographers worldwide whose English level is indeterminate because their reading skills are much higher than their fluency. It is intended to help those health care professionals who need English for their work but do not speak English on a day-to-day basis. (orig.)

  20. The optimisation principle and the new ICRP recommendations: practical implications on operational radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.

    1992-01-01

    The formulation of the optimisation principle proposed by the International Commission of Radiological Protection in its new recommendations is largely oriented towards better control of individual doses. In this perspective, the concept of doe constraint and the reference to equity in dose distributions are becoming key elements within the optimisation process. This paper discusses some first reflexions regarding this new orientation and outlines the main impacts that must be forwarded to the practical level. (author)

  1. Optimisation of monochrome images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, R.

    1983-01-01

    Gamma cameras with modern imaging systems usually digitize the signals to allow storage and processing of the image in a computer. Although such computer systems are widely used for the extraction of quantitative uptake estimates and the analysis of time variant data, the vast majority of nuclear medicine images is still interpreted on the basis of an observer's visual assessment of a photographic hardcopy image. The optimisation of hardcopy devices is therefore vital and factors such as resolution, uniformity, noise grey scales and display matrices are discussed. Once optimum display parameters have been determined, routine procedures for quality control need to be established; suitable procedures are discussed. (U.K.)

  2. Occupational Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  3. Radiology fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Harjit

    2011-01-01

    ""Radiology Fundamentals"" is a concise introduction to the dynamic field of radiology for medical students, non-radiology house staff, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, radiology assistants, and other allied health professionals. The goal of the book is to provide readers with general examples and brief discussions of basic radiographic principles and to serve as a curriculum guide, supplementing a radiology education and providing a solid foundation for further learning. Introductory chapters provide readers with the fundamental scientific concepts underlying the medical use of imag

  4. RSVP radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirks, D.R.; Chaffee, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper develops a relative scale of value for pediatric radiology (RSVPR). Neither the HCFA/ACA Relative Value Scale nor the Workload Measurement System developed by Health and Welfare Canada specifically addressed pediatric radiologic examinations. Technical and professional charges for examinations at Children's Hospital Medical Center were reviewed and compared with time and cost analysis. A scale was developed with chest radiography (PA and lateral views) assigned a value of 1. After review by pediatric radiologic technologists, radiologic administrators, pediatric radiologists, and chairs of departments of children's hospitals, this proposed scale was modified to reflect more accurately relative value components of pediatric radiologic and imaging examinations

  5. Beam position optimisation for IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holloway, L.; Hoban, P.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The introduction of IMRT has not generally resulted in the use of optimised beam positions because to find the global solution of the problem a time consuming stochastic optimisation method must be used. Although a deterministic method may not achieve the global minimum it should achieve a superior dose distribution compared to no optimisation. This study aimed to develop and test such a method. The beam optimisation method developed relies on an iterative process to achieve the desired number of beams from a large initial number of beams. The number of beams is reduced in a 'weeding-out' process based on the total fluence which each beam delivers. The process is gradual, with only three beams removed each time (following a small number of iterations), ensuring that the reduction in beams does not dramatically affect the fluence maps of those remaining. A comparison was made between the dose distributions achieved when the beams positions were optimised in this fashion and when the beams positions were evenly distributed. The method has been shown to work quite effectively and efficiently. The Figure shows a comparison in dose distribution with optimised and non optimised beam positions for 5 beams. It can be clearly seen that there is an improvement in the dose distribution delivered to the tumour and a reduction in the dose to the critical structure with beam position optimisation. A method for beam position optimisation for use in IMRT optimisations has been developed. This method although not necessarily achieving the global minimum in beam position still achieves quite a dramatic improvement compared with no beam position optimisation and is very efficiently achieved. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  6. Optimisation and constraints - a view from ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunster, H.J.

    1994-01-01

    The optimisation of protection has been the major policy underlying the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for more than 20 years. In earlier forms, the concept can be traced back to 1951. Constraints are more recent, appearing in their present form only in the 1990 recommendations of the Commission. The requirement to keep all exposures as low as reasonably achievable applies to both normal and potential exposures. The policy and the techniques are well established for normal exposures, i.e. exposures that are certain to occur. The application to potential exposures, i.e. exposures that have a probability of occurring that is less than unity, is more difficult and is still under international discussion. Constraints are needed to limit the inequity associated with the use of collective dose in cost-benefit analysis and to provide a margin to protect individuals who may be exposed to more than one source. (author)

  7. Radiology illustrated. Pediatric radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In-One (ed.) [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-11-01

    Depicts characteristic imaging findings of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. Will serve as an ideal diagnostic reference in daily practice. Offers an excellent teaching aid, with numerous high-quality illustrations. This case-based atlas presents images depicting the findings typically observed when imaging a variety of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. The cases are organized according to anatomic region, covering disorders of the brain, spinal cord, head and neck, chest, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, genitourinary system, and musculoskeletal system. Cases are presented in a form resembling teaching files, and the images are accompanied by concise informative text. The goal is to provide a diagnostic reference suitable for use in daily routine by both practicing radiologists and radiology residents or fellows. The atlas will also serve as a teaching aide and a study resource, and will offer pediatricians and surgeons guidance on the clinical applications of pediatric imaging.

  8. SU-E-I-57: Estimating the Occupational Eye Lens Dose in Interventional Radiology Using Active Personal Dosimeters Worn On the Chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, A; Marteinsdottir, M; Kadesjo, N; Fransson, A [Dept. of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a general formalism for determination of occupational eye lens dose based on the response of an active personal dosimeter (APD) worn at chest level above the radiation protection apron. Methods: The formalism consists of three factors: (1) APD conversion factor converting the reading at chest level (APDchest) to the corresponding personal dose equivalent at eye level, (2) Dose conversion factor transferring the measured dose quantity, Hp(10), into a dose quantity relevant for the eye lens dose, (3) Correction factor accounting for differences in exposure of the eye(s) compared to the exposure at chest level (e.g., due to protective lead glasses).The different factors were investigated and evaluated based on phantom and clinical measurements performed in an x-ray angiography suite for interventional cardiology. Results: The eye lens dose can be conservatively estimated by assigning an appropriate numerical value to each factor entering the formalism that in most circumstances overestimates the dose. Doing so, the eye lens dose to the primary operator and assisting staff was estimated in this work as D-eye,primary = 2.0 APDchest and D-eye,assisting = 1.0 APDchest, respectively.The annual eye lens dose to three nurses and one cardiologist was estimated to be 2, 2, 2, and 13 mSv (Hp(0.07)), respectively, using a TLD dosimeter worn at eye level. In comparison, using the formalism and APDchest measurements, the respective doses were 2, 2, 2, and 16 mSv (Hp(3)). Conclusion: The formalism outlined in this work can be used to estimate the occupational eye lens dose from the response of an APD worn on the chest. The formalism is general and could be applied also to other types of dosimeters. However, the numerical value of the different factors may differ from those obtained with the APD’s used in this work due to differences in dosimeter properties.

  9. SU-E-I-57: Estimating the Occupational Eye Lens Dose in Interventional Radiology Using Active Personal Dosimeters Worn On the Chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omar, A; Marteinsdottir, M; Kadesjo, N; Fransson, A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a general formalism for determination of occupational eye lens dose based on the response of an active personal dosimeter (APD) worn at chest level above the radiation protection apron. Methods: The formalism consists of three factors: (1) APD conversion factor converting the reading at chest level (APDchest) to the corresponding personal dose equivalent at eye level, (2) Dose conversion factor transferring the measured dose quantity, Hp(10), into a dose quantity relevant for the eye lens dose, (3) Correction factor accounting for differences in exposure of the eye(s) compared to the exposure at chest level (e.g., due to protective lead glasses).The different factors were investigated and evaluated based on phantom and clinical measurements performed in an x-ray angiography suite for interventional cardiology. Results: The eye lens dose can be conservatively estimated by assigning an appropriate numerical value to each factor entering the formalism that in most circumstances overestimates the dose. Doing so, the eye lens dose to the primary operator and assisting staff was estimated in this work as D-eye,primary = 2.0 APDchest and D-eye,assisting = 1.0 APDchest, respectively.The annual eye lens dose to three nurses and one cardiologist was estimated to be 2, 2, 2, and 13 mSv (Hp(0.07)), respectively, using a TLD dosimeter worn at eye level. In comparison, using the formalism and APDchest measurements, the respective doses were 2, 2, 2, and 16 mSv (Hp(3)). Conclusion: The formalism outlined in this work can be used to estimate the occupational eye lens dose from the response of an APD worn on the chest. The formalism is general and could be applied also to other types of dosimeters. However, the numerical value of the different factors may differ from those obtained with the APD’s used in this work due to differences in dosimeter properties

  10. The radiological impact of past and present practices of the mineral sands industry in Queensland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, E.G.; Stewart, N.D.; Wallace, B.J.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that the introduction of uniform Australian national Codes of Practice for radiation protection in the mining and milling of radioactive ores in the early 1980's has led to the mining and health regulatory authorities implementing the provisions of the Codes. Deficiencies involving dust and external gamma radiation levels in the mineral sands industry have led to various administrative and engineering controls being introduced to reduce the levels of radiation doses to employees well below 20 mSv/y limit. There are guidelines for screening the radioactivity of tailings released into the environment and some products for industrial use. Future activities by the regulatory authorities and industry will involve an optimisation of radiation protection, ongoing remedial programs, register of data about contaminated lands and assessments of the environmental, occupational and the public radiological impacts from downstream processing of mineral sands. The latter involves synthetic rutile, zircon flour, rare earth and refractory technologies. 7 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  11. Radiology Aide. Instructor Key [and] Student Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwein, Jon; Dunham, John

    This manual can be used independently by students in secondary health occupations programs or by persons receiving on-the-job training in a radiology department. The manual includes an instructor's key that provides answers to the activity sheets and unit evaluations. The manual consists of the following five units: (1) orientation to radiology;…

  12. RESRAD-BUILD: A computer model for analyzing the radiological doses resulting from the remediation and occupancy of buildings contaminated with radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, C.; LePoire, D.J.; Jones, L.G.

    1994-11-01

    The RESRAD-BUILD computer code is a pathway analysis model designed to evaluate the potential radiological dose incurred by an individual who works or lives in a building contaminated with radioactive material. The transport of radioactive material inside the building from one compartment to another is calculated with an indoor air quality model. The air quality model considers the transport of radioactive dust particulates and radon progeny due to air exchange, deposition and resuspension, and radioactive decay and ingrowth. A single run of the RESRAD-BUILD code can model a building with up to: three compartments, 10 distinct source geometries, and 10 receptor locations. A shielding material can be specified between each source-receptor pair for external gamma dose calculations. Six exposure pathways are considered in the RESRAD-BUILD code: (1) external exposure directly from the source; (2) external exposure to materials deposited on the floor; (3) external exposure due to air submersion; (4) inhalation of airborne radioactive particulates; (5) inhalation of aerosol indoor radon progeny; and (6) inadvertent ingestion of radioactive material, either directly from the sources or from materials deposited on the surfaces of the building compartments

  13. Late radiation effects of low doses from occupational exposure. Antibodies to cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 in radiological technologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagai, Etsuko; Tanoue, Shozo (Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). Coll. of Medical Science); Sawada, Shozo

    1989-05-01

    To elucidate the effects of long-term exposure to low dose irradiation, serostatus of antibodies to cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) was determined in 99 radiological technologists and 96 healthy volunteers. Abnormal seropositivity rate for CMV was significantly higher in technologists working for 15 years or more than in those working for less than 15 years. For the same age group, however, there was no significant difference between technologists and controls. Seropositivity rates for EBV-viral capsid antigen (VSA)/IgG and early antigen (EA)/IgG were significantly higher in technologists working for 15 years or more than in the age-matched control group. In the group of technologists exposed to 0.3 Sv or more, seropositivity rates of these antibodies were significantly higher than in those exposed to less than 0.3 Sv. However, there was no correlation between exposure doses and both EBV-associated nuclear antigen antibody and HTLV-1 antibody. Few technologists seronegative for CMV antibody had seropositive antibodies of EBV-VCA/IgG and EA/IgG. For technologists seropositive for CMV antibody, 31% and 54% were seropositive for EBV-VCA/IgG and EA/IgG antibodies, respectively. (Namekawa, K).

  14. Imaging and radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interventional radiology; Diagnostic radiology; X-ray imaging ... DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Diagnostic radiology helps health care professionals see structures inside your body. Doctors that specialize in the interpretation ...

  15. Chronicle of pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz-Bohm, Gabriele; Richter, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    The chronicle of pediatric radiology covers the following issues: Development of pediatric radiology in Germany (BRD, DDR, pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in the Netherlands (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in Austria (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in Switzerland (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations).

  16. Topology optimised wavelength dependent splitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, K. K.; Burgos Leon, J.; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    A photonic crystal wavelength dependent splitter has been constructed by utilising topology optimisation1. The splitter has been fabricated in a silicon-on-insulator material (Fig. 1). The topology optimised wavelength dependent splitter demonstrates promising 3D FDTD simulation results....... This complex photonic crystal structure is very sensitive against small fabrication variations from the expected topology optimised design. A wavelength dependent splitter is an important basic building block for high-performance nanophotonic circuits. 1J. S. Jensen and O. Sigmund, App. Phys. Lett. 84, 2022...

  17. Radiological Protection in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valetin, J.

    2011-01-01

    This report was prepared to underpin the Commission's 2007 Recommendations with regard to the medical exposure of patients, including their comforters and carers, and volunteers in biomedical research. It addresses the proper application of the fundamental principles (justification, optimisation of protection, and application of dose limits) of the Commission's 2007 Recommendations to these individuals. With regard to medical exposure of patients, it is not appropriate to apply dose limits or dose constraints, because such limits would often do more harm than good. Often, there are concurrent chronic, severe, or even life-threatening medical conditions that are more critical than the radiation exposure. The emphasis is then on justification of the medical procedures and on the optimisation of radiological protection. In diagnostic and interventional procedures, justification of procedures (for a defined purpose and for an individual patient), and management of the patient dose commensurate with the medical task, are the appropriate mechanisms to avoid unnecessary or unproductive radiation exposure. Equipment features that facilitate patient dose management, and diagnostic reference levels derived at the appropriate national, regional, or local level, are likely to be the most effective approaches. In radiation therapy, the avoidance of accidents is a predominant issue. With regard to comforters and carers, and volunteers in biomedical research, dose constraints are appropriate. Over the last decade, the Commission has published a number of documents that provided detailed advice related to radiological protection and safety in the medical applications of ionising radiation. Each of the publications addressed a specific topic defined by the type of radiation source and the medical discipline in which the source is applied, and was written with the intent of communicating directly with the relevant medical practitioners and supporting medical staff. This report

  18. Dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaskar, S.N.

    1982-01-01

    The book presents the radiological manifestations of the maxillodental region in a suitable manner for fast detection and correct diagnosing of diseases of the teeth, soft tissue, and jaws. Classification therefore is made according to the radiological manifestations of the diseases and not according to etiology. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Optimisation of the Laser Cutting Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Birgitte; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1996-01-01

    The problem in optimising the laser cutting process is outlined. Basic optimisation criteria and principles for adapting an optimisation method, the simplex method, are presented. The results of implementing a response function in the optimisation are discussed with respect to the quality as well...

  20. Turbulence optimisation in stellarator experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proll, Josefine H.E. [Max-Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Faber, Benjamin J. [HSX Plasma Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Helander, Per; Xanthopoulos, Pavlos [Max-Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics (Germany); Lazerson, Samuel A.; Mynick, Harry E. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451 Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Stellarators, the twisted siblings of the axisymmetric fusion experiments called tokamaks, have historically suffered from confining the heat of the plasma insufficiently compared with tokamaks and were therefore considered to be less promising candidates for a fusion reactor. This has changed, however, with the advent of stellarators in which the laminar transport is reduced to levels below that of tokamaks by shaping the magnetic field accordingly. As in tokamaks, the turbulent transport remains as the now dominant transport channel. Recent analytical theory suggests that the large configuration space of stellarators allows for an additional optimisation of the magnetic field to also reduce the turbulent transport. In this talk, the idea behind the turbulence optimisation is explained. We also present how an optimised equilibrium is obtained and how it might differ from the equilibrium field of an already existing device, and we compare experimental turbulence measurements in different configurations of the HSX stellarator in order to test the optimisation procedure.

  1. Optimisation of load control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, P.

    1998-01-01

    Electricity cannot be stored in large quantities. That is why the electricity supply and consumption are always almost equal in large power supply systems. If this balance were disturbed beyond stability, the system or a part of it would collapse until a new stable equilibrium is reached. The balance between supply and consumption is mainly maintained by controlling the power production, but also the electricity consumption or, in other words, the load is controlled. Controlling the load of the power supply system is important, if easily controllable power production capacity is limited. Temporary shortage of capacity causes high peaks in the energy price in the electricity market. Load control either reduces the electricity consumption during peak consumption and peak price or moves electricity consumption to some other time. The project Optimisation of Load Control is a part of the EDISON research program for distribution automation. The following areas were studied: Optimization of space heating and ventilation, when electricity price is time variable, load control model in power purchase optimization, optimization of direct load control sequences, interaction between load control optimization and power purchase optimization, literature on load control, optimization methods and field tests and response models of direct load control and the effects of the electricity market deregulation on load control. An overview of the main results is given in this chapter

  2. Optimisation of load control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koponen, P [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-08-01

    Electricity cannot be stored in large quantities. That is why the electricity supply and consumption are always almost equal in large power supply systems. If this balance were disturbed beyond stability, the system or a part of it would collapse until a new stable equilibrium is reached. The balance between supply and consumption is mainly maintained by controlling the power production, but also the electricity consumption or, in other words, the load is controlled. Controlling the load of the power supply system is important, if easily controllable power production capacity is limited. Temporary shortage of capacity causes high peaks in the energy price in the electricity market. Load control either reduces the electricity consumption during peak consumption and peak price or moves electricity consumption to some other time. The project Optimisation of Load Control is a part of the EDISON research program for distribution automation. The following areas were studied: Optimization of space heating and ventilation, when electricity price is time variable, load control model in power purchase optimization, optimization of direct load control sequences, interaction between load control optimization and power purchase optimization, literature on load control, optimization methods and field tests and response models of direct load control and the effects of the electricity market deregulation on load control. An overview of the main results is given in this chapter

  3. SPS batch spacing optimisation

    CERN Document Server

    Velotti, F M; Carlier, E; Goddard, B; Kain, V; Kotzian, G

    2017-01-01

    Until 2015, the LHC filling schemes used the batch spac-ing as specified in the LHC design report. The maximumnumber of bunches injectable in the LHC directly dependson the batch spacing at injection in the SPS and hence onthe MKP rise time.As part of the LHC Injectors Upgrade project for LHCheavy ions, a reduction of the batch spacing is needed. In thisdirection, studies to approach the MKP design rise time of150ns(2-98%) have been carried out. These measurementsgave clear indications that such optimisation, and beyond,could be done also for higher injection momentum beams,where the additional slower MKP (MKP-L) is needed.After the successful results from 2015 SPS batch spacingoptimisation for the Pb-Pb run [1], the same concept wasthought to be used also for proton beams. In fact, thanksto the SPS transverse feed back, it was already observedthat lower batch spacing than the design one (225ns) couldbe achieved. For the 2016 p-Pb run, a batch spacing of200nsfor the proton beam with100nsbunch spacing wasreque...

  4. Optimisation of the radiological protection of the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, M.J.; Fleishman, A.B.; Webb, G.A.M.

    1981-07-01

    The report contains recommendations in a number of areas, including the costs to be assigned to collective doses and the treatment of doses which arise in the future. Some practical guidance is given in implementing the formal advice. (author)

  5. Can we speak of optimisation in the medical and non-electronuclear industrial fields in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaure, C.; Abadia, G.; Aubert, B.

    1995-01-01

    In France, in 1993, more than 10 000 workers, i.e. nearly a quarter of the workers significantly exposed, were working in the medical, research and non-nuclear industrial fields. The annual average dose per significantly exposed worker was 2 mSv for veterinary surgeons, 3 mSv for the medical sector, 5.5 mSv for the non-nuclear industry. In the industrial sector, more than 8% of the exposed workers received an annual dose higher than 15 mSv. Such exposures are neither negligible nor really lower than those of the nuclear industry where the optimisation of radiological protection is currently implemented. So far, no publication has mentioned experience in the other sectors. Optimisation surveys in reference centres, for x-ray examinations or specific industrial practices, especially for the new practices such as interventional radiology, would make it possible to supply other enterprises or radiological services with information on what an optimised practice might be, under reference conditions, as far as radiological protection is concerned. The true difficulties in the implementation of optimisation in the industrial and medical sectors are not those which are commonly put forward (low levels of exposure, lack of resources, complexity...) but rather a lack of relevant data and above all a lack of culture on the residual risk. (authors). 19 refs., 5 tabs., 2 annexes

  6. Handbook of radiologic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedgcock, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book is organized around radiologic procedures with each discussed from the points of view of: indications, contraindications, materials, method of procedures and complications. Covered in this book are: emergency radiology chest radiology, bone radiology, gastrointestinal radiology, GU radiology, pediatric radiology, computerized tomography, neuroradiology, visceral and peripheral angiography, cardiovascular radiology, nuclear medicine, lymphangiography, and mammography

  7. Optimisation in X-ray and Molecular Imaging 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baath, Magnus; Hoeschen, Christoph; Mattsson, Soeren; Mansson, Lars Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    This issue of Radiation Protection Dosimetry is based on contributions to Optimisation in X-ray and Molecular Imaging 2015 - the 4. Malmoe Conference on Medical Imaging (OXMI 2015). The conference was jointly organised by members of former and current research projects supported by the European Commission EURATOM Radiation Protection Research Programme, in cooperation with the Swedish Society for Radiation Physics. The conference brought together over 150 researchers and other professionals from hospitals, universities and industries with interests in different aspects of the optimisation of medical imaging. More than 100 presentations were given at this international gathering of medical physicists, radiologists, engineers, technicians, nurses and educational researchers. Additionally, invited talks were offered by world-renowned experts on radiation protection, spectral imaging and medical image perception, thus covering several important aspects of the generation and interpretation of medical images. The conference consisted of 13 oral sessions and a poster session, as reflected by the conference title connected by their focus on the optimisation of the use ionising radiation in medical imaging. The conference included technology-specific topics such as computed tomography and tomosynthesis, but also generic issues of interest for the optimisation of all medical imaging, such as image perception and quality assurance. Radiation protection was covered by e.g. sessions on patient dose benchmarking and occupational exposure. Technically-advanced topics such as modelling, Monte Carlo simulation, reconstruction, classification, and segmentation were seen taking advantage of recent developments of hardware and software, showing that the optimisation community is at the forefront of technology and adapts well to new requirements. These peer-reviewed proceedings, representing a continuation of a series of selected reports from meetings in the field of medical imaging

  8. Vaccine strategies: Optimising outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardt, Karin; Bonanni, Paolo; King, Susan; Santos, Jose Ignacio; El-Hodhod, Mostafa; Zimet, Gregory D; Preiss, Scott

    2016-12-20

    factors that encourage success, which often include strong support from government and healthcare organisations, as well as tailored, culturally-appropriate local approaches to optimise outcomes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiological optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeevaert, T.

    1998-01-01

    Radiological optimization is one of the basic principles in each radiation-protection system and it is a basic requirement in the safety standards for radiation protection in the European Communities. The objectives of the research, performed in this field at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN, are: (1) to implement the ALARA principles in activities with radiological consequences; (2) to develop methodologies for optimization techniques in decision-aiding; (3) to optimize radiological assessment models by validation and intercomparison; (4) to improve methods to assess in real time the radiological hazards in the environment in case of an accident; (5) to develop methods and programmes to assist decision-makers during a nuclear emergency; (6) to support the policy of radioactive waste management authorities in the field of radiation protection; (7) to investigate existing software programmes in the domain of multi criteria analysis. The main achievements for 1997 are given

  10. MEMO radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner-Manslau, C.

    1989-01-01

    This radiology volume is a concise handbook of imaging techniques, nuclear medicine, and radiation therapy, albeit that the main emphasis is on classic radiology. It offers, for instance, a survey of radiological findings for the most frequent pathological conditions, many overviews of differential diagnosis, a glossary of the technical bases of radiology and so forth. The contents are divided into the following chapters: Physical and biological bases; skeleton; thorax with the subdivisions lungs, heart, mediastinum, and pleura; gastrointestinal tract with the subsections esophagus, small and large intestine; liver; biliary tract; pancreas; retroperitoneal space; kidney; suprarenal glands; bladder; blood vessels, lymph nodes, spleen; mammary glands; female genitals; prostate and scrotum, epididymis and seminal vesicle. (orig./MG) With 23 figs [de

  11. Radiological hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.

    1984-01-01

    The work of the (United Kingdom) National Radiological Protection Board is discussed. The following topics are mentioned: relative contributions to genetically significant doses of radiation from various sources; radon gas in non-coal mines and in dwelling houses; effects of radiation accidents; radioactive waste disposal; radiological protection of the patient in medicine; microwaves, infrared radiation and cataracts; guidance notes for use with forthcoming Ionising Radiations Regulations; training courses; personal dosimetry service; work related to European Communities. (U.K.)

  12. Visual grading characteristics and ordinal regression analysis during optimisation of CT head examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarb, Francis; McEntee, Mark F; Rainford, Louise

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate visual grading characteristics (VGC) and ordinal regression analysis during head CT optimisation as a potential alternative to visual grading assessment (VGA), traditionally employed to score anatomical visualisation. Patient images (n = 66) were obtained using current and optimised imaging protocols from two CT suites: a 16-slice scanner at the national Maltese centre for trauma and a 64-slice scanner in a private centre. Local resident radiologists (n = 6) performed VGA followed by VGC and ordinal regression analysis. VGC alone indicated that optimised protocols had similar image quality as current protocols. Ordinal logistic regression analysis provided an in-depth evaluation, criterion by criterion allowing the selective implementation of the protocols. The local radiology review panel supported the implementation of optimised protocols for brain CT examinations (including trauma) in one centre, achieving radiation dose reductions ranging from 24 % to 36 %. In the second centre a 29 % reduction in radiation dose was achieved for follow-up cases. The combined use of VGC and ordinal logistic regression analysis led to clinical decisions being taken on the implementation of the optimised protocols. This improved method of image quality analysis provided the evidence to support imaging protocol optimisation, resulting in significant radiation dose savings. • There is need for scientifically based image quality evaluation during CT optimisation. • VGC and ordinal regression analysis in combination led to better informed clinical decisions. • VGC and ordinal regression analysis led to dose reductions without compromising diagnostic efficacy.

  13. Radiation exams in occupational medical evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelsleichter, A.M.; Hunh, A.; Nandi, D.M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In occupational medicine, medical care must be geared toward the prevention of worker health. However, occupational medical exams often seek only through rigorous screening, reduce absenteeism, and thus increase productivity. To meet this goal, many institutions include radiological examinations indiscriminately in their medical and expert evaluations, contrary to the principle of justification. Objective: To provide a reflection about the presence of radiological exams in occupational medical evaluations. Methodology: Literary review including legislation related to the research topic. Results: Portaria 453/98 ANVISA prohibits the performance of radiological examinations for employment or expert purposes, except in cases where the exam may bring a benefit to the health of the individual examined or to society. However, in some situations the Norma Regulamentadora number 7 of the Ministry of Labor and Employment provides for radiological exams as a parameter for monitoring occupational exposure. Article 168 of the Consolidation of Labor Laws also prescribes that additional examinations may be required, at the medical discretion, to determine the physical and mental fitness of the employee for the job. Conclusion: Although there are legal provisions that prohibit and others that allow radiological exams in medical occupational evaluations, companies and institutions should take into account that any radiological exam has a risk involved and should not request them in a compulsory and indiscriminate manner. Radiological exams are only permissible to elucidate the diagnostic hypothesis produced by clinical evaluation, in order to provide a real benefit for the individual

  14. ICRP PUBLICATION 121: Radiological Protection in Paediatric Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khong, P-L.; Ringertz, H.; Donoghue, V.; Frush, D.; Rehani, M.; Appelgate, K.; Sanchez, R.

    2013-01-01

    Paediatric patients have a higher average risk of developing cancer compared with adults receiving the same dose. The longer life expectancy in children allows more time for any harmful effects of radiation to manifest, and developing organs and tissues are more sensitive to the effects of radiation. This publication aims to provide guiding principles of radiological protection for referring clinicians and clinical staff performing diagnostic imaging and interventional procedures for paediatric patients. It begins with a brief description of the basic concepts of radiological protection, followed by the general aspects of radiological protection, including principles of justification and optimisation. Guidelines and suggestions for radiological protection in specific modalities – radiography and fluoroscopy, interventional radiology, and computed tomography – are subsequently covered in depth. The report concludes with a summary and recommendations. The importance of rigorous justification of radiological procedures is emphasised for every procedure involving ionising radiation, and the use of imaging modalities that are non-ionising should always be considered. The basic aim of optimisation of radiological protection is to adjust imaging parameters and institute protective measures such that the required image is obtained with the lowest possible dose of radiation, and that net benefit is maximised to maintain sufficient quality for diagnostic interpretation. Special consideration should be given to the availability of dose reduction measures when purchasing new imaging equipment for paediatric use. One of the unique aspects of paediatric imaging is with regards to the wide range in patient size (and weight), therefore requiring special attention to optimisation and modification of equipment, technique, and imaging parameters. Examples of good radiographic and fluoroscopic technique include attention to patient positioning, field size and adequate collimation

  15. Annual report on occupational safety 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report presents detailed information on occupational safety relating to the Company's employees for 1987. Data are quoted in tables and text, together with data from the previous year for comparison where available. The report is presented under the following headings: radiological and non-radiological safety, incidents, appendices (statutory dose limits, nuclear incident criteria for reporting to ministers). (author)

  16. Multi-Optimisation Consensus Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Swift, Stephen; Liu, Xiaohui

    Ensemble Clustering has been developed to provide an alternative way of obtaining more stable and accurate clustering results. It aims to avoid the biases of individual clustering algorithms. However, it is still a challenge to develop an efficient and robust method for Ensemble Clustering. Based on an existing ensemble clustering method, Consensus Clustering (CC), this paper introduces an advanced Consensus Clustering algorithm called Multi-Optimisation Consensus Clustering (MOCC), which utilises an optimised Agreement Separation criterion and a Multi-Optimisation framework to improve the performance of CC. Fifteen different data sets are used for evaluating the performance of MOCC. The results reveal that MOCC can generate more accurate clustering results than the original CC algorithm.

  17. Radiological protection in industrial gamma scintigraphy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Suarez, S.

    2002-01-01

    Operational experience has shown that the mobile scintigraphy sector is not only that where individual doses are highest but also where there are the greatest number of high doses, overdoses and incidents. This fact highlights the need for improvement in the optimisation of radiological protection in the sector. In this context the CSN has adopted and implemented an action plan aimed at reducing doses to operation staff. (Author)

  18. Interpretation of optimisation in the context of a disposal facility for long-lived radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Guidance on the Requirements for Authorisation (the GRA) issued by the Environment Agency for England and Wales requires that all disposals of radioactive waste are undertaken in a manner consistent with four principles for the protection of the public. Among these is a principle of Optimisation, that: 'The radiological detriment to members of the public that may result from the disposal of radioactive waste shall be as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account'. The principle of optimisation is widely accepted and has been discussed in both UK national policy and guidance and in documents from international organisations. The practical interpretation of optimisation in the context of post-closure safety of radioactive waste repositories is, however, still open to question. In particular, the strategies and procedures that a developer might employ to implement optimisation in the siting and development of a repository, and demonstrate optimisation in a safety case, are not defined. In preparation for its role of regulatory review, the Agency has undertaken a pilot study to explore the possible interpretations of optimisation stemming from the GRA, and to identify possible strategies and procedures that a developer might follow. A review has been undertaken of UK regulatory guidance and related documents, and also international guidance, referring to optimisation in relation to radioactive waste disposal facilities. In addition, diverse examples of the application of optimisation have been identified in the international and UK performance assessment literature. A one-day meeting was organised bringing together Agency staff and technical experts with different experiences and perspectives on the subject of optimisation in the context of disposal facilities for radioactive waste. This meeting identified and discussed key issues and possible approaches to optimisation, and specifically: (1) The meaning of

  19. Evaluation of the non-radiological environmental problems relating to the WIPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baca, T.E.

    1983-02-01

    The major non-radiological environmental problems addressed are: air pollution, water pollution and sanitary waste, solid waste, domestic drinking water, occupational health and safety and toxic chemicals

  20. Isogeometric Analysis and Shape Optimisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Jens; Evgrafov, Anton; Gersborg, Allan Roulund

    of the whole domain. So in every optimisation cycle we need to extend a parametrisation of the boundary of a domain to the whole domain. It has to be fast in order not to slow the optimisation down but it also has to be robust and give a parametrisation of high quality. These are conflicting requirements so we...... will explain how the validity of a parametrisation can be checked and we will describe various ways to parametrise a domain. We will in particular study the Winslow functional which turns out to have some desirable properties. Other problems we touch upon is clustering of boundary control points (design...

  1. Radionuclide radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.; Bradley, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    This is the fourth in a series of short reviews of internet-based radiological educational resources, and will focus on radionuclide radiology and nuclear medicine. What follows is a list of carefully selected websites to save time in searching them out. Most of the sites cater for trainee or non-specialist radiologists, but may also be of interest to specialists for use in teaching. This article may be particularly useful to radiologists interested in the rapidly expanding field of positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT). Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (February 2006)

  2. Emergency radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keats, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book is the German, translated version of the original published in 1984 in the U.S.A., entitled 'Emergency Radiology'. The publication for the most part is made up as an atlas of the radiological images presenting the findings required for assessment of the emergency cases and their first treatment. The test parts' function is to explain the images and give the necessary information. The material is arranged in seven sections dealing with the skull, the facial part of the skull, the spine, thorax, abdominal region, the pelvis and the hip, and the limbs. With 690 figs [de

  3. Postoperative radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burhenne, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the importance of postoperative radiology. Most surgical procedures on the alimentary tract are successful, but postoperative complications remain a common occurrence. The radiologist must be familiar with a large variety of possible surgical complications, because it is this specialty that is most commonly called on to render a definitive diagnosis. The decision for reoperation, for instance, is usually based on results from radiologic imaging techniques. These now include ultrasonography, CT scanning, needle biopsy, and interventional techniques in addition to contrast studies and nuclear medicine investigation

  4. Cogeneration technologies, optimisation and implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Frangopoulos, Christos A

    2017-01-01

    Cogeneration refers to the use of a power station to deliver two or more useful forms of energy, for example, to generate electricity and heat at the same time. This book provides an integrated treatment of cogeneration, including a tour of the available technologies and their features, and how these systems can be analysed and optimised.

  5. For Time-Continuous Optimisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinrich, Mary Katherine; Ayres, Phil

    2016-01-01

    Strategies for optimisation in design normatively assume an artefact end-point, disallowing continuous architecture that engages living systems, dynamic behaviour, and complex systems. In our Flora Robotica investigations of symbiotic plant-robot bio-hybrids, we re- quire computational tools...

  6. A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR MANAGING RADIATION DOSE TO PATIENTS IN DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY USING REFERENCE DOSE LEVELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almén, Anja; Båth, Magnus

    2016-06-01

    The overall aim of the present work was to develop a conceptual framework for managing radiation dose in diagnostic radiology with the intention to support optimisation. An optimisation process was first derived. The framework for managing radiation dose, based on the derived optimisation process, was then outlined. The outset of the optimisation process is four stages: providing equipment, establishing methodology, performing examinations and ensuring quality. The optimisation process comprises a series of activities and actions at these stages. The current system of diagnostic reference levels is an activity in the last stage, ensuring quality. The system becomes a reactive activity only to a certain extent engaging the core activity in the radiology department, performing examinations. Three reference dose levels-possible, expected and established-were assigned to the three stages in the optimisation process, excluding ensuring quality. A reasonably achievable dose range is also derived, indicating an acceptable deviation from the established dose level. A reasonable radiation dose for a single patient is within this range. The suggested framework for managing radiation dose should be regarded as one part of the optimisation process. The optimisation process constitutes a variety of complementary activities, where managing radiation dose is only one part. This emphasises the need to take a holistic approach integrating the optimisation process in different clinical activities. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. A conceptual framework for managing radiation dose to patients in diagnostic radiology using reference dose levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almen, Anja; Baath, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    The overall aim of the present work was to develop a conceptual framework for managing radiation dose in diagnostic radiology with the intention to support optimisation. An optimisation process was first derived. The framework for managing radiation dose, based on the derived optimisation process, was then outlined. The outset of the optimisation process is four stages: providing equipment, establishing methodology, performing examinations and ensuring quality. The optimisation process comprises a series of activities and actions at these stages. The current system of diagnostic reference levels is an activity in the last stage, ensuring quality. The system becomes a reactive activity only to a certain extent engaging the core activity in the radiology department, performing examinations. Three reference dose levels-possible, expected and established-were assigned to the three stages in the optimisation process, excluding ensuring quality. A reasonably achievable dose range is also derived, indicating an acceptable deviation from the established dose level. A reasonable radiation dose for a single patient is within this range. The suggested framework for managing radiation dose should be regarded as one part of the optimisation process. The optimisation process constitutes a variety of complementary activities, where managing radiation dose is only one part. This emphasises the need to take a holistic approach integrating the optimisation process in different clinical activities. (authors)

  8. Research and development in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butragueno, J. L.; Villota, C.; Gutierrez, C.; Rodriguez, A.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of Radiological Protection is to guarantee that neither people, be they workers or members of the public, or the environment are exposed to radiological risks considered by society to be unacceptable. Among the various resources available to meet this objective is Research and Development (R and D), which is carried out in three areas: I. Radiological protection of persons: (a) knowledge of the biological effects of radiations, in order to determine the relationship that exists between radiation exposure dose and its effects on health; (b) the development of new personal dosimetry techniques in order to adapt to new situations, instrumental techniques and information management technologies allowing for better assessment of exposure dose; and (c) development of the principle of radiological protection optimisation (ALARA), which has been set up internationally as the fundamental principle on which radiological protection interventions are based. II. Assessment of environmental radiological impact, the objective of which is to assess the nature and magnitude of situations of exposure to ionising radiations as a result of the controlled or uncontrolled release of radioactive material to the environment, and III.Reduction of the radiological impact of radioactive wastes, the objective of which is to develop radioactive material and waste management techniques suitable for each situation, in order to reduce the risks associated with their definitive management or their release to the environment. Briefly described below are the strategic lines of R and D of the CSN, the Electricity Industry, Ciemat and Enresa in the aforementioned areas. (Author)

  9. The new ICRP recommendations' project: A broader approach of the optimisation of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.

    2005-01-01

    In the framework of the preparation of its new recommendations ICRP has developed a new text on the optimisation of radiological protection. This text prolongs the previous publications on the principle (Publications 37 and 45) reminding the need to adopt a pragmatic approach combining quantitative techniques when they are relevant as well as know-how and past experience which are often sufficient to ensure good protection. Moreover, it aims at adapting the optimisation process to the recent evolutions of risk management with the increasing role of stakeholder involvement in the decision framing. (author)

  10. Radiological protection in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padovani, R.

    2001-01-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) reduces the need for many traditional interventions, particularly surgery, so reducing the discomfort and risk for patients compared with traditional systems. IR procedures are frequently performed by non-radiologist physicians, often without the proper radiological equipment and sufficient knowledge of radiation protection. Levels of doses to patients and staff in IR vary enormously. A poor correlation exists between patient and staff dose, and large variations of dose are reported for the same procedure. The occurrence of deterministic effects in patients is another peculiar aspect of IR owing to the potentially high skin doses of some procedures. The paper reviews the use of IR and the radiological protection of patients and staff, and examines the need for new standards for IR equipment and the training of personnel. (author)

  11. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz-Bohm, G.

    1997-01-01

    Pediatric radiology is an important subsection of diagnostic radiology involving specific difficulties, but unfortunately is quite too often neglected as a subject of further education and training. The book therefore is not intended for specialists in the field, but for radiologists wishing to plunge deeper into the matter of pediatric radiology and to acquire a sound, basic knowledge and information about well-proven modalities, the resulting diagnostic images, and interpretation of results. The book is a compact guide and a helpful source of reference and information required for every-day work, or in special cases. With patients who are babies or children, the challenges are different. The book offers all the information needed, including important experience from pediatric hospital units that may be helpful in diagnostic evaluation, information about specific dissimilarities in anatomy and physiology which affect the imaging results, hints for radiology planning and performance, as well as information about the various techniques and their indication and achievements. The book presents a wide spectrum of informative and annotated images. (orig./CB) [de

  12. Radiologic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judge, L.O.

    1987-01-01

    An increasing variety of imaging modalities as well as refinements of interventional techniques have led to a resurgence of radiologic interest and participation in urolithiasis management. Judicious selection of the diagnostic examination, close monitoring during the procedure, consultation with urologic colleagues, and a careful regard for radiation safety guidelines define the role of the radiologist in renal stone disease

  13. Protecting people against radiation exposure in the event of a radiological attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentin, J.

    2005-01-01

    after exposure has occurred. Responders involved in recovery, remediation and eventual restoration should be subject to the usual international standards for occupational radiological protection, which are based on ICRP recommendations, including the relevant requirements for occupational dose limitation established in such standards. These restrictions may be relaxed for informed volunteers undertaking urgent rescue operations, and they are not applicable for voluntary life-saving actions. However, specific protection measures are recommended for female workers who may be pregnant or nursing an infant. The immediate countermeasures to protect the public in the rescue phase are primarily caring for people with traumatic injuries and controlling access. Subsequent actions include respiratory protection, personal decontamination, sheltering, iodine prophylaxis (if radioiodines are involved), and temporary evacuation. In the recovery phase, the relocation and resettlement of people may be needed in extreme cases. This phase may require remedial action, including cleanup, management of the resulting radioactive waste, management of any human remains containing significant amounts of radioactive substances, and dealing with remaining radioactive residues. The guidance given in relation to public protection is based solely on radiological protection considerations and should be seen as a decision-aiding tool to prepare for the aftermath of a radiological attack. It is expected to serve as input to a final decision-making process that may include other societal concerns, consideration of lessons learned in the past (especially these involving the public perception of the risks posed by radioactive contamination) and the participation of interested parties. A radiological attack could also be the cause of radioactive contamination of water, food, and other widely consumed commodities. This possible outcome is considered unlikely to lead to significant internal contamination of

  14. Occupational cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alderson, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book aims to review the occurrence and causes of occupational cancer and is aimed at assisting medical and safety staff, management and health and safety representatives. It is presented in the following chapters: 1) Epidemiological method 2) Agents causing occupationally induced cancer, including radiation 3) Occupations associated with risk of cancer 4) Aetiology of cancer 5) Control of occupationally induced cancer, research, prevention, legislation, national and international bodies, control of specific occupational carcinogens, including irradiation. (U.K.)

  15. Characterization of workplaces in interventional radiology using active dosemeters ALARA OD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prlic, I.; Milkovic-Kraus, S.; Mestrovic, T.; Suric-Mihic, M.; Vrtar, M.

    2005-01-01

    receiving the dose. It means that any, even 'very low' dose and corresponding dose rate will be recorded. The dose rate data where used to define radiation control area around the interventional x-ray equipment and PC data readout from devices forms a real time exposure dose rate pattern which is to be added to personal occupational dosimetric data and medical data records of medical staff because the health surveillance for the medical staff performing intervention, is justified. The dose measurement optimisation showed that the workers performing radiological intervention are directly exposed to occupationally, mostly 'very low' but 'not negligible' exposures. Exposures are small (in order of μSv ) but the dose rate can be significantly frequent and sometimes high. The frequency of receiving very low doses while performing interventional radiology will give us data necessary to upgrade the radiation protection of such working places (and to discuss the linear no threshold model). Additionally the active dosemeter will be promoted for occupational use in any similar working environment. (author)

  16. Radiological protection report 2016; Strahlenschutzbericht 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-06-15

    In the radiological protection report 2016, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) provides an overview of the radiological protection in its area of supervision. Part A of the report deals with protecting the staff of nuclear power plants from the dangers of ionising radiation. It also includes a list of the personal doses accumulated by the staff, broken down using various parameters. Applying the optimisation imperative, it has been proved possible to significantly reduce the annual collective doses in Switzerland's nuclear power plants since they came on stream thanks to major efforts by the operators. In 2016, a total of 6,153 people measured accumulated 2,877 person-mSv. The collective doses have reached a low level corresponding to the radiological condition of the plants and the scope of the work required to be performed in controlled zones (e.g. non-destructive materials testing). ENSI will continue to follow the trend for collective doses and assess the reasons for local variances as well as for measures initiated. The individual doses for people employed in ENSI's area of supervision in 2016 showed a maximum figure of 10 mSv and a mean value of 0.5 mSv which was significantly below the dose limit of 20 mSv for occupational radiation exposure. The discharge of radioactive substances with the exhaust air and waste water from nuclear power plants are dealt with in Part B of the report. In 2016, nuclear power plant operators again met the admissible release limits set by the authorities, in some cases by a considerable margin. The emissions of Swiss nuclear power plants led to a dose of less than 0.01 mSv per year in the direct neighbourhood. A comparison with the average annual radiation dose for the Swiss population of 5.5 mSv shows that the relevant contribution from nuclear power plants lies in the area of one percent of this figure. Effluents from Swiss nuclear power plants were also below the target of 1 GBq per year set by ENSI

  17. Aplastic anemia in Japanese radiological technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitabatake, T.; Watanabe, T.; Saito, A.; Nakamura, M.; Shiohama Hospital, Mie

    1976-01-01

    Among the Japanese radiological technicians, four deaths from aplastic anemia have been reported after 1930. On the other hand, during the period from 1930 to 1960, the population of radiological technicians is estimated to be 74,400 man-years, in which 0.5 aplastic anemias are expected. However, actually three died from aplastic anemia. This difference is statistically significant at the 1% level. While, in the period from 1961 to 1973, the observed value is 1 against 0.7 expected. It is concluded that aplastic anemia had been induced frequently among the Japanese radiological technicians in the era when there was much exposure to occupational radiation. (orig.) [de

  18. Aspects of radiological protection in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J.G.; Oliveira Filho, D.S.; Rabello, P.N.P.

    1987-01-01

    Due to the short term, long term and genetic effects of radiation, the work with radioactive materials requires special protection measures. The objective of radiological protection is to assure the occupational health of the workers by maintaining the dose levels as low as reasonably achievable. The radiological protection measures implanted in the NUCLEBRAS fuel element factory are described. The philosophy and practical measures taken are explained, and a comparison between radiation protection and industrial safety norms is made. The result of this work shows that the radiological safety of the element factory is assured. (author) [pt

  19. Comparison of the distribution of non-radiological and radiological fatal risk in Ontario industries (addendum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, C.K.; Forbes, W.F.; Hayward, L.M.

    1986-09-01

    Occupational limits for exposure to ionizing radiation, in force in Canada, are based on recommendations of international bodies, particularly the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). To determine whether the ICRP assertions concerning the similarity of the distributions of occupational risk at the higher risk levels (from non-radiation and from radiation work) to Canada a study of the high end of the distributions of non-radiological risk of occupational fatalities in the province of Ontario was performed. For the present study total doses from exposure to sources of ionizing radiation for Ontario workers were converted to relative risk rates to allow direct comparison with the non-radiological results. In addition, absolute values for the radiological risk rates (RRR) were derived. The radiological risk estimates are based on workers who work both from nuclear reactions and from X-rays. The conclusion is made that the radiological and non-radiological risk rate (NRRR) distributions are similar in shape, but the RRR are approximately 1 to 27 percent of the NRRR, depending on the industry concerned

  20. DOE standard: Radiological control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

  1. DOE standard: Radiological control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ''Occupational Radiation Protection''. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835

  2. Chest radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference in plain chest film diagnosis provides a thorough background in the differential diagnosis of 22 of the most common radiologic patterns of chest disease. Each chapter is introduced with problem cases and a set of questions, followed by a tabular listing of the appropriate differential considerations. The book emphasizes plain films, CT and some MR scans are integrated to demonstrate how these modalities enhance the work of a case

  3. Optimising Comprehensibility in Interlingual Translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nisbeth Jensen, Matilde

    2015-01-01

    The increasing demand for citizen engagement in areas traditionally belonging exclusively to experts, such as health, law and technology has given rise to the necessity of making expert knowledge available to the general public through genres such as instruction manuals for consumer goods, patien...... the functional text type of Patient Information Leaflet. Finally, the usefulness of applying the principles of Plain Language and intralingual translation for optimising comprehensibility in interlingual translation is discussed....

  4. TEM turbulence optimisation in stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proll, J. H. E.; Mynick, H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Lazerson, S. A.; Faber, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of neoclassically optimised stellarators, optimising stellarators for turbulent transport is an important next step. The reduction of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence has been achieved via shaping of the magnetic field, and the reduction of trapped-electron mode (TEM) turbulence is addressed in the present paper. Recent analytical and numerical findings suggest TEMs are stabilised when a large fraction of trapped particles experiences favourable bounce-averaged curvature. This is the case for example in Wendelstein 7-X (Beidler et al 1990 Fusion Technol. 17 148) and other Helias-type stellarators. Using this knowledge, a proxy function was designed to estimate the TEM dynamics, allowing optimal configurations for TEM stability to be determined with the STELLOPT (Spong et al 2001 Nucl. Fusion 41 711) code without extensive turbulence simulations. A first proof-of-principle optimised equilibrium stemming from the TEM-dominated stellarator experiment HSX (Anderson et al 1995 Fusion Technol. 27 273) is presented for which a reduction of the linear growth rates is achieved over a broad range of the operational parameter space. As an important consequence of this property, the turbulent heat flux levels are reduced compared with the initial configuration.

  5. Transposition of the 97/43 EURATOM directive. Mission on procedures and standard levels of medical examinations using ionizing radiations. The radiological procedures: quality criteria and doses optimization; Transposition de la directive 97/43 Euratom. Mission sur les procedures et les niveaux de reference des examens medicaux utilisant les rayonnements ionisants. Les procedures radiologiques: criteres de qualite et optimisation des doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this report concerns the optimization of radiological practices, to avoid delivering unuseful doses while ensuring an image quality necessary to the obtaining of the desired diagnosis information. (N.C.)

  6. Quality Control in Diagnostic Radiology in the Netherlands (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoetelief, J.

    1998-01-01

    Application of the general principles of radiation protection to medical diagnostic radiology implies that each procedure using X rays or radionuclides is to be justified and optimised. Optimisation in diagnostic radiology implies that the radiation burden to the patient should be as low as possible, but compatible with the image quality necessary to obtain an adequate diagnosis or to guide treatment. Quality control of equipment is a prerequisite for achieving optimisation in diagnostic radiology. This was especially recognised for mammography as employed for breast cancer screening. Existing legislation in the Netherlands includes only a few criteria for equipment used in diagnostic radiology. In addition, the criteria are not all operational and measurement methods are lacking. Therefore, upon the initiative of the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sports, the relevant professional societies, in collaboration with the former TNO Centre for Radiological Protection and Dosimetry, formulated eleven guidelines for quality control of equipment used in diagnostic radiology, including test procedures, test frequencies and limiting values. The implementation of quality control of equipment was included in the 1984 European Directive (84/466/Euratom) laying down basic measures for the radiation protection of persons undergoing medical examination or treatment. In the most recent European Directive on medical exposure (97/43/Euratom) the importance of quality control is stressed. In addition, the latter EC directive proposes the use of diagnostic reference levels for limiting the risks for patients undergoing diagnostic radiology. In the Netherlands preliminary reference levels for various procedures employed in diagnostic radiology are suggested. Finally, methods applied in the Netherlands for assessment of image quality are discussed. (author)

  7. Radiological error: analysis, standard setting, targeted instruction and teamworking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzGerald, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology does not have objective benchmarks for acceptable levels of missed diagnoses [1]. Until now, data collection of radiological discrepancies has been very time consuming. The culture within the specialty did not encourage it. However, public concern about patient safety is increasing. There have been recent innovations in compiling radiological interpretive discrepancy rates which may facilitate radiological standard setting. However standard setting alone will not optimise radiologists' performance or patient safety. We must use these new techniques in radiological discrepancy detection to stimulate greater knowledge sharing, targeted instruction and teamworking among radiologists. Not all radiological discrepancies are errors. Radiological discrepancy programmes must not be abused as an instrument for discrediting individual radiologists. Discrepancy rates must not be distorted as a weapon in turf battles. Radiological errors may be due to many causes and are often multifactorial. A systems approach to radiological error is required. Meaningful analysis of radiological discrepancies and errors is challenging. Valid standard setting will take time. Meanwhile, we need to develop top-up training, mentoring and rehabilitation programmes. (orig.)

  8. Radiological design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, J.M.; Andersen, B.V.; Carter, L.A.; Waite, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    Many new nuclear facilities are unsatisfactory from a radiation protection point of view, particularly when striving to maintain occupational exposure as low as practicable 'ALAP'. Radiation protection is achieved through physical protective features supplemented by administrative controls. Adequate physical protective feature should be achieved during construction so that supplemental administrative controls may be kept simple and workable. Many nuclear facilities fall short of adequate physical protective features, thus, remedial and sometimes awkward administrative procedures are required to safely conduct work. In reviewing the various handbooks, reports and regulations which deal with radiation protection, it may be noted that there is minimal radiological design guidance for application to nuclear facilities. A set of criteria or codes covering functional areas rather than specific nuclear facility types is badly needed. The following are suggested as functional areas to be considered: characterization of the Facility; siting and access; design exposure limits; layout (people and materials flow); ventilation and effluent control; radiation protection facilities and systems. The application of such radiological design criteria early in the design process would provide some assurance that nuclear facilities will be safe, flexible, and efficient with a minimum of costly retrofitting or administrative restrictions. Criteria which we have found helpful in these functional areas is discussed together with justification for adoption of such criteria and identification of problems which still require solution

  9. Radiological diagnosis of pneumoconiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hering, K.G.; Wiebe, V.

    1990-01-01

    Radiology is extremely important in the diagnosis of occupational lung disease. Owing to its general availability and international comparability, the roentgenographic pa view of the chest obtained by the high-voltage technique is still the basis of the radiologic examination. Supplementary investigations are necessary for medical reasons, however, as well as for documentation of experts' certification. Valuable diagnostic information is supplied by oblique views of the thorax and by conventional X-ray tomography, though not by scintigraphic examinations or - up to now - by digital luminescence radiography. Ultrasound helps in the differentiation of free pleural fluid, organized pleural effusion, and pleural malignancy. In addition, computed tomography (CT) can be guided by ultrasound. CT has emerged as the method of choice for examination and for support of medical expert's certification of pneumoconiotic pleural disease, and high-resolution CT (HRCT) is also increasing used for examination of pneumoconiotic lung foci as well. Diagnostic accurcay in pneumoconiosis is further improved by shorter CT scanning times in combination with HRCT. (orig.) [de

  10. Health surveillance of persons occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation: Guidance for occupational physicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This Safety Report is intended mainly for occupational physicians, as well as for occupational health service personnel, to assist them in routine practice by specifying the features of work under radiation conditions, the general rules of radiological protection for occupational exposure and the organization of the medical surveillance of workers occupationally exposed to radiation. The Report is consistent with the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection presented in its Publication 60 (1990) and with the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources published by the IAEA in 1966. It supersedes Safety Series No.83 (Radiation Protection in Occupational Health: Manual for Occupational Physicians) published by the IAEA in 1987

  11. Diagnostic radiology 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulis, A.R.; Gooding, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    This is the latest version of the continuing education course on diagnostic radiology given yearly by the Department of Radiology at the University of California, San Francisco. The lectures are grouped into sections on gastrointestinal radiology, mammography, uroradiology, magnetic resonance, hepatobiliary radiology, pediatric radiology, ultrasound, interventional radiology, chest radiology, nuclear medicine, cardiovascular radiology, and skeletal radiology. Each section contains four to eight topics. Each of these consists of text that represents highlights in narrative form, selected illustrations, and a short bibliography. The presentation gives a general idea of what points were made in the lecture

  12. Curriculum Guidelines for Predoctoral Oral Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1987

    1987-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for oral radiology curricula give an overview of the field and its interrelationships with other fields and outline the primary educational objectives, prerequisites, core content, specific behavioral objectives, sequencing, faculty, facilities, and occupational hazards to be considered in…

  13. Cardiothoracic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    A wealth of cardiothoracic websites exist on the internet. What follows is a list of the higher quality resources currently available which should save you time searching them out for yourself. Many of the sites listed cater for undergraduates and trainee or non-specialist radiologists, nevertheless these may also be of interest to specialists in thoracic radiology, particularly for use in teaching. Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (April 2005)

  14. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, F.N.

    1982-01-01

    A literature review with 186 references of diagnostic pediatric radiology, a speciality restricted to an age group rather than to an organ system or technique of examination, is presented. In the present chapter topics follow the basic organ system divisions with discussions of special techniques within these divisions. The diagnosis of congenital malformations, infectious diseases and neoplasms are a few of the topics discussed for the head and neck region, the vertebrae, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal tract, the urinary tract, and the skeleton

  15. Particle swarm optimisation classical and quantum perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Jun; Wu, Xiao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    IntroductionOptimisation Problems and Optimisation MethodsRandom Search TechniquesMetaheuristic MethodsSwarm IntelligenceParticle Swarm OptimisationOverviewMotivationsPSO Algorithm: Basic Concepts and the ProcedureParadigm: How to Use PSO to Solve Optimisation ProblemsSome Harder Examples Some Variants of Particle Swarm Optimisation Why Does the PSO Algorithm Need to Be Improved? Inertia and Constriction-Acceleration Techniques for PSOLocal Best ModelProbabilistic AlgorithmsOther Variants of PSO Quantum-Behaved Particle Swarm Optimisation OverviewMotivation: From Classical Dynamics to Quantum MechanicsQuantum Model: Fundamentals of QPSOQPSO AlgorithmSome Essential ApplicationsSome Variants of QPSOSummary Advanced Topics Behaviour Analysis of Individual ParticlesConvergence Analysis of the AlgorithmTime Complexity and Rate of ConvergenceParameter Selection and PerformanceSummaryIndustrial Applications Inverse Problems for Partial Differential EquationsInverse Problems for Non-Linear Dynamical SystemsOptimal De...

  16. Radiologic findings of anthracofibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Mi Jin; Ko, Eun Joo; Yoon, Sook Ja; Tien, Kuang Lung; Yoon, Yong Kyu; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Jin Hwan

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the CT findings of bronchial anthracofibrosis. Fourteen patients with bronchoscopically confirmed anthracofibrosis were involved in this study. CT findings (n=3D12) were retrospectively analysed; the pattern, distri-bution and extent of bronchial and parenchymal abnormalities and additional findings such as mediastinal lymphadenopathy and pleural effusion were assessed. Age, sex, and occupational and disease history were history were also reviewed. Patients were aged between 63 and 95 (mean, 71.3) years, and ten were female. Only one patient had an occupational history, but four had a history of pulmonary tuberculosis. Frequent radiologic findings were bronchial wall thickening(n=3D6), atelectasis(n=3D8), mediastinal lymphad-enopathy(n=3D7) and mass(n=3D4). Other accompanying findings were bronchial wall calcification(n=3D3), consolidation(n=3D2) and pleural effusion(n=3D2). Right upper (n=3D7) and right middle lobe(n=3D7) were the most commonly involved sites, and multifocal involvement (n=3D7) was frequent. Bronchial wall thickening, atelectasis and mediastinal lymphadenopathy were characteristic CT findings of anthracofibrosis. When such findings are noted in older or aged female patients, anthracofibrosis should be included in the differential diagnosis

  17. An Optimisation Approach for Room Acoustics Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Jørgensen, Kristian; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Andersen, Lars

    2005-01-01

    This paper discuss on a conceptual level the value of optimisation techniques in architectural acoustics room design from a practical point of view. It is chosen to optimise one objective room acoustics design criterium estimated from the sound field inside the room. The sound field is modeled...... using the boundary element method where absorption is incorporated. An example is given where the geometry of a room is defined by four design modes. The room geometry is optimised to get a uniform sound pressure....

  18. Occupational dose constraint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilbron Filho, Paulo Fernando Lavalle; Xavier, Ana Maria

    2005-01-01

    The revision process of the international radiological protection regulations has resulted in the adoption of new concepts, such as practice, intervention, avoidable and restriction of dose (dose constraint). The latter deserving of special mention since it may involve reducing a priori of the dose limits established both for the public and to individuals occupationally exposed, values that can be further reduced, depending on the application of the principle of optimization. This article aims to present, with clarity, from the criteria adopted to define dose constraint values to the public, a methodology to establish the dose constraint values for occupationally exposed individuals, as well as an example of the application of this methodology to the practice of industrial radiography

  19. Radiological protection and quality control for diagnostic radiology in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baorong, Yue

    2008-01-01

    Full text: There are 43,000 diagnostic departments, nearly 70,000 X-ray diagnostic facilities, 7,000 CT, 250 million for the annual total numbers of X-ray examinations, 120,000 occupationally exposed workers in diagnostic radiology. 'Basic standards for protection against ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources' is promulgated on October, 2002. This basic standard follows the BSS. 'Rule on the administration of radio-diagnosis and radiotherapy', as a order of the Ministry of Health No. 46, is promulgated by Minister of Health on January 24, 2006. It includes general provisions, requirements and practice, establishment and approval of radio-diagnosis and radiotherapy services, safeguards and quality assurance, and so on. There are a series of radiological protection standards and quality control standards in diagnostic radiology, including 'radiological protection standard for the examination in X-ray diagnosis', 'radiological health protection standards for X-ray examination of child-bearing age women and pregnant women', 'radiological protection standards for the children in X-ray diagnosis', 'standards for radiological protection in medical X-ray diagnosis', 'specification for radiological protection monitoring in medical X-ray diagnosis', 'guide for reasonable application of medical X-ray diagnosis', 'general aspects for quality assurance in medical X-ray image of diagnosis', 'specification of image quality control test for the medical X-ray diagnostic equipment', 'specification of image quality assurance test for X-ray equipment for computed tomography', 'specification for testing of quality control in computed radiography (CR)' and 'specification for testing of quality control in X-ray mammography'. With the X-ray diagnostic equipment, there are acceptant tests, status tests and routing tests in large hospitals. It is poor for routing test in middle and smaller hospitals. CT is used widely in diagnostic radiology, however most workers in CT

  20. A study on occupational exposure in a PET/CT facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas Castrillan, S.; Cutanda henraquez, F.

    2011-01-01

    Staff occupational exposure for 18 F-FDG studies has been assessed. For this purpose, different detectors, all traceable to PTB standards, have been used. Measurements were carried out in different working areas in the facility for different procedures and 400 MBq per patient standard injected activity. A radiological map of the patient lying on the couch was obtained; the largest dose rate result was obtained in contact with the patient's abdomen. The maximum dose to the most exposed staff member for this position is 3.6 mSv y -1 , under some conservative assumptions. A typical value would be 0.9±0.3 mSv y -1 close to the abdomen, taking into account staff rotations. These results have been obtained from a sample of 50 patients and average values have been statistically tested. Particularly, a negligible probability of reaching 20 mSv in a year (assuming no incidents or contamination) was obtained (P < 0.01). Annual dose received by personnel lies well within the recommended limits (International Commission on Radiological Protection), these measurements help to optimise working procedures in the facility. (authors)

  1. Radiological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Environmental monitoring in the vicinity of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant has been shown the radiation dose to the public from plant operation to be quite small. Calculations from the reported release rates yield 0.2 mrem whole body dose and 0.6 mrem skin dose for the calendar quarter of maximum release. Radioactivity discharges to the Chesapeake Bay have resulted in detectable concentrations of /sup 110m/Ag, 58 Co, and 60 Co in sediments and shellfish. The area yielding samples with detectable concentrations of plant effluents extends for roughly six miles up and down the western shore, with maximum values found at the plant discharge area. The radiation dose to an individual eating 29 doz oysters and 15 doz crabs (5 kg of each) taken from the plant discharge area would be about 4/1000 mrem whole body dose and 0.2 mrem gastrointestinal tract dose (about 0.007% and 0.5% of the applicable guidelines, respectively.) Comparison of these power plant-induced doses with the fluctuations in natural radiation dose already experienced by the public indicates that the power plant effects are insignificant. The natural variations are tens of times greater than the maximum doses resulting from Calvert Cliffs Power Plant. Although operations to date provide an insufficient basis to predict radiological impact of the Calvert Cliffs Plant over its operational lifetime, available data indicate that the plant should continue to operate with insignificant radiological impact, well within all applicable guidelines

  2. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, J.A. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomography has made possible the excellent and basic work having to do with the characteristics of the trachea, its caliber, shape, and length in children. Another group of articles has to do with interventional pediatric radiology. This year there were a number of articles of which only a sample is included, dealing with therapeutic procedures involving drainage of abscesses, angioplasty, nephrostomy, therapeutic embolization, and the removal of esophageal foreign bodies. Obviously, there is no reason to think that techniques developed for the adult may not be applicable to the infant or child; also, there is no reason to believe that processes peculiar to the child should not be amenable to intervention, for instance, use of embolization of hepatic hemangioma and transluminal balloon valvuloplasty for pulmonary valvular stenosis. Among the reports and reviews, the author would add that sonography remains a basic imaging technique in pediatric radiology and each year its application broadens. For example, there is an excellent article having to do with sonography of the neonatal and infant hip and evaluation of the inferior vena cava and the gallbladder. Nuclear medicine continues to play a significant role in diagnosis, which is featured in two articles concerned with problems of the hip

  3. Radiological malpractice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, G.

    1987-01-01

    As medico-legal statistics show, compared with other branches of medicine, cases of liability of the radiologist or his assistants are relatively rare. The duty to exercise due care as set out in Paragraph 6 of the Austrian penal code or Paragraph 276 of the German civil code, respectively, provide a basic rule of law also for radiology. Due to the risk inherent in the investigation method, incidents in angiography cannot be totally excluded. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that all steps be taken with regard to staff, equipment and drugs to be able to deal with any complications and incidents that may arise. The courts of law require the employer to produce strongest exonerating evidence to prove that the duty to exercise due care in the selection and supervision of the assistants has been duly fulfilled. For the practical execution of radiological investigations of the digestive tract, also the RTA is responsible; her liability when performing an irrigoscopy is particularly great, as perforation of the intestine is often lethal. The introduction of the rectal tube into the vagina by mistake, with resultant injury or death of the patient, will regularly lead to conviction under penal law. (orig.) [de

  4. Optimisation of technical specifications using probabilistic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericsson, G.; Knochenhauer, M.; Hultqvist, G.

    1986-01-01

    During the last few years the development of methods for modifying and optimising nuclear power plant Technical Specifications (TS) for plant operations has received increased attention. Probalistic methods in general, and the plant and system models of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) in particular, seem to provide the most forceful tools for optimisation. This paper first gives some general comments on optimisation, identifying important parameters and then gives a description of recent Swedish experiences from the use of nuclear power plant PSA models and results for TS optimisation

  5. Layout Optimisation of Wave Energy Converter Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz, Pau Mercadé; Nava, Vincenzo; Topper, Mathew B. R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes an optimisation strategy for the layout design of wave energy converter (WEC) arrays. Optimal layouts are sought so as to maximise the absorbed power given a minimum q-factor, the minimum distance between WECs, and an area of deployment. To guarantee an efficient optimisation......, a four-parameter layout description is proposed. Three different optimisation algorithms are further compared in terms of performance and computational cost. These are the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA), a genetic algorithm (GA) and the glowworm swarm optimisation (GSO) algorithm...

  6. Optimisation combinatoire Theorie et algorithmes

    CERN Document Server

    Korte, Bernhard; Fonlupt, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Ce livre est la traduction fran aise de la quatri me et derni re dition de Combinatorial Optimization: Theory and Algorithms crit par deux minents sp cialistes du domaine: Bernhard Korte et Jens Vygen de l'universit de Bonn en Allemagne. Il met l accent sur les aspects th oriques de l'optimisation combinatoire ainsi que sur les algorithmes efficaces et exacts de r solution de probl mes. Il se distingue en cela des approches heuristiques plus simples et souvent d crites par ailleurs. L ouvrage contient de nombreuses d monstrations, concises et l gantes, de r sultats difficiles. Destin aux tudia

  7. Protection of staff in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melkamu, M. A.

    2013-04-01

    This project focuses on the interventional radiology. The main objective of this project work was to provide a guidance and advice for occupational exposure and hospital management to optimize radiation protection safety and endorse safety culture. It provides practical information on how to minimize occupational exposure in interventional radiology. In the literature review all considerable parameters to reduce dose to the occupationally exposed are well discussed. These parameters include dose limit, risk estimation, use of dosimeter, personal dose record keeping, analysis of surveillance of occupational dose, investigation levels, and proper use of radiation protection tools and finally about scatter radiation dose rate. In addition the project discusses the ways to reduce occupational exposure in interventional radiology. The methods for dose reduction are minimizing fluoroscopic time, minimizing the number of fluoroscopic image, use of patient dose reduction technologies, use of collimation, planning interventional procedures, positioning in low scattered areas, use of protective shielding, use of appropriate fluoroscopic imaging equipment, giving training for the staff, wearing the dosimeters and know their own dose regularly, and management commitment to quality assurance and quality control system and optimization of radiation protection of safety. (author)

  8. Procedures in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, T.; Hare, W.S.C.; Thomson, K.; Tess, B.

    1989-01-01

    This book outlines the various procedures necessary for the successful practice of diagnostic radiology. Topics covered are: general principles, imaging of the urinary and gastrointestinal tracts, vascular radiology, arthrography, and miscellaneous diagnostic radiologic procedures

  9. Inquiry into the radiological consequences of power uprates at light-water reactors worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilic Zabric, Tea; Tomic, Bojan; Lundgren, Klas; Sjoeberg, Mats

    2007-05-01

    In Sweden, most of the nuclear power plants are planning power uprates within the next few years. The Dept. of Occupational and Medical Exposures at the Swedish Radiation Protection Agency, SSI, has initiated a research project to investigate the radiological implications of power uprates on light-water reactors throughout the world. The project was divided into three tasks: 1. A compilation of power uprates of light-water reactors worldwide. The compilation contains a technical description in brief of how the power uprates were carried out. 2. An analysis of the radiological consequences at four selected Nuclear Power Plants, which was the main objective of the inquiry. Affects on the radiological and chemical situation due to the changed situation were discussed. 3. Review of technical and organisational factors to be considered in uprate projects to keep exposures ALARA. The project was carried out, starting with the collecting of information on the implemented and planned uprates on reactors internationally. The information was catalogued in accordance with criteria focusing on radiological impact. A detailed analysis followed of four plants selected for uprates chosen according to established criteria, in line with the project requirements. The selected plants were Olkiluoto 1 and 2, Cofrentes, Asco and Tihange. The plants were selected with design and operation conditions close to the Swedish plants. All information was compiled to identify good and bad practices that are impacting on the occupational exposure. Important factors were discussed concerning BWRs and PWRs which affect radiation levels and occupational exposures in general, and especially at power uprates. Conclusions related to each task are in detail presented in a particular chapter of the report. Taking into account the whole project and its main objective the following conclusions are considered to be emphasized: Optimisation of the work processes to limit the duration of the time spent in

  10. Inquiry into the radiological consequences of power uprates at light-water reactors worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilic Zabric, Tea; Tomic, Bojan; Lundgren, Klas; Sjoeberg, Mats

    2007-05-15

    In Sweden, most of the nuclear power plants are planning power uprates within the next few years. The Dept. of Occupational and Medical Exposures at the Swedish Radiation Protection Agency, SSI, has initiated a research project to investigate the radiological implications of power uprates on light-water reactors throughout the world. The project was divided into three tasks: 1. A compilation of power uprates of light-water reactors worldwide. The compilation contains a technical description in brief of how the power uprates were carried out. 2. An analysis of the radiological consequences at four selected Nuclear Power Plants, which was the main objective of the inquiry. Affects on the radiological and chemical situation due to the changed situation were discussed. 3. Review of technical and organisational factors to be considered in uprate projects to keep exposures ALARA. The project was carried out, starting with the collecting of information on the implemented and planned uprates on reactors internationally. The information was catalogued in accordance with criteria focusing on radiological impact. A detailed analysis followed of four plants selected for uprates chosen according to established criteria, in line with the project requirements. The selected plants were Olkiluoto 1 and 2, Cofrentes, Asco and Tihange. The plants were selected with design and operation conditions close to the Swedish plants. All information was compiled to identify good and bad practices that are impacting on the occupational exposure. Important factors were discussed concerning BWRs and PWRs which affect radiation levels and occupational exposures in general, and especially at power uprates. Conclusions related to each task are in detail presented in a particular chapter of the report. Taking into account the whole project and its main objective the following conclusions are considered to be emphasized: Optimisation of the work processes to limit the duration of the time spent in

  11. Optimising resource management in neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Richard M; Griffiths, Jeff D; Williams, Janet E; Brouwers, Jakko

    2014-01-01

    To date, little research has been published regarding the effective and efficient management of resources (beds and staff) in neurorehabilitation, despite being an expensive service in limited supply. To demonstrate how mathematical modelling can be used to optimise service delivery, by way of a case study at a major 21 bed neurorehabilitation unit in the UK. An automated computer program for assigning weekly treatment sessions is developed. Queue modelling is used to construct a mathematical model of the hospital in terms of referral submissions to a waiting list, admission and treatment, and ultimately discharge. This is used to analyse the impact of hypothetical strategic decisions on a variety of performance measures and costs. The project culminates in a hybridised model of these two approaches, since a relationship is found between the number of therapy hours received each week (scheduling output) and length of stay (queuing model input). The introduction of the treatment scheduling program has substantially improved timetable quality (meaning a better and fairer service to patients) and has reduced employee time expended in its creation by approximately six hours each week (freeing up time for clinical work). The queuing model has been used to assess the effect of potential strategies, such as increasing the number of beds or employing more therapists. The use of mathematical modelling has not only optimised resources in the short term, but has allowed the optimality of longer term strategic decisions to be assessed.

  12. A review from the regulatory position of the control of occupational exposure associated with the first 20 years of the United Kingdom commercial nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmerson, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    Experience gained by the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) during the past 20 years in the regulatory control of the nuclear power programme is discussed. After discussing control objectives, the principle sources of occupational exposure associated with the nuclear power programme are tabulated from 1962 to 1979. The fuel reprocessing plants give rise to the highest contribution to radiation dose. It is concluded that there is an improving trend in the radiological exposure pattern despite increasing power generation, fuel burn-up and processing plant throughput. The objective of ensuring that individuals do not exceed the statutory dose limits has largely been achieved. However, optimization procedures will probably be used in the future to optimise procedures and thus exposure data for various tasks will be required. (UK)

  13. Digital radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallas, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Radiology is vital to the life-saving efforts of surgeons and other physicians, but precious time can be lost generating the images and transferring them to and from the operating room. Furthermore, hospitals are straining under the task of storing and managing the deluge of diagnostic films produced every year. A 300-bed hospital generates about 1 gigabyte (8 x 10 9 bits) of picture information every day and is legally bound to hold it for three to seven years--30 years in the case of silicosis or black lung disease, illnesses that may have relevance to future lawsuits. Consequently, hospital warehouses are filling with x-ray film and written reports that are important for analysis of patient histories, for comparison between patients, and for analyzing the progress of disease. Yet only a fraction of the information's potential is being used because access is so complicated. What is more, films are easily lost, erasing valuable medical histories

  14. Fetal dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.

    2002-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology examinations are frequently performed in all countries because of the benefit that the patient derives from the resultant diagnosis. Given that so many examinations are performed it is inevitable that there will be occasions when the planned exposure of a woman who is known to be pregnant is contemplated. In these circumstances, there must be rigorous justification of the examination and the procedure itself must be optimised as well. Radiation risks from fetal irradiation are well established. These risks fall into three categories: 1) a cancer induction risk (mainly leukaemia); 2) hereditary effects (as the fetus is a potential parent); 3) a risk of serious mental retardation (if the fetus is exposed in the critical 8-15 weeks period when the forebrain is being developed). Risk factors for these effects have been reviewed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Special rules apply to the radiology of women who are or who may be pregnant. These rules have been developed to avoid he unintended irradiation of the fetus. These rules have been variously referred to as the 10-day rule and the 28-day rules, in which radiology of potentially pregnant women is restricted to the first 10 or 28 days following menstruation. It is apparent that the advice provided by national bodies varies, as different rules apply internationally, due presumably to a lack of an international consensus on the subject. The advice from the National Radiological Protection Board, the College of Radiographers and the Royal College of Radiologists applies in the United Kingdom. In summary, the advice is that women of child bearing age are asked before a diagnostic radiology examination in which the pelvis is in, or near, the primary beam are asked if they are, or may be, pregnant. If pregnancy can be excluded then the examination can proceed. If it is likely that the patient is pregnant, then the proposed examination must undergo rigorous justification. If

  15. [Radiation protection in interventional radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamus, R; Loose, R; Wucherer, M; Uder, M; Galster, M

    2016-03-01

    The application of ionizing radiation in medicine seems to be a safe procedure for patients as well as for occupational exposition to personnel. The developments in interventional radiology with fluoroscopy and dose-intensive interventions require intensified radiation protection. It is recommended that all available tools should be used for this purpose. Besides the options for instruments, x‑ray protection at the intervention table must be intensively practiced with lead aprons and mounted lead glass. A special focus on eye protection to prevent cataracts is also recommended. The development of cataracts might no longer be deterministic, as confirmed by new data; therefore, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has lowered the threshold dose value for eyes from 150 mSv/year to 20 mSv/year. Measurements show that the new values can be achieved by applying all X‑ray protection measures plus lead-containing eyeglasses.

  16. Radiological impact of the Argentine Nuclear Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    An assessment is made of the radiological impact resulting from the activities carried out so far under the Argentine Nuclear Programme, together with a prediction of the impact which could result from the future activities planned under that Programme. The average individual risks and the radiological detriment due to the various activities are determined in terms of the average individual effective dose equivalents and the collective effective dose equivalent commitments. The assessments cover exposures of occupationally exposed workers and the public. The data obtained indicate that both the risks and the resultant detriment are reasonably comparable with those derived from other similar programmes. Moreover, they clearly indicate that the radiological impact of the Programme is tending to decrease with time so that it can be assumed that the radiological impact per unit of practice will be even lower in future. (author)

  17. Occupational rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, Maria M; Slavin, Raymond G

    2003-05-01

    This article aims to define occupational rhinitis, classify its various causes, review the steps in its diagnosis, and describe its nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic principles of management. Occupational rhinitis frequently coexists with asthma but also occurs alone. Although it does not have the same impact as occupational asthma, occupational rhinitis causes distress, discomfort, and work inefficiency. By concentrating on the patient's workplace, the clinician has an opportunity to practice preventive medicine: to recognize substances in the patient's micro- and macroenvironment that are causing the problems and then to intervene by altering the environment or removing the patient from the environment.

  18. Annual report on occupational safety 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    This report presents information on occupational safety relating to the Company's employees for the year 1985, and compares data with figures for the previous year. The following headings are listed: principle activities of BNFL, general policy and organisation, radiological safety, including whole body, skin and extremity, and internal organ doses, non-radiological safety, incidents reportable to the health and safety executive. (U.K.)

  19. Reflections on the juridicial roots of the principle of optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.; Boehler, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    The disciplines of jurisprudence tend in general towards a rationalisation and stabilisation of social or economic practice and are oriented towards concepts or practices which belong to the field of the determinate. When it comes to the principle of optimising radiological protection, however, the classical juridical technique of administrative law does not exactly answer the problems of implementing this. From the obligations of performance traditionally imposed by the government, a transition to obligation of behaviour by those involved seems to be called for, and this is what makes the optimisation principle difficult to qualify juridically. Instead of a law of command, exemption and control the government must essentially put its trust in the operators of nuclear installations by issuing a standard which sets an objective rather than a standard with the force of a regulation as in the past. Does the future of the juridical sciences in fact lie in the development of an administrative law of the indeterminate which would oblige the government to recognise that, even in the field of the determinate, it is not always government which knows best? While our classical administrative law is a law of command and control, the administrative law of the indeterminate will be that of the law of common effort, framed in collective acts and based on trust, consultation, and obligations of behaviour, all under the control of a judge who intervenes when there is a manifest contradiction between the acts and the promised behaviour. In French law optimisation has remained a general principle unaccompanied by specific provisions for its implementation. The object of our paper is to examine on what juridical foundations it would be possible to apply this principle at practical level without betraying its spirit. (author)

  20. Design aspects of radiological safety in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patkulkar, D.S.; Purohit, R.G.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    In order to keep operational performance of a nuclear facility high and to keep occupational and public exposure ALARA, radiological safety provisions must be reviewed at the time of facility design. Deficiency in design culminates in deteriorated system performance and non adherence to safety standards and could sometimes result in radiological incident. Important radiological aspects relevant to safety were compiled based on operating experiences, design deficiencies brought out from past nuclear incidents, experience gained during maintenance, participation in design review of upcoming nuclear facilities and radiological emergency preparedness

  1. Evolutionary programming for neutron instrument optimisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentley, Phillip M. [Hahn-Meitner Institut, Glienicker Strasse 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)]. E-mail: phillip.bentley@hmi.de; Pappas, Catherine [Hahn-Meitner Institut, Glienicker Strasse 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Habicht, Klaus [Hahn-Meitner Institut, Glienicker Strasse 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Lelievre-Berna, Eddy [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2006-11-15

    Virtual instruments based on Monte-Carlo techniques are now integral part of novel instrumentation development and the existing codes (McSTAS and Vitess) are extensively used to define and optimise novel instrumental concepts. Neutron spectrometers, however, involve a large number of parameters and their optimisation is often a complex and tedious procedure. Artificial intelligence algorithms are proving increasingly useful in such situations. Here, we present an automatic, reliable and scalable numerical optimisation concept based on the canonical genetic algorithm (GA). The algorithm was used to optimise the 3D magnetic field profile of the NSE spectrometer SPAN, at the HMI. We discuss the potential of the GA which combined with the existing Monte-Carlo codes (Vitess, McSTAS, etc.) leads to a very powerful tool for automated global optimisation of a general neutron scattering instrument, avoiding local optimum configurations.

  2. Evolutionary programming for neutron instrument optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, Phillip M.; Pappas, Catherine; Habicht, Klaus; Lelievre-Berna, Eddy

    2006-01-01

    Virtual instruments based on Monte-Carlo techniques are now integral part of novel instrumentation development and the existing codes (McSTAS and Vitess) are extensively used to define and optimise novel instrumental concepts. Neutron spectrometers, however, involve a large number of parameters and their optimisation is often a complex and tedious procedure. Artificial intelligence algorithms are proving increasingly useful in such situations. Here, we present an automatic, reliable and scalable numerical optimisation concept based on the canonical genetic algorithm (GA). The algorithm was used to optimise the 3D magnetic field profile of the NSE spectrometer SPAN, at the HMI. We discuss the potential of the GA which combined with the existing Monte-Carlo codes (Vitess, McSTAS, etc.) leads to a very powerful tool for automated global optimisation of a general neutron scattering instrument, avoiding local optimum configurations

  3. Radiologic protection in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco Jimenez, R.E.; Bermudez Jimenez, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    With this work and employing the radioprotection criterion, the authors pretend to minimize the risks associated to this practice; without losing the quality of the radiologic image. Odontology should perform the following criterions: 1. Justification: all operation of practice that implies exposition to radiations, should be reweighed, through an analysis of risks versus benefits, with the purpose to assure, that the total detriment will be small, compared to resultant benefit of this activity. 2. Optimization: all of the exposures should be maintained as low as reasonable possible, considering the social and economic factors. 3. Dose limit: any dose limit system should be considered as a top condition, nota as an admissible level. (S. Grainger)

  4. Dose optimisation in computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner-Karoussou, A.

    2005-01-01

    After the installation of computed radiography (CR) systems in three hospitals in Luxembourg a patient dose survey was carried out for three radiographic examinations, thorax, pelvis and lumbar spine. It was found that the patient doses had changed in comparison with the patient doses measured for conventional radiography in the same three hospitals. A close collaboration between the manufacturers of the X-ray installations, the CR imaging systems and the medical physicists led to the discovery that the speed class with which each radiographic examination was to be performed, had been ignored, during installation of the digital imaging systems. A number of procedures were carried out in order to calibrate and program the X-ray installations in conjunction with the CR systems. Following this optimisation procedure, a new patient dose survey was carried out for the three radiographic examinations. It was found that patient doses for the three hospitals were reduced. (authors)

  5. Optimising costs in WLCG operations

    CERN Document Server

    Pradillo, Mar; Flix, Josep; Forti, Alessandra; Sciabà, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The Worldwide LHC Computing Grid project (WLCG) provides the computing and storage resources required by the LHC collaborations to store, process and analyse the 50 Petabytes of data annually generated by the LHC. The WLCG operations are coordinated by a distributed team of managers and experts and performed by people at all participating sites and from all the experiments. Several improvements in the WLCG infrastructure have been implemented during the first long LHC shutdown to prepare for the increasing needs of the experiments during Run2 and beyond. However, constraints in funding will affect not only the computing resources but also the available effort for operations. This paper presents the results of a detailed investigation on the allocation of the effort in the different areas of WLCG operations, identifies the most important sources of inefficiency and proposes viable strategies for optimising the operational cost, taking into account the current trends in the evolution of the computing infrastruc...

  6. Current radiology. Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, G.H.; Hanafee, W.N.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. They are: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Interventional Vascular Radiology, Genitourinary Radiology, Skeletal Radiology, Digital Subtraction Angiography, Neuroradiology, Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Degenerative Diseases of the Lumbar Spine, The Lung, Otolaringology and Opthalmology, and Pediatric Radiology: Cranial, Facial, Cervical, Vertebral, and Appendicular

  7. Research in diagnostic radiology: a holistic perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrams, H.L.

    1981-01-01

    This 24th Annual Crookshank Lecture of the Royal College of Radiologists reviews the continuity and interactive relationships among the various components of radiological research, with particular reference to imaging. The following aspects are considered: 1) Clinical decision-making indications vs. yield and cost vs. utility in relation to diagnostic processes. 2) Generation of the image, including x-ray tubes, cinefluorography, ultrasound, CT, N.M.R.; biological radiation effects. 3) Enhancement of the image, optimised information yield. 4) Image perception 5) Boundaries of the radiological process, e.g. radioimmunoassay, isotopes in tumour therapy, venous sampling for assay 6) Image interpretation, its pathophysiological roots and resultant disease research 7) Impact of the image, and the effect of the decision process of therapeutic alternatives. (U.K.)

  8. Occupational health physics at a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shank, K.E.; Easterly, C.E.; Shoup, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    Future generation of electrical power using controlled thermonuclear reactors will involve both traditional and new concerns for health protection. A review of the problems associated with exposures to tritium and magnetic fields is presented with emphasis on the occupational worker. The radiological aspects of tritium, inventories and loss rates of tritium for fusion reactors, and protection of the occupational worker are discussed. Magnetic fields in which workers may be exposed routinely and possible biological effects are also discussed

  9. The development of standard operating protocols for paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardwick, J.; Mencik, C.; McLaren, C.; Young, C.; Scadden, S.; Mashford, P.; McHugh, K.; Beckett, M.; Calvert, M.; Marsden, P.J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes how the requirement for operating protocols for standard radiological practice was expanded to provide a comprehensive aide to the operator conducting a medical exposure. The protocols adopted now include justification criteria, patient preparation, radiographic technique, standard exposure charts, diagnostic reference levels and image quality criteria. In total, the protocols have been welcomed as a tool for ensuring that medical exposures are properly optimised. (author)

  10. Discussion on Implementation of ICRP Recommendations Concerning Reference Levels and Optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-02-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103, 'The 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection', issued in 2007, defines emergency exposure situations as unexpected situations that may require the implementation of urgent protective actions and perhaps longer term protective actions. The ICRP continues to recommend optimisation and the use of reference levels to ensure an adequate degree of protection in regard to exposure to ionising radiation in emergency exposure situations. Reference levels represent the level of dose or risk above which it is judged to be inappropriate to plan to allow exposures to occur and for which protective actions should therefore be planned and optimised. National authorities are responsible for establishing reference levels. The Expert Group on the Implementation of New International Recommendations for Emergency Exposure Situations (EGIRES) performed a survey to analyse the established processes for optimisation of the protection strategy for emergency exposure situations and for practical implementation of the reference level concept in several member states of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). The EGIRES collected information on several national optimisation strategy definitions, on optimisation of protection for different protective actions, and also on optimisation of urgent protective actions. In addition, national criteria for setting reference levels, their use, and relevant processes, including specific triggers and dosimetric quantifies in setting reference levels, are focus points that the EGIRES also evaluated. The analysis of national responses to this 2011 survey shows many differences in the interpretation and application of the established processes and suggests that most countries are still in the early stages of implementing these processes. Since 2011, national authorities have continued their study of the ICRP recommendations to incorporate them into

  11. Occupancy-based illumination control of LED lighting systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caicedo Fernandez, D.R.; Pandharipande, A.; Leus, G.

    2011-01-01

    Light emitting diode (LED)-based systems are considered to be the future of lighting. We consider the problem of energy-efficient illumination control of such systems. Energy-efficient system design is based on two aspects: localised information on occupancy and optimisation of dimming levels of the

  12. Combining simulation and multi-objective optimisation for equipment quantity optimisation in container terminals

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Zhougeng

    2013-01-01

    This thesis proposes a combination framework to integrate simulation and multi-objective optimisation (MOO) for container terminal equipment optimisation. It addresses how the strengths of simulation and multi-objective optimisation can be integrated to find high quality solutions for multiple objectives with low computational cost. Three structures for the combination framework are proposed respectively: pre-MOO structure, integrated MOO structure and post-MOO structure. The applications of ...

  13. Occupational Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occupational health problems occur at work or because of the kind of work you do. These problems can include ... by exposure to radiation Exposure to germs in health care settings Good job safety and prevention practices ...

  14. Occupational cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choril, A.C.; McCracken, W.J.; Dowd, E.C.; Stewart, Charles; Burton, D.F.; Dyer, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews the experience of the Workmen's Compensation Board of Ontario in identifying cases of cancer that could be attributed to occupational hazards. Workers' claims for compensation are allowed if there is reasonable medical evidence that their cancer was caused by exposure to risk factors associated with their occupation. Details of the types of cancers associated with specific carcinogens or fields of employment are discussed. About 50% of the cases were related to exposure in particular industrial operations that functioned for relatively brief periods. The number of deaths from cancer identified as being caused by occupational factors is compared with the total for cancer from all causes in Ontario during the period 1971 through 1975. Although all workers eligible for compensation may not have been identified, the data suggest that less than 1% is presently caused by occupational factors

  15. Occupational Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... November 3, 2015 Content source: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations, and Field Studies ... Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 ...

  16. Occupational health

    CERN Document Server

    Fingret, Dr Ann

    2013-01-01

    Offers a comprehensive view of health and safety issues at work. An invaluable resource for managers, personnel professionals and occupational health practitioners. Recommended by the Institute of Personnel Management.

  17. Proceedings of the 4. European Workshop on Occupational Exposure Management at NPPs (ISOE '04)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Ascenzo, Lucie [ISOE ETC - CEPN, BP 48, 92263 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    The European ISOE Technical Centre co-organised with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Fourth European ISOE Workshop on Occupational Exposure at Nuclear Power Plants in March 2004, at Lyon, France. 190 participants from 26 countries, European (all countries from western and central Europe with nuclear power plants), American (Canada and United States) and Asian (China, Japan, Korea) attended the meeting with a good balance between utilities, regulatory bodies and contractors. The IAEA supported participants from Central and Eastern European countries as well as from Eastern Asia. The workshop allowed 35 oral presentations and 28 posters presentations to be provided. A very informative exhibition was held by vendors and allowed participants to know more about their products during the coffee-breaks. All participants were split into small groups devoted to 10 pre-selected themes. Each group met twice and reached recommendations. Three papers were awarded during the workshop: - 'ALARA versus reactor safety concern - a practical case' by S. Hennigor and B. Oegren; - 'Recent international developments on contamination limits on packages' by J. Hesse and B. Lorenz; - 'Advantages of combining gamma scanning techniques and 3D dose simulation in dose optimisation problems; by F. Vermeersch. Five main recommendations were agreed on by the participants: 1. There is a need for harmonizing regulations in order to maintain a high status of radiological protection at an international level in a deregulated context; 2. The regulatory bodies should also harmonize the contents of training, particularly in the context of workforce ageing; 3. The international organisations and regulatory bodies should take the lead to harmonize at the international level a dose passport for itinerant workers; 4. Radiological protection indicators should be selected to help in optimising doses, provide indication for continuous improvement, estimate the effectiveness

  18. Proceedings of the 4. European Workshop on Occupational Exposure Management at NPPs (ISOE '04)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Ascenzo, Lucie [ISOE ETC - CEPN, BP 48, 92263 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    The European ISOE Technical Centre co-organised with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Fourth European ISOE Workshop on Occupational Exposure at Nuclear Power Plants in March 2004, at Lyon, France. 190 participants from 26 countries, European (all countries from western and central Europe with nuclear power plants), American (Canada and United States) and Asian (China, Japan, Korea) attended the meeting with a good balance between utilities, regulatory bodies and contractors. The IAEA supported participants from Central and Eastern European countries as well as from Eastern Asia. The workshop allowed 35 oral presentations and 28 posters presentations to be provided. A very informative exhibition was held by vendors and allowed participants to know more about their products during the coffee-breaks. All participants were split into small groups devoted to 10 pre-selected themes. Each group met twice and reached recommendations. Three papers were awarded during the workshop: - 'ALARA versus reactor safety concern - a practical case' by S. Hennigor and B. Oegren; - 'Recent international developments on contamination limits on packages' by J. Hesse and B. Lorenz; - 'Advantages of combining gamma scanning techniques and 3D dose simulation in dose optimisation problems; by F. Vermeersch. Five main recommendations were agreed on by the participants: 1. There is a need for harmonizing regulations in order to maintain a high status of radiological protection at an international level in a deregulated context; 2. The regulatory bodies should also harmonize the contents of training, particularly in the context of workforce ageing; 3. The international organisations and regulatory bodies should take the lead to harmonize at the international level a dose passport for itinerant workers; 4. Radiological protection indicators should be selected to help in optimising doses, provide indication for continuous improvement, estimate the effectiveness of radiological

  19. Proceedings of the 4. European Workshop on Occupational Exposure Management at NPPs (ISOE '04)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ascenzo, Lucie

    2004-01-01

    The European ISOE Technical Centre co-organised with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Fourth European ISOE Workshop on Occupational Exposure at Nuclear Power Plants in March 2004, at Lyon, France. 190 participants from 26 countries, European (all countries from western and central Europe with nuclear power plants), American (Canada and United States) and Asian (China, Japan, Korea) attended the meeting with a good balance between utilities, regulatory bodies and contractors. The IAEA supported participants from Central and Eastern European countries as well as from Eastern Asia. The workshop allowed 35 oral presentations and 28 posters presentations to be provided. A very informative exhibition was held by vendors and allowed participants to know more about their products during the coffee-breaks. All participants were split into small groups devoted to 10 pre-selected themes. Each group met twice and reached recommendations. Three papers were awarded during the workshop: - 'ALARA versus reactor safety concern - a practical case' by S. Hennigor and B. Oegren; - 'Recent international developments on contamination limits on packages' by J. Hesse and B. Lorenz; - 'Advantages of combining gamma scanning techniques and 3D dose simulation in dose optimisation problems; by F. Vermeersch. Five main recommendations were agreed on by the participants: 1. There is a need for harmonizing regulations in order to maintain a high status of radiological protection at an international level in a deregulated context; 2. The regulatory bodies should also harmonize the contents of training, particularly in the context of workforce ageing; 3. The international organisations and regulatory bodies should take the lead to harmonize at the international level a dose passport for itinerant workers; 4. Radiological protection indicators should be selected to help in optimising doses, provide indication for continuous improvement, estimate the effectiveness of radiological

  20. The radiological installation in dental office: selection and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirre, Christian

    2010-01-01

    This thesis for a PhD in dental surgery aimed at identifying and analysing different ways to optimise radiographs. In a first part, the author presents the characteristics of X rays, and dosimetric values used in dental offices. He describes the interaction of X rays with living cells by recalling the discovery of biological effects and the emergence of radiation protection, and by discussing the consequences for the patient as well as for the practician. In the next part, the author comments technological advances of devices, and means available to practicians to improve their performance. He presents X ray tubes, discusses factors which influence ray production, and selection criteria, indicates additional devices (beam application tubes, filtration, collimation), discusses the selection of the receiver (types of receivers used in intra-oral radiology, digital or silver film-based sensors), and describes the picture-taking process (radiological techniques, use of angulators and lead shielding). He finally discusses how to optimise intra-oral dental imagery through good practices which comprise optimisation, selection of apparatuses and devices, performance of the radiological act with a patient sitting in the armchair, and maintenance of a good image quality [fr

  1. Layout Optimisation of Wave Energy Converter Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Mercadé Ruiz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an optimisation strategy for the layout design of wave energy converter (WEC arrays. Optimal layouts are sought so as to maximise the absorbed power given a minimum q-factor, the minimum distance between WECs, and an area of deployment. To guarantee an efficient optimisation, a four-parameter layout description is proposed. Three different optimisation algorithms are further compared in terms of performance and computational cost. These are the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA, a genetic algorithm (GA and the glowworm swarm optimisation (GSO algorithm. The results show slightly higher performances for the latter two algorithms; however, the first turns out to be significantly less computationally demanding.

  2. Topology optimisation of natural convection problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe; Aage, Niels; Andreasen, Casper Schousboe

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the application of the density-based topology optimisation approach for the design of heat sinks and micropumps based on natural convection effects. The problems are modelled under the assumptions of steady-state laminar flow using the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations...... coupled to the convection-diffusion equation through the Boussinesq approximation. In order to facilitate topology optimisation, the Brinkman approach is taken to penalise velocities inside the solid domain and the effective thermal conductivity is interpolated in order to accommodate differences...... in thermal conductivity of the solid and fluid phases. The governing equations are discretised using stabilised finite elements and topology optimisation is performed for two different problems using discrete adjoint sensitivity analysis. The study shows that topology optimisation is a viable approach...

  3. Topology Optimisation for Coupled Convection Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe

    This thesis deals with topology optimisation for coupled convection problems. The aim is to extend and apply topology optimisation to steady-state conjugate heat transfer problems, where the heat conduction equation governs the heat transfer in a solid and is coupled to thermal transport...... in a surrounding uid, governed by a convection-diffusion equation, where the convective velocity field is found from solving the isothermal incompressible steady-state Navier-Stokes equations. Topology optimisation is also applied to steady-state natural convection problems. The modelling is done using stabilised...... finite elements, the formulation and implementation of which was done partly during a special course as prepatory work for this thesis. The formulation is extended with a Brinkman friction term in order to facilitate the topology optimisation of fluid flow and convective cooling problems. The derived...

  4. Benchmarks for dynamic multi-objective optimisation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Helbig, M

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available When algorithms solve dynamic multi-objective optimisation problems (DMOOPs), benchmark functions should be used to determine whether the algorithm can overcome specific difficulties that can occur in real-world problems. However, for dynamic multi...

  5. Credit price optimisation within retail banking

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-02-14

    Feb 14, 2014 ... cost based pricing, where the price of a product or service is based on the .... function obtained from fitting a logistic regression model .... Note that the proposed optimisation approach below will allow us to also incorporate.

  6. Occupational cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, N.

    1987-01-01

    Cancer resulting from occupational exposure is now receiving major attention, focusing on identification, regulation, and control of cancer-causing agents. Such cancer can result from exposure to chemicals and ionizing and nonionizing radiation. Extended exposure (often years) and an extended latent period of perhaps decades may intervene before tumor appearance. Although the actual extent of occupational cancer is in debate, estimates have ranged from 4 to 15 per cent of all cancer

  7. Occupational health

    OpenAIRE

    Coosemans, R.

    1997-01-01

    Health at work and healthy work environments are among the most valuable assets of individuals, communities and countries. Nowadays, new broader approach is promoted, recognizing the fact that occupational health is a key, but not a unique element of workers’ health. Workers health is a public health approach to resolving the health problems of working populations including all determinants of health recognized as targets of risk management. It focuses on primary prevention of occupational an...

  8. Educational treasures in Radiology: The Radiology Olympics - striving for gold in Radiology education

    OpenAIRE

    Talanow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on Radiology Olympics (www.RadiologyOlympics.com) - a collaboration with the international Radiology community for Radiology education, Radiolopolis (www.Radiolopolis.com). The Radiology Olympics honour the movers and shakers in Radiology education and offer an easy to use platform for educating medical professionals based on Radiology cases.

  9. Application of the principles of justification and optimisation to products causing public exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleishman, A.B.; Wrixon, A.D.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the practical incorporation of the ICRP principles of justification and optimisation into a policy designed to control radioactive consumer products. ICRP recommends the use of cost benefit analysis and differential cost benefit analysis for justification and optimisation respectively, and expresses these procedures in simple mathematical forms. This might suggest that their application should involve quantification and therefore be objective. The problems which arise in such quantification are discussed. These include the derivation of a market demand curve for a given product and its adjustment to remove any distortion of perceived value or risk produced by advertising; the costing of detriment to those who receive no benefit (e.g., as a consequence of uncontrolled disposal); and the costs of the analyses themselves. Furthermore, both cost benefit and differential cost benefit analyses are dependent on availability of market and performance data. This is incompatible with prior approval schemes in which a decision must be made before the product is distributed. Ultimately criteria for product justification must therefore be based on judgements on the acceptability of risk that are political rather than scientific in nature. Optimisation must initially be carried out on an intuitive basis. However as experience is gained with similar products the opportunity for more formal optimisation and the setting of radiological protection standards arise. This requires further value judgements which are illustrated with reference to examples. (author)

  10. User perspectives in public transport timetable optimisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Parbo; Nielsen, Otto Anker; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    The present paper deals with timetable optimisation from the perspective of minimising the waiting time experienced by passengers when transferring either to or from a bus. Due to its inherent complexity, this bi-level minimisation problem is extremely difficult to solve mathematically, since tim...... on the large-scale public transport network in Denmark. The timetable optimisation approach yielded a yearly reduction in weighted waiting time equivalent to approximately 45 million Danish kroner (9 million USD)....

  11. Methodological principles for optimising functional MRI experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuestenberg, T.; Giesel, F.L.; Strasburger, H.

    2005-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is one of the most common methods for localising neuronal activity in the brain. Even though the sensitivity of fMRI is comparatively low, the optimisation of certain experimental parameters allows obtaining reliable results. In this article, approaches for optimising the experimental design, imaging parameters and analytic strategies will be discussed. Clinical neuroscientists and interested physicians will receive practical rules of thumb for improving the efficiency of brain imaging experiments. (orig.) [de

  12. Dose optimisation in single plane interstitial brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Honoré, Henriette Benedicte

    2006-01-01

    patients,       treated for recurrent rectal and cervical cancer, flexible catheters were       sutured intra-operatively to the tumour bed in areas with compromised       surgical margin. Both non-optimised, geometrically and graphically       optimised CT -based dose plans were made. The overdose index...... on the       regularity of the implant, such that the benefit of optimisation was       larger for irregular implants. OI and HI correlated strongly with target       volume limiting the usability of these parameters for comparison of dose       plans between patients. CONCLUSIONS: Dwell time optimisation significantly......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Brachytherapy dose distributions can be optimised       by modulation of source dwell times. In this study dose optimisation in       single planar interstitial implants was evaluated in order to quantify the       potential benefit in patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 14...

  13. Occupational radiation exposure risks: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besar, Idris [PUSPATI, Selangor (Malaysia)

    1984-06-01

    This paper presents a review of the health risk as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation. A comparison of occupational risk among workers exposed to radiological and nonradiological harms are also presented. This comparison shows that radiation workers exposed to the current nuclear industry average of 3.4 mSv. per year are among the safest of all industry groupings.

  14. Annual report on occupational safety 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report presents detailed information on occupational safety relating to BNFL's employees for 1989 and data compared with the previous year. Routine monitoring, non-radiological safety and 'incidents' are discussed and 'statutory' whole-body exposures, nuclear incidents, lost-time accidents, and types of injury are tabulated. (author)

  15. Dose coefficients for individual occupationally exposed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    This Regulation refers to the requirements of the Regulation CNEN-NN.3.01, 'Basic Act of Radiological Protection', aiming its application to the dose calculation, with purposes of conformity verification with limits and restrictions of doses and level of reference for individual occupationally exposed, according to the express in its section 5

  16. Valuing the radiation detriment of occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robb, J.D.; Crick, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The implications of changes in the radiation risk estimates on the valuation of radiation detriment for use in cost-benefit analysis are being considered at the National Radiological Protection Board. This paper discusses the pertinent factors that are currently being considered for further investigation. An example of relevance to occupational exposure is detailed. (author)

  17. Occupational radiation exposure risks: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idris Besar

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the health risk as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation. A comparison of occupational risk among workers exposed to radiological and nonradiological harms are also presented. This comparison shows that radiation workers exposed to the current nuclear industry average of 3.4 mSv. per year are among the safest of all industry groupings. (author)

  18. The current regulatory requirements on optimisation and BAT in Sweden in the context of geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dverstorp, B.

    2010-01-01

    Bjorn Dverstorp, Swedish Radiation Safety authority (SSM) presented 'The current regulatory requirements on optimisation and BAT in Sweden in the context of geological disposal'. In Sweden, a nuclear waste repository will be evaluated according to both to general environmental legislation (the Environmental Code, SFS, 1998:808) and according to more specific requirements in the Act on Nuclear Activities (SFS, 1984:3) and the Radiation Protection Act (SFS, 1988:220). The evaluations according to these laws will be carried out according to two separate, but coordinated, legal-review and decision-making processes. This will be a basis for the siting process. Although the requirements on BAT and siting in the Environmental Code apply to radiological protection, they aim at a broader system optimisation. The more specific requirements on optimisation and BAT of radiological protection of geological disposal systems are given in the regulations associated with the Radiation Protection Act. The Swedish radiation protection regulations (SSM, 2009) comprise three corner stones: a risk target, environmental protection goals and the use of optimisation and BAT. In SSM' s guidance optimisation is defined as a means to reduce risk, guided by the results of risk calculations. In case of a conflict between BAT and optimisation, measures satisfying BAT should have priority. Application of optimisation and BAT on different timescales are described as well as for human intrusion scenarios. B. Dverstorp explained that because of uncertainties in the long term there is a need for additional arguments in the safety case in support of decision making. It is in this context that the requirements on optimisation and BAT should be seen as supplementary to the risk target, in providing evidence that the developer has taken into consideration, as far as reasonably possible, measures and options for reducing future doses and risks. Both principles focus on the proponent's work on developing

  19. Common tasks and problems in paediatric trauma radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paertan, Gerald; Pamberger, Petra; Blab, Edmund; Hruby, Walter

    2003-01-01

    Scope of this article is to give practical hints for the most common, typical and important topics of trauma radiology in children to those radiologists who are not exclusively occupied with paediatric imaging. Due to the increased radiation sensitivity of children compared with adults balancing radiation protection and necessary image quality is of utmost importance. Outlines for this optimisation process are given. Especially in imaging of the extremities perhaps the greatest difficulties are posed by the dynamically changing face of the immature, growing, only partially ossified skeleton. Lack of experience must be compensated by meticulous comparison with the normal skeletal development as shown in standard textbooks, and by knowledge of the radiological image of the developmental variants. Besides general remarks about paediatric trauma radiology, some important topics are discussed into more detail. Especially the elbow joint poses a challenge for those less experienced with its radiological appearance in children. More than in adults, ultrasound should remain the primary imaging modality of choice especially in the assessment of abdominal trauma, and CT be tailored to radiological and clinical findings. Imaging and diagnosis of non-accidental injury (NAI) may be a less common task for the general radiologist, however, the severe social implications of physical child abuse mandate a basic knowledge about the radiological symptoms and the imaging management of this problem for all physicians occupied with paediatric radiology

  20. Common tasks and problems in paediatric trauma radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paertan, Gerald E-mail: gerald.paertan@smz.magwien.gv.at; Pamberger, Petra; Blab, Edmund; Hruby, Walter

    2003-10-01

    Scope of this article is to give practical hints for the most common, typical and important topics of trauma radiology in children to those radiologists who are not exclusively occupied with paediatric imaging. Due to the increased radiation sensitivity of children compared with adults balancing radiation protection and necessary image quality is of utmost importance. Outlines for this optimisation process are given. Especially in imaging of the extremities perhaps the greatest difficulties are posed by the dynamically changing face of the immature, growing, only partially ossified skeleton. Lack of experience must be compensated by meticulous comparison with the normal skeletal development as shown in standard textbooks, and by knowledge of the radiological image of the developmental variants. Besides general remarks about paediatric trauma radiology, some important topics are discussed into more detail. Especially the elbow joint poses a challenge for those less experienced with its radiological appearance in children. More than in adults, ultrasound should remain the primary imaging modality of choice especially in the assessment of abdominal trauma, and CT be tailored to radiological and clinical findings. Imaging and diagnosis of non-accidental injury (NAI) may be a less common task for the general radiologist, however, the severe social implications of physical child abuse mandate a basic knowledge about the radiological symptoms and the imaging management of this problem for all physicians occupied with paediatric radiology.

  1. Thermal performance monitoring and optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunde, Svein; Berg; Oeyvind

    1998-01-01

    Monitoring of the thermal efficiency of nuclear power plants is expected to become increasingly important as energy-market liberalisation exposes plants to increasing availability requirements and fiercer competition. The general goal in thermal performance monitoring is straightforward: to maximise the ratio of profit to cost under the constraints of safe operation. One may perceive this goal to be pursued in two ways, one oriented towards fault detection and cost-optimal predictive maintenance, and another determined at optimising target values of parameters in response to any component degradation detected, changes in ambient conditions, or the like. Annual savings associated with effective thermal-performance monitoring are expected to be in the order of $ 100 000 for power plants of representative size. A literature review shows that a number of computer systems for thermal-performance monitoring exists, either as prototypes or commercially available. The characteristics and needs of power plants may vary widely, however, and decisions concerning the exact scope, content and configuration of a thermal-performance monitor may well follow a heuristic approach. Furthermore, re-use of existing software modules may be desirable. Therefore, we suggest here the design of a flexible workbench for easy assembly of an experimental thermal-performance monitor at the Halden Project. The suggested design draws heavily on our extended experience in implementing control-room systems featured by assets like high levels of customisation, flexibility in configuration and modularity in structure, and on a number of relevant adjoining activities. The design includes a multi-computer communication system and a graphical user's interface, and aims at a system adaptable to any combination of in-house or end user's modules, as well as commercially available software. (author)

  2. Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland activities and responsibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This brochure describes the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland's functions and responsibilities which relate principally to the monitoring of radioactivity in the environment and of radiation doses received by people occupationally or otherwise; regulation of the uses of ionising radiation in medicine, industry and elsewhere; assistance in developing national preparedness for response to a radiological emergency; and providing information and advice to government, other organisations and the general public on matters relating to ionising radiation. ills

  3. Conditions of radiological protection in the health unities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sa, L.R.B.S.; Neto, A.T.; Pires, A.; Azevedo, H.F.; Boasquevisque, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this study was explained which conditions is practiced for occupational and environmental radiological protection. Fifteen hospitables and ambulatories services, pertaining to the public system are studies, verifying that the professional group that are preoccupied with the radioprotection conditions are the assistants services and technician. The common knowledge about Basic Standards of Radiological Protection was also observed, of which is rather precarious. (C.G.C.) [pt

  4. Radiology trainer. Musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, A.; Erlt-Wagner, B.

    2006-01-01

    This book enables students to simulate examinations. The Radiology Trainer series comprises the whole knowledge of radiology in the form of case studies for self-testing. It is based on the best-sorted German-language collection of radiological examinations of all organ regions. Step by step, radiological knowledge is trained in order to make diagnoses more efficient. The book series ensures optimal preparation for the final medical examinations and is also a valuable tool for practical training. (orig.)

  5. Radiological diagnostics in hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moedder, U.; Kuhn, F.P.; Gruetzner, G.

    1991-01-01

    The most important radiologically detectable effects of the primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism of the skeletal system and the periarticular soft tissue structures are presented. In the following sensitivity and specificity of radiological imaging - sonography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, arteriography and selective venous sampling - in the preoperative diagnostic of the parathyroid adenomas are discussed. Therefore, radiological imaging can be omitted before primary surgery. It was only in secondary surgery that radiological process proved useful and a guide during surgical intervention. (orig.) [de

  6. Radiology systems architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deibel, S R; Greenes, R A

    1996-05-01

    This article focuses on the software requirements for enterprise integration in radiology. The needs of a future radiology systems architecture are examined, both at a concrete functional level and at an abstract system-properties level. A component-based approach to software development is described and is validated in the context of each of the abstract system requirements for future radiology computing environments.

  7. Radiological impacts of uranium recovery in the phosphate industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, M.T.

    1981-01-01

    This article characterizes the occupational and public radiological health impacts associated with phosphate mining and milling. These impacts are related to the phosphate industry's uranium production potential and are compared with those associated with conventional uranium mining and milling. The radiological impacts resulting from occupational and nonoccupational exposures are assessed. Occupational exposures in phosphate facilities are compared to background exposures and radiological population dose assessments, which characterize important radionuclides and exposure pathways. The following conclusions were reached: (1) public consequences of phosphate mining will occur whether or not uranium is recovered as a by-product, (2) radiological consequences of phosphate mining may be comparable to those associated with uranium mining and milling per unit uranium production, (3) radiological impacts via surface waterways and crops fertilized with uranium-bearing phosphates are of minor consequence, and (4) major radiological public health problems associated with phosphate mining are related to radon and radon progeny exposures in structures built on reclaimed lands or with phosphate mining residues, although the magnitudes of these impacts are difficult to evaluate with current data

  8. Reflections on a peculiar bet for the future's radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donnell, P.

    2000-01-01

    Wishing to make fruitless certain types of speculations and wanting to avoid the perplexity that can provoke a strict application of the actual system, Roger Clarke, Chairman of ICRP, has been proposing, for a year now, a new protection frame. In this article, the main aspects of his proposal and the consequences of its implantation are analysed. To express his principles, Clarke has settled a new term, the controllable dose. The author believes that naming under the same concept different sources and exposures, avoiding a separate treatment of them, could create a more balance outlook on the public's perception from radiological risk, somewhat distant from the facts. The author shares the idea of establishing a general principle based on the individual's protection, but does not see the need of rejecting the collective dose concept, especially in occupational exposure, and its role on optimisation and justification principles. Justification has been one of the less used and understood principles in the practice. Few are the counties that have thoroughly regulated their application, apart from naming it. Nonetheless, the author does not share the attitude of giving up under the weight of the evidence, and would rather persuade on the need of rationalisation in regulating the practices through justification. The author firmly believes that the use of this principle should be established more explicitly, through a balanced distribution of different roles which different institutions must act. Accordingly to the author, Clarke's approach has distorted the principle of optimisation in more ambiguous and less compromising terms. There is however one aspect, which the author considers more significant, the evolution taking place in its praxis and, in particular, within the nuclear power plants organisations. The author highlights that this principle has transformed into a personal challenge for workers and managers, moving from radiological expert to performer's field

  9. Radiation dose optimisation for conventional imaging in infants and newborns using automatic dose management software: an application of the new 2013/59 EURATOM directive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, L; Corredoira, E; Sánchez-Muñoz, F; Huerga, C; Aza, Z; Plaza-Núñez, R; Serrada, A; Bret-Zurita, M; Parrón, M; Prieto-Areyano, C; Garzón-Moll, G; Madero, R; Guibelalde, E

    2018-04-09

    Objective: The new 2013/59 EURATOM Directive (ED) demands dosimetric optimisation procedures without undue delay. The aim of this study was to optimise paediatric conventional radiology examinations applying the ED without compromising the clinical diagnosis. Automatic dose management software (ADMS) was used to analyse 2678 studies of children from birth to 5 years of age, obtaining local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in terms of entrance surface air kerma. Given local DRL for infants and chest examinations exceeded the European Commission (EC) DRL, an optimisation was performed decreasing the kVp and applying the automatic control exposure. To assess the image quality, an analysis of high-contrast resolution (HCSR), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and figure of merit (FOM) was performed, as well as a blind test based on the generalised estimating equations method. For newborns and chest examinations, the local DRL exceeded the EC DRL by 113%. After the optimisation, a reduction of 54% was obtained. No significant differences were found in the image quality blind test. A decrease in SNR (-37%) and HCSR (-68%), and an increase in FOM (42%), was observed. ADMS allows the fast calculation of local DRLs and the performance of optimisation procedures in babies without delay. However, physical and clinical analyses of image quality remain to be needed to ensure the diagnostic integrity after the optimisation process. Advances in knowledge: ADMS are useful to detect radiation protection problems and to perform optimisation procedures in paediatric conventional imaging without undue delay, as ED requires.

  10. Optimisation of Protection as applicable to geological disposal: the ICRP view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, W.

    2010-01-01

    Wolfgang Weiss (BfS), vice-chair of ICRP Committee 4, recalled that the role of optimisation is to select the best protection options under the prevailing circumstances based on scientific considerations, societal concerns and ethical aspects as well as considerations of transparency. An important role of the concept of optimisation of protection is to foster a 'safety culture' and thereby to engender a state of thinking in everyone responsible for control of radiation exposures, such that they are continuously asking themselves the question, 'Have I done all that I reasonably can to avoid or reduce these doses?' Clearly, the answer to this question is a matter of judgement and necessitates co-operation between all parties involved and, as a minimum, the operating management and the regulatory agencies, but the dialogue would be more complete if other stakeholders were also involved. What kinds of checks and balances or factors would be needed to be considered for an 'optimal' system? Can indicators be identified? Quantitative methods may provide input to this dialogue but they should never be the sole input. The ICRP considers that the parameters to take into account include also social considerations and values, environmental considerations, as well as technical and economic considerations. Wolfgang Weiss approached the question of the distinction to be made between system optimisation (in the sense of taking account of social and economic as well as of all types of hazards) and optimisation of radiological protection. The position of the ICRP is that the system of protection that it proposes is based on both science (quantification of the health risk) and value judgement (what is an acceptable risk?) and optimisation is the recommended process to integrate both aspects. Indeed, there has been evolution since the old system of intervention levels to the new system, whereby, even if the level of the dose or risk (which is called constraint in ICRP-81 ) is met

  11. Patient dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrimpton, P.C.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: X-ray examinations remain an essential and widely used diagnostic tool in medicine and hence the most significant source of exposure to man-made radiation for populations. Patterns of practice in diagnostic radiology continue to evolve, with overall growth in the numbers of procedures worldwide and, particularly in developed countries, increasing importance for complex procedures such as computed tomography (CT) and interventional techniques. In order to maximise the benefits from x-rays relative to the associated radiation risks, there is a need to ensure the prior justification of all examinations and the optimisation of patient protection such that doses are as low as reasonably practicable to meet specific clinical requirements. Accordingly, patient dosimetry is a fundamental requirement in diagnostic radiology. Detailed measurements for the assessment of risks or comparison of different types of procedure require the estimation of organ and effective doses. Such comprehensive dosimetry necessarily involves the simulation of clinical practice using anthropomorphic phantoms, with either measurements in a physical phantom or calculations utilising a mathematical phantom. Simpler measurements for the routine monitoring of dose in x-ray departments can be based on practical quantities such as entrance surface dose, dose-area product and, for CT, weighted CT dose index and dose-length product. Widescale surveys reveal significant variations between departments in the typical doses for a given type of procedure and potential scope for dose reductions. In order to promote improvements in practice, the results of periodic dose surveys in departments should be compared with appropriate standards, such as diagnostic reference levels for adult and paediatric patients, that are set nationally or locally for the purposes of promoting critical review of the equipment and techniques in use. Patient dosimetry should form an essential element of routine quality

  12. Optimisation of Investment Resources at Small Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shvets Iryna B.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the article lies in the study of the process of optimisation of the structure of investment resources, development of criteria and stages of optimisation of volumes of investment resources for small enterprises by types of economic activity. The article characterises the process of transformation of investment resources into assets and liabilities of the balances of small enterprises and conducts calculation of the structure of sources of formation of investment resources in Ukraine at small enterprises by types of economic activity in 2011. On the basis of the conducted analysis of the structure of investment resources of small enterprises the article forms main groups of criteria of optimisation in the context of individual small enterprises by types of economic activity. The article offers an algorithm and step-by-step scheme of optimisation of investment resources at small enterprises in the form of a multi-stage process of management of investment resources in the context of increase of their mobility and rate of transformation of existing resources into investments. The prospect of further studies in this direction is development of a structural and logic scheme of optimisation of volumes of investment resources at small enterprises.

  13. Radiology and fine art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinković, Slobodan; Stošić-Opinćal, Tatjana; Tomić, Oliver

    2012-07-01

    The radiologic aesthetics of some body parts and internal organs have inspired certain artists to create specific works of art. Our aim was to describe the link between radiology and fine art. We explored 13,625 artworks in the literature produced by 2049 artists and found several thousand photographs in an online image search. The examination revealed 271 radiologic artworks (1.99%) created by 59 artists (2.88%) who mainly applied radiography, sonography, CT, and MRI. Some authors produced radiologic artistic photographs, and others used radiologic images to create artful compositions, specific sculptures, or digital works. Many radiologic artworks have symbolic, metaphoric, or conceptual connotations. Radiology is clearly becoming an original and important field of modern art.

  14. The selection of occupancy factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakey, J.R.A.

    1977-01-01

    An estimate of the proportion of time that an area is occupied by radiation workers is often used in radiological protection to permit relaxation of exposure rate limits above those for continuous occupation. This proportion is known as an occupancy factor and is used most frequently in X-ray facilities. The strategy for controlling the external exposure of radiation workers must be decided before occupancy factors are selected for the design of the radiation protection facilities. When shielding has to be designed the occupancy factor effects the design objectives and permits increased exposure rates at the shield surface. It is useful to note that the selection of occupancy factors with due regard to the expected spatial variation of the exposure rate can help to reduce the range of the worker's radiation exposure because field gradients are usually steeper close to the shield. When other hazards, such as internal exposure, and other constraints, such as cost of the space consumed, are added, the selection of the optimum set of occupancy factors is more difficult. Two zone occupancy factors are discussed in this paper and proposals are made for a strategy to be used when there is more than one hazard and the designer has to meet constraints imposed by limitations of the facilities available. An important feature of the strategy is the avoidance of high radiation exposure to small groups of workers. The errors involved in assessment of the actual dose received by the radiation worker must be taken into account and in particular the selection of the higher exposure rate limits must be made with attention to the accident potential

  15. Multicriteria Optimisation in Logistics Forwarder Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Poletan Jugović

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Logistics forwarder, as organizer and planner of coordinationand integration of all the transport and logistics chains elements,uses adequate ways and methods in the process of planningand decision-making. One of these methods, analysed inthis paper, which could be used in optimisation of transportand logistics processes and activities of logistics forwarder, isthe multicriteria optimisation method. Using that method, inthis paper is suggested model of multicriteria optimisation of logisticsforwarder activities. The suggested model of optimisationis justified in keeping with method principles of multicriteriaoptimization, which is included in operation researchmethods and it represents the process of multicriteria optimizationof variants. Among many different processes of multicriteriaoptimization, PROMETHEE (Preference Ranking OrganizationMethod for Enrichment Evaluations and Promcalc& Gaia V. 3.2., computer program of multicriteria programming,which is based on the mentioned process, were used.

  16. Noise aspects at aerodynamic blade optimisation projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schepers, J.G.

    1997-06-01

    The Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN) has often been involved in industrial projects, in which blade geometries are created automatic by means of numerical optimisation. Usually, these projects aim at the determination of the aerodynamic optimal wind turbine blade, i.e. the goal is to design a blade which is optimal with regard to energy yield. In other cases, blades have been designed which are optimal with regard to cost of generated energy. However, it is obvious that the wind turbine blade designs which result from these optimisations, are not necessarily optimal with regard to noise emission. In this paper an example is shown of an aerodynamic blade optimisation, using the ECN-program PVOPT. PVOPT calculates the optimal wind turbine blade geometry such that the maximum energy yield is obtained. Using the aerodynamic optimal blade design as a basis, the possibilities of noise reduction are investigated. 11 figs., 8 refs

  17. Optimisation of structural shielding of accelerator control room for compliance with ALARA principle under Indian conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Masood; Singh, Brijesh

    1999-01-01

    The case of a 20 MV x-ray accelerator has been considered in this paper for optimisation. An internationally recommended value of α = US$ 1000 per person-sievert has been assumed. Cost of concrete has been assumed as US$ 82.7/m 3 . It is seen that, extra shielding is needed to satisfy the ALARA principle. Further, the amount of requisite shielding increases with the degree of occupancy and, also, if the local construction materials or the labour are cheaper than considered in this paper. Accordingly 1.5 to 4.75 HVLs may be needed as extra shielding in different situations. Therefore, a site specific and installation specific optimisation of shielding is necessary

  18. Training in Radiation Protection for Interventional Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vano, E.; Guibelalde, E.

    2002-07-01

    Several potential problems have been detected in the safety aspects for the practice of interventional radiology procedures: a) An important increase in the number cases and their complexity and the corresponding increase of installations and specialists involved; b) New X ray systems more sophisticated, with advanced operational possibilities, requiring special skills in the operators to obtain the expected benefits;c) New medical specialists arriving to the interventional arena to profit the benefits of the interventional techniques without previous experience in radiation protection. For that reason, education and training is one of the basic areas in any optimisation programme in radiation protection (RP). the medical field and especially interventional radiology requires actions to promote and to profit the benefit of the new emerging technologies for training (Internet, electronic books, etc). The EC has recently sponsored the MARTIR programme (Multimedia and Audio-visual Radiation Protection Training in Interventional Radiology) with the production of two videos on basic aspects of RP and quality control and one interactive CD-ROM to allow tailored individual training programmes. those educational tools are being distributed cost free in the main European languages. To go ahead with these actions, the EC has decided to promote during 2002, a forum with the main Medical European Societies involved in these interventional procedures. (Author)

  19. Training in Radiation Protection for Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.; Guibelalde, E.

    2002-01-01

    Several potential problems have been detected in the safety aspects for the practice of interventional radiology procedures: a) An important increase in the number cases and their complexity and the corresponding increase of installations and specialists involved; b) New X ray systems more sophisticated, with advanced operational possibilities, requiring special skills in the operators to obtain the expected benefits;c) New medical specialists arriving to the interventional arena to profit the benefits of the interventional techniques without previous experience in radiation protection. For that reason, education and training is one of the basic areas in any optimisation programme in radiation protection (RP). the medical field and especially interventional radiology requires actions to promote and to profit the benefit of the new emerging technologies for training (Internet, electronic books, etc). The EC has recently sponsored the MARTIR programme (Multimedia and Audio-visual Radiation Protection Training in Interventional Radiology) with the production of two videos on basic aspects of RP and quality control and one interactive CD-ROM to allow tailored individual training programmes. those educational tools are being distributed cost free in the main European languages. To go ahead with these actions, the EC has decided to promote during 2002, a forum with the main Medical European Societies involved in these interventional procedures. (Author)

  20. Quality management in a department of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Vosshenrich, R.; Baum, F.; Schorn, C.; Funke, M.; Grabbe, E.; Strasser, G.; Staudacher, J.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose. To increase the quality of internal and external interactions (patients, clinical colleagues, technicians, radiologists) in a department of radiology.Method. Accompanied by a well-experienced adviser workshops have been performed dealing with different topics like ''contact to patients'', ''performance of the radiological report and interaction with the referring colleague'' or ''research and teaching''. A catalogue of different actions was defined to reduce hindrances within the internal and external work-flow.Results. A total number of 53 actions was defined and related to different persons who were responsible for the realisation of the measures within a time interval. Six months after starting the quality management 46 (86%) of the defined actions were realised successfully, and another 4 (8%) measures were still running. There was a moderate increase of satisfaction of the patients and clinical colleagues considering the waiting time.Conclusions. A quality management in a radiological department allows an optimisation of the internal and external interactions. However, the guidance of a well-experienced adviser is as essential as the continuous control of successful finished measures. (orig.) [de

  1. Topology Optimisation of Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thike Aye Min

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks are widely used in a variety of fields including industrial environments. In case of a clustered network the location of cluster head affects the reliability of the network operation. Finding of the optimum location of the cluster head, therefore, is critical for the design of a network. This paper discusses the optimisation approach, based on the brute force algorithm, in the context of topology optimisation of a cluster structure centralised wireless sensor network. Two examples are given to verify the approach that demonstrate the implementation of the brute force algorithm to find an optimum location of the cluster head.

  2. Optimisation need of dental radiodiagnostic procedures: results of effective dose evaluation from Rando phantom measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borio, R.; Chiocchini, S.; Cicioni, R.; Degli Esposti, P.; Rongoni, A.; Sabatini, P.; Saetta, D.M.S.; Regi, L.; Caprino, G.

    1994-01-01

    Radiological examinations of different types are needed in dental practice both to make a correct diagnosis and to carry out an adequate therapy. Particularly in orthodentic practices, because of the youth of the majority of the patients, an assessment of the detriment to health (through the effective dose equivalent) caused by medical diagnostic exposure to ionising radiation is needed to make decisions about the optimisation of dental radiodiagnostic procedures. Experimental data from measurements on a Rando phantom were collected for the radiological examinations required for dental and for orthodontic practices (with and without protective apron and collar). The results show the effectiveness of the leaded apron and collar in all the examinations carried out, particularly in reducing thyroid dose. (author)

  3. The occupational exposure of radiation workers, 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasaki, S; Yamada, N; Sakurai, K [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    1975-03-01

    Because the medical use of x-rays and radioisotopes is gradually increasing for diagnosis and therapy, radiation workers, special doctors, nurses and radiological technicians have occupational exposure. Procedures for monitoring external exposure of personnel include the wearing of a filmbadge or a pocket chamber. The results of filmbadge monitoring in Yamaguchi University Hospital for the last 10 years were described. In 1964, the total number of filmbadges that radiation workers used during a 2 week period of radiological examination and therapy was 610. This has been increasing yearly, and in 1972 it was 1999. Radiological technicians generally had low occupational exposure, and about 90 per cent of their filmbadges were exposed to less than 10 mR. Approximately 65 per cent of the filmbadges that nurses used were less than 10 mR, but some nurses who worked in radium therapy at the isotope ward suffered large doses. Some nurses had occasionally exposure higher than 100 mR in radiological examination. Some doctors sustained an occupational exposure of more than 150 mR. From these data, some problems on radiation monitoring using a filmbadge were discussed.

  4. The occupational exposure of radiation workers, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Shoji; Yamada, Norimasa; Sakurai, Koh

    1975-01-01

    Because the medical use of x-rays and radioisotopes is gradually increasing for diagnosis and therapy, radiation workers, special doctors, nurses and radiological technicians have occupational exposure. Procedures for monitoring external exposure of personnel include the wearing of a filmbadge or a pocket chamber. The results of filmbadge monitoring in Yamaguchi University Hospital for the last 10 years were described. In 1964, the total number of filmbadges that radiation workers used during a 2 week period of radiological examination and therapy was 610. This has been increasing yearly, and in 1972 it was 1999. Radiological technicians generally had low occupational exposure, and about 90 per cent of their filmbadges were exposed to less than 10 mR. Approximately 65 per cent of the filmbadges that nurses used were less than 10 mR, but some nurses who worked in radium therapy at the isotope ward suffered large doses. Some nurses had occasionally exposure higher than 100 mR in radiological examination. Some doctors sustained an occupational exposure of more than 150 mR. From these data, some problems on radiation monitoring using a filmbadge were discussed. (author)

  5. Audit Programmes in a Diagnostic Radiological Facility (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moores, B.M.; Connolly, P.A.; Cole, P.R.

    1998-01-01

    The effective implementation of optimisation strategies for radiation protection in diagnostic radiology including nuclear medicine requires mechanisms for ongoing audit of all relevant factors. The Quality Criteria of the Commission of European Communities highlights clearly the three aspects of a radiological examination which needed to be considered, which are: (i) radiographic technique, (ii) patient dose, and (iii) image quality. Therefore, it is important that the choice of a known and acceptable radiographic technique provides a known outcome in terms of patient dose and image quality. This requirement should be capable of being achieved throughout Europe and capable of being updated as new radiological strategies are developed. Audit programmes aimed at monitoring that this situation exists may be considered at three levels: Level 1 involves routine, periodic, assessment of patient doses on a representative sample of patients undergoing a particular type of examination. Results from this audit are then compared with acceptable and clearly defined diagnostic reference levels or reference dose values which provides a framework for guidance on acceptable practice. A summary of such level 1 programmes which are being pursued in Europe is presented. Level 2 audit programmes, beside patient dose assessment, will also involve an assessment of all those parameters relevant to an X ray examination which may have a bearing on the actual dose delivered to the patient. Such level 2 audit programmes provide the basis for implementation of optimisation strategies for radiation protection in terms of risk reduction, one of the fundamental tenets of radiation protection philosophy. Level 3 audit programmes also include assessment and verification of image quality requirements for particular examinations. This latter aspect is a necessary basis for overall optimisation of radiation protection in diagnostic radiology. (author)

  6. Poul Erik Andersen's radiological work on Osteochondrodysplasias and interventional radiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Erik

    2011-01-01

    Hospital. His significant experience and extensive scientific work has led to many posts in the Danish Society of Interventional Radiology, the European Society of Radiology and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe, where he is a fellow and has passed the European Board...... of Interventional Radiology - The European qualification in Interventional Radiology....

  7. Application of Surpac and Whittle Software in Open Pit Optimisation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of Surpac and Whittle Software in Open Pit Optimisation and Design. ... This paper studies the Surpac and Whittle software and their application in designing an optimised pit. ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  8. (MBO) algorithm in multi-reservoir system optimisation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative study of marriage in honey bees optimisation (MBO) algorithm in ... A practical application of the marriage in honey bees optimisation (MBO) ... to those of other evolutionary algorithms, such as the genetic algorithm (GA), ant ...

  9. A comparison of an energy/economic-based against an exergoeconomic-based multi-objective optimisation for low carbon building energy design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García Kerdan, Iván; Raslan, Rokia; Ruyssevelt, Paul; Morillón Gálvez, David

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a comparison of the optimisation of building energy retrofit strategies from two different perspectives: an energy/economic-based analysis and an exergy/exergoeconomic-based analysis. A recently retrofitted community centre is used as a case study. ExRET-Opt, a novel building energy/exergy simulation tool with multi-objective optimisation capabilities based on NSGA-II is used to run both analysis. The first analysis, based on the 1st Law only, simultaneously optimises building energy use and design's Net Present Value (NPV). The second analysis, based on the 1st and the 2nd Laws, simultaneously optimises exergy destructions and the exergoeconomic cost-benefit index. Occupant thermal comfort is considered as a common objective function for both approaches. The aim is to assess the difference between the methods and calculate the performance among main indicators, considering the same decision variables and constraints. Outputs show that the inclusion of exergy/exergoeconomics as objective functions into the optimisation procedure has resulted in similar 1st Law and thermal comfort outputs, while providing solutions with less environmental impact under similar capital investments. This outputs demonstrate how the 1st Law is only a necessary calculation while the utilisation of the 1st and 2nd Laws becomes a sufficient condition for the analysis and design of low carbon buildings. - Highlights: • The study compares an energy-based and an exergy-based building design optimisation. • Occupant thermal comfort is considered as a common objective function. • A comparison of thermodynamic outputs is made against the actual retrofit design. • Under similar constraints, second law optimisation presents better overall results. • Exergoeconomic optimisation solutions improves building exergy efficiency to double.

  10. Occupational hazards

    OpenAIRE

    Paz-Fuchs, Amir; Ronen, Yaël

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an analysis and a critique of the law governing the employment relationship between Israeli employers and Palestinian employees in industries operating in the West Bank. \\ud \\ud Through an analysis of Israeli jurisprudence it highlights the intersection among different areas of law: choice of law, public international law (in particular the law of occupation), and labor law. The article explores the tensions that this intersection creates: first, between the importance t...

  11. Socioeconomic trends in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barneveld Binkhuysen, F.H.

    1998-01-01

    For radiology the socioeconomic environment is a topic of increasing importance. In addition to the well-known important scientific developments in radiology such as interventional MRI, several other major trends can be recognized: (1) changes in the delivery of health care, in which all kinds of managed care are developing and will influence the practice of radiology, and (2) the process of computerization and digitization. The socioeconomic environment of radiology will be transformed by the developments in managed care, teleradiology and the integration of information systems. If radiologists want to manage future radiology departments they must have an understanding of the changes in the fields of economics and politics that are taking place and that will increasingly influence radiology. Some important and recognizable aspects of these changes will be described here. (orig.)

  12. Extending Particle Swarm Optimisers with Self-Organized Criticality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvbjerg, Morten; Krink, Thiemo

    2002-01-01

    Particle swarm optimisers (PSOs) show potential in function optimisation, but still have room for improvement. Self-organized criticality (SOC) can help control the PSO and add diversity. Extending the PSO with SOC seems promising reaching faster convergence and better solutions.......Particle swarm optimisers (PSOs) show potential in function optimisation, but still have room for improvement. Self-organized criticality (SOC) can help control the PSO and add diversity. Extending the PSO with SOC seems promising reaching faster convergence and better solutions....

  13. Optimisation of surgical care for rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borstlap, W.A.A.

    2017-01-01

    Optimisation of surgical care means weighing the risk of treatment related morbidity against the patients’ potential benefits of a surgical intervention. The first part of this thesis focusses on the anaemic patient undergoing colorectal surgery. Hypothesizing that a more profound haemoglobin

  14. On optimal development and becoming an optimiser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruyter, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    The article aims to provide a justification for the claim that optimal development and becoming an optimiser are educational ideals that parents should pursue in raising their children. Optimal development is conceptualised as enabling children to grow into flourishing persons, that is persons who

  15. Particle Swarm Optimisation with Spatial Particle Extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krink, Thiemo; Vesterstrøm, Jakob Svaneborg; Riget, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce spatial extension to particles in the PSO model in order to overcome premature convergence in iterative optimisation. The standard PSO and the new model (SEPSO) are compared w.r.t. performance on well-studied benchmark problems. We show that the SEPSO indeed managed...

  16. OPTIMISATION OF COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH OF PERIWINKLE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, a regression model is developed to predict and optimise the compressive strength of periwinkle shell aggregate concrete using Scheffe's regression theory. The results obtained from the derived regression model agreed favourably with the experimental data. The model was tested for adequacy using a student ...

  17. An efficient optimisation method in groundwater resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DRINIE

    2003-10-04

    Oct 4, 2003 ... theories developed in the field of stochastic subsurface hydrology. In reality, many ... Recently, some researchers have applied the multi-stage ... Then a robust solution of the optimisation problem given by Eqs. (1) to (3) is as ...

  18. Water distribution systems design optimisation using metaheuristics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The topic of multi-objective water distribution systems (WDS) design optimisation using metaheuristics is investigated, comparing numerous modern metaheuristics, including several multi-objective evolutionary algorithms, an estimation of distribution algorithm and a recent hyperheuristic named AMALGAM (an evolutionary ...

  19. Optimisation of efficiency of axial fans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, Nicolaas P.; Pennings, P.C.; Faasen, R.

    2014-01-01

    A three-stage research project has been executed to develop ducted axial-fans with increased efficiency. In the first stage a design method has been developed in which various conflicting design criteria can be incorporated. Based on this design method, an optimised design has been determined

  20. Thermodynamic optimisation of a heat exchanger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Rene; Hirs, Gerard

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to show that for the optimal design of an energy system, where there is a trade-off between exergy saving during operation and exergy use during construction of the energy system, exergy analysis and life cycle analysis should be combined. An exergy optimisation of a

  1. Self-optimising control of sewer systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Montero-Castro, Ignacio; Mollerup, Ane Loft

    2013-01-01

    . The definition of an optimal performance was carried out by through a two-stage optimisation (stochastic and deterministic) to take into account both the overflow during the current rain event as well as the expected overflow, given the probability of a future rain event. The methodology is successfully applied...

  2. Radiological Emergency Response Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Quality Data Asset includes all current and historical emergency radiological response event and incident of national significance data and surveillance, monitoring,...

  3. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-11-21

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint.

  4. Machine Learning and Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. PMID:22465077

  5. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint

  6. Machine learning and radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Optimization of radiological protection in Spanish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donnell, P.; Amor, I.; Butragueno, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Optimizing the radiological protection of occupationally exposed nuclear power plant workers has become one further item in what is called the safety culture. Spanish facilities are implementing programme with this in mind, grounded on a personal motivation policy with the backing of a suitable organizational structure. (Author)

  8. The 7 basic tools of quality applied to radiological safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez F, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    This work seeks to establish a series of correspondences among the search of the quality and the optimization of the doses received by the occupationally exposed personnel. There are treated about the seven basic statistic tools of the quality: the Pareto technique, Cause effect diagrams, Stratification, Verification sheet, Histograms, Dispersion diagrams and Graphics and control frames applied to the Radiological Safety

  9. Optimising Shovel-Truck Fuel Consumption using Stochastic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimising the fuel consumption and truck waiting time can result in significant fuel savings. The paper demonstrates that stochastic simulation is an effective tool for optimising the utilisation of fossil-based fuels in mining and related industries. Keywords: Stochastic, Simulation Modelling, Mining, Optimisation, Shovel-Truck ...

  10. Design of optimised backstepping controller for the synchronisation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ehsan Fouladi

    2017-12-18

    Dec 18, 2017 ... for the proposed optimised method compared to PSO optimised controller or any non-optimised backstepping controller. Keywords. Colpitts oscillator; backstepping controller; chaos synchronisation; shark smell algorithm; particle .... The velocity model is based on the gradient of the objective function, tilting ...

  11. Efficient topology optimisation of multiscale and multiphysics problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe

    The aim of this Thesis is to present efficient methods for optimising high-resolution problems of a multiscale and multiphysics nature. The Thesis consists of two parts: one treating topology optimisation of microstructural details and the other treating topology optimisation of conjugate heat...

  12. Guidelines on patient dose to promote the optimisation of protection for diagnostic medical exposures : documents of the NRPB v 10(1), 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Heron, J.

    1999-01-01

    Historically there has always been plenty of scope for the optimisation of radiation protection in diagnostic radiology. The message has always been to obtain diagnostically useful images for doses that are as low as reasonably achievable. But because of the large number of factors influencing both image quality and patient dose, there has persisted, to this day, a wide range of doses for any given X-ray procedure. In the above publication (documents of the NRPB v 10(1), 1999) an advisory group offers summary advice and some fresh ideas to help guide the process of optimisation in the context of the UK. (author)

  13. Validation of a large-scale audit technique for CT dose optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, T. J.; Davis, A. W.; Moore, C. S.; Beavis, A. W.; Saunderson, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    The expansion and increasing availability of computed tomography (CT) imaging means that there is a greater need for the development of efficient optimisation strategies that are able to inform clinical practice, without placing a significant burden on limited departmental resources. One of the most fundamental aspects to any optimisation programme is the collection of patient dose information, which can be compared with appropriate diagnostic reference levels. This study has investigated the implementation of a large-scale audit technique, which utilises data that already exist in the radiology information system, to determine typical doses for a range of examinations on four CT scanners. This method has been validated against what is considered the 'gold standard' technique for patient dose audits, and it has been demonstrated that results equivalent to the 'standard-sized patient' can be inferred from this much larger data set. This is particularly valuable where CT optimisation is concerned as it is considered a 'high dose' technique, and hence close monitoring of patient dose is particularly important. (authors)

  14. Occupation: nurse; occupational hazard: radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickson, K.

    1984-01-01

    The work of the occupational health nurses at the Pickering Generating Station is described. A staff of two nurses teach first aid and safety, practice an emergency plan, and monitor personnel for minimum health standards for radiation workers. Special attention is paid to problems which might be aggravated by radiation, such as skin complaints, respiratory diseases, emotional stability, or phobias regarding heights, plastic suits, or radiation itself. Procedures used in treating contaminated personnel are outlined

  15. Occupation: nurse; occupational hazard: radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickson, K

    1984-03-01

    The work of the occupational health nurses at the Pickering Generating Station is described. A staff of two nurses teach first aid and safety, practice an emergency plan, and monitor personnel for minimum health standards for radiation workers. Special attention is paid to problems which might be aggravated by radiation, such as skin complaints, respiratory diseases, emotional stability, or phobias regarding heights, plastic suits, or radiation itself. Procedures used in treating contaminated personnel are outlined.

  16. Managing patient dose in digital radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Digital techniques have the potential to improve the practice of radiology but they also risk the overuse of radiation. The main advantages of digital imaging, i.e. wide dynamic range, post processing, multiple viewing options, and electronic transfer and archiving possibilities, are clear but overexposures can occur without an adverse impact on image quality. In conventional radiography, excessive exposure produces a black film. In digital systems, good images are obtained for a large range of doses. It is very easy to obtain (and delete) images with digital fluoroscopy systems, and there may be a tendency to obtain more images than necessary. In digital radiology, higher patient dose usually means improved image quality, so a tendency to use higher patient doses than necessary could occur. Different medical imaging tasks require different levels of image quality, and doses that have no additional benefit for the clinical purpose should be avoided. Image quality can be compromised by inappropriate levels of data compression and/or post processing techniques. All these new challenges should be part of the optimisation process and should be included in clinical and technical protocols. Local diagnostic reference levels should be re-evaluated for digital imaging, and patient dose parameters should be displayed at the operator console. Frequent patient dose audits should occur when digital techniques are introduced. Training in the management of image quality and patient dose in digital radiology is necessary. Digital radiology will involve new regulations and invoke new challenges for practitioners. As digital images are easier to obtain and transmit, the justification criteria should be reinforced. Commissioning of digital systems should involve clinical specialists, medical physicists, and radiographers to ensure that imaging capability and radiation dose management are integrated. Quality control requires new procedures and protocols (visualisation, transmission

  17. Occupational radiation risks in conveyance of bulk phosphate and potash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grof, Y.; Even, O.; Schlesinger, T.; Margaliot, M.

    1996-01-01

    The issue of occupational ionizing radiation risks encountered in the conveyance and storage of Phosphates and Potash as loose cargo got very minor attention from the national health and occupational safety authorities in the world. In Israel, the Phosphates include an average 100- 150 ppm of Uranium in equilibrium with its daughters, while in Phosphates produced in most other countries the inaction reaches regularly only few ppm up to 50 ppm. Because of the high content of the Uranium in the Phosphate in Israel we must take into consideration the radiological implications involved in the handling of this mineral. The radiological implications of handling Potash are less significant but can not be neglected as we demonstrate bellow In this presentation we will estimate the occupational radiological risks involved in the storing and transportation of Phosphate and Potash. Note, that the main risk in working with Phosphate and Potash is the risk from the dust itself (authors)

  18. Occupational radiation risks in conveyance of bulk phosphate and potash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grof, Y; Even, O; Schlesinger, T; Margaliot, M [Israel Atomic Energy Commission, Yavne (Israel). Soreq Nuclear Research Center

    1996-12-01

    The issue of occupational ionizing radiation risks encountered in the conveyance and storage of Phosphates and Potash as loose cargo got very minor attention from the national health and occupational safety authorities in the world. In Israel, the Phosphates include an average 100- 150 ppm of Uranium in equilibrium with its daughters, while in Phosphates produced in most other countries the inaction reaches regularly only few ppm up to 50 ppm. Because of the high content of the Uranium in the Phosphate in Israel we must take into consideration the radiological implications involved in the handling of this mineral. The radiological implications of handling Potash are less significant but can not be neglected as we demonstrate bellow In this presentation we will estimate the occupational radiological risks involved in the storing and transportation of Phosphate and Potash. Note, that the main risk in working with Phosphate and Potash is the risk from the dust itself (authors).

  19. Radiological hazards to uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    The purpose of the present document is to review and assess the occupational hazards to uranium miners in Canada. Amendments to regulations set the maximum permissible dose to uranium miners at 50 mSv per year. Uranium miners are exposed to radon and thoron progeny, external gamma radiation and long-lived alpha-emitting radionuclides in dust. The best estimate for the lifetime risk of inhaled radon progeny is about 3 x 10 -4 lung cancers per WLM for the average miner, with a range of uncertainty from about 1 -6 x 10 -4 per WLM. This central value is nearly twice as high as that recommended by the ICRP in 1981. The probability of serious biological consequences following exposure to external gamma rays is currently under review but is expected to be in the range of 3 - 6 x 10 -2 Sv -1 . Dosimetric calculations indicate that the stochastic risks per WLM of thoron progeny are about one-third of those for radon progeny. The annual limits on intake of inhaled ore dusts recommended by the ICRP are probably too low by at least a factor of two for the type of ore and dust normally encountered in underground uranium mines in Ontario; this is due in part to the fact that the average diameter of these dusts is five times greater than the value used by the ICRP. Radiological exposures of uranium miners in Canada were reviewed. The biological impact of these exposures were compared with those of conventional accidents on the basis of the years of normal life expectancy that are lost or seriously impaired due to occupational hazards. The objectives in considering all occupational risks are to reduce the total risk from all causes and to use funds spent for health protection as effectively as possible

  20. Radiological protection in medicine. ICRP Publication 105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This report was prepared to underpin the Commission's 2007 Recommendations with regard to the medical exposure of patients, including their comforters and carers, and volunteers in biomedical research. It addresses the proper application of the fundamental principles (justification, optimisation of protection, and application of dose limits) of the Commission's 2007 Recommendations to these individuals. With regard to medical exposure of patients, it is not appropriate to apply dose limits or dose constraints, because such limits would often do more harm than good. Often, there are concurrent chronic, severe, or even life-threatening medical conditions that are more critical than the radiation exposure. The emphasis is then on justification of the medical procedures and on the optimisation of radiological protection. In diagnostic and interventional procedures, justification of procedures (for a defined purpose and for an individual patient), and management of the patient dose commensurate with the medical task, are the appropriate mechanisms to avoid unnecessary or unproductive radiation exposure. Equipment features that facilitate patient dose management, and diagnostic reference levels derived at the appropriate national, regional, or local level, are likely to be the most effective approaches. In radiation therapy, the avoidance of accidents is a predominant issue. With regard to comforters and carers, and volunteers in biomedical research, dose constraints are appropriate. Over the last decade, the Commission has published a number of documents that provided detailed advice related to radiological protection and safety in the medical applications of ionising radiation. Each of the publications addressed a specific topic defined by the type of radiation source and the medical discipline in which the source is applied, and was written with the intent of communicating directly with the relevant medical practitioners and supporting medical staff. This report

  1. ICRP Publication 105. Radiological Protection in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, Bernard; Biau, Alain; Derreumaux, Sylvie; Etard, Cecile; Rannou, Alain; Rehel, Jean-Luc; Roch, Patrice Elle a ete validee par le Professeur Jean-Marc Cosset

    2011-01-01

    This report was prepared to underpin the Commission's 2007 Recommendations with regard to the medical exposure of patients, including their comforters and carers, and volunteers in biomedical research. It addresses the proper application of the fundamental principles (justification, optimisation of protection, and application of dose limits) of the Commission's 2007 Recommendations to these individuals. With regard to medical exposure of patients, it is not appropriate to apply dose limits or dose constraints, because such limits would often do more harm than good. Often, there are concurrent chronic, severe, or even life-threatening medical conditions that are more critical than the radiation exposure. The emphasis is then on justification of the medical procedures and on the optimisation of radiological protection. In diagnostic and interventional procedures, justification of procedures (for a defined purpose and for an individual patient), and management of the patient dose commensurate with the medical task, are the appropriate mechanisms to avoid unnecessary or unproductive radiation exposure. Equipment features that facilitate patient dose management, and diagnostic reference levels derived at the appropriate national, regional, or local level, are likely to be the most effective approaches. In radiation therapy, the avoidance of accidents is a predominant issue. With regard to comforters and carers, and volunteers in biomedical research, dose constraints are appropriate. Over the last decade, the Commission has published a number of documents that provided detailed advice related to radiological protection and safety in the medical applications of ionising radiation. Each of the publications addressed a specific topic defined by the type of radiation source and the medical discipline in which the source is applied, and was written with the intent of communicating directly with the relevant medical practitioners and supporting medical staff. This

  2. Occupational physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Toomingas, Allan; Tornqvist, Ewa Wigaeus

    2011-01-01

    In a clear and accessible presentation, Occupational Physiology focuses on important issues in the modern working world. Exploring major public health problems-such as musculoskeletal disorders and stress-this book explains connections between work, well-being, and health based on up-to-date research in the field. It provides useful methods for risk assessment and guidelines on arranging a good working life from the perspective of the working individual, the company, and society as a whole.The book focuses on common, stressful situations in different professions. Reviewing bodily demands and r

  3. Reducing occupational radiation exposures at LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattanzi, D.; Neri, C.; Papa, C.; Paribelli, S.

    1980-01-01

    The occupational radiation doses received by nuclear power plant personnel during a period of several years of operation are briefly reviewed. Comparisons are made between the data for BWRs and PWRs in order to identify the more ''critical'' reactor type, from a radiological poin; of view. Attention is also devoted to GCRs. Furthermore the areas which contribute most to personnel doses are considered and briefly reviewed. The main steps to be taken in order to reduce occupational radiation exposures at LWRs are discussed. (H.K.)

  4. DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure, 2001 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2001-12-31

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its operations, including radiological, to ensure the safety and health of all DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures to levels that are “As Low As Reasonably Achievable” (ALARA). The 2001 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides a summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE, and energy research.

  5. [Instruction in dental radiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanden, W.J.M. van der; Kreulen, C.M.; Berkhout, W.E.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic use of oral radiology is an essential part of daily dental practice. Due to the potentially harmful nature of ionising radiation, the clinical use of oral radiology in the Netherlands is framed by clinical practice guidelines and regulatory requirements. Undergraduate students receive

  6. Medical Ethics in Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Won; Park, Jae Hyung; Yoon, Soon Ho

    2010-01-01

    According to the recent developments in radiological techniques, the role of radiology in the clinical management of patients is ever increasing and in turn, so is the importance of radiology in patient management. Thus far, there have been few open discussions about medical ethics related to radiology in Korea. Hence, concern about medical ethics as an essential field of radiology should be part of an improved resident training program and patient management. The categories of medical ethics related with radiology are ethics in the radiological management of patient, the relationship of radiologists with other medical professionals or companies, the hazard level of radiation for patients and radiologists, quality assurance of image products and modalities, research ethics, and other ethics issues related to teleradiology and fusion imaging. In order to achieve the goal of respectful progress in radiology as well as minimizing any adverse reaction from other medical professions or society, we should establish a strong basis of medical ethics through the continuous concern and self education

  7. Physics of Radiology

    CERN Document Server

    Johns, Harold Elford

    1983-01-01

    Authority, comprehensivity and a consummate manner of presentation have been hallmarks of The Physics of Radiology since it first saw publication some three decades past. This Fourth Edition adheres to that tradition but again updates the context. It thoroughly integrates ideas recently advanced and practices lately effected. Students and professionals alike will continue to view it, in essence, as the bible of radiological physics.

  8. Gout. Radiological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix; Pena Cortes, Mario; Rondon Herrera, Federico; Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Calvo Paramo, Enrique

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we reviewed the clinical and radiological aspects of gout, showing the most frequent radiological findings that can guide to the correct diagnosis of the disease. The cases that we presented here have been analyzed for many years in our rheumatology service, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Hospital San Juan de Dios, Bogota

  9. Advanced Neutron Source radiological design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westbrook, J.L.

    1995-08-01

    The operation of the proposed Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) facility will present a variety of radiological protection problems. Because it is desired to design and operate the ANS according to the applicable licensing standards of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), it must be demonstrated that the ANS radiological design basis is consistent not only with state and Department of Energy (DOE) and other usual federal regulations, but also, so far as is practicable, with NRC regulations and with recommendations of such organizations as the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Also, the ANS radiological design basis is in general to be consistent with the recommendations of authoritative professional and scientific organizations, specifically the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). As regards radiological protection, the principal goals of DOE regulations and guidance are to keep occupational doses ALARA [as low as (is) reasonably achievable], given the current state of technology, costs, and operations requirements; to control and monitor contained and released radioactivity during normal operation to keep public doses and releases to the environment ALARA; and to limit doses to workers and the public during accident conditions. Meeting these general design objectives requires that principles of dose reduction and of radioactivity control by employed in the design, operation, modification, and decommissioning of the ANS. The purpose of this document is to provide basic radiological criteria for incorporating these principles into the design of the ANS. Operations, modification, and decommissioning will be covered only as they are affected by design

  10. Global view on the radiological protection of patients: PAHO position paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borras, C.

    2001-01-01

    The Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO), founded in 1902, initiated a radiological health programme in the 1950s. Within this programme, there are currently three lines of work: (a) radiology services; (b) radiation safety; and (c) radiological emergencies. Radiology services deals with health services for diagnostic and interventional imaging, and for radiation therapy. Radiation safety studies the three types of exposures to both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation: occupational; medical; and public. Radiological emergencies involve radioactive waste management programmes and emergency plans. The radiological protection of patients is addressed in each of these areas: (a) when analysing the infrastructure of radiology services; and (b) when determining medical exposures; and (c) when investigating overexposures in interventional or therapeutic procedures or under-doses in radiation therapy. (author)

  11. Real-time optimisation of the Hoa Binh reservoir, Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richaud, Bertrand; Madsen, Henrik; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2011-01-01

    -time optimisation. First, the simulation-optimisation framework is applied for optimising reservoir operating rules. Secondly, real-time and forecast information is used for on-line optimisation that focuses on short-term goals, such as flood control or hydropower generation, without compromising the deviation...... in the downstream part of the Red River, and at the same time to increase hydropower generation and to save water for the dry season. The real-time optimisation procedure further improves the efficiency of the reservoir operation and enhances the flexibility for the decision-making. Finally, the quality......Multi-purpose reservoirs often have to be managed according to conflicting objectives, which requires efficient tools for trading-off the objectives. This paper proposes a multi-objective simulation-optimisation approach that couples off-line rule curve optimisation with on-line real...

  12. NV/YMP RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL MANUAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE; BECHTEL NEVADA

    2004-11-01

    This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and the Yucca Mountain Office of Repository Development (YMORD). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835), Occupational Radiation Protection. Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Pleasanton, California; and at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, field work by NNSA/NSO at other locations is also covered by this manual.

  13. NV/YMP RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL MANUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and the Yucca Mountain Office of Repository Development (YMORD). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835), Occupational Radiation Protection. Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Pleasanton, California; and at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, field work by NNSA/NSO at other locations is also covered by this manual

  14. Acoustic Resonator Optimisation for Airborne Particle Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendran, Citsabehsan; Billson, Duncan R.; Hutchins, David A.; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    Advances in micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology and biomedical research necessitate micro-machined manipulators to capture, handle and position delicate micron-sized particles. To this end, a parallel plate acoustic resonator system has been investigated for the purposes of manipulation and entrapment of micron sized particles in air. Numerical and finite element modelling was performed to optimise the design of the layered acoustic resonator. To obtain an optimised resonator design, careful considerations of the effect of thickness and material properties are required. Furthermore, the effect of acoustic attenuation which is dependent on frequency is also considered within this study, leading to an optimum operational frequency range. Finally, experimental results demonstrated good particle levitation and capture of various particle properties and sizes ranging to as small as 14.8 μm.

  15. Techno-economic optimisation of energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansilla Pellen, Ch.

    2006-07-01

    The traditional approach currently used to assess the economic interest of energy systems is based on a defined flow-sheet. Some studies have shown that the flow-sheets corresponding to the best thermodynamic efficiencies do not necessarily lead to the best production costs. A method called techno-economic optimisation was proposed. This method aims at minimising the production cost of a given energy system, including both investment and operating costs. It was implemented using genetic algorithms. This approach was compared to the heat integration method on two different examples, thus validating its interest. Techno-economic optimisation was then applied to different energy systems dealing with hydrogen as well as electricity production. (author)

  16. Pre-operative optimisation of lung function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naheed Azhar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The anaesthetic management of patients with pre-existing pulmonary disease is a challenging task. It is associated with increased morbidity in the form of post-operative pulmonary complications. Pre-operative optimisation of lung function helps in reducing these complications. Patients are advised to stop smoking for a period of 4–6 weeks. This reduces airway reactivity, improves mucociliary function and decreases carboxy-haemoglobin. The widely used incentive spirometry may be useful only when combined with other respiratory muscle exercises. Volume-based inspiratory devices have the best results. Pharmacotherapy of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease must be optimised before considering the patient for elective surgery. Beta 2 agonists, inhaled corticosteroids and systemic corticosteroids, are the main drugs used for this and several drugs play an adjunctive role in medical therapy. A graded approach has been suggested to manage these patients for elective surgery with an aim to achieve optimal pulmonary function.

  17. Occupational exposure in the National Institute of Nuclear Research between 1990-1994. Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar A, L.; Molina, G.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper an analysis of the occupational doses of the workers is performed, in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the programs and activities of the radiological occupational control that the Radiological Protection Department has been carrying out in order to execute the ALARA Recommendation. It is also discussed the possibility of adopting the recommendations about dose limits of ICRP 60. (authors). 4 refs., 6 figs

  18. Coefficients calculations of conversion of cancer risk for occupational exposure using Monte Carlo simulations in cardiac procedures of interventionist radiology; Calculo de coeficientes de conversao de risco de cancer para exposicoes medicas e ocupacionais usando simulacoes Monte Carlo em procedimentos cardiacos de radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, William S.; Neves, Lucio P.; Perini, Ana P.; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: wssantos@ipen.br, E-mail: lpneves@ipen.br, E-mail: aperini@ipen.br, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Maia, Ana F., E-mail: afmaia@ufs.br [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2014-07-01

    Cardiac procedures are among the most common procedures in interventional radiology (IR), and can lead to high medical and occupational exposures, as in most cases are procedures complex and long lasting. In this work, conversion coefficients (CC) for the risk of cancer, normalized by kerma area product (KAP) to the patient, cardiologist and nurse were calculated using Monte Carlo simulation. The patient and the cardiologist were represented by anthropomorphic simulators MESH, and the nurse by anthropomorphic phantom FASH. Simulators were incorporated into the code of Monte Carlo MCNPX. Two scenarios were created: in the first (1), lead curtain and protective equipment suspended were not included, and in the second (2) these devices were inserted. The radiographic parameters employed in Monte Carlo simulations were: tube voltage of 60 kVp and 120 kVp; filtration of the beam and 3,5 mmAl beam area of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}. The average values of CCs to eight projections (in 10{sup -4} / Gy.cm{sup 2} were 1,2 for the patient, 2,6E-03 (scenario 1) and 4,9E-04 (scenario 2) for cardiologist and 5,2E-04 (scenario 1) and 4,0E-04 (Scenario 2) to the nurse. The results show a significant reduction in CCs for professionals, when the lead curtain and protective equipment suspended are employed. The evaluation method used in this work can provide important information on the risk of cancer patient and professional, and thus improve the protection of workers in cardiac procedures of RI.

  19. Optimised dipper fine tunes shovel performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiscor, S.

    2005-06-01

    Joint efforts between mine operators, OEMs, and researchers yields unexpected benefits from dippers for shovels for coal, oil, or hardrock mining that can now be tailored to meet site-specific conditions. The article outlines a process being developed by CRCMining and P & H MIning Equipment to optimise the dipper that involves rapid prototyping and scale modelling of the dipper and the mine conditions. Scale models have been successfully field tested. 2 photos.

  20. Public transport optimisation emphasising passengers’ travel behaviour.

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Jens Parbo; Nielsen, Otto Anker; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Passengers in public transport complaining about their travel experiences are not uncommon. This might seem counterintuitive since several operators worldwide are presenting better key performance indicators year by year. The present PhD study focuses on developing optimisation algorithms to enhance the operations of public transport while explicitly emphasising passengers’ travel behaviour and preferences. Similar to economic theory, interactions between supply and demand are omnipresent in ...

  1. ATLAS software configuration and build tool optimisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybkin, Grigory; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    ATLAS software code base is over 6 million lines organised in about 2000 packages. It makes use of some 100 external software packages, is developed by more than 400 developers and used by more than 2500 physicists from over 200 universities and laboratories in 6 continents. To meet the challenge of configuration and building of this software, the Configuration Management Tool (CMT) is used. CMT expects each package to describe its build targets, build and environment setup parameters, dependencies on other packages in a text file called requirements, and each project (group of packages) to describe its policies and dependencies on other projects in a text project file. Based on the effective set of configuration parameters read from the requirements files of dependent packages and project files, CMT commands build the packages, generate the environment for their use, or query the packages. The main focus was on build time performance that was optimised within several approaches: reduction of the number of reads of requirements files that are now read once per package by a CMT build command that generates cached requirements files for subsequent CMT build commands; introduction of more fine-grained build parallelism at package task level, i.e., dependent applications and libraries are compiled in parallel; code optimisation of CMT commands used for build; introduction of package level build parallelism, i. e., parallelise the build of independent packages. By default, CMT launches NUMBER-OF-PROCESSORS build commands in parallel. The other focus was on CMT commands optimisation in general that made them approximately 2 times faster. CMT can generate a cached requirements file for the environment setup command, which is especially useful for deployment on distributed file systems like AFS or CERN VMFS. The use of parallelism, caching and code optimisation significantly-by several times-reduced software build time, environment setup time, increased the efficiency of

  2. Nevada National Security Site Radiological Control Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, 'Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 1 issued in February 2010. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect a recent change in name for the NTS; changes in name for some tenant organizations; and to update references to current DOE policies, orders, and guidance documents. Article 237.2 was deleted. Appendix 3B was updated. Article 411.2 was modified. Article 422 was re-written to reflect the wording of DOE O 458.1. Article 431.6.d was modified. The glossary was updated. This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection.' Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Livermore, California; and Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, fieldwork by NNSA/NSO at other locations is covered by this manual. Current activities at NNSS include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for United States defense-generated waste, assembly and execution of subcritical experiments, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, the storage and use of special nuclear materials, performing criticality experiments, emergency responder training, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, environmental activity by the University system, and nonnuclear test operations, such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center. Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of

  3. Nevada National Security Site Radiological Control Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radiological Control Managers’ Council

    2012-03-26

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, 'Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 1 issued in February 2010. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect a recent change in name for the NTS; changes in name for some tenant organizations; and to update references to current DOE policies, orders, and guidance documents. Article 237.2 was deleted. Appendix 3B was updated. Article 411.2 was modified. Article 422 was re-written to reflect the wording of DOE O 458.1. Article 431.6.d was modified. The glossary was updated. This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection.' Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Livermore, California; and Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, fieldwork by NNSA/NSO at other locations is covered by this manual. Current activities at NNSS include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for United States defense-generated waste, assembly and execution of subcritical experiments, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, the storage and use of special nuclear materials, performing criticality experiments, emergency responder training, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, environmental activity by the University system, and nonnuclear test operations, such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center. Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of

  4. Natural Erosion of Sandstone as Shape Optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostanin, Igor; Safonov, Alexander; Oseledets, Ivan

    2017-12-11

    Natural arches, pillars and other exotic sandstone formations have always been attracting attention for their unusual shapes and amazing mechanical balance that leave a strong impression of intelligent design rather than the result of a stochastic process. It has been recently demonstrated that these shapes could have been the result of the negative feedback between stress and erosion that originates in fundamental laws of friction between the rock's constituent particles. Here we present a deeper analysis of this idea and bridge it with the approaches utilized in shape and topology optimisation. It appears that the processes of natural erosion, driven by stochastic surface forces and Mohr-Coulomb law of dry friction, can be viewed within the framework of local optimisation for minimum elastic strain energy. Our hypothesis is confirmed by numerical simulations of the erosion using the topological-shape optimisation model. Our work contributes to a better understanding of stochastic erosion and feasible landscape formations that could be found on Earth and beyond.

  5. Exploration of automatic optimisation for CUDA programming

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Mouhamed, Mayez

    2014-09-16

    © 2014 Taylor & Francis. Writing optimised compute unified device architecture (CUDA) program for graphic processing units (GPUs) is complex even for experts. We present a design methodology for a restructuring tool that converts C-loops into optimised CUDA kernels based on a three-step algorithm which are loop tiling, coalesced memory access and resource optimisation. A method for finding possible loop tiling solutions with coalesced memory access is developed and a simplified algorithm for restructuring C-loops into an efficient CUDA kernel is presented. In the evaluation, we implement matrix multiply (MM), matrix transpose (M-transpose), matrix scaling (M-scaling) and matrix vector multiply (MV) using the proposed algorithm. We present the analysis of the execution time and GPU throughput for the above applications, which favourably compare to other proposals. Evaluation is carried out while scaling the problem size and running under a variety of kernel configurations. The obtained speedup is about 28-35% for M-transpose compared to NVIDIA Software Development Kit, 33% speedup for MV compared to general purpose computation on graphics processing unit compiler, and more than 80% speedup for MM and M-scaling compared to CUDA-lite.

  6. Exploration of automatic optimisation for CUDA programming

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Mouhamed, Mayez; Khan, Ayaz ul Hassan

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Taylor & Francis. Writing optimised compute unified device architecture (CUDA) program for graphic processing units (GPUs) is complex even for experts. We present a design methodology for a restructuring tool that converts C-loops into optimised CUDA kernels based on a three-step algorithm which are loop tiling, coalesced memory access and resource optimisation. A method for finding possible loop tiling solutions with coalesced memory access is developed and a simplified algorithm for restructuring C-loops into an efficient CUDA kernel is presented. In the evaluation, we implement matrix multiply (MM), matrix transpose (M-transpose), matrix scaling (M-scaling) and matrix vector multiply (MV) using the proposed algorithm. We present the analysis of the execution time and GPU throughput for the above applications, which favourably compare to other proposals. Evaluation is carried out while scaling the problem size and running under a variety of kernel configurations. The obtained speedup is about 28-35% for M-transpose compared to NVIDIA Software Development Kit, 33% speedup for MV compared to general purpose computation on graphics processing unit compiler, and more than 80% speedup for MM and M-scaling compared to CUDA-lite.

  7. Optimisation and symmetry in experimental radiation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghose, A.

    1988-01-01

    The present monograph is concerned with the optimisation of geometric factors in radiation physics experiments. The discussions are essentially confined to those systems in which optimisation is equivalent to symmetrical configurations of the measurement systems. They include, measurements of interaction cross section of diverse types, determination of polarisations, development of detectors with almost ideal characteristics, production of radiations with continuously variable energies and development of high efficiency spectrometers etc. The monograph is intended for use by experimental physicists investigating primary interactions of radiations with matter and associated technologies. We have illustrated the various optimisation procedures by considering the cases of the so-called ''14 MeV'' on d-t neutrons and gamma rays with energies less than 3 MeV. Developments in fusion technology are critically dependent on the availability accurate cross sections of nuclei for fast neutrons of energies at least as high as d-t neutrons. In this monograph we have discussed various techniques which can be used to improve the accuracy of such measurements and have also presented a method for generating almost monoenergetic neutrons in the 8 MeV to 13 MeV energy range which can be used to measure cross sections in this sparingly investigated region

  8. Radiologic diagnosis of asbestosis in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Yoon Ki; Kim, Jeung Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yook Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yoon Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Asbestosis is the most important change noted in the lung parenchyma after environmental and occupational exposure to asbestos fibers. It is characterized by diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. In Korea, the incidence of asbestosis will continue to increase for many years to come and the government enacted the Asbestos Damage Relief Law in 2011 to provide compensation to those suffering from asbestos-related diseases. Radiologic evaluation is necessary for diagnosis of asbestosis, and radiologists play a key role in this process. Therefore, it is important for radiologists to be aware of the various imaging features of asbestosis.

  9. Radiologic Diagnosis of Asbestosis in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Yoon Ki; Kim, Jeung Sook [Department of Radiology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Goyang 10326 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yookyung [Department of Radiology, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul 07985 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yoon Kyung [Department of Radiology, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Gachon University, Incheon 21565 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Asbestosis is the most important change noted in the lung parenchyma after environmental and occupational exposure to asbestos fibers. It is characterized by diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. In Korea, the incidence of asbestosis will continue to increase for many years to come and the government enacted the Asbestos Damage Relief Law in 2011 to provide compensation to those suffering from asbestos-related diseases. Radiologic evaluation is necessary for diagnosis of asbestosis, and radiologists play a key role in this process. Therefore, it is important for radiologists to be aware of the various imaging features of asbestosis.

  10. Examination of respiratory tract in workers occupationally exposed to beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cianciara, M.; Swiatkowski, J.

    1989-01-01

    In a group (30) occupationally exposed to beryllium below the Maximum Allowed Concentration, deviations from the norm were found in 13% of chest x rays and impairments of lung ventilatory reserves in 46%. The low intensity and non-specific character of the changes did not allow confirmation of connection with occupational exposure. Radiological examination of the lungs, expanded functional testing of the respiratory system and measurements of blood gases are recommended to identify workers with respiratory changes at an early stage. (UK)

  11. Referral expectations of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.L.; Altmaier, E.; Berberoglu, L.; Morris, K.

    1989-01-01

    The expectation of the referring physician are key to developing a successful practice in radiology. Structured interviews with 17 clinicians in both community care and academic practice documented that accuracy of the radiologic report was the single most important factor in clinician satisfaction. Data intercorrelation showed that accuracy of report correlated with frequency of referral (r = .49). Overall satisfaction of the referring physician with radiology correlated with accuracy (r = .69), patient satisfaction (r = .36), and efficiency in archiving (r = .42). These data may be weighted by departmental managers to allocate resources for improving referring physician satisfaction

  12. Marketing a Radiology Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, David C; Rao, Vijay M; Flanders, Adam E; Sundaram, Baskaran; Colarossi, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    In addition to being a profession, the practice of radiology is a business, and marketing is an important part of that business. There are many facets to marketing a radiology practice. The authors present a number of ideas on how to go about doing this. Some marketing methods can be directed to both patients and referring physicians. Others should be directed just to patients, while still others should be directed just to referring physicians. Aside from marketing, many of them provide value to both target audiences. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Guidelines for radiological interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffmann, G.W.

    1998-01-01

    The German Radiological Society, in cooperation with other German professional bodies, set up draft Guidelines for Radiological Interventions and submitted them to the professional community for discussion. The Guidelines are meant to assess the potential of radiological interventions as treatment alternatives to surgery or aggressive therapy such as chemotherapy. In fact, technical practicability on its own is insufficient to warrant intervention. The Guidelines are systematically compiled notions and recommendations whose aim it is to provide support to physicians and patients in choosing suitable medical care provisions (prevention, diagnosis, therapy, aftertreatment) in specific circumstances. A complete Czech translation of the Guidelines is given. (P.A.)

  14. Interventional Radiology in Paediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chippington, Samantha J; Goodwin, Susie J

    2015-01-01

    As in adult practice, there is a growing role for paediatric interventional radiology expertise in the management of paediatric pathologies. This review is targeted for clinicians who may refer their patients to paediatric interventional radiology services, or who are responsible for patients who are undergoing paediatric interventional radiology procedures. The article includes a brief overview of the indications for intervention, techniques involved and the commonest complications. Although some of the procedures described are most commonly performed in a tertiary paediatric centre, many are performed in most Children's hospitals.

  15. [Controlling instruments in radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, M

    2013-10-01

    Due to the rising costs and competitive pressures radiological clinics and practices are now facing, controlling instruments are gaining importance in the optimization of structures and processes of the various diagnostic examinations and interventional procedures. It will be shown how the use of selected controlling instruments can secure and improve the performance of radiological facilities. A definition of the concept of controlling will be provided. It will be shown which controlling instruments can be applied in radiological departments and practices. As an example, two of the controlling instruments, material cost analysis and benchmarking, will be illustrated.

  16. Active electronic personal dosemeter in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prlic, I.; Suric Mihic, M.; Vucic, Z.

    2008-01-01

    A recently developed active electronic personal dosemeter (AEPD) was utilised in order to measure the levels and the structure of occupational exposure to scattered X-ray radiation of medical staff who performed percutaneous revascularisation therapy that involves interventional radiology (IR) on the pelvis and upper leg arteries. The AEPDs, placed on the operators' and assistants' chests, that is, above the protective apron, continuously measured and recorded the received doses and, as a novelty, dose rates as a function of time, thus yielding a unique record of occupational doses and dose rates pattern at the working place. This paper presents and discusses one typical daily pattern in which seven percutaneous interventions were performed. (authors)

  17. ICRP and radiological protection in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousins, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Standards in relation to radiological protection in medicine are well-documented, particularly with the recent update of the Basic Safety Standards. The principles of justification and optimisation remain key, as dose limitation is not applicable in medical practice. Appropriate justification relies on the knowledge, experience and discretion of the relevant medical practitioners and this may be overlooked in the race for diagnosis and treatment. One argument would be further regulation of medical exposures, although it is difficult to see how this could be imposed without denying patients essential investigations and treatments. Another contentious issue is individual patient dose management with the possible creation of a 'radiation passport'. Individual radiation susceptibility is a topic that has attracted much attention, but how to manage such persons, if identified, raises further questions. Communicating radiation risks and benefits to patients appropriately needs to be addressed, including who should be responsible for this, given accurate knowledge is a prerequisite. Ethics in radiological protection is also being widely discussed and this in relation to medical practice, which already involves numerous ethical issues, is likely to be open to debate in the near future. (authors)

  18. Site-specific optimisation of the countermeasure structure on rehabilitation of radioactive contaminated territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatsalo, B.I.; Okhrimenko, D.V.; Lisyanski, B.G.; Okhrimenko, I.V.; Mirzeabassov, O.A.

    2000-01-01

    The use of 'soft' countermeasures (CMs) (agricultural CMs, some administrative ones, except for relocation/resettlement and some 'strong' measures on restriction of living conditions) allows considering the radiological and economic parameters for assessing their effectiveness. In this case cost-benefit analysis (CBA) or some its modification are used. However, the determination of various radiological and economic parameters (and their combination) is not enough for making final decisions on countermeasure implementation. All radiological, ecological and economic characteristics and other expert knowledge, corresponding standards and regulations should be taken into account, and many of them may not be used very often in analytical methods directly. The approaches to evaluating strong' CMs are based, as a rule, on expert judgements (MAUA, M-Crit). However, in practice they can lead to any result given in advance or to a choice of an weighted solution which does not comply with opinions by most experts due to considerable range of expert opinions and subjective weights for chosen attributes/criteria. Implementation of CMs on rehabilitation of contaminated territories should be based on the radiation protection principles. However, these principles are declared only when realising CMs on rehabilitation of contaminated territories after the Chernobyl accident. In practice some national or departmental standards are used and principles of justification'/'optimisation' are not examined. Taking into consideration a complex character of tasks on CM analysis and comparison of various alternatives it is quite necessary to use up-to-date computer decision support systems (DSSs). One of the systems which is directly intended for site-specific rehabilitation of territories subjected to radioactive contamination after the Chernobyl accident is the PRANA DSS. A key block of PRANA is 'analysis and optimisation of CMs structure'. It is intended for : -determination of territories

  19. Site-specific optimisation of the countermeasure structure on rehabilitation of radioactive contaminated territories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yatsalo, B.I.; Okhrimenko, D.V.; Lisyanski, B.G.; Okhrimenko, I.V.; Mirzeabassov, O.A. [Obninsk Institute of Nuclear Power Engineering, Obninsk, Kaluga (Russian Federation)

    2000-05-01

    The use of 'soft' countermeasures (CMs) (agricultural CMs, some administrative ones, except for relocation/resettlement and some 'strong' measures on restriction of living conditions) allows considering the radiological and economic parameters for assessing their effectiveness. In this case cost-benefit analysis (CBA) or some its modification are used. However, the determination of various radiological and economic parameters (and their combination) is not enough for making final decisions on countermeasure implementation. All radiological, ecological and economic characteristics and other expert knowledge, corresponding standards and regulations should be taken into account, and many of them may not be used very often in analytical methods directly. The approaches to evaluating strong' CMs are based, as a rule, on expert judgements (MAUA, M-Crit). However, in practice they can lead to any result given in advance or to a choice of an weighted solution which does not comply with opinions by most experts due to considerable range of expert opinions and subjective weights for chosen attributes/criteria. Implementation of CMs on rehabilitation of contaminated territories should be based on the radiation protection principles. However, these principles are declared only when realising CMs on rehabilitation of contaminated territories after the Chernobyl accident. In practice some national or departmental standards are used and principles of justification'/'optimisation' are not examined. Taking into consideration a complex character of tasks on CM analysis and comparison of various alternatives it is quite necessary to use up-to-date computer decision support systems (DSSs). One of the systems which is directly intended for site-specific rehabilitation of territories subjected to radioactive contamination after the Chernobyl accident is the PRANA DSS. A key block of PRANA is 'analysis and optimisation of CMs structure

  20. Pediatric radiology for medical-technical radiology assistants/radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppelt, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    The book on pediatric radiology includes the following chapter: differences between adults and children; psycho-social aspects concerning the patient child in radiology; relevant radiation doses in radiology; help for self-help: simple phantoms for image quality estimation in pediatric radiology; general information; immobilization of the patient; pediatric features for radiological settings; traumatology; contrast agents; biomedical radiography; computerized tomography; NMR imaging; diagnostic ultrasonography; handling of stress practical recommendations; medical displays.

  1. An optimisation framework for thermal energy storage integration in a residential heat pump heating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renaldi, R.; Kiprakis, A.; Friedrich, D.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An integrated framework for the optimal design of low carbon heating systems. • Development of a synthetic heat demand model with occupancy profiles. • Linear model of a heat pump with thermal energy storage heating system. • Evaluation of domestic heating system from generally available input parameters. • The lower carbon heating system can be cost competitive with conventional systems. - Abstract: Domestic heating has a large share in the UK total energy consumption and significant contribution to the greenhouse gas emissions since it is mainly fulfilled by fossil fuels. Therefore, decarbonising the heating system is essential and an option to achieve this is by heating system electrification through heat pumps (HP) installation in combination with renewable power generation. A potential increase in performance and flexibility can be achieved by pairing HP with thermal energy storage (TES), which allows the shifting of heat demand to off peak periods or periods with surplus renewable electricity. We present a design and operational optimisation model which is able to assess the performance of HP–TES relative to conventional heating systems. The optimisation is performed on a synthetic heat demand model which requires only the annual heat demand, temperature and occupancy profiles. The results show that the equipment and operational cost of a HP system without TES are significantly higher than for a conventional system. However, the integration of TES and time-of-use tariffs reduce the operational cost of the HP systems and in combination with the Renewable Heating Incentive make the HP systems cost competitive with conventional systems. The presented demand model and optimisation procedure will enable the design of low carbon district heating systems which integrate the heating system with the variable renewable electricity supply.

  2. Radiological assessment and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeevaert, T.; Sohier, A.

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's research in the field of radiological assessment and optimization are (1) to implement ALARA principles in activities with radiological consequences; (2) to develop methodologies for radiological optimization in decision-aiding; (3) to improve methods to assess in real time the radiological hazards in the environment in case of an accident; (4) to develop methods and programmes to assist decision-makers during a nuclear emergency; (5) to support the policy of radioactive waste management authorities in the field of radiation protection; (6) to investigate computer codes in the area of multi criteria analysis; (7) to organise courses on off-site emergency response to nuclear accidents. Main achievements in these areas for 1997 are summarised

  3. Laenderyggens degeneration og radiologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper Kjaerulf; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2006-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common conditions, and at the same time one of the most complex nosological entities. The lifetime prevalence is approximately 80%, and radiological features of lumbar degeneration are almost universal in adults. The individual risk factors for LBP and signi......Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common conditions, and at the same time one of the most complex nosological entities. The lifetime prevalence is approximately 80%, and radiological features of lumbar degeneration are almost universal in adults. The individual risk factors for LBP...... and significant relationships between radiological findings and subjective symptoms have both been notoriously difficult to identify. The lack of consensus on clinical criteria and radiological definitions has hampered the undertaking of properly executed epidemiological studies. The natural history of LBP...

  4. Diagnostic radiology: I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter describes the historic development of diagnostic equipment for radiology. The problems associated with fluoroscope design are detailed and the current uses of updated technology, particularly digitization, are considered. Numerous historical photographs are included. 13 refs

  5. Ergonomics in radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, N. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom)], E-mail: nimitgoyal@doctors.org.uk; Jain, N.; Rachapalli, V. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    The use of computers is increasing in every field of medicine, especially radiology. Filmless radiology departments, speech recognition software, electronic request forms and teleradiology are some of the recent developments that have substantially increased the amount of time a radiologist spends in front of a computer monitor. Computers are also needed for searching literature on the internet, communicating via e-mails, and preparing for lectures and presentations. It is well known that regular computer users can suffer musculoskeletal injuries due to repetitive stress. The role of ergonomics in radiology is to ensure that working conditions are optimized in order to avoid injury and fatigue. Adequate workplace ergonomics can go a long way in increasing productivity, efficiency, and job satisfaction. We review the current literature pertaining to the role of ergonomics in modern-day radiology especially with the development of picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) workstations.

  6. SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SA Journal of Radiology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 19, No 2 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  7. SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SA Journal of Radiology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 21, No 1 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. Ergonomics in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, N.; Jain, N.; Rachapalli, V.

    2009-01-01

    The use of computers is increasing in every field of medicine, especially radiology. Filmless radiology departments, speech recognition software, electronic request forms and teleradiology are some of the recent developments that have substantially increased the amount of time a radiologist spends in front of a computer monitor. Computers are also needed for searching literature on the internet, communicating via e-mails, and preparing for lectures and presentations. It is well known that regular computer users can suffer musculoskeletal injuries due to repetitive stress. The role of ergonomics in radiology is to ensure that working conditions are optimized in order to avoid injury and fatigue. Adequate workplace ergonomics can go a long way in increasing productivity, efficiency, and job satisfaction. We review the current literature pertaining to the role of ergonomics in modern-day radiology especially with the development of picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) workstations

  9. Society of Interventional Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Picture yourself in L.A. Register now SIR Essentials Purchase/register Search SIR's entire catalog for educational ... Quality Improvement Clinical practice MACRA Matters Health Policy, Economics, Coding Toolkits Society of Interventional Radiology 3975 Fair ...

  10. Radiology Architecture Project Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Raymond W; Hogan, Laurie; Teshima, Satoshi; Davidson, Scott

    2017-12-19

    The rapid pace of technologic advancement and increasing expectations for patient- and family-friendly environments make it common for radiology leaders to be involved in imaging remodel and construction projects. Most radiologists and business directors lack formal training in architectural and construction processes but are expected to play significant and often leading roles in all phases of an imaging construction project. Avoidable mistakes can result in significant increased costs and scheduling delays; knowledgeable participation and communication can result in a final product that enhances staff workflow and morale and improves patient care and experience. This article presents practical guidelines for preparing for and leading a new imaging architectural and construction project. We share principles derived from the radiology and nonradiology literature and our own experience over the past decade completely remodeling a large pediatric radiology department and building a full-service outpatient imaging center. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Radiology and the law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Law of Medical Malpractice: An Overview; The Radiologist as Defendant; The Radiologist as an Expert Witness; The Missed Diagnosis; Legalities of the Radiograph; and Angiography and Interventional Radiology

  12. Work procedures and risk factors for high rdiation exposure among radiologic technologists in South Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Young; Choi, Yeong Chull [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won Jin; Cha, Eun Shil [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Radiologic technologists currently consist of 31.5% among diagnostic radiation workers in South Korea. Among diagnostic radiation workers, radiologic technologists receive the highest annual and collective doses in South Korea. Comprehensive assessment of the work practices and associated radiation doses from diagnostic radiology procedures should be undertaken for effective prevention for radiologic technologists. Using the national survey, this study aimed (1) to explore the distribution of the work procedures performed by gender, (2) to evaluate occupational radiation exposure by work characteristics and safety compliance, (3) to identify the primary factors influencing high radiation exposure among radiologic technologists in South Korea. This study provided detailed information on work practices, number of procedures performed on weekly basis, and occupational radiation doses among radiologic technologists in South Korea. Average radiation dose for radiologic technologists is higher than other countries, and type of facility, work safety, and wearing lead apron explained quite a portion of increased risk in the association between radiology procedures and radiation exposure among radiologic technologists.

  13. Work procedures and risk factors for high rdiation exposure among radiologic technologists in South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Young; Choi, Yeong Chull; Lee, Won Jin; Cha, Eun Shil

    2016-01-01

    Radiologic technologists currently consist of 31.5% among diagnostic radiation workers in South Korea. Among diagnostic radiation workers, radiologic technologists receive the highest annual and collective doses in South Korea. Comprehensive assessment of the work practices and associated radiation doses from diagnostic radiology procedures should be undertaken for effective prevention for radiologic technologists. Using the national survey, this study aimed (1) to explore the distribution of the work procedures performed by gender, (2) to evaluate occupational radiation exposure by work characteristics and safety compliance, (3) to identify the primary factors influencing high radiation exposure among radiologic technologists in South Korea. This study provided detailed information on work practices, number of procedures performed on weekly basis, and occupational radiation doses among radiologic technologists in South Korea. Average radiation dose for radiologic technologists is higher than other countries, and type of facility, work safety, and wearing lead apron explained quite a portion of increased risk in the association between radiology procedures and radiation exposure among radiologic technologists.

  14. Radiological clerkships as a critical curriculum component in radiology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V.; Verstraete, Koenraad L.; Valcke, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this research was to explore the perceived value of clinical clerkships in the radiology curriculum as well as the impact of radiology clerkship on students' beliefs about the profession of radiology as a whole and as a career. Methods: This study is a sequel to a previous survey in which student perceptions about radiology curriculum components were investigated. The present study focuses on a further analysis of a subsection in this study, based on 14 statements about radiology clerkship and two statements about radiology as a career. Results: Perceived usefulness of the aspects of radiology clerkship as 'radiology examination', 'skills development' and 'diagnosis focus' were awarded the highest scores. The predict value of the subscale 'radiology examination' on the level of performance was very high (adjusted R 2 = 0.19, p < .001). Conclusion: Students expressed highly favorable evaluation of clerkship as a learning environment to learn to order and to interpret imaging studies as well as an unique possibility to attend various radiological examinations and to access to specific radiology software systems, as well as to get a better view on radiology and to improve image interpretation skills. This positive attitude towards clerkship is closely tied to students' beliefs about the profession of radiology as a whole. These aspects of dedicated radiology clerkship are crucial for effective and high-quality education as well as for the choice of radiology as a career.

  15. Radiologic science for technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushong, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book provides in-depth coverage of physics, biology and protection for the radiologic technology student. It presents a significant portion of all of the science required of radiologic technology students under one cover. Chapter content reflects a readable and practical organization with outlines listed on the first page of each chapter and sample problems at the end. New to this edition are: new and expanded sections on radiation techniques, digital imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound

  16. Hygiene in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapp-Schwoerer, A.; Daschner, F.

    1987-01-01

    A survey is given of the hygienic management in radiological departments with special regard to the handling of injections and infusions. It includes prevention of bacterial as well as viral infections. In radiological departments disinfection of X-ray tables is necessary only in exceptional cases. A special proposal for disinfection is added. A safe method of sterilisation of flexible catheders is included, which proved to prevent bacterial infection. (orig.) [de

  17. Radiological protection act, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Act provides for the establishment of the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland and dissolves An Bord Fuinnimh Nuicleigh (the Board), transferring its assets and liabilities to the Institute. It sets out a range of radiation protection measures to be taken by various Ministers in the event of a radiological emergency and gives effect at national level to the Assistance Convention, the Early Notification Convention and the Physical Protection Convention. The Institute is the competent Irish authority for the three Conventions. (NEA) [fr

  18. Textbook of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putman, C.E.; Ravin, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book is presented in two volumes, standard textbook of imaging, conclusive and totally up-to-date. This provides information organized by major topics covering the state-of-the-art for all imaging procedures. The volume 1 presents radiologic physics and technology by discussing roentgenography, ultrasound, CT, nuclear medicine, MRI, and positron emission tomography. The volume 2 studies pulmonary radiology, imaging of the skeletal and central nervous systems, uroradiology, abdominal and cardiac imaging, and imaging of the pelvis

  19. Laenderyggens degeneration og radiologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper Kjaerulf; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2006-01-01

    and significant relationships between radiological findings and subjective symptoms have both been notoriously difficult to identify. The lack of consensus on clinical criteria and radiological definitions has hampered the undertaking of properly executed epidemiological studies. The natural history of LBP...... is cyclic: exacerbations relieved by asymptomatic periods. New imaging modalities, including the combination of MR imaging and multiplanar 3-D CT scans, have broadened our awareness of possible pain-generating degenerative processes of the lumbar spine other than disc degeneration....

  20. Quality control in the radiological examinations of paediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaiba, W.; Rossi, A.; Vos, C.V.; Giacomelli, G.; Galletti, S.; Rimondi, E.

    1985-01-01

    With a view to minimising the dose absorbed by the paediatric patient during radiological investigations, the most usual X-ray examinations performed in paediatrics were checked in order to standardise and optimise the techniques used. The present study deals with the quality control of the X-ray beam used in radiological diagnosis of young patients, particularly considering that hips and pelvis pathologies can be widespread and that very often it is not possible to shield the patient's gonads during the examination. The electrical and geometrical parameters which minimise the absorbed dose but are compatible with obtaining valid diagnostic information are selected. An anthromorphic phantom reproducing bone and lung inhomogeneities was constructed to the average size of a 12-month-old baby. Inside the phantom TLD 4F 100 dosimeters were located in order to evaluate the absorbed doses. The technique which proved more convenient is indicated and suggested for routine work. (author)

  1. Dose level of occupational exposure in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Y.; Zhang, L.; Ju, Y.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the dose level of Chinese occupational exposures during 1986-2000. Data on occupational exposures from the main categories in nuclear fuel cycle (uranium enrichment and conversion, fuel fabrication, reactor operation, waste management and research activity, except for uranium mining and milling because of the lack of data), medical uses of radiation (diagnostic radiation, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy) and industrial uses of radiation (industrial radiography and radioisotope production) are presented and summarised in detail. These are the main components of occupational exposures in China. In general, the average annual effective doses show a steady decreasing trend over periods: from 2.16 to 1.16 mSv in medical uses of radiation during 1990-2000; from 1.92 to 1.18 mSv in industrial radiography during 1990-2000; from 8.79 to 2.05 mSv in radioisotope production during the period 1980-2000. Almost all the average annual effective doses in discussed occupations were lower than 5 mSv in recent years (except for well-logging: 6.86 mSv in 1999) and no monitored workers were found to have received the occupational exposure exceeding 50 mSv in a single year or 100 mSv in a five-year period. So the Chinese protection status of occupation exposure has been improved in recent years. However, the average annual effective doses in some occupations, such as diagnostic radiology and coal mining, were still much higher than that of the whole world. There are still needs for further improvement and careful monitoring of occupational exposure to protect every worker from excessive occupational exposure, especially for the workers who were neglected before. (authors)

  2. Diagnostic and interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, Thomas J. [Klinikum der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Reith, Wolfgang [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie; Rummeny, Ernst J. (ed.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2016-08-01

    This exceptional book covers all aspects of diagnostic and interventional radiology within one volume, at a level appropriate for the specialist. From the basics through diagnosis to intervention: the reader will find a complete overview of all areas of radiology. The clear, uniform structure, with chapters organized according to organ system, facilitates the rapid retrieval of information. Features include: Presentation of the normal radiological anatomy Classification of the different imaging procedures according to their diagnostic relevance Imaging diagnosis with many reference images Precise description of the interventional options The inclusion of many instructive aids will be of particular value to novices in decision making: Important take home messages and summaries of key radiological findings smooth the path through the jungle of facts Numerous tables on differential diagnosis and typical findings in the most common diseases offer a rapid overview and orientation Diagnostic flow charts outline the sequence of diagnostic evaluation All standard procedures within the field of interventional radiology are presented in a clinically relevant and readily understandable way, with an abundance of illustrations. This is a textbook, atlas, and reference in one: with more than 2500 images for comparison with the reader's own findings. This comprehensive and totally up-to-date book provides a superb overview of everything that the radiology specialist of today needs to know.

  3. Methods for Optimisation of the Laser Cutting Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Birgitte

    This thesis deals with the adaptation and implementation of various optimisation methods, in the field of experimental design, for the laser cutting process. The problem in optimising the laser cutting process has been defined and a structure for at Decision Support System (DSS......) for the optimisation of the laser cutting process has been suggested. The DSS consists of a database with the currently used and old parameter settings. Also one of the optimisation methods has been implemented in the DSS in order to facilitate the optimisation procedure for the laser operator. The Simplex Method has...... been adapted in two versions. A qualitative one, that by comparing the laser cut items optimise the process and a quantitative one that uses a weighted quality response in order to achieve a satisfactory quality and after that maximises the cutting speed thus increasing the productivity of the process...

  4. Radiological protection of the unborn child. Recommendation of the Commission on Radiological Protection and scientific grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarenio, O.

    2006-01-01

    The Commission on Radiological Protection was asked to give advice on the practical implications of the absorption of the maximum possible activity values that, under the Radiological Protection Ordinance, may be incorporated in women of child-bearing age occupationally exposed to radiation with regard to incorporation monitoring and compliance with the dose limit for the protection of the unborn child. An unborn child's conceivable level of exposure to radiation in the least favourable case due to continuous and single incorporations of radionuclides in the mother was determined on a nuclide-specific basis by the Federal Office for Radiation Protection with the aid of the mathematical metabolic models provided in ICRP 88. At the proposal of the Commission on Radiological Protection, the Federal Office for Radiation Protection considered the following very conservative scenarios: - the mother's maximum possible exposure due to a continuous intake of activity over 10 years prior to the pregnancy and in the first 10 weeks postconception based on the limits set out in the Radiological Protection Ordinance; - the mother's maximum possible exposure due to a single intake at the most unfavourable time in the first 10 weeks postconception based on the limits set out in the Radiological Protection Ordinance. Examination of these scenarios found that, with a few exceptions, the dose to the unborn child attributable to the incorporation of radiation in the mother summed up over 70 years is less than that to the mother. The committed effective dose to the unborn child from certain radionuclides may exceed the value of 1 mSv when the dose to the mother reaches the maximum limit. The Commission on Radiological Protection was therefore asked 1. to examine whether compliance with the limit of 1 mSv effective dose is sufficient for the protection of the unborn child or whether any additional limitation is required for individual organs, 2. to discuss the implications for

  5. Safety, dose optimisation and security: the quadrature of the circle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardeman, Frank; Vermeersch, Fernand [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK.CEN), Boeretang 200, BE-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    The growing concern for potential terrorist acts has lead to a number of new ideas about storing radiological and nuclear materials that are not always compatible with existing practices or infrastructures. This is valid in routine circumstances, but especially poses problems in case of accidents. As such, the management of nuclear safety, radiological protection and security within an evolving world such as a nuclear research centre sometimes looks like implementing the quadrature of the circle. International guidance exists, but is not always easily converted into an adequate policy comprehensible to all levels in a plant, from management to the work floor. Some examples. 1. infrastructure related problems: from a security point of view, fuels are better stored in the heart of a protected zone, while in case of criticality, fire... a more peripheral location is appropriate. 2. Safety related problems: Protection infrastructure may lead to difficulties of evacuation in case of emergencies; access limitations may be a burden in the management of safety interventions, maintenance... 3. Administrative contradictions: inventories of fuel storages and high active sealed sources are a cornerstone of inspections and verifications; yet, this information is a treasure for terrorists aiming at actions to obtain special materials. 4. Dose management: measures taken to secure sources may lead to a dose increase (e.g. labelling of old sources). However, the main difficulty is related to the 'cultural' aspect. There are synergies between safety culture, 'ALARA' culture and security culture. An individual aspect of desirable behaviour (e.g. questioning attitude), complemented with an organisational dimension (e.g. training, raising awareness) are obviously common. The objective is also in line: to avoid reduction of well-being of people, to protect the environment, to prevent damage to facilities. The main difficulties arise however because of the fundamental

  6. Image Quality and Patient Dose Optimisation in Mammography in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvathova, M.; Nikodemova, D.; Prikazska, M.

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer represents also in Slovakia the greatest cancer risk for women, with great incidence and mortality. Conventional film-screen mammography is still the primary breast imaging modality with increasing number of mammography units and mammography examinations. From the radiation protection point of view achievement of good practice in mammography department by implementation of quality assurance play an important role for reduction of patients doses. Introduction of QA needs trained and experienced staff and requires close collaboration between radiologists, medical physicist and radiographers. At the beginning of nineties at the Institute of Preventive and Clinical Medicine we started with a survey of mean glandular doses at 15 existing mammography units in the country. On the basis of a questionnaire in the year 1991 were performed 10 488 mammography examinations, where due to out of date mammography units the mean glandular dose reached more as 3 mGy. In the following years the claim to the modern mammography units kept growing and in the year 1999 the total number of 63 mammography units were operating in Slovakia providing about 101 471 mammography examinations. According to the alarming increase of the number of mammography examinations it is absolutely necessary to work out criteria and principles for Quality Control at mammography workplaces in our country and make it obligatory for the staff of all mammography units. Summarising the CRP results it can be stated that they: 1) Initiated the suggestion of unified QA/QC criteria in mammography and the urgent need to implement them into the national program of radiology image quality improvement; 2) Remitted on unhomogenity not only in the equipment outfit but also in the procedure of evaluation of the measured parameters and imaging quality; 3) Revealed the shortcomings in the everyday practice of mammography units which can be removed only by comprehensive by training of personal in imaging radiology

  7. Safety, dose optimisation and security: the quadrature of the circle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardeman, Frank; Vermeersch, Fernand

    2010-01-01

    The growing concern for potential terrorist acts has lead to a number of new ideas about storing radiological and nuclear materials that are not always compatible with existing practices or infrastructures. This is valid in routine circumstances, but especially poses problems in case of accidents. As such, the management of nuclear safety, radiological protection and security within an evolving world such as a nuclear research centre sometimes looks like implementing the quadrature of the circle. International guidance exists, but is not always easily converted into an adequate policy comprehensible to all levels in a plant, from management to the work floor. Some examples. 1. infrastructure related problems: from a security point of view, fuels are better stored in the heart of a protected zone, while in case of criticality, fire... a more peripheral location is appropriate. 2. Safety related problems: Protection infrastructure may lead to difficulties of evacuation in case of emergencies; access limitations may be a burden in the management of safety interventions, maintenance... 3. Administrative contradictions: inventories of fuel storages and high active sealed sources are a cornerstone of inspections and verifications; yet, this information is a treasure for terrorists aiming at actions to obtain special materials. 4. Dose management: measures taken to secure sources may lead to a dose increase (e.g. labelling of old sources). However, the main difficulty is related to the 'cultural' aspect. There are synergies between safety culture, 'ALARA' culture and security culture. An individual aspect of desirable behaviour (e.g. questioning attitude), complemented with an organisational dimension (e.g. training, raising awareness) are obviously common. The objective is also in line: to avoid reduction of well-being of people, to protect the environment, to prevent damage to facilities. The main difficulties arise however because of the fundamental differences being

  8. Chemical toxicity and radiological health detriment associated with the inhalation of various enrichments of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3C Limited, Queen Square House, 18-21 Queen Square, Bristol BS1 4NH (United Kingdom))" data-affiliation=" (SR3C Limited, Queen Square House, 18-21 Queen Square, Bristol BS1 4NH (United Kingdom))" >Bryant, P A

    2014-01-01

    The occupational risks associated with the chemical toxicity of uranium can be overlooked during the processing, handling and storage of the material, as the radioactivity of the material is often used alone to assess the health consequences of exposure to uranium compounds. This note provides a summary of the current United Kingdom occupational standards for uranium based on radiation dose and/or chemical toxicity with a particular focus on intake via inhalation. A simple model is subsequently presented to allow a comparison to be drawn between the occupational exposure standard for chemical toxicity and radiological dose limit. Using these data a set of suggested limits on occupational exposure to airborne uranium is proposed that indicate where the legal annual radiological dose limit for workers or the Health and Safety Executive occupational exposure standard for chemical toxicity are at risk of being breached. (note)

  9. Occupational thyroid dose during cardiovascular examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaharada, Yasuhiro; Kayama, Jiro; Hatori, Noboru; Takahashi, Noboru; Koyama, Ichiro; Shiraishi, Akihisa; Otake, Hidenori; Miyazawa, Yasushi

    1991-01-01

    Medical system has been recently divided into many divisions where appropriate examinations and treatments are performed by specialists in each field. Special and complicated radiologic examinations such as cardiovascular angiography are performed by specialists. An occupational exposure dose tends to increase and to be limited to some specialized physicians and technicians. Therefore, efficient protective equipment and clothing have to be seriously considered so as to decrease the occupational exposure dose. The thyroid gland is not protected by any of the conventional protectors. We have tried to decrease the occupational exposure doses by improving the conventional protector and utilizing various other materials. The paper is a report on the effectiveness of the methods used and the results. (author)

  10. Technology as an Occasion for Structuring: Evidence from Observations of CT Scanners and the Social Order of Radiology Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barley, Stephen R.

    1986-01-01

    New technologies such as the CT scanner are challenging traditional role relations among radiology workers and may be altering the organizational and occupational structure of radiological work. This paper expands recent sociological thought by showing how identical CT scanners occasion similar structuring processes and created divergent forms of…

  11. Mechatronic System Design Based On An Optimisation Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben Ole; Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen; Hansen, Michael Rygaard

    The envisaged objective of this paper project is to extend the current state of the art regarding the design of complex mechatronic systems utilizing an optimisation approach. We propose to investigate a novel framework for mechatronic system design. The novelty and originality being the use...... of optimisation techniques. The methods used to optimise/design within the classical disciplines will be identified and extended to mechatronic system design....

  12. Analysis and optimisation of heterogeneous real-time embedded systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pop, Paul; Eles, Petru; Peng, Zebo

    2005-01-01

    . The success of such new design methods depends on the availability of analysis and optimisation techniques. Analysis and optimisation techniques for heterogeneous real-time embedded systems are presented in the paper. The authors address in more detail a particular class of such systems called multi...... of application messages to frames. Optimisation heuristics for frame packing aimed at producing a schedulable system are presented. Extensive experiments and a real-life example show the efficiency of the frame-packing approach....

  13. Analysis and optimisation of heterogeneous real-time embedded systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pop, Paul; Eles, Petru; Peng, Zebo

    2006-01-01

    . The success of such new design methods depends on the availability of analysis and optimisation techniques. Analysis and optimisation techniques for heterogeneous real-time embedded systems are presented in the paper. The authors address in more detail a particular class of such systems called multi...... of application messages to frames. Optimisation heuristics for frame packing aimed at producing a schedulable system are presented. Extensive experiments and a real-life example show the efficiency of the frame-packing approach....

  14. The evolving system of radiological protection: the nuclear industry perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coates, R.

    2003-01-01

    . (A set of key examples is listed herein.) In our view, the current system comprising of the dose limit (1 mSv pa) and the ALARA Principle provides the necessary flexibility and tools to regulators for addressing any country specific or site specific settings, and there are already good examples of this. Again, we believe that this matter is best left for discussion and agreement between the local stakeholders rather than at an international level. We strongly support the need to establish an international approach to defining a level of dose below which society may legitimately maintain that an individual is adequately protected., and hence the allocation of further resources to control the source on radiological health grounds would be inappropriate. WNA considers that this dose is not less than a few tens of micro-sieverts. This approach should be supported by guidance on the appropriate level of conservatism within dose assessments, both in the context of exclusion/clearance/exemption and critical groups in general. WNA supports the continued use of the term 'ALARA, economic and social factors being taken into account'. Collective dose is a useful concept in the optimisation of occupational exposure: in addition it needs to be supplemented by the consideration of the number of workers exposed at the higher levels and by wider pragmatic experience. Public collective dose is of very limited utility in decision making, and little if any weight should be given to exposures at long timescales and exceedingly trivial levels of individual exposure. WNA welcomes both the lead taken by ICRP to bring the protection of non-human biota into a coherent overall framework addressing the totality of radiological protection, and the recognition that the current system has in practice provided an appropriate standard of environmental protection. On this basis the development of the future system of protection must not impose a disproportionate burden on operators. The focus for

  15. Flotation process control optimisation at Prominent Hill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardi, Josephine; Muhamad, Nur; Weidenbach, M.

    2012-01-01

    OZ Minerals' Prominent Hill copper- gold concentrator is located 130 km south east of the town of Coober Pedy in the Gawler Craton of South Australia. The concentrator was built in 2008 and commenced commercial production in early 2009. The Prominent Hill concentrator is comprised of a conventional grinding and flotation processing plant with a 9.6 Mtpa ore throughput capacity. The flotation circuit includes six rougher cells, an IseMill for regrinding the rougher concentrate and a Jameson cell heading up the three stage conventional cell cleaner circuit. In total there are four level controllers in the rougher train and ten level controllers in the cleaning circuit for 18 cells. Generic proportional — integral and derivative (PID) control used on the level controllers alone propagated any disturbances downstream in the circuit that were generated from the grinding circuit, hoppers, between cells and interconnected banks of cells, having a negative impact on plant performance. To better control such disturbances, FloatStar level stabiliser was selected for installation on the flotation circuit to account for the interaction between the cells. Multivariable control was also installed on the five concentrate hoppers to maintain consistent feed to the cells and to the IsaMill. An additional area identified for optimisation in the flotation circuit was the mass pull rate from the rougher cells. FloatStar flow optimiser was selected to be installed subsequent to the FloatStar level stabiliser. This allowed for a unified, consistent and optimal approach to running the rougher circuit. This paper describes the improvement in the stabilisation of the circuit achieved by the FloatStar level stabiliser by using the interaction matrix between cell level controllers and the results and benefits of implementing the FloatStar flow optimiser on the rougher train.

  16. Risk based test interval and maintenance optimisation - Application and uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparre, E.

    1999-10-01

    The project is part of an IAEA co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Development of Methodologies for Optimisation of Surveillance Testing and Maintenance of Safety Related Equipment at NPPs'. The purpose of the project is to investigate the sensitivity of the results obtained when performing risk based optimisation of the technical specifications. Previous projects have shown that complete LPSA models can be created and that these models allow optimisation of technical specifications. However, these optimisations did not include any in depth check of the result sensitivity with regards to methods, model completeness etc. Four different test intervals have been investigated in this study. Aside from an original, nominal, optimisation a set of sensitivity analyses has been performed and the results from these analyses have been compared to the original optimisation. The analyses indicate that the result of an optimisation is rather stable. However, it is not possible to draw any certain conclusions without performing a number of sensitivity analyses. Significant differences in the optimisation result were discovered when analysing an alternative configuration. Also deterministic uncertainties seem to affect the result of an optimisation largely. The sensitivity of failure data uncertainties is important to investigate in detail since the methodology is based on the assumption that the unavailability of a component is dependent on the length of the test interval

  17. Improving Vector Evaluated Particle Swarm Optimisation by incorporating nondominated solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kian Sheng; Ibrahim, Zuwairie; Buyamin, Salinda; Ahmad, Anita; Naim, Faradila; Ghazali, Kamarul Hawari; Mokhtar, Norrima

    2013-01-01

    The Vector Evaluated Particle Swarm Optimisation algorithm is widely used to solve multiobjective optimisation problems. This algorithm optimises one objective using a swarm of particles where their movements are guided by the best solution found by another swarm. However, the best solution of a swarm is only updated when a newly generated solution has better fitness than the best solution at the objective function optimised by that swarm, yielding poor solutions for the multiobjective optimisation problems. Thus, an improved Vector Evaluated Particle Swarm Optimisation algorithm is introduced by incorporating the nondominated solutions as the guidance for a swarm rather than using the best solution from another swarm. In this paper, the performance of improved Vector Evaluated Particle Swarm Optimisation algorithm is investigated using performance measures such as the number of nondominated solutions found, the generational distance, the spread, and the hypervolume. The results suggest that the improved Vector Evaluated Particle Swarm Optimisation algorithm has impressive performance compared with the conventional Vector Evaluated Particle Swarm Optimisation algorithm.

  18. Improving Vector Evaluated Particle Swarm Optimisation by Incorporating Nondominated Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kian Sheng Lim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Vector Evaluated Particle Swarm Optimisation algorithm is widely used to solve multiobjective optimisation problems. This algorithm optimises one objective using a swarm of particles where their movements are guided by the best solution found by another swarm. However, the best solution of a swarm is only updated when a newly generated solution has better fitness than the best solution at the objective function optimised by that swarm, yielding poor solutions for the multiobjective optimisation problems. Thus, an improved Vector Evaluated Particle Swarm Optimisation algorithm is introduced by incorporating the nondominated solutions as the guidance for a swarm rather than using the best solution from another swarm. In this paper, the performance of improved Vector Evaluated Particle Swarm Optimisation algorithm is investigated using performance measures such as the number of nondominated solutions found, the generational distance, the spread, and the hypervolume. The results suggest that the improved Vector Evaluated Particle Swarm Optimisation algorithm has impressive performance compared with the conventional Vector Evaluated Particle Swarm Optimisation algorithm.

  19. Optimising end of generation of Magnox reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, D.; Hopper, E.D.A.

    2014-01-01

    Designing, justifying and gaining regulatory approval for optimised, terminal fuel cycles for the last 4 of the 13 strong Magnox Fleet is described, covering: - constraints set by the plant owner's integrated closure plan, opportunities for innovative fuel cycles while preserving flexibility to respond to business changes; - methods of collectively determining best options for each site; - selected strategies including lower fuel element retention and inter-reactor transfer of fuel; - the required work scope, its technical, safety case and resource challenges and how they were met; - achieving additional electricity generation worth in excess of Pound 1 b from 4 sites (a total of 8 reactors); - the keys to success. (authors)

  20. Advanced manufacturing: optimising the factories of tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippon, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Faced with competition Patrick Philippon - Les Defis du CEA no.179 - April 2013 from the emerging countries, the competitiveness of the industrialised nations depends on the ability of their industries to innovate. This strategy necessarily entails the reorganisation and optimisation of the production systems. This is the whole challenge for 'advanced manufacturing', which relies on the new information and communication technologies. Interactive robotics, virtual reality and non-destructive testing are all technological building blocks developed by CEA, now approved within a cross-cutting programme, to meet the needs of industry and together build the factories of tomorrow. (author)

  1. Biorefinery plant design, engineering and process optimisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo; Ehimen, Ehiazesebhor Augustine

    2014-01-01

    Before new biorefinery systems can be implemented, or the modification of existing single product biomass processing units into biorefineries can be carried out, proper planning of the intended biorefinery scheme must be performed initially. This chapter outlines design and synthesis approaches...... applicable for the planning and upgrading of intended biorefinery systems, and includes discussions on the operation of an existing lignocellulosic-based biorefinery platform. Furthermore, technical considerations and tools (i.e., process analytical tools) which could be applied to optimise the operations...... of existing and potential biorefinery plants are elucidated....

  2. Specification, Verification and Optimisation of Business Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbert, Luke Thomas

    is extended with stochastic branching, message passing and reward annotations which allow for the modelling of resources consumed during the execution of a business process. Further, it is shown how this structure can be used to formalise the established business process modelling language Business Process...... fault tree analysis and the automated optimisation of business processes by means of an evolutionary algorithm. This work is motivated by problems that stem from the healthcare sector, and examples encountered in this field are used to illustrate these developments....

  3. Topology Optimisation for Coupled Convection Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe; Andreasen, Casper Schousboe; Aage, Niels

    stabilised finite elements implemented in a parallel multiphysics analysis and optimisation framework DFEM [1], developed and maintained in house. Focus is put on control of the temperature field within the solid structure and the problems can therefore be seen as conjugate heat transfer problems, where heat...... conduction governs in the solid parts of the design domain and couples to convection-dominated heat transfer to a surrounding fluid. Both loosely coupled and tightly coupled problems are considered. The loosely coupled problems are convection-diffusion problems, based on an advective velocity field from...

  4. Cost optimisation studies of high power accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAdams, R.; Nightingale, M.P.S.; Godden, D. [AEA Technology, Oxon (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Cost optimisation studies are carried out for an accelerator based neutron source consisting of a series of linear accelerators. The characteristics of the lowest cost design for a given beam current and energy machine such as power and length are found to depend on the lifetime envisaged for it. For a fixed neutron yield it is preferable to have a low current, high energy machine. The benefits of superconducting technology are also investigated. A Separated Orbit Cyclotron (SOC) has the potential to reduce capital and operating costs and intial estimates for the transverse and longitudinal current limits of such machines are made.

  5. Spectrum of high-resolution computed tomography imaging in occupational lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satija, Bhawna; Kumar, Sanyal; Ojha, Umesh Chandra; Gothi, Dipti

    2013-10-01

    Damage to the lungs caused by dusts or fumes or noxious substances inhaled by workers in certain specific occupation is known as occupational lung disease. Recognition of occupational lung disease is especially important not only for the primary worker, but also because of the implications with regard to primary and secondary disease prevention in the exposed co-workers. Although many of the disorders can be detected on chest radiography, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is superior in delineating the lung architecture and depicting pathology. The characteristic radiological features suggest the correct diagnosis in some, whereas a combination of clinical features, occupational history, and radiological findings is essential in establishing the diagnosis in others. In the presence of a history of exposure and consistent clinical features, the diagnosis of even an uncommon occupational lung disease can be suggested by the characteristic described HRCT findings. In this article, we briefly review the HRCT appearance of a wide spectrum of occupational lung diseases.

  6. Spectrum of high-resolution computed tomography imaging in occupational lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satija, Bhawna; Kumar, Sanyal; Ojha, Umesh Chandra; Gothi, Dipti

    2013-01-01

    Damage to the lungs caused by dusts or fumes or noxious substances inhaled by workers in certain specific occupation is known as occupational lung disease. Recognition of occupational lung disease is especially important not only for the primary worker, but also because of the implications with regard to primary and secondary disease prevention in the exposed co-workers. Although many of the disorders can be detected on chest radiography, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is superior in delineating the lung architecture and depicting pathology. The characteristic radiological features suggest the correct diagnosis in some, whereas a combination of clinical features, occupational history, and radiological findings is essential in establishing the diagnosis in others. In the presence of a history of exposure and consistent clinical features, the diagnosis of even an uncommon occupational lung disease can be suggested by the characteristic described HRCT findings. In this article, we briefly review the HRCT appearance of a wide spectrum of occupational lung diseases

  7. Long-term radiological aspects of management of wastes from uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    Due to the contamination of uranium mill tailings by long-lived natural radionuclides, their management presents specific radiation protection aspects in the long term. This report presents several examples of the application of the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) methodology for the optimisation of radiation protection to these types of waste. The advantages and disadvantages of such an approach are discussed and several important limitations are identified

  8. Virtual pilot course in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Romero, Angela Maria; Plazas, Maria Cristina

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The radiological protection performs vital importance in the fields medically, industrially and environmental. The X-rays and the radioactive materials used in medicine have allowed to realize important progresses and to develop new technologies skills for the diagnosis, the therapy and the prevention of diseases. Having in it counts tells the risks associated with the ionizing radiations, it is required legally that the personnel that intervenes in the different procedures has the necessary knowledge of radiological protection to assure that the use of radiations in the medical practice should carry out of ideal form, at the right moment and adopting all the necessary measures to guarantee the best protection, so much of the occupationally exposed personnel, since as, like of the patients and the public in general. The virtual environments for the construction of the knowledge like it is the virtual university, allows presenting an effective alternative in the learning of different areas and in this particular case of the radiological protection. With the aim lens to give response to these needs there is implemented this pilot virtual course year based on the current course of radiological protection that is dictated in the Mastery in Medical Physics of the National University of Colombia, sedate Bogota. The purpose of this virtual course is to use as academic and bibliographical support on radiological protection, as well as to answer to the needs of initial formation that the professionals have, to acquire a solid base in the mentioned matter. It has been conceived so that it provides theoretical formation, so much scientific as technology and that contemplates the recommendations and international and national procedure on radiological protection and some applications. Given the incorporation of the technologies of information and communication that in the academic area it has brought with it not only to give support to the curricular activities but

  9. Evaluation of illnesses associated with occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frometa Suarez, I.

    1997-01-01

    A retrospective study by the Institute of Occupational Medicine is presented of all cases of pathological indications of ionizing radiation exposure during the period 1990-1995. It describes the incidence of theses diseases and their relationship with other factors. It has shown the predominance of pathologies of the haemolymphopoietic system in individuals who work in radiological diagnostics

  10. ICRP recommendations on 'managing patient dose in digital radiology'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.

    2005-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) approved the publication of a document on 'Managing patient dose in digital radiology' in 2003. The paper describes the content of the report and some of its key points, together with the formal recommendations of the Commission on this topic. With digital techniques exists not only the potential to improve the practice of radiology but also the risk to overuse radiation. The main advantages of digital imaging: wide dynamic range, post-processing, multiple viewing options, electronic transfer and archiving possibilities are clear but overexposures can occur without an adverse impact on image quality. It is expected that the ICRP report helps to profit from the benefits of this important technological advance in medical imaging with the best management of radiation doses to the patients. It is also expected to promote training actions before the digital techniques are introduced in the radiology departments and to foster the industry to offer enough technical and dosimetric information to radiologists, radiographers and medical physicists to help in the optimisation of the imaging. (authors)

  11. The Future of Radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander R. Margulis

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been my good fortune to live and practice radiology during a long period of momentous change – to see the transformation of the discipline from a supportive service into a mainstream, essential branch of clinical medicine. I remember wearing red goggles to adapt my vision before performing fluoroscopy; observing the horrible, now thankfully obsolete, practice of ventriculography, which was considered advanced neuroradiology; and performing other, now rarely prescribed procedures, such as double-contrast barium enemas and intravenous pyelography. Witnessing the beginnings of interventional radiology, I suggested its name in an editorial. I also had the good fortune to see the introduction of computed tomography (CT and a technology first known as nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Together with fellow members of a committee of the American College of Radiology and editors of prestigious radiological journals, I took part in changing the name of the latter modality to MRI, freeing it from threatening implications. Looking back on these experiences, one lesson stands out above all: Innovation and transformation never cease. Looking forward, it is clear that radiology, along with the rest of medicine, is now undergoing further momentous changes that will affect the future of all those already practicing as well as those yet to start their careers.

  12. HVAC system optimisation-in-building section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, L.; Cai, W.; Xie, L.; Li, S.; Soh, Y.C. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (Singapore)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a practical method to optimise in-building section of centralised Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems which consist of indoor air loops and chilled water loops. First, through component characteristic analysis, mathematical models associated with cooling loads and energy consumption for heat exchangers and energy consuming devices are established. By considering variation of cooling load of each end user, adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) is employed to model duct and pipe networks and obtain optimal differential pressure (DP) set points based on limited sensor information. A mix-integer nonlinear constraint optimization of system energy is formulated and solved by a modified genetic algorithm. The main feature of our paper is a systematic approach in optimizing the overall system energy consumption rather than that of individual component. A simulation study for a typical centralized HVAC system is provided to compare the proposed optimisation method with traditional ones. The results show that the proposed method indeed improves the system performance significantly. (author)

  13. Optimisation of milling parameters using neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipski Jerzy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to design and test an intelligent computer software developed with the purpose of increasing average productivity of milling not compromising the design features of the final product. The developed system generates optimal milling parameters based on the extent of tool wear. The introduced optimisation algorithm employs a multilayer model of a milling process developed in the artificial neural network. The input parameters for model training are the following: cutting speed vc, feed per tooth fz and the degree of tool wear measured by means of localised flank wear (VB3. The output parameter is the surface roughness of a machined surface Ra. Since the model in the neural network exhibits good approximation of functional relationships, it was applied to determine optimal milling parameters in changeable tool wear conditions (VB3 and stabilisation of surface roughness parameter Ra. Our solution enables constant control over surface roughness parameters and productivity of milling process after each assessment of tool condition. The recommended parameters, i.e. those which applied in milling ensure desired surface roughness and maximal productivity, are selected from all the parameters generated by the model. The developed software may constitute an expert system supporting a milling machine operator. In addition, the application may be installed on a mobile device (smartphone, connected to a tool wear diagnostics instrument and the machine tool controller in order to supply updated optimal parameters of milling. The presented solution facilitates tool life optimisation and decreasing tool change costs, particularly during prolonged operation.

  14. Noise aspects at aerodynamic blade optimisation projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schepers, J.G. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Petten (Netherlands)

    1997-12-31

    This paper shows an example of an aerodynamic blade optimisation, using the program PVOPT. PVOPT calculates the optimal wind turbine blade geometry such that the maximum energy yield is obtained. Using the aerodynamic optimal blade design as a basis, the possibilities of noise reduction are investigated. The aerodynamic optimised geometry from PVOPT is the `real` optimum (up to the latest decimal). The most important conclusion from this study is, that it is worthwhile to investigate the behaviour of the objective function (in the present case the energy yield) around the optimum: If the optimum is flat, there is a possibility to apply modifications to the optimum configuration with only a limited loss in energy yield. It is obvious that the modified configurations emits a different (and possibly lower) noise level. In the BLADOPT program (the successor of PVOPT) it will be possible to quantify the noise level and hence to assess the reduced noise emission more thoroughly. At present the most promising approaches for noise reduction are believed to be a reduction of the rotor speed (if at all possible), and a reduction of the tip angle by means of low lift profiles, or decreased twist at the outboard stations. These modifications were possible without a significant loss in energy yield. (LN)

  15. ICRP Publication 103. The 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenot, Jean-Claude; Brenot, Jean; Laurier, Dominique; Rannou, Alain; Thierry, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    These revised Recommendations for a System of Radiological Protection formally replace the Commission's previous, 1990, Recommendations; and update, consolidate, and develop the additional guidance on the control of exposure from radiation sources issued since 1990. Thus, the present Recommendations update the radiation and tissue weighting factors in the quantities equivalent and effective dose and update the radiation detriment, based on the latest available scientific information of the biology and physics of radiation exposure. They maintain the Commission's three fundamental principles of radiological protection, namely justification, optimisation, and the application of dose limits, clarifying how they apply to radiation sources delivering exposure and to individuals receiving exposure. The Recommendations evolve from the previous process-based protection approach using practices and interventions by moving to an approach based on the exposure situation. They recognise planned, emergency, and existing exposure situations, and apply the fundamental principles of justification and optimisation of protection to all of these situations. They maintain the Commission's current individual dose limits for effective dose and equivalent dose from all regulated sources in planned exposure situations. They reinforce the principle of optimisation of protection, which should be applicable in a similar way to all exposure situations, subject to the following restrictions on individual doses and risks; dose and risk constraints for planned exposure situations, and reference levels for emergency and existing exposure situations. The Recommendations also include an approach for developing a framework to demonstrate radiological protection of the environment

  16. The regulatory application of authorization in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, T.; Frullani, S.

    2004-01-01

    Authorization is the process used by governments and regulatory authorities to decide what regulatory controls or conditions, if any, should be applied to radioactive sources or radiation exposure situations in order to protect the public, workers and the environment appropriately. Over the years, governments and regulatory authorities have used various approaches to the authorization process under differing circumstances. Now, with the new draft recommendations from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), there is the prospect of being able to use a single, simple and self-coherent approach for the process of regulatory authorization under all circumstances. Previously, the ICRP recommended the use of various approaches to manage radiological protection situations. For what were called practices, exposures were subject to limits, and optimisation was required below these limits. What were called interventions were subject to intervention levels, above which some action could be considered justified, and which should be optimised based on consideration of how much dose could be averted by the countermeasure considered. Radon in homes was subject to action levels, above which some sort of countermeasure could be recommended. These approaches are all philosophically distinct and logically constructed, but their differences, particularly in the types of numerical criteria used (limits, intervention levels, action levels, etc.) contributed to confusion and misunderstanding. (author)

  17. Study of the radiation protection in the radiology services of the Town of Ouagadougou. Actual realities and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisse, R.; Lougue, L.C.; Bamouni, Y.A.; Ouedraogo, V.; Siko, A.; Diallo, O.; Ouedraogo, N.; Napon, M.; Zoungrana, R.; Kambou, S.; Tapsoba, T.L.; Sondo, B.

    2005-01-01

    This study has shown numerous factors of risks able to favour occupational irradiations to x radiations in the radiological services. The factors of risks are in relation with the following categories: medical surveillance of the personnel, collective and individual protection, monitoring of occupational exposure to X radiations and the periodic checking of installations. (N.C.)

  18. An analysis of the potential role of chest tomosynthesis in optimising imaging resources in thoracic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersson, Cecilia; Baath, Magnus; Vikgren, Jenny; Allansdotter Johnsson, Aase

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the potential role of chest tomosynthesis (CTS) at a tertiary referral centre by exploring to what extent CTS could substitute chest radiography (CXR) and computed tomography (CT). The study comprised 1433 CXR, 523 CT and 216 CTS examinations performed 5 years after the introduction of CTS. For each examination, it was decided if CTS would have been appropriate instead of CXR (CXR cases), if CTS could have replaced the performed CT (CT cases) or if CT would have been performed had CTS not been available (CTS cases). It was judged that (a) CTS had been appropriate in 15 % of the CXR examinations, (b) CTS could have replaced additionally 7 % of the CT examinations and (c) CT would have been carried out in 63 % of the performed CTS examinations, had CTS not been available. In conclusion, the potential role for CTS to substitute other modalities during office hours at a tertiary referral centre may be in the order of 20 and 25 % of performed CXR and chest CT, respectively. (authors)

  19. AN ANALYSIS OF THE POTENTIAL ROLE OF CHEST TOMOSYNTHESIS IN OPTIMISING IMAGING RESOURCES IN THORACIC RADIOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Cecilia; Båth, Magnus; Vikgren, Jenny; Johnsson, Åse Allansdotter

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the potential role of chest tomosynthesis (CTS) at a tertiary referral centre by exploring to what extent CTS could substitute chest radiography (CXR) and computed tomography (CT). The study comprised 1433 CXR, 523 CT and 216 CTS examinations performed 5 years after the introduction of CTS. For each examination, it was decided if CTS would have been appropriate instead of CXR (CXR cases), if CTS could have replaced the performed CT (CT cases) or if CT would have been performed had CTS not been available (CTS cases). It was judged that (a) CTS had been appropriate in 15 % of the CXR examinations, (b) CTS could have replaced additionally 7 % of the CT examinations and (c) CT would have been carried out in 63 % of the performed CTS examinations, had CTS not been available. In conclusion, the potential role for CTS to substitute other modalities during office hours at a tertiary referral centre may be in the order of 20 and 25 % of performed CXR and chest CT, respectively. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. AN ANALYSIS OF THE POTENTIAL ROLE OF CHEST TOMOSYNTHESIS IN OPTIMISING IMAGING RESOURCES IN THORACIC RADIOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Cecilia; Båth, Magnus; Vikgren, Jenny; Johnsson, Åse Allansdotter

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the potential role of chest tomosynthesis (CTS) at a tertiary referral centre by exploring to what extent CTS could substitute chest radiography (CXR) and computed tomography (CT). The study comprised 1433 CXR, 523 CT and 216 CTS examinations performed 5 years after the introduction of CTS. For each examination, it was decided if CTS would have been appropriate instead of CXR (CXR cases), if CTS could have replaced the performed CT (CT cases) or if CT would have been performed had CTS not been available (CTS cases). It was judged that (a) CTS had been appropriate in 15 % of the CXR examinations, (b) CTS could have replaced additionally 7 % of the CT examinations and (c) CT would have been carried out in 63 % of the performed CTS examinations, had CTS not been available. In conclusion, the potential role for CTS to substitute other modalities during office hours at a tertiary referral centre may be in the order of 20 and 25 % of performed CXR and chest CT, respectively. PMID:26979807

  1. Evaluating phantom image quality parameters to optimise patient radiation dose in dental digital radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Luciano; Vano, Eliseo; Fernandez, Ramon; Ziraldo, Viviana; Delgado, Jaime; Delgado, Victor; Moro, Javier; Ubeda, Carlos

    2012-08-01

    Our objective was to obtain images of a predictable level of quality using an intraoral X-ray system with digital imaging, avoiding patient overexposure. A polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) physical test phantom was imaged at different exposure times and at various PMMA thicknesses using a dental imaging coupled charge device. Two identical regions of interest (ROIs) were chosen in every image file, and quality was numerically evaluated by measuring high-contrast spatial resolutions, low-contrast thresholds and signal-to-noise ratios. In addition, three practitioners proposed personal quality scores by image inspection. Numerical contents in the ROIs, related to the image quality, were plotted against exposure time. From here, a simple expression linking the exposure time with the thickness to obtain images of comparable quality was deduced. As a result, the optimum exposure time for imaging with a predictable level of quality can be inferred. The potential effect could imply savings above 1000 man Sv, roughly 20 % of the collective dose due to dental imaging, over a population of 1540 millions.

  2. Radiology of chest diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, S.; Stark, P.

    1990-01-01

    This book is divided into three parts: The first part - 'Technology and normal findings' - explains current radiological diagnostic methods. The indications for particular examinations are given, with the techniques and possible errors. The second part of the book - 'Diseases of the lung' - gives a systematic description of basic knowledge needed for diagnosis. Each chapter begins with a definition of the disease and a discussion of the diagnostic information that can be expected from the various radiological methods. This is followed by the pathological morphology and pathological physiology and the clinical symptoms. The third part of the book - 'Radiological signs and differential diagnosis' - deals with image patterns, such as segmental opacities, calcification, localized hyperlucency, etc. It begins where the diagnostician must begin - immediate confrontation with the radiograph, analysis of the details, recognition of structures and understanding the image. (orig./DGD) With 381 figs., 42 tabs

  3. Anesthesia for radiologic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forestner, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Anesthetic techniques for neurodiagnostic studies and radiation therapy have been recently reviewed, but anesthetic involvement in thoracic and abdominal radiology has received little attention. Patient reactions to radiologic contrast media may be of concern to the anesthesiologist, who is often responsible for injecting these agents during diagnostic procedures, and thus is included in this discussion. Finally, the difficulties of administering anesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are outlined, in an effort to help anesthesiologist to anticipate problems with this new technologic development. Although there are very few indications for the use of general anesthesia for diagnostic radiologic studies in adults, most procedures performed with children, the mentally retarded, or the combative adult require either heavy sedation or general anesthesia. In selecting an anesthetic technique for a specific procedure, both the patient's disease process and the requirements of the radiologist must be carefully balanced

  4. Organizational decentralization in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aas, I H Monrad

    2006-01-01

    At present, most hospitals have a department of radiology where images are captured and interpreted. Decentralization is the opposite of centralization and means 'away from the centre'. With a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) and broadband communications, transmitting radiology images between sites will be far easier than before. Qualitative interviews of 26 resource persons were performed in Norway. There was a response rate of 90%. Decentralization of radiology interpretations seems less relevant than centralization, but several forms of decentralization have a role to play. The respondents mentioned several advantages, including exploitation of capacity and competence. They also mentioned several disadvantages, including splitting professional communities and reduced contact between radiologists and clinicians. With the new technology decentralization and centralization of image interpretation are important possibilities in organizational change. This will be important for the future of teleradiology.

  5. Radiology education: a radiology curriculum for all medical students?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, Laura; Kok, E.M.; van der Gijp, Anouk

    2017-01-01

    Diagnostic errors in radiology are frequent and can cause severe patient harm. Despite large performance differences between radiologists and non-radiology physicians, the latter often interpret medical images because electronic health records make images available throughout the hospital. Some

  6. Radiological incidents in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobzova, L.; Novotny, J.

    2008-01-01

    In many countries a reporting system of radiological incidents to national regulatory body exists and providers of radiotherapy treatment are obliged to report all major and/or in some countries all incidents occurring in institution. State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) is providing a systematic guidance for radiotherapy departments from 1997 by requiring inclusion of radiation safety problems into Quality assurance manual, which is the basic document for obtaining a license of SONS for handling with sources of ionizing radiation. For that purpose SONS also issued the recommendation 'Introduction of QA system for important sources in radiotherapy-radiological incidents' in which the radiological incidents are defined and the basic guidance for their classification (category A, B, C, D), investigation and reporting are given. At regular periods the SONS in co-operation with radiotherapy centers is making a survey of all radiological incidents occurring in institutions and it is presenting obtained information in synoptic communication (2003 Motolske dny, 2005 Novy Jicin). This presentation is another summary report of radiological incidents that occurred in our radiotherapy institutions during last 3 years. Emphasis is given not only to survey and statistics, but also to analysis of reasons of the radiological incidents and to their detection and prevention. Analyses of incidents in radiotherapy have led to a much broader understanding of incident causation. Information about the error should be shared as early as possible during or after investigation by all radiotherapy centers. Learning from incidents, errors and near misses should be a part of improvement of the QA system in institutions. Generally, it is recommended that all radiotherapy facilities should participate in the reporting, analyzing and learning system to facilitate the dissemination of knowledge throughout the whole country to prevent errors in radiotherapy.(authors)

  7. Radiology's value chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzmann, Dieter R

    2012-04-01

    A diagnostic radiology value chain is constructed to define its main components, all of which are vulnerable to change, because digitization has caused disaggregation of the chain. Some components afford opportunities to improve productivity, some add value, while some face outsourcing to lower labor cost and to information technology substitutes, raising commoditization risks. Digital image information, because it can be competitive at smaller economies of scale, allows faster, differential rates of technological innovation of components, initiating a centralization-to-decentralization technology trend. Digitization, having triggered disaggregation of radiology's professional service model, may soon usher in an information business model. This means moving from a mind-set of "reading images" to an orientation of creating and organizing information for greater accuracy, faster speed, and lower cost in medical decision making. Information businesses view value chain investments differently than do small professional services. In the former model, producing a better business product will extend image interpretation beyond a radiologist's personal fund of knowledge to encompass expanding external imaging databases. A follow-on expansion with integration of image and molecular information into a report will offer new value in medical decision making. Improved interpretation plus new integration will enrich and diversify radiology's key service products, the report and consultation. A more robust, information-rich report derived from a "systems" and "computational" radiology approach will be facilitated by a transition from a professional service to an information business. Under health care reform, radiology will transition its emphasis from volume to greater value. Radiology's future brightens with the adoption of a philosophy of offering information rather than "reads" for decision making. Staunchly defending the status quo via turf wars is unlikely to constitute a

  8. Radiologic protection in pediatric radiology: ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Ramon; Khong, Pek-Lan; Ringertz, Hans

    2013-01-01

    ICRP has provided an updated overview of radiation protection principles in pediatric radiology. The authors recommend that staff, radiologists, medical physicists and vendors involved in pediatric radiology read this document. For conventional radiography, the report gives advice on patient positioning, immobilization, shielding and appropriate exposure conditions. It describes extensively the use of pulsed fluoroscopy, the importance of limiting fluoroscopy time, and how shielding and geometry must be used to avoid unnecessary radiation to the patient and operator. Furthermore, the use of fluoroscopy in interventional procedures with emphasis on dose reduction to patients and staff is discussed in light of the increasing frequency, complexity and length ofthe procedures. CT is the main reason that medical imaging in several developed countries is the highest annual per capita effective radiation dose from man-made sources. The ICRP report gives extensive descriptions of how CT protocols can be optimized to minimize radiation exposure in pediatric patients. The importance of balancing image quality with acceptable noise in pediatric imaging and the controversies regarding the use of protective shielding in CT are also discussed.

  9. Radiology illustrated. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung Ihn

    2014-01-01

    Clear, practical guide to the diagnostic imaging of diseases of the liver, biliary tree, gallbladder, pancreas, and spleen. A wealth of carefully selected and categorized illustrations. Highlighted key points to facilitate rapid review. Aid to differential diagnosis. Radiology Illustrated: Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Radiology is the first of two volumes that will serve as a clear, practical guide to the diagnostic imaging of abdominal diseases. This volume, devoted to diseases of the liver, biliary tree, gallbladder, pancreas, and spleen, covers congenital disorders, vascular diseases, benign and malignant tumors, and infectious conditions. Liver transplantation, evaluation of the therapeutic response of hepatocellular carcinoma, trauma, and post-treatment complications are also addressed. The book presents approximately 560 cases with more than 2100 carefully selected and categorized illustrations, along with key text messages and tables, that will allow the reader easily to recall the relevant images as an aid to differential diagnosis. At the end of each text message, key points are summarized to facilitate rapid review and learning. In addition, brief descriptions of each clinical problem are provided, followed by both common and uncommon case studies that illustrate the role of different imaging modalities, such as ultrasound, radiography, CT, and MRI.

  10. Radiology illustrated. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byung Ihn (ed.) [Seoul National Univ. Hospital (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Clear, practical guide to the diagnostic imaging of diseases of the liver, biliary tree, gallbladder, pancreas, and spleen. A wealth of carefully selected and categorized illustrations. Highlighted key points to facilitate rapid review. Aid to differential diagnosis. Radiology Illustrated: Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Radiology is the first of two volumes that will serve as a clear, practical guide to the diagnostic imaging of abdominal diseases. This volume, devoted to diseases of the liver, biliary tree, gallbladder, pancreas, and spleen, covers congenital disorders, vascular diseases, benign and malignant tumors, and infectious conditions. Liver transplantation, evaluation of the therapeutic response of hepatocellular carcinoma, trauma, and post-treatment complications are also addressed. The book presents approximately 560 cases with more than 2100 carefully selected and categorized illustrations, along with key text messages and tables, that will allow the reader easily to recall the relevant images as an aid to differential diagnosis. At the end of each text message, key points are summarized to facilitate rapid review and learning. In addition, brief descriptions of each clinical problem are provided, followed by both common and uncommon case studies that illustrate the role of different imaging modalities, such as ultrasound, radiography, CT, and MRI.

  11. Image quality and dose management in digital radiography: A new paradigm for optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, H. P.; Faulkner, K.

    2005-01-01

    The advent of digital imaging in radiology, combined with the explosive growth of technology, has dramatically improved imaging techniques. This has led to the expansion of diagnostic capabilities, both in terms of the number of procedures and their scope. Throughout the world, film/ screen radiography systems are being rapidly replaced with digital systems. Many progressive medical institutions have acquired, or are considering the purchase of computed radiography systems with storage phosphor plates or direct digital radiography systems with flat panel detectors. However, unknown to some users, these devices offer a new paradigm of opportunity and challenges. Images can be obtained at a lower dose owing to the higher detective quantum efficiency (DQE). These fundamental differences in comparison to conventional film/screens necessitate the development of new strategies for dose and quality optimisations. A set of referral criteria based upon three dose levels is proposed. (authors)

  12. A health survey of radiologic technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boice, J.D. Jr.; Mandel, J.S.; Doody, M.M.; Yoder, R.C.; McGowan, R.

    1992-01-01

    A health survey of more than 143,000 radiologic technologists is described. The population was identified from the 1982 computerized files of the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists, which was established in 1926. Inactive members were traced to obtain current addresses or death notifications. More than 6000 technologists were reported to have died. For all registrants who were alive when located, a detailed 16-page questionnaire was sent, covering occupational histories, medical conditions, and other personal and lifestyle characteristics. Nonrespondents were contacted by telephone to complete an abbreviated questionnaire. More than 104,000 responses were obtained. Most technologists were female (76%), white (93%), and employed for an average of 12 years; 37% attended college, and approximately 50% never smoked cigarettes. Radiation exposure information was sought from employer records and commercial dosimetry companies. Technologists employed for the longest times had the highest estimated cumulative exposures, with approximately 9% with exposures greater than 5 cGy. There was a high correlation between cumulative occupational exposure and personal exposure to medical radiographs, related, in part, to the association of both factors with attained age. It is interesting that 10% of all technologists allowed others to practice taking radiographs on them during their training. Nearly 4% of the respondents reported having some type of cancer, mainly of the skin (1517), breast (665), and cervix (726). Prospective surveys will monitor cancer mortality rates through use of the National Death Index and cancer incidence through periodic mailings of questionnaires. This is the only occupational study of radiation employees who are primarily women and should provide new information on the possible risks associated with relatively low levels of exposure

  13. Gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.; Scarsbrook, A.F.

    2006-01-01

    This is the fifth in the series of short reviews of internet-based radiological learning resources and will focus on gastrointestinal (GI) and hepatobiliary radiology. Below are details of a few of the higher quality resources currently available. Most of the sites cater for medical students and trainee or non-specialist radiologists, but may be also be of interest to specialists, especially for use in teaching. Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (May 2006)

  14. Genitourinary and breast radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perriss, R.W.; Graham, R.N.J.; Scarsbrook, A.F.

    2006-01-01

    This is the sixth in a series of short reviews of internet-based radiological learning resources and will focus on genitourinary (GU) and breast radiology. Below are details of a few of the higher quality resources currently available. Most of the sites cater for medical students and trainee or non-specialist radiologists, but may be also be of interest to specialists, especially for use in teaching. Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (July 2006)

  15. Practical interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, J.; Schreyer, H.

    1991-01-01

    The book is intended as a practical guide and manual for interventional radiology applications. Main emphasis is placed on the performance of the various techniques, with explanations of the various steps to be taken, illustrated by drawings or pictures. Indications, contra-indications and clinical achievements are given in brief. There is one chapter each for the following techniques: angioplasty - intra-arterial fibrinolysis - vascular stents - neuroembolisation - embolisation of other vessels - biliary interventions - abscess drainage - nephrostomy and ureteral manipulations -percutaneous fine-needle biopsy - vena cava filters - interventional radiology in infants. (orig.)

  16. Dosimetry in Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andisco, D.; Blanco, S.; Buzzi, A.E

    2014-01-01

    The steady growth in the use of ionizing radiation in diagnostic imaging requires to maintain a proper management of patient’s dose. Dosimetry in Radiology is a difficult topic to address, but vital for proper estimation of the dose the patient is receiving. The awareness that every day is perceived in our country on these issues is the appropriate response to this problem. This article describes the main dosimetric units used and easily exemplifies doses in radiology through internationally known reference values. (authors) [es

  17. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, S.B.; Brown, R.L.; Cantrell, J.R.; Wilcox, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste

  18. Synopsis of radiologic anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meschan, I.

    1987-01-01

    The book is a compact version of earlier publications that appeared in 1975 as a one- and a two-volume issue under the title 'Atlas of Radiologic Anatomy'. A chapter on computed tomography has been added as this novel technique requires a new approach to radiologic anatomy. The radiologist will find all the information on the anatomic conditions he needs for analysing radiographs and CT pictures. More than 600 radiographs and CT pictures are given that illustrate typical and rare findings. The book also is useful as a source of reference for making good radiographs and evaluating the quality of radiographs or CT pictures. With 1413 figs., 18 tabs [de

  19. Radiological worker training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

  20. Radiological sciences dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    Dowsett, David

    2009-01-01

    The Radiological Sciences Dictionary is a rapid reference guide for all hospital staff employed in diagnostic imaging, providing definitions of over 3000 keywords as applied to the technology of diagnostic radiology.Written in a concise and easy to digest form, the dictionary covers a wide variety of subject matter, including:· radiation legislation and measurement · computing and digital imaging terminology· nuclear medicine radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals· radiographic contrast agents (x-ray, MRI and ultrasound)· definitions used in ultrasound and MRI technology· statistical exp

  1. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitken, S.B. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Brown, R.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, J.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Wilcox, D.P. [West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc., West Valley, NY (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste.

  2. Radiological worker training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance

  3. Radiology of thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, P.

    1987-01-01

    This course provides an overview of the radiologic manifestations of trauma to the chest. The basic mechanisms of injury are discussed. The effect of trauma on the chest wall, the lung parenchyma, and the pleural space is described. Rib fractures, sternal fractures, lung contusion, lung hematoma, lung laceration, post-traumatic atelectasis, hemothorax, chylothorax, pneumothorax, and adult respiratory distress syndrome are discussed and illustrated. Injuries to the tracheobronchial tree, the aorta and brachiocephalic vessels, the esophagus, the diaphragm, and the heart are also presented. The purpose of the lecture is to familiarize the audience with common and unusual radiologic presentations of traumatic injury to the thorax

  4. Anesthesia for interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Sonnenberg, E.; Casola, G.; Varney, R.R.; D'Agostino, H.B.; Zornow, M.; Mazzie, W.

    1989-01-01

    We recognized that the complexity and surgical nature of many interventional radiology procedures dictate essential radiologic involvement into traditional anesthesiologic areas. They reviewed our experience with a variety of interventional procedures to document complications and problems related to anesthetic use (or misuse) and compile recommendations for rational monitoring and control for these procedures. In particular, the authors have studied complications of drug therapies and the treatment of these complications; use of complex anesthesia procedures (e.g., epidural anesthesia, succinylcholine blockage); reasons for choice of drugs (e.g., fentanyl vs meperidine vs morphine); and medico-legal aspects of radiologist performing traditional anesthesiology-type procedures

  5. Optimising polarised neutron scattering measurements--XYZ and polarimetry analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cussen, L.D.; Goossens, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    The analytic optimisation of neutron scattering measurements made using XYZ polarisation analysis and neutron polarimetry techniques is discussed. Expressions for the 'quality factor' and the optimum division of counting time for the XYZ technique are presented. For neutron polarimetry the optimisation is identified as analogous to that for measuring the flipping ratio and reference is made to the results already in the literature

  6. Optimising polarised neutron scattering measurements--XYZ and polarimetry analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Cussen, L D

    2002-01-01

    The analytic optimisation of neutron scattering measurements made using XYZ polarisation analysis and neutron polarimetry techniques is discussed. Expressions for the 'quality factor' and the optimum division of counting time for the XYZ technique are presented. For neutron polarimetry the optimisation is identified as analogous to that for measuring the flipping ratio and reference is made to the results already in the literature.

  7. Application of ant colony optimisation in distribution transformer sizing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study proposes an optimisation method for transformer sizing in power system using ant colony optimisation and a verification of the process by MATLAB software. The aim is to address the issue of transformer sizing which is a major challenge affecting its effective performance, longevity, huge capital cost and power ...

  8. Multi-objective evolutionary optimisation for product design and manufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Presents state-of-the-art research in the area of multi-objective evolutionary optimisation for integrated product design and manufacturing Provides a comprehensive review of the literature Gives in-depth descriptions of recently developed innovative and novel methodologies, algorithms and systems in the area of modelling, simulation and optimisation

  9. Design Optimisation and Conrol of a Pilot Operated Seat Valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Brian; Andersen, Torben Ole; Hansen, Michael Rygaard

    2004-01-01

    The paper gives an approach for optimisation of the bandwidth of a pilot operated seat valve for mobile applications. Physical dimensions as well as parameters of the implemented control loop are optimised simultaneously. The frequency response of the valve varies as a function of the pressure drop...

  10. DACIA LOGAN LIVE AXLE OPTIMISATION USING COMPUTER GRAPHICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KIRALY Andrei

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some contributions to the calculus and optimisation of a live axle used at Dacia Logan using computer graphics software for creating the model and afterwards using FEA evaluation to determine the effectiveness of the optimisation. Thus using specialized computer software, a simulation is made and the results were compared to the measured real prototype.

  11. Spatial-structural interaction and strain energy structural optimisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeyer, H.; Davila Delgado, J.M.; Borrmann, A.; Geyer, P.; Rafiq, Y.; Wilde, de P.

    2012-01-01

    A research engine iteratively transforms spatial designs into structural designs and vice versa. Furthermore, spatial and structural designs are optimised. It is suggested to optimise a structural design by evaluating the strain energy of its elements and by then removing, adding, or changing the

  12. Adjoint Optimisation of the Turbulent Flow in an Annular Diffuser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, Erik; Agular Knudsen, Christian; Kunoy, Jens Dahl

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, a numerical optimisation of guide vanes in an annular diffuser, is performed. The optimisation is preformed for the purpose of improving the following two parameters simultaneously; the first parameter is the uniformity perpen-dicular to the flow direction, a 1/3 diameter do...

  13. Optimising of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Mix Design | Beddar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimising of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Mix Design. ... as a result of the loss of mixture workability that will be translated into a difficult concrete casting in site. ... An experimental study of an optimisation method of fibres in reinforced ...

  14. GAOS: Spatial optimisation of crop and nature within agricultural fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, de S.; Janssen, H.; Klompe, A.; Lerink, P.; Vanmeulebrouk, B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes and demonstrates a spatial optimiser that allocates areas of inefficient machine manoeuvring to field margins thus improving the use of available space and supporting map-based Controlled Traffic Farming. A prototype web service (GAOS) allows farmers to optimise tracks within

  15. Sampling on radiological protection training in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.

    2001-01-01

    Radiological security aspects were evaluated in radiology departments from Mexico City. The study was carried out in two stages, the first one evaluated 40 departments just before the implementation of the new Official Mexican Standards related to Radiological Security and Quality Control in Radiology; in the second stage 33 departments were evaluated 2 years after those standards were implanted, showing a favorable impact of the training programs for the type of answers obtained [es

  16. Clearance and recycling - how can radiation protection and application of the waste hierarchy be optimised?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efraimsson, Henrik; Wiebert, Anders; Carroll, Simon

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the principles behind the current Swedish regulations for clearance of materials and for application of the waste hierarchy on radioactive waste are described and discussed. As a background, the applicable legislation for radiation protection and nuclear safety is briefly described and compared with the environmental legislation for waste management. The possibilities for a simultaneous optimisation of radiation protection, waste management and sustainability are analysed. As part of this, different factors to be considered in the optimisation of waste management in the context of clearance and recycling are presented and discussed. Examples of such factors are: possibilities of waste segregation, availability and acceptability of routes for recycling or disposal, availability of methods for radiological characterisation, predicted or potential radiation doses to members of the public, predicted or potential spread of radioactive substances in the environment, costs and material value. As an illustration, some examples on the use of the clearance option in the Swedish nuclear industry are presented, both from operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Concluding remarks are made from a radiation protection regulatory perspective. (authors)

  17. Introduction of radiological protection; Pengenalan kepada perlindungan radiologi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-12-31

    The chapter briefly discussed the following subjects: basic principles of radiological protection , dose limit which was suggested, stochastic and nonstochastic effects, equivalent dose and alternative of it`s calculation, limit for the publics, ICRP (International Commission for Radiological Protection) recommendations, and the principles of radiological protection. Dangerous radiation sources also briefly summarized i.e. x-ray generators, reactor nucleus.

  18. Radioactive isotopes in occupational health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favino, Angelo.

    1976-01-01

    It is highly desirable today to know and use for industrial medicine purposes all scientific and technological data available in the field of nuclear medicine. The present textbook is an inventory of all possibilities given to occupational doctors in order to pronounce a judgement of ability to work on the occasion of preemployment or routine medical examinations. Such applications require a high degree of competence in radiological protection and also require observation of the basic Safety Standards of Euratom and of the recommendations of the International Committee on Radiological Protection, the same safety principles having been incorporated in all the legislations of the Member States of the Community. In this book a number of chapters are devoted to the description of the basic principles for maximum permissible doses, dosimetric surveillance, medical supervision of workers exposed to ionizing radiations, and medical treatments to be used after a radioactive contamination. In addition a small number of preventive measures are described for all utilisations of radioactive substances for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes

  19. Modified cuckoo search: A new gradient free optimisation algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, S.; Hassan, O.; Morgan, K.; Brown, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Modified cuckoo search (MCS) is a new gradient free optimisation algorithm. → MCS shows a high convergence rate, able to outperform other optimisers. → MCS is particularly strong at high dimension objective functions. → MCS performs well when applied to engineering problems. - Abstract: A new robust optimisation algorithm, which can be regarded as a modification of the recently developed cuckoo search, is presented. The modification involves the addition of information exchange between the top eggs, or the best solutions. Standard optimisation benchmarking functions are used to test the effects of these modifications and it is demonstrated that, in most cases, the modified cuckoo search performs as well as, or better than, the standard cuckoo search, a particle swarm optimiser, and a differential evolution strategy. In particular the modified cuckoo search shows a high convergence rate to the true global minimum even at high numbers of dimensions.

  20. Results of the 2010 IGSC Topical Session on Optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text follows: The 2010 IGSC topical session on optimisation explored a wide range of issues concerning optimisation throughout the radioactive waste management process. Philosophical and ethical questions were discussed, such as: - To what extent is the process of optimisation more important than the end result? - How do we balance long-term environmental safety with near-term operational safety? - For how long should options be kept open? - In balancing safety and excessive cost, when is BAT achieved and who decides on this? * How should we balance the needs of current society with those of future generations? It was clear that optimisation is about getting the right balance between a range of issues that cover: radiation protection, environmental protection, operational safety, operational requirements, social expectations and cost. The optimisation process will also need to respect various constraints, which are likely to include: regulatory requirements, site restrictions, community-imposed requirements or restrictions and resource constraints. These issues were explored through a number of presentations that discussed practical cases of optimisation occurring at different stages of international radioactive waste management programmes. These covered: - Operations and decommissioning - management of large disused components, from the findings of an international study, presented by WPDD; - Concept option selection, prior to site selection - upstream and disposal system optioneering in the UK; - Siting decisions - examples from both Germany and France, explaining how optimisation is being used to support site comparisons and communicate siting decisions; - Repository design decisions - comparison of KBS-3 horizontal and vertical deposition options in Finland; and - On-going optimisation during repository operation - operational experience from WIPP in the US. The variety of the remarks and views expressed during the

  1. Research and development in radiological protection; Investigacion y desarrollo en proteccion radiologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butragueno, J. L.; Villota, C.; Gutierrez, C.; Rodriguez, A.

    2004-07-01

    The objective of Radiological Protection is to gurantee that neither people, be they workers or members of the public, or the environment are exposed to radiological risks considered by society to be unacceptable. Among the various resources available to meet this objective is Research and Development (R and D), which is carried out in three areas: I. Radiological protection of persons: (a) knowledge of the biological effects of radiations, in order to determine the relationship that exists between radiation exposure dose and its effects on health; (b) the development of new personal dosimetry techniques in order to adapt to new situations, instrumental techniques and information managmenet technologies allowing for better assessment of exposure dose; and (c) development of the principle of radiological protection optimisation (ALARA), which has been set up internationally as the fundamental principle on which radiological protection interventions are based. II. Assessment of environmental radiological impact, the objective of which is to assess the nature and magnitude of situations of exposure to ionising radiations as a result of the controlled or uncontrolled release of radioactive material to the environment, and III.Reduction of the radiological impact of radioactive wastes, the objective of which is to develop radioactive material and waste management techniques suitable for each situation, in order to reduce the risks assocaited with their definitive managmenet or thier release to the environment. Briefly desribed below are the strategic lines of R and D of the CSN, the Electricity Industry, Ciemat and Enresa in the aforementioned areas. (Author)

  2. ICRP Publication 138: Ethical Foundations of the System of Radiological Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, K-W; Cantone, M-C; Kurihara-Saio, C; Le Guen, B; Martinez, N; Oughton, D; Schneider, T; Toohey, R; ZöLzer, F

    2018-02-01

    Despite a longstanding recognition that radiological protection is not only a matter of science, but also ethics, ICRP publications have rarely addressed the ethical foundations of the system of radiological protection explicitly. The purpose of this publication is to describe how the Commission has relied on ethical values, either intentionally or indirectly, in developing the system of radiological protection with the objective of presenting a coherent view of how ethics is part of this system. In so doing, it helps to clarify the inherent value judgements made in achieving the aim of the radiological protection system as underlined by the Commission in Publication 103. Although primarily addressed to the radiological protection community, this publication is also intended to address authorities, operators, workers, medical professionals, patients, the public, and its representatives (e.g. NGOs) acting in the interest of the protection of people and the environment. This publication provides the key steps concerning the scientific, ethical, and practical evolutions of the system of radiological protection since the first ICRP publication in 1928. It then describes the four core ethical values underpinning the present system: beneficence/ non-maleficence, prudence, justice, and dignity. It also discusses how these core ethical values relate to the principles of radiological protection, namely justification, optimisation, and limitation. The publication finally addresses key procedural values that are required for the practical implementation of the system, focusing on accountability, transparency, and inclusiveness. The Commission sees this publication as a founding document to be elaborated further in different situations and circumstances.

  3. An exergy-based multi-objective optimisation model for energy retrofit strategies in non-domestic buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García Kerdan, Iván; Raslan, Rokia; Ruyssevelt, Paul

    2016-01-01

    While the building sector has a significant thermodynamic improvement potential, exergy analysis has been shown to provide new insight for the optimisation of building energy systems. This paper presents an exergy-based multi-objective optimisation tool that aims to assess the impact of a diverse range of retrofit measures with a focus on non-domestic buildings. EnergyPlus was used as a dynamic calculation engine for first law analysis, while a Python add-on was developed to link dynamic exergy analysis and a Genetic Algorithm optimisation process with the aforementioned software. Two UK archetype case studies (an office and a primary school) were used to test the feasibility of the proposed framework. Different measures combinations based on retrofitting the envelope insulation levels and the application of different HVAC configurations were assessed. The objective functions in this study are annual energy use, occupants' thermal comfort, and total building exergy destructions. A large range of optimal solutions was achieved highlighting the framework capabilities. The model achieved improvements of 53% in annual energy use, 51% of exergy destructions and 66% of thermal comfort for the school building, and 50%, 33%, and 80% for the office building. This approach can be extended by using exergoeconomic optimisation. - Highlights: • Integration of dynamic exergy analysis into a retrofit-oriented simulation tool. • Two UK non-domestic building archetypes are used as case studies. • The model delivers non-dominated solutions based on energy, exergy and comfort. • Exergy destructions of ERMs are optimised using GA algorithms. • Strengths and limitations of the proposed exergy-based framework are discussed.

  4. Guidelines for a radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    This manual presents guidelines for hospitals on a radiology quality assurance and dose measurement audit program and a system of planned actions that monitor and record the performance and effectiveness of the radiological service

  5. Radiological Approach to Forefoot Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Chung Ho

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Forefoot pain is a common clinical complaint in orthopaedic practice. In this article, we discuss the anatomy of the forefoot, clinical and radiological approaches to forefoot pain, and common painful forefoot disorders and their associated radiological features.

  6. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

    2010-06-24

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

  7. Radiological controls integrated into design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kindred, G.W. [Cleveland Electric Illuminating Co., Perry, OH (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Radiological controls are required by law in the design of commercial nuclear power reactor facilities. These controls can be relatively minor or significant, relative to cost. To ensure that radiological controls are designed into a project, the health physicist (radiological engineer) must be involved from the beginning. This is especially true regarding keeping costs down. For every radiological engineer at a nuclear power plant there must be fifty engineers of other disciplines. The radiological engineer cannot be an expert on every discipline of engineering. However, he must be knowledgeable to the degree of how a design will impact the facility from a radiological perspective. This paper will address how to effectively perform radiological analyses with the goal of radiological controls integrated into the design package.

  8. Program of environmental radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    This Regulation refers to the requirement of the Regulation CNEN-NN.3.01, 'Basic Act of Radiological Protection', as expressed in the section 5.14, related to the Program of Environmental Radiological Monitoring (PMRA)

  9. A comparison of forward planning and optimised inverse planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldham, Mark; Neal, Anthony; Webb, Steve

    1995-01-01

    A radiotherapy treatment plan optimisation algorithm has been applied to 48 prostate plans and the results compared with those of an experienced human planner. Twelve patients were used in the study, and a 3, 4, 6 and 8 field plan (with standard coplanar beam angles for each plan type) were optimised by both the human planner and the optimisation algorithm. The human planner 'optimised' the plan by conventional forward planning techniques. The optimisation algorithm was based on fast-simulated-annealing. 'Importance factors' assigned to different regions of the patient provide a method for controlling the algorithm, and it was found that the same values gave good results for almost all plans. The plans were compared on the basis of dose statistics and normal-tissue-complication-probability (NTCP) and tumour-control-probability (TCP). The results show that the optimisation algorithm yielded results that were at least as good as the human planner for all plan types, and on the whole slightly better. A study of the beam-weights chosen by the optimisation algorithm and the planner will be presented. The optimisation algorithm showed greater variation, in response to individual patient geometry. For simple (e.g. 3 field) plans it was found to consistently achieve slightly higher TCP and lower NTCP values. For more complicated (e.g. 8 fields) plans the optimisation also achieved slightly better results with generally less numbers of beams. The optimisation time was always ≤5 minutes; a factor of up to 20 times faster than the human planner

  10. Epidemiology of aplastic anemia in Japanese radiological technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitabatake, Takashi; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Saito, Akira; Nakamura, Minoru.

    1976-01-01

    Among Japanese radiological technicians, four deaths from aplastic anemia have been recorded. Based on this fact, some epidemiological considerations are tried. During the period from 1930 to 1960, the population of radiological technicians is estimated to be 74,400 man-years, in which 0.5 aplastic anemias are expected. However actually three died from aplastic anemia. This difference is statistically significant at the 1% level. On the other hand, in the period from 1961 to 1973, the observed value is 1 against 0.7 expected. It is concluded that aplastic anemia had been frequently induced among Japanese radiological technicians in the era when there was much exposure to occupational radiation. (auth.)

  11. Radiological Emergency Preparedness using Old ORTEC Whole Body Counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawy, W.M.

    2012-01-01

    During a radiological emergency (RE) a large number of occupational and public may be exposed externally and to a number of radionuclides internally as a result of inhalation or injection. The radiological effect is directly proportional to the time of exposure and the activity of the contaminant materials. The main task of this paper is to show the emergency preparedness capability of using the old ORTEC whole body counter (WBC). In case of a nuclear accident ORTEC WBC is ready for use to estimate the radioactivity which inhaled or digested with food, as well as in case of medical exposure in general and nuclear medicine in particular. The present study showed that the duration time to make analysis for only one individual is about 25 min. Hence 57 individuals are monitored per day. Consequently, old ORTEC WBC is effective tool in field of research and limited use for radiological and nuclear emergencies

  12. Radiological and environmental surveillance in front-end fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.H.; Sahoo, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the occupational and environmental radiological safety measures associated with the operations of front end nuclear fuel cycle. Radiological monitoring in the facilities is important to ensure safe working environment, protection of workers against exposure to radiation and comply with regulatory limits of exposure. The radiation exposure of workers in different units of the front end nuclear fuels cycle facilities operated by IREL, UCIL and NFC and environmental monitoring results are summarised

  13. VEHICLE DRIVING CYCLE OPTIMISATION ON THE HIGHWAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinoviy STOTSKO

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the problem of reducing vehicle energy consumption. The authors consider the optimisation of highway driving cycle a way to use the kinetic energy of a car more effectively at various road conditions. The model of a vehicle driving control at the highway which consists of elementary cycles, such as accelerating, free rolling and deceleration under forces of external resistance, was designed. Braking, as an energy dissipation regime, was not included. The influence of the various longitudinal profiles of the road was taken into consideration and included in the model. Ways to use the results of monitoring road and traffic conditions are presented. The method of non-linear programming is used to design the optimal vehicle control function and phase trajectory. The results are presented by improved typical driving cycles that present energy saving as a subject of choice at a specified schedule.

  14. Optimisation algorithms for ECG data compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugland, D; Heber, J G; Husøy, J H

    1997-07-01

    The use of exact optimisation algorithms for compressing digital electrocardiograms (ECGs) is demonstrated. As opposed to traditional time-domain methods, which use heuristics to select a small subset of representative signal samples, the problem of selecting the subset is formulated in rigorous mathematical terms. This approach makes it possible to derive algorithms guaranteeing the smallest possible reconstruction error when a bounded selection of signal samples is interpolated. The proposed model resembles well-known network models and is solved by a cubic dynamic programming algorithm. When applied to standard test problems, the algorithm produces a compressed representation for which the distortion is about one-half of that obtained by traditional time-domain compression techniques at reasonable compression ratios. This illustrates that, in terms of the accuracy of decoded signals, existing time-domain heuristics for ECG compression may be far from what is theoretically achievable. The paper is an attempt to bridge this gap.

  15. Optimising Impact in Astronomy for Development Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Eli

    2015-08-01

    Positive outcomes in the fields of science education and international development are notoriously difficult to achieve. Among the challenges facing projects that use astronomy to improve education and socio-economic development is how to optimise project design in order to achieve the greatest possible benefits. Over the past century, medical scientists along with statisticians and economists have progressed an increasingly sophisticated and scientific approach to designing, testing and improving social intervention and public health education strategies. This talk offers a brief review of the history and current state of `intervention science'. A similar framework is then proposed for astronomy outreach and education projects, with applied examples given of how existing evidence can be used to inform project design, predict and estimate cost-effectiveness, minimise the risk of unintended negative consequences and increase the likelihood of target outcomes being achieved.

  16. Optimisation of Multilayer Insulation an Engineering Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Chorowski, M; Parente, C; Riddone, G

    2001-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to describe the heat flux through multilayer insulation (MLI). The total heat flux between the layers is the result of three distinct heat transfer modes: radiation, residual gas conduction and solid spacer conduction. The model describes the MLI behaviour considering a layer-to-layer approach and is based on an electrical analogy, in which the three heat transfer modes are treated as parallel thermal impedances. The values of each of the transfer mode vary from layer to layer, although the total heat flux remains constant across the whole MLI blanket. The model enables the optimisation of the insulation with regard to different MLI parameters, such as residual gas pressure, number of layers and boundary temperatures. The model has been tested with experimental measurements carried out at CERN and the results revealed to be in a good agreement, especially for insulation vacuum between 10-5 Pa and 10-3 Pa.

  17. Public transport optimisation emphasising passengers’ travel behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Parbo

    to the case where the two problems are solved sequentially without taking into account interdependencies. Figure 1 - Planning public transport The PhD study develops a metaheuristic algorithm to adapt the line plan configuration in order better to match passengers’ travel demand in terms of transfers as well......Passengers in public transport complaining about their travel experiences are not uncommon. This might seem counterintuitive since several operators worldwide are presenting better key performance indicators year by year. The present PhD study focuses on developing optimisation algorithms...... to enhance the operations of public transport while explicitly emphasising passengers’ travel behaviour and preferences. Similar to economic theory, interactions between supply and demand are omnipresent in the context of public transport operations. In public transport, the demand is represented...

  18. Value Chain Optimisation of Biogas Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ida Græsted

    economically feasible. In this PhD thesis, the focus is to create models for investigating the profitability of biogas projects by: 1) including the whole value chain in a mathematical model and considering mass and energy changes on the upstream part of the chain; and 2) including profit allocation in a value......, the costs on the biogas plant has been included in the model using economy of scale. For the second point, a mathematical model considering profit allocation was developed applying three allocation mechanisms. This mathematical model can be applied as a second step after the value chain optimisation. After...... in the energy systems model to find the optimal end use of each type of gas and fuel. The main contributions of this thesis are the methods developed on plant level. Both the mathematical model for the value chain and the profit allocation model can be generalised and used in other industries where mass...

  19. Expect systems and optimisation in process control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamdani, A.; Efstathiou, J. (eds.)

    1986-01-01

    This report brings together recent developments both in expert systems and in optimisation, and deals with current applications in industry. Part One is concerned with Artificial Intellegence in planning and scheduling and with rule-based control implementation. The tasks of control maintenance, rescheduling and planning are each discussed in relation to new theoretical developments, techniques available, and sample applications. Part Two covers model based control techniques in which the control decisions are used in a computer model of the process. Fault diagnosis, maintenance and trouble-shooting are just some of the activities covered. Part Three contains case studies of projects currently in progress, giving details of the software available and the likely future trends. One of these, on qualitative plant modelling as a basis for knowledge-based operator aids in nuclear power stations is indexed separately.

  20. Expert systems and optimisation in process control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamdani, A.; Efstathiou, J.

    1986-01-01

    This report brings together recent developments both in expert systems and in optimisation, and deals with current applications in industry. Part One is concerned with Artificial Intellegence in planning and scheduling and with rule-based control implementation. The tasks of control maintenance, rescheduling and planning are each discussed in relation to new theoretical developments, techniques available, and sample applications. Part Two covers model based control techniques in which the control decisions are used in a computer model of the process. Fault diagnosis, maintenance and trouble-shooting are just some of the activities covered. Part Three contains case studies of projects currently in progress, giving details of the software available and the likely future trends. One of these, on qualitative plant modelling as a basis for knowledge-based operator aids in nuclear power stations is indexed separately. (author)

  1. Improving and optimising road pricing in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Otto Anker; Larsen, Marie Karen

    2008-01-01

    though quite a number of proposed charging systems have been examined only a few pricing strategies have been investigated. This paper deals with the optimisation of different designs for a road pricing system in the Greater Copenhagen area with respect to temporal and spatial differentiation......The question whether to introduce toll rings or road pricing in Copenhagen has been discussed intensively during the last 10 years. The main results of previous analyses are that none of the systems would make a positive contribution at present, when considered from a socio-economic view. Even...... of the pricing levels. A detailed transport model was used to describe the demand effects. The model was based on data from a real test of road pricing on 500 car drivers. The paper compares the price systems with regard to traffic effects and generalised costs for users and society. It is shown how important...

  2. A code for optimising triplet layout

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2141109; Seryi, Andrei; Abelleira, Jose; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia

    2017-01-01

    One of the main challenges when designing final focus systems of particle accelerators is maximising the beam stay clear in the strong quadrupole magnets of the inner triplet. Moreover it is desirable to keep the quadrupoles in the inner triplet as short as possible for space and costs reasons but also to reduce chromaticity and simplify corrections schemes. An algorithm that explores the triplet parameter space to optimise both these aspects was written. It uses thin lenses as a first approximation for a broad parameter scan and MADX for more precise calculations. The thin lens algorithm is significantly faster than a full scan using MADX and relatively precise at indicating the approximate area where the optimum solution lies.

  3. Optimising Signalised Intersection Using Wireless Vehicle Detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjin, Daniel Michael Okwabi; Torkudzor, Moses; Asare, Jack

    Traffic congestion on roads wastes travel times. In this paper, we developed a vehicular traffic model to optimise a signalised intersection in Accra, using wireless vehicle detectors. Traffic volume gathered was extrapolated to cover 2011 and 2016 and were analysed to obtain the peak hour traffic...... volume causing congestion. The intersection was modelled and simulated in Synchro7 as an actuated signalised model using results from the analysed data. The model for morning peak periods gave optimal cycle lengths of 100s and 150s with corresponding intersection delay of 48.9s and 90.6s in 2011 and 2016...... respectively while that for the evening was 55s giving delay of 14.2s and 16.3s respectively. It is shown that the model will improve traffic flow at the intersection....

  4. Dynamic optimisation of an industrial web process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Soufian

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available An industrial web process has been studied and it is shown that theunderlying physics of such processes governs by the Navier-Stokes partialdifferential equations with moving boundary conditions, which in turn have tobe determined by the solution of the thermodynamics equations. Thedevelopment of a two-dimensional continuous-discrete model structurebased on this study is presented. Other models are constructed based onthis model for better identification and optimisation purposes. Theparameters of the proposed models are then estimated using real dataobtained from the identification experiments with the process plant. Varioussimulation tests for validation are accompanied with the design, developmentand real-time industrial implementation of an optimal controller for dynamicoptimisation of this web process. It is shown that in comparison with thetraditional controller, the new controller resulted in a better performance, animprovement in film quality and saving in raw materials. This demonstrates theefficiency and validation of the developed models.

  5. Optimisation of parameters of DCD for PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velmurugan, S.; Sathyaseelan, V.S.; Narasimhan, S.V.; Mathur, P.K.

    1991-01-01

    Decontamination formulation based on EDTA, Oxalic acid, Citric acid was evaluated for its efficacy in removing oxide layers of PHWR. An ion exchange system which was specifically suitable for fission product dominated contamination in PHWRs was optimised for the reagent regeneration stage of the decontamination process. An analysis of the nature of the complexed metal species formed in the dissolution process and Electrochemical measurements were employed as a tool to follow the course of oxide removal during the dissolution process. An attempt was made to understand the redeposition behaviour of various isotopes during the decontamination process. SEM and ESCA studies of metal coupons before and after the dissolution process were used to analyse the deposits in the above context. The pick up of DCD reagents on the ion exchangers and material compatibility tests on Carbon steel, Monel-400 and Zircaloy-2 with the decontaminant under the conditions of decontamination experiment are reported. (author)

  6. SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radiology examination as a diagnostic aid in presentations with wide differential diagnoses: Case report of new Hodgkin's lymphoma on a background of poorly controlled HIV · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Rachel Hubbard, Jalpa Kotecha, Thomas ...

  7. Classification of radiological procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    A classification for departments in Danish hospitals which use radiological procedures. The classification codes consist of 4 digits, where the first 2 are the codes for the main groups. The first digit represents the procedure's topographical object and the second the techniques. The last 2 digits describe individual procedures. (CLS)

  8. Radiology of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baert, A.L.; Delorme, G.

    1994-01-01

    This book, written by internationally recognized experts, fully illustrates the diagnosis of both common and rarer diseases of the pancreas, the latest technical developments in relevant imaging modalities are thoroughly discussed and appraised with respect to the pancreas. The book will appeal to both clinicians and researchers in radiology and oncology. (orig.)

  9. ERC Radiological Glovebag Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellesen, A.L.

    1997-07-01

    This document establishes the requirements and responsibilities for the standardized methods for installation, use, and dismantlement of glovebags within the Hanford Site Environmental Contractor Radiological Glovebag Program. This document addresses the following topics: Containment selection and fabrication, Glovebag fabrication, Containment installation and inspection, General glovebag containment work practices, Emergency situations, and Containment removal

  10. German radiological congress 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubitz, B.; Stender, H.S.

    1983-01-01

    The publication contains the abstracts of the 261 papers read at the meeting and the 82 further papers announced, and 37 brief descriptions of the contributions to the scientific exhibition. The papers were on the subjects of radiology, nuclear medicine and to a certain extent, also radiobiology. (MG) [de

  11. Medical radiology terminology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Standardization achievements in the field of radiology induced the IEC to compile the terminology used in its safety and application standards and present it in publication 788 (1984 issue), entitled 'Medical radiology terminology'. The objective pursued is to foster the use of standard terminology in the radiology standards. The value of publication 788 lies in the fact that it presents definitions of terms used in the French and English versions of IEC standards in the field of radiology, and thus facilitates adequate translation of these terms into other languages. In the glossary in hand, German-language definitions have been adopted from the DIN standards in cases where the French or English versions of definitions are identical with the German wording or meaning. The numbers of DIN standards or sections are then given without brackets, ahead of the text of the definition. In cases where correspondance of the various texts is not so good, or reference should be made to a term in a DIN standard, the numbers are given in brackets. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Collaborative Radiological Response Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    DOE and EPA national laboratories .55 Additionally, the GAO conducted a survey of emergency management officials in cities, states and federal...for Biosecurity of UPMC, (2012). After fukushima: Managing the consequences of a radiological release. Retrieved from : http://issuu.com

  13. Radiological protective screen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flaugnatti, R.B.

    1976-01-01

    A radiological screen for placing on a patient's skin is discussed, comprising a flat jacket containing a fine particulate filler and a settable resin binder, the fine particulate filler being of a material which absorbs medical radiation, and the jacket including a window to transmit such radiation through the flat jacket. 16 claims, 4 drawing figures

  14. Radiology of spinal curvature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Smet, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    This book offers the only comprehensive, concise summary of both the clinical and radiologic features of thoracic and lumbar spine deformity. Emphasis is placed on idiopathic scoliosis, which represents 85% of all patients with scoliosis, but less common areas of secondary scoliosis, kyphosis and lordosis are also covered

  15. Radiological safety by design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundaker, W.E.

    1977-01-01

    Under the Radiation Control for Health and Safety Act enacted by the U.S. Congress in 1968, the Food and Drug Administration's Bureau of Radiological Health may prescribe performance standards for products that emit radiation. A description is given of the development of these standards and outlines the administrative procedures by which they are enforced. (author)

  16. Radiology in emergency medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, R.; Barsan, W.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book gives a discussion of radiologic modalities currently being used in emergency situations. Radiographs, echocardiographs, radionuclide scans and CT scans are systematically analyzed and evaluated to provide a step-by-step diagnostic process for emergency physicians to follow when a radiologist is not present

  17. Cardiovascular and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.I. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A symposium of eight short but complete papers giving an overview of interventional radiology is presented. Organized by Dr. William Casarella, this symposium is certainly the most current review of the subject available. This year's cardiovascular section is again heavily weighted toward interventional radiology. Abrams and Doubilet's article on the underutilization of angioplasty is important because it describes the cost effectiveness of this method. Most health planners, right or wrong, have complained about overutilization of diagnostic radiology procedures. In general, the opposite is true for interventional procedures - they are underutilized. If the authors draw the attention of their hospital administrators to these approaches and also produce the data on long-term follow-up for our medical colleagues, interventional radiology may realize its full potential. Articles on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging are beginning to appear and this technique seems to have great potential. An important article, which is the first prospective study comparing lung scintigraphy and pulmonary angiography in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, supports the increased use of pulmonary angiography. Finally, an article on complications of percutaneous biliary drainage provokes some discussion of its value for routine preoperative use

  18. The radiological technologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    Radiologists rely upon the talents of the technologists with whom they work. Indeed, a good technologist will only enhance the radiologist's performance. Radiological technologists no longer solely take radiographs, but are involved in many more detailed areas of imaging, such as computered tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear radiology, ultrasound, angiography, and special procedures. They are also required to make decisions that affect the radiological examination. Besides the degree in radiological technology (RT), advanced degrees in nuclear medicine technology (NMT) and diagnostic medical sonography (RDMS) are attainable. The liability of the technologist is not the same as the radiologist involved, but the liability is potentially real and governed by a subdivision of jurisprudence known as agency law. Since plaintiffs and attorneys are constantly searching for new frontiers of medical liability, it is wise for the radiologist and technologist to be aware of the legalities governing their working relationship and to behave accordingly. The legal principles that apply to this working relationship are discussed in this chapter, followed by a presentation of some relevant and interesting cases that have been litigated

  19. Optimisation of Inulinase Production by Kluyveromyces bulgaricus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darija Vranešić

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is based on observation of the effects of pH and temperature of fermentation on the production of microbial enzyme inulinase by Kluyveromyces marxianus var. bulgaricus. Inulinase hydrolyzes inulin, a polysaccharide which can be isolated from plants such as Jerusalem artichoke, chicory or dahlia, and transformed into pure fructose or fructooligosaccharides. Fructooligosaccharides have great potential in food industry because they can be used as calorie-reduced compounds and noncariogenic sweeteners as well as soluble fibre and prebiotic compounds. Fructose formation from inulin is a single step enzymatic reaction and yields are up to 95 % the fructose. On the contrary, conventional fructose production from starch needs at least three enzymatic steps, yielding only 45 % of fructose. The process of inulinase production was optimised by using experimental design method. pH value of the cultivation medium showed to be the most significant variable and it should be maintained at optimum value of 3.6. The effect of temperature was slightly lower and optimal values were between 30 and 33 °C. At a low pH value of the cultivation medium, the microorganism was not able to producem enough enzyme and enzyme activities were low. Similar effect was caused by high temperature. The highest values of enzyme activities were achieved at optimal fermentation conditions and the values were: 100.16–124.36 IU/mL (with sucrose as substrate for determination of enzyme activity or 8.6–11.6 IU/mL (with inulin as substrate, respectively. The method of factorial design and response surface analysis makes it possible to study several factors simultaneously, to quantify the individual effect of each factor and to investigate their possible interactions. As a comparison to this method, optimisation of a physiological enzyme activity model depending on pH and temperature was also studied.

  20. Chest radiological findings in pakistani cement mill workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meo, Sultan A.

    2003-01-01

    Chest radiological findings in Pakistani cement mill workers Even in the 21st century, in developing countries millions of people work daily in dusty environments. They are exposed to different types of health hazards namely, fumes, gases and dust, which are risk factors for developing occupational diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform chest radiology to determine the occupational hazards of cement dust on the lungs of cement mill workers. This study was carried out in the Department of Physiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Hamdard University Karachi, Pakistan, during the period June to August 2000. In this study 50, apparently healthy volunteer male cement mill workers were randomly selected with an average of 13 years exposure with age ranging from 20-60 years. They were matched with 50, healthy male control subjects in terms of age, height, weight and socioeconomic status. Both groups met with exclusion criteria as per standard. Radiology was performed by Trophy radiology. Results: The present study demonstrated 12% of cases with interstitial lung disease and 2% of cases with pleural thickening and chronic bronchitis in cement mill workers. Conclusion: Exposure to cement dust causes interstitial lung disease, pleural thickening and chronic bronchitis in cement mill workers. (author)