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Sample records for optimal golf stroke

  1. The Optimal Golf Stroke

    Buchinger, Mikael; Durigen, Susan; Dahl, Johan Rambech

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a preliminary investigation into aspects of the game of golf. A series of models is proposed for the golf stroke, the momentum transfer between club and ball and the flight of the ball.Numerical and asymptotic solutions are presented reproducing many of the features observed in...

  2. Preferential location for arterial dissection presenting as golf-related stroke.

    Choi, M H; Hong, J M; Lee, J S; Shin, D H; Choi, H A; Lee, K

    2014-02-01

    Golf-related stroke has not been systematically reviewed. The purpose of our study was to describe in detail this particular stroke syndrome. Seven patients were analyzed at a university hospital and 7 patients were reviewed from MEDLINE literature. General demographics, symptom onset, neurologic signs, radiologic findings, and outcome were investigated. A total of 14 patients including 7 patients from the MEDLINE search were analyzed; all were men, with a mean age of 46.9 ± 12.8 years. Symptom onset was classified as during the golf swing (n = 9), unknown (n = 3), and after playing golf (n = 2). Most patients (n = 12) showed involvement of the vertebral artery and 2 patients showed involvement of the internal carotid artery (P = .008). Nine dissections were found on the right side, 3 on the left side, and 2 were bilateral (P = .046). Twelve patients had extracranial involvement and 2 patients had intracranial involvement (P = .008). Seven patients returned to normal, 5 returned to independence, 1 had unknown status, and 1 died. The anatomic preference of golf-related craniocervical arterial dissection is associated with the extracranial and vertebrobasilar system with a right-sided tendency as the result of stereotypical rotational movement during a golf swing.

  3. The effects of golf training in patients with stroke: a pilot study.

    Schachten, Tobias; Jansen, Petra

    2015-05-01

    Stroke is the most common neurological disease and the primary cause of lifelong disability in industrialized countries. Because of this it is important to investigate any kind of successful therapy. From the 24 recruited stroke patients who were between 23 and 72 years old, 14 patients were separated either in a golf training group (EG), or a social communication meeting (CG). Both groups met for one hour sessions, twice a week, for ten weeks. All participants completed assessment tests before and after the experimental period: cognitive tests measuring attention (Go/No-Go task), visual-spatial memory (Block-Tapping test) and mental rotation performance (MRT); a balance test (Berg Balance Scale), and an emotional well-being test (CES-D-Scale). The results show that both groups improved in the CES Scale, the block-tapping test and the balance test. In addition, stroke patients who received a golf training showed a significant improvement in the MRT comparing to the control group (CG). It is indicated that golf training can improve visual imagery ability in stroke patients, even late after stroke.

  4. Kinetic constrained optimization of the golf swing hub path.

    Nesbit, Steven M; McGinnis, Ryan S

    2014-12-01

    This study details an optimization of the golf swing, where the hand path and club angular trajectories are manipulated. The optimization goal was to maximize club head velocity at impact within the interaction kinetic limitations (force, torque, work, and power) of the golfer as determined through the analysis of a typical swing using a two-dimensional dynamic model. The study was applied to four subjects with diverse swing capabilities and styles. It was determined that it is possible for all subjects to increase their club head velocity at impact within their respective kinetic limitations through combined modifications to their respective hand path and club angular trajectories. The manner of the modifications, the degree of velocity improvement, the amount of kinetic reduction, and the associated kinetic limitation quantities were subject dependent. By artificially minimizing selected kinetic inputs within the optimization algorithm, it was possible to identify swing trajectory characteristics that indicated relative kinetic weaknesses of a subject. Practical implications are offered based upon the findings of the study. Key PointsThe hand path trajectory is an important characteristic of the golf swing and greatly affects club head velocity and golfer/club energy transfer.It is possible to increase the energy transfer from the golfer to the club by modifying the hand path and swing trajectories without increasing the kinetic output demands on the golfer.It is possible to identify relative kinetic output strengths and weakness of a golfer through assessment of the hand path and swing trajectories.Increasing any one of the kinetic outputs of the golfer can potentially increase the club head velocity at impact.The hand path trajectory has important influences over the club swing trajectory.

  5. Kinetic Constrained Optimization of the Golf Swing Hub Path

    Steven M. Nesbit

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study details an optimization of the golf swing, where the hand path and club angular trajectories are manipulated. The optimization goal was to maximize club head velocity at impact within the interaction kinetic limitations (force, torque, work, and power of the golfer as determined through the analysis of a typical swing using a two-dimensional dynamic model. The study was applied to four subjects with diverse swing capabilities and styles. It was determined that it is possible for all subjects to increase their club head velocity at impact within their respective kinetic limitations through combined modifications to their respective hand path and club angular trajectories. The manner of the modifications, the degree of velocity improvement, the amount of kinetic reduction, and the associated kinetic limitation quantities were subject dependent. By artificially minimizing selected kinetic inputs within the optimization algorithm, it was possible to identify swing trajectory characteristics that indicated relative kinetic weaknesses of a subject. Practical implications are offered based upon the findings of the study.

  6. Effect of Putting Grip on Eye and Head Movements During the Golf Putting Stroke

    George K. Hung

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to determine the effect of three different putting grips (conventional, cross-hand, and one-handed on variations in eye and head movements during the putting stroke. Seven volunteer novice players, ranging in age from 21 to 22 years, participated in the study. During each experimental session, the subject stood on a specially designed platform covered with artificial turf and putted golf balls towards a standard golf hole. The three different types of grips were tested at two distances: 3 and 9 ft. For each condition, 20 putts were attempted. For each putt, data were recorded over a 3-s interval at a sampling rate of 100 Hz. Eye movements were recorded using a helmet-mounted eye movement monitor. Head rotation about an imaginary axis through the top of the head and its center-of-rotation was measured by means of a potentiometer mounted on a fixed frame and coupled to the helmet. Putter-head motion was measured using a linear array of infrared phototransistors embedded in the platform. The standard deviation (STD, relative to the initial level was calculated for eye and head movements over the duration of the putt (i.e., from the beginning of the backstroke, through the forward stroke, to impact. The averaged STD for the attempted putts was calculated for each subject. Then, the averaged STDs and other data for the seven subjects were statistically compared across the three grip conditions. The STD of eye movements were greater (p < 0.1 for conventional than cross-hand (9 ft and one-handed (3 and 9 ft grips. Also, the STD of head movements were greater (p < 0.1; 3 ft for conventional than cross-hand and one-handed grips. Vestibulo-ocular responses associated with head rotations could be observed in many 9 ft and some 3 ft putts. The duration of the putt was significantly longer (p < 0.05; 3 and 9 ft for the one-handed than conventional and cross-hand grips. Finally, performance, or percentage putts made, was

  7. Golf Injuries

    ... Our Newsletter Donate Blog Skip breadcrumb navigation Preventing Golf Injuries Golf looks like an easy game to ... WHAT TYPES OF INJURIES ARE MOST COMMON IN GOLF? Acute injuries are usually the result of a ...

  8. Different centre of pressure patterns within the golf stroke II: group-based analysis.

    Ball, K A; Best, R J

    2007-05-01

    Although the golf coaching literature stresses the importance of weight transfer during the swing, research has been conflicting or lacking statistical support. A potential problem with previous studies is that no attempt was made to account for different movement strategies in the golf swing. This study evaluated the relationship between centre of pressure measures and club head velocity within two previously identified swing styles, the "Front Foot" and "Reverse" styles. Thirty-nine Front Foot golfers and 19 Reverse golfers performed swings with a driver while standing on two force plates. From the force plate data, centre of pressure displacement, velocity, range, and timing parameters were calculated. Correlation and regression analysis indicated that a larger range of centre of pressure and a more rapid centre of pressure movement in the downswing was associated with a larger club head velocity at ball contact for the Front Foot group. For the Reverse golfers, positioning the centre of pressure further from the back foot at late backswing and a more rapid centre of pressure transfer towards the back foot at ball contact was associated with a larger club head velocity at ball contact. This study has highlighted the importance of identifying different movement strategies before evaluating performance measures, as different parameters were found to be important for the Front Foot and Reverse styles.

  9. Golf Club

    Golf Club

    2011-01-01

    Golf Initiation CERN Golf Club invites you to a golf initiation session in collaboration with the Albatross Golf Academy. Where: Les Serves Golf, St Genis (situated behind the CERN football and rugby pitches) When: 30-July 2011 at 16:00 On offer: An experienced golf professional will take you through the basics of hitting golf balls on the practice area. As part of a group of 3 players and accompanied by an experienced CERN golf club member you will play a round of golf on the small 5 hole practice course enabling you to get a true experience of the sport. You will finish with the a drink in the 19th hole and share your day’s experience with other participants and CERN golf club members. Inscriptions by email are now open and should be sent to Mats.Wilhelmsson@cern.ch. There are a limited number of places and participants will be welcomed on a first come first served basis. The cost of the session will be Euro15 and equipment and golf balls will be provided. Training or jogging shoes...

  10. Golf Club

    CERN Golf Club

    2017-01-01

    Would you like to learn a new sport and meet new people? The CERN Golf Club organises golf lessons for beginners starting in August or September. The lesson series consist of 6 lessons of 1h30 each week, in a group of 6 people and given by the instructor Cedric Steinmetz at the Jiva Hill golf course in Crozet: http://www.jivahillgolf.com The cost for the golf lessons is 40 euros for CERN employees or family members plus the golf club membership fee of 30 CHF. If you are interested in participating in these lessons or need more details, please contact us by email at: club-golf-committee@cern.ch

  11. Golf Ball

    1998-01-01

    The Ultra 500 Series golf balls, introduced in 1995 by Wilson Sporting Goods Company, has 500 dimples arranged in a pattern of 60 spherical triangles. The design employs NASA's aerodynamics technology analysis of air loads of the tank and Shuttle orbiter that was performed under the Space Shuttle External Tank program. According to Wilson, this technology provides 'the most symmetrical ball surface available, sustaining initial velocity longer and producing the most stable ball flight for unmatched accuracy and distance.' The dimples are in three sizes, shapes and depths mathematically positioned for the best effect. The selection of dimples and their placement optimizes the interaction of opposing forces of lift and drag. Large dimples reduce air drag, enhance lift, and maintain spin for distance. Small dimples prevent excessive lift that destabilizes the ball flight and the medium size dimples blend the other two.

  12. The physics of golf

    Jorgensen, Theodore P

    1999-01-01

    Improve your golf game by learning the underlying fundamentals of the golf swing in this acclaimed, unique contribution to the sport Finally, you’ll understand why shortening your backswing doesn’t substantially decrease clubhead velocity what components contribute to the optimal swing and what variations are acceptable how and why properly shifting your weight adds to distance why a golf ball behaves and spins as it does and much more Written by a physicist after some twenty years of research, Physics of Golf is the only book devoted exclusively to explaining the science behind a successful golf game Technical appendices offer details for the so inclined The revised and expanded second now offers you -new material on high-tech club designs -a complete new chapter on short putts -additional applications of physics to the problems every player faces "Jorgensen tells golfers what they ought to be doing and why, the correct technique according to the principles of physics" -Golf Weekly "…gives new insights...

  13. Video Golf

    1995-01-01

    George Nauck of ENCORE!!! invented and markets the Advanced Range Performance (ARPM) Video Golf System for measuring the result of a golf swing. After Nauck requested their assistance, Marshall Space Flight Center scientists suggested video and image processing/computing technology, and provided leads on commercial companies that dealt with the pertinent technologies. Nauck contracted with Applied Research Inc. to develop a prototype. The system employs an elevated camera, which sits behind the tee and follows the flight of the ball down range, catching the point of impact and subsequent roll. Instant replay of the video on a PC monitor at the tee allows measurement of the carry and roll. The unit measures distance and deviation from the target line, as well as distance from the target when one is selected. The information serves as an immediate basis for making adjustments or as a record of skill level progress for golfers.

  14. Akademi Golf di Surabaya

    Santoso, Indra Purnama

    2013-01-01

    Golf adalah salah satu olahraga yang mulaipopular pada tahun-tahun ini. Popularitasnya makinmeningkat yang berdampak pada meningkatnya jumlahpemain golf padahal fasilitas yang mewadahinya sangatminim. Dalam Perancangan Akademi Golf di Surabaya,diharapkan dapat menambah fasilitas khususnya dalambidang pendidikan mengingat penggunanya mulaibanyak pada kaum muda. Fasilitas-fasilitas yangdirencanakan secara keseluruhan berhubungan denganpendidikan golf dimana juga mempertahankan kondisieksisting ...

  15. Golf club

    Golf club

    2016-01-01

    The CERN Golf Club Members are herewith invited to the: Annual General Meeting Which takes place Wednesday evening the 10th February 2016 at 18 h 00 in the Conference room in building 13-2-005. A committee member will be at CERN gate B, 17 h 50 and accompany “external” CGC members to the conference room. Agenda: President’s report Treasurer’s report Election of the Committee for 2016 Election of  Auditors Draft schedule for 2016 CGC-competitions and other events “Corpo” report Report from lessons organized by CGC    Proposals and any other business Please forward any proposals (to any of the committee members) you have, including candidature for the 2016 committee minimum three days in advance before the meeting. Welcome !

  16. Determining Optimal Post-Stroke Exercise (DOSE)

    2018-02-13

    Cerebrovascular Accident; Stroke; Cerebral Infarction; Brain Infarction; Brain Ischemia; Cerebrovascular Disorders; Brain Diseases; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Vascular Diseases

  17. Play Golf with the CERN Golf Club

    Golf Club

    2014-01-01

    The snow has gone, the grass is getting greener and the golf courses open up to hibernating golfers; The CERN golf club committee has been busy organising the program for the coming golf season, with many attractive outings to nearby courses. Are you new to CERN? And you play golf? or would like to learn ? then join us, playing golf and having fun. You can find all you need to know on our web-page; don’t hesitate to contact any of the committee members who will answer your questions.  Take a look at the provisional schedule below, sign-up and take part!  Besides these regular outings, as a CERN Golf Club member, you have also the opportunity to play in our “Corpo” team, in the competitions organised by the Golf Entreprise Rhone-Alpes. You can also play in our match play-tournament, and for new to the game, we organise some group–lessons with a local Pro. See:  http://club-golf.web.cern.ch/club-golf/index.php

  18. Golf Club

    Golf Club

    2012-01-01

      The CERN Golf Club Members are herewith invited to the Annual General Meeting which takes place Wednesday evening the 8th February at 18 h 00 in the Conference room in bldg 13-2-005. A committee member will be at CERN gate B, 17h50 and accompany “external” CGC members to the conference room. Agenda 1. President’s report 2. Treasurer’s report 3. Election of the Committee for 2012 4. Election of  Auditors 5. Draft schedule for 2012 CGC  competitions and other events 6. “Corpo” report     7. Proposals and any other business Please forward any proposals (to any of the committee members) you have, including candidature for the 2012 committee minimum three days in advance before the meeting. After the meeting we will book a table at the restaurant "Red Café", St-Genis. Please confirm to Alasdair Ross (Alasdair.Ross@cern.ch) if you would like to eat so th...

  19. Golf Club

    Golf Club

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Golf Club Members are herewith invited to the: Annual General Meeting Which takes place Wednesday evening the 6th February 2013 at 18h00 in the Conference room in building 13-2-005. A committee member will be at CERN gate B, 17h50 and accompany “external” CGC members to the conference room. Agenda: President’s report Treasurer’s report Election of the Committee for 2013 Election of  Auditors Draft schedule for 2013 CGC-competitions and other events “Corpo” report     Proposals and any other business Please forward any proposals (to any of the committee members) you have, including candidature for the 2013 committee minimum three days in advance before the meeting. After the meeting we will book a table at the restaurant "Red Café", St. Genis. Please confirm to Alasdair Ross (Alasdair.Ross@cern.ch) if you would like to eat so that he can make the res...

  20. [Golf handicap score is a suitable scale for monitoring rehabilitation after apoplexia cerebri].

    Jensen, Per; Meden, Per; Knudsen, Lars V; Knudsen, G M; Thomsen, Carsten; Feng, Ling; Pinborg, Lars H

    2015-12-21

    A 67-year-old male was examined nine, 35 and 135 days after stroke using conventional stroke scales, 18 holes of golf, functional MRI (fist closures) and translocator protein imaging of microglial function in the brain using single photon emission computed tomography. The data showed that the over 100-year-old golf handicap scale is better suited for quantifying recovery after stroke than conventional stroke assessment scales, which are prone to ceiling effect. We suggest that rating with golf handicap should be used more widely in stroke research, and we find it tremendously important that these new findings are published before Christmas.

  1. Performance processes within affect-related performance zones: a multi-modal investigation of golf performance.

    van der Lei, Harry; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2012-12-01

    Individual affect-related performance zones (IAPZs) method utilizing Kamata et al. (J Sport Exerc Psychol 24:189-208, 2002) probabilistic model of determining the individual zone of optimal functioning was utilized as idiosyncratic affective patterns during golf performance. To do so, three male golfers of a varsity golf team were observed during three rounds of golf competition. The investigation implemented a multi-modal assessment approach in which the probabilistic relationship between affective states and both, performance process and performance outcome, measures were determined. More specifically, introspective (i.e., verbal reports) and objective (heart rate and respiration rate) measures of arousal were incorporated to examine the relationships between arousal states and both, process components (i.e., routine consistency, timing), and outcome scores related to golf performance. Results revealed distinguishable and idiosyncratic IAPZs associated with physiological and introspective measures for each golfer. The associations between the IAPZs and decision-making or swing/stroke execution were strong and unique for each golfer. Results are elaborated using cognitive and affect-related concepts, and applications for practitioners are provided.

  2. [Shoulder injuries in golf].

    Liem, D; Gosheger, G; Schmidt, C

    2014-03-01

    Due to its growing popularity golf has now come into the focus of orthopedic sports medicine. With a wide range of age groups and playing levels, orthopedic surgeons will encounter a wide range of musculoskeletal problems which are usually the result of overuse rather than trauma. The shoulder joint plays an important role in the golf swing whereby not only the muscles around the glenohumeral joint but also the scapula stabilizing muscles are extremely important for an effective golf swing. Golf is strictly not considered to be an overhead sport; however, the extreme peak positions of the golf swing involve placing the shoulder joint in maximum abduction and adduction positions which can provoke impingement, lesions of the pulley system or even a special form of posterior shoulder instability. Even after complex shoulder operations, such as rotator cuff repair or shoulder arthroplasty, a return to the golf course at nearly the same level of play can be expected.

  3. Upper extremity golf injuries.

    Cohn, Michael A; Lee, Steven K; Strauss, Eric J

    2013-01-01

    Golf is a global sport enjoyed by an estimated 60 million people around the world. Despite the common misconception that the risk of injury during the play of golf is minimal, golfers are subject to a myriad of potential pathologies. While the majority of injuries in golf are attributable to overuse, acute traumatic injuries can also occur. As the body's direct link to the golf club, the upper extremities are especially prone to injury. A thorough appreciation of the risk factors and patterns of injury will afford accurate diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of further injury.

  4. [Optimized logistics in the prehospital management of acute stroke].

    Luiz, T; Moosmann, A; Koch, C; Behrens, S; Daffertshofer, M; Ellinger, K

    2001-12-01

    Current management of acute stroke is characterised by an aggressive approach including specific therapy i. e. reperfusion therapy. However currently stroke patients often arrive too late in hospitals offering adequate treatment. Therefore optimized logistics play a predominant role in modern stroke management. 1. Does teaching of EMS staff and the public result in reduced prehospital latencies 2. Will EMS personnel be able to effectively screen patients potentially suitable for thrombolysis? During a six week-period all EMS patients presenting with possible signs of an acute stroke were prospectively registered (period 1). Data of interest were age, mode of primary contact, prehospital latencies, mode of transportation, destination and final diagnosis. Next an algorithm was established allowing EMS personnel to transfer patients with an assumed stroke to the best suitable hospital. Teaching comprised clinical signs, indication of CT scanning, pathophysiology, specific therapeutic options (thrombolysis), and criteria to identify patients suitable for thrombolysis. In a second step the public was continuously taught about stroke symptoms and the necessity to instantly seek EMS assistance. After 12 months data were compared to baseline (period 2). (period 2 vs. Period 1): Rate of patients transferred to a stroke center: 60 % vs. 54 %; rate of those transported to hospitals not offering CT scans: 17 % vs. 26 % (p < 0.05). Percentage of patients primarily contacting the EMS system: 33 % vs. 24 %. Median interval between onset of symptoms and emergency call: 54 vs. 263 minutes Median interval between the emergency call and arrival at the emergency department: 44 vs. 58 minutes (p < 0.01). Rate of patients admitted with a diagnosis other than stroke: 18 % vs. 25 % (n. s.). Median interval between onset of symptoms and hospital admission: 140 vs. 368 minutes (p < 0.001). Median age: 69 vs. 75 years (p < 0.01). This study demonstrates the efficacy of educational efforts in

  5. Playing Golf Is Elementary

    Goldman, Jill S.; Pfluge, Kevin F.

    2010-01-01

    Golf is a lifelong activity that people of all ages can enjoy if they experience success and have fun. Early involvement in the sport facilitates the development of the ability to strike an object with an implement. Striking with implements can be challenging for young children and teachers, but golf can be taught in all elementary school settings…

  6. Disc Golf: Teaching a Lifetime Activity

    Eastham, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Disc golf is a lifetime activity that can be enjoyed by students of varying skill levels and abilities. Disc golf follows the principles of ball golf but is generally easier for students to play and enjoy success. The object of disc golf is similar to ball golf and involves throwing a disc from the teeing area to the target in as few throws as…

  7. Marketing of cocrete golf course

    Krausová, Lenka

    2011-01-01

    This thesis deals with the marketing of golf services. The main goal is to propose a marketing strategy for concrete golf course. Prior to its implementation were needed to work out individual analysis - SWOT analysis, competitor analysis and survey of customer satisfaction. Furthermore, the identified individual operating costs and revenues of golf course. When creating marketing strategy was put stress on the Internet. It proposes a new form and structure of the website, Facebook profile an...

  8. Golf cart prototype development and navigation simulation using ROS and Gazebo

    Shimchik Ilya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents our approach to development of an autonomous golf cart, which will navigate in inaccessible by regular vehicles private areas. For this purpose, we have built a virtual golf course terrain and golf cart model in Gazebo, selected and modernized ROS-based packages in order to use them with Ackermann steering vehicle simulation. To verify our simulation and algorithms, we navigated the golf cart model from one golf hole to another within a virtual 3D golf course. For the real world algorithms’ verification, we developed a small-size vehicle prototype based on Traxxas radio-controlled car model, which is equipped with an on-board controller and sensors. The autonomous navigation of Traxxas-based vehicle prototype has been tested in indoor environment, where it utilized sensory data about environment and vehicle states, and performed localization, optimal trajectory computation and dynamic obstacles’ recognition with adjusting the route in real time.

  9. Cern Golf Club

    Cern Golf Club

    2014-01-01

      The Cern Golf Club   Members are here with invited to the: Annual General Meeting which takes place Wednesday evening the 5th February 2014 at 18h00 in the Conference room in bldg 13-2-005. A committee member will be at CERN gate B, 17h50 and accompany “external” CGC members to the conference room. Agenda: 1. President’s report 2. Treasurer’s report 3. Election of the Committee for 2014 4. Election of  Auditors 5. Draft schedule for 2014 CGC-competitions and other events 6. “Corpo” report    7. Proposals and any other business Please forward any proposals (to any of the committee members) you have, including candidature for the 2014 committee minimum three days in advance before the meeting.      Cern Golf Club   Les membres de club de golf de CERN sont invités à l’Assemblée Géné...

  10. The role of physiology in the development of golf performance.

    Smith, Mark F

    2010-08-01

    The attainment of consistent high performance in golf requires effective physical conditioning that is carefully designed and monitored in accordance with the on-course demands the player will encounter. Appreciating the role that physiology plays in the attainment of consistent performance, and how a player's physicality can inhibit performance progression, supports the notion that the application of physiology is fundamental for any player wishing to excel in golf. With cardiorespiratory, metabolic, hormonal, musculoskeletal and nutritional demands acting on the golfer within and between rounds, effective physical screening of a player will ensure physiological and anatomical deficiencies that may influence performance are highlighted. The application of appropriate golf-specific assessment methods will ensure that physical attributes that have a direct effect on golf performance can be measured reliably and accurately. With the physical development of golf performance being achieved through a process of conditioning with the purpose of inducing changes in structural and metabolic functions, training must focus on foundation whole-body fitness and golf-specific functional strength and flexibility activities. For long-term player improvement to be effective, comprehensive monitoring will ensure the player reaches an optimal physical state at predetermined times in the competitive season. Through continual assessment of a player's physical attributes, training effectiveness and suitability, and the associated adaptive responses, key physical factors that may impact most on performance success can be determined.

  11. Optimal Scoring Methods of Hand-Strength Tests in Patients with Stroke

    Huang, Sheau-Ling; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Lin, Jau-Hong; Chen, Hui-Mei

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal scoring methods for measuring strength of the more-affected hand in patients with stroke by examining the effect of reducing measurement errors. Three hand-strength tests of grip, palmar pinch, and lateral pinch were administered at two sessions in 56 patients with stroke. Five scoring methods…

  12. Cost management of golf courses

    Černický, Marek

    2010-01-01

    The thesis focuses on costs incurred during the golf course construction and also on operating costs. Types of these costs and options of cost cutting are described. The final part of the thesis analyzes and models usage yield and capacity of golf courses.

  13. Golf: A Game of Inclusion

    Dempsey, Dana

    2009-01-01

    Golf has become a popular sport for kids throughout the world; however, many do not realize that it is also a sport that offers benefits to children with physical challenges. Golf can be used for recreational purposes and as a motivational tool for rehabilitation. These two principles serve as the foundation upon which Texas Scottish Rite Hospital…

  14. The science of golf

    Wesson, John

    2009-01-01

    This book gives a scientific account of all aspects of the game of golf and answers the questions which occur to all who play the game. The mechanics of the swing and the impact of the club on the ball are explained. Together these decide the range of the ball - which is shown to be the most important factor for success. The aerodynamics of the ball's flight has several surprises, including the effects of dimples and spin. Understanding these effects allows a calculation of the ball's flight and explains how the range depends on the clubhead speed and the characteristics of the club. Putting is analyzed to find the optimum strategy and to understand how winds, slopes, and mud affect the run of the ball. Handicaps are perhaps the most discussed topic in golf and the book examines the handicaps system to identify their consequences in matches and competitions, with results which will surprise many players. The famous question - "what is the probability of a hole-in-one?" is discussed and a neat way of answering...

  15. Stroke

    ... doctor Preventing falls Stroke - discharge Swallowing problems Images Brain Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the left artery Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the right artery Stroke Brainstem function Cerebellum - function Circle of Willis Left cerebral hemisphere - ...

  16. Some applications of mathematics in golf.

    Otto, S R

    2017-08-01

    At its core, like many other sports, golf is a game of integers. The minimization of the number of strokes played is generally what determines the winner, whether each of these are associated with the shortest of putts or the longest of drives. The outcomes of these shots are influenced by very slight changes, but hopefully in a deterministic sense. Understanding the mechanics of golf necessitates the development of models and this is coupled more often than not to the use of statistics. In essence, the individual aspects of the sport can be modelled adequately via fairly simplistic models, but the presence of a human at one end of the kinematic chain has a significant impact on the variability of the entire process. In this paper, we will review some of the ways that mathematics has been used to develop the understanding of the physical processes involved in the sport, including some of the analysis which is exploited within the Equipment Rules. We will also discuss some of the future challenges.

  17. The Importance of Assessing Nutritional Status to Ensure Optimal Recovery during the Chronic Phase of Stroke.

    Serra, Monica C

    2018-01-01

    Despite evidence that many of the consequences of stroke that hinder recovery (i.e., obesity, muscle atrophy, and functional declines) have nutritionally modifiable behavior components, little attention has been focused on the significance of nutrition beyond the acute phase of stroke. This literature review summarizes the evidence for and against the influence of nutrition on optimal recovery and rehabilitation in chronic (>6 months) stroke. The literature, which is mainly limited to cross-sectional studies, suggests that a suboptimal nutritional status, including an excess caloric intake, reduced protein intake, and micronutrient deficiencies, particularly the B-vitamins, vitamin D, and omega 3 fatty acids, may have deleterious effects on metabolic, physical, and psychological functioning in chronic stroke survivors. Careful evaluation of dietary intake, especially among those with eating disabilities and preexisting malnutrition, may aid in the identification of individuals at increased nutritional risk through which early intervention may benefit recovery and rehabilitation and prevent further complications after stroke.

  18. Optimism, well-being, depressive symptoms, and perceived physical health: a study among Stroke survivors.

    Shifren, Kim; Anzaldi, Kristen

    2018-01-01

    The investigation of the relation of positive personality characteristics to mental and physical health among Stroke survivors has been a neglected area of research. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between optimism, well-being, depressive symptoms, and perceived physical health among Stroke survivors. It was hypothesized that Stroke survivors' optimism would explain variance in their physical health above and beyond the variance explained by demographic variables, diagnostic variables, and mental health. One hundred seventy-six Stroke survivors (97 females, 79 males) completed the Revised Life Orientation Test, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, two items on perceived physical health from the 36-item Short Form of the Medical Outcomes study, and the Identity scale of the Illness Perception Questionnaire. Pearson correlations, hierarchical regression analyses, and the PROCESS approach to determining mediators were used to assess hypothesized relations between variables. Stroke survivors' level of optimism explained additional variance in overall health in regression models controlling for demographic and diagnostic variables, and mental health. Analyses revealed that optimism played a partial mediator role between mental health (well-being, depressive symptoms and total score on CES-D) variables and overall health.

  19. The green game: investigating golf management practices

    Bianca de Klerk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, golf is the largest sports-related travel market segment showing tremendous economic growth. Unfortunately, tourism and the so-called ‘green game’ contribute to environmental damage. Golf tourism is a rapidly expanding special interest activity linked to tourism. With a degraded physical environment, a destination may be in danger of losing its original appeal, which may force ‘naturebased’ tourists to move on to other destinations. The private sector, governments and the environment will benefit from responsible and sustainable practices including the management of golf courses. This will ensure that destinations continue to attract tourists for future generations. Therefore, green golf tourism is the only logical option placing the responsibility on golf course management to take a second look at the nature of this game. The study focused on the effects that golf course management might have on the environment and the adaptation methods implemented to reduce environmental damage. The management of George Golf Club and Pinnacle Point, located along the Garden Route, one of South Africa’s prime attractions were included in the study. Results indicated that management did not specifically monitor the impact of the golf course on the environment and did not educate golf tourists about environmental friendly practices on golf courses. Little was also done to motivate golf tourists to demand environmental friendly golf courses.

  20. Analysis of Golf Swing Motion and Applied Loads on the Human Body Using Soft-Golf TM Club

    Kwak, Ki Young; So, Ha Ju; Kim, Sung Hyeon; Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Nam Gyun

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the kinetic effect of Soft-golf TM instrument on the human body structure. To analyze the kinetic effect of Soft-golf TM instrument, Golf swing using Soft-golf TM instrument and regular golf instrument was captured. And then Upper limbs and lumbar joint torques was calculated via computer simulation. Five man participated this study. Subjects performed golf swing using a regular golf and Soft-golf TM instrument. Golf swing motion was captured using three position sensor, active infrared LED maker and force plate. Golf swing model was generated and simulated using ADAMS/LifeMOD program. As a results, joint torque during Soft-golf swing were lower than regular golf swing. Thus soft-golf swing have joint load lower than regular golf swing and contribute to reduce joint injury

  1. Optimal control of the power adiabatic stroke of an optomechanical heat engine.

    Bathaee, M; Bahrampour, A R

    2016-08-01

    We consider the power adiabatic stroke of the Otto optomechanical heat engine introduced in Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 150602 (2014)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.112.150602. We derive the maximum extractable work of both optomechanical normal modes in the minimum time while the system experiences quantum friction effects. We show that the total work done by the system in the power adiabatic stroke is optimized by a bang-bang control. The time duration of the power adiabatic stroke is of the order of the inverse of the effective optomechanical-coupling coefficient. The optimal phase-space trajectory of the Otto cycle for both optomechanical normal modes is also obtained.

  2. Effects of Workflow Optimization in Endovascularly Treated Stroke Patients - A Pre-Post Effectiveness Study.

    Schregel, Katharina; Behme, Daniel; Tsogkas, Ioannis; Knauth, Michael; Maier, Ilko; Karch, André; Mikolajczyk, Rafael; Hinz, José; Liman, Jan; Psychogios, Marios-Nikos

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke has become standard of care for patients with large artery occlusion. Early restoration of blood flow is crucial for a good clinical outcome. We introduced an interdisciplinary standard operating procedure (SOP) between neuroradiologists, neurologists and anesthesiologists in order to streamline patient management. This study analyzes the effect of optimized workflow on periprocedural timings and its potential influence on clinical outcome. Data were extracted from a prospectively maintained university hospital stroke database. The standard operating procedure was established in February 2014. Of the 368 acute stroke patients undergoing endovascular treatment between 2008 and 2015, 278 patients were treated prior to and 90 after process optimization. Outcome measures were periprocedural time intervals and residual functional impairment. After implementation of the SOP, time from symptom onset to reperfusion was significantly reduced (median 264 min prior and 211 min after SOP-introduction (IQR 228-32 min and 161-278 min, respectively); Pworkflow optimization as measured with the modified Rankin Scale (common odds ratio (OR) 0.56; 95% CI 0.32-0.98; P = 0.038). Optimization of workflow and interdisciplinary teamwork significantly improved the outcome of patients with acute ischemic stroke due to a significant reduction of in-hospital examination, transportation, imaging and treatment times.

  3. Experience mapping and multifunctional golf course development

    Caspersen, Ole H.; Jensen, Frank Søndergaard; Jensen, Anne Mette Dahl

    This report describes the development of a method for mapping and describing recreational experiences on golf courses. The objective is to provide a planning tool that can facilitate development of a broader multifunctional use of the golf course landscape. The project has produced several results....... The main output is this report, which provides a detailed description of the mapping procedure. This process is illustrated using examples from five test golf courses. In addition to this mapping report, a catalogue has been developed providing hands-on guidance for adapting the method in a golf club...... without the use of a specialist. During the project period, the research team has participated in a number of workshops that included representatives from golf courses, STERF, the Norwegian Golf Federation and the Danish Golf Union. At these workshops, the method was presented and discussed. This has been...

  4. The Importance of Assessing Nutritional Status to Ensure Optimal Recovery during the Chronic Phase of Stroke

    Monica C. Serra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Despite evidence that many of the consequences of stroke that hinder recovery (i.e., obesity, muscle atrophy, and functional declines have nutritionally modifiable behavior components, little attention has been focused on the significance of nutrition beyond the acute phase of stroke. Objective. This literature review summarizes the evidence for and against the influence of nutrition on optimal recovery and rehabilitation in chronic (>6 months stroke. Results. The literature, which is mainly limited to cross-sectional studies, suggests that a suboptimal nutritional status, including an excess caloric intake, reduced protein intake, and micronutrient deficiencies, particularly the B-vitamins, vitamin D, and omega 3 fatty acids, may have deleterious effects on metabolic, physical, and psychological functioning in chronic stroke survivors. Conclusions. Careful evaluation of dietary intake, especially among those with eating disabilities and preexisting malnutrition, may aid in the identification of individuals at increased nutritional risk through which early intervention may benefit recovery and rehabilitation and prevent further complications after stroke.

  5. Golf Injuries to the Hand, Wrist, or Elbow

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Golf Injuries to the Hand, Wrist or Elbow Email ... enjoyment of the game injury free. Types of Golf Injuries Golf injuries can include tendonitis, sprains or ...

  6. Russian Golf Profile with the Perspective of Golf Tourism in South East Asia

    Nikiforova, Tatiana

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to formulate Russian golf profile and evaluate it from the perspective of golf tourism in South East Asian countries concentrating on five countries: Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines and Singapore. The research discovered and analyzed the factors that accelerate and prevent Russian golf players from traveling to South East Asia region with golf and tourism purposes. In the theoretical part of the study the main issue was to describe the current situation...

  7. Simulation and Test of a Fuel Cell Hybrid Golf Cart

    Jingming Liang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper establishes the simulation model of fuel cell hybrid golf cart (FCHGC, which applies the non-GUI mode of the Advanced Vehicle Simulator (ADVISOR and the genetic algorithm (GA to optimize it. Simulation of the objective function is composed of fuel consumption and vehicle dynamic performance; the variables are the fuel cell stack power sizes and the battery numbers. By means of simulation, the optimal parameters of vehicle power unit, fuel cell stack, and battery pack are worked out. On this basis, GUI mode of ADVISOR is used to select the rated power of vehicle motor. In line with simulation parameters, an electrical golf cart is refitted by adding a 2 kW hydrogen air proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC stack system and test the FCHGC. The result shows that the simulation data is effective but it needs improving compared with that of the real cart test.

  8. Classifying post-stroke fatigue: Optimal cut-off on the Fatigue Assessment Scale.

    Cumming, Toby B; Mead, Gillian

    2017-12-01

    Post-stroke fatigue is common and has debilitating effects on independence and quality of life. The Fatigue Assessment Scale (FAS) is a valid screening tool for fatigue after stroke, but there is no established cut-off. We sought to identify the optimal cut-off for classifying post-stroke fatigue on the FAS. In retrospective analysis of two independent datasets (the '2015' and '2007' studies), we evaluated the predictive validity of FAS score against a case definition of fatigue (the criterion standard). Area under the curve (AUC) and sensitivity and specificity at the optimal cut-off were established in the larger 2015 dataset (n=126), and then independently validated in the 2007 dataset (n=52). In the 2015 dataset, AUC was 0.78 (95% CI 0.70-0.86), with the optimal ≥24 cut-off giving a sensitivity of 0.82 and specificity of 0.66. The 2007 dataset had an AUC of 0.83 (95% CI 0.71-0.94), and applying the ≥24 cut-off gave a sensitivity of 0.84 and specificity of 0.67. Post-hoc analysis of the 2015 dataset revealed that using only the 3 most predictive FAS items together ('FAS-3') also yielded good validity: AUC 0.81 (95% CI 0.73-0.89), with sensitivity of 0.83 and specificity of 0.75 at the optimal ≥8 cut-off. We propose ≥24 as a cut-off for classifying post-stroke fatigue on the FAS. While further validation work is needed, this is a positive step towards a coherent approach to reporting fatigue prevalence using the FAS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell therapy in ischemic stroke: mechanisms of action and treatment optimization strategies

    Guihong Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal and clinical studies have confirmed the therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cerebral ischemia, but their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Here, we summarize the transplantation approaches, directional migration, differentiation, replacement, neural circuit reconstruction, angiogenesis, neurotrophic factor secretion, apoptosis, immunomodulation, multiple mechanisms of action, and optimization strategies for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of ischemic stroke. We also explore the safety of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation and conclude that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an important direction for future treatment of cerebral ischemia. Determining the optimal timing and dose for the transplantation are important directions for future research.

  10. Learning Technology and Engineering Principles through Golf

    Yoshikawa, Emily; Bartholomew, Scott R.

    2018-01-01

    While the physical exercise of playing golf and the sheer enjoyment of the sport are both positive benefits, there are subtler opportunities for golf to be used in conjunction with other ideas for learning in K-12 education; the mechanics and details behind the sport, as well as the variety of clubs, courses, and swings are all potential…

  11. Return to golf after spine surgery.

    Abla, Adib A; Maroon, Joseph C; Lochhead, Richard; Sonntag, Volker K H; Maroon, Adara; Field, Melvin

    2011-01-01

    no published evidence indicates when patients can resume golfing after spine surgery. The objective of this study is to provide data from surveys sent to spine surgeons. a survey of North American Spine Society members was undertaken querying the suggested timing of return to golf. Of 1000 spine surgeons surveyed, 523 responded (52.3%). The timing of recommended return to golf and the reasons were questioned for college/professional athletes and avid and recreational golfers of both sexes. Responses were tallied for lumbar laminectomy, lumbar microdiscectomy, lumbar fusion, and anterior cervical discectomy with fusion. the most common recommended time for return to golf was 4-8 weeks after lumbar laminectomy and lumbar microdiscectomy, 2-3 months after anterior cervical fusion, and 6 months after lumbar fusion. The results showed a statistically significant increase in the recommended time to resume golf after lumbar fusion than after cervical fusion in all patients (p golf after spine surgery depends on many variables, including the general well-being of patients in terms of pain control and comfort when golfing. This survey serves as a guide that can assist medical practitioners in telling patients the average times recommended by surgeons across North America regarding return to golf after spine surgery.

  12. A synoptic view of golf course management

    Katula, Robert L.

    1996-03-01

    The maintenance, construction, and redesign of private, public, and municipal golf courses in the United States is a multi-billion dollar industry. The entire golf course maintenance market, according to the National Golf Foundation, was 6.2 billion per year in 1991. The average maintenance cost in the United States was approximately 40,000 per hole per year for the over 15,000 golf courses in the United States in 1991. Golf course maintenance costs have risen 500 percent from 1971 to 1991. These costs are projected to continue to increase at a rate of 8 percent per year due to the demand for quality playing surfaces, increased use of non-potable water, and taxes on water and chemicals required to maintain turfgrass. The golf course construction and redesign market continues to maintain a rate of over 300 new golf courses and redesigned courses completed each year. The average construction costs run from 4 to 6 million and the average redesign costs 2 to 3 million per course. In order to create a perfectly maintained golf course, golf course managers may use as many as 25 different pesticides, fertilizers, and herbicides to control insects and turf disease. Further, turfgrass is often stressed to its limits when kept at the unnatural heights required to obtain firm and fast greens and fairways. The daily practice of living on the edge is often done with limited knowledge of changes taking place on the golf course, of the location of soil types and fertility, of surface and subsurface drainage, and of previous maintenance practices. There is a growing concern in the golf course industry that the concentration of chemicals and water required to maintain today's golf course may endanger ground water supplies for the surrounding ecosystem. This paper will describe the general methodology PTS used to develop a new management system for the maintenance, construction, and redesign of golf courses. The management system integrates remote sensing technology, geographic

  13. Effective management of patients with acute ischemic stroke based on lean production on thrombolytic flow optimization.

    Liang, Zhuoyuan; Ren, Lijie; Wang, Ting; Hu, Huoyou; Li, Weiping; Wang, Yaping; Liu, Dehong; Lie, Yi

    2016-12-01

    The efficacy of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) decreases when the administration of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is delayed. Derived from Toyota Production System, lean production aims to create top-quality products with high-efficiency procedures, a concept that easily applies to emergency medicine. In this study, we aimed to determine whether applying lean principles to flow optimization could hasten the initiation of thrombolysis. A multidisciplinary team (Stroke Team) was organized to implement an ongoing, continuous loop of lean production that contained the following steps: decomposition, recognition, intervention, reengineering and assessment. The door-to-needle time (DNT) and the percentage of patients with DNT ≤ 60 min before and after the adoption of lean principles were used to evaluate the efficiency of our flow optimization. Thirteen patients with AIS in the pre-lean period and 43 patients with AIS in the lean period (23 in lean period I and 20 patients in lean period II) were consecutively enrolled in our study. After flow optimization, we reduced DNT from 90 to 47 min (p < 0.001 ¤ ). In addition, the percentage of patients treated ≤60 min after hospital arrival increased from 38.46 to 75.0 % (p = 0.015 ¤ ). Adjusted analysis of covariance confirmed a significant influence of optimization on delay of tPA administration (p < 0.001). The patients were more likely to have a good prognosis (mRS ≤ 2 at 90 days) after the flow optimization (30.77-75.00 %, p = 0.012 ¤ ). Our study may offer an effective approach for optimizing the thrombolytic flow in the management of AIS.

  14. Implementace marketingového mixu Prague City Golf Club

    Čmakal, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Title: Marketing mix implementation of Prague City Golf Club Objective: Analysis of marketing mix of the golf resort Prague City Golf Club and addresses proposals for its further improvement Methods: PEST analysis SWOT analysis Porter five forces analysis In-depth interview Results: The results of assessment of the marketing mix instruments of the Prague City Golf Club have shown that it is a high-quality golf resort with elaborate and numerous components of the marketing mix. In terms of com...

  15. Optimizing the Performance of a 50cc Compression Ignition Two-Stroke Engine Operating on Dimethyl Ether

    Hansen, Kim Rene; Dolriis, J.D.; Hansson, C.

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the optimization of a 50cc crankcase scavenged two-stroke diesel engine operating on dimethyl ether (DME). The optimization is primarily done with respect to engine efficiency. The underlying idea behind the work is that the low weight, low internal friction and low engine...

  16. Motor abundance and control structure in the golf swing.

    Morrison, A; McGrath, D; Wallace, E S

    2016-04-01

    Variability and control structure are under-represented areas of golf swing research. This study investigated the use of the abundant degrees of freedom in the golf swing of high and intermediate skilled golfers using uncontrolled manifold (UCM) analysis. The variance parallel to (VUCM) and orthogonal to (VOrth) the UCM with respect to the orientation and location of the clubhead were calculated. The higher skilled golfers had proportionally higher values of VUCM than lower skilled players for all measured outcome variables. Motor synergy was found in the control of the orientation of the clubhead and the combined outcome variables but not for clubhead location. Clubhead location variance zeroed-in on impact as has been previously shown, whereas clubhead orientation variance increased near impact. Both skill levels increased their control over the clubhead location leading up to impact, with more control exerted over the clubhead orientation in the early downswing. The results suggest that to achieve higher skill levels in golf may not lie simply in optimal technique, but may lie more in developing control over the abundant degrees of freedom in the body. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Is primary care a neglected piece of the jigsaw in ensuring optimal stroke care? Results of a national study.

    Whitford, David L

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke is a major cause of mortality and morbidity with potential for improved care and prevention through general practice. A national survey was undertaken to determine current resources and needs for optimal stroke prevention and care. METHODS: Postal survey of random sample of general practitioners undertaken (N = 204; 46% response). Topics included practice organisation, primary prevention, acute management, secondary prevention, long-term care and rehabilitation. RESULTS: Service organisation for both primary and secondary prevention was poor. Home management of acute stroke patients was used at some stage by 50% of responders, accounting for 7.3% of all stroke patients. Being in a structured cardiovascular management scheme, a training practice, a larger practice, or a practice employing a practice nurse were associated with structures and processes likely to support stroke prevention and care. CONCLUSION: General practices were not fulfilling their potential to provide stroke prevention and long-term management. Systems of structured stroke management in general practice are essential to comprehensive national programmes of stroke care.

  18. Is primary care a neglected piece of the jigsaw in ensuring optimal stroke care? Results of a national study

    O'Sullivan Bernadette

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is a major cause of mortality and morbidity with potential for improved care and prevention through general practice. A national survey was undertaken to determine current resources and needs for optimal stroke prevention and care. Methods Postal survey of random sample of general practitioners undertaken (N = 204; 46% response. Topics included practice organisation, primary prevention, acute management, secondary prevention, long-term care and rehabilitation. Results Service organisation for both primary and secondary prevention was poor. Home management of acute stroke patients was used at some stage by 50% of responders, accounting for 7.3% of all stroke patients. Being in a structured cardiovascular management scheme, a training practice, a larger practice, or a practice employing a practice nurse were associated with structures and processes likely to support stroke prevention and care. Conclusion General practices were not fulfilling their potential to provide stroke prevention and long-term management. Systems of structured stroke management in general practice are essential to comprehensive national programmes of stroke care.

  19. Intraoperative stroke volume optimization using stroke volume, arterial pressure, and heart rate: closed-loop (learning intravenous resuscitator) versus anesthesiologists.

    Rinehart, Joseph; Chung, Elena; Canales, Cecilia; Cannesson, Maxime

    2012-10-01

    The authors compared the performance of a group of anesthesia providers to closed-loop (Learning Intravenous Resuscitator [LIR]) management in a simulated hemorrhage scenario using cardiac output monitoring. A prospective cohort study. In silico simulation. University hospital anesthesiologists and the LIR closed-loop fluid administration system. Using a patient simulator, a 90-minute simulated hemorrhage protocol was run, which included a 1,200-mL blood loss over 30 minutes. Twenty practicing anesthesiology providers were asked to manage this scenario by providing fluids and vasopressor medication at their discretion. The simulation program was also run 20 times with the LIR closed-loop algorithm managing fluids and an additional 20 times with no intervention. Simulated patient weight, height, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and cardiac output (CO) were similar at baseline. The mean stroke volume, the mean arterial pressure, CO, and the final CO were higher in the closed-loop group than in the practitioners group, and the coefficient of variance was lower. The closed-loop group received slightly more fluid (2.1 v 1.9 L, p closed-loop maintained more stable hemodynamics than the practitioners primarily because the fluid was given earlier in the protocol and CO optimized before the hemorrhage began, whereas practitioners tended to resuscitate well but only after significant hemodynamic change indicated the need. Overall, these data support the potential usefulness of this closed-loop algorithm in clinical settings in which dynamic predictors are not available or applicable. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Difference in peak weight transfer and timing based on golf handicap.

    Queen, Robin M; Butler, Robert J; Dai, Boyi; Barnes, C Lowry

    2013-09-01

    Weight shift during the golf swing has been a topic of discussion among golf professionals; however, it is still unclear how weight shift varies in golfers of different performance levels. The main purpose of this study was to examine the following: (a) the changes in the peak ground reaction forces (GRF) and the timing of these events between high (HHCP) and low handicap (LHCP) golfers and (b) the differences between the leading and trailing legs. Twenty-eight male golfers were recruited and divided based on having an LHCP 9. Three-dimensional GRF peaks and the timing of the peaks were recorded bilaterally during a golf swing. The golf swing was divided into different phases: (a) address to the top of the backswing, (b) top of the backswing to ball contact, and (c) ball contact to the end of follow through. Repeated measures analyses of variance (α = 0.05) were completed for each study variable: the magnitude and the timing of peak vertical GRF, peak lateral GRF, and peak medial GRF (α = 0.05). The LHCP group had a greater transfer of vertical force from the trailing foot to the leading foot in phase 2 than the HHCP group. The LHCP group also demonstrated earlier timing of peak vertical force throughout the golf swing than the HHCP group. The LHCP and HHCP groups demonstrated different magnitudes of peak lateral force. The LHCP group had an earlier timing of peak lateral GRF in phase 2 and earlier timing of peak medial GRF in phases 1 and 2 than the HHCP group. In general, LHCP golfers demonstrated greater and earlier force generation than HHCP golfers. It may be relevant to consider both the magnitude of the forces and the timing of these events during golf-specific training to improve performance. These data reveal weight shifting differences that can be addressed by teaching professionals to help their students better understand weight transfer during the golf swing to optimize performance.

  1. INJURIES IN DISC GOLF - A DESCRIPTIVE CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

    Rahbek, Martin Amadeus; Nielsen, Rasmus Oestergaard

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Disc golf is rapidly increasing in popularity and more than two million people are estimated to regularly participate in disc golf activities. Despite this popularity, the epidemiology of injuries in disc golf remains under reported. PURPOSE: The purpose of the present study...... was to investigate the prevalence and anatomic distribution of injuries acquired through disc-golf participation in Danish disc golf players. METHODS: The study was a cross-sectional study conducted on Danish disc-golf players. In May 2015, invitations to complete a web-based questionnaire were spread online via...... social media, and around disc-golf courses in Denmark. The questionnaire included questions regarding disc-golf participation and the characteristics of injuries acquired through disc golf participation. The data was analyzed descriptively. RESULTS: An injury prevalence of 13.3% (95% CI: 6.7% to 19...

  2. Estonian Golf & Country Club / Urmas Oja

    Oja, Urmas, 1981-2012

    2005-01-01

    Konkursil "Eesti parim puitehitis 2005" pälvis voodrilaua eripreemia Jõelähtme Estonian Golf & Country Club'i katus. Arhitekt Andres Siim. Sisearhitekt Juta Lember. Konstruktor: AS Resand. 11 värv. ill

  3. Tourism Areas - MDC_GolfCourse

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — A polygon feature class of all known Golf Courses within Miami-Dade County. Data was extracted from U.S. GDT Large Area Landmarks dataset, which represents common...

  4. Effects of golf courses on local biodiversity.

    Gange, A.C.; Tanner, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    There are approximately 2600 golf courses in the UK, occupying 0.7% of the total land cover. However, it is unknown whether these represent a significant resource, in terms of biodiversity conservation, or if they are significantly less diverse than the surrounding habitats. The diversity of vegetation (tree and herbaceous species) and three indicator taxa (birds, ground beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae) and bumblebees (Hymenoptera, Apidae)) was studied on nine golf courses and nine adja...

  5. BIOMEHANICAL MODEL OF THE GOLF SWING TECHNIQUE

    Milan Čoh

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Golf is an extremely complex game which depends on a number of interconnected factors. One of the most important elements is undoubtedly the golf swing technique. High performance of the golf swing technique is generated by: the level of motor abilities, high degree of movement control, the level of movement structure stabilisation, morphological characteristics, inter- and intro-muscular coordination, motivation, and concentration. The golf swing technique was investigated using the biomechanical analysis method. Kinematic parameters were registered using two synchronised high-speed cameras at a frequency of 2,000 Hz. The sample of subjects consisted of three professional golf players. The study results showed a relatively high variability of the swing technique. The maximum velocity of the ball after a wood swing ranged from 233 to 227 km/h. The velocity of the ball after an iron swing was lower by 10 km/h on average. The elevation angle of the ball ranged from 11.7 to 15.3 degrees. In the final phase of the golf swing, i.e. downswing, the trunk rotators play the key role.

  6. Golf hand prosthesis performance of transradial amputees.

    Carey, Stephanie L; Wernke, Matthew M; Lura, Derek J; Kahle, Jason T; Dubey, Rajiv V; Highsmith, M Jason

    2015-06-01

    Typical upper limb prostheses may limit sports participation; therefore, specialized terminal devices are often needed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of transradial amputees to play golf using a specialized terminal device. Club head speed, X-factor, and elbow motion of two individuals with transradial amputations using an Eagle Golf terminal device were compared to a non-amputee during a golf swing. Measurements were collected pre/post training with various stances and grips. Both prosthesis users preferred a right-handed stance initially; however, after training, one preferred a left-handed stance. The amputees had slower club head speeds and a lower X-factor compared to the non-amputee golfer, but increased their individual elbow motion on the prosthetic side after training. Amputees enjoyed using the device, and it may provide kinematic benefits indicated by the increase in elbow flexion on the prosthetic side. The transradial amputees were able to swing a golf club with sufficient repetition, form, and velocity to play golf recreationally. Increased elbow flexion on the prosthetic side suggests a potential benefit from using the Eagle Golf terminal device. Participating in recreational sports can increase amputees' health and quality of life. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  7. Performance optimization of a Two-Stroke supercharged diesel engine for aircraft propulsion

    Carlucci, Antonio Paolo; Ficarella, Antonio; Trullo, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A Two-Stroke diesel engine for aircraft propulsion was modeled with a 0D/1D approach. • The results of the 0D/1D model are compared with those resulting from a 3D model. • The effect of several design and thermodynamic parameters have been analyzed. • Guidelines for the optimization of engine performance are provided. - Abstract: In Two-Stroke engines, the cylinder filling efficiency is antithetical to the cylinder scavenging efficiency; moreover, both of them are influenced by geometric and thermodynamic parameters characterizing the design and operation of both the engine and the related supercharging system. Aim of this work is to provide several guidelines about the definition of design and operation parameters for a Two-Stroke two banks Uniflow diesel engine, supercharged with two sequential turbochargers and an aftercooler per bank, with the goal of either increasing the engine brake power at take-off or decreasing the engine fuel consumption in cruise conditions. The engine has been modeled with a 0D/1D modeling approach. Then, the model capability in describing the effect of several parameters on engine performance has been assessed comparing the results of 3D simulations with those of 0D/1D model. The validated 0D/1D model has been used to simulate the engine behavior varying several design and operation engine parameters (exhaust valves opening and closing angles and maximum valve lift, scavenging ports opening angle, distance between bottom edge of the scavenging ports and bottom dead center, area of the single scavenging port and number of ports, engine volumetric compression ratio, low and high pressure compressor pressure ratios, air/fuel ratio) on a wide range of possible values. The parameters most influencing the engine performance are then recognized and their effect on engine thermodynamic behavior is discussed. Finally, the system configurations leading to best engine power at sea level and lowest fuel consumption in cruise

  8. Simulation Modeling and Optimization of Uniflow Scavenging System Parameters on Opposed-Piston Two-Stroke Engines

    Fukang Ma

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on the introduction of opposed-piston two-stroke (OP2S gasoline direct injection (GDI engines, the OP2S-GDI engine working principle and scavenging process were analyzed. GT-Power software was employed to model the working process based on the structural style and principle of OP2S-GDI engine. The tracer gas method and OP2S-GDI engine experiment were employed for model validation at full load of 6000 rpm. The OP2S-GDI engine scavenging system parameters were optimized, including intake port height stroke ratio, intake port circumference ratio, exhaust port height stroke ratio, exhaust port circumference ratio, and opposed-piston motion phase difference. At the same time, the effect of the port height stroke ratio and opposed-piston motion phase difference on effective compression ratio and expansion ratio were considered, and the indicated work was employed as the optimization objective. A three-level orthogonal experiment was applied in the calculation process to reduce the calculation work. The influence and correlation coefficient on the scavenging efficiency and delivery ratio were investigated by the orthogonal experiment analysis of intake and exhaust port height stroke ratio and circular utilization. The effect of the scavenging system parameters on delivery ratio, scavenging efficiency and indicated work were calculated to obtain the best parameters. The results show that intake port height stroke ratio is the main factor for the delivery ratio, while exhaust port height stroke ratio is the main factor to engine delivery ratio and scavenging efficiency.

  9. Archery - Golf Guide with Official Rules. June 1972 - June 1974.

    Driscoll, Margaret L., Ed.; Michalson, Doddy, Ed.

    This guide for women's archery and golf dated June 1972 - June 1974 details rules and standards as well as the Division for Girls and Women's Sports (DGWS) statement of beliefs. Articles on archery nomenclature, archery interest builders, and archery golf are included in the section on archery. Articles dealing with golf take up such topics as…

  10. Evaluation of golf courses water demand in southern of Portugal for the last three decades

    Gago Pedras, Celestina M.; Lança, Rui M.; Martins, Fernando; Fernandez, Helena; Vieira, Cristina; Monteiro, José Paulo; Guerrero, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Golf is an economic activity with a prominent position in the tourist-sport offer in the region of Algarve. Located in southern of Portugal, this region is the most suitable region for the growth of the golf industry. The climate is characterized by mild winters with slight rainfall and hot and dry summers. The region has an annual average temperature of 14oC and annual precipitation that rarely exceeds 500 mm year-1. Since most of the rainfall occurs concentrated in the winter, irrigation is needed during the remaining months of the year to meet the water demand from plants. A proper irrigation management will allow to optimize the use water, thus it constitutes a key issue for the sustainability of this activity in areas subjected to water scarcity. Currently, remote sensing provides the tools to assess the evolution of the greenish quality of the area in the golf courses. In this study, based on Landsat images, vegetation indices were calculated the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), for the spring and summer seasons during the last 30 years. For the same period, according the data collected from weather stations distributed in the region, maps of precipitation, temperature, solar radiation, relative humidity and wind were produced. According the current maintenance practices and irrigation cycles, maps of potential and real evapotranspiration and with basis on the water balance were calculated, and water deficit maps estimated. Upon crossing this information with the NDVI maps, trends were identified in the consumption of water for irrigation due to the growth of the occupied area by golf courses in the region of Algarve. Since drought problems tend to increase due to climate changes, it becomes relevant the need to conduct this study aiming the research of strategies to ensure the beneficial use of water on golf courses and other turfgrass areas. Keywords: evapotranspiration, golf, irrigation, NDVI, water deficit

  11. The Development and Validation of a Golf Swing and Putt Skill Assessment for Children

    Barnett, Lisa M.; Hardy, Louise L.; Brian, Ali S.; Robertson, Sam

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to describe development of a process-oriented instrument designed to assess the golf swing and putt stroke, and to assess the instrument’s discriminative validity in terms of age and reliability (intra-rater and re-test). A Delphi consultation (with golf industry professionals and researchers in movement skill assessment) was used to develop an assessment for each skill based on existing skill assessment protocols. Each skill had six components to be marked as present/absent. Individual scores were based on the number of performance components successfully demonstrated over two trials for each skill (potential score range 0 to 24). Children (n = 43) aged 6-10 years (M = 7.8 years, SD = 1.3) were assessed in both skills live in the field by one rater at Time 1(T1). A subset of children (n = 28) had consent for assessments to be videoed. Six weeks later 19 children were reassessed, five days apart (T2, T3). An ANOVA assessed discriminative validity i.e. whether skill competence at T1 differed by age (6 years, 7/8 years and 9/10 years). Intraclass correlations (ICC) assessed intra-rater reliability between the live and video assessment at T1 and test-retest reliability (between T2 and T3). Paired t-tests assessed any systematic differences between live and video assessments (T1) and between T2 and T3. Older children were more skilled (F (2, 40) = 11.18, p golf coaches and physical education teachers as part of systematic early player assessment and feedback. Key points Golf is becoming an increasingly popular sport among young children, however there is no standard protocol available to assess and identify skill deficits, mastery level, and talent identification in beginner young golf players. Process rather than product oriented outcomes better identify areas of skill deficit in young children. The proposed swing and putt instrument can reliably identify skill deficits in children of elementary school age who are new to golf and can be used by a range

  12. The development and validation of a golf swing and putt skill assessment for children.

    Barnett, Lisa M; Hardy, Louise L; Brian, Ali S; Robertson, Sam

    2015-03-01

    The aim was to describe development of a process-oriented instrument designed to assess the golf swing and putt stroke, and to assess the instrument's discriminative validity in terms of age and reliability (intra-rater and re-test). A Delphi consultation (with golf industry professionals and researchers in movement skill assessment) was used to develop an assessment for each skill based on existing skill assessment protocols. Each skill had six components to be marked as present/absent. Individual scores were based on the number of performance components successfully demonstrated over two trials for each skill (potential score range 0 to 24). Children (n = 43) aged 6-10 years (M = 7.8 years, SD = 1.3) were assessed in both skills live in the field by one rater at Time 1(T1). A subset of children (n = 28) had consent for assessments to be videoed. Six weeks later 19 children were reassessed, five days apart (T2, T3). An ANOVA assessed discriminative validity i.e. whether skill competence at T1 differed by age (6 years, 7/8 years and 9/10 years). Intraclass correlations (ICC) assessed intra-rater reliability between the live and video assessment at T1 and test-retest reliability (between T2 and T3). Paired t-tests assessed any systematic differences between live and video assessments (T1) and between T2 and T3. Older children were more skilled (F (2, 40) = 11.18, p < 0.001). The live assessment reflected the video assessment (ICC = 0.79, 95% CI 0.59, 0.90) and scores did not differ between live and video assessments. Test retest reliability was acceptable (ICC = 0.60, 95% CI 0.23, 0.82), although the mean score was slightly higher at retest. This instrument could be used reliably by golf coaches and physical education teachers as part of systematic early player assessment and feedback. Key pointsGolf is becoming an increasingly popular sport among young children, however there is no standard protocol available to assess and identify skill deficits, mastery level

  13. Effects of Self-esteem, Optimism, and Perceived Control on Depressive Symptoms in Stroke Survivor-Spouse Dyads.

    Chung, Misook L; Bakas, Tamilyn; Plue, Laura D; Williams, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in stroke survivors and their family caregivers. Given the interdependent relationship between the members of dyads in poststroke management, improving depressive symptoms in dyads may depend on their partner's characteristics. Self-esteem, optimism, and perceived control, all known to be associated with depressive symptoms in an individual, may also contribute to their partner's depressive symptoms. The purpose of this study is to examine actor and partner effects of self-esteem, optimism, and perceived control on depression in stroke survivors and their spousal caregivers. A total of 112 ischemic stroke survivors (78% white, 34% women; mean age, 62.5 ± 12.3 years) and their spouses (mean age, 60.6 ± 12.9 years) completed surveys in which depressive symptoms, self-esteem, optimism, and perceived control were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire, the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, the Revised Life Orientation Test, and the Sense of Control Scale. Multilevel modeling, actor-partner interdependence model regression was used to determine influences on depressive symptoms within the dyad. Individuals with lower self-esteem, optimism, and perceived control had higher levels of depressive symptoms. Stroke survivors whose spouses had lower levels of self-esteem (B = -0.338, P self-esteem (B = -0.047, P = .036) also had higher levels of depressive symptoms. We found significant partner effects of self-esteem on depression for both members and partner effect of optimism on patient's depressive symptoms. These findings suggest that further research is needed to determine if dyadic interventions may help to improve self-esteem, optimism, and depressive symptoms in both patients and their caregivers.

  14. Pärnu Bay Golf Club = Pärnu Bay Golf Club / Arhitekt11

    2016-01-01

    Pärnu Bay Golf Club, arhitektid Jürgen Lepper, Anto Savi, Margus Soonets, Janar Toomesso (Arhitekt11), sisearhitektid Liina Vaino, Kaari Metslang, Hannelore Kääramees (Arhitekt11). Kultuurkapitali Arhitektuuri sihtkapitali aastapreemia nominent 2016

  15. Physical Therapy Adjuvants to Promote Optimization of Walking Recovery after Stroke

    Mark G. Bowden

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke commonly results in substantial and persistent deficits in locomotor function. The majority of scientific inquiries have focused on singular intervention approaches, with recent attention given to task specific therapies. We propose that measurement should indicate the most critical limiting factor(s to be addressed and that a combination of adjuvant treatments individualized to target accompanying impairment(s will result in the greatest improvements in locomotor function. We explore training to improve walking performance by addressing a combination of: (1 walking specific motor control; (2 dynamic balance; (3 cardiorespiratory fitness and (4 muscle strength and put forward a theoretical framework to maximize the functional benefits of these strategies as physical adjuvants. The extent to which any of these impairments contribute to locomotor dysfunction is dependent on the individual and will undoubtedly change throughout the rehabilitation intervention. Thus, the ability to identify and measure the relative contributions of these elements will allow for identification of a primary intervention as well as prescription of additional adjuvant approaches. Importantly, we highlight the need for future studies as appropriate dosing of each of these elements is contingent on improving the capacity to measure each element and to titrate the contribution of each to optimal walking performance.

  16. Prevention Of Stroke

    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an important cause for neurological morbidity and mortality. Prevention of ischemic stroke involves identification and prevention of risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy. Risk factors have been classified as modifiable and non-modifiable; control of modifiable factors should prevent stroke occurrence. Stroke prevention has been described at three levels: primary, secondary and tertiary. Prolonged hypertension increases an individual′s risk for developing fatal or nonfatal stroke by three times and its control has been shown to prevent stroke. Diabetes mellitus is an important cause for microangiopathy and predisposes to stroke. Statin trials have shown significant reduction in stroke in those who were treated with statins. Stroke risk can be reduced by avoiding tobacco use, control of obesity and avoiding sedentary life style. Anti platelet medications are effective for secondary prevention of stroke. Educating society regarding modifiable risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy form the cornerstone for the prevention of stroke.

  17. Defining Optimal Brain Health in Adults: A Presidential Advisory From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Gorelick, Philip B; Furie, Karen L; Iadecola, Costantino; Smith, Eric E; Waddy, Salina P; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Bae, Hee-Joon; Bauman, Mary Ann; Dichgans, Martin; Duncan, Pamela W; Girgus, Meighan; Howard, Virginia J; Lazar, Ronald M; Seshadri, Sudha; Testai, Fernando D; van Gaal, Stephen; Yaffe, Kristine; Wasiak, Hank; Zerna, Charlotte

    2017-10-01

    Cognitive function is an important component of aging and predicts quality of life, functional independence, and risk of institutionalization. Advances in our understanding of the role of cardiovascular risks have shown them to be closely associated with cognitive impairment and dementia. Because many cardiovascular risks are modifiable, it may be possible to maintain brain health and to prevent dementia in later life. The purpose of this American Heart Association (AHA)/American Stroke Association presidential advisory is to provide an initial definition of optimal brain health in adults and guidance on how to maintain brain health. We identify metrics to define optimal brain health in adults based on inclusion of factors that could be measured, monitored, and modified. From these practical considerations, we identified 7 metrics to define optimal brain health in adults that originated from AHA's Life's Simple 7: 4 ideal health behaviors (nonsmoking, physical activity at goal levels, healthy diet consistent with current guideline levels, and body mass index brain health but recognize that the truly ideal circumstance may be uncommon because there is a continuum of brain health as demonstrated by AHA's Life's Simple 7. Therefore, there is opportunity to improve brain health through primordial prevention and other interventions. Furthermore, although cardiovascular risks align well with brain health, we acknowledge that other factors differing from those related to cardiovascular health may drive cognitive health. Defining optimal brain health in adults and its maintenance is consistent with the AHA's Strategic Impact Goal to improve cardiovascular health of all Americans by 20% and to reduce deaths resulting from cardiovascular disease and stroke by 20% by the year 2020. This work in defining optimal brain health in adults serves to provide the AHA/American Stroke Association with a foundation for a new strategic direction going forward in cardiovascular health

  18. Imaging the Sport of Golf – Envisioning Communities

    Emese Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hungary also has seen a tremendous increase in quality golf facilities in the last decade. The sport of golf – including golf tourism – in Hungary also makes it first moves to be officially (reunified with its historical partners in Western Europe and in the USA. This paper looks at developments in Hungarian Golf community in the last decades. While focusing on the ongoing economic, financial, and political changes surrounding the Hungarian National Golf Federation, this study also poses some questions. To what extent mushrooming of golf communities could be seen as a result of Europeanization of the country? Is it just a new achievement in PGA America’s global explosion? Can we see it as the benefit of the European Team’s astronomical success at the Ryder Cup tournaments?

  19. Evaluation of water demand in golf courses from southern Portugal during the last three decades

    Gago Pedras, Celestina M.; Lança, Rui M.; Granja-Martins, Fernando M.; Neto-Paixão, Helena M.; Vieira, Cristina; Monteiro, José P.; Guerrero, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Golf is an economic activity with a prominent position in the tourist-sport offer in the region of Algarve. Located in southern of Portugal, this region is the most suitable region for the growth of the golf industry. The climate is characterized by mild winters with slight rainfall and hot and dry summers. The region has an annual average temperature of 14oC and annual precipitation that rarely exceeds 500 mm year-1. Since most of the rainfall occurs concentrated in the winter, irrigation is needed during the remaining months of the year to meet the water demand from plants. A proper irrigation management will allow to optimize the use water, thus it constitutes a key issue for the sustainability of this activity in areas subjected to water scarcity. Currently, remote sensing provides the tools to assess the evolution of the greenish quality of the area in the golf courses. In this study, based on Landsat images, vegetation indices were calculated the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), for the spring and summer seasons during the last 30 years. For the same period, according the data collected from weather stations distributed in the region, maps of precipitation, temperature, solar radiation, relative humidity and wind were produced. According the current maintenance practices and irrigation cycles, maps of potential and real evapotranspiration and with basis on the water balance were calculated, and water deficit maps estimated. Upon crossing this information with the NDVI maps, trends were identified in the consumption of water for irrigation due to the growth of the occupied area by golf courses in the region of Algarve. Since drought problems tend to increase due to climate changes, it becomes relevant the need to conduct this study aiming the research of strategies to ensure the beneficial use of water on golf courses and other turfgrass areas.

  20. Integrated dynamic policy management methodology and system for strategic environmental assessment of golf course installation policy in Taiwan

    Chen, Ching-Ho; Liu, Wei-Lin; Liaw, Shu-Liang

    2011-01-01

    Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) focuses primarily on assessing how policies, plans, and programs (PPPs) influence the sustainability of the involved regions. However, the processes of assessing policies and developing management strategies for pollution load and resource use are usually separate in the current SEA system. This study developed a policy management methodology to overcome the defects generated during the above processes. This work first devised a dynamic management framework using the methods of systems thinking, system dynamics, and Managing for Results (MFRs). Furthermore, a driving force-pressure-state-impact-response (DPSIR) indicator system was developed. The golf course installation policy was applied as a case study. Taiwan, counties of Taiwan, and the golf courses within those individual counties were identified as a system, subsystems, and objects, respectively. This study identified an object-linked double-layer framework with multi-stage-option to simultaneously to quantify golf courses in each subsystem and determine ratios of abatement and allocation for pollution load and resource use of each golf course. The DPSIR indicator values for each item of each golf course in each subsystem are calculated based on the options taken in the two decision layers. The summation of indicator values for all items of all golf courses in all subsystems according to various options is defined as the sustainability value of the policy. An optimization model and a system (IDPMS) were developed to obtain the greatest sustainability value of the policy, while golf course quantity, human activity intensity, total quantities of pollution load and resource use are simultaneously obtained. The solution method based on enumeration of multiple bounds for objectives and constraints (EMBOC) was developed for the problem with 1.95 x 10 128 combinations of possible options to solve the optimal solution in ten minutes using a personal computer with 3.0 GHz CPU

  1. Golf in the Wind: Exploring the Effect of Wind on the Accuracy of Golf Shots

    Yaghoobian, Neda; Mittal, Rajat

    2015-11-01

    Golf play is highly dependent on the weather conditions with wind being the most significant factor in the unpredictability of the ball landing position. The direction and strength of the wind alters the aerodynamic forces on a ball in flight, and consequently its speed, distance and direction of travel. The fact that local wind conditions on any particular hole change over times-scales ranging all the way from a few seconds to minutes, hours and days introduces an element of variability in the ball trajectory that is not understood. Any such analysis is complicated by the effect of the local terrestrial and vegetation topology, as well as the inherent complexity of golf-ball aerodynamics. In the current study, we use computational modeling to examine the unpredictability of the shots under different wind conditions over Hole-12 at the Augusta National Golf Club, where the Masters Golf Tournament takes place every year. Despite this being the shortest hole on the course, the presence of complex vegetation canopy around this hole introduces a spatial and temporal variability in wind conditions that evokes uncertainty and even fear among professional golfers. We use our model to examine the effect of wind direction and wind-speed on the accuracy of the golf shots at this hole and use the simulations to determine the key aerodynamic factors that affect the accuracy of the shot.

  2. Estimation of tissue stiffness, reflex activity, optimal muscle length and slack length in stroke patients using an electromyography driven antagonistic wrist model.

    de Gooijer-van de Groep, Karin L; de Vlugt, Erwin; van der Krogt, Hanneke J; Helgadóttir, Áróra; Arendzen, J Hans; Meskers, Carel G M; de Groot, Jurriaan H

    2016-06-01

    About half of all chronic stroke patients experience loss of arm function coinciding with increased stiffness, reduced range of motion and a flexed wrist due to a change in neural and/or structural tissue properties. Quantitative assessment of these changes is of clinical importance, yet not trivial. The goal of this study was to quantify the neural and structural properties contributing to wrist joint stiffness and to compare these properties between healthy subjects and stroke patients. Stroke patients (n=32) and healthy volunteers (n=14) were measured using ramp-and-hold rotations applied to the wrist joint by a haptic manipulator. Neural (reflexive torque) and structural (connective tissue stiffness and slack lengths and (contractile) optimal muscle lengths) parameters were estimated using an electromyography driven antagonistic wrist model. Kruskal-Wallis analysis with multiple comparisons was used to compare results between healthy subjects, stroke patients with modified Ashworth score of zero and stroke patients with modified Ashworth score of one or more. Stroke patients with modified Ashworth score of one or more differed from healthy controls (Pslack length of connective tissue of the flexor muscles. Non-invasive quantitative analysis, including estimation of optimal muscle lengths, enables to identify neural and non-neural changes in chronic stroke patients. Monitoring these changes in time is important to understand the recovery process and to optimize treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Belagaje, Samir R

    2017-02-01

    Rehabilitation is an important aspect of the continuum of care in stroke. With advances in the acute treatment of stroke, more patients will survive stroke with varying degrees of disability. Research in the past decade has expanded our understanding of the mechanisms underlying stroke recovery and has led to the development of new treatment modalities. This article reviews and summarizes the key concepts related to poststroke recovery. Good data now exist by which one can predict recovery, especially motor recovery, very soon after stroke onset. Recent trials have not demonstrated a clear benefit associated with very early initiation of rehabilitative therapy after stroke in terms of improvement in poststroke outcomes. However, growing evidence suggests that shorter and more frequent sessions of therapy can be safely started in the first 24 to 48 hours after a stroke. The optimal amount or dose of therapy for stroke remains undetermined, as more intensive treatments have not been associated with better outcomes compared to standard intensities of therapy. Poststroke depression adversely affects recovery across a variety of measures and is an important target for therapy. Additionally, the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) appears to benefit motor recovery through pleiotropic mechanisms beyond their antidepressant effect. Other pharmacologic approaches also appear to have a benefit in stroke rehabilitation. A comprehensive rehabilitation program is essential to optimize poststroke outcomes. Rehabilitation is a process that uses three major principles of recovery: adaptation, restitution, and neuroplasticity. Based on these principles, multiple different approaches, both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic, exist to enhance rehabilitation. In addition to neurologists, a variety of health care professionals are involved in stroke rehabilitation. Successful rehabilitation involves understanding the natural history of stroke recovery and a

  4. Sensorimotor Rhythm Neurofeedback Enhances Golf Putting Performance.

    Cheng, Ming-Yang; Huang, Chung-Ju; Chang, Yu-Kai; Koester, Dirk; Schack, Thomas; Hung, Tsung-Min

    2015-12-01

    Sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) activity has been related to automaticity during skilled action execution. However, few studies have bridged the causal link between SMR activity and sports performance. This study investigated the effect of SMR neurofeedback training (SMR NFT) on golf putting performance. We hypothesized that preelite golfers would exhibit enhanced putting performance after SMR NFT. Sixteen preelite golfers were recruited and randomly assigned into either an SMR or a control group. Participants were asked to perform putting while electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded, both before and after intervention. Our results showed that the SMR group performed more accurately when putting and exhibited greater SMR power than the control group after 8 intervention sessions. This study concludes that SMR NFT is effective for increasing SMR during action preparation and for enhancing golf putting performance. Moreover, greater SMR activity might be an EEG signature of improved attention processing, which induces superior putting performance.

  5. An operation management system for golf tournament

    Yuan Yijun; Luo Hanwen

    2017-01-01

    In this paper,an operation management system for golf tournament is designed to calculate the beginning and finishing dates of the preparation automatically.The efficiency of management work during preparatory period,such as meetings before match and task announcement,is raised by nearly 40% after using our system than using traditional management tools or other software systems.And the probability of occurrence of delay and omission of work are controlled within 5%.It is proved to be helpful...

  6. Going golfing in Norway: consumer motivation

    Mukhamodeev, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    Master's thesis in International hotel and tourism management Golf development has been quite rapid in the past years all over the world. The purpose of this study is to analyze the validity and reliability of Motivation Sport Consumer scale proposed by McDonald et al. and its applicability to Holt‘s typology of consumption metaphors. The results of reliability tests and factor analysis confirm that the present instrumentation has demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties overall t...

  7. Return to Golf After Lumbar Fusion.

    Shifflett, Grant D; Hellman, Michael D; Louie, Philip K; Mikhail, Christopher; Park, Kevin U; Phillips, Frank M

    Spinal fusion surgery is being increasingly performed, yet few studies have focused on return to recreational sports after lumbar fusion and none have specifically analyzed return to golf. Most golfers successfully return to sport after lumbar fusion surgery. Case series. Level 4. All patients who underwent 1- or 2-level primary lumbar fusion surgery for degenerative pathologies performed by a single surgeon between January 2008 and October 2012 and had at least 1-year follow-up were included. Patients completed a specifically designed golf survey. Surveys were mailed, given during follow-up clinic, or answered during telephone contact. A total of 353 patients met the inclusion and exclusion criteria, with 200 responses (57%) to the questionnaire producing 34 golfers. The average age of golfers was 57 years (range, 32-79 years). In 79% of golfers, preoperative back and/or leg pain significantly affected their ability to play golf. Within 1 year from surgery, 65% of patients returned to practice and 52% returned to course play. Only 29% of patients stated that continued back/leg pain limited their play. Twenty-five patients (77%) were able to play the same amount of golf or more than before fusion surgery. Of those providing handicaps, 12 (80%) reported the same or an improved handicap. More than 50% of golfers return to on-course play within 1 year of lumbar fusion surgery. The majority of golfers can return to preoperative levels in terms of performance (handicap) and frequency of play. This investigation offers insight into when golfers return to sport after lumbar fusion surgery and provides surgeons with information to set realistic expectations postoperatively.

  8. 2012 Problem 15: Frustrating Golf Ball

    Huang, Shan; Zhu, Zheyuan; Gao, Wenli; Wang, Sihui

    2015-10-01

    This paper studies the condition for a golf ball to escape from a hole. The two determining factors are the ball's initial velocity v0 and its deviation from the center of the hole d. There is a critical escaping velocity vc for every deviation d. The ball's motion is analyzed by calculating the change of velocity whenever the ball collides with the hole. The critical conditions predicted by our theory are verified through experiment.

  9. Commercial golf glove effects on golf performance and forearm muscle activity.

    Sorbie, Graeme G; Darroch, Paul; Grace, Fergal M; Gu, Yaodong; Baker, Julien S; Ugbolue, Ukadike C

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to determine whether or not commercial golf gloves influence performance variables and forearm muscle activity during golf play. Fifteen golfers participated in the laboratory based study, each performing 8 golf swings with a Driver and 7-iron whilst wearing a glove and 8 without wearing the glove. Club head speed, ball speed and absolute carry distance performance variables were calculated. Surface electromyography was recorded from the flexor digitorum superficialis and extensor carpi radialis brevis on both forearm muscles. Club head speed, ball speed and absolute carry distance was significantly higher when using the Driver with the glove in comparison to the Driver without the glove (p < 0.05). No significant differences were evident when using the 7-iron and no significant differences were displayed in muscle activity in either of the conditions. Findings from this study suggest that driving performance is improved when wearing a glove.

  10. SOS score: an optimized score to screen acute stroke patients for obstructive sleep apnea.

    Camilo, Millene R; Sander, Heidi H; Eckeli, Alan L; Fernandes, Regina M F; Dos Santos-Pontelli, Taiza E G; Leite, Joao P; Pontes-Neto, Octavio M

    2014-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is frequent in acute stroke patients, and has been associated with higher mortality and worse prognosis. Polysomnography (PSG) is the gold standard diagnostic method for OSA, but it is impracticable as a routine for all acute stroke patients. We evaluated the accuracy of two OSA screening tools, the Berlin Questionnaire (BQ), and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) when administered to relatives of acute stroke patients; we also compared these tools against a combined screening score (SOS score). Ischemic stroke patients were submitted to a full PSG at the first night after onset of symptoms. OSA severity was measured by apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). BQ and ESS were administered to relatives of stroke patients before the PSG and compared to SOS score for accuracy and C-statistics. We prospectively studied 39 patients. OSA (AHI ≥10/h) was present in 76.9%. The SOS score [area under the curve (AUC): 0.812; P = 0.005] and ESS (AUC: 0.789; P = 0.009) had good predictive value for OSA. The SOS score was the only tool with significant predictive value (AUC: 0.686; P = 0.048) for severe OSA (AHI ≥30/h), when compared to ESS (P = 0.119) and BQ (P = 0.191). The threshold of SOS ≤10 showed high sensitivity (90%) and negative predictive value (96.2%) for OSA; SOS ≥20 showed high specificity (100%) and positive predictive value (92.5%) for severe OSA. The SOS score administered to relatives of stroke patients is a useful tool to screen for OSA and may decrease the need for PSG in acute stroke setting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Golf Plus - more space and more functionality; Golf Plus: Raumangebot auf Kundenwunsch

    Martin, F.; Jaeschke, J.; Repmann, C.; Tinschert, T. [Volkswagen AG, Wolfsburg (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    A decisive factor in the design of cars in the Golf class, which have a relatively small floor area, is to make the best possible use of the interior space. The objective behind the development of the Golf Plus was to offer even more space than the Golf V. The length and width of the car remained unchanged, but the height was raised by 95 mm to 1580 mm, which allowed the head and shoulder room to be increased significantly. The improve all-round visibility, the front seats were raised by 75 mm and the rear seats by 85 mm. The result is a more comfortable sitting position, in particular for passengers in the back of the car, and easier access to the interior of the car. In order to obtain detailed information about the aerodynamic properties of the Golf Plus at an early stage of development, a numerical simulation was carried out at the beginning of the project to evaluate the flows around the outer skin of the design model using CAD descriptions. Later in the project, wind tunnel tests gradually replaced the calculations. For these tests, a 1:1 scale wind tunnel model with all the component groups was built on the original platform. This allowed the flow of cool air to the radiator and the front brakes to be optimised at an early stage. As the Golf Plus is based on the same platform as the Golf V, it benefits form the aerodynamic development work already carried out on the underside of the car. In order to reduce drag, the position and size of the front spoiler were improved. The rear spoiler lip has an effect both on drag and on the lift on the rear axle, which is decisive for the car's handling. Taking these factors into account, the spoiler lip was designed to produce a rear lift coefficient of c{sub AH}<0.1. (orig.)

  12. Finding an optimal rehabilitation paradigm after stroke: Enhancing fiber growth and training of the brain at the right moment

    Anna-Sophia eWahl

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available After stroke the central nervous system reveals a spectrum of intrinsic capacities to react as a highly dynamic system which can change the properties of its circuits, form new contacts, erase others, and remap related cortical and spinal cord regions. This plasticity can lead to a surprising degree of spontaneous recovery. It includes the activation of neuronal molecular mechanisms of growth and of extrinsic growth promoting factors and guidance signals in the tissue. Rehabilitative training and pharmacological interventions may modify and boost these neuronal processes, but almost nothing is known on the optimal timing of the different processes and therapeutic interventions and on their detailed interactions. Finding optimal rehabilitation paradigms requires an optimal orchestration of the internal processes of re‐organization and the therapeutic interventions in accordance with defined plastic time windows.In this review we summarize the mechanisms of spontaneous plasticity after stroke and experimental interventions to enhance growth and plasticity, with an emphasis on anti‐Nogo‐A immunotherapy. We highlight critical time windows of growth and of rehabilitative training and consider different approaches of combinatorial rehabilitative schedules. Finally, we discuss potential future strategies for designing repair and rehabilitation paradigms by introducing a 3 step model: determination of the metabolic and plastic status of the brain, pharmacological enhancement of its plastic mechanisms, and stabilization of newly formed functional connections by rehabilitative training.

  13. Mapping soil water content on golf course greens with GPR

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) can be an effective and efficient method for high-resolution mapping of volumetric water content in the sand layer directly beneath the ground surface at a golf course green. This information could potentially be very useful to golf course superintendents for determi...

  14. Leidos Reclaims Defelice Cup at Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Leidos Biomedical Research reclaimed the Defelice Cup trophy from NCI at the eighth annual Ronald H. Defelice golf tournament, held October 14. The final score was 15–7, with Leidos Biomed tying the series 4 to 4. Fourteen players on each team battled it out at Rattlewood golf course in Mount Airy, Md.

  15. Using Sport Education to Teach the Lifetime Sport of Golf

    Scarboro, Shot; Pritchard, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Golf is a lifetime sport activity that can be taught in physical education classes. How one teaches golf in physical education could influence whether students will want to continue to participate outside of physical education. The sport education model (SEM) is an instructional model that promotes student learning in all three domains by ensuring…

  16. Does the transparency of the websites can help in attracting customers? Analysis of the golf courses in Andalusia

    Marta García-Tascón

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to analyze the degree of transparency of the Web pages of organizations that belong to the world of sports, specifically golf courses in Andalusia. Design/methodology/approach: We performed a descriptive analysis of the conditions of transparency of 92 Web pages of golf clubs registered on the official website of the Royal Golf Federation of Andalusia (RFGA. A questionnaire created/adapted ad hoc is used for this study having as a reference the questionnaire used by Barrio and Martin (2012 that analyze the performance of the 4 conditions of transparency of Web pages. Findings: To reflect a high degree of transparency, they show a higher compliance than 75% in 8 of the 10 variables. The Web page becomes an element to quantify the performance of the field without investing too much in other promotional channels to attract as many customers as possible. Research limitations: In some Web pages, the access to information entailed a significant investment of time because they did not have the characteristic of being intuitive. In some cases was not available all required information. Practical implications: Knowledge of this information allows the director or manager identifies possible areas of improvement to optimize their management, while transparency offered by the golf courses is improved. Social implications: This study highlights the need for teaching the user to evaluate the quality, transparency and being critical with the information found on Web pages. Originality/value: The analysis of transparency allows clubs to be reflective of its golf courses. It becomes the tool that the manager can use to display part of all its virtues and to evaluate the social behavior of their customers, to attract possible clients and perform actions with the stakeholders in the golf industry.

  17. 75 FR 52360 - Upper Truckee River Restoration and Golf Course Reconfiguration Project, El Dorado County, CA

    2010-08-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Upper Truckee River Restoration and Golf Course... and comment the draft EIR/EIS for the Upper Truckee River Restoration and Golf Course Reconfiguration... include continuing existing golf course use, removal of the entire Lake Tahoe Golf Course, or...

  18. Movement Variability in the Golf Swing: Theoretical, Methodological, and Practical Issues

    Glazier, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Movement variability in the golf swing has recently been identified as a priority for future research in golf science. Although this ubiquitous aspect of golf performance has featured in previous empirical investigations of the golf swing, it has tended to be subordinate and studied as an adjunct to other more conventional research questions.…

  19. 76 FR 58108 - Safety Zone; Ryder Cup Captain's Duel Golf Shot, Chicago River, Chicago, IL

    2011-09-20

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Ryder Cup Captain's Duel Golf Shot, Chicago River, Chicago, IL AGENCY: Coast Guard... the Chicago River during a golfing event that will involve hitting golf balls from land onto a... vessels from the hazards associated with golf balls being hit from land onto a stationary barge in the...

  20. Electromyographic Patterns during Golf Swing: Activation Sequence Profiling and Prediction of Shot Effectiveness.

    Verikas, Antanas; Vaiciukynas, Evaldas; Gelzinis, Adas; Parker, James; Olsson, M Charlotte

    2016-04-23

    This study analyzes muscle activity, recorded in an eight-channel electromyographic (EMG) signal stream, during the golf swing using a 7-iron club and exploits information extracted from EMG dynamics to predict the success of the resulting shot. Muscles of the arm and shoulder on both the left and right sides, namely flexor carpi radialis, extensor digitorum communis, rhomboideus and trapezius, are considered for 15 golf players (∼5 shots each). The method using Gaussian filtering is outlined for EMG onset time estimation in each channel and activation sequence profiling. Shots of each player revealed a persistent pattern of muscle activation. Profiles were plotted and insights with respect to player effectiveness were provided. Inspection of EMG dynamics revealed a pair of highest peaks in each channel as the hallmark of golf swing, and a custom application of peak detection for automatic extraction of swing segment was introduced. Various EMG features, encompassing 22 feature sets, were constructed. Feature sets were used individually and also in decision-level fusion for the prediction of shot effectiveness. The prediction of the target attribute, such as club head speed or ball carry distance, was investigated using random forest as the learner in detection and regression tasks. Detection evaluates the personal effectiveness of a shot with respect to the player-specific average, whereas regression estimates the value of target attribute, using EMG features as predictors. Fusion after decision optimization provided the best results: the equal error rate in detection was 24.3% for the speed and 31.7% for the distance; the mean absolute percentage error in regression was 3.2% for the speed and 6.4% for the distance. Proposed EMG feature sets were found to be useful, especially when used in combination. Rankings of feature sets indicated statistics for muscle activity in both the left and right body sides, correlation-based analysis of EMG dynamics and features

  1. Electromyographic Patterns during Golf Swing: Activation Sequence Profiling and Prediction of Shot Effectiveness

    Antanas Verikas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes muscle activity, recorded in an eight-channel electromyographic (EMG signal stream, during the golf swing using a 7-iron club and exploits information extracted from EMG dynamics to predict the success of the resulting shot. Muscles of the arm and shoulder on both the left and right sides, namely flexor carpi radialis, extensor digitorum communis, rhomboideus and trapezius, are considered for 15 golf players (∼5 shots each. The method using Gaussian filtering is outlined for EMG onset time estimation in each channel and activation sequence profiling. Shots of each player revealed a persistent pattern of muscle activation. Profiles were plotted and insights with respect to player effectiveness were provided. Inspection of EMG dynamics revealed a pair of highest peaks in each channel as the hallmark of golf swing, and a custom application of peak detection for automatic extraction of swing segment was introduced. Various EMG features, encompassing 22 feature sets, were constructed. Feature sets were used individually and also in decision-level fusion for the prediction of shot effectiveness. The prediction of the target attribute, such as club head speed or ball carry distance, was investigated using random forest as the learner in detection and regression tasks. Detection evaluates the personal effectiveness of a shot with respect to the player-specific average, whereas regression estimates the value of target attribute, using EMG features as predictors. Fusion after decision optimization provided the best results: the equal error rate in detection was 24.3% for the speed and 31.7% for the distance; the mean absolute percentage error in regression was 3.2% for the speed and 6.4% for the distance. Proposed EMG feature sets were found to be useful, especially when used in combination. Rankings of feature sets indicated statistics for muscle activity in both the left and right body sides, correlation-based analysis of EMG

  2. An operation management system for golf tournament

    Yuan Yijun

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper,an operation management system for golf tournament is designed to calculate the beginning and finishing dates of the preparation automatically.The efficiency of management work during preparatory period,such as meetings before match and task announcement,is raised by nearly 40% after using our system than using traditional management tools or other software systems.And the probability of occurrence of delay and omission of work are controlled within 5%.It is proved to be helpful for reducing management costs and improving efficiency of tournament management company.

  3. Blood pressure 1 year after stroke: the need to optimize secondary prevention

    Hornnes, Nete; Larsen, Klaus; Boysen, Gudrun

    2011-01-01

    Lowering blood pressure (BP) in stroke survivors reduces the risk of recurrent stroke. We tested the hypothesis that a nurse-led nonpharmacologic intervention would lower the BP of participants in an intervention group compared with a control group. A total of 349 patients who had sustained acute...... with antihypertensive therapy, and 92% of the hypertensive patients in the intervention group followed the advice to see a general practitioner (GP) for BP checkups. At follow-up, 187 patients (62%) were hypertensive, with no difference in the rate of hypertension seen between the groups. Our data indicate that home...... visits by nurses did not result in a lowering of BP. Patients complied with antihypertensive therapy and GP visits in the case of hypertension. Nonetheless, the majority of patients were hypertensive at the 1-year follow up....

  4. Toward Optimization of Gaze-Controlled Human-Computer Interaction: Application to Hindi Virtual Keyboard for Stroke Patients.

    Meena, Yogesh Kumar; Cecotti, Hubert; Wong-Lin, Kongfatt; Dutta, Ashish; Prasad, Girijesh

    2018-04-01

    Virtual keyboard applications and alternative communication devices provide new means of communication to assist disabled people. To date, virtual keyboard optimization schemes based on script-specific information, along with multimodal input access facility, are limited. In this paper, we propose a novel method for optimizing the position of the displayed items for gaze-controlled tree-based menu selection systems by considering a combination of letter frequency and command selection time. The optimized graphical user interface layout has been designed for a Hindi language virtual keyboard based on a menu wherein 10 commands provide access to type 88 different characters, along with additional text editing commands. The system can be controlled in two different modes: eye-tracking alone and eye-tracking with an access soft-switch. Five different keyboard layouts have been presented and evaluated with ten healthy participants. Furthermore, the two best performing keyboard layouts have been evaluated with eye-tracking alone on ten stroke patients. The overall performance analysis demonstrated significantly superior typing performance, high usability (87% SUS score), and low workload (NASA TLX with 17 scores) for the letter frequency and time-based organization with script specific arrangement design. This paper represents the first optimized gaze-controlled Hindi virtual keyboard, which can be extended to other languages.

  5. Pediatric Stroke

    ... and Patient Resources Home » Patients & Families » About Stroke » Pediatric Stroke » Introduction Introduction What is a Stroke? Ischemic Stroke Intracerebral Hemorrhage Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Pediatric Stroke Introduction Types of Stroke Diagnosis and Treatment ...

  6. Golf-related injuries treated in United States emergency departments.

    Walsh, Brittany A; Chounthirath, Thiphalak; Friedenberg, Laura; Smith, Gary A

    2017-11-01

    This study investigates unintentional non-fatal golf-related injuries in the US using a nationally representative database. This study analyzed golf-related injuries treated in US hospital emergency departments from 1990 through 2011 using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System database. Injury rates were calculated using golf participation data. During 1990 through 2011, an estimated 663,471 (95% CI: 496,370-830,573) individuals ≥7years old were treated in US emergency departments for golf-related injuries, averaging 30,158 annually or 12.3 individuals per 10,000 golf participants. Patients 18-54years old accounted for 42.2% of injuries, but injury rates per 10,000 golf participants were highest among individuals 7-17years old (22.1) and ≥55years old (21.8) compared with 18-54years old (7.6). Patients ≥55years old had a hospital admission rate that was 5.01 (95% CI: 4.12-6.09) times higher than that of younger patients. Injured by a golf club (23.4%) or struck by a golf ball (16.0%) were the most common specified mechanisms of injury. The head/neck was the most frequently injured body region (36.2%), and sprain/strain (30.6%) was the most common type of injury. Most patients were treated and released (93.7%) and 5.9% required hospitalization. Although golf is a source of injury among all age groups, the frequency and rate of injury were higher at the two ends of the age spectrum. Given the higher injury and hospital admission rates of patients ≥55years, this age group merits the special attention of additional research and injury prevention efforts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An Approach to the Prototyping of an Optimized Limited Stroke Actuator to Drive a Low Pressure Exhaust Gas Recirculation Valve.

    Gutfrind, Christophe; Dufour, Laurent; Liebart, Vincent; Vannier, Jean-Claude; Vidal, Pierre

    2016-05-20

    The purpose of this article is to describe the design of a limited stroke actuator and the corresponding prototype to drive a Low Pressure (LP) Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) valve for use in Internal Combustion Engines (ICEs). The direct drive actuator topology is an axial flux machine with two air gaps in order to minimize the rotor inertia and a bipolar surface-mounted permanent magnet in order to respect an 80° angular stroke. Firstly, the actuator will be described and optimized under constraints of a 150 ms time response, a 0.363 N·m minimal torque on an angular range from 0° to 80° and prototyping constraints. Secondly, the finite element method (FEM) using the FLUX-3D(®) software (CEDRAT, Meylan, France) will be used to check the actuator performances with consideration of the nonlinear effect of the iron material. Thirdly, a prototype will be made and characterized to compare its measurement results with the analytical model and the FEM model results. With these electromechanical behavior measurements, a numerical model is created with Simulink(®) in order to simulate an EGR system with this direct drive actuator under all operating conditions. Last but not least, the energy consumption of this machine will be estimated to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed EGR electromechanical system.

  8. Defining Optimal Aerobic Exercise Parameters to Affect Complex Motor and Cognitive Outcomes after Stroke: A Systematic Review and Synthesis

    S. M. Mahmudul Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although poststroke aerobic exercise (AE increases markers of neuroplasticity and protects perilesional tissue, the degree to which it enhances complex motor or cognitive outcomes is unknown. Previous research suggests that timing and dosage of exercise may be important. We synthesized data from clinical and animal studies in order to determine optimal AE training parameters and recovery outcomes for future research. Using predefined criteria, we included clinical trials of stroke of any type or duration and animal studies employing any established models of stroke. Of the 5,259 titles returned, 52 articles met our criteria, measuring the effects of AE on balance, lower extremity coordination, upper limb motor skills, learning, processing speed, memory, and executive function. We found that early-initiated low-to-moderate intensity AE improved locomotor coordination in rodents. In clinical trials, AE improved balance and lower limb coordination irrespective of intervention modality or parameter. In contrast, fine upper limb recovery was relatively resistant to AE. In terms of cognitive outcomes, poststroke AE in animals improved memory and learning, except when training was too intense. However, in clinical trials, combined training protocols more consistently improved cognition. We noted a paucity of studies examining the benefits of AE on recovery beyond cessation of the intervention.

  9. An Approach to the Prototyping of an Optimized Limited Stroke Actuator to Drive a Low Pressure Exhaust Gas Recirculation Valve

    Gutfrind, Christophe; Dufour, Laurent; Liebart, Vincent; Vannier, Jean-Claude; Vidal, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the design of a limited stroke actuator and the corresponding prototype to drive a Low Pressure (LP) Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) valve for use in Internal Combustion Engines (ICEs). The direct drive actuator topology is an axial flux machine with two air gaps in order to minimize the rotor inertia and a bipolar surface-mounted permanent magnet in order to respect an 80° angular stroke. Firstly, the actuator will be described and optimized under constraints of a 150 ms time response, a 0.363 N·m minimal torque on an angular range from 0° to 80° and prototyping constraints. Secondly, the finite element method (FEM) using the FLUX-3D® software (CEDRAT, Meylan, France) will be used to check the actuator performances with consideration of the nonlinear effect of the iron material. Thirdly, a prototype will be made and characterized to compare its measurement results with the analytical model and the FEM model results. With these electromechanical behavior measurements, a numerical model is created with Simulink® in order to simulate an EGR system with this direct drive actuator under all operating conditions. Last but not least, the energy consumption of this machine will be estimated to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed EGR electromechanical system. PMID:27213398

  10. THE SOCIAL LEGITIMACY OF GOLF TOURISM: AN APPLICATION TO THE GOLF COURSES OF ANDALUSIA

    Francisco Riquel-Ligero

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, respect for the natural environmental is a variable that plays animportant role when it comes to configuring a tourist destination orproduct, particularly since this is an industry for which the location isirrevocably fixed. Andalusia, in particular, has become well-establishedas a major golf tourism destination. It has more golf courses than anyother of the 17 Spanish Autonomous Regions. This has stimulated adebate on the environmental impacts of sporting facilities of this type,with attention consequently focused on the need of these tourismcompanies to achieve and maintain social legitimacy. In the workdescribed here, the Partial Least Squares (PLS technique is applied to analyse the impact of the institutional context on the implementation of environmental practices and the achievement of social legitimacy by these organisations.

  11. Optimization of a Clinically Relevant Model of White Matter Stroke in Mice: Histological and Functional Evidences

    Ahmad, Abdullah S.; Satriotomo, Irawan; Fazal, Jawad A.; Nadeau, Stephen E.; Doré, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose White matter (WM) injury during stroke increases the risk of disability and gloomy prognosis of post-stroke rehabilitation. However, modeling of WM loss in rodents has proven to be challenging. Methods We report improved WM injury models in male C57BL/6 mice. Mice were given either endothelin-1 (ET-1) or L-N5-(1-iminoethyl)ornitine (L-NIO) into the periventricular white matter (PVWM), in the corpus callosum (CC), or in the posterior limb of internal capsule (PLIC). Anatomical and functional outcomes were quantified on day 7 post injection. Results Injection of ET-1 or L-NIO caused a small focal lesion in the injection site in the PVWM. No significant motor function deficits were observed in the PVWM lesion model. We next targeted the PLIC by using single or double injections of L-NIO and found that this strategy induced small focal infarction. Interestingly, injection of L-NIO in the PLIC also resulted in gliosis, and significant motor function deficits. Conclusions By employing different agents, doses, and locations, this study shows the feasibility of inducing brain WM injury accompanied with functional deficits in mice. Selective targeting of the injury location, behavioral testing, and the agents chosen to induce WM injury are all keys to successfully develop a mouse model and subsequent testing of therapeutic interventions against WM injury. PMID:27512724

  12. Golf science research at the beginning of the twenty-first century.

    Farrally, M R; Cochran, A J; Crews, D J; Hurdzan, M J; Price, R J; Snow, J T; Thomas, P R

    2003-09-01

    At the beginning of the twenty-first century, there are 30,000 golf courses and 55 million people who play golf worldwide. In the USA alone, the value of golf club memberships sold in the 1990s was US dollar 3.2 billion. Underpinning this significant human activity is a wide variety of people researching and applying science to sustain and develop the game. The 11 golf science disciplines recognized by the World Scientific Congress of Golf have reported 311 papers at four world congresses since 1990. Additionally, scientific papers have been published in discipline-specific peer-reviewed journals, research has been sponsored by the two governing bodies of golf, the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews and the United States Golf Association, and confidential research is undertaken by commercial companies, especially equipment manufacturers. This paper reviews much of this human endeavour and points the way forward for future research into golf.

  13. Golf tourism in South Africa: Profiling attendees at a major ...

    Golf tourism in South Africa: Profiling attendees at a major championship event. ... from the less developed and developing context from an impact perspective. ... participated in various tourism activities that contributed to the local economy.

  14. Ejection of a rear facing, golf cart passenger.

    Schau, Kyle; Masory, Oren

    2013-10-01

    The following report details the findings of a series of experiments and simulations performed on a commercially available, shuttle style golf cart during several maneuvers involving rapid accelerations of the vehicle. It is determined that the current set of passive restraints on these types of golf carts are not adequate in preventing ejection of a rear facing passenger during rapid accelerations in the forward and lateral directions. Experimental data and simulations show that a hip restraint must be a minimum of 13 in. above the seat in order to secure a rear facing passenger during sharp turns, compared to the current restraint height of 5 in. Furthermore, it is determined that a restraint directly in front of the rear facing passenger is necessary to prevent ejection. In addressing these issues, golf cart manufacturers could greatly reduce the likelihood of injury due to ejection of a rear facing, golf cart passenger. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Golf in the United States: an evolution of accessibility.

    Parziale, John R

    2014-09-01

    Golf affords physical and psychological benefits to persons who are physically challenged. Advances in adaptive technology, changes in golf course design, and rules modifications have enabled persons with neurological, musculoskeletal, and other impairments to play golf at a recreational, elite amateur, or professional level. The Americans with Disabilities Act has been cited in both federal and US Supreme Court rulings that have improved access for physically challenged golfers. Medical specialties, including physiatry, have played an important role in this process. This article reviews the history of golf's improvements in accessibility, and provides clinicians and physically challenged golfers with information that will facilitate participation in the sport. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Increasing Minority Golf Participation Through PGA Education Initiatives

    Jill Fjelstul

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The article provides a report on the successful acquisition of the Professional Golfers Association of America (PGA golf management university program by the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore (UMES. The PGA’s accredited program is housed at 20 universities with UMES being the first predominantly Black college to offer the coveted program. The article provides interview excerpts on the process undertaken by UMES. The article also identifies initiatives by programs and associations to increase minority golf participation.

  17. Ranking prediction model using the competition record of Ladies Professional Golf Association players.

    Chae, Jin Seok; Park, Jin; So, Wi-Young

    2017-07-28

    The purpose of this study was to suggest a ranking prediction model using the competition record of the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) players. The top 100 players on the tour money list from the 2013-2016 US Open were analyzed in this model. Stepwise regression analysis was conducted to examine the effect of performance and independent variables (i.e., driving accuracy, green in regulation, putts per round, driving distance, percentage of sand saves, par-3 average, par-4 average, par-5 average, birdies average, and eagle average) on dependent variables (i.e., scoring average, official money, top-10 finishes, winning percentage, and 60-strokes average). The following prediction model was suggested:Y (Scoring average) = 55.871 - 0.947 (Birdies average) + 4.576 (Par-4 average) - 0.028 (Green in regulation) - 0.012 (Percentage of sand saves) + 2.088 (Par-3 average) - 0.026 (Driving accuracy) - 0.017 (Driving distance) + 0.085 (Putts per round)Y (Official money) = 6628736.723 + 528557.907 (Birdies average) - 1831800.821 (Par-4 average) + 11681.739 (Green in regulation) + 6476.344 (Percentage of sand saves) - 688115.074 (Par-3 average) + 7375.971 (Driving accuracy)Y (Top-10 finish%) = 204.462 + 12.562 (Birdies average) - 47.745 (Par-4 average) + 1.633 (Green in regulation) - 5.151 (Putts per round) + 0.132 (Percentage of sand saves)Y (Winning percentage) = 49.949 + 3.191 (Birdies average) - 15.023 (Par-4 average) + 0.043 (Percentage of sand saves)Y (60-strokes average) = 217.649 + 13.978 (Birdies average) - 44.855 (Par-4 average) - 22.433 (Par-3 average) + 0.16 (Green in regulation)Scoring of the above five prediction models and the prediction of golf ranking in the 2016 Women's Golf Olympic competition in Rio revealed a significant correlation between the predicted and real ranking (r = 0.689, p ranking prediction model using LPGA data may help coaches and players to identify which players are likely to participate in Olympic and World competitions, based

  18. Estimated Colorado Golf Course Irrigation Water Use, 2005

    Ivahnenko, Tamara

    2009-01-01

    Golf course irrigation water-use data were collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Use Program's 2005 compilation to provide baseline information, as no golf course irrigation water-use data (separate from crop irrigation) have been reported in previous compilations. A Web-based survey, designed by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Rocky Mountain Golf Course Superintendents Association (RMGCSA), was electronically distributed by the association to the 237 members in Colorado. Forty-three percent of the members returned the survey, and additional source water information was collected by telephone for all but 20 of the 245 association member and non-member Colorado golf courses. For golf courses where no data were collected at all, an average 'per hole' coefficient, based on returned surveys from that same county, were applied. In counties where no data were collected at all, a State average 'per hole' value of 13.2 acre-feet was used as the coefficient. In 2005, Colorado had 243 turf golf courses (there are 2 sand courses in the State) that had an estimated 2.27 acre-feet per irrigated course acre, and 65 percent of the source water for these courses was surface water. Ground water, potable water (public supply), and reclaimed wastewater, either partially or wholly, were source waters for the remaining courses. Fifty-three of the 64 counties in Colorado have at least one golf course, with the greatest number of courses in Jefferson (23 courses), Arapahoe (22 courses), and El Paso Counties (20 courses). In 2005, an estimated 5,647.8 acre-feet in Jefferson County, 5,402 acre-feet in Arapahoe County, and 4,473.3 acre-feet in El Paso County were used to irrigate the turf grass.

  19. Burrowing owl nesting productivity: A comparison between artificial and natural burrows on and off golf courses

    Smith, M.D.; Conway, C.J.; Ellis, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia) populations are declining in many portions of their range, and lack of suitable nesting burrows is thought to be one reason for observed declines. Burrowing owls are attracted to golf courses because the birds generally nest and forage in short-grass, open areas, yet golf courses seldom have suitable nesting burrows. We examined the efficacy of installing artificial nesting burrows on golf courses as a way to help restore local burrowing owl populations. From 2001-2004 we monitored over 175 natural burrows off golf courses, 14 natural burrows on golf courses, 86 artificial burrows off golf courses, and 130 artificial burrows on golf courses. Owls located and used 8 of the 130 artificial burrows installed on golf courses (4 were used as nests). Owls selected burrows that were closer to existing natural burrows, farther from maintained areas (areas receiving turf maintenance by golf course staff), and farther from sprinkler heads. All 4 of the artificial burrows used as nests successfully fledged young, and annual site fidelity for owls nesting on golf courses was higher than for owls nesting off golf courses. However, annual fecundity of owls nesting on golf courses was lower than that of owls nesting off golf courses. If golf courses have sufficiently large nonmaintained areas and there are nesting owls nearby, course managers potentially can help in restoring local burrowing owl populations by installing artificial nesting burrows on the periphery of the course. However, the low fecundity on golf courses reported here should be more thoroughly examined before artificial burrows are used to attract owls to golf courses.

  20. Korean Golf Tourism in China: Place, Perception and Narratives

    Jinah Park

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is a critical, cross-cultural social behavior in contemporary society and provides diverse experiences based on different regional resources in destinations. This research identified the attributes associated with Korean golf tourists’ images of seven destination regions in Mainland China. A content analysis of 328 golf tourists’ blogs indicated that each region had different combinations of destination attributes, but these were partially hidden in vivid descriptions of playing experiences. The narratives were coded with 15 golf destination attributes with 136 headwords and they reflected both place-centred images and interactions through perceptual experiences with different social groups. The golfers greatly appreciated congestion control at courses and social interaction during their tours, including the services of local human resources and play partners. The seven Chinese golf destinations had different perceived characteristics and relationships with South Korean society. Thus, they had dissimilar destination images for Korean golf tourists. Historical ties and geographical proximity played important roles, including, for example, the significant presence of ethnic Koreans in northeast China.

  1. WORK AND POWER ANALYSIS OF THE GOLF SWING

    Steven M. Nesbit

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A work and power (energy analysis of the golf swing is presented as a method for evaluating the mechanics of the golf swing. Two computer models were used to estimate the energy production, transfers, and conversions within the body and the golf club by employing standard methods of mechanics to calculate work of forces and torques, kinetic energies, strain energies, and power during the golf swing. A detailed model of the golf club determined the energy transfers and conversions within the club during the downswing. A full-body computer model of the golfer determined the internal work produced at the body joints during the downswing. Four diverse amateur subjects were analyzed and compared using these two models. The energy approach yielded new information on swing mechanics, determined the force and torque components that accelerated the club, illustrated which segments of the body produced work, determined the timing of internal work generation, measured swing efficiencies, calculated shaft energy storage and release, and proved that forces and range of motion were equally important in developing club head velocity. A more comprehensive description of the downswing emerged from information derived from an energy based analysis

  2. Reuse of reclaimed wastewater for golf course irrigation in Tunisia.

    Bahri, A; Basset, C; Oueslati, F; Brissaud, F

    2001-01-01

    In Tunisia, golf courses are irrigated with secondary treated effluent stored in landscape impoundments. The impact of the conveyance and storage steps on the physical-chemical and biological quality of irrigation water was evaluated on three golf courses over two years. It was found that the water quality varies all along the water route, from the wastewater treatment plant up to the irrigation site: nutrient and bacteria contents decreased along the route in the three cases. This variation depends on the wastewater quality, the length of the pipes conveying water, the number of regulation reservoirs and ponds, the water residence time in pipes, reservoirs and ponds, and the operation of the ponds. The bacteriological quality of irrigation water deteriorates during the irrigation period in the three golf courses as the ponds are operated as continuous flow reactors. The results obtained in this study indicate the inability of golf water supplies, as currently managed, to properly sanitize reclaimed wastewater and meet target quality criteria recommended by WHO (1989) for water intended for recreational use. For a safe reuse of reclaimed wastewater for golf course irrigation, changes in the design and operation of the ponds should be planned or additional treatment steps provided.

  3. Golf Blue-e-Motion. The electric Volkswagen; Golf Blue-e-Motion. Der elektrische Volkswagen

    Hadler, Jens; Neusser, Heinz-Jakob; Jelden, Hanno; Lueck, Peter; Tousen, Jonas [Volkswagen AG, Wolfsburg (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    The particular challenges of our time require a consistent focus on the development activities of powertrain technologies with continuously reduced fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. The past years have seen many technological milestones by Volkswagen's Powertrain Development as illustrated by the exceptional success of the TSI and TDI engines as well as the double clutch transmissions. As a part of this comprehensive list of powertrain strategy, the development of drivetrains for alternative fuels, such as CNG, has also been included. With particular emphasis Volkswagen is pressing forward the electrification of the drivetrain with the goal of appealing to more customers through these new technologies. A milestone of the electrification activity is the Golf Blue-e-Motion, in which the comfort and especially the city driving performance are improved compared with the conventional vehicle. This driving performance is achieved by an electric drivetrain which consists of a permanent magnet synchronous electric motor together with associated power electronics and a Li-Ion battery. This presentation will pay particular attention to the characteristics of the drivetrain system and its components. The efficient powertrain including the recovering of braking energy (recuperation) as well as the attention paid on optimising all system components, has increased the driving range of the vehicle. Environmental awareness and driving pleasure - the electric drivetrain of the Golf Blue-e-Motion shows that these both requirements are possible to be realised by an electric drivetrain. (orig.)

  4. Blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol targets for prevention of recurrent strokes and cognitive decline in the hypertensive patient: design of the European Society of Hypertension-Chinese Hypertension League Stroke in Hypertension Optimal Treatment randomized trial.

    Zanchetti, Alberto; Liu, Lisheng; Mancia, Giuseppe; Parati, Gianfranco; Grassi, Guido; Stramba-Badiale, Marco; Silani, Vincenzo; Bilo, Grzegorz; Corrao, Giovanni; Zambon, Antonella; Scotti, Lorenza; Zhang, Xinhua; Wang, HayYan; Zhang, Yuqing; Zhang, Xuezhong; Guan, Ting Rui; Berge, Eivind; Redon, Josep; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Dominiczak, Anna; Nilsson, Peter; Viigimaa, Margus; Laurent, Stéphane; Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico; Wu, Zhaosu; Zhu, Dingliang; Rodicio, José Luis; Ruilope, Luis Miguel; Martell-Claros, Nieves; Pinto, Fernando; Schmieder, Roland E; Burnier, Michel; Banach, Maciej; Cifkova, Renata; Farsang, Csaba; Konradi, Alexandra; Lazareva, Irina; Sirenko, Yuriy; Dorobantu, Maria; Postadzhiyan, Arman; Accetto, Rok; Jelakovic, Bojan; Lovic, Dragan; Manolis, Athanasios J; Stylianou, Philippos; Erdine, Serap; Dicker, Dror; Wei, Gangzhi; Xu, Chengbin; Xie, Hengge; Coca, Antonio; O'Brien, John; Ford, Gary

    2014-09-01

    The SBP values to be achieved by antihypertensive therapy in order to maximize reduction of cardiovascular outcomes are unknown; neither is it clear whether in patients with a previous cardiovascular event, the optimal values are lower than in the low-to-moderate risk hypertensive patients, or a more cautious blood pressure (BP) reduction should be obtained. Because of the uncertainty whether 'the lower the better' or the 'J-curve' hypothesis is correct, the European Society of Hypertension and the Chinese Hypertension League have promoted a randomized trial comparing antihypertensive treatment strategies aiming at three different SBP targets in hypertensive patients with a recent stroke or transient ischaemic attack. As the optimal level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level is also unknown in these patients, LDL-C-lowering has been included in the design. The European Society of Hypertension-Chinese Hypertension League Stroke in Hypertension Optimal Treatment trial is a prospective multinational, randomized trial with a 3 × 2 factorial design comparing: three different SBP targets (1, hypertension and a stroke or transient ischaemic attack 1-6 months before randomization. Antihypertensive and statin treatments will be initiated or modified using suitable registered agents chosen by the investigators, in order to maintain patients within the randomized SBP and LDL-C windows. All patients will be followed up every 3 months for BP and every 6 months for LDL-C. Ambulatory BP will be measured yearly. Primary outcome is time to stroke (fatal and non-fatal). Important secondary outcomes are: time to first major cardiovascular event; cognitive decline (Montreal Cognitive Assessment) and dementia. All major outcomes will be adjudicated by committees blind to randomized allocation. A Data and Safety Monitoring Board has open access to data and can recommend trial interruption for safety. It has been calculated that 925 patients would reach the primary

  5. Export of nutrients from golf courses on the Precambrian Shield

    Winter, Jennifer G.; Dillon, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    Annual export rates, or fluxes, of total nitrogen (TN), nitrate, total phosphorus (TP) and potassium from four streams on two golf courses on the Precambrian Shield were compared with those from forested reference locations. Overall, the mean annual fluxes of K, TN, NO 3 and TP from golf courses were greater than from forested areas by 10, 2, 6 and 2 times, respectively. The overall mean export coefficients (kg/ha/yr) were 16 for K, 5.2 for TN, 2.1 for NO 3 and 0.14 for TP. For TN and TP, these are similar to those reported from cropland in Canada by Chambers and Dale (1997. Contribution of industrial, municipal, agricultural and groundwater sources to nutrient export, Athabasca, Wapiti and Smoky Rivers, 1980 to 1993. Northern River Basins Study Project Report No. 110. Northern River Basins Study, Edmonton, Alberta). -- Golf courses increase nutrient loads in receiving streams

  6. KARAKTERISTIK KOMUNITAS NEMATODA DI PADANG GOLF SUKARAME (PGS BANDAR LAMPUNG

    I Gede Swibawa dan Titik Nur Aeny .

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Characteristic of  Nematodes Community at PGS Golf Course Bandar Lampung. Golf course is a unique ecosystem where plant parasitic nematodes inhabit and become  important pest because they reduce the quality of the grass.  The pest problems on golf course can be indicated by its characteristics of nematode community.  Survey on nematodes community at PGS Golf Course Bandar Lampung was conducted from March to December 2004.  The objective was to study the characteristics of nematode community in the part of golf courses hole (green, collar, apron, and fairway.  Soil samples were taken from five holes each of it consists of green, collar, apron, and fairway, respectiveley.  Nematodes extraction was done in Laboratory of Arthropod Pest, Department of Plant Protection University of Lampung.   The result showed that at least 50 nematodes genera of 28 families inhabit PGS. The number of plant parasitic nematode genera was higher than the free-living one.  The characteristic of nematodes community on green and collar was different than on faiway. Nematode abundance and diversity on green and collar were higher than on fairway.  Based on abundance of nematode feeding group, maturity index of free-living nematodes (MI and that of plant parasitic nematodes (PPI, green and collar part seemed to be more favorable to plant parasitic nematodes than free-living nematodes. The contrary happened for fairway.  Four most dominant genera of plant parasitic nematodes on PGS golf course were Helicotylenchus, Hoplolaimus, Criconemella, and Xiphinema.

  7. Energy expenditure and sex differences of golf playing.

    Zunzer, Stefan C; von Duvillard, Serge P; Tschakert, Gerhard; Mangus, Brent; Hofmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the average physical intensity and energy expenditure during a single round of golf on hilly and flat courses in a heterogeneous group of healthy men and women of varying age and golf handicap. Forty-two males and 24 females completed an incremental cycle-ergometer exercise test to determine exercise performance markers. The heart rate (HR), duration, distance, walking speed, ascent and descent were measured via a global positioning system (GPS)/HR monitor during the game and energy expenditure was calculated. Playing 9 or 18-holes of golf, independent of the golf course design, the average HR was not significantly different between sexes or the subgroups. The intensities were light with respect to the percentage of maximal HR and metabolic equivalents of task (METs). Total energy expenditure of all participants was not significantly different for hilly (834 ± 344 kcal) vs. flat courses (833 ± 295 kcal) whereas male players expended significantly greater energy than female players (926 ± 292 vs. 556 ± 180 kcal), but did not have significantly greater relative energy expenditure (2.8 ± 0.8 vs. 2.2 ± 0.7 METs). As a high volume physical activity, playing golf is suggested to yield health benefits. Since the intensity was well below recommended limits, golf may have health related benefits unrelated to the intensity level of the activity.

  8. Stroke Treatments

    ... Stroke Association.org Professionals for Stroke Association.org Shop for Stroke Association.org Support for Stroke Association. ... works by dissolving the clot and improving blood flow to the part of the brain being deprived ...

  9. Effects of golden hour thrombolysis: a Prehospital Acute Neurological Treatment and Optimization of Medical Care in Stroke (PHANTOM-S) substudy.

    Ebinger, Martin; Kunz, Alexander; Wendt, Matthias; Rozanski, Michal; Winter, Benjamin; Waldschmidt, Carolin; Weber, Joachim; Villringer, Kersten; Fiebach, Jochen B; Audebert, Heinrich J

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke is time dependent. The effects are likely to be highest if the time from symptom onset to treatment is within 60 minutes, termed the golden hour. To determine the achievable rate of golden hour thrombolysis in prehospital care and its effect on outcome. The prospective controlled Prehospital Acute Neurological Treatment and Optimization of Medical Care in Stroke study was conducted in Berlin, Germany, within an established infrastructure for stroke care. Weeks were randomized according to the availability of a specialized ambulance (stroke emergency mobile unit (STEMO) from May 1, 2011, through January 31, 2013. We included 6182 consecutive adult patients for whom a stroke dispatch (44.1% male; mean [SD] age, 73.9 [15.0] years) or regular care (45.0% male; mean [SD] age, 74.2 [14.9] years) were included. The STEMO was deployed when the dispatchers suspected an acute stroke during emergency calls. If STEMO was not available (during control weeks, when the unit was already in operation, or during maintenance), patients received conventional care. The STEMO is equipped with a computed tomographic scanner plus a point-of-care laboratory and telemedicine connection. The unit is staffed with a neurologist trained in emergency medicine, a paramedic, and a technician. Thrombolysis was started in STEMO if a stroke was confirmed and no contraindication was found. Rates of golden hour thrombolysis, 7- and 90-day mortality, secondary intracerebral hemorrhage, and discharge home. Thrombolysis rates in ischemic stroke were 200 of 614 patients (32.6%) when STEMO was deployed and 330 of 1497 patients (22.0%) when conventional care was administered (P golden hour thrombolysis was 6-fold higher after STEMO deployment (62 of 200 patients [31.0%] vs 16 of 330 [4.9%]; P golden hour thrombolysis had no higher risks for 7- or 90-day mortality (adjusted odds ratios, 0.38 [95% CI, 0.09-1.70]; P = .21 and 0.69 [95% CI

  10. A comparative study of golf industry between Yangtze River Delta, China and Central Japan

    Yang, Yangfan; Jin, Pingbin; Gong, Huiwen

    2018-03-01

    As a competition event of the 2016 Olympic Game, golf sport has aroused great attention around the world. And the Yangtze River Delta(YRD) in China, has already got certain basis and qualifications of developing golf industry, but somehow far from meeting the great potential demand of the market. This research selects the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) and Central Japan (CJ), which are indifferent golf developing stages, as the objectives. Comparative studies are being carried out with an aim of revealing the discrepancies of golf industry in selected regions. The correlations between golf industry and regional economic developing level have been explored as well. Mainly based on a geographical perspective, this research presents an initial effort to combine approaches of setting comparative indexes and spatial analysis, so that golf industry of selected regions will be compared in all directions. The results reveal that great gaps exist in YRD and CJ in terms of golf construction, service, and golf consumption. Problems in developing golf industry in YRD are identified based on the empirical results. A long-term golf development in YRD that deviating from the realistic demand is attributed to both government policies and the operational principles that the market subjects hold. Based on a comparative empirical study, suggestions relating to the government as well as the market players are put forward, with an aim of guiding the golf industry to develop in a sustainable way.

  11. Assessment of head injury of children due to golf ball impact.

    Lee, Heow Pueh; Wang, Fang

    2010-10-01

    Head trauma injury due to impact by a flying golf ball is one of the most severe possible injury accidents on the golf course. Numerical simulations based on the finite element method are presented to investigate head injury in children due to impact by a flying golf ball. The stress and energy flow patterns in a head model during the golf ball impact are computed for various combinations of striking speed, falling angle of the golf ball before impact, and impact location. It is found that a child is more prone to head injury due to golf ball impact on the frontal and side/temporal areas. The simulated results are found to conform to the clinical reports on children's head injuries from flying golf balls.

  12. The Development and Validation of a Golf Swing and Putt Skill Assessment for Children

    Lisa M. Barnett, Louise L. Hardy, Ali S. Brian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to describe development of a process-oriented instrument designed to assess the golf swing and putt stroke, and to assess the instrument’s discriminative validity in terms of age and reliability (intra-rater and re-test. A Delphi consultation (with golf industry professionals and researchers in movement skill assessment was used to develop an assessment for each skill based on existing skill assessment protocols. Each skill had six components to be marked as present/absent. Individual scores were based on the number of performance components successfully demonstrated over two trials for each skill (potential score range 0 to 24. Children (n = 43 aged 6-10 years (M = 7.8 years, SD = 1.3 were assessed in both skills live in the field by one rater at Time 1(T1. A subset of children (n = 28 had consent for assessments to be videoed. Six weeks later 19 children were reassessed, five days apart (T2, T3. An ANOVA assessed discriminative validity i.e. whether skill competence at T1 differed by age (6 years, 7/8 years and 9/10 years. Intraclass correlations (ICC assessed intra-rater reliability between the live and video assessment at T1 and test-retest reliability (between T2 and T3. Paired t-tests assessed any systematic differences between live and video assessments (T1 and between T2 and T3. Older children were more skilled (F (2, 40 = 11.18, p < 0.001. The live assessment reflected the video assessment (ICC = 0.79, 95% CI 0.59, 0.90 and scores did not differ between live and video assessments. Test retest reliability was acceptable (ICC = 0.60, 95% CI 0.23, 0.82, although the mean score was slightly higher at retest. This instrument could be used reliably by golf coaches and physical education teachers as part of systematic early player assessment and feedback.

  13. An imaging informatics-based ePR (electronic patient record) system for providing decision support in evaluating dose optimization in stroke rehabilitation

    Liu, Brent J.; Winstein, Carolee; Wang, Ximing; Konersman, Matt; Martinez, Clarisa; Schweighofer, Nicolas

    2012-02-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of death and disability in America. After stroke, about 65% of survivors still suffer from severe paresis, while rehabilitation treatment strategy after stroke plays an essential role in recovery. Currently, there is a clinical trial (NIH award #HD065438) to determine the optimal dose of rehabilitation for persistent recovery of arm and hand paresis. For DOSE (Dose Optimization Stroke Evaluation), laboratory-based measurements, such as the Wolf Motor Function test, behavioral questionnaires (e.g. Motor Activity Log-MAL), and MR, DTI, and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) imaging studies are planned. Current data collection processes are tedious and reside in various standalone systems including hardcopy forms. In order to improve the efficiency of this clinical trial and facilitate decision support, a web-based imaging informatics system has been implemented together with utilizing mobile devices (eg, iPAD, tablet PC's, laptops) for collecting input data and integrating all multi-media data into a single system. The system aims to provide clinical imaging informatics management and a platform to develop tools to predict the treatment effect based on the imaging studies and the treatment dosage with mathematical models. Since there is a large amount of information to be recorded within the DOSE project, the system provides clinical data entry through mobile device applications thus allowing users to collect data at the point of patient interaction without typing into a desktop computer, which is inconvenient. Imaging analysis tools will also be developed for structural MRI, DTI, and TMS imaging studies that will be integrated within the system and correlated with the clinical and behavioral data. This system provides a research platform for future development of mathematical models to evaluate the differences between prediction and reality and thus improve and refine the models rapidly and efficiently.

  14. Cost Benefit Analysis of the Monterey Pines Golf Course

    Zielinski, Matthew

    2000-01-01

    ..., the government-operated course in the Monterey area. The main purpose of this thesis is to examine the costs and benefits of having a government-operated course in Monterey, where the golf market is extremely competitive, and to examine alternatives...

  15. Estonian Golf & Country Club / Liina Jänes

    Jänes, Liina, 1977-

    2005-01-01

    Estonian Golf & Country Club'i etnomodernistlik golfikeskus ja klubihoone Jõelähtmel. Projekteerija: Arhitektuuristuudio Siim & Kreis. Autor Andres Siim. Konstruktor: Resand. Sisekujundaja Juta Lember (SAB Lember & Padar). Projekt 2004, valmis 2005. Ill.: I ja II korruse plaan, 3 värv. välis ja 3 sisevaadet

  16. Estonian Golf & Country Clubi klubihoone / Andres Siim, Alar Just

    Siim, Andres

    2005-01-01

    Harjumaal Jõelähtme vallas rajab Estonian Golf & Country Club uut Jägala-Jõesuu spordi- ja puhkekeskust, mille südameks saab puidust golgiklubi hoone, mida tutvustavad klubihoone arhitekt ja üks inseneridest. Ill.: vaade ehitusele, projekti kaks vaadet, lõige

  17. Acrchery-Golf Guide. June 1974-June 1976.

    Shick, Jacqueline, Ed.; Hague, Andrea, Ed.

    This guide is a collection of essays by various authors on archery and golf. There is a separate section for each sport. In the archery section, the topics covered include archery coaching, aiming, the spine of the arrow, do-it-yourself ideas for archery instruction, archery visual aids, and official rules for various archery activities. The…

  18. Effects of Terrestrial Buffer Zones on Amphibians on Golf Courses

    Puglis, Holly J.; Boone, Michelle D.

    2012-01-01

    A major cause of amphibian declines worldwide is habitat destruction or alteration. Public green spaces, such as golf courses and parks, could serve as safe havens to curb the effects of habitat loss if managed in ways to bolster local amphibian communities. We reared larval Blanchard's cricket frogs (Acris blanchardi) and green frogs (Rana clamitans) in golf course ponds with and without 1 m terrestrial buffer zones, and released marked cricket frog metamorphs at the golf course ponds they were reared in. Larval survival of both species was affected by the presence of a buffer zone, with increased survival for cricket frogs and decreased survival for green frogs when reared in ponds with buffer zones. No marked cricket frog juveniles were recovered at any golf course pond in the following year, suggesting that most animals died or migrated. In a separate study, we released cricket frogs in a terrestrial pen and allowed them to choose between mown and unmown grass. Cricket frogs had a greater probability of using unmown versus mown grass. Our results suggest that incorporating buffer zones around ponds can offer suitable habitat for some amphibian species and can improve the quality of the aquatic environment for some sensitive local amphibians. PMID:22761833

  19. The variable and chaotic nature of professional golf performance.

    Stöckl, Michael; Lamb, Peter F

    2018-05-01

    In golf, unlike most other sports, individual performance is not the result of direct interactions between players. Instead decision-making and performance is influenced by numerous constraining factors affecting each shot. This study looked at the performance of PGA TOUR golfers in 2011 in terms of stability and variability on a shot-by-shot basis. Stability and variability were assessed using Recurrence Quantification Analysis (RQA) and standard deviation, respectively. About 10% of all shots comprised short stable phases of performance (3.7 ± 1.1 shots per stable phase). Stable phases tended to consist of shots of typical performance, rather than poor or exceptional shots; this finding was consistent for all shot categories. Overall, stability measures were not correlated with tournament performance. Variability across all shots was not related to tournament performance; however, variability in tee shots and short approach shots was higher than for other shot categories. Furthermore, tee shot variability was related to tournament standing: decreased variability was associated with better tournament ranking. The findings in this study showed that PGA TOUR golf performance is chaotic. Further research on amateur golf performance is required to determine whether the structure of amateur golf performance is universal.

  20. Electromyography variables during the golf swing: a literature review.

    Marta, Sérgio; Silva, Luís; Castro, Maria António; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro; Cabri, Jan

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the study was to review systematically the literature available on electromyographic (EMG) variables of the golf swing. From the 19 studies found, a high variety of EMG methodologies were reported. With respect to EMG intensity, the right erector spinae seems to be highly activated, especially during the acceleration phase, whereas the oblique abdominal muscles showed moderate to low levels of activation. The pectoralis major, subscapularis and latissimus dorsi muscles of both sides showed their peak activity during the acceleration phase. High muscle activity was found in the forearm muscles, especially in the wrist flexor muscles demonstrating activity levels above the maximal voluntary contraction. In the lower limb higher muscle activity of the trail side was found. There is no consensus on the influence of the golf club used on the neuromuscular patterns described. Furthermore, there is a lack of studies on average golf players, since most studies were executed on professional or low handicap golfers. Further EMG studies are needed, especially on lower limb muscles, to describe golf swing muscle activation patterns and to evaluate timing parameters to characterize neuromuscular patterns responsible for an efficient movement with lowest risk for injury. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Age, psychological skills, and golf performance: a prospective investigation.

    Hayslip, Bert; Petrie, Trent A

    2014-03-01

    This study explored the influence of age in understanding mental skills utilization in the context of performance at a major national golf competition. Participants, who ranged in age and in skill level, included 1150 male and 170 female amateur golfers competing in the Dupont World Amateur Golf Championship in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Measures targeted general mental skills used in competitions, golf-specific skills, and competitive trait anxiety. Hierarchical linear regression was utilized to explore the potential moderating role that chronological age may play in influencing the impact of psychological skills and anxiety on competitive tournament performance across the adult life span. Findings suggested no significant age-moderating effects and instead pointed to the importance of developing golf-specific psychological skills to enhance or maintain performance, irrespective of age. Although automaticity (performance feels "automatic") predicted performance for all golfers, commitment to the game and confidence in one's putting did so only for the men. These findings reinforce the age-irrelevant role of such skills in fostering the experience of peak performance in a competitive sport context and underscore the importance of interventions targeting older players to help maintain or facilitate the use of psychological skills in helping them manage their games.

  2. [Application of near-infrared spectroscopy in golf turfgrass management].

    Li, Shu-Ying; Han, Jian-Guo

    2008-07-01

    The management of golf course is different from other turfs. Its particularity lies in its higher and more precise requirement during maintenance compare with other turfs. In case something happened to turf of golf course, more effective and higher speed detecting and resolution are required. Only the data about turf growth and environment were mastered precisely in time, the friendly environmental and scientific management goal could be completed effectively and economically. The near infrared spectroscopy is a new kind of effective, convenient and non-destructive analytical method in the turfgrass management of golf course in recent years. Many factors of turf-soil system in golf course could be determined by near infrared spectroscopy at the same time. In this paper, the existing literature that use of near infrared spectroscopy to study turfgrass and soil nutrient content, soil hygroscopic moisture, feasible fertilizer application time and rate, to fix the time and volume of irrigation, turfgrass visual quality evaluation, turfgrass disease prediction and prevention were reviewed. Most researchers considered the nutrition condition of turf impacted the visual and playing quality of golf course directly and then indirectly influenced most of assistant cultivation such as fertilization, mowing and irrigation and so on. The using of NIRS can detect the nutrient content of turfgrass effectively and estimate the nutrient is excessive or deficient quickly. And then the feasible time and rate of fertilizers can be decided. Comparing with the common judgment ways based on the season fertilization and visual estimation, the using of NIRS can reduce the application of fertilizers on the base of keeping the same turf quality simultaneously. NIRS can analysis many items of soil such as moisture, elements concentration, textures on the spot by the thousands. This method can get lots of cover-all data non-destructively. What's more, NIRS can analysis soil betimes quickly

  3. Effects of special composite stretching on the swing of amateur golf players.

    Lee, Joong-Chul; Lee, Sung-Wan; Yeo, Yun-Ghi; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The study investigated stretching for safer a golf swing compared to present stretching methods for proper swings in order to examine the effects of stretching exercises on golf swings. [Subjects] The subjects were 20 amateur golf club members who were divided into two groups: an experimental group which performed stretching, and a control group which did not. The subjects had no bone deformity, muscle weakness, muscle soreness, or neurological problems. [Methods] A swing analyzer and a ROM measuring instrument were used as the measuring tools. The swing analyzer was a GS400-golf hit ball analyzer (Korea) and the ROM measuring instrument was a goniometer (Korea). [Results] The experimental group showed a statistically significant improvement in driving distance. After the special stretching training for golf, a statistically significant difference in hit-ball direction deviation after swings were found between the groups. The experimental group showed statistically significant decreases in hit ball direction deviation. After the special stretching training for golf, statistically significant differences in hit-ball speed were found between the groups. The experimental group showed significant increases in hit-ball speed. [Conclusion] To examine the effects of a special stretching program for golf on golf swing-related factors, 20 male amateur golf club members performed a 12-week stretching training program. After the golf stretching training, statistically significant differences were found between the groups in hit-ball driving distance, direction deviation, deflection distance, and speed.

  4. Hazardous materials on golf courses: Experience and knowledge of golf course superintendents and grounds maintenance workers from seven states

    Arcury-Quandt, Alice E.; Gentry, Amanda L.; Marín, Antonio J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The golf course industry has a growing Latino work force. Little occupational health research has addressed this work force. This paper examines golf course superintendents’ and Latino grounds maintenance workers’ pesticide knowledge, beliefs, and safety training. In particular, it focuses on knowledge of and adherence to OSHA Right-to-Know regulations. Methods In person, in-depth interviews were conducted with ten golf course superintendents in five states and with sixteen Latino grounds maintenance workers in four states. Results Few superintendents were in compliance with Right-to-Know regulations or did pesticide safety training with all of their workers. Few workers had any pesticide safety knowledge. Most safety training on golf courses was rudimentary and focused on machine safety, and was usually conducted in the off-season or on rainy days, not before workers were assigned tasks. Conclusions More Right-to-Know training is necessary for superintendents and grounds maintenance workers. Culturally and linguistically appropriate Spanish language materials need to be developed or made more widely available to train workers. Better enforcement of safety and training regulations is necessary. PMID:21360723

  5. Morbidity associated with golf-related injuries among children: findings from a pediatric trauma center.

    Vitale, Melissa A; Mertz, Kristen J; Gaines, Barbara; Zuckerbraun, Noel S

    2011-01-01

    To describe injuries due to golf-related activities among pediatric patients requiring hospital admission. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all sports-related injuries from 2000 to 2006 using a level 1 trauma center database. Of 1005 children admitted with sports-related injuries, 60 (6%) had golf-related injuries. The mean injury severity score was significantly higher for golf-related injuries (11.0) than that for all other sports-related injuries (6.8). Most golf-related injuries occurred in children younger than 12 years (80%), at home (48%), and by a strike from a club (57%) and resulted in trauma to the head or neck (68%). Golf-related injuries, although an infrequent cause of sports-related injuries, have the potential to result in severe injuries, especially in younger children. Preventive efforts should target use of golf clubs by younger children in the home setting.

  6. Gross efficiency during rowing is not affected by stroke rate

    Hofmijster, M.J.; van Soest, A.J.; de Koning, J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: It has been suggested that the optimal stroke rate in rowing is partly determined by the stroke-rate dependence of internal power losses. This should be reflected in a stroke-rate dependency of gross efficiency (e

  7. Optimizing cutoff scores for the Barthel Index and the modified Rankin Scale for defining outcome in acute stroke trials

    Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Stewart, Roy E; Vroomen, Patrick C A J; De Keyser, Jacques; Luijckx, Gert-Jan

    Background and Purpose - There is little agreement on how to assess outcome in acute stroke trials. Cutoff scores for the Barthel Index (BI) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) are frequently arbitrarily chosen to dichotomize favorable and unfavorable outcome. We investigated sensitivity and specificity

  8. Fast component placement with optimized long-stroke passive gravity compensation integrated in a cylindrical/tubular PM actuator

    Paulides, J.J.H.; Encica, L.; Meessen, K.J.; Lomonova, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    Applications such as vibration isolation, gravity compensation, pick-and-place machines, etc., would benefit from (long-stroke) cylindrical/tubular permanent magnet (PM) actuators with integrated passive gravity compensation to minimize the power consumption. As an example, in component placing

  9. Golf and upper limb injuries: a summary and review of the literature

    Pollard Henry P

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Golf is a popular past time that provides exercise with social interaction. However, as with all sports and activities, injury may occur. Many golf-related injuries occur in the upper limb, yet little research on the potential mechanisms of these injuries has been conducted. Objective To review the current literature on golf-related upper limb injuries and report on potential causes of injury as it relates to the golf swing. Discussion An overview of the golf swing is described in terms of its potential to cause the frequently noted injuries. Most injuries occur at impact when the golf club hits the ball. This paper concludes that more research into golf-related upper limb injuries is required to develop a thorough understanding of how injuries occur. Types of research include epidemiology studies, kinematic swing analysis and electromyographic studies of the upper limb during golf. By conducting such research, preventative measures maybe developed to reduce golf related injury.

  10. The role of anxiety in golf putting performance

    Kenny, Ian; MacNamara, Aine; Shafat, Amir; Dunphy, Orla; Murphy, Sinead; O'Connor, Kenneth; Ryan, Tara; Waldron, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    peer-reviewed INTRODUCTION: Anxiety???s influence on performance continues to be one of the main research interests for sport psychologists (Hanin, 2000). It is apparent, though, that there is a lack of empirical research characterising the multi-disciplinary effect of anxiety on sports performance. The current study aimed to ascertain biomechanical (accuracy, movement variability) and psychological (anxiety) markers to determine how anxiety affects golf putting. METHOD: 22 healthy s...

  11. LUMBAR CORSETS CAN DECREASE LUMBAR MOTION IN GOLF SWING

    Koji Hashimoto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Swinging a golf club includes the rotation and extension of the lumbar spine. Golf-related low back pain has been associated with degeneration of the lumbar facet and intervertebral discs, and with spondylolysis. Reflective markers were placed directly onto the skin of 11young male amateur golfers without a previous history of back pain. Using a VICON system (Oxford Metrics, U.K., full golf swings were monitored without a corset (WOC, with a soft corset (SC, and with a hard corset (HC, with each subject taking 3 swings. Changes in the angle between the pelvis and the thorax (maximum range of motion and angular velocity in 3 dimensions (lumbar rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral tilt were analyzed, as was rotation of the hip joint. Peak changes in lumbar extension and rotation occurred just after impact with the ball. The extension angle of the lumbar spine at finish was significantly lower under SC (38° or HC (28° than under WOC (44° conditions (p < 0.05. The maximum angular velocity after impact was significantly smaller under HC (94°/sec than under SC (177°/sec and WOC (191° /sec conditions, as were the lumbar rotation angles at top and finish. In contrast, right hip rotation angles at top showed a compensatory increase under HC conditions. Wearing a lumbar corset while swinging a golf club can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles from impact until the end of the swing. These effects were significantly enhanced while wearing an HC

  12. Epidemiology of golf related musculo-skeletal injuries

    Dhillon Mandeep

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Golfing has become an increasingly popular sport enjoyed by both men and women. Although the game is not viewed as hazardous, golfers do sustain injuries connected with the game. However, golf injuries have received little attention in the literature and there is no study from Asia. Methods : A prospective study was undertaken to analyze the incidence, cause and type of injury among amateur golfers. Open ended questionnaires were sent to 1000 golfers; 240 responded (Av age 51 years, 200 males and 40 females. The respondents played an average of 2 rounds per week. Results : One hundered and ten (46% responders had sustained one or more orthopaedic injuries. Both among men and women, the lower back was the most common site of injury followed by shoulder and dorsal spine. There was a difference in the injury pattern in skilled and relatively unskilled players. Lack of warm up, excessive practice and improper swing mechanics were the most common causes. Conclusion : Golf injuries perhaps could be prevented or reduced by proper technique, controlled practice routines, physical conditioning and pre-play stretching exercises. The most important factor in this playing population seems to be prevention.

  13. Distance and slope constraints: adaptation and variability in golf putting.

    Dias, Gonçalo; Couceiro, Micael S; Barreiros, João; Clemente, Filipe M; Mendes, Rui; Martins, Fernando M

    2014-07-01

    The main objective of this study is to understand the adaptation to external constraints and the effects of variability in a golf putting task. We describe the adaptation of relevant variables of golf putting to the distance to the hole and to the addition of a slope. The sample consisted of 10 adult male (33.80 ± 11.89 years), volunteers, right handed and highly skilled golfers with an average handicap of 10.82. Each player performed 30 putts at distances of 2, 3 and 4 meters (90 trials in Condition 1). The participants also performed 90 trials, at the same distances, with a constraint imposed by a slope (Condition 2). The results indicate that the players change some parameters to adjust to the task constraints, namely the duration of the backswing phase, the speed of the club head and the acceleration at the moment of impact with the ball. The effects of different golf putting distances in the no-slope condition on different kinematic variables suggest a linear adjustment to distance variation that was not observed when in the slope condition.

  14. Brain networks governing the golf swing in professional golfers.

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Han, Joung Kyue; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Han, Doug Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Golf, as with most complex motor skills, requires multiple different brain functions, including attention, motor planning, coordination, calculation of timing, and emotional control. In this study we assessed the correlation between swing components and brain connectivity from the cerebellum to the cerebrum. Ten female golf players and 10 age-matched female controls were recruited. In order to determine swing consistency among participants, the standard deviation (SD) of the mean swing speed time and the SD of the mean swing angle were assessed over 30 swings. Functional brain connectivity was assessed by resting state functional MRI. Pro-golfers showed greater positive left cerebellum connectivity to the occipital lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe and both frontal lobes compared to controls. The SD of play scores was positively correlated with the SD of the impact angle. Constant swing speed and back swing angle in professional golfers were associated with functional connectivity (FC) between the cerebellum and parietal and frontal lobes. In addition, the constant impact angle in professional golfers was associated with improved golf scores and additional FC of the thalamus.

  15. Flight trajectory of a rotating golf ball with grooves

    Baek, Moonheum; Kim, Jooha; Choi, Haecheon

    2014-11-01

    Dimples are known to reduce drag on a sphere by the amount of 50% as compared to a smooth surface. Despite the advantage of reducing drag, dimples deteriorate the putting accuracy owing to their sharp edges. To minimize this putting error but maintain the same flight distance, we have devised a grooved golf ball (called G ball hereafter) for several years. In this study, we modify the shape and pattern of grooves, and investigate the flow characteristics of the G ball by performing wind-tunnel experiments at the Reynolds numbers of 0 . 5 ×105 - 2 . 5 ×105 and the spin ratios (ratio of surface velocity to the free-stream velocity) of 0 - 0.6 that include the real golf-ball velocity and rotational speed. We measure the drag and lift forces on the rotating G ball and compare them with those of a smooth ball and two well-known dimpled balls. The lift-to-drag ratio of the G ball is much higher than that of a smooth ball and is in between those of the two dimpled balls. The trajectories of flying golf balls are computed. The flight distance of G ball is almost the same as that of one dimpled ball but slightly shorter than that of the other dimpled ball. The fluid-dynamic aspects of these differences will be discussed at the talk. Supported by 2011-0028032, 2014M3C1B1033980.

  16. Design and optimization of an EEG-based brain machine interface (BMI to an upper-limb exoskeleton for stroke survivors

    Nikunj Arunkumar Bhagat

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the feasibility of detecting motor intent from brain activity of chronic stroke patients using an asynchronous electroencephalography (EEG-based brain machine interface (BMI. Intent was inferred from movement related cortical potentials (MRCPs measured over an optimized set of EEG electrodes. Successful intent detection triggered the motion of an upper-limb exoskeleton (MAHI Exo-II, to guide movement and to encourage active user participation by providing instantaneous sensory feedback. Several BMI design features were optimized to increase system performance in the presence of single-trial variability of MRCPs in the injured brain: 1 an adaptive time window was used for extracting features during BMI calibration; 2 training data from two consecutive days were pooled for BMI calibration to increase robustness to handle the day-to-day variations typical of EEG, and 3 BMI predictions were gated by residual electromyography (EMG activity from the impaired arm, to reduce the number of false positives. This patient-specific BMI calibration approach can accommodate a broad spectrum of stroke patients with diverse motor capabilities. Following BMI optimization on day 3, testing of the closed-loop BMI-MAHI exoskeleton, on 4th and 5th days of the study, showed consistent BMI performance with overall mean true positive rate (TPR = 62.7 +/- 21.4 % on day 4 and 67.1 +/- 14.6 % on day 5. The overall false positive rate (FPR across subjects was 27.74 +/- 37.46 % on day 4 and 27.5 +/- 35.64 % on day 5; however for two subjects who had residual motor function and could benefit from the EMG-gated BMI, the mean FPR was quite low (< 10 %. On average, motor intent was detected -367 +/- 328 ms before movement onset during closed-loop operation. These findings provide evidence that closed-loop EEG-based BMI for stroke patients can be designed and optimized to perform well across multiple days without system recalibration.

  17. Design and Optimization of an EEG-Based Brain Machine Interface (BMI) to an Upper-Limb Exoskeleton for Stroke Survivors

    Bhagat, Nikunj A.; Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Abibullaev, Berdakh; Artz, Edward J.; Yozbatiran, Nuray; Blank, Amy A.; French, James; Karmonik, Christof; Grossman, Robert G.; O'Malley, Marcia K.; Francisco, Gerard E.; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L.

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of detecting motor intent from brain activity of chronic stroke patients using an asynchronous electroencephalography (EEG)-based brain machine interface (BMI). Intent was inferred from movement related cortical potentials (MRCPs) measured over an optimized set of EEG electrodes. Successful intent detection triggered the motion of an upper-limb exoskeleton (MAHI Exo-II), to guide movement and to encourage active user participation by providing instantaneous sensory feedback. Several BMI design features were optimized to increase system performance in the presence of single-trial variability of MRCPs in the injured brain: (1) an adaptive time window was used for extracting features during BMI calibration; (2) training data from two consecutive days were pooled for BMI calibration to increase robustness to handle the day-to-day variations typical of EEG, and (3) BMI predictions were gated by residual electromyography (EMG) activity from the impaired arm, to reduce the number of false positives. This patient-specific BMI calibration approach can accommodate a broad spectrum of stroke patients with diverse motor capabilities. Following BMI optimization on day 3, testing of the closed-loop BMI-MAHI exoskeleton, on 4th and 5th days of the study, showed consistent BMI performance with overall mean true positive rate (TPR) = 62.7 ± 21.4% on day 4 and 67.1 ± 14.6% on day 5. The overall false positive rate (FPR) across subjects was 27.74 ± 37.46% on day 4 and 27.5 ± 35.64% on day 5; however for two subjects who had residual motor function and could benefit from the EMG-gated BMI, the mean FPR was quite low (< 10%). On average, motor intent was detected −367 ± 328 ms before movement onset during closed-loop operation. These findings provide evidence that closed-loop EEG-based BMI for stroke patients can be designed and optimized to perform well across multiple days without system recalibration. PMID:27065787

  18. 76 FR 66328 - Callaway Golf Ball Operations, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Reliable Temp Services...

    2011-10-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-80,110] Callaway Golf Ball... Golf Ball Operations, Inc., including on-site leased workers from Reliable Temp Services, Inc., and... production of golf balls. The notice was published in the Federal Register on July 8, 2011 (76 FR 40401). At...

  19. Evaluation of solar-assisted, electric and gas golf carts, Bathurst Glen golf course, Richmond Hill, Ontario

    2010-08-01

    Municipalities try to limit air pollution resulting from the use of small gasoline engines. Indeed, these engines participate in the smog and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and they present operating costs more important than electric equivalents. The potential positive impacts of the use of electric or solar electric golf carts instead of gasoline carts are analyzed through a study that compares two solar-assisted electric golf carts, two standard electric golf carts and two gas-powered golf carts. The energy use and related Co2 emissions, the dependability, and the relative costs were evaluated and Golfer preference was also considered thanks to a feedback survey. The comparison between the solar-assisted and the standard electric carts was made on the basis of electricity measures at three points: alternating current (AC) electricity taken from the grid, direct current (DC) electricity flowing into and out of the batteries, and DC electricity generated by the solar panels. The data collected during this study suggested that other factors associated with cart condition or driver behaviours can be more important than the solar panels in determining overall energy consumption. Choosing an area with full sun exposure to install the solar panel and connecting directly to the grid would also maximize generation potential. The comparison of performance between electric carts and gas carts showed the most considerable positive findings. Indeed, fuel costs and emissions are significantly lower in the case of the electric carts, which also present a better fuel efficiency. Switching the 20 percent of gas-powered carts counted within a 100 km radius of Toronto with electric carts could be comparable to removing 155 mid-sized gasoline cars of the road. The electric golf carts present many important financial and environmental benefits when compared to gas carts. The performance is marginally enhanced with the use of solar panels on electric carts and the date collected from

  20. IMPROVED MOTOR-TIMING: EFFECTS OF SYNCHRONIZED METRO-NOME TRAINING ON GOLF SHOT ACCURACY

    Louise Rönnqvist

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of synchronized metronome training (SMT on motor timing and how this training might affect golf shot accuracy. Twenty-six experienced male golfers participated (mean age 27 years; mean golf handicap 12.6 in this study. Pre- and post-test investigations of golf shots made by three different clubs were conducted by use of a golf simulator. The golfers were randomized into two groups: a SMT group and a Control group. After the pre-test, the golfers in the SMT group completed a 4-week SMT program designed to improve their motor timing, the golfers in the Control group were merely training their golf-swings during the same time period. No differences between the two groups were found from the pre-test outcomes, either for motor timing scores or for golf shot accuracy. However, the post-test results after the 4-weeks SMT showed evident motor timing improvements. Additionally, significant improvements for golf shot accuracy were found for the SMT group and with less variability in their performance. No such improvements were found for the golfers in the Control group. As with previous studies that used a SMT program, this study's results provide further evidence that motor timing can be improved by SMT and that such timing improvement also improves golf accuracy

  1. Nitrous oxide emissions from a golf course fairway and rough following application of different nitrogen fertilizers

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas that destroys stratospheric ozone. There is limited research of golf course N2O emission and the effects of frequent fertilization and irrigation. Three enhanced efficiency nitrogen fertilizers (EENFs) were applied to a Colorado golf course fairway and ...

  2. Promoting Golf as a Lifetime Physical Activity for Persons with Disabilities

    Sandt, Dawn D.; Flynn, Erin; Turner, Tiffany A.

    2014-01-01

    Golf is one of the most accessible and versatile physical activities and is a viable choice for young adults with disabilities to engage in the recommended levels of physical activity. Teaching golf to youth with disabilities requires more than making accommodations regarding equipment, technique, and rules in the physical education setting. For…

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF A GOLF COMPLEX ON COASTAL WETLANDS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    The increasing density of golf courses represents a potential source of contamination to nearby coastal wetlands and other near-shore areas. The chemical and biological magnitude of the problem is almost unknown. To provide perspective on this issue, the effects of golf complex r...

  4. Ground penetrating radar water content mapping of golf course green sand layers

    Information on the spatial distribution of water content across the sand layer component of a golf course green can be important to golf course superintendents for evaluating drainage effectiveness and scheduling irrigation. To estimate the bulk water content of the sand layer at point locations ac...

  5. A Scoping Review of the Associations of Golf with Eye Injuries in Adults and Children

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Sport presents a risk of ocular trauma and accounts for a significant number of eye injuries that require hospital admission. The sport of golf presents a risk to eyesight from fast moving objects such as golf clubs and balls. This study aims to investigate the associations of golf with eye injuries and the reasons that these injuries occur. Material/Methods. A literature search was conducted using the databases MEDLINE, Web of Science, SPORTDiscus, and PsycINFO. Grey literature was searched using the WHO international clinical trials registry platform, Google Scholar, and ProQuest. Data was extracted using a standardised form and summarised into a report. Results and Discussion. Twenty-three studies were found relating to eye injuries in golf. Injuries appear to be rare, but more frequent in men and children. Injuries resulted in high rates of enucleation and visual impairment. Children sustained more injury from golf clubs whereas adults sustained more injuries from golf balls. Conclusion. Efforts are needed to encourage golf participants to understand the risks of ocular and indeed other head injuries. Initiatives to provide appropriate supervision and education on this topic are merited. Further research is needed to investigate the circumstances of eye injury in golf and assess the effects of interventions aimed at reducing risk of injury. PMID:27504485

  6. Golf Tournament Drives in a Win for the Children’s Inn | Poster

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On September 23, golfers took to the Clustered Spires golf course in Frederick, Md., for a cause. The R&W Club Frederick hosted its inaugural golf tournament, with proceeds benefiting the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Children’s Inn.

  7. Bridging the Generation Gap: "Growing Golf" through an Action Learning Activity

    Elbert, Norb; Cumiskey, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an action learning simulation designed for a Professional Golf Management (PGM) program housed in a College of Business of a public university. The PGA Golf Management University Program, a 4.5- to 5-year college curriculum for aspiring PGA Professionals is offered at 19 PGA accredited universities nationwide. The program…

  8. Omanikud lõpetavad skandaalse firma Kuressaare Golf tegevuse / Andres Sepp

    Sepp, Andres, 1976-

    2004-01-01

    AS Kuressaare Golf likvideeritakse, sest Põduste jõe äärde kavandatud golfiväljaku ehitamise plaanid sumbusid, kuna firma aktsionäride vahel tekitas tüli rahakantimise kahtlus. Kommenteerib AS-i Kuressaare Golf juhatuse liige Meelis Põlda

  9. Shufflegolf: Teaching Golf Strategies and Etiquette to Young Children and Learners with Intellectual Disabilities

    Kozub, Francis M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to share a unique curricular idea with physical educators interested about adding golf concepts to their curriculum. The focus is on a modified golf game that helps teach tactics, strategies, rules, and etiquette to young learners and those with intellectual disabilities. The specific content for this unit focuses on…

  10. Evaluating poverty grass (Danthonia spicata) for golf courses in the Midwest

    Nadia E. Navarrete-Tindall; J.W. Van Sambeek

    2010-01-01

    Poverty grass (Danthonia spicata (L.) P. beauv. Ex Roem & Schult. ) results presented here are part of ongoing studies to evaluate its adaptation for golf courses as part of low maintenance natural communities at Lincoln University of Missouri. Because its natural adaptation to shade and poor soils, poverty grass could be established in golf...

  11. A big win for the CERN Golf Club at the ASCERI tournament

    Katarina Anthony

    2010-01-01

    The CERN Golf Club returned victorious from the autumn ASCERI (Association of the Sports Communities of the European Research Institutes) tournament which was held from 17 to 20 September.   The CERN Golf Team (left to right: Peter Jones, Alasdair Ross, Claes Frisk and Per Werner) celebrates its victories at ASCERI. Competitions took place on the Dreihof Golf Club at Essingen in southern Germany, starting with the singles Stableford competition on the first day and a 4 ball, better ball Stableford group competition the next day. CERN’s four-man team – Peter Jones, Per Werner, Claes Frisk and Alasdair Ross – came first in the group competition, with Peter Jones, CERN’s star golfer from the IT Department, winning the individual competition. The autumn ASCERI tournament included competitions in football, tennis and cart racing as well as golf. Over 230 representatives of research institutes across Europe took part. “The CERN Golf Club only began p...

  12. A good walk spoiled: on the disappearance of golf as an active sport in America.

    Puterbaugh, James S

    2011-07-01

    During the past 60 years, there has been a major transition in the way golf is played in America. Its potential as exercise largely has been negated by the increase in motorized golf cart usage to approximately two of every three rounds played in this country. Accidents in golf carts have increased rapidly, which, by making the sport more dangerous, will likely bring future regulations. Consequently, playing golf has gradually become more of a public health threat than a benefit. The motorized cart also has resulted in an almost doubling of the size of golf courses, which now occupy a large amount of the built environment designated for activity. These changes are a major loss to society, portend future problems, and call for the sport to reevaluate its current model.

  13. The "swing-ding": a golf-related head injury in children.

    Wang, Arthur; Cohen, Alan R; Robinson, Shenandoah

    2011-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increased incidence of golf-associated head injuries in children and adolescents. At the authors' institution, they have identified a unique pattern of head injury associated with a swinging golf club. In this study, the authors highlight the mechanism of this injury and report their experience treating it. The authors reviewed the database of Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital Trauma Center and performed a retrospective analysis of golf injuries recorded over a 10-year period (January 2000-April 2010). They identified 13 children (9 boys and 4 girls) who sustained head injuries in golfing accidents. All patients were 10 years of age or younger. The medical charts were reviewed and follow-up interviews were conducted to better delineate the details of the injuries. Injuries included 13 depressed skull fractures, 7 epidural hematomas, and 1 cerebral contusion. All 13 patients sustained their injuries after being struck in the head by a golf club. Seven sustained injuries on the follow-through of the initial swing and 3 sustained injuries on the backswing. All but one patient required neurosurgical intervention. Five patients developed neurological sequelae. None of the children had prior experience with golf equipment. All but one injury occurred in the child's own backyard. There was no direct supervision by an adult in any of the cases. Golfing can lead to serious head injuries in children. The authors noticed a unique pattern of golf-related head injuries, previously not described, that they have termed the "swing-ding." This golf club-inflicted injury occurs when a child stands too close to a swinging golfer and is struck in the head, subsequently sustaining a comminuted depressed skull fracture in the frontal or temporal region, with or without further intracranial injury. The study suggests that a lack of adult supervision, minimal previous golf experience, and proximity of the child to the swinging golfer are all

  14. Dynamic perfusion CT: Optimizing the temporal resolution for the calculation of perfusion CT parameters in stroke patients

    Kaemena, Andreas [Department of Radiology, Charite-Medical University Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: andreas.kaemena@charite.de; Streitparth, Florian; Grieser, Christian; Lehmkuhl, Lukas [Department of Radiology, Charite-Medical University Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany); Jamil, Basil [Department of Radiotherapy, Charite-Medical University Berlin, Schumannstr. 20/21, D-10117 Berlin (Germany); Wojtal, Katarzyna; Ricke, Jens; Pech, Maciej [Department of Radiology, Charite-Medical University Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    Purpose: To assess the influence of different temporal sampling rates on the accuracy of the results from cerebral perfusion CTs in patients with an acute ischemic stroke. Material and methods: Thirty consecutive patients with acute stroke symptoms received a dynamic perfusion CT (LightSpeed 16, GE). Forty millilitres of iomeprol (Imeron 400) were administered at an injection rate of 4 ml/s. After a scan delay of 7 s, two adjacent 10 mm slices at 80 kV and 190 mA were acquired in a cine mode technique with a cine duration of 49 s. Parametric maps for the blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and mean transit time (MTT) were calculated for temporal sampling intervals of 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 4 s using GE's Perfusion 3 software package. In addition to the quantitative ROI data analysis, a visual perfusion map analysis was performed. Results: The perfusion analysis proved to be technically feasible with all patients. The calculated perfusion values revealed significant differences with regard to the BF, BV and MTT, depending on the employed temporal resolution. The perfusion contrast between ischemic lesions and healthy brain tissue decreased continuously at the lower temporal resolutions. The visual analysis revealed that ischemic lesions were best depicted with sampling intervals of 0.5 and 1 s. Conclusion: We recommend a temporal scan resolution of two images per second for the best detection and depiction of ischemic areas.

  15. Goal-directed fluid optimization based on stroke volume variation and cardiac index during one-lung ventilation in patients undergoing thoracoscopy lobectomy operations: a pilot study

    Jian Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This pilot study was designed to utilize stroke volume variation and cardiac index to ensure fluid optimization during one-lung ventilation in patients undergoing thoracoscopic lobectomies. METHODS: Eighty patients undergoing thoracoscopic lobectomy were randomized into either a goal-directed therapy group or a control group. In the goal-directed therapy group, the stroke volume variation was controlled at 10%±1%, and the cardiac index was controlled at a minimum of 2.5 L.min-1.m-2. In the control group, the MAP was maintained at between 65 mm Hg and 90 mm Hg, heart rate was maintained at between 60 BPM and 100 BPM, and urinary output was greater than 0.5 mL/kg-1/h-1. The hemodynamic variables, arterial blood gas analyses, total administered fluid volume and side effects were recorded. RESULTS: The PaO2/FiO2-ratio before the end of one-lung ventilation in the goal-directed therapy group was significantly higher than that of the control group, but there were no differences between the goal-directed therapy group and the control group for the PaO2/FiO2-ratio or other arterial blood gas analysis indices prior to anesthesia. The extubation time was significantly earlier in the goal-directed therapy group, but there was no difference in the length of hospital stay. Patients in the control group had greater urine volumes, and they were given greater colloid and overall fluid volumes. Nausea and vomiting were significantly reduced in the goal-directed therapy group. CONCLUSION: The results of this study demonstrated that an optimization protocol, based on stroke volume variation and cardiac index obtained with a FloTrac/Vigileo device, increased the PaO2/FiO2-ratio and reduced the overall fluid volume, intubation time and postoperative complications (nausea and vomiting in thoracic surgery patients requiring one-lung ventilation.

  16. Peer pressure and thai amateur golfers' gambling on their games: the mediating effect of golf self-efficacy.

    Ariyabuddhiphongs, Vanchai; Promsakha Na Sakolnakorn, Chomnad

    2014-09-01

    Our study hypothesizes that Thai amateur golfers gamble on their game because of peer pressure and their golf self-efficacy. To support our hypothesis, we conducted a study to examine the mediating effect of golf self-efficacy on the peer pressure-golf gambling relationship among 387 amateur golfers in Thailand. Peer pressure was operationally defined as fellow players' influence on the individual golfer to gamble; golf self-efficacy as the judgment of the golfer's skills to play golf; and golf gambling as the frequency and amounts of gambling. Regression analysis with bootstrapping was used to test the mediation effect of golf self-efficacy on the peer pressure-golf gambling relationship. The results support our hypothesis; peer pressure predicted golf gambling, and the indirect effect of peer pressure to golf gambling through the mediation of golf self-efficacy was significant. The results support the influence of peer pressure on gambling, and the social cognitive theory reciprocal relationship model.

  17. Ischemic Stroke

    ... Workplace Giving Fundraise Planned Giving Corporate Giving Cause Marketing Join your team, your way! The Stroke Challenge ... Your Technology Guide High Blood Pressure and Stroke Importance of Physical Activity See More Multimedia Las minorías ...

  18. Paediatric stroke

    2011-04-02

    Apr 2, 2011 ... Organization definition of stroke is 'a clinical syndrome of rapidly developing focal or global ..... In the case of sickle cell disease primary and secondary prevention is by ... stroke and must involve caregivers. Prognosis7,10,17.

  19. On the origin of the drag force on golf balls

    Balaras, Elias; Beratlis, Nikolaos; Squires, Kyle

    2017-11-01

    It is well establised that dimples accelerate the drag-crisis on a sphere. The result of the early drag-crisis is a reduction of the drag coefficient by more than a factor of two when compared to a smooth sphere at the same Reynolds number. However, when the drag coefficients for smooth and dimpled spheres in the supercritical regime are compared, the latter is higher by a factor of two to three. To understand the origin of this behavior we conducted direct numerical simulations of the flow around a dimpled sphere, which is similar to commercially available golf balls, in the supercritical regime. By comparing the results to those for a smooth sphere it is found that dimples, although effective in accelerating the drag crisis, impose a local drag-penalty, which contributes significantly to the overall drag force. This finding challenges the broadly accepted view, that the dimples only indirectly affect the drag force on a golf ball by manipulating the structure of the turbulent boundary layer near the wall and consequently affect global separation. Within this view, typically the penalty on the drag force imposed by the dimples is assumed to be small and coming primarily from skin friction. The direct numerical simulations we will report reveal a very different picture.

  20. Trunk muscle activation during golf swing: Baseline and threshold.

    Silva, Luís; Marta, Sérgio; Vaz, João; Fernandes, Orlando; Castro, Maria António; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro

    2013-10-01

    There is a lack of studies regarding EMG temporal analysis during dynamic and complex motor tasks, such as golf swing. The aim of this study is to analyze the EMG onset during the golf swing, by comparing two different threshold methods. Method A threshold was determined using the baseline activity recorded between two maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Method B threshold was calculated using the mean EMG activity for 1000ms before the 500ms prior to the start of the Backswing. Two different clubs were also studied. Three-way repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare methods, muscles and clubs. Two-way mixed Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) with absolute agreement was used to determine the methods reliability. Club type usage showed no influence in onset detection. Rectus abdominis (RA) showed the higher agreement between methods. Erector spinae (ES), on the other hand, showed a very low agreement, that might be related to postural activity before the swing. External oblique (EO) is the first being activated, at 1295ms prior impact. There is a similar activation time between right and left muscles sides, although the right EO showed better agreement between methods than left side. Therefore, the algorithms usage is task- and muscle-dependent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hybrid markerless tracking of complex articulated motion in golf swings.

    Fung, Sim Kwoh; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Ahamed, Nizam Uddin; Kiang, Lam Chee; Nadarajah, Sivadev; Sahayadhas, Arun; Ali, Md Asraf; Islam, Md Anamul; Palaniappan, Rajkumar

    2014-04-01

    Sports video tracking is a research topic that has attained increasing attention due to its high commercial potential. A number of sports, including tennis, soccer, gymnastics, running, golf, badminton and cricket have been utilised to display the novel ideas in sports motion tracking. The main challenge associated with this research concerns the extraction of a highly complex articulated motion from a video scene. Our research focuses on the development of a markerless human motion tracking system that tracks the major body parts of an athlete straight from a sports broadcast video. We proposed a hybrid tracking method, which consists of a combination of three algorithms (pyramidal Lucas-Kanade optical flow (LK), normalised correlation-based template matching and background subtraction), to track the golfer's head, body, hands, shoulders, knees and feet during a full swing. We then match, track and map the results onto a 2D articulated human stick model to represent the pose of the golfer over time. Our work was tested using two video broadcasts of a golfer, and we obtained satisfactory results. The current outcomes of this research can play an important role in enhancing the performance of a golfer, provide vital information to sports medicine practitioners by providing technically sound guidance on movements and should assist to diminish the risk of golfing injuries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Amounts of mercury in soil of some golf course sites

    MacLean, A J; Stone, B; Cordukes, W E

    1973-01-01

    Mercurial compounds are widely used for controlling diseases of turfgrass of golf courses, but the fungicides are usually confined to the greens. Composite soil samples were obtained from three golf courses in the Ottawa and Ontario region of Canada. Samples from the turf and surface layer of soil were analyzed and high amounts of mercury were found. The soil of No.I course was a sand; No.II was a sandy loam in the surface and a loam below; and No. III was a loam in the surface layer and a clay loam below. The pH of the surface layer was 6.4 in No. I, 7.5 in No. II, and 6.0 in No. III. The amounts of Hg in the turf were high near the green but they decreased with distance. Fairway III contained the highest amounts of Hg and there was evidence of it leaching to a depth of 90 cm at the edge of the green. The particularly high amounts of Hg in no III were in accord with the liberal use of mercurial fungicides on this course in the period 1912-64. The leaching of Hg depends on amounts of organic matter and the clay in the soil.

  3. Correlation of Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) level 1 movement screens and golf swing faults.

    Gulgin, Heather R; Schulte, Brian C; Crawley, Amy A

    2014-02-01

    Although some research in the past has examined how physical limitations in strength or flexibility affect a golfer's performance, the performance outcome most measured was driving distance. Currently, there are no data that have examined the relationship between selected strength and flexibility variables and golf swing faults. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) level 1 movement screen variables and 14 common golf swing faults. Thirty-six male and female golfers (mean age, 25.4 ± 9.9 years; height, 175.9 ± 16.2 cm; mass, 76.2 ± 14.6 kg; handicap, 14.2 ± 10.4) participated. Twelve physical tests of strength, flexibility, and balance were assessed using the TPI level 1 golf fitness screening tool. Golfers then hit 4 golf shots (with a 5-iron) while being videoed, and those were then analyzed for 14 different golf swing faults (using V1Pro software). Three significant associations between a physical limitation and a particular golf swing fault were found: toe touch and early hip extension (p = 0.015), bridge on right side with both early hip extension (p = 0.050), and loss of posture (p = 0.028). In addition, an odds ratio showed that when a golfer could not overhead deep squat or single leg balance on left side, they were 2-3 times more likely to exhibit a early hip extension, loss of posture, or slide during the golf swing, as compared with those who could perform a correct overhead deep squat. Based on our findings, it is important for the golf fitness professional to particularly address a golfer's core strength, balance, and hamstring flexibility to help avoid common golf swing faults, which affect a golfer's ball striking ability and ultimately their performance.

  4. Suitability of Strain Gage Sensors for Integration into Smart Sport Equipment: A Golf Club Example.

    Umek, Anton; Zhang, Yuan; Tomažič, Sašo; Kos, Anton

    2017-04-21

    Wearable devices and smart sport equipment are being increasingly used in amateur and professional sports. Smart sport equipment employs various sensors for detecting its state and actions. The correct choice of the most appropriate sensor(s) is of paramount importance for efficient and successful operation of sport equipment. When integrated into the sport equipment, ideal sensors are unobstructive, and do not change the functionality of the equipment. The article focuses on experiments for identification and selection of sensors that are suitable for the integration into a golf club with the final goal of their use in real time biofeedback applications. We tested two orthogonally affixed strain gage (SG) sensors, a 3-axis accelerometer, and a 3-axis gyroscope. The strain gage sensors are calibrated and validated in the laboratory environment by a highly accurate Qualisys Track Manager (QTM) optical tracking system. Field test results show that different types of golf swing and improper movement in early phases of golf swing can be detected with strain gage sensors attached to the shaft of the golf club. Thus they are suitable for biofeedback applications to help golfers to learn repetitive golf swings. It is suggested that the use of strain gage sensors can improve the golf swing technical error detection accuracy and that strain gage sensors alone are enough for basic golf swing analysis. Our final goal is to be able to acquire and analyze as many parameters of a smart golf club in real time during the entire duration of the swing. This would give us the ability to design mobile and cloud biofeedback applications with terminal or concurrent feedback that will enable us to speed-up motor skill learning in golf.

  5. Cryptogenic Stroke

    Mohammad Saadatnia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cryptogenic stroke is defined as brain infarction that is not attributable to a source of definite embolism, large artery atherosclerosis, or small artery disease despite a thorough vascular, cardiac, and serologic evaluation. Despite many advances in our understanding of ischemic stroke, cryptogenic strokes remain a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The pathophysiology of cryptogenic stroke is likely various. Probable mechanisms include cardiac embolism secondary to occult paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, aortic atheromatous disease or other cardiac sources, paradoxical embolism from atrial septal abnormalities such as patent foramen ovale, hypercoagulable states, and preclinical or subclinical cerebrovascular disease.  Cryptogenic stroke is one-fourth among cerebral infarction, but most of them could be ascribed to embolic stroke. A significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes adhere to embolic infarct topography on brain imaging and improvement in our ability to detect paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in patients with cryptogenic stroke has strengthened the idea that these strokes are embolic in nature. a significant proportion of cryptogenic strokes adhere to embolic infarct topography on brain imaging.embolic stroke of undetermined sources(ESUS was planned for unifying embolic stroke of undetermined source.  The etiologies underlying ESUS included minor-risk potential cardioembolic sources, covert paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, cancer-associated coagulopathy and embolism, arteriogenic emboli, and paroxysmal embolism. Extensive evaluation including transesophageal echocardiography and cardiac monitoring for long time could identify the etiology of these patients. Therefore cryptogenic stroke is a diagnosis of exclusion. Compared with other stroke subtypes, cryptogenic stroke tends to have a better prognosis and lower long-term risk of recurrence.

  6. Reliability of P mode event classification using contemporaneous BiSON and GOLF observations

    Simoniello, R; Chaplin, W J; Elsworth, Y P; Garcia, R A

    2008-01-01

    We carried out a comparison of the signals seen in contemporaneous BiSON and GOLF data sets. Both instruments perform Doppler shift velocity measurements in integrated sunlight, although BiSON perform measurements from the two wings of potassium absorption line and GOLF from one wing of the NaD1 line. Discrepancies between the two datasets have been observed. We show,in fact, that the relative power depends on the wing in which GOLF data observes. During the blue wing period, the relative power is mugh higher than in BiSON datasets, while a good agreement has been observed during the red period.

  7. ANALISA INVESTASI DALAM PENGAMBILAN KEPUTUSAN INVESTASI PADA PENGEMBANGAN LAPANGAN GOLF DAN PERUMAHAN CITRARAYA

    Njo Anastasia

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Investment in the real estate sector has a great risk, therefore a developer needs to do investment analysis before making a decision. The decision is made by considering the returns from two investment alternatives. The first alternative examined is a 9-hole golf course and housing in proximity to the golf. The second alternative is residential property. Given the above conditions, the purpose of this research is to help the developer to make the proper investment decision, based on which alternative has the higher return. Two data collection methods are used in this research, including interviews and a survey which was done by distributing questionnaires to develop a profile of golfers and purchasers as well as potential residential purchasers. Forecasting analysis using the Holt-Winters model was used for forecasting the number of golfers. The Box-Jenkins model was utilized to forecast residential sales. The forecasting results were used for cash flow analysis. The results show that the first alternative produces a higher IRR (25,16% per year and NPV of Rp.25.056.800.000 , relative to the the second alternative with an IRR of 16,72% per year and NPV of Rp.4.794.945.000. Thus, the first alternative, a 9-hole golf course and housing in proximity to the golf, was selected. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Investasi di bidang real estat mengandung risiko besar, sehingga pengembang perlu melakukan analisa investasi sebelum mengambil keputusan. Pengambilan keputusan adalah dengan mempertimbangkan tingkat pengembalian dua alternatif investasi. Alternatif pertama adalah properti 9-hole lapangan golf dan perumahan dalam bentuk kavling golf. Alternatif kedua adalah properti perumahan saja. Dengan kondisi di atas, maka tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah membantu pengembang untuk memutuskan menginvestasikan dananya di alternatif pertama jika tingkat pengembalian investasinya lebih tinggi dibanding alternatif kedua. Metode penelitian yang digunakan adalah

  8. The science of golf putting a complete guide for researchers, players and coaches

    Dias, Gonçalo

    2015-01-01

    This SpringerBrief explores the motor performance and biomechanics of golf putting, providing methodologies, studies and approaches to this concept. Presenting outcomes of research published over the past six years, it offers guidelines from a scientifically oriented perspective, and employs new technologies and mathematical methods to assess golf putting. The chapters cover aspects such as pendulum-like motion in sports, setting up the experimental design, and performance metrics for putting variables. Paving the way for an improved understanding of what leads to failure and success in golf putting, this book offers an invaluable reference source for sports scientists, engineers and mathematicians, as well as golfers.

  9. Golf Balls, Boomerangs and Asteroids The Impact of Missiles on Society

    Kaye, Brian H

    1996-01-01

    Exciting reading for anyone with a curious mind!. 'Walking one day by a golf course in Wisconsin, I was startled to hear a sharp bang as a golf ball narrowly missed my head and hit a tree. My companion cheerfully remarked, 'That could have killed you, you know.' I picked up the innocent looking little white ball and looked at it with new respect.'. Prompted by this perilous experience, Brian Kaye has written a delightful and informative book on the design and behavior of different kinds of missiles from golf balls, arrows, and slingshots to comets and rockets to outer space. You'll learn about

  10. Water quality, pesticide occurrence, and effects of irrigation with reclaimed water at golf courses in Florida

    Swancar, Amy

    1996-01-01

    Reuse of treated wastewater for golf course irrigation is an increasingly popular water management option in Florida, where growth has put stress on potable water supplies. Surface water, ground water, and irrigation water were sampled at three pairs of golf courses quarterly for one year to determine if pesticides were present, and the effect of irrigation with treated effluent on ground-water quality, with an emphasis on interactions of effluent with pesticides. In addition to the six paired golf courses, which were in central Florida, ground water was sampled for pesticides and other constituents at three more golf courses in other parts of the State. This study was the first to analyze water samples from Florida golf courses for a broad range of pesticides. Statistical methods based on the percentage of data above detection limits were used to determine the effects of irrigation with reclaimed water on ground-water quality. Shallow ground water at golf courses irrigated with treated effluent has higher concentrations of chloride, lower concentrations of bicarbonate, and lower pH than ground water at golf courses irrigated with water from carbonate aquifers. There were no statistically significant differences in nutrient concentrations in ground water between paired golf courses grouped by irrigation water type at a 95 percent confidence level. The number of wells where pesticides occurred was significantly higher at the paired golf courses using ground water for irrigation than at ones using reclaimed water. However, the limited occurrences of individual pesticides in ground water make it difficult to correlate differences in irrigation- water quality with pesticide migration to the water table. At some of the golf courses, increased pesticide occurrences may be associated with higher irrigation rates, the presence of well-drained soils, and shallow depths to the surficial aquifer. Pesticides used by golf courses for turf grass maintenance were detected in

  11. Off site transport of fungicides with snowmelt and rainfall runoff from golf course fairway turf

    Pesticides associated with the turfgrass industry have been detected in storm runoff and surface waters of urban watersheds; inferring contaminant contributions from residential, urban, and recreational sources. Golf course turf often requires multiple applications of pesticides at rates that exceed...

  12. Improving performance in golf: current research and implications from a clinical perspective.

    Evans, Kerrie; Tuttle, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Golf, a global sport enjoyed by people of all ages and abilities, involves relatively long periods of low intensity exercise interspersed with short bursts of high intensity activity. To meet the physical demands of full swing shots and the mental and physical demands of putting and walking the course, it is frequently recommended that golfers undertake golf-specific exercise programs. Biomechanics, motor learning, and motor control research has increased the understanding of the physical requirements of the game, and using this knowledge, exercise programs aimed at improving golf performance have been developed. However, while it is generally accepted that an exercise program can improve a golfer's physical measurements and some golf performance variables, translating the findings from research into clinical practice to optimise an individual golfer's performance remains challenging. This paper discusses how biomechanical and motor control research has informed current practice and discusses how emerging sophisticated tools and research designs may better assist golfers improve their performance.

  13. Golf Tourism: A Research Profile and Security Perceptions in Belek, Antalya, Turkey.

    Akın Aksu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Our study aim to determine the current profile of sampled golf tourists visiting Belek, Antalya in high season and their perceptions of security using questionnaires to survey golf tourists in the sample were evaluated separately. The sample consisted of a survey profile of 280 golf tourists and their responses regarding security perceptions for Belek, Antalya. Chi-square testing and descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Despite some negative developments in Turkey (such as terrorist attacks, the majority of golf tourists still remain satisfied and motivated to recommend the destination to others. The results of the study would be of help for tourism professionals, academicians and decision makers especially in developing future marketing strategies for Belek.

  14. Effects of golf course management on subsurface soil properties in Iowa

    Streeter, Matthew T.; Schilling, Keith E.

    2018-05-01

    Currently, in the USA and especially in the Midwest region, urban expansion is developing turfgrass landscapes surrounding commercial sites, homes, and recreational areas on soils that have been agriculturally managed for decades. Often, golf courses are at the forefront of conversations concerning anthropogenic environmental impacts as they account for some of the most intensively managed soils in the world. Iowa golf courses provide an ideal location to evaluate whether golf course management is affecting the quality of soils at depth. Our study evaluated how soil properties relating to soil health and resiliency varied with depth at golf courses across Iowa and interpreted relationships of these properties to current golf course management, previous land use, and inherent soil properties. Systematic variation in soil properties including sand content, NO3, and soil organic matter (SOM) were observed with depth at six Iowa golf courses among three landform regions. Variability in sand content was identified between the 20 and 50 cm depth classes at all courses, where sand content decreased by as much as 37 %. Highest concentrations of SOM and NO3 were found in the shallowest soils, whereas total C and P variability was not related to golf course management. Sand content and NO3 were found to be directly related to golf course management, particularly at shallow depths. The effects of golf course management dissipated with depth and deeper soil variations were primarily due to natural geologic conditions. The two abovementioned soil properties were very noticeably altered by golf course management and may directly impact crop productivity, soil health, and water quality, and while NO3 may be altered relatively quickly in soil through natural processes, particle size of the soil may not be altered without extensive mitigation. Iowa golf courses continue to be developed in areas of land use change from historically native prairies and more recently agriculture to

  15. A model of greenhouse gas emissions from the management of turf on two golf courses

    Bartlett, Mark D.; James, Iain T.

    2011-01-01

    An estimated 32,000 golf courses worldwide (approximately 25,600 km 2 ), provide ecosystem goods and services and support an industry contributing over $124 billion globally. Golf courses can impact positively on local biodiversity however their role in the global carbon cycle is not clearly understood. To explore this relationship, the balance between plant-soil system sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions from turf management on golf courses was modelled. Input data were derived from published studies of emissions from agriculture and turfgrass management. Two UK case studies of golf course type were used, a Links course (coastal, medium intensity management, within coastal dune grasses) and a Parkland course (inland, high intensity management, within woodland). Playing surfaces of both golf courses were marginal net sources of greenhouse gas emissions due to maintenance (Links 0.4 ± 0.1 Mg CO 2 e ha -1 y -1 ; Parkland 0.7 ± 0.2 Mg CO 2 e ha -1 y -1 ). A significant proportion of emissions were from the use of nitrogen fertiliser, especially on tees and greens such that 3% of the golf course area contributed 16% of total greenhouse gas emissions. The area of trees on a golf course was important in determining whole-course emission balance. On the Parkland course, emissions from maintenance were offset by sequestration from trees which comprised 48% of total area, resulting in a net balance of -4.3 ± 0.9 Mg CO 2e ha -1 y -1 . On the Links course, the proportion of trees was much lower (2%) and sequestration from links grassland resulted in a net balance of 0.0 ± 0.2 Mg CO 2e ha -1 y -1 . Recommendations for golf course management and design include the reduction of nitrogen fertiliser, improved operational efficiency when mowing, the inclusion of appropriate tree-planting and the scaling of component areas to maximise golf course sequestration capacity. The findings are transferrable to the management and design of urban parks and gardens, which range

  16. A model of greenhouse gas emissions from the management of turf on two golf courses

    Bartlett, Mark D., E-mail: m.d.bartlett@cranfield.ac.uk; James, Iain T., E-mail: i.t.james@cranfield.ac.uk

    2011-03-15

    An estimated 32,000 golf courses worldwide (approximately 25,600 km{sup 2}), provide ecosystem goods and services and support an industry contributing over $124 billion globally. Golf courses can impact positively on local biodiversity however their role in the global carbon cycle is not clearly understood. To explore this relationship, the balance between plant-soil system sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions from turf management on golf courses was modelled. Input data were derived from published studies of emissions from agriculture and turfgrass management. Two UK case studies of golf course type were used, a Links course (coastal, medium intensity management, within coastal dune grasses) and a Parkland course (inland, high intensity management, within woodland). Playing surfaces of both golf courses were marginal net sources of greenhouse gas emissions due to maintenance (Links 0.4 {+-} 0.1 Mg CO{sub 2}e ha{sup -1} y{sup -1}; Parkland 0.7 {+-} 0.2 Mg CO{sub 2}e ha{sup -1} y{sup -1}). A significant proportion of emissions were from the use of nitrogen fertiliser, especially on tees and greens such that 3% of the golf course area contributed 16% of total greenhouse gas emissions. The area of trees on a golf course was important in determining whole-course emission balance. On the Parkland course, emissions from maintenance were offset by sequestration from trees which comprised 48% of total area, resulting in a net balance of -4.3 {+-} 0.9 Mg CO{sub 2e} ha{sup -1} y{sup -1}. On the Links course, the proportion of trees was much lower (2%) and sequestration from links grassland resulted in a net balance of 0.0 {+-} 0.2 Mg CO{sub 2e} ha{sup -1} y{sup -1}. Recommendations for golf course management and design include the reduction of nitrogen fertiliser, improved operational efficiency when mowing, the inclusion of appropriate tree-planting and the scaling of component areas to maximise golf course sequestration capacity. The findings are transferrable to the

  17. Utilizing Kolb’s Experiential Learning Theory to Implement a Golf Scramble

    Glenna G. Bower

    2013-01-01

    This study introduced how Kolb’s Experiential Learning Theory was used across the four-mode learning cycle of abstract conceptualization, active experimentation, concrete experience and reflective observation as a pedagogical tool for implementing a golf scramble. The primary research question was to see whether Kolb’s Experiential Learning Theory four-mode learning cycle was an effective means for implementing a the golf scramble. The participants of the experiential learning experience wer...

  18. Root-knot nematodes in golf course greens of the western United States

    A survey of 238 golf courses in ten of the Western U.S. found root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) in 60 % of the putting greens sampled. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of 18S rRNA, D2-D3 of 28S rRNA, ITS-rRNA and mtDNA gene sequences were used to identify specimens from 110 golf courses. The...

  19. O golfe e os rumos do Cabo Verde independente = Golfing and the independent Cape Verde directions = El golf y los caminos del Cabo Verde independiente

    Melo, Victor Andrade de

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Em função de uma série de peculiaridades, o golfe tem desempenhado um importante papel na história de Cabo Verde. A prática, que tem uma longa trajetória no arquipélago, em diversas ocasiões foi mobilizada a fim de materializar a ideia de que o cabo-verdiano era portador de um alto padrão civilizacional. No período colonial, essa foi uma das estratégias pelos nativos usada para lidar com o jugo da metrópole, argumento utilizado para requisitar maior respeito às especificidades e atenção às necessidades locais. O que terá mudado nas considerações sobre esse esporte quando chegou a independência (1975? Que diferenças podem ser sentidas nas décadas seguintes? Neste artigo, argumentamos que os discursos sobre a modalidade nos ajudam a lançar um olhar sobre os debates acerca dos rumos do país insular nos últimos 40 anos

  20. The most important "factor" in producing clubhead speed in golf.

    Joyce, Christopher

    2017-10-01

    Substantial experiential research into x-factor, and to a lesser extent crunch-factor has been undertaken with the aim of increasing clubhead speed. However, a direct comparison of the golf swing kinematics associated with each 'factor' has not, and possible differences when using a driver compared to an iron. Fifteen low handicap male golfers who displayed a modern swing had their golf swing kinematic data measured when hitting their own driver and five-iron, using a 10-camera motion analysis system operating at 250Hz. Clubhead speed was collected using a validated launch monitor. No between-club differences in x-factor and crunch-factor existed. Correlation analyses revealed within-club segment (trunk and lower trunk) interaction was different for the driver, compared to the five-iron, and that a greater number of kinematic variables associated with x-factor, compared to crunch-factor were shown to be correlated with faster clubhead speeds. This was further explained in the five-iron regression model, where a significant amount of variance in clubhead speed was associated with increased lower trunk x-factor stretch, and reduced trunk lateral bending. Given that greens in regulation was shown to be the strongest correlated variable with PGA Tour earnings (1990-2004), the findings suggests a link to player performance for approach shots. These findings support other empiric research into the importance of x-factor as well as anecdotal evidence on how crunch-factor can negatively affect clubhead speed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The Biomechanics of the Modern Golf Swing: Implications for Lower Back Injuries.

    Cole, Michael H; Grimshaw, Paul N

    2016-03-01

    The modern golf swing is a complex and asymmetrical movement that places an emphasis on restricting pelvic turn while increasing thorax rotation during the backswing to generate higher clubhead speeds at impact. Increasing thorax rotation relative to pelvic rotation preloads the trunk muscles by accentuating their length and allowing them to use the energy stored in their elastic elements to produce more power. As the thorax and pelvis turn back towards the ball during the downswing, more skilled golfers are known to laterally slide their pelvis toward the target, which further contributes to final clubhead speed. However, despite the apparent performance benefits associated with these sequences, it has been argued that the lumbar spine is incapable of safely accommodating the forces they produce. This notion supports a link between the repeated performance of the golf swing and the development of golf-related low back injuries. Of the complaints reported by golfers, low back injuries continue to be the most prevalent, but the mechanism of these injuries is still poorly understood. This review highlights that there is a paucity of research directly evaluating the apparent link between the modern golf swing and golf-related low back pain. Furthermore, there has been a general lack of consensus within the literature with respect to the methods used to objectively assess the golf swing and the methods used to derived common outcome measures. Future research would benefit from a clear set of guidelines to help reduce the variability between studies.

  2. Where do golf driver swings go wrong? Factors influencing driver swing consistency.

    Zhang, X; Shan, G

    2014-10-01

    One of the challenging skills in golfing is the driver swing. There have been a large number of studies characterizing golf swings, yielding insightful instructions on how to swing well. As a result, achieving a sub-18 handicap is no longer the top problem for golfers. Instead, players are now most troubled by a lack of consistency during swing execution. The goal of this study was to determine how to consistently execute good golf swings. Using 3D motion capture and full-body biomechanical modeling, 22 experienced golfers were analysed. For characterizing both successful and failed swings, 19 selected parameters (13 angles, 4 time parameters, and 2 distances) were used. The results showed that 14 parameters are highly sensitive and/or prone to motor control variations. These parameters sensitized five distinct areas of swing to variation: (a) ball positioning, (b) transverse club angle, (c) transition, (d) wrist control, and (e) posture migration between takeaway and impact. Suggestions were provided for how to address these five distinct problem areas. We hope our findings on how to achieve consistency in golf swings will benefit all levels of golf pedagogy and help maintain/develop interests to involve more golf/physical activity for a healthy lifestyle. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Orbital fracture and eyeball rupture caused by golf-club injury.

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Joo Ho

    2014-05-01

    We report a case of an orbital fracture and an eyeball rupture caused by a golf-club injury. A 75-year-old man was struck in his right eye by a golf club while watching behind his son swinging a hybrid-type golf club at his home. A 70-mm muscle-depth laceration was present in the infraorbital area with active bleeding. Computed tomographic imaging of the face revealed a rupture of the right eyeball; fractures in the superior, medial, lateral, and inferior wall of the right orbit; a fracture in the right zygomaticofrontal junction; and a small amount of pneumocephalus in the parafalx region. Under general anesthesia, evisceration of the right eyeball was performed. Not only golfers but also people just watching or passing by can be injured by an errantly struck golf ball or swung golf club. Elderly people as well as children should be instructed in technique and safety and also be supervised when playing golf. Also, the public should be educated about the risk of eye injuries and the benefits of wearing a protective eyewear.

  4. Golf-Related Low Back Pain: A Review of Causative Factors and Prevention Strategies

    Lindsay, David M.; Vandervoort, Anthony A.

    2014-01-01

    Golf is a popular sport with both perceived and real health benefits. However, certain injury risks are also prevalent, particularly to the lower back. Epidemiological studies have shown that lower back pain (LBP) from golf account for between 18% and 54% of all documented ailments, leading many researchers to regard the condition as the most common golf injury. The purpose of this review was to examine the scientific literature to ascertain the risk factors associated with the development of LBP from playing golf and suggest methods to modify or limit these factors. Results of the review indicate that the high frequency of LBP appears multi-factorial although the asymmetrical and forceful nature of the swing along with excessive play and practice, particularly amongst elite players, appear to be common factors. Other factors include swing flaws leading to excessive side-bend and over-rotation of the spine, abnormal muscle recruitment, poor trunk endurance, restricted lead hip internal rotation and the use of unnecessarily stressful club transportation methods. Methods to help control or eliminate excessive stress on the lower back would include reducing the amount spent playing or practicing, seeking professional assistance to assess and adjust swing mechanics, improve trunk and hip flexibility, increase the strength and endurance of the trunk musculature, consider different footwear options and avoid carrying the golf bag. Adopting some or all of these recommendations should allow players to continue to enjoy the sport of golf well into their senior years. PMID:25741420

  5. Achievement of optimal medical therapy goals for U.S. adults with coronary artery disease: results from the REGARDS Study (REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke).

    Brown, Todd M; Voeks, Jenifer H; Bittner, Vera; Brenner, David A; Cushman, Mary; Goff, David C; Glasser, Stephen; Muntner, Paul; Tabereaux, Paul B; Safford, Monika M

    2014-04-29

    In a nonclinical trial setting, we sought to determine the proportion of individuals with coronary artery disease (CAD) with optimal risk factor levels based on the COURAGE (Clinical Outcomes Utilizing Revascularization and Aggressive DruG Evaluation) trial. In the COURAGE trial, the addition of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) to optimal medical therapy did not reduce the risk of death or myocardial infarction in stable CAD patients but resulted in more revascularization procedures. The REGARDS (REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke) study is a national prospective cohort study of 30,239 African-American and white community-dwelling individuals older than 45 years of age who enrolled in 2003 through 2007. We calculated the proportion of 3,167 participants with self-reported CAD meeting 7 risk factor goals based on the COURAGE trial: 1) aspirin use; 2) systolic blood pressure 40 mg/dl, and triglycerides exercise ≥4 days per week. The mean age of participants was 69 ± 9 years; 33% were African American and 35% were female. Overall, the median number of goals met was 4. Less than one-fourth met ≥5 of the 7 goals, and 16% met all 3 goals for aspirin, blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Older age, white race, higher income, more education, and higher physical functioning were independently associated with meeting more goals. There is substantial room for improvement in risk factor reduction among U.S. individuals with CAD. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. R&W Club Frederick Hosts Second Annual Golf Tourney for The Children’s Inn | Poster

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On Sept. 8, more than 40 NCI at Frederick and Leidos Biomedical Research employees, along with family and friends, swapped work clothes for golf gear at Maryland National Golf Club in Middletown. The golfers didn’t just play for fun; they participated in the second annual R&W Club Frederick Golf Tournament to support The Children’s Inn

  7. R&W Club Frederick Raises $1,500 for The Children’s Inn at Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    Forty-four government and contractor employees, along with their friends and family members, took to the Maryland National Golf Club course this fall for a cause. The R&W Club Frederick held its third annual golf tournament at the Middletown, Md., golf course on Sept. 14 to raise funds for The Children’s Inn at NIH, which celebrated its 25th anniversary this year. The Inn

  8. Effect of Caffeine on Golf Performance and Fatigue during a Competitive Tournament.

    Mumford, Petey W; Tribby, Aaron C; Poole, Christopher N; Dalbo, Vincent J; Scanlan, Aaron T; Moon, Jordan R; Roberts, Michael D; Young, Kaelin C

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of a caffeine-containing supplement on golf-specific performance and fatigue during a 36-hole competitive golf tournament. Twelve male golfers (34.8 ± 13.9 yr, 175.9 ± 9.3 cm, 81.23 ± 13.14 kg) with a United States Golf Association handicap of 3-10 participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design in which they played an 18-hole round of golf on two consecutive days (36-hole tournament) and were randomly assigned to consume a caffeine-containing supplement (CAF) or placebo (PLA). CAF/PLA was consumed before and after nine holes during each 18-hole round. Total score, drive distance, fairways and greens in regulation, first putt distance, HR, breathing rate, peak trunk acceleration, and trunk posture while putting were recorded. Self-perceived ratings of energy, fatigue, alertness and concentration were also recorded. Total score (76.9 ± 8.1 vs 79.4 ± 9.1, P = 0.039), greens in regulation (8.6 ± 3.3 vs 6.9 ± 4.6, P = 0.035), and drive distance (239.9 ± 33.8 vs 233.2 ± 32.4, P = 0.047) were statistically better during the CAF condition compared with those during PLA. Statistically significant main effects for condition (P golf. There were no substantial differences in HR or breathing rates, peak trunk acceleration, or putting posture between conditions or over the round (P > 0.05). A moderate dose (1.9 ± 0.3 mg · kg(-1)) of caffeine consumed before and during a round of golf improves golf-specific measures of performance and reduces fatigue in skilled golfers.

  9. Stroke Care 2: Stroke rehabilitation

    Langhorne, P.; Bernhardt, J.; Kwakkel, G.

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is a common, serious, and disabling global health-care problem, and rehabilitation is a major part of patient care. There is evidence to support rehabilitation in well coordinated multidisciplinary stroke units or through provision of early supported provision of discharge teams. Potentially

  10. Biotherapies in stroke.

    Detante, O; Jaillard, A; Moisan, A; Barbieux, M; Favre, I M; Garambois, K; Hommel, M; Remy, C

    2014-12-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide and the most common cause of severe disability. Neuroprotection and repair mechanisms supporting endogenous brain plasticity are often insufficient to allow complete recovery. While numerous neuroprotective drugs trials have failed to demonstrate benefits for patients, they have provided interesting translational research lessons related to neurorestorative therapy mechanisms in stroke. Stroke damage is not limited to neurons but involve all brain cell type including the extracellular matrix in a "glio-neurovascular niche". Targeting a range of host brain cells, biotherapies such as growth factors and therapeutic cells, currently hold great promise as a regenerative medical strategy for stroke. These techniques can promote both neuroprotection and delayed neural repair through neuro-synaptogenesis, angiogenesis, oligodendrogliogenesis, axonal sprouting and immunomodulatory effects. Their complex mechanisms of action are interdependent and vary according to the particular growth factor or grafted cell type. For example, while "peripheral" stem or stromal cells can provide paracrine trophic support, neural stem/progenitor cells (NSC) or mature neurons can act as more direct neural replacements. With a wide therapeutic time window after stroke, biotherapies could be used to treat many patients. However, guidelines for selecting the optimal time window, and the best delivery routes and doses are still debated and the answers may depend on the chosen product and its expected mechanism including early neuroprotection, delayed neural repair, trophic systemic transient effects or graft survival and integration. Currently, the great variety of growth factors, cell sources and cell therapy products form a therapeutic arsenal that is available for stroke treatment. Their effective clinical use will require prior careful considerations regarding safety (e.g. tumorgenicity, immunogenicity), potential efficacy, cell

  11. A model of greenhouse gas emissions from the management of turf on two golf courses.

    Bartlett, Mark D; James, Iain T

    2011-11-01

    An estimated 32,000 golf courses worldwide (approximately 25,600 km2), provide ecosystem goods and services and support an industry contributing over $124 billion globally. Golf courses can impact positively on local biodiversity however their role in the global carbon cycle is not clearly understood. To explore this relationship, the balance between plant–soil system sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions from turf management on golf courses was modelled. Input data were derived from published studies of emissions from agriculture and turfgrass management. Two UK case studies of golf course type were used, a Links course (coastal, medium intensity management, within coastal dune grasses) and a Parkland course (inland, high intensity management, within woodland).Playing surfaces of both golf courses were marginal net sources of greenhouse gas emissions due to maintenance (Links −2.2 ± 0.4 Mg CO2e ha(−1) y(−1); Parkland − 2.0 ± 0.4 Mg CO2e ha(−1) y(−1)). A significant proportion of emissions were from the use of nitrogen fertiliser, especially on tees and greens such that 3% of the golf course area contributed 16% of total greenhouse gas emissions. The area of trees on a golf course was important in determining whole-course emission balance. On the Parkland course, emissions from maintenance were offset by sequestration from turfgrass, and trees which comprised 48% of total area, resulting in a net balance of −5.4 ± 0.9 Mg CO2e ha(−1) y(−1). On the Links course, the proportion of trees was much lower (2%) and sequestration from links grassland resulted in a net balance of −1.6 ± 0.3 Mg CO2e ha(−1) y(−1). Recommendations for golf course management and design include the reduction of nitrogen fertiliser, improved operational efficiency when mowing, the inclusion of appropriate tree-planting and the scaling of component areas to maximise golf course sequestration capacity. The findings are transferrable to the management and design of

  12. Design and fabrication hazard stakes golf course polymeric foam material empty bunch (EFB) fiber reinforced

    Zulfahmi; Syam, B.; Wirjosentono, B.

    2018-02-01

    A golf course with obstacles in the forms of water obstacle and lateral water obstacle marked with the stakes which are called golf course obstacle stake in this study. This study focused on the design and fabrication of the golf course obstacle stake with a solid cylindrical geometry using EFB fiber-reinforced polimeric foam composite materials. To obtain the EFB fiber which is free from fat content and other elements, EFB is soaked in the water with 1% (of the watre total volume) NaOH. The model of the mould designed is permanent mould that can be used for the further refabrication process. The mould was designed based on resin-compound paste materials with talc powder plus E-glass fiber to make the mould strong. The composition of polimeric foam materials comprised unsaturated resin Bqtn-Ex 157 (70%), blowing agent (10%), fiber (10%), and catalyst (10%). The process of casting the polimeric foam composit materials into the mould cavity should be at vertical casting position, accurate interval time of material stirring, and periodical casting. To find out the strength value of the golf course obstacle stake product, a model was made and simulated by using the software of Ansys workbench 14.0, an impact loading was given at the height of 400 mm and 460 mm with the variation of golf ball speed (USGA standard) v = 18 m/s, v = 35 m/s, v = 66.2 m/s, v = 70 m/s, and v = 78.2 m/s. The clarification showed that the biggest dynamic explicit loading impact of Fmax = 142.5 N at the height of 460 mm with the maximum golf ball speed of 78.2 m/s did not experience the hysteresis effect and inertia effect. The largest deformation area occurred at the golf ball speed v = 66.2 mm/s, that is 18.029 mm (time: 2.5514e-004) was only concentrated around the sectional area of contact point of impact, meaning that the golf course obstacle stakes made of EFB fiber-reinforced polymeric foam materials have the geometric functional strength that are able to absorb the energy of golf ball

  13. Pesticide-free management of weed on golf courses: Current situation and future challenges, European Journal of Turfgrass Science 45(2/14)

    Jensen, Anne Mette Dahl; Norman Petersen, Karin; Aamlid, Trygve

    2014-01-01

    Restrictions on use of pesticides on recreational areas including golf courses are encouraged by EU legislation. Denmark has introduced legislation in 2013 and set an upper limit on how much pesticide can be used on golf courses. Weeds can impair on golf course quality and must be controlled, esp...

  14. Synchronized metronome training induces changes in the kinematic properties of the golf swing.

    Sommer, Marius; Häger, Charlotte; Rönnqvist, Louise

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate possible effects of synchronized metronome training (SMT) on movement dynamics during golf-swing performance, as captured by kinematic analysis. A one-group, between-test design was applied on 13 male golfers (27.5 +/- 4.6 years old, 12.7 +/- 4.9 handicap) who completed 12 sessions of SMT over a four-week period. Pre- and post-assessments of golf swings with three different clubs (4-iron, 7-iron, and pitching wedge) were performed using a three-dimensional motion capture system. Club velocity at three different swing phases (backswing, downswing, and follow-through) was measured and cross-correlation analysis of time-series signals were made on joint couplings (wrist-elbow-shoulder) of both arms, and between joints and the club, during the full golf swing. There were significantly higher cross-correlations between joint-couplings and concomitant changes of the associated phase-shift differences, as well as reduced phase-shift variability at post-test. No significant effect of SMT was found for the club velocities. We suggest that domain-general influences of SMT on the underlying brain-based motor control strategies lead to a more coordinated movement pattern of the golf-swing performance, which may explain previous observations of significantly improved golf-shot accuracy and decreased variability after SMT.

  15. KINEMATIC ANALYSES OF THE GOLF SWING HUB PATH AND ITS ROLE IN GOLFER/CLUB KINETIC TRANSFERS

    Steven M. Nesbit

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the fundamental geometric and kinematic characteristics of the swing hub path of the golf shot for four diverse subjects. In addition, the role of the hub path geometry in transferring the kinetic quantities from the golfer to the club were investigated. The hub path was found to have a complex geometry with significantly changing radii, and a constantly moving center-of-curvature during the downswing for all subjects. While the size and shape of the hub path differed considerably among the subjects, a three phase radius-based pattern was revealed that aligned with distinct stages of the downswing. Artificially controlling and optimizing the hub path of the better golfer in the group indicated that a non-circular hub path was superior to a constant radius path in minimizing the kinetic loading while generating the highest possible club head velocity. The shape and purpose of the hub path geometry appears to result from a complex combination of achieving equilibrium between the golfer and the club, and a purposeful configuring of the path to control the outward movement of the club while minimizing the kinetic loading on the golfer yet transferring the maximum kinetic quantities to the club. Describing the downswing relative to the hub path phasing is presented and was found to be informative since the phases align with significant swing, kinetic and kinematic markers. These findings challenge golf swing modeling methodologies which fix the center-of-curvature of the hub path thus constraining it to constant radius motion

  16. Preventing stroke

    ... with which you were born Changes to your lifestyle You can change some risk factors for stroke, ... sodium (salt). Read labels and stay away from unhealthy fats. Avoid foods with: Saturated fat Partially-hydrogenated ...

  17. Stroke Rehabilitation

    ... of the effects of a stroke Trouble swallowing (dysphagia) Problems with bowel or bladder control Fatigue Difficulty ... NINDS Focus on Disorders Alzheimer's & Related Dementias Epilepsy Parkinson's Disease Spinal Cord Injury Traumatic Brain Injury Focus ...

  18. 76 FR 41691 - Safety Zone; BGSU Football Gridiron Classic Golf and Dinner Fireworks, Catawba Island Club, Port...

    2011-07-15

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; BGSU Football Gridiron Classic Golf and Dinner Fireworks, Catawba Island Club, Port.... This zone is intended to restrict vessels from portions of Lake Erie during the BGSU Football Gridiron... Purpose On July 25, 2011, Bowling Green State University will hold its BGSU Football Gridiron Classic Golf...

  19. The Effect of Biological Movement Variability on the Performance of the Golf Swing in High- and Low-Handicapped Players

    Bradshaw, Elizabeth J.; Keogh, Justin W. L.; Hume, Patria A.; Maulder, Peter S.; Nortje, Jacques; Marnewick, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of neuromotor noise on golf swing performance in high- and low-handicap players. Selected two-dimensional kinematic measures of 20 male golfers (n = 10 per high- or low-handicap group) performing 10 golf swings with a 5-iron club was obtained through video analysis. Neuromotor noise was calculated…

  20. Effect of Cyber-Golfing on Balance Amongst the Elderly in Hong Kong: A Pilot Randomised Trial

    Daniel H.K. Chow

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that cyber-golfing might be an alternative to golfing, which is capable of enhancing balance ability amongst community-dwelling elderly. The potential of exergaming as a clinical tool for geriatric rehabilitation was discussed.

  1. Penelitian mutu kulit sarung tangan golf samak krom

    Sri Untari

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available The Study aimed at improving the quality of chrome-tanned leather for golf floves producted by Indonesian tanners. Samples used in this study were 32. They were visually inspected and tested on their chemical and physical properties. The results of the chemical and physical tests were analyzed using deviation standard in descriptive statistics. It was obtained from the visual inspection of the samples taken that the leather was soft enough, the colour was even, their hair was not loose, and it was flexible but not elastic. While from the Chemical Tests, the results obtained were : water content (13,78 – 16,94 %; Fat Content (6,04 – 11,38 % and pH Valueness (4,43 – 5,19. It was obtained from the physical tests that Thickness (0,32 – 0,64 mm; well tanned; Tensile Strength resistence (106,07 – 109,73 kg/cm2; Flexibility (53,11 – 103,07 %; Slit Tear Resistance (13,48 – 39,22 kgf/cm; Stitch Tear Strength (74,51 – 137,79 kgf/cm, wet rub fastness tst shown a little discolourisation while dry rub fastness test shown no discolourisation.

  2. Think aloud: acute stress and coping strategies during golf performances.

    Nicholls, Adam R; Polman, Remco C J

    2008-07-01

    A limitation of the sport psychology coping literature is the amount of time between a stressful episode and the recall of the coping strategies used in the stressful event (Nicholls & Polman, 2007). The purpose of this study was to develop and implement a technique to measure acute stress and coping during performance. Five high-performance adolescent golfers took part in Level 2 verbalization think aloud trials (Ericsson & Simon, 1993), which involved participants verbalizing their thoughts, over six holes of golf. Verbal reports were audio-recorded during each performance, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using protocol analysis (Ericsson & Simon, 1993). Stressors and coping strategies varied throughout the six holes, which support the proposition that stress and coping is a dynamic process that changes across phases of the same performance (Lazarus, 1999). The results also revealed information regarding the sequential patterning of stress and coping, suggesting that the golfers experienced up to five stressors before reporting a coping strategy. Think aloud appears a suitable method to collect concurrent stress and coping data.

  3. Pediatric stroke

    Hoermann, M.

    2008-01-01

    Stroke in childhood has gained increasingly more attention and is accepted as an important disease in childhood. The reasons for this severe event and the consequences for the rest of the life are totally different than for adults. This is also true for the diagnosis and therapy. This paper gives a comprehensive overview on the characteristics of pediatric stroke to assist radiologists in making a rapid and safe diagnosis in order to identify the underlying disease. (orig.) [de

  4. Basics of acute stroke treatment

    Haass, A.

    2005-01-01

    Acute stroke presents an emergency that requires immediate referral to a specialized hospital, preferably with a stroke unit. Disability and mortality are reduced by 30% in patients treated in stroke units compared to those treated on regular wards, even if a specialized team is present on the ward. Systolic blood pressure may remain high at 200-220 mmHg in the acute phase and should not be lowered too quickly. Further guidelines for basic care include: optimal O 2 delivery, blood sugar levels below 100-150 mg%, and lowering body temperature below 37.5 C using physical means or drugs. Increased intracranial pressure should be treated by raising the upper body of the patient, administration of glycerol, mannitol, and/or sorbitol, artificial respiration, and special monitoring of Tris buffer. Decompressive craniectomy may be considered in cases of ''malignant'' media stroke and expansive cerebellar infarction. Fibrinolysis is the most effective stroke treatment and is twice as effective in the treatment of stroke than myocardial infarction. Fibrinolysis may be initiated within 3 h of a stroke in the anterior circulation. If a penumbra is detectable by ''PWI-DWI mismatch MRI,'' specialized hospitals may perform fibrinolysis up to 6 h after symptom onset. In cases of stroke in the basilar artery, fibrinolysis may be performed even later after symptom onset. Intra-arterial fibrinolysis is performed in these cases using rt-PA or urokinase. Follow-up treatment of stroke patients should not only address post-stroke depression and neuropsychological deficits, but also include patient education about risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, and cardiac arrhythmias. (orig.) [de

  5. Atherosclerosis and Stroke

    ... Stroke Association.org Professionals for Stroke Association.org Shop for Stroke Association.org Support for Stroke Association. ... endothelium significantly. The artery’s diameter shrinks and blood flow decreases, reducing oxygen supply. How atherosclerotic plaque causes ...

  6. Hip joint torques during the golf swing of young and senior healthy males.

    Foxworth, Judy L; Millar, Audrey L; Long, Benjamin L; Way, Michael; Vellucci, Matthew W; Vogler, Joshua D

    2013-09-01

    Descriptive, laboratory study. To compare the 3-D hip torques during a golf swing between young and senior healthy male amateur golfers. The secondary purpose was to compare the 3-D hip joint torques between the trail leg and lead leg. The generation of hip torques from the hip musculature is an important aspect of the golf swing. Golf is a very popular activity, and estimates of hip torques during the golf swing have not been reported. Twenty healthy male golfers were divided into a young group (mean ± SD age, 25.1 ± 3.1 years) and a senior group (age, 56.9 ± 4.7 years). All subjects completed 10 golf swings using their personal driver. A motion capture system and force plates were used to obtain kinematic and kinetic data. Inverse dynamic analyses were used to calculate 3-D hip joint torques of the trail and lead limbs. Two-way analyses of covariance (group by leg), with club-head velocity as a covariate, were used to compare peak hip torques between groups and limbs. Trail-limb hip external rotator torque was significantly greater in the younger group compared to the senior group, and greater in the trail leg versus the lead leg. When adjusting for club-head velocity, young and senior healthy male amateur golfers generated comparable hip torques during a golf swing, with the exception of the trail-limb hip external rotator torque. The largest hip torque found was the trail-limb hip extensor torque.

  7. The role of biomechanics in maximising distance and accuracy of golf shots.

    Hume, Patria A; Keogh, Justin; Reid, Duncan

    2005-01-01

    Golf biomechanics applies the principles and technique of mechanics to the structure and function of the golfer in an effort to improve golf technique and performance. A common recommendation for technical correction is maintaining a single fixed centre hub of rotation with a two-lever one-hinge moment arm to impart force on the ball. The primary and secondary spinal angles are important for conservation of angular momentum using the kinetic link principle to generate high club-head velocity. When the golfer wants to maximise the distance of their drives, relatively large ground reaction forces (GRF) need to be produced. However, during the backswing, a greater proportion of the GRF will be observed on the back foot, with transfer of the GRF on to the front foot during the downswing/acceleration phase. Rapidly stretching hip, trunk and upper limb muscles during the backswing, maximising the X-factor early in the downswing, and uncocking the wrists when the lead arm is about 30 degrees below the horizontal will take advantage of the summation of force principle. This will help generate large angular velocity of the club head, and ultimately ball displacement. Physical conditioning will help to recruit the muscles in the correct sequence and to optimum effect. To maximise the accuracy of chipping and putting shots, the golfer should produce a lower grip on the club and a slower/shorter backswing. Consistent patterns of shoulder and wrist movements and temporal patterning result in successful chip shots. Qualitative and quantitative methods are used to biomechanically assess golf techniques. Two- and three-dimensional videography, force plate analysis and electromyography techniques have been employed. The common golf biomechanics principles necessary to understand golf technique are stability, Newton's laws of motion (inertia, acceleration, action reaction), lever arms, conservation of angular momentum, projectiles, the kinetic link principle and the stretch

  8. Scintigraphic diagnosis of sport injuries: Multiple fractures of ribs by golf-players

    Pohle, W.; Schuemichen, C.; Hoffmann, G.; Keul, J.; Kluemper, A.

    1981-01-01

    Three untrained golf-players suffered from pain in the dorsal region of the left thorax after some training hours. Three to four weeks after the pains had begun serial fractures of ribs were diagnosed by sup(99m)Tc-MDP bonescan-examinations. All fractures were localized near the costal angulus (paravertebral) of these ribs. The fractures are caused by manual tensions. The difficulties in timing the bone-scan and in identifying the morphologic substrate are demonstrated. It is recommended, that golf-players suffering from thoracic pain ought to be examined by bone scan. (orig.) [de

  9. High resolution electrical resistivity tomography of golf course greens irrigated with reclaimed wastewater: Hydrological approach

    Tapias, Josefina C.; Lovera, Raúl; Himi, Mahjoub; Gallardo, Helena; Sendrós, Alexandre; Marguí, Eva; Queralt, Ignasi; Casas, Albert

    2014-05-01

    Actually, there are over 300 golf courses and more than three thousand licensed players in Spain. For this reason golf cannot be considered simply a hobby or a sport, but a very significant economic activity. Considered as one of the most rapidly expanding land-use and water demanding business in the Mediterranean, golf course development generates controversy. In the recent years there has been a considerable demand for golf courses to adopt environmentally sustainable strategies and particularly water authorities are forcing by law golf managers to irrigate with alternative water resources, mainly reclaimed wastewater. Watering practices must be based on soil properties that are characterized by samples removed from the different zones of the golf course and submitted to an accredited physical soil testing laboratory. Watering schedules are critical on greens with poor drainage or on greens with excessively high infiltration rates. The geophysical survey was conducted over the greens of the Girona Golf Club. Eighteen electrical resistivity tomographies were acquired using a mixed Wenner-Schlumberger configuration with electrodes placed 0.5 meter apart. Small stainless-steel nails were used as electrodes to avoid any damage in the fine turfgrass of greens The resistivity meter was set for systematically and automatically selects current electrodes and measurement electrodes to sample apparent resistivity values. Particle size analysis (PSA) has been performed on soil materials of any putting green. The PSA analysis has been composed of two distinct phases. The first has been the textural analysis of the soils for determining the content of sand, silt, and clay fraction via the use of a stack of sieves with decreasing sized openings from the top sieve to the bottom. Subsequently, the hydraulic conductivity of the substrates has been evaluated by means of Bredding and Hazen empirical relationships. The results of this research show that the electrical resistivity

  10. Manufacturing of golf club using wood-plastic combination produced by γ-irradiation

    Yamagami, Masayuki; Tsujii, Yukio; Ohnishi, Tokuhiro; Miyoshi, Hirofumi; Chubachi, Mitsuo; Takada, Hisatoshi.

    1992-01-01

    Wood-plastic combination (WPC) was produced by γ-irradiation of persimmon impregnated with acrylonitrile and styrene. The hardness and strength of WPC obtained were higher than those of an unmodified wood. Thus, it was found that the WPC is suited for a head of golf club, because the Shore hardness value of WPC is 36% greater than that of unmodified wood. An impregnation method of monomers with some pigments could produce colored WPC without diminishing natural grain. Head of golf club could be manufactured from colored WPC in practice. (auhtor)

  11. Scintigraphic diagnosis of sport injuries: Multiple fractures of ribs by golf-players

    Pohle, W; Schuemichen, C; Hoffmann, G; Keul, J; Kluemper, A

    1981-02-01

    Three untrained golf-players suffered from pain in the dorsal region of the left thorax after some training hours. Three to four weeks after the pains had begun serial fractures of ribs were diagnosed by sup(99m)Tc-MDP bonescan-examinations. All fractures were localized near the costal angulus (paravertebral) of these ribs. The fractures are caused by manual tensions. The difficulties in timing the bone-scan and in identifying the morphologic substrate are demonstrated. It is recommended, that golf-players suffering from thoracic pain ought to be examined by bone scan.

  12. Triazole Fungicides Sensitivity of Sclerotinia homoeocarpa in Korean Golf Courses

    Ji Won Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemical management of dollar spot in turf may lead to the development of Sclerotinia homoeocarpa populations with reduced fungicide sensitivity. The objective of this study was to investigate resistance of S. homoeocarpa isolates to triazole fungicides and to test cross-resistance among three triazole fungicides. A total of 66 isolates of S. homoeocarpa were collected from 15 golf courses across Korea, and tested via in vitro sensitivity assay against hexaconazole, propiconazole and tebuconazole. EC₅₀ values of the isolates to these fungicides were distributed in the range of 0.001–1.1 a. i. μg ml−1. Based on the EC₅₀ values, twelve representative strains were selected as sensitive isolates including control and insensitive isolates with respect to each fungicide. At a concentration of 0.1 a. i. μg ml−1 for all fungicides, the selected strains were distinguished as sensitive or resistant isolates with the mycelial growth inhibition rate of 50% as the criterion. The EC₅₀ values of resistant strains exposed to hexaconazole, propiconazole and tebuconazole were 20–50 times, 50–70 times, and 77 times greater, respectively, than that of the control strains. Two isolates of S. homoeocarpa S0–41 and Sh14-2-1 showed sensitivity toward all the fungicides used, while two other isolates Sh7-5-1 and Sh2-1-1 showed resistance to all fungicides. Each isolate showed similar resistance to the three types of triazole fungicides, whereby cross-resistance of isolates was confirmed in the present study; all three triazole fungicide combinations displayed significant correlation coefficients equivalent to or greater than 0.8.

  13. Launch Velocities in Successful Golf Putting: An Analytical Analysis

    John F. Mahoney

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study is concerned with the special case of a putted ball intersecting a standard golf hole at its diameter. The velocity of the ball at the initial rim of the hole is termed the launch velocity and depending upon its value the ball may either be captured or it may escape capture by jumping over the hole. The critical value of the launch velocity (V is such that lesser values result in capture while greater values produce escape. Purpose: Since the value of the V entered prominently in some theoretical studies of putting, the aim of the current study is to provide an original re-evaluation of V and to contrast our results with existing results. Method: This analytical analysis relies on trigonometry in conjunction with Newtonian mechanics and the mathematics of projectiles. The results of a recent study into the mathematics of a bouncing ball which included the notions of restitution and friction were also employed in the analysis. Results: If bouncing and slipping do not occur when the ball hits the far rim of the hole our analysis produces a value of V of 1.356 m/s. When bouncing and slipping are present we find that V is at least 1.609 m/s but increases beyond this value as slipping and friction become greater. Useful relations which relate the dynamics and geometry of the ball to V are provided. Conclusion: Since ambient conditions may influence the extent of bounce and slippage we conjecture that the value of V is not unique.

  14. Heat Stroke

    Mørch, Sofie Søndergaard; Andersen, Johnny Dohn Holmgren; Bestle, Morten Heiberg

    2017-01-01

    not diagnosed until several days after admittance; hence treatment with cooling was delayed. Both patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, where they were treated with an external cooling device and received treatment for complications. Both cases ended fatally. As global warming continues, more heat......Heat stroke is an acute, life-threatening emergency characterized clinically by elevated body temperature and central nervous system dysfunction. Early recognition and treatment including aggressive cooling and management of life-threatening systemic complications are essential to reduce morbidity...... and mortality. This case report describes two Danish patients diagnosed with heat stroke syndrome during a heat wave in the summer of 2014. Both patients were morbidly obese and had several predisposing illnesses. However since heat stroke is a rare condition in areas with temperate climate, they were...

  15. Speech and Language Therapy for Aphasia following Subacute Stroke

    Koyuncu, E.; Çam, P.; Altinok, N.; Çalli, D.E.; Yarbay Duman, T.; Özgirgin, N.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the time window, duration and intensity of optimal speech and language therapy applied to aphasic patients with subacute stroke in our hospital. The study consisted of 33 patients being hospitalized for stroke rehabilitation in our hospital with first stroke

  16. Analysis of speed, stroke rate, and stroke distance for world-class breaststroke swimming.

    Garland Fritzdorf, Stephen; Hibbs, Angela; Kleshnev, Valery

    2009-02-15

    Speed in aquatic locomotion is determined by stroke distance and stroke rate, but it does not always follow that an increase in stroke rate will lead to an increase in speed. Kleshnev (2006) developed a method to evaluate the relationship between speed and stroke rate during rowing - the effective work per stroke. In this case study, the effective work per stroke was determined for a male world-class 100-m breaststroke swimmer for seven races in major championships and compared between: each of the seven races; each quarter within each race; and the best swims of this case study and seven other world-class swimmers. The effective work per stroke was related to race performance, with the fastest race having the highest effective work per stroke and lowest stroke rate, with slower races having low effectiveness and high stroke rate (R(2) = 0.85). The effective work per stroke was reduced in a race as the swimmer fatigued. The within-race standard deviation of effectiveness was lower in fast swims (R(2) = 0.84). This analysis has identified some characteristics of fast swimming: high effectiveness, optimal stroke rate, and a flat effectiveness profile. Training and racing strategies can now be devised to improve performance by increasing the sensitivity of assessment of strengths and weaknesses in individuals.

  17. Etiologic stroke subtypes: updated definition and efficient workup strategies.

    Mehndiratta, Prachi; Chapman Smith, Sherita; Worrall, Bradford B

    2015-01-01

    Stroke affects approximately 16.9 million individuals per year worldwide and is the second leading cause of death. Stroke represents a family of related, but distinct subtypes. Classifying stroke subtypes must take into account various aspects of a standardized stroke workup to allow optimization of treatment and prevention strategies. Secondary prevention and pharmacologic treatment is tailored based on stroke mechanism. Additionally prognostication and recurrent risk also depends on stroke etiology. Efficient workup of stroke relies on a thorough history, clinical examination, imaging studies, and putative mechanism of stroke that lead the treating physician to a particular etiological path. Here , we provide the reader with updated definitions of etiologic ischemic stroke types as well as efficient workup strategies.

  18. The need for a population-based, dose optimization study for recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in acute ischemic stroke: A study from a tertiary care teaching hospital from South India

    Siju V Abraham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The guideline recommended dose of intravenous (i.v recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA for acute ischemic stroke is 0.9 mg/kg in the European and American populations. In Asiatic population, some studies have shown that a lower dose of i.v rt-PA is equally efficacious. Aims: To assess if there is a need for a dose optimization for i.v rt-PA study among Indians. Setting and Design: A prospective, observational database of acute stroke cases that presented to a tertiary care institute over a period of 1 year was made. Methods: The data procured using a prestructured elaborate pro forma. Based on the dose of rt-PA received, the individuals were divided into three groups; Group 1 (0.6–0.7 mg/kg, Group 2 (0.7–0.8 mg/kg, and Group 3 (0.8–0.9 mg/kg. Improvement was assessed in each group and between the thrombolysed and nonthrombolysed individuals. Statistical Analysis Used: The nonparametric Mann–Whitney U-test (Wilcoxon rank-sum test was applied for assessing improvement of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score with significance level of α < 0.05 (P < 0.012 and compliance level at 95%. Results: Between the thrombolysed (n = 46 and nonthrombolysed (n = 113 group, there was a statistically significant neurological improvement in the thrombolysed group. Clinical improvement was noted in 75%, 85.7%, and 66.7% of individuals receiving rt-PA in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Four out of the five who developed a clinically significant intracranial hemorrhage were thrombolysed at a dose of 0.8–0.9 mg/kg rt-PA (Group 3. Conclusion: There is a need for a properly randomized, dose optimization study of i.v rt-PA in the Indian subcontinent.

  19. Managing phosphorus export from golf courses using industrial byproducts as filter materials

    Golf courses, and in particular the tees, fairways, and putting greens, are vulnerable to loss of phosphorus (P) as dissolved reactive P (DRP) through sandy, porous grass rooting media and subsurface tile drainage. Excess levels of phosphorus (P) in surface waters promotes eutrophication, which in t...

  20. CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICITY ASSOCIATED WITH A COASTAL GOLF COURSE COMPLEX

    The increasing density of golf courses represents a potential source of contamination to nearby coastal areas, the chemical and biological magnitude of which is almost unknown. The objective of this study was to compare the concentrations of contaminants and toxicities of sedime...

  1. A new method to identify the location of the kick point during the golf swing.

    Joyce, Christopher; Burnett, Angus; Matthews, Miccal

    2013-12-01

    No method currently exists to determine the location of the kick point during the golf swing. This study consisted of two phases. In the first phase, the static kick point of 10 drivers (having identical grip and head but fitted with shafts of differing mass and stiffness) was determined by two methods: (1) a visual method used by professional club fitters and (2) an algorithm using 3D locations of markers positioned on the golf club. Using level of agreement statistics, we showed the latter technique was a valid method to determine the location of the static kick point. In phase two, the validated method was used to determine the dynamic kick point during the golf swing. Twelve elite male golfers had three shots analyzed for two drivers fitted with stiff shafts of differing mass (56 g and 78 g). Excellent between-trial reliability was found for dynamic kick point location. Differences were found for dynamic kick point location when compared with static kick point location, as well as between-shaft and within-shaft. These findings have implications for future investigations examining the bending behavior of golf clubs, as well as being useful to examine relationships between properties of the shaft and launch parameters.

  2. Evaluation of a Florida coastal golf complex as a local and watershed source of bioavailable contaminants

    Lewis, Michael A., Robert L. Quarles, Darrin D. Dantin and James C. Moore. 2004. Evaluation of a Coastal Golf Complex as a Local and Watershed Source of Bioavailable Contaminants. Mar. Pollut. Bull. 48(3-4):254-262. (ERL,GB 1183). Contaminant fate in coastal areas impacte...

  3. A methodological approach for the biomechanical cause analysis of golf-related lumbar spine injuries.

    Sim, Taeyong; Jang, Dong-Jin; Oh, Euichaul

    2014-01-01

    A new methodological approach employing mechanical work (MW) determination and relative portion of its elemental analysis was applied to investigate the biomechanical causes of golf-related lumbar spine injuries. Kinematic and kinetic parameters at the lumbar and lower limb joints were measured during downswing in 18 golfers. The MW at the lumbar joint (LJ) was smaller than at the right hip but larger than the MWs at other joints. The contribution of joint angular velocity (JAV) to MW was much greater than that of net muscle moment (NMM) at the LJ, whereas the contribution of NMM to MW was greater rather than or similar to that of JAV at other joints. Thus, the contribution of JAV to MW is likely more critical in terms of the probability of golf-related injury than that of NMM. The MW-based golf-related injury index (MWGII), proposed as the ratio of the contribution of JAV to MW to that of NMM, at the LJ (1.55) was significantly greater than those at other joints ( golf-related injuries around the lumbar spine. Therefore, both MW and MWGII should be considered when investigating the biomechanical causes of lumbar spine injuries.

  4. Biochar-compost mixtures added to simulated golf greens increase creeping bentgrass growth

    Mixtures of 85% sand and 15% mixtures of peat (control), a commercial biochar, a commercial biochar-compost product (CarbonizPN), and seven biochar-commercial compost mixtures were tested on the growth of creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L. "007") in simulated golf greens. Physical properti...

  5. A pilot study of indoor air quality in screen golf courses.

    Goung, Sun-Ju Nam; Yang, Jinho; Kim, Yoon Shin; Lee, Cheol Min

    2015-05-01

    The aims of this study were to provide basic data for determining policies on air quality for multi-user facilities, including the legal enrollment of the indoor air quality regulation as designated by the Ministry of Environment, and to establish control plans. To this end, concentrations of ten pollutants (PM10, carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde (HCHO), total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs), radon (Rn), oxone (O3), total bacteria counts (TBC), and asbestos) in addition to nicotine, a smoking index material used to determine the impact of smoking on the air quality, were investigated in indoor game rooms and lobbies of 64 screen golf courses. The average concentration of none of the ten pollutants in the game rooms and lobbies of screen golf courses was found to exceed the limit set by the law. There were, however, pollutant concentrations exceeding limits in some screen golf courses, in order to establish a control plan for the indoor air quality of screen golf courses, a study on the emission sources of each pollutant was conducted. The major emission sources were found to be facility users' activities such as smoking and the use of combustion appliances, building materials, and finishing materials.

  6. Three-dimensional trunk kinematics in golf: between-club differences and relationships to clubhead speed.

    Joyce, Christopher; Burnett, Angus; Cochrane, Jodie; Ball, Kevin

    2013-06-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to determine whether significant three-dimensional (3D) trunk kinematic differences existed between a driver and a five-iron during a golf swing; and (ii) to determine the anthropometric, physiological, and trunk kinematic variables associated with clubhead speed. Trunk range of motion and golf swing kinematic data were collected from 15 low-handicap male golfers (handicap = 2.5 +/- 1.9). Data were collected using a 10-camera motion capture system operating at 250 Hz. Data on clubhead speed and ball velocity were collected using a real-time launch monitor. Paired t-tests revealed nine significant (p golf swing kinematics, namely trunk and lower trunk flexion/extension and lower trunk axial rotation. Multiple regression analyses explained 33.7-66.7% of the variance in clubhead speed for the driver and five-iron, respectively, with both trunk and lower trunk variables showing associations with clubhead speed. Future studies should consider the role of the upper limbs and modifiable features of the golf club in developing clubhead speed for the driver in particular.

  7. Grating Oriented Line-Wise Filtration (GOLF) for Dual-Energy X-ray CT

    Xi, Yan; Cong, Wenxiang; Harrison, Daniel; Wang, Ge

    2017-12-01

    In medical X-ray Computed Tomography (CT), the use of two distinct X-ray source spectra (energies) allows dose-reduction and material discrimination relative to that achieved with only one source spectrum. Existing dual-energy CT methods include source kVp-switching, double-layer detection, dual-source gantry, and two-pass scanning. Each method suffers either from strong spectral correlation or patient-motion artifacts. To simultaneously address these problems, we propose to improve CT data acquisition with the Grating Oriented Line-wise Filtration (GOLF) method, a novel X-ray filter that is placed between the source and patient. GOLF uses a combination of absorption and filtering gratings that are moved relative to each other and in synchronization with the X-ray tube kVp-switching process and/or the detector view-sampling process. Simulation results show that GOLF can improve the spectral performance of kVp-switching to match that of dual-source CT while avoiding patient motion artifacts and dual imaging chains. Although significant flux is absorbed by this pre-patient filter, the proposed GOLF method is a novel path for cost-effectively extracting dual-energy or multi-energy data and reducing radiation dose with or without kVp switching.

  8. Addition of biochar to simulated golf greens promotes creeping bentgrass growth

    Organic amendments such as peat moss and various composts are typically added to sand-based root zones such as golf greens to increase water and nutrient retention. However, these attributes are generally lost as these amendments decompose in a few years. Biochar is a high carbon, extremely porous ...

  9. EFFECTS OF A COASTAL GOLF COMPLEX ON WATER QUALITY, PERIPHYTON, AND SEAGRASS.

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a golf course complex on water quality, colonized periphyton and seagrass meadows in adjacent freshwater, near-coastal and wetland areas. The environmental impact of the recreational facility, which uses spray wastewater...

  10. Relationships between field-based measures of strength and power and golf club head speed.

    Read, Paul J; Lloyd, Rhodri S; De Ste Croix, Mark; Oliver, Jon L

    2013-10-01

    Increased golf club head speed (CHS) has been shown to result in greater driving distances and is also correlated with golf handicap. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between field-based measures of strength and power and golf CHS with a secondary aim to determine the reliability of the selected tests. A correlation design was used to assess the following variables: anthropometrics, squat jump (SJ) height and squat jump peak power (SJPP), unilateral countermovement jump (CMJ) heights (right leg countermovement jump and left leg countermovement jump [LLCMJ]), bilateral CMJ heights, countermovement jump peak power (CMJPP), and medicine ball seated throw (MBST) and medicine ball rotational throw (MBRT). Fouty-eight male subjects participated in the study (age: 20.1 ± 3.2 years, height: 1.76 ± 0.07 m, mass: 72.8 ± 7.8 kg, handicap: 5.8 ± 2.2). Moderate significant correlations were reported between CHS and MBRT (r = 0.67; p golf athletes using the proposed battery of field tests. Additionally, movements that are more concentrically dominant in nature may display stronger relationships with CHS due to MBST and SJ displaying the highest explained variance after a stepwise linear regression.

  11. SEDIMENT CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICITY ASSOCIATED WITH A COASTAL GOLF COURSE COMPLEX.

    The increasing density of golf courses represents a potential source of sediment contamination to nearby coastal areas, the chemical and biological magnitude of which is almost unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the concentrations of contaminants and toxicities...

  12. GOLF COURSES AS A SOURCE OF COASTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICITY: A FLORIDA EXPERIENCE

    The chemical and biological impacts of two coastal golf courses that receive wastewater spray irrigation were determined during a two-year period. A variety of techniques were used to assess the spatial and temporal variability of contaminant levels and their bioavailability in t...

  13. You Don't Have to Be a Professional Golfer to Teach Golf

    Hill, Kory; Thornburg, Roland

    2005-01-01

    Although physical educators cannot be experts on every sport or activity, there is still a need to include specialized activities in the curriculum that a physical educator may not initially feel comfortable teaching because of inexperience and a lack of expertise. Golf, like other activities such as tennis, requires a specificity of training that…

  14. Assessment of management of a golf course by means of sustainability indicators

    Gaio Cesare Pacini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Golf courses are supposed to produce remarkable negative effects on the environment, due to some techniques involved in their management. To provide data useful for the proper assessment of the agro-environmental sustainability of a golf course, the framework agro-environmental sustainability information system (AESIS was used, utilizing a set of indicators suitable to evaluate different dimensions of sustainability (physical, ecological, productive and social. The management of areal golf course located in Tuscany (central Italy was compared to an alternative land use of the same area represented by an ordinary farm based on a sunflower-wheat rotation. Assessment indicators were selected by applying a conceptual model based on ecology theory and were calculated considering site-specific production and pedo-climatic features of the area. Different weighting scenarios were hypothesized in order to have different management options assessed and to carry out a targeted sensitivity analysis. Main results confirmed the significant impact of golf management on some ecological characteristics but the holistic assessment of AESIS approach permitted an overall evaluation that comprised a wide range of different issues. AESIS demonstrated to be a practical and adaptive tool able to perform an efficient comparison of possible land destinations.

  15. The Sequence of Hip and Selected Upper-Extremity Joint Movements During the Golf Drive.

    Hunter, Charles L.

    This study analyzed wrist, elbow, and hip actions of golfers who were accurately driving a golf ball a maximum distance. Electrogoniometry and cinematography were used to measure wrist, forearm, elbow, and hip actions during the downswing of 10 low-handicap golfers who were attempting to drive a minimum of 225 yards within a 50-yard corridor.…

  16. Etiologies of pediatric craniofacial injuries: a comparison of injuries involving all-terrain vehicles and golf carts.

    White, Lauren C; McKinnon, Brian J; Hughes, C Anthony

    2013-03-01

    To determine incidence and etiologies of craniofacial injuries in the pediatric population through comparison of injuries caused by all-terrain vehicles and golf cart trauma. Case series with chart review. Level 1 trauma center. Retrospective review of pediatric traumas at a tertiary academic medical center from 2003 to 2012 identified 196 patients whose injuries resulted from accidents involving either all-terrain vehicles or golf carts. Data was collected and variables such as age, gender, driver vs. passenger, location of accident, Glasgow coma scale, Injury severity scale, Abbreviated injury scale, and presence or absence of helmet use were examined. 196 pediatric patients were identified: 68 patients had injuries resulting from golf cart accidents, and 128 patients from ATV accidents. 66.4% of ATV-related traumas were male, compared to 52.9% of golf cart-related traumas. Ages of injured patients were similar between the two modalities with average age of ATV traumas 10.8 (±4.0) years and golf cart traumas 10.0 (±4.6) years. Caucasians were most commonly involved in both ATV (79.7%) and golf cart traumas (85.3%). 58.6% of all ATV related trauma and 69.1% of all golf cart trauma resulted in craniofacial injuries. The most common craniofacial injury was a closed head injury with brief loss of consciousness, occurring in 46.1% of the ATV traumas and 54.4% of the golf cart traumas. Temporal bone fractures were the second most common type of craniofacial injury, occurring in 5.5% of ATV accidents and 7.4% of the golf cart traumas. Length of hospital stay and, cases requiring surgery and severity scores were similar between both populations. Intensive care admissions and injury severity scores approached but not reach statistical significance (0.096 and 0.083, respectively). The only statistically significant differences between the two modalities were helmet use (P=0.00018%) and days requiring ventilator assistance (P=0.025). ATVs and golf carts are often exempt

  17. Procedimiento y viabilidad para el envío de paquetes en campos de Golf mediante tecnologia drone

    Pedrosa Cabello, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this project is to study the feasibility of using drones in golf courses and designing an operative use. The first step was to conduct a search for the existence of drones with the ability to carry packages and see if this service currently exists on some golf course. After this search it was concluded that the technology needed to make a delivery of a package with dron exists and that there is no golf course in Europe that performs an operation of this style. The next s...

  18. Skin cancer prevention and detection campaign at golf courses on Spain's Costa del Sol.

    del Boz, J; Fernández-Morano, T; Padilla-España, L; Aguilar-Bernier, M; Rivas-Ruiz, F; de Troya-Martín, M

    2015-01-01

    Skin cancer prevention and detection campaigns targeting specific groups are necessary and have proven to be more effective than those aimed at the general population. Interventions in outdoor tourist spots have proven successful, although none have specifically targeted golf courses. The aims of this study were to describe the risk profile of golfers and golf course workers and evaluate the impact of a skin cancer prevention and early detection intervention. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted at 6 golf courses. The intervention included a skin examination and completion of a questionnaire about demographic details, risk factors, and sun exposure and sun protection habits. Participants were also given advice on sun protection measures, self-examination, and use of sunscreens, and were asked about their satisfaction with the intervention and their intention to change their current behaviors. The effect was measured in terms of the diagnoses made, satisfaction with the intervention, reported intention to change, and potential effect in terms of existing risk factors. Of the 351 participants (57% golfers and 43% golf course workers), 70.4% had fair skin, 11.7% had a family history of skin cancer, and 8.5% had a personal history of skin cancer. Skin cancer and actinic keratoses were diagnosed in 10.7% and 40% of the golfers, respectively. The session was rated positively by 99.4% of the participants; 93.9% stated that they intended to improve their sun exposure habits and 93.4% said that they planned to examine their skin more frequently. Our findings confirm that golf course workers and, in particular, golfers are an important target for skin cancer prevention campaigns. This is the first intervention to specifically target golf courses, and it proved to be both feasible and useful. Its success appears to be attributable to numerous factors: it was conducted at golf courses, had multiple components, and was preceded by a motivational campaign

  19. Kinematic relationship between rotation of lumbar spine and hip joints during golf swing in professional golfers.

    Mun, Frederick; Suh, Seung Woo; Park, Hyun-Joon; Choi, Ahnryul

    2015-05-14

    Understanding the kinematics of the lumbar spine and hip joints during a golf swing is a basic step for identifying swing-specific factors associated with low back pain. The objective of this study was to examine the kinematic relationship between rotational movement of the lumbar spine and hip joints during a golf swing. Fifteen professional golfers participated in this study with employment of six infrared cameras to record their golf swings. Anatomical reference system of the upper torso, pelvis and thigh segments, and the location of each hip and knee joint were defined by the protocols of the kinematic model of previous studies. Lumbar spine and hip joint rotational angle was calculated utilizing the Euler angle method. Cross-correlation and angle-angle plot was used to examine the degree of kinematic relationship between joints. A fairly strong coupling relationship was shown between the lumbar spine and hip rotational movements with an average correlation of 0.81. Leading hip contribution to overall rotation was markedly high in the early stage of the downswing, while the lumbar spine contributed greater towards the end of the downswing; however, the relative contributions of the trailing hip and lumbar spine were nearly equal during the entire downswing. Most of the professional golfers participated in this study used a similar coordination strategy when moving their hips and lumbar spine during golf swings. The rotation of hips was observed to be more efficient in producing the overall rotation during the downswing when compared to the backswing. These results provide quantitative information to better understand the lumbar spine and hip joint kinematic characteristics of professional golfers. This study will have great potential to be used as a normal control data for the comparison with kinematic information among golfers with low back pain and for further investigation of golf swing-specific factors associated with injury.

  20. Analysis of impact noise induced by hitting of titanium head golf driver.

    Kim, Young Ho; Kim, Young Chul; Lee, Jun Hee; An, Yong-Hwi; Park, Kyung Tae; Kang, Kyung Min; Kang, Yeon June

    2014-11-01

    The hitting of titanium head golf driver against golf ball creates a short duration, high frequency impact noise. We analyzed the spectra of these impact noises and evaluated the auditory hazards from exposure to the noises. Noises made by 10 titanium head golf drivers with five maximum hits were collected, and the spectra of the pure impact sounds were studied using a noise analysis program. The noise was measured at 1.7 m (position A) and 3.4 m (position B) from the hitting point in front of the hitter and at 3.4 m (position C) behind the hitting point. Average time duration was measured and auditory risk units (ARUs) at position A were calculated using the Auditory Hazard Assessment Algorithm for Humans. The average peak levels at position A were 119.9 dBA at the sound pressure level (SPL) peak and 100.0 dBA at the overall octave level. The average peak levels (SPL and overall octave level) at position B were 111.6 and 96.5 dBA, respectively, and at position C were 111.5 and 96.7 dBA, respectively. The average time duration and ARUs measured at position A were 120.6 ms and 194.9 units, respectively. Although impact noises made by titanium head golf drivers showed relatively low ARUs, individuals enjoying golf frequently may be susceptible to hearing loss due to the repeated exposure of this intense impact noise with short duration and high frequency. Unprotected exposure to impact noises should be limited to prevent cochleovestibular disorders.

  1. Golf Course Irrigation with Reclaimed Water in the Mediterranean: A Risk Management Matter

    Miquel Salgot

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Controversy regarding the amount of water consumed or saved as a result of human activity is currently paramount in water-scarce areas. In recent decades, golf—a land and water consuming activity—has been implanted in several areas of the Mediterranean basin, where the scarcity of water resources is well-known. As a result, the use of conventional water resources for golf course irrigation is increasingly contested and its replacement by reclaimed water has become essential. This paper examines the wide range of issues involved in its use on golf courses, including hazards—due to the presence of microorganisms and pollutants—and the corresponding risks that can appear. The resulting biological, chemical and physical water quality concerns are analyzed. Legal aspects related to the use of reclaimed water are also discussed and good reuse practices are suggested, including a detailed examination of risk assessment procedures and tools through observation or chemical, physical and microbiological analysis. The HACCP system—which focuses on quality determination in water samples from relevant control points—is described in detail, as it is generally accepted as one of the most scientific ways to detect health problems on a golf course. The paper concludes that, given the increasing availability of treated and reclaimed water and the water needs of golf courses, the future development of the sport in areas without surplus water resources—such as the Mediterranean basin—will predictably depend upon the use of reclaimed water. In recent years, risk assessment or analysis has emerged as an essential tool to guarantee the application of reclaimed water at an acceptable risk level. There certainly have been considerable advances and improvements in the tools that guarantee the safe use of reclaimed water, although current methods available require simplification for their practical application. Nevertheless, protocols applied at present

  2. [The optimization of an early rehabilitation program for cerebral stroke patients: the use of different methods of magneto- and laser therapy].

    Kochetkov, A V; Gorbunov, F E; Minenkov, A A; Strel'tsova, E N; Filina, T F; Krupennikov, A I

    2000-01-01

    Magnetotherapy and laser therapy were used in complex and complex-combined regimens in 75 patients after cerebral ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke starting on the poststroke week 4-5. Clinico-neurologic, neurophysiological and cerebrohemodynamic findings evidence for the highest effectiveness of neurorehabilitation including complex magneto-laser therapy in hemispheric ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke of subcortical location in the absence of marked clinico-tomographic signs of dyscirculatory encephalopathy. Complex-combined magneto-laser therapy is more effective for correction of spastic dystonia. Mutual potentiation of magnetotherapy and laser therapy results in maximal development of collateral circulation and cerebral hemodynamic reserve (84% of the patients). Complex effects manifest in arteriodilating and venotonic effects. Complex magneto-laser therapy is accompanied by reduction of hyperthrombocythemia and hyperfibrinogenemia.

  3. Strokes In Young Adults And Children

    Farhad Iranmanesh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is in second place on a mortality list in the world. Also, stroke is a leading cause of disability. Approximately 20% of all strokes occur in Children and young adults. The etiology of stroke in Children and young adults is different from that in older patients, and has an influence on diagnostic evaluation and treatment, so knowledge about older patients cannot always be applied to these patients. The list of stroke etiologies among young adults and children is extensive. Ischemic stroke are more frequent than hemorrhagic strokes in both groups. Stroke in young adults had been thought to be associated with   risk factors, including arterial (such as dissection, reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, inflammatory arteritis ,moyamoya ,migraine - induced stroke, genetic or inherted arteriopathy, premature atherosclerosis cardiac (such as patent foramen ovale, cardiomyopathy , congenital heart disease and   hematologic (such as  deficiencies of protein S,protein C,or antithrombin;factor V lieden mutation . Common risk factors for stroke in children include: Sickle-cell disease, diseases of the arteries, abnormal blood clotting, head or neck trauma. There are no specific recommendations or guidelines for primary or secondary stroke prevention in young adults. Primary prevention focused on identifying and managing known vascular risk factors, such as hypertension, disorders of lipid metabolism, and diabetes, and non-drug strategies and lifestyle changes, including smoking, reducing body weight, increasing regular aerobic physical activity, and adopting a healthy diet with more fruit and vegetables and less salt. For secondary stroke prevention, identification of the etiologic mechanism of the initial stroke and the presence of any additional risk factors is most important. It consists of optimal treatment of vascular risk factors administering antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy, and if indicated, invasive surgical or

  4. Stroke rehabilitation.

    Langhorne, Peter; Bernhardt, Julie; Kwakkel, Gert

    2011-05-14

    Stroke is a common, serious, and disabling global health-care problem, and rehabilitation is a major part of patient care. There is evidence to support rehabilitation in well coordinated multidisciplinary stroke units or through provision of early supported provision of discharge teams. Potentially beneficial treatment options for motor recovery of the arm include constraint-induced movement therapy and robotics. Promising interventions that could be beneficial to improve aspects of gait include fitness training, high-intensity therapy, and repetitive-task training. Repetitive-task training might also improve transfer functions. Occupational therapy can improve activities of daily living; however, information about the clinical effect of various strategies of cognitive rehabilitation and strategies for aphasia and dysarthria is scarce. Several large trials of rehabilitation practice and of novel therapies (eg, stem-cell therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, virtual reality, robotic therapies, and drug augmentation) are underway to inform future practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Effects of Resistance Training on Golf Performance and Physiological Stress Response During Competition in Intercollegiate Golfers

    Doan, Brandon

    2002-01-01

    ...) on clubhead speed, consistency, and putting distance control. 2) To investigate the effects of 36 continuous holes of competitive golf on testosterone and cortisol response and their relation to performance. Study #1...

  6. Multiple Strokes

    Obododimma Oha

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This poem playfully addresses the slippery nature of linguistic signification, employing humour and sarcasm in presenting a wide range of human experience. It ironical twists -- and "strokes" (read ambiguously as both a giving a punishment and erotic pleasuring -- move from the naming of location through international discourse of capital to the crumbling relationships between nation states. It reading of the signs of language is tied to the unease and fracture in cultural and political experience.

  7. Combination treatment of r-tPA and an optimized human apyrase reduces mortality rate and hemorrhagic transformation 6h after ischemic stroke in aged female rats.

    Tan, Zhenjun; Li, Xinlan; Turner, Ryan C; Logsdon, Aric F; Lucke-Wold, Brandon; DiPasquale, Kenneth; Jeong, Soon Soeg; Chen, Ridong; Huber, Jason D; Rosen, Charles L

    2014-09-05

    Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) is the only FDA-approved drug treatment for ischemic stroke and must be used within 4.5h. Thrombolytic treatment with r-tPA has deleterious effects on the neurovascular unit that substantially increases the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage if administered too late. These therapeutic shortcomings necessitate additional investigation into agents that can extend the therapeutic window for safe use of thrombolytics. In this study, combination of r-tPA and APT102, a novel form of human apyrase/ADPase, was investigated in a clinically-relevant aged-female rat embolic ischemic stroke model. We propose that successfully extending the therapeutic window of r-tPA administration would represent a significant advance in the treatment of ischemic stroke due to a significant increase in the number of patients eligible for treatment. Results of our study showed significantly reduced mortality from 47% with r-tPA alone to 16% with co-administration of APT102 and r-tPA. Co-administration decreased cortical (47 ± 5% vs. 29 ± 5%), striatal (50 ± 2%, vs. 40 ± 3%) and total (48 ± 3%vs. 33 ± 4%) hemispheric infarct volume compared to r-tPA alone. APT102 improved neurological outcome (8.9±0.6, vs. 6.8 ± 0.8) and decreased hemoglobin extravasation in cortical tissue (1.9 ± 0.1mg/dl vs. 1.4 ± 0.1mg/dl) striatal tissue (2.1 ± 0.3mg/dl vs. 1.4 ± 0.1mg/dl) and whole brain tissue (2.0 ± 0.2mg/dl vs. 1.4 ± 0.1mg/dl). These data suggest that APT102 can safely extend the therapeutic window for r-tPA mediated reperfusion to 6h following experimental stroke without increased hemorrhagic transformation. APT102 offers to be a viable adjunct therapeutic option to increase the number of clinical patients eligible for thrombolytic treatment after ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Treatment of Travel Expenses by Golf Course Patrons: Sunk or Bundled Costs and the First and Third Laws of Demand

    Matt, Brown; Daniel, Rascher; Chad, McEvoy; Mark, Nagel

    2007-01-01

    To attract golf patrons, sport managers must understand consumption patterns of the golfer. Importantly, the treatment of travel costs must be understood. According to the Alchian-Allen (1964) theorem, golfers treat travel costs as bundled costs (third law of economic demand) whereas classical consumer theory indicates that golfers treat travel costs as sunk costs (first law of economic demand). The purpose of this study was to determine if golf patrons treated travel costs as sunk costs o...

  9. R&W Club Frederick Hosts 4th Annual Golf Tournament Benefiting The Children’s Inn at NIH | Poster

    The R&W Club Frederick’s 4th Annual Golf Tournament to benefit the Children’s Inn at NIH teed off on time despite cloudy weather and scattered showers. Employees from NCI at Frederick, the main NIH campus, and Leidos Biomed, along with family and friends, came to enjoy an afternoon at the beautiful Maryland National Golf Club in Middletown and to support a wonderful charity.

  10. Methodological considerations for the 3D measurement of the X-factor and lower trunk movement in golf.

    Joyce, Christopher; Burnett, Angus; Ball, Kevin

    2010-09-01

    It is believed that increasing the X-factor (movement of the shoulders relative to the hips) during the golf swing can increase ball velocity at impact. Increasing the X-factor may also increase the risk of low back pain. The aim of this study was to provide recommendations for the three-dimensional (3D) measurement of the X-factor and lower trunk movement during the golf swing. This three-part validation study involved; (1) developing and validating models and related algorithms (2) comparing 3D data obtained during static positions representative of the golf swing to visual estimates and (3) comparing 3D data obtained during dynamic golf swings to images gained from high-speed video. Of particular interest were issues related to sequence dependency. After models and algorithms were validated, results from parts two and three of the study supported the conclusion that a lateral bending/flexion-extension/axial rotation (ZYX) order of rotation was deemed to be the most suitable Cardanic sequence to use in the assessment of the X-factor and lower trunk movement in the golf swing. The findings of this study have relevance for further research examining the X-factor its relationship to club head speed and lower trunk movement and low back pain in golf.

  11. Effects of golf course construction and operation on water chemistry of headwater streams on the Precambrian Shield

    Winter, Jennifer G.; Dillon, Peter J.

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the effects of golf course construction and operation on the water chemistry of Shield streams, we compared the water chemistry in streams draining golf courses under construction (2) and in operation (5) to streams in forested reference locations and to upstream sites where available. Streams were more alkaline and higher in base cation and nitrate concentrations downstream of operational golf courses. Levels of these parameters and total phosphorus increased over time in several streams during golf course construction through to operation. There was evidence of inputs of mercury to streams on two of the operational courses. Nutrient (phosphorus and nitrogen) concentrations were significantly related to the area of unmanaged vegetation in a 30 x 30 m area on either side of the sampling sites, and to River Bank Quality Index scores, suggesting that maintaining vegetated buffers along the stream on golf courses will reduce in-stream nutrient concentrations. - Golf course construction and operation had a significant impact on alkalinity, nitrogen and base cation concentrations of streams

  12. In-hospital stroke: characteristics and outcomes.

    Briggs, R

    2015-01-01

    In-hospital stroke (IS) made up 6.5% of strokes recorded in the Irish National Stroke Register in 2012. International research has demonstrated poorer outcomes post IS compared to out of hospital stroke (OS). We aimed to profile all IS and OS over a 22 month period and compare the two groups by gathering data from the HIPE portal stroke register. The study site is a primary stroke centre. IS represented 11% (50\\/458) of total strokes with over half (27\\/50, 54%) admitted initially with medical complaints. IS patients had a significantly longer length of stay (79.2 +\\/- 87.4 days vs. 21.9 +\\/- 45.9 days, p < 0.01) and higher mortality (13\\/50 vs. 39\\/408, p < 0.01). Patients in the IS group were also less likely to receive stroke unit care (1\\/50 vs. 136\\/408, p < 0.01). This study demonstrates the significant morbidity and mortality associated with IS and highlights the need for efforts to be made to optimize identification and management of acute stroke in this cohort.

  13. Use of electromyography to optimize Lokomat® settings for subject-specific gait rehabilitation in post-stroke hemiparetic patients: A proof-of-concept study.

    Cherni, Yosra; Begon, Mickael; Chababe, Hicham; Moissenet, Florent

    2017-09-01

    While generic protocols exist for gait rehabilitation using robotic orthotics such as the Lokomat ® , several settings - guidance, body-weight support (BWS) and velocity - may be adjusted to individualize patient training. However, no systematic approach has yet emerged. Our objective was to assess the feasibility and effects of a systematic approach based on electromyography to determine subject-specific settings with application to the strengthening of the gluteus maximus muscle in post-stroke hemiparetic patients. Two male patients (61 and 65 years) with post-stroke hemiparesis performed up to 9 Lokomat ® trials by changing guidance and BWS while electromyography of the gluteus maximus was measured. For each subject, the settings that maximized gluteus maximus activity were used in 20 sessions of Lokomat ® training. Modified Functional Ambulation Classification (mFAC), 6-minutes walking test (6-MWT), and extensor strength were measured before and after training. The greatest gluteus maximus activity was observed at (Guidance: 70% -BWS: 20%) for Patient 1 and (Guidance: 80% - BWS: 30%) for Patient 2. In both patients, mFAC score increased from 4 to 7. The additional distance in 6-MWT increased beyond minimal clinically important difference (MCID=34.4m) reported for post-stroke patients. The isometric strength of hip extensors increased by 43 and 114%. Defining subject-specific settings for a Lokomat ® training was feasible and simple to implement. These two case reports suggest a benefit of this approach for muscle strengthening. It remains to demonstrate the superiority of such an approach for a wider population, compared to the use of a generic protocol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Multisensory stimulation in stroke rehabilitation

    Barbro Birgitta Johansson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The brain has a large capacity for automatic simultaneous processing and integration of sensory information. Combining information from different sensory modalities facilitates our ability to detect, discriminate, and recognize sensory stimuli, and learning is often optimal in a multisensory environment. Currently used multisensory stimulation methods in stroke rehabilitation include motor imagery, action observation, training with a mirror or in a virtual environment, or various kinds of music therapy. Several studies have shown positive effects been reported but to give general recommendation more studies are needed. Patient heterogeneity and the interactions of age, gender, genes and environment are discussed. Randomized controlled longitudinal trials starting earlier post stroke are needed. The advance in brain network science and neuroimaging enabling longitudinal studies of structural and functional networks are likely to have an important impact on patient selection for specific interventions in future stroke rehabilitation.

  15. Campos de golf y medio ambiente. Una interacción necesaria

    Cayetano Espejo Marín

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Desde finales de la década de los años ochenta del siglo pasado hay una preocupación generalizada por el impacto de los campos de golf sobre el medio ambiente. Varias Comunidades Autónomas españolas han redactado una normativa que permite controlar la incidencia de los campos de golf sobre dos aspectos fundamentales: las transformaciones paisajísticas y la procedencia del agua consumida. Las evaluaciones de impacto ambiental y el uso cada vez más generalizado de aguas depuradas contribuyen a minimizar los efectos sobre el entorno de estas instalaciones, que constituyen una interesante oferta turística de calidad sin estacionalidad.

  16. Quasi-stiffness of the knee joint in flexion and extension during the golf swing.

    Choi, Ahnryul; Sim, Taeyong; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical understanding of the knee joint during a golf swing is essential to improve performance and prevent injury. In this study, we quantified the flexion/extension angle and moment as the primary knee movement, and evaluated quasi-stiffness represented by moment-angle coupling in the knee joint. Eighteen skilled and 23 unskilled golfers participated in this study. Six infrared cameras and two force platforms were used to record a swing motion. The anatomical angle and moment were calculated from kinematic and kinetic models, and quasi-stiffness of the knee joint was determined as an instantaneous slope of moment-angle curves. The lead knee of the skilled group had decreased resistance duration compared with the unskilled group (P golf swing and developing rehabilitation strategies following surgery.

  17. Putting Like a Pro: The Role of Positive Contagion in Golf Performance and Perception

    Lee, Charles; Linkenauger, Sally A.; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Joy-Gaba, Jennifer A.; Profitt, Dennis R.

    2011-01-01

    Many amateur athletes believe that using a professional athlete's equipment can improve their performance. Such equipment can be said to be affected with positive contagion, which refers to the belief of transference of beneficial properties between animate persons/objects to previously neutral objects. In this experiment, positive contagion was induced by telling participants in one group that a putter previously belonged to a professional golfer. The effect of positive contagion was examined for perception and performance in a golf putting task. Individuals who believed they were using the professional golfer's putter perceived the size of the golf hole to be larger than golfers without such a belief and also had better performance, sinking more putts. These results provide empirical support for anecdotes, which allege that using objects with positive contagion can improve performance, and further suggest perception can be modulated by positive contagion. PMID:22028804

  18. NCI Takes Back the Defelice Cup at Ninth Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer After being down by a point in the morning, NCI reclaimed the Defelice Cup trophy from Leidos Biomedical Research, with a final score of 12 ½ to 11 ½, at the ninth annual Ronald H. Defelice Golf Tournament, held Oct. 13. “The tightest matches in the nine-year history of this cup competition resulted in a narrow victory for NCI and allowed NCI to

  19. SOCIAL LEGITIMACY VERSUS BUSINESS PERFORMANCE IN THE ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY POLICIES OF ANDALUSIAN GOLF COURSES

    Francisco José, Riquel Ligero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts an analysis of organizational motivations when developing policies for environmental liability. Specifically, to compare the production of social legitimacy to the improvement of organizational performance, we proceeded to test two models in a sector which in recent years has opened a wide debate on environmental sustainability. We refer to golf tourism in Andalusia, in which there has been a considerable increase in such facilities. We have used the statistical technique Partial Least Square (PLS.

  20. Helioseismic inferences of the solar cycles 23 and 24: GOLF and VIRGO observations

    Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Jiménez, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Sun-as-a star helioseismic spectrophotometer GOLF and photometer VIRGO instruments onboard the SoHO spacecraft are collecting high-quality, continuous data since April 1996. We analyze here these unique datasets in order to investigate the peculiar and weak on-going solar cycle 24. As this cycle 24 is reaching its maximum, we compare its rising phase with the rising phase of the previous solar cycle 23.

  1. The Analysis of Knee Joint Movement During Golf Swing in Professional and Amateur Golfers

    M.Somjarod; V. Tanawat; l. Weerawat

    2011-01-01

    The understanding of knee movement during swing importance for golf swing improving and preventing injury. Thirty male professional and amateur golfers were assigned to swing time by time for 3 times. Data from a vedio-based motion capture were used to compute knee joint movement variables. The results showed that professional and amateur golfers were significantly in left knee flexion angle at the impact point and mid follow through phase. Nevertheless, left knee externa...

  2. A COMPARISON OF GOLF SHOE DESIGNS HIGHLIGHTS GREATER GROUND REACTION FORCES WITH SHORTER IRONS

    Paul Worsfold

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to reduce golf turf damage the traditional metal spike golf shoe has been redesigned, but shoe-ground biomechanical evaluations have utilised artificial grass surfaces. Twenty-four golfers wore three different golf shoe traction designs (traditional metal spikes, alternative spikes, and a flat-soled shoe with no additional traction when performing shots with a driver, 3 iron and 7 iron. Ground action forces were measured beneath the feet by two natural grass covered force platforms. The maximum vertical force recorded at the back foot with the 3 iron and 7 iron was 0.82 BW (body weight and at the front foot 1.1 BW approximately in both the metal spike and alternative spike golf shoe designs. When using the driver these maximal vertical values were 0.49 BW at the back foot and 0.84 BW at the front foot. Furthermore, as performance of the backswing and then downswing necessitates a change in movement direction the range of force generated during the complete swing was calculated. In the metal spike shoe the vertical force generated at the back foot with both irons was 0.67 BW and at the front foot 0.96 BW with the 3 iron and 0.92 BW with the 7 iron. The back foot vertical force generated with the driver was 0.33 BW and at the front foot 0.83 BW wearing the metal spike shoe. Results indicated the greater force generation with the irons. When using the driver the more horizontal swing plane associated with the longer club reduced vertical forces at the back and front foot. However, the mediolateral force generated across each foot in the metal and alternative spike shoes when using the driver was greater than when the irons were used. The coefficient of friction was 0. 62 at the back and front foot whichever shoe was worn or club used

  3. Waste minimization assessment for a manufacturer of baseball bats and golf clubs. Environmental research brief

    Fleischman, M.; Kirsch, F.W.; Maginn, J.C.

    1993-09-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. Waste Minimization Assessment Center (WMAC) at the University of Louisville performed an assessment at a plant manufacturing baseball bats and golf clubs -- approximately 1,500,000 bats/yr and 550,000 golf clubs/yr. To make the bats, wood billets are oven-dried and machined to a standard dimension. After sanding they are branded and finished. The golf clubs are made by finishing and assembling purchased heads and shafts. The team's report detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that the most waste, other than rinse water discharged to the publicly owned treatment works (POTW) and wood turnings which are sold, consists of scrap cardboard and paper from the shop and offices, and that the greatest savings, including new income, could be obtained by segregating the cardboard and paper wastes for sale to a local recycler.

  4. Examination of the suitability of collecting in event cognitive processes using Think Aloud protocol in golf.

    Amy Elizabeth Whitehead

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Two studies examined the use of think aloud (TA protocol as a means for collecting data of cognitive processes during performance in golf. In study 1, TA was employed to examine if different verbalisation (Level 2 or Level 3 TA instructions influence performance of high and low skilled golfers. Participants performed 30 putts using TA at either Level 2, Level 3, or no verbalization condition. Although Level 3 verbalization produced a higher volume of verbal data than Level 2, TA at either level 2 or 3 did not impair putting performance compared to no verbalization. Study 2 examined the congruence between data collected via TA at Level 3 and cued retrospective recall of cognitive processes during golf performance. Experienced golfers performed six holes of golf whilst engaging in Level 3 TA. After performance, three semi-structured retrospective interviews were conducted (ten minutes after performance, 24 hours after performance and 48 hours after performance. A comparison of the themes identified large discrepancies between the information reported during TA and at interview, with only 38-41% similarity in variables reported to influence decision making on each hole. Both studies suggest TA is a valuable method for recording cognitive processes of individuals during task performance. TA provides richer verbal data regarding decisions than cued retrospective recall, and TA does not negatively impact performance.

  5. Relationships between golf range users’ participation motivation, satisfaction, and exercise adherence intention

    Kyoung-Ran Shim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - This paper aims to identify the relationship between participation motivation, satisfaction and exercise adherence intention of golf range users on the basis of self-determination theory. Design/methodology/approach - For this purpose, the authors proposed research questions and a conceptual research model as well. Then, the authors surveyed users of golf ranges located in Seoul Metropolitan City and Gyeonggi-do province. Findings - By applying convenience sampling, the authors received a total of 313 questionnaires. Results were as follows. First, among the participation motivation sub-factors, health-oriented motivation, achievement motivation, pleasure-oriented motivation and self-displayed motivation had a significant effect on emotional satisfaction, while achievement motivation and pleasure-orientation motivation had a significant effect on performance satisfaction. Second, the following participation motivation factors had a significant effect on exercise adherence intention: health-orientation motivation, achievement motivation and pleasure-orientation motivation. Third, among the satisfaction factors, emotional satisfaction and performance satisfaction both had a significant effect on exercise adherence intention. Originality/value - This is one of the first papers to examine the relationships that exist between golf range users’ participation motivation, satisfaction and exercise adherence intention.

  6. In Their Own Words: Stakeholder Perceptions of the Golf World Cup, 2006

    Wendy Sealy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a framework for the formulation of a sport tourism event policy for the island of Barbados. Although some research has been conducted on the residents’ perceptions of major sporting events including the Olympic Games, smaller but globally significant events such as the Golf World Cup have received little attention from researchers. Less attention has been given to sport events in the Caribbean. This dearth in knowledge has inspired the direction of this study, which is, to explore the stakeholder perceptions of the Golf World Cup which was hosted in Barbados in December 2006. The data collection process adopted included semi-structured interviews with the Barbados tourism private sector. The 65 participants in this study highlighted a diversity of mainly congruent views. Private sector participants contend that the Golf World Cup was socially exclusive and perpetuated social divisions rather than ameliorated them. Many stakeholders felt that the event was culturally alienating and highlighted the failure of the organisers to undertake stakeholder consultations. The findings in this study can make a worthwhile contribution to the marketing, management and design of future events and the direction of policy formulation for sport events on the island of Barbados and the wider Caribbean.

  7. Visual and anatomic outcomes of golf ball-related ocular injuries.

    Park, S J; Park, K H; Heo, J W; Woo, S J

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the characteristics and prognoses of golf ball-related ocular injuries (GROIs) using standardized terminology, classification, and scoring systems. Twenty-two GROI patients were assessed using the Birmingham Eye Trauma Terminology, Ocular Trauma Classification Group (OTCG) classification, and Ocular Trauma Score. Globe preservation and final visual acuity (FVA) were assessed according to the injury severity categorical designation. Fourteen patients were injured on golf courses and eight on driving ranges. Nine patients (40.9%) had open-globe injuries (five ruptures (22.7%), four penetrating injuries (18.2%)). All rupture cases required enucleation, whereas penetrating injury cases did not (the FVA ranged from 20/100 to no light perception). In open-globe injuries, wearing glasses protected against rupture (P=0.008). Thirteen patients sustained closed-globe injuries that were accompanied by lens subluxation (38.5%), choroidal rupture (30.8%), macular commotio retinae (38.5%), and traumatic optic neuropathy (7.7%). Twelve (54.5%) patients had orbital wall fractures. The mean number of related surgeries required was 1.5±1.7 across all patients. Eyes with GROIs had devastating FVA and globe preservation status, especially those with open-globe injuries. Observing golf rules and improving driving-range facilities are essential for preventing GROIs. Protective eyewear may reduce ocular damage from GROIs, especially globe rupture.

  8. Golf-course and funnel energy landscapes: Protein folding concepts in martensites

    Shankaraiah, N.

    2017-06-01

    We use protein folding energy landscape concepts such as golf course and funnel to study re-equilibration in athermal martensites under systematic temperature quench Monte Carlo simulations. On quenching below a transition temperature, the seeded high-symmetry parent-phase austenite that converts to the low-symmetry product-phase martensite, through autocatalytic twinning or elastic photocopying, has both rapid conversions and incubation delays in the temperature-time-transformation phase diagram. We find the rapid (incubation delays) conversions at low (high) temperatures arises from the presence of large (small) size of golf-course edge that has the funnel inside for negative energy states. In the incubating state, the strain structure factor enters into the Brillouin-zone golf course through searches for finite transitional pathways which close off at the transition temperature with Vogel-Fulcher divergences that are insensitive to Hamiltonian energy scales and log-normal distributions, as signatures of dominant entropy barriers. The crossing of the entropy barrier is identified through energy occupancy distributions, Monte Carlo acceptance fractions, heat emission, and internal work.

  9. Evaluation of a Florida coastal golf complex as a local and watershed source of bioavailable contaminants

    Lewis, Michael A.; Quarles, Robert L.; Dantin, Darrin D.; Moore, James C.

    2004-01-01

    Contaminant fate in coastal areas impacted by golf course runoff is not well understood. This report summarizes trace metal, pesticide and PCB residues for colonized periphyton, Ruppia maritima (widgeon grass), Callinectes sapidus Rathbun (blue crabs) and Crassostrea virginica Gemlin (Eastern oyster) collected from areas adjacent to a Florida golf course complex which receive runoff containing reclaimed municipal wastewater. Concentrations of 19 chlorinated pesticides and 18 PCB congeners were usually below detection in the biota. In contrast, 8 trace metals were commonly detected although concentrations were not usually significantly different for biota collected from reference and non-reference coastal areas. Residue concentrations in decreasing order were typically: zinc, arsenic, copper, chromium, lead, nickel, cadmium and mercury. Mean BCF values for the eight trace metals ranged between 160-57 000 (periphyton), 79-11 033 (R. maritima), 87-162 625 (C. virginica) and 12-9800 (C. sapidus). Most trace metal residues in periphyton colonized adjacent to the golf complex, were either similar to or significantly less than those reported for periphyton colonized in nearby coastal areas impacted by urban stormwater runoff and treated municipal and industrial wastewater discharges. Consequently, the recreational complex does not appear to be a major source of bioavailable contaminants locally nor in the immediate watershed based on results for the selected biota

  10. Effects of physical randomness training on virtual and laboratory golf putting performance in novices.

    Pataky, T C; Lamb, P F

    2018-06-01

    External randomness exists in all sports but is perhaps most obvious in golf putting where robotic putters sink only 80% of 5 m putts due to unpredictable ball-green dynamics. The purpose of this study was to test whether physical randomness training can improve putting performance in novices. A virtual random-physics golf-putting game was developed based on controlled ball-roll data. Thirty-two subjects were assigned a unique randomness gain (RG) ranging from 0.1 to 2.0-times real-world randomness. Putter face kinematics were measured in 5 m laboratory putts before and after five days of virtual training. Performance was quantified using putt success rate and "miss-adjustment correlation" (MAC), the correlation between left-right miss magnitude and subsequent right-left kinematic adjustments. Results showed no RG-success correlation (r = -0.066, p = 0.719) but mildly stronger correlations with MAC for face angle (r = -0.168, p = 0.358) and clubhead path (r = -0.302, p = 0.093). The strongest RG-MAC correlation was observed during virtual training (r = -0.692, p golf putting kinematics. Adaptation to external physical randomness during virtual training may therefore help golfers adapt to external randomness in real-world environments.

  11. Electromyographic analyses of the erector spinae muscles during golf swings using four different clubs.

    Sorbie, Graeme G; Grace, Fergal M; Gu, Yaodong; Baker, Julien S; Ugbolue, Ukadike C

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the electromyography (EMG) patterns of the thoracic and lumbar regions of the erector spinae (ES) muscle during the golf swing whilst using four different golf clubs. Fifteen right-handed male golfers performed a total of twenty swings in random order using the driver, 4-iron, 7-iron and pitching-wedge. Surface EMG was recorded from the lead and trail sides of the thoracic and lumbar regions of the ES muscle (T8, L1 and L5 lateral to the spinous-process). Three-dimensional high-speed video analysis was used to identify the backswing, forward swing, acceleration, early and late follow-through phases of the golf swing. No significant differences in muscle-activation levels from the lead and trail sides of the thoracic and lumbar regions of the ES muscle were displayed between the driver, 4-iron, 7-iron and pitching-wedge (P > 0.05). The highest mean thoracic and lumbar ES muscle-activation levels were displayed in the forward swing (67-99% MVC) and acceleration (83-106% MVC) phases of the swing for all clubs tested. The findings from this study show that there were no significant statistical differences between the driver, 4-iron, 7-iron and pitching-wedge when examining muscle activity from the thoracic and lumbar regions of the ES muscle.

  12. PREFERENSI PENGHUNI TINGGAL DI APARTEMEN BERSUBSIDI THE MODERN GOLF KOTA TANGERANG

    Prima Dea Arijani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pemenuhan kebutuhan perumahan layak bagi masyarakat menengah kebawah dan pembangunan perumahan vertikal menjadi sangat penting dalam mengurangi kepadatan. The Modern Golf Apartement menjadi apartemen bersubsidi pertama yang dibangun di kota Tangerang dengan statusnya yang bersubsidi memiliki daya tarik tersendiri bagi para penghuni untuk tinggal. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui preferensi dan tujuan penghuni untuk tinggal di apartemen bersubsidi The Modern Golf. Metode analisis yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah metode deskriptif kuantitatif dengan teknik sampling stratified random sampling. Berdasarkan analisis, diketahui bahwa faktor penghuni tinggal di apartemen bersubsidi The Modern Golf yang memiliki preferensi paling tinggi berdasakan nilai rata-ratanya yaitu faktor kemudahan aksesibilitas menuju sarana perdagangan dengan nilai rata-rata 4,63. Hal ini diperkuat dengan adanya berbagai jenis sarana perdagangan yang dapat memudahkan penghuni untuk memenuhi kebutuhannya tanpa perlu keluar dari kawasan The Modernland, serta terdapat kecenderungan aktivitas bahwa penghuni akan menuju ke sarana perdagangan baik mall maupun pusat pertokoan setelah pulang bekerja. Hal tersebut menunjukkan bahwa adanya fenomena masyarakat perkotaan yang cenderung konsumtif serta tingginya minat masyarakat terhadap hunian yang berada di pusat kota dengan dilengkapi dengan sarana prasarana pendukung.

  13. Numerical study on the aerodynamics of a golf ball and its comparison with a smooth sphere

    Li, Jing; Tsubokura, Makoto; Tsunoda, Masaya

    2014-11-01

    The present study has numerically investigated the flow over a golf ball and a smooth sphere by conducting large-eddy simulation (LES) using hundreds of millions of unstructured elements. Simulations were conducted at various Reynolds numbers ranging from the subcritical to the supercritical regimes. Special attention was paid to the phenomenon of drag crisis as well as the effect of surface roughness on the drag crisis. The simulation result shows that the surface roughness introduced by the dimples of the golf ball causes a local instability of the flow around the ball and subsequently leads to a momentum transfer in the near-wall region inside the dimples. The flow with high momentum in the near-wall region travels further downstream, which consequently results in the drag crisis occurring at a relatively lower Reynolds number compared with that of the smooth sphere. Moreover, the Magnus effect resulting from the rotating motion of a sphere was also one of the main concerns in this study. The simulation result shows that lift forces are imposed on both the rotating smooth sphere and rotating golf ball. For most cases the lift force points to the positive direction, however, the negative lift force appears also under certain conditions.

  14. El impacto ambiental de campos de golf. Un caso real en Toledo

    Sobrini, I. M.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available We expose the environmental impact statement (EIS of a future golf course in Toledo city (Spain. This golf course is included in an ambitious scientific-medical research project concerning new therapies through the practice of golf for medullary handicapped persons, in addition with a cultural approach between the three big monotheistic religions that have historically lived together in Toledo. The methodology used to carry out the EIS was very particular and easy to be extrapolated to similar cases, but not to be generalized. It was based in comparing the future project. with the actual intensive irrigation farming of the land, and with the future urban consequences due lo its position next to Toledo city. The comparison between the different environmental impacts of this project and a the actual use of the land, suffering a very intensive irrigation farming, and b the future without the project, was favourable to the golf course, because it was concerned as less aggressive. An appropriate water managing will allow reducing the consumption from the actual 99 l/s authorised for agricultural use, until 54 l/s required for the golf course, improving the environment of this section of the Tajo river: The turf management will be less harmful than the irrigation farming, this one being held nowadays with a high pesticide consumption. Later on, environmental management practice will allow to reduce costs and will help to increase golf-players environmental consciousness. This new golf course will provide the integration o/ this section of Tajo River in the future urban development of Toledo city, creating a green island in its west side, profitable for all city dwellers. This change will be a great improvement, not only for Toledo’s environment, but also for the development of different economical sectors. due to the golf course implantation.Se expone el estudio realizado sobre la incidencia ambiental de un futuro campo de golf en Toledo

  15. Peran Pemerintah dalam Perencanaan Pembangunan Lapangan Golf Kintamani dengan Prinsip Pariwisata Berkelanjutan

    Rila Hilma

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Planning a tourist destination, some aspects need to be considered concerning government’s role, surrounding society, and sustainable development principles. The project of golf court in caldera Gunung Batur must be analysed by some experts. This study aims to anticipate some new troubles that might come up when the construction of golf court begins. Above it all, every study has opportunity to be applied whether by regional or national government, who responsibly takes control of the region, once they approved the project. Based on it, the plan of golf court construction in Kintamani, Bangli regency, Bali Province (as cited by www.bisnisbali.com on 27th January 2011 proposed by Ministre Jero Wacik and approved by the parlement members of DPRD Bangli, concerns the principles of sustainable tourism which could prevent, especially Kintamani region, from deconstructed side effects of the development. This research applies qualitative-descriptive method supported by literature review and news from media, especially online media which are able to provide the actual news from Kintamani region.

  16. Driving After a Stroke

    ... 23,2015 Can I drive after a stroke? Driving is often a major concern after someone has a stroke. It’s not unusual for stroke survivors to want to drive. Being able to get around after a stroke is important. Safety behind the wheel is even more important after ...

  17. Leukocytosis in acute stroke

    Kammersgaard, L P; Jørgensen, H S; Nakayama, H

    1999-01-01

    Leukocytosis is a common finding in the acute phase of stroke. A detrimental effect of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has been suggested, and trials aiming at reducing the leukocyte response in acute stroke are currently being conducted. However, the influence of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has...

  18. [Ischemic stroke in the young adult].

    Calvet, D

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is not rare in young adults since one in ten stroke patients are less than 50 years old. This incidence increased over the past last years, mainly due to the rise in the prevalence of traditional vascular risk factors in this sub-group of age but also of illegal drug use. Even though both survival and functional outcome of young stroke patients are better than those observed in older patients, socio-economic and quality of life consequences make this disease a main objective in terms of primary and secondary prevention. Identifying the cause of ischemic stroke in young adults is of major importance to prevent stroke recurrence. However, given the wide variety of potential underlying causes, the etiologic work-up of stroke in young adults requires a different approach from that in the elderly. In this context, a sequential diagnostic work-up is needed in order to optimize the yield of diagnostic tests, to reduce their cost and risks for the patient. Arterial dissection is the most frequent cause of stroke in young adults but other less frequent causes are numerous. Despite a comprehensive work-up, about one third of cases remains unexplained leading to the diagnosis of cryptogenic ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Occurrence of Meloidogyne fallax in North America, and molecular characterization of M. fallax and M. minor from U.S. golf course greens

    Several species of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are known to have significant presence on turf grass in golf course greens, particularly in the western United States. Nematodes isolated from a golf course in King Co., Washington were identified as Meloidogyne minor based on analysis of the...

  20. Strategies for stroke rehabilitation.

    Dobkin, Bruce H

    2004-09-01

    Rehabilitation after hemiplegic stroke has typically relied on the training of patients in compensatory strategies. The translation of neuroscientific research into care has led to new approaches and renewed promise for better outcomes. Improved motor control can progress with task-specific training incorporating increased use of proximal and distal movements during intensive practice of real-world activities. Functional gains are incorrectly said to plateau by 3-6 months. Many patients retain latent sensorimotor function that can be realised any time after stroke with a pulse of goal-directed therapy. The amount of practice probably best determines gains for a given level of residual movement ability. Clinicians should encourage patients to build greater strength, speed, endurance, and precision of multijoint movements on tasks that increase independence and enrich daily activity. Imaging tools may help clinicians determine the capacity of residual networks to respond to a therapeutic approach and help establish optimal dose-response curves for training. Promising adjunct approaches include practice with robotic devices or in a virtual environment, electrical stimulation to increase cortical excitability during training, and drugs to optimise molecular mechanisms for learning. Biological strategies for neural repair may augment rehabilitation in the next decade.

  1. Airplane stroke syndrome.

    Humaidan, Hani; Yassi, Nawaf; Weir, Louise; Davis, Stephen M; Meretoja, Atte

    2016-07-01

    Only 37 cases of stroke during or soon after long-haul flights have been published to our knowledge. In this retrospective observational study, we searched the Royal Melbourne Hospital prospective stroke database and all discharge summaries from 1 September 2003 to 30 September 2014 for flight-related strokes, defined as patients presenting with stroke within 14days of air travel. We hypothesised that a patent foramen ovale (PFO) is an important, but not the only mechanism, of flight-related stroke. We describe the patient, stroke, and flight characteristics. Over the study period, 131 million passengers arrived at Melbourne airport. Our centre admitted 5727 stroke patients, of whom 42 (0.73%) had flight-related strokes. Flight-related stroke patients were younger (median age 65 versus 73, p<0.001), had similar stroke severity, and received intravenous thrombolysis more often than non-flight-related stroke patients. Seven patients had flight-related intracerebral haemorrhage. The aetiology of the ischaemic strokes was cardioembolic in 14/35 (40%), including seven patients with confirmed PFO, one with atrial septal defect, four with atrial fibrillation, one with endocarditis, and one with aortic arch atheroma. Paradoxical embolism was confirmed in six patients. Stroke related to air travel is a rare occurrence, less than one in a million. Although 20% of patients had a PFO, distribution of stroke aetiologies was diverse and was not limited to PFO and paradoxical embolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Early Rehabilitation After Stroke: a Narrative Review.

    Coleman, Elisheva R; Moudgal, Rohitha; Lang, Kathryn; Hyacinth, Hyacinth I; Awosika, Oluwole O; Kissela, Brett M; Feng, Wuwei

    2017-11-07

    Despite current rehabilitative strategies, stroke remains a leading cause of disability in the USA. There is a window of enhanced neuroplasticity early after stroke, during which the brain's dynamic response to injury is heightened and rehabilitation might be particularly effective. This review summarizes the evidence of the existence of this plastic window, and the evidence regarding safety and efficacy of early rehabilitative strategies for several stroke domain-specific deficits. Overall, trials of rehabilitation in the first 2 weeks after stroke are scarce. In the realm of very early mobilization, one large and one small trial found potential harm from mobilizing patients within the first 24 h after stroke, and only one small trial found benefit in doing so. For the upper extremity, constraint-induced movement therapy appears to have benefit when started within 2 weeks of stroke. Evidence for non-invasive brain stimulation in the acute period remains scant and inconclusive. For aphasia, the evidence is mixed, but intensive early therapy might be of benefit for patients with severe aphasia. Mirror therapy begun early after stroke shows promise for the alleviation of neglect. Novel approaches to treating dysphagia early after stroke appear promising, but the high rate of spontaneous improvement makes their benefit difficult to gauge. The optimal time to begin rehabilitation after a stroke remains unsettled, though the evidence is mounting that for at least some deficits, initiation of rehabilitative strategies within the first 2 weeks of stroke is beneficial. Commencing intensive therapy in the first 24 h may be harmful.

  3. Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia)

    ... Stroke Heroes Among Us Difficulty Swallowing After Stroke (Dysphagia) Updated:Nov 15,2016 Excerpted and adapted from "Swallowing Disorders After a Stroke," Stroke Connection Magazine July/August ...

  4. The Influence of Face Angle and Club Path on the Resultant Launch Angle of a Golf Ball

    Paul Wood

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A two-part experimental study was conducted in order to better understand how the delivered face angle and club path of a golf club influences the initial launch direction of a golf ball for various club types. A robust understanding of how these parameters influence the ball direction has implications for both coaches and club designers. The first study used a large sample of golfers hitting shots with different clubs. Initial ball direction was measured with a Foresight Sports camera system, while club delivery parameters were recorded with a Vicon motion capture system. The second study used a golf robot and Vision Research camera to measure club and ball parameters. Results from these experiments show that the launch direction fell closer to face angle than club path. The percent toward the face angle ranged from 61% to 83%, where 100% designates a launch angle entirely toward the face angle.

  5. Immediate Effects of Sports Taping Applied on the Lead Knee of Low- and High-Handicapped Golfers During Golf Swing.

    Kim, Tae-Gyu; Kim, Eun-Kuk; Park, Jong-Chul

    2017-04-01

    Kim, T-G, Kim, E-K, and Park, J-C. Immediate effects of sports taping applied on the lead knee of low- and high-handicapped golfers during golf swing. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 981-989, 2017-Elite golf athletes suffer from various musculoskeletal injuries due to repeated golf swings. Repetitive varus moment during golf swing has been suggested as a possible cause of injuries to the lead knee. The aim of this study was to objectively and quantitatively evaluate the immediate effects of sports taping on the lead knee of elite golfers to restrict varus moment. Thirty-one elite golfers were assigned to the low- (LHG, n = 15) or high-handicapped group (HHG, n = 16). Using 3-dimensional motion analysis, the lead knee position on the frontal plane with and without rigid taping (RT), elastic taping (ET), and placebo taping was identified in 4 separate phases by the 5 events of golf swing as follows: the peak of the backswing (E1), parallel to the ground during downswing (E2), ball impact (E3), parallel to the ground during follow-through (E4), and finish (E5). The LHG when using a driver club had decreased movement toward knee varus with RT and ET than that without it from E1 to E2 (p = 0.001). The LHG when using a 5-iron club decreased movement toward knee varus with RT than that without it from E1 to E2 (p = 0.006) and from E2 to E3 (p = 0.019). The HHG when using a driver club had decreased movement toward knee varus with RT from E1 to E2 (p = 0.014). Sports taping may be helpful for elite golfers in terms of reducing varus moment of the lead knee during the downswing and be useful for the development of preventive strategies for golf-related knee injuries.

  6. Report of ground water monitoring for expansion of the golf course, Salt Lake City, Utah, vitro processing site

    1995-06-01

    To determine the potential impacts of the proposed golf course expansion on the south side of the Vitro site, ground water data from the UMTRA Vitro processing site were evaluated in response to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office request. Golf in the Round, Inc., has proposed an expansion of the present driving range to include a 9-hole golf course on the UMTRA Vitro processing site, which is owned by the Central Valley Water Reclamation Facility (CVWRF). An expanded golf course would increase irrigation and increase the amount of water that could infiltrate the soil, recharging the unconfined aquifer. Increased water levels in the aquifer could alter the ground water flow regime; contaminants in the shallow ground water could then migrate off the site or discharge to surface water in the area. Dewatering of the unconfined aquifer on CVWRF property could also impact site contaminant migration; a significant amount of ground water extraction at CVWRF could reduce the amount of contaminant migration off the site. Since 1978, data have been collected at the site to determine the distribution of tailings materials (removed from the site from 1985 to 1987) and to characterize the presence and migration of contaminants in sediments, soils, surface water, and ground water at the former Vitro processing site. Available data suggest that irrigating an expanded golf course may cause contamination to spread more rapidly within the unconfined aquifer. The public is not at risk from current Vitro processing site activities, nor is risk expected due to golf course expansion. However, ecological risk could increase with increased surface water contamination and the development of ground water seeps

  7. The relationship and effects of golf on physical and mental health: a scoping review protocol.

    Murray, A; Daines, L; Archibald, D; Hawkes, R; Grant, L; Mutrie, N

    2016-06-01

    Golf is a sport played in 206 countries worldwide by over 50 million people. It is possible that participation in golf, which is a form of physical activity, may be associated with effects on longevity, the cardiovascular, metabolic and musculoskeletal systems, as well as on mental health and well-being. We outline our scoping review protocol to examine the relationships and effects of golf on physical and mental health. Best practice methodological frameworks suggested by Arksey and O'Malley, Levac et al and the Joanna Briggs Institute will serve as our guide, providing clarity and rigour. A scoping review provides a framework to (1) map the key concepts and evidence, (2) summarise and disseminate existing research findings to practitioners and policymakers and (3) identify gaps in the existing research. A three-step search strategy will identify reviews as well as original research, published and grey literature. An initial search will identify suitable search terms, followed by a search using keyword and index terms. Two reviewers will independently screen identified studies for final inclusion. We will map key concepts and evidence, and disseminate existing research findings to practitioners and policymakers through peer-reviewed and non-peer reviewed publications, conferences and in-person communications. We will identify priorities for further study. This method may prove useful to examine the relationships and effects of other sports on health. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Evaluating management-induced soil salinization in golf courses in semi-arid landscapes

    Young, J.; Udeigwe, T. K.; Weindorf, D. C.; Kandakji, T.; Gautam, P.; Mahmoud, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Site-specific information on land management practices are often desired to make better assessments of their environmental impacts. A study was conducted in Lubbock, Texas, in the Southern High Plains of the United States, an area characterized by semi-arid climatic conditions, to (1) examine the potential management-induced alterations in soil salinity indicators in golf course facilities and (2) develop predictive relationships for a more rapid soil salinity examination within these urban landscape soils using findings from a portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) spectrometer. Soil samples were collected from managed (well irrigated) and non-managed (non-irrigated) areas of seven golf course facilities at 0-10, 10-20, and 20-30 cm depths and analyzed for a suite of chemical properties. Among the extractable cations, sodium (Na) was significantly (p golf facilities. Soil electrical conductivity (EC), exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), parameters often used in characterizing soil salinity and sodicity, were for the most part significantly (p < 0.05) higher in the managed areas. Water quality reports collected over a 22-year period (1991-2013, all years not available) indicated a gradual increase in pH, EC, SAR, total alkalinity, and extractable ions, thus supporting the former findings. Findings from the PXRF suggested possible differences in chemical species and sources that contribute to salinity between the managed and non-managed zones. PXRF-quantified Cl and S, and to a lesser extent Ca, individually and collectively explained 23-85% of the variability associated with soil salinity at these facilities.

  9. Stroking and tapping the skin: behavioral and electrodermal effects.

    Etzi, Roberta; Carta, Carlotta; Gallace, Alberto

    2018-02-01

    Being caressed represents one of the most typical expressions of affection conveyed by touch. Converging evidence suggests that the pleasant perception of gentle and slow stroking delivered to the hairy skin is mediated by C-Tactile afferents (CTs). While behavioral and neural responses to CT-optimal touch have been moderately explored so far, less is known about the autonomic reaction to different kinds of touch (both CT-optimal and not). Here, we investigated whether physiological arousal varies as a function of the specific tactile stimulation provided. Stroking (slow: 3 cm/s 'CT-optimal'; or fast: 30 cm/s) and tapping (random or fixed spatial order) stimulations were delivered to the participants' forearm with a brush, for durations of 9 or 60 s. Participants' skin conductance response (SCR) and level (SCL), as well as subjective evaluations, were recorded. The results revealed that being stroked (at both the velocities) induced higher SCR and SCL than being tapped. Moreover, while higher SCR was elicited by CT-suboptimal stroking compared to CT-optimal stroking, SCL was not affected differently by CT-optimal touch. No differences were found between the effects of 9 and 60 s stimulations. Slow stroking was evaluated as the most pleasant, relaxing and 'social' type of touch compared to the other tactile stimulations. Taken together, these findings shed light on the psychophysiological responses to stroking (including CT-optimal touch) and tapping, and contribute to elucidate the mechanisms underlying hedonic tactile perception.

  10. Croissance relative, sex-ratio et exploitation de la crevette blanche metapenaeus monoceros (fabricius, 1798) du golfe de gabes (tunisie)

    Jarboui, O.; Ben Abdallah, O.; Missaoui, H.; Ben Hadj Hamida, N.

    2003-01-01

    Les crevettes, particulièrement Penaeus kerathurus, sont considérées parmi les espèces de crustacés les plus exploitées au niveau des côtes tunisiennes, essentiellement dans le golfe de Gabès. Depuis l’année 1993, une nouvelle espèce de crevette d’origine lesseptienne est apparue dans le golfe et s’est bien adaptée avec ses conditions climatiques et environnementales : c’est la crevette blanche Metapenaeus monoceros. L’objectif principal de cette étude consiste à suivre l’exploitation de cett...

  11. Brain Basics: Preventing Stroke

    ... NINDS) are committed to reducing that burden through biomedical research. What is a Stroke? A stroke, or "brain ... Testimony Legislative Updates Impact NINDS Contributions to Approved Therapies ... Director, Division of Intramural Research

  12. Stroke Warning Signs

    ... person to repeat a simple sentence, like "The sky is blue." Is the person able to correctly ... to Your Doctor to Create a Plan The Life After Stroke Journey Every stroke recovery is different. ...

  13. [Genetics of ischemic stroke].

    Gschwendtner, A; Dichgans, M

    2013-02-01

    Stroke is one of the most widespread causes of mortality und disability worldwide. Around 80 % of strokes are ischemic and different forms of intracranial bleeding account for the remaining cases. Monogenic stroke disorders are rare but the diagnosis may lead to specific therapeutic consequences for the affected patients who are predominantly young. In common sporadic stroke, genetic factors play a role in the form of susceptibility genes. Their discovery may give rise to new therapeutic options in the future.

  14. Prediction of Major Vascular Events after Stroke

    Ovbiagele, Bruce; Goldstein, Larry B.; Amarenco, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identifying patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) at high risk of major vascular events (MVEs; stroke, myocardial infarction, or vascular death) may help optimize the intensity of secondary preventive interventions. We evaluated the relationships between...... the baseline Framingham Coronary Risk Score (FCRS) and a novel risk prediction model and with the occurrence of MVEs after stroke or TIA in subjects enrolled in the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Level (SPARCL) trial. METHODS: Data from the 4731 subjects enrolled in the SPARCL study...... were analyzed. Hazard ratios (HRs) from Cox regression models were used to determine the risk of subsequent MVEs based on the FCRS predicting 20% or more 10-year coronary heart disease risk. The novel risk model was derived based on multivariable modeling with backward selection. Model discrimination...

  15. Management Of Post Stroke Seizures

    Kavian Ghandehari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of seizures in relation to stroke is 8.9%, with a frequency of 10.6 and 8.6% in haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke, respectively. In subarachnoid haemorrhage the incidence is 8.5%. Due to the fact that infarcts are significantly more frequent than haemorrhages, seizures are mainly related to occlusive vascular disease of the brain. The general view is to consider stroke-related seizures as harmless complications in the course of a prolonged vascular disease involving the heart and brain. Seizures can be classified as those of early and those of late onset in a paradigm comparable to post-traumatic epilepsy, with an arbitrary dividing point of two weeks after the event. Most early-onset seizures occur during the first day after the stroke. Late-onset seizures occur three times more often than early-onset ones. A first late-onset epileptic event is most likely to take place between six months and two years after the stroke. However, up to 28% of patients develop their first seizure several years later. Simple partial seizures, with or without secondary generalisation, account for about 50% of total seizures, while complex partial spells, with or without secondary generalisation, and primary generalised tonic–clonic insults account for approximately 25% each. Status epilepticus occurs in 12% of stroke patients, but the recurrence rate after an initial status epilepticus is not higher than after a single seizure. Inhibitory seizures, mimicking transient ischaemic attacks, are observed in 7.1% of cases. The only clinical predictor of late-onset seizures is the initial presentation of partial anterior circulation syndrome due to a territorial infarct. Patients with total anterior circulation syndrome have less chance of developing epileptic spells, not only due to their shorter life expectancy but also due to the fact that the large infarcts are sharply demarcated in these patients. The optimal timing and type of antiepileptic drug

  16. Guidelines for the early management of patients with acute ischemic stroke: a guideline for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Jauch, Edward C; Saver, Jeffrey L; Adams, Harold P; Bruno, Askiel; Connors, J J Buddy; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Khatri, Pooja; McMullan, Paul W; Qureshi, Adnan I; Rosenfield, Kenneth; Scott, Phillip A; Summers, Debbie R; Wang, David Z; Wintermark, Max; Yonas, Howard

    2013-03-01

    The authors present an overview of the current evidence and management recommendations for evaluation and treatment of adults with acute ischemic stroke. The intended audiences are prehospital care providers, physicians, allied health professionals, and hospital administrators responsible for the care of acute ischemic stroke patients within the first 48 hours from stroke onset. These guidelines supersede the prior 2007 guidelines and 2009 updates. Members of the writing committee were appointed by the American Stroke Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee, representing various areas of medical expertise. Strict adherence to the American Heart Association conflict of interest policy was maintained throughout the consensus process. Panel members were assigned topics relevant to their areas of expertise, reviewed the stroke literature with emphasis on publications since the prior guidelines, and drafted recommendations in accordance with the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Level of Evidence grading algorithm. The goal of these guidelines is to limit the morbidity and mortality associated with stroke. The guidelines support the overarching concept of stroke systems of care and detail aspects of stroke care from patient recognition; emergency medical services activation, transport, and triage; through the initial hours in the emergency department and stroke unit. The guideline discusses early stroke evaluation and general medical care, as well as ischemic stroke, specific interventions such as reperfusion strategies, and general physiological optimization for cerebral resuscitation. Because many of the recommendations are based on limited data, additional research on treatment of acute ischemic stroke remains urgently needed.

  17. Cognitive impairment and stroke in elderly patients

    Lo Coco D

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Daniele Lo Coco,1 Gianluca Lopez,1 Salvatore Corrao,2,31Neurology and Stroke Unit, 2Department of Internal Medicine, National Relevance and High Specialization Hospital Trust ARNAS Civico, Di Cristina, Benfratelli, Palermo, 3Centre of Research for Effectiveness and Appropriateness in Medicine (C.R.E.A.M., Di.Bi.M.I.S., University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy Abstract: We reviewed current knowledge about the interaction between stroke and vascular risk factors and the development of cognitive impairment and dementia. Stroke is increasingly recognized as an important cause of cognitive problems and has been implicated in the development of both Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. The prevalence of cognitive impairment after stroke is high, and their combined effects significantly increase the cost of care and health resource utilization, with reflections on hospital readmissions and increased mortality rates. There is also substantial evidence that vascular risk factors (such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and tobacco smoking are independently associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Thus, a successful management of these factors, as well as optimal acute stroke management, might have a great impact on the development of cognitive impairment. Notwithstanding, the pathological link between cognitive impairment, stroke, and vascular risk factors is complex and still partially unclear so that further studies are needed to better elucidate the boundaries of this relationship. Many specific pharmacological treatments, including anticholinergic drugs and antihypertensive medications, and nonpharmacological approaches, such as diet, cognitive rehabilitation, and physical activity, have been studied for patients with vascular cognitive impairment, but the optimal care is still far away. Meanwhile, according to the most recent knowledge, optimal stroke care should also include cognitive assessment in the

  18. Achievement of Optimal Medical Therapy Goals for US Adults with Coronary Artery Disease: Results from the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study

    Brown, Todd M.; Voeks, Jenifer H.; Bittner, Vera; Brenner, David A.; Cushman, Mary; Goff, David C.; Glasser, Stephen; Muntner, Paul; Tabereaux, Paul B.; Safford, Monika M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective In a non-clinical trial setting, to determine the proportion of individuals with coronary artery disease (CAD) with optimal risk factor levels based on the Clinical Outcomes Utilizing Revascularization and Aggressive DruG Evaluation (COURAGE) trial. Background In COURAGE, the addition of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) to optimal medical therapy did not reduce the risk of death or myocardial infarction in stable CAD patients but resulted in more revascularization procedures. Methods REGARDS is a national prospective cohort study of 30,239 African American and White community-dwelling individuals aged >45 years enrolled in 2003-7. We calculated the proportion of 3,167 participants with self-reported CAD meeting 7 risk factor goals based on COURAGE: 1) aspirin use, 2) systolic blood pressure 40 mg/dL, and triglycerides goals met was 4. Less than a quarter met ≥5 of the 7 goals, and 16% met all 3 goals for aspirin, blood pressure, and LDL-C. Older age, white race, higher income, more education, and higher physical functioning were independently associated with meeting more goals. Conclusions There is substantial room for improvement in risk factor reduction among US individuals with CAD. PMID:24534599

  19. Sex Disparities in Stroke

    Dehlendorff, Christian; Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2015-01-01

    between 2003 and 2012 (N=79 617), and the Danish Register of Causes of Death. Information was available on age, sex, marital status, stroke severity, stroke subtype, socioeconomic status, and cardiovascular risk profile. We studied only deaths due to the index stroke, with the assumption that death.......5%) or 1 month (6.9%), respectively. After the age of 60 years, women had more severe strokes than men. Up to ages in the mid-60s, no difference in the risk of death from stroke was seen between the 2 sexes. For people aged >65 years, however, the risk gradually became greater in men than in women...

  20. The effects of cognitive anxiety on the biomechanical characteristics of the golf swing

    MBA De Ste Croix

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the effect of cognitive anxiety (CA on the biomechanical characteristics of the golf swing. Written informed consent was obtained from 9 subjects, with a range of golf experience (handicap range 4-23. Each subject was filmed under a low anxiety condition (during practice, and a high anxiety condition (during competition and completed a revised version of the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 (CSAI-2. Human movement analysis (Hu-m-an software package was used to identify the clubhead speeds during the backswing, downswing, and impact time, along with the completion times for each phase. The absolute angle of the club to the vertical, and the relative angle of the forearm, wrist, and club hinge, at the completion of the backswing stage were also examined. CA intensity scores were significantly lower during practice than competition (p<0.05. CA interpretation scores indicate that anxiety symptoms during practice were significantly more facilitative to performance (p<0.05. The time taken to complete the downswing phase was significantly lower during competition (p<0.05. The combined backswing and downswing times were significantly lower during the competition trial (p<0.05. There were no significant differences between the practice and competition trials on any of the remaining swing variables measured.

  1. Lower extremity work is associated with club head velocity during the golf swing in experienced golfers.

    McNally, M P; Yontz, N; Chaudhari, A M

    2014-08-01

    While the golf swing is a complex whole body movement requiring coordination of all joints to achieve maximum ball velocity, the kinetic contribution of the lower extremities to club head velocity has not been quantified, despite the perception that the legs are a primary source of power during the swing. Mechanical power at the hips, knees, and ankles was estimated during the downswing phase of a full swing with a driver using a passive optical motion capture system and 2 force plates for adult males across a range of age and self-reported skill levels. Total work by the lower extremities was calculated by integrating the powers of all 6 joints over the downswing. Regression analyses showed that total lower extremity work was a strong predictor of club head velocity (R=0.63). Secondary analyses showed different relationships to club head velocity in lead and trail leg lower extremity joints, but none of these were as predictive of club head velocity as the total work performed by the lower extremities. These results provide quantitative evidence that the lower body's kinetic contribution may be an important factor in achieving greater club head velocity, contributing to greater driving distance and overall golf performance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Reliability of an experimental method to analyse the impact point on a golf ball during putting.

    Richardson, Ashley K; Mitchell, Andrew C S; Hughes, Gerwyn

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to examine the reliability of an experimental method identifying the location of the impact point on a golf ball during putting. Forty trials were completed using a mechanical putting robot set to reproduce a putt of 3.2 m, with four different putter-ball combinations. After locating the centre of the dimple pattern (centroid) the following variables were tested; distance of the impact point from the centroid, angle of the impact point from the centroid and distance of the impact point from the centroid derived from the X, Y coordinates. Good to excellent reliability was demonstrated in all impact variables reflected in very strong relative (ICC = 0.98-1.00) and absolute reliability (SEM% = 0.9-4.3%). The highest SEM% observed was 7% for the angle of the impact point from the centroid. In conclusion, the experimental method was shown to be reliable at locating the centroid location of a golf ball, therefore allowing for the identification of the point of impact with the putter head and is suitable for use in subsequent studies.

  3. Early Improper Motion Detection in Golf Swings Using Wearable Motion Sensors: The First Approach

    Stančin, Sara; Tomažič, Sašo

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a golf swing to detect improper motion in the early phase of the swing. Led by the desire to achieve a consistent shot outcome, a particular golfer would (in multiple trials) prefer to perform completely identical golf swings. In reality, some deviations from the desired motion are always present due to the comprehensive nature of the swing motion. Swing motion deviations that are not detrimental to performance are acceptable. This analysis is conducted using a golfer's leading arm kinematic data, which are obtained from a golfer wearing a motion sensor that is comprised of gyroscopes and accelerometers. Applying the principal component analysis (PCA) to the reference observations of properly performed swings, the PCA components of acceptable swing motion deviations are established. Using these components, the motion deviations in the observations of other swings are examined. Any unacceptable deviations that are detected indicate an improper swing motion. Arbitrarily long observations of an individual player's swing sequences can be included in the analysis. The results obtained for the considered example show an improper swing motion in early phase of the swing, i.e., the first part of the backswing. An early detection method for improper swing motions that is conducted on an individual basis provides assistance for performance improvement. PMID:23752563

  4. Looking to Learn: The Effects of Visual Guidance on Observational Learning of the Golf Swing.

    D'Innocenzo, Giorgia; Gonzalez, Claudia C; Williams, A Mark; Bishop, Daniel T

    2016-01-01

    Skilled performers exhibit more efficient gaze patterns than less-skilled counterparts do and they look more frequently at task-relevant regions than at superfluous ones. We examine whether we may guide novices' gaze towards relevant regions during action observation in order to facilitate their learning of a complex motor skill. In a Pre-test-Post-test examination of changes in their execution of the full golf swing, 21 novices viewed one of three videos at intervention: i) a skilled golfer performing 10 swings (Free Viewing, FV); ii) the same video with transient colour cues superimposed to highlight key features of the setup (Visual Guidance; VG); iii) or a History of Golf video (Control). Participants in the visual guidance group spent significantly more time looking at cued areas than did the other two groups, a phenomenon that persisted after the cues had been removed. Moreover, the visual guidance group improved their swing execution at Post-test and on a Retention test one week later. Our results suggest that visual guidance to cued areas during observational learning of complex motor skills may accelerate acquisition of the skill.

  5. Local Navon letter processing affects skilled behavior: a golf-putting experiment.

    Lewis, Michael B; Dawkins, Gemma

    2015-04-01

    Expert or skilled behaviors (for example, face recognition or sporting performance) are typically performed automatically and with little conscious awareness. Previous studies, in various domains of performance, have shown that activities immediately prior to a task demanding a learned skill can affect performance. In sport, describing the to-be-performed action is detrimental, whereas in face recognition, describing a face or reading local Navon letters is detrimental. Two golf-putting experiments are presented that compare the effects that these three tasks have on experienced and novice golfers. Experiment 1 found a Navon effect on golf performance for experienced players. Experiment 2 found, for experienced players only, that performance was impaired following the three tasks described above, when compared with reading or global Navon tasks. It is suggested that the three tasks affect skilled performance by provoking a shift from automatic behavior to a more analytic style. By demonstrating similarities between effects in face recognition and sporting behavior, it is hoped to better understand concepts in both fields.

  6. Fertilizer source effects on phosphate and nitrate leaching through simulated golf greens

    Shuman, L.M.

    2003-01-01

    In general, more P than N leached from both field and greenhouse lysimeters. - Phosphorus and nitrogen leached from high-porosity golf greens can adversely affect surface water and groundwater quality. Greenhouse and field lysimeter experiments were carried out to determine the effects of eight fertilizer sources on P and N leaching from simulated golf greens. Phosphorus appeared in the leachate later than nitrate-N, and the highest concentrations were for the soluble 20-20-20 and the 16-25-12 starter fertilizers. The other six sources resulted in lower P concentrations. The soluble 20-20-20 and the 16-25-12 sources each resulted in 43% of the added P eluting in the leachate, whereas the others varied from 15 to 25%. For nitrate-N the lowest cumulative mass was for the controlled-release 13-13-13 and sulfur-coated urea. A higher percentage of applied P than applied N leached from both field and greenhouse lysimeters. However, the amounts of P leached for the field lysimeters were lower than for the greenhouse columns

  7. Development of a golf-specific load monitoring tool: Content validity and feasibility.

    Williams, Scott B; Gastin, Paul B; Saw, Anna E; Robertson, Sam

    2018-05-01

    Athletes often record details of their training and competitions, supported by information such as environmental conditions, travel, as well as how they felt. However, it is not known how prevalent these practices are in golfers, or how valuable this process is perceived. The purpose of this study was to develop a golf-specific load monitoring tool (GLMT), and establish the content validity and feasibility of this tool amongst high-level golfers. In the first phase of development, 21 experts were surveyed to determine the suitability of items for inclusion in the GLMT. Of the 36 items, 21 received >78% agreement, a requirement to establish content validity and for inclusion in the GLMT. Total duration was the preferred metric for golf-specific activities, whilst rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was preferred for measuring physical training. In the second phase, feasibility of the tool was assessed by surveying 13 high-level male golfers following 28-days of daily GLMT use. All items included in the GLMT were deemed feasible to record, with all players participating in the feasibility study providing high to very high ratings. Golfers responded that they would consider using a load monitoring tool of this nature long term, provided it can be completed in less than five minutes per day.

  8. Photospheric activity of the Sun with VIRGO and GOLF. Comparison with standard activity proxies

    Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Jiménez, A.; Bertello, L.; Corsaro, E.; Pallé, P. L.

    2017-12-01

    We study the variability of solar activity using new photospheric proxies originally developed for the analysis of stellar magnetism with the CoRoT and Kepler photometric observations. These proxies were obtained by tracking the temporal modulations in the observations associated with the spots and magnetic features as the Sun rotates. We analyzed 21 yr of observations, spanning solar cycles 23 and 24, collected by the space-based photometric VIRGO and radial velocity GOLF instruments on board the SoHO satellite. We then calculated the photospheric activity proxy Sph is for each of the three VIRGO photometers and the associated Svel proxy from the radial velocity GOLF observations. Comparisons with several standard solar activity proxies sensitive to different layers of the Sun demonstrate that these new activity proxies, Sph and Svel, provide a new manner to monitor solar activity. We show that both the long- and short-term magnetic variabilities respectively associated with the 11-yr cycle and the quasi-biennial oscillation are well monitored, and that the magnetic field interaction between the subsurface, photosphere, and chromosphere of the Sun was modified between Cycle 24 and Cycle 23. Furthermore, the photometric proxies show a wavelength dependence of the response function of the solar photosphere among the three channels of the VIRGO photometers, providing inputs for the study of the stellar magnetism of Sun-like stars.

  9. The crunch factor's role in golf-related low back pain.

    Cole, Michael H; Grimshaw, Paul N

    2014-05-01

    The golf swing exposes the spine to complex torsional, compressive, and shearing loads that increase a player's risk of injury. The crunch factor (CF) has been described as a measure to evaluate the risk of low back injuries in golfers and is based on the notion that lateral flexion and axial trunk rotation jointly contribute to spinal degeneration. However, few studies have evaluated the appropriateness of this measure in golfers with low back pain (LBP). To objectively examine the usefulness of the CF as a measure for assessing the risk of low back injury in golfers. Field-based research using a cross-sectional design. This research used three-dimensional motion analysis to assess the golf swings of 12 golfers with LBP and 15 asymptomatic controls. Three-dimensional kinematics were derived using Vicon Motus, and the CF was calculated as the instantaneous product of axial trunk rotation velocity and lateral trunk flexion angle. Maximum CFs and their timings were not significantly different between the symptomatic and asymptomatic groups. Furthermore, for those golfers who produced higher CFs (irrespective of the group), the increased magnitude could not be attributed to an increased axial angular trunk velocity or lateral flexion angle, but rather to a concomitant increase in both of these variables. The findings suggested that although the fundamental concepts that underpin the CF seem sensible, this measure does not appear to be sensitive enough to distinguish golfers with LBP from the asymptomatic players. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Customer Satisfaction Among the Members of the Summit Point Golf and Country Club

    VERONICA JOY V. BENCITO

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the customer satisfaction among the members of the Summit Point Golf and Country Club which served as the basis for continuous improvement. It determined the level of customer satisfaction on the services offered by the Summit Point employees in terms of food and beverages, customer service and facilities. Lastly, it also tested the significant differences on the level of customer satisfactions when grouped according to their membership variables of the club. The descriptive type of research was used to assess the operation of the club. Data gathered were analyzed using the weighted mean and ANOVA method. The members of the Summit Point Golf and Country Club are generally satisfied in terms of facilities and amenities, food and beverages and customer service. The hypothesis has no significant difference between the membership profile and level of customer satisfaction in terms of facilities and amenities and customer service is rejected. This means that their responses differ as to their reasons of joining the club, their obtained degree and the frequency of playing in the club.

  11. The relevance of coordination at the golf swing performance of junior players Importancia de la coordinación en el rendimiento del swing de golf en jóvenes promesas

    D. Juarez

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

    The golf swing is a skill which could be classified as a high velocity hitting where the main goal is that the head of the golf club reaches its maximum velocity at impact time. The aim of this study was to find the movement pattern of the golf swing in order to apply this pattern to improve their performance. Twelve golf swings executed by four young players were biomechanically analyzed. Automatic capture with Vicon Oxford Metrics © was used. The analysis of the maximum angular velocity sequence during the downswing showed, that depending on the gender, they described different timing. The angular velocity sequences had the same order, being first the hip turn, secondly the shoulder turn y finally the golf club head acceleration. It was found discriminant function for each gender group which could predict whether the golf swing was “good” or “bad” considering the club head speed as performance criteria. This separation at the timing of the key events could be the reason why that explains men reached more velocity at the head club near impact time than women.
    Key Words: Biomechanics, hitting, swing, golf, pattern, performance.

     

    El swing de golf es una destreza que podríamos catalogar de golpeo de velocidad donde el objetivo es que la cara del palo alcance la máxima velocidad en el momento del impacto. El objetivo de este estudio fue hallar el patrón de movimiento en el swing de golf y aplicar este patrón para la mejora del rendimiento. Se han analizado biomecánicamente doce golpeos de cuatro jugadores promesas, mediante el sistema fotogrametría 3D Vicon Oxford Metrics © de captura automática. El análisis de la secuencia de velocidades angulares máximas en el downswing muestra cómo siguen un timing diferente en función del género. Las secuencias

  12. optimised intake stroke analysis for flat and dome head pistons

    user

    The piston models were meshed using tetrahedral mesh of base size 0.001m. ... applied to simulate the actual intake stroke process for normal operating conditions and initial conditions. ... simulation of optimization characteristics has followed.

  13. Seizure development after stroke.

    Misirli, H; Ozge, A; Somay, G; Erdoğan, N; Erkal, H; Erenoğlu, N Y

    2006-12-01

    Although there have been many studies on seizures following stroke, there is still much we do not know about them. In this study, we evaluated the characteristics of seizures in stroke patients. There were 2267 patients with a first-ever stroke, and after excluding 387 patients, 1880 were available for analysis. Of these 1880 patients, we evaluated 200 patients with seizures and 400 patients without seizures. We investigated the seizures according to age, gender, stroke type, the aetiology of ischaemic stroke and the localisation of the lesion. The seizures were classified as early onset and late onset and the seizure type as partial, generalised or secondarily generalised. Seizures occurred in 200 (10.6%) of 1880 strokes. The number of patients with seizures were 138 (10.6%) in ischaemic stroke group and 62 (10.7%) in haemorrhagic stroke group. Patients with ischaemic strokes had 41 embolic (29.7%) and 97 thrombotic (70.3%) origin, and these were not statistically significant in comparison with controls. Cortical involvement for the development of seizures was the most important risk factor (odds ratios = 4.25, p < 0.01). It was concluded that embolic strokes, being younger than 65 years old, and cortical localisation of stroke were important risks for developing seizures.

  14. Clinical Epidemiology Of Stroke

    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a huge public health problem because of its high morbidity and disability. The epidemiology of stroke is of relevance to construct practical paradigms to tackle this major health issue in the community. Recent data have shown that about 72-86% of strokes are ischemic, 9-18% are due to hemorrhage (intracerebral of subarachnoid and the rest are undefined. The risk factors for stroke are multiple and combined. At present, stroke is no more considered as unavoidable and untreatable. It is an emergency and specialized units and teams improve outcome and lower costs. Death related to stroke is declining in many countries and in both sexes. This decrease in multifactorial. The detection and more effective treatment of hypertension may play an important factor, as well as the improved medical care and improvement in diagnostic procedures. While stroke incidence appears stable and stroke mortality is slowly declining, the absolute magnitude of stroke is likely to grow over the next 30 years. as the population ages, the absolute number of stroke victims and demands on healthcare and other support systems is likely to increase substantially in the future. Keeping this in perspective, this chapter shall focus on the epidemiology of stroke in the world and in Indian, in particular.

  15. Registration of acute stroke

    Wildenschild, Cathrine; Mehnert, Frank; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The validity of the registration of patients in stroke-specific registries has seldom been investigated, nor compared with administrative hospital discharge registries. The objective of this study was to examine the validity of the registration of patients in a stroke-specific registry...... (The Danish Stroke Registry [DSR]) and a hospital discharge registry (The Danish National Patient Registry [DNRP]). METHODS: Assuming that all patients with stroke were registered in either the DSR, DNRP or both, we first identified a sample of 75 patients registered with stroke in 2009; 25 patients...... in the DSR, 25 patients in the DNRP, and 25 patients registered in both data sources. Using the medical record as a gold standard, we then estimated the sensitivity and positive predictive value of a stroke diagnosis in the DSR and the DNRP. Secondly, we reviewed 160 medical records for all potential stroke...

  16. Análisis de la accesibilidad en los campos de golf de la Región de Murcia

    P. Zarco-Pérez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Otorgar el correcto nivel de accesibilidad en los campos de golf es una premisa fundamental si se quiere fomentar y facilitar el acceso a la práctica del golf por personas con discapacidad. El presente estudio trata de analizar la accesibilidad en los campos de golf de la Región de Murcia. Para ello se recurre a un estudio de carácter cuantitativo utilizando una hoja de observación creada a partir de los criterios de accesibilidad encontrados en la legislación estatal y regional vigente, en la que se evalúa la accesibilidad de todos los campos de golf de 18 hoyos de la Comunidad Autónoma de Murcia. Los resultados indican que no se cumple la normativa vigente en torno a la accesibilidad ya que el cumplimiento de los ítems se sitúa por debajo de la mitad (40,88%. El área de accesos presenta el mejor resultado, con un 50,54% de ítems cumplidos de media, mientras que los vestuarios presentan los peores resultados, con un 34,94%. En todas las áreas se observa cómo la señalización y mobiliario presentan los porcentajes más bajos. Sería necesario tomar medidas para superar los criterios de accesibilidad requeridos para estos espacios.

  17. Evaluating poverty grass (Danthonia spicata L.) for use in tees, fairways, or rough areas in golf courses in the midwest

    Nadia E. Navarrete-Tindall; Brad Fresenburg; J.W. Van Sambeek

    2007-01-01

    Poverty grass (Danthonia spicata L.), a native, cool-season perennial bunchgrass with wide distribution in the United States, is being evaluated for its suitability for use on golf courses. The goal is to identify practices to improve seed germination and successfully establish field plots as monocultures or with other native species to mimic natural...

  18. The identification of benefit needs of golf players in the U.S.: Implicationsand strategy considerations for sport management professionals

    CHUNG-MI LEE

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The golf industry has expanded over the past 50 years throughout the world, particularly in America. The number of golfers in the United States has increased seven-fold since 1950, as the game was transformed from an expensive diversion of the rich to a mass-market pastime. A number of recent studies have shown that demographic variables such as age, gender, occupation, income, and race are –in general– poor predictors of golfers’ consumer behaviour and, consequently, less than optimum bases for segmentation strategies. Because of those problems associated with demographic segmentation, benefit segmentation has become a favourite tool of marketers; to satisfy target consumers’ needs, benefit needs and product attributes are the most popular variables for segmenting the target market. The main strength of benefit segmentation lies in the causal relationship to perceived future behaviour. The purpose of this study was to identify the benefit needs of golfers who frequent public golf courses. Implications for public golf course owners or managers are then discussed with strategy considerations about golf marketing for a variety of benefit segments.

  19. Biochar-organic amendment mixtures added to simulated golf greens under reduced chemical fertilization increase creeping bentgrass growth

    Simulated golf greens were used to test the growth of creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L. "007") receiving suboptimal chemical fertilization in sand based substrates amended with 15% peat (control), a commercial biochar, a commercial biochar-compost (CarbonizPN), or seven formulated biochar...

  20. An electromyographic study of the effect of hand grip sizes on forearm muscle activity and golf performance.

    Sorbie, Graeme G; Hunter, Henry H; Grace, Fergal M; Gu, Yaodong; Baker, Julien S; Ugbolue, Ukadike Chris

    2016-01-01

    The study describes the differences in surface electromyography (EMG) activity of two forearm muscles in the lead and trail arm at specific phases of the golf swing using a 7-iron with three different grip sizes among amateur and professional golfers. Fifteen right-handed male golfers performed five golf swings using golf clubs with three different grip sizes. Surface EMG was used to measure muscle activity of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) on both forearms. There were no significant differences in forearm muscle activity when using the three golf grips within the group of 15 golfers (p > 0.05). When using the undersize grip, club head speed significantly increased (p = 0.044). During the backswing and downswing phases, amateurs produced significantly greater forearm muscle activity with all three grip sizes (p < 0.05). In conclusion, forearm muscle activity is not affected by grip sizes. However, club head speed increases when using undersize grips.

  1. Chromium supplementation improved post-stroke brain infarction and hyperglycemia.

    Chen, Wen-Ying; Mao, Frank Chiahung; Liu, Chia-Hsin; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lai, Nai-Wei; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is common after acute stroke and is associated with a worse outcome of stroke. Thus, a better understanding of stress hyperglycemia is helpful to the prevention and therapeutic treatment of stroke. Chromium is an essential nutrient required for optimal insulin activity and normal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Beyond its nutritional effects, dietary supplement of chromium causes beneficial outcomes against several diseases, in particular diabetes-associated complications. In this study, we investigated whether post-stroke hyperglycemia involved chromium dynamic mobilization in a rat model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia and whether dietary supplement of chromium improved post-stroke injury and alterations. Stroke rats developed brain infarction, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Post-stroke hyperglycemia was accompanied by elevated secretion of counter-regulatory hormones including glucagon, corticosterone, and norepinephrine, decreased insulin signaling in skeletal muscles, and increased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Correlation studies revealed that counter-regulatory hormone secretion showed a positive correlation with chromium loss and blood glucose increased together with chromium loss. Daily chromium supplementation increased tissue chromium levels, attenuated brain infarction, improved hyperglycemia, and decreased plasma levels of glucagon and corticosterone in stroke rats. Our findings suggest that stroke rats show disturbance of tissue chromium homeostasis with a net loss through urinary excretion and chromium mobilization and loss might be an alternative mechanism responsible for post-stroke hyperglycemia.

  2. Secondary prevention of stroke in Saskatchewan, Canada: hypertension control.

    Bartsch, Janelle Ann; Teare, Gary F; Neufeld, Anne; Hudema, Nedeene; Muhajarine, Nazeem

    2013-10-01

    and March 31, 2008. The results of this study indicate that the management of hypertension for secondary stroke prevention is sub-optimal in Saskatchewan. Although there was some improvement over the time period, approximately 40% of patients were not taking antihypertensives at 90 days after discharge from acute care. The correlates, urban/non-urban, previous use of antihypertensive drugs and effect of age modified by sex, were found to be significantly associated with receiving hypertensive secondary stroke prevention, suggesting there are modifiable factors that contribute to variations in this form of secondary stroke care quality in Saskatchewan. The results of this study suggest that there is a need for province-wide improvement to secondary stroke prevention in Saskatchewan, Canada. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  3. Kinematic evaluation of movement smoothness in golf: relationship between the normalized jerk cost of body joints and the clubhead.

    Choi, Ahnryul; Joo, Su-Bin; Oh, Euichaul; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2014-02-26

    When the human body is introduced to a new motion or movement, it learns the placement of different body parts, sequential muscle control, and coordination between muscles to achieve necessary positions, and it hones this new skill over time and repetition. Previous studies have demonstrated definite differences in the smoothness of body movements with different levels of training, i.e., amateurs compared with professionals. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that skilled golfers swing a driver with a smoother motion than do unskilled golfers. In addition, the relationship between the smoothness of body joints and that of the clubhead was evaluated to provide further insight into the mechanism of smooth golf swing. Two subject groups (skilled and unskilled) participated in the experiment. The skilled group comprised 20 male professional golfers registered with the Korea Professional Golf Association, and the unskilled group comprised 19 amateur golfers who enjoy golf as a hobby. Six infrared cameras (VICON460 system) were used to record the 3D trajectories of markers attached to the clubhead and body segments, and the resulting data was evaluated with kinematic analysis. A physical quantity called jerk was calculated to investigate differences in smoothness during downswing between the two study groups. The hypothesis that skilled golfers swing a driver with a smoother motion than do unskilled golfers was supported. The normalized jerk of the clubhead of skilled golfers was lower than that of unskilled golfers in the anterior/posterior, medial/lateral, and proximal/distal directions. Most human joints, especially in the lower body, had statistically significant lower normalized jerk values in the skilled group. In addition, the normalized jerk of the skilled group's lower body joints had a distinct positive correlation with the normalized jerk of the clubhead with r = 0.657 (p golf swings and, eventually, to improve golf performance.

  4. Flexures for large stroke electrostatic actuation in MEMS

    Krijnen, B; Brouwer, D M

    2014-01-01

    The stroke of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) stage suspended by a flexure mechanism and actuated by electrostatic comb-drives is limited by pull-in. A method to analyze the electrostatic stability of a flexure mechanism and to optimize the stroke with respect to the footprint of flexure mechanisms is presented. Four flexure mechanisms for large stroke are investigated; the standard folded flexure, the slaved folded flexure, the tilted folded flexure and the Watt flexure. Given a certain stroke and load force, the flexures are optimized to have a minimum wafer footprint. From these optimizations it is concluded that the standard folded flexure mechanism is the best flexure mechanism for relatively small strokes (up to ±40 μm) and for larger strokes it is better to use the tilted folded flexure. Several optimized flexure mechanisms have been fabricated and experimentally tested to reach a stroke of ±100 μm. The displacement of the fabricated stages as a function of the actuation voltage could be predicted with 82% accuracy, limited by the fairly large tolerances of our fabrication process. (paper)

  5. Stroke And Substance Abuse

    A Chitsaz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: stroke in recreational substance users can be an indirect complication, like endocarditis and cardio embolism in parenteral drug users. With some drug like cocaine, stroke appear to be the result of a direct effect. In young subjects without other risk factors provide persuasive evidence for causality . OPIATES: Heroine is the most abused opiate drug, which is administered by injection, by snorting or by smoking. Stroke affects heroin users by diverse mechanisms,. Injectors are at risk of infections endocarditis, which carries risk for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Cerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhage usually occurs after rupture of a septic (mycotic aneurysm. Heroine users can are also at risk for hemorrhagic stroke secondary to liver failure with deranged clotting and to heroin nephropathy with uremia or malignant hypertension. In some heroin users the drug it self is directly causal due to vasculitis, hypersensitivity and immunologic changes. Embolization of foreign material to brain due to mixed of heroine with quinine can cause cerebral embolism. AMPHETAMINE AND other psychostimulants: In abuser of amphetamine hemorrhagic stroke can occur, oral, intravenous, nasal, and inhalational routes of administration have been reported. Most were chronic user, but in several patients, stroke followed a first exposure. Some of amphetamine induced intracranial hemorrhages are secondary to acute hypertension, some to cerebral vacuities, and some to a combination of two. Decongestants and diet pills: Phenylpropanolamine (PPA, an amphetamine – like drug, in decongestants and diet pills, induce acute hypertension, sever headache, psychiatric symptoms, seizures and hemorrhagic stroke. Ephedrine and pseudo ephedrine are present in decongestants and bronchodilators and induce headache, tachyarrhythmia, hypertensive emergency, and hemorrhagic and occlusive stroke. Ecstasy, 3,4 Methylenedioxymethamphetamin (MDMA with amphetamine like can

  6. Stroke in Commercial Flights.

    Álvarez-Velasco, Rodrigo; Masjuan, Jaime; DeFelipe, Alicia; Corral, Iñigo; Estévez-Fraga, Carlos; Crespo, Leticia; Alonso-Cánovas, Araceli

    2016-04-01

    Stroke on board aircraft has been reported in retrospective case series, mainly focusing on economy class stroke syndrome. Data on the actual incidence, pathogenesis, and prognosis of stroke in commercial flights are lacking. A prospective registry was designed to include all consecutive patients referred from an international airport (40 million passengers a year) to our hospital with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack and onset of symptoms during a flight or immediately after landing. Forty-four patients (32 ischemic strokes and 12 transient ischemic attacks) were included over a 76-month period (January 2008 to April 2014). The estimated incidence of stroke was 1 stroke in 35 000 flights. Pathogeneses of stroke or transient ischemic attack were atherothrombotic in 16 (36%), economy class stroke syndrome in 8 (18%), cardioembolic in 7 (16%), arterial dissection in 4 (9%), lacunar stroke in 4 (9%), and undetermined in 5 (12%) patients. Carotid stenosis >70% was found in 12 (27%) of the patients. Overall prognosis was good, and thrombolysis was applied in 44% of the cases. The most common reason for not treating patients who had experienced stroke onset midflight was the delay in reaching the hospital. Only 1 patient with symptom onset during the flight prompted a flight diversion. We found a low incidence of stroke in the setting of air travel. Economy class stroke syndrome and arterial dissection were well represented in our sample. However, the main pathogenesis was atherothrombosis with a high proportion of patients with high carotid stenosis. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. New techniques to control salinity-wastewater reuse interactions in golf courses of the Mediterranean regions

    Beltrao, J.; Costa, M.; Rosado, V.; Gamito, P.; Santos, R.; Khaydarova, V.

    2003-04-01

    Due to the lack water around the Mediterranean regions, potable water luxurious uses - as in golf courses - are increasingly contested. In order to solve this problem, non conventional water resources (effluent, gray, recycled, reclaimed, brackish), like treated wastewater, for irrigation gained increasing role in the planning and development of additional water supplies in golf courses. In most cases, the intense use of effluent for irrigation attracted public awareness in respect of contaminating pathogens and heavy metals. The contaminating effect of salinity in soil and underground water is very often neglected. The objective of this work is to present the conventional techniques to control salinity of treated wastewater and to present some results on new clean techniques to solve this problem, in the framework of the INCO-COPERNICUS project (no. IC-15CT98-0105) "Adaptation of Efficient Water Use Criteria in Marginal Regions of Europe and Middle Asia with Scarce Sources Subject to Environmental Control, Climate Change and Socio-Economic Development" and of the INCO-DC project (no. IC18-CT98-0266) "Control of Salination and Combating Desertification Effects in the Mediterranean Region. Phase II". Saline water is the most common irrigation water in arid climates. Moreover, for each region treated wastewater is always more saline than tap water, and therefore, when treated wastewater is reused in golf courses, more salinity problems occur. Conventional techniques to combat the salination process in golf courses can be characterized by four generations: 1) Problem of root zone salination by soil leaching - two options can occur - when there is an impermeable layer, salts will be concentrated above this layer; on the other hand, when there is no impermeable layer, aquifers contamination can be observed; 2) Use of subsurface trickle irrigation - economy of water, and therefore less additional salts; however the problem of groundwater contamination due to natural rain

  8. Does caregiver well-being predict stroke survivor depressive symptoms? A mediation analysis.

    Grant, Joan S; Clay, Olivio J; Keltner, Norman L; Haley, William E; Wadley, Virginia G; Perkins, Martinique M; Roth, David L

    2013-01-01

    Studies suggest that family caregiver well-being (ie, depressive symptoms and life satisfaction) may affect stroke survivor depressive symptoms. We used mediation analysis to assess whether caregiver well-being might be a factor explaining stroke survivor depressive symptoms, after controlling for demographic factors and stroke survivor impairments and problems. Caregiver/stroke participant dyads (N = 146) completed measures of stroke survivor impairments and problems and depressive symptoms and caregiver depressive symptoms and life satisfaction. Mediation analysis was used to examine whether caregiver well-being mediated the relationship between stroke survivor impairments and problems and stroke survivor depressive symptoms. As expected, more stroke survivor problems and impairments were associated with higher levels of stroke survivor depressive symptoms (P mediated by caregiver life satisfaction (29.29%) and caregiver depressive symptoms (32.95%). Although these measures combined to account for 40.50% of the relationship between survivor problems and impairments and depressive symptoms, the direct effect remained significant. Findings indicate that stroke survivor impairments and problems may affect family caregivers and stroke survivors and a high level of caregiver distress may result in poorer outcomes for stroke survivors. Results highlight the likely importance of intervening with both stroke survivors and family caregivers to optimize recovery after stroke.

  9. Blood Pressure Control: Stroke and Stroke Prevention

    Hans-Christoph Diener

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor for primary and secondary stroke prevention.All antihypertensive drugs are effective in primary prevention: the risk reduction for stroke is 30—42%. However, not all classes of drugs have the same effects: there is some indication that angiotensin receptor blockers may be superior to other classes of antihypertensive drugs in stroke prevention.Seventy-five percent of patients who present to hospital with acute stroke have elevated blood pressure within the first 24—48 hours. Extremes of systolic blood pressure (SBP increase the risk of death or dependency. The aim of treatment should be to achieve and maintain the SBP in the range 140—160 mmHg. However, fast and drastic blood pressure lowering can have adverse consequences.The PROGRESS trial of secondary prevention with perindopril + indapamide versus placebo + placebo showed a decrease in numbers of stroke recurrences in patients given both active antihypertensive agents, more impressive for cerebral haemorrhage.There were also indications that active treatment might decrease the development of post-stroke dementia.

  10. Improving Community Stroke Preparedness in the HHS (Hip-Hop Stroke) Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Williams, Olajide; Leighton-Herrmann Quinn, Ellyn; Teresi, Jeanne; Eimicke, Joseph P; Kong, Jian; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Noble, James

    2018-04-01

    Deficiencies in stroke preparedness cause major delays to stroke thrombolysis, particularly among economically disadvantaged minorities. We evaluated the effectiveness of a stroke preparedness intervention delivered to preadolescent urban public school children on the stroke knowledge/preparedness of their parents. We recruited 3070 fourth through sixth graders and 1144 parents from 22 schools into a cluster randomized trial with schools randomized to the HHS (Hip-Hop Stroke) intervention or attentional control (nutrition classes). HHS is a 3-hour culturally tailored, theory-based, multimedia stroke literacy intervention targeting school children, which systematically empowers children to share stroke information with parents. Our main outcome measures were stroke knowledge/preparedness of children and parents using validated surrogates. Among children, it was estimated that 1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0%-1%) of controls and 2% (95% CI, 1%-4%; P =0.09) of the intervention group demonstrated optimal stroke preparedness (perfect scores on the knowledge/preparedness test) at baseline, increasing to 57% (95% CI, 44%-69%) immediately after the program in the intervention group compared with 1% (95% CI, 0%-1%; P <0.001) among controls. At 3-month follow-up, 24% (95% CI, 15%-33%) of the intervention group retained optimal preparedness, compared with 2% (95% CI, 0%-3%; P <0.001) of controls. Only 3% (95% CI, 2%-4%) of parents in the intervention group could identify all 4 letters of the stroke FAST (Facial droop, Arm weakness, Speech disturbance, Time to call 911) acronym at baseline, increasing to 20% at immediate post-test (95% CI, 16%-24%) and 17% at 3-month delayed post-test (95% CI, 13%-21%; P =0.0062), with no significant changes (3% identification) among controls. Four children, all in the intervention group, called 911 for real-life stroke symptoms, in 1 case overruling a parent's wait-and-see approach. HHS is an effective, intergenerational model for

  11. Knowledge of Stroke Risk Factors among Stroke Survivors in Nigeria

    Grace Vincent-Onabajo; Taritei Moses

    2016-01-01

    Background. Knowledge of stroke risk factors is expected to reduce the incidence of stroke?whether first-ever or recurrent. This study examined knowledge of stroke risk factors and its determinants among stroke survivors. Methods. A cross-sectional survey of consenting stroke survivors at two physiotherapy facilities in Nigeria was carried out. Sociodemographic and clinical data were obtained and knowledge of stroke risk factors (defined as the ability to mention at least one correct risk fac...

  12. Stroke And Substance Abuse

    A Chitsaz

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: stroke in recreational substance users can be an indirect complication, like endocarditis and cardio embolism in parenteral drug users. With some drug like cocaine, stroke appear to be the result of a direct effect. In young subjects without other risk factors provide persuasive evidence for causality . OPIATES: Heroine is the most abused opiate drug, which is administered by injection, by snorting or by smoking. Stroke affects heroin users by diverse mechanisms,. Injec...

  13. Stroke Prevention & Treatment: Diet & Nutrition

    ... Prevention & Treatment: Diet & Nutrition Stroke Prevention & Treatment: Diet & Nutrition A healthy diet can reduce your risk for ... Treatment How does a stroke affect eating and nutrition? Stroke can devastate a person's nutritional health because ...

  14. Acute stroke imaging research roadmap

    Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Bammer, Roland; Baron, Jean-Claude; Davis, Stephen; Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Eastwood, James D.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.; Hacke, Werner; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Kloska, Stephan P.; Koehrmann, Martin; Koroshetz, Walter; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lees, Kennedy R.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Ostergaard, Leif; Powers, William J.; Provenzale, James; Schellinger, Peter; Silbergleit, Robert; Sorensen, Alma Gregory; Wardlaw, Joanna; Warach, Steven

    The recent "Advanced Neuroimaging for Acute Stroke Treatment" meeting on September 7 and 8, 2007 in Washington DC, brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  15. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    ... Prevent Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and ... can’t change some of your risks for heart disease and stroke, but you can manage many of ...

  16. Validation of an Inertial Sensor System for Swing Analysis in Golf

    Paul Lückemann

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Wearable inertial sensor systems are an upcoming tool for self-evaluation in sports, and can be used for swing analysis in golf. The aim of this work was to determine the validity and repeatability of an inertial sensor system attached to a player’s glove using a radar system as a reference. 20 subjects performed five full swings with each of three different clubs (wood, 7-iron, wedge. Clubhead speed was measured simultaneously by both sensor systems. Limits of Agreement were used to determine the accuracy and precision of the inertial sensor system. Results show that the inertial sensor system is quite accurate but with a lack of precision. Random error was quantified to approximately 17 km/h. The measurement error was dependent on the club type and was weakly negatively correlated to the magnitude of clubhead speed.

  17. Putting to a bigger hole: Golf performance relates to perceived size

    Witt, Jessica K.; Linkenauger, Sally A.; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Proffitt, Dennis R.

    2011-01-01

    When engaged in a skilled behaviour such as occurs in sports, people's perceptions relate optical information to their performance. In current research we demonstrate the effects of performance on size perception in golfers. We found golfers who played better judged the hole to be bigger than golfers who did not play as well (Study 1). In follow-up laboratory experiments, participants putted on a golf mat from a location near or far from the hole then judged the size of the hole. Participants who putted from the near location perceived the hole to be bigger than participants who putted from the far location. Our results demonstrate that perception is influenced by the perceiver's current ability to act effectively in the environment. PMID:18567258

  18. Influencia de variables psicológicas en el rendimiento de jugadores amateurs de golf

    Susana Irazusta

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available El propósito de la presente investigación es analizar las variaciones del estado de ánimo intracompetición en los jugadores amateurs de golf, así como analizar la influencia que tiene el grado de confianza y otras variables motivacionales en el resultado de la competición. Se realizó la investigación con un total de 296 jugadores y se pasaron los cuestionarios a cada jugador en tres momentos, antes, durante y después de la competición.Una vez analizados los datos se constató que existen grandes fluctuaciones en el estado de ánimo de los jugadores y que el resultado esperado sufre modificaciones a lo largo de la competición.

  19. Positive psychology interventions in golf: Mindfulness versus positive self-talk

    2015-09-01

    Results: There was a significant multivariate effect of Time on putting test scores, F(1, 21 = 13.9, p = .001, Ƞ2 = .399. Specifically, a mean increase of 1.4 out of 10 putts over the 4-week intervention period was found, but no univariate effect of Time on distance (cm from the hole for putts missed. There was no Group or Time by Group interaction effect for either putting test variable. Furthermore, groups did not differ at baseline or post-intervention on reported handicap, KIMS, technique adherence, or rounds of golf played. Conclusions: These preliminary findings fail to support previously reported findings that mindfulness or positive self-talk have short-term effects on putting accuracy. To maximise access, the current study used a self-guided intervention, which may have accounted for the lack of improvement that may occur with one-on-one coaching.

  20. Spontaneous ischaemic stroke in dogs

    Gredal, Hanne Birgit; Skerritt, G. C.; Gideon, P.

    2013-01-01

    Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms.......Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms....

  1. Body Mass Index and Stroke

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2013-01-01

    Although obesity is associated with excess mortality and morbidity, mortality is lower in obese than in normal weight stroke patients (the obesity paradox). Studies now indicate that obesity is not associated with increased risk of recurrent stroke in the years after first stroke. We studied...... the association between body mass index (BMI) and stroke patient's risk of having a history of previous stroke (recurrent stroke)....

  2. Changes in task self-efficacy and emotion across competitive performances in golf.

    Boardley, Ian D; Jackson, Ben; Simmons, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    This research aimed to investigate (a) the effect of golfers' perceptions of coach motivation efficacy on golfers' precompetition task self-efficacy, (b) the effect of performance on pre-to-postround changes in self-efficacy, (c) the effect of pre-to-postround changes in self-efficacy on pre-to-postround changes in affect and emotion, and (d) whether any effects of performance on pre-to-postcompetition changes in affect and emotion were mediated by pre-to-postcompetition changes in self-efficacy. In Study 1, a scale measuring golf self-efficacy was developed and validated using data from 197 golfers. In Study 2, 200 golfers completed this measure alongside measures of coach motivation efficacy, and positive and negative affect before a golf competition; all measures (except coach motivation efficacy) were again completed following the competition. Structural equation modeling showed that coach motivation efficacy positively predicted precompetition self-efficacy, performance positively predicted pre-to-postcompetition changes in self-efficacy, which had positive and negative effects, respectively, on pre-to-postcompetition changes in positive and negative affect; mediation analyses demonstrated that pre-to-postcompetition changes in self-efficacy mediated effects of performance on pre-to-postcompetition changes in positive and negative affect. In Study 3, the Study-2 procedures were replicated with a separate sample of 212 golfers, except measures of excitement, concentration disruption, somatic anxiety, and worry replaced those for positive and negative affect. Structural analyses showed the findings from Study 2 were largely replicated when specific emotions were investigated in place of general indices of affect. This investigation makes novel contributions regarding the potential importance of perceptions of coach efficacy for golfers' own efficacy beliefs, and the role personal efficacy beliefs may play in facilitating the effects of performance on affective

  3. Numerical investigation of the flow over a golf ball in the subcritical and supercritical regimes

    Smith, C.E.; Beratlis, N.; Balaras, E.; Squires, K.; Tsunoda, M.

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand the role of surface dimpling on the flow over a golf ball, direct numerical simulations (DNS) are conducted within the framework of an immersed boundary approach for two physical regimes. Computations of the flow over a non-rotating golf ball are reported for a subcritical flow at a Reynolds number of 2.5 x 10 4 and a supercritical case at a Reynolds number of 1.1 x 10 5 . Grid refinement studies for both Reynolds numbers indicated that characteristics of the subcritical flow could be captured using a mesh of 337 x 10 6 points, and for the supercritical case using a grid with 1.2 x 10 9 points. Flow visualizations reveal the differences in separation characteristics between the two Reynolds numbers. Profiles of the mean velocity indicate that the flow detaches completely at approximately 84 o in the subcritical case (measured from the stagnation point at the front of the ball), while in the supercritical regime there are alternating regions of reattachment and separation within dimples with complete detachment around 110 o . Energy spectra highlight frequencies associated with vortex formation over the dimples prior to complete detachment in the supercritical regime. Reynolds stresses quantify momentum transport in the near-wall region, showing that the axial stress increases around 90 o for the subcritical case. In the supercritical regime these stress components alternately increase and decrease, corresponding to local separation and reattachment. Prediction of the drag coefficient for both Reynolds numbers is in reasonable agreement with measurements.

  4. On the signatures of flare-induced global waves in the Sun: GOLF and VIRGO observations

    Kumar, Brajesh; Mathur, Savita; García, Rafael A.; Jiménez, Antonio

    2017-11-01

    Recently, several efforts have been made to identify the seismic signatures of flares and magnetic activity in the Sun and Sun-like stars. In this work, we have analysed the disc-integrated velocity and intensity observations of the Sun obtained from the Global Oscillations at Low Frequencies (GOLF) and Variability of solar IRradiance and Gravity Oscillations/Sun photometers (VIRGO/SPM) instruments, respectively, on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory space mission covering several successive flare events, for the period from 2011 February 11 to 2011 February 17, of which 2011 February 11 remained a relatively quiet day and served as a `null test' for the investigation. Application of the spectral analysis to these disc-integrated Sun-as-a-star velocity and intensity signals indicates that there is enhanced power of the global modes of oscillations in the Sun during the flares, as compared to the quiet day. The GOLF instrument obtains velocity observations using the Na I D lines which are formed in the upper solar photosphere, while the intensity data used in our analysis are obtained by VIRGO/SPM instrument at 862 nm, which is formed within the solar photosphere. Despite the fact that the two instruments sample different layers of the solar atmosphere using two different parameters (velocity versus intensity), we have found that both these observations show the signatures of flare-induced global waves in the Sun. These results could suffice in identifying the asteroseismic signatures of stellar flares and magnetic activity in the Sun-like stars.

  5. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome with nasal positive airway pressure improves golf performance.

    Benton, Marc L; Friedman, Neil S

    2013-12-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with impairment of cognitive function, and improvement is often noted with treatment. Golf is a sport that requires a range of cognitive skills. We evaluated the impact of nasal positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy on the handicap index (HI) of golfers with OSAS. Golfers underwent a nocturnal polysomnogram (NPSG) to determine whether they had significant OSAS (respiratory disturbance index > 15). Twelve subjects with a positive NPSG were treated with PAP. HI, an Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and sleep questionnaire (SQ) were submitted upon study entry. After 20 rounds of golf on PAP treatment, the HI was recalculated, and the questionnaires were repeated. A matched control group composed of non-OSAS subjects was studied to assess the impact of the study construct on HI, ESS, and SQ. Statistical comparisons between pre- and post-PAP treatment were calculated. The control subjects demonstrated no significant change in HI, ESS, or SQ during this study, while the OSAS group demonstrated a significant drop in average HI (11.3%, p = 0.01), ESS, (p = 0.01), and SQ (p = 0.003). Among the more skilled golfers (defined as HI ≤ 12), the average HI dropped by an even greater degree (31.5%). Average utilization of PAP was 91.4% based on data card reporting. Treatment of OSAS with PAP enhanced performance in golfers with this condition. Treatment adherence was unusually high in this study. Non-medical performance improvement may be a strong motivator for selected subjects with OSAS to seek treatment and maximize adherence.

  6. Assessing Cardiovascular Health Using Life′s Simple 7 in a Chinese Population Undergoing Stroke Prevention

    Qiong Yang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Few Chinese patients undergoing stroke prevention had optimal CVH (determined using LS7. Additionally, fewer patients undergoing secondary prevention had optimal CVH than those undergoing primary prevention. In particular, physical activity and diet status in this population require improvement.

  7. Ischemic Stroke: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Spanish Thrombolytic therapy (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Ischemic Stroke updates ... cardiogenic embolism Stroke - slideshow Thrombolytic therapy Related Health Topics Hemorrhagic Stroke Stroke Stroke Rehabilitation National Institutes of ...

  8. Systemic risk score evaluation in ischemic stroke patients (SCALA): a prospective cross sectional study in 85 German stroke units.

    Weimar, Christian; Goertler, Michael; Röther, Joachim; Ringelstein, E Bernd; Darius, Harald; Nabavi, Darius Günther; Kim, In-Ha; Theobald, Karlheinz; Diener, Han-Christoph

    2007-11-01

    Stratification of patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) or ischemic stroke (IS) by risk of recurrent stroke can contribute to optimized secondary prevention. We therefore aimed to assess cardiovascular risk factor profiles of consecutive patients hospitalized with TIA/IS to stratify the risk of recurrent stroke according to the Essen Stroke Risk Score (ESRS) and of future cardiovascular events according to the ankle brachial index (ABI) as a marker of generalized atherosclerosis In this cross-sectional observational study, 85 neurological stroke units throughout Germany documented cardiovascular risk factor profiles of 10 consecutive TIA/IS patients on standardized questionnaires. Screening for PAD was done with Doppler ultrasonography to calculate the ABI. A total of 852 patients (57% men) with a mean age of 67+/-12.4 years were included of whom 82.9 % had IS. The median National Institutes of Health stroke sum score was 4 (TIA: 1). Arterial hypertension was reported in 71%, diabetes mellitus in 26%, clinical PAD in 10%, and an ABI or = 3 was observed in 58%, which in two previous retrospective analyses corresponded to a recurrent stroke risk of > or = 4%/year. The correlation between the ESRS and the ABI was low (r = 0.21). A high proportion of patients had asymptomatic atherosclerotic disease and a considerable risk of recurrent stroke according to the ABI and ESRS category. The prognostic accuracy as well as the potential benefit of various risk stratification scores in secondary stroke prevention require validation in a larger prospective study.

  9. Diagnostic neuroimaging in stroke

    Jarenwattananon, A.; Khandji, A.; Brust, J.C.M.

    1988-01-01

    Since the development of cerebral angiography 60 years ago, there has been a proliferation of increasingly sophisticated, expensive, and, fortunately, safe imaging techniques for patients with cerebrovascular disease. In addition, occlusive and hemorrhagic stroke are now recognized as having a wide variety of possible causes. This chapter addresses the different imaging options available for particular kinds of stroke

  10. Relational Processing Following Stroke

    Andrews, Glenda; Halford, Graeme S.; Shum, David; Maujean, Annick; Chappell, Mark; Birney, Damian

    2013-01-01

    The research examined relational processing following stroke. Stroke patients (14 with frontal, 30 with non-frontal lesions) and 41 matched controls completed four relational processing tasks: sentence comprehension, Latin square matrix completion, modified Dimensional Change Card Sorting, and n-back. Each task included items at two or three…

  11. Stroke (For Kids)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... for Educators Search English Español Stroke KidsHealth / For Kids / Stroke What's in this article? What Happens During ...

  12. Predicting functional outcomes of posterior circulation acute ischemic stroke in first 36 h of stroke onset.

    Lin, Sheng-Feng; Chen, Chin-I; Hu, Han-Hwa; Bai, Chyi-Huey

    2018-04-01

    Posterior circulation acute ischemic stroke constitutes one-fourth of all ischemic strokes and can be efficiently quantified using the posterior circulation Alberta stroke program early computed tomography score (PC-ASPECTS) through diffusion-weighted imaging. We investigated whether the PC-ASPECTS and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) facilitate functional outcome prediction among Chinese patients with posterior circulation acute ischemic stroke. Participants were selected from our prospective stroke registry from January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2016. The baseline NIHSS score was assessed on the first day of admission, and brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed within 36 h after stroke onset. Simple and multiple logistic regressions were conducted to determine stroke risk factors and the PC-ASPECTS. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was performed to compare the NIHSS and PC-ASPECTS. Of 549 patients from our prospective stroke admission registry database, 125 (22.8%) had a diagnosis of posterior circulation acute ischemic stroke. The optimal cutoff for the PC-ASPECTS in predicting outcomes was 7. The odds ratios of the PC-ASPECTS (≤ 7 vs > 7) in predicting outcomes were 6.33 (p = 0.0002) and 8.49 (p = 0.0060) in the univariate and multivariate models, respectively, and 7.52 (p = 0.0041) in the aging group. On ROC curve analysis, the PC-ASPECTS demonstrated more reliability than the baseline NIHSS for predicting functional outcomes of minor posterior circulation stroke. In conclusion, both the PC-ASPECTS and NIHSS help clinicians predict functional outcomes. PC-ASPECTS > 7 is a helpful discriminator for achieving favorable functional outcome prediction in posterior circulation acute ischemic stroke.

  13. Burden of stroke in Bangladesh.

    Islam, Md Nazmul; Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Basri, Rehana; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Loo, Keat Wei; Gan, Siew Hua

    2013-04-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death in Bangladesh. The World Health Organization ranks Bangladesh's mortality rate due to stroke as number 84 in the world. The reported prevalence of stroke in Bangladesh is 0.3%, although no data on stroke incidence have been recorded. Hospital-based studies conducted in past decades have indicated that hypertension is the main cause of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke in Bangladesh. The high number of disability-adjusted life-years lost due to stroke (485 per 10,000 people) show that stroke severely impacts Bangladesh's economy. Although two non-governmental organizations, BRAC and the Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paralysed, are actively involved in primary stroke prevention strategies, the Bangladeshi government needs to emphasize healthcare development to cope with the increasing population density and to reduce stroke occurrence. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  14. Effort, performance, and motivation: insights from robot-assisted training of human golf putting and rat grip strength.

    Duarte, Jaime E; Gebrekristos, Berkenesh; Perez, Sergi; Rowe, Justin B; Sharp, Kelli; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2013-06-01

    Robotic devices can modulate success rates and required effort levels during motor training, but it is unclear how this affects performance gains and motivation. Here we present results from training unimpaired humans in a virtual golf-putting task, and training spinal cord injured (SCI) rats in a grip strength task using robotically modulated success rates and effort levels. Robotic assistance in golf practice increased trainees feelings of competence, and, paradoxically, increased their sense effort, even though it had mixed effects on learning. Reducing effort during a grip strength training task led rats with SCI to practice the task more frequently. However, the more frequent practice of these rats did not cause them to exceed the strength gains achieved by rats that exercised less often at higher required effort levels. These results show that increasing success and decreasing effort with robots increases motivation, but has mixed effects on performance gains.

  15. Report of ground water monitoring for expansion of the golf course, Salt Lake City, Utah, Vitro Processing Site. Revision 0

    1996-03-01

    Ground water elevations of the shallow unconfined aquifer have been monitored at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, Vitro Processing site, Salt Lake City, Utah, for the purposes of characterizing ground water flow conditions and evaluating the effects of irrigation of the golf driving range. Data collected, to date, show that the water table reached its highest level for the year during March and April 1995. From May through July 1995, the water table elevations decreased in most monitor wells due to less precipitation and higher evapotranspiration. Review and evaluation of collected data suggest that irrigation of the golf driving range will have negligible effects on water levels and ground water flow patterns if rates of irrigation do not significantly exceed future rates of evapotranspiration

  16. Post-stroke depression among stroke survivors attending two ...

    Background: The burden of stroke worldwide is increasing rapidly. There is paucity of data on post-stroke depression (PSD) among stroke survivors in Uganda, despite the high prevalence of PSD reported elsewhere. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, we assessed adult participants with confirmed first stroke with a ...

  17. Stroke mimic diagnoses presenting to a hyperacute stroke unit.

    Dawson, Ang; Cloud, Geoffrey C; Pereira, Anthony C; Moynihan, Barry J

    2016-10-01

    Stroke services have been centralised in several countries in recent years. Diagnosing acute stroke is challenging and a high proportion of patients admitted to stroke units are diagnosed as a non-stroke condition (stroke mimics). This study aims to describe the stroke mimic patient group, including their impact on stroke services. We analysed routine clinical data from 2,305 consecutive admissions to a stroke unit at St George's Hospital, London. Mimic groupings were derived from 335 individual codes into 17 groupings. From 2,305 admissions, 555 stroke mimic diagnoses were identified (24.2%) and 72% of stroke mimics had at least one stroke risk factor. Common mimic diagnoses were headache, seizure and syncope. Medically unexplained symptoms and decompensation of underlying conditions were also common. Median length of stay was 1 day; a diagnosis of dementia (p=0.028) or needing MRI (p=0.006) was associated with a longer stay. Despite emergency department assessment by specialist clinicians and computed tomography brain, one in four suspected stroke patients admitted to hospital had a non-stroke diagnosis. Stroke mimics represent a heterogeneous patient group with significant impacts on stroke services. Co-location of stroke and acute neurology services may offer advantages where service reorganisation is being considered. © Royal College of Physicians 2016. All rights reserved.

  18. In vivo kinematics of healthy male knees during squat and golf swing using image-matching techniques.

    Murakami, Koji; Hamai, Satoshi; Okazaki, Ken; Ikebe, Satoru; Shimoto, Takeshi; Hara, Daisuke; Mizu-uchi, Hideki; Higaki, Hidehiko; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-03-01

    Participation in specific activities requires complex ranges of knee movements and activity-dependent kinematics. The purpose of this study was to investigate dynamic knee kinematics during squat and golf swing using image-matching techniques. Five healthy males performed squats and golf swings under periodic X-ray images at 10 frames per second. We analyzed the in vivo three-dimensional kinematic parameters of subjects' knees, namely the tibiofemoral flexion angle, anteroposterior (AP) translation, and internal-external rotation, using serial X-ray images and computed tomography-derived, digitally reconstructed radiographs. During squat from 0° to 140° of flexion, the femur moved about 25 mm posteriorly and rotated 19° externally relative to the tibia. Screw-home movement near extension, bicondylar rollback between 20° and 120° of flexion, and medial pivot motion at further flexion were observed. During golf swing, the leading and trailing knees (the left and right knees respectively in the right-handed golfer) showed approximately five millimeters and four millimeters of AP translation with 18° and 26° of axial rotation, respectively. A central pivot motion from set-up to top of the backswing, lateral pivot motion from top to ball impact, and medial pivot motion from impact to the end of follow-through were observed. The medial pivot motion was not always recognized during both activities, but a large range of axial rotation with bilateral condylar AP translations occurs during golf swing. This finding has important implications regarding the amount of acceptable AP translation and axial rotation at low flexion in replaced knees. IV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiology in cases of cerebral stroke

    Forsting, M.; Reith, W.; Kummer, R. von; Sartor, K.

    1993-01-01

    Today radiologic methods play an important role in the diagnosis of cerebral stroke. The aim of the radiologist, however, should not only be to classify the stroke into the four main categories (ischemic stroke, intracerebral bleeding, subarachnoid hemorrhage, sinovenous thrombis), but also to interprete the findings with regard to the etiology of the disease. The pattern of lesions gives information about the etiology of ischemic stroke; the correct interpretation of these lesion patterns allows one to optimize therapeutic decisions. This paper additionally focusses on the differential diagnosis of intracerebral hemorrhage and the CT and MR signs of sinovenous thrombosis. New developed concepts in the field of stroke therapy and prophylaxis call for authority and continuous education of the radiolgist on this topic. Pure descriptions of radiologic findings without an understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease will be ignored by the clinician. On the other hand, the radiologist can turn the therapeutic decisions in the right direction by combining morphological descriptions with pathogenetic orientated interpretations. In this way, the radiolgist can contribute to the reduction of costs in the public health system. (orig.) [de

  20. Knowledge-guided golf course detection using a convolutional neural network fine-tuned on temporally augmented data

    Chen, Jingbo; Wang, Chengyi; Yue, Anzhi; Chen, Jiansheng; He, Dongxu; Zhang, Xiuyan

    2017-10-01

    The tremendous success of deep learning models such as convolutional neural networks (CNNs) in computer vision provides a method for similar problems in the field of remote sensing. Although research on repurposing pretrained CNN to remote sensing tasks is emerging, the scarcity of labeled samples and the complexity of remote sensing imagery still pose challenges. We developed a knowledge-guided golf course detection approach using a CNN fine-tuned on temporally augmented data. The proposed approach is a combination of knowledge-driven region proposal, data-driven detection based on CNN, and knowledge-driven postprocessing. To confront data complexity, knowledge-derived cooccurrence, composition, and area-based rules are applied sequentially to propose candidate golf regions. To confront sample scarcity, we employed data augmentation in the temporal domain, which extracts samples from multitemporal images. The augmented samples were then used to fine-tune a pretrained CNN for golf detection. Finally, commission error was further suppressed by postprocessing. Experiments conducted on GF-1 imagery prove the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  1. Stroke Risk Factors and Symptoms

    ... » [ pdf, 433 kb ] Order Materials » Stroke Risk Factors and Symptoms Risk Factors for a Stroke Stroke prevention is still ... it. Treatment can delay complications that increase the risk of stroke. Transient ischemic attacks (TIAs). Seek help. ...

  2. Real-ear acoustical characteristics of impulse sound generated by golf drivers and the estimated risk to hearing: a cross-sectional study.

    Zhao, Fei; Bardsley, Barry

    2014-01-21

    This study investigated real-ear acoustical characteristics in terms of the sound pressure levels (SPLs) and frequency responses in situ generated from golf club drivers at impact with a golf ball. The risk of hearing loss caused by hitting a basket of golf balls using various drivers was then estimated. Cross-sectional study. The three driver clubs were chosen on the basis of reflection of the commonality and modern technology of the clubs. The participants were asked to choose the clubs in a random order and hit six two-piece range golf balls with each club. The experiment was carried out at a golf driving range in South Wales, UK. 19 male amateur golfers volunteered to take part in the study, with an age range of 19-54 years. The frequency responses and peak SPLs in situ of the transient sound generated from the club at impact were recorded bilaterally and simultaneously using the GN Otometric Freefit wireless real-ear measurement system. A swing speed radar system was also used to investigate the relationship between noise level and swing speed. Different clubs generated significantly different real-ear acoustical characteristics in terms of SPL and frequency responses. However, they did not differ significantly between the ears. No significant correlation was found between the swing speed and noise intensity. On the basis of the SPLs measured in the present study, the percentage of daily noise exposure for hitting a basket of golf balls using the drivers described above was less than 2%. The immediate danger of noise-induced hearing loss for amateur golfers is quite unlikely. However, it may be dangerous to hearing if the noise level generated by the golf clubs exceeded 116 dBA.

  3. Dizziness in stroke

    M. V. Zamergrad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential diagnosis of new-onset acute vestibular vertigo is chiefly made between vestibular neuronitis and stroke. Dizziness in stroke is usually accompanied by other focal neurological symptoms of brainstem and cerebellar involvement. However, stroke may appear as isolated vestibular vertigo in some cases. An analysis of history data and the results of neurovestibular examination and brain magnetic resonance imaging allows stroke to be diagnosed in patients with acute isolated dizziness. The treatment of patients with stroke-induced dizziness involves a wide range of medications for the reduction of the degree of dizziness and unsteadiness and for the secondary prevention of stroke. Vestibular rehabilitation is an important component of treatment. The paper describes an observation of a patient with poorly controlled hypertension, who developed new-onset acute systemic dizziness. Vestibular neuronitis might be presumed to be a peripheral cause of vestibular disorders, by taking into account the absence of additional obvious neurological symptoms (such as pareses, defective sensation, diplopia, etc. and the nature of nystagmus. However, intention tremor in fingernose and heel-knee tests on the left side, a negative Halmagyi test, and results of Romberg’s test could suggest that stroke was a cause ofdizziness.

  4. Stroke in tuberculous meningitis.

    Misra, Usha Kant; Kalita, Jayantee; Maurya, Pradeep Kumar

    2011-04-15

    Stroke in tuberculous meningitis (TBM) occurs in 15-57% of patients especially in advance stage and severe illness. The majority of strokes may be asymptomatic because of being in a silent area, deep coma or associated pathology such as spinal arachnoiditis or tuberculoma. Methods of evaluation also influence the frequency of stroke. MRI is more sensitive in detecting acute (DWI) and chronic (T2, FLAIR) stroke. Most of the strokes in TBM are multiple, bilateral and located in the basal ganglia especially the 'tubercular zone' which comprises of the caudate, anterior thalamus, anterior limb and genu of the internal capsule. These are attributed to the involvement of medial striate, thalamotuberal and thalamostriate arteries which are embedded in exudates and likely to be stretched by a coexistent hydrocephalus. Cortical stroke can also occur due to the involvement of proximal portion of the middle, anterior and posterior cerebral arteries as well as the supraclinoid portion of the internal carotid and basilar arteries which are documented in MRI, angiography and autopsy studies. Arteritis is more common than infarction in autopsy study. The role of cytokines especially tumor necrosis factor (TNFα), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metaloproteineases (MMPs) in damaging the blood brain barrier, attracting leucocytes and release of vasoactive autocoids have been suggested. The prothrombotic state may also contribute to stroke in TBM. Corticosteroids with antitubercular therapy were thought to reduce mortality and morbidity but their role in reducing strokes has not been proven. Aspirin also reduces mortality and its role in reducing stroke in TBM needs further studies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hyponatremia in stroke

    Sheikh Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte disorder encountered in patients of neurological disorders which is usually either due to inappropriate secretion of Antidiuretic hormone (SIADH or cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS. We conducted this study in a tertiary care hospital to determine the incidence and etiology of hyponatremia in patients of stroke admitted in the hospital. Materials and Methods: It was a prospective study done over a period of two years that included established cases of stroke diagnosed on the basis of clinical history, examination and neuroimaging. 1000 stoke patients were evaluated for hyponatremia (serum sodium <130 meq/l. The data was analysed using Chi-square test using SPSS (Statistical package for social science software. Results: Out of 1000 patients, 353 patients had hyponatremia. Out of this 353 patients, 238 (67% had SIADH and 115 (33% had CSWS. SIADH was seen in 83 patients who had ischemic stroke and 155 patients of hemorrhagic stroke. CSWS was found in 38 patients with ischemic stroke and 77 patients with hemorrhagic stroke. Statistical analysis revealed that hyponatremia significantly affects the outcome of stroke especially when it is due to CSWS rather than SIADH. Conclusion: Incidence of hyponatremia in our study population was 35%. In patients of hyponatremia 67% were having SIADH and 33% were having CSWS. Overall hyponatremia affected the outcome of stroke especially when caused by CSWS. Therefore close monitoring of serum sodium must be done in all patients who are admitted with stroke and efforts must be made to determine the cause of hyponatremia, in order to properly manage such patients thereby decreasing the mortality rate.

  6. Melatonin-Based Therapeutics for Neuroprotection in Stroke

    Cesar V. Borlongan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present review paper supports the approach to deliver melatonin and to target melatonin receptors for neuroprotection in stroke. We discuss laboratory evidence demonstrating neuroprotective effects of exogenous melatonin treatment and transplantation of melatonin-secreting cells in stroke. In addition, we describe a novel mechanism of action underlying the therapeutic benefits of stem cell therapy in stroke, implicating the role of melatonin receptors. As we envision the clinical entry of melatonin-based therapeutics, we discuss translational experiments that warrant consideration to reveal an optimal melatonin treatment strategy that is safe and effective for human application.

  7. A comparison of stroke rehabilitation; data from two national cohorts.

    Bērziņa, G; Vētra, A; Sunnerhagen, K S

    2016-10-01

    Inpatient rehabilitation is a commonly used complex intervention to improve a person's independence after stroke. Evaluation and comparison of the effects of routine clinical practice could provide a contribution towards optimization of stroke care. The aim of this study is to describe results of inpatient rehabilitation as a complex intervention for persons after stroke and explore possible differences between two countries. Data from 1055 Latvian and 1748 Swedish adult patients after stroke receiving inpatient rehabilitation, during 2011-2013, were used for this retrospective cohort study. Qualitative description of systems, as well as information on basic medical and sociodemographic information, and organizational aspects were reported. Change in the Functional Independence Measure during rehabilitation was investigated. In six domains of the instrument, the shifts for three levels of dependence were analysed using ordinal regression analysis. The components of stroke care seem to be similar in Latvia and Sweden. However, the median time since stroke onset until the start of rehabilitation was 13 weeks in Latvia and 2 weeks in Sweden. The median length of rehabilitation was 12 and 49 days, respectively. The level of dependency at start, time since stroke onset and length of the period had an impact on the results of the rehabilitation. Although components of the rehabilitation are reported as being the same, characteristics and the outcome of the inpatient rehabilitation are different. Therefore, comparison of stroke rehabilitation between countries requires caution. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Management of arterial hypertension in patients with acute stroke.

    Adeoye, Opeolu; Jauch, Edward C

    2006-11-01

    Management of arterial hypertension in the hyperacute period immediately after stroke ictus remains controversial. Extremes of blood pressure (BP) are associated with poor outcomes in all stroke subtypes. Severely hypertensive patients likely benefit from modest BP reductions, but aggressive BP reduction may worsen outcome. Although little evidence is currently available to definitively establish guideline recommendations for optimal BP goals at stroke presentation, recently published research is shedding some light on how to approach management of BP after stroke. Antihypertensive treatment should probably be deferred in ischemic stroke patients except in cases of severe hypertension or when thrombolytic therapy is warranted and the patient's BP is above acceptable levels. Hypertensive hemorrhagic stroke patients may benefit from modest BP reductions. Relative hypotension causing regional hypoperfusion is an increasingly understood concept immediately following ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, emphasizing the need for careful titration of appropriate medications to minimize fluctuations in BP for treated patients. Ongoing trials will improve our current knowledge regarding BP management after ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

  9. Cost of stroke

    Jennum, Poul; Iversen, Helle K; Ibsen, Rikke

    2015-01-01

    . The attributable cost of direct net health care costs after the stroke (general practitioner services, hospital services, and medication) and indirect costs (loss of labor market income) were €10,720, €8,205 and €7,377 for patients, and €989, €1,544 and €1.645 for their partners, over and above that of controls......BACKGROUND: To estimate the direct and indirect costs of stroke in patients and their partners. DESCRIPTION: Direct and indirect costs were calculated using records from the Danish National Patient Registry from 93,047 ischemic, 26,012 hemorrhagic and 128,824 unspecified stroke patients...

  10. Clinical neurogenetics: stroke.

    Rost, Natalia S

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of cerebrovascular disease holds promise of novel stroke prevention strategies and therapeutics that are both safe and effective. Apart from a few single-gene disorders associated with cerebral ischemia or intracerebral hemorrhage, stroke is a complex genetic phenotype that requires careful ascertainment and robust association testing for discovery and validation analyses. The recently uncovered shared genetic contribution between clinically manifest stroke syndromes and closely related intermediate cerebrovascular phenotypes offers effective and efficient approaches to complex trait analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Determinan Penyakit Stroke

    Woro Riyadina

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Penyakit stroke merupakan penyebab kematian dan kecacatan kronik yang paling tinggi pada kelompok umur diatas usia 45 tahun terbanyak di Indonesia. Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengidentifikasi determinan utama yang berhubungan dengan penyakit stroke pada masyarakat di kelurahan Kebon Kalapa Bogor. Analisis lanjut terhadap 1.912 responden subset baseline data penelitian “Studi Kohort Faktor Risiko Penyakit Tidak Menular” Data dikumpulkan dengan metode wawancara pada penduduk tetap di kelurahan Kebon Kalapa, Kecamatan Bogor Tengah, Bogor tahun 2012. Diagnosis stroke berdasarkan anamnesis dan pemeriksaan dokter spesialis syaraf. Variabel independen meliputi karakteristik sosiodemografi, status kesehatan dan perilaku berisiko. Data dianalisis dengan uji regresi logistik ganda. Penyakit stroke ditemukan pada 49 (2,6% orang. Determinan utama stroke meliputi hipertensi (OR = 4,20; IK 95% = 2,20 – 8,03, penyakit jantung koroner (OR = 2,74; IK 95% = 1,51 – 4,99, diabetes melitus (OR = 2,89; IK 95% = 1,47 – 5,64, dan status ekonomi miskin (OR = 1,83 ; IK 95% = 1,03 – 3,33. Pencegahan penyakit stroke dilakukan dengan peningkatan edukasi (kampanye/penyuluhan melalui pengendalian faktor risiko utama yaitu hipertensi dan pencegahan terjadinya penyakit degeneratif lain yaitu penyakit jantung koroner dan diabetes melitus. Stroke disease is the leading cause of death and chronic disabi lity in most over the age of 45 years in Indonesia. The aim of study was to identify the major determinants of stroke disease in Kebon Kalapa community in Bogor. A deep analyze was conducted in 1.912 respondents based on the subset of baseline data “Risk Factors Cohort Study of Non Communicable Diseases.” Data was collected by interviews on Kebon Kalapa community, Bogor in 2012. Stroke diagnosis was determined by anamnesis and neu-rological examination with specialist. Independent variables were sociodemographic characteristics, health status and risk behavior

  12. Hypertension and experimental stroke therapies

    O'Collins, Victoria E; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Macleod, Malcolm R; Howells, David W

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is an established target for long-term stroke prevention but procedures for management of hypertension in acute stroke are less certain. Here, we analyze basic science data to examine the impact of hypertension on candidate stroke therapies and of anti-hypertensive treatments on stroke outcome. Methods: Data were pooled from 3,288 acute ischemic stroke experiments (47,899 animals) testing the effect of therapies on infarct size (published 1978–2010). Data were combined using meta...

  13. Long-Term Prognosis of Ischemic Stroke in Young Adults

    Varona, Jose F.

    2010-01-01

    There is limited information about long-term prognosis of ischemic stroke in young adults. Giving the potentially negative impact in physical, social, and emotional aspects of an ischemic stroke in young people, providing early accurate long-term prognostic information is very important in this clinical setting. Moreover, detection of factors associated with bad outcomes (death, recurrence, moderate-to-severe disability) help physicians in optimizing secondary prevention strategies. The prese...

  14. Remote sensing technologies applied to the irrigation water management on a golf course

    Pedras, Celestina; Lança, Rui; Martins, Fernando; Soares, Cristina; Guerrero, Carlos; Paixão, Helena

    2015-04-01

    An adequate irrigation water management in a golf course is a complex task that depends upon climate (multiple microclimates) and land cover (where crops differ in morphology, physiology, plant density, sensitivity to water stress, etc.). These factors change both in time and space on a landscape. A direct measurement provides localized values of the evapotranspiration and climate conditions. Therefore this is not a practical or economical methodology for large-scale use due to spatial and temporal variability of vegetation, soils, and irrigation management strategies. Remote sensing technology combines large scale with ground measurement of vegetation indexes. These indexes are mathematical combinations of different spectral bands mostly in the visible and near infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. They represent the measures of vegetation activity that vary not only with the seasonal variability of green foliage, but also across space, thus they are suitable for detecting spatial landscape variability. The spectral vegetation indexes may enhance irrigation management through the information contained in spectral reflectance data. This study was carried out on the 18th fairway of the Royal Golf Course, Vale do Lobo, Portugal, and it aims to establish the relationship between direct measurements and vegetation indexes. For that it is required (1) to characterize the soil and climatic conditions, (2) to assessment of the irrigation system, (3) to estimate the evapotranspiration (4) and to calculate the vegetation indices. The vegetation indices were determined with basis on spectral bands red, green and blue, RGB, and near Infrared, NIR, obtained from the analysis of images acquired from a unpiloted aerial vehicle, UAV, platform. The measurements of reference evapotranspiration (ETo) were obtained from two meteorological stations located in the study area. The landscape evapotranspiration, ETL, was determined in the fairway with multiple microclimates

  15. Perfusion CT in acute stroke

    Eckert, Bernd; Roether, Joachim; Fiehler, Jens; Thomalla, Goetz

    2015-01-01

    Modern multislice CT scanners enable multimodal protocols including non-enhanced CT, CT angiography, and CT perfusion. A 64-slice CT scanner provides 4-cm coverage. To cover the whole brain, a 128 - 256-slice scanner is needed. The use of perfusion CT requires an optimized scan protocol in order to reduce exposure to radiation. As compared to non-enhanced CT and CT angiography, the use of CT perfusion increases detection rates of cerebral ischemia, especially small cortical ischemic lesions, while the detection of lacunar and infratentorial stroke lesions remains limited. Perfusion CT enables estimation of collateral flow in acute occlusion of large intra- or extracranial arteries. Currently, no established reliable thresholds are available for determining infarct core and penumbral tissue by CT perfusion. Moreover, perfusion parameters depend on the processing algorithms and the software used for calculation. However, a number of studies point towards a reduction of cerebral blood volume (CBV) below 2 ml/100 g as a critical threshold that identifies infarct core. Large CBV lesions are associated with poor outcome even in the context of recanalization. The extent of early ischemic signs on non-enhanced CT remains the main parameter from CT imaging to guide acute reperfusion treatment. Nevertheless, perfusion CT increases diagnostic and therapeutic certainty in the acute setting. Similar to stroke MRI, perfusion CT enables the identification of tissue at risk of infarction by the mismatch between infarct core and the larger area of critical hypoperfusion. Further insights into the validity of perfusion parameters are expected from ongoing trials of mechanical thrombectomy in stroke.

  16. Stroke: Hope through Research

    ... in a compromised state for several hours. With timely treatment these cells can be saved. The ischemic ... this research is the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in stroke rehabilitation. Some evidence suggests that ...

  17. Healthy Living after Stroke

    ... Nutrition Cooking for Health Food for Thought: Heart-healthy Diet is Also Good For Your Brain Physical Activity Get Moving and Boost Your Brain Power Understanding Risky Conditions Converging Risk Factors for Stroke ...

  18. The "Know Stroke" Campaign

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section The "Know Stroke" Campaign Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... Javascript on. NINDS is conducting a public awareness campaign across the United States to educate people about ...

  19. Recovering after stroke

    ... urine from their body. To prevent skin or pressure sores: Clean up after incontinence Change position often and ... artery surgery - discharge Daily bowel care program Preventing pressure ulcers Stroke - discharge References Dobkin BH. Neurological rehabilitation In: ...

  20. National Stroke Association

    ... partnership will offer free access to the RapidSOS Haven app for one year, providing individuals with enhanced ... of care to thrive after stroke. Make your tax-deductible donation today to support the growing needs ...

  1. Strokes (For Parents)

    ... paralysis or weakness on one side of the body language or speech delays or changes, such as slurring ... uses many different types of therapy to help children recover from stroke. Outlook At this time, no ...

  2. Stroke - risk factors

    ... oxygen. Brain cells can die, causing lasting damage. Risk factors are things that increase your chance of ... a disease or condition. This article discusses the risk factors for stroke and things you can do ...

  3. Epilepsy after stroke

    Olsen, T S; Høgenhaven, H; Thage, O

    1987-01-01

    Development of epilepsy was studied prospectively in a group of 77 consecutive stroke patients. Included were stroke patients less than 75 years old admitted within the first 3 days after the stroke. Excluded were patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, vertebrobasilar stroke, and patients...... with other severe diseases. Cerebral angiography, CT, and EEG were performed in all patients. The patients were followed clinically for 2 to 4 years. Seven patients (9%) developed epilepsy. Of 23 patients with lesions involving the cortex, 6 (26%) developed epilepsy. Of 54 patients in whom the cortex...... was not involved, only 1 (2%) developed epilepsy. Patients with persisting paresis and cortical involvement seem to be at particularly high risk of developing epilepsy, as 50% of such patients (6 of 12) developed the disease....

  4. Autopsy approach to stroke.

    Love, Seth

    2011-02-01

    Stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality but the brain and other relevant tissues are often examined only cursorily when stroke patients come to autopsy. The pathological findings and clinical implications vary according to the type of stroke and its location and cause. Large ischaemic strokes are usually associated with atherosclerosis of extracranial or major intracranial arteries but can be caused by dissection. Most small cerebral infarcts are caused by arteriosclerosis or, in the elderly, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). However, vasculitides and coagulopathies can cause a range of different patterns of ischaemic (and, occasionally, haemorrhagic) stroke. Global brain ischaemia, caused by severe hypotension or raised intracranial pressure, produces damage that is accentuated in certain regions and neuronal populations and may be confused with hypoglycaemic injury. The main cause of subarachnoid haemorrhage is a ruptured berry aneurysm but CAA, arteriovenous malformations and infective aneurysms are occasionally responsible. These can also cause parenchymal brain haemorrhage, although this most often complicates hypertensive small vessel disease. Sometimes the haemorrhage arises from a neoplasm. Performing an adequate autopsy in stroke requires proper preparation, awareness of the likely pathological processes, familiarity with intracranial vascular anatomy, careful gross examination and dissection, and appropriate use of histology. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  5. Integrated geophysical survey in defining subsidence features on a golf course

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.

    2007-01-01

    Subsidence was observed at several places on the Salina Municipal Golf Course in areas known to be built over a landfill in Salina, Kansas. High-resolution magnetic survey (???5400 m2), multi-channel electrical resistivity profiling (three 154 m lines) and microgravity profiling (23 gravity-station values) were performed on a subsidence site (Green 16) to aid in determining boundaries and density deficiency of the landfill in the vicinity of the subsidence. Horizontal boundaries of the landfill were confidently defined by both magnetic anomalies and the pseudo-vertical gradient of total field magnetic anomalies. Furthermore, the pseudo-vertical gradient of magnetic anomalies presented a unique anomaly at Green 16, which provided a criterion for predicting other spots with subsidence potential using the same gradient property. Results of multi-channel electrical resistivity profiling (ERP) suggested the bottom limit of the landfill at Green 16 was around 21 m below the ground surface based on the vertical gradient of electric resistivity and a priori information on the depth of the landfill. ERP results also outlined several possible landfill bodies based on their low resistivity values. Microgravity results suggested a -0.14 g cm-3 density deficiency at Green 16 that could equate to future surface subsidence of as much as 1.5 m due to gradual compaction. ?? 2007 Nanjing Institute of Geophysical Prospecting.

  6. Resolution of low-velocity control in golf putting differentiates professionals from amateurs.

    Hasegawa, Yumiko; Fujii, Keisuke; Miura, Akito; Yamamoto, Yuji

    2017-07-01

    It is difficult for humans to apply small amounts of force precisely during motor control. However, experts who have undergone extended training are thought to be able to control low-velocity movement with precision. We investigated the resolution of motor control in golf putting. A total of 10 professional and 10 high-level amateur golfers participated. Putting distances were 0.6-3.3 m, in increments of 0.3 m. We measured the impact velocity and the club-face angle at impact, and the acceleration profile of the downswing. The professionals showed significantly smaller coefficients of variation with respect to impact velocity and smaller root mean square errors in relation to acceleration profiles than did the amateurs. To examine the resolution of motor control for impact velocity, we investigated intra-participant differences in the impact velocity of the club head at two adjacent distances. We found that professionals had higher velocity precision when putting small distance intervals than did amateurs. That is, professionals had higher resolution of low-velocity control than did high-level amateurs. Our results suggest that outstanding performance at a task involves the ability to recognise small distinctions and to produce appropriate movements.

  7. Relationships between clubshaft motions and clubface orientation during the golf swing.

    Takagi, Tokio; Yokozawa, Toshiharu; Inaba, Yuki; Matsuda, Yuji; Shiraki, Hitoshi

    2017-09-01

    Since clubface orientation at impact affects ball direction and ball spin, the ability to control clubface orientation is one of the most important skills for golfers. This study presents a new method to describe clubface orientation as a function of the clubshaft motions (i.e., swing plane orientation, clubshaft angle in the swing plane, and clubshaft rolling angle) during a golf swing and investigates the relationships between the clubshaft motions and clubface orientation at impact. The club motion data of driver shots were collected from eight skilled golfers using a three-dimensional motion capture system. The degrees of influence of the clubshaft motions on the clubface orientation were investigated using sensitivity analysis. The sensitivity analysis revealed that the swing plane horizontal angle affected the clubface horizontal angle to an extent of 100%, that the clubshaft angle in the swing plane affected both the clubface vertical and horizontal angles to extents of 74 and 68%, respectively, and that the clubshaft rolling angle affected both the clubface vertical and horizontal angles to extents of -67 and 75%, respectively. Since the method presented here relates clubface orientation to clubshaft motions, it is useful for understanding the clubface control of a golfer.

  8. Spine biomechanics associated with the shortened, modern one-plane golf swing.

    Dale, R Barry; Brumitt, Jason

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare kinetic, kinematic, and performance variables associated with full and shortened modern backswings in a skilled group of modern swing (one-plane) golfers. Shortening the modern golf backswing is proposed to reduce vertebral spine stress, but supporting evidence is lacking and performance implications are unknown. Thirteen male golfers performed ten swings of each swing type using their own 7-iron club. Biomechanical-dependent variables included the X-Factor kinematic data and spine kinetics. Performance-related dependent variables included club head velocity (CHV), shot distance, and accuracy (distance from the target line). Data were analysed with repeated measures ANOVA with an a priori alpha of 0.05 (SPSS 22.0, IBM, Armonk, NY, USA). We found significant reductions for the X-Factor (p < 0.05) between the full and shortened swings. The shortened swing condition ameliorated vertebral compression force from 7.6 ± 1.4 to 7.0 ± 1.7 N (normalised to body weight, p = 0.01) and significantly reduced CHV (p < 0.05) by ~2 m/s with concomitant shot distance diminution by ~10 m (p < 0.05). Further research is necessary to examine the applicability of a shortened swing for golfers with low back pain.

  9. The relationship between the golf swing plane and ball impact characteristics using trajectory ellipse fitting.

    Morrison, Andrew; McGrath, Denise; Wallace, Eric S

    2018-02-01

    The trajectory of the clubhead close to ball impact during the golf swing has previously been shown to be planar. However, the relationship between the plane orientation and the orientation characteristics of the clubhead at ball impact has yet to be defined. Fifty-two male golfers (27 high skilled, 25 intermediate skilled) hit 40 drives each in an indoor biomechanics laboratory. This study successfully fitted the trajectory of the clubhead near impact to an ellipse for each swing for players of different skill levels to help better explain this relationship. Additionally, the eccentricities of the ellipses were investigated for links to skill level. The trajectory of the clubhead was found to fit to an ellipse with RMSE of 1.2 mm. The eccentricity of the ellipse was found to be greater in the high-skilled golfers. The club path and angle of attack generated from the ellipse fitted clubhead trajectory were found to have a normalised bias-corrected RMSE of 2% and 3%, respectively. A set of "rule of thumb" values for the relationship between the club path, angle of attack and delivery plane angle was generated for use by coaches.

  10. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell/Supercapasitor Hybrid Power Management System for a Golf Cart

    Siti Afiqah Abd Hamid; Ros Emilia Rosli; Edy Herianto Majlan; Wan Ramli Wan Daud; Ramizi Mohamed; Ramli Sitanggang

    2016-01-01

    This paper presented the transformation of a golf cart system powered lead acid battery into an environmental friendly hybrid vehicle. The design developed by using an advantage contributes by the uprising alternative power source candidate which is Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) and the maintenance free energy storage device, a supercapacitor (SC). The fuel cell (FC) stack was an in house manufactured with 450 W (36 V, 12.5 A) power, while the SC was from Maxwell Technologies (48 V, 165 F). This two power sources were controlled by the mechanical relay, meanwhile the reactant (hydrogen) are control by mass flow controller (MFC) both signaled by a National Instrument (NI) devices. The power management controller are programmed in the LabVIEW environment and then downloaded to the NI devices. The experimental result of the power trend was compared before and after the transformation with the same route to validate the effectiveness of the proposed power management strategy. The power management successfully controls the power sharing between power sources and satisfies the load transient. While the reactant control managed to vary the hydrogen mass flow rate feed according to the load demand in vehicular applications. (author)

  11. Nursing care for stroke patients

    Tulek, Zeliha; Poulsen, Ingrid; Gillis, Katrin

    2018-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To conduct a survey of the clinical nursing practice in European countries in accordance with the European Stroke Strategies (ESS) 2006, and to examine to what extent the ESS have been implemented in stroke care nursing in Europe. BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death...... comprising 61 questions based on the ESS and scientific evidence in nursing practice was distributed to representatives of the European Association of Neuroscience Nurses, who sent the questionnaire to nurses active in stroke care. The questionnaire covered the following areas of stroke care: Organization...... of stroke services, Management of acute stroke and prevention including basic care and nursing, and Secondary prevention. RESULTS: Ninety-two nurses in stroke care in 11 European countries participated in the survey. Within the first 48 hours after stroke onset, 95% monitor patients regularly, 94% start...

  12. Stroke risk perception among participants of a stroke awareness campaign

    Kraywinkel, Klaus; Heidrich, Jan; Heuschmann, Peter U; Wagner, Markus; Berger, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Background Subjective risk factor perception is an important component of the motivation to change unhealthy life styles. While prior studies assessed cardiovascular risk factor knowledge, little is known about determinants of the individual perception of stroke risk. Methods Survey by mailed questionnaire among 1483 participants of a prior public stroke campaign in Germany. Participants had been informed about their individual stroke risk based on the Framingham stroke risk score. Stroke risk factor knowledge, perception of lifetime stroke risk and risk factor status were included in the questionnaire, and the determinants of good risk factor knowledge and high stroke risk perception were identified using logistic regression models. Results Overall stroke risk factor knowledge was good with 67–96% of the participants recognizing established risk factors. The two exceptions were diabetes (recognized by 49%) and myocardial infarction (57%). Knowledge of a specific factor was superior among those affected by it. 13% of all participants considered themselves of having a high stroke risk, 55% indicated a moderate risk. All major risk factors contributed significantly to the perception of being at high stroke risk, but the effects of age, sex and education were non-significant. Poor self-rated health was additionally associated with high individual stroke risk perception. Conclusion Stroke risk factor knowledge was high in this study. The self perception of an increased stroke risk was associated with established risk factors as well as low perception of general health. PMID:17371603

  13. Caracterização química e granulométrica de solos do Golfão maranhense Chemical and granulometric caracterization of soils in the Golfão Maranhense

    Gustavo Souza Valladares

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A área de estudo corresponde aos campos flúvio-marinhos com risco de inundação e presença de solos hidromórficos da região do Golfão Maranhense. Os solos dessa região apresentam algum impedimento a drenagem, proximidade com o mar (fonte de sais, condições favoráveis a inundação e aos processos de evaporação. Este conjunto de fatores pode elevar as concentrações de sais solúveis e inviabilizar ou reduzir a produtividade. Foram coletadas 38 amostras de solo em 22 pontos com trado holandês a profundidades variáveis, normalmente de 0 a 20 e de 30 a 50 cm. As amostras foram secas ao ar e analisados atributos químicos e granulométricos. Os solos do golfão maranhense apresentam grande variabilidade e predominam os com argila de atividade alta, alta soma de bases e altos teores de hidrogênio e alumínio. Os teores de magnésio são predominantes em relação aos de cálcio. Apesar da maioria dos solos apresentarem textura argilosa a granulometria é bastante variável. Mesmo com altos teores de magnésio e de sódio o grau de floculação das amostras pode ser considerado alto. Os solos do Golfão Maranhense não se encontram salinizados, porém é necessário manejá-los de maneira adequada para não promover sua salinização.The study area of this study corresponds to fluviomarine fields with flood risk and the presence of hydromorphic soils in the Golfão Maranhense region. The soils of the area present slow drenage, proximity with the sea (salt source and favorable conditions for flood, and evaporation processes. All these factors may increase the concentration of soluble salts and reduce productivity or make it inviable. We collected 38 soil samples in 22 points at variable depths, normally between 0 to 20 and 30 to 50 cm. The samples were air dried and their chemical and granulometric attributes analyzed. The soil of Golfão Maranhense presents high variability of chemical and granulometric attributes, and is predominant

  14. Relearning the Basics: Rehabilitation after a Stroke

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Stroke Rehabilitation Relearning the Basics: Rehabilitation After a Stroke Past ... to help them recover successfully. What is post-stroke rehabilitation? Rehab helps stroke survivors relearn skills lost to ...

  15. Factors Delaying Hospital Arrival Aftr Acute Stroke Onset

    Ghiasian M

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Optimal time of referral aftr stroke and the use of new therapies, such as r-tPA and blood pressure control, could accelerate symptoms recovery aftr stroke. Th aim of this study was to investigate factors contributing to the delay in referral to hospitals aftr the occurrence of acute stroke. Methods: Ths analytic-descriptive study included 425 patients, who had referred to the Hamadan Farshchian hospital during years 2015 and 2016. Demographic data, time of referring to medical center, the time of occurrence of stroke, risk factors, clinical symptoms of stroke, way of referring, distance from medical center and type of stroke by using a questionnaire and checklist were recorded. Th SPSS (version 16 softare was used for all calculations. Results: Th mean age of patients in this study was 70.12 years old. Overall, 260 patients (61.2% were male and 85.6% had ischemic stroke. Mean time of referral to fist treatment center and Farshchian hospital was 2.06 and 4.77 hours, respectively. A total of 36.2% patients arrived to Farshchian hospital, within less than 2 hours. Factors that prolonged time to presentation were male gender, ischemic stroke, low education, being at a location far from the medical center, referral from other medical centers, being single, having no witness during stroke, and having a stroke at home, and during night. Th most common symptoms in patients who were referred within less than two hours were confusion and loss of consciousness with frequency of 29.2%. Th most common risk factor in 61.4% of patients, who were referred within less than 2 hours, was high blood pressure. Conclusion: Ths study showed mean time of referral for treatment aftr stroke was high. Inflential elements that could possibly delay hospital arrival include, being at a location far from the medical center, no adequate knowledge about stroke symptom, having stroke at night, not referring directly to the medical center, being single, and no

  16. Improved determination of dynamic balance using the centre of mass and centre of pressure inclination variables in a complete golf swing cycle.

    Choi, Ahnryul; Sim, Taeyong; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Golf requires proper dynamic balance to accurately control the club head through a harmonious coordination of each human segment and joint. In this study, we evaluated the ability for dynamic balance during a golf swing by using the centre of mass (COM)-centre of pressure (COP) inclination variables. Twelve professional, 13 amateur and 10 novice golfers participated in this study. Six infrared cameras, two force platforms and SB-Clinic software were used to measure the net COM and COP trajectories. In order to evaluate dynamic balance ability, the COM-COP inclination angle, COM-COP inclination angular velocity and normalised COM-COP inclination angular jerk were used. Professional golfer group revealed a smaller COM-COP inclination angle and angular velocity than novice golfer group in the lead/trail direction (P golf injuries.

  17. Code stroke in Asturias.

    Benavente, L; Villanueva, M J; Vega, P; Casado, I; Vidal, J A; Castaño, B; Amorín, M; de la Vega, V; Santos, H; Trigo, A; Gómez, M B; Larrosa, D; Temprano, T; González, M; Murias, E; Calleja, S

    2016-04-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase is an effective treatment for ischaemic stroke when applied during the first 4.5 hours, but less than 15% of patients have access to this technique. Mechanical thrombectomy is more frequently able to recanalise proximal occlusions in large vessels, but the infrastructure it requires makes it even less available. We describe the implementation of code stroke in Asturias, as well as the process of adapting various existing resources for urgent stroke care in the region. By considering these resources, and the demographic and geographic circumstances of our region, we examine ways of reorganising the code stroke protocol that would optimise treatment times and provide the most appropriate treatment for each patient. We distributed the 8 health districts in Asturias so as to permit referral of candidates for reperfusion therapies to either of the 2 hospitals with 24-hour stroke units and on-call neurologists and providing IV fibrinolysis. Hospitals were assigned according to proximity and stroke severity; the most severe cases were immediately referred to the hospital with on-call interventional neurology care. Patient triage was provided by pre-hospital emergency services according to the NIHSS score. Modifications to code stroke in Asturias have allowed us to apply reperfusion therapies with good results, while emphasising equitable care and managing the severity-time ratio to offer the best and safest treatment for each patient as soon as possible. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Late night activity regarding stroke codes: LuNAR strokes.

    Tafreshi, Gilda; Raman, Rema; Ernstrom, Karin; Rapp, Karen; Meyer, Brett C

    2012-08-01

    There is diurnal variation for cardiac arrest and sudden cardiac death. Stroke may show a similar pattern. We assessed whether strokes presenting during a particular time of day or night are more likely of vascular etiology. To compare emergency department stroke codes arriving between 22:00 and 8:00 hours (LuNAR strokes) vs. others (n-LuNAR strokes). The purpose was to determine if late night strokes are more likely to be true strokes or warrant acute tissue plasminogen activator evaluations. We reviewed prospectively collected cases in the University of California, San Diego Stroke Team database gathered over a four-year period. Stroke codes at six emergency departments were classified based on arrival time. Those arriving between 22:00 and 8:00 hours were classified as LuNAR stroke codes, the remainder were classified as 'n-LuNAR'. Patients were further classified as intracerebral hemorrhage, acute ischemic stroke not receiving tissue plasminogen activator, acute ischemic stroke receiving tissue plasminogen activator, transient ischemic attack, and nonstroke. Categorical outcomes were compared using Fisher's Exact test. Continuous outcomes were compared using Wilcoxon's Rank-sum test. A total of 1607 patients were included in our study, of which, 299 (19%) were LuNAR code strokes. The overall median NIHSS was five, higher in the LuNAR group (n-LuNAR 5, LuNAR 7; P=0·022). There was no overall differences in patient diagnoses between LuNAR and n-LuNAR strokes (P=0·169) or diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke receiving tissue plasminogen activator (n-LuNAR 191 (14·6%), LuNAR 42 (14·0%); P=0·86). Mean arrival to computed tomography scan time was longer during LuNAR hours (n-LuNAR 54·9±76·3 min, LuNAR 62·5±87·7 min; P=0·027). There was no significant difference in 90-day mortality (n-LuNAR 15·0%, LuNAR 13·2%; P=0·45). Our stroke center experience showed no difference in diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke between day and night stroke codes. This

  19. Risk Factors and Stroke Characteristic in Patients with Postoperative Strokes.

    Dong, Yi; Cao, Wenjie; Cheng, Xin; Fang, Kun; Zhang, Xiaolong; Gu, Yuxiang; Leng, Bing; Dong, Qiang

    2017-07-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis and intra-arterial thrombectomy are now the standard therapies for patients with acute ischemic stroke. In-house strokes have often been overlooked even at stroke centers and there is no consensus on how they should be managed. Perioperative stroke happens rather frequently but treatment protocol is lacking, In China, the issue of in-house strokes has not been explored. The aim of this study is to explore the current management of in-house stroke and identify the common risk factors associated with perioperative strokes. Altogether, 51,841 patients were admitted to a tertiary hospital in Shanghai and the records of those who had a neurological consult for stroke were reviewed. Their demographics, clinical characteristics, in-hospital complications and operations, and management plans were prospectively studied. Routine laboratory test results and risk factors of these patients were analyzed by multiple logistic regression model. From January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2015, over 1800 patients had neurological consultations. Among these patients, 37 had an in-house stroke and 20 had more severe stroke during the postoperative period. Compared to in-house stroke patients without a procedure or operation, leukocytosis and elevated fasting glucose levels were more common in perioperative strokes. In multiple logistic regression model, perioperative strokes were more likely related to large vessel occlusion. Patients with perioperative strokes had different risk factors and severity from other in-house strokes. For these patients, obtaining a neurological consultation prior to surgery may be appropriate in order to evaluate the risk of perioperative stroke. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Child-Mediated Stroke Communication: findings from Hip Hop Stroke.

    Williams, Olajide; DeSorbo, Alexandra; Noble, James; Gerin, William

    2012-01-01

    Low thrombolysis rates for acute ischemic stroke are linked to delays in seeking immediate treatment due to low public stroke awareness. We aimed to assess whether "Child-Mediated Stroke Communication" could improve stroke literacy of parents of children enrolled in a school-based stroke literacy program called Hip Hop Stroke. Parents of children aged 9 to 12 years from 2 public schools in Harlem, New York City, were recruited to participate in stroke literacy questionnaires before and after their child's participation in Hip Hop Stroke, a novel Child-Mediated Stroke Communication intervention delivered in school auditoriums. Parental recall of stroke information communicated through their child was assessed 1-week after the intervention. Fifth and sixth grade students (n=182) were enrolled into Hip Hop Stroke. One hundred two parents were approached in person to participate; 75 opted to participate and 71 completed both the pretest and post-test (74% response rate and 95% retention rate). Parental stroke literacy improved after the program; before the program, 3 parents of 75 (3.9%) were able to identify the 5 cardinal stroke symptoms, distracting symptom (chest pains), and had an urgent action plan (calling 911) compared with 21 of 71 parents (29.6%) postintervention (P<0.001). The FAST mnemonic was known by 2 (2.7%) of participants before the program versus 29 (41%) after program completion (P<0.001). Knowledge of stroke signs and symptoms remains low among residents of this high-risk population. The use of Child-Mediated Stroke Communication suggests that school children aged 9 to 12 years may be effective conduits of critical stroke knowledge to their parents.

  1. Examining Differences in Patterns of Sensory and Motor Recovery After Stroke With Robotics.

    Semrau, Jennifer A; Herter, Troy M; Scott, Stephen H; Dukelow, Sean P

    2015-12-01

    Developing a better understanding of the trajectory and timing of stroke recovery is critical for developing patient-centered rehabilitation approaches. Here, we quantified proprioceptive and motor deficits using robotic technology during the first 6 months post stroke to characterize timing and patterns in recovery. We also make comparisons of robotic assessments to traditional clinical measures. One hundred sixteen subjects with unilateral stroke were studied at 4 time points: 1, 6, 12, and 26 weeks post stroke. Subjects performed robotic assessments of proprioceptive (position sense and kinesthesia) and motor function (unilateral reaching task and bimanual object hit task), as well as several clinical measures (Functional Independence Measure, Purdue Pegboard, and Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment). One week post stroke, many subjects displayed proprioceptive (48% position sense and 68% kinesthesia) and motor impairments (80% unilateral reaching and 85% bilateral movement). Interindividual recovery on robotic measures was highly variable. However, we characterized recovery as early (normal by 6 weeks post stroke), late (normal by 26 weeks post stroke), or incomplete (impaired at 26 weeks post stroke). Proprioceptive and motor recovery often followed different timelines. Across all time points, robotic measures were correlated with clinical measures. These results highlight the need for more sensitive, targeted identification of sensory and motor deficits to optimize rehabilitation after stroke. Furthermore, the trajectory of recovery for some individuals with mild to moderate stroke may be much longer than previously considered. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Stroke occurring in patients with cognitive impairment or dementia

    Solène Moulin

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT One in six patients admitted for stroke was previously demented. These patients have less access to appropriate stroke care, although little is known about their optimal management. Objective To determine how pre-stroke cognitive impairment can be detected, its mechanism, and influence on outcome and management. Methods Literature search. Results (i A systematic approach with the Informant Questionnaire of Cognitive Decline in the Elderly is recommended; (ii Pre-stroke cognitive impairment may be due to brain lesions of vascular, degenerative, or mixed origin; (iii Patients with pre-stroke dementia, have worse outcomes, more seizures, delirium, and depression, and higher mortality rates; they often need to be institutionalised after their stroke; (iv Although the safety profile of treatment is not as good as that of cognitively normal patients, the risk:benefit ratio is in favour of treating these patients like others. Conclusion Patients with cognitive impairment who develop a stroke have worse outcomes, but should be treated like others.

  3. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes, Sexual, & Bladder Problems Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes means that ... help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood ...

  4. Preventable Pediatric Stroke via Vaccination?

    Craig A. Press

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from the Vascular Effects of Infection in Pediatric Stroke (VIPS group studied the risk of arterial ischemic stroke (AIS associated with minor infection and routine childhood vaccinations.

  5. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

    ... Media for Heart.org Heart and Stroke Association Statistics Each year, the American Heart Association, in conjunction ... health and disease in the population. Heart & Stroke Statistics FAQs What is Prevalence? Prevalence is an estimate ...

  6. State Primary Stroke Center Policies in the US: Rural Health Issues.

    Slade, C.; O'Toole, Laurence J.; Rho, E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between state primary stroke center (PSC) designation policy implementation and access to optimal stroke care for residents of rural areas. Materials and Methods: Primary data were collected during the period September 2008–August 2009. Following content

  7. Lixiviación de agroquímicos en campos de golf bajo diferentes dotaciones de riego y sustratos

    Martín del Campo Delgado, MIguel Angel

    2017-01-01

    La contaminación por actividades agrícolas, que afecta tanto a aguas superficiales como subterráneas, es debida, fundamentalmente, a la aplicación de agua y nutrientes en cantidades mayores a las que las plantas pueden utilizar. En este sentido, los campos de golf pueden ser considerados como una actividad agrícola, en donde se cultiva césped de manera intensiva, con demandas de agua similares a la que se aplican en cultivos de cítricos, girasol y arroz y utilizándose grandes cantidades de fe...

  8. Los campos de golf en España y sus repercusiones en el sector turístico

    Francisco Feo Parrondo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available El golf es uno de los deportes con más crecimiento en España en las dos últimas décadas, triplicándose el número de campos y multiplicándose casi por 18 el de golfistas federados. Los campos se reparten por todo el territorio aunque siguen predominando los ubicados cerca de la costa mediterránea para que en ellos jueguen turistas europeos, sobre todo británicos. Por sus altos costes sigue siendo un deporte de élite que reporta ingresos turísticos muy elevados.

  9. Burden of Stroke in Qatar.

    Ibrahim, Faisal; Deleu, Dirk; Akhtar, Naveed; Al-Yazeedi, Wafa; Mesraoua, Boulenouar; Kamran, Sadaat; Shuaib, Ashfaq

    2015-12-01

    Qatar is located on the northeastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula. The total population is over 2.1 million with around 15% being Qatari citizens. Hamad General Hospital (HGH) is the only tertiary referral governmental hospital in Qatar which admits acute (thrombolysis-eligible) stroke patients. To provide an overview of the burden of stroke in Qatar. Data from literature databases, online sources and our stroke registry were collated to identify information on the burden of stroke in Qatar. Overall, over 80% of all stroke patients in Qatar are admitted in HGH. In 2010, the age-standardized incidence for first-ever ischemic stroke was 51.88/100,000 person-years. To date our stroke registry reveals that 79% of all stroke patients are male and almost 50% of stroke patients are 50 years or less. Hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia are the main predisposing factors for stroke, with ischemic stroke being more common (87%) than hemorrhagic stroke (13%). Despite the lack of a stroke unit, 9% of ischemic stroke patients are being thrombolyzed. However the presence of a stroke ward allows swift turnover of patients with a length of stay of less than 5 days before discharge or, if required, transfer to the fully-equipped hospital-based rehabilitation service. Several community awareness programs are ongoing, in addition to several research programs funded by the Qatar National Research Fund and Hamad Medical Corporation. In a country where over 15% of the population suffers from diabetes there is continuous need for national community-based awareness campaigns, prevention and educational programs particularly targeting patients and health care workers. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of the speech language pathologist in acute stroke

    Dilworth Cindy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysphagia and communication impairment are common consequences of stroke. Stroke survivors with either or both of these impairments are likely to have poorer long-term outcomes than those who do not have them. Speech-language pathologists (SLP play a significant role in the screening, formal assessment, management, and rehabilitation of stroke survivors who present with dysphagia and/or communication impairment. Early diagnosis and referral is critical, as is intensive intervention as soon as the patient is able to participate. The SLP is also responsible for educating carers and staff in strategies that can support the patient and for making appropriate environmental modifications (e.g. altering diet consistencies or providing information in an aphasia-friendly format to optimize the stroke survivor′s participation, initially, in the rehabilitation program and, subsequently, within the community.

  11. ANTITHROMBOCYTIC THERAPY IN THE SECONDARY PREVENTION OF ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Andrey Viktorovich Fonyakin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Approaches to preventing recurrent stroke by antithrombocytic therapy are shown to be as diverse as its causes. The diagnosis of cardioembolic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation should not limit the choice of an antithrombocytic agent to only oral (indirect anticoagulants (OAC. If OAC cannot be used, antithrombocytic therapy, including combined (clopidogrel + ASA one, may be considered as a reasonable alternative. Approaches to choosing the optimal antithrombocytic drug in noncardioembolic strokes are intricate since atherosclerosis is a systemic vascular disease and the poststroke period is characterized by a higher risk for not only recurrent stroke, but also for coronary catastrophes. It is concluded that an antithrombocytic agent should be chosen, by taking into account the multifocality of atherosclerosis, associated clinical conditions, diabetes mellitus, intravascular interventions and the individual risk of all cardiovascular events.

  12. SAR: Stroke Authorship Recognition

    Shaheen, Sara; Rockwood, Alyn; Ghanem, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Are simple strokes unique to the artist or designer who renders them? If so, can this idea be used to identify authorship or to classify artistic drawings? Also, could training methods be devised to develop particular styles? To answer these questions, we propose the Stroke Authorship Recognition (SAR) approach, a novel method that distinguishes the authorship of 2D digitized drawings. SAR converts a drawing into a histogram of stroke attributes that is discriminative of authorship. We provide extensive classification experiments on a large variety of data sets, which validate SAR's ability to distinguish unique authorship of artists and designers. We also demonstrate the usefulness of SAR in several applications including the detection of fraudulent sketches, the training and monitoring of artists in learning a particular new style and the first quantitative way to measure the quality of automatic sketch synthesis tools. © 2015 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Rehabilitation after stroke.

    Knecht, Stefan; Hesse, Stefan; Oster, Peter

    2011-09-01

    Stroke is becoming more common in Germany as the population ages. Its long-term sequelae can be alleviated by early reperfusion in stroke units and by complication management and functional restoration in early-rehabilitation and rehabilitation centers. Selective review of the literature. Successful rehabilitation depends on systematic treatment by an interdisciplinary team of experienced specialists. In the area of functional restoration, there has been major progress in our understanding of the physiology of learning, relearning, training, and neuroenhancement. There have also been advances in supportive pharmacotherapy and robot technology. Well-organized acute and intermediate rehabilitation after stroke can provide patients with the best functional results attainable on the basis of our current scientific understanding. Further experimental and clinical studies will be needed to expand our knowledge and improve the efficacy of rehabilitation.

  14. Mortality after hemorrhagic stroke

    González-Pérez, Antonio; Gaist, David; Wallander, Mari-Ann

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate short-term case fatality and long-term mortality after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) using data from The Health Improvement Network database. METHODS: Thirty-day case fatality was stratified by age, sex, and calendar year after ICH...... = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: More than one-third of individuals die in the first month after hemorrhagic stroke, and patients younger than 50 years are more likely to die after ICH than SAH. Short-term case fatality has decreased over time. Patients who survive hemorrhagic stroke have a continuing elevated......, 54.6% for 80-89 years; SAH: 20.3% for 20-49 years, 56.7% for 80-89 years; both p-trend stroke patients...

  15. SAR: Stroke Authorship Recognition

    Shaheen, Sara

    2015-10-15

    Are simple strokes unique to the artist or designer who renders them? If so, can this idea be used to identify authorship or to classify artistic drawings? Also, could training methods be devised to develop particular styles? To answer these questions, we propose the Stroke Authorship Recognition (SAR) approach, a novel method that distinguishes the authorship of 2D digitized drawings. SAR converts a drawing into a histogram of stroke attributes that is discriminative of authorship. We provide extensive classification experiments on a large variety of data sets, which validate SAR\\'s ability to distinguish unique authorship of artists and designers. We also demonstrate the usefulness of SAR in several applications including the detection of fraudulent sketches, the training and monitoring of artists in learning a particular new style and the first quantitative way to measure the quality of automatic sketch synthesis tools. © 2015 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A Comparison of Trap Types for Assessing Diversity of Scarabaeoidea on South Carolina Golf Courses.

    Chong, Juang-Horng; Hinson, Kevin R

    2015-10-01

    A 2-yr survey was conducted on golf courses in South Carolina to 1) document the species richness and seasonal activity of Scarabaeoidea; 2) assess any species compositional differences among three trap types (ultraviolet light, unbaited flight-intercept, and unbaited pitfall); and 3) identify any dominant taxa in each trap type. A total of 74,326 scarabaeoid beetles were captured, of which 77.4% were Aphodiinae (not identified to species). The remaining specimens belong to 104 species in 47 genera and 6 families. The most abundant species were Cyclocephala lurida Bland, Dyscinetus morator (F.), Euetheola humilis (Burmeister), Hybosorus illigeri Reiche, and Maladera castanea (Arrow). In all trap types, >90% of all specimens and taxa were collected between April and August. Ultraviolet light traps collected ∼94% of total specimens consisting of 83 taxa (of which 51 were unique to this trap type), whereas flight-intercept traps captured ∼2% of all specimens representing 53 taxa (18 of which were unique), and pitfall traps captured ∼4% of all specimens representing 15 taxa (no unique species; all species also captured by ultraviolet light traps). Indicator species analysis identified 2-3 and 10-13 taxa that were most frequently collected by flight-intercept and ultraviolet light traps, respectively. Flight-intercept traps complemented ultraviolet light traps by capturing more species of dung and carrion beetles and diurnal phytophagous scarab beetles. Results suggested that a similar survey for domestic or exotic scarabaeoid beetles in turfgrass systems should be conducted between April and August using ultraviolet light and flight-intercept traps at 13-58 sites. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Development and validation of the Approach-Iron Skill Test for use in golf.

    Robertson, Samuel John; Burnett, Angus F; Newton, Robert U

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to develop and validate a golf-specific approach-iron test for use with elite and high-level amateur golfers. Elite (n=26) and high-level amateur (n=23) golfers were recruited for this study. The 'Approach-Iron Skill Test' requires players to hit a total of 27 shots. Specifically, three shots are hit at each of nine targets on a specially constructed driving range in a randomised order. A real-time launch monitor positioned behind the player, measured the carry distance for each of these shots. A scoring system was developed based on the percentage error index of each shot, meaning that 81 points was the maximum score possible (with a maximum of three points per shot). Two rounds of the test were performed. For both rounds of the test, elite-level golfers scored significantly higher than their high-level amateur counterparts (56.3 ± 5.6 and 58.5 ± 4.6 points versus 46.0 ± 6.3 and 46.1 ± 6.7 points, respectively) (P<0.05). For both elite and high-level players, 95% limits of agreement statistics also indicated that the test showed good test-retest reliability (2.1 ± 7.9 and 0.2 ± 10.8, respectively). Due to the clinimetric properties of the test, we conclude that the Approach-Iron Skill Test is suitable for further examination with the players examined in this study.

  18. Questions and Answers about Stroke

    ... stroke. High blood pressure increases your risk of stroke four to six times. Heart disease, especially a condition ... leading cause of serious, long-term adult disability. Four million Americans are living with the effects of stroke. The length of time to recover from a ...

  19. Stroke and Episodic Memory Disorders

    Lim, Chun; Alexander, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Memory impairments are common after stroke, and the anatomical basis for impairments may be quite variable. To determine the range of stroke-related memory impairment, we identified all case reports and group studies through the Medline database and the Science Citation Index. There is no hypothesis about memory that is unique to stroke, but there…

  20. Mridangam stroke dataset

    CompMusic

    2014-01-01

    The audio examples were recorded from a professional Carnatic percussionist in a semi-anechoic studio conditions by Akshay Anantapadmanabhan using SM-58 microphones and an H4n ZOOM recorder. The audio was sampled at 44.1 kHz and stored as 16 bit wav files. The dataset can be used for training models for each Mridangam stroke. /n/nA detailed description of the Mridangam and its strokes can be found in the paper below. A part of the dataset was used in the following paper. /nAkshay Anantapadman...

  1. Stroke and Therapeutic Hypothermia

    Ozlem Ozkan Kuscu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is significant cause of morbidity and mortality caused by disruption of blood flow. Neural injury occurs with two stage; while primary neural injury occurs with disruption of blood flow, after days and hours with metabolic processes secondary injury develops in tissues which is non injured in the first stage. Therefore it is important to prevent and treat the secondary injury as much as preventing and treating the primary neural injury. In this article developing pathophysiological changes after stroke, mechanisms of therapeutic hypothermia, application methods, the factors that determine the effectiveness, side effects and complications were reviewed. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(3.000: 351-368

  2. Efeitos do contínuo de níveis de interferência contextual na aprendizagem do "putt" do golfe Effects of a contextual interference continuum on golf putting task

    Gonçalo Dias

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A estruturação da prática motora é uma variável de aprendizagem muito estudada na área de Controle Motor e Aprendizagem, sendo, neste âmbito, o efeito de Interferência Contextual um dos pressupostos teóricos mais investigados (TANI, 2005. Tendo como suporte a hipótese de PORTER e MAGILL (2004, 2005, o objetivo deste estudo foi verificar se o grupo com prática num contínuo de níveis Interferência Contextual alcançava melhores resultados na aprendizagem do "putt", do golfe, comparativamente com os grupos de prática por blocos, em séries e aleatória. Participaram voluntariamente 48 estudantes (24 de cada gênero do ensino superior com 21,2 ± 1,4 anos de idade, todos destros e inexperientes. Na fase de aquisição foram realizados 126 ensaios de "putt" às distâncias de 2, 2,75 e 3,5 metros do buraco. Vinte e quatro horas depois ocorreu a fase de retenção e o teste de tranferência. Na fase de retenção foram praticados 30 ensaios de forma aleatória. O teste de tranferência consistiu em 20 ensaios, 10 ensaios a 2,5 metros e 10 ensaios a 2,5 metros com 10 graus de desvio face ao centro do buraco. A análise dos resultados demonstra que não existem diferenças estatisticamente significativas entre grupos. O efeito do incremento de Interferência Contextual não foi verificado neste estudo.The purpose of this study was to investigate the contextual interference (CI effect on learning a golf putting task. PORTER and MAGILL (2004, 2005 conducted studies where they applied a new concept of practice: the contextual interference continuum. The hypothesis is that practicing with gradual increases of CI will lead to better performance on retention and transfer tests that both the blocked and random groups. Forty undergraduate students (N = 48 were randomly assigned to one of four groups: blocked, serial, random, or increasing CI practice schedule. Participants were inexperienced with the task and were blinded to the purpose of the

  3. Family History in Young Patients With Stroke.

    Thijs, Vincent; Grittner, Ulrike; Dichgans, Martin; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Kessler, Christof; Kolodny, Edwin; Kropp, Peter; Martus, Peter; Norrving, Bo; Ringelstein, Erich Bernd; Rothwell, Peter M; Schmidt, Reinhold; Tanislav, Christian; Tatlisumak, Turgut; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Rolfs, Arndt

    2015-07-01

    Family history of stroke is an established risk factor for stroke. We evaluated whether family history of stroke predisposed to certain stroke subtypes and whether it differed by sex in young patients with stroke. We used data from the Stroke in Fabry Patients study, a large prospective, hospital-based, screening study for Fabry disease in young patients (aged stroke in whom cardiovascular risk factors and family history of stroke were obtained and detailed stroke subtyping was performed. A family history of stroke was present in 1578 of 4232 transient ischemic attack and ischemic stroke patients (37.3%). Female patients more often had a history of stroke in the maternal lineage (P=0.027) than in the paternal lineage. There was no association with stroke subtype according to Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment nor with the presence of white matter disease on brain imaging. Patients with dissection less frequently reported a family history of stroke (30.4% versus 36.3%; P=0.018). Patients with a parental history of stroke more commonly had siblings with stroke (3.6% versus 2.6%; P=0.047). Although present in about a third of patients, a family history of stroke is not specifically related to stroke pathogenic subtypes in patients with young stroke. Young women with stroke more often report stroke in the maternal lineage. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00414583. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Stroke care challenges in rural India: Awareness of causes, preventive measures and treatment options of stroke among the rural communities

    Kanaga Lakshmi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Management of stroke in the remote rural areas in India faces major challenges because of lack of awareness. Stroke care services can be optimally implemented only if the communities have an understanding of the disease. Method: A population based, cross sectional survey of an adult general population sample between the ages of 31-60 years in a rural block in Tamil Nadu, India was carried out to study their knowledge, attitude, beliefs about cause, signs and symptoms, preventive measures and treatment options of stroke. Results: Of the 174 subjects studied only 69% were aware of the term stroke and 63% were able to list the symptoms. Only a little more than half the participants (58% were aware that diabetes, smoking and hypertension are risk factors for stroke. None of the participants were aware of the endovascular thrombolysis injection for better recovery from stroke. About quarter (23% of the participants did not think that the stroke is an emergency condition and they need to take the patient urgently to the hospital. Only 56% of the participants had checked their blood pressure and 49% for diabetes. A history of having either hypertension or diabetes and stroke in the family was the only factor that was significantly associated with better awareness (p=<0.001 independent of other potential facilitating factors including age, occupation, education and gender. Conclusion: There is a need to educate the rural communities about the risk factors, how to recognize the onset, the preventive measures and optimum care of stroke to reduce the burden.

  5. Continuous stroke unit electrocardiographic monitoring versus 24-hour Holter electrocardiography for detection of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation after stroke.

    Rizos, Timolaos; Güntner, Janina; Jenetzky, Ekkehart; Marquardt, Lars; Reichardt, Christine; Becker, Rüdiger; Reinhardt, Roland; Hepp, Thomas; Kirchhof, Paulus; Aleynichenko, Elena; Ringleb, Peter; Hacke, Werner; Veltkamp, Roland

    2012-10-01

    Cardioembolism in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (pxAF) is a frequent cause of ischemic stroke. Sensitive detection of pxAF after stroke is crucial for adequate secondary stroke prevention; the optimal diagnostic modality to detect pxAF on stroke units is unknown. We compared 24-hour Holter electrocardiography (ECG) with continuous stroke unit ECG monitoring (CEM) for pxAF detection. Patients with acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack were prospectively enrolled. After a 12-channel ECG on admission, all patients received 24-hour Holter ECG and CEM. Additionally, ECG monitoring data underwent automated analysis using dedicated software to identify pxAF. Patients with a history of atrial fibrillation or with atrial fibrillation on the admission ECG were excluded. Four hundred ninety-six patients (median age, 69 years; 61.5% male) fulfilled all inclusion criteria (ischemic stroke: 80.4%; transient ischemic attack: 19.6%). Median stroke unit stay lasted 88.8 hours (interquartile range, 65.0-122.0). ECG data for automated CEM analysis were available for a median time of 64.0 hours (43.0-89.8). Paroxysmal AF was documented in 41 of 496 patients (8.3%). Of these, Holter detected pxAF in 34.1%; CEM in 65.9%; and automated CEM in 92.7%. CEM and automated CEM detected significantly more patients with pxAF than Holter (Pstroke on stroke units compared with 24-hour Holter ECG. The comparative usefulness of prolonged or repetitive Holter ECG recordings requires further evaluation.

  6. Stroke Connection Magazine

    ... controlling blood pressure over the long term than exercise, diet, not smoking and reducing alcohol consumption. Combo of Smaller Meds May Just Be the Dose to Lower Blood Pressure Combined smaller doses of blood pressure medications may be effective with ... Exercise May Lessen Stroke Severity Being physically active may ...

  7. Neurorehabilitation after Stroke

    Rüdiger J. Seitz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recovery from ischaemic stroke is determined in the acute phase by the lesion impact of ischaemia and subsequently, by functional and structural network changes in the spared brain tissue. Neurorehabilitation supports the restitution of function using repetitive, learning-based and, more recently, technology-based training strategies.

  8. Ischemic strokes and migraine

    Bousser, M.G.; Baron, J.C.; Chiras, J.

    1985-11-01

    Lasting neurological deficits, though most infrequent, do occur in migrainous subjects and are well documented by clinical angiographic computed tomographic (CT scan) and even pathological studies. However the mechanism of cerebral ischemia in migraine remains widely unknown and the precise role of migraine in the pathogenesis of ischemic strokes is still debated. (orig./MG).

  9. Hypercholesterolemia, Stroke And Statins

    Prabhakar S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The link between serum cholesterol levels and the incidence of stroke still remain to be established. There are conflicting reports from a series of observational cohort studies. However, clinical trials with HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (also called statins have shown that cholesterol lowering therapy used in the primary and secondary prevention of myocardial infarction significantly reduced cardiovascular events including strokes. Meta analysis of trials with statins have shown a relative risk reduction in stroke of 12 to 48% in patients with coronary heart disease after MI. It has been postulated that the clinical action of statins is the result of pleiotropic / antiatherogenic effects rather than simply a reduction in cholesterol. The putative beneficial effect of statins in stroke involve blocking of macrophage and platelet activation, improvement of endothelial cell vasomotor function, enhancement of endothelial fibrinolytic function, immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory action, inhibition of smooth muscle cell proliferation and particularly enhancement of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS.

  10. Stroke? Localized, otogenic meningitis!

    Ingolfsdottir, Harpa Maria; Thomasen, Per Caye

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a patient admitted with aphasia, treated for a stroke. Subsequently, it was revealed that the symptoms were caused by complicated otitis media with localized meningitis. This case draws attention to the possible intracranial spread of infection when neurological symptoms occur...

  11. Evaluation of Econem™, a Formulated Pasteuria sp. Bionematicide, for Management of Belonolaimus longicaudatus on Golf Course Turf1

    Luc, John E.; Giblin-Davis, Robin M.

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, a turfgrass bionematicide containing in vitro produced Pasteuria sp. for management of Belonolaimus longicaudatus was launched under the tradename Econem™. Greenhouse pot studies and field trials on golf course fairways and tee boxes evaluated Econem at varied rates and application frequencies. Trials on putting greens compared efficacy of three applications of Econem at 98 kg/ha to untreated controls and 1,3-dichloropropene at 53 kg a.i/ha. Further putting green trials evaluated the ability of three applications of Econem at 98 kg/ha to prevent resurgence of population densities of B. longicaudatus following treatment with 1,3-dichloropropene at 53 kg a.i./ha. None of the Econem treatments in pot studies were effective at reducing B. longicaudatus numbers (P ≤ 0.05). Econem was associated with reduction in population densities of B. longicaudatus (P ≤ 0.1) on only a single sampling date in one of the eight field trials and did not improve turf health in any of the trials (P > 0.1). These results did not indicate that Econem is an effective treatment for management of B. longicaudatus on golf course turf. PMID:22791919

  12. Evaluation of Econem™, a formulated Pasteuria sp. Bionematicide, for management of Belonolaimus longicaudatus on golf course turf.

    Crow, William T; Luc, John E; Giblin-Davis, Robin M

    2011-06-01

    In 2010, a turfgrass bionematicide containing in vitro produced Pasteuria sp. for management of Belonolaimus longicaudatus was launched under the tradename Econem(™). Greenhouse pot studies and field trials on golf course fairways and tee boxes evaluated Econem at varied rates and application frequencies. Trials on putting greens compared efficacy of three applications of Econem at 98 kg/ha to untreated controls and 1,3-dichloropropene at 53 kg a.i/ha. Further putting green trials evaluated the ability of three applications of Econem at 98 kg/ha to prevent resurgence of population densities of B. longicaudatus following treatment with 1,3-dichloropropene at 53 kg a.i./ha. None of the Econem treatments in pot studies were effective at reducing B. longicaudatus numbers (P ≤ 0.05). Econem was associated with reduction in population densities of B. longicaudatus (P ≤ 0.1) on only a single sampling date in one of the eight field trials and did not improve turf health in any of the trials (P > 0.1). These results did not indicate that Econem is an effective treatment for management of B. longicaudatus on golf course turf.

  13. Biomechanical effect of altered lumbar lordosis on intervertebral lumbar joints during the golf swing: a simulation study.

    Bae, Tae Soo; Cho, Woong; Kim, Kwon Hee; Chae, Soo Won

    2014-11-01

    Although the lumbar spine region is the most common site of injury in golfers, little research has been done on intervertebral loads in relation to the anatomical-morphological differences in the region. This study aimed to examine the biomechanical effects of anatomical-morphological differences in the lumbar lordosis on the lumbar spinal joints during a golf swing. The golf swing motions of ten professional golfers were analyzed. Using a subject-specific 3D musculoskeletal system model, inverse dynamic analyses were performed to compare the intervertebral load, the load on the lumbar spine, and the load in each swing phase. In the intervertebral load, the value was the highest at the L5-S1 and gradually decreased toward the T12. In each lumbar spine model, the load value was the greatest on the kypholordosis (KPL) followed by normal lordosis (NRL), hypolordosis (HPL), and excessive lordosis (EXL) before the impact phase. However, results after the follow-through (FT) phase were shown in reverse order. Finally, the load in each swing phase was greatest during the FT phase in all the lumbar spine models. The findings can be utilized in the training and rehabilitation of golfers to help reduce the risk of injury by considering individual anatomical-morphological characteristics.

  14. Cathodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Over Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Area Promotes Implicit Motor Learning in a Golf Putting Task.

    Zhu, Frank F; Yeung, Andrew Y; Poolton, Jamie M; Lee, Tatia M C; Leung, Gilberto K K; Masters, Rich S W

    2015-01-01

    Implicit motor learning is characterized by low dependence on working memory and stable performance despite stress, fatigue, or multi-tasking. However, current paradigms for implicit motor learning are based on behavioral interventions that are often task-specific and limited when applied in practice. To investigate whether cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) area during motor learning suppressed working memory activity and reduced explicit verbal-analytical involvement in movement control, thereby promoting implicit motor learning. Twenty-seven healthy individuals practiced a golf putting task during a Training Phase while receiving either real cathodal tDCS stimulation over the left DLPFC area or sham stimulation. Their performance was assessed during a Test phase on another day. Verbal working memory capacity was assessed before and after the Training Phase, and before the Test Phase. Compared to sham stimulation, real stimulation suppressed verbal working memory activity after the Training Phase, but enhanced golf putting performance during the Training Phase and the Test Phase, especially when participants were required to multi-task. Cathodal tDCS over the left DLPFC may foster implicit motor learning and performance in complex real-life motor tasks that occur during sports, surgery or motor rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of Two- and Three-Dimensional Methods for Analysis of Trunk Kinematic Variables in the Golf Swing.

    Smith, Aimée C; Roberts, Jonathan R; Wallace, Eric S; Kong, Pui; Forrester, Stephanie E

    2016-02-01

    Two-dimensional methods have been used to compute trunk kinematic variables (flexion/extension, lateral bend, axial rotation) and X-factor (difference in axial rotation between trunk and pelvis) during the golf swing. Recent X-factor studies advocated three-dimensional (3D) analysis due to the errors associated with two-dimensional (2D) methods, but this has not been investigated for all trunk kinematic variables. The purpose of this study was to compare trunk kinematic variables and X-factor calculated by 2D and 3D methods to examine how different approaches influenced their profiles during the swing. Trunk kinematic variables and X-factor were calculated for golfers from vectors projected onto the global laboratory planes and from 3D segment angles. Trunk kinematic variable profiles were similar in shape; however, there were statistically significant differences in trunk flexion (-6.5 ± 3.6°) at top of backswing and trunk right-side lateral bend (8.7 ± 2.9°) at impact. Differences between 2D and 3D X-factor (approximately 16°) could largely be explained by projection errors introduced to the 2D analysis through flexion and lateral bend of the trunk and pelvis segments. The results support the need to use a 3D method for kinematic data calculation to accurately analyze the golf swing.

  16. QGOLF-9: Escala para la evaluación de la calidad percibida en los clubes de golf

    Virginia Serrano-G\\u00F3mez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available La evaluación de la calidad percibida ha cobrado una gran importancia en la gestión de las organizaciones de prestación de servicios. El objetivo de este trabajo es desarrollar una escala con propiedades psicométricas adecuadas, breve y de fácil aplicación que permita incorporar las percepciones de los usuarios a la gestión de los clubes de golf. Fueron entrevistados 403 usuarios de 4 clubes de golf con campos de 9 hoyos ubicados en Galicia (316 hombres y 87 mujeres, con edades comprendidas entre los 16 y 75 años (Media = 47.19; DE = 13.91. Para la recogida de datos se utilizó un cuestionario estructurado ad hoc que contaba con 25 elementos agrupados en 4 dimensiones. Fruto de un Análisis Factorial Exploratorio inicial y de un Análisis Factorial Confirmatorio posterior, ha sido posible obtener una escala final compuesta por tan solo 15 ítems agrupados en tres dimensiones. Dicha escala, además de ser breve y de fácil aplicación, posee un alto grado de validez de criterio (ya que explica el 72% del desempeño percibido del club y una elevada consistencia interna (con un α global de .91, lo que la convierte en una herramienta de notable interés aplicado.

  17. Optimised Selection of Stroke Biomarker Based on Svm and Information Theory

    Wang Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of molecular biology and gene-engineering technology, gene diagnosis has been an emerging approach for modern life sciences. Biological marker, recognized as the hot topic in the molecular and gene fields, has important values in early diagnosis, malignant tumor stage, treatment and therapeutic efficacy evaluation. So far, the researcher has not found any effective way to predict and distinguish different type of stroke. In this paper, we aim to optimize stroke biomarker and figure out effective stroke detection index based on SVM (support vector machine and information theory. Through mutual information analysis and principal component analysis to complete the selection of biomarkers and then we use SVM to verify our model. According to the testing data of patients provided by Xuanwu Hospital, we explore the significant markers of the stroke through data analysis. Our model can predict stroke well. Then discuss the effects of each biomarker on the incidence of stroke.

  18. Rehabilitation outcome in hemorrhagic transformation of ischemic stroke: a case presentation

    Ioana Stanescu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic transformation (HT may occur as a part of the natural history of acute ischemic stroke, with incidence between 13-43% in computer-tomography (CT studies. Detection of HT in a patient with ischemic stroke is important in establishing treatment in the acute phase in assessing prognosis and in taking therapeutical decisions for secondary stroke prevention. There were controversies regarding optimal treatment in acute ischemic stroke with HT, especially if the patient needs further anticoagulant or antiplatelet treatment. Rehabilitation treatment needs to be continued for post-stroke patients who developed HT, because HT does not decrease rehabilitation outcome. We present rehabilitation treatment and prognosis in a case of hemorrhagic transformation after an embolic ischemic stroke treated with anticoagulants, which required reinitiation of anticoagulant treatment.

  19. Thrombolysis in Postoperative Stroke.

    Voelkel, Nicolas; Hubert, Nikolai Dominik; Backhaus, Roland; Haberl, Roman Ludwig; Hubert, Gordian Jan

    2017-11-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) is beneficial in reducing disability in selected patients with acute ischemic stroke. There are numerous contraindications to IVT. One is recent surgery. The aim of this study was to analyze the safety of IVT in patients with postoperative stroke. Data of consecutive IVT patients from the Telemedical Project for Integrative Stroke Care thrombolysis registry (February 2003 to October 2014; n=4848) were retrospectively searched for keywords indicating preceding surgery. Patients were included if surgery was performed within the last 90 days before stroke. The primary outcome was defined as surgical site hemorrhage. Subgroups with major/minor surgery and recent/nonrecent surgery (within 10 days before IVT) were analyzed separately. One hundred thirty-four patients underwent surgical intervention before IVT. Surgery had been performed recently (days 1-10) in 49 (37%) and nonrecently (days 11-90) in 85 patients (63%). In 86 patients (64%), surgery was classified as major, and in 48 (36%) as minor. Nine patients (7%) developed surgical site hemorrhage after IVT, of whom 4 (3%) were serious, but none was fatal. One fatal bleeding occurred remotely from surgical area. Rate of surgical site hemorrhage was significantly higher in recent than in nonrecent surgery (14.3% versus 2.4%, respectively, odds ratio adjusted 10.73; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-61.27). Difference between patients with major and minor surgeries was less distinct (8.1% and 4.2%, respectively; odds ratio adjusted 4.03; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-25.04). Overall in-hospital mortality was 8.2%. Intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 9.7% and was asymptomatic in all cases. IVT may be administered safely in postoperative patients as off-label use after appropriate risk-benefit assessment. However, bleeding risk in surgical area should be taken into account particularly in patients who have undergone surgery shortly before stroke onset. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Rehabilitating the Stroke Collection

    Mary Grimmond

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this project was to complete an analysis of monograph and audiovisual items held in the Central Coast Health Service (CCHS Libraries and containing information relevant to the treatment of acute stroke. Acute stroke is treated by multidisciplinary teams of clinicians based at two hospitals within the CCHS. The adequacy of the library collection was measured by subject coverage and age. Methods The methodology used consisted of three main steps: a literature review; design, administration, and analysis of a questionnaire to members of the CCHS Acute Stroke Team; and an analysis of the libraries’ collections. The research project utilised project management methodology and an evidence based librarianship framework. Results The questionnaire revealed that electronic resources were by far the most frequently used by participants, followed in order by print journals, books, interlibrary loan articles, and audiovisual items. Collection analysis demonstrated that the monograph and audiovisual collections were adequate in both scope and currency to support the information needs of Acute Stroke Team members, with the exception of resources to support patient education. Conclusion The researchers developed recommendations for future collection development in the area of acute stroke resources. Conducting this project within the evidence based librarianship framework helped to develop library staff members’ confidence in their ability to make future collection development decisions, informed by the target group’s information needs and preferences. The collection analysis methodology was designed to be replicated, and new specialist groups within the client base of the library will be targeted to repeat the collection analysis process.

  1. Imaging of Hemorrhagic Stroke.

    Hakimi, Ryan; Garg, Ankur

    2016-10-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke comprises approximately 15% to 20% of all strokes. This article provides readers with an understanding of the indications and significance of various neuroimaging techniques available for patients presenting with hemorrhagic strokes of distinct causes. The most common initial neuroimaging study is a noncontrast head CT, which allows for the identification of hemorrhage. Once an intracranial hemorrhage has been identified, the pattern of blood and the patient's medical history, neurologic examination, and laboratory studies lead the practitioner to pursue further neuroimaging studies to guide the medical, surgical, and interventional management. Given that hemorrhagic stroke constitutes a heterogeneous collection of diagnoses, the subsequent neuroimaging pathway necessary to better evaluate and care for these patients is variable based on the etiology.With an increasing incidence and prevalence of atrial fibrillation associated with the aging population and the introduction of three new direct factor Xa inhibitors and one direct thrombin inhibitor to complement vitamin K antagonists, oral anticoagulant use continues to increase. Patients on oral anticoagulants have a sevenfold to tenfold increased risk for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Furthermore, patients who have an ICH associated with oral anticoagulant use have a higher mortality rate than those with primary ICH. Despite the reduced incidence of hypertension-related ICH over the past decade, it is expected that the incidence of ICH will continue to increase. Neuroimaging studies are integral to the identification of hemorrhagic stroke, determination of the underlying etiology, prevention of hematoma expansion, treatment of acute complications, and treatment of the underlying etiology, if indicated. Neuroimaging is essential for prognostication and thus directly impacts patient care.

  2. Design of a Golf Swing Injury Detection and Evaluation open service platform with Ontology-oriented clustering case-based reasoning mechanism.

    Ku, Hao-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, people can easily use a smartphone to get wanted information and requested services. Hence, this study designs and proposes a Golf Swing Injury Detection and Evaluation open service platform with Ontology-oritened clustering case-based reasoning mechanism, which is called GoSIDE, based on Arduino and Open Service Gateway initative (OSGi). GoSIDE is a three-tier architecture, which is composed of Mobile Users, Application Servers and a Cloud-based Digital Convergence Server. A mobile user is with a smartphone and Kinect sensors to detect the user's Golf swing actions and to interact with iDTV. An application server is with Intelligent Golf Swing Posture Analysis Model (iGoSPAM) to check a user's Golf swing actions and to alter this user when he is with error actions. Cloud-based Digital Convergence Server is with Ontology-oriented Clustering Case-based Reasoning (CBR) for Quality of Experiences (OCC4QoE), which is designed to provide QoE services by QoE-based Ontology strategies, rules and events for this user. Furthermore, GoSIDE will automatically trigger OCC4QoE and deliver popular rules for a new user. Experiment results illustrate that GoSIDE can provide appropriate detections for Golfers. Finally, GoSIDE can be a reference model for researchers and engineers.

  3. Off-site transport of fungicides with runoff: A comparison of flutolanil and pentachloronitrobeneze applied to creeping bentgrass managed as a golf course fairway

    Flutolanil and pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB) are fungicides used to control or suppress foliar and soil borne diseases in turf and ornamental crops. On golf courses, sports fields, sod farms and commercial lawns these fungicides are used as preventive treatments to combat snow mold, brown patch an...

  4. Organismal effects of pesticide exposure on meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) living in golf course ecosystems: developmental instability, clinical hematology, body condition, and blood parasitology.

    Knopper, Loren D; Mineau, Pierre

    2004-06-01

    This is the second of two articles reporting the results of a nonlethal biomonitoring study that quantified the effects of pesticide exposure on meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) living in golf course ecosystems of the Ottawa/Gatineau region (ON and PQ, Canada, respectively). In the present article, we describe results of measurements regarding developmental instability (e.g., fluctuating asymmetry), congenital birth defects (e.g., skeletal terata), clinical hematology (e.g., differential counts), general body condition (e.g., body mass-length relationships), and blood parasite load (Trypanosoma sp. and Bartonella spp.). Voles were captured during the year 2001 to 2003 at six golf courses and two reference sites. Once voles were fully sedated using isoflurane, blood was collected, radiographs taken, and morphometric measurements recorded. Three animals from each course were euthanized to determine body burdens of historically used organochlorine (OC) and metal-based pesticides. Exposure to in-use pesticides was determined from detailed golf course pesticide-use records. None of the endpoints measured was significantly related to body burdens of OC pesticides and metals historically used, nor did any endpoint significantly vary among capture sites in relation to total pesticide application to the capture site or to the number of days since the last application of pesticide. Based on these findings, it appears that voles from golf courses were no less healthy than their conspecifics from reference sites.

  5. Outcome Determinants of Stroke in a Brazilian Primary Stroke Center

    Gustavo W. Kuster

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Stroke mortality in Brazil is one of the highest among Western countries. Nonetheless, stroke outcome determinants are still poorly known in this country. In this study we evaluate outcome determinants of stroke in a primary stroke center in São Paulo, Brazil. Methods. We evaluated demographic, clinical, and outcome data of patients with ischemic stroke (IS, transient ischemic attack (TIA, and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH admitted at “Hospital Paulistano,” São Paulo, Brazil. In-hospital mortality and functional outcome determinants were assessed. Univariate and binary logistic regression analysis were performed. Results. Three hundred forty-one patients were included in the study, 52.2% being male with 66.8±15.7 years. The stroke type distribution was IS: 59.2%, TIA: 29.6%, and ICH: 11.1%. ICH was associated with greater severity and poorer functional outcome. The determinants of poorer functional outcome were higher NIHSS, lower Glasgow score, and lower oxygen saturation level. The most important mortality determinant was the presence of visual symptoms. Conclusions. The stroke mortality and stroke outcome determinants found in the present study do not remarkably differ from studies carried out in developed countries. Stroke prognosis studies are crucial to better understand the high burden of stroke in Brazil.

  6. Stroke treatment outcomes in hospitals with and without Stroke Units.

    Masjuan, J; Gállego Culleré, J; Ignacio García, E; Mira Solves, J J; Ollero Ortiz, A; Vidal de Francisco, D; López-Mesonero, L; Bestué, M; Albertí, O; Acebrón, F; Navarro Soler, I M

    2017-10-23

    Organisational capacity in terms of resources and care circuits to shorten response times in new stroke cases is key to obtaining positive outcomes. This study compares therapeutic approaches and treatment outcomes between traditional care centres (with stroke teams and no stroke unit) and centres with stroke units. We conducted a prospective, quasi-experimental study (without randomisation of the units analysed) to draw comparisons between 2 centres with stroke units and 4 centres providing traditional care through the neurology department, analysing a selection of agreed indicators for monitoring quality of stroke care. A total of 225 patients participated in the study. In addition, self-administered questionnaires were used to collect patients' evaluations of the service and healthcare received. Centres with stroke units showed shorter response times after symptom onset, both in the time taken to arrive at the centre and in the time elapsed from patient's arrival at the hospital to diagnostic imaging. Hospitals with stroke units had greater capacity to respond through the application of intravenous thrombolysis than centres delivering traditional neurological care. Centres with stroke units showed a better fit to the reference standards for stroke response time, as calculated in the Quick study, than centres providing traditional care through the neurology department. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Are inertial forces ever of significance in cricket, golf and other sports?

    Robinson, Garry; Robinson, Ian

    2017-04-01

    In previous papers we investigated the motion of a spherical projectile rotating about an arbitrary axis, subject to a drag force, a lift or Magnus force, and in the presence of a wind. The aim was to determine the motion of balls used in sporting games, primarily cricket. Newton’s laws of motion apply in an inertial (unaccelerated) coordinate system, but the rotating Earth is not an inertial system. In such a non-inertial system two additional forces are present, the Coriolis force which produces a side-ways movement, and the centrifugal force. Generally these two inertial forces produce noticeable effects only on the large scale, when either the time of travel and/or the path length is large. In this paper we have added both of these forces to the equations of motion. In addition, we have also included a ground friction force in order to simulate a ball rolling over a surface or, more generally, a body moving through a resistive medium such as water. Here we quantitatively investigate the magnitude and direction of the effect of the inertial forces in a number of cases. It is found that, as expected, the effects of the inertial forces are generally small for ball games. In cricket the side-ways movement is ≲1 cm for a throw from the boundary and ≲1 mm for a slow bowler’s delivery, and for a long drive in golf it is ≲10 cm. In lawn bowls the side-ways movement can be ∼2.8 cm, which may be significant, given the nature of this sport. The inertial forces are also potentially of relevance in sporting events not employing spherical projectiles. For example, in Olympic rowing we find that the side-ways movement can be more than 40 m for a 2 km race if it is not compensated for, and nearly 20 m for a 4 min mile event in athletics. The effect is also of significance in events such as swimming and horse racing. The importance of this is that athletes may not be aware of the effect and, in the case of rowing for example, may attribute it to side-ways currents

  8. Urinary Retention Associated with Stroke.

    Umemura, Takeru; Ohta, Hirotsugu; Yokota, Akira; Yarimizu, Shiroh; Nishizawa, Shigeru

    Patients often exhibit urinary retention following a stroke. Various neuropathological and animal studies have implicated the medulla oblongata, pons, limbic system, frontal lobe as areas responsible for micturition control, although the exact area responsible for urinary retention after stroke is not clear. The purpose of this study was to identify the stroke area responsible for urinary retention by localizing the areas where strokes occur. We assessed 110 patients with cerebral infarction and 27 patients with cerebral hemorrhage (78 men, 59 women; mean age, 73.0 years) who had been admitted to our hospital between October, 2012 and September, 2013. We used computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate the stroke location, and evaluated whether post-stroke urinary retention occurred. Twelve (8.8%) of the 137 patients (7 men, 5 women; mean age, 78.8 years) exhibited urinary retention after a stroke. Stroke occurred in the right/left dominant hemisphere in 7 patients; nondominant hemisphere in 1; cerebellum in 3; and brainstem in 1. Strokes in the dominant hemisphere were associated with urinary retention (P = 0.0314), particularly in the area of the insula (P < 0.01). We concluded that stroke affecting the insula of the dominant hemisphere tends to cause urinary retention.

  9. Organizational issues in stroke treatment: The Swiss paradigm - Stroke units

    Georgios K Matis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke represents the leading cause of acquired disability in adults and poses a tremendous socioeconomic burden both on patients and the society. In this sense, prompt diagnosis and urgent treatment are needed in order to radically reduce the devastating consequences of this disease. Herein the authors present the new guidelines recently adopted by the Swiss Stroke Society concerning the establishment of stroke units. Standardized treatment and allocation protocols along with an acute rehabilitation concept seem to be the core of the Swiss stroke management system. Coordinated multidisciplinary care provided by specialized medical, nursing and therapy staff is of utmost importance for achieving a significant dependency and death reduction. It is believed that the implementation of these guidelines in the stroke care system would be beneficial not only for the stroke patients, but also for the health system.

  10. Guidelines for acute ischemic stroke treatment: part II: stroke treatment

    Sheila Cristina Ouriques Martins

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The second part of these Guidelines covers the topics of antiplatelet, anticoagulant, and statin therapy in acute ischemic stroke, reperfusion therapy, and classification of Stroke Centers. Information on the classes and levels of evidence used in this guideline is provided in Part I. A translated version of the Guidelines is available from the Brazilian Stroke Society website (www.sbdcv.com.br.

  11. Validation of minor stroke definitions for thrombolysis decision making.

    Park, Tai Hwan; Hong, Keun-Sik; Choi, Jay Chol; Song, Pamela; Lee, Ji Sung; Lee, Juneyoung; Park, Jong-Moo; Kang, Kyusik; Lee, Kyung Bok; Cho, Yong-Jin; Saposnik, Gustavo; Han, Moon-Ku; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2013-05-01

    Patients with low National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores are frequently excluded from thrombolysis, but more than 25% of them remain disabled. We sought to define a validated minor stroke definition to reduce the inappropriate treatment exclusion. From an outcome database, untreated patients with an NIHSS score of 5 or less presenting within a 4.5-hour window were identified and 3-month modified Rankin Scale (mRS) outcomes were analyzed according to individual isolated symptoms and total NIHSS scores. The validity of the following minor stroke definitions were assessed: (1) the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Tissue Plasminogen Activator (NINDS-TPA) trials' definition, (2) the total NIHSS score, varying a cutoff point from 0 to 4, and (3) our proposed definition that included an NIHSS score = 0 or an NIHSS score = 1 on the items of level of consciousness (LOC), gaze, facial palsy, sensory, or dysarthria. Of 647 patients, 172 patients (26.6%) had a 3-month unfavorable outcome (mRS score 2-6). Favorable outcome was achieved in more than 80% of patients with an NIHSS score of 1 or less or with an isolated symptom on the LOC, gaze, facial palsy, sensory, or dysarthria item. In contrast, unfavorable outcome proportion was more than 25% in patients with an NIHSS score of 2 or more. When the NINDS-TPA trials' definition, our definition, or the definition of an NIHSS score of 1 or less were applied, more than 75% of patients with an unfavorable outcome were defined as a non-minor stroke and less than 15% of patients with an unfavorable outcome were defined as a minor stroke. Implementation of an optimal definition of minor stroke into thrombolysis decision-making process would decrease the unfavorable outcomes in patients with low NIHSS scores. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hemichorea after ischemic stroke

    Sadullah Saglam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The deterioration of the balance between direct and indirect ways in the basal ganglia causes chorea. The lesions of contralateral basal ganglia, thalamus or the connection of them all together are responsible for this. Chorea can be observed during the course of metabolic and vascular diseases, neurodegenerative or hereditary diseases. Hyperkinetic movement disorders after acute ischemic stroke are reported as rare; however, hemichorea is the most frequent developing disorder of hyperkinetic movement as a result of cerebrovascular disease. In this case report, we presented two case who applied us with choreiform movements in his left half of the body after acute thalamic stroke. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(0.100: 29-32

  13. Seismic sensitivity to sub-surface solar activity from 18 yr of GOLF/SoHO observations

    Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Turck-Chièze, S.

    2015-06-01

    Solar activity has significantly changed over the last two Schwabe cycles. After a long and deep minimum at the end of Cycle 23, the weaker activity of Cycle 24 contrasts with the previous cycles. In this work, the response of the solar acoustic oscillations to solar activity is used in order to provide insights into the structural and magnetic changes in the sub-surface layers of the Sun during this on-going unusual period of low activity. We analyze 18 yr of continuous observations of the solar acoustic oscillations collected by the Sun-as-a-star GOLF instrument on board the SoHO spacecraft. From the fitted mode frequencies, the temporal variability of the frequency shifts of the radial, dipolar, and quadrupolar modes are studied for different frequency ranges that are sensitive to different layers in the solar sub-surface interior. The low-frequency modes show nearly unchanged frequency shifts between Cycles 23 and 24, with a time evolving signature of the quasi-biennial oscillation, which is particularly visible for the quadrupole component revealing the presence of a complex magnetic structure. The modes at higher frequencies show frequency shifts that are 30% smaller during Cycle 24, which is in agreement with the decrease observed in the surface activity between Cycles 23 and 24. The analysis of 18 yr of GOLF oscillations indicates that the structural and magnetic changes responsible for the frequency shifts remained comparable between Cycle 23 and Cycle 24 in the deeper sub-surface layers below 1400 km as revealed by the low-frequency modes. The frequency shifts of the higher-frequency modes, sensitive to shallower regions, show that Cycle 24 is magnetically weaker in the upper layers of Sun. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe following 68 GOLF frequency tables are available and Table A.1 is also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  14. Modeling Dynamic Regulatory Processes in Stroke

    McDermott, Jason E.; Jarman, Kenneth; Taylor, Ronald; Lancaster, Mary; Shankaran, Harish; Vartanian, Keri B.; Stevens, Susan L.; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P.; Sanfilippo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The ability to examine the behavior of biological systems in silico has the potential to greatly accelerate the pace of discovery in diseases, such as stroke, where in vivo analysis is time intensive and costly. In this paper we describe an approach for in silico examination of responses of the blood transcriptome to neuroprotective agents and subsequent stroke through the development of dynamic models of the regulatory processes observed in the experimental gene expression data. First, we identified functional gene clusters from these data. Next, we derived ordinary differential equations (ODEs) from the data relating these functional clusters to each other in terms of their regulatory influence on one another. Dynamic models were developed by coupling these ODEs into a model that simulates the expression of regulated functional clusters. By changing the magnitude of gene expression in the initial input state it was possible to assess the behavior of the networks through time under varying conditions since the dynamic model only requires an initial starting state, and does not require measurement of regulatory influences at each time point in order to make accurate predictions. We discuss the implications of our models on neuroprotection in stroke, explore the limitations of the approach, and report that an optimized dynamic model can provide accurate predictions of overall system behavior under several different neuroprotective paradigms. PMID:23071432

  15. Khat and stroke

    Sanjay V Kulkarni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Khat chewing, though a tradition followed majorly in African countries, has of late spread widely across the globe due to faster transport systems and advanced preservation techniques. Many complications such as psychosis, arterial hypertension, angina pectoris, and myocardial infarction have been reported in connection to khat abuse. We present a case of a young man who presented with acute onset left-sided weakness. He was a known khat addict for over three decades. A diagnosis of left hemiplegia due to right middle cerebral artery infarction was established. Detailed evaluation revealed no significant underlying cause for stroke. Since the main central nervous system effects of khat are comparable with those of amphetamines and there are established reports of stroke in amphetamine abuse, the former was assumed to be the etiological factor. The patient was discontinued from taking khat and was managed conservatively. The subject showed significant recovery with no further complications or similar episodes during follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second case of stroke associated with khat. Since the management is essentially conservative, a vigilant history eliciting of khat abuse in prevalent countries would cut down unnecessary healthcare costs.

  16. Problematising risk in stroke rehabilitation.

    Egan, Mary Y; Kessler, Dorothy; Ceci, Christine; Laliberté-Rudman, Debbie; McGrath, Colleen; Sikora, Lindsey; Gardner, Paula

    2016-11-01

    Following stroke, re-engagement in personally valued activities requires some experience of risk. Risk, therefore, must be seen as having positive as well as negative aspects in rehabilitation. Our aim was to identify the dominant understanding of risk in stroke rehabilitation and the assumptions underpinning these understandings, determine how these understandings affect research and practise, and if necessary, propose alternate ways to conceptualise risk in research and practise. Alvesson and Sandberg's method of problematisation was used. We began with a historical overview of stroke rehabilitation, and proceeded through five steps undertaken in an iterative fashion: literature search and selection; data extraction; syntheses across texts; identification of assumptions informing the literature and; generation of alternatives. Discussion of risk in stroke rehabilitation is largely implicit. However, two prominent conceptualisations of risk underpin both knowledge development and clinical practise: the risk to the individual stroke survivor of remaining dependent in activities of daily living and the risk that the health care system will be overwhelmed by the costs of providing stroke rehabilitation. Conceptualisation of risk in stroke rehabilitation, while implicit, drives both research and practise in ways that reinforce a focus on impairment and a generic, decontextualised approach to rehabilitation. Implications for rehabilitation Much of stroke rehabilitation practise and research seems to centre implicitly on two risks: risk to the patient of remaining dependent in ADL and risk to the health care system of bankruptcy due to the provision of stroke rehabilitation. The implicit focus on ADL dependence limits the ability of clinicians and researchers to address other goals supportive of a good life following stroke. The implicit focus on financial risk to the health care system may limit access to rehabilitation for people who have experienced either milder or

  17. Post-stroke cognitive impairments

    Elena Anatolyevna Katunina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-stroke cognitive impairments are common effects of stroke. Vascular cognitive impairments are characterized by the heterogeneity of the neuropsychological profile in relation to the site and pattern of stroke. Their common trait is the presence of dysregulation secondary to frontal dysfunction. The treatment of vascular cognitive impairments should be multimodality and aimed at stimulating neuroplasticity processes, restoring neurotransmitter imbalance, and preventing recurrent vascular episodes.

  18. Experimental Stroke Differentially Affects Discrete Subpopulations of Splenic Macrophages

    Laura McCulloch

    2018-05-01

    could be impaired after stroke and the contribution of macrophages to stroke-associated pathology and infectious complications should be considered at a subset-specific level. Therefore, optimal therapeutic manipulation of macrophages to improve stroke outcome is likely to require selective targeting of functionally and spatially distinct subpopulations.

  19. Epidermoid Causing Ischemic Stroke in the Brainstem

    Raghvendra Ramdasi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial tumors may rarely cause stroke. We report an epidermoid cyst causing stroke in a pediatric patient. We have also reviewed the literature and pathogenesis of stroke caused by intracranial tumors.

  20. Guide to Choosing Stroke Rehabilitation Services

    National Stroke Association’s Guide to Choosing Stroke Rehabilitation Services Rehabilitation, often referred to as rehab, is an important part of stroke recovery. Through rehab, you:  Re-learn basic skills such ...

  1. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute stroke

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Weber, Uno Jakob; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2003-01-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical experience show that hypothermia protects the brain from damage during ischaemia. There is a growing hope that the prevention of fever in stroke will improve outcome and that hypothermia may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of stroke. Body temperature...... obvious therapeutic potential, hypothermia as a form of neuroprotection for stroke has been investigated in only a few very small studies. Therapeutic hypothermia is feasible in acute stroke but owing to serious side-effects--such as hypotension, cardiac arrhythmia, and pneumonia--it is still thought...

  2. Burden of stroke in Cambodia.

    Loo, Keat Wei; Gan, Siew Hua

    2013-08-01

    In Cambodia, stroke is not ranked among the top 10 leading causes of death, but infectious disease are among the top three leading causes of death. This finding could be attributed to a lack of awareness among Cambodians of the signs and symptoms of stroke or to poor reporting, incomplete data, lack of neurologists and neurosurgeons, or low accessibility to the hospitals. The only study of stroke in Cambodia is the Prevalence of Non-Communicable Disease Risk Factors in Cambodia survey, which identified several stroke-related risk factors in the population. Tobacco chewing or smoking is the main risk factor for stroke in Cambodia. Traditional therapies, such as oyt pleung (moxibustion) and jup (cupping), are widely practiced for stroke rehabilitation. In Cambodia, there are few neurologists and few important equipment, such as magnetic resonance imaging machines and computed tomography scanners. The Cambodian government should cooperate with the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund to attract foreign expertise and technologies to treat stroke patients. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  3. Cerebrogenic tachyarrhythmia in acute stroke

    A S Praveen Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrocardiac abnormalities following acute stroke are frequent and seen in both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. The changes seen in electrocardiogram (ECG consist of repolarization abnormalities such as ST elevation, ST depression, negative T waves, and QT prolongation. Among tachyarrhythmias, atrial fibrillation is the most common and occurrence of focal atrial tachycardia is very rare though any cardiac arrhythmias can follow acute stroke. We report a case of focal atrial tachycardia following acute ischemic stroke in 50-year-old female without structural heart disease, and their mechanisms and clinical implications.

  4. Stroke scale score and early prediction of outcome after stroke

    Ahmed, R.; Zuberi, F.Z.; Afsar, S.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the baseline National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score as a predictor of functional outcome after ischemic stroke. Subjects and Methods: The study included 50 patients who presented to Civil Hospital, Karachi, during the study period with acute stroke and were evaluated with CT scan of brain. Only those patients were enrolled in the study that had acute ischemic stroke. The enrolled subjects were then evaluated for the neurological impairment using National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). The subjects were followed-up and their functional outcome was assessed using Barthel index (BI) on the 7th day of their admission. Results: Of the fifty patients enrolled in the study, 31 (62%) were males and 19 (38%) were females, with age ranging from 45 years to 95 years and a mean age of 59.9 years. Neurological impairment at presentation was assessed by NIHSS. The score ranged between 2 and 28. The functional outcome was evaluated on the 7th day using Barthel index (BI), which ranged from 0 to 80. NIHSS score was found to be a good predictor of functional outcome in patients with ischemic stroke (p<0.001). Other factors like gender, hypertension and heart disease did not affect the functional recovery in such patients. Various factors were found to be significant for early prediction of stroke recovery. The NIHSS score was the strongest predictor of outcome after ischemic stroke. Age at the time of the event was also found to be an important predictor for stroke recovery. Conclusion: The NIHSS score is a good predictor of patient's recovery after stroke. Assessing the patient's neurological impairment at first presentation of ischemic stroke can guide the physician regarding the prognosis and management plan. (author)

  5. Identification of stroke mimics among clinically diagnosed acute strokes.

    Tuntiyatorn, Lojana; Saksornchai, Pichaya; Tunlayadechanont, Supoch

    2013-09-01

    Stroke is a clinically syndrome of a sudden onset of neurological deficit in a vascular cause. Stroke mimics is the non-vascular disorders with stroke-like clinical symptoms. It is important to distinguish true stroke from mimics since treatment plan may differ To determine the incidence of the stroke mimics and identify their etiologies. All non-contrast head CT of the patients with clinically diagnosed stroke who immediately received imaging upon arrival at the emergency department of the university hospital were retrospectively reviewed in 12-month period between January 1 and December 31, 2008. Medical records, laboratory results, MRI, and 6-month clinical follow-up records were reviewed for final diagnosis. Seven hundred four patients were included in this study, including 363 (51.5%) men and 341 (48.5%) women with range in age from 24 to 108 years. Amongst those, 417 (59.2%) were ischemic stroke, 80 (11.40%) were hemorrhagic stroke, 186 (26.4%) were stroke-mimics, and 21 (3%) were inconclusive. The etiologies among stroke-mimics were metabolic/intoxication (35, 18.8%), sepsis (28, 15.0%), seizure (21, 11.3%), syncope (20, 10.8%), subdural hemorrhage (14, 7.5%), vertigo (11, 6.0%), brain tumor (10, 5.30%), central nervous system infection (5, 2.7%), others (26, 14.0%), and unspecified (16, 8.6%). Incidence rates and etiologies of the stroke mimics were similar to the western reports. However the frequency of each mimic was not.

  6. Efficacy of Supplementation with B Vitamins for Stroke Prevention: A Network Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Dong, Hongli; Pi, Fuhua; Ding, Zan; Chen, Wei; Pang, Shaojie; Dong, Wenya; Zhang, Qingying

    2015-01-01

    Supplementation with B vitamins for stroke prevention has been evaluated over the years, but which combination of B vitamins is optimal for stroke prevention is unclear. We performed a network meta-analysis to assess the impact of different combinations of B vitamins on risk of stroke. A total of 17 trials (86 393 patients) comparing 7 treatment strategies and placebo were included. A network meta-analysis combined all available direct and indirect treatment comparisons to evaluate the efficacy of B vitamin supplementation for all interventions. B vitamin supplementation was associated with reduced risk of stroke and cerebral hemorrhage. The risk of stroke was lower with folic acid plus vitamin B6 as compared with folic acid plus vitamin B12 and was lower with folic acid plus vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 as compared with placebo or folic acid plus vitamin B12. The treatments ranked in order of efficacy for stroke, from higher to lower, were folic acid plus vitamin B6 > folic acid > folic acid plus vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 > vitamin B6 plus vitamin B12 > niacin > vitamin B6 > placebo > folic acid plus vitamin B12. B vitamin supplementation was associated with reduced risk of stroke; different B vitamins and their combined treatments had different efficacy on stroke prevention. Folic acid plus vitamin B6 might be the optimal therapy for stroke prevention. Folic acid and vitamin B6 were both valuable for stroke prevention. The efficacy of vitamin B12 remains to be studied.

  7. Stroke in Saudi children

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Al-Jarallah, Ahmed A.; Kentab, Anal Y.; Al-Nasser, Mohammad N.; Bahakim, Hassan M.; Kurban, Khadija M.; Zahraa, Jihad N.; Nasir, Ali A.; Abdel-Gader, Abdel-Galil M.; Alorainy, Ibrahim A.; Hassan, Hamdy H.; Kabiraj, Mohammad M.; Khoja, Waleed A.

    2006-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology and clinical features of stroke in a prospective and retrospective cohort of Saudi children and ascertain the causes, pathogenesis, and risk factors. The Retrospective Study Group (RSG) included children with stroke who were evaluated at the Division of Pediatric Neurology, or admitted to King Khalid University Hospital, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the period July 1992 to February 2001. The Prospective Study Group (PSG) included those seen between February 2001 and March 2003. During the combined study periods of 10 years and 7 months, 117 children (61 males and 56 females, aged one month-12 years) were evaluated; the majority (89%) of these were Saudis. The calculated annual hospital frequency rate of stroke was 27.1/100,000 of the pediatric (1month-12 years) population The mean age at onset of the initial stroke in the 104 Saudi children was 27.1 months (SD=39.3 months) median and median was 6 months. Ischemic strokes accounted for the majority of cases (76%). Large-vessel infarcts (LVI, 51.9%) were more common than small-vessel lacunar lesions (SVLL, 19.2%). Five patients (4.8%) had combined LVI and SVLL. Intracranial hemorrhage was less common (18.2%), whereas sinovenous thrombosis was diagnosed in 6 (5.8%) patients. A major risk factor was identified in 94 of 104 (89.4%) Saudi children. Significantly more hematologic disorders and coagulopathies were identified in the PSG compared to the RSG (p=0.001), reflecting a better yield following introduction of more comprehensive hematologic and cogulation laboratory tests during the prospective study period. Hematologic disorders were the most common risk factor (46.2%); presumed perinatal ischemic cerebral injury was risk factor in 23 children (22.1) and infectious and inflammatory disorders of the circulatory system in 18 (17.3%). Congenital and genetic cerebrovascular anomalies were the underlying cause in 7 patients (6.7%) and

  8. Verbal-motor attention-focusing instructions influence kinematics and performance on a golf-putting task.

    Munzert, Jörn; Maurer, Heiko; Reiser, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    The authors examined how varying the content of verbal-motor instructions and requesting an internal versus external focus influenced the kinematics and outcome of a golf putting task. On Day 1, 30 novices performed 120 trials with the instruction to focus attention either on performing a pendulum-like movement (internal) or on the desired ball path (external). After 20 retention trials on Day 2, they performed 20 transfer trials with the opposite instruction. Group differences for retention and a group by block interaction showed that external instruction enhanced movement outcome. Kinematic data indicated that specific instruction content influenced outcomes by eliciting changes in movement execution. Switching from the external to the internal focus instruction resulted in a more pendulum-like movement.

  9. Sex Differences in Neuromuscular Fatigability of the Knee Extensors Post-Stroke

    Meghan Kirking

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Despite the implications of optimizing strength training post-stroke, little is known about the differences in fatigability between men and women with chronic stroke. The purpose of this study was to determine the sex differences in knee extensor muscle fatigability and potential mechanisms in individuals with stroke. Methods: Eighteen participants (10 men, eight women with chronic stroke (≥6 months and 23 (12 men, 11 women nonstroke controls participated in the study. Participants performed an intermittent isometric contraction task (6 s contraction, 3 s rest at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC torque until failure to maintain the target torque. Electromyography was used to determine muscle activation and contractile properties were assessed with electrical stimulation of the quadriceps muscles. Results: Individuals with stroke had a briefer task duration (greater fatigability than nonstroke individuals (24.1 ± 17 min vs. 34.9 ± 16 min. Men were more fatigable than women for both nonstroke controls and individuals with stroke (17.9 ± 9 min vs. 41.6 ± 15 min. Individuals with stroke had less fatigue-related changes in muscle contractile properties and women with stroke differed in their muscle activation strategy during the fatiguing contractions. Conclusions: Men and women fatigue differently post-stroke and this may be due to the way they neurally activate muscle groups.

  10. Psychological factors are associated with subjective cognitive complaints 2 months post-stroke.

    Nijsse, Britta; van Heugten, Caroline M; van Mierlo, Marloes L; Post, Marcel W M; de Kort, Paul L M; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate which psychological factors are related to post-stroke subjective cognitive complaints, taking into account the influence of demographic and stroke-related characteristics, cognitive deficits and emotional problems. In this cross-sectional study, 350 patients were assessed at 2 months post-stroke, using the Checklist for Cognitive and Emotional consequences following stroke (CLCE-24) to identify cognitive complaints. Psychological factors were: proactive coping, passive coping, self-efficacy, optimism, pessimism, extraversion, and neuroticism. Associations between CLCE-24 cognition score and psychological factors, emotional problems (depressive symptoms and anxiety), cognitive deficits, and demographic and stroke characteristics were examined using Spearman correlations and multiple regression analyses. Results showed that 2 months post-stroke, 270 patients (68.4%) reported at least one cognitive complaint. Age, sex, presence of recurrent stroke(s), comorbidity, cognitive deficits, depressive symptoms, anxiety, and all psychological factors were significantly associated with the CLCE-24 cognition score in bivariate analyses. Multiple regression analysis showed that psychological factors explained 34.7% of the variance of cognitive complaints independently, and 8.5% (p psychological factors, proactive coping was independently associated with cognitive complaints (p cognitive complaints. Because cognitive complaints are common after stroke and are associated with psychological factors, it is important to focus on these factors in rehabilitation programmes.

  11. How to quantify the transition phase during golf swing performance: Torsional load affects low back complaints during the transition phase.

    Sim, Taeyong; Choi, Ahnryul; Lee, Soeun; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2017-10-01

    The transition phase of a golf swing is considered to be a decisive instant required for a powerful swing. However, at the same time, the low back torsional loads during this phase can have a considerable effect on golf-related low back pain (LBP). Previous efforts to quantify the transition phase were hampered by problems with accuracy due to methodological limitations. In this study, vector-coding technique (VCT) method was proposed as a comprehensive methodology to quantify the precise transition phase and examine low back torsional load. Towards this end, transition phases were assessed using three different methods (VCT, lead hand speed and X-factor stretch) and compared; then, low back torsional load during the transition phase was examined. As a result, the importance of accurate transition phase quantification has been documented. The largest torsional loads were observed in healthy professional golfers (10.23 ± 1.69 N · kg -1 ), followed by professional golfers with a history of LBP (7.93 ± 1.79 N · kg -1 ), healthy amateur golfers (1.79 ± 1.05 N · kg -1 ) and amateur golfers with a history of LBP (0.99 ± 0.87 N · kg -1 ), which order was equal to that of the transition phase magnitudes of each group. These results indicate the relationship between the transition phase and LBP history and the dependency of the torsional load magnitude on the transition phase.

  12. Stroke: advances in medical therapy and acute stroke intervention.

    Barrett, Kevin M; Lal, Brajesh K; Meschia, James F

    2015-10-01

    Evidence-based therapeutic options for stroke continue to emerge based on results from well-designed clinical studies. Ischemic stroke far exceeds hemorrhagic stroke in terms of prevalence and incidence, both in the USA and worldwide. The public health effect of reducing death and disability related to ischemic stroke justifies the resources that have been invested in identifying safe and effective treatments. The emergence of novel oral anticoagulants for ischemic stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation has introduced complexity to clinical decision making for patients with this common cardiac arrhythmia. Some accepted ischemic stroke preventative strategies, such as carotid revascularization for asymptomatic carotid stenosis, require reassessment, given advances in risk factor management, antithrombotic therapy, and surgical techniques. Intra-arterial therapy, particularly with stent retrievers after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, has recently been demonstrated to improve functional outcomes and will require investment in system-based care models to ensure that effective treatments are received by patients in a timely fashion. The purpose of this review is to describe recent advances in medical and surgical approaches to ischemic stroke prevention and acute treatment. Results from recently published clinical trials will be highlighted along with ongoing clinical trials addressing key questions in ischemic stroke management and prevention where equipoise remains.

  13. Stroke subtypes and factors associated with ischemic stroke in ...

    Stroke subtypes assessed four OCSP (Oxfordshire Communi-. African Health Sciences Vol 15 Issue 1, March 2015. 68. 69 ty Stroke Project Classification) subtypes classification. 13 was used with lacunar circulation infarct (LACI) and total anterior (TACI), partial anterior (PACI), posterior. (POCI) circulation infarcts as non ...

  14. 'This stroke was sent…': Stroke-related illness concepts and ...

    Though there is evidence that stroke incidence is increasing even in low and middle income countries, there is no study of stroke-related illness concepts and HSB in Nigerians. Data from 960 educated Nigerians were analysed. Eight hundred and fifty four respondents (431 aged 20-40 years and 423 aged 41 years or ...

  15. Thromboxane biosynthesis in stroke and post-stroke dementia

    F. van Kooten (Fop)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractWith 25 to 30 thousand new patients per year and an incidence of 170/100.000, stroke is a major health problem in the Netherlands, as it is in other western countries. It accounts for almost I 0% of the annual death in the Netherlands. Approximately 80% of stroke is of ischemic

  16. Impacts of and adaptation to GHG climate change on the ski and golf recreational activities and the tourism industry : a case study in Quebec

    Singh, B.; Bryant, C.; Andre, P.; Thouez, J.P.; Savoie, M.; Tapes, V.; Granjon, D.; Pecheux, I.; Davey, N. [Montreal Univ., PQ (Canada). Dept. of Geography

    2006-03-31

    The ski and golf industries in southern Quebec are 2 major sectors of the province's tourism industry and both are sensitive to climate change. The impacts that are attributable to future climate change can significantly affect the profitability and viability of these recreational activities in southern Quebec. This paper presented the results of detailed studies conducted in regions around Montreal, Quebec City and the Eastern Townships in which the diagnostic outputs of 2 coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (GCM) were used to analyze the impact of climate change on the ski and golf industries. The models were used for 3 time periods: a control period from 1961 to 1990; a short term future period from 2010 to 2039; and a long-term future period from 2040-2069. The climate variables chosen for the impacts and adaptation studies included maximum and minimum air temperature, precipitation, atmospheric humidity and wind speeds. Environment Canada provided the data for the control period, and the gaps for missing data were filled by regression analyses between neighbouring stations. The outputs of the 2 GCMs were used to determine the changes in the selected climate variables for the 2 future time periods. Irrigation requirements for the golfing season were calculated for each of the stations within the study area for the 3 time periods. The study showed that future climate change and variability will have significant impacts on these 2 key sectors in southern Quebec. The important changes in variety of key climate variables and parameters, mainly temperature and precipitation, will cause negative impacts, more so for the ski industry as opposed to the golf sector. There will be a significant reduction in the length of the ski season in the future, and snow-making may be the only possibility for some of the 84 ski centers in southern Quebec to continue to operate. However, less intense cold may favour the number of skiable days for certain centres

  17. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Stroke Rehabilitation: A Review of Recent Advancements

    Gomez Palacio Schjetnan, Andrea; Faraji, Jamshid; Metz, Gerlinde A.; Tatsuno, Masami; Luczak, Artur

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a promising technique to treat a wide range of neurological conditions including stroke. The pathological processes following stroke may provide an exemplary system to investigate how tDCS promotes neuronal plasticity and functional recovery. Changes in synaptic function after stroke, such as reduced excitability, formation of aberrant connections, and deregulated plastic modifications, have been postulated to impede recovery from stroke. However, if tDCS could counteract these negative changes by influencing the system's neurophysiology, it would contribute to the formation of functionally meaningful connections and the maintenance of existing pathways. This paper is aimed at providing a review of underlying mechanisms of tDCS and its application to stroke. In addition, to maximize the effectiveness of tDCS in stroke rehabilitation, future research needs to determine the optimal stimulation protocols and parameters. We discuss how stimulation parameters could be optimized based on electrophysiological activity. In particular, we propose that cortical synchrony may represent a biomarker of tDCS efficacy to indicate communication between affected areas. Understanding the mechanisms by which tDCS affects the neural substrate after stroke and finding ways to optimize tDCS for each patient are key to effective rehabilitation approaches. PMID:23533955

  18. Yoga for stroke rehabilitation.

    Lawrence, Maggie; Celestino Junior, Francisco T; Matozinho, Hemilianna Hs; Govan, Lindsay; Booth, Jo; Beecher, Jane

    2017-12-08

    Stroke is a major health issue and cause of long-term disability and has a major emotional and socioeconomic impact. There is a need to explore options for long-term sustainable interventions that support stroke survivors to engage in meaningful activities to address life challenges after stroke. Rehabilitation focuses on recovery of function and cognition to the maximum level achievable, and may include a wide range of complementary strategies including yoga.Yoga is a mind-body practice that originated in India, and which has become increasingly widespread in the Western world. Recent evidence highlights the positive effects of yoga for people with a range of physical and psychological health conditions. A recent non-Cochrane systematic review concluded that yoga can be used as self-administered practice in stroke rehabilitation. To assess the effectiveness of yoga, as a stroke rehabilitation intervention, on recovery of function and quality of life (QoL). We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched July 2017), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (last searched July 2017), MEDLINE (to July 2017), Embase (to July 2017), CINAHL (to July 2017), AMED (to July 2017), PsycINFO (to July 2017), LILACS (to July 2017), SciELO (to July 2017), IndMED (to July 2017), OTseeker (to July 2017) and PEDro (to July 2017). We also searched four trials registers, and one conference abstracts database. We screened reference lists of relevant publications and contacted authors for additional information. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared yoga with a waiting-list control or no intervention control in stroke survivors. Two review authors independently extracted data from the included studies. We performed all analyses using Review Manager (RevMan). One review author entered the data into RevMan; another checked the entries. We discussed disagreements with a third review author until consensus was reached. We used

  19. Microalbuminuria could improve risk stratification in patients with TIA and minor stroke.

    Elyas, Salim; Shore, Angela C; Kingwell, Hayley; Keenan, Samantha; Boxall, Leigh; Stewart, Jane; James, Martin A; Strain, William David

    2016-09-01

    Transient ischemic attacks (TIA) and minor strokes are important risk factors for recurrent strokes. Current stroke risk prediction scores such as ABCD2, although widely used, lack optimal sensitivity and specificity. Elevated urinary albumin excretion predicts cardiovascular disease, stroke, and mortality. We explored the role of microalbuminuria (using albumin creatinine ratio (ACR)) in predicting recurrence risk in patients with TIA and minor stroke. Urinary ACR was measured on a spot sample in 150 patients attending a daily stroke clinic with TIA or minor stroke. Patients were followed up at day 7, 30, and 90 to determine recurrent stroke, cardiovascular events, or death. Eligible patients had a carotid ultrasound Doppler investigation. High-risk patients were defined as those who had an event within 90 days or had >50% internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis. Fourteen (9.8%) recurrent events were reported by day 90 including two deaths. Fifteen patients had severe ICA stenosis. In total, 26 patients were identified as high risk. These patients had a higher frequency of previous stroke or hypercholesterolemia compared to low-risk patients (P = 0.04). ACR was higher in high-risk patients (3.4 [95% CI 2.2-5.2] vs. 1.7 [1.5-2.1] mg/mmol, P = 0.004), independent of age, sex, blood pressure, diabetes, and previous stroke. An ACR greater than 1.5 mg/mmol predicted high-risk patients (Cox proportional hazard ratio 3.5 (95% CI 1.3-9.5, P = 0.01). After TIA or minor stroke, a higher ACR predicted recurrent events and significant ICA stenosis. Incorporation of urinary ACR from a spot sample in the acute setting could improve risk stratification in patients with TIA and minor stroke.

  20. Red cell distribution width and neurological scoring systems in acute stroke patients

    Kara H

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hasan Kara,1 Selim Degirmenci,1 Aysegul Bayir,1 Ahmet Ak,1 Murat Akinci,1 Ali Dogru,1 Fikret Akyurek,2 Seyit Ali Kayis3 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Selcuk University, Konya, Turkey; 2Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Selcuk University, Konya, Turkey; 3Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, Karabuk University, Karabuk, Turkey Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the association between the red blood cell distribution width (RDW and the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, Canadian Neurological Scale (CNS, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores in patients who had acute ischemic stroke. Methods: This prospective observational cohort study included 88 patients who have had acute ischemic stroke and a control group of 40 patients who were evaluated in the Emergency Department for disorders other than acute ischemic stroke. All subjects had RDW determined, and stroke patients had scoring with the GCS, CNS, and NIHSS scores. The GCS, CNS, and NIHSS scores of the patients were rated as mild, moderate, or severe and compared with RDW. Results: Stroke patients had significantly higher median RDW than control subjects. The median RDW values were significantly elevated in patients who had more severe rather than milder strokes rated with all three scoring systems (GCS, CNS, and NIHSS. The median RDW values were significantly elevated for patients who had moderate rather than mild strokes rated by GCS and CNS and for patients who had severe rather than mild strokes rated by NIHSS. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.760 (95% confidence interval, 0.676–0.844. Separation of stroke patients and control groups was optimal with RDW 14% (sensitivity, 71.6%; specificity, 67.5%; accuracy, 70.3%. Conclusion: In stroke patients who have symptoms <24 hours, the RDW may be useful in predicting the severity and functional outcomes of the stroke