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Sample records for optimal surfactant solution

  1. Optimization of surfactant-aided remediation of industrially contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, M.M.; Lee, S.

    1996-01-01

    Soil matrices contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) abound at the sites of coke-oven gas plants, refineries, and many other major chemical industries. The removal of PAHs from soil using pure water, via soil washing (ex situ) or soil flushing (in situ), is quite ineffective due to their low solubility and hydrophobicity. However, addition of suitable surfactant(s) has been shown to increase the removal efficiency several fold. For the present work, the removal of PAHs occurring in industrially contaminated soil was studied. The objective was to use a nonionic surfactant solution for in situ soil flushing and to evaluate the optimal range of process parameters that can significantly increase the removal efficiency. The process parameters chosen were surfactant concentration, ratio of washing solution volume to soil weight, and temperature of washing solution. These parameters were found to have a significant effect on PAH removal from the contaminated soil and an optimal range was determined for each parameter under given washing conditions

  2. Solubilization of Hydrophobic Dyes in Surfactant Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Tehrani-Bagha

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the use of surfactants for solubilization of hydrophobic organic dyes (mainly solvent and disperse dyes has been reviewed. The effect of parameters such as the chemical structures of the surfactant and the dye, addition of salt and of polyelectrolytes, pH, and temperature on dye solubilization has been discussed. Surfactant self-assemble into micelles in aqueous solution and below the concentration where this occurs—the critical micelle concentration (CMC—there is no solubilization. Above the CMC, the amount of solubilized dye increases linearly with the increase in surfactant concentration. It is demonstrated that different surfactants work best for different dyes. In general, nonionic surfactants have higher solubilization power than anionic and cationic surfactants. It is likely that the reason for the good performance of nonionic surfactants is that they allow dyes to be accommodated not only in the inner, hydrocarbon part of the micelle but also in the headgroup shell. It is demonstrated that the location of a dye in a surfactant micelle can be assessed from the absorption spectrum of the dye-containing micellar solution.

  3. Foaming behaviour of polymer-surfactant solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervantes-MartInez, Alfredo; Maldonado, Amir

    2007-01-01

    We study the effect of a non-ionic amphiphilic polymer (PEG-100 stearate also called Myrj 59) on the foaming behaviour of aqueous solutions of an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate or SDS). The SDS concentration was kept fixed while the Myrj 59 concentration was varied. Measurements of foamability, surface tension and electrical conductivity were carried out. The results show two opposite effects depending on the polymer concentration: foamability is higher when the Myrj 59 concentration is low; however, it decreases considerably when the polymer concentration is increased. This behaviour is due to the polymer adsorption at the air/liquid interface at lower polymer concentrations, and to the formation of a polymer-surfactant complex in the bulk at higher concentrations. The results are confirmed by surface tension and electrical conductivity measurements, which are interpreted in terms of the microstructure of the polymer-surfactant solutions. The observed behaviour is due to the amphiphilic nature of the studied polymer. The increased hydrophobicity of Myrj 59, compared to that of water-soluble polymers like PEG or PEO, increases its 'reactivity' towards SDS, i.e. the strength of its interaction with this anionic surfactant. Our results show that hydrophobically modified polymers have potential applications as additives in order to control the foaming properties of surfactant solutions

  4. Selective labeling of pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C in organic solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, I; Cruz, A; López-Lacomba, J L

    2001-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C has been isolated from porcine lungs and treated with dansyl isothiocyanate in chloroform:methanol 2:1 (v/v) solutions,under conditions optimized to introduce a single dansyl group covalently attached to the N-terminalamine group of the protein without loss of its...

  5. Silica micro- and nanoparticles reduce the toxicity of surfactant solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, Francisco; Fernández-Arteaga, Alejandro; Fernández-Serrano, Mercedes; Jurado, Encarnación; Lechuga, Manuela

    2018-04-20

    In this work, the toxicity of hydrophilic fumed silica micro- and nanoparticles of various sizes (7 nm, 12 nm, and 50 μm) was evaluated using the luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri. In addition, the toxicity of an anionic surfactant solution (ether carboxylic acid), a nonionic surfactant solution (alkyl polyglucoside), and a binary (1:1) mixture of these solutions all containing these silica particles was evaluated. Furthermore, this work discusses the adsorption of surfactants onto particle surfaces and evaluates the effects of silica particles on the surface tension and critical micellar concentration (CMC) of these anionic and nonionic surfactants. It was determined that silica particles can be considered as non-toxic and that silica particles reduce the toxicity of surfactant solutions. Nevertheless, the toxicity reduction depends on the ionic character of the surfactants. Differences can be explained by the different adsorption behavior of surfactants onto the particle surface, which is weaker for nonionic surfactants than for anionic surfactants. Regarding the effects on surface tension, it was found that silica particles increased the surface activity of anionic surfactants and considerably reduced their CMC, whereas in the case of nonionic surfactants, the effects were reversed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Charging and Screening in Nonpolar Solutions of Nonionizable Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Sven

    2010-03-01

    Nonpolar liquids do not easily accommodate electric charges, but surfactant additives are often found to dramatically increase the solution conductivity and promote surface charging of suspended colloid particles. Such surfactant-mediated electrostatic effects have been associated with equilibrium charge fluctuations among reverse surfactant micelles and in some cases with the statistically rare ionization of individual surfactant molecules. Here we present experimental evidence that even surfactants without any ionizable group can mediate charging and charge screening in nonpolar oils, and that they can do so at surfactant concentrations well below the critical micelle concentration (cmc). Precision conductometry, light scattering, and Karl-Fischer titration of sorbitan oleate solutions in hexane, paired with electrophoretic mobility measurements on suspended polymer particles, reveal a distinctly electrostatic action of the surfactant. We interpret our observations in terms of a charge fluctuation model and argue that the observed charging processes are likely facilitated, but not limited, by the presence of ionizable impurities.

  7. NMR study of the dynamics of cationic gemini surfactant 14-2-14 in mixed solutions with conventional surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Lu, Xing-Yu; Chen, Hong; Mao, Shi-Zhen; Liu, Mai-Li; Luo, Ping-Ya; Du, You-Ru

    2009-06-18

    Three kinds of conventional surfactants, namely, two nonionic surfactants [polyethylene glycol (23) lauryl ether (Brij-35) and Triton X-100 (TX-100)], one cationic surfactant [n-tetradecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (TTAB)], and an anionic surfactant [sodium n-dodecyl sulfate (SDS)}, were mixed into the quaternary ammonium gemini surfactant [C(14)H(29)N(+)(CH(3))(2)](2)(CH(2))(2).2Br(-) (14-2-14) in aqueous solution. The exchange rate constants between 14-2-14 molecules in the mixed micelles and those in the bulk solution were detected using two nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods: one-dimensional (1D) line shape analysis and two-dimensional (2D) exchange spectroscopy (EXSY). The results obtained from these two methods were consistent. Both showed that mixing a nonionic conventional surfactant, either Brij-35 or TX-100, enhanced the exchange process between the 14-2-14 molecules in the mixed micelles and those in the bulk solution. In contrast, the anionic surfactant SDS and the cationic surfactant TTAB slowed the process slightly.

  8. The photodegradation of trichloroethylene with or without the NAPL by UV irradiation in surfactant solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Juncai [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, Research Centre for Urban Environmental Technology and Management, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Chu, W. [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, Research Centre for Urban Environmental Technology and Management, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)], E-mail: cewchu@polyu.edu.hk

    2009-01-15

    The photodegradation of trichloroethene (TCE) with or without nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPL) by ultraviolet irradiation in surfactant solutions was examined in this study. The photodecay of TCE was studied at monochromatic 254 nm UV lamps. The effects of the type of surfactants, initial surfactant concentrations, pH levels and NAPL concentrations were examined to explore the photodecay of TCE. All the photodegradation of TCE followed pseudo-first-order decay kinetics at various conditions. It was found that Brij 35 overdose and higher initial pH levels may retard or inhibit the photodecay of TCE, mainly due to protons, intermediate generation and change of surfactant structure in the processes. The optimal condition for TCE photodecay was suggested based on the analysis of kinetics data, from which the reaction mechanism of TCE in the presence of NAPL form was also studied. In general, the reactions of TCE in micellar solution and NAPL pool can be considered as independent pathways due to the low molecule diffusion between the two phases.

  9. The photodegradation of trichloroethylene with or without the NAPL by UV irradiation in surfactant solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Juncai; Chu, W.

    2009-01-01

    The photodegradation of trichloroethene (TCE) with or without nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPL) by ultraviolet irradiation in surfactant solutions was examined in this study. The photodecay of TCE was studied at monochromatic 254 nm UV lamps. The effects of the type of surfactants, initial surfactant concentrations, pH levels and NAPL concentrations were examined to explore the photodecay of TCE. All the photodegradation of TCE followed pseudo-first-order decay kinetics at various conditions. It was found that Brij 35 overdose and higher initial pH levels may retard or inhibit the photodecay of TCE, mainly due to protons, intermediate generation and change of surfactant structure in the processes. The optimal condition for TCE photodecay was suggested based on the analysis of kinetics data, from which the reaction mechanism of TCE in the presence of NAPL form was also studied. In general, the reactions of TCE in micellar solution and NAPL pool can be considered as independent pathways due to the low molecule diffusion between the two phases

  10. Nanofiltration: ion exchange system for effective surfactant removal from water solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kowalska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A system combining nanofiltration and ion exchange for highly effective separation of anionic surfactant from water solutions was proposed. The subjects of the study were nanofiltration polyethersulfone membranes and ion-exchange resins differing in type and structure. The quality of the treated solution was affected by numerous parameters, such as quality of the feed solution, membrane cut-off, resin type, dose and the solution contact time with the resin. A properly designed purification system made it possible to reduce the concentration of anionic surfactant below 1 mg L-1 from feed solutions containing surfactant in concentrations above the CMC value.

  11. Liquid crystalline states of surfactant solutions of isotropic micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagdassarian, C.; Gelbart, W.M.; Ben-Shaul, A.

    1988-01-01

    We consider micellar solutions whose surfactant molecules prefer strongly to form small, globular aggregates in the absence of intermicellar interactions. At sufficiently high volume fraction of surfactant, the isotropic phase of essentially spherical micelles is shown to be unstable with respect to an orientationally ordered (nematic) state of rodlike aggregates. This behavior is relevant to the phase diagrams reported for important classes of aqueous amphiphilic solutions

  12. Enhanced Oil Recovery from Oil-wet Carbonate Rock by Spontaneous Imbibition of Aqueous Surfactant Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Standnes, Dag Chun

    2001-09-01

    The main theme of this thesis is an experimental investigation of spontaneous imbibition (SI) of aqueous cationic surfactant solution into oil-wet carbonate (chalk- and dolomite cores). The static imbibition process is believed to represent the matrix flow of oil and water in a fractured reservoir. It was known that aqueous solution of C{sub 12}-N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Br (C12TAB) was able to imbibe spontaneously into nearly oil-wet chalk material, but the underlying mechanism was not understood. The present work was therefore initiated, with the following objectives: (1) Put forward a hypothesis for the chemical mechanism underlying the SI of C12TAB solutions into oil-wet chalk material based on experimental data and (2) Perform screening tests of low-cost commercially available surfactants for their ability to displace oil by SI of water into oil-wet carbonate rock material. It is essential for optimal use of the surfactant in field application to have detailed knowledge about the mechanism underlying the SI process. The thesis also discusses some preliminary experimental results and suggests mechanisms for enhanced oil recovery from oil-wet carbonate rock induced by supply of thermal energy.

  13. Optimization of palm oil extraction from Decanter cake of small crude palm oil mill by aqueous surfactant solution using RSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Pirshahid, Shewa; Arirob, Wallop; Punsuvon, Vittaya

    2018-04-01

    The use of hexane to extract vegetable oil from oilseeds or seed cake is of growing concern due to its environmental impact such as its smelling and toxicity. In our method, used Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was applied to study the optimum condition of decanter cake obtained from small crude palm oil with aqueous surfactant solution. For the first time, we provide an optimum condition of preliminary study with decanter cake extraction to obtain the maximum of oil yield. The result from preliminary was further used in RSM study by using Central Composite Design (CCD) that consisted of thirty experiments. The effect of four independent variables: the concentration of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) as surfactant, temperature, the ratio by weight to volume of cake to surfactant solution and the amount of sodium chloride (NaCl) on dependent variables are studied. Data were analyzed using Design-Expert 8 software. The results showed that the optimum condition of decanter cake extraction were 0.016M of SDS solution concentration, 73°C of extraction temperature, 1:10 (g:ml) of the ratio of decanter cake to SDS solution and 2% (w/w) of NaCl amount. This condition gave 77.05% (w/w) oil yield. The chemical properties of the extracted palm oil from this aqueous surfactant extraction are further investigated compared with the hexane extraction. The obtained result showed that all properties of both extractions were nearly the same.

  14. Investigation of extractive microbial transformation in nonionic surfactant micelle aqueous solution using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yingying; Qian, Chen; Wang, Zhilong; Xu, Jian-He; Yang, Rude; Qi, Hanshi

    2010-01-01

    Extractive microbial transformation of L-phenylacetylcarbinol (L-PAC) in nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 micelle aqueous solution was investigated by response surface methodology. Based on the Box-Behnken design, a mathematical model was developed for the predication of mutual interactions between benzaldehyde, Triton X-100, and glucose on L-PAC production. It indicated that the negative or positive effect of nonionic surfactant strongly depended on the substrate concentration. The model predicted that the optimal concentration of benzaldehyde, Triton X-100, and glucose was 1.2 ml, 15 g, and 2.76 g per 100 ml, respectively. Under the optimal condition, the maximum L-PAC production was 27.6 mM, which was verified by a time course of extractive microbial transformation. A discrete fed-batch process for verification of cell activity was also presented.

  15. Effects of surfactant micelles on viscosity and conductivity of poly(ethylene glycol) solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shun-Cheng; Wei, Tzu-Chien; Chen, Wun-Bin; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2004-03-01

    The neutral polymer-micelle interaction is investigated for various surfactants by viscometry and electrical conductometry. In order to exclude the well-known necklace scenario, we consider aqueous solutions of low molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) (2-20)×103, whose radial size is comparable to or smaller than micelles. The single-tail surfactants consist of anionic, cationic, and nonionic head groups. It is found that the viscosity of the polymer solution may be increased several times by micelles if weak attraction between a polymer segment and a surfactant exists, ɛsolutions may be significantly hindered by cooperative interactions between polymers and micelles. Even though ɛ is small, the interaction energy between a macromolecule and a micelle can be a few kBT due to many contacts, and thus leads to polymer adsorption on micelles' surfaces. The rapid growth of the viscosity with surfactant concentration is therefore attributed to the considerable cross links among micelles and polymers (transient network). In addition to substantial alteration of the transport properties, this weak interaction also influences the onset point of thermodynamic instability associated with polymer-surfactant solutions. The examples include the decrease of critical aggregation concentration for ionic surfactant and clouding point for nonionic surfactant due to PEG addition.

  16. Enhanced removal of radioactive particles by fluorocarbon surfactant solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, R.; Harling, O.K.

    1993-08-01

    The proposed research addressed the application of ESI's particle removal process to the non-destructive decontamination of nuclear equipment. The cleaning medium used in this process is a solution of a high molecular weight fluorocarbon surfactant in an inert perfluorinated liquid which results in enhanced particle removal. The perfluorinated liquids of interest, which are recycled in the process, are nontoxic, nonflammable, and environmentally compatible, and do not present a hazard to the ozone layer. The information obtained in the Phase 1 program indicated that the proposed ESI process is technically effective and economically attractive. The fluorocarbon surfactant solutions used as working media in the ESI process survived exposure of up to 10 Mrad doses of gamma rays, and are considered sufficiently radiation resistant for the proposed process. Ultrasonic cleaning in perfluorinated surfactant solutions was found to be an effective method of removing radioactive iron (Fe 59) oxide particles from contaminated test pieces. Radioactive particles suspended in the process liquids could be quantitatively removed by filtration through a 0.1 um membrane filter. Projected economics indicate a pre-tax pay back time of 1 month for a commercial scale system

  17. Searching for life on Mars: degradation of surfactant solutions used in organic extraction experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, Richard W; Sims, Mark R; Cullen, David C; Sephton, Mark A

    2014-09-01

    Life-detection instruments on future Mars missions may use surfactant solutions to extract organic matter from samples of martian rocks. The thermal and radiation environments of space and Mars are capable of degrading these solutions, thereby reducing their ability to dissolve organic species. Successful extraction and detection of biosignatures on Mars requires an understanding of how degradation in extraterrestrial environments can affect surfactant performance. We exposed solutions of the surfactants polysorbate 80 (PS80), Zonyl FS-300, and poly[dimethylsiloxane-co-[3-(2-(2-hydroxyethoxy)ethoxy)propyl]methylsiloxane] (PDMSHEPMS) to elevated radiation and heat levels, combined with prolonged storage. Degradation was investigated by measuring changes in pH and electrical conductivity and by using the degraded solutions to extract a suite of organic compounds spiked onto grains of the martian soil simulant JSC Mars-1. Results indicate that the proton fluences expected during a mission to Mars do not cause significant degradation of surfactant compounds. Solutions of PS80 or PDMSHEPMS stored at -20 °C are able to extract the spiked standards with acceptable recovery efficiencies. Extraction efficiencies for spiked standards decrease progressively with increasing temperature, and prolonged storage at 60°C renders the surfactant solutions ineffective. Neither the presence of ascorbic acid nor the choice of solvent unequivocally alters the efficiency of extraction of the spiked standards. Since degradation of polysorbates has the potential to produce organic compounds that could be mistaken for indigenous martian organic matter, the polysiloxane PDMSHEPMS may be a superior choice of surfactant for the exploration of Mars.

  18. Desorption of organophosphorous pesticides from soil with wastewater and surfactant solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Soriano, M. C.; Mingorance, M. D.; Pena, A.

    2009-01-01

    Surfactants can be introduced in the environment by wastewater discharge, point-charge pollution or deliberate action, e. g. to remediate contaminated soil or groundwater. The irrigation of soil with wastewater containing surfactants may modify pesticide desorption from soil, thus affecting their affecting their environmental fate. Desorption from soil of the plain of Granada (South-eastern Spain) of two organophosphorous pesticides, diazinon and dimethoate, differing in solubility and hydrophobicity, has been evaluated in the presence of different surfactant aqueous solutions and municipal wastewater. (Author)

  19. Kinetics of Surfactant Desorption at an Air–Solution Interface

    KAUST Repository

    Morgan, C. E.; Breward, C. J. W.; Griffiths, I. M.; Howell, P. D.; Penfold, J.; Thomas, R. K.; Tucker, I.; Petkov, J. T.; Webster, J. R. P.

    2012-01-01

    The kinetics of re-equilibration of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate at the air-solution interface have been studied using neutron reflectivity. The experimental arrangement incorporates a novel flow cell in which the subphase

  20. Comparison of cytotoxicity in vitro and irritation in vivo for aqueous and oily solutions of surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajkowska-Kośnik, Anna; Wolska, Eliza; Chorążewicz, Juliusz; Sznitowska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    The in vivo model on rabbit eyes and the in vitro cytotoxicity on fibroblasts were used to compare irritation effect of aqueous and oily (Miglyol 812) solutions of surfactants. Tween 20, Tween 80 and Cremophor EL were tested in different concentrations (0.1, 1 or 5%) and the in vitro test demonstrated that surfactants in oil are less cytotoxic than in aqueous solutions. In the in vivo study, the aqueous solutions of surfactants were characterized as non-irritant while small changes in conjunctiva were observed after application the oily solutions of surfactants and the preparations were classified as slightly irritant, however this effect was similar when Miglyol was applied alone. In conclusion, it is reported that the MTT assay does not correlate well with the Draize scores.

  1. [Effect of 60Co gamma-irradiation on dilute aqueous solutions of surfactants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawai, T; Shimokowa, T; Miki, Y; Oseko, K; Sawai, T

    1978-01-01

    Present work deals with the effects of gamma irradiation from 60Co gamma-ray source upon aqueous solutions of three kinds of surfactants. When dilute aqueous solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, anionic), cethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC, cationic), and polyoxyethylene lauryl ether (POE, non-ionic) were irradiated with gamma-rays at a room remperature, the residual concentration, products, surface tension, and forming power were examined by colorimetric method, IR spectrophotometric method, gaschromatography, Ross-Miles method, and Traube's stalagnometer etc.. These surfactants were decomposed by the irradiation and thus the surface tension increased and the forming power, on the contrary, decreased with dose. Radiation chemical yields (G-value) of the degradation were about 1 for the solutions of SDS and CTAC, and about 0.3 for the POE solution. From the experimental results, it was found that following chemical reactions seem to occur followed by the radiolysis of water; a) bond cleavage of ester for SDS, of CN for CTAC, and of oxyethylene for POE, b) hydrogen abstraction from the surfactants, c) production of CO bond in the presence of dissolved oxygen.

  2. Screening and Optimization of Bio surfactant Production by the Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainon Hamzah; Noramiza Sabturani; Shahidan Radiman

    2013-01-01

    Bio surfactants are amphiphilic compounds produced by microorganisms as secondary metabolite. The unique properties of bio surfactants make them possible to replace or to be added to synthetic surfactants which are mainly used in food, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries and in environmental applications. In this study twenty hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were screened for bio surfactant production. All of the bacterial isolates were grown in mineral salt medium (MSM) with addition of 1 % (v/v) Tapis crude oil as carbon source. The presence of bio surfactant was determined by the drop-collapse test, microplate analysis, oil spreading technique, emulsification index (%EI24) and surface tension measurement. Only one isolate, Pseudomonas aeruginosa UKMP14T, was found to be positive for all the qualitative tests and reducing the surface tension of the medium to 49.5 dynes/ with emulsification index of 25.29 %. This isolate produced bio surfactant optimally at pH 9.0 and incubation temperature of 37 degree Celsius. Furthermore, P. aeruginosa UKMP14T when grown in MSM with addition of 1 % (v/v) glycerol and 1.3 g/ L ammonium sulphate with C/N ratio 14:1 produced bio surfactant with percentage of surface tension reduction at 55 % or 30.6 dynes/ cm with %EI24 of 43 %. This percentage of surface tension reduction represents an increasing reduction in surface tension of medium by 39 % over the value before optimization. This study showed that P. aeruginosa UKMP14T has the ability to biodegrade hydrocarbon and concurrently produce bio surfactant. (author)

  3. Evaporation kinetics of surfactant solution droplets on rice (Oryza sativa) leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Li-Dong; Zheng, Li; Xu, Jun; Li, Feng-Min; Huang, Qi-Liang

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of evaporating sessile droplets on hydrophilic or hydrophobic surfaces is widely studied, and many models for these processes have been developed based on experimental evidence. However, few research has been explored on the evaporation of sessile droplets of surfactant or pesticide solutions on target crop leaves. Thus, in this paper the impact of surfactant concentrations on contact angle, contact diameter, droplet height, and evolution of the droplets’ evaporative volume on rice leaf surfaces have been investigated. The results indicate that the evaporation kinetics of surfactant droplets on rice leaves were influenced by both the surfactant concentrations and the hydrophobicity of rice leaf surfaces. When the surfactant concentration is lower than the surfactant CMC (critical micelle concentration), the droplet evaporation time is much longer than that of the high surfactant concentration. This is due to the longer existence time of a narrow wedge region under the lower surfactant concentration, and such narrow wedge region further restricts the droplet evaporation. Besides, our experimental data are shown to roughly collapse onto theoretical curves based on the model presented by Popov. This study could supply theoretical data on the evaporation of the adjuvant or pesticide droplets for practical applications in agriculture. PMID:28472108

  4. Lateral transport of solutes in microfluidic channels using electrochemically generated gradients in redox-active surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2011-04-15

    We report principles for a continuous flow process that can separate solutes based on a driving force for selective transport that is generated by a lateral concentration gradient of a redox-active surfactant across a microfluidic channel. Microfluidic channels fabricated with gold electrodes lining each vertical wall were used to electrochemically generate concentration gradients of the redox-active surfactant 11-ferrocenylundecyl-trimethylammonium bromide (FTMA) in a direction perpendicular to the flow. The interactions of three solutes (a hydrophobic dye, 1-phenylazo-2-naphthylamine (yellow AB), an amphiphilic molecule, 2-(4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-pentanoyl)-1-hexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (BODIPY C(5)-HPC), and an organic salt, 1-methylpyridinium-3-sulfonate (MPS)) with the lateral gradients in surfactant/micelle concentration were shown to drive the formation of solute-specific concentration gradients. Two distinct physical mechanisms were identified to lead to the solute concentration gradients: solubilization of solutes by micelles and differential adsorption of the solutes onto the walls of the microchannels in the presence of the surfactant concentration gradient. These two mechanisms were used to demonstrate delipidation of a mixture of BODIPY C(5)-HPC (lipid) and MPS and purification of BODIPY C(5)-HPC from a mixture of BODIPY C(5)-HPC and yellow AB. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that lateral concentration gradients of redox-active surfactants formed within microfluidic channels can be used to transport solutes across the microfluidic channels in a solute-dependent manner. The approach employs electrical potentials (solutions having high ionic strength (>0.1M), and offers the basis of continuous processes for the purification or separation of solutes in microscale systems. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  5. Preparation of ZnS semiconductor nanocrystals using pulsed laser ablation in aqueous surfactant solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, S-H; Sasaki, T; Shimizu, Y; Yoon, J-W; Nichols, W T; Sung, Y-E; Koshizaki, N

    2007-01-01

    Cubic ZnS semiconductor nanocrystals with the size of 2 to 5 nm were prepared by pulsed laser ablation in aqueous surfactant solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide without any further treatments. The obtained suspensions of the nanocrystals have broad photoluminescence emission from 375 to 600 nm. The abundance and emission intensity of the nanocrystals depend on the concentration of the surfactant in solution

  6. Absorption and recovery of n-hexane in aqueous solutions of fluorocarbon surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiao; Yan, Bo; Fu, Jiamo; Xiao, Xianming

    2015-11-01

    n-Hexane is widely used in industrial production as an organic solvent. As an industrial exhaust gas, the contribution of n-hexane to air pollution and damage to human health are attracting increasing attention. In the present study, aqueous solutions of two fluorocarbon surfactants (FSN100 and FSO100) were investigated for their properties of solubilization and dynamic absorption of n-hexane, as well as their capacity for regeneration and n-hexane recovery by thermal distillation. The results show that the two fluorocarbon surfactants enhance dissolution and absorption of n-hexane, and their effectiveness is closely related to their concentrations in solution. For low concentration solutions (0.01%-0.30%), the partition coefficient decreases dramatically and the saturation capacity increases significantly with increasing concentration, but the changes for both are more modest when the concentration is over 0.30%. The FSO100 solution presents a smaller partition coefficient and a greater saturation capacity than the FSN100 solution at the same concentration, indicating a stronger solubilization for n-hexane. Thermal distillation is a feasible method to recover n-hexane from these absorption solutions, and to regenerate them. With 90sec heating at 80-85°C, the recovery of n-hexane ranges between 81% and 85%, and the regenerated absorption solution maintains its original performance during reuse. This study provides basic information on two fluorocarbon surfactants for application in the treatment of industrial n-hexane waste gases. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Spontaneous vesicle phase formation by pseudogemini surfactants in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Nan; Shi, Lijuan; Lu, Fei; Xie, Shuting; Zheng, Liqiang

    2014-08-14

    The phase behavior of a kind of pseudogemini surfactant in aqueous solutions, formed by the mixture of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) and butane-1,4-bis (methylimidazolium bromide) ([mim-C4-mim]Br2) or butane-1,4-bis(methylpyrrolidinium bromide) ([mpy-C4-mpy]Br2) in a molar ratio of 2 : 1, is reported in the present work. When [mim-C4-mim]Br2 or [mpy-C4-mpy]Br2 is mixed with SDBS in aqueous solutions, one cationic [mim-C4-mim]Br2 or [mpy-C4-mpy]Br2 molecule "bridges" two SDBS molecules by noncovalent interactions (e.g. electrostatic, π-π stacking, and σ-π interactions), behaving like a pseudogemini surfactant. Vesicles can be formed by this kind of pseudogemini surfactant, determined by freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy (FF-TEM) or cryogenic-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The mixed system of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) with [mim-C4-mim]Br2 or [mpy-C4-mpy]Br2 was also constructed, and only micelles were observed. We infer that a pseudogemini surfactant is formed under the synergic effect of electrostatic, π-π stacking, and σ-π interactions in the SDBS/[mim-C4-mim]Br2/H2O system, while electrostatic attraction and hydrophobic interactions may provide the directional force for vesicle formation in the SDBS/[mpy-C4-mpy]Br2/H2O system.

  8. Effect of 60Co gamma-ray irradiation on dilute aqueous solutions of surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawai, Teruko; Shimokawa, Toshinari; Miki, Yasushi; Oseko, Koichi; Sawai, Takeshi

    1978-01-01

    Present work deals with the effects of gamma irradiation from 60 Co γ-ray source upon aqueous solutions of three kinds of surfactants. When dilute aqueous solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, anionic), cethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC, cationic), and polyoxyethylene lauryl ether (POE, non-ionic) were irradiated with γ-rays at a room temperature, the residual concentration, products, surface tension, and forming power were examined by colorimetric method, IR spectrophotometric method, gaschromatography, Ross-Miles method, and Traube's stalagmometer etc. These surfactants were decomposed by the irradiation and thus the surface tension increased and the forming power, on the contrary, decreased with dose. Radiation chemical yields (G-value) of the degradation were about 1 for the solutions of SDS and CTAC, and about 0.3 for the POE solution. From the experimental results, it was found that following chemical reactions seem to occur followed by the radiolysis of water: a) bond cleavage of ester for SDS, of CN for CTAC, and of oxyethylene for POE, b) hydrogen abstraction from the surfactants, c) production of CO bond in the presence of dissolved oxygen. (auth.)

  9. Model study of enhanced oil recovery by flooding with aqueous surfactant solution and comparison with theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Paul D I; Savory, Luke D; Woods, Freya; Clarke, Andrew; Howe, Andrew M

    2015-03-17

    With the aim of elucidating the details of enhanced oil recovery by surfactant solution flooding, we have determined the detailed behavior of model systems consisting of a packed column of calcium carbonate particles as the porous rock, n-decane as the trapped oil, and aqueous solutions of the anionic surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT). The AOT concentration was varied from zero to above the critical aggregation concentration (cac). The salt content of the aqueous solutions was varied to give systems of widely different, post-cac oil-water interfacial tensions. The systems were characterized in detail by measuring the permeability behavior of the packed columns, the adsorption isotherms of AOT from the water to the oil-water interface and to the water-calcium carbonate interface, and oil-water-calcium carbonate contact angles. Measurements of the percent oil recovery by pumping surfactant solutions into calcium carbonate-packed columns initially filled with oil were analyzed in terms of the characterization results. We show that the measured contact angles as a function of AOT concentration are in reasonable agreement with those calculated from values of the surface energy of the calcium carbonate-air surface plus the measured adsorption isotherms. Surfactant adsorption onto the calcium carbonate-water interface causes depletion of its aqueous-phase concentration, and we derive equations which enable the concentration of nonadsorbed surfactant within the packed column to be estimated from measured parameters. The percent oil recovery as a function of the surfactant concentration is determined solely by the oil-water-calcium carbonate contact angle for nonadsorbed surfactant concentrations less than the cac. For surfactant concentrations greater than the cac, additional oil removal occurs by a combination of solubilization and emulsification plus oil mobilization due to the low oil-water interfacial tension and a pumping pressure increase.

  10. A mean-density model of ionic surfactants for the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Young Soo

    2018-05-01

    We propose a new analytical model of ionic surfactants used for the dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in aqueous solutions. Although ionic surfactants are commonly used to facilitate the dispersion of CNTs in aqueous solutions, understanding the dispersion process is challenging and time-consuming owing to its complexity and nonlinearity. In this work, we develop a mean-density model of ionic surfactants to simplify the calculation of interaction forces between CNTs stabilized by ionic surfactants. Using this model, we can evaluate various interaction forces between the CNTs and ionic surfactants under different conditions. The dispersion mechanism is investigated by estimating the potential of mean force (PMF) as a function of van der Waals forces, electrostatic forces, interfacial tension, and osmotic pressure. To verify the proposed model, we compare the PMFs derived using our method with those derived from molecular dynamics simulations using comparable CNTs and ionic surfactants. Notably, for stable dispersions, the osmotic pressure and interfacial energy are important for long-range and short-range interactions, respectively, in comparison with the effect of electrostatic forces. Our model effectively prescribes specific surfactants and their concentrations to achieve stable aqueous suspensions of CNTs.

  11. Adsorption of tannic acid from aqueous solution onto surfactant-modified zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jianwei, E-mail: jwlin@shou.edu.cn [College of Marine Science, Shanghai Ocean University, No. 999 Hucheng Huan Road, Pudong District, Shanghai 201306 (China); Zhan, Yanhui; Zhu, Zhiliang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Xing, Yunqing [College of Marine Science, Shanghai Ocean University, No. 999 Hucheng Huan Road, Pudong District, Shanghai 201306 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Surfactant-modified zeolites (SMZs) with various loadings of cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) were used as adsorbents to remove tannic acid (TA) from aqueous solution. Highlights: {yields} Surfactant modified zeolites (SMZs) have a good tannic acid (TA) adsorption capacity. {yields} Adsorption capacity for SMZ with bilayer was relatively high at solution pH 3.5-7.0. {yields} Adsorption was well described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. {yields} Adsorption fitted well with Langmuir, Redlich-Peterson and Sips isotherm models. {yields} Coexisting Cu(II) in aqueous solution resulted in markedly enhanced TA adsorption. - Abstract: Surfactant-modified zeolites (SMZs) with various loadings of cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) were used as adsorbents to remove tannic acid (TA) from aqueous solution. The TA adsorption efficiencies for natural zeolite and various SMZs were compared. SMZ presented higher TA adsorption efficiency than natural zeolite, and SMZ with higher loading amount of CPB exhibited higher TA adsorption efficiency. The adsorption of TA onto SMZ as a function of contact time, initial adsorbate concentration, temperature, ionic strength, coexisting Cu(II) and solution pH was investigated. The adsorbents before and after adsorption were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The adsorption kinetics of TA onto SMZ with CPB bilayer coverage (SMZ-CBC) followed a pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium adsorption data of TA onto SMZ-CBC were well represented by Langmuir, Redlich-Peterson and Sips isotherm models. The calculated thermodynamic parameters indicated that TA adsorption onto SMZ-CBC was spontaneous and exothermic. The TA adsorption capacity for SMZ-CBC slightly decreased with increasing ionic strength but significantly increased with increasing Cu(II) concentration. The TA adsorption

  12. Small angle neutron scattering study of the gemini nonionic surfactant in heavy water solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajewska, A

    2012-01-01

    The nonionic gemini surfactant α α'-[2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-decyne-4,7diyl]bis[ω hydroxyl-polyoxyethylene] (S-10) was investigated in heavy water solutions only for concentrations: 2.3%, 2.5%,3%, 3.4%, 4% and 5% at temperature 25 C with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) method. All of surfactants solutions were prepared using D 2 O (99.9% deuterated, Prikladnaia Chimia, St. Petersburg, Russia) as a solvent. The nonionic gemini surfactant S-10 was obtained from Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., and used without further purification. All SANS measurements were performed on V-4 SANS spectrometer at BENSC, Berlin (Germany). Neutrons were used in wavelength range of 0.02 - 4 nm - 1. For the measurements quartz cells of were used during experiment. Up to 14 such cells were placed in a holder. Results from experiment was calculated and evaluated with PCG 2.0 program from Graz University (Austria). In the investigated solutions two axis ellipsoidal micelles was observed.

  13. Entropy of adsorption of mixed surfactants from solutions onto the air/water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L.-W.; Chen, J.-H.; Zhou, N.-F.

    1995-01-01

    The partial molar entropy change for mixed surfactant molecules adsorbed from solution at the air/water interface has been investigated by surface thermodynamics based upon the experimental surface tension isotherms at various temperatures. Results for different surfactant mixtures of sodium dodecyl sulfate and sodium tetradecyl sulfate, decylpyridinium chloride and sodium alkylsulfonates have shown that the partial molar entropy changes for adsorption of the mixed surfactants were generally negative and decreased with increasing adsorption to a minimum near the maximum adsorption and then increased abruptly. The entropy decrease can be explained by the adsorption-orientation of surfactant molecules in the adsorbed monolayer and the abrupt entropy increase at the maximum adsorption is possible due to the strong repulsion between the adsorbed molecules.

  14. Equilibrium of adsorption of mixed milk protein/surfactant solutions at the water/air interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsmar, C; Grigoriev, D O; Xu, F; Aksenenko, E V; Fainerman, V B; Leser, M E; Miller, R

    2008-12-16

    Ellipsometry and surface profile analysis tensiometry were used to study and compare the adsorption behavior of beta-lactoglobulin (BLG)/C10DMPO, beta-casein (BCS)/C10DMPO and BCS/C12DMPO mixtures at the air/solution interface. The adsorption from protein/surfactant mixed solutions is of competitive nature. The obtained adsorption isotherms suggest a gradual replacement of the protein molecules at the interface with increasing surfactant concentration for all studied mixed systems. The thickness, refractive index, and the adsorbed amount of the respective adsorption layers, determined by ellipsometry, decrease monotonically and reach values close to those for a surface covered only by surfactant molecules, indicating the absence of proteins from a certain surfactant concentration on. These results correlate with the surface tension data. A continuous increase of adsorption layer thickness was observed up to this concentration, caused by the desorption of segments of the protein and transforming the thin surface layer into a rather diffuse and thick one. Replacement and structural changes of the protein molecules are discussed in terms of protein structure and surface activity of surfactant molecules. Theoretical models derived recently were used for the quantitative description of the equilibrium state of the mixed surface layers.

  15. Interactions between Surfactants in Solution and Electrospun Protein Fibers: Effects on Release Behavior and Fiber Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutrup Stephansen, Karen; García-Díaz, María; Jessen, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    , and drug delivery. In the present study, we present a systematic investigation of how surfactants and proteins, as physiologically relevant components, interact with insulin-loaded fish sarcoplasmic protein (FSP) electrospun fibers (FSP-Ins fibers) in solution and thereby affect fiber properties...... such as accessible surface hydrophilicity, physical stability, and release characteristics of an encapsulated drug. Interactions between insulin-loaded protein fibers and five anionic surfactants (sodium taurocholate, sodium taurodeoxycholate, sodium glycocholate, sodium glycodeoxycholate, and sodium dodecyl sulfate......), a cationic surfactant (benzalkonium chloride), and a neutral surfactant (Triton X-100) were studied. The anionic surfactants increased the insulin release in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas the neutral surfactant had no significant effect on the release. Interestingly, only minute amounts...

  16. Freely dissolved concentrations of anionic surfactants in seawater solutions: optimization of the non-depletive solid-phase microextraction method and application to linear alkylbenzene sulfonates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rico Rico, A.; Droge, S.T.J.; Widmer, D.; Hermens, J.L.M.

    2009-01-01

    A solid-phase microextraction method (SPME) has been optimized for the analysis of freely dissolved anionic surfactants, namely linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS), in seawater. An effect of the thermal conditioning treatment on the polyacrylate fiber coating was demonstrated for both uptake

  17. Cloud point extraction of vanadium in pharmaceutical formulations, dialysate and parenteral solutions using 8-hydroxyquinoline and nonionic surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Sumaira; Kazi, Tasneem G.; Baig, Jameel A.; Kolachi, Nida F.; Afridi, Hassan I.; Wadhwa, Sham Kumar; Shah, Abdul Q.; Kandhro, Ghulam A.; Shah, Faheem

    2010-01-01

    A cloud point extraction (CPE) method has been developed for the determination of trace quantity of vanadium ions in pharmaceutical formulations (PF), dialysate (DS) and parenteral solutions (PS). The CPE of vanadium (V) using 8-hydroxyquinoline (oxine) as complexing reagent and mediated by nonionic surfactant (Triton X-114) was investigated. The parameters that affect the extraction efficiency of CPE, such as pH of sample solution, concentration of oxine and Triton X-114, equilibration temperature and time period for shaking were investigated in detail. The validity of CPE of V was checked by standard addition method in real samples. The extracted surfactant-rich phase was diluted with nitric acid in ethanol, prior to subjecting electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Under these conditions, the preconcentration of 50 mL sample solutions, allowed raising an enrichment factor of 125-fold. The lower limit of detection obtained under the optimal conditions was 42 ng/L. The proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of trace quantity of V in various pharmaceutical preparations with satisfactory results. The concentration ranges of V in PF, DS and PS samples were found in the range of 10.5-15.2, 0.65-1.32 and 1.76-6.93 μg/L, respectively.

  18. Adsorption properties of Congo Red from aqueous solution onto surfactant-modified montmorillonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Li; Wang Aiqin

    2008-01-01

    A series of surfactant-modified montmorillonites (MMT) were prepared using octyltrimethylammonium bromide (OTAB), dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and stearyltrimethylammonium bromide (STAB), and the organification of MMT was proved by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron micrographic (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The adsorption of Congo Red (CR) anionic dye from aqueous solution onto surfactant-modified MMT was carried out. Compared with MMT, the adsorption capacity of surfactant-modified MMT for CR was greatly enhanced and MMT modified with CTAB (2.0 CEC) exhibited the higher adsorption capacity. The effects of pH value of the dye solution, adsorption temperature, adsorption time and the initial dye concentration on the adsorption capacity of CR on CTAB-MMT have been investigated. The results showed that the adsorption kinetic of CR on CTAB-MMT could be best described by the pseudo-second-order model and that the adsorption isotherm of CR was in good agreement with the Langmuir equation. The IR spectra and SEM analysis also revealed that the adsorption of CTAB-MMT was a chemical adsorption process between CTAB and the NH 2 , -N=N- and SO 3 groups of CR

  19. Optimizing the surfactant for the aqueous processing of LiFePO{sub 4} composite electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porcher, W.; Jouanneau, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Lestriez, B.; Guyomard, D. [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Universite de Nantes, CNRS, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)

    2010-05-01

    Aqueous processing would reduce the costs associated with the making of the composite electrode. To achieve the incorporation and the dispersion of the carbon black (CB) conductive agent in aqueous slurries, a surfactant is needed. In this paper, three surfactants are compared, an anionic one, the sodium dodecyle sulphate (SDS), a non-ionic one, the isooctylphenylether of polyoxyethylene called commercially Triton X-100 and a cationic one, the hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), by using rheology and laser granulometry measurements on electrode slurries on one hand, and SEM observations, porosity and adhesion measurements and electrochemical testing on composite electrodes on the other hand. Ionic surfactants were found to be not suitable because a corrosion of the aluminium current collector occurred. The utilization of Triton X-100 favoured a more homogeneous CB distribution, resulted in a better electronic wiring of the active material particles and higher rate behavior of the electrode. Optimal electrochemical performances are obtained for an optimal surfactant concentration which depends on the BET surface area of the CB powder. (author)

  20. Interactions between fluorinated cationic guar gum and surfactants in the dilute and semi-dilute solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Li, Xiaorui; Li, Peizhi; Niu, Yuhua

    2014-01-01

    The interactions between the fluorinated cationic guar gum (FCGG) and ionic surfactants including cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium lauryl sulfate (SDS) were studied by light scattering, fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-spectrophotometer, (19)F NMR and dynamic rheometer, respectively. The FCGG is prepared with cationic guar gum, isophorone diisocyanate and 2,2,3,4,4,4-hexafluoro-1-butanol. The results show that, with the addition of the surfactants, the stretching degree of the FCGG chains is increased in the FCGG/CTAB solutions, while the dramatical shrinking of FCGG chain, the phase separation and the re-stretched macromolecules appear successively because of the electricity neutralization reaction in the FCGG/SDS system. The mixed hydrophobic domains in all solutions will be reinforced and then dismantled. The solution elasticity shows up the maximum value accordingly. The surfactants can be embedded in the micro-domains and then hinder the fluorinated segmental motions. The interactions between FCGG and SDS are much stronger than those between FCGG and CTAB. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The impact of alkyl sulfate surfactant geometry and electrolyte on the co-adsorption of anionic surfactants with model perfumes at the air-solution interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Robert; Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Tucker, Ian M; Petkov, Jordan T; Jones, Craig

    2013-08-01

    The impact of surfactant geometry and electrolyte on the co-adsorption of anionic surfactants and model perfumes at the air-solution interface has been studied by neutron reflectivity. The more hydrophobic perfume linalool, competes more favourably for the surface with sodium dodecylsulfate than was previously reported for the anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl 6-benzenesulfonate. Due to an increase in surface activity of the sodium dodecylsulfate, the addition of electrolyte results in a reduction in the linalool adsorption. Changing the alkyl chain length affects the relative adsorption of linalool and surfactant at the interface. Similar measurements for the different alkyl sulfates and with electrolyte with the more hydrophilic perfume phenyl ethanol, reveal broadly similar trends. Although the relative adsorption of phenyl ethanol with sodium dodecylsulfate is substantially enhanced compared to sodium dodecyl-6-benzenesulfonate the effects are not as significant as was observed with linalool. The variations with alkyl chain geometry show the importance of the hydrophobic interaction between the perfume and surfactant and changes in the packing constraints on the relative adsorption. The results highlight the importance of the specific interaction between the surfactant and perfume, and the surfactant and perfume geometries on the relative adsorption at the interface. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Performance of Surfactant Methyl Ester Sulphonate solution for Oil Well Stimulation in reservoir sandstone TJ Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eris, F. R.; Hambali, E.; Suryani, A.; Permadi, P.

    2017-05-01

    Asphaltene, paraffin, wax and sludge deposition, emulsion and water blocking are kinds ofprocess that results in a reduction of the fluid flow from the reservoir into formation which causes a decrease of oil wells productivity. Oil well Stimulation can be used as an alternative to solve oil well problems. Oil well stimulation technique requires applying of surfactant. Sodium Methyl Ester Sulphonate (SMES) of palm oil is an anionic surfactant derived from renewable natural resource that environmental friendly is one of potential surfactant types that can be used in oil well stimulation. This study was aimed at formulation SMES as well stimulation agent that can identify phase transitions to phase behavior in a brine-surfactant-oil system and altered the wettability of rock sandstone and limestone. Performance of SMES solution tested by thermal stability test, phase behavioral examination and rocks wettability test. The results showed that SMES solution (SMES 5% + xylene 5% in the diesel with addition of 1% NaCl at TJformation water and SMES 5% + xylene 5% in methyl ester with the addition of NaCl 1% in the TJ formation water) are surfactant that can maintain thermal stability, can mostly altered the wettability toward water-wet in sandstone reservoir, TJ Field.

  3. All-proportional solid-solution Rh–Pd–Pt alloy nanoparticles by femtosecond laser irradiation of aqueous solution with surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarker, Md. Samiul Islam, E-mail: samiul-phy@ru.ac.bd; Nakamura, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi [Tohoku University, Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Formation of Rh–Pd–Pt solid-solution alloy nanoparticles (NPs) by femtosecond laser irradiation of aqueous solution in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) or citrate as a stabilizer was studied. It was found that the addition of surfactant (PVP or citrate) significantly contributed to reduce the mean size of the particles to 3 nm for PVP and 10 nm for citrate, which was much smaller than that of the particles fabricated without any surfactants (20 nm), and improved the dispersion state as well as the colloidal stability. The solid-solution formation of the Rh–Pd–Pt alloy NPs was confirmed by the XRD results that the diffraction pattern was a single peak, which was found between the positions corresponding to each pure Rh, Pd, and Pt NPs. Moreover, all the elements were homogeneously distributed in every particle by STEM-EDS elemental mapping, strongly indicating the formation of homogeneous solid-solution alloy. Although the Rh–Pd–Pt alloy NPs fabricated with PVP was found to be Pt rich by EDS observation, the composition of NPs fabricated with citrate almost exactly preserved the feeding ratio of ions in the mixed solution. To our best knowledge, these results demonstrated for the first time, the formation of all-proportional solid-solution Rh–Pd–Pt alloy NPs with well size control.

  4. Micellization and microstructural studies between amphiphilic drug ibuprofen with non-ionic surfactant in aqueous urea solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rub, Malik Abdul; Azum, Naved; Kumar, Dileep; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Marwani, Hadi M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Micellization behavior of (ibuprofen + non-ionic surfactant) mixtures has been investigated. • Ion–dipole type of interaction between ibuprofen drug and non-ionic surfactant. • The negative β values propose attractive interactions between the components. • Stern–Volmer binding constants (K sv ) and dielectric constant of mixed systems have also been evaluated. • The results have applicability in drug delivery. - Abstract: Herein, we have accounted for the interaction between a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen (IBF) and non-ionic surfactant polyethoxyglycol t-octylphenyl ether (TX-100 (4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenyl-polyethylene glycol) and TX-114 ((1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenyl-polyethylene glycol)), in aqueous urea solutions using tensiometric and fluorimetric techniques at T = 298.15 K. Surface tension measurements were carried out to evaluate the critical micelle concentrations (cmc) of the drug and surfactant as well as their mixtures of varying compositions. An increase in the surface charge of the micelles was observed with the addition of urea followed by halt of micelles formation. Various physicochemical parameters, such as, cmc values of the mixture, micellar mass fraction (X 1 Rub ) of surfactants (TX-100/TX-114), interaction parameters (β) at the monolayer air–water interface and in bulk solutions, different thermodynamic parameters and activity coefficients (f 1 m ,f 2 m ) for the non-ionic surfactant and drug in the mixed micelles, were determined by using the approach of Clint, of Rubingh, and of Rosen. All results identified synergism and attractive interactions in the mixed systems of (drug–surfactant) mixtures and showed effective involvement of the non-ionic surfactant (TX-100/TX-114) component in the mixture. Micelle aggregation numbers (N agg ), evaluated by using steady-state fluorescence quenching studies, suggest that the contribution of non-ionic surfactant was always more than that of

  5. An experimental study of flow boiling chf with porous surface coatings and surfactant solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarwar, Mohammad Sohail

    2007-02-01

    The boiling crisis or critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon is an enormously studied topic of the boiling heat transfer. The great interest in the CHF is due to practical motives, since it is desirable to design an equipment (heat exchanger or boiler, etc) to operate at as high a heat flux as possible with optimum heat transfer rates but without the risk of physical burnout. This study consists of two parts of flow boiling CHF experiment: with porous surface coated tubes and by using surfactant solutions as working fluid. In first part, the effect of micro- and nano-porous inside surface coated vertical tubes on the CHF was determined for flow boiling of water in vertical round tubes at atmospheric pressure. CHF was measured for a smooth and three different coated tubes, at mass fluxes of 100∼300 kg/m 2 s and two inlet subcooling temperatures (50 .deg. C and 75 .deg. C). Greater CHF enhancement was found with microporous coatings. Al 2 O 3 microporous coatings with particle size <10 μm and coating thickness of 50 μm showed the best CHF enhancement. The maximum increase in the CHF was about 25% for microporous Al 2 O 3 . A wettability test was performed to study the physical mechanism of increase of CHF with microporous coated surfaces and contact angle was measured for smooth and coated surfaces. Pressure drop measurements were also performed across the coated tubes using the DP-cell apparatus. In second part, surfactant effect on the CHF was determined for water flow boiling at atmospheric pressure in a closed loop filled with solution of tri-sodium phosphate (TSP, Na 3 PO 4 ·12H 2 O). The TSP is usually added to the containment sump water to adjust pH level during accident in nuclear power plants. The CHF was measured for four different surfactant solutions of water in vertical tubes, at different mass fluxes (100 ∼ 500 kg/m 2 s) and two inlet subcooling temperatures (50 .deg. C and 75 .deg. C). Surfactant solutions in the range of 0.05%∼0.2% at low mass

  6. Thermodynamics of non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100-cationic surfactants mixtures at the cloud point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batigoec, Cigdem; Akbas, Halide; Boz, Mesut

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Non-ionic surfactants are used as emulsifier and solubilizate in such as textile, detergent and cosmetic. → Non-ionic surfactants occur phase separation at temperature as named the cloud point in solution. → Dimeric surfactants have attracted increasing attention due to their superior surface activity. → The positive values of ΔG cp 0 indicate that the process proceeds nonspontaneous. - Abstract: This study investigates the effects of gemini and conventional cationic surfactants on the cloud point (CP) of the non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 (TX-100) in aqueous solutions. Instead of visual observation, a spectrophotometer was used for measurement of the cloud point temperatures. The thermodynamic parameters of these mixtures were calculated at different cationic surfactant concentrations. The gemini surfactants of the alkanediyl-α-ω-bis (alkyldimethylammonium) dibromide type, on the one hand, with different alkyl groups containing m carbon atoms and an ethanediyl spacer, referred to as 'm-2-m' (m = 10, 12, and 16) and, on the other hand, with -C 16 alkyl groups and different spacers containing s carbon atoms, referred to as '16-s-16' (s = 6 and 10) were synthesized, purified and characterized. Additions of the cationic surfactants to the TX-100 solution increased the cloud point temperature of the TX-100 solution. It was accepted that the solubility of non-ionic surfactant containing polyoxyethylene (POE) hydrophilic chain was a maximum at the cloud point so that the thermodynamic parameters were calculated at this temperature. The results showed that the standard Gibbs free energy (ΔG cp 0 ), the enthalpy (ΔH cp 0 ) and the entropy (ΔS cp 0 ) of the clouding phenomenon were found positive in all cases. The standard free energy (ΔG cp 0 ) increased with increasing hydrophobic alkyl chain for both gemini and conventional cationic surfactants; however, it decreased with increasing surfactant concentration.

  7. Adsorption at air-water and oil-water interfaces and self-assembly in aqueous solution of ethoxylated polysorbate nonionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun X; Petkov, Jordan T; Tucker, Ian; Webster, John R P; Terry, Ann E

    2015-03-17

    The Tween nonionic surfactants are ethoxylated sorbitan esters, which have 20 ethylene oxide groups attached to the sorbitan headgroup and a single alkyl chain, lauryl, palmityl, stearyl, or oleyl. They are an important class of surfactants that are extensively used in emulsion and foam stabilization and in applications associated with foods, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. A range of ethoxylated polysorbate surfactants, with differing degrees of ethoxylation from 3 to 50 ethylene oxide groups, have been synthesized and characterized by neutron reflection, small-angle neutron scattering, and surface tension. In conjunction with different alkyl chain groups, this provides the opportunity to modify their surface properties, their self-assembly in solution, and their interaction with macromolecules, such as proteins. Adsorption at the air-water and oil-water interfaces and solution self-assembly of the range of ethoxylated polysorbate surfactants synthesized are presented and discussed.

  8. Electrostatic self-assembly in polyelectrolyte-neutral block copolymers and oppositely charged surfactant solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berret, J.-F.Jean-Francois; Oberdisse, Julian

    2004-01-01

    We report on small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) of colloidal complexes resulting from the electrostatic self-assembly of polyelectrolyte-neutral copolymers and oppositely charged surfactants. The polymers are double hydrophilic block copolymers of low molecular weight (between 5000 and 50 000 g/mol). One block is a polyelectrolyte chain, which can be either positively or negatively charged, whereas the second block is neutral and in good solvent conditions. In aqueous solutions, surfactants with an opposite charge to that of the polyelectrolyte interact strongly with these copolymers. The two species associate into stable 100 nm-colloidal complexes which exhibit a core-shell microstructure. For different polymer/surfactant couples, we have shown that the core is constituted from densely packed surfactant micelles connected by the polyelectrolyte chains. The outer part of the complex is a corona formed by the neutral soluble chains. Using a model of aggregation based on a Monte-Carlo algorithm, we have simulated the internal structure of the aggregates. The model assumes spherical cages containing one to several hundreds of micelles in a closely packed state. The agreement between the model and the data is remarkable

  9. Theoretical and Simulations-Based Modeling of Micellization in Linear and Branched Surfactant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, Jonathan D.

    's and other micellization properties for a variety of linear and branched surfactant chemical architectures which are commonly encountered in practice. Single-component surfactant solutions are investigated, in order to clarify the specific contributions of the surfactant head and tail to the free energy of micellization, a quantity which determines the cmc and all other aspects of micellization. First, a molecular-thermodynamic (MT) theory is presented which makes use of bulk-phase thermodynamics and a phenomenological thought process to describe the energetics related to the formation of a micelle from its constituent surfactant monomers. Second, a combined computer-simulation/molecular-thermodynamic (CSMT) framework is discussed which provides a more detailed quantification of the hydrophobic effect using molecular dynamics simulations. A novel computational strategy to identify surfactant head and tail using an iterative dividing surface approach, along with simulated micelle results, is proposed. Force-field development for novel surfactant structures is also discussed. Third, a statistical-thermodynamic, single-chain, mean-field theory for linear and branched tail packing is formulated, which enables quantification of the specific energetic penalties related to confinement and constraint of surfactant tails within micelles. Finally, these theoretical and simulations-based strategies are used to predict the micellization behavior of 55 linear surfactants and 28 branched surfactants. Critical micelle concentration and optimal micelle properties are reported and compared with experiment, demonstrating good agreement across a range of surfactant head and tail types. In particular, the CSMT framework is found to provide improved agreement with experimental cmc's for the branched surfactants considered. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs mit.edu)

  10. Surfactant therapy in late preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Yurdakök

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Late preterm (LPT neonates are at a high risk for respiratory distress soon after birth due to respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, transient tachypnea of the newborn, persistent pulmonary hypertension, and pneumonia along with an increased need for surfactant replacement therapy, continuous positive airway pressure, and ventilator support when compared with the term neonates. In the past, studies on outcomes of infants with respiratory distress have primarily focused on extremely premature infants, leading to a gap in knowledge and understanding of the developmental biology and mechanism of pulmonary diseases in LPT neonates. Surfactant deficiency is the most frequent etiology of RDS in very preterm and moderately preterm infants, while cesarean section and lung infection play major roles in RDS development in LPT infants. The clinical presentation and the response to surfactant therapy in LPT infants may be different than that seen in very preterm infants. Incidence of pneumonia and occurrence of pneumothorax are significantly higher in LPT and term infants. High rates of pneumonia in these infants may result in direct injury to the type II alveolar cells of the lung with decreasing synthesis, release, and processing of surfactant. Increased permeability of the alveolar capillary membrane to both fluid and solutes is known to result in entry of plasma proteins into the alveolar hypophase, further inhibiting the surface properties of surfactant. However, the oxygenation index value do not change dramatically after ventilation or surfactant administration in LPT infants with RDS compared to very preterm infants. These finding may indicate a different pathogenesis of RDS in late preterm and term infants. In conclusion, surfactant therapy may be of significant benefit in LPT infants with serious respiratory failure secondary to a number of insults. However, optimal timing and dose of administration are not so clear in this group. Additional

  11. Simultaneous removal of binary mixture of Brilliant Green and Crystal Violet using derivative spectrophotometric determination, multivariate optimization and adsorption characterization of dyes on surfactant modified nano-γ-alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolgharnein, Javad; Bagtash, Maryam; Shariatmanesh, Tahere

    2015-02-01

    The present study deals with the simultaneous removal of Brilliant Green (BG) and Crystal Violet (CV) by surfactant-modified alumina. The utilization of alumina nanoparticles with an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) as a novel and efficient adsorbent is successfully carried out to remove two cationic dyes from aqueous solutions in binary batch systems. A first-order derivative spectrophotometric method is developed for the simultaneous determination of BG and CV in binary solutions. The linear concentration range and limits of detection for the simultaneous determination of BG and CV were found to be: 1-20, 1-15 mg/L, 0.3 and 0.5 mg/L, respectively. The influence of various parameters, such as contact time, initial concentration of dyes and sorbent mass on the dye adsorption is investigated. A response surface methodology achieved through performing the Box-Behnken design is utilized to optimize the removal of dyes by surfactant-modified nanoparticle alumina through a batch adsorption process. The proposed quadratic model resulting from the Box-Behnken design approach fitted very well with the experimental data. The optimal conditions for dye removal were contact time t = 50 min, sorbent dose = 0.036 g, CBG (Initial BG concentration) = 215 mg/L and CCV (Initial CV concentration) = 170 mg/L. Furthermore, FT-IR analysis, the isotherms and kinetics of adsorption were also explored.

  12. Development Characteristics of Velocity Transports in An Isothermal Heated Drag-Reducing Surfactant Solution Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongxia; Wang, Dezhong; Chen, Hanping; Wang, Yanping

    2007-06-01

    The development characteristics, turbulence transports for stresses and kinetic energy of a cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC) surfactant solution for a two-dimensional channel flow have been experimentally investigated. Time mean velocity and fluctuating velocity are measured using a Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) at the Reynolds number 1.78×104 and isothermal heated temperature 31°C. Although mean velocity profiles at three cross sections show that the fluid is almost fully developed, the peak location of fluctuating intensity for the CTAC solution is slightly away from the wall downstream from the fluid and the peak location of fluctuating intensity is observed at far away from the wall than that of water. The location where the velocity gradient has its maximum, the fluctuating intensity does not get the high value. The elastic shear stress contribution to the total shear stress is 15 percents to 36 percents and it gets to the maximum near to the wall. The surfactant elastic shear stress is almost a liner function of the height of the channel, which means that the elastic stress contribution of the different cross locations is approximately the same. The fluctuating surfactant stress work is negative and the fluctuating elastic shear stresses produce rather than dissipate kinetic energy.

  13. ASSOCIATION OF BRANCHED POLYETHYLENE IMINE WITH SURFACTANTS IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael C. Bellettini

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Three polymer-surfactant systems comprised of branched polyethylene imine (PEI with an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecylsulfate; SDS, a cationic surfactant (tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide; TTAB, and a zwitterionic surfactant (N-tetradecyl-N,N-dimethyl-3-ammonio-1-propanesulfonate; SB3-14 were studied based on the properties of surface tension, pyrene fluorescence emission, dynamic light scattering, pH, and zeta potential measurements. The critical aggregation concentration (cac and polymer saturation point (psp were determined for all three systems. The effect of these surfactants on the physico-chemical characteristics (diameter and surface charge of the complexes formed was determined. Polymer-surfactant interactions occurred in all of the systems studied, with the strongest interactions, electrostatic in nature, occurring in the SDS-PEI system. After the neutralization of the polymer charges with the addition of the surfactant, the hydrophobic effect started to control the interlacing of the polymer chains. For the PEI-TTAB system, a very dense film was formed at surfactant concentrations above 2.0 mmol L-1. In this case, the bromide counter-ion interacted with both the positively-charged PEI and the head of the surfactant, which is responsible for the formation of double layer coordination complexes. For the system composed of PEI and the zwitterionic surfactant, less cooperative associations occurred in comparison with the other systems.

  14. Decontamination by cleaning with fluorocarbon surfactant solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, R.; Benson, C.E.; Meyers, E.S.; Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1994-02-01

    In the nuclear industry, facilities and their components inevitably become contaminated with radioactive materials. This report documents the application of a novel particle-removal process developed by Entropic Systems, Inc. (ESI), to decontaminate critical instruments and parts that are contaminated with small radioactive particles that adhere to equipment surfaces. The tests were performed as a cooperative effort between ESI and the Chemical Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ESI developed a new, environmentally compatible process to remove small particles from solid surfaces that is more effective than spraying or sonicating with CFC-113. This process uses inert perfluorinated liquids as working media; the liquids have zero ozone-depleting potential, are nontoxic and nonflammnable, and are generally recognized as nonhazardous materials. In the ESI process, parts to be cleaned are first sprayed or sonicated with a dilute solution of a high-molecular-weight fluorocarbon surfactant in an inert perfluorinated liquid to effect particle removal. The parts are then rinsed with the perfluorinated liquid to remove the fluorocarbon surfactant applied in the first step, and the residual rinse liquid is then evaporated from the parts into an air or nitrogen stream from which it is recovered. Nuclear contamination is inherently a surface phenomenon. The presence of radioactive particles is responsible for all ''smearable'' contamination and, if the radioactive particles are small enough, for some of the fixed contamination. Because radioactivity does not influence the physical chemistry of particle adhesion, the ESI process should be just as effective in removing radioactive particles as it is in removing nonradioactive particles

  15. Absorption of a volatile organic compound by a jet loop reactor with circulation of a surfactant solution: Performance evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byungjoon; Hwang, Geelsu; Haam, Seungjoo; Lee, Changha; Ahn, Ik-Sung; Lee, Kyoungjoo

    2008-01-01

    Biofiltration shows high efficiency for the removal of industrial waste gases and reliable operational stability at low investment and operating cost, especially when the VOC concentration is low, such as 100 ppmv (μL L -1 ) or less. However, it has been reported that the abrupt change in VOC concentrations leads to the failure of the biofilter. Hence, the pretreatment of waste gases is necessary to ensure the stable operation of the biofilter. The objective of this study is to develop a jet loop reactor (JLR) with circulation of a surfactant solution to lower the concentration of VOCs, especially hydrophobic VOCs. Toluene and Tween 81 were used as a model industrial waste gas and a surfactant, respectively. Among several non-ionic surfactants tested, Tween 81 showed the most rapid dissolution of toluene. When a JLR is replaced with fresh Tween 81 solution (0.3% w/v) every hour, it successfully absorbed for 48 h over 90% of the toluene in an inlet gas containing toluene at 1000 ppmv (μL L -1 ) or less. Therefore, JLR with circulation of a surfactant solution is believed to ensure the stable operation of the biofilter even with the unexpected increase in the VOC concentrations

  16. Surface rheology of surfactant solutions close to equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baets, P.J.M.; Stein, H.N.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the authors present surface rheol. measurements of various surfactant solns. close to equil. in a Langmuir trough. The authors find that the storage modulus is, in the systems investigated, higher than the loss modulus. The rheol. behavior depends strongly on the surfactant concn.,

  17. Remediation using trace element humate surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddle, Catherine Lynn; Taylor, Steven Cheney; Bruhn, Debra Fox

    2016-08-30

    A method of remediation at a remediation site having one or more undesirable conditions in which one or more soil characteristics, preferably soil pH and/or elemental concentrations, are measured at a remediation site. A trace element humate surfactant composition is prepared comprising a humate solution, element solution and at least one surfactant. The prepared trace element humate surfactant composition is then dispensed onto the remediation site whereby the trace element humate surfactant composition will reduce the amount of undesirable compounds by promoting growth of native species activity. By promoting native species activity, remediation occurs quickly and environmental impact is minimal.

  18. Large-scale exfoliation of inorganic layered compounds in aqueous surfactant solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Ronan J.; King, Paul J.; Lotya, Mustafa; Wirtz, Christian; Khan, Umar; De, Sukanta; O' Neill, Arlene; Coleman, Jonathan N. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); CRANN, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Duesberg, Georg S. [CRANN, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Grunlan, Jaime C.; Moriarty, Gregory [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Chen, Jun [Intelligent Polymer Research Institute, ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, AIIM Facility, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Wang, Jiazhao [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Minett, Andrew I. [Laboratory for Sustainable Technology, School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Nicolosi, Valeria [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-08

    A method to exfoliate MoS{sub 2} in large quantities in surfactant-water solutions is described. The layered material tends to be exfoliated as dispersions of thin, relatively defect-free flakes with lateral sizes of hundreds of nanometers. This method can be extended to a range of other layered compounds. The dispersed flakes can be mixed with nanotubes or graphene to greate functional hybrid materials. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. On the predictions and limitations of the Becker–Döring model for reaction kinetics in micellar surfactant solutions

    KAUST Repository

    Griffiths, I.M.

    2011-08-01

    We investigate the breakdown of a system of micellar aggregates in a surfactant solution following an order-one dilution. We derive a mathematical model based on the Becker-Döring system of equations, using realistic expressions for the reaction constants fit to results from Molecular Dynamics simulations. We exploit the largeness of typical aggregation numbers to derive a continuum model, substituting a large system of ordinary differential equations for a partial differential equation in two independent variables: time and aggregate size. Numerical solutions demonstrate that re-equilibration occurs in two distinct stages over well-separated timescales, in agreement with experiment and with previous theories. We conclude by exposing a limitation in the Becker-Döring theory for re-equilibration of surfactant solutions. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  20. Electrodialytic remediation of polychlorinated biphenyls contaminated soil with iron nanoparticles and two different surfactants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomes, Helena I.; Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) are persistent organic pollutants (POP) that strongly adsorb in soils and sediments. There is a need to develop new and cost-effective solutions for the remediation of PCB contaminated soils. The suspended electrodialytic remediation combined with zero valent iron......ZVI showed encouraging tendencies and a base is thus formed for further optimization towards a new method for remediation of PCB polluted soils....... nanoparticles (nZVI) could be a competitive alternative to the commonly adapted solutions of incineration or landfilling. Surfactants can enhance the PCB desorption, dechlorination, and the contaminated soil cleanup. In this work, two different surfactants (saponin and Tween 80) were tested to enhance PCB...

  1. Degradation of Surfactants in Hydroponic Wheat Root Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Oscar; McCoy, Lashelle; Flanagan, Aisling

    Hygiene water recycling in recirculating hydroponic systems can be enhanced by plant roots by providing a substrate and root exudates for bacterial growth. However, reduced plant growth can occur during batch mode additions of high concentrations of surfactant. An analog hygiene water stream containing surfactants (Steol CS330, Mirataine CB) was added to a hydroponically-grown wheat plant root zone. The plants were grown at 700 mol mol-1 CO2, a photosynthetic photon flux of 300 mol m-2 s-1, and a planting density of 380 plants m-2. Volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficients were determined using the fermentative/dynamic outgassing method to maintain adequate oxygen mass transfer rates in the root zone. This analysis suggested an optimal flow rate of the hydroponic solution of 5 L min-1. The hydroponic system was inoculated with biofilm from a bioreactor and rates of surfactant degradation were measured daily based on reduction in chemical oxygen demand (COD). The COD decreased from 400 to 100 mg L-1 after 2 days following batch addition of the analog hygiene water to the hydroponic system. Measurements of dissolved oxygen concentration and solution temperature suggest that the root zone was provided adequate aeration to meet both oxygen demands from plant and microbial respiration during the degradation of the surfactant. Results from this study show that hydroponic systems can be used to enhance rates of hygiene water processing.

  2. Anionic Surfactant as a Corrosion Inhibitor for Synthesized Ferrous Alloy in Acidic Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Kellou-Kerkouche

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of temperature on the corrosion behaviour of a synthesized iron-based alloy in 1 N sulphuric acid solution has been examined by means of three electrochemical techniques. Thereafter, we studied the influence of an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate at various concentrations on the electrochemical behaviour of the ferrous alloy. The obtained results show that the temperature increase reduced the performance of the used alloy, in the acidic environment. Otherwise, the surfactant inhibits the alloy dissolution in the sulphuric acid, through its adsorption on the metal surface without modifying the mechanism of corrosion process. We also noticed that the highest inhibition effect is obtained at a concentration above its critical micelle concentration (CMC. Langmuir adsorption isotherm fits well with the experimental data.

  3. Micellar solubilization in strongly interacting binary surfactant systems. [Binary surfactant systems of: dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride + sodium dodecyl sulfate; benzyldimethyltetradecylammonium chloride + tetradecyltrimethylammonium chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treiner, C. (Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France)); Nortz, M.; Vaution, C. (Faculte de Pharmacie de Paris-sud, Chatenay-Malabry (France))

    1990-07-01

    The apparent partition coefficient P of barbituric acids between micelles and water has been determined in mixed binary surfactant solutions from solubility measurements in the whole micellar composition range. The binary systems chosen ranged from the strongly interacting system dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride + sodium dodecyl sulfate to weakly interacting systems such as benzyldimethyltetradecylammonium chloride + tetradecyltrimethyammonium chloride. In all cases studied, mixed micelle formation is unfavorable to micellar solubilization. A correlation is found between the unlike surfactants interaction energy, as measured by the regular solution parameter {beta} and the solute partition coefficient change upon surfactant mixing. By use of literature data on micellar solubilization in binary surfactant solutions, it is shown that the change of P for solutes which are solubilized by surface adsorption is generally governed by the sign and amplitude of the interaction parameter {beta}.

  4. Effect of surfactants on the aggregation of pyronin B and pyronin Y in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arik, Mustafa; Meral, Kadem [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Onganer, Yavuz, E-mail: yonganer@atauni.edu.t [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)

    2009-06-15

    Molecular dynamics of pyronin B (PyB) and pyronin Y (PyY) in aqueous solution containing different surfactants were investigated by using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. First, the interactions of PyB and PyY with the negatively charged surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) were investigated in the below and above critical micelle concentration (cmc). The H-aggregate formation of the dye compounds was observed for below the cmc of SDS surfactant. The absorbance of H-aggregate absorption band of PyB and PyY decreased according to the aggregate-monomer equilibrium by increasing SDS surfactant concentration towards the cmc. Therefore, equilibrium constants of the aggregate formation and oscillator strengths of monomer and aggregate of the dye compounds were calculated from spectral studies. Moreover, aggregate formation dynamics was discussed in terms of thermodynamic functions by using temperature studies. The interactions of PyB and PyY with the positively charged hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and neutral Triton X-100 (TX-100) were also studied and it was observed that there was no aggregate formation on the absorption and fluorescence spectra for below and above the cmc.

  5. Dispersion of nanoparticulate suspensions using self-assembled surfactant aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar

    The dispersion of particles is critical for several industrial applications such as paints, inks, coatings, and cosmetics. Several emerging applications such as abrasives for precision polishing, and drug delivery systems are increasingly relying on nanoparticulates to achieve the desired performance. In the case of nanoparticles, the dispersion becomes more challenging because of the lack of fundamental understanding of dispersant adsorption and interparticle force prediction. Additionally, many of these processes use severe processing environments such as high normal forces (>100 mN/m), high shear forces (>10,000 s -1), and high ionic strengths (>0.1 M). Under such processing conditions, traditionally used dispersants based on electrostatics, and steric force repulsion mechanism may not be adequate. Hence, the development of optimally performing dispersants requires a fundamental understanding of the dispersion mechanism at the atomic/molecular scale. This study explores the use of self-assembled surfactant aggregates at the solid-liquid interface for dispersing nanoparticles in severe processing environments. Surfactant molecules can provide a feasible alternative to polymeric or inorganic dispersants for stabilizing ultrafine particles. The barrier to aggregation in the presence of surfactant molecules was measured using atomic force microscopy. The barrier heights correlated to suspension stability. To understand the mechanism for nanoparticulate suspension stability in the presence of surfactant films, the interface was characterized using zeta potential, contact angle, adsorption, and FT-IR (adsorbed surfactant film structure measurements). The effect of solution conditions such as pH and ionic strength on the suspension stability, and the self-assembled surfactant films was also investigated. It was determined that a transition from a random to an ordered orientation of the surfactant molecules at the interface was responsible for stability of

  6. Optimization of surfactant application for synthetic drilling fluid; Otimizacao da aplicacao de emulsificante em fluidos de perfuracao sinteticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arruda, Jefferson Teixeira [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil); Santos, Telma Pitanga; Medeiros, Ana Catarina da Rocha; Garcia, Rosangela Balaban [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Lab. de Pesquisa em Petroleo

    2008-07-01

    The most common synthetic drilling fluids are made of polymerized olefins, paraffin and esters, which have absence of aromatics hydrocarbons and biodegradability as advantages. These fluids have good performance during the drilling operations (high thermal stability) and have low toxicity. Nevertheless, their big disadvantage is the high cost, which limits their use. One of the biggest challenges in working with synthetic fluids is the control of water/oil emulsion stability, being the surfactant the main agent responsible for keeping this stability between both phases of the fluid. The water/oil and oil/water emulsion is defined by the chemical nature of the surfactant. The emulsions can be changed from oil/water to water/oil and vice versa by many mechanisms, such as temperature variation, addition of another surfactant and alteration of the disperse phase volumetric percentage. The aim of this work was the optimization of synthetic drilling fluids formulations by using commercial surfactants. The optimized formulations showed similar rheological properties. After aging at high temperature (300 deg F), some tendency to migration of oil phase in both fluids was observed. This result was associated to the fluid's viscosity. However, the formulations showed high electrical stability, indicating formation of stable emulsions. The HTHP filtration volumes were small. (author)

  7. Microemulsion-based lycopene extraction: Effect of surfactants, co-surfactants and pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri-Rigi, Atefeh; Abbasi, Soleiman

    2016-04-15

    Lycopene is a potent antioxidant that has received extensive attention recently. Due to the challenges encountered with current methods of lycopene extraction using hazardous solvents, industry calls for a greener, safer and more efficient process. The main purpose of present study was application of microemulsion technique to extract lycopene from tomato pomace. In this respect, the effect of eight different surfactants, four different co-surfactants, and ultrasound and enzyme pretreatments on lycopene extraction efficiency was examined. Experimental results revealed that application of combined ultrasound and enzyme pretreatments, saponin as a natural surfactant, and glycerol as a co-surfactant, in the bicontinuous region of microemulsion was the optimal experimental conditions resulting in a microemulsion containing 409.68±0.68 μg/glycopene. The high lycopene concentration achieved, indicates that microemulsion technique, using a low-cost natural surfactant could be promising for a simple and safe separation of lycopene from tomato pomace and possibly from tomato industrial wastes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A simplified treatment of surfactant effects on cloud drop activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Raatikainen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved surface active species, or surfactants, have a tendency to partition to solution surface and thereby decrease solution surface tension. Activating cloud droplets have large surface-to-volume ratios, and the amount of surfactant molecules in them is limited. Therefore, unlike with macroscopic solutions, partitioning to the surface can effectively deplete the droplet interior of surfactant molecules.

    Surfactant partitioning equilibrium for activating cloud droplets has so far been solved numerically from a group of non-linear equations containing the Gibbs adsorption equation coupled with a surface tension model and an optional activity coefficient model. This can be a problem when surfactant effects are examined by using large-scale cloud models. Namely, computing time increases significantly due to the partitioning calculations done in the lowest levels of nested iterations.

    Our purpose is to reduce the group of non-linear equations to simple polynomial equations with well known analytical solutions. In order to do that, we describe surface tension lowering using the Szyskowski equation, and ignore all droplet solution non-idealities. It is assumed that there is only one surfactant exhibiting bulk-surface partitioning, but the number of non-surfactant solutes is unlimited. It is shown that the simplifications cause only minor errors to predicted bulk solution concentrations and cloud droplet activation. In addition, computing time is decreased at least by an order of magnitude when using the analytical solutions.

  9. Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas D.; Hiller, John M.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration.

  10. Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.D.; Hiller, J.M.

    1998-02-24

    The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration. 1 fig.

  11. Degradation of surfactants by sono-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashokkumar, M.; Grieser, F.; Vinodgopal, K.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The ultrasound induced decomposition of a commercially available polydisperse nonylphenol ethoxylate surfactant (Teric GN9) has been investigated. Nearly 90% mineralization and/or degradation into volatile products of the surfactant is achieved after sonication for 24 hours. Ultrasound has been found to be a useful tool to achieve a number of chemical processes. Linear and branched alkyl benzene sulfonates and alkyl nonylphenol ethoxylates are widely used surfactants which accumulated in the environment and contribute to a well-recognised pollution problem. We have investigated the use of ultrasound in the degradation of both types of surfactants with the aim of understanding the mechanism of degradation in order to optimise the decomposition process. In this presentation, we report on the sonochemical degradation of Teric GN9- polydisperse, a nonylphenol ethoxylate with an average of 9 ethylene oxide units. The ultrasound unit used for the degradation studies of the surfactant solutions was an Allied Signal (ELAC Nautik) RF generator and transducer with a plate diameter of 54.5 mm operated at 363 kHz in continuous wave mode at an intensity of 2 W/cm 2 . Ultrasound induced cavitation events generate primary radicals inside gas/vapour filled bubbles. Due to the extreme conditions (T ∼ 5000 K; P ∼ 100 atm) generated within the collapsing bubble, H and OH radicals are produced by the homolysis of water molecules, if water is the medium of sonication. These primary radicals attack the surfactant molecules adsorbed at the bubble/water interface. The initial rate of reaction of the surfactant was found to be dependent on the monomer concentration in solution below and above the critical micelle concentration of the surfactants. This result strongly suggests that the initial radical attack on the surfactants occurs at the cavitation bubble/solution interface, followed by oxidative decomposition and pyrolysis of volatile fragments of the surfactant within

  12. The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-component DNAPLS with surfactant solutions. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Laboratory studies were conducted at the State University of New York at Buffalo (SUNY) while numerical simulation and field work were undertaken by INTERA Inc. in collaboration with Martin Marietta Energy Systems Inc. at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Kentucky. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). Ten of these were capable of solubilizing TCE to concentrations greater than 15,000 mg/L, compared to its aqueous solubility of 1,100 mg/L. Four surfactants were identified as good solubilizers of all three chlorinated solvents. Of these, a secondary alcohol ethoxylate was the first choice for in situ testing because of its excellent solubilizing ability and its low propensity to sorb. However, this surfactant did not meet the Commonwealth of Kentucky`s acceptance criteria. Consequently, it was decided to use a surfactant approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration as a food-grade additive. As a 1% micellar-surfactant solution, this sorbitan monooleate has a solubilization capacity of 16,000 mg TCE/L, but has a higher propensity to sorb to clays than has the alcohol ethoxylate.

  13. Possibility of ozone application in purification of waste water of NPP special laundries from surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grachok, M.A.; Prokudina, S.A.; Permyakov, V.G.; Shulyat'ev, M.I.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of the medium pH, temperature, rate of ozone-air mixture (OAM) feed on ozonation rate of model solutions and actual sewage waters of Kursk NPP was studied. It is shown that pH≤11, 60, 50 deg C and OAM feed rate of 50 l/h are the optimal conditions of solutions of sewage waters of specialized laundry at Kursk NPP. Specific consumption of ozone for surfactant destruction (OP-10 and Kristall synthetic detergent) under the conditions mentioned was determined. The investigations show that preliminary ozonation of sewage waters to remove surfactants increases considerably the efficiency of evaporator operation, improves the quality of condensate and prolongs service life of ion-exchange filters

  14. Polyacrylamide grafted cellulose as an eco-friendly flocculant: Key factors optimization of flocculation to surfactant effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hangcheng; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Xiaogang; Shao, Lan; Zhang, Xiumei; Yao, Juming

    2016-01-01

    The discharge of effluents from surfactant manufacturers is giving rise to increasingly serious environmental problems. In order to develop the eco-friendly flocculation materials to achieve effective removal of pollutants from the surfactant effluents, the bamboo pulp cellulose from Phyllostachys heterocycla is employed as the skeleton material to synthesize an eco-friendly bamboo pulp cellulose-g-polyacrylamide (BPC-g-PAM) for flocculation. The BPC-g-PAM is used with the metal ions as the coagulant to treat the effluent from a surfactant manufacturer. The response surface methodology coupled with Box-behnken design is employed to optimize the key factors of coagulation-flocculation. The results show that the combination of Fe(3+) with BPC-g-PAM achieves the best coagulation-flocculation performance like, the fast treatment time, minimum coagulant and BPC-g-PAM dosages compared with the other two combinations of Al(3+) with BPC-g-PAM and Ca(2+) with BPC-g-PAM. Therefore, the combination of Fe(3+) with BPC-g-PAM is expected to promote its application for the pollution control in the surfactant manufacturers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Polyethoxylated carboxylic surfactant for ion foam flotation: fundamental study from solution to foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micheau, Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Ion foam flotation allows to concentrate ions in a foam phase formed by a soap. For classical systems, the strong interaction between ions and surfactant generally leads to the formation of precipitates and of froth. When the froth collapses, the solid residue thus recovered requires a recycling or conversion. In order to remedy this, the present work uses as collector a polyethoxylated carboxylic surfactant, AKYPO RO 90 VG, which forms soluble ion/surfactant complexes, even with multi-charge ions. This work presents a detailed study of the fundamental mechanisms that govern the extraction of ions by foaming. In the first part, surface activity and acid/base properties of the surfactant in solution are determined by combining numerous independent techniques which are pH-metric dosage, tensiometry and small angle scattering. The evolution of these properties in the presence of different nitrate salts (Nd, Eu, Ca, Sr, Cu, Li, Na, Cs) coupled with electrophoretic measurements give a first approach to selectivity. Finally, all of these data combined with a study of the formation of surfactant/ion complexes allow us to determine the speciation of Nd/AKYPO system as a function of pH. In the second part, the analysis of the foam by conductivity and neutron scattering provides information on the wetness and foam film thickness, parameters governing foam stability. The pH and the nature of the added ions, their number of charge and also their chemical nature thus appear to be major parameters that governed wetness and foam film thickness. The last part is devoted to the understanding of the ion extraction/separation experiments by flotation based on all previous results. It is shown that the flotation of neodymium is strongly related to its speciation, which could lead to its re-extraction or its flotation in precipitated form. It is shown that, neodymium induces a phenomenon of mono-charge ion depletion in the foam. This ionic specificity allows to consider the studied

  16. Improvement of the Separation Efficiency of Ion Flotation and Adsorbing Colloid Flotation by the Synergistic Effect of Mixed Surfactant Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.H.; Seo, E.J.; Choi, S.J. [Dept. of. Env. Eng., Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea)

    1999-02-01

    Experimental investigations on the removal of Cd(II) from aqueous ablution were carried out through two foam separation techniques : ion floatation and adsorbing colloid flotation with Fe(III). The optimum pH for good removal was found to be about 6.4 for the former and about 11 for the latter. The effect of flotation time. pH, surfactant(sodium lauryl sulfate), foreign ions(Na{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, No{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 2}{sup -4} ) on the efficiency of Cd(II) removal were discussed. The presence of foreign ions inhibit the Cd(II) removal by foam flotation. It was suggested that the limitation of foam flotation on Cd(II) removal may be overcome by the surface activity of mixed surfactant solution. The application of the synergistic effect of mixed surfactant solutions to the improvement of the removal efficiency of foam flotation was experimentally verified in this work. 19 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Removal of As(V, Cr(VI and Pb(II from aqueous solution using surfactant-modified Sabzevar nanozeolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourosh Razmgar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The pollution of water environments is a challenging issue especially in developing countries. Contamination of drinking water with heavy metals has been reported in many parts of the world. Arsenic, chromium and lead are dangerous heavy metals and also common contaminants of drinking water. In this study, the capacity and performance of the surfactant-modified Sabzevar natural nanozeolite (SMSNZ on the removal of heavy metals from an aqueous solution was investigated. Initially, the appropriate concentration of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide HDTMA-Br solution for modification was investigated; it was found that it must be higher than the critical concentration micelle (CMC. Then, the removal of As (V, Cr (VI, and Pb(II from an aqueous solution was studied using SMSNZ. The results indicated that the removal efficiency was very high in different initial concentrations of heavy metals. The Linear, Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were used to investigate the adsorption equilibrium of the surfactant-modified natural zeolite for heavy metals adsorption. The results showed that the Linear isotherm is a better fit for the three studied heavy metals.

  18. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and the Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding froin swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in

  19. Interactions between Surfactants in Solution and Electrospun Protein Fibers: Effects on Release Behavior and Fiber Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutrup Stephansen, Karen; García-Díaz, María; Jessen, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    , and drug delivery. In the present study, we present a systematic investigation of how surfactants and proteins, as physiologically relevant components, interact with insulin-loaded fish sarcoplasmic protein (FSP) electrospun fibers (FSP-Ins fibers) in solution and thereby affect fiber properties...... such as accessible surface hydrophilicity, physical stability, and release characteristics of an encapsulated drug. Interactions between insulin-loaded protein fibers and five anionic surfactants (sodium taurocholate, sodium taurodeoxycholate, sodium glycocholate, sodium glycodeoxycholate, and sodium dodecyl sulfate......Intermolecular interaction phenomena occurring between endogenous compounds, such as proteins and bile salts, and electrospun compounds are so far unreported, despite the exposure of fibers to such biorelevant compounds when applied for biomedical purposes, e.g., tissue engineering, wound healing...

  20. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in

  1. MICROBIAL SURFACTANTS IN ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Pirog

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It was shown literature and own experimental data concerning the use of microbial surface active glycolipids (rhamno-, sophoro- and trehalose lipids and lipopeptides for water and soil purification from oil and other hydrocarbons, removing toxic heavy metals (Cu2+, Cd2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, degradation of complex pollution (oil and other hydrocarbons with heavy metals, and the role of microbial surfactants in phytoremediation processes. The factors that limit the use of microbial surfactants in environmental technologies are discussed. Thus, at certain concentrations biosurfactant can exhibit antimicrobial properties and inhibit microorganisms destructing xenobiotics. Microbial biodegradability of surfactants may also reduce the effectiveness of bioremediation. Development of effective technologies using microbial surfactants should include the following steps: monitoring of contaminated sites to determine the nature of pollution and analysis of the autochthonous microbiota; determining the mode of surfactant introduction (exogenous addition of stimulation of surfactant synthesis by autochthonous microbiota; establishing an optimal concentration of surfactant to prevent exhibition of antimicrobial properties and rapid biodegradation; research both in laboratory and field conditions.

  2. Adsorption of dissymmetric cationic gemini surfactants at silica/water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuhai; Feng, Yujun; Dong, Hongwei; Chen, Zhi

    2007-05-01

    Adsorption of a series of cationic gemini surfactants 12-2- m ( m = 8, 12, 16) on the surface of silica was investigated. The critical micelle concentrations, cmcs, of cationic gemini surfactants in the initial solutions and in the supernatants were measured by conductometry and tensiometer. The changes in cmc values indicate that the ion exchanges take place between polar groups of gemini surfactants adsorbed and ions bound on the surface of silica. The adsorption isotherms of cationic gemini surfactants were obtained by a solution depletion method. Based on the driving force, the adsorption includes two steps, one of which is ion exchange, and the other is hydrophobic interaction. In each step, the tendency of surfactant molecules in the solution to form aggregates or to be adsorbed on the silica varies with their structures. The maximum adsorption amount of gemini surfactants on the silica, τmax, decreases as increasing in the length of one alkyl chain, m, from 8, 12 to 16. So the results show that the adsorption behaviors of gemini surfactants are closely related to the dissymmetry of gemini molecules.

  3. Complex phase behavior in solvent-free nonionic surfactants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillmyer, M.A.; Bates, F.S.; Almdal, K.

    1996-01-01

    Unsolvated block copolymers and surfactant solutions are ''soft materials'' that share a common set of ordered microstructures, A set of polyethyleneoxide-polyethylethylene (PEG-PEE) block copolymers that are chemically similar to the well-known alkane-oxyethylene (C(n)EO(m)) nonionic surfactants...... was synthesized here. The general phase behavior in these materials resembles that of both higher molecular weight block copolymers and lower molecular weight nonionic surfactant solutions. Two of the block copolymers exhibited thermally induced order-order transitions and were studied in detail by small...

  4. Effects of gamma radiation from 60Co on dilute aqueous solutions of Linear Alkyl Sulfonate Surfactants and other organic pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrer, D.M.

    1975-01-01

    This study is the result of research findings and operational experiences gained by the author in over four years of work associated with the use of 60 Co for the treatment of waste-water. The effects of 60 Co are discussed with regard to radiochemical destruction of specific organic pollutant species. The study deals specifically with the effects of gamma radiation from a 30,000 Ci 60 Co source upon aqueous solutions of Linear Alkyl Sulfonate Surfactants. The new Linear Alkyl Sulfonate (LAS) Surfactants, the major surfactant produced in the United States of America since June 1965, was developed to replace the old Alkyl Benzene Sulfonate (ABS) Surfactants. The reason for the removal of Alkyl Benzene Sulfonate Surfactants was their extreme environmental stability and the associated appearance of foam in waste-water treatment plants and receiving streams. Although the Linear Alkyl Sulfonate Surfactants are considered 'bio-degradable', the time required for 'bio-degradation' is impractical within the present environmental guidelines. This led to research into alternate techniques of treatment for the destruction of Linear Alkyl Sulfonate Surfactants. Consideration is also given to similar effects of gamma radiation upon pesticides and to the practical aspects of the use of gamma radiation for the treatment of waste-water. Included are discussions of the general experimental procedures used, the sources and their calibration, and sampling techniques to ensure the accuracy of the data. (author)

  5. Molar concentration-depth profiles at the solution surface of a cationic surfactant reconstructed with angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chuangye; Morgner, Harald

    2011-01-01

    In the current work, we first reconstructed the molar fraction-depth profiles of cation and anion near the surface of tetrabutylammonium iodide dissolved in formamide by a refined calculation procedure, based on angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments. In this calculation procedure, both the transmission functions of the core levels and the inelastic mean free paths of the photoelectrons have been taken into account. We have evaluated the partial molar volumes of surfactant and solvent by the densities of such solutions with different bulk concentrations. With those partial molar volumes, the molar concentration-depth profiles of tetrabutylammonium ion and iodide ion were determined. The surface excesses of both surfactant ions were then achieved directly by integrating these depth profiles. The anionic molar concentration-depth profiles and surface excesses have been compared with their counterparts determined by neutral impact ion scattering spectroscopy. The comparisons exhibit good agreements. Being capable of determining molar concentration-depth profiles of surfactant ions by core levels with different kinetic energies may extend the applicable range of ARXPS in investigating solution surfaces.

  6. Adsorption behavior of direct red 80 and congo red onto activated carbon/surfactant: Process optimization, kinetics and equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhengjun; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Xiao; Jiang, Xiaohui; Li, Tian

    2015-02-01

    Adsorptions of congo red and direct red 80 onto activated carbon/surfactant from aqueous solution were optimized. The Box-Behnken design (BBD) has been employed to analyze the effects of concentration of surfactant, temperature, pH, and initial concentration of the dye in the adsorption capacity. Their corresponding experimental data could be evaluated excellently by second order polynomial regression models and the two models were also examined based on the analysis of variance and t test statistics, respectively. The optimum conditions were obtained as follows: Cs = 34.10 μM, T = 50 °C, pH = 3.5, and CCR = 160 mg/L for the congo red system, and Cs = 34.10 μM, T = 50 °C, pH = 6.1, and CDR80 = 110 mg/L for the direct red 80 system. And in these conditions, the measured experimental maximum adsorption capacities for the congo red and direct red 80 removals were 769.48 mg/g and 519.90 mg/g, which were consistent with their corresponding predicted values, with small relative errors of -2.81% and -0.67%, respectively. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetics for the two dye adsorptions onto AC/DDAC were also investigated. The experimental data were fitted by four isotherm models, and Langmuir model presented the best fit. The kinetic studies indicated that the kinetic data followed the pseudo-second-order model.

  7. Application of Surfactant Micellar Solutions as Extractants and Mobile Phases for TLC-Determination of Purine Bases and Doping Agents in Biological Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Victorovna Yedamenko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Separation of caffeine and its metabolites (theophylline and theobromine and doping agents (spironolactone, propranolol, and ephedrine and determination of caffeine in serum sample and propranolol and ephedrine in urine were studied on normal-phase thin layers (“Sorbfil-UV-254”. Aqueous organic solvents and aqueous micellar surfactant solutions were compared as the mobile phases for separation. The acceptable separation of purine bases and doping agents was achieved by micellar Thin Layer Chromatography and normal-phase Thin Layer Chromatography. Anionic surfactant solution with added 1-propanol was the best eluent as for caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine separation, as for doping agents. The best characteristics of caffeine extraction from serum, and propranolol and ephedrine from urine were achieved when micellar eluent based on non-ionic Tween-80 surfactant was used. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v7i1.632

  8. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2006-02-01

    There are many fractured carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). The process of using dilute anionic surfactants in alkaline solutions has been investigated in this work for oil recovery from fractured oil-wet carbonate reservoirs both experimentally and numerically. This process is a surfactant-aided gravity drainage where surfactant diffuses into the matrix, lowers IFT and contact angle, which decrease capillary pressure and increase oil relative permeability enabling gravity to drain the oil up. Anionic surfactants have been identified which at dilute concentration of 0.05 wt% and optimal salinity can lower the interfacial tension and change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil. The force of adhesion in AFM of oil-wet regions changes after anionic surfactant treatment to values similar to those of water-wet regions. The AFM topography images showed that the oil-wetting material was removed from the surface by the anionic surfactant treatment. Adsorption studies indicate that the extent of adsorption for anionic surfactants on calcite minerals decreases with increase in pH and with decrease in salinity. Surfactant adsorption can be minimized in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (20-42% OOIP in 50 days; up to 60% in 200 days) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Small (<10%) initial gas saturation does not affect significantly the rate of oil recovery in the imbibition process, but larger gas saturation decreases the oil recovery rate. As the core permeability decreases, the rate of oil recovery reduces

  9. Optimization of transesterification conditions for the production of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) from Chinese tallow kernel oil with surfactant-coated lipase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yin-yu; Liu, Yuhuan; Lin, Xiangyang [Key Laboratory of Food Science, Ministry of Education, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China); Chen, Wen-wei [College of Life Science, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Lei, Hanwu [Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007 (United States); Ruan, Roger [Key Laboratory of Food Science, Ministry of Education, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China)]|[Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems Engineering, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108-6005 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Surfactant-coated lipase was used as a catalyst in preparing fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) from Chinese tallow kernel oil from Sapium sebiferum (L.) Roxb. syn. Triadica sebifera (L.) small. FAME transesterification was analyzed using response surface methodology to find out the effect of the process variables on the esterification rate and to establish prediction models. Reaction temperature and time were found to be the main factors affecting the esterification rate with the presence of surfactant-coated lipase. Developed prediction models satisfactorily described the esterification rate as a function of reaction temperature, time, dosage of surfactant-coated lipase, ratio of methanol to oil, and water content. The FAME mainly contained fatty acid esters of C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, C18:2, and C18:3, determined by a gas chromatograph. The optimal esterification rate was 93.86%. The optimal conditions for the above esterification ratio were found to be a reaction time of 9.2 h, a reaction temperature of 49 C, dosage of surfactant-coated lipase of 18.5%, a ratio of methanol to oil of 3:1, and water content of 15.6%. Thus, by using the central composite design, it is possible to determine accurate values of the transesterification parameters where maximum production of FAME occurs using the surfactant-coated lipase as a transesterification catalyst. (author)

  10. Modeling the effect of structural details of nonionic surfactant on micellization in solution and adsorption onto hydrophobic surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jodar-Reyes, A.B.; Ortega-Vinuesa, J.L.; Martin-Rodriguez, A.; Leermakers, F.A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Applying the classical one-gradient self-consistent-field (SCF) theory for adsorption and/or association, we can show that the molecular architecture of nonionic surfactants influences strongly the micellization in solution and the adsorption on solid-liquid interfaces. This is illustrated by using

  11. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qui; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling

    2004-05-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding in the swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to the naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of the injected solution bypasses the target pore space containing oil. The objective of this work is to investigate whether combining these two technologies could broaden the applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium--polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 9.2 to 12.9.

  12. Kinetics of Surfactant Desorption at an Air–Solution Interface

    KAUST Repository

    Morgan, C. E.

    2012-12-18

    The kinetics of re-equilibration of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate at the air-solution interface have been studied using neutron reflectivity. The experimental arrangement incorporates a novel flow cell in which the subphase can be exchanged (diluted) using a laminar flow while the surface region remains unaltered. The rate of the re-equilibration is relatively slow and occurs over many tens of minutes, which is comparable with the dilution time scale of approximately 10-30 min. A detailed mathematical model, in which the rate of the desorption is determined by transport through a near-surface diffusion layer into a diluted bulk solution below, is developed and provides a good description of the time-dependent adsorption data. A key parameter of the model is the ratio of the depth of the diffusion layer, H c, to the depth of the fluid, Hf, and we find that this is related to the reduced Péclet number, Pe*, for the system, via Hc/Hf = C/Pe*1/2. Although from a highly idealized experimental arrangement, the results provide an important insight into the "rinse mechanism", which is applicable to a wide variety of domestic and industrial circumstances. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  13. Determination of Surface Tension of Surfactant Solutions through Capillary Rise Measurements: An Image-Processing Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck-Iriart, Cristia´n; De-Candia, Ariel; Rodriguez, Javier; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we described an image processing procedure for the measurement of surface tension of the air-liquid interface using isothermal capillary action. The experiment, designed for an undergraduate course, is based on the analysis of a series of solutions with diverse surfactant concentrations at different ionic strengths. The objective of…

  14. Perfectly Wetting Mixtures of Surfactants from Renewable Resources: The Interaction and Synergistic Effects on Adsorption and Micellization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szumała, Patrycja; Mówińska, Alicja

    This paper presents a study of the surface properties of mixtures of surfactants originating from renewable sources, i.e., alkylpolyglucoside (APG), ethoxylated fatty alcohol (AE), and sodium soap (Na soap). The main objective was to optimize the surfactant ratio which produces the highest wetting properties during the analysis of the solution of the individual surfactants, two- and three-component mixtures, and at different pH values. The results showed the existence of a synergistic effect in lowering the interfacial tension, critical micelle concentration and the formation of mixed micelles in selected solutions. We found that best wetting properties were measured for the binary AE:APG mixtures. It has been demonstrated that slightly lower contact angles values were observed on Teflon and glass surfaces for the AE:APG:soap mixtures but the results were obtained for higher concentration of the components. In addition, all studied solutions have very good surface properties in acidic, basic and neural media. However, the AE:soap (molar ratio of 1:2), AE:APG (2:1) and AE:APG:soap (1:1:1) compositions improved their wetting power at pH 7 on the aluminium and glass surfaces, as compared to solutions at other pH values tested (selected Θ values close to zero-perfectly wetting liquids). All described effects detected would allow less surfactant to be used to achieve the maximum capacity of washing, wetting or solubilizing while minimizing costs and demonstrating environmental care.

  15. Influence of surfactants in forced dynamic dewetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Franziska; Fell, Daniela; Truszkowska, Dorota; Weirich, Marcel; Anyfantakis, Manos; Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Wagner, Manfred; Auernhammer, Günter K; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-09-20

    In this work we show that the forced dynamic dewetting of surfactant solutions depends sensitively on the surfactant concentration. To measure this effect, a hydrophobic rotating cylinder was horizontally half immersed in aqueous surfactant solutions. Dynamic contact angles were measured optically by extrapolating the contour of the meniscus to the contact line. Anionic (sodium 1-decanesulfonate, S-1DeS), cationic (cetyl trimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) and nonionic surfactants (C 4 E 1 , C 8 E 3 and C 12 E 5 ) with critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) spanning four orders of magnitude were used. The receding contact angle in water decreased with increasing velocity. This decrease was strongly enhanced when adding surfactant, even at surfactant concentrations of 10% of the critical micelle concentration. Plots of the receding contact angle-versus-velocity almost superimpose when being plotted at the same relative concentration (concentration/CMC). Thus the rescaled concentration is the dominating property for dynamic dewetting. The charge of the surfactants did not play a role, thus excluding electrostatic effects. The change in contact angle can be interpreted by local surface tension gradients, i.e. Marangoni stresses, close to the three-phase contact line. The decrease of dynamic contact angles with velocity follows two regimes. Despite the existence of Marangoni stresses close to the contact line, for a dewetting velocity above 1-10 mm s -1 the hydrodynamic theory is able to describe the experimental results for all surfactant concentrations. At slower velocities an additional steep decrease of the contact angle with velocity was observed. Particle tracking velocimetry showed that the flow profiles do not differ with and without surfactant on a scales >100 μm.

  16. The Inhibiting or Accelerating Effect of Different Surfactants on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The course of differential capacity curves of the electric double layer at the mercury electrode/surfactant solution interface was described for three different surfactants from different groups. Using square-wave voltammetry (SWV) it was found that the surfactants had a varying effect on the kinetics of electroreduction of Zn2+ ...

  17. Structure and performance of cationic assembly dispersed in amphoteric surfactants solution as a shampoo for hair damaged by coloring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahara, Yasuo; Nishida, Yuichi; Isoda, Masanori; Yamagata, Yoshifumi; Nishikawa, Naoki; Takada, Koji

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, hair coloring gains popularity as a trend of consumer's hair care. This coloring frequently damages hair. In response to this, a new shampoo-base was developed for repairing hair damaged by coloring. The new shampoo-base was prepared by dispersing cationic assembly in a solution of amphoteric surfactants. The mixture of behenyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (C22TAC) and behenyl alcohol (C22OH) was applied as the cationic assembly, which are dispersed in amido propyl betaine laurate (LPB) solution. LPB, which behaves as an amphoteric surfactant, was used as the wash-base. It was verified from the results on the measurements of DSC, calorimeter polarization, cryo-SEM and X-ray diffraction that the cationic assembly has a crystalline structure in the LPB solution. The new shampoo-base was highly efficient to change the color-damaged hair from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. The friction level of the hair washed with the new shampoo-base recovered to the same state as that of healthy hair. The exfoliation of cuticle was reduced after washing with the new shampoo-base.

  18. Experimental Study on the Properties and Displacement Effects of Polymer Surfactant Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Liang Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the characteristics of oil reservoirs and the requirements of further enhancing oil recovery at high water cut stage of Pubei Oilfield, the displacement performance of polymer surfactant is evaluated. Reasonable injection parameters and oil displacement effects after water flooding are also researched. Compared with conventional polymer with intermediate molecular weight, polymer surfactant has the properties of higher viscosity at low concentration condition and lower interfacial tension. Laboratory experiments indicate that the displacement effect of polymer surfactant is much better than that of conventional polymer at a slug size of 0.57 PV. The oil recovery of polymer surfactant increases by more than 10% after water flooding. Considering the actual situation of low-permeability of Pubei Oilfield reservoirs, the system viscosity of 30 mPa·s is chosen. The corresponding concentration of Type III polymer surfactant is 600 mg/L and the injected slug is 0.57 PV and the oil recovery can be increased by 11.69%.

  19. An Asymptotic Theory for the Re-Equilibration of a Micellar Surfactant Solution

    KAUST Repository

    Griffiths, I. M.; Bain, C. D.; Breward, C. J. W.; Chapman, S. J.; Howell, P. D.; Waters, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    Micellar surfactant solutions are characterized by a distribution of aggregates made up predominantly of premicellar aggregates (monomers, dimers, trimers, etc.) and a region of proper micelles close to the peak aggregation number, connected by an intermediate region containing a very low concentration of aggregates. Such a distribution gives rise to a distinct two-timescale reequilibration following a system dilution, known as the t1 and t2 processes, whose dynamics may be described by the Becker-Döring equations. We use a continuum version of these equations to develop a reduced asymptotic description that elucidates the behavior during each of these processes.© 2012 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  20. Micelle formation of nonionic surfactants in a room temperature ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate: surfactant chain length dependence of the critical micelle concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Tohru; Yamakawa, Haruka

    2011-04-15

    Micellization behavior was investigated for polyoxyethylene-type nonionic surfactants with varying chain length (C(n)E(m)) in a room temperature ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (bmimBF(4)). Critical micelle concentration (cmc) was determined from the variation of (1)H NMR chemical shift with the surfactant concentration. The logarithmic value of cmc decreased linearly with the number of carbon atoms in the surfactant hydrocarbon chain, similarly to the case observed in aqueous surfactant solutions. However, the slope of the straight line is much smaller in bmimBF(4) than in aqueous solution. Thermodynamic parameters for micelle formation estimated from the temperature dependence of cmc showed that the micellization in bmimBF(4) is an entropy-driven process around room temperature. This behavior is also similar to the case in aqueous solution. However, the magnitude of the entropic contribution to the overall micellization free energy in bmimBF(4) is much smaller compared with that in aqueous solution. These results suggest that the micellization in bmimBF(4) proceeds through a mechanism similar to the hydrophobic interaction in aqueous surfactant solutions, although the solvophobic effect in bmimBF(4) is much weaker than the hydrophobic effect. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Study of polyacrylamide-surfactant system on the water–oil interface properties and rheological properties for EOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Z. Mahdavi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, due to the remarkable oil reduction in oil fields, enhanced oil recovery (EOR techniques have been considered by a large number of scientists and company. Situ oil extraction is normally done by these techniques with high efficiency. In this particular study, five different surface active agents (surfactant, two kinds of oil with various API, two kinds of sulfonated polyacrylamide, two different electrolyte solutions with various TDS and two distinctive alcohols were tested and evaluated. An optimal formulation in terms of the properties and quantity of materials has to be used in order to enhance oil recovery, achieved by investigation of surface tension and the phase behavior of mentioned substances. Rheological behavior of polymer flooding and surfactant was studied. Employing this formulation, the maximum micro emulsion of oil in water occurred. Due to the synergy between surfactant and alcohol (as a co-surfactant, relatively lower amounts of surfactants were used which led to the dip in the cost of operation, and ultimately the efficiency of operation improved.

  2. Separation of oil and grease from oil sludge using surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainon Abdul Aziz; Syed Hakimi Sakuma Syed Ahmad; Zalina Laili

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the experiments was to observe the efficiency of the surfactant to remove oil and grease from oil sludges using various surfactant concentration ranging from 10 %, 15 %, 20 % and 30 %. The surfactant solution consists of two mixtures of Aqua 2000 and D Bond. The oil sludge were subjected to heating and surfactant treatment process. Remaining oil and grease concentration were observed on the oil sludges after treatment. Small scale experiments were conducted by heating process, without heating process and heating process with addition of sodium chloride. Surfactant solution was added in each process. Results shows that there is separation of oil and grease from the oil sludges. There were formation of mini emulsions (oil in water). The higher the concentration of surfactant used, the higher the concentrations of mini emulsion formed as observed. Solid remains after the treatment process were found to contain lesser oil concentration with presence of bitumen, sediment, organic and inorganic materials. After a washing process using distilled water, the solid was still black but less oily than before the treatment. There is no separation of oil occurred in aqueous solution for the control experiment. (Author)

  3. Probing dynamics and mechanism of exchange process of quaternary ammonium dimeric surfactants, 14-s-14, in the presence of conventional surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Jiang, Yan; Chen, Hong; Mao, Shi Zhen; Du, You Ru; Liu, Mai Li

    2012-12-27

    In this Article, we investigated effects of different types of conventional surfactants on exchange dynamics of quaternary ammonium dimeric surfactants, with chemical formula C(14)H(29)N(+)(CH(3))(2)- (CH(2))(s)-N(+)(CH(3))(2)C(14)H(29)·2Br(-), or 14-s-14 for short. Two nonionic surfactants, TritonX-100 (TX-100) and polyethylene glycol (23) laurylether (Brij-35), and one cationic surfactant, n-tetradecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (TTAB), and one ionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were chosen as typical conventional surfactants. Exchange rates of 14-s-14 (s = 2, 3, and 4) between the micelle form and monomer in solution were detected by two NMR methods: one-dimensional (1D) line shape analysis and two-dimensional (2D) exchange spectroscopy (EXSY). Results show that the nonionic surfactants (TX-100 and Brij-35), the cationic surfactant (TTAB), and the ionic surfactant (SDS) respectively accelerated, barely influenced, and slowed the exchange rate of 14-s-14. The effect mechanism was investigated by the self-diffusion experiment, relaxation time measurements (T(2)/T(1)), the fluorescence experiment (I(1)/I(3)) and observed chemical shift variations. Results reveal that, nonionic conventional surfactants (TX-100 and Brij-35) loosened the molecule arrangement and decreased hydrophobic interactions in the micelle, and thus accelerated the exchange rate of 14-s-14. The cationic conventional surfactant (TTAB) barely changed the molecule arrangement and thus barely influenced the exchange rate of 14-s-14. The ionic conventional surfactant (SDS) introduced the electrostatic attraction effect, tightened the molecule arrangement, and increased hydrophobic interactions in the micelle, and thus slowed down the exchange rate of 14-s-14. Additionally, the two-step exchange mechanism of 14-s-14 in the mixed solution was revealed through interesting variation tendencies of exchange rates of 14-s-14.

  4. Small-angle neutron scattering studies of nonionic surfactant: Effect

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Micellar solution of nonionic surfactant -dodecyloligo ethyleneoxide surfactant, decaoxyethylene monododecyl ether [CH3(CH2)11(OCH2CH2)10OH], C12E10 in D2O solution have been analysed by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) at different temperatures (30, 45 and 60°C) both in the presence and absence of ...

  5. Mass spectrometry compatible surfactant for optimized in-gel protein digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveliev, Sergei V; Woodroofe, Carolyn C; Sabat, Grzegorz; Adams, Christopher M; Klaubert, Dieter; Wood, Keith; Urh, Marjeta

    2013-01-15

    Identification of proteins resolved by SDS-PAGE depends on robust in-gel protein digestion and efficient peptide extraction, requirements that are often difficult to achieve. A lengthy and laborious procedure is an additional challenge of protein identification in gel. We show here that with the use of the mass spectrometry compatible surfactant sodium 3-((1-(furan-2-yl)undecyloxy)carbonylamino)propane-1-sulfonate, the challenges of in-gel protein digestion are effectively addressed. Peptide quantitation based on stable isotope labeling showed that the surfactant induced 1.5-2 fold increase in peptide recovery. Consequently, protein sequence coverage was increased by 20-30%, on average, and the number of identified proteins saw a substantial boost. The surfactant also accelerated the digestion process. Maximal in-gel digestion was achieved in as little as one hour, depending on incubation temperature, and peptides were readily recovered from gel eliminating the need for postdigestion extraction. This study shows that the surfactant provides an efficient means of improving protein identification in gel and streamlining the in-gel digestion procedure requiring no extra handling steps or special equipment.

  6. A novel biosensor method for surfactant determination based on acetylcholinesterase inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucherenko, I S; Soldatkin, O O; Arkhypova, V M; Dzyadevych, S V; Soldatkin, A P

    2012-01-01

    A novel enzyme biosensor based on acetylcholinesterase inhibition for the determination of surfactants in aqueous solutions is described. Acetylcholinesterase-based bioselective element was deposited via glutaraldehyde on the surface of conductometric transducers. Different variants of inhibitory analysis of surfactants were tested, and finally surfactant's concentration was evaluated by measuring initial rate of acetylcholinesterase inhibition. Besides, we studied the effect of solution characteristics on working parameters of the biosensor for direct measurement of acetylcholine and for inhibitory determination of surfactants. The biosensor's sensitivity to anionic and cationic surfactants (0.35 mg l −1 ) was tested. The high operational stability of the biosensor during determination of acetylcholine (RSD 2%) and surfactants (RSD 11%) was shown. Finally, we discussed the selectivity of the biosensor toward surfactants and other AChE inhibitors. The proposed biosensor can be used as a component of the multibiosensor for ecological monitoring of toxicants. (paper)

  7. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson

    2004-10-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Neither aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide nor silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems produced significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of

  8. Adsorption of proteins at the solution/air interface influenced by added nonionic surfactants at very low concentrations for both components. 3. Dilational surface rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fainerman, V B; Aksenenko, E V; Lylyk, S V; Lotfi, M; Miller, R

    2015-03-05

    The influence of the addition of the nonionic surfactants C12DMPO, C14DMPO, C10OH, and C10EO5 at concentrations between 10(-5) and 10(-1) mmol/L to solutions of β-casein (BCS) and β-lactoglobulin (BLG) at a fixed concentration of 10(-5) mmol/L on the dilational surface rheology is studied. A maximum in the viscoelasticity modulus |E| occurs at very low surfactant concentrations (10(-4) to 10(-3) mmol/L) for mixtures of BCS with C12DMPO and C14DMPO and for mixtures of BLG with C10EO5, while for mixture of BCS with C10EO5 the value of |E| only slightly increased. The |E| values calculated with a recently developed model, which assumes changes in the interfacial molar area of the protein molecules due to the interaction with the surfactants, are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. A linear dependence exists between the ratio of the maximum modulus for the mixture to the modulus of the single protein solution and the coefficient reflecting the influence of the surfactants on the adsorption activity of the protein.

  9. The effect of nanoparticle aggregation on surfactant foam stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlYousef, Zuhair A; Almobarky, Mohammed A; Schechter, David S

    2018-02-01

    The combination of nanoparticles (NPs) and surfactant may offer a novel technique of generating stronger foams for gas mobility control. This study evaluates the potential of silica NPs to enhance the foam stability of three nonionic surfactants. Results showed that the concentration of surfactant and NPs is a crucial parameter for foam stability and that there is certain concentrations for strong foam generation. A balance in concentration between the nonionic surfactants and the NPs can enhance the foam stability as a result of forming flocs in solutions. At fixed surfactant concentration, the addition of NPs at low to intermediate concentrations can produce a more stable foam compared to the surfactant. The production of small population of flocs as a result of mixing the surfactant and NPs can enhance the foam stability by providing a barrier between the gas bubbles and delaying the coalescence of bubbles. Moreover, these flocs can increase the solution viscosity and, therefore, slow the drainage rate of thin aqueous film (lamellae). The measurements of foam half-life, bubble size, and mobility tests confirmed this conclusion. However, the addition of more solid particles or surfactant might have a negative impact on foam stability and reduce the maximum capillary pressure of coalescence as a result of forming extensive aggregates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. An investigation of bubble coalescence and post-rupture oscillation in non-ionic surfactant solutions using high-speed cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bournival, G; Ata, S; Karakashev, S I; Jameson, G J

    2014-01-15

    Most processes involving bubbling in a liquid require small bubbles to maximise mass/energy transfer. A common method to prevent bubbles from coalescing is by the addition of surfactants. In order to get an insight into the coalescence process, capillary bubbles were observed using a high speed cinematography. Experiments were performed in solutions of 1-pentanol, 4-methyl-2-pentanol, tri(propylene glycol) methyl ether, and poly(propylene glycol) for which information such as the coalescence time and the deformation of the resultant bubble upon coalescence was extracted. It is shown in this study that the coalescence time increases with surfactant concentration until the appearance of a plateau. The increase in coalescence time with surfactant concentration could not be attributed only to surface elasticity. The oscillation of the resultant bubble was characterised by the damping of the oscillation. The results suggested that a minimum elasticity is required to achieve an increased damping and considerable diffusion has a detrimental effect on the dynamic response of the bubble, thereby reducing the damping. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Caractérisation des solutions de tensio-actif utilisées en récupération assistée Characterization of Surfactant Solutions Used in Enhanced Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moulu J. C.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Des solutions de tensio-actif sont étudiées en vue de déterminer celles qui doivent être les plus efficaces pour le déplacement d'huile résiduelle en milieu poreux. Selon les propriétés de ces solutions au moment de leur injection, un banc d'huile se forme rapidement et progresse au niveau du front de tensio-actif, ou au contraire, les globules d'huile sont entraînés avec une vitesse faible dans l'ensemble du bouchon, les échanges entre les phases peuvent alors être importants. On a donc cherché à évaluer les caractéristiques des solutions en tenant compte des échanges qu'elles ont pu avoir avec l'huile et en particulier dans les deux cas extrêmes : solutions aqueuses sans huile et solutions équilibrées avec un grand volume d'huile. Pour ces deux états des solutions aqueuses, on a mis en évidence des comportements rhéologiques et interfaciaux très différents, dus à la migration d'alcool et d'huile entre les phases en présence. Ces propriétés des solutions de tensio-actif ont par ailleurs été reliées à la présence de structures cristallines et à leur transformation au cours des échanges qui se produisent. Research is being done on surfactant solutions to determine the ones that should be the most efficient for driving residual oil in porous media. Depending on the properties of these solutions at the time of their injection, an oil bank is formed quickly and progresses at the level of the surfactant front or, on the contrary, the oil ganglia are displaced slowly in the slug as a whole, and exchanges between the phases may then be great. Therefore, an effort was made to assess the characteristics of solutions while considering the exchanges they may have had with the oil, and particularly in the two extreme cases, i. e. aqueous solutions without oil and equilibrated solutions with a large volume of oil. For these two states of aqueous solutions, very different rheological and interfacial behaviors were found as

  12. Surfactants: behavior and some of their applications in the petroleum industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivas, Hercilio; Gutierrez, Xiomara

    1999-01-01

    The most important theoretical aspect related to the behavior of surfactants in solution and the mechanism which govern the processes of their adsorption at the liquid - liquid, liquid- gas and liquid - solid interfaces are discussed in this paper. The basic principles, which characterize the phase behavior of surfactants in solution are described, and the procedures for stablishing the condition under which surfactants ca be successfully used in basic and applied research activities are given. Finally, the most important aspect of the different processes carried out in the oil industry, with special mention to those in exploration and production, where the surfactants play a very important role, are briefly discussed

  13. Optimizing sonication parameters for dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Haibo [Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nano Systems (Fraunhofer ENAS), 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 110016 Shenyang (China); Hermann, Sascha, E-mail: sascha.hermann@zfm.tu-chemnitz.de [Center for Microtechnologies (ZfM), Chemnitz University of Technology, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Schulz, Stefan E.; Gessner, Thomas [Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nano Systems (Fraunhofer ENAS), 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Center for Microtechnologies (ZfM), Chemnitz University of Technology, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Dong, Zaili [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 110016 Shenyang (China); Li, Wen J., E-mail: wenjungli@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 110016 Shenyang (China); Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2012-10-26

    Graphical abstract: We study the dispersing behavior of SWCNTs based on the surfactant and the optimization of sonication parameters including the sonication power and running time. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the optimization of sonication for the surfactant-based dispersion of SWCNTs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The absorption spectrum of SWCNT solution strongly depend on the sonication conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sonication process has an important influence on the average length and diameters of SWCNTs in solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Centrifugation mainly contributes to the decrease of nonresonant absorption background. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Under the same sonication parameters, the large-diameter tip performs dispersion of SWCNTs better than the small-diameter tip. -- Abstract: Non-covalent functionalization based on surfactants has become one of the most common methods for dispersing of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Previously, efforts have mainly been focused on experimenting with different surfactant systems, varying their concentrations and solvents. However sonication plays a very important role during the surfactant-based dispersion process for SWCNTs. The sonication treatment enables the surfactant molecules to adsorb onto the surface of SWCNTs by overcoming the interactions induced by the hydrophobic, electrostatic and van der Waals forces. This work describes a systematic study of the influence of the sonication power and time on the dispersion of SWCNTs. UV-vis-NIR absorption spectra is used to analyze and to evaluate the dispersion of SWCNTs in an aqueous solution of 1 w/v% sodium deoxycholate (DOC) showing that the resonant and nonresonant background absorption strongly depends on the sonication conditions. Furthermore, the diameter and length of SWCNTs under different sonication parameters are investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  14. Ecotoxicological characterization of polyoxyethylene glycerol ester non-ionic surfactants and their mixtures with anionic and non-ionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, Francisco; Fernández-Arteaga, Alejandro; Lechuga, Manuela; Fernández-Serrano, Mercedes

    2017-04-01

    This paper reports on a study that investigated the aquatic toxicity of new non-ionic surfactants derived from renewable raw materials, polyoxyethylene glycerol ester (PGE), and their binary mixtures with anionic and non-ionic surfactants. Toxicity of pure PGEs was determined using representative organisms from different trophic levels: luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), microalgae (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), and freshwater crustaceans (Daphnia magna). Relationships between toxicity and the structural parameters such as unit of ethylene oxide (EO) and hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) were evaluated. Critical micellar concentration (CMC) in the conditions of the toxicity test was also determined. It was found that the toxicity of the aqueous solutions of PGE decreased when the number of EO units in the molecule, HLB, and CMC increased. PGEs showed lower CMC in marine medium, and the toxicity to V. ficheri is lower when the CMC was higher. Given their non-polar nature, narcosis was expected to be the primary mode of toxic action of PGEs. For the mixture of surfactants, we observed that the mixtures with PGE that had the higher numbers of EO units were more toxic than the aqueous solutions of pure surfactants. Moreover, we found that concentration addition was the type of action more likely to occur for mixtures of PGE with lower numbers of EO units with non-ionic surfactants (alkylpolyglucoside and fatty alcohol ethoxylate), whereas for the mixture of PGE with lower EO units and anionic surfactant (ether carboxylic derivative), the most common response type was response addition. In case of mixtures involving amphoteric surfactants and PGEs with the higher numbers of EO units, no clear pattern with regard to the mixture toxicity response type could be observed.

  15. Removal of cationic surfactant (CTAB from aqueous solution on to activated carbon obtained from corncob.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Yakout

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct and indirect releases of large quantities of surfactants to the environment may result in serious health and environmental problems. Therefore, surfactants should be removed from water before water is released to the environment or delivered for public use. Using powdered activated carbon (PAC as adsorbent may be an effective technique to remove surfactants. In this study, the removal of surfactants by PAC was investigated and the influencesof the operating parameters on the effectiveness on adsorption rate were studied. Cationic surfactant, Cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB was selected for the experiments. A series of batch experiments were performed to determine the sorption isotherms of surfactants to PAC. The results showed that carbon structure affect mainly on the surfactant adsorption. Surfactant equilibrium data fitted very well to the binary langmuir model. The pseudo first-,second- order and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models were applied. Both, the external mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion mechanisms involve in CTAB sorption.

  16. Molecular-thermodynamic theory of micellization of pH-sensitive surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsipe, Arthur; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2006-04-11

    A predictive, molecular-thermodynamic theory is developed to model the micellization of pH-sensitive surfactants. The theory combines a molecular-thermodynamic description of micellization in binary surfactant mixtures with the protonation equilibrium of the surfactant monomers. The thermodynamic component of the theory models the pH-mediated equilibrium between micelles, surfactant monomers, and counterions. These counterions may originate from the surfactant or from added salt, acid, or base. The molecular component of the theory models the various contributions to the free energy of micellization, which corresponds to the free-energy change associated with forming a mixed micelle from the protonated and deprotonated forms of the surfactant and from the bound counterions. The free energy of micellization includes hydrophobic, interfacial, packing, steric, electrostatic, and entropic contributions, which are all calculated molecularly. The theory also requires knowledge of the surfactant molecular structure and the solution conditions, including the temperature and the amount of any added salt, acid, or base. To account for the pH sensitivity of the surfactant, the theory requires knowledge of the surfactant monomer equilibrium deprotonation constant (pK1), which may be obtained from experimental titration data obtained below the critical micelle concentration (cmc). The theory can be utilized to predict the equilibrium micelle and solution properties, including the cmc, the micelle composition, the micelle shape and aggregation number, the solution pH, and the micelle deprotonation equilibrium constant (pKm). Theoretical predictions of the cmc, the micelle aggregation number, and the pKm compare favorably with the available experimental data for alkyldimethylamine oxide surfactants. This class of pH-sensitive surfactants exhibits a form of self-synergy, which has previously been attributed to hydrogen-bond formation at the micelle interface. Instead, we show that

  17. Tailor-made surfactants for optimized chemical EOR. Meeting oil reservoir conditions by applied knowledge of structure-performance relationship in extended surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trahan, G.; Sorensen, W. [Sasol North America Inc., Westlake, LA (United States); Jakobs-Sauter, B. [Sasol Germany GmbH (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    Formulating the surfactant package for chemical EOR is a time consuming and expensive process - the formulation needs to fit the specific reservoir conditions (like oil type, temperature, salinity, etc.) to give optimum performance and the number of formulation variables is virtually endless. This paper studies the impact of surfactant structure on EOR formulation ability and performance and how to adjust the structure of the surfactant molecule to meet a specific reservoir's needs. Data from salinity phase boundary studies of alcohol propoxy sulfates illustrate how changes in alcohol structure as well as in propylene oxide level can shift optimum salinity and temperature to the desired range in a given model oil. From these data the impact of individual structural units was evaluated. Application of the HLD model (Hydrophilic-Lipophilic Deviation) shows how to extrapolate from the known data set to actual reservoir conditions. This is illustrated by studies on crude oil samples. Additional tests study how effective the selected surfactants perform. The HLD concept proves to be a valuable tool to select and tailor surfactants to individual reservoir needs, thus simplifying the surfactant screening process for EOR formulations by pre-selection of suitable structures and ultimately reducing cost and effort on the way to the most effective chemical EOR package. (orig.)

  18. Finding Multiple Optimal Solutions to Optimal Load Distribution Problem in Hydropower Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhao Jiang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Optimal load distribution (OLD among generator units of a hydropower plant is a vital task for hydropower generation scheduling and management. Traditional optimization methods for solving this problem focus on finding a single optimal solution. However, many practical constraints on hydropower plant operation are very difficult, if not impossible, to be modeled, and the optimal solution found by those models might be of limited practical uses. This motivates us to find multiple optimal solutions to the OLD problem, which can provide more flexible choices for decision-making. Based on a special dynamic programming model, we use a modified shortest path algorithm to produce multiple solutions to the problem. It is shown that multiple optimal solutions exist for the case study of China’s Geheyan hydropower plant, and they are valuable for assessing the stability of generator units, showing the potential of reducing occurrence times of units across vibration areas.

  19. Surfactant-impregnated activated carbon for enhanced adsorptive removal of Ce(IV) radionuclides from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, Mamdoh R.; Sharaf El-deen, Gehan E.; Soliman, Mohamed A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Activated carbon (AC) was impregnated in this work with CTAB and NaLS surfactants. • The materials were evaluated as a sorbent for adsorption of Ce(IV) radionuclides. • Adsorption capacity of AC–NaLS for Ce(IV) is two-times the capacity of AC. • The kinetic and equilibrium data are fitted to pseudo-second-order and D–R models. • The results suggest the applicability of surface modified AC for waste treatment. - Abstract: The surfactants cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium lauryl sulfate (NaLS) were utilized for modifying the activated carbon’s surface. The materials were characterized using BET–N 2 , scanning electron microscope, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Adsorption of Ce(IV) radionuclides from aqueous solutions by activated carbon (AC) and surfactant-impregnated AC was studied. The obtained data showed that adsorption of Ce(IV) is strongly dependent on the solution pH and AC–NaLS exhibits the widest pH-range of maximum removal. The experimental adsorption capacity of AC–NaLS (0.069 mmol/g) for Ce(IV) is found to be nearly twice greater than that of AC (0.036 mmol/g). The adsorption kinetics of Ce(IV) onto AC and AC–NaLS were analyzed by linear and non-linear fittings to the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and Elovich kinetic models. Of these models, the pseudo-second-order is the best kinetic expression for describing the experimental data. The diffusion studies indicated that adsorption of Ce(IV) radionuclides on AC and AC–NaLS is controlled by film diffusion. Linear and non-linear fittings of the adsorption equilibrium data for Ce(IV) onto AC and AC–NaLS revealed that the Dubinin–Radushkevich (D–R) isotherm model fits the experimental data better than Freundlich and Langmuir models. The values of adsorption free energy, E, calculated from both linear and non-linear methods suggested that Ce(IV) radionuclides are physically adsorbed onto AC and AC–NaLS

  20. Improved recovery potential in mature heavy oil fields by Alkali-surfactant flooding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, J.; Kantzas, A. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Tomographic Imaging and Porous Media Laboratory

    2008-10-15

    Primary and secondary alkali surfactant (AS) chemical flooding techniques were optimized in this study. Core flooding experiments were conducted in order to investigate the formation of emulsions in bulk liquid system due to flow through rock pores. Cores were dried and then saturated with water or brine in order to measure permeability. The floods were then performed at various injection rates followed by the AS solution. Solutions were also injected without previous waterflooding. Individual oil and water mobilities were then calculated using the experimental data. Individual phase mobilities were calculated using the total pressure gradient measured across the core. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies were conducted in order to determine emulsion formation within porous media from in situ flooding tests at 4 different locations. Data from the NMR studies were used to calculate fluid distributions and measurements of in situ emulsification during the chemical floods. The study demonstrated that the use of the surfactants resulted in the in situ formation of oil-water and water-oil emulsions. Responses from de-ionized alkali and brine AS systems were similar. The recovery mechanism blocked off water channels and provided improved sweep efficiency in the core. It was concluded that injection rates and pressure gradients for chemical floods should be lowered in order to optimize their efficiency. 26 refs., 6 tabs., 15 figs.

  1. Influence of metacide - surfactant complexes on agricultural crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orynkul Esimova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The complexes based on surfactants and polyhexamethyleneguanidine hydrochloride (metacide are important for agriculture. This paper considers compositions of known bactericidal metacide with different surfactants: anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulphate (DDSNa and nonionic surfactant Tween 80 (monooleate of oxyethylenated anhydrosorbitols. The effect of individual components and associates of metacide and surfactants on productivity and infection of cereals was studied. According to the study, the highest productivity and infection rate were shown by the associate of metacide and Tween-80. At concentration of Tween-80 in aqueous solution equal to 0.001% in combination with metacide, efficiency was 98% at 0% infection. The surface tension and the wetting of metacide, DDSNa, Tween-80, and associates of metacide with surfactants were studied. In comparison with individual components, metacide-DDSNa and metacide-Tween-80 associates have higher surface activity.

  2. Growth Mechanism of Gold Nanorods in Binary Surfactant System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Seo, Sun-Hwa; Joe, Ara; Shim, Kyu-Dong; Jang, Eue-Soon [Kumoh National Institute of Technology, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    In order to reveal the growth mechanism of gold nanorods (GNRs) in a binary surfactant system, we synthesized various GNRs by changing the concentration of the surfactants, AgNO{sub 3}, and HBr in the growth solution. We found that the benzyldime thylhexadecylammoniumchloride surfactant had weak interaction with the gold ions, but it could reduce the membrane fluidity. In addition, we could dramatically decrease the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide concentration required for GNR growth by adding an HBr solution. Notably, Ag{sup +} ions were necessary to break the symmetry of the seed crystals for GNR growth, but increasing the concentration of Ag{sup +} and Br{sup -} ions caused a decrease in the template size.

  3. Potentiometric titration of polyhexamethylene biguanide hydrochloride with potassium poly(vinyl sulfate) solution using a cationic surfactant-selective electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masadome, Takashi; Yamagishi, Yuichi; Takano, Masaki; Hattori, Toshiaki

    2008-03-01

    A potentiometric titration method using a cationic surfactant as an indicator cation and a plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) membrane electrode sensitive to the cationic surfactant is proposed for the determination of polyhexamethylene biguanide hydrochloride (PHMB-HCl), which is a cationic polyelectrolyte. A sample solution of PHMB-HCl containing an indicator cation (hexadecyltrimethylammonium ion, HTA) was titrated with a standard solution of an anionic polyelectrolyte, potassium poly(vinyl sulfate) (PVSK). The end-point was detected as a sharp potential change due to an abrupt decrease in the concentration of the indicator cation, HTA, which is caused by its association with PVSK. The effects of the concentrations of HTA ion and coexisting electrolytes in the sample solution on the degree of the potential change at the end-point were examined. A linear relationship between the concentration of PHMB-HCl and the end-point volume of the titrant exists in the concentration range from 2.0 x 10(-5) to 4.0 x 10(-4) M in the case that the concentration of HTA is 1.0 x 10(-5) M, and that from 1.0 x 10(-6) to 1.2 x 10(-5) M in the case that the concentration of HTA is 5.0 x 10(-6) M, respectively. The proposed method was applied to the determination of PHMB-HCl in some contact-lens detergents.

  4. The effect of surfactants on the electropolishing behavior of copper in orthophosphoric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taha, A.A., E-mail: asia_taha@yahoo.com; Ahmed, A.M.; Rahman, H.H. Abdel; Abouzeid, F.M.

    2013-07-15

    The electropolishing behavior of copper was studied in orthophosphoric acid with Triton X-100, sodium dodecyl sulphate and cetyl pyridinium chloride as additives for improving the finish obtained on copper surface. This was investigated by measuring and comparing anode potential-limiting current relationships in solutions of gradually increasing concentration of surfactants. The addition of surfactants to the electropolishing solution results in a lower limiting current. This confirms the mass transport of dissolved species from the anode surface to the bulk of solution as the rate-determining step in the presence of three surfactants in all concentrations investigated. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM) and measured brightness values were used to investigate the copper surface after electropolishing and the results were compared to polishing done in absence of surfactants. According to SEM images and brightness values, addition of Triton X-100 was effective to enhance levelling and brightening more than sodium dodecyl sulphate and cetyl pyridinium chloride. AFM analysis showed that the roughness values (R{sub a}) for an electropolished copper surface, in presence of surfactants, is significantly lower than in absence of surfactants. Different reaction conditions and the physical properties of solutions are studied to obtain dimensionless correlation among all these parameters.

  5. Adsorption of surfactants and polymers at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Orlando Jose

    Surface tension and high-resolution laser light scattering experiments were used to investigate the adsorption of isomeric sugar-based surfactants at the air/liquid interface in terms of surfactant surface packing and rheology. Soluble monolayers of submicellar surfactant solutions exhibited a relatively viscous behavior. It was also proved that light scattering of high-frequency thermally-induced capillary waves can be utilized to study surfactant exchange between the surface and the bulk solution. Such analysis revealed the existence of a diffusional relaxation mechanism. A procedure based on XPS was developed for quantification, on an absolute basis, of polymer adsorption on mica and Langmuir-Blodgett cellulose films. The adsorption of cationic polyelectrolytes on negatively-charged solid surfaces was highly dependent on the polymer ionicity. It was found that the adsorption process is driven by electrostatic mechanisms. Charge overcompensation (or charge reversal) of mica occurred after adsorption of polyelectrolytes of ca. 50% charge density, or higher. It was demonstrated that low-charge-density polyelectrolytes adsorb on solid surfaces with an extended configuration dominated by loops and tails. In this case the extent of adsorption is limited by steric constraints. The conformation of the polyelectrolyte in the adsorbed layer is dramatically affected by the presence of salts or surfactants in aqueous solution. The phenomena which occur upon increasing the ionic strength are consistent with the screening of the electrostatic attraction between polyelectrolyte segments and solid surface. This situation leads to polyelectrolyte desorption accompanied by both an increase in the layer thickness and the range of the steric force. Adsorbed polyelectrolytes and oppositely charged surfactants readily associate at the solid/liquid interface. Such association induces polyelectrolyte desorption at a surfactant concentration which depends on the polyelectrolyte charge

  6. Gemini surfactant for fluorescent and stable quantum dots in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Haibing [Key Laboratory of Pesticide and Chemical Biology (CCNU), Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Wang Xiaoqiong [Key Laboratory of Pesticide and Chemical Biology (CCNU), Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Gao Zhinong [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); He Zhike [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2007-05-23

    Highly fluorescent and stable CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) coated with gemini surfactant are successfully synthesized in aqueous media. Analyses of luminescence spectrometry, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometry, and transmission electron micrographs (TEMs) indicate that the water-soluble QDs are monodisperse and have a luminescence enhancement compared with the original hydrophobic QDs. The water-soluble QDs coated with gemini surfactant are shown to be biocompatible, photostable, and have been proven to be suitable for live cell imaging.

  7. Gemini surfactant for fluorescent and stable quantum dots in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Haibing; Wang Xiaoqiong; Gao Zhinong; He Zhike

    2007-01-01

    Highly fluorescent and stable CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) coated with gemini surfactant are successfully synthesized in aqueous media. Analyses of luminescence spectrometry, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometry, and transmission electron micrographs (TEMs) indicate that the water-soluble QDs are monodisperse and have a luminescence enhancement compared with the original hydrophobic QDs. The water-soluble QDs coated with gemini surfactant are shown to be biocompatible, photostable, and have been proven to be suitable for live cell imaging

  8. Alkyl-imidazolium glycosides: non-ionic-cationic hybrid surfactants from renewable resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Abbas Abdulameer; Tabandeh, Mojtaba; Heidelberg, Thorsten; Hussen, Rusnah Syahila Duali; Ali, Hapipah Mohd

    2015-08-14

    A series of surfactants combining carbohydrate and imidazolium head groups were prepared and investigated on their assembly behavior. The presence of the imidazolium group dominated the interactions of the surfactants, leading to high CMCs and large molecular surface areas, reflected in curved rather than lamellar surfactant assemblies. The carbohydrate, on the other hand, stabilized molecular assemblies slightly and reduced the surface tension of surfactant solutions considerably. A comparative emulsion study discourages the use of pure alkyl imidazolium glycosides owing to reduced assembly stabilities compared with APGs. However, the surfactants are believed to have potential as component in carbohydrate based surfactant mixtures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Anionic Polyelectrolyte-Cationic Surfactant Interactions in Aqueous Solutions and Foam Films Stability Interactions entre polyélectrolytes anioniques et tensioactifs cationiques en solutions aqueuses et stabilité des films de mousses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langevin D.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to study polymer/surfactant interactions in aqueous solution and at the air/water interface. These interations are involved in many physicochemical phenomena, such as colloidal stabilization and wettability which are of major importance in oil application as for exemple drilling muds. More precisely, we have attempted to characterize interactions between a non surface active anionic copolymer (acrylamide/acrylamide sulfonate and an oppositely charged cationic surfactant (C12 TAB. Our results show a synergestic surface tension lowering (coadsorption at extremely low surfactant concentrations (10 to the power of (-3 to 10 to the power of (-1 CMC. At higher concentrations, namely above the so called Critical Aggregation Concentration (CAC, polymer-surfactant complexes form in the bulk and the macromolecules precipitate out of the solution. Foam films made from these mixed solutions are stable while C12TAB films are unstable. Disjoining pressure measurements on mixed films with surfactant concentration two orders of magnitude below the CAC show the existence of long range repulsive forces and a discrete film thickness transition. At the CAC, we obtain mixed films with gel-like networks that are strongly affected by the film thinning rate. L'objectif de cette étude est d'étudier les interactions polymère/tensioactif en solution aqueuse et à l'interface eau/air. Ces interactions interviennent dans de nombreux phénomènes physico-chimiques tels que la stabilisation de suspensions colloïdales et la mouillabilité qui sont d'une importance majeure dans les applications pétrolières comme, par exemple, les boues de forage. Plus précisément, nous avons essayé de caractériser les interactions entre un copolymère anionique n'ayant pas d'activité de surface (acrylamide/acrylamide sulfoné avec un tensioactif de charge opposée cationique (C12TAB. Nos résultats montrent une diminution synergique de la tension

  10. (Surfactant + polymer) interaction parameter studied by (liquid + liquid) equilibrium data of quaternary aqueous solution containing surfactant, polymer, and salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foroutan, Masumeh [Physical Chemistry Department, School of Chemistry, College of Science, University of Tehran, 14155-6455 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: foroutan@khayam.ut.ac.ir; Heidari, Nosrat; Mohammadlou, Maryam [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Uremia University, Uremia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sojahrood, Amin Jafari [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Uremia University, Uremia (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) data of quaternary aqueous system containing polyoxyethylene (20) cetyl ether (with abbreviation name Brij 58, non-ionic surfactant), diammonium hydrogen phosphate, and poly ethylene glycol (PEG) with three molar masses {l_brace}M{sub W} = (1000, 6000, and 35,000) g . mol{sup -1}{r_brace} have been determined experimentally at T = 313.15 K. Furthermore, the Flory-Huggins theory with two electrostatic terms (Debye-Hueckel and Pitzer-Debye-Hueckel equations) have been used to calculate the phase behavior of the quaternary systems and (surfactant + polymer) interaction parameter as well as interaction parameters between other species. Temperature dependency of the parameters of the Flory-Huggins theory has been obtained. Also an effort have been done to show that addition of PEG as well as increasing the temperature can shift the binodal curves of the ternary aqueous system containing surfactant and salt to lower mole fraction of salt. Also the effect of polymer molar mass on the binodal diagram displacement has been discussed.

  11. Br2 production from the heterogeneous reaction of gas-phase OH with aqueous salt solutions: Impacts of acidity, halide concentration, and organic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frinak, Elizabeth K; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2006-09-07

    This study reports the first laboratory measurement of gas-phase Br2 production from the reaction between gas-phase hydroxyl radicals and aqueous salt solutions. Experiments were conducted at 269 K in a rotating wetted-wall flow tube coupled to a chemical-ionization mass spectrometer for analysis of gas-phase components. From both pure NaBr solutions and mixed NaCl/NaBr solutions, the amount of Br2 released was found to increase with increasing acidity, whereas it was found to vary little with increasing concentration of bromide ions in the sample. For mixed NaCl/NaBr solutions, Br2 was formed preferentially over Cl2 unless the Br- levels in the solution were significantly depleted by OH oxidation, at which point Cl2 formation was observed. Presence of a surfactant in solution, sodium dodecyl sulfate, significantly suppressed the formation of Br2; this is the first indication that an organic surfactant can affect the rate of interfacial mass transfer of OH to an aqueous surface. The OH-mediated oxidation of bromide may serve as a source of active bromine in the troposphere and contribute to the subsequent destruction of ozone that proceeds in marine-influenced regions of the troposphere.

  12. Adsorption of proteins at the solution/air interface influenced by added nonionic surfactants at very low concentrations for both components. 2. Effect of different surfactants and theoretical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fainerman, V B; Lotfi, M; Javadi, A; Aksenenko, E V; Tarasevich, Yu I; Bastani, D; Miller, R

    2014-11-04

    The influence of the addition of the nonionic surfactants dodecyl dimethyl phosphine oxide (C12DMPO), tetradecyl dimethyl phosphine oxide (C14DMPO), decyl alcohol (C10OH), and C10EO5 at concentrations between 10(-5) and 10(-1) mmol/L to solutions of β-casein (BCS) and β-lactoglobulin (BLG) at a fixed concentration of 10(-5) mmol/L on the surface tension is studied. It is shown that a significant decrease of the water/air surface tension occurs for all the surfactants studied at very low concentrations (10(-5)-10(-3) mmol/L). All measurements were performed with the buoyant bubble profile method. The dynamics of the surface tension was simulated using the Fick and Ward-Tordai equations. The calculation results agree well with the experimental data, indicating that the equilibration times in the system studied do not exceed 30 000 s, while the time required to attain the equilibrium on a plane surface is by one order of magnitude higher. To achieve agreement between theory and experiment for the mixtures, a supposition was made about the influence of the concentration of nonionic surfactant on the adsorption activity of the protein. The adsorption isotherm equation of the protein was modified accordingly, and this corrected model agrees well with all experimental data.

  13. Surfactant-controlled etching of ion track nanopores and its practical applications in membrane technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel, P.Yu.; Blonskaya, I.V.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Mamonova, T.I.; Orelovitch, O.L.; Sartowska, B.; Yamauchi, Yu.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of surfactants on chemical development of ion tracks in polymers has been studied. It has been shown that surface-active agents added to an alkaline etching solution adsorb on the polymer surface at the pore entrances. This reduces the etch rate, which leads to the formation of pores tapered toward the surface. Self-assembly of surfactant molecules at the pore entrance creates a barrier for their penetration into the etched-out nanopores, whereas hydroxide ions diffuse freely. Due to this, the internal pore volume grows faster than the pore surface diameter. The ability to control pore shape is demonstrated with the fabrication of profiled nano- and micropores in polyethylene terephthalate, polycarbonate. Some earlier published data on small track-etched pores in polycarbonate (in particular, the pore diameter vs. etching time curves measured conductometrically) have been revised in light of the above findings. Adding surfactants to chemical etchants makes it possible to optimize the structure of track membranes, thus improving their retention and permeation properties. Asymmetric membranes with thin skin retention layers have been produced and their performance studied

  14. Approximative solutions of stochastic optimization problem

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lachout, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 3 (2010), s. 513-523 ISSN 0023-5954 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/08/0539 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Stochastic optimization problem * sensitivity * approximative solution Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.461, year: 2010 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/SI/lachout-approximative solutions of stochastic optimization problem.pdf

  15. Comparative study of the physicochemical properties of aqueous solutions of the hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon surfactants and their ternary mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymczyk, Katarzyna, E-mail: katarzyna.szymczyk@poczta.umcs.lublin.pl

    2014-03-03

    Highlights: • Acoustic properties of hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon surfactants were studied. • Auerbach’s relation is not proper for mixtures with fluorocarbon surfactants. • Values of the hydration number decreases at concentrations higher than CMC. • FSO100 and its mixtures are the strongest chaotropes. - Abstract: Speed of sound and density of aqueous solutions of hydrocarbon p-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl) phenoxypoly(ethyleneglycols) (Triton X-100 (TX100), Triton X-165 (TX165)) and fluorocarbon (Zonyl FSN-100 (FSN100), Zonyl FSO-100 (FSO100)) surfactants as well as their ternary mixtures were measured at 293 K. Taking into account these values and the literature data of the surface tension and viscosity of the studied systems, the values of the isentropic compressibility, apparent specific adiabatic compressibility, hydration number, apparent specific volume and Jones Dole’s A and B-coefficients were determined. For the systems containing FSO100 also the values of dB/dT were determined on the basis of the values of viscosity measured at different temperatures. Next, the calculated thermodynamic properties have been discussed in the term of intermolecular interactions between the components of the mixtures.

  16. Liquid scintillation solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    The liquid scintillation solution described includes a mixture of: a liquid scintillation solvent, a primary scintillation solute, a secondary scintillation solute, a variety of appreciably different surfactants, and a dissolving and transparency agent. The dissolving and transparency agent is tetrahydrofuran, a cyclic ether. The scintillation solvent is toluene. The primary scintillation solute is PPO, and the secondary scintillation solute is dimethyl POPOP. The variety of appreciably different surfactants is composed of isooctylphenol-polyethoxyethanol and sodium dihexyl sulphosuccinate [fr

  17. Control of stain geometry by drop evaporation of surfactant containing dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbil, H Yildirim

    2015-08-01

    Control of stain geometry by drop evaporation of surfactant containing dispersions is an important topic of interest because it plays a crucial role in many applications such as forming templates on solid surfaces, in ink-jet printing, spraying of pesticides, micro/nano material fabrication, thin film coatings, biochemical assays, deposition of DNA/RNA micro-arrays, and manufacture of novel optical and electronic materials. This paper presents a review of the published articles on the diffusive drop evaporation of pure liquids (water), the surfactant stains obtained from evaporating drops that do not contain dispersed particles and deposits obtained from drops containing polymer colloids and carbon based particles such as carbon nanotubes, graphite and fullerenes. Experimental results of specific systems and modeling attempts are discussed. This review also has some special subtopics such as suppression of coffee-rings by surfactant addition and "stick-slip" behavior of evaporating nanosuspension drops. In general, the drop evaporation process of a surfactant/particle/substrate system is very complex since dissolved surfactants adsorb on both the insoluble organic/inorganic micro/nanoparticles in the drop, on the air/solution interface and on the substrate surface in different extends. Meanwhile, surfactant adsorbed particles interact with the substrate giving a specific contact angle, and free surfactants create a solutal Marangoni flow in the drop which controls the location of the particle deposition together with the rate of evaporation. In some cases, the presence of a surfactant monolayer at the air/solution interface alters the rate of evaporation. At present, the magnitude of each effect cannot be predicted adequately in advance and consequently they should be carefully studied for any system in order to control the shape and size of the final deposit. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanisms of dynamic wetting failure in the presence of soluble surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Satish; Liu, Chen-Yu; Carvalho, Marcio S.

    2017-11-01

    A hydrodynamic model and flow visualization experiments are used to understand the mechanisms through which soluble surfactants can influence the onset of dynamic wetting failure. In the model, a Newtonian liquid displaces air in a rectangular channel in the absence of inertia. A Navier-slip boundary condition and constant contact angle are used to describe the dynamic contact line, and surfactants are allowed to adsorb to the interface and moving channel wall (substrate). The Galerkin finite element method is used to calculate steady states and identify the critical capillary number Cacrit at which wetting failure occurs. It is found that surfactant solubility weakens the influence of Marangoni stresses, which tend to promote the onset of wetting failure. The experiments indicate that Cacrit increases with surfactant concentration. For the more viscous solutions used, this behaviour can largely be explained by accounting for changes to the mean surface tension and static contact angle produced by surfactants. For the lowest-viscosity solution used, comparison between the model predictions and experimental observations suggests that other surfactant-induced phenomena such as Marangoni stresses may play a more important role.

  19. Performance improvement of ionic surfactant flooding in carbonate rock samples by use of nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Ahmadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Various surfactants have been used in upstream petroleum processes like chemical flooding. Ultimately, the performance of these surfactants depends on their ability to reduce the interfacial tension between oil and water. The surfactant concentration in the aqueous solution decreases owing to the loss of the surfactant on the rock surface in the injection process. The main objective of this paper is to inhibit the surfactant loss by means of adding nanoparticles. Sodium dodecyl sulfate and silica nanoparticles were used as ionic surfactant and nanoparticles in our experiments, respectively. AEROSIL® 816 and AEROSIL® 200 are hydrophobic and hydrophilic nanoparticles. To determine the adsorption loss of the surfactant onto rock samples, a conductivity approach was used. Real carbonate rock samples were used as the solid phase in adsorption experiments. It should be noted that the rock samples were water wet. This paper describes how equilibrium adsorption was investigated by examining adsorption behavior in a system of carbonate sample (solid phase and surfactant solution (aqueous phase. The initial surfactant and nanoparticle concentrations were 500–5000 and 500–2000 ppm, respectively. The rate of surfactant losses was extremely dependent on the concentration of the surfactant in the system, and the adsorption of the surfactant decreased with an increase in the nanoparticle concentration. Also, the hydrophilic nanoparticles are more effective than the hydrophobic nanoparticles.

  20. Microwave-assisted nonionic surfactant extraction of aliphatic hydrocarbons from petroleum source rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akinlua, A., E-mail: geochemresearch@yahoo.com [Fossil Fuels and Environmental Geochemistry Group, Department of Chemistry, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife (Nigeria); Jochmann, M.A.; Laaks, J.; Ewert, A.; Schmidt, T.C. [Instrumental Analytical Chemistry, University Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstr, 5, 45141 Essen (Germany)

    2011-04-08

    The extraction of aliphatic hydrocarbons from petroleum source rock using nonionic surfactants with the assistance of microwave was investigated and the conditions for maximum yield were determined. The results showed that the extraction temperatures and kinetic rates have significant effects on extraction yields of aliphatic hydrocarbons. The optimum temperature for microwave-assisted nonionic surfactant extraction of aliphatic hydrocarbons from petroleum source rock was 105 deg. C. The optimum extraction time for the aliphatic hydrocarbons was at 50 min. Concentration of the nonionic surfactant solution and irradiation power had significant effect on the yields of aliphatic hydrocarbons. The yields of the analytes were much higher using microwave assisted nonionic surfactant extraction than with Soxhlet extraction. The recoveries of the n-alkanes and acyclic isoprenoid hydrocarbons for GC-MS analysis from the extractant nonionic surfactant solution by in-tube extraction (ITEX 2) with a TENAX TA adsorbent were found to be efficient. The results show that microwave-assisted nonionic surfactant extraction (MANSE) is a good and efficient green analytical preparatory technique for geochemical evaluation of petroleum source rock.

  1. Microwave-assisted nonionic surfactant extraction of aliphatic hydrocarbons from petroleum source rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akinlua, A.; Jochmann, M.A.; Laaks, J.; Ewert, A.; Schmidt, T.C.

    2011-01-01

    The extraction of aliphatic hydrocarbons from petroleum source rock using nonionic surfactants with the assistance of microwave was investigated and the conditions for maximum yield were determined. The results showed that the extraction temperatures and kinetic rates have significant effects on extraction yields of aliphatic hydrocarbons. The optimum temperature for microwave-assisted nonionic surfactant extraction of aliphatic hydrocarbons from petroleum source rock was 105 deg. C. The optimum extraction time for the aliphatic hydrocarbons was at 50 min. Concentration of the nonionic surfactant solution and irradiation power had significant effect on the yields of aliphatic hydrocarbons. The yields of the analytes were much higher using microwave assisted nonionic surfactant extraction than with Soxhlet extraction. The recoveries of the n-alkanes and acyclic isoprenoid hydrocarbons for GC-MS analysis from the extractant nonionic surfactant solution by in-tube extraction (ITEX 2) with a TENAX TA adsorbent were found to be efficient. The results show that microwave-assisted nonionic surfactant extraction (MANSE) is a good and efficient green analytical preparatory technique for geochemical evaluation of petroleum source rock.

  2. Surfactive stabilization of multi-walled carbon nanotube dispersions with dissolved humic substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappell, Mark A. [Environmental Laboratory, Engineering Research and Development Center, US Army Corps of Engineers, 3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States)], E-mail: mark.a.chappell@usace.army.mil; George, Aaron J.; Dontsova, Katerina M.; Porter, Beth E. [SpecPro, Inc., 4815 Bradford Drive, Suite 201, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Price, Cynthia L. [Environmental Laboratory, Engineering Research and Development Center, US Army Corps of Engineers, 3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States); Zhou Pingheng; Morikawa, Eizi [J. Bennett Johnston Sr. Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, 6980 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, LA 70806 (United States); Kennedy, Alan J.; Steevens, Jeffery A. [Environmental Laboratory, Engineering Research and Development Center, US Army Corps of Engineers, 3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Soil humic substances (HS) stabilize carbon nanotube (CNT) dispersions, a mechanism we hypothesized arose from the surfactive nature of HS. Experiments dispersing multi-walled CNT in solutions of dissolved Aldrich humic acid (HA) or water-extractable Catlin soil HS demonstrated enhanced stability at 150 and 300 mg L{sup -1} added Aldrich HA and Catlin HS, respectively, corresponding with decreased CNT mean particle diameter (MPD) and polydispersivity (PD) of 250 nm and 0.3 for Aldrich HA and 450 nm and 0.35 for Catlin HS. Analogous trends in MPD and PD were observed with addition of the surfactants Brij 35, Triton X-405, and SDS, corresponding to surfactant sorption maximum. NEXAFS characterization showed that Aldrich HA contained highly surfactive domains while Catlin soil possessed a mostly carbohydrate-based structure. This work demonstrates that the chemical structure of humic materials in natural waters is directly linked to their surfactive ability to disperse CNT released into the environment. - Suspensions of multi-walled carbon nanotubes are stabilized by relatively low concentrations of dissolved humic substances in solution through surfactive mechanisms.

  3. Surfactive stabilization of multi-walled carbon nanotube dispersions with dissolved humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappell, Mark A.; George, Aaron J.; Dontsova, Katerina M.; Porter, Beth E.; Price, Cynthia L.; Zhou Pingheng; Morikawa, Eizi; Kennedy, Alan J.; Steevens, Jeffery A.

    2009-01-01

    Soil humic substances (HS) stabilize carbon nanotube (CNT) dispersions, a mechanism we hypothesized arose from the surfactive nature of HS. Experiments dispersing multi-walled CNT in solutions of dissolved Aldrich humic acid (HA) or water-extractable Catlin soil HS demonstrated enhanced stability at 150 and 300 mg L -1 added Aldrich HA and Catlin HS, respectively, corresponding with decreased CNT mean particle diameter (MPD) and polydispersivity (PD) of 250 nm and 0.3 for Aldrich HA and 450 nm and 0.35 for Catlin HS. Analogous trends in MPD and PD were observed with addition of the surfactants Brij 35, Triton X-405, and SDS, corresponding to surfactant sorption maximum. NEXAFS characterization showed that Aldrich HA contained highly surfactive domains while Catlin soil possessed a mostly carbohydrate-based structure. This work demonstrates that the chemical structure of humic materials in natural waters is directly linked to their surfactive ability to disperse CNT released into the environment. - Suspensions of multi-walled carbon nanotubes are stabilized by relatively low concentrations of dissolved humic substances in solution through surfactive mechanisms

  4. Recycling of surfactant template in mesoporous MCM-41 synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, J. Y.; Twaiq, F.; Ngu, L. H.

    2017-06-01

    The recycling of surfactant template is investigated through the reuse of the surfactant template in the mesoporous MCM-41 synthesis process. In the synthesis of MCM-41, tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) solution in water was utilized as the silica source while hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) solution in ethyl alcohol was used as a surfactant template. The synthesized gel is formed thoroughly by mixing the two solutions under acid conditions with a pH value of 0.5 for 1 hour and kept for crystallization for 48 hours. The as-synthesized MCM-41 powder is recovered by filtration while the filtrate (mother liquor) was then reused for the second synthesis cycle. The synthesis procedure was repeated till no further solid product was formed. The synthesized gel was not produced in the unifying solution in the fifth cycle of MCM-41 synthesis. The quality of the calcined MCM-41 powder produced in each synthesis cycle was evaluated by calculating the amount of MCM-41 produced and the surface area of the powder product. The result showed that 1.28, 0.37, 1.64, 1.90 and 0.037 g were obtained in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th synthesis cycle, respectively. The surface area of the powder produced was found to be 1170, 916, 728, and 508 m2/g for 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th respectively. The concentration of the surfactant template has reached value lower than the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and remained constant after the 4th cycle. There was no further formation of gel due to low availability in the interaction between silicate anions and surfactant cations when the amount of TEOS was fixed for every synthesis cycle.

  5. Antimicrobial and biophysical properties of surfactant supplemented with an antimicrobial peptide for treatment of bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaschewski, Brandon J H; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Keating, Eleonora; Haagsman, Henk P; Zuo, Yi Y; Yamashita, Cory M; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections represent an emerging health concern in clinical settings, and a lack of novel developments in the pharmaceutical pipeline is creating a "perfect storm" for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been suggested as future therapeutics for these drug-resistant bacteria, since they have potent broad-spectrum activity, with little development of resistance. Due to the unique structure of the lung, bacterial pneumonia has the additional problem of delivering antimicrobials to the site of infection. One potential solution is coadministration of AMPs with exogenous surfactant, allowing for distribution of the peptides to distal airways and opening of collapsed lung regions. The objective of this study was to test various surfactant-AMP mixtures with regard to maintaining pulmonary surfactant biophysical properties and bactericidal functions. We compared the properties of four AMPs (CATH-1, CATH-2, CRAMP, and LL-37) suspended in bovine lipid-extract surfactant (BLES) by assessing surfactant-AMP mixture biophysical and antimicrobial functions. Antimicrobial activity was tested against methillicin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All AMP/surfactant mixtures exhibited an increase of spreading compared to a BLES control. BLES+CATH-2 mixtures had no significantly different minimum surface tension versus the BLES control. Compared to the other cathelicidins, CATH-2 retained the most bactericidal activity in the presence of BLES. The BLES+CATH-2 mixture appears to be an optimal surfactant-AMP mixture based on in vitro assays. Future directions involve investigating the potential of this mixture in animal models of bacterial pneumonia. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Surfactant self-assembly in alcohol-rich solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouguerra, N.; Jebari, M.M.; Gomati, R.; Gharbi, A.

    2005-01-01

    Ionic conductivity and viscosity measurements are achieved along alcohol dilution lines of a single-isotropic phase domain, which extends from the alcohol corner to sponge phase domain to brine corner, of an alcohol-surfactant-brine phase diagram. The results are discussed in terms of amphiphilic self-assembly which leads to stable mixtures of the slightly miscible alcohol and brine used. We show the formation of reverse micelles, whose cores are either dry or charged of brine according to the samples composition, and whose sizes remain small near the sponge phase structure

  7. Numerical Simulation and Optimization of Enhanced Oil Recovery by the In Situ Generated CO2 Huff-n-Puff Process with Compound Surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the numerical investigation and optimization of the operating parameters of the in situ generated CO2 Huff-n-Puff method with compound surfactant on the performance of enhanced oil recovery. First, we conducted experiments of in situ generated CO2 and surfactant flooding. Next, we constructed a single-well radial 3D numerical model using a thermal recovery chemical flooding simulator to simulate the process of CO2 Huff-n-Puff. The activation energy and reaction enthalpy were calculated based on the reaction kinetics and thermodynamic models. The interpolation parameters were determined through history matching a series of surfactant core flooding results with the simulation model. The effect of compound surfactant on the Huff-n-Puff CO2 process was demonstrated via a series of sensitivity studies to quantify the effects of a number of operation parameters including the injection volume and mole concentration of the reagent, the injection rate, the well shut-in time, and the oil withdrawal rate. Based on the daily production rate during the period of Huff-n-Puff, a desirable agreement was shown between the field applications and simulated results.

  8. Investigation on Minimum Film Boiling Point of Highly Heated Vertical Metal Rod in Aqueous Surfactant Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chi Young; Kim, Jae Han [Pukyong Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    In this study, experiments were conducted on the MFB(minimum film boiling) point of highly heated vertical metal rod quenched in aqueous surfactant solution at various temperature conditions. The aqueous Triton X-100 solution(100 wppm) and pure water were used as the liquid pool. Their temperatures ranged from 77 °C to 100 °C. A stainless steel vertical rod of initial center temperature of 500 °C was used as a test specimen. In both liquid pools, as the liquid temperature decreased, the time to reach the MFB point decreased with a parallel increase in the temperature and heat flux of the MFB point. However, over the whole present temperature range, in the aqueous Triton X-100 solution, the time to reach the MFB point was longer, while the temperature and heat flux of the MFB point were reduced when compared with pure water. Based on the present experimental data, this study proposed the empirical correlations to predict the MFB temperature of a high temperature vertical metal rod in pure water and in aqueous Triton X-100 solution.

  9. Nonionic surfactant Brij35 effects on toluene biodegradation in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nonionic surfactant effects on the toluene dissolved in the water phase and biodegradation kinetic behaviors of toluene in a composite bead biofilter were investigated. The toluene dissolved in the water phase was enhanced by the addition of surfactant into aqueous solution and the enhancing effect was more pronounced ...

  10. Use of surfactants for the remediation of contaminated soils: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuhui; Jiang, Rui; Xiao, Wei; Yu, Jiaguo

    2015-03-21

    Due to the great harm caused by soil contamination, there is an increasing interest to apply surfactants to the remediation of a variety of contaminated soils worldwide. This review article summarizes the findings of recent literatures regarding remediation of contaminated soils/sites using surfactants as an enhancing agent. For the surfactant-based remedial technologies, the adsorption behaviors of surfactants onto soil, the solubilizing capability of surfactants, and the toxicity and biocompatibility of surfactants are important considerations. Surfactants can enhance desorption of pollutants from soil, and promote bioremediation of organics by increasing bioavailability of pollutants. The removal of heavy metals and radionuclides from soils involves the mechanisms of dissolution, surfactant-associated complexation, and ionic exchange. In addition to the conventional ionic and nonionic surfactants, gemini surfactants and biosurfactants are also applied to soil remediation due to their benign features like lower critical micelle concentration (CMC) values and better biocompatibility. Mixed surfactant systems and combined use of surfactants with other additives are often adopted to improve the overall performance of soil washing solution for decontamination. Worldwide the field studies and full-scale remediation using surfactant-based technologies are yet limited, however, the already known cases reveal the good prospect of applying surfactant-based technologies to soil remediation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Drivers and applications of integrated clean-up technologies for surfactant-enhanced remediation of environments contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xujun; Guo, Chuling; Liao, Changjun; Liu, Shasha; Wick, Lukas Y; Peng, Dan; Yi, Xiaoyun; Lu, Guining; Yin, Hua; Lin, Zhang; Dang, Zhi

    2017-06-01

    Surfactant-enhanced remediation (SER) is considered as a promising and efficient remediation approach. This review summarizes and discusses main drivers on the application of SER in removing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from contaminated soil and water. The effect of PAH-PAH interactions on SER efficiency is, for the first time, illustrated in an SER review. Interactions between mixed PAHs could enhance, decrease, or have no impact on surfactants' solubilization power towards PAHs, thus affecting the optimal usage of surfactants for SER. Although SER can transfer PAHs from soil/non-aqueous phase liquids to the aqueous phase, the harmful impact of PAHs still exists. To decrease the level of PAHs in SER solutions, a series of SER-based integrated cleanup technologies have been developed including surfactant-enhanced bioremediation (SEBR), surfactant-enhanced phytoremediation (SEPR) and SER-advanced oxidation processes (SER-AOPs). In this review, the general considerations and corresponding applications of the integrated cleanup technologies are summarized and discussed. Compared with SER-AOPs, SEBR and SEPR need less operation cost, yet require more treatment time. To successfully achieve the field application of surfactant-based technologies, massive production of the cost-effective green surfactants (i.e. biosurfactants) and comprehensive evaluation of the drivers and the global cost of SER-based cleanup technologies need to be performed in the future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Adsorption of anionic surfactants in limestone medium during oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canbolat, Serhat; Bagci, Suat [Middle East Technical Univ., Dept. of Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering, Ankara (Turkey)

    2004-07-15

    Foam-forming surfactant performance was evaluated by several experimental methods (interfacial tension, foam stability, corefloods) using commercial surfactants. There is considerable interest in the use of foam-forming surfactants for mobility control in water flood. To provide effective mobility control, the injected surfactant must propagate from the injection well toward the production well. One of the important parameters affecting propagation of foam-forming surfactant through the reservoir is the retention of surfactant due to its adsorption on reservoir rock. The determination of the adsorption of foam-forming surfactants in limestone reservoirs is important for the residual oil recovery efficiency. Adsorption measurements, recovery efficiencies, and surfactant and alkaline flooding experiments carried out with the representative of the selected surfactants alkaline solutions, linear alkyl benzene sulphonic acid (LABSA), sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES), and NaOH in a limestone medium. These surfactants were selected with respect to their foaming ability. Calibration curves formed by pH measurements were used to determine the correct adsorption amount of the used surfactants and recovery efficiency of these surfactants compared with base waterflooding. The results showed that LABSA adsorbed more than SLES in limestone reservoirs. The recovery efficiency of SLES was higher than the recovery efficiency of LABSA, and they decreased the recovery efficiency with respect to only the water injection case. (Author)

  13. On the complexity of determining tolerances for ->e--optimal solutions to min-max combinatorial optimization problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, D.; Sierksma, G.

    2000-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis of e-optimal solutions is the problem of calculating the range within which a problem parameter may lie so that the given solution re-mains e-optimal. In this paper we study the sensitivity analysis problem for e-optimal solutions tocombinatorial optimization problems with

  14. Surfactant selection for a liquid foam-bed photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoska, Agnes; Vázquez, María; Janssen, Marcel; Wijffels, René H; Cuaresma, María; Vílchez, Carlos

    2018-02-01

    A novel liquid foam-bed photobioreactor has been shown to hold potential as an innovative technology for microalgae production. In this study, a foam stabilizing agent has been selected which fits the requirements of use in a liquid foam-bed photobioreactor. Four criteria were used for an optimal surfactant: the surfactant should have good foaming properties, should not be rapidly biodegradable, should drag up microalgae in the foam formed, and it should not be toxic for microalgae. Ten different surfactants (nonionic, cationic, and anionic) and two microalgae genera (Chlorella and Scenedesmus) were compared on the above-mentioned criteria. The comparison showed the following facts. Firstly, poloxameric surfactants (Pluronic F68 and Pluronic P84) have acceptable foaming properties described by intermediate foam stability and liquid holdup and small bubble size. Secondly, the natural surfactants (BSA and Saponin) and Tween 20 were easily biodegraded by bacteria within 3 days. Thirdly, for all surfactants tested the microalgae concentration is reduced in the foam phase compared to the liquid phase with exception of the cationic surfactant CTAB. Lastly, only BSA, Saponin, Tween 20, and the two Pluronics were not toxic at concentrations of 10 CMC or higher. The findings of this study indicate that the Pluronics (F68 and P84) are the best surfactants regarding the above-mentioned criteria. Since Pluronic F68 performed slightly better, this surfactant is recommended for application in a liquid foam-bed photobioreactor. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2018. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  15. Surfactant properties of human meibomian lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgil, Poonam; Millar, Thomas J

    2011-03-25

    Human meibomian lipids are the major part of the lipid layer of the tear film. Their surfactant properties enable their spread across the aqueous layer and help maintain a stable tear film. The purpose of this study was to investigate surfactant properties of human meibomian lipids in vitro and to determine effects of different physical conditions such as temperature and increased osmolarity, such as occur in dry eye, on these properties. Human meibomian lipids were spread on an artificial tear solution in a Langmuir trough. The lipid films were compressed and expanded to record the surface pressure-area (Π-A) isocycles. The isocycles were recorded under different physical conditions such as high pressure, increasing concentration and size of divalent cations, increasing osmolarity, and varying temperature. Π-A isocycles of meibomian lipids showed that they form liquid films that are compressible and multilayered. The isocycles were unaffected by increasing concentration or size of divalent cations and increasing osmolarity in the subphase. Temperature had a marked effect on the lipids. Increase in temperature caused lipid films to become fluid, an expected feature, but decrease in temperature unexpectedly caused expansion of lipids and an increase in pressure suggesting enhanced surfactant properties. Human meibomian lipids form highly compressible, non-collapsible, multilayered liquid films. These lipids have surfactants that allow them to spread across an aqueous subphase. Their surfactant properties are unaffected by increasing divalent cations or hyperosmolarity but are sensitive to temperature. Cooling of meibomian lipids enhances their surfactant properties.

  16. Development of cost-effective surfactant flooding technology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1996-11-01

    Task 1 of this research was the development of a high-resolution, fully implicit, finite-difference, multiphase, multicomponent, compositional simulator for chemical flooding. The major physical phenomena modeled in this simulator are dispersion, heterogeneous permeability and porosity, adsorption, interfacial tension, relative permeability and capillary desaturation, compositional phase viscosity, compositional phase density and gravity effects, capillary pressure, and aqueous-oleic-microemulsion phase behavior. Polymer and its non-Newtonian rheology properties include shear-thinning viscosity, permeability reduction, inaccessible pore volume, and adsorption. Options of constant or variable space grids and time steps, constant-pressure or constant-rate well conditions, horizontal and vertical wells, and multiple slug injections are also available in the simulator. The solution scheme used in this simulator is fully implicit. The pressure equation and the mass-conservation equations are solved simultaneously for the aqueous-phase pressure and the total concentrations of each component. A third-order-in-space, second-order-in-time finite-difference method and a new total-variation-diminishing (TVD) third-order flux limiter are used that greatly reduce numerical dispersion effects. Task 2 was the optimization of surfactant flooding. The code UTCHEM was used to simulate surfactant polymer flooding.

  17. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Surfactant Flooding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandersen, Sara Bülow

    , thus reducing the interfacial tension (IFT) to ultra low (0.001 mN/m), which consequently will mobilize the residual oil and result in improved oil recovery. This EOR technology is, however, made challenging by a number of factors, such as the adsorption of surfactant and co-surfactant to the rock...... be resistant to and remain active at reservoir conditions such as high temperatures, pressures and salinities. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of systems that exhibit liquid-liquid equilibrium (e.g. oil-brine systems) at reservoir conditions is an area of increasing interest within EOR. This is true...... studied. The effect of increased pressure became more significant when combined with increasing temperature. The experiments performed on the oil/ seawater systems were similar to the high pressure experiments for the surfactant system discussed above. Oil was contacted with different brine solutions...

  18. Effect of double-tailed surfactant architecture on the conformation, self-assembly, and processing in polypeptide-surfactant complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junnila, Susanna; Hanski, Sirkku; Oakley, Richard J; Nummelin, Sami; Ruokolainen, Janne; Faul, Charl F J; Ikkala, Olli

    2009-10-12

    This work describes the solid-state conformational and structural properties of self-assembled polypeptide-surfactant complexes with double-tailed surfactants. Poly(L-lysine) was complexed with three dialkyl esters of phosphoric acid (i.e., phosphodiester surfactants), where the surfactant tail branching and length was varied to tune the supramolecular architecture in a facile way. After complexation with the branched surfactant bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate in an aqueous solution, the polypeptide chains adopted an alpha-helical conformation. These rod-like helices self-assembled into cylindrical phases with the amorphous alkyl tails pointing outward. In complexes with dioctyl phosphate and didodecyl phosphate, which have two linear n-octyl or n-dodecyl tails, respectively, the polypeptide formed antiparallel beta-sheets separated by alkyl layers, resulting in well-ordered lamellar self-assemblies. By heating, it was possible to trigger a partial opening of the beta-sheets and disruption of the lamellar phase. After repeated heating/cooling, all of these complexes also showed a glass transition between 37 and 50 degrees C. Organic solvent treatment and plasticization by overstoichiometric amount of surfactant led to structure modification in poly(L-lysine)-dioctyl phosphate complexes, PLL(diC8)(x) (x = 1.0-3.0). Here, the alpha-helical PLL is surrounded by the surfactants and these bottle-brush-like chains self-assemble in a hexagonal cylindrical morphology. As x is increased, the materials are clearly plasticized and the degree of ordering is improved: The stiff alpha-helical backbones in a softened surfactant matrix give rise to thermotropic liquid-crystalline phases. The complexes were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering, transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, polarized optical microscopy, and circular dichroism.

  19. Use of surfactants for the remediation of contaminated soils: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Xuhui; Jiang, Rui; Xiao, Wei; Yu, Jiaguo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The recent advances in use of surfactant for soil remediation are reviewed. • The mechanisms of surfactant-based soil remediation are discussed. • A review on the application of different types of surfactants is made. • The future research direction of surfactant-based technologies is suggested. - Abstract: Due to the great harm caused by soil contamination, there is an increasing interest to apply surfactants to the remediation of a variety of contaminated soils worldwide. This review article summarizes the findings of recent literatures regarding remediation of contaminated soils/sites using surfactants as an enhancing agent. For the surfactant-based remedial technologies, the adsorption behaviors of surfactants onto soil, the solubilizing capability of surfactants, and the toxicity and biocompatibility of surfactants are important considerations. Surfactants can enhance desorption of pollutants from soil, and promote bioremediation of organics by increasing bioavailability of pollutants. The removal of heavy metals and radionuclides from soils involves the mechanisms of dissolution, surfactant-associated complexation, and ionic exchange. In addition to the conventional ionic and nonionic surfactants, gemini surfactants and biosurfactants are also applied to soil remediation due to their benign features like lower critical micelle concentration (CMC) values and better biocompatibility. Mixed surfactant systems and combined use of surfactants with other additives are often adopted to improve the overall performance of soil washing solution for decontamination. Worldwide the field studies and full-scale remediation using surfactant-based technologies are yet limited, however, the already known cases reveal the good prospect of applying surfactant-based technologies to soil remediation

  20. Use of surfactants for the remediation of contaminated soils: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Xuhui, E-mail: clab@whu.edu.cn [School of Resource and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Jiang, Rui; Xiao, Wei [School of Resource and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yu, Jiaguo, E-mail: jiaguoyu@yahoo.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Material Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2015-03-21

    Highlights: • The recent advances in use of surfactant for soil remediation are reviewed. • The mechanisms of surfactant-based soil remediation are discussed. • A review on the application of different types of surfactants is made. • The future research direction of surfactant-based technologies is suggested. - Abstract: Due to the great harm caused by soil contamination, there is an increasing interest to apply surfactants to the remediation of a variety of contaminated soils worldwide. This review article summarizes the findings of recent literatures regarding remediation of contaminated soils/sites using surfactants as an enhancing agent. For the surfactant-based remedial technologies, the adsorption behaviors of surfactants onto soil, the solubilizing capability of surfactants, and the toxicity and biocompatibility of surfactants are important considerations. Surfactants can enhance desorption of pollutants from soil, and promote bioremediation of organics by increasing bioavailability of pollutants. The removal of heavy metals and radionuclides from soils involves the mechanisms of dissolution, surfactant-associated complexation, and ionic exchange. In addition to the conventional ionic and nonionic surfactants, gemini surfactants and biosurfactants are also applied to soil remediation due to their benign features like lower critical micelle concentration (CMC) values and better biocompatibility. Mixed surfactant systems and combined use of surfactants with other additives are often adopted to improve the overall performance of soil washing solution for decontamination. Worldwide the field studies and full-scale remediation using surfactant-based technologies are yet limited, however, the already known cases reveal the good prospect of applying surfactant-based technologies to soil remediation.

  1. Improved surfactants formulation for remediation of oil sludge recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Hakimi Sakuma Syed Ahmad; Shahidan Radiman

    2000-01-01

    Surfactant enhanced remediation based on mobilisation of the residual NAPLs (oil sludge) which is radioactive depends on the tendency of the surfactants to lower interfacial tension. Mobilisation has greater potential than solubilisation to increase the rate of remediation. Optimised surfactants formulation was determined with concentration of Aqua 2000 and D Bond of 1% wt respectively, sodium chloride concentration of 2 gmL -1 and addition of 3% wt butanol as cosolvent. The formulation was of benefit not only able to decrease further the interfacial tension of aqueous solution containing oil emulsion, but also to make possible to be more mobile and destruction of mixed liquid crystals that formed. Formation of liquid crystals can hinders significantly recovery efficiency of aqueous solution containing oil emulsion in field remediation work. In a 100 litres soil column experiment conducted containing oil emulsion in field sludge soil and using the surfactants formulation for flushing, miniemulsion formed sizes maintained at average size between 125 nm and 280 nm before and after remediation. Total oil and grease concentration removed from the soil were significant due to the decreased in oil emulsion sizes, increase mobility and solubility. (Author)

  2. Optimization of Variable Ventilation for Physiology, Immune Response and Surfactant Enhancement in Preterm Lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erzsébet Bartolák-Suki

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Preterm infants often require mechanical ventilation due to lung immaturity including reduced or abnormal surfactant. Since cyclic stretch with cycle-by-cycle variability is known to augment surfactant release by epithelial cells, we hypothesized that such in vivo mechanotransduction improves surfactant maturation and hence lung physiology in preterm subjects. We thus tested whether breath-by-breath variability in tidal volume (VT in variable ventilation (VV can be tuned for optimal performance in a preterm lamb model. Preterm lambs were ventilated for 3 h with conventional ventilation (CV or two variants of VV that used a maximum VT of 1.5 (VV1 or 2.25 (VV2 times the mean VT. VT was adjusted during ventilation to a permissive pCO2 target range. Respiratory mechanics were monitored continuously using the forced oscillation technique, followed by postmortem bronchoalveolar lavage and tissue collection. Both VVs outperformed CV in blood gas parameters (pH, SaO2, cerebral O2 saturation. However, only VV2 lowered PaCO2 and had a higher specific respiratory compliance than CV. VV2 also increased surfactant protein (SP-B release compared to VV1 and stimulated its production compared to CV. The production and release of proSP-C however, was increased with CV compared to both VVs. There was more SP-A in both VVs than CV in the lung, but VV2 downregulated SP-A in the lavage, whereas SP-D significantly increased in CV in both the lavage and lung. Compared to CV, the cytokines IL-1β, and TNFα decreased with both VVs with less inflammation during VV2. Additionally, VV2 lungs showed the most homogeneous alveolar structure and least inflammatory cell infiltration assessed by histology. CV lungs exhibited over-distension mixed with collapsed and interstitial edematous regions with occasional hemorrhage. Following VV1, some lambs had normal alveolar structure while others were similar to CV. The IgG serum proteins in the lavage, a marker of leakage, were the

  3. Influence of Surfactants and Fluoride against Enamel Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Rayssa Ferreira; Ávila, Daniele Mara da Silva; Miyamoto, Karen Mayumi; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Borges, Alessandra Bühler

    2018-06-06

    This study investigated the effect of surfactants associated with sodium fluoride (NaF) on enamel erosion prevention, using an erosion-remineralization in vitro model. Sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), polysorbate 20 (P20), and cocoamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) were tested, at concentrations of 1.0 and 1.5%, and associated or not with NaF (275 ppm). The control groups were distilled water and the NaF solution. Bovine enamel samples (n = 12) were prepared and submitted to a 5-day cycling model: acid challenge (0.3% citric acid, pH 2.6, 4×/day), human saliva (2 h, 4×/day), and the treatment solutions (2 min, 2×/day). The protective potential of the agents against initial erosion was assessed by microhardness and the surface loss by profilometry. Enamel surface wettability was determined by goniometry, protein adsorption was measured by spectroscopy (FTIR), and the KOH-soluble fluoride was quantified. Goniometry showed that SLS and CAPB increased enamel wettability. No differences were found among the surfactants regarding protein adsorption. Microhardness showed that SLS reduced NaF protection. P20 (1 and 1.5%) and CAPB 1.5% presented a protective effect, but lower than the NaF solution. Profilometry showed that CAPB protected enamel, but no agent associated with NaF promoted a higher protection than the NaF solution alone. KOH-soluble fluoride analysis showed that all surfactants reduced the fluoride adsorption on the enamel surface. Therefore, the surfactants tested (except for P20) changed the enamel surface energy. The SLS decreased the protective potential of NaF on initial erosion, but no tested agent interfered with the protective effect of NaF on enamel erosive wear. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Simultaneous treatment of chlorinated organics and removal of metals and radionuclides with bimetals and complexing acids - application to surfactant solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, N.E.; Gu, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Currently available methods for separation and treatment of radioactive mixed waste are typically energy-intensive, and often require high temperatures. Passive methods that operate at ambient temperatures are needed. The purpose of this task is to develop bimetallic substrates, using a base metal such as iron and a promoter metal such as palladium (Pd), to provide a passive, low-energy solution to a substantial portion of DOE`s mixed-waste problem. This technology consists of a porous medium that can simultaneously dechlorinate hazardous organics such as TCE and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at the same time that it removes metallic and hazardous wastes from a solvent/surfactant solution. The porous medium consists of a bimetallic substrate such as palladized iron (Pd/Fe). Palladium is readily chemically plated on iron and preliminary studies suggest that only 0.05 to 0.1% Pd is needed for an efficient reaction. Thus, the cost of the material is reasonable especially is it is long-lived or can be regenerated. Field implementation would consist of the passage of a surfactant-laden, mixed waste through a column or bed of the bimetallic substrate. The organic component of this mixed waste may contain semivolatile compounds such as PCBs or pesticides and herbicides. The bimetal simultaneously removes radionuclides and metals and degrades halogenated hydrocarbons. Virtually any concentration can be treated. Following reaction of the bimetal with the waste stream, the resulting effluent will consist of an uncontaminated aqueous solution of surfactant or solvent that can be reused. The bimetal would then be rinsed with a dilute mineral acid or a mild complexing acid (e.g., oxalic or citric acid) to regenerate the surface and to remove sorbed metals and non-hazardous organic residue. The latter effluent would be low-level radioactive waste in some cases, but it would now be much easier to manage and be of a lower volume than the original mixed waste.

  5. Controlling block copolymer phase behavior using ionic surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, D.; Aswal, V. K. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India E-mail: debes.phys@gmail.com (India)

    2016-05-23

    The phase behavior of poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide-poly(ethylene oxide) PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymer [P85 (EO{sub 26}PO{sub 39}EO{sub 26})] in presence of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in aqueous solution as a function of temperature has been studied using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The measurements have been carried out for fixed concentrations (1 wt%) of block copolymer and surfactants. Each of the individual components (block copolymer and surfactant) and the nanoparticle–surfactant mixed system have been examined at varying temperature. The block copolymer P85 forms spherical micelles at room temperature whereas shows sphere-to-rod like micelle transition at higher temperatures. On the other hand, SDS surfactant forms ellipsoidal micelles over a wide temperature range. Interestingly, it is found that phase behavior of mixed micellar system (P85 + SDS) as a function of temperature is drastically different from that of P85, giving the control over the temperature-dependent phase behavior of block copolymers.

  6. IMRT optimization: Variability of solutions and its radiobiological impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattia, Maurizio; Del Giudice, Paolo; Caccia, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    We aim at (1) defining and measuring a 'complexity' index for the optimization process of an intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment plan (IMRT TP), (2) devising an efficient approximate optimization strategy, and (3) evaluating the impact of the complexity of the optimization process on the radiobiological quality of the treatment. In this work, for a prostate therapy case, the IMRT TP optimization problem has been formulated in terms of dose-volume constraints. The cost function has been minimized in order to achieve the optimal solution, by means of an iterative procedure, which is repeated for many initial modulation profiles, and for each of them the final optimal solution is recorded. To explore the complexity of the space of such solutions we have chosen to minimize the cost function with an algorithm that is unable to avoid local minima. The size of the (sub)optimal solutions distribution is taken as an indicator of the complexity of the optimization problem. The impact of the estimated complexity on the probability of success of the therapy is evaluated using radiobiological indicators (Poissonian TCP model [S. Webb and A. E. Nahum, Phys. Med. Biol. 38(6), 653-666 (1993)] and NTCP relative seriality model [Kallman et al., Int. J. Radiat. Biol. 62(2), 249-262 (1992)]). We find in the examined prostate case a nontrivial distribution of local minima, which has symmetry properties allowing a good estimate of near-optimal solutions with a moderate computational load. We finally demonstrate that reducing the a priori uncertainty in the optimal solution results in a significant improvement of the probability of success of the TP, based on TCP and NTCP estimates

  7. Use of surfactants in cleaning paraffin from oil wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebold, G; Rehberg, W

    1969-05-01

    The use of surfactants is described especially oxethylated alkylphenols, in the cleaning of oil wells from paraffin. Aqueous 1 or 10% solutions of the surfactant were injected into the well through the annulus, partially in combination with demulsifiers (for example Separol-brands of BASF). Injection was accomplished continuously or in intervals; in the beginning of 50 ppm surfactant, afterward 15 to 30 ppm as related to the wet crude was necessary. Efficiency of the treatment could be proved by the decrease of pressure in the pipes, the loosening of paraffin shells, and considerably prolonged operation periods in wells which otherwise would have come to a standstill. In quite a number of wells, treatment with hot oil and electric heating could be completely replaced by injection of surfactants. (11 refs.)

  8. Adsorption of surfactant ions and binding of their counterions at an air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagashira, Hiroaki; Takata, Youichi; Hyono, Atsushi; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    An expression for the surface tension of an aqueous mixed solution of surfactants and electrolyte ions in the presence of the common ions was derived from the Helmholtz free energy of an air/water surface. By applying the equation to experimental data for the surface tension, the adsorption constant of surfactant ions onto the air/water interface, the binding constant of counterions on the surfactants, and the surface potential and surface charge density of the interface were estimated. The adsorption constant and binding constant were dependent on the species of surfactant ion and counterion, respectively. Taking account of the dependence of surface potential and surface charge density on the concentration of electrolyte, it was suggested that the addition of electrolyte to the aqueous surfactant solution brings about the decrease in the surface potential, the increase in the surface density of surfactant ions, and consequently, the decrease in the surface tension. Furthermore, it was found that the configurational entropy plays a predominant role for the surface tension, compared to the electrical work.

  9. Sono-electroanalysis of copper: enhanced detection and determination in the presence of surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, Joanna Lorraine; Hignett, Geraldine; Melville, James L; Compton, Richard G

    2002-04-01

    Surfactant adsorption has been shown to have a passivating effect on the electrode surface during anodic stripping voltammetric measurements. In the present work the feasibility of sono-anodic stripping analysis for the determination of copper in aqueous media contaminated with surfactant has been studied at an unmodified bare glassy carbon electrode. We illustrate the deleterious effect of three common surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), dodecyl pyridinium chloride (DPC) and Triton-X 100 (TX-100) on conventional electroanalysis. The analogous sono-electroanalytical response was investigated for each surfactant at ultrasound intensities above and below the cavitation threshold. The enhancement in the stripping signal observed is attributed to the increased mass transport due to acoustic streaming and above the cavitation threshold the intensity of cavitational events is significantly increased leading to shearing of adsorbed surfactant molecules from the surface. As a result accurate analyses for SDS concentrations up to 100 ppm are possible, with analytical signals visible in solutions of SDS and TX-100 of 1000 ppm. Analysis is reported in high concentration of surfactant with use of sono-solvent double extraction. The power of this technique is clearly illustrated by the ability to obtain accurate measurements of copper concentration from starting solutions containing 1000 ppm SDS or TX-100. This was also exemplified by analysis of the low concentration 0.3 microM Cu(II) solution giving a percentage recovery of 94% in the presence of 1000 ppm SDS or TX-100.

  10. The role of charge in the surfactant-assisted stabilization of the natural product curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zifan; Leung, Mandy H M; Kee, Tak W; English, Douglas S

    2010-04-20

    Colloidal solutions of surfactants that form micelles or vesicles are useful for solubilizing and stabilizing hydrophobic molecules that are otherwise sparingly soluble in aqueous solutions. In this paper we investigate the use of micelles and vesicles prepared from ionic surfactants for solubilizing and stabilizing curcumin, a medicinal natural product that undergoes alkaline hydrolysis in water. We identify spectroscopic signatures to evaluate curcumin partitioning and deprotonation in surfactant mixtures containing micelles or vesicles. These spectroscopic signatures allow us to monitor the interaction of curcumin with charged surfactants over a wide range of pH values. Titration data are presented to show the pH dependence of curcumin interactions with negatively and positively charged micelles and vesicles. In solutions of cationic micelles or positively charged vesicles, strong interaction between the Cur(-1) phenoxide ion and the positively charged surfactants results in a change in the acidity of the phenolic hydrogen and a lowering of the apparent lowest pK(a) value for curcumin. In the microenvironments formed by anionic micelles or negatively charged bilayers, our data indicates that curcumin partitions as the Cur(0) species, which is stabilized by interactions with the respective surfactant aggregates, and this leads to an increase in the apparent pK(a) values. Our results may explain some of the discrepancies within the literature with respect to reported pK(a) values and the acidity of the enolic versus phenolic protons. Hydrolysis rates, quantum yields, and molar absorption coefficients are reported for curcumin in a variety of solutions.

  11. Surfactant enhanced non-classical extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanowski, J.

    2000-01-01

    Surfactant enhanced non-classical extractions are presented and discussed. They include micellar enhanced ultrafiltration and cloud point extraction. The ideas of the processes are given and the main features are presented. They are compared to the classical solvent extraction. The fundamental of micellar solutions and their solubilisation abilities are also discussed. (author)

  12. Surfactant enhanced non-classical extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanowski, J.

    1999-01-01

    Surfactant enhanced non-classical extractions are presented and discussed. They include micellar enhanced ultrafiltration and cloud point extraction. The ideas of the processes are given and the main features are presented. They are compared to the classical solvent extraction. The fundamental of micellar solutions and their solubilization abilities are also discussed. (author)

  13. SCREENING METHODS FOR SELECTION OF SURFACTANT FORMULATIONS FOR IOR FROM FRACTURED CARBONATE RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William A. Goddard III; Yongchun Tang; Patrick Shuler; Mario Blanco; Yongfu Wu; Seung Soon Jang

    2005-07-01

    This topical report presents details of the laboratory work performed to complete Task 1 of this project; developing rapid screening methods to assess surfactant performance for IOR (Improved Oil Recovery) from fractured carbonate reservoirs. The desired outcome is to identify surfactant formulations that increase the rate and amount of aqueous phase imbibition into oil-rich, oil-wet carbonate reservoir rock. Changing the wettability from oil-wet to water-wet is one key to enhancing this water-phase imbibition process that in turn recovers additional oil from the matrix portion of a carbonate reservoir. The common laboratory test to evaluate candidate surfactant formulations is to measure directly the aqueous imbibition rate and oil recovery from small outcrop or reservoir cores, but this procedure typically requires several weeks. Two methods are presented here for the rapid screening of candidate surfactant formulations for their potential IOR performance in carbonate reservoirs. One promising surfactant screening protocol is based on the ability of a surfactant solution to remove aged crude oil that coats a clear calcite crystal (Iceland Spar). Good surfactant candidate solutions remove the most oil the quickest from the chips, plus change the apparent contact angle of the remaining oil droplets on the surface that thereby indicate increased water-wetting. The other fast surfactant screening method is based on the flotation behavior of powdered calcite in water. In this test protocol, first the calcite power is pre-treated to make the surface oil-wet. The next step is to add the pre-treated powder to a test tube and add a candidate aqueous surfactant formulation; the greater the percentage of the calcite that now sinks to the bottom rather than floats, the more effective the surfactant is in changing the solids to become now preferentially water-wet. Results from the screening test generally are consistent with surfactant performance reported in the literature.

  14. Optimization of Surfactant Mixtures and Their Interfacial Behavior for Advanced Oil Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somasundaran, Prof. P.

    2002-03-04

    The objective of this project was to develop a knowledge base that is helpful for the design of improved processes for mobilizing and producing oil left untapped using conventional techniques. The main goal was to develop and evaluate mixtures of new or modified surfactants for improved oil recovery. In this regard, interfacial properties of novel biodegradable n-alkyl pyrrolidones and sugar-based surfactants have been studied systematically. Emphasis was on designing cost-effective processes compatible with existing conditions and operations in addition to ensuring minimal reagent loss.

  15. UV-vis spectra as an alternative to the Lowry method for quantify hair damage induced by surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires-Oliveira, Rafael; Joekes, Inés

    2014-11-01

    It is well known that long term use of shampoo causes damage to human hair. Although the Lowry method has been widely used to quantify hair damage, it is unsuitable to determine this in the presence of some surfactants and there is no other method proposed in literature. In this work, a different method is used to investigate and compare the hair damage induced by four types of surfactants (including three commercial-grade surfactants) and water. Hair samples were immersed in aqueous solution of surfactants under conditions that resemble a shower (38 °C, constant shaking). These solutions become colored with time of contact with hair and its UV-vis spectra were recorded. For comparison, the amount of extracted proteins from hair by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and by water were estimated by the Lowry method. Additionally, non-pigmented vs. pigmented hair and also sepia melanin were used to understand the washing solution color and their spectra. The results presented herein show that hair degradation is mostly caused by the extraction of proteins, cuticle fragments and melanin granules from hair fiber. It was found that the intensity of solution color varies with the charge density of the surfactants. Furthermore, the intensity of solution color can be correlated to the amount of proteins quantified by the Lowry method as well as to the degree of hair damage. UV-vis spectrum of hair washing solutions is a simple and straightforward method to quantify and compare hair damages induced by different commercial surfactants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A PIV Study of Drop-interface Coalescence with Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weheliye, Weheliye Hashi; Dong, Teng; Angeli, Panagiota

    2017-11-01

    In this work, the coalescence of a drop with an aqueous-organic interface was studied by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The effect of surfactants on the drop surface evolution, the vorticity field and the kinetic energy distribution in the drop during coalescence were investigated. The coalescence took place in an acrylic rectangular box with 79% glycerol solution at the bottom and Exxsol D80 oil above. The glycerol solution drop was generated through a nozzle fixed at 2cm above the aqueous/oil interface and was seeded with Rhodamine particles. The whole process was captured by a high-speed camera. Different mass ratios of non-ionic surfactant Span80 to oil were studied. The increase of surfactant concentration promoted deformation of the interface before the rupture of the trapped oil film. At the early stages after film rupture, two counter-rotating vortices appeared at the bottom of the drop which then travelled to the upper part. The propagation rates, as well as the intensities of the vortices decreased at high surfactant concentrations. At early stages, the kinetic energy was mainly distributed near the bottom part of the droplet, while at later stages it was distributed near the upper part of the droplet. Programme Grant MEMPHIS, Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC).

  17. Regularities of ions and surfactants adsorption on metal corrosion products and salt deposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batrakov, V.V.; Gorichev, I.G.; Martynova, T.V.; Gutenev, A.V.

    1994-01-01

    Adsorption of ions on oxide/solution interface is described using the concepts of existence of acid-base equilibria and assumptions of the Graham-Parson theory on the structure of double electric layer. It is shown that adsorption data are in a good agreement with theoretical aspects. The influence of solution pH on adsorption of certain surfactant organic substances on oxide/solution interface was discussed. Data on adsorption of surfactants on salts-silver iodide and calcium carbonate - are dicussed making allowance for the structure of double electric layer

  18. Surfactant flushing remediation of o-dichlorobenzene and p-dichlorobenzene contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Guangpeng; Zhu, Yuen; Cai, Xiatong; Shi, Weiyu; Li, Hua

    2017-10-01

    Surfactant-enhanced remediation is used to treat dichlorobenzene (DCB) contaminated soil. In this study, soil column experiments were conducted to investigate the removal efficiencies of o-dichlorobenzene (o-DCB) and p-dichlorobenzene (p-DCB) from contaminated soil using micellar solutions of biosurfactants (saponin, alkyl polyglycoside) compare to a chemically synthetic surfactant (Tween 80). Leachate was collected and analyzed for o-DCB and p-DCB content. In addition, soil was analyzed to explore the effect of surfactants on soil enzyme activities. Results showed that the removal efficiency of o-DCB and p-DCB was highest for saponin followed by alkyl polyglycoside and Tween 80. The maximum o-DCB and p-DCB removal efficiencies of 76.34% and 80.43%, respectively, were achieved with 4 g L -1 saponin solution. However, an opposite result was observed in the cumulative mass of o-DCB and p-DCB in leachate. The cumulative extent of o-DCB and p-DCB removal by the biosurfactants saponin and alkyl polyglycoside was lower than that of the chemically synthetic surfactant Tween 80 in leachate. Soil was also analyzed to explore the effect of surfactants on soil enzyme activities. The results indicated that surfactants were potentially effective in facilitating soil enzyme activities. Thus, it was confirmed that the biosurfactants saponin and alkyl polyglycoside could be used for remediation of o-DCB and p-DCB contaminated soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Studies on interfacial tension and contact angle of synthesized surfactant and polymeric from castor oil for enhanced oil recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Keshak; Pal, Nilanjan; Bera, Achinta; Saxena, V. K.; Mandal, Ajay

    2015-10-01

    New synthesized polymeric surfactants have immensely attracted the researchers for further development of chemical enhanced oil recovery method particularly in surfactant flooding. Contact angle and interfacial tension measurement tests are the effective ways to identify proper chemicals/surfactants for enhanced oil recovery by chemical/surfactant flooding. In the present study a new polymeric surfactant was synthesized from pre-synthesized sodium methyl ester sulfonate (surfactant) and acrylamide for application in chemical enhanced oil recovery. The synthesized surfactant and polymeric surfactant were used to measure interfacial tension between their aqueous phase and crude oil phase to investigate the efficiency of the surfactants in reduction of interfacial tension. The synthesized polymeric surfactant has also ability to control the mobility because of its viscous nature in aqueous solution. Contact angles of solid-crude oil-surfactant interface were also measured to study the effect of the synthesized surfactant and polymeric surfactant on wettability alteration mechanism. Synergistic effect was studied by using NaCl and synthesized surfactants on interfacial tension. Dynamic interfacial tensions of the surfactant and polymeric surfactant solutions with crude oil were measured at different NaCl concentrations. Interfacial tension was found to be lowered up to 10-2 to 10-3 mN/m which is effective for oil recovery. Measurement of contact angle indicates the wettability change of the quartz surface. Comparative studies on efficiencies of synthesized sodium methyl ester sulfonate surfactant and polymeric surfactant were also carried out with respect to interfacial tension reduction and contact angle change.

  20. Degradation of surfactant solutions by age and by a flow singularity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Myška, Jiří; Mík, Václav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 43, - (2004), s. 1495-1501 ISSN 0255-2701 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA2060204 Keywords : turbulence * drag reduction * surfactants Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.033, year: 2004

  1. Surfactant-enhanced electrokinetic remediation of soil contaminated with hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.W.; Park, J.Y.; Lee, H.H.; Cho, H.J. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea)

    2001-07-01

    Removal of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) using electrokinetic method was studied in a model system. Kaolinite and phenanthrene were selected as the model clay soil and representative HOC. Three different types of surfactants, APG (alkyl polyglucoside), Brij30 (polyoxyethylene 4 lauryl ether), and SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate), were used to enhance the solubility of HOCs. Electrokinetic (EK) column experiments were performed using water, surfactant solution, and acetate buffer solution under a constant current condition. Voltage and flow through the soil system were interpreted with time. Electrolyte pH at the anode and cathode compartments was observed for operation time. Removal efficiency of phenanthrene was examined after the end of EK operation during 2, 4, and 6 weeks. (orig.)

  2. Indium flotation from hydrometallurgical solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sviridov, V.V.; Mal'tsev, G.I.; Petryakova, N.K.; Gomzikov, A.I.

    1980-01-01

    The principal possibility of flotation of indium small quantities (10 -4 gxion/l) is established from sulphuric-acid solutions of leaching converter dusts of the copper melting production in the form of complex compounds with sodium hexametaphosphate and cation-active nitrogen-containing surfactants. It is shown that the flotation process effectiveness is determined by the molar ratio of hexametaphosphate and collector introduced into the solution, solution oxidity and surfactant nature

  3. SU-F-R-10: Selecting the Optimal Solution for Multi-Objective Radiomics Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Z; Folkert, M; Wang, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an evidential reasoning approach for selecting the optimal solution from a Pareto solution set obtained by a multi-objective radiomics model for predicting distant failure in lung SBRT. Methods: In the multi-objective radiomics model, both sensitivity and specificity are considered as the objective functions simultaneously. A Pareto solution set with many feasible solutions will be resulted from the multi-objective optimization. In this work, an optimal solution Selection methodology for Multi-Objective radiomics Learning model using the Evidential Reasoning approach (SMOLER) was proposed to select the optimal solution from the Pareto solution set. The proposed SMOLER method used the evidential reasoning approach to calculate the utility of each solution based on pre-set optimal solution selection rules. The solution with the highest utility was chosen as the optimal solution. In SMOLER, an optimal learning model coupled with clonal selection algorithm was used to optimize model parameters. In this study, PET, CT image features and clinical parameters were utilized for predicting distant failure in lung SBRT. Results: Total 126 solution sets were generated by adjusting predictive model parameters. Each Pareto set contains 100 feasible solutions. The solution selected by SMOLER within each Pareto set was compared to the manually selected optimal solution. Five-cross-validation was used to evaluate the optimal solution selection accuracy of SMOLER. The selection accuracies for five folds were 80.00%, 69.23%, 84.00%, 84.00%, 80.00%, respectively. Conclusion: An optimal solution selection methodology for multi-objective radiomics learning model using the evidential reasoning approach (SMOLER) was proposed. Experimental results show that the optimal solution can be found in approximately 80% cases.

  4. SU-F-R-10: Selecting the Optimal Solution for Multi-Objective Radiomics Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Z; Folkert, M; Wang, J [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an evidential reasoning approach for selecting the optimal solution from a Pareto solution set obtained by a multi-objective radiomics model for predicting distant failure in lung SBRT. Methods: In the multi-objective radiomics model, both sensitivity and specificity are considered as the objective functions simultaneously. A Pareto solution set with many feasible solutions will be resulted from the multi-objective optimization. In this work, an optimal solution Selection methodology for Multi-Objective radiomics Learning model using the Evidential Reasoning approach (SMOLER) was proposed to select the optimal solution from the Pareto solution set. The proposed SMOLER method used the evidential reasoning approach to calculate the utility of each solution based on pre-set optimal solution selection rules. The solution with the highest utility was chosen as the optimal solution. In SMOLER, an optimal learning model coupled with clonal selection algorithm was used to optimize model parameters. In this study, PET, CT image features and clinical parameters were utilized for predicting distant failure in lung SBRT. Results: Total 126 solution sets were generated by adjusting predictive model parameters. Each Pareto set contains 100 feasible solutions. The solution selected by SMOLER within each Pareto set was compared to the manually selected optimal solution. Five-cross-validation was used to evaluate the optimal solution selection accuracy of SMOLER. The selection accuracies for five folds were 80.00%, 69.23%, 84.00%, 84.00%, 80.00%, respectively. Conclusion: An optimal solution selection methodology for multi-objective radiomics learning model using the evidential reasoning approach (SMOLER) was proposed. Experimental results show that the optimal solution can be found in approximately 80% cases.

  5. Multivalent-Counterion-Induced Surfactant Multilayer Formation at Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Solid-Solution Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun; Xu, Hui; Tucker, Ian M; Petkov, Jordan T; Sivia, Devinderjit S

    2015-06-23

    Surface multilayer formation from the anionic-nonionic surfactant mixture of sodium dodecyl dioxyethylene sulfate, SLES, and monododecyl dodecaethylene glycol, C12E12, by the addition of multivalent Al(3+) counterions at the solid-solution interface is observed and characterized by neutron reflectivity, NR. The ability to form surface multilayer structures on hydrophobic and hydrophilic silica and cellulose surfaces is demonstrated. The surface multilayer formation is more pronounced and more well developed on the hydrophilic and hydrophobic silica surfaces than on the hydrophilic and hydrophobic cellulose surfaces. The less well developed multilayer formation on the cellulose surfaces is attributed to the greater surface inhomogeneities of the cellulose surface which partially inhibit lateral coherence and growth of the multilayer domains at the surface. The surface multilayer formation is associated with extreme wetting properties and offers the potential for the manipulation of the solid surfaces for enhanced adsorption and control of the wetting behavior.

  6. Dilational viscoelastic properties of fluid interfaces - III mixed surfactant systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djabbarah, N.F.; Wasan, D.T.

    1982-01-01

    The surface viscosity and elasticity of solutions of mixed surfactants were determined using the longitudinal wave technique combined with tracer particle measurements. The recent analysis of Maru et al., which was restricted to insoluble monolayers and to monolayers adsorbed from a single surfactant solution, has now been extended to multicomponent solutions. This analysis can be used not only to estimate the ''net'' viscoelastic properties at gas-liquid interfaces but also to estimate the composition as well as the intrinsic viscoelastic properties. Furthermore, when accompanied by separate measurements of shear viscoelastic properties, the above analysis can be used for the determination of dilational viscosity and elasticity. Surface viscoelasticity measurements were conducted on aqueous solutions of sodium lauryl sulfate and sodium lauryl sulfate-lauryl alcohol. Net surface viscosity and elasticity of sodium lauryl sulfate solutions increased with bulk concentration and reached a maximum at a concentration in the neighborhood of the critical micelle concentration. The presence of small amount of lauryl alcohol caused almost an order of magnitude increase in intrinsic surface viscosity and a similar increase in compositional surface elasticity. A comparison between the values of intrinsic surface viscosity and those of surface shear viscosity indicated that surface dilational viscosity exceeds surface shear viscosity by at least two orders of magnitude. These appear to be the first set of data presented hitherto for the surface dilational properties in addition to surface shear properties for the same mixed surfactant systems.

  7. Summer/winter variability of the surfactants in aerosols from Grenoble, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baduel, Christine; Nozière, Barbara; Jaffrezo, Jean-Luc

    2012-02-01

    Many atmospheric aerosols seem to contain strong organic surfactants likely to enhance their cloud-forming properties. Yet, few techniques allow for the identification and characterization of these compounds. Recently, we introduced a double extraction method to isolate the surfactant fraction of atmospheric aerosol samples, and evidenced their very low surface tension (≤30 mN m -1). In this work, this analytical procedure was further optimized. In addition to an optimized extraction and a reduction of the analytical time, the improved method led to a high reproducibility in the surface tension curves obtained (shapes and minimal values), illustrated by the low uncertainties on the values, ±10% or less. The improved method was applied to PM 10 aerosols from the urban area of Grenoble, France collected from June 2009 to January 2010. Significant variability was observed between the samples. The minimum surface tension obtained from the summer samples was systematically lower (30 mN m -1) than that of the winter samples (35-45 mN m -1). Sharp transitions in the curves together with the very low surface tensions suggested that the dominating surfactants in the summer samples were biosurfactants, which would be consistent with the high biogenic activity in that season. One group of samples from the winter also displayed sharp transitions, which, together with the slightly higher surface tension, suggested the presence of weaker, possibly man-made, surfactants. A second group of curves from the winter did not display any clear transition but were similar to those of macromolecular surfactants such as polysaccharides or humic substances from wood burning. These surfactants are thus likely to originate from wood burning, the dominating source for aerosols in Grenoble in winter. These observations thus confirm the presence of surfactants from combustion processes in urban aerosols reported by other groups and illustrates the ability of our method to distinguish between

  8. Cost Effective Surfactant Formulations for Improved Oil Recovery in Carbonate Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William A. Goddard; Yongchun Tang; Patrick Shuler; Mario Blanco; Yongfu Wu

    2007-09-30

    This report summarizes work during the 30 month time period of this project. This was planned originally for 3-years duration, but due to its financial limitations, DOE halted funding after 2 years. The California Institute of Technology continued working on this project for an additional 6 months based on a no-cost extension granted by DOE. The objective of this project is to improve the performance of aqueous phase formulations that are designed to increase oil recovery from fractured, oil-wet carbonate reservoir rock. This process works by increasing the rate and extent of aqueous phase imbibition into the matrix blocks in the reservoir and thereby displacing crude oil normally not recovered in a conventional waterflood operation. The project had three major components: (1) developing methods for the rapid screening of surfactant formulations towards identifying candidates suitable for more detailed evaluation, (2) more fundamental studies to relate the chemical structure of acid components of an oil and surfactants in aqueous solution as relates to their tendency to wet a carbonate surface by oil or water, and (3) a more applied study where aqueous solutions of different commercial surfactants are examined for their ability to recover a West Texas crude oil from a limestone core via an imbibition process. The first item, regarding rapid screening methods for suitable surfactants has been summarized as a Topical Report. One promising surfactant screening protocol is based on the ability of a surfactant solution to remove aged crude oil that coats a clear calcite crystal (Iceland Spar). Good surfactant candidate solutions remove the most oil the quickest from the surface of these chips, plus change the apparent contact angle of the remaining oil droplets on the surface that thereby indicate increased water-wetting. The other fast surfactant screening method is based on the flotation behavior of powdered calcite in water. In this test protocol, first the calcite

  9. Ultrathin nanofibrous films prepared from cadmium hydroxide nanostrands and anionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xinsheng; Karan, Santanu; Ichinose, Izumi

    2009-08-04

    We developed a simple fabrication method of ultrathin nanofibrous films from the dispersion of cadmium hydroxide nanostrands and anionic surfactants. The nanostrands were prepared in a dilute aqueous solution of cadmium chloride by using 2-aminoethanol. They were highly positively charged and gave bundlelike fibers upon mixing an aqueous solution of anionic surfactant. The nanostrand/surfactant composite fibers were filtered on an inorganic membrane filter. The resultant nanofibrous film was very uniform in the area of a few centimeters square when the thickness was not less than 60 nm. The films obtained with sodium tetradecyl sulfate (STS) had a composition close to the electroneutral complex, [Cd37(OH)68(H2O)n] x 6(STS), as confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. They were water-repellent with a contact angle of 117 degrees, and the value slightly decreased with the alkyl chain length of anionic surfactants. Ultrathin nanofibrous films were stable enough to be used for ultrafiltration at pressure difference of 90 kPa. We could effectively separate Au nanoparticles of 40 nm at an extremely high filtration rate of 14000 L/(h m2 bar).

  10. Impact of cationic surfactant on the self-assembly of sodium caseinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinceković, Marko; Curlin, Marija; Jurašin, Darija

    2014-08-27

    The impact of a cationic surfactant, dodecylammonium chloride (DDACl), on the self-assembly of sodium caseinate (SC) has been investigated by light scattering, zeta potential, and rheological measurements as well as by microscopy (transmission electron and confocal laser scanning microscopy). In SC dilute solutions concentration-dependent self-assembly proceeds through the formation of spherical associates and their aggregation into elongated structures composed of connected spheres. DDACl interacts with SC via its hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups, inducing changes in SC self-assembled structures. These changes strongly depend on the surfactant aggregation states (monomeric or micellar) as well as concentration ratio of both components, leading to the formation of soluble and insoluble complexes of nano- to microdimensions. DDACl monomers interact with SC self-assembled entities in a different way compared to their micelles. Surfactant monomers form soluble complexes (similar to surfactant mixed micelles) at lower SC concentration but insoluble gelatinous complexes at higher SC concentration. At surfactant micellar concentration soluble complexes with casein chains wrapped around surfactant micelles are formed. This study suggests that the use of proper cationic surfactant concentration will allow modification and control of structural changes of SC self-assembled entities.

  11. Decontamination Procedure for Sorghum and Coffee Leaves Sprayed With Zinc and a Surfactant

    OpenAIRE

    Caione, Gustavo; Guirra, Ana Paula Pires Maciel; Prado, Renato de Mello; Klar, Antonio Evaldo

    2014-01-01

    Decontaminating leaf samples from crops sprayed with pesticides and nutrient solutions is important for foliar analysis. This study evaluated the effect of different washing methods in coffee and sorghum foliage that had been sprayed with zinc (with or without surfactant). The plants were sprayed with a 3 g L-1 zinc sulfate solution, with and without surfactant. Seven days later, leaves were collected and washed. The experiment was completely randomized in a 2 x 2 x 3 + 2 factorial, with thre...

  12. Mineral-Surfactant Interactions for Minimum Reagents Precipitation and Adsorption for Improved Oil Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Somasundaran

    2008-09-20

    Chemical EOR can be an effective method for increasing oil recovery and reducing the amount of produced water; however, reservoir fluids are chemically complex and may react adversely to the polymers and surfactants injected into the reservoir. While a major goal is to alter rock wettability and interfacial tension between oil and water, rock-fluid and fluid-fluid interactions must be understood and controlled to minimize reagent loss, maximize recovery and mitigate costly failures. The overall objective of this project was to elucidate the mechanisms of interactions between polymers/surfactants and the mineral surfaces responsible for determining the chemical loss due to adsorption and precipitation in EOR processes. The role of dissolved inorganic species that are dependent on the mineralogy is investigated with respect to their effects on adsorption. Adsorption, wettability and interfacial tension are studied with the aim to control chemical losses, the ultimate goal being to devise schemes to develop guidelines for surfactant and polymer selection in EOR. The adsorption behavior of mixed polymer/surfactant and surfactant/surfactant systems on typical reservoir minerals (quartz, alumina, calcite, dolomite, kaolinite, gypsum, pyrite, etc.) was correlated to their molecular structures, intermolecular interactions and the solution conditions such as pH and/or salinity. Predictive models as well as general guidelines for the use of polymer/surfactant surfactant/surfactant system in EOR have been developed The following tasks have been completed under the scope of the project: (1) Mineral characterization, in terms of SEM, BET, size, surface charge, and point zero charge. (2) Study of the interactions among typical reservoir minerals (quartz, alumina, calcite, dolomite, kaolinite, gypsum, pyrite, etc.) and surfactants and/or polymers in terms of adsorption properties that include both macroscopic (adsorption density, wettability) and microscopic (orientation

  13. Interactions of short chain phenylalkanoic acids within ionic surfactant micelles in aqueous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeem Kashif

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available % SDS KR nema Solubilization and interactions of phenylalkanoic acids induced by cationic surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB and an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS was investigated spectrophotometrically at 25.0°C. The UV spectra of the additives (acids were measured with and without surfactant above and below critical micelle concentration (cmc of the surfactant. The presence of alkyl chain in phenylalkanoic acids is responsible for hydrophobic interaction resulting in shift of the spectra towards longer wavelength (red shift. The value of partition coefficient (Kx between the bulk water and surfactant micelles and in turn standard free energy change of solubilization (ΔGpº were also estimated by measuring the differential absorbance (ΔA of the additives in micellar solutions.

  14. Combined ultrasound/ozone degradation of carbazole in APG1214 surfactant solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Guodong; Zhang, Baolong; Wu, Yingchao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We first describe the role of US/O 3 in promoting carbazole degradation in APG 1214 solution. ► 20 W ultrasound for 30 min improves the effectiveness of carbazole ozonolysis by 5–10%. ► 40 W or 80 W only plays a role in promoting degradation of carbazole in the first 5 min. ► The content of ·OH radical is inversely proportional to the ultrasound power. ► Absolute value of zeta potential of APG 1214 micelles is inversely proportional to US power. - Abstract: We examined the effects of power and treatment time on the ultrasonically enhanced ozonation of carbazole dissolved in APG 1214 surfactant solutions, including an analysis of the mechanism of ·OH radical formation, the zeta potential of the colloidal suspension, the influence of ultrasound on micellar morphology, and the degradation kinetics for carbazole and APG 1214 . A 30 min ultrasound treatment at 28 kHz and 20 W improved the degradation of carbazole by 5–10%, while power levels of 40 W and 80 W provided improvements only during the first 5 min and resulted in reduced degradation after 15 min. The ·OH concentration was inversely proportional to ultrasound power, and directly proportional to the irradiation time. The absolute value of the APG 1214 micelle zeta potential was inversely proportional to power and decreased with increasing irradiation time. The relationships of ·OH radical concentration in APG 1214 micelles, the zeta potential, and the micellar dynamic radius (R h ) to ultrasonic power and time are the key factors affecting carbazole degradation in this system.

  15. Multiobjective Optimization of Linear Cooperative Spectrum Sensing: Pareto Solutions and Refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wei; You, Xinge; Xu, Jing; Leung, Henry; Zhang, Tianhang; Chen, Chun Lung Philip

    2016-01-01

    In linear cooperative spectrum sensing, the weights of secondary users and detection threshold should be optimally chosen to minimize missed detection probability and to maximize secondary network throughput. Since these two objectives are not completely compatible, we study this problem from the viewpoint of multiple-objective optimization. We aim to obtain a set of evenly distributed Pareto solutions. To this end, here, we introduce the normal constraint (NC) method to transform the problem into a set of single-objective optimization (SOO) problems. Each SOO problem usually results in a Pareto solution. However, NC does not provide any solution method to these SOO problems, nor any indication on the optimal number of Pareto solutions. Furthermore, NC has no preference over all Pareto solutions, while a designer may be only interested in some of them. In this paper, we employ a stochastic global optimization algorithm to solve the SOO problems, and then propose a simple method to determine the optimal number of Pareto solutions under a computational complexity constraint. In addition, we extend NC to refine the Pareto solutions and select the ones of interest. Finally, we verify the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed methods through computer simulations.

  16. Adsorption of cationic surfactants on silica surface: 1. Adsorption isotherms and surface charge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goloub, T.P.; Koopal, L.K.; Sidorova, M.P.

    2004-01-01

    Adsorption isotherms of cationic surfactant, dodecylpyridinium chloride, on an Aerosil OX50 and isotherms of surface charge against the background of 0.001- and 0.1-M KCl solutions at pH 7 and 9 were measured and analyzed. Different forms of adsorption isotherms of surfactants at low and high

  17. Separation process for lanthanides based on solvation properties of non ionic surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draye, M.; Favre-Reguillon, A.; Foos, J.; Cote, G.

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, cloud-point extraction is used with a lipophilic chelating agent (8-hydroxyquinoline) to extract and separate lanthanum (III) and gadolinium (III) from an aqueous solution. The methodology used is based on the formation of lanthanide (III) organic complexes that are soluble in a micellar phase of non-ionic surfactant. The lanthanide (III) complexes are then extracted into the surfactant-rich phase at a temperature above the cloud-point temperature. The cloud-point temperature, the structure of the lipophilic part of the nonionic surfactant and the chelating agent - metal molar ratio are identified as factors determining the extraction efficiency and selectivity. With Triton X-114, high selectivity and decontamination factor for Gd(III) is observed indicating that micelle mediated extraction involving cloud-point extraction is promising for the specific separation of actinide ions from nuclear waste solution. (authors)

  18. Formation of protein/surfactant adsorption layer at the air/water interface as studied by dilational surface rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailovskaya, A A; Noskov, B A; Lin, S-Y; Loglio, G; Miller, R

    2011-08-25

    The dynamic dilatational surface elasticity of mixed solutions of globular proteins (β-lactoglobulin (BLG) and bovine serum albumin (BSA)) with cationic (dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB)) and anionic (sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) surfactants was measured as a function of the surfactant concentration and surface age. If the cationic surfactant concentration exceeds a certain critical value, the kinetic dependencies of the dynamic surface elasticity of BLG/DTAB and BSA/DTAB solutions become nonmonotonous and resemble those of mixed solutions of proteins with guanidine hydrochloride. This result indicates not only the destruction of the protein tertiary structure in the surface layer of mixed solution but also a strong perturbation of the secondary structure. The corresponding kinetic dependencies for protein solutions with added anionic surfactants are always monotonous, thereby revealing a different mechanism of the adsorption layer formation. One can assume that the secondary structure is destroyed to a lesser extent in the latter case and hinders the formation of loops and tails at the interface. The increase of the solution's ionic strength by the addition of sodium chloride results in stronger changes of the protein conformations in the surface layer and the appearance of a local maximum in the kinetic dependencies of the dynamic surface elasticity in a relatively narrow range of SDS concentration. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  19. Degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by Fe and Fe-Pd bimetals in the presence of surfactants and cosolvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, B.; Liang, L.; West, O.R.; Cameron, P.; Davenport, D.

    1997-01-01

    Surfactants and cosolvents are being used to enhance the removal of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) from contaminated soils. However, the waste surfactant solution containing TCE and PCBs must be treated before it can be disposed. This study evaluated the use of zero-valence iron and palladized iron fillings on the dechlorination of TCE and a PCB congener in a dihexylsulfosuccinate surfactant solution. Batch experimental results indicated that TCE can be rapidly degraded by palladized iron filings with a half-life of 27.4 min. PCB was degraded at a slower rate than TCE with a half-life ranging from 100 min to 500 min as the concentration of surfactant increased. In column flow-through experiments, both TCE and PCBs degrade at an enhanced rate with a half-life about 1.5 and 6 min because of an increased solid to solution ratio in the column than in the batch experiments. Results of this work suggest that Fe-Pd filings may be potentially applicable for ex-situ treatment of TCE and PCBs in the surfactant solutions that are generated during surfactant washing of the contaminated soils

  20. Synthesis and characterization of emamectin-benzoate slow-release microspheres with different surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Anqi; Wang, Chunxin; Cui, Bo; Sun, Changjiao; Zhao, Xiang; Zeng, Zhanghua; Shen, Yue; Gao, Fei; Liu, Guoqiang; Cui, Haixin

    2017-10-06

    Pesticide slow-release formulations provide a way to increase the efficiency of active components by reducing the amount of pesticide that needs to be applied. Slow-release formulations also increase the stability and prolong the control effect of photosensitive pesticides. Surfactants are an indispensable part of pesticide formulations, and the choice of surfactant can strongly affect formulation performance. In this study, emamectin-benzoate (EMB) slow-release microspheres were prepared by the microemulsion polymerization method. We explored the effect of different surfactants on the particle size and dispersity of EMB in slow-release microspheres. The results indicated that the samples had uniform spherical shapes with an average diameter of 320.5 ±5.24 nm and good dispersity in the optimal formulation with the polymeric stabilizer polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and composite non-ionic surfactant polyoxyethylene castor oil (EL-40). The optimal EMB pesticide slow-release microspheres had excellent anti-photolysis performance, stability, controlled release properties, and good leaf distribution. These results demonstrated that EMB slow-release microspheres are an attractive candidate for improving pesticide efficacy and prolonging the control effect of EMB in the environment.

  1. Surfactant phosphatidylcholine metabolism and surfactant function in preterm, ventilated lambs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobe, A.H.; Ikegami, M.; Seidner, S.R.; Pettenazzo, A.; Ruffini, L.

    1989-01-01

    Preterm lambs were delivered at 138 days gestational age and ventilated for periods up to 24 h in order to study surfactant metabolism and surfactant function. The surfactant-saturated phosphatidylcholine pool in the alveolar wash was 13 +/- 4 mumol/kg and did not change from 10 min to 24 h after birth. Trace amounts of labeled natural sheep surfactant were mixed with fetal lung fluid at birth. By 24 h, 80% of the label had become lung-tissue-associated, yet there was no loss of label from phosphatidylcholine in the lungs when calculated as the sum of the lung tissue plus alveolar wash. De novo synthesized phosphatidylcholine was labeled with choline given by intravascular injection at 1 h of age. Labeled phosphatidylcholine accumulated in the lung tissue linearly to 24 h, and the labeled phosphatidylcholine moved through lamellar body to alveolar pools. The turnover time for alveolar phosphatidylcholine was estimated to be about 13 h, indicating an active metabolic pool. A less surface-active surfactant fraction recovered as a supernatant after centrifugation of the alveolar washes at 40,000 x g increased from birth to 10 min of ventilation, but no subsequent changes in the distribution of surfactant phosphatidylcholine in surfactant fractions occurred. The results were consistent with recycling pathway(s) that maintained surface-active surfactant pools in preterm ventilated lambs

  2. Nanoparticle decoration with surfactants: Molecular interactions, assembly, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Hendrik; Pramanik, Chandrani; Heinz, Ozge; Ding, Yifu; Mishra, Ratan K.; Marchon, Delphine; Flatt, Robert J.; Estrela-Lopis, Irina; Llop, Jordi; Moya, Sergio; Ziolo, Ronald F.

    2017-02-01

    Nanostructures of diverse chemical nature are used as biomarkers, therapeutics, catalysts, and structural reinforcements. The decoration with surfactants has a long history and is essential to introduce specific functions. The definition of surfactants in this review is very broad, following its lexical meaning ;surface active agents;, and therefore includes traditional alkyl modifiers, biological ligands, polymers, and other surface active molecules. The review systematically covers covalent and non-covalent interactions of such surfactants with various types of nanomaterials, including metals, oxides, layered materials, and polymers as well as their applications. The major themes are (i) molecular recognition and noncovalent assembly mechanisms of surfactants on the nanoparticle and nanocrystal surfaces, (ii) covalent grafting techniques and multi-step surface modification, (iii) dispersion properties and surface reactions, (iv) the use of surfactants to influence crystal growth, as well as (v) the incorporation of biorecognition and other material-targeting functionality. For the diverse materials classes, similarities and differences in surfactant assembly, function, as well as materials performance in specific applications are described in a comparative way. Major factors that lead to differentiation are the surface energy, surface chemistry and pH sensitivity, as well as the degree of surface regularity and defects in the nanoparticle cores and in the surfactant shell. The review covers a broad range of surface modifications and applications in biological recognition and therapeutics, sensors, nanomaterials for catalysis, energy conversion and storage, the dispersion properties of nanoparticles in structural composites and cement, as well as purification systems and classical detergents. Design principles for surfactants to optimize the performance of specific nanostructures are discussed. The review concludes with challenges and opportunities.

  3. Persurf, a new method to improve surfactant delivery: a study in surfactant depleted rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Burkhardt

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Exogenous surfactant is not very effective in adults with ARDS, since surfactant does not reach atelectatic alveoli. Perfluorocarbons (PFC can recruit atelectatic areas but do not replace impaired endogenous surfactant. A surfactant-PFC-mixture could combine benefits of both therapies. The aim of the proof-of-principal-study was to produce a PFC-in-surfactant emulsion (Persurf and to test in surfactant depleted Wistar rats whether Persurf achieves I. a more homogenous pulmonary distribution and II. a more homogenous recruitment of alveoli when compared with surfactant or PFC alone. METHODS: Three different PFC were mixed with surfactant and phospholipid concentration in the emulsion was measured. After surfactant depletion, animals either received 30 ml/kg of PF5080, 100 mg/kg of stained (green dye Curosurf™ or 30 ml/kg of Persurf. Lungs were fixated after 1 hour of ventilation and alveolar aeration and surfactant distribution was estimated by a stereological approach. RESULTS: Persurf contained 3 mg/ml phospholipids and was stable for more than 48 hours. Persurf-administration improved oxygenation. Histological evaluation revealed a more homogenous surfactant distribution and alveolar inflation when compared with surfactant treated animals. CONCLUSIONS: In surfactant depleted rats administration of PFC-in-surfactant emulsion leads to a more homogenous distribution and aeration of the lung than surfactant alone.

  4. Selection and Characterization of Carbon Black and Surfactants for Development of Small Scale Uranium Oxicarbide Kernels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    This report supports the effort for development of small scale fabrication of UCO (a mixture of UO{sub 2} and UC{sub 2}) fuel kernels for the generation IV high temperature gas reactor program. In particular, it is focused on optimization of dispersion conditions of carbon black in the broths from which carbon-containing (UO{sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O + C) gel spheres are prepared by internal gelation. The broth results from mixing a hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) and urea solution with an acid-deficient uranyl nitrate (ADUN) solution. Carbon black, which is previously added to one or other of the components, must stay dispersed during gelation. The report provides a detailed description of characterization efforts and results, aimed at identification and testing carbon black and surfactant combinations that would produce stable dispersions, with carbon particle sizes below 1 {micro}m, in aqueous HMTA/urea and ADUN solutions. A battery of characterization methods was used to identify the properties affecting the water dispersability of carbon blacks, such as surface area, aggregate morphology, volatile content, and, most importantly, surface chemistry. The report introduces the basic principles for each physical or chemical method of carbon black characterization, lists the results obtained, and underlines cross-correlations between methods. Particular attention is given to a newly developed method for characterization of surface chemical groups on carbons in terms of their acid-base properties (pK{sub a} spectra) based on potentiometric titration. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to confirm the identity of surfactants, both ionic and non-ionic. In addition, background information on carbon black properties and the mechanism by which surfactants disperse carbon black in water is also provided. A list of main physical and chemical properties characterized, samples analyzed, and results obtained, as well as information on the desired trend or

  5. Determination of the critical micelle concentration in simulations of surfactant systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Andrew P.; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z., E-mail: azp@princeton.edu [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Alternative methods for determining the critical micelle concentration (cmc) are investigated using canonical and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of a lattice surfactant model. A common measure of the cmc is the “free” (unassociated) surfactant concentration in the presence of micellar aggregates. Many prior simulations of micellizing systems have observed a decrease in the free surfactant concentration with overall surfactant loading for both ionic and nonionic surfactants, contrary to theoretical expectations from mass-action models of aggregation. In the present study, we investigate a simple lattice nonionic surfactant model in implicit solvent, for which highly reproducible simulations are possible in both the canonical (NVT) and grand canonical (μVT) ensembles. We confirm the previously observed decrease of free surfactant concentration at higher overall loadings and propose an algorithm for the precise calculation of the excluded volume and effective concentration of unassociated surfactant molecules in the accessible volume of the solution. We find that the cmc can be obtained by correcting the free surfactant concentration for volume exclusion effects resulting from the presence of micellar aggregates. We also develop an improved method for determination of the cmc based on the maximum in curvature for the osmotic pressure curve determined from μVT simulations. Excellent agreement in cmc and other micellar properties between NVT and μVT simulations of different system sizes is observed. The methodological developments in this work are broadly applicable to simulations of aggregating systems using any type of surfactant model (atomistic/coarse grained) or solvent description (explicit/implicit)

  6. Determination of the critical micelle concentration in simulations of surfactant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Andrew P; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2016-01-28

    Alternative methods for determining the critical micelle concentration (cmc) are investigated using canonical and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of a lattice surfactant model. A common measure of the cmc is the "free" (unassociated) surfactant concentration in the presence of micellar aggregates. Many prior simulations of micellizing systems have observed a decrease in the free surfactant concentration with overall surfactant loading for both ionic and nonionic surfactants, contrary to theoretical expectations from mass-action models of aggregation. In the present study, we investigate a simple lattice nonionic surfactant model in implicit solvent, for which highly reproducible simulations are possible in both the canonical (NVT) and grand canonical (μVT) ensembles. We confirm the previously observed decrease of free surfactant concentration at higher overall loadings and propose an algorithm for the precise calculation of the excluded volume and effective concentration of unassociated surfactant molecules in the accessible volume of the solution. We find that the cmc can be obtained by correcting the free surfactant concentration for volume exclusion effects resulting from the presence of micellar aggregates. We also develop an improved method for determination of the cmc based on the maximum in curvature for the osmotic pressure curve determined from μVT simulations. Excellent agreement in cmc and other micellar properties between NVT and μVT simulations of different system sizes is observed. The methodological developments in this work are broadly applicable to simulations of aggregating systems using any type of surfactant model (atomistic/coarse grained) or solvent description (explicit/implicit).

  7. Determination of the critical micelle concentration in simulations of surfactant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Andrew P.; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2016-01-01

    Alternative methods for determining the critical micelle concentration (cmc) are investigated using canonical and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of a lattice surfactant model. A common measure of the cmc is the “free” (unassociated) surfactant concentration in the presence of micellar aggregates. Many prior simulations of micellizing systems have observed a decrease in the free surfactant concentration with overall surfactant loading for both ionic and nonionic surfactants, contrary to theoretical expectations from mass-action models of aggregation. In the present study, we investigate a simple lattice nonionic surfactant model in implicit solvent, for which highly reproducible simulations are possible in both the canonical (NVT) and grand canonical (μVT) ensembles. We confirm the previously observed decrease of free surfactant concentration at higher overall loadings and propose an algorithm for the precise calculation of the excluded volume and effective concentration of unassociated surfactant molecules in the accessible volume of the solution. We find that the cmc can be obtained by correcting the free surfactant concentration for volume exclusion effects resulting from the presence of micellar aggregates. We also develop an improved method for determination of the cmc based on the maximum in curvature for the osmotic pressure curve determined from μVT simulations. Excellent agreement in cmc and other micellar properties between NVT and μVT simulations of different system sizes is observed. The methodological developments in this work are broadly applicable to simulations of aggregating systems using any type of surfactant model (atomistic/coarse grained) or solvent description (explicit/implicit)

  8. Effect of surfactants on the spectrofluorimetric properties of zearalenone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appell, Michael; Bosma, Wayne B.

    2011-01-01

    The chemiluminescent properties of the estrogenic mycotoxin zearalenone in the presence of aqueous micellar media were investigated using steady state fluorescence techniques. Micelles of surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and non-ionic Triton X-100 enhanced the fluorescence intensity of zearalenone in aqueous solutions. The binding constants have been determined and indicate zearalenone has the highest affinity for Triton X-100, followed by CTAB, and then by SDS. The encapsulation of zearalenone by the micelles studied is spontaneous and exothermic. The selective microenvironments provided by organized micellar systems offer an attractive medium to modulate fluorescence detection of zearalenone. - Highlights: → Surfactants can selectively modulate the fluorescence detection of zearalenone. → Binding studies provide information on the zearalenone-surfactant interactions. → Fluorescence intensity of zearalenone is related to the micelle microenvironment.

  9. Molecular perspective on diazonium adsorption for controllable functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous surfactant solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shangchao; Hilmer, Andrew J; Mendenhall, Jonathan D; Strano, Michael S; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2012-05-16

    Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) using diazonium salts allows modification of their optical and electronic properties for a variety of applications, ranging from drug-delivery vehicles to molecular sensors. However, control of the functionalization process remains a challenge, requiring molecular-level understanding of the adsorption of diazonium ions onto heterogeneous, charge-mobile SWCNT surfaces, which are typically decorated with surfactants. In this paper, we combine molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, experiments, and equilibrium reaction modeling to understand and model the extent of diazonium functionalization of SWCNTs coated with various surfactants (sodium cholate, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide). We show that the free energy of diazonium adsorption, determined using simulations, can be used to rank surfactants in terms of the extent of functionalization attained following their adsorption on the nanotube surface. The difference in binding affinities between linear and rigid surfactants is attributed to the synergistic binding of the diazonium ion to the local "hot/cold spots" formed by the charged surfactant heads. A combined simulation-modeling framework is developed to provide guidance for controlling the various sensitive experimental conditions needed to achieve the desired extent of SWCNT functionalization.

  10. Flow improvers for water injection based on surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oskarsson, H.; Uneback, I.; Hellsten, M.

    2006-03-15

    In many cases it is desirable to increase the flow of injection water when an oil well deteriorates. It is very costly in offshore operation to lay down an additional water pipe to the injection site. Flow improvers for the injection water will thus be the most cost-effective way to increase the flow rate. During the last years water-soluble polymers have also been applied for this purpose. These drag-reducing polymers are however only slowly biodegraded which has been an incentive for the development of readily biodegradable surfactants as flow improvers for injection water. A combination of a zwitterionic and an anionic surfactant has been tested in a 5.5 inch, 700 m long flow loop containing sulphate brine with salinity similar to sea water. A drag reduction between 75 and 80% was achieved with 119 ppm in solution of the surfactant blend at an average velocity of 1.9 m/s and between 50 and 55% at 2.9 m/s. The surfactants in this formulation were also found to be readily biodegradable in sea water and low bio accumulating which means they have an improved environmental profile compared to the polymers used today. Due to the self-healing properties of the drag-reducing structures formed by surfactants, these may be added before the pump section - contrary to polymers which are permanently destroyed by high shear forces. (Author)

  11. Synthesis, surface properties and antimicrobial activity of some germanium nonionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Mohamed F; Tawfik, Salah M

    2014-01-01

    Esterification reaction between different fatty acid namely; lauric, stearic, oleic and linoleic acids and polyethylene glycol-400 were performed. The produced polyethylene glycol ester were reacted with p-amine benzoic acid followed by condensation reaction with germanium dioxide in presence of sodium carbonate to form desired germinate surfactants. The chemical structures of the synthesized surfactants were determined using different spectra tools. The surface parameter including: the critical micelle concentration (CMC), effectiveness (π(cmc)), efficiency (Pc20), maximum surface excess (Γ(max)) and minimum surface area (A(min)), were calculated from the surface tension measurements. The synthesized surfactants showed higher surface activity. The thermodynamic parameters showed that adsorption and micellization processes are spontaneous. It is clear that the synthesized nonionic surfactants showed their tendency towards adsorption at the interfaces and also micellization in the bulk of their solutions. The synthesized surfactants were tested against different strain of bacteria using inhibition zone diameters. The synthesized surfactants showed good antimicrobial activities against the tested microorganisms including Gram positive, Gram negative as well as fungi. The promising inhibition efficiency of these compounds against the sulfate reducing bacteria facilitates them to be applicable as new categories of sulfate reducing bacteria biocides.

  12. Asymptotic Normality of the Optimal Solution in Multiresponse Surface Mathematical Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz-García, José A.; Caro-Lopera, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    An explicit form for the perturbation effect on the matrix of regression coeffi- cients on the optimal solution in multiresponse surface methodology is obtained in this paper. Then, the sensitivity analysis of the optimal solution is studied and the critical point characterisation of the convex program, associated with the optimum of a multiresponse surface, is also analysed. Finally, the asymptotic normality of the optimal solution is derived by the standard methods.

  13. NMR studies of electrophoretic mobility in surfactant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conveney, F.M.; Strange, J.H.; Smith, A.L.; Smith, E.G.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental technique is described in which the flow of electrically charged micelles is measured in the presence of an applied electric field using an NMR technique. The method is used to determine the electrophoretic mobility at ambient temperature of a 5% aqueous solution of sodium dodecyl sulphate and is shown to provide a new technique for the study of electrophoresis in surfactant solutions. (author). 8 refs.; 4 figs

  14. Kinetic study of the hydrolysis of 1-(4-nitrophenyl)-3-methyltriazene in aqueous solution and in the presence of surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, C; Lassiani, L; Linda, P; Lovrecich, M; Nisi, C; Rubessa, F

    1984-12-01

    The hydrolysis of 1-(4-nitrophenyl)-3-methyltriazene in aqueous solution has been studied over a pH range of 3-14. The effect of the anionic and cationic surfactants (sodium lauryl sulfate and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide) on the rate of hydrolysis was investigated. The quaternary ammonium bromide causes a rate decrease at all pH values studied, while sodium lauryl sulfate enhances the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and decreases the observed rate constants in the pH-independent region. The results are discussed in terms of the current theory of micellar effects.

  15. Effect of cationic/anionic organic surfactants on evaporation induced self assembled tin oxide nanostructured films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khun Khun, Kamalpreet; Mahajan, Aman; Bedi, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    Tin oxide nanostructures with well defined morphologies have been obtained through an evaporation induced self assembly process. The technique has been employed using an ultrasonic nebulizer for production of aersol and its subsequent deposition onto a heated glass substrate. The precursor used for aersol production was modified by introducing cationic and anionic surfactants namely cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide and sodium dodecyl sulphate respectively. The effect of surfactants on the structural, electrical and optical properties of self assembled tin oxide nanostructures were investigated by using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electroscope microscopy, two probe technique and photoluminiscence studies. The results reveal that high concentration of surfactants in the precursor solution leads to reduction in crystallite size with significant changes in the morphology of tin oxide nanostructures. Photoluminiscence studies of the nanostructures show emissions in the visible region which exhibit marked changes in the intensities upon variation of surfactants in the precursor solutions.

  16. Effect of cationic/anionic organic surfactants on evaporation induced self assembled tin oxide nanostructured films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khun Khun, Kamalpreet [Material Science Laboratory, Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India); Mahajan, Aman, E-mail: dramanmahajan@yahoo.co.in [Material Science Laboratory, Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India); Bedi, R.K. [Material Science Laboratory, Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India)

    2011-01-15

    Tin oxide nanostructures with well defined morphologies have been obtained through an evaporation induced self assembly process. The technique has been employed using an ultrasonic nebulizer for production of aersol and its subsequent deposition onto a heated glass substrate. The precursor used for aersol production was modified by introducing cationic and anionic surfactants namely cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide and sodium dodecyl sulphate respectively. The effect of surfactants on the structural, electrical and optical properties of self assembled tin oxide nanostructures were investigated by using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electroscope microscopy, two probe technique and photoluminiscence studies. The results reveal that high concentration of surfactants in the precursor solution leads to reduction in crystallite size with significant changes in the morphology of tin oxide nanostructures. Photoluminiscence studies of the nanostructures show emissions in the visible region which exhibit marked changes in the intensities upon variation of surfactants in the precursor solutions.

  17. Uptake of phosphorus from surfactant solutions by wheat leaves: spreading kinetics, wetted area, and drying time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirce, Courtney A E; Priest, Craig; McBeath, Therese M; McLaughlin, Mike J

    2016-01-07

    The delivery and uptake of nutrients at the surface of plant leaves is an important physicochemical phenomenon that depends on leaf surface morphology and chemistry, fertilizer formulation chemistry (including adjuvant and associated surfactants), wetting dynamics, and many other physical, chemical and biological factors. In this study, the role of spreading dynamics in determining uptake of the macronutrient phosphorus from phosphoric acid fertilizer solution in combination with three different adjuvants was measured in the absence of droplet run-off and splashing. When run-off and splashing losses were zero, spreading and drying rates had a small to negligible effect on the uptake efficiency. The results suggest that uptake may be much less sensitive to the specific choice of adjuvant and long time-scale spreading behaviour than one might intuitively expect.

  18. Simultaneous injection of polymer and surfactant for improving oil recovery; Injecao simultanea de polimero e surfactante para aumento da recuperacao de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Ana C.R.; Valentim, Adriano C.M.; Marcelino, Cleuton P.; Fagundes, Fabio P.; Girao, Joaquim H.S.; Garcia, Rosangela B. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Lab. de Pesquisa em Petroleo (LAPET)

    2004-07-01

    The injection of polymeric solutions in petroleum reservoirs is a supplemental method of petroleum recovery, that seeks to increase the volumetric efficiency of swept of the oil with the decrease of the mobility of the injection water. In the contact between two non miscible fluids, superficial tensions are established, that can influence the relations between the rock and the fluids, depending on the nature of both. Therefore, the combined injection of a surfactant and a polymer can promote improvements in the injectivity and in the global recovery efficiency. In this work it was used samples of commercial polyacrylamide, which were characterized through hydrolysis degree, molecular weight and rheological behavior. From these results it was chosen one sample to be used associated to a polymeric surfactant. Through a core flood system, the following tests were done: injection of polymer solution; injection of surfactant solution followed by polymer solution and injection of surfactant / polymer mixture. The results showed that the injection of surfactant / polymer mixture promoted a significant increase in the residual resistance factor, in relation to the other situations. (author)

  19. Surfactant from neonatal to pediatric ICU: bench and bedside evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boet, A; Brat, R; Aguilera, S S; Tissieres, P; De Luca, D

    2014-12-01

    Surfactant is a cornerstone of neonatal critical care for the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome of preterm babies. However, other indications have been studied for various clinical conditions both in term neonates and in children beyond neonatal age. A high degree of evidence is not yet available in some cases and this is due to the complex and not yet totally understood physiopathology of the different types of pediatric and neonatal lung injury. We here summarise the state of the art of the bench and bedside knowledge about surfactant use for the respiratory conditions usually cared for in neonatal and pediatric intensive care units. Future research direction will also be presented. On the whole, surfactant is able to improve oxygenation in infection related respiratory failure, pulmonary hemorrhage and meconium aspiration syndrome. Bronchoalveolar lavage with surfactant solution is currently the only means to reduce mortality or need for extracorporeal life support in neonates with meconium aspiration. While surfactant bolus or lavage only improves the oxygenation and ventilatory requirements in other types of postneonatal acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), there seems to be a reduction in the mortality of small infants with RSV-related ARDS.

  20. Activated carbon oxygen content influence on water and surfactant adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Phillip; Wu, Sophie Hua; Badalyan, Alexander

    2002-02-15

    This research investigates the adsorption properties of three activated carbons (AC) derived from coconut, coal, and wood origin. Each carbon demonstrates different levels of resistance to 2 M NaOH treatment. The coconut AC offers the greatest and wood AC the least resistance. The influence of base treatment is mapped in terms of its effects on specific surface area, micropore volume, water adsorption, and dodecanoic acid adsorption from both water and 2 M NaOH solution. A linear relationship exists between the number of water molecules adsorbed at the B-point of the water adsorption isotherm and the oxygen content determined from elemental analysis. Surfactant adsorption isotherms from water and 2 M NaOH indicate that the AC oxygen content effects a greater dependence on affinity for surfactant than specific surface area and micropore volume. We show a linear relationship between the plateau amount of surfactant adsorbed and the AC oxygen content in both water and NaOH phases. The higher the AC oxygen content, the lower the amount of surfactant adsorbed. In contrast, no obvious relationship could be drawn between the surfactant amount adsorbed and the surface area.

  1. Effect of organic complexing compounds and surfactants on coprecipitation of cesium radionuclides with nickel ferrocyanide precipitate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milyutin, V.V.; Gelis, V.M.; Ershov, B.G.; Seliverstov, A.F.

    2008-01-01

    One studied the effect of the organic complexing compounds and of the surfactants on the coprecipitation of Cs trace amounts with the nickel ferrocyanide precipitate. The presence of the oxalate- and ethylenediamin-tetraacetate-ions in the solutions is shown to result in the abrupt reduction of Cs coprecipitation degree. The effect of the various surfactants manifested itself not so explicitly. To reduce the negative effect of the organic compounds on the intimacy of Cs coprecipitation one tried out the procedure of their chemical destruction by ozon. Pre-ozonization of the solutions enabled to prevent the negative effect of the organic complexing compounds and of the surfactants on Cs coprecipitation with nickel ferrocyanide precipitate [ru

  2. Kinetics and mechanism for the sonochemical degradation of a nonionic surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Ritu; Grieser, Franz; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2009-03-26

    The sonolytic degradation of the nonionic surfactant, octaethylene glycol monododecyl ether (C(12)E(8)), has been studied at various initial concentrations below and above its critical micelle concentration (CMC). It has been observed that the degradation rate increases with an increase in the initial concentration of the surfactant until the CMC is reached. Above the CMC an almost constant degradation rate is observed, suggesting that the surfactant in its monomer form is involved in the degradation process. The degradation process of C(12)E(8) involves two distinct primary processes occurring at the bubble/solution interface: (a) hydroxylation/oxidation of the surfactant and (b) pyrolytic fragmentation of the surfactant. The oxidative cleavage of ethylene oxide units provides evidence for OH radical attack. Hydroxylation of the ethoxy chain gives rise to various short-chain carboxyalkyl-polyethylene glycol intermediates. The polyethylene glycol chain formed, due to the scission of the C(12)E(8) molecule, undergoes rapid hydroxylation/oxidation to yield simple compounds that have the potential to undergo further degradation. The detection of multiple intermediates indicates that several processes affect the complete degradation pathways of the surfactant molecule. TOC analysis, however, indicates that the sonolytic mineralization of the surfactant is difficult to achieve at reasonable rates due to the relatively low surface activity of the degradation products formed during sonolysis.

  3. A hybrid interface tracking - level set technique for multiphase flow with soluble surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seungwon; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir; Kahouadji, Lyes; Matar, Omar K.; Craster, Richard V.

    2018-04-01

    A formulation for soluble surfactant transport in multiphase flows recently presented by Muradoglu and Tryggvason (JCP 274 (2014) 737-757) [17] is adapted to the context of the Level Contour Reconstruction Method, LCRM, (Shin et al. IJNMF 60 (2009) 753-778, [8]) which is a hybrid method that combines the advantages of the Front-tracking and Level Set methods. Particularly close attention is paid to the formulation and numerical implementation of the surface gradients of surfactant concentration and surface tension. Various benchmark tests are performed to demonstrate the accuracy of different elements of the algorithm. To verify surfactant mass conservation, values for surfactant diffusion along the interface are compared with the exact solution for the problem of uniform expansion of a sphere. The numerical implementation of the discontinuous boundary condition for the source term in the bulk concentration is compared with the approximate solution. Surface tension forces are tested for Marangoni drop translation. Our numerical results for drop deformation in simple shear are compared with experiments and results from previous simulations. All benchmarking tests compare well with existing data thus providing confidence that the adapted LCRM formulation for surfactant advection and diffusion is accurate and effective in three-dimensional multiphase flows with a structured mesh. We also demonstrate that this approach applies easily to massively parallel simulations.

  4. Small angle neutron scattering study of two nonionic surfactants in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nonionic surfactants in water micellar solutions. RAJEWSKA ALDONA. Institute of ... water solution for concentration c = 0.17% (dilute regime) at different temperatures in the range t = 10–35°C by small .... which yields the pair distance distribution function p(r), where r is the distance in real space. The point, at which the p(r) ...

  5. Atrazine and Diuron partitioning within a soil-water-surfactant system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.; Keller, A.

    2006-12-01

    The interaction between pesticide and soil and water is even more complex in the presence of surfactants. In this study, batch equilibrium was employed to study the sorption of surfactants and the partitioning behaviors of Atrazine and Diuron within a soil-water-surfactant system. Five soils and four surfactants (nonionic Triton- 100, cationic Benzalkonium Chloride (BC), anionic Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS), and anionic Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS)) were used. All surfactant sorption isotherms exhibited an initial linear increase at low surfactant concentrations but reached an asymptotic value as the surfactant concentrations increased. Among the surfactants, BC had the highest sorption onto all soils, followed by Triton-100 and then by LAS and SDS, implying that the nature of the charge significantly influences surfactant sorption. Sorption of either Triton-100 or BC was highly correlated with soil Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) while that of LAS and SDS was complicated by the presence of Ca2+ and Mg2+ in the aqueous phase and the CEC sites. Both LAS and SDS formed complexes with Ca2+ and Mg2+, resulting in a significant decrease in the detergency of the surfactants. At high surfactant concentrations and with micelles present in the aqueous phase, the micelles formed a more competitive partitioning site for the pesticides, resulting in less pesticide sorbed to the soil. At low Triton-100 and BC concentration, the sorption of the surfactants first resulted in less Atrazine sorption but more Diuron sorption, implying competition between the surfactants and Atrazine, which serves as an indirect evidence that there is a different sorption mechanism for Atrazine. Atrazine is a weak base and it protonates and becomes positively charged near particle surfaces where the pH is much lower than in the bulk solution. The protonated Atrazine may then be held on the CEC sites via electrostatic attraction. Triton-100, LAS and SDS sorbed on the soil showed similar

  6. Optimal Water-Power Flow Problem: Formulation and Distributed Optimal Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall-Anese, Emiliano [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhao, Changhong [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zamzam, Admed S. [University of Minnesota; Sidiropoulos, Nicholas D. [University of Minnesota; Taylor, Josh A. [University of Toronto

    2018-01-12

    This paper formalizes an optimal water-power flow (OWPF) problem to optimize the use of controllable assets across power and water systems while accounting for the couplings between the two infrastructures. Tanks and pumps are optimally managed to satisfy water demand while improving power grid operations; {for the power network, an AC optimal power flow formulation is augmented to accommodate the controllability of water pumps.} Unfortunately, the physics governing the operation of the two infrastructures and coupling constraints lead to a nonconvex (and, in fact, NP-hard) problem; however, after reformulating OWPF as a nonconvex, quadratically-constrained quadratic problem, a feasible point pursuit-successive convex approximation approach is used to identify feasible and optimal solutions. In addition, a distributed solver based on the alternating direction method of multipliers enables water and power operators to pursue individual objectives while respecting the couplings between the two networks. The merits of the proposed approach are demonstrated for the case of a distribution feeder coupled with a municipal water distribution network.

  7. Novel Pyridinium Surfactants with Unsaturated Alkyl Chains : Aggregation Behavior and Interactions with Methyl Orange in Aqueous Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Johanna M.; Buwalda, Rixt T.; Hulst, Ron; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the synthesis and a study of the aggregation behavior of 4-undecyl-1-methyl- and 4-undecenyl-1-methylpyridinium iodide surfactants. The effect of the position of the double bond in the alkyl chain of the surfactant on the critical micelle concentration (cmc), degree of counterion

  8. Study of interactions between hyaluronan and cationic surfactants by means of calorimetry, turbidimetry, potentiometry and conductometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krouská, J; Pekař, M; Klučáková, M; Šarac, B; Bešter-Rogač, M

    2017-02-10

    The thermodynamics of the micelle formation of the cationic surfactants tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) with and without the addition of hyaluronan of two molecular weights was studied in aqueous solution by titration calorimetry. Macroscopic phase separation, which was detected by calorimetry and also by conductometry, occurs when charges on the surfactant and hyaluronan are balanced. In contrast, turbidimetry and potentiometry showed hyaluronan-surfactant interactions at very low surfactant concentrations. The observed differences between systems prepared with CTAB and TTAB indicate that besides the electrostatic interactions, which probably predominate, hydrophobic effects also play a significant role in hyaluronan interactions with cationic surfactants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermodynamic aspects of polymer–surfactant interactions: Gemini (16-5-16-PVP-water system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naved Azum

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP and gemini surfactant (16-5-16 in aqueous solution has been analyzed using conductometry. From conductivity data the critical aggregation concentration (cac, critical micelle concentration (cmc, the effective degree of counter-ion binding (β at different temperatures were obtained. The thermodynamic parameters, i.e., Gibbs energy of aggregation and micellization, standard enthalpy of aggregation, and standard entropy of aggregation of surfactant/polymer system were estimated, employing pseudophase separation model. The negative values of Gibbs energy and standard enthalpy suggest that the surfactant/polymer aggregation process is spontaneous and exothermic respectively.

  10. A Visualization Technique for Accessing Solution Pool in Interactive Methods of Multiobjective Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Filatovas, Ernestas; Podkopaev, Dmitry; Kurasova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Interactive methods of multiobjective optimization repetitively derive Pareto optimal solutions based on decision maker’s preference information and present the obtained solutions for his/her consideration. Some interactive methods save the obtained solutions into a solution pool and, at each iteration, allow the decision maker considering any of solutions obtained earlier. This feature contributes to the flexibility of exploring the Pareto optimal set and learning about the op...

  11. Design and screening of synergistic blends of SiO2 nanoparticles and surfactants for enhanced oil recovery in high-temperature reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Nhu Y Thi; Pham, Duy Khanh; Le, Kim Hung; Nguyen, Phuong Tung

    2011-01-01

    SiO 2 nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by the sol–gel method in an ultrasound reactor and monodispersed NPs with an average particle size of 10–12 nm were obtained. The synergy occurring in blending NPs and anionic surfactant solutions was identified by ultra-low interfacial tension (IFT) reduction measured by a spinning drop tensiometer (Temco500). The oil displacement efficiency of the synergistic blends and surfactant solutions at Dragon South-East (DSE) reservoir temperature was evaluated using contact angle measurement (Dataphysics OCA 20). It was found that SiO 2 /surfactant synergistic blends displace oil as well as their original surfactant solutions at the same 1000 ppm total concentration. Abundant slag appearing in the SiO 2 /surfactant medium during oil displacement could be attributed to an adsorption of surfactants onto the NPs. The results indicate that at a concentration of 1000 ppm in total, the original surfactant SS16-47A and its blend with SiO 2 NPs in the ratio of 8:2 exhibited an IFT reduction as high as fourfold of the IFT recorded for the DSE oil–brine interface and very high speed of oil displacement. Therefore, it could potentially be applicable to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in high-temperature reservoirs with high hardness-injection-brine, like the one at DSE. This opens up a new direction for developing effective EOR compositions, which require less surfactant and are environmentally safer

  12. Optimality conditions for the numerical solution of optimization problems with PDE constraints :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilo Valentin, Miguel Alejandro; Ridzal, Denis

    2014-03-01

    A theoretical framework for the numerical solution of partial di erential equation (PDE) constrained optimization problems is presented in this report. This theoretical framework embodies the fundamental infrastructure required to e ciently implement and solve this class of problems. Detail derivations of the optimality conditions required to accurately solve several parameter identi cation and optimal control problems are also provided in this report. This will allow the reader to further understand how the theoretical abstraction presented in this report translates to the application.

  13. Deposition and release kinetics of nano-TiO2 in saturated porous media: Effects of solution ionic strength and surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godinez, Itzel G.; Darnault, Christophe J.G.; Khodadoust, Amid P.; Bogdan, Dorin

    2013-01-01

    The aggregation, transport and deposition kinetics (i.e. attachment and release) of TiO 2 nanoparticles (nano-TiO 2 ) were investigated as a function of ionic strength and the presence of anionic (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, SDBS) and non-ionic (Triton X-100) surfactants in 100% critical micelle concentration (CMC). The electrolyte concentration of the suspensions dictated the kinetic stability of nano-TiO 2 thus influencing the transport and retention of the nanoaggregates in the saturated porous medium. With increasing ionic strength, the interaction between approaching nano-TiO 2 and nano-TiO 2 already deposited onto collectors surfaces seemed to be more favorable than the interaction between approaching nano-TiO 2 and bare collectors surfaces. The abrupt and gradual reduction in electrolyte concentration during the flushing cycles of the column experiments induced the release of previously deposited nano-TiO 2 suggesting attachment of nano-TiO 2 through secondary energy minimum. Highlights: ► This study focuses on aggregation, transport and deposition kinetics of nano-TiO 2 . ► Ionic strength and surfactants impact nano-TiO 2 transport in saturated porous media. ► Previously deposited nano-TiO 2 serve as preferential sites for subsequent deposition. ► Changes in solution chemistry cause nanodeposits to release a portion of nano-TiO 2 . -- Previously deposited nano-TiO 2 serve as preferential sites for subsequent deposition and changes in solution chemistry cause nanodeposits to release a portion of nano-TiO 2

  14. LOWER COST METHODS FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY (IOR) VIA SURFACTANT FLOODING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William A. Goddard III; Yongchun Tang; Patrick Shuler; Mario Blanco; Seung Soon Jang; Shiang-Tai Lin; Prabal Maiti; Yongfu Wu; Stefan Iglauer; Xiaohang Zhang

    2004-09-01

    This report provides a summary of the work performed in this 3-year project sponsored by DOE. The overall objective of this project is to identify new, potentially more cost-effective surfactant formulations for improved oil recovery (IOR). The general approach is to use an integrated experimental and computational chemistry effort to improve our understanding of the link between surfactant structure and performance, and from this knowledge, develop improved IOR surfactant formulations. Accomplishments for the project include: (1) completion of a literature review to assemble current and new surfactant IOR ideas, (2) Development of new atomistic-level MD (molecular dynamic) modeling methodologies to calculate IFT (interfacial tension) rigorously from first principles, (3) exploration of less computationally intensive mesoscale methods to estimate IFT, Quantitative Structure Property Relationship (QSPR), and cohesive energy density (CED) calculations, (4) experiments to screen many surfactant structures for desirable low IFT and solid adsorption behavior, and (5) further experimental characterization of the more promising new candidate formulations (based on alkyl polyglycosides (APG) and alkyl propoxy sulfate surfactants). Important findings from this project include: (1) the IFT between two pure substances may be calculated quantitatively from fundamental principles using Molecular Dynamics, the same approach can provide qualitative results for ternary systems containing a surfactant, (2) low concentrations of alkyl polyglycoside surfactants have potential for IOR (Improved Oil Recovery) applications from a technical standpoint (if formulated properly with a cosurfactant, they can create a low IFT at low concentration) and also are viable economically as they are available commercially, and (3) the alkylpropoxy sulfate surfactants have promising IFT performance also, plus these surfactants can have high optimal salinity and so may be attractive for use in higher

  15. Optimized mixed oils remarkably reduce the amount of surfactants in microemulsions without affecting oral bioavailability of ibuprofen by simultaneously enlarging microemulsion areas and enhancing drug solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yizhen; Tuo, Jue; Huang, Huizhi; Liu, Dan; You, Xiuhua; Mai, Jialuo; Song, Jiaqi; Xie, Yanqi; Wu, Chuanbin; Hu, Haiyan

    2015-06-20

    The toxicity and irritation associated with high amounts of surfactants restrict the extensive utilization of microemulsions. To address these shortcomings, employing mixed oils to enlarge microemulsion areas therefore reducing surfactant contents is a promising strategy. However, what kinds of mixed oils are more efficient in enlarging microemulsion areas still remains unclear. In this research, we found that the chain length and degree of unsaturation of oils play a key role in enlarging microemulsion areas. The combination of moderate chain saturated oil caprylic/capric triglyceride (GTCC) with long chain unsaturated oil glycerol trioleate significantly increased the microemulsion areas. Solubility of ibuprofen in the mixed oils was unexpectedly and remarkably increased (almost 300mg/mL) compared with that (around 100mg/mL) of the single oil (GTCC), which also resulted in greatly increased solubility of ibuprofen in mixed oils-containing microemulsions. By optimizing the mixed oil formulation, the absolute amount of surfactant in drug-loaded microemulsions was reduced but increased drug oral bioavailability in rats was maintained. It could be concluded that the combined use of moderate chain oils and long chain unsaturated oils could not only acquire enlarged microemulsion areas but also enhanced drug solubility, therefore doubly reducing surfactant amount, which is extremely beneficial for developing safe microemulsions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Effect of temperature on the (liquid + liquid) equilibrium for aqueous solution of nonionic surfactant and salt: Experimental and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foroutan, Masumeh [Physical Chemistry Department, School of Chemistry, College of Science, University of Tehran, 14155-6455 Enghelab Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: foroutan@khayam.ut.ac.ir; Heidari, Nosrat; Mohammadlou, Maryam [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Uremia University, Uremia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sojahrood, Amin Jafari [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Uremia University, Uremia (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-07-15

    The effect of temperature on the (liquid + liquid) equilibrium of the aqueous solution of surfactant polyoxyethylene cetylether (with abbreviation name Brij 58) and diammonium hydrogen phosphate has been investigated at T = (303.15, 313.15, 323.15, and 333.15) K. The Flory-Huggins equation with two electrostatic terms (Debye-Huckle and Pitzer-Debye-Huckle equations) was used to correlate the phase behavior of this system. Good agreement has been found between experimental and calculated data from both models. The results indicated that the enlargement of the two-phase region upon increasing the temperature. Additionally temperature dependency of the parameters of the Flory-Huggins model has been calculated.

  17. Aggregation work at polydisperse micellization: ideal solution and "dressed micelle" models comparing to molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burov, S V; Shchekin, A K

    2010-12-28

    General thermodynamic relations for the work of polydisperse micelle formation in the model of ideal solution of molecular aggregates in nonionic surfactant solution and the model of "dressed micelles" in ionic solution have been considered. In particular, the dependence of the aggregation work on the total concentration of nonionic surfactant has been analyzed. The analogous dependence for the work of formation of ionic aggregates has been examined with regard to existence of two variables of a state of an ionic aggregate, the aggregation numbers of surface active ions and counterions. To verify the thermodynamic models, the molecular dynamics simulations of micellization in nonionic and ionic surfactant solutions at two total surfactant concentrations have been performed. It was shown that for nonionic surfactants, even at relatively high total surfactant concentrations, the shape and behavior of the work of polydisperse micelle formation found within the model of the ideal solution at different total surfactant concentrations agrees fairly well with the numerical experiment. For ionic surfactant solutions, the numerical results indicate a strong screening of ionic aggregates by the bound counterions. This fact as well as independence of the coefficient in the law of mass action for ionic aggregates on total surfactant concentration and predictable behavior of the "waterfall" lines of surfaces of the aggregation work upholds the model of "dressed" ionic aggregates.

  18. On the mesoscopic origins of high viscosities in some polyelectrolyte-surfactant mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Ingo, E-mail: ingo.hoffmann@tu-berlin.de [Stranski-Laboratorium für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Institut für Chemie, Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 124, Sekr. TC 7, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Institut Max von Laue-Paul Langevin (ILL), F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Farago, Bela; Schweins, Ralf; Falus, Peter; Sharp, Melissa [Institut Max von Laue-Paul Langevin (ILL), F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Prévost, Sylvain [Stranski-Laboratorium für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Institut für Chemie, Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 124, Sekr. TC 7, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Gradzielski, Michael, E-mail: michael.gradzielski@tu-berlin.de [Stranski-Laboratorium für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Institut für Chemie, Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 124, Sekr. TC 7, D-10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-08-21

    Oppositely charged polyelectrolyte (PE) surfactant mixtures allow the control of rheological parameters of a solution even at fairly low concentrations. For example, addition of 0.3 wt. % of anionic surfactant to a 1 wt. % solution of the polycation JR 400 increases the viscosity by 4 orders of magnitude. Recently, we could show that this increase is related to the formation of mixed, rod-like PE/surfactant aggregates which interconnect several polyelectrolyte chains [Hoffmann et al., Europhys. Lett. 104, 28001 (2013)]. In this paper, we refine our structural model of the aggregates to obtain a more consistent picture of their internal structure for different anionic surfactants. Combining small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron spin-echo (NSE) allows us to determine the size of the aggregates. By comparing different contrasts, the internal structure of the aggregates can be elucidated and it is seen that the PE in the aggregates retains a relatively high freedom of movement. We proceeded to investigate the influence of the surfactant concentration and the surfactant type on structure and dynamics of the mixed aggregates. It is seen that the structural parameters of the aggregates depend very little on the surfactant concentration and headgroup. However, it is crucial to incorporate a sufficient amount of PE in the aggregates to increase the viscosity of the aggregates. By comparing viscous samples at 1 wt. % PE concentration with samples at a PE concentration of 0.3 wt. %, where no significant increase in viscosity is observed, we find that similar aggregates are formed already at this lower PE concentrations. However, the amount of PE incorporated in them is insufficient to interconnect several PE chains and therefore, they do not increase viscosity. So, our detailed investigation combining contrast variation SANS and NSE does not only allow to explain the viscosity behavior but also to deduced detailed information regarding the structures and

  19. Effect of a cationic surfactant on the volatilization of PAHs from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Li; Zhu, Lizhong

    2012-06-01

    Cationic surfactants are common in soils because of their use in daily cosmetic and cleaning products, and their use as a soil amendment for the mitigation and remediation of organic contaminated soils has been proposed. Such surfactant may affect the transfer and fate of organic contaminants in the environment. This study investigated the effect of a cationic surfactant, dodecylpyridinium bromide (DDPB), on the volatilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from a paddy soil. The volatilization of PAHs from moist soil amended with different concentrations of DDPB was tested in an open system. The specific effects of DDPB on the liquid-vapor and solid-vapor equilibriums of PAHs were separately investigated in closed systems by headspace analysis. DDPB affects both liquid-vapor and solid-vapor processes of PAHs in soil. At DDPB concentrations below the critical micelle concentration (CMC), movement of PAHs from the bulk solution to the gas-liquid interface appeared to be facilitated by interaction between PAHs and the surfactant monomers adsorbed at the gas-liquid interface, promoting the volatilization of PAHs from solution. However, when DDPB was greater than the CMC, volatilization was inhibited due to the solubilization of PAHs by micelles. On the other hand, the formation of sorbed surfactant significantly inhibited the solid-vapor volatilization of PAHs. The overall effect of the two simultaneous effects of DDPB on liquid-vapor and solid-vapor processes was a decreased volatilization loss of PAHs from soil. Inhibition of PAH volatilization was more significant for the soil with a lower moisture content.

  20. Pulmonary surfactant and lung transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erasmus, Michiel Elardus

    1997-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant lowers the surface tension at the air-water interface inside the alveolus. This is achieved by adsorption of surfactant phospholipids at the air-water interface, a process controlled by surfactant-associated proteins, such as SP-A. In this way, surfactant prevents collapse of

  1. Solubilisation of a host molecule in a surfactant film: thermodynamic and structural approach in the case of lindane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testard, Fabienne

    1996-01-01

    In this research thesis, the author aimed at understanding the main aspects of solubilisation in the specific case of a pesticide, the lindane, which is a hydrophobic molecule, poorly soluble in water. She first proposes a review of some existing models of solubilisation, and presents the only existing predictive model for the prediction of solubilisation in water-ionic surfactant binary systems. She addresses these systems and tries to characterise disruptions induced by the presence of the solute for lindane-saturated solutions (study of phase diagrams, of structure for different surfactant concentrations and different temperatures). Then she focuses on a part of the ternary diagram which allows micro emulsions to be reached at the point of spontaneous null curvature. She reports the study (by neutron and X ray scattering at small angles) of structural information on the surfactant film in different aggregates of ternary solutions in presence of solute. She finally proposes a more chemical approach to solubilisation [fr

  2. Liquid scintillation solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, E.C.

    1977-01-01

    A liquid scintillation solution is described which includes (1) a scintillation solvent (toluene and xylene), (2) a primary scintillation solute (PPO and Butyl PBD), (3) a secondary scintillation solute (POPOP and Dimethyl POPOP), (4) a plurality of substantially different surfactants and (5) a filter dissolving and/or transparentizing agent. 8 claims

  3. Modulation of the wettability of excipients by surfactant and its impacts on the disintegration and release of tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Baixue; Xu, Lu; Wang, Qiuxiao; Li, Sanming

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the modulation of the wettability of excipients by different types of surfactants and its impacts on the disintegration of tablets and drug release. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of surfactants, including sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB), cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and polysorbate (Tween-20 and Tween-80), was obtained using the platinum ring method. Contact angles of surfactant solutions on the excipient compacts and double-distilled water on the mixture of surfactant and the other excipient (magnesium stearate (MgSt) or sodium alginate (SA)) were measured by the sessile drop technique. Besides, surface free energy of excipients was calculated by the Owens method. Finally, the disintegration of tablets and in vitro dissolution testing were performed according to the method described in USP. The wettability of excipients could be enhanced to different extent with low concentration of surfactant solutions and maintained stable basically after CMC. For MgSt (hydrophobic excipient), the shorter the hydrophobic chain (C 12 , including SDS and DTAB), the better the wettability with the addition of surfactant in the formulation, leading to the shorter disintegration time of tablets and higher drug release rate. In contrast, the wettability of SA (hydrophilic excipient) was reduced by adding surfactant, resulting in the longer disintegration time of tablets and lower release rate. The modulation of the wetting of pharmaceutical excipients by surfactant had changed the disintegration time of tablets and drug release rate to a greater extent.

  4. Relating Structure to Efficiency in Surfactant-Free Polymer/Fullerene Nanoparticle-Based Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Stefan; Clulow, Andrew J; Howard, Ian A; Gilbert, Elliot P; Burn, Paul L; Gentle, Ian R; Colsmann, Alexander

    2017-12-13

    Nanoparticle dispersions open up an ecofriendly route toward printable organic solar cells. They can be formed from a variety of organic semiconductors by using miniemulsions that employ surfactants to stabilize the nanoparticles in dispersion and to prevent aggregation. However, whenever surfactant-based nanoparticle dispersions have been used to fabricate solar cells, the reported performances remain moderate. In contrast, solar cells from nanoparticle dispersions formed by precipitation (without surfactants) can exhibit power conversion efficiencies close to those of state-of-the-art solar cells processed from blend solutions using chlorinated solvents. In this work, we use small-angle neutron scattering measurements and transient absorption spectroscopy to investigate why surfactant-free nanoparticles give rise to efficient organic solar cells. We show that surfactant-free nanoparticles comprise a uniform distribution of small semiconductor domains, similar to that of bulk-heterojunction films formed using traditional solvent processing. This observation differs from surfactant-based miniemulsion nanoparticles that typically exhibit core-shell structures. Hence, the surfactant-free nanoparticles already possess the optimum morphology for efficient energy conversion before they are assembled into the photoactive layer of a solar cell. This structural property underpins the superior performance of the solar cells containing surfactant-free nanoparticles and is an important design criterion for future nanoparticle inks.

  5. Solution quality improvement in chiller loading optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geem, Zong Woo

    2011-01-01

    In order to reduce greenhouse gas emission, we can energy-efficiently operate a multiple chiller system using optimization techniques. So far, various optimization techniques have been proposed to the optimal chiller loading problem. Most of those techniques are meta-heuristic algorithms such as genetic algorithm, simulated annealing, and particle swarm optimization. However, this study applied a gradient-based method, named generalized reduced gradient, and then obtains better results when compared with other approaches. When two additional approaches (hybridization between meta-heuristic algorithm and gradient-based algorithm; and reformulation of optimization structure by adding a binary variable which denotes chiller's operating status) were introduced, generalized reduced gradient found even better solutions. - Highlights: → Chiller loading problem is optimized by generalized reduced gradient (GRG) method. → Results are compared with meta-heuristic algorithms such as genetic algorithm. → Results are even enhanced by hybridizing meta-heuristic and gradient techniques. → Results are even enhanced by modifying the optimization formulation.

  6. Combined ultrasound/ozone degradation of carbazole in APG{sub 1214} surfactant solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Guodong, E-mail: jiguodong@iee.pku.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Baolong; Wu, Yingchao [Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2012-07-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We first describe the role of US/O{sub 3} in promoting carbazole degradation in APG{sub 1214} solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 20 W ultrasound for 30 min improves the effectiveness of carbazole ozonolysis by 5-10%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 40 W or 80 W only plays a role in promoting degradation of carbazole in the first 5 min. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The content of {center_dot}OH radical is inversely proportional to the ultrasound power. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absolute value of zeta potential of APG{sub 1214} micelles is inversely proportional to US power. - Abstract: We examined the effects of power and treatment time on the ultrasonically enhanced ozonation of carbazole dissolved in APG{sub 1214} surfactant solutions, including an analysis of the mechanism of {center_dot}OH radical formation, the zeta potential of the colloidal suspension, the influence of ultrasound on micellar morphology, and the degradation kinetics for carbazole and APG{sub 1214}. A 30 min ultrasound treatment at 28 kHz and 20 W improved the degradation of carbazole by 5-10%, while power levels of 40 W and 80 W provided improvements only during the first 5 min and resulted in reduced degradation after 15 min. The {center_dot}OH concentration was inversely proportional to ultrasound power, and directly proportional to the irradiation time. The absolute value of the APG{sub 1214} micelle zeta potential was inversely proportional to power and decreased with increasing irradiation time. The relationships of {center_dot}OH radical concentration in APG{sub 1214} micelles, the zeta potential, and the micellar dynamic radius (R{sub h}) to ultrasonic power and time are the key factors affecting carbazole degradation in this system.

  7. Effects of Fructose and Temperature on the Micellization of a Cationic Gemini Surfactant, Pentanediyl-1,5-bis(dimethylcetylammonium) Bromide in Aqueous Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md. Sayem; Mohammed Siddiq, A.; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2017-12-01

    By the conductivity measurements the effects of fructose and temperature (293-308 K) on the micellization of a cationic gemini surfactant (GS), pentanediyl-1,5-bis(dimethylcetylammonium) bromide in aqueous solutions have been investigated. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of GS was measured at the different temperatures and fructose concentrations. An increasing trend of the CMC values is with addition of fructose. With increasing temperature, the CMC values are in a similar increasing trend. The CMC of GS by dye solubilization method at room temperature have been determined. The standard Gibbs energy, enthalpy and entropy of GS micellization have been evaluated. From these thermodynamic parameters, it was found that in presence of fructose, the stability of the GS aqueous solutions decreases.

  8. Families of optimal thermodynamic solutions for combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy, E.; Scenna, N.J.; Benz, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    Optimal designs of a CCGT power plant characterized by maximum second law efficiency values are determined for a wide range of power demands and different values of the available heat transfer area. These thermodynamic optimal solutions are found within a feasible operation region by means of a non-linear mathematical programming (NLP) model, where decision variables (i.e. transfer areas, power production, mass flow rates, temperatures and pressures) can vary freely. Technical relationships among them are used to systematize optimal values of design and operative variables of a CCGT power plant into optimal solution sets, named here as optimal solution families. From an operative and design point of view, the families of optimal solutions let knowing in advance optimal values of the CCGT variables when facing changes of power demand or adjusting the design to an available heat transfer area.

  9. Microstructure and thermal conductivity of surfactant-free NiO nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, Pranati [Laboratory for Emerging Energy and Electronic Materials, Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Misra, Dinesh K. [The Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Salvador, Jim [Chemical Sciences and Materials Systems Laboratory, General Motors R and D Center, Warren, MI 48090 (United States); Makongo, Julien P.A. [Laboratory for Emerging Energy and Electronic Materials, Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Chaubey, Girija S. [Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Takas, Nathan J. [Laboratory for Emerging Energy and Electronic Materials, Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Wiley, John B. [Department of Chemistry, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Poudeu, Pierre F.P., E-mail: ppoudeup@umich.edu [Laboratory for Emerging Energy and Electronic Materials, Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    High purity, nanometer sized surfactant-free nickel oxide (NiO) particles were produced in gram scale using a solution combustion method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), gas pycnometry and gas adsorption analysis (BET). The average particle size of the as-synthesized NiO increases significantly with the preheating temperature of the furnace, while the specific surface area decreases. A BET specific surface area of {approx}100 m{sup 2}/g was obtained for NiO nanoparticles with size as small as 3 nm synthesized at 300 Degree-Sign C. The thermal conductivity ({kappa}) of pressed pellets of the synthesized NiO nanoparticles obtained using spark plasma sintering (SPS) and uniaxial hot pressing is drastically decreased ({approx}60%) compared to that of NiO single crystal. This strong reduction in {kappa} with particle size suggests the suitability of the synthesized surfactant-free NiO nanoparticles for use as nanoinclusions when designing high performance materials for waste heat recovery. - Graphical abstract: Highly efficient phonon scattering by surfactant-free NiO nanostructures obtained by solution combustion of a mixture of nickel (II) nitrate hexahydrate (oxidizer) and urea (fuel) at various temperatures. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fast synthesis of surfactant-free NiO nanoparticles with controllable size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High specific surface area for NiO nanoparticles with size range from 3 to 7 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strong reduction of the thermal conductivity with decreasing particle size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiO as nanoinclusions in high performance materials for energy conversion.

  10. Microstructure and thermal conductivity of surfactant-free NiO nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Pranati; Misra, Dinesh K.; Salvador, Jim; Makongo, Julien P.A.; Chaubey, Girija S.; Takas, Nathan J.; Wiley, John B.; Poudeu, Pierre F.P.

    2012-01-01

    High purity, nanometer sized surfactant-free nickel oxide (NiO) particles were produced in gram scale using a solution combustion method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), gas pycnometry and gas adsorption analysis (BET). The average particle size of the as-synthesized NiO increases significantly with the preheating temperature of the furnace, while the specific surface area decreases. A BET specific surface area of ∼100 m 2 /g was obtained for NiO nanoparticles with size as small as 3 nm synthesized at 300 °C. The thermal conductivity (κ) of pressed pellets of the synthesized NiO nanoparticles obtained using spark plasma sintering (SPS) and uniaxial hot pressing is drastically decreased (∼60%) compared to that of NiO single crystal. This strong reduction in κ with particle size suggests the suitability of the synthesized surfactant-free NiO nanoparticles for use as nanoinclusions when designing high performance materials for waste heat recovery. - Graphical abstract: Highly efficient phonon scattering by surfactant-free NiO nanostructures obtained by solution combustion of a mixture of nickel (II) nitrate hexahydrate (oxidizer) and urea (fuel) at various temperatures. Highlights: ► Fast synthesis of surfactant-free NiO nanoparticles with controllable size. ► High specific surface area for NiO nanoparticles with size range from 3 to 7 nm. ► Strong reduction of the thermal conductivity with decreasing particle size. ► NiO as nanoinclusions in high performance materials for energy conversion.

  11. Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of binary mixtures of surfactants using continuous wavelet transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afkhami, Abbas; Nematollahi, Davood; Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Abbasi-Tarighat, Maryam; Hajihadi, Mitra

    2009-01-01

    This work presents a simple, rapid, and novel method for simultaneous determination of binary mixtures of some surfactants using continuous wavelet transformation. The method is based on the difference in the effect of surfactants Cetyltrimethylammoniumbromide (CTAB), dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) and TritonX-100 (TX-100) on the absorption spectra of complex of Beryllium with Chrome Azurol S (CAS) at pH 5.4. Binary mixtures of CTAB-DTAB, DTAB-CPB and CTAB-TX-100 were analyzed without prior separation steps. Different mother wavelets from the family of continuous wavelet transforms were selected and applied under the optimal conditions for simultaneous determinations. The proposed methods, under the working conditions, were successfully applied to simultaneous determination of surfactants in hair conditioner and mouthwash samples.

  12. Adsorption of anionic surfactant on porous and nonporous polyethylene terephthalate films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Yu.; Apel, P.Yu.

    2016-01-01

    We study the adsorption of anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl diphenyloxide disulfonate (SDDD) on three types of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates from aqueous solutions of SDDD of different concentrations. Neutral electrolyte (KCl) was added to the solutions to vary the ionic strength. Three types of substrates were used: 1) original PET film; 2) etched nonporous film, obtained from pristine film by chemical etching and bearing negative charge on the surface; 3) etched porous membranes, fabricated from pristine film by ion irradiation and subsequent chemical etching. The membranes have negative charge on the flat surface and on the inner pore walls. The comparison shows that the negative charge on the flat surface has weak effect on adsorption of the anionic surfactant, and the SDDD adsorption on the inner walls of pores is much weaker than on flat surface, even if the pore radius is significantly larger than the Debye length. This «exclusion» effect strongly depends on ionic strength of solution. [ru

  13. Thermodynamics of Surfactants, Block Copolymers and Their Mixtures in Water: The Role of the Isothermal Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lisi, Rosario; Milioto, Stefania; Muratore, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    The thermodynamics of conventional surfactants, block copolymers and their mixtures in water was described to the light of the enthalpy function. The two methodologies, i.e. the van’t Hoff approach and the isothermal calorimetry, used to determine the enthalpy of micellization of pure surfactants and block copolymers were described. The van’t Hoff method was critically discussed. The aqueous copolymer+surfactant mixtures were analyzed by means of the isothermal titration calorimetry and the enthalpy of transfer of the copolymer from the water to the aqueous surfactant solutions. Thermodynamic models were presented to show the procedure to extract straightforward molecular insights from the bulk properties. PMID:19742173

  14. Constraint and flow: Poiseuille shear response of a surfactant ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. To minimize their free energy in aqueous solution, surfactant molecules self-assemble to form some basic morphologies – globular micelles, highly extended thead- like micelles and membrane bilayers – which themselves order to display a rich variety of mesophase symmetries and properties. In membrane ...

  15. Synthesis and optimization of cholesterol-based diquaternary ammonium Gemini Surfactant (Chol-GS) as a new gene delivery vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bieong-Kil; Doh, Kyung-Oh; Bae, Yun-Ui; Seu, Young-Bae

    2011-01-01

    Amongst a number of potential nonviral vectors, cationic liposomes have been actively researched, with both gemini surfactants and bola amphiphiles reported as being in possession of good structures in terms of cell viability and in vitro transfection. In this study, a cholesterol-based diquaternary ammonium gemini surfactant (Chol-GS) was synthesized and assessed as a novel nonviral gene vector. Chol-GS was synthesized from cholesterol by way of four reaction steps. The optimal efficiency was found to be at a weight ratio of 1:4 of lipid:DOPE (1,2-dioleoyl-L-alpha- glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine), and at a ratio of between 10:1~15:1 of liposome:DNA. The transfection efficiency was compared with commercial liposomes and with Lipofectamine, 1,2-dimyristyloxypropyl-3-dimethylhydroxyethylammonium bromide (DMRIE-C), and N-[1-(2,3-dioleoyloxy)propyl]- N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride (DOTAP). The results indicate that the efficiency of Chol-GS is greater than that of all the tested commercial liposomes in COS7 and Huh7 cells, and higher than DOTAP and Lipofectamine in A549 cells. Confirmation of these findings was observed through the use of green fluorescent protein expression. Chol-GS exhibited a moderate level of cytotoxicity, at optimum concentrations for efficient transfection, indicating cell viability. Hence, the newly synthesized Chol-GS liposome has the potential of being an excellent nonviral vector for gene delivery.

  16. A multi-objective optimization framework for surfactant-enhanced remediation of DNAPL contaminations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaerlaekens, J.; Mertens, J.; Van Linden, J.; Vermeiren, G.; Carmeliet, J.; Feyen, J.

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence of Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) contaminations in the subsurface is a threat for drinkwater resources in the western world. Surfactant-Enhanced Aquifer Remediation (SEAR) is widely considered as one of the most promising techniques to remediate DNAPL contaminations in-situ,

  17. Multi-Objective Optimization of the Setup of a Surfactant-Enhanced DNAPL Remediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaerlaekens, J.; Carmeliet, J.; Feyen, J.

    2005-01-01

    Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) is widely considered a promising technique to remediate dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminations in-situ. The costs of a SEAR remediation are important and depend mostly on the setup of the remediation. Costs can be associated with the

  18. The energetics of mesopore formation in zeolites with surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Noemi; Jardim, Erika de Oliveira; Sachse, Alexander; Serrano, Elena; Garcia-Martinez, Javier

    2018-05-02

    Mesoporosity can be conveniently introduced in zeolites by treating them in basic surfactant solutions. The apparent activation energy involved in the formation of mesopores in USY via surfactant-templating was obtained through the combination of in situ synchrotron XRD and ex situ gas adsorption. Additionally, techniques such as pH measurements and TG/DTA were employed to determine the OH- evolution and the CTA+ uptake during the development of mesoporosity, providing information about the different steps involved. By combining both in situ and ex situ techniques, we have been able, for the first time, to determine the apparent activation energies of the different processes involved in the mesostructuring of USY zeolites, which are in the same order of magnitude (30 - 65 kJ mol-1) of those involved in the crystallization of zeolites. Hence, important mechanistic insights on the surfactant-templating method were obtained. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Ammonium Laurate Surfactant for Cleaner Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Hanna M. [Department of Material Science and Engineering and ‡Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, United States; Meany, Brendan [Department of Material Science and Engineering and ‡Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, United States; Ticey, Jeremy [Department of Material Science and Engineering and ‡Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, United States; Sun, Chuan-Fu [Department of Material Science and Engineering and ‡Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, United States; Wang, YuHuang [Department of Material Science and Engineering and ‡Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, United States; Cumings, John [Department of Material Science and Engineering and ‡Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, United States

    2015-06-15

    Experiments probing the properties of individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and those measuring bulk composites show vastly different results. One major issue limiting the results is that the procedures required to separate and test CNTs introduce contamination that changes the properties of the CNT. These contamination residues often come from the resist used in lithographic processing and the surfactant used to suspend and deposit the CNTs, commonly sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Here we present ammonium laurate (AL), a surfactant that has previously not been used for this application, which differs from SDS only by substitution of ionic constituents but shows vastly cleaner depositions. In addition, we show that compared to SDS, AL-suspended CNTs have greater shelf stability and more selective dispersion. These results are verified using transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, ζ-potential measurements, and Raman and absorption optical spectroscopy. This surfactant is simple to prepare, and the nanotube solutions require minimal sonication and centrifugation in order to outperform SDS.

  20. The use of microemulsion and flushing solutions to remediate diesel-polluted oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dnatas, T.N.C.; Moura, M.C.P.A.; Dants Neto, A.A; Pinheiro, F.S.H.T.; Barros Neto, E.L. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica], E-mail: carlenise@eq.ufrn.br

    2007-07-15

    The applicability of a surfactant derived from coconut oil (saponified coconut oil - SCO) to remove diesel oil from contaminated soil was investigated. This surfactant was applied in aqueous solutions and in a microemulsion precursory solution (surfactant/cosurfactant/water). Bench-scale tests were carried out using both column and batch setups with artificially contaminated soil. Parameters tested, that have influence in microemulsion formation, include: cosurfactant nature, cosurfactant/surfactant ratio (C/S), and presence or absence of an electrolyte in the aqueous phase (NaCl). Upon construction of pseudo ternary phase diagrams it was observed that increasing C/S ratio and presence of electrolyte cause a reduction in the microemulsion region. Five washing solutions were tested: distilled water, distilled water with 0.5 wt.% NaCl, surfactant solution (0.5 wt.% SCO - above critical micelle concentration - CMC), and a microemulsion precursory solution with and without NaCl in its aqueous phase. It was observed that the formation of diesel-in-oil microemulsion makes easy the removal of contaminants from the used soil. It was found that in batch experiments a 74% contaminant removal can be achieved and in column experiments up to 75% diesel oil could be removed, showing the potential applicability of this surfactant in microemulsion systems for cleaning up contaminated sandy soils. (author)

  1. Polyelectrolyte surfactant aggregates and their deposition on macroscopic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voisin, David

    2002-01-01

    Oppositely charged surfactant and polyelectrolyte are present in hair shampoos and conditioners, together with particles (e.g. anti-dandruff agents for scalp) and droplets (e.g. silicone oil for the hair). These are normally formulated at high surfactant concentrations, beyond the flocculation region for the polyelectrolyte concentration used. However, on dilution with water, during application, flocs are formed which carry the particles and droplets to the scalp and hair. The addition of an anionic surfactant to an aqueous solution of cationic polyelectrolyte, at a given concentration, can lead to the formation of polyelectrolyte-surfactant 'particles', in which the surfactant 'binds' to the polyelectrolyte. This occurs from the critical association concentration (CAC), up to the surfactant concentration corresponding to maximum binding. Within this range of surfactant concentrations, the surfactant bound to the polyelectrolyte is thought to associate to form what might be termed 'internal micelles'. Each polyelectrolyte-surfactant particle in the region of the CAC, and just beyond, contains many polyelectrolyte chains, held together essentially by micelle bridges. These particles, however, remain net positively charged, and therefore stable. At the other end of the binding range of the surfactant, so many internal micelles are present that the polymer-surfactant particles are now net negatively charged. Indeed binding stops since no further micelles can be accommodated. Again, the particles are stable. However, there exists a range of surfactant concentrations, lying within the range referred to above, where the net charge is reduced sufficiently that the polymer-surfactant particles will flocculate to form much larger structures. The onset of this second range might be termed the 'critical flocculation concentration' (CFC), and the end, the 'critical stabilisation concentration' (CSC). In this work, the CFC and the CSC have been determined for mixtures of

  2. Structure and Conformational Dynamics of DMPC/Dicationic Surfactant and DMPC/Dicationic Surfactant/DNA Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Kozak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Amphiphilic dicationic surfactants, known as gemini surfactants, are currently studied for gene delivery purposes. The gemini surfactant molecule is composed of two hydrophilic “head” groups attached to hydrophobic chains and connected via molecular linker between them. The influence of different concentrations of 1,5-bis (1-imidazolilo-3-decyloxymethyl pentane chloride (gemini surfactant on the thermotropic phase behaviour of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC bilayers with and without the presence of DNA was investigated using Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR and circular dichroism (CD spectroscopies, small angle scattering of synchrotron radiation and differential scanning calorimetry. With increasing concentration of surfactant in DMPC/DNA systems, a disappearance of pretransition and a decrease in the main phase transition enthalpy and temperature were observed. The increasing intensity of diffraction peaks as a function of surfactant concentration also clearly shows the ability of the surfactant to promote the organisation of lipid bilayers in the multilayer lamellar phase.

  3. Influence of surfactants on the microstructure of dental zirconia ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'icheva, A. A.; Michalina, N. A.; Podzorova, L. I.; Pen'kova, O. I.; Kutsev, S. V.; Berezina, S.

    2013-01-01

    This work studies the influence of different surfactants included in the synthesis of precursor powders on the microstructure of ceramic material to search for an optimal agents providing an uniform grain microstructure required for accurate medical products with a high degree of surface cleanliness. (authors)

  4. Surfactant Membrane Phases Containing Mixtures of Hydrocarbon and Fluorocarbon Surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Campo, Liliana; Warr, G.G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We describe the structure and stability of sponge and lamellar phases comprising mixtures of hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon surfactants. Such mixtures can show limited miscibility with each other, forming for example coexisting populations of hydrocarbon rich and fluorocarbon rich micelles under some circumstances. Our system is based on the well-characterised lamellar and sponge phases of cetylpyridinium chloride, hexanol and 0.2M brine, into which the partially fluorinated surfactant N-1H,1H,2H,2H-tridecafluorooctylpyridinium chloride is incorporated. By probing the structures with SAXS (small angle x-ray scattering) and SANS (small angle neutron scattering) using contrast variation, and by characterizing the dynamic properties with dynamic light scattering, we will describe the effect of incorporating the fluorinated surfactant on the phase equilibria and properties of the surfactant membrane structures. (authors)

  5. Enhanced oil recovery with surfactant flooding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buelow Sandersen, S.

    2012-05-15

    different compositions of the surfactant system were studied. The effect of increased pressure became more significant when combined with increasing temperature. The experiments performed on the oil/ seawater systems were similar to the high pressure experiments for the surfactant system discussed above. Oil was contacted with different brine solutions with varying sulfate concentrations at a WOR of 70/30. A series of experiments were performed on two crude oils; a Latin American crude oil and a Middle East crude oil. The two crude oils showed significantly different phase behavior when exposed to elevated temperatures and pressures. The Latin American crude showed a decrease in oil viscosity with an increase in sulfate concentration in the brine solution after contacting in the PVT cell. The Middle East crude oil formed emulsions in the PVT cell with increasing temperature and pressure which was more pronounced at higher sulfate concentrations. Further characterization of the two crude oils using gas chromatography and SARA analysis confirmed that the heavier components in the crude oils, (in the case of the Latin American crude oil), are correlated to the observed decrease of viscosity, where the viscosity decrease may be explained from change of the shape of the heavy components with the increase in sulfate concentration after contacting at high pressures and temperatures. A third model system consisting of heptane and seawater solutions was also studied. This system formed emulsions in the PVT cell similar to the Middle East crude oil, which indicates that the lighter components in the Middle East crude oil (compared to the Latin American crude oil) are responsible for the observed formation of emulsions. The final part of the thesis is a phase behavior modeling study of alkane/ alkanol/ water systems relevant for surfactant flooding. Existing thermodynamic models, such as equations of state, while able to predict and correlate phase equilibrium in two liquid phases

  6. Influence of container structures and content solutions on dispensing time of ophthalmic solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Yoshikawa

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Keiji Yoshikawa1, Hiroshi Yamada21Yoshikawa Eye Clinic, Tokyo, Japan; 2Santen Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Osaka, JapanPurpose: To investigate the influence of container structures and content solutions on the time of dispensing from eye dropper bottles.Methods: Eye dropper bottle models, solution models (filtrate water/surfactant solution and a dispensing time measuring apparatus were prepared to measure the dispensing time.Results: With filtrate water and pressure thrust load of 0.3 MPa, the dispensing time significantly increased from 1.1 ± 0.5 seconds to 4.6 ± 1.1 seconds depending on the decrease of inner aperture diameters from 0.4 mm to 0.2 mm (P < 0.0001. When using the bottle models with inner aperture diameters of 0.4 mm or larger, the dispensing time became constant. The dispensing time using surfactant solution showed the same tendency as above. When pressure thrust load was large (0.07 MPa, the solution flew out continuously with inner aperture diameters of 0.4 mm or larger and the dispensing time could not be measured. The inner aperture diameter most strongly explained the variation of the dispensing time in both the content solutions in the multiple linear regression analysis (filtrate water: 46%, R2 = 0.462, surfactant solution: 56%, R2 = 0.563.Conclusions: Among content solutions and container structures, the dispensing time was mostly influenced by the diameter of the inner aperture of bottles.Keywords: dispensing time, model eye dropper bottle, model ophthalmic solution, nozzle internal space volume, nozzle inner aperture diameter

  7. Using temperature-responsive zwitterionic surfactant to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocelluloses and recover cellulase by cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Cheng; Pang, Yuxia; Zhan, Xuejuan; Zeng, Meijun; Lou, Hongming; Qian, Yong; Yang, Dongjie; Qiu, Xueqing

    2017-11-01

    Some zwitterionic surfactants exhibit upper critical solution temperature (UCST) in aqueous solutions. For the zwitterionic surfactant solution mixed with cellulase, when its temperature is below UCST, the cellulase can be recovered by coprecipitation with zwitterionic surfactant. In this work, 3-(Hexadecyldimethylammonio) propanesulfonate (SB3-16) was selected to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocelluloses and recover the cellulase. After adding 2mmol/L of SB3-16, the enzymatic digestibility of eucalyptus pretreated by dilute acid (Eu-DA) and by sulfite (Eu-SPORL) increased from 27.9% and 35.1% to 72.6% and 89.7%, respectively. The results showed that SB3-16 could reduce the non-productive adsorption of cellulase on hydrophobic interface, while it did not significantly inhibit the activity of cellulase. For the solution contained 1wt% SB3-16 and 200mg protein/L CTec2 cellulase, 55.2% of protein could be recovered by cooling. The filter paper activity of the recovered cellulase was 1.93FPU/mg protein, which was 95.8% of its initial activity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Preparation of fluorescent polyaniline nanoparticles in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Kleber G. B. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica (Brazil); Melo, Etelino F. de [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Departamento de Quimica Fundamental (Brazil); Andrade, Cesar A. S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Departamento de Bioquimica (Brazil); Melo, Celso P. de, E-mail: celso@df.ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    We report the synthesis of stable polyaniline nanoparticles (PANI{sub N}Ps) based on the chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline in aqueous solutions of surfactants. Surfactants of three different types-cationic (dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide-DTAB), anionic (sodium dodecyl sulfate-SDS), and non-ionic (Triton X-405-TX-405)-were used. The resulting PANI{sub N}Ps{sub s}urfactant samples were characterized through UV-Vis, fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies, and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). We have verified that the color of the PANI{sub N}Ps{sub s}urfactant dispersions is affected by a change in the pH of the solution. The PANI-NPs{sub s}urfactant colloidal suspensions in aqueous solution present a surprising high fluorescence quantum yield value (ranging from 1.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} to 6.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}) that can be controlled as a function of the pH, a fact that we associate to the corresponding protonation degree of the PANI polymeric chains. We suggest that these fluorescent nanocomposites can find important technological applications in different areas such as organic light emitting devices, biosensors, and pigments for coatings.

  9. The different-ligand complexing of europium with complexones and β-diketones in micellar solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svetlova, I.E.; Dobrynina, N.A.; Smirnova, N.S.; Martynenko, L.I.; Evseev, A.M.; Savitskij, A.P.

    1989-01-01

    Method of pH-metric titration with mathematical simulation was used to study the effect of nonionic surfactant (polyoxyethyleneoctylphenyl este) on stability of europium complexes with cyclohexanediaminetetraacetic and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acids. Optimal conditions for ternary complex formation in the system Eu 3+ -complexone-β-diketone at pH 7.0-9.0 were found. Complex-compositions were determined and their stability constants were calculated. It is shown that complex stability decreases by several orders in micellar solutions, tecause β-diketone introduction to the solution decreases thermodynamic stability of complexes

  10. Surfactant adsorption study in sandstone for enhanced oil recovery; Estudo da adsorcao de tensoativos em arenitos para recuperacao avancada de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curbelo, Fabiola D.S.; Santanna, Vanessa C.; Barros Neto, Eduardo L. de; Dutra Junior, Tarcilio V.; Dantas Neto, Afonso A. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica; Garnica, Alfredo I.C. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Tecnologia Quimica e de Alimentos; Lucena Neto, Marciano [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil); Dantas, Tereza N.C. [Faculdade Natalense para o Desenvolvimento do RN (FARN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    Adsorption of surfactants from aqueous solutions in porous media is very important in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) of oil reservoirs because surfactant loss due to adsorption on the reservoir rocks weakens the effectiveness of the injected chemical slug in reducing oil-water tension (IFT) and makes the process uneconomical. In this paper, two nonionic surfactants, such as alkyl phenol polyoxyethylene, with different ethoxylation degrees were studied, ENP95 and ENP150. The results of flow experiments of surfactant solutions in porous media showed that adsorption was higher for ENP95 because it has smaller ethoxylation degree than ENP150. This occurs what with increasing length of the head group, the molecules become more hydrophilic and, in associated structures, the steric hindrance between the head groups increases. Generally speaking, adsorption appears to be a cooperative process involving lateral interaction between surfactant and weak interaction with the solid surface. (author)

  11. Effects of an anionic surfactant (FFD-6) on the energy and information flow between a primary producer (Scenedesmus obliquus) and a consumer (Daphnia magna)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lürling, M.; de Lange, H.J.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of a commercially available anionic surfactant solution (FFD-6) on growth and morphology of a common green alga (Scenedesmus obliquus) and on survival and clearance rates of the water flea Daphnia magna were studied. The surfactant-solution elicited a morphological response (formation of

  12. Synthesis of zeolites coal ash in surfactant modified in application and removal of orange 8 acid solution: study in batch, fixed bed column and evaluation ecotoxicological

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magdalena, Carina Pitwak

    2015-01-01

    In this study, synthesized zeolitic material from coal ash and modified cationic surfactant was used for removing the acid dye Orange 8 (AL8) by adsorption process using moving bed and fixed-bed column. The raw material and adsorbents were characterized by different techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, among others. The adsorption of AL8 was performed by moving bed in order to optimize the results when they are launched in a fixed bed. The effects of adsorption on zeolite AL8 were compared: (1) Effect of counterions Br - and Cl - surfactant used in the modification of the zeolite; (2) effect of type of coal ash used as raw material in the synthesis of zeolites (fly and bottom). The following adsorbents were used in the study: fly and bottom zeolite modified by surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (ZLMS-Br-Br and ZPMS-Br) and fly zeolite modified by surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (ZLMS-Cl). The pseudo-second-order kinetic described the adsorption of the dye on all adsorbents. The equilibrium time was reached 40, 60 and 120 min for ZLMS-Br, ZLMS-Cl and ZPMS-Br, respectively. The adsorption equilibrium was analyzed by the equations of the models of linear and nonlinear isotherms of Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin- Radushkevivh (DR) and the criterion of best fit was evaluated using the error functions.The DR model was adjusted better to the experimental data for the system AL8 / ZLMS-Br, the Freundlich model for AL8 / ZLMS-Cl and Langmuir for AL8 / ZPMS. According to the Langmuir maximum adsorption capacity was 4.67, 1.48 and 1.38 mg g -1 for ZLMS-Br, ZLMS-Cl and ZPMS-Br, in order. In studies employing fixed bed columns, the effects of inlet concentration (20- 30 mg L -1 ), flow rate (4.0 -5.3 mL min -1 ) and the bed height (5, 5 - 6.5 cm) above the breakthrough curves characteristics in the adsorption system were determined. The Adams-Bohart, Thomas, Yoon-Nelson models were applied to experimental

  13. A Green and Efficient Method for the Preconcentration and Determination of Gallic Acid, Bergenin, Quercitrin, and Embelin from Ardisia japonica Using Nononic Surfactant Genapol X-080 as the Extraction Solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Du, Kunze; Li, Jin; Bai, Yun; An, Mingrui; Tan, Zhijing

    2018-01-01

    A simple cloud point preconcentration method was developed and validated for the determination of gallic acid, bergenin, quercitrin, and embelin in Ardisia japonica by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using ultrasonic assisted micellar extraction. Nonionic surfactant Genapol X-080 was selected as the extraction solvent. The effects of various experimental conditions such as the type and concentration of surfactant and salt, temperature, and solution pH on the extraction of these components were studied to optimize the conditions of Ardisia japonica. The solution was incubated in a thermostatic water bath at 60°C for 10 min, and 35% NaH2PO4 (w/v) was added to the solution to promote the phase separation and increase the preconcentration factor. The intraday and interday precision (RSD) were both below 5.0% and the limits of detection (LOD) for the analytes were between 10 and 20 ng·mL−1. The proposed method provides a simple, efficient, and organic solvent-free method to analyze gallic acid, bergenin, quercitrin, and embelin for the quality control of Ardisia japonica. PMID:29487621

  14. A Green and Efficient Method for the Preconcentration and Determination of Gallic Acid, Bergenin, Quercitrin, and Embelin from Ardisia japonica Using Nononic Surfactant Genapol X-080 as the Extraction Solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple cloud point preconcentration method was developed and validated for the determination of gallic acid, bergenin, quercitrin, and embelin in Ardisia japonica by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC using ultrasonic assisted micellar extraction. Nonionic surfactant Genapol X-080 was selected as the extraction solvent. The effects of various experimental conditions such as the type and concentration of surfactant and salt, temperature, and solution pH on the extraction of these components were studied to optimize the conditions of Ardisia japonica. The solution was incubated in a thermostatic water bath at 60°C for 10 min, and 35% NaH2PO4 (w/v was added to the solution to promote the phase separation and increase the preconcentration factor. The intraday and interday precision (RSD were both below 5.0% and the limits of detection (LOD for the analytes were between 10 and 20 ng·mL−1. The proposed method provides a simple, efficient, and organic solvent-free method to analyze gallic acid, bergenin, quercitrin, and embelin for the quality control of Ardisia japonica.

  15. Optimization of the annual construction program solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleinik Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers potentially possible optimization solutions in scheduling while forming the annual production programs of the construction complex organizations. The optimization instrument is represented as a two-component system. As a fundamentally new approach in the first block of the annual program solutions, the authors propose to use a scientifically grounded methodology for determining the scope of work permissible for the transfer to a subcontractor without risk of General Contractor’s management control losing over the construction site. For this purpose, a special indicator is introduced that characterizes the activity of the general construction organization - the coefficient of construction production management. In the second block, the principal methods for the formation of calendar plans for the fulfillment of the critical work effort by the leading stream are proposed, depending on the intensity characteristic.

  16. Surfactant-Mediated Growth Revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerheim, H. L.; Sander, D.; Popescu, R.; Pan, W.; Kirschner, J.; Popa, I.

    2007-01-01

    The x-ray structure analysis of the oxygen-surfactant-mediated growth of Ni on Cu(001) identifies up to 0.15 monolayers of oxygen in subsurface octahedral sites. This questions the validity of the general view that surfactant oxygen floats on top of the growing Ni film. Rather, the surfactant action is ascribed to an oxygen-enriched zone extending over the two topmost layers. Surface stress measurements support this finding. Our results have important implications for the microscopic understanding of surfactant-mediated growth and the change of the magnetic anisotropy of the Ni films

  17. Surfactants in tribology

    CERN Document Server

    Biresaw, Girma

    2014-01-01

    Surface science and tribology play very critical roles in many industries. Manufacture and use of almost all consumer and industrial products rely on the application of advanced surface and tribological knowledge. The fourth in a series, Surfactants in Tribology, Volume 4 provides an update on research and development activities connecting surfactants and tribological phenomena. Written by renowned subject matter experts, the book demonstrates how improved design of surfactants can be harnessed to control tribological phenomena. Profusely illustrated and copiously referenced, the chapters also

  18. Surfactant-enhanced solubilization of residual dodecane in soil columns. 2. Mathematical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abriola, L.M.; Dekker, T.J.; Pennell, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe surfactant-enhanced solubilization of nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) in porous media. The model incorporates aqueous-phase transport equations for organic and surfactant components as well as a mass balance for the organic phase. Rate-limited solubilization and surfactant sorption are represented by a linear driving force expression and a Langmuir isotherm, respectively. The model is implemented in a one-dimensional Galerkin finite element simulator which idealizes the entrapped residual organic as a collection of spherical globules. Soil column data for the solubilization of residual dodecane by an aqueous solution of polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monooleate are used to evaluate the conceptual model. Input parameters were obtained, where possible, from independent batch experiments. Calibrated model simulations exhibit good agreement with measured effluent concentrations, supporting the utility of the conceptual modeling approach. Sensitivity analyses explore the influence of surfactant concentration and flushing strategy on NAPL recovery. 45 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Amodified probabilistic genetic algorithm for the solution of complex constrained optimization problems

    OpenAIRE

    Vorozheikin, A.; Gonchar, T.; Panfilov, I.; Sopov, E.; Sopov, S.

    2009-01-01

    A new algorithm for the solution of complex constrained optimization problems based on the probabilistic genetic algorithm with optimal solution prediction is proposed. The efficiency investigation results in comparison with standard genetic algorithm are presented.

  20. The effect of surfactants on the dissolution behavior of amorphous formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mah, Pei T; Peltonen, Leena; Novakovic, Dunja

    2016-01-01

    The optimal design of oral amorphous formulations benefits from the use of excipients to maintain drug supersaturation and thus ensures adequate absorption during intestinal transit. The use of surfactants for the maintenance of supersaturation in amorphous formulations has not been investigated ...

  1. On Attainability of Optimal Solutions for Linear Elliptic Equations with Unbounded Coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. I. Kogut

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We study an optimal boundary control problem (OCP associated to a linear elliptic equation —div (Vj/ + A(xVy = f describing diffusion in a turbulent flow. The characteristic feature of this equation is the fact that, in applications, the stream matrix A(x = [a,ij(x]i,j=i,...,N is skew-symmetric, ац(х = —a,ji(x, measurable, and belongs to L -space (rather than L°°. An optimal solution to such problem can inherit a singular character of the original stream matrix A. We show that optimal solutions can be attainable by solutions of special optimal boundary control problems.

  2. Reducing plant uptake of PAHs by cationic surfactant-enhanced soil retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Li, E-mail: ll19840106@zju.edu.c [Department of Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310028 (China); Zhu Lizhong, E-mail: zlz@zju.edu.c [Department of Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310028 (China); Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecological Health, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310029 (China)

    2009-06-15

    Reducing the transfer of contaminants from soils to plants is a promising approach to produce safe agricultural products grown on contaminated soils. In this study, 0-400 mg/kg cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB) and dodecylpyridinium bromide (DDPB) were separately utilized to enhance the sorption of PAHs onto soils, thereby reducing the transfer of PAHs from soil to soil solution and subsequently to plants. Concentrations of phenanthrene and pyrene in vegetables grown in contaminated soils treated with the cationic surfactants were lower than those grown in the surfactant-free control. The maximum reductions of phenanthrene and pyrene were 66% and 51% for chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum coronarium L.), 62% and 71% for cabbage (Brassica campestris L.), and 34% and 53% for lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), respectively. Considering the impacts of cationic surfactants on plant growth and soil microbial activity, CTMAB was more appropriate to employ, and the most effective dose was 100-200 mg/kg. - Cationic surfactants could enhance the retention of PAHs in soil, and reduce PAH transfer to and accumulation in vegetables.

  3. Reducing plant uptake of PAHs by cationic surfactant-enhanced soil retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Li; Zhu Lizhong

    2009-01-01

    Reducing the transfer of contaminants from soils to plants is a promising approach to produce safe agricultural products grown on contaminated soils. In this study, 0-400 mg/kg cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB) and dodecylpyridinium bromide (DDPB) were separately utilized to enhance the sorption of PAHs onto soils, thereby reducing the transfer of PAHs from soil to soil solution and subsequently to plants. Concentrations of phenanthrene and pyrene in vegetables grown in contaminated soils treated with the cationic surfactants were lower than those grown in the surfactant-free control. The maximum reductions of phenanthrene and pyrene were 66% and 51% for chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum coronarium L.), 62% and 71% for cabbage (Brassica campestris L.), and 34% and 53% for lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), respectively. Considering the impacts of cationic surfactants on plant growth and soil microbial activity, CTMAB was more appropriate to employ, and the most effective dose was 100-200 mg/kg. - Cationic surfactants could enhance the retention of PAHs in soil, and reduce PAH transfer to and accumulation in vegetables.

  4. Impacts of Natural Surfactant Soybean Phospholipid on Wettability of High-rank Coal Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, S.; Xiao, Y.; Yuan, M.; Wang, S.

    2017-12-01

    It is significant to change the surface wettability of coal rock with the surfactant in coal mining and coalbed methane exploitation. Soybean phospholipid (SP) is a kind of natural zwitterionic surfactant which is non-toxic and degradable. In order to study the effects of soybean phospholipid on wettability of high-rank coal in Qinshui Basin, some experiments including surface tension test, contact angle measurement on the coal surface, coal fines imbibition, observation of dispersion effect and gas permeability test were carried out, and water locking mechanism of fracturing fluid in micro fractures of coal reservoir was analyzed. The results show that the surface of high-rank coal was negatively charged in solution and of weak hydrophilicity. The soybean phospholipid with the mass fraction of 0.1% reduced the surface tension of water by 69%, and increased the wettability of coal. Meanwhile, the soybean phospholipid helped coal fines to disperse by observation of the filter cake with the scanning electron microscope. The rising rate of soybean phospholipid solution in the pipe filled with coal fines was lower than that of anionic and cationic surfactant, higher than that of clean water and non-ionic surfactant. Composite surfactant made up of soybean phospholipid and OP-10 at the ratio of 1:3 having a low surface tension and large contact angle, reduced the capillary force effectively, which could be conducive to discharge of fracturing fluid from coal reservoir micro fracture and improve the migration channels of gas. Therefore it has a broad application prospect.

  5. An Experimental Study of Surfactant Alternating CO2 Injection for Enhanced Oil Recovery of Carbonated Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Gandomkar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Core flooding experiments were conducted with the objective of evaluating near miscible surfactant alternating CO2 injection and the effect of surfactant concentrations on gas-oil and water displacements in porous media. The core samples were provided from a low permeability mixed wet oil reservoir at 156 °F and 1900 psia. In addition, very few studies of surfactant adsorption on carbonate minerals have been conducted. Hence, the surfactant adsorption on carbonate rock was determined by core flooding and crushed tests. It was found that for the crushed rock, the required equilibrium time is approximately five hours, while it is more than four days for the flow-through tests. Hysteresis effects demonstrated that the irreducible water saturations were 5 to 10% higher than the initial connate water saturation after drainage cycles during 5000 ppm surfactant solution. Furthermore, near-miscible surfactant alternating CO2 injection process led to a 4-17% increase in the recovery factor in comparison to water alternating gas process.

  6. Tensiometry and dilational rheology of mixed β-lactoglobulin/ionic surfactant adsorption layers at water/air and water/hexane interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Abhijit; Gochev, Georgi; Miller, Reinhard

    2015-07-01

    Oscillating drop tensiometry was applied to study adsorbed interfacial layers at water/air and water/hexane interfaces formed from mixed solutions of β-lactoglobulin (BLG, 1 μM in 10 mM buffer, pH 7 - negative net charge) and the anionic surfactant SDS or the cationic DoTAB. The interfacial pressure Π and the dilational viscoelasticity modulus |E| of the mixed layers were measured for mixtures of varying surfactant concentrations. The double capillary technique was employed which enables exchange of the protein solution in the drop bulk by surfactant solution (sequential adsorption) or by pure buffer (washing out). The first protocol allows probing the influence of the surfactant on a pre-adsorbed protein layer thus studying the protein/surfactant interactions at the interface. The second protocol gives access to the residual values of Π and |E| measured after the washing out procedure thus bringing information about the process of protein desorption. The DoTAB/BLG complexes exhibit higher surface activity and higher resistance to desorption in comparison with those for the SDS/BLG complexes due to hydrophobization via electrostatic binding of surfactant molecules. The neutral DoTAB/BLG complexes achieve maximum elastic response of the mixed layer. Mixed BLG/surfactant layers at the water/oil interface are found to reach higher surface pressure and lower maximum dilational elasticity than those at the water/air surface. The sequential adsorption mode experiments and the desorption study reveal that binding of DoTAB to pre-adsorbed BLG globules is somehow restricted at the water/air surface in comparison with the case of complex formation in the solution bulk and subsequently adsorbed at the water/air surface. Maximum elasticity is achieved with washed out layers obtained after simultaneous adsorption, i.e. isolation of the most surface active DoTAB/BLG complex. These specific effects are much less pronounced at the W/H interface. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc

  7. Respiratory and Systemic Effects of LASSBio596 Plus Surfactant in Experimental Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnatas Dutra Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Exogenous surfactant has been proposed as adjunctive therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, but it is inactivated by different factors present in the alveolar space. We hypothesized that co-administration of LASSBio596, a molecule with significant anti-inflammatory properties, and exogenous surfactant could reduce lung inflammation, thus enabling the surfactant to reduce edema and improve lung function, in experimental ARDS. Methods: ARDS was induced by cecal ligation and puncture surgery in BALB/c mice. A sham-operated group was used as control (CTRL. After surgery (6 hours, CTRL and ARDS animals were assigned to receive: (1 sterile saline solution; (2 LASSBio596; (3 exogenous surfactant or (4 LASSBio596 plus exogenous surfactant (n = 22/group. Results: Regardless of exogenous surfactant administration, LASSBio596 improved survival rate and reduced collagen fiber content, total number of cells and neutrophils in PLF and blood, cell apoptosis, protein content in BALF, and urea and creatinine levels. LASSBio596 plus surfactant yielded all of the aforementioned beneficial effects, as well as increased BALF lipid content and reduced surface tension. Conclusion: LASSBio596 exhibited major anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrogenic effects in experimental sepsis-induced ARDS. Its association with surfactant may provide further advantages, potentially by reducing surface tension.

  8. pH-Sensitive self-propelled motion of oil droplets in the presence of cationic surfactants containing hydrolyzable ester linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banno, Taisuke; Kuroha, Rie; Toyota, Taro

    2012-01-17

    Self-propelled oil droplets in a nonequilibrium system have drawn much attention as both a primitive type of inanimate chemical machinery and a dynamic model of the origin of life. Here, to create the pH-sensitive self-propelled motion of oil droplets, we synthesized cationic surfactants containing hydrolyzable ester linkages. We found that n-heptyloxybenzaldehyde oil droplets were self-propelled in the presence of ester-containing cationic surfactant. In basic solution prepared with sodium hydroxide, oil droplets moved as molecular aggregates formed on their surface. Moreover, the self-propelled motion in the presence of the hydrolyzable cationic surfactant lasted longer than that in the presence of nonhydrolyzable cationic surfactant. This is probably due to the production of a fatty acid by the hydrolysis of the ester-containing cationic surfactant and the subsequent neutralization of the fatty acid with sodium hydroxide. A complex surfactant was formed in the aqueous solution because of the cation and anion combination. Because such complex formation can induce both a decrease in the interfacial tension of the oil droplet and self-assembly with n-heptyloxybenzaldehyde and lauric acid in the aqueous dispersion, the prolonged movement of the oil droplet may be explained by the increase in heterogeneity of the interfacial tension of the oil droplet triggered by the hydrolysis of the ester-containing surfactant. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  9. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF RELATIONSHIP STRUCTURE AND ANIONIC SURFACTANT MICELLE CONCENTRATION CRITIC WITH SEMIEMPIRIS AM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Vaulina Yulistia Delsy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This research determines the mathematical equation which calculate the Concentration Micelle Critic theoretical anionic surfactant. The research was conducted the depiction of each surfactant anionic three-dimensional compound models, followed by optimizing the model structure anionic surfactant by using AM1 calculation method. Furthermore the calculation of descriptors (QSPR method, then it was analyzed statistically using Multiple Linear Regression (MLR. The results of statistical calculations showed that to calculate the theoretical CMC anionic surfactant can use the QSPR equation: log CMC = 4.157+0.118qC1+7.698qC2+0.425α–0.010µ-0.129RD–0.138 log P+0.021BM–0.034Avdw, n = 100 ; r = 0.927 ; r2 = 0.860 ; SE = 0.352 ; F= 30.888 ; PRESS = 23.506

  10. Polyelectrolyte surfactant aggregates and their deposition on macroscopic surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voisin, David

    2002-07-01

    Oppositely charged surfactant and polyelectrolyte are present in hair shampoos and conditioners, together with particles (e.g. anti-dandruff agents for scalp) and droplets (e.g. silicone oil for the hair). These are normally formulated at high surfactant concentrations, beyond the flocculation region for the polyelectrolyte concentration used. However, on dilution with water, during application, flocs are formed which carry the particles and droplets to the scalp and hair. The addition of an anionic surfactant to an aqueous solution of cationic polyelectrolyte, at a given concentration, can lead to the formation of polyelectrolyte-surfactant 'particles', in which the surfactant 'binds' to the polyelectrolyte. This occurs from the critical association concentration (CAC), up to the surfactant concentration corresponding to maximum binding. Within this range of surfactant concentrations, the surfactant bound to the polyelectrolyte is thought to associate to form what might be termed 'internal micelles'. Each polyelectrolyte-surfactant particle in the region of the CAC, and just beyond, contains many polyelectrolyte chains, held together essentially by micelle bridges. These particles, however, remain net positively charged, and therefore stable. At the other end of the binding range of the surfactant, so many internal micelles are present that the polymer-surfactant particles are now net negatively charged. Indeed binding stops since no further micelles can be accommodated. Again, the particles are stable. However, there exists a range of surfactant concentrations, lying within the range referred to above, where the net charge is reduced sufficiently that the polymer-surfactant particles will flocculate to form much larger structures. The onset of this second range might be termed the 'critical flocculation concentration' (CFC), and the end, the 'critical stabilisation concentration' (CSC). In this work, the CFC and

  11. Comparative study of hydro soluble polymers solutions and surfactants aiming the polymer-rock interactions in consolidated sandstone; Estudo comparativo de solucoes de polimeros hidrossoluveis e tensoativos visando as interacoes polimero-rocha em arenito consolidado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentim, Adriano Cesar M.; Marcelino, Cleuton Pereira; Medeiros, Ana Catarina R.; Garcia, Rosangela Balaban [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Lab. de Pesquisa em Petroleo (LAPET)

    2004-07-01

    The polyacrylamide is one of the main polymers used in the petroleum industry. Among its properties, stands out the capacity to alter the permeability of the rock to water. However, the polyacrylamide presents some limitations, such as low tolerance to the presence of salts, what can promote its precipitation resulting in low oil recovery efficiency. The application of the polymer in emulsion can promote a larger stability, due to the presence of a surfactant, which has the capacity to modify the interfacial tension and to form a film between the phases of the emulsion. Thereby, the injection of a polymer emulsion can promote an increase of oil recovery. In this work, a preliminary study of the effect of a anionic surfactant (SDS) and polyacrylamides (anionic and neutral) on the surface tension and rheology is presented in aqueous solutions contend salt (NaCl). The results showed surface tension of the mixtures had been remained constant and low (around 32 mN/m), independent of the polymer concentration. A viscosity reduction was observed at polymeric solutions as much in presence of salt, as in presence of the surfactant. Both the samples showed a pseudo plastic behavior. (author)

  12. Numerical approach for enhanced oil recovery with surfactant flooding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Keshtkar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The remained oil in the reservoir after conventional water-flooding processes, forms a dispersed phase in the form of oil drops which is trapped by capillary forces and is almost about 70% of the original oil in the place (OOIP. To reduce oil residual saturation in laboratory experiments and field projects, surfactant flooding is effective via decreasing the interfacial tension mobility ratio between oil and water phases. Estimation of the role of design variables, like chemical concentrations, partition coefficient and injection rate in different performance quantities, considering a heterogeneous and multiphase oil reservoir is a critical stage for optimal design. Increasing demand for oil production from water-flooded reservoirs has caused an increasing interest in surfactant-polymer (SP and alkali-surfactant-polymer (ASP. Modeling minimizes the risk of high cost of chemicals by improving our insight of process. In the present paper, a surfactant compositional flood model for a three-component (water, petroleum and surfactant, two phase (aqueous and oleic system is studied. A homogeneous, two-dimensional, isothermal reservoir with no free gas or alkali is assumed. The governing equations are in three categories: the continuity equations for the transport of each component, Darcy's equation for the transport of each phase and other auxiliary equations. The equations are solved by finite-differences using a procedure implicit in pressure and explicit in saturation. The validation of the model is achieved through comparing the modeling results with CMG simulators and Buckley–Leverett theory. The results of modeling showed good agreement with CMG results, and the comparison with Buckley–Leverett theory is explained according to different assumptions. After validation of the model, in order to investigate sensitivity analysis, the effects of system variables (partition coefficient, surface tension, oil viscosity and surface injection

  13. Silver nanocombs and branched nanowires formation in aqueous binary surfactants solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umar, Akrajas Ali; Oyama, Munetaka; Salleh, Muhamad Mat; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop

    2012-01-01

    Branched nanocrystals, particularly nanocombs, are a unique 1D-morphology that is normally formed in polytypic materials, such as ZnO, and rarely occurs in the highly symmetric fcc metallic system. Here, we report the chemical synthesis of nanocombs of a highly symmetrical fcc silver system that is realized by reducing the silver ions in the presence of a mixture of silver nanoseeds and binary surfactants, namely cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and hexamethylenetetramine (hexamine or HMT), under an alkaline condition. The silver nanocombs feature a high-degree branching orientation toward a single direction with good branch-to-branch spacing. The nanocombs formation was very sensitive to the concentrations of CTAB, HMT and NaOH in the reaction in which, in a typical case, nanocombs or curly nanowires were produced by controlling the concentration of these chemicals in the reaction. We hypothesized that the branching could be due to: (i) a kind of polytypism in such highly symmetrical fcc nanocrystals that was enabled by a selective surfactant adhesion process on the growing crystalline plane and (ii) lattice defects or twinning induced growth redirection in the nanocrystals. The silver nanocombs might generate a peculiar characteristic that is probably superior to those produced by other morphologies, such as nanorods, nanowires, and so on. Thus, it should find extensive use in the currently existing applications.

  14. Surfactant replacement therapy--economic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejaver, R K; al Hifzi, I; Aldussari, S

    2001-06-01

    Surfactant replacement is an effective treatment for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. (RDS). As widespread use of surfactant is becoming a reality, it is important to assess the economic implications of this new form of therapy. A comparison study was carried out at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Northwest Armed Forces Hospital, Saudi Arabia. Among 75 infants who received surfactant for RDS and similar number who were managed during time period just before the surfactant was available, but by set criteria would have made them eligible for surfactant. All other management modalities except surfactant were the same for all these babies. Based on the intensity of monitoring and nursing care required by the baby, the level of care was divided as: Level IIIA, IIIB, Level II, Level I. The cost per day per bed for each level was calculated, taking into account the use of hospital immovable equipment, personal salaries of nursing, medical, ancillary staff, overheads and maintenance, depreciation and replacement costs. Medications used, procedures done, TPN, oxygen, were all added to individual patient's total expenditure. 75 infants in the Surfactant group had 62 survivors. They spent a total of 4300 days in hospital. (av 69.35) Out of which 970 d (av 15.65 per patient) were ventilated days. There were 56 survivors in the non-surfactant group of 75. They had spent a total of 5023 days in the hospital (av 89.69/patient) out of which 1490 were ventilated days (av 26.60 d). Including the cost of surfactant (two doses), cost of hospital stay for each infant taking the average figures of stay would be SR 118, 009.75 per surfactant treated baby and SR 164, 070.70 per non-surfactant treated baby. The difference of 46,061 SR is 39.03% more in non-surfactant group. One Saudi rial = 8 Rs (approx at the time study was carried out.) Medical care cost varies from place to place. However, it is definitely cost-effective where surfactant is concerned. Quality adjusted

  15. Surfactant -- Where Are We in 2003?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JF Lewis

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactant research has progressed over the past several years to the extent that exogenous surfactant administration in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is now being evaluated. Unfortunately, clinical responses have been variable, and we now need to take a look at how surfactant is altered in this disease so that more effective treatment strategies can be developed. This review briefly discusses the biophysical and host defense properties of surfactant, the impact of mechanical ventilation (MV on the endogenous surfactant system and the most recent clinical data involving exogenous surfactant administration in patients with ARDS. Discussions regarding future directions of surfactant research both in ARDS and diseases other than acute lung injury are included.

  16. Multiobjective optimization of urban water resources: Moving toward more practical solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Mohammad; Kuczera, George; Cui, Lijie

    2012-03-01

    The issue of drought security is of paramount importance for cities located in regions subject to severe prolonged droughts. The prospect of "running out of water" for an extended period would threaten the very existence of the city. Managing drought security for an urban water supply is a complex task involving trade-offs between conflicting objectives. In this paper a multiobjective optimization approach for urban water resource planning and operation is developed to overcome practically significant shortcomings identified in previous work. A case study based on the headworks system for Sydney (Australia) demonstrates the approach and highlights the potentially serious shortcomings of Pareto optimal solutions conditioned on short climate records, incomplete decision spaces, and constraints to which system response is sensitive. Where high levels of drought security are required, optimal solutions conditioned on short climate records are flawed. Our approach addresses drought security explicitly by identifying approximate optimal solutions in which the system does not "run dry" in severe droughts with expected return periods up to a nominated (typically large) value. In addition, it is shown that failure to optimize the full mix of interacting operational and infrastructure decisions and to explore the trade-offs associated with sensitive constraints can lead to significantly more costly solutions.

  17. Theoretical modeling of cationic surfactant aggregation at the silica/aqueous solution interface: Effects of pH and ionic strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drach, M.; Andrzejewska, A.; Narkiewicz-Michalek, J.; Rudzinski, W.; Koopal, L.K.

    2002-01-01

    A theory of ionic surfactant aggregation on oppositely charged surfaces is presented. In the proposed model the adsorbed phase is considered as a mixture of singly dispersed surfactant molecules, monolayered and bilayered aggregates of various sizes and the ions of simple electrolyte added to the

  18. Application of Optimized Vortex-Assisted Surfactant-Enhanced DLLME for Preconcentration of Thymol and Carvacrol, and Their Determination by HPLC-UV: Response Surface Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Roosta, Mostafa; Khodadoust, Saeid; Daneshfar, Ali

    2015-08-01

    A novel vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with high-performance liquid chromatography (VASEDLLME-HPLC) was developed for the determination of thymol and carvacrol (phenolic compound). In this method, the extraction solvent (CHCl3) was dispersed into the aqueous samples via a vortex agitator and addition of the surfactant (Triton X-100). The preliminary experiments were undertaken to select the best extraction solvent and surfactant. The influences of effective variables were investigated using a Plackett-Burman 2(7-4) screening design and then, the significant variables were optimized by using a central composite design combined with desirability function. Working under optimum conditions specified as: 140 µL CHCl3, 0.08% (w/v, Triton X-100), 3 min extraction time, 6 min centrifugation at 4,500 rpm, pH 7, 0.0% (w/v) NaCl permit achievement of high and reasonable linear range over 0.005-4.0 mg L(-1) with R(2) = 0.9998 (n = 10). The separation of thymol and carvacrol was achieved in <14 min using a C18 column and an isocratic binary mobile phase acetonitrile-water (55:45, v/v) with a flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1). The VASEDLLME is applied for successful determination of carvacrol and thymol in different thyme and pharmaceutical samples with relative standard deviation <4.7% (n = 5). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Dynamic and structural characterisation of micellar solutions of surfactants by spin relaxation and translational diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahieu, Nathalie

    1992-01-01

    The work reported in this research thesis aimed at characterizing micellar phases formed by some surfactants (sodium carboxylates) in aqueous solution. After some recalls on nuclear magnetic resonance dealing with spin relaxation (longitudinal relaxation, transverse relaxation, relaxation in the rotating coordinate system, and crossed relaxation), and comments on the dipolar mechanism responsible of relaxation phenomena, the author presents the methods used for relaxation parameter measurement and the data processing software issued from experiments. He presents experiments which allowed the self-diffusion coefficient to be measured, reports data processing, and addresses problems of special diffusion and of coherence transfers during diffusion measurements. Results of proton relaxation measurements are then presented and discussed. They are used to determine the micellar state of the studied carboxylates. The case of the oleate is also addressed. Measurements of carbon-13 relaxation times are reported, and exploited in terms of structural parameters by using the Relaxator software. An original method of the hetero-nuclear Overhauser method is presented, and used to assess the average distance between water molecules and micelle surface [fr

  20. Efficient Solutions and Cost-Optimal Analysis for Existing School Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Maria Congedo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The recast of the energy performance of buildings directive (EPBD describes a comparative methodological framework to promote energy efficiency and establish minimum energy performance requirements in buildings at the lowest costs. The aim of the cost-optimal methodology is to foster the achievement of nearly zero energy buildings (nZEBs, the new target for all new buildings by 2020, characterized by a high performance with a low energy requirement almost covered by renewable sources. The paper presents the results of the application of the cost-optimal methodology in two existing buildings located in the Mediterranean area. These buildings are a kindergarten and a nursery school that differ in construction period, materials and systems. Several combinations of measures have been applied to derive cost-effective efficient solutions for retrofitting. The cost-optimal level has been identified for each building and the best performing solutions have been selected considering both a financial and a macroeconomic analysis. The results illustrate the suitability of the methodology to assess cost-optimality and energy efficiency in school building refurbishment. The research shows the variants providing the most cost-effective balance between costs and energy saving. The cost-optimal solution reduces primary energy consumption by 85% and gas emissions by 82%–83% in each reference building.

  1. Effect of surfactants and temperature on germination and vegetative growth of Beauveria bassiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizzy A. Mwamburi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Three non-ionic surfactants: Tween20, Tween80 and Breakthru® were screened for their effects on spore germination and mycelial growth rates and for their influence on three isolates of Beauveria bassianaspore germination at various temperatures. Tween20 and Tween80 were compatible with all the B. bassiana isolates in the germination studies, but inhibited germination at higher surfactant concentrations, irrespective of the conidial concentrations. Breakthru® had an inhibitory effect on germination even at the lowest concentration of 0.1% on all the B. bassiana isolates. The effects of the surfactants on spore germination did not correspond with their effects on colony growth. Conidial viability within the same formulation declined significantly with increases in temperature, irrespective of the surfactant. The optimal temperature for conidial germination of B. bassiana isolates was approximately 25 °C with an upper limit at 30 °C. Isolate 7320 was identified as the least affected by the different surfactants. This isolate was able to germinate rapidly in a broad temperature range of 25–30 °C after 24 h, this characteristic being an essential factor in controlling house fly populations in poultry houses.

  2. Effect of surfactants and temperature on germination and vegetative growth of Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwamburi, Lizzy A; Laing, Mark D; Miller, Ray M

    2015-03-01

    Three non-ionic surfactants: Tween20, Tween80 and Breakthru (®) were screened for their effects on spore germination and mycelial growth rates and for their influence on three isolates of Beauveria bassiana spore germination at various temperatures. Tween20 and Tween80 were compatible with all the B. bassiana isolates in the germination studies, but inhibited germination at higher surfactant concentrations, irrespective of the conidial concentrations . Breakthru (®) had an inhibitory effect on germination even at the lowest concentration of 0.1% on all the B. bassiana isolates. The effects of the surfactants on spore germination did not correspond with their effects on colony growth. Conidial viability within the same formulation declined significantly with increases in temperature, irrespective of the surfactant. The optimal temperature for conidial germination of B. bassiana isolates was approximately 25 °C with an upper limit at 30 °C. Isolate 7320 was identified as the least affected by the different surfactants. This isolate was able to germinate rapidly in a broad temperature range of 25-30 °C after 24 h, this characteristic being an essential factor in controlling house fly populations in poultry houses.

  3. Effect of surfactant on kinetics of thinning of capillary bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Emilia; Kovalchuk, Nina; Simmons, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Kinetics of thinning of capillary bridges is of great scientific and industrial interest being of vital importance for example in various emulsification and microfluidic processes. It is well known that the rate of bridge thinning is proportional to the interfacial tension. Therefore it is expected that the process should slow down by addition of surfactant. The kinetics of capillary bridges in the presence of surfactant was studied by the dripping of liquid from a capillary tip under conditions of nearly zero flow rate (We personal care products. The viscosity, surfactant activity and adsorption kinetics have been controlled by addition of glycerol and sodium chloride. The study has shown that the kinetics of capillary bridges are determined by dynamic surface tension rather than by its equilibrium value. In particular, the kinetics of the bridge thinning for the 0.1 g L-1 aqueous SLES solution is practically the same as that of pure water despite twice lower equilibrium surface tension. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  4. Practical solutions for multi-objective optimization: An application to system reliability design problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taboada, Heidi A.; Baheranwala, Fatema; Coit, David W.; Wattanapongsakorn, Naruemon

    2007-01-01

    For multiple-objective optimization problems, a common solution methodology is to determine a Pareto optimal set. Unfortunately, these sets are often large and can become difficult to comprehend and consider. Two methods are presented as practical approaches to reduce the size of the Pareto optimal set for multiple-objective system reliability design problems. The first method is a pseudo-ranking scheme that helps the decision maker select solutions that reflect his/her objective function priorities. In the second approach, we used data mining clustering techniques to group the data by using the k-means algorithm to find clusters of similar solutions. This provides the decision maker with just k general solutions to choose from. With this second method, from the clustered Pareto optimal set, we attempted to find solutions which are likely to be more relevant to the decision maker. These are solutions where a small improvement in one objective would lead to a large deterioration in at least one other objective. To demonstrate how these methods work, the well-known redundancy allocation problem was solved as a multiple objective problem by using the NSGA genetic algorithm to initially find the Pareto optimal solutions, and then, the two proposed methods are applied to prune the Pareto set

  5. Exogenous surfactant therapy in 2013: what is next? who, when and how should we treat newborn infants in the future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Surfactant therapy is one of the few treatments that have dramatically changed clinical practice in neonatology. In addition to respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), surfactant deficiency is observed in many other clinical situations in term and preterm infants, raising several questions regarding the use of surfactant therapy. Objectives This review focuses on several points of interest, including some controversial or confusing topics being faced by clinicians together with emerging or innovative concepts and techniques, according to the state of the art and the published literature as of 2013. Surfactant therapy has primarily focused on RDS in the preterm newborn. However, whether this treatment would be of benefit to a more heterogeneous population of infants with lung diseases other than RDS needs to be determined. Early trials have highlighted the benefits of prophylactic surfactant administration to newborns judged to be at risk of developing RDS. In preterm newborns that have undergone prenatal lung maturation with steroids and early treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), the criteria for surfactant administration, including the optimal time and the severity of RDS, are still under discussion. Tracheal intubation is no longer systematically done for surfactant administration to newborns. Alternative modes of surfactant administration, including minimally-invasive and aerosolized delivery, could thus allow this treatment to be used in cases of RDS in unstable preterm newborns, in whom the tracheal intubation procedure still poses an ethical and medical challenge. Conclusion The optimization of the uses and methods of surfactant administration will be one of the most important challenges in neonatal intensive care in the years to come. PMID:24112693

  6. Soil remediation: humic acids as natural surfactants in the washings of highly contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, Pellegrino; Agretto, Anna; Spaccini, Riccardo; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2005-01-01

    The remediation of the highly contaminated site around the former chemical plant of ACNA (near Savona) in Northern Italy is a top priority in Italy. The aim of the present work was to contribute in finding innovative and environmental-friendly technology to remediate soils from the ACNA contaminated site. Two soils sampled from the ACNA site (A and B), differing in texture and amount and type of organic contaminants, were subjected to soil washings by comparing the removal efficiency of water, two synthetic surfactants, sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) and Triton X-100 (TX100), and a solution of a natural surfactant, a humic acid (HA) at its critical micelle concentration (CMC). The extraction of pollutants by sonication and soxhlet was conducted before and after the soil washings. Soil A was richer in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, whereas soil B had a larger content of thiophenes. Sonication resulted more analytically efficient in the fine-textured soil B. The coarse-textured soil A was extracted with a general equal efficiency also by soxhlet. Clean-up by water was unable to exhaustively remove contaminants from the two soils, whereas all the organic surfactants revealed very similar efficiencies (up to 90%) in the removal of the contaminants from the soils. Hence, the use of solutions of natural HAs appears as a better choice for soil washings of highly polluted soils due to their additional capacity to promote microbial activity, in contrast to synthetic surfactants, for a further natural attenuation in washed soils. - Solutions of natural humic acids appear to be a better choice for washing highly polluted soils

  7. Liquid scintillation solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    The invention deals with a liquid scintillation solution which contains 1) a scintillation solvent (toluol), 2) a primary scintillation solute (PPO), 3) a secondary scintillation solute (dimethyl POPOP), 4) several surfactants (iso-octyl-phenol polyethoxy-ethanol and sodium di-hexyl sulfosuccinate) essentially different from one another and 5) a filter resolution and/or transparent-making agent (cyclic ether, especially tetrahydrofuran). (HP) [de

  8. Transport behaviors of anionic azo dyes at interface between surfactant-modified flax shives and aqueous solution: Synchrotron infrared and adsorption studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenxia [MOE Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Systems Optimization, Institute for Energy, Environment and Sustainability Research, UR-NCEPU, North China Electric Power University, Beijing, 102206 (China); Huang, Guohe, E-mail: huang@iseis.org [MOE Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Systems Optimization, Institute for Energy, Environment and Sustainability Research, UR-NCEPU, North China Electric Power University, Beijing, 102206 (China); An, Chunjiang; Xin, Xiaying [Institute for Energy, Environment and Sustainable Communities, University of Regina, Regina, S4S 0A2 (Canada); Zhang, Yan [MOE Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Systems Optimization, Institute for Energy, Environment and Sustainability Research, UR-NCEPU, North China Electric Power University, Beijing, 102206 (China); Liu, Xia [Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, S7N 2V3 (Canada)

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • Surfactant modified flax shives for removing anionic azo dyes. • The equilibrium and kinetic studies for the adsorption of anionic azo dyes. • The migration patterns of dye pollutants at flax shive-water interface. • New insights from synchrotron infrared-assisted characterization. • Potential as biomass adsorbent for the removal of dyes from wastewater. - Abstract: From the viewpoint of sustainability, biomass adsorbent has a high potential in pollution control and there is an emerging interest to investigate the behaviors of pollutants at the interface between biomass adsorbent and solution. This study investigated the performance of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide surfactant-modified flax shives (MFS) for removal of anionic azo dyes from aqueous solution. The equilibrium and kinetic analysis for the adsorption of Acid Orange 7 (AO-7), Acid Red 18 (AR-18) and Acid Black 1 (AB-1) on MFS were conducted. The surface of MFS was characterized by synchrotron infrared and SEM analysis. The absorbed amount of three anionic azo dyes varied with the change of adsorbent dosage, pH and ionic strength. The adsorption isotherm data well fit to the Langmuir model. The adsorption process followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics and the liquid film diffusion models. Thermodynamic studies indicated that the adsorption of three anionic azo dyes was spontaneous. The adsorption of AR-18 and AB-1 onto MFS was endothermic while the adsorption of AO-7 was exothermic. The results can help better understand the behaviors of organic pollutants at biomass adsorbent-water interface. They also present the potential of using MFS as a suitable adsorbent for the removal of anionic azo dyes from wastewater.

  9. Transport behaviors of anionic azo dyes at interface between surfactant-modified flax shives and aqueous solution: Synchrotron infrared and adsorption studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wenxia; Huang, Guohe; An, Chunjiang; Xin, Xiaying; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Xia

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Surfactant modified flax shives for removing anionic azo dyes. • The equilibrium and kinetic studies for the adsorption of anionic azo dyes. • The migration patterns of dye pollutants at flax shive-water interface. • New insights from synchrotron infrared-assisted characterization. • Potential as biomass adsorbent for the removal of dyes from wastewater. - Abstract: From the viewpoint of sustainability, biomass adsorbent has a high potential in pollution control and there is an emerging interest to investigate the behaviors of pollutants at the interface between biomass adsorbent and solution. This study investigated the performance of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide surfactant-modified flax shives (MFS) for removal of anionic azo dyes from aqueous solution. The equilibrium and kinetic analysis for the adsorption of Acid Orange 7 (AO-7), Acid Red 18 (AR-18) and Acid Black 1 (AB-1) on MFS were conducted. The surface of MFS was characterized by synchrotron infrared and SEM analysis. The absorbed amount of three anionic azo dyes varied with the change of adsorbent dosage, pH and ionic strength. The adsorption isotherm data well fit to the Langmuir model. The adsorption process followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics and the liquid film diffusion models. Thermodynamic studies indicated that the adsorption of three anionic azo dyes was spontaneous. The adsorption of AR-18 and AB-1 onto MFS was endothermic while the adsorption of AO-7 was exothermic. The results can help better understand the behaviors of organic pollutants at biomass adsorbent-water interface. They also present the potential of using MFS as a suitable adsorbent for the removal of anionic azo dyes from wastewater.

  10. Dynamic covalent surfactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minkenberg, C.B.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis the development of surfactant aggregates with fast exchange dynamics between the aggregated and non-aggregated state is described. Dynamic surfactant exchange plays an important role in natural systems, for instance in cell signaling, cell division, and uptake and release of cargo.

  11. Complicated problem solution techniques in optimal parameter searching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gergel', V.P.; Grishagin, V.A.; Rogatneva, E.A.; Strongin, R.G.; Vysotskaya, I.N.; Kukhtin, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm is presented of a global search for numerical solution of multidimentional multiextremal multicriteria optimization problems with complicated constraints. A boundedness of object characteristic changes is assumed at restricted changes of its parameters (Lipschitz condition). The algorithm was realized as a computer code. The algorithm was realized as a computer code. The programme was used to solve in practice the different applied optimization problems. 10 refs.; 3 figs

  12. Lung surfactant levels are regulated by Ig-Hepta/GPR116 by monitoring surfactant protein D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taku Fukuzawa

    Full Text Available Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins, which is secreted from the alveolar type II epithelial cell and coats the surface of alveoli as a thin layer. It plays a crucial role in the prevention of alveolar collapse through its ability to reduce surface tension. Under normal conditions, surfactant homeostasis is maintained by balancing its release and the uptake by the type II cell for recycling and the internalization by alveolar macrophages for degradation. Little is known about how the surfactant pool is monitored and regulated. Here we show, by an analysis of gene-targeted mice exhibiting massive accumulation of surfactant, that Ig-Hepta/GPR116, an orphan receptor, is expressed on the type II cell and sensing the amount of surfactant by monitoring one of its protein components, surfactant protein D, and its deletion results in a pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and emphysema-like pathology. By a coexpression experiment with Sp-D and the extracellular region of Ig-Hepta/GPR116 followed by immunoprecipitation, we identified Sp-D as the ligand of Ig-Hepta/GPR116. Analyses of surfactant metabolism in Ig-Hepta(+/+ and Ig-Hepta(-/- mice by using radioactive tracers indicated that the Ig-Hepta/GPR116 signaling system exerts attenuating effects on (i balanced synthesis of surfactant lipids and proteins and (ii surfactant secretion, and (iii a stimulating effect on recycling (uptake in response to elevated levels of Sp-D in alveolar space.

  13. Rhamnolipids--next generation surfactants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Markus Michael; Kügler, Johannes H; Henkel, Marius; Gerlitzki, Melanie; Hörmann, Barbara; Pöhnlein, Martin; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2012-12-31

    combine a holistic X-omics strategy with metabolic engineering to achieve the next step in rhamnolipid production based on non-food renewable resources. This review discusses different approaches towards optimization of rhamnolipid production and enhancement of product spectra. The optimization of rhamnolipid production with P. aeruginosa strains, screening methods for new non-pathogenic natural rhamnolipid producers and recombinant rhamnolipid production are examined. Finally, biocatalysis with rhamnolipids for the synthesis of l-rhamnose, β-hydroxyfatty acids, and tailor-made surfactants is discussed. Biosurfactants are still in the phase of initial commercialization. However, for next generation development of rhamnolipid production processes and next generation biosurfactants there are still considerable obstacles to be surmounted, which are discussed here. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of model perfume molecules on the self-assembly of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl 6-benzene sulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Robert; Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Tucker, Ian M; Petkov, Jordan T; Jones, Craig; Grillo, Isabelle

    2013-03-12

    The impact of two model perfumes with differing degrees of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, linalool (LL) and phenylethanol (PE), on the solution structure of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl 6-benzene sulfonate, LAS-6, has been studied by small angle neutron scattering, SANS. For both types of perfume molecules, complex phase behavior is observed. The phase behavior depends upon the concentration, surfactant/perfume composition, and type of perfume. The more hydrophilic perfume PE promotes the formation of more highly curved structures. At relatively low surfactant concentrations, small globular micelles, L1, are formed. These become perfume droplets, L(sm), stabilized by the surfactant at much higher perfume solution compositions. At higher surfactant concentrations, the tendency of LAS-6 to form more planar structures is evident. The more hydrophobic linalool promotes the formation of more planar structures. Combined with the greater tendency of LAS-6 to form planar structures, this results in the planar structures dominating the phase behavior for the LAS-6/linalool mixtures. For the LAS-6/linalool mixture, the self-assembly is in the form of micelles only at the lowest surfactant and perfume concentrations. Over most of the concentration-composition space explored, the structures are predominantly lamellar, L(α), or vesicle, L(v), or in the form of a lamellar/micellar coexistence. At low and intermediate amounts of LL, a significantly different structure is observed, and the aggregates are in the form of small, relatively monodisperse vesicles (i.e., nanovesicles), L(sv).

  15. Study of the enhanced oil recovery with surfactant based systems; Estudo de recuperacao avancada de petroleo por sistemas a base de tensoativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro Neto, Valdir Cotrim; Paulino, Luisa Cimatti; Acyoly, Alessandra; Santos, Enio Rafael M.; Dantas Neto, Afonso Avelino [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The recent changes in the world scenario, the large reserves of heavy oils and also the lack of new discoveries of large petroleum fields are indications that, in the near future, the oil recovery by conventional methods will be limited. In order to increase the efficiency of the extraction process, it must be used enhanced recovery methods. One of these technologies is the injection of surfactant solutions, where exists a chemical interaction between the injected fluid and the reservoir's fluid. With this in mind, this work was developed with two main objectives: to study of parameters that influence the surfactant behavior in solution, namely the critical micelle concentration (CMC), the surface and interface tensions between fluids and the evaluation of oil recovery with these solutions. After the Botucatu sandstone (Brazil) porosity study, the plug samples were submitted to assay steps comprising saturation with seawater and petroleum, conventional recovery with seawater and enhanced recovery with surfactant solutions. The solutions were studied in enhanced recovery step, when the plug samples could already be compared to a mature field. The PJN surfactant, at a concentration 1000% above CMC in water, had a higher recovery factor, causing the original oil in place to be recovered by an extra 20.97%, after conventional recovery with seawater. (author)

  16. [Optimizing synthesis of conjugates of superoxide dismutase and catalase with aldehyde dextrans in surfactant microemulsions in heptane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, A N; Metelitsa, D I

    1997-01-01

    Stable microemulsions in heptane retaining considerable amounts of the polar phase were obtained by using Aerosol OT (AOT), Triton X-45, and catalase. Conjugates of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase with aldehyde dextrans (AD) were synthesized in surfactant microemulsions in heptane. Effects of the reaction duration, the microemulsion polar phase volume, and concentrations of enzymes and modifiers on the properties of these conjugates were studied. The catalytic properties of conjugates depended on the nature of the surfactants used to stabilize the microemulsions, the initial concentration of protein in the reaction mixture, and the enzyme: modifier ratio. The degree of modification of the enzymes and the stabilities of their conjugates during isolation from microemulsions by a water-acetone solution depended on the concentration of the AD used. The catalytic properties of the conjugates synthesized were compared, and their stabilities in the presence of H2O2 were described. We suggested a simple method of transformation of whole kinetic curves of H2O2 conversion in coordinates 1/ln([H2O2]0/[H2O2]t - 1/t for simultaneous measurement of the constant of the catalase inactivation rate by H2O2 (Cin, S-1) and the rate constant of the catalase complex 1 interaction with the second H2O2 molecule (C2, M-1 S-1). This method was tested experimentally. Values C2 and Cin for catalase and its conjugates with ADs were compared, and these results were discussed.

  17. Modification of shape oscillations of an attached bubble by surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tihon J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Surface-active agents (surfactants, e.g. washing agents strongly modifies properties of gas-liquid interface. We have carried out extensive experiments, in which we study effect of surfactants on the shape oscillations of a bubble, which is attached at a tip of a capillary. In the experiments, shape oscillations of a bubble are invoked by a motion of a capillary, to which the bubble is injected. Decaying oscillations are recorded and their frequency and damping are evaluated. By changing the excitation frequency, three lowest oscillation modes are studied. Experiments were repeated in aqueous solution of several surfactants (terpineol, SDS, CTAB, Triton X-100, Triton X-45 at various concentrations. Generally, these features are observed: Initially a surfactant addition leads to an increase of the oscillation frequency (though surface tension is decreasing; this effect can be attributed to the increasing interfacial elasticity. The decay time of oscillation is strongly decreasing, as a consequence of energy dissipation linked with Marangoni stresses. At a certain critical concentration, frequency decreases abruptly and the decay time passes by a minimum. With further addition of surfactant, frequency decreases, and the decay time slightly lengthens. Above critical micelle concentration, all these parameters stabilize. Interestingly, the critical concentration, at which frequency drop occurs, depends on mode order. This clearly shows that the frequency drop and minimum decay time are not a consequence of some abrupt change of interfacial properties, but are a consequence of some phenomena, which still need to be explained.

  18. Treatment with exogenous surfactant stimulates endogenous surfactant synthesis in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunt, JEH; Carnielli, VP; Janssen, DJ; Wattimena, JLD; Hop, WC; Sauer, PJ; Zimmermann, LJI

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) with exogenous surfactant has greatly improved clinical outcome. Some infants require multiple doses, and it has not been studied whether these large amounts of exogenous surfactant disturb endogenous surfactant

  19. [Determination of Trace Lead in Water by UV-Visible Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy Combined with Surfactant and Membrane Filtration-Enrichment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-fang; Zhu, Bi-lin; Li, Wei; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Ting; Du, Yi-ping

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a method of determination of trace lead in water by UV-Visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy combined with surfactant and membrane filtration enrichment was proposed. In the NH3 x H2O-NH4Cl buffer solution with pH 8.5, the lead(II) ion would react with dithizone to form the red complex under vigorous stirring, which is hydrophobic and can be enriched by the mixed cellulose ester membrane. In addition, the nonionic surfactant Polyoxyethylene lauryl ether (Brij-30) was added into the solution to improve the enrichment efficiency, then visible diffuse reflectance spectra of the membrane were measured directly after the membrane were naturally dried. We also optimized the reaction conditions which may affect the complexation reaction process, such as type of surfactants, the concentration of the surfactant, the reaction acidity, the concentration of dithizone as well as the reaction time. The research results show that under the optimum conditions, a good linear correlation between absorbance at 485 nm and concentration of lead in the range of 5.0-100.0 microg x L(-1) was obtained with a squared correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.9906, and the detection limit was estimated accordingly to be 2.88 microg x L(-1). To determine real water sample, the interference from some potential coexisting ions was also studied at the optimal conditions when the concentration of lead (II) ion standard solution was fixed to 20 microg x L(-1). The results indicate that the following ions cannot interfere in the determination of lead with the proposed method: 500 times of the K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, NH4+, NO3-, Cl-, CH3COO-, SO4(2-); 10 times of the Al3+ (using 10% NaF as a masking reagent to avoid the interference); 10 times of the Fe3+ (using 10% NaF and 10% sodium potassium tartrate as masking reagents); 10 times of Hg2+ or Zn2+ (using 10% NaSCN and 10% potassium sodium tartrate as masking reagents); the same amount of Cd2+, Cu2+. The proposed method was applied to the

  20. Rape phosphatide concentrate in the technologies of surfactants production by the Actinobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Koretska

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Due to the fact that the production of microbial surfactants is limited by the low yield of end products and high cost of processes, the actual task is to optimize and reduce the cost of the technology of biosurfactants synthesis. One of the solutions of this problem is to use the industrial wastes, including rape phosphatide concentrate (PC. Materials and methods. Hexadecane and rape phosphatide concentrate (2% were used as a carbon source in a nutrient medium for the cultivation of bacteria. Lipids were extracted from a cell mass and supernatant by the mixture of chloroform-methanol 2:1. The qualitative analysis of metabolites was performed by a thin layer chromatography. Results and discussion. The peculiarities of synthesis of biosurfactants by strains G. rubripertincta UCM Aс-122 and R. erythropolis Au-1 during the growth on the nutrient media with rape phosphatide concentrate as a carbon source was studied. Quantity of biomass was 9.4 – 10.1 g/l, exopoly mers –8.9-9.5 g/l and the content of cellbound trehalose lipids was 1.37 – 2.26 g/l; whereas the content of exogenous trehalose lipids –metabolites of R. erythropolis Au-1 was 2.95 g/l. It was found that the addition of trehalose lipids (0.01 g/l to the nutrient medium caused the increase of biomass on 14.6 –17.0 % and cell-bound lipids on 13.9 –15.5 %. Conclusions. Rape phosphatide concentrate is economically viable carbon source in the technologies of surfactant production by Actinobacteria. Its use promotes an increasing of exogenous surfactants strain R. erythropolisAu-1 in 3-fold compared with cultivation on nutrient medium with hexadecane. Trehalose lipids show a stimulating effect on growth and synthesis of biosurfactants by strains of G. rubripertincta UCM Ac-122 and R. erythropolisAu-1.

  1. Surfactant nebulisation : lung function, surfactant distribution and pulmonary blood flow distribution in lung lavaged rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Peter H.; Heikamp, A; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Surfactant nebulisation is a promising alternative to surfactant instillation in newborns with the respiratory distress syndrome. Although less surfactant is deposited in the lung, it improves gas exchange, probably due to a superior distribution. We hypothesize that a more uniform

  2. Surfactants from petroleum paraffin wax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassem, T.M.; Hussein, M.H.; El Sayed, A.S.

    Paraffin wax from Egyptian petroleum was purified and then oxidized to fatty acids which were esterified to form their methyl esters, fractionated and then hydrolysed. The obtained fatty acids were converted into the corresponding primary amines which were converted with ethylene oxide to form nonionic surfactants. The prepared primary amines were also converted into tertiary amines and then converted into cationic surfactants through condensation with benzyl chloride or 1-chloromethylnaphthalene. Also, amine oxide surfactants were prepared by oxidation of the tertiary amines with hydrogen peroxide. The surface active properties of all the prepared surfactants were determined, and the effect of their chemical structure on the surfactant properties are discussed in this paper.

  3. [Optimize preparation of compound licorice microemulsion with D-optimal design].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shu-Wei; Wang, Yong-Jie; Chen, Cheng; Qiu, Yue; Wu, Qing

    2018-03-01

    In order to increase the solubility of essential oil in compound licorice microemulsion and improve the efficacy of the decoction for treating chronic eczema, this experiment intends to prepare the decoction into microemulsion. The essential oil was used as the oil phase of the microemulsion and the extract was used as the water phase. Then the microemulsion area and maximum ratio of water capacity was obtained by plotting pseudo-ternary phase diagram, to determine the appropriate types of surfactant and cosurfactant, and Km value-the mass ratio between surfactant and cosurfactant. With particle size and skin retention of active ingredients as the index, microemulsion prescription was optimized by D-optimal design method, to investigate the in vitro release behavior of the optimized prescription. The results showed that the microemulsion was optimal with tween-80 as the surfactant and anhydrous ethanol as the cosurfactant. When the Km value was 1, the area of the microemulsion region was largest while when the concentration of extract was 0.5 g·mL⁻¹, it had lowest effect on the particle size distribution of microemulsion. The final optimized formulation was as follows: 9.4% tween-80, 9.4% anhydrous ethanol, 1.0% peppermint oil and 80.2% 0.5 g·mL⁻¹ extract. The microemulsion prepared under these conditions had a small viscosity, good stability and high skin retention of drug; in vitro release experiment showed that microemulsion had a sustained-release effect on glycyrrhizic acid and liquiritin, basically achieving the expected purpose of the project. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  4. The Krafft temperature of surfactant solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Manojlović Jelena Ž.

    2012-01-01

    Our main motivation to revisit the solution properties of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide is related to the clear requirement for better control of the adsorption parameters to form uniform self-assembled monolayers on muscovite mica substrates. To readily monitor the temporal evolution of structural details in cetyltrimethylammonium bromide solutions, we realized a rather simple conductivity experiment. Conductivity measurements were carried out as a function of temperature, to look clo...

  5. Acute Pathophysiological Effects of Intratracheal Instillation of Budesonide and Exogenous Surfactant in a Neonatal Surfactant-depleted Piglet Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Feng Yang

    2010-08-01

    Conclusions: Intratracheal instillation of surfactant or surfactant plus budesonide can improve oxygenation and pulmonary histologic outcome in neonatal surfactant-depleted lungs. The additional use of budesonide does not disturb the function of the exogenous surfactant. Intratracheal administration of a corticosteroid combined with surfactant may be an effective method for alleviating local pulmonary inflammation in severe RDS.

  6. Surfactant flooding of diesel-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, R.W.; Montemagno, C.D.; Shem, L.; Lewis, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    At one installation, approximately 60,000 gallons of No. 2 diesel fuel leaked into the subsurface environment, with contamination at depths of 6 to 34 m below the surface. Argonne National Laboratory was contracted to perform treatability studies for site remediation. The treatability studies focused on four separate phases: (1) leachability studies on the various contaminated soil borings, (2) air stripping studies, (3) bioremediation studies, and (4) surfactant screening/surfactant flooding studies. This paper summarizes the fourth phase of this research program after initial surfactant screening of 21 surfactants. Three of the surfactants were used for the surfactant flooding studies; the results from that phase of the research program are described

  7. Efficient Output Solution for Nonlinear Stochastic Optimal Control Problem with Model-Reality Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sie Long Kek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A computational approach is proposed for solving the discrete time nonlinear stochastic optimal control problem. Our aim is to obtain the optimal output solution of the original optimal control problem through solving the simplified model-based optimal control problem iteratively. In our approach, the adjusted parameters are introduced into the model used such that the differences between the real system and the model used can be computed. Particularly, system optimization and parameter estimation are integrated interactively. On the other hand, the output is measured from the real plant and is fed back into the parameter estimation problem to establish a matching scheme. During the calculation procedure, the iterative solution is updated in order to approximate the true optimal solution of the original optimal control problem despite model-reality differences. For illustration, a wastewater treatment problem is studied and the results show the efficiency of the approach proposed.

  8. Point force singularities outside a drop covered with an incompressible surfactant: Image systems and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Vaseem A.; Ardekani, Arezoo M.

    2017-11-01

    In this work we derive the image flow fields for point force singularities placed outside a stationary drop covered with an insoluble, nondiffusing, and incompressible surfactant. We assume the interface to be Newtonian and use the Boussinesq-Scriven constitutive law for the interfacial stress tensor. We use this analytical solution to investigate two different problems. First, we derive the mobility matrix for two drops of arbitrary sizes covered with an incompressible surfactant. In the second example, we calculate the velocity of a swimming microorganism (modeled as a Stokes dipole) outside a drop covered with an incompressible surfactant.

  9. Inverse planning and optimization: a comparison of solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringor, Michael [School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Papiez, Lech [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The basic problem in radiation therapy treatment planning is to determine an appropriate set of treatment parameters that would induce an effective dose distribution inside a patient. One can approach this task as an inverse problem, or as an optimization problem. In this presentation, we compare both approaches. The inverse problem is presented as a dose reconstruction problem similar to tomography reconstruction. We formulate the optimization problem as linear and quadratic programs. Explicit comparisons are made between the solutions obtained by inversion and those obtained by optimization for the case in which scatter and attenuation are ignored (the NS-NA approximation)

  10. Evaluation of the presence of major anionic surfactants in marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero, S; Camino-Sánchez, F J; Zafra-Gómez, A; Ballesteros, O; Navalón, A; Vílchez, J L; Verge, C; Reis, M S; Saraiva, P M

    2012-03-01

    The contamination of aquatic environments has become the focus of increasing regulation and public concern due to their potential and unknown negative effects on the ecosystems. The present work develops a monitoring and statistical study, based on the analysis of variance test (ANOVA) and the multivariable analysis, both for insoluble soap and LAS in order to compare the behavior of different anionic surfactants in this environmental compartment. First, a novel and successfully validated methodology to analyze insoluble soap in these samples is developed. The matrix effect and the comparison of different extraction techniques were also performed. The optimized analytical methodologies were applied to 48 representative samples collected from the Almeria Coast (Spain) and then a statistical analysis to correlate anionic surfactant concentration and several variables associated with marine sediment samples was also developed. The results obtained showed relevant conclusions related to the environmental behavior of anionic surfactants in marine sediments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ion-pair hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction of the quaternary ammonium surfactant dicocodimethylammonium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultgren, Sofie; Larsson, Niklas; Nilsson, Bo F; Jönsson, Jan Ake

    2009-02-01

    A two-phase hollow-fiber (HF) liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) method was developed for determination of a quaternary ammonium compound surfactant, dicocodimethylammonium chloride, in aqueous samples. The porous HF was fixed on a metal rod support and was impregnated with approximately 6.6 microL of organic extractant, which was immobilized in the HF pores. Surfactant extraction was facilitated by addition of carboxylic acid to the sample forming neutral ion pairs with the quaternary ammonium compound. After extraction, the analyte was transferred from the organic extractant in the fiber pores by dissolving the 1-octanol into 100 microL methanol. The methanol extract was analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The method was optimized (with optimized parameters in brackets) with regard to type of organic extractant (1-octanol), fiber length (2 cm), choice and concentration of anionic carrier (600 microg L(-1) octanoate), procedure of transfer to methanol (15-min sonication), sample volume (250 mL), extraction time (17 h), pH (10), and ionic strength (50 mM carbonate). Aspects influencing repeatability in LPME of (quaternary ammonium) surfactants are discussed. The enrichment factor achieved in 250-mL carbonate buffer was around 400. Due to matrix effects, the enrichment factors achieved when industrial process water was analyzed were 120 or about 30% of that in carbonate buffer. Detection limits of 0.3 microg L(-1) in carbonate buffer and 0.9 microg L(-1) in industrial process water were obtained. If the studied compound is seen as a model substance representing quaternary dialkylated dimethylated ammonium surfactants in general, the developed method may be applied to other quaternary ammonium surfactants.

  12. Iterative solution to the optimal poison management problem in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colletti, J.P.; Levine, S.H.; Lewis, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    A new method for solving the optimal poison management problem for a multiregion pressurized water reactor has been developed. The optimization objective is to maximize the end-of-cycle core excess reactivity for any given beginning-of-cycle fuel loading. The problem is treated as an optimal control problem with the region burnup and control absorber concentrations acting as the state and control variables, respectively. Constraints are placed on the power peaking, soluble boron concentration, and control absorber concentrations. The solution method consists of successive relinearizations of the system equations resulting in a sequence of nonlinear programming problems whose solutions converge to the desired optimal control solution. Application of the method to several test problems based on a simplified three-region reactor suggests a bang-bang optimal control strategy with the peak power location switching between the inner and outer regions of the core and the critical soluble boron concentration as low as possible throughout the cycle

  13. CISM Course on Fluid Mechanics of Surfactant and Polymer Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    Colloidal systems and dispersions are of great importance in oil recovery, waist water treatment, coating, food and beverage industry, pharmaceutical industry, medicine, environmental protection etc. Colloidal systems and dispersions are always multi-component and multiphase systems. In these systems at least one dimension is in a range of colloidal forces action: colloidal dispersions/emulsions are examples of three dimensional colloidal systems, while thin liquid films are examples of one dimensional colloidal systems. The contribution presented in this issue deals with flow, distribution and redistribution, coating and deposition of surfactant and polymer molecules in colloidal systems. The book presents reviews of recent advances and trends by well-know scientists and engineers in this area.

  14. Bubble-size distributions produced by wall injection of air into flowing freshwater, saltwater and surfactant solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Eric S.; Ceccio, Steven L.; Dowling, David R.; Perlin, Marc

    2004-12-01

    As air is injected into a flowing liquid, the resultant bubble characteristics depend on the properties of the injector, near-wall flow, and flowing liquid. Previous research has shown that near-wall bubbles can significantly reduce skin-friction drag. Air was injected into the turbulent boundary layer on a test section wall of a water tunnel containing various concentrations of salt and surfactant (Triton-X-100, Union Carbide). Photographic records show that the mean bubble diameter decreased monotonically with increasing salt and surfactant concentrations. Here, 33 ppt saltwater bubbles had one quarter, and 20 ppm Triton-X-100 bubbles had one half of the mean diameter of freshwater bubbles.

  15. Stability of fortified cefazolin ophthalmic solutions prepared in artificial tears containing surfactant-based versus oxidant-based preservatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanarata, Theerasak; Tankul, Junlathip; Woranaipinich, Chayanee; Potawanich, Paweena; Plianwong, Samarwadee; Sakulma, Sirinart; Saehuan, Choedchai

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the stability of fortified cefazolin sodium ophthalmic solutions (50 mg mL⁻¹) extemporaneously prepared in commercial artificial tears containing 2 different types of preservatives, namely the surfactants and oxidants. Fortified cefazolin sodium solutions were prepared by reconstituting cefazolin for injection with sterile water and further diluted with Tears Naturale II or Natear, 2 commercial artificial tears containing polyquaternium-1 and sodium perborate, respectively, as preservatives. The solutions were then kept at room temperature (28°C) or in the refrigerator (4°C). During the 28-day period, the formulations were periodically examined for the physical appearance, pH, and the remaining drug concentrations. The antibacterial potency was evaluated as the minimal inhibitory concentration against Staphylococcus aureus strain ATCC 29923 by broth dilution technique. The activity of the preservatives was demonstrated by antimicrobial effectiveness tests. On day 28, the microbial contamination in the preparations was tested. The stability profiles of cefazolin solutions prepared in Tears Naturale II, Natear, and water were not different, but they were significantly influenced by the storage temperature. The refrigerated formulations showed no loss of drug and antibacterial potency as well as alteration of physical appearance and pH throughout the 28 days. In contrast, those kept at room temperature showed gradual change in color and odor. The degradation of drug exceeded 10% from day 3 and the decrease of antibacterial potency could be observed at week 3. All cefazolin solutions prepared in artificial tears retained the antimicrobial activity of preservatives and were free from bacterial and fungal contamination throughout the 28-day period of study. Cefazolin sodium ophthalmic solutions can be extemporaneously prepared in Tears Naturale II or Natear without the influence from different types of preservatives used in

  16. Influence of the chain length of surfactant in the modification of zeolites and clays. Removal of atrazine from water solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Jaldin, Helen Paola; Blanco-Flores, Alien; Sánchez-Mendieta, Víctor; Martín-Hernández, Osnieski

    2017-08-30

    Removal potentials of a surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) and clay (SMC) for atrazine adsorption were evaluated. Materials were modified with hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (HDTMA-Br) and benzyl octadecyl dimethyl ammonium (BODA) chloride considering the critical micellar concentration (CMC) of each one (0.94 and 0.041 meq/L, respectively). The influence of the surfactant was analyzed in detail, particularly the formation of surfactant layers (complete or partial) connected with the length of the surfactant tail (16 and 18 methyl groups or number of carbons in the chain). Raw materials were characterized by XRD and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), SMZ and SMC were analyzed by FTIR. Results obtained from kinetic adsorption experiments shown that equilibrium time is less for materials modified with HDTMA (8 h) than materials with BODA (10 and 12 h). Materials modified with the largest chain surfactant (BODA) showed more resistance to atrazine masse transference. The chemisorption was presented in the adsorption mechanisms of atrazine and adsorbent materials. Based on the results of adsorption isotherms Langmuir isotherms showed the better correlation coefficients value. The q max is greater for materials modified with BODA (0.9232 and 4.2448 mg/g) than for materials modified with HDTMA (0.6731 and 3.9121 mg/g). Therefore, SMZ and SMC modified with the largest chain surfactant has more affinity for the pesticide. The removal process at high concentration of atrazine depends of the partition process but at lower concentration, it occurs not only by this process but also by absorption process.

  17. Extraction of lithium ion from alkaline aqueous media by a liquid surfactant membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinugasa, Takumi; Ono, Yuri; Kawamura, Yuko; Watanabe, Kunio; Takeuchi, Hiroshi.

    1995-01-01

    Extraction of lithium ion from aqueous alkaline media by a liquid surfactant membrane was performed using a mixture of LIX54 and TOPO as the extractant. Stripping of lithium from the kerosene solution to the acid solution was suppressed with increasing content of polyamine (ECA) surfactant. The extraction rate of lithium by the liquid membrane could be interpreted taking account of an interfacial resistance due to ECA. It was confirmed that swelling of the (W/O) emulsion drops by water permeation through the liquid membrane is evaluated in terms of a change in osmotic pressure gradient between the external and internal aqueous phases during the lithium extraction. In the present operation, the extraction ratio of Li + from the external feed and the uptake into the internal phase reached as high as 95%. (author)

  18. Smooth Solutions to Optimal Investment Models with Stochastic Volatilities and Portfolio Constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, H.

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with an extension of Merton's optimal investment problem to a multidimensional model with stochastic volatility and portfolio constraints. The classical dynamic programming approach leads to a characterization of the value function as a viscosity solution of the highly nonlinear associated Bellman equation. A logarithmic transformation expresses the value function in terms of the solution to a semilinear parabolic equation with quadratic growth on the derivative term. Using a stochastic control representation and some approximations, we prove the existence of a smooth solution to this semilinear equation. An optimal portfolio is shown to exist, and is expressed in terms of the classical solution to this semilinear equation. This reduction is useful for studying numerical schemes for both the value function and the optimal portfolio. We illustrate our results with several examples of stochastic volatility models popular in the financial literature

  19. Effect of Source, Surfactant, and Deposition Process on Electronic Properties of Nanotube Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dheeraj Jain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The electronic properties of arrays of carbon nanotubes from several different sources differing in the manufacturing process used with a variety of average properties such as length, diameter, and chirality are studied. We used several common surfactants to disperse each of these nanotubes and then deposited them on Si wafers from their aqueous solutions using dielectrophoresis. Transport measurements were performed to compare and determine the effect of different surfactants, deposition processes, and synthesis processes on nanotubes synthesized using CVD, CoMoCAT, laser ablation, and HiPCO.

  20. Proficiency feasibility of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the presence of polymeric surfactant on enhanced oil recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhad, Javad Razavi; Jafari, Arezou; Abdollahi, Mahdi

    2018-01-01

    Enhanced heavy oil recovery methods are widely utilized to increase oil recovery. For this purpose, polymer and surfactant flooding have been used extensively. Recently, polymeric surfactant flooding has become an attractive alternative to sole polymer flooding due to their capability of providing an increase in solution viscosity and a decrease in interfacial tension, which are both beneficial for efficiency of the process. Applying nanoparticles as an additive to polymer solutions is a method to improve viscosity and alter rock wettability. Therefore, in this research, multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) was mixed with a polymeric surfactant of polyacrylamide-graft-lignin copolymer (PAM-g-L) synthesized via radical grafting reaction. Moreover, several solutions with different concentrations of nanoparticles with PAM-g-L were prepared. The solutions were injected into a micromodel to evaluate the PAM-g-L flooding efficiency in presence of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The results of micromodel flooding showed that increasing MWCNT concentration results in lower sweep efficiencies; and consequently, oil production will decrease. Therefore, MWCNT along with PAM-g-L has an unacceptable performance in enhanced heavy oil recovery. But data of wettability tests revealed that MWCNT can change the wettability from oil-wet to water-wet. In addition, the combination of the PAM-g-L and MWCNT in a solution will cause more water-wet condition.

  1. Capillary pressure across a pore throat in the presence of surfactants

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Junbong

    2016-11-22

    Capillarity controls the distribution and transport of multiphase and immiscible fluids in soils and fractured rocks; therefore, capillarity affects the migration of nonaqueous contaminants and remediation strategies for both LNAPLs and DNAPLs, constrains gas and oil recovery, and regulates CO2 injection and geological storage. Surfactants alter interfacial tension and modify the invasion of pores by immiscible fluids. Experiments are conducted to explore the propagation of fluid interfaces along cylindrical capillary tubes and across pore constrictions in the presence of surfactants. Measured pressure signatures reflect the interaction between surface tension, contact angle, and the pore geometry. Various instabilities occur as the interface traverses the pore constriction, consequently, measured pressure signatures differ from theoretical trends predicted from geometry, lower capillary pressures are generated in advancing wetting fronts, and jumps are prone to under-sampling. Contact angle and instabilities are responsible for pronounced differences between pressure signatures recorded during advancing and receding tests. Pressure signatures gathered with surfactant solutions suggest changes in interfacial tension at the constriction; the transient surface tension is significantly lower than the value measured in quasi-static conditions. Interface stiffening is observed during receding fronts for solutions near the critical micelle concentration. Wetting liquids tend to form plugs at pore constrictions after the invasion of a nonwetting fluid; plugs split the nonwetting fluid into isolated globules and add resistance against fluid flow.

  2. Influence of Valsartan on the thermodynamics of micellization of anionic surfactant Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stopková L.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this manuscript was investigated behaviour of drug valsartan by micellar media of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate. As the method was used electrical conductivity for the determination of critical micelle concentration at different temperatures (T = 293.15 - 313.15 K, as well as calculated thermodynamic parameters like standard Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy of micellization. According to contribution of Gibbs free energy is the process of micellization primarily controlled by entropy. Solubilization of valsartan was studied in surfactant system at 298.15 K and physiological conditions pH 7.4 using UV-spectrophotometry at different concentration range (0.001 - 0.07 mol/l of sodium dodecyl sulphate. The solubilization of drug was observed with increasing concentration of surfactant in aqueous solution.

  3. Study on the effect of surfactants on morphologies of trigonal selenium in microfluidic reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, Tian-bin [Institute of Microanalytical Systems, Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Zheda Lu 38, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yin, Xue-feng, E-mail: yinxf@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Microanalytical Systems, Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Zheda Lu 38, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Fan, Jie [Institute of Catalysis, Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Liu, Jin-hua [College of Material Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 310036 (China)

    2010-02-15

    The influence of the surfactants on the morphologies of trigonal selenium (t-Se) submicrostructures was studied in a two-step microfluidic system, which is composed of a glass microchip for preparing spherical amorphous selenium (a-Se) colloids coupled with a poly(methyl methacrylate) microchip for transferring a-Se into its t-Se seeds under sonication. The selenious acid containing surfactants and hydrazine solutions were delivered through the two-inlets of the glass microfluidic chip. Submicro-rods, -wires as well as -tubes of t-Se were obtained by simply varying the coexisted surfactants. The as-synthesized products were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectrum, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED).

  4. Adsorption behavior of hydrophobin and hydrophobin/surfactant mixtures at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoli L; Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Tucker, Ian M; Petkov, Jordan T; Bent, Julian; Cox, Andrew; Campbell, Richard A

    2011-09-20

    The adsorption of the surface-active protein hydrophobin, HFBII, and the competitive adsorption of HFBII with the cationic, anionic, and nonionic surfactants hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB, sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS, and hexaethylene monododecyl ether, C(12)E(6), has been studied using neutron reflectivity, NR. HFBII adsorbs strongly at the air-water interface to form a dense monolayer ∼30 Å thick, with a mean area per molecule of ∼400 Å(2) and a volume fraction of ∼0.7, for concentrations greater than 0.01 g/L, and the adsorption is independent of the solution pH. In competition with the conventional surfactants CTAB, SDS, and C(12)E(6) at pH 7, the HFBII adsorption totally dominates the surface for surfactant concentrations less than the critical micellar concentration, cmc. Above the cmc of the conventional surfactants, HFBII is displaced by the surfactant (CTAB, SDS, or C(12)E(6)). For C(12)E(6) this displacement is only partial, and some HFBII remains at the surface for concentrations greater than the C(12)E(6) cmc. At low pH (pH 3) the patterns of adsorption for HFBII/SDS and HFBII/C(12)E(6) are different. At concentrations just below the surfactant cmc there is now mixed HFBII/surfactant adsorption for both SDS and C(12)E(6). For the HFBII/SDS mixture the structure of the adsorbed layer is more complex in the region immediately below the SDS cmc, resulting from the HFBII/SDS complex formation at the interface. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  5. Surface properties and aggregate morphology of partially fluorinated carboxylate-type anionic gemini surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Tomokazu; Bong, Miri; Matsuoka, Keisuke; Honda, Chikako; Endo, Kazutoyo

    2009-11-01

    Three anionic homologues of a novel partially fluorinated carboxylate-type anionic gemini surfactant, N,N'-di(3-perfluoroalkyl-2-hydroxypropyl)-N,N'-diacetic acid ethylenediamine (2C(n)(F) edda, where n represents the number of carbon atoms in the fluorocarbon chain (4, 6, and 8)) were synthesized. In these present gemini surfactants, the relatively small carboxylic acid moieties form hydrophilic head groups. The surface properties or structures of the aggregates of these surfactants are strongly influenced by the nonflexible fluorocarbons and small head groups; this is because these surfactants have a closely packed molecular structure. The equilibrium surface tension properties of these surfactants were measured at 298.2K for various fluorocarbon chain lengths. The plot of the logarithm of the critical micelle concentration (cmc) against the fluorocarbon chain lengths for 2C(n)(F) edda (n=4, 6, and 8) showed a minimum for n=6. Furthermore, the lowest surface tension of 2C(6)(F) edda at the cmc was 16.4mNm(-1). Such unique behavior has not been observed even in the other fluorinated surfactants. Changes in the shapes and sizes of these surfactant aggregate with concentration were investigated by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM micrographs showed that in an aqueous alkali solution, 2C(n)(F) edda mainly formed aggregates with stringlike (n=4), cagelike (n=6), and distorted bilayer structures (n=8). The morphological changes in the aggregates were affected by the molecular structure composed of nonflexible fluorocarbon chains and flexible hydrocarbon chains.

  6. Fluorescent visualization of a spreading surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallest, David W; Lichtenberger, Adele M; Fox, Christopher J; Daniels, Karen E, E-mail: kdaniel@ncsu.ed [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    The spreading of surfactants on thin films is an industrially and medically important phenomenon, but the dynamics are highly nonlinear and visualization of the surfactant dynamics has been a long-standing experimental challenge. We perform the first quantitative, spatiotemporally resolved measurements of the spreading of an insoluble surfactant on a thin fluid layer. During the spreading process, we directly observe both the radial height profile of the spreading droplet and the spatial distribution of the fluorescently tagged surfactant. We find that the leading edge of a spreading circular layer of surfactant forms a Marangoni ridge in the underlying fluid, with a trough trailing the ridge as expected. However, several novel features are observed using the fluorescence technique, including a peak in the surfactant concentration that trails the leading edge, and a flat, monolayer-scale spreading film that differs from concentration profiles predicted by current models. Both the Marangoni ridge and the surfactant leading edge can be described to spread as R{approx}t{sup {delta}}. We find spreading exponents {delta}{sub H}{approx}0.30 and {delta}{sub {Gamma}}{approx}0.22 for the ridge peak and surfactant leading edge, respectively, which are in good agreement with theoretical predictions of {delta}=1/4. In addition, we observe that the surfactant leading edge initially leads the peak of the Marangoni ridge, with the peak later catching up to the leading edge.

  7. Surfactant screening of diesel-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, R.W.; Montemagno, C.D.; Shem, L.; Lewis, B.-A.

    1992-01-01

    At one installation in California, approximately 60,000 gal of No. 2 diesel fuel leaked into the subsurface environment, resulting in contamination at depths from 6 to 34 m below the surface. Argonne National Laboratory was contracted to perform treatability studies for site remediation. This paper summarizes a surfactant screening/surfactant flooding research program in which 22 surfactants were screened for their effectiveness in mobilizing the organics from the contaminated soil prior to bioremediation. Anionic surfactants resulted in the greatest degree of diesel mobilization. The most promising surfactants will be employed on contaminated soil samples obtained from the site

  8. New numerical methods for open-loop and feedback solutions to dynamic optimization problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pradipto

    The topic of the first part of this research is trajectory optimization of dynamical systems via computational swarm intelligence. Particle swarm optimization is a nature-inspired heuristic search method that relies on a group of potential solutions to explore the fitness landscape. Conceptually, each particle in the swarm uses its own memory as well as the knowledge accumulated by the entire swarm to iteratively converge on an optimal or near-optimal solution. It is relatively straightforward to implement and unlike gradient-based solvers, does not require an initial guess or continuity in the problem definition. Although particle swarm optimization has been successfully employed in solving static optimization problems, its application in dynamic optimization, as posed in optimal control theory, is still relatively new. In the first half of this thesis particle swarm optimization is used to generate near-optimal solutions to several nontrivial trajectory optimization problems including thrust programming for minimum fuel, multi-burn spacecraft orbit transfer, and computing minimum-time rest-to-rest trajectories for a robotic manipulator. A distinct feature of the particle swarm optimization implementation in this work is the runtime selection of the optimal solution structure. Optimal trajectories are generated by solving instances of constrained nonlinear mixed-integer programming problems with the swarming technique. For each solved optimal programming problem, the particle swarm optimization result is compared with a nearly exact solution found via a direct method using nonlinear programming. Numerical experiments indicate that swarm search can locate solutions to very great accuracy. The second half of this research develops a new extremal-field approach for synthesizing nearly optimal feedback controllers for optimal control and two-player pursuit-evasion games described by general nonlinear differential equations. A notable revelation from this development

  9. Surfactant nebulization versus instillation during high frequency ventilation in surfactant-deficient rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Peter H.; Heikamp, A; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto

    Surfactant nebulization improves lung function at low alveolar doses of surfactant. However, efficiency of nebulization is low, and lung deposition seems to depend on lung aeration. High frequency ventilation (HFV) has been shown to improve lung aeration. We hypothesize that the combination of HFV

  10. Desorption of hydrocarbon chains by association with ionic and nonionic surfactants under flow as a mechanism for enhanced oil recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrón-Mejía, Ketzasmin A; López-Rendón, Roberto; Goicochea, Armando Gama

    2017-08-29

    The need to extract oil from wells where it is embedded on the surfaces of rocks has led to the development of new and improved enhanced oil recovery techniques. One of those is the injection of surfactants with water vapor, which promotes desorption of oil that can then be extracted using pumps, as the surfactants encapsulate the oil in foams. However, the mechanisms that lead to the optimal desorption of oil and the best type of surfactants to carry out desorption are not well known yet, which warrants the need to carry out basic research on this topic. In this work, we report non equilibrium dissipative particle dynamics simulations of model surfactants and oil molecules adsorbed on surfaces, with the purpose of studying the efficiency of the surfactants to desorb hydrocarbon chains, that are found adsorbed over flat surfaces. The model surfactants studied correspond to nonionic and cationic surfactants, and the hydrocarbon desorption is studied as a function of surfactant concentration under increasing Poiseuille flow. We obtain various hydrocarbon desorption isotherms for every model of surfactant proposed, under flow. Nonionic surfactants are found to be the most effective to desorb oil and the mechanisms that lead to this phenomenon are presented and discussed.

  11. Effect of surfactant on single drop mass transfer for extraction of aromatics from lubricating oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izza, H.; Ben Abdessalam, S.; Korichi, M.

    2018-03-01

    Solvent extraction is an effective method for the reduction of the content of aromatic of lubricating oil. Frequently, with phenol, furfural, the NMP (out of N-methyl pyrrolidone). The power solvent and the selectivity can be still to increase while using surfactant as additive which facilitates the separation of phase and increases the yeild in raffinat. Liquid-liquid mass transfer coefficients for single freely rising drops in the presence of surfactant in an extraction column have been investigated. The surfactant used in this study was sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES). The experiments were performed by bubbling a solvent as a series of individual drops from the top of the column containing furfural-SLES solution. The column used in this experiment was made from glass with 17 mm inner diameter and a capacity of 125ml. The effects of the concentration of surfactant on the overall coefficient of mass transfer was investigated.

  12. Determination of trace impurities in high-purity iron using salting-out of polyoxyethylene-type surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumiya, Hiroaki, E-mail: h-matsu@numse.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Design and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Sakane, Yuto; Hiraide, Masataka [Department of Molecular Design and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2009-10-19

    To an iron sample solution was added polyoxyethylene-4-isononylphenoxy ether (PONPE, nonionic surfactant, average number of ethylene oxides 7.5) and the surfactant was aggregated by the addition of lithium chloride. The iron(III) matrix was collected into the condensed surfactant phase in >99.9% yields, leaving trace metals [e.g., Ti(IV), Cr(III), Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), and Bi(III)] in the aqueous phase. After removing the surfactant phase by centrifugation, the remaining trace metals were concentrated onto an iminodiacetic acid-type chelating resin. The trace metals were desorbed with dilute nitric acid for the determination by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry or graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The proposed separation method allowed the analysis of high-purity iron metals for trace impurities at low {mu}g g{sup -1} to ng g{sup -1} levels.

  13. Partition thermodynamics of ionic surfactants between phosphatidylcholine vesicle and water phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shin-Chi; Hung, Chia-Hui; Wang, Shun-Cheng; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2003-08-01

    The partition of ionic surfactants (sodium alkyl sulfate and alkyl trimethyl ammonium bromide) between phosphatidylcholine vesicles and aqueous phase is investigated by simple conductometry under different temperatures. The experimental results can be well represented by the proposed regular solution theory and the thermodynamic parameters satisfy the thermodynamic consistency. The deviation from ideal partition is manifested through the effective interaction energy between lipid and surfactant wb, which is O(kT) large. It is found that wb rises as the alkyl chain is decreased for a specified head group. This is attributed to significant mismatch of chain lengths between surfactant and lipid molecules. The partition coefficient K declines with increasing temperature. The energy barrier from bilayer to aqueous phase, Δμ/kT∝ln K, is in the range of 16-26 kJ/mol. As the alkyl chain length is decreased for a given head group, Δμ is lowered by 1.3-1.5 kJ/mol per methylene group. Two independent analyses are employed to confirm this result. Using the thermodynamic parameters determined from experiments, the internal energy, entropy, and free energy of the partition process can be derived. Partition is essentially driven by the internal energy gain. The solubilizing ability, which is represented by the maximum surfactant-lipid ratio in the bilayer, Reb also decreases in accord with the K parameter. It is because the change in temperature influences the surfactant incorporation into the bilayer more than the formation of micelles.

  14. Biocompatible Amphiphilic Hydrogel-Solid Dimer Particles as Colloidal Surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Amstad, Esther; Zhao, Chun-Xia; Cai, Liheng; Fan, Jing; Chen, Qiushui; Hai, Mingtan; Koehler, Stephan; Zhang, Huidan; Liang, Fuxin; Yang, Zhenzhong; Weitz, David A

    2017-12-26

    Emulsions of two immiscible liquids can slowly coalesce over time when stabilized by surfactant molecules. Pickering emulsions stabilized by colloidal particles can be much more stable. Here, we fabricate biocompatible amphiphilic dimer particles using a hydrogel, a strongly hydrophilic material, and achieve large contrast in the wetting properties of the two bulbs, resulting in enhanced stabilization of emulsions. We generate monodisperse single emulsions of alginate and shellac solution in oil using a flow-focusing microfluidics device. Shellac precipitates from water and forms a solid bulb at the periphery of the droplet when the emulsion is exposed to acid. Molecular interactions result in amphiphilic dimer particles that consist of two joined bulbs: one hydrogel bulb of alginate in water and the other hydrophobic bulb of shellac. Alginate in the hydrogel compartment can be cross-linked using calcium cations to obtain stable particles. Analogous to surfactant molecules at the interface, the resultant amphiphilic particles stand at the water/oil interface with the hydrogel bulb submerged in water and the hydrophobic bulb in oil and are thus able to stabilize both water-in-oil and oil-in-water emulsions, making these amphiphilic hydrogel-solid particles ideal colloidal surfactants for various applications.

  15. A novel, rapid and automated conductometric method to evaluate surfactant-cells interactions by means of critical micellar concentration analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiecco, Matteo; Corte, Laura; Roscini, Luca; Colabella, Claudia; Germani, Raimondo; Cardinali, Gianluigi

    2014-07-25

    Conductometry is widely used to determine critical micellar concentration and micellar aggregates surface properties of amphiphiles. Current conductivity experiments of surfactant solutions are typically carried out by manual pipetting, yielding some tens reading points within a couple of hours. In order to study the properties of surfactant-cells interactions, each amphiphile must be tested in different conditions against several types of cells. This calls for complex experimental designs making the application of current methods seriously time consuming, especially because long experiments risk to determine alterations of cells, independently of the surfactant action. In this paper we present a novel, accurate and rapid automated procedure to obtain conductometric curves with several hundreds reading points within tens of minutes. The method was validated with surfactant solutions alone and in combination with Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. An easy-to use R script, calculates conductometric parameters and their statistical significance with a graphic interface to visualize data and results. The validations showed that indeed the procedure works in the same manner with surfactant alone or in combination with cells, yielding around 1000 reading points within 20 min and with high accuracy, as determined by the regression analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Electrochemical sample preparation for the determination of Cd, Pb, and Cu in the presence of surfactants by stripping voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svintsova, L.D.; Chernysheva, N.N.

    1997-01-01

    The electrochemical pretreatment of aqueous solutions of synthetic surfactants in a diaphragm elelctrolyzer was used in order to diminish surfactant interference. The determination of cadmium, lead, and copper by stripping voltammetry with a mercury-film electrode in model solutions of cetylpyriridinium chloride, sodium lauryl sulfate, and OP-10 was taken as an example. It was found that the reproducibility of anodic peaks of the elements was improved, and the linearity of calibration characteristics was recovered; however, the sensitivity was not always as high as the value in the blank experiment

  17. Degradation of surfactant-modified montmorillonites in HCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madejová, Jana; Pálková, Helena; Jankovič, Ľuboš

    2012-01-01

    The effect of surfactant size on the extent of montmorillonites decomposition in HCl was investigated. Na-SAz montmorillonite and tetraalkylammonium salts of alkyl-chains length increasing from methyl- Me 4 N to pentyl- Pe 4 N were used for organo-montmorillonites preparation. Decreasing intensity of d 001 diffraction proved destruction of montmorillonite structure connected with gradual surfactant release. A shift of the SiO stretching band to 1097 cm −1 confirmed formation of amorphous silica phase. A new band near 7315 cm −1 corresponding to SiOH overtone revealed creation of protonated silica. This band was observed in the spectra of all acid-treated samples, also in those with minor decomposition of the structure. The size of the cations significantly affected decomposition of montmorillonites in HCl. The less stable were Na-SAz and Me 4 N-SAz in which the content of octahedral atoms dropped to ∼5% of their original values upon 8 h treatments. Et 4 N-SAz and Pr 4 N-SAz were slightly more resistant mainly at short times. Bu 4 N-SAz and Pe 4 N-SAz showed the least structural modifications, only 50% and 35% of octahedral atoms, respectively, were released into solution within 8 h treatments. This observation proves that bulky alkylammonium cations covering the inner and outer surfaces of montmorillonite prevent effectively the access of protons to the layers protecting the mineral from degradation in the acid. - Highlights: ► Hybrid materials were prepared from montmorillonite and alkylammonium cations with short alkyl chains. ► The effect of surfactant on organo-montmorillonites dissolution in HCl was studied. ► With increasing size of cation the extent of montmorillonite decomposition decreased. ► Bulky surfactants prevent the access of protons to the layers and thus protect montmorillonite from degradation.

  18. Adsorption Of Surfactants At the Water-Oil Interface By Short-Time Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Estrada, Aldo; Ibarra-Bracamontes, Laura; Aguilar-Corona, Alicia; Viramontes-Gamboa, Gonzalo

    2017-11-01

    Surface tension is an important parameter for different industrial processes. The addition of surfactants can modify the interfacial tension between two fluids. As the surfactant molecules reach and are adsorbed at a fluid interface, the surface tension or interfacial tension is reduced until the interface is saturated. Dynamic Interfacial tension measurements were carried out using an optical tensiometer by the Pendant Drop technique at a room temperature of 25 °C for a period of 250 sec. A drop of surfactant solution was deposited and allowed to diffuse into a water-oil interface, and then the adsorption rate at the interface was calculated. Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) was used as the surfactant, hexane and dodecane were tested as the oil phase. A linear decay in the interfacial tension was observed for the lower initial concentrations of the order of 0.0001 to 0.01 mM, and an exponential decay was observed for initial concentrations of the order of 0.1 to 1 mM. This study was supported by the Mexican Council of Science and Technology (CONACyT) and by the Scientific Research Coordination of the University of Michoacan in Mexico.

  19. Solubilization and Interaction Studies of Bile Salts with Surfactants and Drugs: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Nisar Ahmad

    2016-05-01

    In this review, bile salt, bile salt-surfactant, and bile salt-drug interactions and their solubilization studies are mainly focused. Usefulness of bile salts in digestion, absorption, and excretion of various compounds and their rare properties in ordering the shape and size of the micelles owing to the presence of hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces are taken into consideration while compiling this review. Bile salts as potential bio-surfactants to solubilize drugs of interest are also highlighted. This review will give an insight into the selection of drugs in different applications as their properties get modified by interaction with bile salts, thus influencing their solution behavior which, in turn, modifies the phase-forming behavior, microemulsion, and clouding phenomenon, besides solubilization. Finally, their future perspectives are taken into consideration to assess their possible uses as bio-surfactants without side effects to human beings.

  20. Solubility enhancement of dioxins and PCBs by surfactant monomers and micelles quantified with polymer depletion techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schacht, Veronika J; Grant, Sharon C; Escher, Beate I; Hawker, Darryl W; Gaus, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    Partitioning of super-hydrophobic organic contaminants (SHOCs) to dissolved or colloidal materials such as surfactants can alter their behaviour by enhancing apparent aqueous solubility. Relevant partition constants are, however, challenging to quantify with reasonable accuracy. Partition constants to colloidal surfactants can be measured by introducing a polymer (PDMS) as third phase with known PDMS-water partition constant in combination with the mass balance approach. We quantified partition constants of PCBs and PCDDs (log KOW 5.8-8.3) between water and sodium dodecyl sulphate monomers (KMO) and micelles (KMI). A refined, recently introduced swelling-based polymer loading technique allowed highly precise (4.5-10% RSD) and fast (KMO. SHOC losses to experimental surfaces were substantial (8-26%) in monomer solutions, but had a low impact on KMO (0.10-0.16 log units). Log KMO for PCDDs (4.0-5.2) were approximately 2.6 log units lower than respective log KMI, which ranged from 5.2 to 7.0 for PCDDs and 6.6-7.5 for PCBs. The linear relationship between log KMI and log KOW was consistent with more polar and moderately hydrophobic compounds. Apparent solubility increased with increasing hydrophobicity and was highest in micelle solutions. However, this solubility enhancement was also considerable in monomer solutions, up to 200 times for OCDD. Given the pervasive presence of surfactant monomers in typical field scenarios, these data suggest that low surfactant concentrations may be effective long-term facilitators for subsurface transport of SHOCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Preparation of Organized Mesoporous Silica from Sodium Metasilicate Solutions in Alkaline Medium using Nonionic Surfactants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zukalová, Markéta; Rathouský, Jiří; Zukal, Arnošt

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 10 (2003), s. 2019-2031 ISSN 0010-0765 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : mesoporous SiO2 * sodium metasilicate * nonionic surfactants Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.041, year: 2003

  2. Flotation of algae for water reuse and biomass production: role of zeta potential and surfactant to separate algal particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Dong-Heui; Kim, Mi-Sug

    2015-01-01

    The effect of chemical coagulation and biological auto-flocculation relative to zeta potential was examined to compare flotation and sedimentation separation processes for algae harvesting. Experiments revealed that microalgae separation is related to auto-flocculation of Anabaena spp. and requires chemical coagulation for the whole period of microalgae cultivation. In addition, microalgae separation characteristics which are associated with surfactants demonstrated optimal microalgae cultivation time and separation efficiency of dissolved CO2 flotation (DCF) as an alternative to dissolved air flotation (DAF). Microalgae were significantly separated in response to anionic surfactant rather than cationic surfactant as a function of bubble size and zeta potential. DAF and DCF both showed slightly efficient flotation; however, application of anionic surfactant was required when using DCF.

  3. Tungsten Oxide and Polyaniline Composite Fabricated by Surfactant-Templated Electrodeposition and Its Use in Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benxue Zou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite nanostructures of tungsten oxide and polyaniline (PANI were fabricated on carbon electrode by electrocodeposition using sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS as the template. The morphology of the composite can be controlled by changing SDBS surfactant and aniline monomer concentrations in solution. With increasing concentration of aniline in surfactant solution, the morphological change from nanoparticles to nanofibers was observed. The nanostructured WO3/PANI composite exhibited enhanced capacitive charge storage with the specific capacitance of 201 F g−1 at 1.28 mA cm−2 in large potential window of -0.5~ 0.65 V versus SCE compared to the bulk composite film. The capacitance retained about 78% when the sweeping potential rate increased from 10 to 150 mV/s.

  4. Effect of Surfactants on the Deformation and Detachment of Oil Droplets in a Model Laminar Flow Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fréville V.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sugar-based surfactants are increasingly present in the development of eco-friendly detergents due to current regulations and consumer demand. In order to assess the degreasing performance of these new surfactants, the behavior of model oil droplets subjected to the action of a flow of surfactant solutions of different concentrations was studied in a laminar flow cell and related to the physico-chemical properties measured at the liquid/liquid (interfacial tension and solid/liquid/liquid interfaces (contact angle. With the surfactant solutions and the model oils employed in this study, three main behaviors were observed when a critical flow rate was reached: elongation, fragmentation or spontaneous detachment of the droplet. The analysis of the results leads to a correlation between the droplet behavior and the balance of the forces applied on the droplet in its initial position, in particular the gravity force Fg, which tends to move the oil droplet upwards (given the density difference, and the capillary force Fc, which tends to keep the droplet spherical. A state diagram could be established, based on the dimensionless Bond number (Fg/Fc and cosθ, θ being the initial contact angle of the drop on the surface before the establishment of the flow. One can thus predict the droplet behavior as a function of the system initial characteristics. The results allowed the comparison of degreasing performance of the different surfactants used and illustrated the potential of AlkylPolyPentosides (APP for detergent formulations.

  5. Solution for state constrained optimal control problems applied to power split control for hybrid vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, van T.A.C.; Gillot, J.; Jager, de A.G.; Steinbuch, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical solution for scalar state constrained optimal control problems. The algorithm rewrites the constrained optimal control problem as a sequence of unconstrained optimal control problems which can be solved recursively as a two point boundary value problem. The solution

  6. Energy efficiency: EDF Optimal Solutions improves the l'Oreal firm of Vichy; Efficacite energetique: EDF Optimal Solutions ameliore l'usine l'Oreal de Vichy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2011-09-15

    The l'Oreal CAP site has inaugurated its energetic eco-efficiency installations realized by EDF Optimal Solutions. This solution combines several techniques and makes possible to halve its yearly CO{sub 2} releases. (O.M.)

  7. Degradation of anionic surfactants using the reactor based on dielectric barrier discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aonyas Munera Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two anionic surfactants (sodium lauryl sulfate - SDS and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate - SDBS were treated with dielectric barrier discharge. Loss of surfactant activity, decrease of chemical oxygen demand and total organic carbon as well as lower toxicity of degradation products were determined. Effects of catalysts - hydrogen peroxide and iron (II, on parameters mentioned above, were determined. Catalysts affect the degradation of SDBS and in the case of SDS catalysts have no effect on degradation. Both catalysts induce the decrease of COD and TOC values. Toxicity of solutions after the plasma treatment is lower in all the systems tested. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI 172030

  8. Probing the surface of aqueous surfactant-perfume mixed solutions during perfume evaporation

    OpenAIRE

    Penfold, J; Thomas, RK; Bradbury, R; Tucker, I; Petkov, JT; Jones, CW; Webster, JRP

    2017-01-01

    The rate of release or evaporation of perfume molecules from surfaces is a key factor in determining the impact of the perfume in a range of applications relating to home and personal care products. For mixtures of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate and the model perfume linalool the rate of change of adsorption with time due to forced air flow over a fixed headspace was evaluated using neutron reflectivity over a period of up to ∼250 min. The measurements were made in the limit of ...

  9. Regulation of Dynamical Systems to Optimal Solutions of Semidefinite Programs: Algorithms and Applications to AC Optimal Power Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall' Anese, Emiliano; Dhople, Sairaj V.; Giannakis, Georgios B.

    2015-07-01

    This paper considers a collection of networked nonlinear dynamical systems, and addresses the synthesis of feedback controllers that seek optimal operating points corresponding to the solution of pertinent network-wide optimization problems. Particular emphasis is placed on the solution of semidefinite programs (SDPs). The design of the feedback controller is grounded on a dual e-subgradient approach, with the dual iterates utilized to dynamically update the dynamical-system reference signals. Global convergence is guaranteed for diminishing stepsize rules, even when the reference inputs are updated at a faster rate than the dynamical-system settling time. The application of the proposed framework to the control of power-electronic inverters in AC distribution systems is discussed. The objective is to bridge the time-scale separation between real-time inverter control and network-wide optimization. Optimization objectives assume the form of SDP relaxations of prototypical AC optimal power flow problems.

  10. Discrepancies over the onset of surfactant monomer aggregation interpreted by fluorescence, conductivity and surface tension methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fátima Carvalho Costa

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Molecular probe techniques have made important contributions to the determination of microstructure of surfactant assemblies such as size, stability, micropolarity and conformation. Conductivity and surface tension were used to determine the critical aggregation concentration (cac of polymer-surfactant complexes and the critical micellar concentration (cmc of aqueous micellar aggregates. The results are compared with those of fluorescent techniques. Several surfactant systems were examined, 1-butanol-sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS mixtures, solutions containing poly(ethylene oxide-SDS, poly(vinylpyrrolidone-SDS and poly(acrylic acid-alkyltrimethylammonium bromide complexes. We found differences between the cac and cmc values obtained by conductivity or surface tension and those obtained by techniques which use hydrophobic probe.

  11. Polymer⁻Surfactant System Based Amorphous Solid Dispersion: Precipitation Inhibition and Bioavailability Enhancement of Itraconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Disang; Peng, Tingting; Huang, Zhengwei; Singh, Vikramjeet; Shi, Yin; Wen, Ting; Lu, Ming; Quan, Guilan; Pan, Xin; Wu, Chuanbin

    2018-04-24

    The rapid release of poorly water-soluble drugs from amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) is often associated with the generation of supersaturated solution, which provides a strong driving force for precipitation and results in reduced absorption. Precipitation inhibitors, such as polymers and surfactants, are usually used to stabilize the supersaturated solution by blocking the way of kinetic or thermodynamic crystal growth. To evaluate the combined effect of polymers and surfactants on maintaining the supersaturated state of itraconazole (ITZ), various surfactants were integrated with enteric polymer hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMC AS) to develop polymer⁻surfactant based solid dispersion. The supersaturation stability was investigated by in vitro supersaturation dissolution test and nucleation induction time measurement. Compared to the ASD prepared with HPMC AS alone, the addition of d-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) exhibited a synergistic effect on precipitation inhibition. The results indicated that the TPGS not only significantly reduced the degree of supersaturation which is the driving force for precipitation, but also provided steric hindrance to delay crystal growth by absorbing onto the surface of small particles. Subsequently, the formulations were evaluated in vivo in beagle dogs. Compared with commercial product Sporanox ® , the formulation prepared with HPMC AS/TPGS exhibited a 1.8-fold increase in the AUC (0⁻24 h) of ITZ and a 1.43-fold increase of hydroxyitraconazole (OH-ITZ) in the plasma. Similarly, the extent of absorption was increased by more than 40% when compared to the formulation prepared with HPMC AS alone. The results of this study demonstrated that the ASD based on polymer⁻surfactant system could obviously inhibit drug precipitation in vitro and in vivo, which provides a new access for the development of ASD for poorly water-soluble drug.

  12. Multiresolution strategies for the numerical solution of optimal control problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sachin

    There exist many numerical techniques for solving optimal control problems but less work has been done in the field of making these algorithms run faster and more robustly. The main motivation of this work is to solve optimal control problems accurately in a fast and efficient way. Optimal control problems are often characterized by discontinuities or switchings in the control variables. One way of accurately capturing the irregularities in the solution is to use a high resolution (dense) uniform grid. This requires a large amount of computational resources both in terms of CPU time and memory. Hence, in order to accurately capture any irregularities in the solution using a few computational resources, one can refine the mesh locally in the region close to an irregularity instead of refining the mesh uniformly over the whole domain. Therefore, a novel multiresolution scheme for data compression has been designed which is shown to outperform similar data compression schemes. Specifically, we have shown that the proposed approach results in fewer grid points in the grid compared to a common multiresolution data compression scheme. The validity of the proposed mesh refinement algorithm has been verified by solving several challenging initial-boundary value problems for evolution equations in 1D. The examples have demonstrated the stability and robustness of the proposed algorithm. The algorithm adapted dynamically to any existing or emerging irregularities in the solution by automatically allocating more grid points to the region where the solution exhibited sharp features and fewer points to the region where the solution was smooth. Thereby, the computational time and memory usage has been reduced significantly, while maintaining an accuracy equivalent to the one obtained using a fine uniform mesh. Next, a direct multiresolution-based approach for solving trajectory optimization problems is developed. The original optimal control problem is transcribed into a

  13. REMOVAL OF ANIONIC SURFACTANTS FROM WASTEWATER BY MAGNETIC MINERAL SORBENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Vladimirova Makarchuk

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The simplest and most effective method of removing low concentrations of anionic surfactants such as sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS is adsorption. Among adsorbents the natural clays are cheap and promising for these purposes. However, there are significant difficulties in removal of spent sorbent after the adsorption process. So, the creation of magnetic sorbents that can be effectively removed from water after sorption by magnetic separation will be a successful decision. The aim of this investigation is the creation of cheap and efficient magnetic sorbents based on natural clays and magnetite for anionic surfactant removal from wastewater. We have synthesized a series of magnetic sorbents from different natural clays with a content of magnetite from 2 to 10 wt%. The ability of magnetic sorbents to remove SDBS and SLS from aqueous solutions has been studied for different adsorbate concentrations by varying the amount of adsorbent, temperature and shaking time. Thermodynamic parameters were calculated from the slope and intercept of the linear plots of ln K against 1/T. Analysis of adsorption results obtained at different temperatures showed that the adsorption pattern on magnetic sorbents correspond to the Langmuir isotherm. It is shown that with increasing the content of magnetite in the magnetic sorbents improves not only their separation from water by magnetic separation, but adsorption capacity to SDBS and SLS. Thus, we obtained of cheap magnetic sorbents based on natural clays and magnetite by the easy way, which not only quickly separated from the solution by magnetic separation, but effectively remove anionic surfactants.

  14. Prediction of Optimal Salinities for Surfactant Formulations Using a Quantitative Structure-Property Relationships Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, C.; Maldonado, A.G.; Varnek, A.; Creton, B.

    2015-01-01

    Each oil reservoir could be characterized by a set of parameters such as temperature, pressure, oil composition, and brine salinity, etc. In the context of the chemical enhanced oil recovery (EOR), the selection of high performance surfactants is a challenging and time-consuming task since this

  15. Pulmonary clearance of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA in experimental surfactant dysfunction treated with surfactant installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, K.; John, J.; Lachmann, B.; Robertson, B.; Wollmer, P.

    1997-02-01

    Background: Breakdown of the alveolo-capillary barrier is a characteristic feature of respiratory distress syndrome. Restoration of alveolo-capillary barrier function may be an important aspect of surfactant replacement therapy. We examined the effect of surfactant installation on alveolo-capillary barrier function in an experimental model of surfactant dysfunction by measuring pulmonary clearance of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA. Methods: Nineteen rabbits were tracheotomized and mechanically ventilated. Surfactant dysfunction was induced by administration of a synthetic detergent in aerosol form. Detergent was given to 13 rabbits; seven rabbits were then treated with installation of natural surfactant, whereas six rabbits received saline. Six rabbits were used as untreated controls. An aerosol of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA was administered to all animals and the pulmonary clearance was measured with a gamma camera. Results: {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA cleared from the lungs with a half-life of 71{+-}22 min in the control animals, 21.4{+-}7.4 min in the surfactant-treated animals and 5.8{+-}1.5 min in the saline-treated animals. The difference in half-life between groups was highly significant (P<0.001). There was no change in arterial oxygenation or compliance in controls or in animals treated with saline. In animals treated with surfactant, a small transient reduction in arterial oxygen tension and a more long-standing reduction in compliance were observed. Conclusion: Surfactant treatment thus significantly attenuated the effect of detergent treatment but did not restore alveolo-capillary transfer of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA to normal. (AU) 26 refs.

  16. The Effect Of Organic Surfactants On The Properties Of Common Hygroscopic Particles: Effective Densities, Reactivity And Water Evaporation Of Surfactant Coated Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrarodriguez, L.; Zelenyuk, A.; Imre, D.; Ellison, B.

    2006-12-01

    Measurements of atmospheric aerosol compositions routinely show that organic compounds account for a very large fraction of the particle mass. The organic compounds that make up this aerosol mass represent a wide range of molecules with a variety of properties. Many of the particles are composed of hygroscopic salts like sulfates, nitrates and sea-salt internally mixed with organics. While the properties of the hygroscopic salts are known, the effect of the organic compounds on the microphysical and chemical properties which include CCN activity is not clear. .One particularly interesting class of internally mixed particles is composed of aqueous salts solutions that are coated with organic surfactants which are molecules with long aliphatic chain and a water soluble end. Because these molecules tend to coat the particles' surfaces, a monolayer might be sufficient to drastically alter their hygroscopic properties, their CCN activity, and reactivity. The aliphatic chains, being exposed to the oxidizing atmosphere are expected to be transformed through heterogeneous chemistry, yielding complex products with mixed properties. We will report the results from a series of observations on ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride and sea salt particles coated with three types of surfactant molecules: sodium lauryl sulfate, sodium oleate and laurtrimonium chloride. We have been able to measure the effective densities of internally mixed particles with a range of surfactant concentration that start below a monolayer and extend all the way to particles composed of pure surfactant. For many of the measurements the data reveal a rather complex picture that cannot be simply interpreted in terms of the known pure-compound densities. For unsaturated hydrocarbons we observed and quantified the effect of oxidation by ozone on particle size, effective density and individual particle mass spectral signatures. One of the more important properties of these surfactants is that they can form a

  17. Surfactant protein A and surfactant protein D variation in pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Grith Lykke; Husby, Steffen; Holmskov, Uffe

    2007-01-01

    Surfactant proteins A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) have been implicated in pulmonary innate immunity. The proteins are host defense lectins, belonging to the collectin family which also includes mannan-binding lectin (MBL). SP-A and SP-D are pattern-recognition molecules with the lectin domains binding...... lavage and blood have indicated associations with a multitude of pulmonary inflammatory diseases. In addition, accumulating evidence in mouse models of infection and inflammation indicates that recombinant forms of the surfactant proteins are biologically active in vivo and may have therapeutic potential...... in controlling pulmonary inflammatory disease. The presence of the surfactant collectins, especially SP-D, in non-pulmonary tissues, such as the gastrointestinal tract and genital organs, suggest additional actions located to other mucosal surfaces. The aim of this review is to summarize studies on genetic...

  18. Biomimetic oligosaccharide and peptide surfactant polymers designed for cardiovascular biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruegsegger, Mark Andrew

    A common problem associated with cardiovascular devices is surface induced thrombosis initiated by the rapid, non-specific adsorption of plasma proteins onto the biomaterial surface. Control of the initial protein adsorption is crucial to achieve the desired longevity of the implanted biomaterial. The cell membrane glycocalyx acts as a non-thrombogenic interface through passive (dense oligosaccharide structures) and active (ligand/receptor interactions) mechanisms. This thesis is designed to investigate biomimicry of the cell glycocalyx to minimize non-specific protein adsorption and promote specific ligand/receptor interactions. Biomimetic macromolecules were designed through the molecular-scale engineering of polymer surfactants, utilizing a poly(vinyl amine) (PVAm) backbone to which hydrophilic (dextran, maltose, peptide) and hydrophobic alkyl (hexanoyl or hexanal) chains are simultaneously attached. The structure was controlled through the molar feed ratio of hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic groups, which also provided control of the solution and surface-active properties. To mimic passive properties, a series of oligomaltose surfactants were synthesized with increasing saccharide length (n = 2, 7, 15 where n is number of glucose units) to investigate the effect of coating height on protein adsorption. The surfactants were characterized by infra red (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies for structural properties and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle goniometry for surface activity. Protein adsorption under dynamic flow (5 dyn/cm2) was reduced by 85%--95% over the bare hydrophobic substrate; platelet adhesion dropped by ˜80% compared to glass. Peptide ligands were incorporated into the oligosaccharide surfactant to promote functional activity of the passive coating. The surfactants were synthesized to contain 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% peptide ligand density and were stable on hydrophobic surfaces. The peptide surface density was

  19. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Domka, Ludwik [Department of Metalorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, A. Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, 60-780 Poznań (Poland); Skrzypczak, Andrzej [Institute of Chemical Technology, Poznań University of Technology, Berdychowo 4, 60-965 Poznań (Poland); Kozak, Maciej, E-mail: mkozak@amu.edu.pl [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The intercalation of dimeric surfactants changed the morphology of MMT samples. • XRD indicated structures formed by surfactant molecules in interlayer space. • The four-step thermal decomposition of dimeric surfactant, confirms intercalation. - Abstract: The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay – hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1′-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d{sub 001}) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  20. Rapid visual detection of quaternary ammonium surfactants using citrate-capped silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) based on hydrophobic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li-Qing; Yu, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a rapid, sensitive and low-cost colorimetric method for detection of quaternary ammonium surfactants using citrate-capped silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) was developed. The quaternary ammonium surfactants induce the aggregation of Ag NPs through the hydrophobic effect, which is a novel aggregation mechanism of Ag NPs. The addition of cationic surfactant results in color change of Ag NPs solution from yellow to red and finally to colorless, which is due to the broadening of the surface plasmon band. The color change was monitored using a UV-vis spectrophotometer. The LOD of different cationic surfactants was in the range of 0.5-5 µM. More importantly, this detection method was successfully utilized to the disinfectant residual sample. Crown Copyright © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhanced Removal of a Human Norovirus Surrogate from Fresh Vegetables and Fruits by a Combination of Surfactants and Sanitizers▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predmore, Ashley; Li, Jianrong

    2011-01-01

    Fruits and vegetables are major vehicles for transmission of food-borne enteric viruses since they are easily contaminated at pre- and postharvest stages and they undergo little or no processing. However, commonly used sanitizers are relatively ineffective for removing human norovirus surrogates from fresh produce. In this study, we systematically evaluated the effectiveness of surfactants on removal of a human norovirus surrogate, murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1), from fresh produce. We showed that a panel of surfactants, including sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Nonidet P-40 (NP-40), Triton X-100, and polysorbates, significantly enhanced the removal of viruses from fresh fruits and vegetables. While tap water alone and chlorine solution (200 ppm) gave only <1.2-log reductions in virus titer in all fresh produce, a solution containing 50 ppm of surfactant was able to achieve a 3-log reduction in virus titer in strawberries and an approximately 2-log reduction in virus titer in lettuce, cabbage, and raspberries. Moreover, a reduction of approximately 3 logs was observed in all the tested fresh produce after sanitization with a solution containing a combination of 50 ppm of each surfactant and 200 ppm of chlorine. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the combination of a surfactant with a commonly used sanitizer enhanced the efficiency in removing viruses from fresh produce by approximately 100 times. Since SDS is an FDA-approved food additive and polysorbates are recognized by the FDA as GRAS (generally recognized as safe) products, implementation of this novel sanitization strategy would be a feasible approach for efficient reduction of the virus load in fresh produce. PMID:21622782

  2. Biodegradation of surfactant bearing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitra, S.; Chandran, S.; Sasidhar, P.; Lal, K.B.; Amalraj, R.V.

    1991-01-01

    In nuclear industry, during decontamination of protective wears and contaminated materials, detergents are employed to bring down the level of radioactive contamination within safe limits. However, the surfactant present in these wastes interferes in the chemical treatment process, reducing the decontamination factor. Biodegradation is an efficient and ecologically safe method for surfactant removal. A surfactant degrading culture was isolated and inoculated separately into simulated effluents containing 1% yeast extract and 5-100 ppm sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) and 1% yeast extract and 5-100 ppm of commercial detergent respectively. The growth of the bacterial culture and the degradation characteristics of the surfactant in the above effluents were monitored under both dynamic and static conditions. (author). 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  3. Adsorption of β-casein-surfactant mixed layers at the air-water interface evaluated by interfacial rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestro, Armando; Kotsmar, Csaba; Javadi, Aliyar; Miller, Reinhard; Ortega, Francisco; Rubio, Ramón G

    2012-04-26

    This work presents a detailed study of the dilational viscoelastic moduli of the adsorption layers of the milk protein β-casein (BCS) and a surfactant at the liquid/air interface, over a broad frequency range. Two complementary techniques have been used: a drop profile tensiometry technique and an excited capillary wave method, ECW. Two different surfactants were studied: the nonionic dodecyldimethylphosphine oxide (C12DMPO) and the cationic dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DoTAB). The interfacial dilational elasticity and viscosity are very sensitive to the composition of protein-surfactant mixed adsorption layers at the air/water interface. Two different dynamic processes have been observed for the two systems studied, whose characteristic frequencies are close to 0.01 and 100 Hz. In both systems, the surface elasticity was found to show a maximum when plotted versus the surfactant concentration. However, at frequencies above 50 Hz the surface elasticity of BCS + C12DMPO is higher than the one of the aqueous BCS solution over most of the surfactant concentration range, whereas for the BCS + DoTAB it is smaller for high surfactant concentrations and higher at low concentrations. The BCS-surfactant interaction modifies the BCS random coil structure via electrostatic and/or hydrophobic interactions, leading to a competitive adsorption of the BCS-surfactant complexes with the free, unbound surfactant molecules. Increasing the surfactant concentration decreases the adsorbed proteins. However, the BCS molecules are rather strongly bound to the interface due to their large adsorption energy. The results have been fitted to the model proposed by C. Kotsmar et al. ( J. Phys. Chem. B 2009 , 113 , 103 ). Even though the model describes well the concentration dependence of the limiting elasticity, it does not properly describe its frequency dependence.

  4. Impact of biogenic amine molecular weight and structure on surfactant adsorption at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun

    2016-02-01

    The oligoamines, such as ethylenediamine to pentaethylenetetramine, and the aliphatic biogenic amines, such as putrescine, spermidine and spermine, strongly interact with anionic surfactants, such as sodium dodecylsulfate, SDS. It has been shown that this results in pronounced surfactant adsorption at the air-water interface and the transition from monolayer to multilayer adsorption which depends upon solution pH and oligoamine structure. In the neutron reflectivity, NR, and surface tension, ST, results presented here the role of the oligoamine structure on the adsorption of SDS is investigated more fully using a range of different biogenic amines. The effect of the extent of the intra-molecular spacing between amine groups on the adsorption has been extended by comparing results for cadavarine with putrescine and ethylenediamine. The impact of more complex biogenic amine structures on the adsorption has been investigated with the aromatic phenethylamine, and the heterocyclic amines histamine and melamine. The results provide an important insight into how surfactant adsorption at interfaces can be manipulated by the addition of biogenic amines, and into the role of solution pH and oligoamine structure in modifying the interaction between the surfactant and oligoamine. The results impact greatly upon potential applications and in understanding some of the important biological functions of biogenic amines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Estimation hydrophilic-lipophilic balance number of surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawignya, Harsa, E-mail: harsa-paw@yahoo.co.id [Chemical Engineering Department Diponegoro University (Indonesia); Chemical Engineering Departement University of Pembangunan Nasional Yogyakarta (Indonesia); Prasetyaningrum, Aji, E-mail: ajiprasetyaningrum@gmail.com; Kusworo, Tutuk D.; Pramudono, Bambang, E-mail: Pramudono2004@yahoo.com [Chemical Engineering Department Diponegoro University (Indonesia); Dyartanti, Endah R. [Chemical Engineering Department Diponegoro University (Indonesia); Chemical Enginering Departement Sebelas Maret University (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    Any type of surfactant has a hydrophilic-lipophilic balance number (HLB number) of different. There are several methods for determining the HLB number, with ohysical properties of surfactant (solubility cloud point and interfacial tension), CMC methods and by thermodynamics properties (Free energy Gibbs). This paper proposes to determined HLB numbers from interfelation methods. The result of study indicated that the CMC method described by Hair and Moulik espesially for nonionic surfactant. The application of exess Gibbs free energy and by implication activity coefficient provides the ability to predict the behavior of surfactants in multi component mixtures of different concentration. Determination of HLB number by solubility and cloud point parameter is spesific for anionic and nonionic surfactant but this methods not available for cationic surfactants.

  6. The Fundamental Solution and Its Role in the Optimal Control of Infinite Dimensional Neutral Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Kai

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we shall consider standard optimal control problems for a class of neutral functional differential equations in Banach spaces. As the basis of a systematic theory of neutral models, the fundamental solution is constructed and a variation of constants formula of mild solutions is established. We introduce a class of neutral resolvents and show that the Laplace transform of the fundamental solution is its neutral resolvent operator. Necessary conditions in terms of the solutions of neutral adjoint systems are established to deal with the fixed time integral convex cost problem of optimality. Based on optimality conditions, the maximum principle for time varying control domain is presented. Finally, the time optimal control problem to a target set is investigated

  7. Alkanediyl-α, ω-bis (dimethyl cetylammonium bromide gemini surfactants as novel corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in formic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mobin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Gemini surfactants, butanediyl 1,4-bis(dimethyl cetylammonium bromide, pentanediyl 1,5 - bis (dimethyl cetylammonium bromide and hexanediyl 1,6 - bis (dimethyl cetylammonium bromide from Alkanediyl-α, ω-bis (dimethyl cetylammonium bromide series were synthesized in laboratory and were characterized by using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy. The surfactants were tested as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in 20% formic acid. The influence of surfactants on mild steel corrosion inhibition was investigated by measuring the corrosion rate of mild steel in their absence and presence by weight loss measurements, solvent analysis of iron ions into the test solution and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The surface morphology of the corroded steel samples in presence and absence of surfactants was evaluated by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The synthesized gemini surfactants performed as excellent corrosion inhibitor, the inhibition efficiency (IE being in the range of 76.66-97.41%. The IE of surfactants is slightly affected by the spacer length. The IE increased with increase in surfactant concentration and temperature. The adsorption of gemini surfactants on the steel surface was found to obey Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The results of the potentiodynamic polarization studies are consistent with the results of weight loss studies.

  8. Study of the effect of surfactants on extraction and determination of polyphenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity of fruits extracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Hosseinzadeh

    Full Text Available Micelle/water mixed solutions of different surface active agents were studied for their effectiveness in the extraction of polyphenolic compounds from various varieties of apples from west Azerbaijan province in Iran. The total content of polyphenolic compound in fruit extracts were determined using ferrous tartrate and Folin-Ciocalteu assays methods and chromatographic methods and compared with theme. High performance liquid chromatography is one of the most common and important methods in biochemical compound identification. The effect of pH, ionic strength, surfactant type, surfactant concentration, extraction time and common organic solvent in the apple polyphenolics extractions was studied using HPLC-DAD. Mixtures of surfactants, water and methanol at various ratios were examined and micellar-water solutions of Brij surfactant showed the highest polyphenol extraction efficiency. Optimum conditions for the extraction of polyphenolic compounds from apple occurred at 7 mM Brij35, pH 3. Effect of ionic strength on extraction was determined and 2% (W/V potassium Chloride was determined to be the optimum salt concentration. The procedure worked well with an ultrasound bath. Total antioxidant capacity also was determined in this study. The method can be safely scaled up for pharmaceutical applications.

  9. Poly(ethylene oxide) surfactant polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacheethasanee, Katanchalee; Wang, Shuwu; Qiu, Yongxing; Marchant, Roger E

    2004-01-01

    We report on a series of structurally well-defined surfactant polymers that undergo surface-induced self-assembly on hydrophobic biomaterial surfaces. The surfactant polymers consist of a poly(vinyl amine) backbone with poly(ethylene oxide) and hexanal pendant groups. The poly(vinyl amine) (PVAm) was synthesized by hydrolysis of poly(N-vinyl formamide) following free radical polymerization of N-vinyl formamide. Hexanal and aldehyde-terminated poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) were simultaneously attached to PVAm via reductive amination. Surfactant polymers with different PEO:hexanal ratios and hydrophilic/hydrophobic balances were prepared, and characterized by FT-IR, 1H-NMR and XPS spectroscopies. Surface active properties at the air/water interface were determined by surface tension measurements. Surface activity at a solid surface/water interface was demonstrated by atomic force microscopy, showing epitaxially molecular alignment for surfactant polymers adsorbed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. The surfactant polymers described in this report can be adapted for simple non-covalent surface modification of biomaterials and hydrophobic surfaces to provide highly hydrated interfaces.

  10. A Molecular Dynamics Study of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) Dispersed in Bile Salt Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Frederick, Jr.; Sun, Huai

    2014-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNCTs) are materials with structural, electronic and optical properties that make them attractive for a myriad of advanced technology applications. A practical barrier to their use is that SWCNT synthesis techniques produce heterogeneous mixtures of varying lengths and chirality, whereas applications generally require tubes with narrow size distributions and individual type. Most separation techniques currently in use to obtain monodisperse tube fractions rely on dispersion of these materials in aqueous solution using surfactants. The dispersion process results in a mixture of colloidal structures in which individual tubes are dispersed and contained in a surfactant shell. Understanding the structure and properties of the SWCNT-surfactant complex at the molecular level, and how this is affected by chirality, is key to understanding and improving separations processes. In this study, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the structure and properties of SWCNT-surfactant colloidal complexes. We tested a number of methods and protocols in order to build an accurate model for simulating SWCNT systems for a variety of bile salt surfactants as well as anionic co-surfactants, components that are widely used and important in experimental separation studies at NIST. The custom force field parameters used here will be stored in WebFF, a Web-hosted smart force-field repository for polymeric and organic materials being developed at NIST for the Materials Genome Initiative.

  11. Surfactant screening of diesel-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, R.W.; Shem, L.; Montemagno, C.D.; Lewis, B.

    1991-01-01

    At one installation, approximately 60,000 gal of No. 2 diesel fuel leaked into the subsurface environment, with contamination at depths of 6 to 34 m below the surface. Argonne National Laboratory was contracted to perform treatability studies for site remediation. The treatability studies focused on four separate phases: (1) leachability studies on the various contaminated soil borings, (2) air stripping studies, (3) bioremediation studies, and (4) surfactant screening/surfactant flooding studies. This paper summarizes the fourth phase of the research program in which 21 surfactants were screened for possible use to mobilize the organics from the contaminated soil prior to bioremediation. Anionic surfactants resulted in the greatest degree of diesel mobilization. The most promising surfactants will be employed on actual contaminated soil samples obtained from the site

  12. Oxygen effect in the radiolysis of triton X-100 aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkowski, J.; Mayer, J.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments with Triton X-100 as a model surfactant were performed under steady-state conditions, using deoxygenated solutions as well as those saturated with N 2 O, O 2 or N 2 O/O 2 mixtures. The Triton x-100 decomposition yield was dependent on the O 2 content of the irradiated system. Oxygen promoted surfactant decomposition in aqueous solution containing only Triton X-100. (author) 13 refs.; 1 tab

  13. Surfactant gene polymorphisms and interstitial lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelidis Panagiotis

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins, which is present in the alveolar lining fluid and is essential for normal lung function. Alterations in surfactant composition have been reported in several interstitial lung diseases (ILDs. Furthermore, a mutation in the surfactant protein C gene that results in complete absence of the protein has been shown to be associated with familial ILD. The role of surfactant in lung disease is therefore drawing increasing attention following the elucidation of the genetic basis underlying its surface expression and the proof of surfactant abnormalities in ILD.

  14. Formation and characterization of zein-propylene glycol alginate-surfactant ternary complexes: Effect of surfactant type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lei; Sun, Cuixia; Wei, Yang; Zhan, Xinyu; Mao, Like; Gao, Yanxiang

    2018-08-30

    In this study, zein, propylene glycol alginate (PGA) and surfactant ternary complexes were fabricated by antisolvent co-precipitation method. Two types of surfactants (rhamnolipid and lecithin) were applied to generate zein-PGA-rhamnolipid (Z-P-R) and zein-PGA-lecithin (Z-P-L) ternary complexes, respectively. Results showed that the surfactant types significantly affected the properties of ternary complexes. The formation of ternary complexes was mainly due to the non-covalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding, electrostatic interaction and hydrophobic interactions among zein, PGA and surfactants. Moreover, the thermal stability of ternary complexes was enhanced with increasing the levels of both surfactants. Notably, ternary complex dispersions exhibited better stability against pH from 2 to 8. Furthermore, a compact network structure was observed in Z-P-R ternary complex, while Z-P-L ternary complex remained the spherical structure. These findings would provide new insights into the development of novel delivery system and expand the options, when zein-based complexes were utilized under different environment conditions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Biomimicry of surfactant protein C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nathan J; Johansson, Jan; Barron, Annelise E

    2008-10-01

    Since the widespread use of exogenous lung surfactant to treat neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, premature infant survival and respiratory morbidity have dramatically improved. Despite the effectiveness of the animal-derived surfactant preparations, there still remain some concerns and difficulties associated with their use. This has prompted investigation into the creation of synthetic surfactant preparations. However, to date, no clinically used synthetic formulation is as effective as the natural material. This is largely because the previous synthetic formulations lacked analogues of the hydrophobic proteins of the lung surfactant system, SP-B and SP-C, which are critical functional constituents. As a result, recent investigation has turned toward the development of a new generation of synthetic, biomimetic surfactants that contain synthetic phospholipids along with a mimic of the hydrophobic protein portion of lung surfactant. In this Account, we detail our efforts in creating accurate mimics of SP-C for use in a synthetic surfactant replacement therapy. Despite SP-C's seemingly simple structure, the predominantly helical protein is extraordinarily challenging to work with given its extreme hydrophobicity and structural instability, which greatly complicates the creation of an effective SP-C analogue. Drawing inspiration from Nature, two promising biomimetic approaches have led to the creation of rationally designed biopolymers that recapitulate many of SP-C's molecular features. The first approach utilizes detailed SP-C structure-activity relationships and amino acid folding propensities to create a peptide-based analogue, SP-C33. In SP-C33, the problematic and metastable polyvaline helix is replaced with a structurally stable polyleucine helix and includes a well-placed positive charge to prevent aggregation. SP-C33 is structurally stable and eliminates the association propensity of the native protein. The second approach follows the same design

  16. Formulation and optimization of mucoadhesive microemulsion containing mirtazapine for intranasal delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetal P Thakkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mirtazapine, an antidepressant drug, has absolute bioavailability of only 50% due to high first pass metabolism. Aim: The purpose of this study was to develop and optimize mucoadhesive microemulsion containing mirtazapine for intranasal delivery. Materials and Methods: Based on solubility study, Capmul Medium chain Monoglyceride, Tween 80 and polyethylene glycol (PEG 400 were selected as oil, surfactant and co surfactant respectively. Microemulsions were prepared using water titration method. 3:1% w/w ratio (Tween 80: PEG 400 was selected for formulation development. The prepared microemulsions were optimized for globule size, zeta potential, % transmittance and polydispersity index. The optimized batch was further characterized for % drug content, conductivity and transmission electron microscopy. Results and Conclusion: All the parameters showed the suitability of microemulsion of mirtazapine for intranasal delivery. Chitosan (0.5% w/w was used as a polymer for the preparation of mucoadhesive microemulsion to enhance the retention time in the nasal mucosa. Results of nasal toxicity study using excised sheep nasal mucosa showed comparatively no damage to epithelium and so formulation was considered safe for nasal administration. mirtazapine mucoadhesive microemulsion showed the highest percentage of diffusion (57.11 ± 0.710% after 210 min during in-vitro drug diffusion study through sheep nasal mucosa, followed by mirtazapine microemulsion (46.08 ± 0.674% and finally by mirtazapine solution (17.63 ± 0.612%.

  17. Determination of anionic surfactants during wastewater recycling process by ion pair chromatography with suppressed conductivity detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, L. H.; Judkins, J. E.; Garland, J. L.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    A direct approach utilizing ion pairing reversed-phase chromatography coupled with suppressed conductivity detection was developed to monitor biodegradation of anionic surfactants during wastewater recycling through hydroponic plant growth systems and fixed-film bioreactors. Samples of hydroponic nutrient solution and bioreactor effluent with high concentrations (up to 120 mS electrical conductance) of inorganic ions can be analyzed without pretreatment or interference. The presence of non-ionic surfactants did not significantly affect the analysis. Dynamic linear ranges for tested surfactants [Igepon TC-42, ammonium lauryl sulfate, sodium laureth sulfate and sodium alkyl (C10-C16) ether sulfate] were 2 to approximately 500, 1 to approximately 500, 2.5 to approximately 550 and 3.0 to approximately 630 microg/ml, respectively.

  18. Synthesis of carbohydrate-based surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pemberton, Jeanne E.; Polt, Robin L.; Maier, Raina M.

    2016-11-22

    The present invention provides carbohydrate-based surfactants and methods for producing the same. Methods for producing carbohydrate-based surfactants include using a glycosylation promoter to link a carbohydrate or its derivative to a hydrophobic compound.

  19. Micellar Surfactant Association in the Presence of a Glucoside-based Amphiphile Detected via High-Throughput Small Angle X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanic, Vesna [Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source, Campinas (Brazil); Broadbent, Charlotte [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Engineering Dept.; DiMasi, Elaine [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Photon Sciences Division; Galleguillos, Ramiro [Lubrizol Advanced Materials, Cleveland, OH (United States); Woodward, Valerie [Lubrizol Advanced Materials, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-11-14

    The interactions of mixtures of anionic and amphoteric surfactants with sugar amphiphiles were studied via high throughput small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). The sugar amphiphile was composed of Caprate, Caprylate, and Oleate mixed ester of methyl glucoside, MeGCCO. Optimal surfactant interactions are sought which have desirable physical properties, which must be identified in a cost effective manner that can access the large phase space of possible molecular combinations. X-ray scattering patterns obtained via high throughput SAXS can probe a combinatorial sample space and reveal the incorporation of MeGCCO into the micelles and the molecular associations between surfactant molecules. Such data make it possible to efficiently assess the effects of the new amphiphiles in the formulation. A specific finding of this study is that formulations containing comparatively monodisperse and homogeneous surfactant mixtures can be reliably tuned by addition of NaCl, which swells the surfactant micelles with a monotonic dependence on salt concentration. In contrast, the presence of multiple different surfactants destroys clear correlations with NaCl concentration, even in otherwise similar series of formulations.

  20. Small angle neutron scattering study of doxorubicin–surfactant ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The binding affinity of doxorubicin within the micelle carrier is enhanced through complex formation of drug and anionic surfactant, aerosol OT (AOT). Electrostatic binding of doxorubicin with negatively charged surfactants leads to the formation of hydrophobic drug–surfactant complexes. Surfactant-induced partitioning of ...

  1. Wetting Resistance of Commercial Membrane Distillation Membranes in Waste Streams Containing Surfactants and Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lies Eykens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Water management is becoming increasingly challenging and several technologies, including membrane distillation (MD are emerging. This technology is less affected by salinity compared to reverse osmosis and is able to treat brines up to saturation. The focus of MD research recently shifted from seawater desalination to industrial applications out of the scope of reverse osmosis. In many of these applications, surfactants or oil traces are present in the feed stream, lowering the surface tension and increasing the risk for membrane wetting. In this study, the technological boundaries of MD in the presence of surfactants are investigated using surface tension, contact angle and liquid entry pressure measurements together with lab-scale MD experiments to predict the wetting resistance of different membranes. Synthetic NaCl solutions mixed with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS were used as feed solution. The limiting surfactant concentration was found to be dependent on the surface chemistry of the membrane, and increased with increasing hydrophobicity and oleophobicity. Additionally, a hexadecane/SDS emulsion was prepared with a composition simulating produced water, a waste stream in the oil and gas sector. When hexadecane is present in the emulsion, oleophobic membranes are able to resist wetting, whereas polytetrafluoretheen (PTFE is gradually wetted by the feed liquid.

  2. DNA compaction by azobenzene-containing surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Kopyshev, Alexey; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana; Morozova, Elena; Lysyakova, Ludmila; Kasyanenko, Nina

    2011-01-01

    We report on the interaction of cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant with DNA investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. The properties of the surfactant can be controlled with light by reversible switching of the azobenzene unit, incorporated into the surfactant tail, between a hydrophobic trans (visible irradiation) and a hydrophilic cis (UV irradiation) configuration. The influence of the trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene on the compaction process of DNA molecules and the role of both isomers in the formation and colloidal stability of DNA-surfactant complexes is discussed. It is shown that the trans isomer plays a major role in the DNA compaction process. The influence of the cis isomer on the DNA coil configuration is rather small. The construction of a phase diagram of the DNA concentration versus surfactant/DNA charge ratio allows distancing between three major phases: colloidally stable and unstable compacted globules, and extended coil conformation. There is a critical concentration of DNA above which the compacted globules can be hindered from aggregation and precipitation by adding an appropriate amount of the surfactant in the trans configuration. This is because of the compensation of hydrophobicity of the globules with an increasing amount of the surfactant. Below the critical DNA concentration, the compacted globules are colloidally stable and can be reversibly transferred with light to an extended coil state.

  3. The structure of normal ionic micelles by interpretation of small-angle neutron scattering data from selectively labeled (2H, 19F) surfactant solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berr, S.S.

    1986-12-01

    We have determined the structure of micelles formed in water by several classes of ionic surfactants under a variety of experimental conditions using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques. Contrast between the micelles and the solvent was achieved through either selective deuteration or fluorination of the surfactant, or through the use of D 2 O. Interpretation of SANS data was facilitated by the use of Hayter, Penfold, and Hansen's rescaled Mean Spherical Approximation theory to calculate the scattering due to interparticle interactions. We have devised a number of micelle models, both spherical and ellipsoidal, to account for the scattering due to single micelles. It was found that changing the solvent from H 2 O to D 2 O results in the formation of larger micelles due to changes in the solvent-surfactant hydrocarbon interactions. This solvent isotope effect increased as the length of the alkyl chain increased. The fractional micellar charge did not change with respect to isotopic composition of solvent. We found that alkyltrimethylammonium bromide surfactants form drier micelles than do the sodium alkyl sulfate surfactants of equal chain length. Also, all micelles studied were found to be dry near the critical micelle concentration (cmc) and to become increasingly wetter as the concentration increased. The increase in aggregation number with respect to the square root of surfactant concentration was found to be linear for all systems studied. 80 figs

  4. Viscosity of the oil-in-water Pickering emulsion stabilized by surfactant-polymer and nanoparticle-surfactant-polymer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Tushar; Kumar, G. Suresh; Chon, Bo Hyun; Sangwai, Jitendra S.

    2014-11-01

    Information on the viscosity of Pickering emulsion is required for their successful application in upstream oil and gas industry to understand their stability at extreme environment. In this work, a novel formulation of oil-in-water (o/w) Pickering emulsion stabilized using nanoparticle-surfactant-polymer (polyacrylamide) system as formulated in our earlier work (Sharma et al., Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, 2014) is investigated for rheological stability at high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) conditions using a controlled-strain rheometer. The nanoparticle (SiO2 and clay) concentration is varied from 1.0 to 5.0 wt%. The results are compared with the rheological behavior of simple o/w emulsion stabilized by surfactant-polymer system. Both the emulsions exhibit non-Newtonian shear thinning behavior. A positive shift in this behavior is observed for surfactant-polymer stabilized emulsion at high pressure conditions. Yield stress is observed to increase with pressure for surfactant-polymer emulsion. In addition, increase in temperature has an adverse effect on the viscosity of emulsion stabilized by surfactant-polymer system. In case of nanoparticle-surfactant-polymer stabilized o/w emulsion system, the viscosity and yield stress are predominantly constant for varying pressure and temperature conditions. The viscosity data for both o/w emulsion systems are fitted by the Herschel-Bulkley model and found to be satisfactory. In general, the study indicates that the Pickering emulsion stabilized by nanoparticle-surfactant-polymer system shows improved and stable rheological properties as compared to conventional emulsion stabilized by surfactant-polymer system indicating their successful application for HPHT environment in upstream oil and gas industry.

  5. Comparison of solutol HS 15, Cremophor EL and novel ethoxylated fatty acid surfactants as multidrug resistance modification agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, L E; Balasubramanian, M; Emanuele, R M; Clodfelter, K E; Coon, J S

    1995-08-09

    Some well-known fatty acid ester surfactants, e.g., Cremophor EL and Solutol HS 15, are modulators of multidrug resistance in vitro and in vivo. Because they are polydisperse, and their active component(s) have not been identified, the therapeutic potential of such surfactants is unclear. To better define the active components of Solutol HS 15 and to make more potent surfactant multidrug resistance modulators, highly purified C-18 fatty acids were esterified with ethylene oxide at 5-200 molar ratios. Unexpectedly, ethylene oxide esters of pure 12-hydroxy stearic acid, the major components of Solutol HS 15, displayed negligible resistance modification activity compared with Solutol HS 15 itself or to stearic and oleic acid esters synthesized under identical conditions. Since oleic acid esters appeared to have good activity, a series of these compounds was prepared to determine the optimal ethylene oxide/fatty acid ratio. The optimal ratio was found to be 20 mole ethylene oxide: I mole fatty acid, with a steep decline in activity for products made with ratios above and below the optimum. The most active oleic acid ester, designated CRL 1337, was 8.4-fold as potent as Solutol HS 15 and over 19-fold as potent as Cremophor EL in promoting rhodamine 123 accumulation in multidrug-resistant KB 8-5-11 cells in vitro. Our results show that the structure of the hydrophobic domain (fatty acid) of surfactants as well as its hydrophile-lipophile balance are critical in determining the potency of surfactants as reversing agents.

  6. Boundary layers of aqueous surfactant and block copolymer solutions against hydrophobic and hydrophilic solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steitz, Roland; Schemmel, Sebastian; Shi Hongwei; Findenegg, Gerhard H

    2005-01-01

    The boundary layer of aqueous surfactants and amphiphilic triblock copolymers against flat solid surfaces of different degrees of hydrophobicity was investigated by neutron reflectometry (NR), grazing incidence small angle neutron scattering (GISANS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Solid substrates of different hydrophobicities were prepared by appropriate surface treatment or by coating silicon wafers with polymer films of different chemical natures. For substrates coated with thin films (20-30 nm) of deuterated poly(styrene) (water contact angle θ w ∼ 90), neutron reflectivity measurements on the polymer/water interface revealed a water depleted liquid boundary layer of 2-3 nm thickness and a density about 90% of the bulk water density. No pronounced depletion layer was found at the interface of water against a less hydrophobic polyelectrolyte coating (θ w ∼ 63). It is believed that the observed depletion layer at the hydrophobic polymer/water interface is a precursor of the nanobubbles which have been observed by AFM at this interface. Decoration of the polymer coatings by adsorbed layers of nonionic C m E n surfactants improves their wettability by the aqueous phase at surfactant concentrations well below the critical micellar concentration (CMC) of the surfactant. Here, GISANS experiments conducted on the system SiO 2 /C 8 E 4 /D 2 O reveal that there is no preferred lateral organization of the C 8 E 4 adsorption layers. For amphiphilic triblock copolymers (PEO-PPO-PEO) it is found that under equilibrium conditions they form solvent-swollen brushes both at the air/water and the solid/water interface. In the latter case, the brushes transform to uniform, dense layers after extensive rinsing with water and subsequent solvent evaporation. The primary adsorption layers maintain properties of the precursor brushes. In particular, their thickness scales with the number of ethylene oxide units (EO) of the block copolymer. In the case of dip-coating without

  7. Surfactant-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis of nickel oxide and lithium-doped nickel oxide thin films, toward electrochromic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denayer, Jessica [Group of Research in Energy and Environment for MATerials (GREENMAT), University of Liège, allée de la chimie 3, 4000 Liège (Belgium); Bister, Geoffroy [Environmental and Material Research Association (CRIBC-INISMa), avenue gouverneur cornez 4, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Simonis, Priscilla [Laboratory LPS, University of Namur, rue de bruxelles 61, 5000 Namur (Belgium); Colson, Pierre; Maho, Anthony [Group of Research in Energy and Environment for MATerials (GREENMAT), University of Liège, allée de la chimie 3, 4000 Liège (Belgium); Aubry, Philippe [Environmental and Material Research Association (CRIBC-INISMa), avenue gouverneur cornez 4, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Vertruyen, Bénédicte [Group of Research in Energy and Environment for MATerials (GREENMAT), University of Liège, allée de la chimie 3, 4000 Liège (Belgium); Henrist, Catherine, E-mail: catherine.henrist@ulg.ac.be [Group of Research in Energy and Environment for MATerials (GREENMAT), University of Liège, allée de la chimie 3, 4000 Liège (Belgium); Lardot, Véronique; Cambier, Francis [Environmental and Material Research Association (CRIBC-INISMa), avenue gouverneur cornez 4, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Cloots, Rudi [Group of Research in Energy and Environment for MATerials (GREENMAT), University of Liège, allée de la chimie 3, 4000 Liège (Belgium)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Surfactant-assisted USP: a novel and low cost process to obtain high quality nickel oxide films, with or without lithium dopant. • Increased uniformity and reduced light scattering thanks to the addition of a surfactant. • Improved electrochromic performance (coloration efficiency and contrast) for lithium-doped films by comparison with the undoped NiO film. - Abstract: Lithium-doped nickel oxide and undoped nickel oxide thin films have been deposited on FTO/glass substrates by a surfactant-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. The addition of polyethylene glycol in the sprayed solution has led to improved uniformity and reduced light scattering compared to films made without surfactant. Furthermore, the presence of lithium ions in NiO films has resulted in improved electrochromic performances (coloration contrast and efficiency), but with a slight decrease of the electrochromic switching kinetics.

  8. Application of Sodium Ligno Sulphonate as Surfactant in Enhanced Oil Recovery and Its Feasibility Test for TPN 008 Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakoso, N. I.; Rochmadi; Purwono, S.

    2018-04-01

    One of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) methods is using surfactants to reduce the interfacial tension between the injected fluid and the oil in old reservoir. The most important principle in enhanced oil recovery process is the dynamic interaction of surfactants with crude oil. Sodium ligno sulphonate (SLS) is a commercial surfactant and already synthesized from palm solid waste by another researcher. This work aimed to apply SLS as a surfactant for EOR especially in TPN 008 oil from Pertamina Indonesia. In its application as an EOR’s surfactant, SLS shall be passed feasibility test like IFT, thermal stability, compatibility, filtration, molecular weight, density, viscosity and pH tests. The feasibility test is very important for a preliminary test prior to another advanced test. The results demonstrated that 1% SLS solution in formation water (TPN 008) had 0.254 mN/M IFT value and was also great in thermal stability, compatibility, filtration, molecular weight, viscosity and pH test.

  9. Synthesis and Surface Activity of Cationic Amino Acid-Based Surfactants in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, Katarzyna E

    2017-01-01

    I studied the possibility of using amino acid-based surfactants as emulsifiers at the same time as preservatives. Fourteen lipopeptides were synthesized employing a solid phase peptide synthesis procedure. All compounds were designed to be positively charged from +1 to +4 and acylated with fatty acid chain-palmitic and miristic. The surface activity of the obtained lipopeptides was tested using a semi-automatic tensiometer to calculate parameters describing the behavior of lipopeptides in the air/water interface. Such parameters as CMC, surface tension at the CMC point ( σ CMC ), effectiveness ( π CMC ), and efficiency (pC20) were measured. Emulsifying properties of all lipopeptides were also examined. The studies reveal that the surface active properties of synthesized compounds strongly depend on the length of alkyl chains as well as on the composition of amino acid polar heads. The critical micelle concentration decreases with increasing alkyl chain length of lipopeptides with the same polar head. The effectiveness and efficiency decrease when the number of amino acids in the polar head increases. All lipopeptides established a very weak emulsification power and created unstable water/Miglyol 812 and water/paraffin oil emulsions. Results suggest that lipopeptides cannot be used as emulsifiers; nonetheless, it is possible to use them as auxiliary surfactants with disinfectant properties in combination with more potent emulsifiers.

  10. Experimental Investigation on Zonal Structure in Drag-Reducing Channel Flow with Surfactant Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Motozawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatial structure of a drag-reducing channel flow with surfactant additives in a two-dimensional channel was investigated experimentally. We carried out detailed measurements of the instantaneous velocity in the streamwise wall-normal plane and streamwise spanwise plane by using particle image velocimetry (PIV. The surfactant used in this experiment is a kind of cationic surfactant CTAC. The weight concentrations of the CTAC solution were 25 and 40 ppm on the flow. We considered the effects of Reynolds number ranging from 10000 to 25000 and the weight concentration of CTAC. The results of this paper showed that in the drag-reducing flow, there appeared an area where the root mean square of streamwise velocity fluctuation and the vorticity fluctuation sharply decreased. This indicated that two layers with different turbulent structure coexisted on the boundary of this area. Moreover, these layers had characteristic flow structures, as confirmed by observation of the instantaneous vorticity fluctuation map.

  11. Binding of cationic surfactants to humic substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiguro, M.; Tan, W.; Koopal, L.K.

    2007-01-01

    Commercial surfactants are introduced into the environment either through waste products or site-specific contamination. The amphiphilic nature of both surfactants and humic substances (HS) leads to their mutual attraction especially when surfactant and HS are oppositely charged. Binding of the

  12. Analytic solution to variance optimization with no short positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondor, Imre; Papp, Gábor; Caccioli, Fabio

    2017-12-01

    We consider the variance portfolio optimization problem with a ban on short selling. We provide an analytical solution by means of the replica method for the case of a portfolio of independent, but not identically distributed, assets. We study the behavior of the solution as a function of the ratio r between the number N of assets and the length T of the time series of returns used to estimate risk. The no-short-selling constraint acts as an asymmetric \

  13. Microbiological Production of Surfactant from Agricultural Residuals for IOR Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bala, Greg Alan; Bruhn, Debby Fox; Fox, Sandra Lynn; Noah, Karl Scott; Thompson, David Neal

    2002-04-01

    Utilization of surfactants for improved oil recovery (IOR) is an accepted technique with high potential. However, technology application is frequently limited by cost. Biosurfactants (surface-active molecules produced by microorganisms) are not widely utilized in the petroleum industry due to high production costs associated with use of expensive substrates and inefficient product recovery methods. The economics of biosurfactant production could be significantly impacted through use of media optimization and application of inexpensive carbon substrates such as agricultural process residuals. Utilization of biosurfactants produced from agricultural residuals may 1) result in an economic advantage for surfactant production and technology application, and 2) convert a substantial agricultural waste stream to a value-added product for IOR. A biosurfactant with high potential for use is surfactin, a lipopeptide biosurfactant, produced by Bacillus subtilis. Reported here is the production and potential IOR utilization of surfactin produced by Bacillus subtilis (American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 21332) from starch-based media. Production of surfactants from microbiological growth media based on simple sugars, chemically pure starch medium, simulated liquid and solid potato-process effluent media, a commercially prepared potato starch in mineral salts, and process effluent from a potato processor is discussed. Additionally, the effect of chemical and physical pretreatments on starchy feedstocks is discussed.

  14. Formulation, optimization, and evaluation of self-emulsifying drug delivery systems of nevirapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintalapudi, Ramprasad; Murthy, T E G K; Lakshmi, K Rajya; Manohar, G Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to formulate and optimize the self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS) of nevirapine (NVP) by use of 2(2) factorial designs to enhance the oral absorption of NVP by improving its solubility, dissolution rate, and diffusion profile. SEDDS are the isotropic mixtures of oil, surfactant, co-surfactant and drug that form oil in water microemulsion when introduced into the aqueous phase under gentle agitation. Solubility of NVP in different oils, surfactants, and co-surfactants was determined for the screening of excipients. Pseudo-ternary phase diagrams were constructed by the aqueous titration method, and formulations were developed based on the optimum excipient combinations with the help of data obtained through the maximum micro emulsion region containing combinations of oil, surfactant, and co-surfactant. The formulations of SEDDS were optimized by 2(2) factorial designs. The optimum formulation of SEDDS contains 32.5% oleic acid, 44.16% tween 20, and 11.9% polyethylene glycol 600 as oil, surfactant, and co-surfactant respectively. The SEDDS was evaluated for the following drug content, self-emulsification time, rheological properties, zeta potential, in vitro diffusion studies, thermodynamic stability studies, and in vitro dissolution studies. An increase in dissolution was achieved by SEDDS compared to pure form of NVP. Overall, this study suggests that the dissolution and oral bioavailability of NVP could be improved by SEDDS technology.

  15. Influence of clay, surfactant and presence of dispersant in the non-aqueous fluids rheology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, N.L.; Guedes, I.C.; Menezes, R.R.; Campos, L.F.A.; Ferreira, H.S.

    2012-01-01

    The bentonite clay used as a thickening agent in production of non-aqueous fluids and can not be used without a prior treatment to their organic surfaces become hydrophobic. These treated clays are called organoclays, and are usually obtained by adding, in aqueous solution, a quaternary ammonium salt. This work makes a detailed study of the variables involved in the dispersion of the bentonite clays in organophilization process, as well, the type of clay, type of surfactant and the presence of dispersant. It was observed this study that the process variables involved in the dispersion of the clays and organophilization, observed through characterization, have low influence on the peaks related to interplanar basal distance caused by the incorporation of the surfactant and bentonite clays been influential the type of clay and surfactant and the presence of sodium as dispersant agent, on the rheological properties. (author)

  16. Synthesis and characterization of Fe colloid catalysts in inverse micelle solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, A.; Stoker, M.; Hicks, M. [Sandia National Lab., Alburquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Surfactant molecules, possessing a hydrophilic head group and a hydrophobic tail group, aggregate in various solvents to form structured solutions. In two component mixtures of surfactant and organic solvents (e.g., toluene and alkanes), surfactants aggregate to form inverse micelles. Here, the hydrophilic head groups shield themselves by forming a polar core, and the hydrophobic tails groups are free to move about in the surrounding oleic phase. The formation of Fe clusters in inverse miscelles was studied.Iron salts are solubilized within the polar interior of inverse micelles, and the addition of the reducing agent LiBH{sub 4} initiates a chemical reduction to produce monodisperse, nanometer sized Fe based particles. The reaction sequence is sustained by material exchange between inverse micelles. The surfactant interface provides a spatial constraint on the reaction volume, and reactions carried out in these micro-heterogeneous solutions produce colloidal sized particles (10-100{Angstrom}) stabilized in solution against flocculation of surfactant. The clusters were stabilized with respect to size with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and with respect to chemical composition with Mossbauer spectroscopy, electron diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In addition, these iron based clusters were tested for catalytic activity in a model hydrogenolysis reaction. The hydrogenolysis of naphthyl bibenzyl methane was used as a model for coal pyrolysis.

  17. Thermodynamic solution properties of pefloxacin mesylate and its interactions with organized assemblies of anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usman, Muhammad; Rashid, Muhammad Abid; Mansha, Asim; Siddiq, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Free energy of adsorption is more negative than free energy of micellization. • Micellization becomes more spontaneous at high temperature. • There is strong interaction between PFM and SDS. - Abstract: This manuscript reports the physicochemical behavior of antibiotic amphiphilic drug pefloxacin mesylate (PFM) and its interaction with anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The data of surface tension and electrical conductivity are helpful to detect the CMC as well as to calculate surface parameters, i.e. surface pressure, π, surface excess concentration, Γ, area per molecule of drug and standard Gibbs free energy of adsorption, ΔG ads and thermodynamic parameters like standard free energy of micellization, ΔG m , standard enthalpy of micellization, ΔH m and standard entropy of micellization, ΔS m . The interaction of this drug with anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was studied by electrical conductivity and UV/visible spectroscopy. This enabled us to compute the values of partition coefficient (K x ), free energy of partition, ΔG p , binding constant, K b , free energy of binding, ΔG b , number of drug molecules per micelle, n, and thermodynamic parameters of drug–surfactant interaction

  18. Surfactants tailored by the class Actinobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kügler, Johannes H.; Le Roes-Hill, Marilize; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Globally the change towards the establishment of a bio-based economy has resulted in an increased need for bio-based applications. This, in turn, has served as a driving force for the discovery and application of novel biosurfactants. The class Actinobacteria represents a vast group of microorganisms with the ability to produce a diverse range of secondary metabolites, including surfactants. Understanding the extensive nature of the biosurfactants produced by actinobacterial strains can assist in finding novel biosurfactants with new potential applications. This review therefore presents a comprehensive overview of the knowledge available on actinobacterial surfactants, the chemical structures that have been completely or partly elucidated, as well as the identity of the biosurfactant-producing strains. Producer strains of not yet elucidated compounds are discussed, as well as the original habitats of all the producer strains, which seems to indicate that biosurfactant production is environmentally driven. Methodology applied in the isolation, purification and structural elucidation of the different types of surface active compounds, as well as surfactant activity tests, are also discussed. Overall, actinobacterial surfactants can be summarized to include the dominantly occurring trehalose-comprising surfactants, other non-trehalose containing glycolipids, lipopeptides and the more rare actinobacterial surfactants. The lack of structural information on a large proportion of actinobacterial surfactants should be considered as a driving force to further explore the abundance and diversity of these compounds. This would allow for a better understanding of actinobacterial surface active compounds and their potential for biotechnological application. PMID:25852670

  19. Surfactants tailored by the class Actinobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes H Kügler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gloablly, the drive towards the establishment of a bio-based economy has resulted in an increased need for bio-based applications. This, in turn, has served as a driving force for the discovery and application of novel biosurfactants. The class Actinobacteria represents a vast group of microorganisms with the ability to produce a diverse range of secondary metabolites, including surfactants. Understanding the extensive nature of the biosurfactants produced by actinobacterial strains can assist in finding novel biosurfactants with new potential applications. This review therefore presents a comprehensive overview of the knowledge available on actinobacterial surfactants, the chemical structures that have been completely or partly elucidated, as well as the identity of the biosurfactant-producing strains. Producer strains of not yet elucidated compounds are discussed, as well as the original habitats of all the producer strains, which seems to indicate that biosurfactant production is environmentally driven. Methodology applied in the isolation, purification and structural elucidation of the different types of surface active compounds, as well as surfactant activity tests, are also discussed. Overall, actinobacterial surfactants can be summarized to include the dominantly occurring trehalose-comprising surfactants, other non-trehalose containing glycolipids, lipopeptides and the more rare actinobacterial surfactants. The lack of structural information on a large proportion of actinobacterial surfactants should be considered as a driving force to further explore the abundance and diversity of these compounds. This would allow for a better understanding of actinobacterial surface active compounds and their potential for biotechnological application.

  20. Self-assembly of metallacarboranes in aqueous solution - a new kind of surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brusselle, Damien

    2013-01-01

    Metallacarboranes are anionic clusters composed of boron, carbon and hydrogen with a metallic cation sandwiched at the heart of this cluster (Co 3+ in general) and highly thermally and chemically stable. These entities are trivially represented by the Greek letter θ where the poles are considered hydrophobic and have a negative charge delocalized and counter-balanced by an acidic proton. This high stability as well as the various properties gives a particular interest in applications such as the co-extraction of Cs and Sr in nuclear waste or in medicine for their ability to inhibit HIV protease by its hydrogen bonds. The chemistry of boron is relatively rich; a synthesis of some derivatives was performed in the laboratory. It is possible to substitute specifically hydrogen by iodine or chlorine atoms or change the metallic heart by other atom as Fe 3+ , respectively forming diiodo-COSAN (I2COSAN), dichloro-COSAN (Cl2COSAN) and ferrabisdicarbollide (FESAN) anions. Metallacarboranes are also considered as a new class of surfactant where a first study of their self-assembly has been performed. The results of one of them, cobaltabisdicarbollide or COSAN, have shown an effect at the surface tension and theses clusters formed spontaneously vesicles in dilute regime (from 0.5 mmol/L) and by Coulomb interactions, they form micelles at higher concentration (after 15 mmol/L). But they offer more surprises by the formation of lyotropic phases in aqueous solution. Indeed, these phases, clearly identified by X-ray scattering techniques and microscopy, showed temperature and concentration dependence, I2COSAN phase diagram was established. Therefore, the thesis is focused on the understanding of the phenomena controlling the aggregation of these curious compounds. (author) [fr

  1. Comparison of several ethanol productions using xylanase, inorganic salts, surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Lu, Jie; Yang, Rui-feng; Song, Wen-jing; Li, Hai-ming; Wang, Hai-song; Zhou, Jing-hui

    2017-03-01

    Liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment is an effective and environmentally friendly method to produce bioethanol with lignocellulosic materials. Corn stover was pretreated with liquid hot water (LHW) and then subjected to semi-simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (S-SSF) to obtain high ethanol concentration and yield. The present study aimed to confirm the effect of several additives on the fermentation digestibility of unwashed WIS of corn stover pretreated with LHW. So we also investigated the process, such as enzyme addition, inorganic salts, surfactant and different loading Triton. Results show that high ethanol concentration is necessary to add xylanase in the stage of saccharification. The ethanol concentration increased mainly with magnesium ion on fermentation. Comparing with Tween 80, Span 80 and Polyethylene glycol, Triton is the best surfactant. In contrast to using xylanase and Triton respectively, optimization can make up the lack of stamina and improve effect of single inorganic salts.

  2. In vitro surfactant structure-toxicity relationships: implications for surfactant use in sexually transmitted infection prophylaxis and contraception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângela S Inácio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The need for woman-controlled, cheap, safe, effective, easy-to-use and easy-to-store topical applications for prophylaxis against sexually transmitted infections (STIs makes surfactant-containing formulations an interesting option that requires a more fundamental knowledge concerning surfactant toxicology and structure-activity relationships. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report in vitro effects of surfactant concentration, exposure time and structure on the viability of mammalian cell types typically encountered in the vagina, namely, fully polarized and confluent epithelial cells, confluent but non-polarized epithelial-like cells, dendritic cells, and human sperm. Representatives of the different families of commercially available surfactants--nonionic (Triton X-100 and monolaurin, zwitterionic (DDPS, anionic (SDS, and cationic (C(nTAB (n = 10 to 16, C(12PB, and C(12BZK--were examined. Triton X-100, monolaurin, DDPS and SDS were toxic to all cell types at concentrations around their critical micelle concentration (CMC suggesting a non-selective mode of action involving cell membrane destabilization and/or destruction. All cationic surfactants were toxic at concentrations far below their CMC and showed significant differences in their toxicity toward polarized as compared with non-polarized cells. Their toxicity was also dependent on the chemical nature of the polar head group. Our results suggest an intracellular locus of action for cationic surfactants and show that their structure-activity relationships could be profitably exploited for STI prophylaxis in vaginal gel formulations. The therapeutic indices comparing polarized epithelial cell toxicity to sperm toxicity for all surfactants examined, except C(12PB and C(12BZK, does not justify their use as contraceptive agents. C(12PB and C(12BZK are shown to have a narrow therapeutic index recommending caution in their use in contraceptive formulations. CONCLUSIONS

  3. Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laura Wesson; Prapas Lohateeraparp; Jeffrey Harwell; Bor-Jier Shiau

    2012-05-31

    The principle objective of this project was to characterize and test current and next generation high performance surfactants for improved chemical flooding technology, focused on reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian-aged (Penn) sands. In order to meet this objective the characteristic curvatures (Cc) of twenty-eight anionic surfactants selected for evaluation for use in chemical flooding formulations were determined. The Cc values ranged from -6.90 to 2.55 with the majority having negative values. Crude oil samples from nine Penn sand reservoirs were analyzed for several properties pertinent to surfactant formulation for EOR application. These properties included equivalent alkane carbon numbers, total acid numbers, and viscosity. The brine samples from these same reservoirs were analyzed for several cations and for total dissolved solids. Surfactant formulations were successfully developed for eight reservoirs by the end of the project period. These formulations were comprised of a tertiary mixture of anionic surfactants. The identities of these surfactants are considered proprietary, but suffice to say the surfactants in each mixture were comprised of varying chemical structures. In addition to the successful development of surfactant formulations for EOR, there were also two successful single-well field tests conducted. There are many aspects that must be considered in the development and implementation of effective surfactant formulations. Taking into account these other aspects, there were four additional studies conducted during this project. These studies focused on the effect of the stability of surfactant formulations in the presence of polymers with an associated examination of polymer rheology, the effect of the presence of iron complexes in the brine on surfactant stability, the potential use of sacrificial agents in order to minimize the loss of surfactant to adsorption, and the effect of electrolytes on surfactant adsorption. In these last four studies

  4. Effect of Added Surfactants on the Dynamic Interfacial Tension Behaviour of Alkaline/Diluted Heavy Crude Oil System Effet de l’ajout de tensioactifs sur le comportement dynamique de la tension interfaciale du système solution alcaline/brut dilué

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trabelsi S.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study has been undertaken to get a better understanding of the interactions between Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR surfactants used in chemical flooding and in situ surfactants present in an heavy oil. We report an experimental study of dynamic Interfacial Tension (IFT behaviour of diluted heavy oil/surfactant enhanced-alkaline systems. The dynamic IFT was measured using pendant drop and spinning drop tensiometers. The dynamic IFT between diluted heavy oil and alkaline solution (pH 11 with no added surfactant increased sharply with time, which was attributed to the transfer of the in situ surfactant (produced by saponification of the acids groups present in the crude oil across the oil/water interface. The addition of Sodium Dodecyl Benzene Sulfonate (SDBS above the Critical Micellar Concentration (CMC ~ 0.002%, changed completely the dynamic IFT behaviour of the diluted heavy oil as the IFT strongly decreased and finally reached a plateau, of about 1.5 × 10-3 mN/m at a concentration of only 0.02%. We attributed the efficiency of SDBS to a synergistic effect between the in situ surfactant and the added surfactant that form a mixed interfacial monolayer, which is very efficient in decreasing the IFT to ultra low values and in resisting mass transfer across the oil/water interface. Cette étude a été réalisée pour mieux comprendre les interactions entre les tensioactifs utilisés pour la récupération assistée de pétrole et les tensioactifs in situ présents dans le brut. Nous expérimentons le comportement dynamique des tensions interfaciales (mesurées par les méthodes de goutte pendante et goutte tournante entre le brut lourd dilué et les solutions alcalines avec ajout de tensioactif. La tension interfaciale dynamique entre le brut dilué et une solution alcaline (pH 11 sans ajout de tensioactif croît fortement au cours du temps, cette augmentation est attribuée au transfert des tensioactifs in situ (produits par saponification des

  5. The Molecular Era of Surfactant Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the physiology, biochemistry, molecular and cell biology of the pulmonary surfactant system transformed the clinical care and outcome of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. The molecular era of surfactant biology provided genetic insights into the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders, previously termed “idiopathic” that affect newborn infants, children and adults. Knowledge related to the structure and function of the surfactant proteins and their roles in alveolar ...

  6. Kolliphor surfactants affect solubilization and bioavailability of fenofibrate. Studies of in vitro digestion and absorption in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Ragna; Holm, Rene; Jacobsen, Jette

    2015-01-01

    formulations only comprised an aqueous micellar solution of the model drug (fenofibrate) in varying concentrations (2–25% (w/v)) of the three tested surfactants. Increased concentrations of Kolliphor ELP and EL led to increased fenofibrate AUC0–24h values. For the Kolliphor RH40 formulations, an apparent...... fenofibrate absorption optimum was seen at 15% (w/v) surfactant, displaying both the highest AUC0–24h and Cmax. The reduced absorption of fenofibrate from the formulation containing the highest level of surfactant (25% w/v) was thought to be caused by some degree of trapping within Kolliphor RH40 micelles....... In vitro, Kolliphor ELP and EL were found to be more prone to digestion than Kolliphor RH40, though not affecting the in vivo results. The highest fenofibrate bioavailability was attained from formulations with high Kolliphor ELP/EL levels (25% (w/v)), indicating that these surfactants are the better...

  7. The inhibition of methane hydrate formation by water alignment underneath surface adsorption of surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ngoc N.; Nguyen, Anh V.; Dang, Liem X.

    2017-06-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been widely shown to strongly promote the formation of methane hydrate. Here we show that SDS displays an extraordinary inhibition effect on methane hydrate formation when the surfactant is used in sub-millimolar concentration (around 0.3 mM). We have also employed Sum Frequency Generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) to elucidate the molecular mechanism of this inhibition. The SFG and MDS results revealed a strong alignment of water molecules underneath surface adsorption of SDS in its sub-millimolar solution. Interestingly, both the alignment of water and the inhibition effect (in 0.3 mM SDS solution) went vanishing when an oppositely-charged surfactant (tetra-n-butylammonium bromide, TBAB) was suitably added to produce a mixed solution of 0.3 mM SDS and 3.6 mM TBAB. Combining structural and kinetic results, we pointed out that the alignment of water underneath surface adsorption of dodecyl sulfate (DS-) anions gave rise to the unexpected inhibition of methane hydration formation in sub-millimolar solution of SDS. The adoption of TBAB mitigated the SDS-induced electrostatic field at the solution’s surface and, therefore, weakened the alignment of interfacial water which, in turn, erased the inhibition effect. We discussed this finding using the concept of activation energy of the interfacial formation of gas hydrate. The main finding of this work is to reveal the interplay of interfacial water in governing gas hydrate formation which sheds light on a universal molecular-scale understanding of the influence of surfactants on gas hydrate formation. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  8. Nanoparticle-enabled delivery of surfactants in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourafkan, Ehsan; Hu, Zhongliang; Wen, Dongsheng

    2018-06-01

    The adsorption of surfactants on the reservoir rocks surface is a serious issue in many energy and environment related areas. Learning from the concept of drug delivery in the nano-medicine field, this work proposes and validates the concept of using nanoparticles to deliver a mixture of surfactants into a porous medium. TiO 2 nanoparticles (NPs) are used as carriers for a blend of surfactants mixtures including anionic alkyl aryl sulfonic acid (AAS) and nonionic alcohol ethoxylated (EA) at the optimum salinity and composition conditions. The transport of NPs through a core sample of crushed sandstone grains and the adsorption of surfactants are evaluated. By using TiO 2 NPs, the adsorption of surfactant molecules can be significantly reduced, i.e. half of the initial adsorption value. The level of surfactant adsorption reduction is related to the NPs transport capability through the porous medium. An application study shows that comparing to surfactant flooding alone, the total oil recovery can be increased by 7.81% of original oil in place (OOIP) by using nanoparticle bonded surfactants. Such work shows the promise of NP as an effective surfactant carrier for sandstone reservoirs, which could have many potential applications in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and environmental remediation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of rSP-C surfactant with natural and synthetic surfactants after late treatment in a rat model of the acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häfner, Dietrich; Germann, Paul-Georg; Hauschke, Dieter

    1998-01-01

    In a previous paper we showed that an SP-C containing surfactant preparation has similar activity as bovine-derived surfactants in a rat lung lavage model of the adult respiratory distress syndrome. In this study surfactant was given ten minutes after the last lavage (early treatment). In the present investigation we were interested how different surfactant preparations behave when they are administered 1 h after the last lavage (late treatment). Four protein containing surfactants (rSP-C surfactant, bLES, Infasurf and Survanta) were compared with three protein-free surfactants (ALEC, Exosurf and the phospholipid (PL) mixture of the rSP-C surfactant termed PL surfactant) with respect to their ability to improve gas exchange in this more stringent model when surfactant is given one hour after the last lavage. For better comparison of the surfactants the doses were related to phospholipids. The surfactants were given at doses of 25, 50 and 100 mg kg−1 body weight. The surfactants were compared to an untreated control group that was only ventilated for the whole experimental period. Tracheotomized rats (8–12 per dose and surfactant) were pressure-controlled ventilated (Siemens Servo Ventilator 900C) with 100% oxygen at a respiratory rate of 30 breaths min−1, inspiration expiration ratio of 1 : 2, peak inspiratory pressure of 28 cmH2O at positive endexpiratory pressure (PEEP) of 8 cmH2O. Animals were ventilated for one hour after the last lavage and thereafter the surfactants were intratracheally instilled. During the whole experimental period the ventilation was not changed. Partial arterial oxygen pressures (PaO2, mmHg) at 30 min and 120 min after treatment were used for statistical comparison. All protein containing surfactants caused a dose-dependent increase of the reduced PaO2 values at 30 min after treatment. The protein-free surfactants showed only weak dose-dependent increase in PaO2 values at this time. This difference between the

  10. Particle Swarm Optimization with Various Inertia Weight Variants for Optimal Power Flow Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabha Umapathy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an efficient method to solve the optimal power flow problem in power systems using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO. The objective of the proposed method is to find the steady-state operating point which minimizes the fuel cost, while maintaining an acceptable system performance in terms of limits on generator power, line flow, and voltage. Three different inertia weights, a constant inertia weight (CIW, a time-varying inertia weight (TVIW, and global-local best inertia weight (GLbestIW, are considered with the particle swarm optimization algorithm to analyze the impact of inertia weight on the performance of PSO algorithm. The PSO algorithm is simulated for each of the method individually. It is observed that the PSO algorithm with the proposed inertia weight yields better results, both in terms of optimal solution and faster convergence. The proposed method has been tested on the standard IEEE 30 bus test system to prove its efficacy. The algorithm is computationally faster, in terms of the number of load flows executed, and provides better results than other heuristic techniques.

  11. Surfactant modified clays’ consistency limits and contact angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Akbulut

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at preparing a surfactant modified clay (SMC and researching the effect of surfactants on clays' contact angles and consistency limits; clay was thus modified by surfactants formodifying their engineering properties. Seven surfactants (trimethylglycine, hydroxyethylcellulose  octyl phenol ethoxylate, linear alkylbenzene sulfonic acid, sodium lauryl ether sulfate, cetyl trimethylammonium chloride and quaternised ethoxylated fatty amine were used as surfactants in this study. The experimental results indicated that SMC consistency limits (liquid and plastic limits changedsignificantly compared to those of natural clay. Plasticity index and liquid limit (PI-LL values representing soil class approached the A-line when zwitterion, nonionic, and anionic surfactant percentageincreased. However, cationic SMC became transformed from CH (high plasticity clay to MH (high plasticity silt class soils, according to the unified soil classification system (USCS. Clay modifiedwith cationic and anionic surfactants gave higher and lower contact angles than natural clay, respectively.

  12. Separation of total lipids on human lipoproteins using surfactant-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes as pseudostationary phase in capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Mei-Yu; Chen, Yen-Yi; Yang, Jian-Ying; Lin, You-Sian; Lin, Yang-Wei; Liu, Mine-Yine

    2014-04-01

    Surfactant-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were used as pseudostationary phase (PSP) in CE to investigate the total lipids of high-density lipoproteins and low-density lipoproteins. To optimize the CE conditions, several experimental factors including carbon nanotube concentration, bile salt concentration, sodium phosphate (PB) concentration, organic modifier concentration and buffer pH value have been examined. In addition, the CE capillary temperature and applied voltage have also been examined. The optimal separation buffer selected was a mixture of 3.2 mg/L MWNT, 50 mM bile salt, 10 mM PB, 20% 1-propanol, pH 9.5. The optimal capillary temperature and applied voltage selected were 50°C and 20 kV, respectively. Phosphatidyl choline (PC) has been used as a model analyte and investigated by the optimal CE method. The linear range for PC was 0.1-3 mg/mL with a correlation coefficient of 0.9934, and the concentration LOD was 0.055 mg/mL. The optimal CE method has been used to characterize the total lipids of high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein. At absorbance 200 nm, one major peak and two or three minor peaks showed for the total lipids of lipoproteins within 13 minutes. Resolutions of the total lipids were enhanced using surfactant-coated MWNTs as PSPs in the CE separation buffer. However, resolutions of the total lipids were not enhanced using surfactant-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes as PSPs in the CE separation buffer. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Steam-explosion mitigation with polymer and surfactant additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineau, D.; Ranval, W.

    1996-02-01

    Vapor explosion (or MFCI for Molten Fuel-Coolant Interaction) is a phenomenon in which a hot liquid rapidly transfers its internal energy into a surrounding colder and more volatile liquid (the coolant) which vaporization is violent. One of the simplest coolant is water. However it was noticed that some particular additives in water could have a mitigative effect on this phenomenon. This paper deals with the description of polymeric and/or surfactant solutions and their ability to suppress vapor explosion. (authors). 24 refs., 5 figs

  14. Effect of laundry surfactants on surface charge and colloidal stability of silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoglund, Sara; Lowe, Troy A; Hedberg, Jonas; Blomberg, Eva; Wallinder, Inger Odnevall; Wold, Susanna; Lundin, Maria

    2013-07-16

    The stability of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) potentially released from clothing during a laundry cycle and their interactions with laundry-relevant surfactants [anionic (LAS), cationic (DTAC), and nonionic (Berol)] have been investigated. Surface interactions between Ag NPs and surfactants influence their speciation and stability. In the absence of surfactants as well as in the presence of LAS, the negatively charged Ag NPs were stable in solution for more than 1 day. At low DTAC concentrations (≤1 mM), DTAC-Ag NP interactions resulted in charge neutralization and formation of agglomerates. The surface charge of the particles became positive at higher concentrations due to a bilayer type formation of DTAC that prevents from agglomeration due to repulsive electrostatic forces between the positively charged colloids. The adsorption of Berol was enhanced when above its critical micelle concentration (cmc). This resulted in a surface charge close to zero and subsequent agglomeration. Extended DLVO theory calculations were in compliance with observed findings. The stability of the Ag NPs was shown to depend on the charge and concentration of the adsorbed surfactants. Such knowledge is important as it may influence the subsequent transport of Ag NPs through different chemical transients and thus their potential bioavailability and toxicity.

  15. Effects of Surfactant on Geotechnical Characteristics of Silty Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, Z.A.; Sahibin, A.R.; Lihan, T.; Idris, W.M.R.; Sakina, M.

    2013-01-01

    Surfactants are often used as a cleaning agent for restoration of oil-contaminated soil. However the effect of surfactant on the geotechnical properties of soil is not clearly understood. In this study, the effects of surfactant on silty soil were investigated for consistency index, compaction, permeability and shear strength. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used in this study to prepare the surfactant-treated soil. Our results showed that the soil with added surfactant exhibited a decrease in liquid and plastic limit values. Maximum dry densities increased and optimum moisture contents decreased as contents of added surfactant were increased. The presence of surfactant assists the soil to achieve maximum density at lower water content. The addition of surfactant decreased the permeability of soil from 6.29 x 10 -4 to 1.15 x 10 -4 ms -1 . The shear strength of soil with added surfactant was examined using the undrained unconsolidated triaxial tests. The results showed that the undrained shear strength, Cu was significantly affected, decreased from 319 kPa to 50 kPa for soil with 20 % of added surfactant. The results of this study showed that the presence of surfactant in soil can modify the mechanical behaviour of the soil. (author)

  16. Effect of dielectric fluid with surfactant and graphite powder on Electrical Discharge Machining of titanium alloy using Taguchi method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murahari Kolli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, Taguchi method was employed to optimize the surfactant and graphite powder concentration in dielectric fluid for the machining of Ti-6Al-4V using Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM. The process parameters such as discharge current, surfactant concentration and powder concentration were changed to explore their effects on Material Removal Rate (MRR, Surface Roughness (SR, Tool wear rate (TWR and Recast Layer Thickness (RLT. Detailed analysis of structural features of machined surface was carried out using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM to observe the influence of surfactant and graphite powder on the machining process. It was observed from the experimental results that the graphite powder and surfactant added dielectric fluid significantly improved the MRR, reduces the SR, TWR and RLT at various conditions. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and F-test of experimental data values related to the important process parameters of EDM revealed that discharge current and surfactant concentration has more percentage of contribution on the MRR and TWR whereas the SR, and RLT were found to be affected greatly by the discharge current and graphite powder concentration.

  17. Surfactant-enhanced control of track-etch pore morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel', P.Yu.; Blonskaya, I.V.; Didyk, A.Yu.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Orelovich, O.L.; Samojlova, L.I.; Vutsadakis, V.A.; Root, D.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of surfactants on the process of chemical development of ion tracks in polymers is studied. Based on the experimental data, a mechanism of the surfactant effect on the track-etch pore morphology is proposed. In the beginning of etching the surfactant is adsorbed on the surface and creates a layer that is quasi-solid and partially protects the surface from the etching agent. However, some etchant molecules diffuse through the barrier and react with the polymer surface. This results in the formation of a small hole at the entrance to the ion track. After the hole has attained a few annometers in diameter, the surfactant molecules penetrate into the track and cover its walls. Further diffusion of the surfactant into the growing pore is hindered. The adsorbed surfactant layer is not permeable for large molecules. In contrast, small alkali molecules and water molecules diffuse into the track and provide the etching process enlarging the pore. At this stage the transport of the surfactant into the pore channel can proceed only due to the lateral diffusion in the adsorbed layer. The volume inside the pore is free of surfactant molecules and grows at a higher rate than pore entrance. After a more prolonged etching the bottle-like (or 'cigar-like') pore channels are formed. The bottle-like shape of the pore channels depends on the etching conditions such as alkali and surfactant concentration, temperature, and type of the surfactant. The use of surfactants enables one to produce track-etch membranes with improved flow rate characteristics compared with those having cylindrical pores with the same nominal pore diameters

  18. Open lung ventilation preserves the response to delayed surfactant treatment in surfactant-deficient newborn piglets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veenendaal, Mariëtte B.; van Kaam, Anton H.; Haitsma, Jack J.; Lutter, René; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Delayed surfactant treatment (>2 hrs after birth) is less effective than early treatment in conventionally ventilated preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. The objective of this study was to evaluate if this time-dependent efficacy of surfactant treatment is also present

  19. Dimeric Surfactants: Promising Ingredients of Cosmetics and Toiletries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants are an essential ingredient for cosmetic, toiletries and personal care products for enhancing their performance. Dimeric surfactants demonstrate superiority compared to conventional surfactants in all areas of application. Dimeric surfactants are extremely promising for utilization in various cosmetic formulations viz. shampoo, lotions, creams, conditioners etc. These surfactants possess extremely unique surface properties viz. lower surface tension, unique micellization, low critical micelle concentration (CMC and antimicrobial activity, higher solubilization etc. Dimerics enhance the performances of cosmetics in an extraordinary manner and provide eco-friendly preparations for human epidermis.

  20. Structural study of surfactant-dependent interaction with protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K., E-mail: vkaswal@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kohlbrecher, Joachim [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 PSI Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-06-24

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the complex structure of anionic BSA protein with three different (cationic DTAB, anionic SDS and non-ionic C12E10) surfactants. These systems form very different surfactant-dependent complexes. We show that the structure of protein-surfactant complex is initiated by the site-specific electrostatic interaction between the components, followed by the hydrophobic interaction at high surfactant concentrations. It is also found that hydrophobic interaction is preferred over the electrostatic interaction in deciding the resultant structure of protein-surfactant complexes.

  1. Optimal Solutions of Multiproduct Batch Chemical Process Using Multiobjective Genetic Algorithm with Expert Decision System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokeddem, Diab; Khellaf, Abdelhafid

    2009-01-01

    Optimal design problem are widely known by their multiple performance measures that are often competing with each other. In this paper, an optimal multiproduct batch chemical plant design is presented. The design is firstly formulated as a multiobjective optimization problem, to be solved using the well suited non dominating sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II). The NSGA-II have capability to achieve fine tuning of variables in determining a set of non dominating solutions distributed along the Pareto front in a single run of the algorithm. The NSGA-II ability to identify a set of optimal solutions provides the decision-maker DM with a complete picture of the optimal solution space to gain better and appropriate choices. Then an outranking with PROMETHEE II helps the decision-maker to finalize the selection of a best compromise. The effectiveness of NSGA-II method with multiojective optimization problem is illustrated through two carefully referenced examples. PMID:19543537

  2. The Biophysical Function of Pulmonary Surfactant

    OpenAIRE

    Rugonyi, Sandra; Biswas, Samares C.; Hall, Stephen B.

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant lowers surface tension in the lungs. Physiological studies indicate two key aspects of this function: that the surfactant film forms rapidly; and that when compressed by the shrinking alveolar area during exhalation, the film reduces surface tension to very low values. These observations suggest that surfactant vesicles adsorb quickly, and that during compression, the adsorbed film resists the tendency to collapse from the interface to form a three-dimensional bulk phase....

  3. Optimization of the recycling process of precipitation barren solution in a uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Qing; Yu Suqin; Zhao Wucheng; Han Wei; Zhang Hui; Chen Shuangxi

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline leaching process was adopted to recover uranium from ores in a uranium mine, and high concentration uranium solution, which would be later used in precipitation, was obtained after ion-exchange and elution steps. The eluting agent consisted of NaCl and NaHCO 3 . Though precipitation barren solution contained as high as 80 g/L Na 2 CO 3 , it still can not be recycled due to presence of high Cl - concentration So, both elution and precipitation processes were optimized in order to control the Cl - concentration in the precipitation barren solution to the recyclable concentration range. Because the precipitation barren solution can be recycled by optimization, the agent consumption was lowered and the discharge of waste water was reduced. (authors)

  4. Performance of Cationic Surfactant Modified Sepiolite and Bentonite in Lead Sorption from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.R. Rafiei

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The remediation of soils and water contaminated with heavy metals generate a great need to develop efficient adsorbents for these pollutants. This study reports the sorption of lead (Pb by bentonite (Bent, and sepiolite (Sep, that were modified with cetyltrimethyl ammonium (CTMA+ organic cations. The natural and surfactant modified clays (organo-clays were characterized with some instrumental techniques including XRF, XRD, FTIR and SEM. Sorption studies were performed in a batch system, and the effects of various experimental parameters including contact time and initial Pb concentration were evaluated upon the Pb sorption onto sorbents. Maximum sorption of Pb was found to be, 83.26, 71.36, 56.25 and 37 mg g-1 for Sep, CTMA-Sep, Bent and CTMA-Bent adsorbents, respectively. The Pb sorption data were fitted to both the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The Freundlich model represented the sorption process better than the Langmuir model. Lead sorption rate was found to be considerably slower for organo-clays than that for unmodified clays. Sorption kinetics was evaluated by pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion models. The sorption processes of organo-clays followed intraparticle diffusion kinetics. The results showed that the cationic surfactant modified bentonite and sepiolite sorbed less Pb than the unmodified clays.

  5. Changes in hydration of the stratum corneum are the most suitable indicator to evaluate the irritation of surfactants on the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, T; Shimotoyodome, Y; Nishijima, T; Sugata, K; Taguchi, H; Moriwaki, S

    2017-02-01

    Irritancy levels of surfactants on human skin have not been clarified completely. The relationships between skin damage and changes of skin properties caused by various surfactants were investigated using non-invasive measurements. Aqueous solutions of seven kinds of anionic, non-ionic, and amphoteric surfactants were exposed to the inside of forearm skin of 20 human subjects in two separate studies using the cup method. Hydration of the stratum corneum (SC), transepidermal water loss (TEWL), pH, skin surface roughness, and contents of the SC were measured before and after one exposure and after five and nine consecutive exposures to various surfactants. The discontinuation ratio of subjects for testing in each surfactant was determined by skin irritation symptoms and was defined as the degree of skin damage. Significant changes were observed only in hydration, TEWL, and natural moisturizing factors (NMF) content in the SC following surfactant exposure. A significant correlation was observed between the discontinuation ratio of each surfactant and the changes of hydration, TEWL, and NMF. Especially, the change of SC hydration showed an excellent correlation with the discontinuation ratio both for single (r = 0.942, P hydration of the SC is equivalent to the skin damage caused by surfactants, and therefore is the most suitable indicator to evaluate the irritation of surfactants on the skin. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Optimization of process and solution parameters in electrospinning polyethylene oxide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacobs, V

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the optimization of electrospinning process and solution parameters using factorial design approach to obtain uniform polyethylene oxide (PEO) nanofibers. The parameters studied were distance between nozzle and collector screen...

  7. Simple one step synthesis of nonionic dithiol surfactants and their self-assembling with silver nanoparticles: Characterization, surface properties, biological activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd-Elaal, Ali A., E-mail: ali_ashour5@yahoo.com; Tawfik, Salah M.; Shaban, Samy M.

    2015-07-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nonionic dithiol surfactants were synthesized by simple one step esterification. • The surface activity of the synthesized dithiol surfactants showed high tendency toward adsorption and micellization. • The nanostructure of the synthesized nonionic dithiol surfactants with silver nanoparticles was prepared. • The silver nanoparticles enhanced the biological activity of the synthesized dithiol surfactants. - Abstract: Simple esterification of 2-mercaptoacetic acid and polyethylene glycol with different molecular weights was done to form the desired nonionic dithiol surfactants. The chemical structures of synthesized thiol surfactants were confirmed using FT-IR and {sup 1}H NMR spectra. The surface activity of the synthesized surfactants was determined by measurement of the surface tension at different temperatures. The surface activity measurements showed their high tendency towards adsorption and micellization. The thermodynamic parameters of micellization (ΔG{sub mic}, ΔH{sub mic} and ΔS{sub mic}) and adsorption (ΔG{sub ads}, ΔG{sub ads} and ΔS{sub ads}) showed their tendency toward adsorption at the interfaces and also micellization in the bulk of their solutions. The nanostructure of the synthesized nonionic dithiol surfactants with silver nanoparticles was prepared and investigated using UV and TEM techniques. Screening tests of the synthesized dithiol surfactants and their nanostructure with silver nanoparticles, against gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Microccus luteus), gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Bordatella pertussis) and fungi (Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans) showed that they are highly active biocides. The presence of silver nanoparticles enhancement the biological activities of the individual synthesized nonionic dithiol surfactants.

  8. Simple one step synthesis of nonionic dithiol surfactants and their self-assembling with silver nanoparticles: Characterization, surface properties, biological activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd-Elaal, Ali A.; Tawfik, Salah M.; Shaban, Samy M.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nonionic dithiol surfactants were synthesized by simple one step esterification. • The surface activity of the synthesized dithiol surfactants showed high tendency toward adsorption and micellization. • The nanostructure of the synthesized nonionic dithiol surfactants with silver nanoparticles was prepared. • The silver nanoparticles enhanced the biological activity of the synthesized dithiol surfactants. - Abstract: Simple esterification of 2-mercaptoacetic acid and polyethylene glycol with different molecular weights was done to form the desired nonionic dithiol surfactants. The chemical structures of synthesized thiol surfactants were confirmed using FT-IR and 1 H NMR spectra. The surface activity of the synthesized surfactants was determined by measurement of the surface tension at different temperatures. The surface activity measurements showed their high tendency towards adsorption and micellization. The thermodynamic parameters of micellization (ΔG mic , ΔH mic and ΔS mic ) and adsorption (ΔG ads , ΔG ads and ΔS ads ) showed their tendency toward adsorption at the interfaces and also micellization in the bulk of their solutions. The nanostructure of the synthesized nonionic dithiol surfactants with silver nanoparticles was prepared and investigated using UV and TEM techniques. Screening tests of the synthesized dithiol surfactants and their nanostructure with silver nanoparticles, against gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Microccus luteus), gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Bordatella pertussis) and fungi (Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans) showed that they are highly active biocides. The presence of silver nanoparticles enhancement the biological activities of the individual synthesized nonionic dithiol surfactants

  9. Biomarker analysis of liver cells exposed to surfactant-wrapped and oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have great potential in industrial, consumer, and mechanical applications, based partly on their unique structural, optical and electronic properties. CNTs are commonly oxidized or treated with surfactants to facilitate aqueous solution processing, and the...

  10. An accurate approximate solution of optimal sequential age replacement policy for a finite-time horizon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, R.

    2009-01-01

    It is difficult to find the optimal solution of the sequential age replacement policy for a finite-time horizon. This paper presents an accurate approximation to find an approximate optimal solution of the sequential replacement policy. The proposed approximation is computationally simple and suitable for any failure distribution. Their accuracy is illustrated by two examples. Based on the approximate solution, an approximate estimate for the total cost is derived.

  11. Removal of trace Cd2+ from aqueous solution by foam fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian; Li, Ying; Zhang, Sen; Sun, Yange

    2015-04-09

    In recent years, aqueous foam was known as an efficient technique with high potential on being used to remove heavy metal ions from the polluted water, not only because of the low cost, simple operation, but also ascribed to the high removal efficiency of trace heavy metal ions and would not cause secondary pollution to the environment. In this paper, the removal of Cd(2+) from aqueous solution by aqueous foam stabilized by a kind of novel anionic-nonionic surfactant sodium trideceth-4 carboxylate (AEC) was investigated. The effect of conditions such as surfactant/metal ions molar ratio, surfactant concentration on the removal efficiency was studied. In large concentration range of surfactant, the removal rate was higher than 90%, and could reach up to 99.8% under the optimum conditions. The Zeta potential of gas bubbles in the AEC solutions was determined to verify the combination between the negative charged group heads of surfactant molecules and heavy metal ions, and isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC) determination was utilized to demonstrate the interaction, which helped to understand the mechanisms more clearly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Surfactant-free synthesis of nickel nanoparticles in near-critical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hald, Peter; Bremholm, Martin; Iversen, Steen Brummerstedt; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    2008-01-01

    Nickel nanoparticles have been produced by combining two well-tested methods: (i) the continuous flow supercritical reactor and (ii) the reduction of a nickel salt with hydrazine. The normal precipitation of a nickel-hydrazine complex, which would complicate pumping and mixing of the precursor, was controlled by the addition of ammonia to the precursor solution, and production of nickel nanoparticles with average sizes from 40 to 60 nm were demonstrated. The method therefore provides some size control and enables the production of nickel nanoparticles without the use of surfactants. The pure nickel nanoparticles can be easily isolated using a magnet. - Graphical abstract: A surfactant-free synthesis route to nickel nanoparticles has been successfully transferred to near-critical water conditions reducing synthesis times from hours to seconds. Nickel nanoparticles in the 40-60 nm range have been synthesised from an ammonia stabilised hydrazine complex with the average size controlled by reaction temperature

  13. Optimal Design Solutions for Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POPESCU, M.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents optimal design solutions for reducing the cogging torque of permanent magnets synchronous machines. A first solution proposed in the paper consists in using closed stator slots that determines a nearly isotropic magnetic structure of the stator core, reducing the mutual attraction between permanent magnets and the slotted armature. To avoid complications in the windings manufacture technology the stator slots are closed using wedges made of soft magnetic composite materials. The second solution consists in properly choosing the combination of pole number and stator slots number that typically leads to a winding with fractional number of slots/pole/phase. The proposed measures for cogging torque reduction are analyzed by means of 2D/3D finite element models developed using the professional Flux software package. Numerical results are discussed and compared with experimental ones obtained by testing a PMSM prototype.

  14. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  15. A novel approach to enhancement of surface properties of CdO films by using surfactant: dextrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Bünyamin; Bayansal, Fatih; Yüksel, Mustafa

    2015-12-01

    We studied the effect of an organic surfactant, dextrin, concentration on structural, morphological and optical properties of nanostructured CdO films deposited on glass substrates by using an easy and low-cost SILAR method. Microstructures of the nanostructured CdO films were optimized by adjusting dextrin concentration. XRD, SEM and UV-Vis Spectroscopy were used to study phase structure, surface morphology and optical properties of CdO films. Furthermore, effects of dextrin concentration on the surface roughness characteristics of CdO samples were reported. The results showed that the presence of organic surfactant highly affected the physical properties of CdO nanomaterials.

  16. The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-compound DNAPLs with surfactant solutions. Phase 1: Laboratory and pilot field-scale testing. Phase 2: Solubilization test and partitioning interwell tracer tests. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). The field test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer which is located 20 to 30 meters beneath a vapor degreasing operation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This aquifer has become contaminated with TCE due to leakage of perhaps 40,000 liters of TCE, which has generated a plume of dissolved TCE extending throughout an area of approximately 3 km 2 in the aquifer. Most of the TCE is believed to be present in the overlying lacustrine deposits and in the aquifer itself as a dense, non-aqueous phase liquid, or DNAPL. The objective of the field test was to assess the efficacy of the surfactant for in situ TCE solubilization. Although the test demonstrated that sorbitan monooleate was unsuitable as a solubilizer in this aquifer, the single-well test was demonstrated to be a viable method for the in situ testing of surfactants or cosolvents prior to proceeding to full-scale remediation

  17. Flow Behaviour of Alkali, Surfactant, and Xanthan Solutions Used for Enhanced Oil Recovery Fluidité des solutions d'alcali, de tensio-actif et de xanthane utilisées pour la récupération assistée du pétrole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasr-El-Din H. A.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was conducted to examine the effects of various alkalis, surfactants and brines on the viscosity of dilute aqueous solutions of two xanthan materials containing medium and high pyruvate content, over a wide range of parameters. The effect of alkalis on the flow curves of xanthan solutions depended on alkali type and concentration, shear rate and pyruvate content of xanthan. Strong alkalis caused partial degradation of the xanthan molecules. As a result, a fast and significant reduction in apparent viscosity occurred, especially with the high pyruvate xanthan. This drop was only noticeable at low shear rates. Buffered alkalis were less detrimental to the viscosity of xanthan solutions. Triton X-100 up to 10 wt% had no significant effect on the flow curves of both xanthan materials. Neodol 25-3S caused noticeable changes only in the flow curves of the high pyruvate xanthan. Triton X-100 up to 10 wt% in the presence of alkali had no significant effect on the flow curves of either xanthan material. The addition of anionic surfactants at low concentrations slightly decreased the viscosity of alkali/xanthan solutions. A significant viscosity enhancement was observed at higher surfactant concentrations over a narrow range of alkali concentrations. This behaviour was only observed with anionic surfactants and was due to the formation of surfactant aggregates. The effect of sodium chloride on the apparent viscosity of xanthan solutions depended on polymer concentration and the pyruvate content of xanthan. Only the high pyruvate polymer at high polymer concentrations (= 1 wtO/o showed a dramatic increase in the apparent viscosity upon the addition of sodium chloride. At low polymer concentrations, calcium chloride had a more detrimental effect on the viscosity of the high pyruvate xanthan than sodium chloride. Une étude expérimentale a été effectuée pour examiner les effets de divers alcalis, tensioactifs et saumures sur la

  18. Splash Dynamics of Falling Surfactant-Laden Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Nur; Buitrago, Lewis; Pereyra, Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    Splashing dynamics is a common issue in oil and gas separation technology. In this study, droplet impact of various surfactant concentrations onto solid and liquid surfaces is studied experimentally using a high-speed imaging analysis. Although this area has been widely studied in the past, there is still not a good understanding of the role of surfactant over droplet impact and characterization of resulting splash dynamics. The experiments are conducted using tap water laden with anionic surfactant. The effects of system parameters on a single droplet impingement such as surfactant concentration (no surfactant, below, at and above critical micelle concentration), parent drop diameter (2-5mm), impact velocity and type of impact surface (thin and deep pool) are investigated. Image analysis technique is shown to be an effective technique for identification of coalescence to splashing transition. In addition, daughter droplets size distributions are analyzed qualitatively in the events of splashing. As expected, it is observed that the formation of secondary droplets is affected by the surfactant concentration. A summary of findings will be discussed.

  19. Recovering hydrocarbons with surfactants from lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naae, D.G.; Whittington, L.E.; Ledoux, W.A.; Debons, F.E.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a method of recovering hydrocarbons from an underground hydrocarbon formation penetrated by at least one injection well and at least one production well, which comprises: injecting into the formation through an injection well a surfactant slug comprising about 0.1% to about 10% by weight of surfactants produced from lignin, the surfactants produced by placing lignin in contact with water, converting the lignin into low molecular weight lignin phenols by reducing the lignin in the presence of a reducing agent of carbon monoxide or hydrogen creating a reduction reaction mixture comprising oil soluble lignin phenols, the reduction occurring at a temperature greater than about 200/sup 0/C and a pressure greater than about 100 psi, recovering the oil soluble lignin phenols from the reduction mixture, and converting the lignin phenols into lignin surfactants by a reaction selected from the group consisting of alkoxylation, sulfonation, sulfation, aklylation, sulfomethylation, and alkoxysulfation; injecting into the formation through the injection well a drive fluid to push the surfactant slug towards a production well; and recovering hydrocarbons at the production well.

  20. Optimization of Surfactant Mixtures and Their Interfacial Behavior for Advanced Oil Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somasundaran, Prof. P.

    2001-02-27

    The goal of this report is to develop improved extraction processes to mobilize and produce the oil left untapped using conventional techniques. Current chemical schemes for recovering the residual oil have been in general less than satisfactory. High cost of the processes as well as significant loss of chemicals by adsorption on reservoir materials and precipitation has limited the utility of chemical-flooding operations. There is a need to develop cost-effective, improved reagent schemes to increase recovery from domestic oil reservoirs. The goal of the report was to develop and evaluate novel mixtures of surfactants for improved oil recovery.

  1. Time-dependent changes in pulmonary surfactant function and composition in acute respiratory distress syndrome due to pneumonia or aspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuchenbuch Tim

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alterations to pulmonary surfactant composition have been encountered in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS. However, only few data are available regarding the time-course and duration of surfactant changes in ARDS patients, although this information may largely influence the optimum design of clinical trials addressing surfactant replacement therapy. We therefore examined the time-course of surfactant changes in 15 patients with direct ARDS (pneumonia, aspiration over the first 8 days after onset of mechanical ventilation. Methods Three consecutive bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL were performed shortly after intubation (T0, and four days (T1 and eight days (T2 after intubation. Fifteen healthy volunteers served as controls. Phospholipid-to-protein ratio in BAL fluids, phospholipid class profiles, phosphatidylcholine (PC molecular species, surfactant proteins (SP-A, -B, -C, -D, and relative content and surface tension properties of large surfactant aggregates (LA were assessed. Results At T0, a severe and highly significant reduction in SP-A, SP-B and SP-C, the LA fraction, PC and phosphatidylglycerol (PG percentages, and dipalmitoylation of PC (DPPC was encountered. Surface activity of the LA fraction was greatly impaired. Over time, significant improvements were encountered especially in view of LA content, DPPC, PG and SP-A, but minimum surface tension of LA was not fully restored (15 mN/m at T2. A highly significant correlation was observed between PaO2/FiO2 and minimum surface tension (r = -0.83; p Conclusion We concluded that a profound impairment of pulmonary surfactant composition and function occurs in the very early stage of the disease and only gradually resolves over time. These observations may explain why former surfactant replacement studies with a short treatment duration failed to improve outcome and may help to establish optimal composition and duration of surfactant administration in future

  2. Polarization-dependent NEXAFS study of adsorption of long-chain surfactants on mechanically milled iron powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syugaev, A.V., E-mail: syual@mail.ru; Maratkanova, A.N.

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Plate-like particles modified with surfactant molecules were obtained under high-energy ball milling. • Adsorption layers were studied with polarization-dependent NEXAFS spectroscopy. • For the first time, arrangement of surfactants molecules on the powdered metal surface has been determined. • Tails of surfactant molecules (C-F/C-H) are shown to be oriented perpendicular to the particle surface. • Arrangement of carboxylate groups on the particle surfaces is discussed. - Abstract: In this work we have demonstrated the possibility of using the polarization-dependent NEXAFS spectra to study the structure of organic layers at the surface of powdered materials with plate-like shaped particles. The polarization dependence of the NEXAFS spectra may be easily obtained by just changing the angle between the X-ray beam direction and the substrate onto which the powder particles are set. For the first time, we have carried out a detailed study of the surfactant layers (n-perfluorononanoic and stearic acid), which are formed at the surface of iron plate-like particles under mechanical milling of iron powder with an addition of corresponding surfactants. The surfactant molecules are predominantly oriented perpendicular to the surface of the mechanically milled particles. Such orientation is similar to the arrangement of the molecules in the layers formed under equilibrium conditions, e.g. deposition from solutions. The changes in the chemical environment occurring in the molecule tails (defluorination or dehydrogenation) under mechanochemical treatment, do not result in a significant change in the molecular orientation and disordering of the adsorbed layer.

  3. A New Methodology to Select the Preferred Solutions from the Pareto-optimal Set: Application to Polymer Extrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Jose C.; Gaspar-Cunha, Antonio; Fonseca, Carlos M.

    2007-01-01

    Most of the real world optimization problems involve multiple, usually conflicting, optimization criteria. Generating Pareto optimal solutions plays an important role in multi-objective optimization, and the problem is considered to be solved when the Pareto optimal set is found, i.e., the set of non-dominated solutions. Multi-Objective Evolutionary Algorithms based on the principle of Pareto optimality are designed to produce the complete set of non-dominated solutions. However, this is not allays enough since the aim is not only to know the Pareto set but, also, to obtain one solution from this Pareto set. Thus, the definition of a methodology able to select a single solution from the set of non-dominated solutions (or a region of the Pareto frontier), and taking into account the preferences of a Decision Maker (DM), is necessary. A different method, based on a weighted stress function, is proposed. It is able to integrate the user's preferences in order to find the best region of the Pareto frontier accordingly with these preferences. This method was tested on some benchmark test problems, with two and three criteria, and on a polymer extrusion problem. This methodology is able to select efficiently the best Pareto-frontier region for the specified relative importance of the criteria

  4. Catalytic Oxidation of Mustard Simulants in Basic Solution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richardson, David

    2002-01-01

    .... Variation of bicarbonate source and the cosolvent can allow optimization of substrate solubility and oxidation rates for applications in chemical warfare agent decontamination, Use of surfactants...

  5. Physicochemical characteristics of PFC surfactants for dry decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Jin; Lee, Chi Woo [Korea University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    Even the trace amount of the used nuclear fuels of high radioactivity are hazardous to the earth and humans. Perfluorocarbons and perfluorocarbon surfactants are emerging to be efficient chemicals in the dry decontamination process of the used fuels of high radioactivity. The theme was undertaken to increase the knowledge on perfluorocarbon surfactants to develop the perfluorocarbon system in the dry decontamination process in Korea. Several cationic and anionic pfc surfactants were synthesized. Effects of pfc surfactants on electrochemical etching of silicon were investigated to form porous silicons. Forces were measured between silicon surfaces and AFM tip in the absence and presence of pfc surfactants. 7 refs., 10 figs. (Author)

  6. Tunable, antibacterial activity of silicone polyether surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Madiha F; Zepeda-Velazquez, Laura; Brook, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Silicone surfactants are used in a variety of applications, however, limited data is available on the relationship between surfactant structure and biological activity. A series of seven nonionic, silicone polyether surfactants with known structures was tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli BL21. The compounds varied in their hydrophobic head, comprised of branched silicone structures with 3-10 siloxane linkages and, in two cases, phenyl substitution, and hydrophilic tail of 8-44 poly(ethylene glycol) units. The surfactants were tested at three concentrations: below, at, and above their Critical Micelle Concentrations (CMC) against 5 concentrations of E. coli BL21 in a three-step assay comprised of a 14-24h turbidometric screen, a live-dead stain and viable colony counts. The bacterial concentration had little effect on antibacterial activity. For most of the surfactants, antibacterial activity was higher at concentrations above the CMC. Surfactants with smaller silicone head groups had as much as 4 times the bioactivity of surfactants with larger groups, with the smallest hydrophobe exhibiting potency equivalent to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Smaller PEG chains were similarly associated with higher potency. These data link lower micelle stability and enhanced permeability of smaller silicone head groups to antibacterial activity. The results demonstrate that simple manipulation of nonionic silicone polyether structure leads to significant changes in antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimal Solution for VLSI Physical Design Automation Using Hybrid Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Hameem Shanavas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Optimization of VLSI Physical Design, area minimization and interconnect length minimization is an important objective in physical design automation of very large scale integration chips. The objective of minimizing the area and interconnect length would scale down the size of integrated chips. To meet the above objective, it is necessary to find an optimal solution for physical design components like partitioning, floorplanning, placement, and routing. This work helps to perform the optimization of the benchmark circuits with the above said components of physical design using hierarchical approach of evolutionary algorithms. The goal of minimizing the delay in partitioning, minimizing the silicon area in floorplanning, minimizing the layout area in placement, minimizing the wirelength in routing has indefinite influence on other criteria like power, clock, speed, cost, and so forth. Hybrid evolutionary algorithm is applied on each of its phases to achieve the objective. Because evolutionary algorithm that includes one or many local search steps within its evolutionary cycles to obtain the minimization of area and interconnect length. This approach combines a hierarchical design like genetic algorithm and simulated annealing to attain the objective. This hybrid approach can quickly produce optimal solutions for the popular benchmarks.

  8. Surfactant assisted pulsed two-phase electromembrane extraction followed by GC analysis for quantification of basic drugs in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi, Pegah; Davarani, Saied Saeed Hosseiny; Moazami, Hamid Reza; Nojavan, Saeed

    2016-01-05

    In this work, a simple and efficient surfactant assisted pulsed two-phase electromembrane extraction (SA-PEME) procedure combined with gas chromatography (GC) has been developed for the determination of alfentanil, sufentanil and methadone in various samples. It has been found that the addition of anionic surfactant causes the accumulation of the cationic analytes at the SLM/solution interface resulting in an easier transfer of the analytes into the organic phase. The method was accomplished with 1-octanol as the acceptor phase and supported liquid membrane (SLM) by means of an 80 V pulsed electrical driving force and the extraction time of 20 min. The model analytes were extracted from 3.0 mL sample solution (pH 4.0) containing 0.02% w/