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Sample records for optically guided stereotactic

  1. CT-guided stereotactic neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Takaaki; Sato, Shoju; Matsumoto, Akira; Sano, Akira; Takahashi, Kazunori; Murakami, Yuji; Ohta, Kosuke

    1985-01-01

    Brown-Roberts-Wells stereotactic instruments were used for CT guided stereotactic surgery in 54 cases (65 operations). Stereotactic biopsy was done in 9 cases and successive regional chemotherapy was done in 3 cases. Stereotactic drainage was done in 2 cases of bacterial abcess, 3 cases of cystic neoplasm and 33 cases (43 operations) of intracerebral hematoma. CT guided stereotactic procedure was valuable for the correct cannulation to the center of the cavity. We tried to utilize CT image for the selection of targets for stereotactic functional neurosurgical procedures in 6 cases. In the cases of thalamotomy, the information derived from CT made the operation safer than that by contrast ventriculography alone. In all cases of electrode implantation for deep brain stimulation, accurate and precise electrode placement was achieved from CT images alone. This rapid and easy surgical technique was useful also for poor risk patients. (author)

  2. Optical Tracking Technology in Stereotactic Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Thomas H.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Bova, Frank J.; Friedman, William A.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Tome, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    The last decade has seen the introduction of advanced technologies that have enabled much more precise application of therapeutic radiation. These relatively new technologies include multileaf collimators, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning, and intensity modulated radiotherapy in radiotherapy. Therapeutic dose distributions have become more conformal to volumes of disease, sometimes utilizing sharp dose gradients to deliver high doses to target volumes while sparing nearby radiosensitive structures. Thus, accurate patient positioning has become even more important, so that the treatment delivered to the patient matches the virtual treatment plan in the computer treatment planning system. Optical and image-guided radiation therapy systems offer the potential to improve the precision of patient treatment by providing a more robust fiducial system than is typically used in conventional radiotherapy. The ability to accurately position internal targets relative to the linac isocenter and to provide real-time patient tracking theoretically enables significant reductions in the amount of normal tissue irradiated. This report reviews the concepts, technology, and clinical applications of optical tracking systems currently in use for stereotactic radiation therapy. Applications of radiotherapy optical tracking technology to respiratory gating and the monitoring of implanted fiducial markers are also discussed

  3. Trilogy Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntzinger, Calvin; Friedman, William; Bova, Frank; Fox, Timothy; Bouchet, Lionel; Boeh, Lester M.B.A.

    2007-01-01

    Full integration of advanced imaging, noninvasive immobilization, positioning, and motion-management methods into radiosurgery have resulted in fundamental changes in therapeutic strategies and approaches that are leading us to the treatment room of the future. With the introduction of image-guided radiosurgery (IGRS) systems, such as Trilogy TM , physicians have for the first time a practical means of routinely identifying and treating very small lesions throughout the body. Using new imaging processes such as positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans, clinics may be able to detect these lesions and then eradicate them with image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery treatments. Thus, there is promise that cancer could be turned into a chronic disease, managed through a series of checkups, and Trilogy treatments when metastatic lesions reappear

  4. Implementation of Upright Digital Breast Tomosynthesis-guided Stereotactic Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omofoye, Toma S; Martaindale, Sarah; Teichgraeber, Davis C; Parikh, Jay R

    2017-11-01

    With growing adoption of digital breast tomosynthesis, an increasing number of imaging abnormalities are being identified only by tomosynthesis. Upright digital breast tomosynthesis-guided stereotactic biopsy is a proven method for sampling these abnormalities as well as abnormalities traditionally evaluated using conventional stereotactic biopsy. In this article, we describe the technique of upright digital breast tomosynthesis-guided stereotactic biopsy and outline a systematic operational approach to implementation of this technique in clinical radiology practices. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using the HI-ART II Helical Tomotherapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, Timothy W.; Hudes, Richard; Dziuba, Sylwester; Kazi, Abdul; Hall, Mark; Dawson, Dana

    2008-01-01

    The highly integrated adaptive radiation therapy (HI-ART II) helical tomotherapy unit is a new radiotherapy machine designed to achieve highly precise and accurate treatments at all body sites. The precision and accuracy of the HI-ART II is similar to that provided by stereotactic radiosurgery systems, hence the historical distinction between external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic procedures based on differing precision requirements is removed for this device. The objectives of this work are: (1) to describe stereotactic helical tomotherapy processes (SRS, SBRT); (2) to show that the precision and accuracy of the HI-ART meet the requirements defined for SRS and SBRT; and (3) to describe the clinical implementation of a stereotactic image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) system that incorporates optical motion management

  6. Robotic System for MRI-Guided Stereotactic Neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Cole, Gregory A.; Shang, Weijian; Harrington, Kevin; Camilo, Alex; Pilitsis, Julie G.; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Stereotaxy is a neurosurgical technique that can take several hours to reach a specific target, typically utilizing a mechanical frame and guided by preoperative imaging. An error in any one of the numerous steps or deviations of the target anatomy from the preoperative plan such as brain shift (up to 20 mm), may affect the targeting accuracy and thus the treatment effectiveness. Moreover, because the procedure is typically performed through a small burr hole opening in the skull that prevents tissue visualization, the intervention is basically “blind” for the operator with limited means of intraoperative confirmation that may result in reduced accuracy and safety. The presented system is intended to address the clinical needs for enhanced efficiency, accuracy, and safety of image-guided stereotactic neurosurgery for Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) lead placement. The work describes a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided, robotically actuated stereotactic neural intervention system for deep brain stimulation procedure, which offers the potential of reducing procedure duration while improving targeting accuracy and enhancing safety. This is achieved through simultaneous robotic manipulation of the instrument and interactively updated in situ MRI guidance that enables visualization of the anatomy and interventional instrument. During simultaneous actuation and imaging, the system has demonstrated less than 15% signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) variation and less than 0.20% geometric distortion artifact without affecting the imaging usability to visualize and guide the procedure. Optical tracking and MRI phantom experiments streamline the clinical workflow of the prototype system, corroborating targeting accuracy with 3-axis root mean square error 1.38 ± 0.45 mm in tip position and 2.03 ± 0.58° in insertion angle. PMID:25376035

  7. Stereotactic body radiotherapy a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Gaya, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Collecting the key information in this burgeoning field into a single volume, this handbook for clinical oncology trainees and consultants covers all of the basic aspects of stereotactic radiotherapy systems and treatment and includes plenty of case studies.

  8. Development of a new apparatus for MRI guided stereotactic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Yukiya; Amano, Keiichi; Kawamura, Hirotsune; Tanikawa, Tatsuya; Kawabatake, Hiroko; Iseki, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Naotoshi; Ono, Yuko

    1990-01-01

    Since Leksell et al. reported the application of NMR imaging to stereotactic surgery, MRI has been used for determination of the coordinates of target in the brain. The image of the MRI, however, is significantly distorted due to non-uniformity of the magnetic field. The authors have devised a new marker system (the imaginary inner marker system) and have also modified the Iseki CT guided stereotactic frame for utilizing MRI. In this system, the imaginary markers were set up inside the brain. The image of the grid phantom, obtained immediately before the operation, is superimposed on the image of a patient's brain. The nearest image of grid phantom is used for MRI localization as an imaginary inner marker. To prevent distortion and resolution degradation on MRI, the localizing system is composed of acrylic resin and titanium. The head ring can be fixed on both the MRI localizing system and the Iseki CT guided stereotactic frame which allows the transformation of target coordinates from the MRI localizing system to the CT guided frame. MRI guided stereotactic surgery, therefore, can be performed while monitoring with the CT scan. The system was tested using a phantom and taking T 1 -weighted images before clinical application. Coordinates of target points were determined accurately to a 2 mm cube. A 47-year-old, right-handed woman underwent a MRI guided biopsy of the right thalamic mass lesion that was more accurately detected by MRI than CT scan. The histological diagnosis was a malignant lymphoma. No complications have occurred. MRI stereotaxy, at the present time, is expected to be most useful in the biopsy of deep-seated brain lesions which are not easily detected by CT scan. In the near future, It will take the place of other imaging techniques during functional neurosurgery, with sufficient accuracy. (author)

  9. MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy: comparison with stereotactically guided and ultrasound-guided techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imschweiler, Thomas; Freiwald, Bianka; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A. [Kantonspital Baden AG, Institute for Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); Haueisen, Harald [Kantonspital Aarau AG, Institute for Radiology, Aarau (Switzerland); Kampmann, Gert [Clinica Sant' Anna, Lugano, Sorengo (Switzerland); Rageth, Luzi [Adjumed Services AG, Zurich (Switzerland); Seifert, Burkhardt [Institute for Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Zurich, Division of Biostatistics, Zuerich (Switzerland); Rageth, Christoph [Breast Centre, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-01-15

    To analyse the development of MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy (VAB) in Switzerland and to compare the procedure with stereotactically guided and ultrasound-guided VAB. We performed a retrospective analysis of VABs between 2009 and 2011. A total of 9,113 VABs were performed. Of these, 557 were MRI guided. MRI-guided VAB showed the highest growth rate (97 %) of all three procedures. The technical success rates for MRI-guided, stereotactically guided and ultrasound-guided VAB were 98.4 % (548/557), 99.1 % (5,904/5,960) and 99.6 % (2,585/2,596), respectively. There were no significant differences (P = 0.12) between the MRI-guided and the stereotactically guided procedures. The technical success rate for ultrasound-guided VAB was significantly higher than that for MRI-guided VAB (P < 0.001). There were no complications using MRI-guided VAB requiring open surgery. The malignancy diagnosis rate for MRI-guided VAB was similar to that for stereotactically guided VAB (P = 0.35). MRI-guided VAB is a safe and accurate procedure that provides insight into clinical breast findings. (orig.)

  10. Stereotactic radiotherapy of meningiomas compressing optical pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, Klaus-Detlef; Henzel, Martin; Gross, Markus W.; Surber, Gunnar; Kleinert, Gabriele; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Microsurgical resection is usually the treatment of choice for meningiomas, especially for those that compress the optical pathways. However, in many cases of skull-base meningiomas a high risk of neurological deficits and recurrences exist in cases where the complete tumor removal was not possible. In such cases (fractionated) stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) can offer an alternative treatment option. We evaluated the local control rate, symptomatology, and toxicity. Patients and Methods: Between 1997 and 2003, 183 patients with skull-base meningiomas were treated with SRT, among them were 65 patients with meningiomas that compressed optical pathways (64 benign, 1 atypical). Of these 65 cases, 20 were treated with SRT only, 27 were subtotally resected before SRT, and 18 underwent multiple tumor resections before SRT. We investigated the results until 2005, with a median follow-up of 45 months (range, 22-83 months). The tumor volume (TV = gross tumor volume) ranged from 0.61 to 90.20 cc (mean, 18.9 cc). Because of the risk of new visual disturbances, the dose per fraction was either 2 or 1.8 Gy for all patients, to a total dose of 50 to 60 Gy. Results: The overall survival and the progression-free survival rates for 5 years were assessed to 100% in this patient group. To date, no progression for these meningiomas have been observed. Quantitatively, tumor shrinkage of more than 20%, or more than 2 mm in diameter, was proved in 35 of the 65 cases after SRT. In 29 of the 65 patients, at least 1 of the symptoms improved. On application of the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC), acute toxicity (Grade 3) was seen in 1 case (worsening of conjunctivitis). Another 2 patients developed late toxicity by LENT-SOMA score, 1 x Grade 1 and 1 x Grade 3 (field of vision loss). Conclusion: As a low-risk and effective treatment option for tumor control, SRT with 1.8 to 2.0 Gy per fraction can also be recommended in case of meningiomas that compress optical pathways. An

  11. A new stereotactic apparatus guided by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huk, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    The accurate information provided by computer tomography about existence, shape, and localization of intracranial neoplasms in an early phase and in inaccessible regions have improved the diagnostics greatly, so that these lie far ahead of the therapeutic possibilities for brain tumors. To reduce this wide margin we have developed a new targeting device which makes a stereotactic approach to central lesions under sight-control by computed tomography within the computed tomography-scanner possible. With the help of this simple device we are now able to perform stereotactic procedures for tumor biopsy guided by computed tomography, needling and drainage of abscesses and cysts, and finally for the implantation of radioactive material for the interstitial radiotherapy of inoperable cysts and tumors. (orig.) [de

  12. CT guided stereotactic evacuation for hypertensive intracerebral hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Hideo

    1990-01-01

    Sixty-one cases of hypertensive intracerebral hematoma were evacuated by CT guided stereotactic method. The operation was performed in the CT room under general anesthesia using the KOMAI-NAKAJIMA STEREOTACTIC DEVICE. This instrument has a micromanipulater that can be used for various kinds of stereotactic procedures. Three dimensional position of the target point (aspiration point of the hematoma) was determined on the film obtained from CT scanning of the patient in the stereotactic system. If the hematoma was small, the target point was enough to be one point at the center of the hematoma, but in case of the large hematoma, several target points were given according to the shape of hematoma. The probe, ordinarily a steel tube 4 mm in outer diameter, was inserted through brain to the target point and the hematoma was aspirated through a silicon tube connected to a vacuum system. Among 61 cases examined, 30 cases of thalamic hemorrhage were operated upon and 36 cases were not operated. They were classified according to the volume of hematoma into 3 groups as follows: A=less than 10 ml, B=11-25 ml, C=more than 25 ml. The operated cases were compared with the non operated cases on the improvement of consciousness in each group. In the A group, the operated patients in the level I recovered more slowly than the non operated patients, but in the level II patients, this was reversed. In the B group, the operated patients improved more quickly except the level I patients. In the C group, almost all of non operated patients died. Thus, this operation was very useful in improving consciousness of level II or III patients independent of hematoma volume. It accelerated the recovery of motor function in the level I. This non inversive technique is considered effective for the removal of deep intracerebral hematoma. (author)

  13. A stereotactic system for guiding complex craniofacial reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialkov, J A; Phillips, J H; Gruss, J S; Kassel, E E; Zuker, R M

    1992-02-01

    A stereotactic system has been designed to address the problem of achieving symmetry in complex and extensive craniofacial defects. Preliminary testing suggests that such a system, which allows for the intraoperative application of preoperative CT planning, will be useful in guiding the reconstruction of congenital or acquired bony time, is being used to investigate the correlation of intraoperative globe position following enophthalmos correction with long-term outcome, particularly as it relates to the size and location of the orbital defect, and the timing of the procedure.

  14. A study on CT-guided stereotactic technique for functional neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uetsuhara, Koichi; Asakura, Tetsuhiko; Hirahara, Kazuho; Gondo, Masazumi; Oda, Hiroshige

    1987-01-01

    Recently, CT-guided stereotactic surgery has become of major interest, and some authors have discussed its potential in functional neurosurgery. The following is a comparative study of the CT-guided stereotactic technique and the conventional roentogenographic stereotactic technique. The Brown-Roberts-Wells apparatus was used for both types of procedures. 37 stereotactic procedures were performed on 35 patients under local anesthesia; 16 for stereotactic biopsy and 21 for stereotactic functional neurosurgery. Target points for stereotactic biopsy were determined by the CT-guided technique and target points for functional neurosurgery were determined by the conventional roentogenographic technique. The correlation with the position of target point determined by both techniques was investigated in the 21 functional neurosurgical procedures. On these occasions the authors used the reformatted horizontal and sagittal CT through the anterior and posterior commissure to determine the position of target point by the CT-guided technique. Results: It was found that the AC-PC line crossed with Reid's base line at angle of 11 ± 1 deg, and therefore it is important to obtain a CT images including AC-PC line at this angle. When applying the CT guided stereotactic procedure for functional surgery, it should be known that there could be a discrepancy within 2 mm from the conventional target determination. (author)

  15. Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery Using a Specially Designed High-Dose-Rate Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayouth, John E.; Kaiser, Heather S.; Smith, Mark C.; Pennington, Edward C.; Anderson, Kathleen M. C.; Ryken, Timothy C.; Buatti, John M.

    2007-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery and image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) place enhanced demands on treatment delivery machines. In this study, we describe a high-dose-rate output accelerator as a part of our stereotactic IGRT delivery system. The linac is a Siemens Oncor without a flattening filter, and enables dose rates to reach 1000 monitor units (MUs) per minute. Even at this high-dose-rate, the linac dosimetry system remains robust; constancy, linearity, and beam energy remain within 1% for 3 to 1000 MU. Dose profiles for larger field sizes are not flat, but they are radially symmetric and, as such, able to be modeled by a treatment planning system. Target localization is performed via optical guidance utilizing a 3-dimensional (3D) ultrasound probe coupled to an array of 4 infrared light-emitting diodes. These diodes are identified by a fixed infrared camera system that determines diode position and, by extension, all objects imaged in the room coordinate system. This system provides sub-millimeter localization accuracy for cranial applications and better than 1.5 mm for extracranial applications. Because stereotactic IGRT can require significantly longer times for treatment delivery, the advantages of the high-dose-rate design and its direct impact on IGRT are discussed

  16. CT-guided stereotactic operation for hypertensive intracerebral hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Shinichiro; Sonobe, Makoto; Koshu, Keiji; Kusunose, Mutsuo; Tsumura, Kotaro

    1989-01-01

    CT-guided stereotactic operation was performed in 55 patients with hypertensive intracerebral hematoma. Location of the hematoma was putamen in 28 cases, thalamus in 14 cases, subcortical area in 9 cases, cerebellum in 3 cases and pons in one case. Ages ranged from 36 to 85 years (mean 59.5). The mean timing of the surgery after bleeding was 4.2 days. The estimated volume of the hematoma on CT was 8 ml to 57 ml in putaminal, 9 ml to 40 ml in thalamic, 18 ml to 77 ml in subcortical, 17 ml to 26 ml in cerebellar and 5 ml in pontine hemorrhage. Aspiration rate at surgery was 60.4% in putaminal, 37.9% in thalamic, 41.7% in subcortical, 45.2% in cerebellar and 30% in pontine hemorrhage. In addition, we evaluated ADL at 6 months postoperatively in patients with putaminal and thalamic hamorrhage. It is concluded that stereotactic operation is advisable in those cases with 10 to 50 ml hematoma volumes in putamen or thalamus. On the other hand, in cases with over 50ml volume, hematoma should be evacuated by craniotomy. (author)

  17. CT guided stereotactic evacuation of hypertensive and traumatic intracerebral hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondo, Hideki; Matsumoto, Keizo

    1983-01-01

    Recent advancement of CT system provides not only definite diagnosis and location of intracerebral hematoma but also coordinates of the center of the hematoma. Trials of stereotactic evacuation of the hematoma have been reported by some authors in the cases of subacute or chronic stages of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage. In this series, similar surgery has been performed in 33 cases of hypertensive intracerebral hematoma including 22 cases in acute stage, and 2 cases of traumatic hematoma. Clinical outcomes were investigated and the results were considered to be equivalent or rather better in the conventional microsurgery with evacuation of hematoma under direct vision. However, there still remained controversial problems in the cases of threatened herniation signs, because in these cases regular surgery with total evacuation of the hematoma at one time might have been preferable. The benefits of this CT guided stereotactic approach for the evacuation of the hematoma were thought to be as follow: 1) the procedure is simple and safe, 2) operation is readily performed under local anesthesia, and 3) the hematoma was drained out totally by means of urokinase activity. It is our impression that this surgery not only is indicated as emergency treatment for the patients of high-age or in high risk, but also can institute as a routine surgery for the intracerebral hematomas in patients showing no herniation sign. (J.P.N.)

  18. CT-guided stereotactic evacuation of hypertensive intracerebral hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondo, Hideki

    1983-01-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) is now effective not only for definite diagnosis and location of intracerebral hematomas but also for coordination of the center of a hematoma. CT-guided stereotactic evacuation of hypertensive intracerebral hematoma was performed in 51 cases: 34 of basal ganglionic hematoma with or without ventricular perforation, 11 of subcortical hematoma, 3 of thalamic hematoma and 3 of cerebellar hematoma. Three dimensional CT images or biplane CT images were taken to determine the coordinates of the target point, which was the center of the hematoma. Then, a silicon tube (O.D. 3.5 phi, I.D. 2.1 phi) was inserted into the center of the hematoma through a burr-hole under local anesthesia, and the liquid or solid hematoma was aspirated as completely as possible with a syringe. Urokinase (6,000 I.U./5 ml saline) was administered through this silicon tube every 6 or 12 hours for several days until the hematoma had drained out competely. The silicon tube was taken out when repeated CT scanning revealed no hematoma. The results of clinical follow-ups indicated that this procedure is as good as, or rather better than conventional microsurgery with evacuation of hematoma under direct vision. Moreover this CT-guided stereotactic approach for evacuation of the hematoma has the following advantages: 1) the procedure is simple and safe, 2) operation can be performed under local anesthesia, and 3) the hematoma is drained out completely with the aid of urokinase. This surgery seems indicated as an emergency treatment for high-age or high risk patients and also as a routine surgery for intracerebral hematomas in patients showing no herination signs. (author)

  19. MRI guided stereotactic ventrointermediate thalamotomy for writer's cramp: two cases report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-shi NIU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the methods and curative effect of stereotactic surgery for treating writer's cramp (WC. Methods and Results Two patients with writer's cramp (tremor type underwent MRI guided stereotactic ventrointermediate (Vim thalamotomy on the left side. The symptoms of one patient disappeared immediately after operation, and the patient could write legibly. The tremor of right upper extremity in another patient was improved significantly. Two patients did not present obvious complications, and the previous symptoms were not found to recur during follow-up period respectively. Conclusions Stereotactic surgery for treatment of writer's cramp has definite therapeutic effect. MRI guided stereotactic technique can effectively avoid the complications of Vim thalamotomy. However, the indications of two methods in surgical treatment [thalamotomy and deep brain stimulation (DBS] and the respective merits still need further study. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.10.009

  20. MR-guided stereotactic neurosurgery-comparison of fiducial-based and anatomical landmark transformation approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunsche, S; Sauner, D; Maarouf, M; Hoevels, M; Luyken, K; Schulte, O; Lackner, K; Sturm, V; Treuer, H

    2004-01-01

    For application in magnetic resonance (MR) guided stereotactic neurosurgery, two methods for transformation of MR-image coordinates in stereotactic, frame-based coordinates exist: the direct stereotactic fiducial-based transformation method and the indirect anatomical landmark method. In contrast to direct stereotactic MR transformation, indirect transformation is based on anatomical landmark coregistration of stereotactic computerized tomography and non-stereotactic MR images. In a patient study, both transformation methods have been investigated with visual inspection and mutual information analysis. Comparison was done for our standard imaging protocol, including t2-weighted spin-echo as well as contrast enhanced t1-weighted gradient-echo imaging. For t2-weighted spin-echo imaging, both methods showed almost similar and satisfying performance with a small, but significant advantage for fiducial-based transformation. In contrast, for t1-weighted gradient-echo imaging with more geometric distortions due to field inhomogenities and gradient nonlinearity than t2-weighted spin-echo imaging, mainly caused by a reduced bandwidth per pixel, anatomical landmark transformation delivered markedly better results. Here, fiducial-based transformation yielded results which are intolerable for stereotactic neurosurgery. Mean Euclidian distances between both transformation methods were 0.96 mm for t2-weighted spin-echo and 1.67 mm for t1-weighted gradient-echo imaging. Maximum deviations were 1.72 mm and 3.06 mm, respectively

  1. MR-guided stereotactic neurosurgery-comparison of fiducial-based and anatomical landmark transformation approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunsche, S [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Sauner, D [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich-Schiller-University of Jena, Jena (Germany); Maarouf, M [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Hoevels, M [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Luyken, K [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Schulte, O [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Lackner, K [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Sturm, V [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Treuer, H [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)

    2004-06-21

    For application in magnetic resonance (MR) guided stereotactic neurosurgery, two methods for transformation of MR-image coordinates in stereotactic, frame-based coordinates exist: the direct stereotactic fiducial-based transformation method and the indirect anatomical landmark method. In contrast to direct stereotactic MR transformation, indirect transformation is based on anatomical landmark coregistration of stereotactic computerized tomography and non-stereotactic MR images. In a patient study, both transformation methods have been investigated with visual inspection and mutual information analysis. Comparison was done for our standard imaging protocol, including t2-weighted spin-echo as well as contrast enhanced t1-weighted gradient-echo imaging. For t2-weighted spin-echo imaging, both methods showed almost similar and satisfying performance with a small, but significant advantage for fiducial-based transformation. In contrast, for t1-weighted gradient-echo imaging with more geometric distortions due to field inhomogenities and gradient nonlinearity than t2-weighted spin-echo imaging, mainly caused by a reduced bandwidth per pixel, anatomical landmark transformation delivered markedly better results. Here, fiducial-based transformation yielded results which are intolerable for stereotactic neurosurgery. Mean Euclidian distances between both transformation methods were 0.96 mm for t2-weighted spin-echo and 1.67 mm for t1-weighted gradient-echo imaging. Maximum deviations were 1.72 mm and 3.06 mm, respectively.

  2. Application of electronic endoscopy and CT-guided stereotactic aspiration to intracerebral hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusaka, Masahiko

    1991-01-01

    According to the development of computer technology and operative instruments, stereotactic neurosurgery became more precise, and extended as its indication. CT-guided stereotactic aspiration of intracerebral hematoma is superior operative procedure with rare complications. Using Stereotactic Aqua-Stream and Aspirator at the same time, hematoma was removed sufficiently. However, stereotactic neurosurgery had a major weak points, it was a blind operation. An endoscope (FVS-1000, M and M Co.) and SASA (Marui Medical Co.) were applied in 5 cases of intracerebral hematoma. In physiological saline, the endoscope had 32.9 deg angle of visual field, 1 mm - 25 mm depth of vision, and 16 pair/mm resolution. It was excellent ability for neurosurgery. Using for clinical cases, the bloody fluid in the hematoma cavity disturbed visibility. It was a difficult problem. Influence of bloody fluid concentration to depth of vision and resolution was investigated, and method of making clear visibility was described. (author)

  3. CT and Ultrasound Guided Stereotactic High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Bradford J.; Yanof, J.; Frenkel, V.; Viswanathan, A.; Dromi, S.; Oh, K.; Kruecker, J.; Bauer, C.; Seip, R.; Kam, A.; Li, K. C. P.

    2006-05-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of CT and B-mode Ultrasound (US) targeted HIFU, a prototype coaxial focused ultrasound transducer was registered and integrated to a CT scanner. CT and diagnostic ultrasound were used for HIFU targeting and monitoring, with the goals of both thermal ablation and non-thermal enhanced drug delivery. A 1 megahertz coaxial ultrasound transducer was custom fabricated and attached to a passive position-sensing arm and an active six degree-of-freedom robotic arm via a CT stereotactic frame. The outer therapeutic transducer with a 10 cm fixed focal zone was coaxially mounted to an inner diagnostic US transducer (2-4 megahertz, Philips Medical Systems). This coaxial US transducer was connected to a modified commercial focused ultrasound generator (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, IN) with a maximum total acoustic power of 100 watts. This pre-clinical paradigm was tested for ability to heat tissue in phantoms with monitoring and navigation from CT and live US. The feasibility of navigation via image fusion of CT with other modalities such as PET and MRI was demonstrated. Heated water phantoms were tested for correlation between CT numbers and temperature (for ablation monitoring). The prototype transducer and integrated CT/US imaging system enabled simultaneous multimodality imaging and therapy. Pre-clinical phantom models validated the treatment paradigm and demonstrated integrated multimodality guidance and treatment monitoring. Temperature changes during phantom cooling corresponded to CT number changes. Contrast enhanced or non-enhanced CT numbers may potentially be used to monitor thermal ablation with HIFU. Integrated CT, diagnostic US, and therapeutic focused ultrasound bridges a gap between diagnosis and therapy. Preliminary results show that the multimodality system may represent a relatively inexpensive, accessible, and simple method of both targeting and monitoring HIFU effects. Small animal pre-clinical models may be translated to large

  4. Image-guided stereotactic surgery using ultrasonography and reconstructive three-dimensional CT-imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hirotsune; Iseki, Hiroshi; Umezawa, Yoshihiro

    1991-01-01

    A new simulation and navigation system utilizing three-dimensional CT images has been developed for image-guided stereotactic surgery. Preoperative CT images are not always useful in predicting the intraoperative location of lesions, for cerebral lesions are easily displaced or distorted by gravity, brain retraction, and/or CSF aspiration during operative procedure. This new system, however, has the advantage that the intraoperative locations of intracranial lesions or the anatomical structures of the brain can be precisely confirmed during stereotactic surgery. Serial CT images were obtained from a patient whose head had been fixed to the ISEKI CT-guided stereotactic frame. The data of serial CT images were saved on a floppy disc and then transferred to the work station (IRIS) using the off line. In order to find the best approach angle for ultrasound-guided stereotactic surgery, three-dimenstional CT images were reconstructed using the work station. The site of the craniotomy or the angle of the trajectory of the ultrasound probe was measured preoperatively based on the three-dimensional CT images. Then, in the operating room, the patient's head was fixed to the ISEKI frame with the subframe at the same position as before according to the measurement of the CT images. In a case of cystic glioma, the predicable ultrasonograms from three-dimensional reconstructive CT images were ascertained to correspond well to the actual ultrasound images during ultrasound-guided stereotactic surgery. Therefore, the new simulation and navigation system can be judged to be a powerful operative supporting modality for correcting the locations of cerebral lesions; it allows one to perform stereotactic surgery more accurately and less invasively. (author)

  5. A computer assisted toolholder to guide surgery in stereotactic space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, C; Pluchino, F; Luzzara, M; Ongania, E; Casolino, D S

    1994-01-01

    A computer assisted toolholder, integrated with an anatomical graphic 3-D rendering programme, is presented. Stereotactic neuroanatomical images are acquired, and the same reference system is employed to represent the position of the toolholder on the monitor. The surgeon can check the orientation of different approach trajectories, moving the toolholder in a situation of virtual reality. Angular values expressed by high precision encoders on the five joints of the toolholder modify "on line" the representation of the configuration of the toolholder within the three dimensional representation of the patient's anatomy.

  6. Field guide to nonlinear optics

    CERN Document Server

    Powers, Peter E

    2013-01-01

    Optomechanics is a field of mechanics that addresses the specific design challenges associated with optical systems. This [i]Field Guide [/i]describes how to mount optical components, as well as how to analyze a given design. It is intended for practicing optical and mechanical engineers whose work requires knowledge in both optics and mechanics. This Field Guide is designed for those looking for a condensed and concise source of key concepts, equations, and techniques for nonlinear optics. Topics covered include technologically important effects, recent developments in nonlinear optics

  7. Real-time 3D-surface-guided head refixation useful for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shidong; Liu Dezhi; Yin Gongjie; Zhuang Ping; Geng, Jason

    2006-01-01

    Accurate and precise head refixation in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy has been achieved through alignment of real-time 3D-surface images with a reference surface image. The reference surface image is either a 3D optical surface image taken at simulation with the desired treatment position, or a CT/MRI-surface rendering in the treatment plan with corrections for patient motion during CT/MRI scans and partial volume effects. The real-time 3D surface images are rapidly captured by using a 3D video camera mounted on the ceiling of the treatment vault. Any facial expression such as mouth opening that affects surface shape and location can be avoided using a new facial monitoring technique. The image artifacts on the real-time surface can generally be removed by setting a threshold of jumps at the neighboring points while preserving detailed features of the surface of interest. Such a real-time surface image, registered in the treatment machine coordinate system, provides a reliable representation of the patient head position during the treatment. A fast automatic alignment between the real-time surface and the reference surface using a modified iterative-closest-point method leads to an efficient and robust surface-guided target refixation. Experimental and clinical results demonstrate the excellent efficacy of <2 min set-up time, the desired accuracy and precision of <1 mm in isocenter shifts, and <1 deg. in rotation

  8. Technical Note: Evaluation of the systematic accuracy of a frameless, multiple image modality guided, linear accelerator based stereotactic radiosurgery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, N., E-mail: nwen1@hfhs.org; Snyder, K. C.; Qin, Y.; Li, H.; Siddiqui, M. S.; Chetty, I. J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Brand Boulevard, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Scheib, S. G.; Schmelzer, P. [Varian Medical System, Täfernstrasse 7, Dättwil AG 5405 (Switzerland)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the total systematic accuracy of a frameless, image guided stereotactic radiosurgery system. Methods: The localization accuracy and intermodality difference was determined by delivering radiation to an end-to-end prototype phantom, in which the targets were localized using optical surface monitoring system (OSMS), electromagnetic beacon-based tracking (Calypso®), cone-beam CT, “snap-shot” planar x-ray imaging, and a robotic couch. Six IMRT plans with jaw tracking and a flattening filter free beam were used to study the dosimetric accuracy for intracranial and spinal stereotactic radiosurgery treatment. Results: End-to-end localization accuracy of the system evaluated with the end-to-end phantom was 0.5 ± 0.2 mm with a maximum deviation of 0.9 mm over 90 measurements (including jaw, MLC, and cone measurements for both auto and manual fusion) for single isocenter, single target treatment, 0.6 ± 0.4 mm for multitarget treatment with shared isocenter. Residual setup errors were within 0.1 mm for OSMS, and 0.3 mm for Calypso. Dosimetric evaluation based on absolute film dosimetry showed greater than 90% pass rate for all cases using a gamma criteria of 3%/1 mm. Conclusions: The authors’ experience demonstrates that the localization accuracy of the frameless image-guided system is comparable to robotic or invasive frame based radiosurgery systems.

  9. Technical Note: Evaluation of the systematic accuracy of a frameless, multiple image modality guided, linear accelerator based stereotactic radiosurgery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, N.; Snyder, K. C.; Qin, Y.; Li, H.; Siddiqui, M. S.; Chetty, I. J.; Scheib, S. G.; Schmelzer, P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the total systematic accuracy of a frameless, image guided stereotactic radiosurgery system. Methods: The localization accuracy and intermodality difference was determined by delivering radiation to an end-to-end prototype phantom, in which the targets were localized using optical surface monitoring system (OSMS), electromagnetic beacon-based tracking (Calypso®), cone-beam CT, “snap-shot” planar x-ray imaging, and a robotic couch. Six IMRT plans with jaw tracking and a flattening filter free beam were used to study the dosimetric accuracy for intracranial and spinal stereotactic radiosurgery treatment. Results: End-to-end localization accuracy of the system evaluated with the end-to-end phantom was 0.5 ± 0.2 mm with a maximum deviation of 0.9 mm over 90 measurements (including jaw, MLC, and cone measurements for both auto and manual fusion) for single isocenter, single target treatment, 0.6 ± 0.4 mm for multitarget treatment with shared isocenter. Residual setup errors were within 0.1 mm for OSMS, and 0.3 mm for Calypso. Dosimetric evaluation based on absolute film dosimetry showed greater than 90% pass rate for all cases using a gamma criteria of 3%/1 mm. Conclusions: The authors’ experience demonstrates that the localization accuracy of the frameless image-guided system is comparable to robotic or invasive frame based radiosurgery systems.

  10. MRI-guided stereotactic amygdalohippocampectomy: a single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Z

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Zdenek Vojtěch,1 Hana Malíková,2 Lenka Krámská,3 Roman Liščák,4 Vilibald Vladyka41Department of Neurology, 2Department of Radiodiagnostics, 3Department of Psychology, 4Department of Stereotactic and Radiation Neurosurgery, Na Homolce Hospital, Prague, Czech RepublicBackground: This paper presents our experience of stereotactic radiofrequency amygdalohippocampectomy performed for intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.Methods: The article describes the cases of 61 patients who were treated during the period from 2004 to 2010. Mean postoperative follow-up was 5.3 years. Neuropsychological results were obtained for a subset of 31 patients.Results: At their last postsurgical visit, 43 (70.5% patients were Engel class I, six (9.8% class II, nine (14.8% class III, and three (4.9% class IV. The surgery was complicated by four intracranial hematomas. One of them caused acute hydrocephalus and was treated by shunting and resolved without sequelae, while another caused transitory aphasia. The remaining hematomas were asymptomatic. There were two cases of meningitis which required antibiotic treatment. One patient committed suicide due to postoperative depression. After the procedure, we performed open epilepsy surgery and rethermolesions in three and two patients, respectively (8.2%. Patients showed increases in their mean full scale, verbal, and performance intelligence quotient (IQ scores of 4, 3, and 4 IQ points, respectively (P<0.05. Five (17.2%, four (13.8%, and four (13.3% patients improved their full scale, verbal, and performance IQ scores, respectively. No significant changes were found in memory performance, with a mean increase of 1, 3, and 0 memory quotient points in global, verbal, and visual memory, respectively (P<0.05. Global memory improved in three (10.3% patients, verbal memory in one (3.4%, and one patient (3.3% showed deterioration in visual memory.Conclusion: Stereotactic radiofrequency amygdalohippocampectomy offers a

  11. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Patients With Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsen, Frank, E-mail: frank.paulsen@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Doerr, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Wilhelm, Helmut [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Becker, Gerd [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinik am Eichert, Goeppingen (Germany); Bamberg, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Classen, Johannes [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Vincentius-Kliniken, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SFRT) in the treatment of optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2005, 109 patients (113 eyes) with primary (n = 37) or secondary (n = 76) ONSM were treated according to a prospective protocol with SFRT to a median dose of 54 Gy. All patients underwent radiographic, ophthalmologic, and endocrine analysis before and after SFRT. Radiographic response, visual control, and late side effects were endpoints of the analysis. Results: Median time to last clinical, radiographic, and ophthalmologic follow up was 30.2 months (n = 113), 42.7 months (n = 108), and 53.7 months (n = 91), respectively. Regression of the tumor was observed in 5 eyes and progression in 4 eyes, whereas 104 remained stable. Visual acuity improved in 12, deteriorated in 11, and remained stable in 68 eyes. Mean visual field defects reduced from 33.6% (n = 90) to 17.8% (n = 56) in ipsilateral and from 10% (n = 94) to 6.7% (n = 62) in contralateral eyes. Ocular motility improved in 23, remained stable in 65, and deteriorated in 3 eyes. Radiographic tumor control was 100% at 3 years and 98% at 5 years. Visual acuity was preserved in 94.8% after 3 years and in 90.9% after 5 years. Endocrine function was normal in 90.8% after 3 years and in 81.3% after 5 years. Conclusions: SFRT represents a highly effective treatment for ONSM. Interdisciplinary counseling of the patients is recommended. Because of the high rate of preservation of visual acuity we consider SFRT the standard approach for the treatment of ONSM. Prolonged observation is warranted to more accurately assess late visual impairment. Moderate de-escalation of the radiation dose might improve the preservation of visual acuity and pituitary gland function.

  12. Clinical experience of quantex coordinate software for CT guided stereotactic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabashi, Toshitake; Ichikawa, Hideo; Yasuda, Eisuke; Tsuruta, Hatsuo; Ishikawa, Yoshihisa; Kimura, Tokuji; Kanamori, Isao

    1991-01-01

    Recently, Quantex Coordinate Software was newly developed for CT-guided stereotactic surgery. We have the opportunity of using this software in 6 cases with intracerebral hematoma for evacuation and 2 cases with brain tumor for needle biopsy by using CT-guided stereotactic surgery. The followings are the features with a little clinical experience. One of the biggest features is that this software can simulate the best expected route of the puncture needle from burr hole to target point before inserting. Also compared with CT 9000 series Software, it has many new functions for more advanced hardware as well as advance standard software. Two cases of intracerebral hematoma for evacuation and 1 case of a brain tumor for a biopsy were carried out using this software mainly as a simulation. In all cases, this software proved to be very useful. (author)

  13. Multifractionated image-guided and stereotactic intensity-modulated radiotherapy of paraspinal tumors: A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yoshiya; Lovelock, D. Michael; Yenice, Kamil M.; Bilsky, Mark H.; Hunt, Margaret A.; Zatcky, Joan; Leibel, Steven A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The use of image-guided and stereotactic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques have made the delivery of high-dose radiation to lesions within close proximity to the spinal cord feasible. This report presents clinical and physical data regarding the use of IMRT coupled with noninvasive body frames (stereotactic and image-guided) for multifractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (Memorial) stereotactic body frame (MSBF) and Memorial body cradle (MBC) have been developed as noninvasive immobilizing devices for paraspinal IMRT using stereotactic (MSBF) and image-guided (MBC) techniques. Patients were either previously irradiated or prescribed doses beyond spinal cord tolerance (54 Gy in standard fractionation) and had unresectable gross disease involving the spinal canal. The planning target volume (PTV) was the gross tumor volume with a 1 cm margin. The PTV was not allowed to include the spinal cord contour. All treatment planning was performed using software developed within the institution. Isocenter verification was performed with an in-room computed tomography scan (MSBF) or electronic portal imaging devices, or both. Patients were followed up with serial magnetic resonance imaging every 3-4 months, and no patients were lost to follow-up. Kaplan-Meier statistics were used for analysis of clinical data. Results: Both the MSBF and MBC were able to provide setup accuracy within 2 mm. With a median follow-up of 11 months, 35 patients (14 primary and 21 secondary malignancies) underwent treatment. The median dose previously received was 3000 cGy in 10 fractions. The median dose prescribed for these patients was 2000 cGy/5 fractions (2000-3000 cGy), which provided a median PTV V100 of 88%. In previously unirradiated patients, the median prescribed dose was 7000 cGy (5940-7000 cGy) with a median PTV V100 of 90%. The median Dmax to the cord was 34% and 68% for previously irradiated and never

  14. Guided-Wave Optical Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaro, Vittorio M. N.; Dell'Olio, Francesco; Casamassima, Biagio; De Leonardis, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Guided-wave optical biosensors are reviewed in this paper. Advantages related to optical technologies are presented and integrated architectures are investigated in detail. Main classes of bio receptors and the most attractive optical transduction mechanisms are discussed. The possibility to use Mach-Zehnder and Young interferometers, microdisk and microring resonators, surface plasmon resonance, hollow and antiresonant waveguides, and Bragg gratings to realize very sensitive and selective, ultra-compact and fast biosensors is discussed. Finally, CMOS-compatible technologies are proved to be the most attractive for fabrication of guided-wave photonic biosensors.

  15. Field guide to geometrical optics

    CERN Document Server

    Greivenkamp, John E

    2004-01-01

    This Field Guide derives from the treatment of geometrical optics that has evolved from both the undergraduate and graduate programs at the Optical Sciences Center at the University of Arizona. The development is both rigorous and complete, and it features a consistent notation and sign convention. This volume covers Gaussian imagery, paraxial optics, first-order optical system design, system examples, illumination, chromatic effects, and an introduction to aberrations. The appendices provide supplemental material on radiometry and photometry, the human eye, and several other topics.

  16. Quality assurance procedure for a gamma guided stereotactic breast biopsy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Benjamin L; Brem, Rachel; Black, Rachel; Majewski, Stan

    2006-01-01

    A quality assurance procedure has been developed for a prototype gamma-ray guided stereotactic biopsy system. The system consists of a compact small-field-of-view gamma-ray camera mounted to the rotational arm of a Lorad stereotactic biopsy system. The small-field-of-view gamma-ray camera has been developed for clinical applications where mammographic X-ray localization is not possible. Marker sources that can be imaged with the gamma-camera have been designed and built for quality assurance testing and to provide a fiducial reference mark. An algorithm for determining the three dimensional location of a region of interest, such as a lesion, relative to the fiducial mark has been implemented into the software control of the camera. This system can be used to determine the three-dimensional location of a region of interest from a stereo pair of images and that information can be used to guide a biopsy needle to that site. Point source phantom tests performed with the system have demonstrated that the camera can be used to localize a point of interest to within 1 mm, which is satisfactory for its use in needle localization.

  17. Target coverage in image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy of liver tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderink, Wouter; Méndez Romero, Alejandra; Vásquez Osorio, Eliana M; de Boer, Hans C J; Brandwijk, René P; Levendag, Peter C; Heijmen, Ben J M

    2007-05-01

    To determine the effect of image-guided procedures (with computed tomography [CT] and electronic portal images before each treatment fraction) on target coverage in stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver patients using a stereotactic body frame (SBF) and abdominal compression. CT guidance was used to correct for day-to-day variations in the tumor's mean position in the SBF. By retrospectively evaluating 57 treatment sessions, tumor coverage, as obtained with the clinically applied CT-guided protocol, was compared with that of alternative procedures. The internal target volume-plus (ITV(+)) was introduced to explicitly include uncertainties in tumor delineations resulting from CT-imaging artifacts caused by residual respiratory motion. Tumor coverage was defined as the volume overlap of the ITV(+), derived from a tumor delineated in a treatment CT scan, and the planning target volume. Patient stability in the SBF, after acquisition of the treatment CT scan, was evaluated by measuring the displacement of the bony anatomy in the electronic portal images relative to CT. Application of our clinical protocol (with setup corrections following from manual measurements of the distances between the contours of the planning target volume and the daily clinical target volume in three orthogonal planes, multiple two-dimensional) increased the frequency of nearly full (> or = 99%) ITV(+) coverage to 77% compared with 63% without setup correction. An automated three-dimensional method further improved the frequency to 96%. Patient displacements in the SBF were generally small (design, patient stability in the SBF should be verified with portal imaging.

  18. Effect of image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy on peripheral non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang SW

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Shu-wen Wang,1 Juan Ren,1 Yan-li Yan,2 Chao-fan Xue,2 Li Tan,2 Xiao-wei Ma2 1Department of Radiotherapy, First Affiliated Hospital of Xian Jiaotong University, 2Medical School of Xian Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The objective of this study was to compare the effects of image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy and conventional fractionated radiotherapy on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Fifty stage- and age-matched cases with NSCLC were randomly divided into two groups (A and B. There were 23 cases in group A and 27 cases in group B. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT and stereotactic radiotherapy were conjugately applied to the patients in group A. Group A patients underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (6–8 Gy/time three times per week, with a total dose of 64–66 Gy; group B received conventional fractionated radiotherapy, with a total dose of 68–70 Gy five times per week. In group A, 1-year and 2-year local failure survival rate and 1-year local failure-free survival rate were significantly higher than in group B (P<0.05. The local failure rate (P<0.05 and distant metastasis rate (P>0.05 were lower in group A than in group B. The overall survival rate of group A was significantly higher than that of group B (P=0.03, and the survival rate at 1 year was 87% vs 63%, (P<0.05. The median survival time of group A was longer than that of group B. There was no significant difference in the incidence of complications between the two groups (P>0.05. Compared with conventional fractionated radiation therapy, image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in NSCLC received better treatment efficacy and showed good tolerability. Keywords: non-small-cell lung cancer, hypofractionated radiotherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, segmentation, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image-guided radiation therapy technology

  19. A novel stereotactic frame for real PET-guided biopsies: A preclinical proof-of-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Rodicio, J; Sanchez-Merino, G; Garcia-Fidalgo, M A; Tobalina-Larrea, I

    2017-09-01

    To design, build and test a stereotactic device that allows PET image-guided biopsies to be performed. An initial prototype consisting of four main pieces, one of which contains radioactive markers to make it visible in the PET images, was built using a 3D printer. Once the device is mounted, a spherical coordinate system is built with the entrance needle point in the skin as the origin of coordinates. Two in-house software programs, namely getCoord.ijm, which obtains the spherical coordinates of the tumour tissue to be biopsied, and getNeedle.ijm, which virtualizes the inner needle tip once the puncture has taken place, were written. This prototype was tested on an FDG-doped phantom to characterize both the accuracy of the system and the procedure time. Up to 11 complete biopsy procedures were conducted. The mean total procedure time was less than 20min, which is less than the procedure time of conventional standard CT-guided biopsies. The overall accuracy of the system was found to be 5.0±1.3mm, which outperforms the criterion used in routine clinical practice when targeting tumours with a diameter of 10mm. A stereotactic frame to conduct real PET image-guided biopsies has been designed and built. A proof-of-concept was performed to characterize the system. The procedure time and accuracy of the system were found to meet the current needs of physicians performing biopsies. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Target Coverage in Image-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Liver Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderink, Wouter; Romero, Alejandra Mendez; Osorio, Eliana M. Vasquez; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Brandwijk, Rene P.; Levendag, Peter C.; Heijmen, Ben

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of image-guided procedures (with computed tomography [CT] and electronic portal images before each treatment fraction) on target coverage in stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver patients using a stereotactic body frame (SBF) and abdominal compression. CT guidance was used to correct for day-to-day variations in the tumor's mean position in the SBF. Methods and Materials: By retrospectively evaluating 57 treatment sessions, tumor coverage, as obtained with the clinically applied CT-guided protocol, was compared with that of alternative procedures. The internal target volume-plus (ITV + ) was introduced to explicitly include uncertainties in tumor delineations resulting from CT-imaging artifacts caused by residual respiratory motion. Tumor coverage was defined as the volume overlap of the ITV + , derived from a tumor delineated in a treatment CT scan, and the planning target volume. Patient stability in the SBF, after acquisition of the treatment CT scan, was evaluated by measuring the displacement of the bony anatomy in the electronic portal images relative to CT. Results: Application of our clinical protocol (with setup corrections following from manual measurements of the distances between the contours of the planning target volume and the daily clinical target volume in three orthogonal planes, multiple two-dimensional) increased the frequency of nearly full (≥99%) ITV + coverage to 77% compared with 63% without setup correction. An automated three-dimensional method further improved the frequency to 96%. Patient displacements in the SBF were generally small (≤2 mm, 1 standard deviation), but large craniocaudal displacements (maximal 7.2 mm) were occasionally observed. Conclusion: Daily, CT-assisted patient setup may substantially improve tumor coverage, especially with the automated three-dimensional procedure. In the present treatment design, patient stability in the SBF should be verified with portal imaging

  1. CT image-guided intensity-modulated therapy for paraspinal tumors using stereotactic immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yenice, Kamil M.; Lovelock, D. Michael; Hunt, Margie A.; Lutz, Wendell R.; Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Hua, C.-H.; Yamada, Josh; Bilsky, Mark; Lee, Henry; Pfaff, Karl; Spirou, Spiridon V.; Amols, Howard I.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To design and implement a noninvasive stereotactic immobilization technique with daily CT image-guided positioning to treat patients with paraspinal lesions accurately and to quantify the systematic and random patient setup errors occurring with this method. Methods and Materials: A stereotactic body frame (SBF) was developed for 'rigid' immobilization of paraspinal patients. The inherent accuracy of this system for stereotactic CT-guided treatment was evaluated with phantom studies. Seven patients with thoracic and lumbar spine lesions were immobilized with the SBF and positioned for 33 treatment fractions using daily CT scans. For all 7 patients, the daily setup errors, as assessed from the daily CT scans, were corrected at each treatment fraction. A retrospective analysis was also performed to assess what the impact on patient treatment would have been without the CT-based corrections (i.e., if patient setup had been performed only with the SBF). Results: The average magnitude of systematic and random errors from uncorrected patient setups using the SBF was approximately 2 mm and 1.5 mm (1 SD), respectively. For fixed phantom targets, the system accuracy for the SBF localization and treatment was shown to be within 1 mm (1 SD) in any direction. Dose-volume histograms incorporating these uncertainties for an intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan for lumbar spine lesions were generated, and the effects on the dose-volume histograms were studied. Conclusion: We demonstrated a very accurate and precise method of patient immobilization and treatment delivery based on a noninvasive SBF and daily image guidance for paraspinal lesions. The SBF provides excellent immobilization for paraspinal targets, with setup accuracy better than 2 mm (1 SD). However, for highly conformal paraspinal treatments, uncorrected systematic and random errors of 2 mm in magnitude can result in a significantly greater (>100%) dose to the spinal cord than planned, even though the

  2. MRI-guided stereotactic neurosurgical procedures in a diagnostic MRI suite: Background and safe practice recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Paul S; Willie, Jon T; Vadivelu, Sudhakar; Azmi-Ghadimi, Hooman; Nichols, Amy; Fauerbach, Loretta Litz; Johnson, Helen Boehm; Graham, Denise

    2017-07-01

    The development of navigation technology facilitating MRI-guided stereotactic neurosurgery has enabled neurosurgeons to perform a variety of procedures ranging from deep brain stimulation to laser ablation entirely within an intraoperative or diagnostic MRI suite while having real-time visualization of brain anatomy. Prior to this technology, some of these procedures required multisite workflow patterns that presented significant risk to the patient during transport. For those facilities with access to this technology, safe practice guidelines exist only for procedures performed within an intraoperative MRI. There are currently no safe practice guidelines or parameters available for facilities looking to integrate this technology into practice in conventional MRI suites. Performing neurosurgical procedures in a diagnostic MRI suite does require precautionary measures. The relative novelty of technology and workflows for direct MRI-guided procedures requires consideration of safe practice recommendations, including those pertaining to infection control and magnet safety issues. This article proposes a framework of safe practice recommendations designed for assessing readiness and optimization of MRI-guided neurosurgical interventions in the diagnostic MRI suite in an effort to mitigate patient risk. The framework is based on existing clinical evidence, recommendations, and guidelines related to infection control and prevention, health care-associated infections, and magnet safety, as well as the clinical and practical experience of neurosurgeons utilizing this technology. © 2017 American Society for Healthcare Risk Management of the American Hospital Association.

  3. Cirurgia estereotáxica guiada para angiomas cavernosos Stereotactic-guided surgery for cavernous angioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MURILO S. MENESES

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Os angiomas cavernosos intracerebrais são lesões que podem causar hemorragias, crises convulsivas e déficits neurológicos. Essa patologia passou a ter diagnóstico mais precoce com o advento da ressonância magnética. A remoção radical por cirurgia é o melhor método de tratamento. Devido a frequente localização subcortical ou profunda, a utilização de métodos de localização por imagem como a estereotaxia apresentam várias vantagens como: menor incisão de pele, craniotomia e manipulação do tecido cerebral, consequentemente com menor morbidade. Apresentamos uma série de nove angiomas cavernosos tratados por ressecção cirúrgica radical guiada por estereotaxia. Em todos os casos o diagnóstico foi realizado por ressonância magnética e houve confirmação anátomo-patológica. A média de idade dos pacientes foi 30 anos, variando entre 20 e 54 anos. Como morbidade transitória, um paciente teve uma crise convulsiva no 3° dia pós-operatório e uma paciente apresentou disfasia e hemiparesia no 2° dia pós-operatório, com recuperação total na evolução. No total, a remoção foi radical em todos os casos e os pacientes permanecem sem nenhum déficit neurológico relacionado à cirurgia.Intracerebral cavernous angiomas may cause hemorrhage, epileptic seizures and neurological deficits. The diagnosis of these lesions became easier with the advent of the magnetic resonance image (MRI. Radical resection is the treatment of choice. Due to frequent subcortical or deep location, image-guided techniques, such as stereotactic-guided surgery, offer many advantages as smaller skin incision and craniotomy, less brain manipulation with consequently lower morbidity. We present a series of nine cavernous angiomas treated by stereotactic-guided radical surgical resection. The diagnosis was done by MRI and confirmed by pathologic studies in all cases. Mean age of patients was 30 years old (range 20-54 years. Postoperative morbidity

  4. Reliability of the Bony Anatomy in Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Brain Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Baier, Kurt; Guenther, Iris; Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Sauer, Otto; Vordermark, Dirk; Flentje, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether the position of brain metastases remains stable between planning and treatment in cranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with 20 brain metastases were treated with single-fraction (17 lesions) or hypofractionated (3 lesions) image-guided SRT. Median time interval between planning and treatment was 8 days. Before treatment a cone-beam CT (CBCT) and a conventional CT after application of i.v. contrast were acquired. Setup errors using automatic bone registration (CBCT) and manual soft-tissue registration of the brain metastases (conventional CT) were compared. Results: Tumor size was not significantly different between planning and treatment. The three-dimensional setup error (mean ± SD) was 4.0 ± 2.1 mm and 3.5 ± 2.2 mm according to the bony anatomy and the lesion itself, respectively. A highly significant correlation between automatic bone match and soft-tissue registration was seen in all three directions (r ≥ 0.88). The three-dimensional distance between the isocenter according to bone match and soft-tissue registration was 1.7 ± 0.7 mm, maximum 2.8 mm. Treatment of intracranial pressure with steroids did not influence the position of the lesion relative to the bony anatomy. Conclusion: With a time interval of approximately 1 week between planning and treatment, the bony anatomy of the skull proved to be an excellent surrogate for the target position in image-guided SRT

  5. Improved operative efficiency using a real-time MRI-guided stereotactic platform for laser amygdalohippocampotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Allen L; Sussman, Eric S; Pendharkar, Arjun V; Le, Scheherazade; Mantovani, Alessandra; Keebaugh, Alaine C; Drover, David R; Grant, Gerald A; Wintermark, Max; Halpern, Casey H

    2018-04-01

    OBJECTIVE MR-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (MRgLITT) is a minimally invasive method for thermal destruction of benign or malignant tissue that has been used for selective amygdalohippocampal ablation for the treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy. The authors report their initial experience adopting a real-time MRI-guided stereotactic platform that allows for completion of the entire procedure in the MRI suite. METHODS Between October 2014 and May 2016, 17 patients with mesial temporal sclerosis were selected by a multidisciplinary epilepsy board to undergo a selective amygdalohippocampal ablation for temporal lobe epilepsy using MRgLITT. The first 9 patients underwent standard laser ablation in 2 phases (operating room [OR] and MRI suite), whereas the next 8 patients underwent laser ablation entirely in the MRI suite with the ClearPoint platform. A checklist specific to the real-time MRI-guided laser amydalohippocampal ablation was developed and used for each case. For both cohorts, clinical and operative information, including average case times and accuracy data, was collected and analyzed. RESULTS There was a learning curve associated with using this real-time MRI-guided system. However, operative times decreased in a linear fashion, as did total anesthesia time. In fact, the total mean patient procedure time was less in the MRI cohort (362.8 ± 86.6 minutes) than in the OR cohort (456.9 ± 80.7 minutes). The mean anesthesia time was significantly shorter in the MRI cohort (327.2 ± 79.9 minutes) than in the OR cohort (435.8 ± 78.4 minutes, p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS The real-time MRI platform for MRgLITT can be adopted in an expedient manner. Completion of MRgLITT entirely in the MRI suite may lead to significant advantages in procedural times.

  6. Image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy for patients with vestibular schwannoma. A clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badakhshi, H.; Muellner, S.; Budach, V. [Charite School of Medicine and University Hospital of Berlin, Departments for Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Wiener, E. [School of Medicine and University Hospital of Berlin, Institute for Neuroradiology, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    Local tumor control and functional outcome after linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) were assessed. In all, 250 patients with VS were treated: 190 patients with tumors < 2 cm diameter underwent SRS and 60 patients with tumors >2 to 3.5 cm underwent FSRT. Dose prescription for all cases with SRS (n = 190, 76 %) was 13.5 Gy. For FSRT, mainly two hypofractionated schedules (n = 60, 24 %) with either 7 fractions of 5 Gy (total dose: 35 Gy; n = 35) or 11 fractions of 3.8 Gy (total dose: 41.8 Gy; n = 16) were used. The primary endpoint was local tumor control. Secondary endpoints were symptomatic control and morbidity. The median follow-up was 33.8 months. The 3-year local tumor control was 88.9 %. Local control for SRS and FSRT was 88 and 92 %, respectively. For FSRT with 35 and 41.8 Gy, local control was 90 and 100 %, respectively. There were no acute reactions exceeding grade I. In 61 cases (24.4 % of the entire cohort), trigeminal neuralgia was reported prior to treatment. At last follow-up, 16.3 % (10/61) of those patients reported relief of pain. Regarding facial nerve dysfunction, 45 patients (18 %) presented with symptoms prior to RT. At the last follow-up, 13.3% (6/45) of those patients reported a relief of dysesthesia. Using SRS to treat small VS results in good local control rates. FSRT for larger lesions also seems effective. Severe treatment-related complications are not frequent. Therefore, image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy is an appropriate alternative to microsurgery for patients with VS. (orig.) [German] Wir analysierten die lokale Kontrolle und die funktionellen Verlaeufe bei Patienten mit einem Vestibularisschwannom (VS), die sich einer linacbasierten stereotaktischen Radiochirurgie (SRS) oder einer fraktionierten stereotaktischen Radiotherapie (FSRT) unterzogen. Zwischen 1998 und 2008 wurden 250 Patienten mit einem VS behandelt. In dieser Kohorte wurden 190

  7. Functional image-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy planning for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsegmed, Uranchimeg [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nakashima, Takeo [Division of Radiation Therapy, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Nakamura, Yuko; Higaki, Toru [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Imano, Nobuki; Doi, Yoshiko; Kenjo, Masahiro; Ozawa, Shuichi; Murakami, Yuji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Awai, Kazuo [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the current planning study is to evaluate the ability of gadoxetate disodium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (EOB-MRI)–guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) planning by using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques in sparing the functional liver tissues during SBRT for hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, 20 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma were enrolled. Functional liver tissues were defined according to quantitative liver-spleen contrast ratios ≥ 1.5 on a hepatobiliary phase scan. Functional images were fused with the planning computed tomography (CT) images; the following 2 SBRT plans were designed using a “step-and-shoot” static IMRT technique for each patient: (1) an anatomical SBRT plan optimization based on the total liver; and (2) a functional SBRT plan based on the functional liver. The total prescribed dose was 48 gray (Gy) in 4 fractions. Dosimetric parameters, including dose to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV D{sub 95%}), percentages of total and functional liver volumes, which received doses from 5 to 30 Gy (V5 to V30 and fV5 to fV30), and mean doses to total and functional liver (MLD and fMLD, respectively) of the 2 plans were compared. Compared with anatomical plans, functional image-guided SBRT plans reduced MLD (mean: plan A, 5.5 Gy; and plan F, 5.1 Gy; p < 0.0001) and fMLD (mean: plan A, 5.4 Gy; and plan F, 4.9 Gy; p < 0.0001), as well as V5 to V30 and fV5 to fV30. No differences were noted in PTV coverage and nonhepatic organs at risk (OARs) doses. In conclusion, EOB-MRI–guided SBRT planning using the IMRT technique may preserve functional liver tissues in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

  8. Stereotactically-guided Ablation of the Rat Auditory Cortex, and Localization of the Lesion in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, Verónica; Estévez, Sheila; Pernía, Marianni; Plaza, Ignacio; Merchán, Miguel A

    2017-10-11

    The rat auditory cortex (AC) is becoming popular among auditory neuroscience investigators who are interested in experience-dependence plasticity, auditory perceptual processes, and cortical control of sound processing in the subcortical auditory nuclei. To address new challenges, a procedure to accurately locate and surgically expose the auditory cortex would expedite this research effort. Stereotactic neurosurgery is routinely used in pre-clinical research in animal models to engraft a needle or electrode at a pre-defined location within the auditory cortex. In the following protocol, we use stereotactic methods in a novel way. We identify four coordinate points over the surface of the temporal bone of the rat to define a window that, once opened, accurately exposes both the primary (A1) and secondary (Dorsal and Ventral) cortices of the AC. Using this method, we then perform a surgical ablation of the AC. After such a manipulation is performed, it is necessary to assess the localization, size, and extension of the lesions made in the cortex. Thus, we also describe a method to easily locate the AC ablation postmortem using a coordinate map constructed by transferring the cytoarchitectural limits of the AC to the surface of the brain.The combination of the stereotactically-guided location and ablation of the AC with the localization of the injured area in a coordinate map postmortem facilitates the validation of information obtained from the animal, and leads to a better analysis and comprehension of the data.

  9. MRI study for CT-guided stereotactic aspiration of intracerebral hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Toshie; Okada, Hitoshi; Kaneko, Uichi; Nishino, Akiko; Ueno, Shinji; Owada, Yuji.

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with acute hypertensive intracerebral hematomas, diagnosed by computed tomography (CT), underwent CT-guided stereotactic aspiration. Magnetic resonance (MR) images were obtained immediately before aspiration, using T 1 -weighted (TR=500 msec, TE=15 msec) and T 2 -weighted (TR=2500 msec, TE=120 msec) sequences and a 0.5 Tesla MR system. On the basis of the MR images the hematomas were divided into peripheral, central, and core segments. The signal intensities were divided into seven grades based on the comparison with white matter. The sequential changes in each segment on the MR images were evaluated, and the ratio of hematoma removal vs. size of residual hematoma was assessed by preoperative MR imaging and pre-and post-operative CT. The hematomas were located in the putamen in 13 cases, the thalamus in 8, combined in 2, and subcortex in 2. The hematomas, targeted in their centers, were evacuated by the aspiration procedure alone, 1 to 12 days after onset (day 0=day of onset). The results were as follows : 1) The proportion of hematomas removed was high after day 4. 2) Sequential T 1 -weighted images showed that the peripheral segments gradually increased in signal intensity, appearing as high-intensity rings that gradually filled and could be easily aspirated. 3) In those cases in which sequential T 2 -weighted images showed the central segments gradually increasing in signal intensity, the hematomas were easily aspirated if the signal was either iso-intense or hyper-intense. 4) Several hematomas had a core that appeared as a high intensity signal on T1-weighted images and as a low intensity signal on T 2 -weighted images; these hematomas could not be aspirated. (author)

  10. Optical forces through guided light deflections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palima, Darwin; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Vizsnyiczai, Gaszton

    2013-01-01

    . In this work we look into the object shaping aspect and its potential for controlled optical manipulation. Using a simple bent waveguide as example, our numerical simulations show that the guided deflection of light efficiently converts incident light momentum into optical force with one order...

  11. Wave-guided optical waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palima, Darwin; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Vizsnyiczai, George

    2012-01-01

    This work primarily aims to fabricate and use two photon polymerization (2PP) microstructures capable of being optically manipulated into any arbitrary orientation. We have integrated optical waveguides into the structures and therefore have freestanding waveguides, which can be positioned anywhe...... bridge the diffraction barrier. This structure-mediated paradigm may be carried forward to open new possibilities for exploiting beams from far-field optics down to the subwavelength domain....

  12. Fractionated stereotactically guided radiotherapy and radiosurgery in the treatment of functional and nonfunctional adenomas of the pituitary gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milker-Zabel, Stefanie; Debus, Juergen; Thilmann, Christoph; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Wannenmacher, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluated survival rates and side effects after fractionated stereotactically guided radiotherapy (SCRT) and radiosurgery in patients with pituitary adenoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 1998, 68 patients were treated with FSRT (n=63) or radiosurgery (n=5) for pituitary adenomas. Twenty-six had functional and 42 had nonfunctional adenomas. Follow-up included CT/MRI, endocrinologic, and ophthalmologic examinations. Mean follow-up was 38.7 months. Seven patients received radiotherapy as primary treatment and 39 patients received it postoperatively for residual disease. Twenty-two patients were treated for recurrent disease after surgery. Mean total dose was 52.2 Gy for SCRT, and 15 Gy for radiosurgery. Results: Overall local tumor control was 93% (60/65 patients). Forty-three patients had stable disease based on CT/MRI, while 15 had a reduction of tumor volume. After FSRT, 26% with a functional adenoma had a complete remission and 19% had a reduction of hormonal overproduction after 34 months' mean. Two patients with STH-secreting adenomas had an endocrinologic recurrence, one with an ACTH-secreting adenoma radiologic recurrence, within 54 months. Reduction of visual acuity was seen in 4 patients and partial hypopituitarism in 3 patients. None of the patients developed brain radionecrosis or radiation-induced gliomas. Conclusion: Stereotactically guided radiotherapy is effective and safe in the treatment of pituitary adenomas to improve local control and reduce hormonal overproduction

  13. Image-Guided Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases: Is There a Dose Response Relationship?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vautravers-Dewas, Claire; Dewas, Sylvain; Bonodeau, Francois; Adenis, Antoine; Lacornerie, Thomas; Penel, Nicolas; Lartigau, Eric; Mirabel, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome, tolerance, and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy, using image-guided robotic radiation delivery, for the treatment of patients with unresectable liver metastases. Methods and Material: Patients were treated with real-time respiratory tracking between July 2007 and April 2009. Their records were retrospectively reviewed. Metastases from colorectal carcinoma and other primaries were not necessarily confined to liver. Toxicity was evaluated using National Cancer Institute Common Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Forty-two patients with 62 metastases were treated with two dose levels of 40 Gy in four Dose per Fraction (23) and 45 Gy in three Dose per Fraction (13). Median follow-up was 14.3 months (range, 3-23 months). Actuarial local control for 1 and 2 years was 90% and 86%, respectively. At last follow-up, 41 (66%) complete responses and eight (13%) partial responses were observed. Five lesions were stable. Nine lesions (13%) were locally progressed. Overall survival was 94% at 1 year and 48% at 2 years. The most common toxicity was Grade 1 or 2 nausea. One patient experienced Grade 3 epidermitis. The dose level did not significantly contribute to the outcome, toxicity, or survival. Conclusion: Image-guided robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy is feasible, safe, and effective, with encouraging local control. It provides a strong alternative for patients who cannot undergo surgery.

  14. Fractionated stereotactically guided radiotherapy for pharmacoresistant epilepsy; Fraktionierte, stereotaktisch gefuehrte Radiotherapie der pharmakoresistenten Epilepsie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabenbauer, G.G.; Reinhold, C.; Lambrecht, U.; Sauer, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Kerling, F.; Pauli, E.; Stefan, H. [Neurologische Klinik, Abt. Epileptologie, Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Mueller, R.G. [Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik, Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Ganslandt, O. [Neurochirurgische Klinik, Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    Aim: This prospective study evaluated the efficiency of fractionated stereotactically guided radiotherapy as a treatment of pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Patients and Methods: Inclusion criteria were patients aged between 17 and 65 years with one-sided temporally located focus, without sufficient epilepsy control by, antiepileptic drugs or neurosurgery. Between 1997 and 1999, two groups of six patients each were treated with 21 Gy (7 times 3 Gy) and 30 Gy (15 times 2 Gy). Study end points were seizure frequency, intensity, seizure length and neuropsychological parameters. Results: All patients experienced a marked reduction in seizure frequency. The mean reduction of seizures was 37% (range 9-77%, i.e. seizures reduced from a monthly mean number of 11.75 to 7.52) at 18 months following radiation treatment and 46% (23-94%, i.e. 0.2-23 seizures per month) during the whole follow-up time. Seizure length was reduced in five out of eleven patients and intensity of seizures in seven out of eleven patients. Conclusion: Radiotherapy was identified as safe and effective for pharmacoresistant epilepsy since a very good reduction of seizure frequency was observed. It is no substitute for regular use of antiepileptic drugs, but means an appropriate alternative for patients with contraindication against neurosurgery or insufficient seizure reduction after neurosurgery. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Diese prospektive Studie untersuchte die Effizienz einer fraktionierten stereotaktischen Radiotherapie (RT) bei therapieresistenter Temporallappenepilepsie. Patienten und Methoden: Einschlusskriterien waren Patienten im Alter von 17 bis 65 Jahren, die weder medikamentoes noch epilepsiechirurgisch anfallsfrei wurden und einen einseitigen Fokus aufwiesen. Zwei Patientenkohorten zu je sechs Patienten wurden zwischen 1997 und 1999 einer fraktionierten, stereotaktisch gefuehrten Radiotherapie mit 21 Gy (7 x 3 Gy) bzw. 30 Gy (15 x 2 Gy) unterzogen. Endpunkte der Untersuchung waren

  15. Design and implementation of a system for treating paediatric patients with stereotactically-guided conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Elizabeth J.; Suter, Bridget L.; Warrington, Alan P.; Black, Peter; Saran, Frank; Brada, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: Stereotactically-guided conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) allows the delivery of highly conformal dose distributions to localised brain tumours. This is of particular importance for children, whose often excellent long-term prognosis should be accompanied by low toxicity. The commercial immobilisation system in use at our hospital for adults was felt to be too heavy for children, and precluded the use of anaesthesia, which is sometimes required for paediatric patients. This paper therefore describes the design and implementation of a system for treating children with SCRT. This system needed to be well tolerated by patients, with good access for treating typical childhood malignancies. Materials and methods: A lightweight frame was developed for immobilisation, with a shell-based alternative for patients requiring general anaesthetic. Procedures were set up to introduce the patients to the frame system in order to maximise patient co-operation and comfort. Film measurements were made to assess the impact of the frame on transmission and surface dose. The reproducibility of the systems was assessed using electronic portal images. Results: Both frame and shell systems are in clinical use. The frame weighs 0.6 kg and is well tolerated. It has a transmission of 92-96%, and fields which pass through it deliver surface doses of 58-82% of the dose at d max , compared to 18% when no frame is present. However, the frame is constructed to maximise the availability of unobstructed beam directions. Reproducibility measurements for the frame showed a mean random error of 1.0±0.2 mm in two dimensions (2D) and 1.4±0.7 mm in 3D. The mean systematic error in 3D was 2.2 mm, and 90% of all overall 3D errors were less than 3.4 mm. For the shell system, the mean 2D random error was 1.5±0.2 mm. Conclusions: Two well-tolerated immobilisation devices have been developed for fractionated SCRT treatment of paediatric patients. A lightweight frame system gives a wide

  16. Design and implementation of a system for treating paediatric patients with stereotactically-guided conformal radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, E J; Suter, B L; Warrington, A P; Black, P; Saran, F; Brada, M

    2001-09-01

    Stereotactically-guided conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) allows the delivery of highly conformal dose distributions to localised brain tumours. This is of particular importance for children, whose often excellent long-term prognosis should be accompanied by low toxicity. The commercial immobilisation system in use at our hospital for adults was felt to be too heavy for children, and precluded the use of anaesthesia, which is sometimes required for paediatric patients. This paper therefore describes the design and implementation of a system for treating children with SCRT. This system needed to be well tolerated by patients, with good access for treating typical childhood malignancies. A lightweight frame was developed for immobilisation, with a shell-based alternative for patients requiring general anaesthetic. Procedures were set up to introduce the patients to the frame system in order to maximise patient co-operation and comfort. Film measurements were made to assess the impact of the frame on transmission and surface dose. The reproducibility of the systems was assessed using electronic portal images. Both frame and shell systems are in clinical use. The frame weighs 0.6 kg and is well tolerated. It has a transmission of 92-96%, and fields which pass through it deliver surface doses of 58-82% of the dose at d(max), compared to 18% when no frame is present. However, the frame is constructed to maximise the availability of unobstructed beam directions. Reproducibility measurements for the frame showed a mean random error of 1.0+/-0.2mm in two dimensions (2D) and 1.4+/-0.7 mm in 3D. The mean systematic error in 3D was 2.2mm, and 90% of all overall 3D errors were less than 3.4mm. For the shell system, the mean 2D random error was 1.5+/-0.2mm. Two well-tolerated immobilisation devices have been developed for fractionated SCRT treatment of paediatric patients. A lightweight frame system gives a wide range of possible unobstructed beam directions, although beams that

  17. Image-Guided Localization Accuracy of Stereoscopic Planar and Volumetric Imaging Methods for Stereotactic Radiation Surgery and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: A Phantom Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jinkoo; Jin, Jian-Yue; Walls, Nicole; Nurushev, Teamour; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J.; Ryu, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the positioning accuracies of two image-guided localization systems, ExacTrac and On-Board Imager (OBI), in a stereotactic treatment unit. Methods and Materials: An anthropomorphic pelvis phantom with eight internal metal markers (BBs) was used. The center of one BB was set as plan isocenter. The phantom was set up on a treatment table with various initial setup errors. Then, the errors were corrected using each of the investigated systems. The residual errors were measured with respect to the radiation isocenter using orthogonal portal images with field size 3 x 3 cm 2 . The angular localization discrepancies of the two systems and the correction accuracy of the robotic couch were also studied. A pair of pre- and post-cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images was acquired for each angular correction. Then, the correction errors were estimated by using the internal BBs through fiducial marker-based registrations. Results: The isocenter localization errors (μ ±σ) in the left/right, posterior/anterior, and superior/inferior directions were, respectively, -0.2 ± 0.2 mm, -0.8 ± 0.2 mm, and -0.8 ± 0.4 mm for ExacTrac, and 0.5 ± 0.7 mm, 0.6 ± 0.5 mm, and 0.0 ± 0.5 mm for OBI CBCT. The registration angular discrepancy was 0.1 ± 0.2 o between the two systems, and the maximum angle correction error of the robotic couch was 0.2 o about all axes. Conclusion: Both the ExacTrac and the OBI CBCT systems showed approximately 1 mm isocenter localization accuracies. The angular discrepancy of two systems was minimal, and the robotic couch angle correction was accurate. These positioning uncertainties should be taken as a lower bound because the results were based on a rigid dosimetry phantom.

  18. Postoperative Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Spine Metastases: A Critical Review to Guide Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redmond, Kristin J., E-mail: kjanson3@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Lo, Simon S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Fisher, Charles [Department of Surgery, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-08-01

    Postoperative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for metastatic spinal tumors is increasingly being performed in clinical practice. Whereas the fundamentals of SBRT practice for intact spinal metastases are established, there are as yet no comprehensive practice guidelines for the postoperative indications. In particular, there are unique considerations for patient selection and treatment planning specific to postoperative spine SBRT that are critical for safe and effective management. The purpose of this critical review is to discuss the rationale for treatment, describe those factors affecting surgical decision making, introduce modern surgical trends, and summarize treatment outcomes for both conventional postoperative external beam radiation therapy and postoperative spine SBRT. Lastly, an in-depth practical discussion with respect to treatment planning and delivery considerations is provided to help guide optimal practice.

  19. Breathing-motion-compensated robotic guided stereotactic body radiation therapy. Patterns of failure analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stera, Susanne; Imhoff, Detlef; Roedel, Claus [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Radiation Oncology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Balermpas, Panagiotis; Keller, Christian [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Radiation Oncology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Saphir Radiosurgery Center, Frankfurt (Germany); Chan, Mark K.H. [University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kiel (Germany); Huttenlocher, Stefan [Saphir Radiosurgery Center, Guestrow (Germany); Wurster, Stefan [Saphir Radiosurgery Center, Guestrow (Germany); University Medicine Greifswald, Department of Radiation Oncology, Greifswald (Germany); Rades, Dirk [University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany); Dunst, Juergen [University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kiel (Germany); University Hospital Copenhagen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Hildebrandt, Guido [University Medicine Rostock, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rostock (Germany); Blanck, Oliver [Saphir Radiosurgery Center, Frankfurt (Germany); University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kiel (Germany); Saphir Radiosurgery Center, Guestrow (Germany)

    2018-02-15

    We retrospectively evaluated the patterns of failure for robotic guided real-time breathing-motion-compensated (BMC) stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of tumors in moving organs. Between 2011 and 2016, a total of 198 patients with 280 lung, liver, and abdominal tumors were treated with BMC-SBRT. The median gross tumor volume (GTV) was 12.3 cc (0.1-372.0 cc). Medians of mean GTV BED{sub α/β=10} {sub Gy} (BED = biological effective dose) was 148.5 Gy{sub 10} (31.5-233.3 Gy{sub 10}) and prescribed planning target volume (PTV) BED{sub α/β=10} {sub Gy} was 89.7 Gy{sub 10} (28.8-151.2 Gy{sub 10}), respectively. We analyzed overall survival (OS) and local control (LC) based on various factors, including BEDs with α/ β ratios of 15 Gy (lung metastases), 21 Gy (primary lung tumors), and 27 Gy (liver metastases). Median follow-up was 10.4 months (2.0-59.0 months). The 2-year actuarial LC was 100 and 86.4% for primary early and advanced stage lung tumors, respectively, 100% for lung metastases, 82.2% for liver metastases, and 90% for extrapulmonary extrahepatic metastases. The 2-year OS rate was 47.9% for all patients. In uni- and multivariate analysis, comparatively lower PTV prescription dose (equivalence of 3 x 12-13 Gy) and higher average GTV dose (equivalence of 3 x 18 Gy) to current practice were significantly associated with LC. For OS, Karnofsky performance score (100%), gender (female), and SBRT without simultaneous chemotherapy were significant prognostic factors. Grade 3 side effects were rare (0.5%). Robotic guided BMC-SBRT can be considered a safe and effective treatment for solid tumors in moving organs. To reach sufficient local control rates, high average GTV doses are necessary. Further prospective studies are warranted to evaluate these points. (orig.) [German] Wir fuehrten eine retrospektive Untersuchung der Rezidivmuster bei der Behandlung von Tumoren in bewegten Organen mittels robotergefuehrter in Echtzeit

  20. CBCT-Guided Rapid Arc for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in lung tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fandino, J. M.; Silva, M. C.; Izquierdo, P.; Candal, A.; Diaz, I.; Fernandez, C.; Gesto, C.; Poncet, M.; Soto, M.; Triana, G.; Losada, C.; Marino, A.

    2013-07-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy has emerged as a standard treatment option for stage I non-small cell lung cancer in patients unfit for surgery, or who refuse surgery. An increasing number of prospective phase I/II trials, as well as large single and multicenter studies have reported local control rates to be in excess of 85% for early stage non-small cell lung cancer. Volumetric arc therapy RapidArc with tumor-based image guidance technique will be presented as well as our preliminary observations. (Author)

  1. Long-term Evaluation of Radiation-Induced Optic Neuropathy After Single-Fraction Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leavitt, Jacqueline A.; Stafford, Scott L.; Link, Michael J.; Pollock, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) in patients having single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for benign skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of 222 patients having Gamma Knife radiosurgery for benign tumors adjacent to the anterior visual pathway (AVP) between 1991 and 1999. Excluded were patients with prior or concurrent external beam radiation therapy or SRS. One hundred twenty-nine patients (58%) had undergone previous surgery. Tumor types included confirmed World Health Organization grade 1 or presumed cavernous sinus meningioma (n=143), pituitary adenoma (n=72), and craniopharyngioma (n=7). The maximum dose to the AVP was ≤8.0 Gy (n=126), 8.1-10.0 Gy (n=39), 10.1-12.0 Gy (n=47), and >12 Gy (n=10). Results: The mean clinical and imaging follow-up periods were 83 and 123 months, respectively. One patient (0.5%) who received a maximum radiation dose of 12.8 Gy to the AVP developed unilateral blindness 18 months after SRS. The chance of RION according to the maximum radiation dose received by the AVP was 0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0-3.6%), 0 (95% CI 0-10.7%), 0 (95% CI 0-9.0%), and 10% (95% CI 0-43.0%) for patients receiving ≤8 Gy, 8.1-10.0 Gy, 10.1-12.0 Gy, and >12 Gy, respectively. The overall risk of RION in patients receiving >8 Gy to the AVP was 1.0% (95% CI 0-6.2%). Conclusions: The risk of RION after single-fraction SRS in patients with benign skull base tumors who have no prior radiation exposure is very low if the maximum dose to the AVP is ≤12 Gy. Physicians performing single-fraction SRS should remain cautious when treating lesions adjacent to the AVP, especially when the maximum dose exceeds 10 Gy

  2. Long-term Evaluation of Radiation-Induced Optic Neuropathy After Single-Fraction Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leavitt, Jacqueline A., E-mail: leavitt.jacqueline@mayo.edu [Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Stafford, Scott L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Link, Michael J. [Department of Neurosurgery, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Pollock, Bruce E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) in patients having single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for benign skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of 222 patients having Gamma Knife radiosurgery for benign tumors adjacent to the anterior visual pathway (AVP) between 1991 and 1999. Excluded were patients with prior or concurrent external beam radiation therapy or SRS. One hundred twenty-nine patients (58%) had undergone previous surgery. Tumor types included confirmed World Health Organization grade 1 or presumed cavernous sinus meningioma (n=143), pituitary adenoma (n=72), and craniopharyngioma (n=7). The maximum dose to the AVP was ≤8.0 Gy (n=126), 8.1-10.0 Gy (n=39), 10.1-12.0 Gy (n=47), and >12 Gy (n=10). Results: The mean clinical and imaging follow-up periods were 83 and 123 months, respectively. One patient (0.5%) who received a maximum radiation dose of 12.8 Gy to the AVP developed unilateral blindness 18 months after SRS. The chance of RION according to the maximum radiation dose received by the AVP was 0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0-3.6%), 0 (95% CI 0-10.7%), 0 (95% CI 0-9.0%), and 10% (95% CI 0-43.0%) for patients receiving ≤8 Gy, 8.1-10.0 Gy, 10.1-12.0 Gy, and >12 Gy, respectively. The overall risk of RION in patients receiving >8 Gy to the AVP was 1.0% (95% CI 0-6.2%). Conclusions: The risk of RION after single-fraction SRS in patients with benign skull base tumors who have no prior radiation exposure is very low if the maximum dose to the AVP is ≤12 Gy. Physicians performing single-fraction SRS should remain cautious when treating lesions adjacent to the AVP, especially when the maximum dose exceeds 10 Gy.

  3. The Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Image Guided Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Initial Clinical Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Winnie; Cho, Young-Bin [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ansell, Steve [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Laperriere, Normand; Ménard, Cynthia; Millar, Barbara-Ann [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Zadeh, Gelareh [Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Macfeeters-Hamilton Centre for Neuro-oncology, Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kongkham, Paul; Bernstein, Mark [Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chung, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.chung.md@gmail.com [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: The present study used cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to measure the inter- and intrafraction uncertainties for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) using the Leksell Gamma Knife (GK). Methods and Materials: Using a novel CBCT system adapted to the GK radiosurgery treatment unit, CBCT images were acquired immediately before and after treatment for each treatment session within the context of a research ethics board–approved prospective clinical trial. Patients were immobilized in the Leksell coordinate frame (LCF) for both volumetric CBCT imaging and GK-SRS delivery. The relative displacement of the patient's skull to the stereotactic reference (interfraction motion) was measured for each CBCT scan. Differences between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans were used to determine the intrafraction motion. Results: We analyzed 20 pre- and 17 post-treatment CBCT scans in 20 LCF patients treated with SRS. The mean translational pretreatment setup error ± standard deviation in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudal directions was −0.19 ± 0.32, 0.06 ± 0.27, and −0.23 ± 0.2 mm, with a maximum of −0.74, −0.53, and −0.68 mm, respectively. After an average time between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans of 82 minutes (range 27-170), the mean intrafraction error ± standard deviation for the LCF was −0.03 ± 0.05, −0.03 ± 0.18, and −0.03 ± 0.12 mm in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudual direction, respectively. Conclusions: Using CBCT on a prototype image guided GK Perfexion unit, we were able to measure the inter- and intrafraction positional changes for GK-SRS using the invasive frame. In the era of image guided radiation therapy, the use of CBCT image guidance for both frame- and non–frame-based immobilization systems could serve as a useful quality assurance tool. Our preliminary measurements can guide the application of achievable thresholds for inter- and intrafraction

  4. The Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Image Guided Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Initial Clinical Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Winnie; Cho, Young-Bin; Ansell, Steve; Laperriere, Normand; Ménard, Cynthia; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Zadeh, Gelareh; Kongkham, Paul; Bernstein, Mark; Jaffray, David A.; Chung, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The present study used cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to measure the inter- and intrafraction uncertainties for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) using the Leksell Gamma Knife (GK). Methods and Materials: Using a novel CBCT system adapted to the GK radiosurgery treatment unit, CBCT images were acquired immediately before and after treatment for each treatment session within the context of a research ethics board–approved prospective clinical trial. Patients were immobilized in the Leksell coordinate frame (LCF) for both volumetric CBCT imaging and GK-SRS delivery. The relative displacement of the patient's skull to the stereotactic reference (interfraction motion) was measured for each CBCT scan. Differences between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans were used to determine the intrafraction motion. Results: We analyzed 20 pre- and 17 post-treatment CBCT scans in 20 LCF patients treated with SRS. The mean translational pretreatment setup error ± standard deviation in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudal directions was −0.19 ± 0.32, 0.06 ± 0.27, and −0.23 ± 0.2 mm, with a maximum of −0.74, −0.53, and −0.68 mm, respectively. After an average time between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans of 82 minutes (range 27-170), the mean intrafraction error ± standard deviation for the LCF was −0.03 ± 0.05, −0.03 ± 0.18, and −0.03 ± 0.12 mm in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudual direction, respectively. Conclusions: Using CBCT on a prototype image guided GK Perfexion unit, we were able to measure the inter- and intrafraction positional changes for GK-SRS using the invasive frame. In the era of image guided radiation therapy, the use of CBCT image guidance for both frame- and non–frame-based immobilization systems could serve as a useful quality assurance tool. Our preliminary measurements can guide the application of achievable thresholds for inter- and intrafraction

  5. Sonographically-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy with digital mammography-guided skin marking of suspicious breast microcalcifications: comparison of outcomes with stereotactic biopsy in Asian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Soo Yeon; Shin, Jung Hee; Han, Boo-Kyung; Ko, Eun Young

    2011-02-01

    Management of suspicious microcalcifications in very thin breasts is problematic. To evaluate whether sonographically-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy (USVAB) with digital mammography-guided skin marking (DM) for the diagnosis of breast microcalcifications is comparable to stereotactic-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy (SVAB) in Asian women with thin breasts. Retrospective review was performed for 263 consecutive suspicious microcalcification lesions in 261 women who underwent USVAB with DM or SVAB using a prone table between January 2004 and December 2007. SVAB was performed for 190 lesions and USVAB for 73 lesions. Biopsy results were correlated with surgical pathology or followed up for at least 12 months. The diagnostic outcomes of SVAB and USVAB to diagnose microcalcifications were compared. Of 263 lesions, 104 (40%) underwent surgery and 159 (60%) were followed up. SVAB and USVAB groups showed similar final categories or the extent of microcalcifications. US visible lesions were 57 (78%) of 73 at USVAB and 14 (10%) of 140 at SVAB. Of 57 US visible lesions at USVAB, 29 (51%) were not found in initial US but were detectable with the help of DM. Specimen radiographs were negative in 2.1% of lesions at SVAB and in 4.1% at USVAB (p=0.4008). The under-estimation rate and false-negative rate were similar in SVAB and USVAB. US with DM facilitates US visibility of microcalcifications. USVAB with DM can produce acceptable biopsy results, as can SVAB, to diagnose breast microcalcifications in patients with thin breasts.

  6. Robotic Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy, for Isolated Recurrent Primary, Lymph Node or Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Beltramo, Giancarlo; Fariselli, Laura; Fodor, Cristiana; Santoro, Luigi; Vavassori, Andrea; Zerini, Dario; Gherardi, Federica; Ascione, Carmen; Bossi-Zanetti, Isa; Mauro, Roberta; Bregantin, Achille; Bianchi, Livia Corinna; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA)–based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2007 and December 2009, 34 consecutive patients/38 lesions were treated (15 patients reirradiated for local recurrence [P], 4 patients reirradiated for anastomosis recurrence [A], 16 patients treated for single lymph node recurrence [LN], and 3 patients treated for single metastasis [M]). In all but 4 patients, [ 11 C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography was performed. CBK-SRT consisted of reirradiation and first radiotherapy in 27 and 11 lesions, respectively. The median CBK-SRT dose was 30 Gy in 4.5 fractions (P, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; A, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; LN, 33 Gy in 3 fractions; and M, 36 Gy in 3 fractions). In 18 patients (21 lesions) androgen deprivation was added to CBK-SRT (median duration, 16.6 months). Results: The median follow-up was 16.9 months. Acute toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event). Late toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event and 1 Grade 2 event). Biochemical response was observed in 32 of 38 evaluable lesions. Prostate-specific antigen stabilization was seen for 4 lesions, and in 2 cases prostate-specific antigen progression was reported. The 30-month progression-free survival rate was 42.6%. Disease progression was observed for 14 lesions (5, 2, 5, and 2 in Groups P, A, LN, and M respectively). In only 3 cases, in-field progression was seen. At the time of analysis (May 2010), 19 patients are alive with no evidence of disease and 15 are alive with disease. Conclusions: CyberKnife-based stereotactic radiotherapy is a feasible approach for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer, offering excellent in-field tumor

  7. Radiographic and metabolic response rates following image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy for lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, Nasiruddin; Grills, Inga S.; Wong, Ching-Yee Oliver; Galerani, Ana Paula; Chao, Kenneth; Welsh, Robert; Chmielewski, Gary; Yan Di; Kestin, Larry L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate radiographic and metabolic response after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for early lung tumors. Materials and methods: Thirty-nine tumors were treated prospectively with SBRT (dose = 48-60 Gy, 4-5 Fx). Thirty-six cases were primary NSCLC (T1N0 = 67%; T2N0 = 25%); three cases were solitary metastases. Patients were followed using CT and PET at 6, 16, and 52 weeks post-SBRT, with CT follow-up thereafter. RECIST and EORTC criteria were used to evaluate CT and PET responses. Results: At median follow-up of 9 months (0.4-26), RECIST complete response (CR), partial response (PR), and stable disease (SD) rates were 3%, 43%, 54% at 6 weeks; 15%, 38%, 46% at 16 weeks; 27%, 64%, 9% at 52 weeks. Mean baseline tumor volume was reduced by 46%, 70%, 87%, and 96%, respectively at 6, 16, 52, and 72 weeks. Mean baseline maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) was 8.3 (1.1-20.3) and reduced to 3.4, 3.0, and 3.7 at 6, 16, and 52 weeks after SBRT. EORTC metabolic CR/PR, SD, and progressive disease rates were 67%, 22%, 11% at 6 weeks; 86%, 10%, 3% at 16 weeks; 95%, 5%, 0% at 52 weeks. Conclusions: SBRT yields excellent RECIST and EORTC based response. Metabolic response is rapid however radiographic response occurs even after 1-year post treatment.

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Oligometastasis: Opportunities for Biology to Guide Clinical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Rohann J M; Salama, Joseph K; Milano, Michael T; Palma, David A

    2016-01-01

    Oligometastasis refers to a state of limited metastatic disease burden, in which surgical or ablative treatment to all known visible metastases holds promise to extend survival or even effect cure. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is a form of radiation treatment capable of delivering a high biologically effective dose of radiation in a highly conformal manner, with a favorable toxicity profile. Enthusiasm for oligometastasis ablation, however, should be counterbalanced against the limited supporting evidence. It remains unknown to what extent (if any) ablation influences survival or quality of life. Rising clinical equipoise necessitates the completion of randomized controlled trials to assess this, several of which are underway. However, a lack of clear identification criteria or biomarkers to define the oligometastatic state hampers optimal patient selection.This narrative review explores the evolutionary origins of oligometastasis, the steps of the metastatic process at which oligometastases may arise, and the biomolecular mediators of this state. It discusses clinical outcomes with treatment of oligometastases, ongoing trials, and areas of basic and translational research that may lead to novel biomarkers. These efforts should provide a clearer, biomolecular definition of oligometastatic disease and aid in the accurate selection of patients for ablative therapies.

  9. Evaluation of motion measurement using cine MRI for image guided stereotactic body radiotherapy on a new phantom platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing; Wang, Ziheng; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate accuracy of motion tracking of cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy. A phantom platform was developed in this work to fulfill the goal. The motion phantom consisted of a platform, a solid thread, a motor and a control system that can simulate motion in various modes. To validate its reproducibility, the phantom platform was setup three times and imaged with fluoroscopy using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for the same motion profile. After the validation test, the phantom platform was evaluated using cine MRI at 2.5 frames/second on a 1.5T GE scanner using five different artificial profiles and five patient profiles. The above profiles were again measured with EPID fluoroscopy and used as references. Discrepancies between measured profiles from cine MRI and EPID were quantified using root-mean-square (RMS) and standard deviation (SD). Pearson’s product moment correlational analysis was used to test correlation. The standard deviation for the reproducibility test was 0.28 mm. The discrepancies (RMS) between all profiles measured by cine MRI and EPID fluoroscopy ranged from 0.30 to 0.49 mm for artificial profiles and ranged from 0.75 to 0.91 mm for five patient profiles. The cine MRI sequence could precisely track phantom motion and the proposed motion phantom was feasible to evaluate cine MRI accuracy. PMID:29296304

  10. Fast and robust online adaptive planning in stereotactic MR-guided adaptive radiation therapy (SMART) for pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohoudi, O; Bruynzeel, A M E; Senan, S; Cuijpers, J P; Slotman, B J; Lagerwaard, F J; Palacios, M A

    2017-12-01

    To implement a robust and fast stereotactic MR-guided adaptive radiation therapy (SMART) online strategy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). SMART strategy for plan adaptation was implemented with the MRIdian system (ViewRay Inc.). At each fraction, OAR (re-)contouring is done within a distance of 3cm from the PTV surface. Online plan re-optimization is based on robust prediction of OAR dose and optimization objectives, obtained by building an artificial neural network (ANN). Proposed limited re-contouring strategy for plan adaptation (SMART 3CM ) is evaluated by comparing 50 previously delivered fractions against a standard (re-)planning method using full-scale OAR (re-)contouring (FULLOAR). Plan quality was assessed using PTV coverage (V 95% , D mean , D 1cc ) and institutional OAR constraints (e.g. V 33Gy ). SMART 3CM required a significant lower number of optimizations than FULLOAR (4 vs 18 on average) to generate a plan meeting all objectives and institutional OAR constraints. PTV coverage with both strategies was identical (mean V 95% =89%). Adaptive plans with SMART 3CM exhibited significant lower intermediate and high doses to all OARs than FULLOAR, which also failed in 36% of the cases to adhere to the V 33Gy dose constraint. SMART 3CM approach for LAPC allows good OAR sparing and adequate target coverage while requiring only limited online (re-)contouring from clinicians. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Intrafraction Variation of Mean Tumor Position During Image-Guided Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Chirag; Grills, Inga S.; Kestin, Larry L.; McGrath, Samuel; Ye Hong; Martin, Shannon K.; Yan Di

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Prolonged delivery times during daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) introduce concerns regarding intrafraction variation (IFV) of the mean target position (MTP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnitude of the IFV-MTP and to assess target margins required to compensate for IFV and postonline CBCT correction residuals. Patient, treatment, and tumor characteristics were analyzed with respect to their impact on IFV-MTP. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 patients with 140 tumors underwent 659 fractions of lung SBRT. Dose prescribed was 48 or 60 Gy in 12 Gy fractions. Translational target position correction of the MTP was performed via onboard CBCT. IFV-MTP was measured as the difference in MTP between the postcorrection CBCT and the posttreatment CBCT excluding residual error. Results: IFV-MTP was 0.2 ± 1.8 mm, 0.1 ± 1.9 mm, and 0.01 ± 1.5 mm in the craniocaudal, anteroposterior, and mediolateral dimensions and the IFV-MTP vector was 2.3 ± 2.1 mm. Treatment time and excursion were found to be significant predictors of IFV-MTP. An IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 and 5 mm was seen in 40.8% and 7.2% of fractions, respectively. IFV-MTP greater than 2 mm was seen in heavier patients with larger excursions and longer treatment times. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were seen between immobilization devices. The stereotactic frame immobilization device was found to be significantly less likely to have an IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 mm compared with the alpha cradle, BodyFIX, and hybrid immobilization devices. Conclusions: Treatment time and respiratory excursion are significantly associated with IFV-MTP. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were found between immobilization devices. Target margins for IFV-MTP plus post-correction residuals are dependent on immobilization device with 5-mm uniform margins being acceptable for the frame immobilization device.

  12. Dosimetric Comparison of Real-Time MRI-Guided Tri-Cobalt-60 Versus Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Lung Cancer Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcieszynski, Andrzej P; Hill, Patrick M; Rosenberg, Stephen A; Hullett, Craig R; Labby, Zacariah E; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Geurts, Mark W; Bayliss, R Adam; Bayouth, John E; Harari, Paul M; Bassetti, Michael F; Baschnagel, Andrew M

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging-guided radiation therapy has entered clinical practice at several major treatment centers. Treatment of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer with stereotactic body radiation therapy is one potential application of this modality, as some form of respiratory motion management is important to address. We hypothesize that magnetic resonance imaging-guided tri-cobalt-60 radiation therapy can be used to generate clinically acceptable stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans. Here, we report on a dosimetric comparison between magnetic resonance imaging-guided radiation therapy plans and internal target volume-based plans utilizing volumetric-modulated arc therapy. Ten patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer who underwent radiation therapy planning and treatment were studied. Following 4-dimensional computed tomography, patient images were used to generate clinically deliverable plans. For volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans, the planning tumor volume was defined as an internal target volume + 0.5 cm. For magnetic resonance imaging-guided plans, a single mid-inspiratory cycle was used to define a gross tumor volume, then expanded 0.3 cm to the planning tumor volume. Treatment plan parameters were compared. Planning tumor volumes trended larger for volumetric-modulated arc therapy-based plans, with a mean planning tumor volume of 47.4 mL versus 24.8 mL for magnetic resonance imaging-guided plans ( P = .08). Clinically acceptable plans were achievable via both methods, with bilateral lung V20, 3.9% versus 4.8% ( P = .62). The volume of chest wall receiving greater than 30 Gy was also similar, 22.1 versus 19.8 mL ( P = .78), as were all other parameters commonly used for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy. The ratio of the 50% isodose volume to planning tumor volume was lower in volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans, 4.19 versus 10.0 ( P guided tri-cobalt-60 radiation therapy is capable of delivering lung high

  13. Spatial Distortion in MRI-Guided Stereotactic Procedures: Evaluation in 1.5-, 3- and 7-Tesla MRI Scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Jan-Oliver; Giese, Henrik; Biller, Armin; Nagel, Armin M; Kiening, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is replacing computed tomography (CT) as the main imaging modality for stereotactic transformations. MRI is prone to spatial distortion artifacts, which can lead to inaccuracy in stereotactic procedures. Modern MRI systems provide distortion correction algorithms that may ameliorate this problem. This study investigates the different options of distortion correction using standard 1.5-, 3- and 7-tesla MRI scanners. A phantom was mounted on a stereotactic frame. One CT scan and three MRI scans were performed. At all three field strengths, two 3-dimensional sequences, volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition with gradient echo, were acquired, and automatic distortion correction was performed. Global stereotactic transformation of all 13 datasets was performed and two stereotactic planning workflows (MRI only vs. CT/MR image fusion) were subsequently analysed. Distortion correction on the 1.5- and 3-tesla scanners caused a considerable reduction in positional error. The effect was more pronounced when using the VIBE sequences. By using co-registration (CT/MR image fusion), even a lower positional error could be obtained. In ultra-high-field (7 T) MR imaging, distortion correction introduced even higher errors. However, the accuracy of non-corrected 7-tesla sequences was comparable to CT/MR image fusion 3-tesla imaging. MRI distortion correction algorithms can reduce positional errors by up to 60%. For stereotactic applications of utmost precision, we recommend a co-registration to an additional CT dataset. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Hypofractionated image-guided breath-hold SABR (Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy of liver metastases – clinical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boda-Heggemann Judit

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR is a non-invasive therapy option for inoperable liver oligometastases. Outcome and toxicity were retrospectively evaluated in a single-institution patient cohort who had undergone ultrasound-guided breath-hold SABR. Patients and methods 19 patients with liver metastases of various primary tumors consecutively treated with SABR (image-guidance with stereotactic ultrasound in combination with computer-controlled breath-hold were analysed regarding overall-survival (OS, progression-free-survival (PFS, progression pattern, local control (LC, acute and late toxicity. Results PTV (planning target volume-size was 108 ± 109cm3 (median 67.4 cm3. BED2 (Biologically effective dose in 2 Gy fraction was 83.3 ± 26.2 Gy (median 78 Gy. Median follow-up and median OS were 12 months. Actuarial 2-year-OS-rate was 31%. Median PFS was 4 months, actuarial 1-year-PFS-rate was 20%. Site of first progression was predominantly distant. Regression of irradiated lesions was observed in 84% (median time to detection of regression was 2 months. Actuarial 6-month-LC-rate was 92%, 1- and 2-years-LC-rate 57%, respectively. BED2 influenced LC. When a cut-off of BED2 = 78 Gy was used, the higher BED2 values resulted in improved local control with a statistical trend to significance (p = 0.0999. Larger PTV-sizes, inversely correlated with applied dose, resulted in lower local control, also with a trend to significance (p-value = 0.08 when a volume cut-off of 67 cm3 was used. No local relapse was observed at PTV-sizes 3 and BED2 > 78 Gy. No acute clinical toxicity > °2 was observed. Late toxicity was also ≤ °2 with the exception of one gastrointestinal bleeding-episode 1 year post-SABR. A statistically significant elevation in the acute phase was observed for alkaline-phosphatase; in the chronic phase for alkaline-phosphatase, bilirubine, cholinesterase and C

  15. Performance of a Novel Repositioning Head Frame for Gamma Knife Perfexion and Image-Guided Linac-Based Intracranial Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruschin, Mark; Nayebi, Nazanin; Carlsson, Per; Brown, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the geometric positioning and immobilization performance of a vacuum bite-block repositioning head frame (RHF) system for Perfexion (PFX-SRT) and linac-based intracranial image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with intracranial tumors received linac-based image-guided SRT using the RHF for setup and immobilization. Three hundred thirty-three fractions of radiation were delivered in 12 patients. The accuracy of the RHF was estimated for linac-based SRT with online cone-beam CT (CBCT) and for PFX-SRT with a repositioning check tool (RCT) and offline CBCT. The RCT's ability to act as a surrogate for anatomic position was estimated through comparison to CBCT image matching. Immobilization performance was evaluated daily with pre- and postdose delivery CBCT scans and RCT measurements. Results: The correlation coefficient between RCT- and CBCT-reported displacements was 0.59, 0.75, 0.79 (Right, Superior, and Anterior, respectively). For image-guided linac-based SRT, the mean three-dimensional (3D) setup error was 0.8 mm with interpatient (Σ) and interfraction (σ) variations of 0.1 and 0.4 mm, respectively. For PFX-SRT, the initial, uncorrected mean 3D positioning displacement in stereotactic coordinates was 2.0 mm, with Σ = 1.1 mm and σ = 0.8 mm. Considering only RCT setups o in pitch. The mean 3D intrafraction motion was 0.4 ± 0.3 mm. Conclusion: The RHF provides excellent immobilization for intracranial SRT and PFX-SRT. Some small systematic uncertainties in stereotactic positioning exist and must be considered when generating PFX-SRT treatment plans. The RCT provides reasonable surrogacy for internal anatomic displacement.

  16. Utilization of Patient-Reported Outcomes to Guide Symptom Management during Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malika Danner

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionUtilization of patient-reported outcomes (PROs to guide symptom management during radiation therapy is increasing. This study focuses on the use of the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite for Clinical Practice (EPIC-CP as a tool to assess urinary and bowel bother during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT and its utility in guiding medical management.MethodsBetween September 2015 and January 2017, 107 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with 35–36.25 Gy via SBRT in five fractions. PROs were assessed using EPIC-CP 1 h prior to the first fraction and after each subsequent fraction. Symptom management medications were prescribed based on the physician clinical judgment or if patients reported a moderate to big problem. Clinical significance was assessed using a minimally important difference of 1/2 SD from baseline score.ResultsA median baseline EPIC-CP urinary symptom score of 1.5 significantly increased to 3.7 on the day of the final treatment (p < 0.0001. Prior to treatment, 9.3% of men felt that their overall urinary function was a moderate to big problem that increased to 28% by the end of the fifth treatment. A median baseline EPIC-CP bowel symptom score of 0.3 significantly increased to 1.4 on the day of the final treatment (p < 0.0001. Prior to treatment, 1.9% of men felt that their overall bowel function was a moderate to big problem that increased to 3.7% by the end of the fifth treatment. The percentage of patients requiring an increased dose of alpha-antagonist increased to 47% by the end of treatment, and an additional 28% of patients required a short steroid taper to manage moderate to big urinary problems. Similarly, the percentage of patients requiring antidiarrheals reached 12% by the fifth treatment.ConclusionDuring the course of SBRT, an increasing percentage of patients experienced clinically significant symptoms many of which required medical management

  17. Integral test phantom for dosimetric quality assurance of image guided and intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letourneau, Daniel; Keller, Harald; Sharpe, Michael B.; Jaffray, David A.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a dosimetric phantom quality assurance (QA) of linear accelerators capable of cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guided and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT). This phantom is to be used in an integral test to quantify in real-time both the performance of the image guidance and the dose delivery systems in terms of dose localization. The prototype IG-IMRT QA phantom consisted of a cylindrical imaging phantom (CatPhan) combined with an array of 11 radiation diodes mounted on a 10 cm diameter disk, oriented perpendicular to the phantom axis. Basic diode response characterization was performed for 6 and 18 MV photons. The diode response was compared to planning system calculations in the open and penumbrae regions of simple and complex beam arrangements. The clinical use of the QA phantom was illustrated in an integral test of an IG-IMRT treatment designed for a clinical spinal radiosurgery case. The sensitivity of the phantom to multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration and setup errors in the clinical setting was assessed by introducing errors in the IMRT plan or by displacing the phantom. The diodes offered good response linearity and long-term reproducibility for both 6 and 18 MV. Axial dosimetry of coplanar beams (in a plane containing the beam axes) was made possible with the nearly isoplanatic response of the diodes over 360 deg. of gantry (usually within ±1%). For single beam geometry, errors in phantom placement as small as 0.5 mm could be accurately detected (in gradient ≥1%/mm). In clinical setting, MLC systematic errors of 1 mm on a single MLC bank introduced in the IMRT plan were easily detectable with the QA phantom. The QA phantom demonstrated also sufficient sensitivity for the detection of setup errors as small as 1 mm for the IMRT delivery. These results demonstrated that the prototype can accurately and efficiently verify the entire IG-IMRT process. This tool, in conjunction with image guidance capabilities

  18. Integral test phantom for dosimetric quality assurance of image guided and intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Létourneau, Daniel; Keller, Harald; Sharpe, Michael B; Jaffray, David A

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a dosimetric phantom quality assurance (QA) of linear accelerators capable of cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guided and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT). This phantom is to be used in an integral test to quantify in real-time both the performance of the image guidance and the dose delivery systems in terms of dose localization. The prototype IG-IMRT QA phantom consisted of a cylindrical imaging phantom (CatPhan) combined with an array of 11 radiation diodes mounted on a 10 cm diameter disk, oriented perpendicular to the phantom axis. Basic diode response characterization was performed for 6 and 18 MV photons. The diode response was compared to planning system calculations in the open and penumbrae regions of simple and complex beam arrangements. The clinical use of the QA phantom was illustrated in an integral test of an IG-IMRT treatment designed for a clinical spinal radiosurgery case. The sensitivity of the phantom to multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration and setup errors in the clinical setting was assessed by introducing errors in the IMRT plan or by displacing the phantom. The diodes offered good response linearity and long-term reproducibility for both 6 and 18 MV. Axial dosimetry of coplanar beams (in a plane containing the beam axes) was made possible with the nearly isoplanatic response of the diodes over 360 degrees of gantry (usually within +/-1%). For single beam geometry, errors in phantom placement as small as 0.5 mm could be accurately detected (in gradient > or = 1% /mm). In clinical setting, MLC systematic errors of 1 mm on a single MLC bank introduced in the IMRT plan were easily detectable with the QA phantom. The QA phantom demonstrated also sufficient sensitivity for the detection of setup errors as small as 1 mm for the IMRT delivery. These results demonstrated that the prototype can accurately and efficiently verify the entire IG-IMRT process. This tool, in conjunction with image guidance

  19. WE-G-BRD-03: Development of a Real-Time Optical Tracking Goggle System (OTGS) for Intracranial Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittauer, K; Yan, G; Lu, B; Barraclough, B; Li, J; Liu, C [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Optical tracking systems (OTS) are an acceptable alternative to frame-based stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). However, current surface-based OTS lack the ability to target exclusively rigid/bony anatomical features. We propose a novel marker-based optical tracking goggle system (OTGS) that provides real-time guidance based on the nose/facial bony anatomy. This ongoing study involves the development and characterization of the OTGS for clinical implementation in intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. Methods: The OTGS consists of eye goggles, a custom thermoplastic nosepiece, and 6 infrared markers pre-attached to the goggles. A phantom and four healthy volunteers were used to evaluate the calibration/registration accuracy, intrafraction accuracy, interfraction reproducibility, and end-to-end accuracy of the OTGS. The performance of the OTGS was compared with that of the frameless SonArray system and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for volunteer and phantom cases, respectively. The performance of the OTGS with commercial immobilization devices and under treatment conditions (i.e., couch rotation and translation range) was also evaluated. Results: The difference in the calibration/registration accuracy of 24 translations or rotation combinations between CBCT and in-house OTS software was within 0.5 mm/0.4°. The mean intrafraction and interfraction accuracy among the volunteers was 0.004+/−0.4mm with −0.09+/−0.5° (n=6,170) and −0.26+/−0.8mm with 0.15+/0.8° (n=11), respectively. The difference in end-to-end accuracy between the OTGS and CBCT was within 1.3 mm/1.1°. The predetermined marker pattern (1) minimized marker occlusions, (2) allowed for continuous tracking for couch angles +/− 90°, (3) and eliminated individual marker misplacement. The device was feasible with open and half masks for immobilization. Conclusion: Bony anatomical localization eliminated potential errors due to facial hair changes and/or soft tissue deformation. The

  20. Accuracy of VarioGuide Frameless Stereotactic System Against Frame-Based Stereotaxy: Prospective, Randomized, Single-Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradac, Ondrej; Steklacova, Anna; Nebrenska, Katerina; Vrana, Jiri; de Lacy, Patricia; Benes, Vladimir

    2017-08-01

    Frameless stereotactic brain biopsy systems are widely used today. VarioGuide (VG) is a relatively novel frameless system. Its accuracy was studied in a laboratory setting but has not yet been studied in the clinical setting. The purpose of this study was to determine its accuracy and diagnostic yield and to compare this with frame-based (FB) stereotaxy. Overall, 53 patients (33 males and 20 females, 60 ± 15 years old) were enrolled into this prospective, randomized, single-center study. Twenty-six patients were randomized into the FB group and 27 patients into the VG group. Real trajectory was pointed on intraoperative magnetic resonance. The distance of the targets and angle deviation between the planned and real trajectories were computed. The overall discomfort of the patient was subjectively assessed by the visual analog scale score. The median lesion volume was 5 mL (interquartile range [IQR]: 2-16 mL) (FB) and 16 mL (IQR: 2-27 mL) (VG), P = 0.133. The mean distance of the targets was 2.7 ± 1.1 mm (FB) and 2.9 ± 1.3 mm (VG), P = 0.456. Mean angle deviation was 2.6 ± 1.3 deg (FB) and 3.5 ± 2.1 deg (VG), P = 0.074. Diagnostic yield was 93% (25/27) in VG and 96% (25/26) in FB, P = 1.000. Mean operating time was 47 ± 26 minutes (FB) and 59 ± 31 minutes (VG), P = 0.140. One minor bleeding was encountered in the VG group. Overall patient discomfort was significantly higher in the FB group (visual analog scale score 2.5 ± 2.1 vs. 1.2 ± 0.6, P = 0,004). The VG system proved to be comparable in terms of the trajectory accuracy, rate of complications and diagnostic yield compared with the "gold standard" represented by the traditional FB stereotaxy for patients undergoing brain biopsy. VG is also better accepted by patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Outcomes and Toxicity for Hypofractionated and Single-Fraction Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Sarcomas Metastasizing to the Spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folkert, Michael R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bilsky, Mark H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Tom, Ashlyn K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Oh, Jung Hun [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Laufer, Ilya [Department of Neurosurgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Tap, William D. [Department of Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya, E-mail: yamadaj@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Conventional radiation treatment (20-40 Gy in 5-20 fractions, 2-5 Gy per fraction) for sarcoma metastatic to the spine provides subtherapeutic doses, resulting in poor durable local control (LC) (50%-77% at 1 year). Hypofractionated (HF) and/or single-fraction (SF) image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery (IG-SRS) may provide a more effective means of managing these lesions. Methods and Materials: Patients with pathologically proven high-grade sarcoma metastatic to the spine treated with HF and SF IG-SRS were included. LC and overall survival (OS) were analyzed by the use of Kaplan-Meier statistics. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed by the use of Cox regression with competing-risks analysis; all confidence intervals are 95%. Toxicities were assessed according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Results: From May 2005 to November 11, 2012, 88 patients with 120 discrete metastases received HF (3-6 fractions; median dose, 28.5 Gy; n=52, 43.3%) or SF IG-SRS (median dose, 24 Gy; n=68, 56.7%). The median follow-up time was 12.3 months. At 12 months, LC was 87.9% (confidence interval [CI], 81.3%-94.5%), OS was 60.6% (CI, 49.6%-71.6%), and median survival was 16.9 months. SF IG-SRS demonstrated superior LC to HF IG-SRS (12-month LC of 90.8% [CI, 83%-98.6%] vs 84.1% [CI, 72.9%-95.3%] P=.007) and retained significance on multivariate analysis (P=.030, hazard ratio 0.345; CI, 0.132-0.901]. Treatment was well tolerated, with 1% acute grade 3 toxicity, 4.5% chronic grade 3 toxicity, and no grade >3 toxicities. Conclusions: In the largest series of metastatic sarcoma to the spine to date, IG-SRS provides excellent LC in the setting of an aggressive disease with low radiation sensitivity and poor prognosis. Single-fraction IG-SRS is associated with the highest rates of LC with minimal toxicity.

  2. Diffusion tractography imaging-guided frameless linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgical thalamotomy for tremor: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won; Sharim, Justin; Tenn, Stephen; Kaprealian, Tania; Bordelon, Yvette; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Pouratian, Nader

    2018-01-01

    Essential tremor and Parkinson's disease-associated tremor are extremely prevalent within the field of movement disorders. The ventral intermediate (VIM) nucleus of the thalamus has been commonly used as both a neuromodulatory and neuroablative target for the treatment of these forms of tremor. With both deep brain stimulation and Gamma Knife radiosurgery, there is an abundance of literature regarding the surgical planning, targeting, and outcomes of these methodologies. To date, there have been no reports of frameless, linear accelerator (LINAC)-based thalomotomies for tremor. The authors report the case of a patient with tremor-dominant Parkinson's disease, with poor tremor improvement with medication, who was offered LINAC-based thalamotomy. High-resolution 0.9-mm isotropic MR images were obtained, and simulation was performed via CT with 1.5-mm contiguous slices. The VIM thalamic nucleus was determined using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-based segmentation on FSL using probabilistic tractography. The supplemental motor and premotor areas were the cortical target masks. The authors centered their isocenter within the region of the DTI-determined target and treated the patient with 140 Gy in a single fraction. The DTI-determined target had coordinates of 14.2 mm lateral and 8.36 mm anterior to the posterior commissure (PC), and 3 mm superior to the anterior commissure (AC)-PC line, which differed by 3.30 mm from the original target determined by anatomical considerations (15.5 mm lateral and 7 mm anterior to the PC, and 0 mm superior to the AC-PC line). There was faint radiographic evidence of lesioning at the 3-month follow-up within the target zone, which continued to consolidate on subsequent scans. The patient experienced continued right upper-extremity resting tremor improvement starting at 10 months until it was completely resolved at 22 months of follow-up. Frameless LINAC-based thalamotomy guided by DTI-based thalamic segmentation is a feasible method

  3. Development of stereotactically guided laser interstitial thermotherapy of breast cancer: in situ measurement and analysis of the temperature field in ex vivo and in vivo adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, P J; Parel, J M; Manns, F; Denham, D B; Gonzalez-Cirre, X; Robinson, D S

    2000-01-01

    The size (0.5-1.0 cm) of early nonpalpable breast tumors currently detected by mammography and confirmed by stereotactic core biopsy is of the order of the penetration depth of near infrared photons in breast tissue. In principle, stereotactically biopsied tumors, therefore, could be safely and efficiently treated with laser thermotherapy. The aim of the current study is to confirm the controlled heating produced by clinically relevant power levels delivered with an interstitial laser fiber optic probe adapted for use with stereotactic mammography and biopsy procedures. Temperature increases and the resultant thermal field produced by the irradiation of ex vivo (porcine and human) and in vivo (porcine) tissue models appropriate to the treatment of human breast tissue by using cw Nd:YAG laser radiation delivered with a interstitial fiber optic probe with a quartz diffusing tip, were recorded with an array of fifteen 23-gauge needle thermocouple probes connected to a laboratory computer-based data acquisition system. By using a stepwise decreasing power cycle to avoid tissue charring, acceptably symmetric thermal fields of repeatable volumetric dimensions were obtained. Reproducible thermal gradients and predictable tissue necrosis without carbonization could be induced in a 3-cm-diameter region around the fiber probe during a single treatment lasting only 3 minutes. The time-dependences of the temperature rise of the thermocouples surrounding the LITT probe were quantitatively modeled with simple linear functions during the applied laser heating cycles. Analysis of our experimental results show that reproducible, symmetric and predictable volumetric temperature increases in time can be reliably produced by interstitial laser thermotherapy. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. A Practical Guide to Experimental Geometrical Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbovskiy, Yuriy A.; Glushchenko, Anatoliy V.

    2017-12-01

    Preface; 1. Markets of optical materials, components, accessories, light sources and detectors; 2. Introduction to optical experiments: light producing, light managing, light detection and measuring; 3. Light detectors based on semiconductors: photoresistors, photodiodes in a photo-galvanic regime. Principles of operation and measurements; 4. Linear light detectors based on photodiodes; 5. Basic laws of geometrical optics: experimental verification; 6. Converging and diverging thin lenses; 7. Thick lenses; 8. Lens systems; 9. Simple optical instruments I: the eye and the magnifier, eyepieces and telescopes; 10. Simple optical instruments II: light illuminators and microscope; 11. Spherical mirrors; 12. Introduction to optical aberrations; 13. Elements of optical radiometry; 14. Cylindrical lenses and vials; 15. Methods of geometrical optics to measure refractive index; 16. Dispersion of light and prism spectroscope; 17. Elements of computer aided optical design; Index.

  5. Optical measurements for scientists and engineers a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    McClelland, Arthur

    2018-01-01

    With this accessible, introductory guide, you will quickly learn how to use and apply optical spectroscopy and optical microscopy techniques. Focusing on day-to-day implementation and offering practical lab tips throughout, it provides step-by-step instructions on how to select the best technique for a particular application, how to set up and customize new optical systems, and how to analyze optical data. You will gain an intuitive understanding of the full range of standard optical techniques, from fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy to super resolution microscopy. Understand how to navigate around an optics lab with clear descriptions of the most common optical components and tools. Including explanations of basic optics and photonics, and easy-to-understand mathematics, this is an invaluable resource for graduate students, instructors, researchers and professionals who use or teach optical measurements in laboratories.

  6. Adaptive optics and laser guide stars at Lick observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brase, J.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    For the past several years LLNL has been developing adaptive optics systems for correction of both atmospheric turbulence effects and thermal distortions in optics for high-power lasers. Our early work focused on adaptive optics for beam control in laser isotope separation and ground-based free electron lasers. We are currently developing innovative adaptive optics and laser systems for sodium laser guide star applications at the University of California`s Lick and Keck Observeratories. This talk will describe our adaptive optics technology and some of its applications in high-resolution imaging and beam control.

  7. Image-Guided Radiotherapy via Daily Online Cone-Beam CT Substantially Reduces Margin Requirements for Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grills, Inga S.; Hugo, Geoffrey; Kestin, Larry L.; Galerani, Ana Paula; Chao, K. Kenneth; Wloch, Jennifer; Yan Di

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine treatment accuracy and margins for stereotactic lung radiotherapy with and without cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance. Methods and Materials: Acquired for the study were 308 CBCT of 24 patients with solitary peripheral lung tumors treated with stereotactic radiotherapy. Patients were immobilized in a stereotactic body frame (SBF) or alpha-cradle and treated with image guidance using daily CBCT. Four (T1) or five (T2/metastatic) 12-Gy fractions were prescribed to the planning target volume (PTV) edge. The PTV margin was ≥5 mm depending on a pretreatment estimate of tumor excursion. Initial daily setup was according to SBF coordinates or tattoos for alpha-cradle cases. A CBCT was performed and registered to the planning CT using soft tissue registration of the target. The initial setup error/precorrection position, was recorded for the superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and medial-lateral directions. The couch was adjusted to correct the tumor positional error. A second CBCT verified tumor position after correction. Patients were treated in the corrected position after the residual errors were ≤2 mm. A final CBCT after treatment assessed intrafraction tumor displacement. Results: The precorrection systematic (Σ) and random errors (σ) for the population ranged from 2-3 mm for SBF and 2-6 mm for alpha-cradle patients; postcorrection errors ranged from 0.4-1.0 mm. Calculated population margins were 9 to 13 mm (SBF) and 10-14 mm (cradle) precorrection, 1-2 mm (SBF), and 2-3 mm (cradle) postcorrection, and 2-4 mm (SBF) and 2-5 mm (cradle) posttreatment. Conclusions: Setup for stereotactic lung radiotherapy using a SBF or alpha-cradle alone is suboptimal. CBCT image guidance significantly improves target positioning and substantially reduces required target margins and normal tissue irradiation

  8. A practical guide to experimental geometrical optics

    CERN Document Server

    Garbovskiy, Yuriy A

    2017-01-01

    A concise, yet deep introduction to experimental, geometrical optics, this book begins with fundamental concepts and then develops the practical skills and research techniques routinely used in modern laboratories. Suitable for students, researchers and optical engineers, this accessible text teaches readers how to build their own optical laboratory and to design and perform optical experiments. It uses a hands-on approach which fills a gap between theory-based textbooks and laboratory manuals, allowing the reader to develop their practical skills in this interdisciplinary field, and also explores the ways in which this knowledge can be applied to the design and production of commercial optical devices. Including supplementary online resources to help readers track and evaluate their experimental results, this text is the ideal companion for anyone with a practical interest in experimental geometrical optics.

  9. Optical effects on neutron guide tubes produced by collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margaca, F.M.A.; Falcao, A.N.; Sequeira, A.D.; Salgado, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    The collimation of a neutron beam carried by a guide tube is shown to procedure extensive regions of umbra and penumbra on the inner walls of the guide tube whenever a diaphragm is used at the exit. The region of umbra renders useless a certain length of the guide-tube end while in the region of penumbra the guide exhibits a faint luminosity. These optical effects are particularly important for stringent collimation. It is shown that these effects render impossible the implementation of the 'equal-flight-paths' design currently used for small-angle neutron scattering instruments, which use guide segments and a diaphragm in the collimation assembly. As a consequence, these operate most of the time in strongly unmatched configurations. It is shown that the optimized design formerly proposed by the authors, in which, whenever possible, the full luminous source area is used, not only avoids the optical effects mentioned but also guarantees the highest detector count rate. (orig.)

  10. Guided-wave acousto-optics interactions, devices, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    1990-01-01

    The field of integrated- or guided-wave optics has experienced significant and continuous growth since its inception in the late 1960s. There has been a considerable increase in research and development activity in this field worldwide and some significant advances in the realization of working in­ tegrated optic devices and modules have been made in recent years. In fact, there have already been some commercial manufacturing and technical ap­ plications of such devices and modules. The guided-wave-acoustooptics involving Bragg interactions between guided optical waves and surface acoustic waves is one of the areas of in­ tegrated-optics that has reached some degree of scientific and technological maturity. This topical volume is devoted to an in-depth treatment of this emerging branch of science and technology. Presented in this volume are concise treatments on bulk-wave acoustooptics, guided-wave optics, and surface acoustic waves, and detailed studies of guided-wave acoustooptic Bragg diffraction in thr...

  11. Optical guiding and beam bending in free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharlemann, E.T.

    1987-01-01

    The electron beam in a free-electron laser (FEL) can act as an optical fiber, guiding or bending the optical beam. The refractive and gain effects of the bunched electron beam can compensate for diffraction, making possible wigglers that are many Rayleigh ranges (i.e., characteristic diffraction lengths) long. The origin of optical guiding can be understood by examining gain and refractive guiding in a fiber with a complex index of refraction, providing a mathematical description applicable also to the FEL, with some extensions. In the exponential gain regime of the FEL, the electron equations of motion must be included, but a self-consistent description of exponential gain with diffraction fully included becomes possible. The origin of the effective index of refraction of an FEL is illustrated with a simple example of bunched, radiating dipoles. Some of the properties of the index of refraction are described. The limited experimental evidence for optical beam bending is summarized. The evidence does not yet provide conclusive proof of the existence of optical guiding, but supports the idea. Finally, the importance of refractive guiding for the performance of a high-gain tapered-wiggler FEL amplifier is illustrated with numerical simulations

  12. Inter- and intrafractional localisation errors in cone-beam CT guided stereotactic radiation therapy of tumours in the liver and lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worm, Esben S.; Hansen, Anders T.; Petersen, Joergen B.; Muren, Ludvig P.; Praestegaard, Lars H.; Hoeyer, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Background. Localisation errors in cone-beam CT (CBCT) guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) were evaluated and compared to positioning using the external coordinates of a stereotactic body frame (SBF) alone. Possible correlations to patient- or treatment-specific factors such as body mass index (BMI), planning time, treatment delivery time, and distance between tumour and spinal cord were explored to determine whether they influenced on the benefit of image-guidance. Material and methods. A total of 34 patients received SBRT (3 fractions) for tumours in the liver (15 patients) or the lung (19 patients). Immobilisation and positioning was obtained with a SBF. Pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans were registered with the bony anatomy of the planning CT to find inter- and intrafractional patient positioning errors (PPE). For lung tumour patients, matching was also performed on the tumours to find the tumour positioning errors (TPE) and baseline shifts relative to bony anatomy. Results. The mean inter- and intrafractional 3D vector PPE was 4.5 ± 2.7 mm (average ± SD) and 1.5 ± 0.6 mm, respectively, for the combined group of patients. For lung tumours, the interfractional misalignment was 5.6 ± 1.8 mm. The baseline shift was 3.9 ± 2.0 mm. Intrafractional TPE and baseline shifts were 2.1 ± 0.7 mm and 1.9 ± 0.6 mm, respectively. The magnitude of interfractional baseline shift was closely correlated with the distance between the tumour and the spinal cord. Intrafractional errors were independent of patient BMI, age or gender. Conclusion. Image-guidance reduced setup errors considerably. The study demonstrated the benefit of CBCT-guidance regardless of patient specific factors such as BMI, age or gender. Protection of the spinal cord was facilitated by the correlation between the tumour position relative to the spinal cord and the magnitude of baseline shift.

  13. Optical phased array using guided resonance with backside reflectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horie, Yu; Arbabi, Amir; Faraon, Andrei

    2018-03-13

    Methods and systems for controlling the phase of electromagnetic waves are disclosed. A device can consist of a guided resonance grating layer, a spacer, and a reflector. A plurality of devices, arranged in a grid pattern, can control the phase of reflected electromagnetic phase, through refractive index control. Carrier injection, temperature control, and optical beams can be applied to control the refractive index.

  14. A guide to experiments in quantum optics

    CERN Document Server

    Bachor, Hans-A

    2019-01-01

    In the third, fully revised and expanded edition of this well established textbook, the authors present new concepts, results, techniques, and the latest experiments in the field of quantum optics. They begin with the basic building blocks and concepts, before moving on to detailed procedures, and novel techniques. The focus is on metrology, communications, and quantum logic, with a special emphasis on single photon technology as well as hybrid detection. A new feature to this edition are the end-of-chapter summaries and full problems sets throughout.

  15. Guided Optical Structures in the Military Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    gyroscopes using integrated optica " (ref.9A), H.C.Lefevre, J.P. Bettini, S.Vatoux and M.Papuohon showed that considerable progress had meanwhile been made...Rotating Optical Fiber Ring Intorferometer", Applied Optica , 16, p. 2605, 1977. 7. V. Vali, R. W. Shorthill, A. Goldstein, and R. S. Krogstad, "Laser...Trmometro, a fibra ottica- Italian Patent No. 04155 A/82 (1982) under extension. 7-5 10 A.M. Sohoggi, M. Dranci, G. Conforti, R. Falcioi, G.P. Preti

  16. Optical design of the adaptive optics laser guide star system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissinger, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The design of an adaptive optics package for the 3 meter Lick telescope is presented. This instrument package includes a 69 actuator deformable mirror and a Hartmann type wavefront sensor operating in the visible wavelength; a quadrant detector for the tip-tile sensor and a tip-tilt mirror to stabilize atmospheric first order tip-tile errors. A high speed computer drives the deformable mirror to achieve near diffraction limited imagery. The different optical components and their individual design constraints are described. motorized stages and diagnostics tools are used to operate and maintain alignment throughout observation time from a remote control room. The expected performance are summarized and actual results of astronomical sources are presented.

  17. Artificial guide stars for adaptive optics using unmanned aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basden, A. G.; Brown, Anthony M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Clark, P.; Massey, R.

    2018-06-01

    Astronomical adaptive optics (AO) systems are used to increase effective telescope resolution. However, they cannot be used to observe the whole sky since one or more natural guide stars of sufficient brightness must be found within the telescope field of view for the AO system to work. Even when laser guide stars are used, natural guide stars are still required to provide a constant position reference. Here, we introduce a technique to overcome this problem by using rotary unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a platform from which to produce artificial guide stars. We describe the concept that relies on the UAV being able to measure its precise relative position. We investigate the AO performance improvements that can be achieved, which in the cases presented here can improve the Strehl ratio by a factor of at least 2 for a 8 m class telescope. We also discuss improvements to this technique, which is relevant to both astronomical and solar AO systems.

  18. Outcome of Elderly Patients with Meningioma after Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy: A Study of 100 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kaul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Incidence of meningioma increases with age. Surgery has been the mainstay treatment. Elderly patients, however, are at risk of severe morbidity. Therefore, we conducted this study to analyze long-term outcomes of linac-based fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT for older adults (aged ≥65 years with meningioma and determine prognostic factors. Materials and Methods. Between October 1998 and March 2009, 100 patients (≥65, median age, 71 years were treated with FSRT for meningioma. Two patients were lost to follow-up. Eight patients each had grade I and grade II meningiomas, and five patients had grade III meningiomas. The histology was unknown in 77 cases (grade 0. Results. The median follow-up was 37 months, and 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year progression-free survival (PFS rates were 93.7%, 91.1%, and 82%. Patients with grade 0/I meningioma showed 3- and 5-year PFS rates of 98.4% and 95.6%. Patients with grade II or III meningiomas showed 3-year PFS rates of 36%. 93.8% of patients showed local tumor control. Multivariate analysis did not indicate any significant prognostic factors. Conclusion. FSRT may play an important role as a noninvasive and safe method in the clinical management of older patients with meningioma.

  19. CyberKnife robotic image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy for oligometastic cancer. A prospective evaluation of 95 patients/118 lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jereczek-Fossa, B.A.; Bossi-Zanetti, I.; Mauro, R. [European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Milan Univ. (Italy); Beltramo, G.; Bianchi, L.C. [CyberKnife Center CDI, Milan (Italy); Fariselli, L. [Carlo Besta Neurological Institute Foundation, Milan (Italy). Radiotherapy Unit; Fodor, C. [European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Fossati, P.; Orecchia, R. [European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Radiotherapy; National Center for Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO) Foundation, Pavia, Milan (Italy); Milan Univ. (Italy); Baroni, G. [National Center for Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO) Foundation, Pavia, Milan (Italy); Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dept. of Bioengineering

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray Inc. Sunnyvale, USA)-based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for oligometastic cancer patients. Patients and methods: Between May 2007 and December 2009, 95 patients with a total of 118 lesions underwent CBK-SRT (median dose 24 Gy in 3 fractions). Inclusion criteria: adult patients with limited volume cancer; suitability for SRT but not for other local therapies. Primary diagnoses included breast, lung, head and neck, gastrointestinal and other malignancies. Prostate cancer patients were excluded. Concomitant systemic therapy was given in 40 % of cases and median follow-up was 12 months. Toxicity and tumor response were evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) Scale and Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors RECIST. Results: Toxicity was rare and observed mainly in patients with comorbidities or uncontrolled cancer. Out of 87 evaluable lesions, complete radiological response, partial response, stabilization and progressive disease were observed in 15 (17 %), 25 (29 %), 34 (39 %) and 13 (15 %) lesions, respectively. Upon restricting the analysis to lesions treated with CBK-SRT alone (no concomitant therapy), response- and local control (LC) rates remained similar. Actuarial 3-year in-field progression-free survival- (i.e. LC), progression-free survival- (PFS) and overall-survival (OS) rates were 67.6, 18.4, and 31.2 %, respectively. LC was reduced in cases of early recurrence. OS- and cause-specific survival (CSS) rates were significantly lower in patients treated for visceral lesions. Failures were predominantly out-field. Conclusion: CBK-SRT is a feasible therapeutic approach for oligometastastic cancer patients that provides long-term in-field tumor control with a low toxicity profile. Further investigations should focus on dose escalation and optimization of the combination with systemic therapies. (orig.)

  20. Fiducial marker guided stereotactic liver radiotherapy: Is a time delay between marker implantation and planning CT needed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Esben S; Bertholet, Jenny; Høyer, Morten

    2016-01-01

    To minimize the risk of marker migration in fiducial marker guided liver SBRT it is common to add a delay of a week between marker implantation and planning CT. This study found that such a delay is unnecessary and could be avoided to minimize the treatment preparation time.......To minimize the risk of marker migration in fiducial marker guided liver SBRT it is common to add a delay of a week between marker implantation and planning CT. This study found that such a delay is unnecessary and could be avoided to minimize the treatment preparation time....

  1. Simulated Online Adaptive Magnetic Resonance–Guided Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Oligometastatic Disease of the Abdomen and Central Thorax: Characterization of Potential Advantages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henke, Lauren; Kashani, Rojano; Yang, Deshan; Zhao, Tianyu; Green, Olga; Olsen, Lindsey; Rodriguez, Vivian; Wooten, H. Omar; Li, H. Harold; Hu, Yanle; Bradley, Jeffrey; Robinson, Clifford; Parikh, Parag; Michalski, Jeff; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Olsen, Jeffrey R., E-mail: Jeffrey.R.Olsen@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To characterize potential advantages of online-adaptive magnetic resonance (MR)-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to treat oligometastatic disease of the non-liver abdomen and central thorax. Methods and Materials: Ten patients treated with RT for unresectable primary or oligometastatic disease of the non-liver abdomen (n=5) or central thorax (n=5) underwent imaging throughout treatment on a clinical MR image guided RT system. The SBRT plans were created on the basis of tumor/organ at risk (OAR) anatomy at initial computed tomography simulation (P{sub I}), and simulated adaptive plans were created on the basis of observed MR image set tumor/OAR “anatomy of the day” (P{sub A}). Each P{sub A} was planned under workflow constraints to simulate online-adaptive RT. Prescribed dose was 50 Gy/5 fractions, with goal coverage of 95% planning target volume (PTV) by 95% of the prescription, subject to hard OAR constraints. The P{sub I} was applied to each MR dataset and compared with P{sub A} to evaluate changes in dose delivered to tumor/OARs, with dose escalation when possible. Results: Hard OAR constraints were met for all P{sub Is} based on anatomy from initial computed tomography simulation, and all P{sub As} based on anatomy from each daily MR image set. Application of the P{sub I} to anatomy of the day caused OAR constraint violation in 19 of 30 cases. Adaptive planning increased PTV coverage in 21 of 30 cases, including 14 cases in which hard OAR constraints were violated by the nonadaptive plan. For 9 P{sub A} cases, decreased PTV coverage was required to meet hard OAR constraints that would have been violated in a nonadaptive setting. Conclusions: Online-adaptive MRI-guided SBRT may allow PTV dose escalation and/or simultaneous OAR sparing compared with nonadaptive SBRT. A prospective clinical trial is underway at our institution to evaluate clinical outcomes of this technique.

  2. Clinical Results of Mean GTV Dose Optimized Robotic-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Lung Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Baumann

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionWe retrospectively evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of gross tumor volume (GTV mean dose optimized stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT for primary and secondary lung tumors with and without robotic real-time motion compensation.Materials and methodsBetween 2011 and 2017, 208 patients were treated with SBRT for 111 primary lung tumors and 163 lung metastases with a median GTV of 8.2 cc (0.3–174.0 cc. Monte Carlo dose optimization was performed prioritizing GTV mean dose at the potential cost of planning target volume (PTV coverage reduction while adhering to safe normal tissue constraints. The median GTV mean biological effective dose (BED10 was 162.0 Gy10 (34.2–253.6 Gy10 and the prescribed PTV BED10 ranged 23.6–151.2 Gy10 (median, 100.8 Gy10. Motion compensation was realized through direct tracking (44.9%, fiducial tracking (4.4%, and internal target volume (ITV concepts with small (≤5 mm, 33.2% or large (>5 mm, 17.5% motion. The local control (LC, progression-free survival (PFS, overall survival (OS, and toxicity were analyzed.ResultsMedian follow-up was 14.5 months (1–72 months. The 2-year actuarial LC, PFS, and OS rates were 93.1, 43.2, and 62.4%, and the median PFS and OS were 18.0 and 39.8 months, respectively. In univariate analysis, prior local irradiation (hazard ratio (HR 0.18, confidence interval (CI 0.05–0.63, p = 0.01, GTV/PTV (HR 1.01–1.02, CI 1.01–1.04, p < 0.02, and PTV prescription, mean GTV, and maximum plan BED10 (HR 0.97–0.99, CI 0.96–0.99, p < 0.01 were predictive for LC while the tracking method was not (p = 0.97. For PFS and OS, multivariate analysis showed Karnofsky Index (p < 0.01 and tumor stage (p ≤ 0.02 to be significant factors for outcome prediction. Late radiation pneumonitis or chronic rip fractures grade 1–2 were observed in 5.3% of the patients. Grade ≥3 side effects did not occur.ConclusionRobotic SBRT is a safe and

  3. Effect of intra-fraction motion on the accumulated dose for free-breathing MR-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy of renal-cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Glitzner, Markus; Kontaxis, Charis; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Prins, Fieke M.; Crijns, Sjoerd P. M.; Kerkmeijer, Linda G. W.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.; Tijssen, Rob H. N.

    2017-09-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has shown great promise in increasing local control rates for renal-cell carcinoma (RCC). Characterized by steep dose gradients and high fraction doses, these hypo-fractionated treatments are, however, prone to dosimetric errors as a result of variations in intra-fraction respiratory-induced motion, such as drifts and amplitude alterations. This may lead to significant variations in the deposited dose. This study aims to develop a method for calculating the accumulated dose for MRI-guided SBRT of RCC in the presence of intra-fraction respiratory variations and determine the effect of such variations on the deposited dose. For this, RCC SBRT treatments were simulated while the underlying anatomy was moving, based on motion information from three motion models with increasing complexity: (1) STATIC, in which static anatomy was assumed, (2) AVG-RESP, in which 4D-MRI phase-volumes were time-weighted, and (3) PCA, a method that generates 3D volumes with sufficient spatio-temporal resolution to capture respiration and intra-fraction variations. Five RCC patients and two volunteers were included and treatments delivery was simulated, using motion derived from subject-specific MR imaging. Motion was most accurately estimated using the PCA method with root-mean-squared errors of 2.7, 2.4, 1.0 mm for STATIC, AVG-RESP and PCA, respectively. The heterogeneous patient group demonstrated relatively large dosimetric differences between the STATIC and AVG-RESP, and the PCA reconstructed dose maps, with hotspots up to 40% of the D99 and an underdosed GTV in three out of the five patients. This shows the potential importance of including intra-fraction motion variations in dose calculations.

  4. A dose planning study on applicator guided stereotactic IMRT boost in combination with 3D MRI based brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assenholt, Marianne S.; Petersen, Joergen B.; Nielsen, Soeren K.; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Tanderup, Kari

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. Locally advanced cervical cancer is usually treated with external beam radiotherapy followed by brachytherapy (BT). However, if response or tumour topography is unfavourable it may be difficult to reach a sufficient BT dose. The purpose of this study was to explore whether an applicator guided stereotactic IMRT boost could be combined with brachytherapy to improve dose volume parameters. Material and methods. Dose plans of 6 patients with HR CTV volumes of 31-100cc at the time of BT were analysed. MRI was performed with a combined intracavitary (IC)-interstitial (IS) ring applicator in situ. A radiotherapy schedule consisting of 45Gy (1.8Gyx25) IMRT followed by boost of 28Gy (7Gyx4fx) was modelled. Four different boost techniques were evaluated: IC-BT, IC/IS-BT, IC-BT+IMRT and IMRT. Dose plans were optimised for maximal tumour dose (D90) and coverage (V85Gy) while respecting DVH constraints in organs at risk: D2cc <75Gy in rectum and sigmoid and <90Gy in bladder (EQD2). In combined BT+IMRT dose plans, the IMRT plan was optimised on top of the BT dose distribution. Volumes irradiated to more than 60 Gy EQD2 (V60Gy) were evaluated. Results. Median dose coverage in IC plans was 74% [66-93%]. By using IC/IS or IC-BT+IMRT boost, the median coverage was improved to 95% [78-99%], and to 96% [69-99%] respectively. For IMRT alone, a median coverage of 98% [90-100%] was achieved, but V60Gy volumes were significantly increased by a median factor of 2.0 [1.4-2.3] as compared to IC/IS. It depended on the individual tumour topography whether IC/IS-BT or IC-BT+IMRT boost was the most favourable technique. Conclusion. It is technically possible to create dose plans that combine image guided BT and IMRT. In this study the dose coverage could be significantly increased by adding IS-BT or IMRT boost to the intracavitary dose. Using IMRT alone for boost cannot be advocated since this results in a significant increase of the volume irradiated to 60Gy

  5. Handbook of fiber optic data communication a practical guide to optical networking

    CERN Document Server

    DeCusatis, Casimer

    2008-01-01

    The third edition of this Handbook provides a comprehensive, easy to use guide to the field of optical fiber data communications. Written by experts in the industry from major companies such as IBM, Cisco and Nortel, the Handbook is a key reference for optical fiber technology, networking, protocols, applications, manufacturing, and future directions. It includes chapters on all the major industry standards, written by the same experts who developed them.This edition contains new material on transceiver form factors (QSFP, SFP +, XFP, X2), manufacturing standards, including JEDEC and R

  6. Solitonic guides in photopolymerizable materials for optical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorkenoo, Kokou D.; Cregut, Olivier; Fort, Alain

    2003-11-01

    These last twenty years, advanced studies in integrated optics have demonstrated the capacity to elaborate optical circuits in planar substrates. Most of the optical integrated devices are realized on glass substrate and the guide areas are usually obtained by photolithography techniques. We present here a new approach based on the use of compounds photopolymerizable in the visible range. The conditions of self written channel creation by solitonic propagation inside the bulk of the photopolymerizable formulation are analyzed. Waveguides can be self-written in photopolymerizable materials1,2 due to the dependence of their refractive index on intensity and duration of the active light. This process results from the competition between the diffraction of the incident Gaussian beam and the photopolymerization which tends to increase the refractive index where light intensity is the highest. By controlling the difference between the refractive index values of the polymerized and non polymerized zones, the beam can be self-trapped along the propagation axis giving rise to a waveguide over distances as large as 10 cm without any broadening. Such permanent waveguides can be structured by inscription of gratings and doped with a dye in a plastic cell leading to the elaboration of a completely plastic laser.

  7. Hair sparing does not compromise real-time magnetic resonance imaging guided stereotactic laser fiber placement for temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shikha; Kumar, Kevin K; Rabon, Matthew J; Dolce, Dana; Halpern, Casey H

    2018-06-01

    Pre-operative scalp shaving is conventionally thought to simplify postoperative cranial wound care, lower the rate of wound infections, and ease optimal incision localization. Over the past few decades, some neurosurgeons have refrained from scalp shaving in order to improve patient satisfaction with brain surgery. However, this hair-sparing approach has not yet been explored in the growing field of magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (MRgLITT). This study investigated the initial impact of a no-shave technique on post-operative wound infection rate as well as on entry and target accuracy in MRgLITT for mesial temporal epilepsy. Eighteen patients selected by the Stanford Comprehensive Epilepsy Program between November 2015 and August 2017 were included in the study. All patients underwent functional selective amygdalohippocampotomies using MRgLITT entirely within a diagnostic MRI suite. No hair was removed and no additional precautions were taken for hair or scalp care. Otherwise, routine protocols for surgical preparations and wound closure were followed. The study was performed under approval from Stanford University's Internal Review Board (IRB-37830). No post-operative wound infections or erosions occurred for any patient. The mean entry point error was 2.87 ± 1.3 mm and the mean target error was 1.0 ± 0.9 mm. There have been no other complications associated with this hair-sparing approach. The study's results suggest that hair sparing in MRgLITT surgery for temporal epilepsy does not increase the risk of wound complications or compromise accuracy. This preferred cosmetic approach may thus appeal to epilepsy patients considering such interventions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. High Retention and Safety of Percutaneously Implanted Endovascular Embolization Coils as Fiducial Markers for Image-Guided Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Pulmonary Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Julian C.; Yu Yao; Rao, Aarti K.; Dieterich, Sonja; Maxim, Peter G.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Diehn, Maximilian; Sze, Daniel Y.; Kothary, Nishita; Loo, Billy W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the retention rates of two types of implanted fiducial markers for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of pulmonary tumors, smooth cylindrical gold 'seed' markers ('seeds') and platinum endovascular embolization coils ('coils'), and to compare the complication rates associated with the respective implantation procedures. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the retention of percutaneously implanted markers in 54 consecutive patients between January 2004 and June 2009. A total of 270 markers (129 seeds, 141 coils) were implanted in or around 60 pulmonary tumors over 59 procedures. Markers were implanted using a percutaneous approach under computed tomography (CT) guidance. Postimplantation and follow-up imaging studies were analyzed to score marker retention relative to the number of markers implanted. Markers remaining near the tumor were scored as retained. Markers in a distant location (e.g., pleural space) were scored as lost. CT imaging artifacts near markers were quantified on radiation therapy planning scans. Results: Immediately after implantation, 140 of 141 coils (99.3%) were retained, compared to 110 of 129 seeds (85.3%); the difference was highly significant (p < 0.0001). Of the total number of lost markers, 45% were reported lost during implantation, but 55% were lost immediately afterwards. No additional markers were lost on longer-term follow-up. Implanted lesions were peripherally located for both seeds (mean distance, 0.33 cm from pleural surface) and coils (0.34 cm) (p = 0.96). Incidences of all pneumothorax (including asymptomatic) and pneumothorax requiring chest tube placement were lower in implantation of coils (23% and 3%, respectively) vs. seeds (54% and 29%, respectively; p = 0.02 and 0.01). The degree of CT artifact was similar between marker types. Conclusions: Retention of CT-guided percutaneously implanted coils is significantly better than that of seed markers. Furthermore, implanting coils is at

  9. Optimization of stereotactically-guided conformal treatment planning of sellar and parasellar tumors, based on normal brain dose volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perks, Julian R.; Jalali, Rakesh; Cosgrove, Vivian P.; Adams, Elizabeth J.; Shepherd, Stephen F.; Warrington, Alan P.; Brada, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the optimal treatment plan for stereo tactically-guided conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) of sellar and parasellar lesions, with respect to sparing normal brain tissue, in the context of routine treatment delivery, based on dose volume histogram analysis. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography (CT) data sets for 8 patients with sellar- and parasellar-based tumors (6 pituitary adenomas and 2 meningiomas) have been used in this study. Treatment plans were prepared for 3-coplanar and 3-, 4-, 6-, and 30-noncoplanar-field arrangements to obtain 95% isodose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) for each plan. Conformal shaping was achieved by customized blocks generated with the beams eye view (BEV) facility. Dose volume histograms (DVH) were calculated for the normal brain (excluding the PTV), and comparisons made for normal tissue sparing for all treatment plans at ≥80%, ≥60%, and ≥40% of the prescribed dose. Results: The mean volume of normal brain receiving ≥80% and ≥60% of the prescribed dose decreased by 22.3% (range 14.8-35.1%, standard deviation σ = 7.5%) and 47.6% (range 25.8-69.1%, σ 13.2%), respectively, with a 4-field noncoplanar technique when compared with a conventional 3-field coplanar technique. Adding 2 further fields, from 4-noncoplanar to 6-noncoplanar fields reduced the mean normal brain volume receiving ≥80% of the prescribed dose by a further 4.1% (range -6.5-11.8%, σ = 6.4%), and the volume receiving ≥60% by 3.3% (range -5.5-12.2%, σ = 5.4%), neither of which were statistically significant. Each case must be considered individually however, as a wide range is seen in the volume spared when increasing the number of fields from 4 to 6. Comparing the 4- and 6-field noncoplanar techniques to a 30-field conformal field approach (simulating a dynamic arc plan) revealed near-equivalent normal tissue sparing. Conclusion: Four to six widely spaced, fixed-conformal fields provide the optimum class solution

  10. Magnetic atom optics: mirrors, guides, traps, and chips for atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinds, E.A.; Hughes, I.G. [Sussex Centre for Optical and Atomic Physics, University of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    1999-09-21

    For the last decade it has been possible to cool atoms to microkelvin temperatures ({approx}1 cm s{sup -1}) using a variety of optical techniques. Light beams provide the very strong frictional forces required to slow atoms from room temperature ({approx}500 m s{sup -1}). However, once the atoms are cold, the relatively weak conservative forces of static electric and magnetic fields play an important role. In our group we have been studying the interaction of cold rubidium atoms with periodically magnetized data storage media. Here we review the underlying principles of the forces acting on atoms above a suitably magnetized substrate or near current-carrying wires. We also summarize the status of experiments. These structures can be used as smooth or corrugated reflectors for controlling the trajectories of cold atoms. Alternatively, they may be used to confine atoms to a plane, a line, or a dot and in some cases to reach the quantum limit of confinement. Atoms levitated above a magnetized surface can be guided electrostatically by wires deposited on the surface. The flow and interaction of atoms in such a structure may form the basis of a new technology, 'integrated atom optics' which might ultimately be capable of realizing a quantum computer. (author)

  11. Laser guide stars for optical free-space communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Calvo, Ramon; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Barrios, Ricardo; Centrone, Mauro; Giggenbach, Dirk; Lombardi, Gianluca; Becker, Peter; Zayer, Igor

    2017-02-01

    The German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) performed a measurement campaign together in April and July 2016 at Teide-Observatory (Tenerife), with the support of the European Space Agency (ESA), to investigate the use of laser guide stars (LGS) in ground to space optical communications. Atmospheric turbulence causes strong signal fluctuations in the uplink, due to scintillation and beam wander. In space communications, the use of the downlink channel as reference for pointing and for pre-distortion adaptive optics is limited by the size of the isokinetic and isoplanatic angle in relation to the required point-ahead angle. Pointing and phase errors due to the decorrelation between downward and upward beam due to the point-ahead angle may have a severe impact on the required transmit power and the stability of the communications link. LGSs provide a self-tailored reference to any optical ground-to-space link, independently of turbulence conditions and required point-ahead angle. In photon-starved links, typically in deep-space scenarios, LGSs allow dedicating all downlink received signal to communications purposes, increasing the available link margin. The scope of the joint DLR-ESO measurement campaign was, first, to measure the absolute value of the beam wander (uplink-tilt) using a LGS, taking a natural star as a reference, and, second, to characterize the decrease of correlation between uplink-tilt and downlink-tilt with respect to the angular separation between both sources. This paper describes the experiments performed during the measurement campaigns, providing an overview of the measured data and the first outcomes of the data post-processing.

  12. Optical Coherence Tomography-Guided Decisions in Retinoblastoma Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Sameh E; VandenHoven, Cynthia; MacKeen, Leslie D; Héon, Elise; Gallie, Brenda L

    2017-06-01

    Assess the role of handheld optical coherence tomography (OCT) in guiding management decisions during diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of eyes affected by retinoblastoma. Retrospective, noncomparative, single-institution case series. All children newly diagnosed with retinoblastoma from January 2011 to December 2015 who had an OCT session during their active treatment at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto, Canada. The OCT sessions for fellow eyes of unilateral retinoblastoma without any suspicious lesion and those performed more than 6 months after the last treatment were excluded. Data collected included age at presentation, sex, family history, RB1 mutation status, 8th edition TNMH cancer staging and International Intraocular Retinoblastoma Classification (IIRC), and number of OCT sessions per eye. Details of each session were scored for indication-related details (informative or not) and assessed for guidance (directive or not), diagnosis (staging changed, new tumors found or excluded), treatment (modified, stopped, or modality shifted), or follow-up modified. Frequency of OCT-guided management decisions, stratified by indication and type of guidance (confirmatory vs. influential). Sixty-three eyes of 44 children had 339 OCT sessions over the course of clinical management (median number of OCT scans per eye, 5; range, 1-15). The age at presentation and presence of a heritable RB1 mutation significantly correlated with an increased number of OCT sessions. Indications included evaluation of post-treatment scar (55%) or fovea (16%), and posterior pole scanning for new tumors (11%). Of all sessions, 92% (312/339) were informative; 19 of 27 noninformative sessions had large, elevated lesions; of these, 14 of 19 were T2a or T2b (IIRC group C or D) eyes. In 94% (293/312) of the informative sessions, OCT directed treatment decisions (58%), diagnosis (16%), and follow-up (26%). Optical coherence tomography influenced and changed management from pre

  13. Guided Acoustic and Optical Waves in Silicon-on-Insulator for Brillouin Scattering and Optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    APL PHOTONICS 1, 071301 (2016) Guided acoustic and optical waves in silicon-on- insulator for Brillouin scattering and optomechanics Christopher J...is possible to simultaneously guide optical and acoustic waves in the technologically important silicon on insulator (SOI) material system. Thin...high sound velocity — makes guiding acoustic waves difficult, motivating the use of soft chalcogenide glasses and partial or complete releases (removal

  14. Stereotactic CO2 laser therapy for hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozodoy-Pins, Rebecca L.; Harrington, James A.; Zazanis, George A.; Nosko, Michael G.; Lehman, Richard M.

    1994-05-01

    A new fiber-optic delivery system for CO2 radiation has been used to successfully treat non-communicating hydrocephalus. This system consists of a hollow sapphire waveguide employed in the lumen of a stereotactically-guided neuroendoscope. CO2 gas flows through the bore of the hollow waveguide, creating a path for the laser beam through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This delivery system has the advantages of both visualization and guided CO2 laser radiation without the same 4.3 mm diameter scope. Several patients with hydrocephalus were treated with this new system. The laser was used to create a passage in the floor of the ventricle to allow the flow of CSF from the ventricles to the sub-arachnoid space. Initial postoperative results demonstrated a relief of the clinical symptoms. Long-term results will indicate if this type of therapy will be superior to the use of implanted silicone shunts. Since CO2 laser radiation at 10.6 micrometers is strongly absorbed by the water in tissue and CSF, damage to tissue surrounding the lesion with each laser pulse is limited. The accuracy and safety of this technique may prove it to be an advantageous therapy for obstructive hydrocephalus.

  15. Ghost marker detection and elimination in marker-based optical tracking systems for real-time tracking in stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Guanghua; Li, Jonathan; Huang, Yin; Mittauer, Kathryn; Lu, Bo; Liu, Chihray

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To propose a simple model to explain the origin of ghost markers in marker-based optical tracking systems (OTS) and to develop retrospective strategies to detect and eliminate ghost markers. Methods: In marker-based OTS, ghost markers are virtual markers created due to the cross-talk between the two camera sensors, which can lead to system execution failure or inaccuracy in patient tracking. As a result, the users have to limit the number of markers and avoid certain marker configurations to reduce the chances of ghost markers. In this work, the authors propose retrospective strategies to detect and eliminate ghost markers. The two camera sensors were treated as mathematical points in space. The authors identified the coplanar within limit (CWL) condition as the necessary condition for ghost marker occurrence. A simple ghost marker detection method was proposed based on the model. Ghost marker elimination was achieved through pattern matching: a ghost marker-free reference set was matched with the optical marker set observed by the OTS; unmatched optical markers were eliminated as either ghost markers or misplaced markers. The pattern matching problem was formulated as a constraint satisfaction problem (using pairwise distances as constraints) and solved with an iterative backtracking algorithm. Wildcard markers were introduced to address missing or misplaced markers. An experiment was designed to measure the sensor positions and the limit for the CWL condition. The ghost marker detection and elimination algorithms were verified with samples collected from a five-marker jig and a nine-marker anthropomorphic phantom, rotated with the treatment couch from −60° to +60°. The accuracy of the pattern matching algorithm was further validated with marker patterns from 40 patients who underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). For this purpose, a synthetic optical marker pattern was created for each patient by introducing ghost markers, marker position

  16. Ghost marker detection and elimination in marker-based optical tracking systems for real-time tracking in stereotactic body radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Guanghua, E-mail: yan@ufl.edu; Li, Jonathan; Huang, Yin; Mittauer, Kathryn; Lu, Bo; Liu, Chihray [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32610 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: To propose a simple model to explain the origin of ghost markers in marker-based optical tracking systems (OTS) and to develop retrospective strategies to detect and eliminate ghost markers. Methods: In marker-based OTS, ghost markers are virtual markers created due to the cross-talk between the two camera sensors, which can lead to system execution failure or inaccuracy in patient tracking. As a result, the users have to limit the number of markers and avoid certain marker configurations to reduce the chances of ghost markers. In this work, the authors propose retrospective strategies to detect and eliminate ghost markers. The two camera sensors were treated as mathematical points in space. The authors identified the coplanar within limit (CWL) condition as the necessary condition for ghost marker occurrence. A simple ghost marker detection method was proposed based on the model. Ghost marker elimination was achieved through pattern matching: a ghost marker-free reference set was matched with the optical marker set observed by the OTS; unmatched optical markers were eliminated as either ghost markers or misplaced markers. The pattern matching problem was formulated as a constraint satisfaction problem (using pairwise distances as constraints) and solved with an iterative backtracking algorithm. Wildcard markers were introduced to address missing or misplaced markers. An experiment was designed to measure the sensor positions and the limit for the CWL condition. The ghost marker detection and elimination algorithms were verified with samples collected from a five-marker jig and a nine-marker anthropomorphic phantom, rotated with the treatment couch from −60° to +60°. The accuracy of the pattern matching algorithm was further validated with marker patterns from 40 patients who underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). For this purpose, a synthetic optical marker pattern was created for each patient by introducing ghost markers, marker position

  17. Stereotactic (Mammographically Guided) Breast Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits The procedure is less invasive than surgical biopsy, ... risk of infection. The chance of infection requiring antibiotic treatment appears to be less than one in ...

  18. A study on the optimization of optical guide of gamma camera detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Yong Hyun; Cho, Gyu Seong; Kim, Ho Kyung; Lee, Wan No; Kim, Young Soo

    2000-01-01

    An optical guide, which is a light guide located between NaI(Tl) scintillation-crystal and array of photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs) in the gamma camera detector system, is an essential component to deliver the spatial information recorded in scintillator to the PMTs. Without the optical guide, the spatial information within the range of a single PMT could not be obtained. For the design of the optimal optical guide, it is necessary to characterize its properties, especially sensitivity and spatial resolution of detector. In this study, the thickness and the refractive index of optical guide, which affect not only on the sensitivity but also on the spatial resolution of gamma-camera detector, were investigated by using Monte Carlo simulation. A 12'x12'x3/8' NaI(Tl) and 23 PMTs with each 5' diameter were considered as a gamma-camera detector components. Interactions of optical photons in the scintillator and the optical guide were simulated using a commercial code DETECT97, and the spatial resolution, mainly interfered by the intrinsic inward distortion within the PMT, was investigated using our own ANGER program, which was developed to calculate positions of incident photons in the gamma camera. From the simulation results, it was found that an optical guide with 1.6 of refractive index and 10 mm of thickness give maximum sensitivity and minimum spatial distortion, respectively

  19. Dosimetric and deformation effects of image-guided interventions during stereotactic body radiation therapy of the prostate using an endorectal balloon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Bernard L.; Gan, Gregory; Diot, Quentin; Kavanagh, Brian; Timmerman, Robert D.; Miften, Moyed

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: During stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for the treatment of prostate cancer, an inflatable endorectal balloon (ERB) may be used to reduce motion of the target and reduce the dose to the posterior rectal wall. This work assessed the dosimetric impact of manual interventions on ERB position in patients receiving prostate SBRT and investigated the impact of ERB interventions on prostate shape. Methods: The data of seven consecutive patients receiving SBRT for the treatment of clinical stage T1cN0M0 prostate cancer enrolled in a multi-institutional, IRB-approved trial were analyzed. The SBRT dose was 50 Gy in five fractions to a planning target volume (PTV) that included the prostate (implanted with three fiducial markers) with a 3–5 mm margin. All plans were based on simulation images that included an ERB inflated with 60 cm 3 of air. Daily kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging was performed to localize the PTV, and an automated fusion with the planning images yielded displacements required for PTV relocalization. When the ERB volume and/or position were judged to yield inaccurate repositioning, manual adjustment (ERB reinflation and/or repositioning) was performed. Based on all 59 CBCT image sets acquired, a deformable registration algorithm was used to determine the dose received by, displacement of, and deformation of the prostate, bladder (BLA), and anterior rectal wall (ARW). This dose tracking methodology was applied to images taken before and after manual adjustment of the ERB (intervention), and the delivered dose was compared to that which would have been delivered in the absence of intervention. Results: Interventions occurred in 24 out of 35 (69%) of the treated fractions. The direct effect of these interventions was an increase in the prostate radiation dose that included 95% of the PTV (D95) from 9.6 ± 1.0 to 10.0 ± 0.2 Gy (p = 0.06) and an increase in prostate coverage from 94.0% ± 8.5% to 97.8% ± 1.9% (p = 0

  20. Guided wave and damage detection in composite laminates using different fiber optic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fucai; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Shirai, Takehiro

    2009-01-01

    Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD) sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminate and acquired by these fiber optic sensors. Characteristics of these fiber optic sensors in ultrasonic guided wave detection were systematically compared. Results demonstrated that both the FBG and FOD sensors can be applied in guided wave and damage detection for the CFRP laminates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of guided wave signal captured by an FOD sensor is relatively high in comparison with that of the FBG sensor because of their different physical principles in ultrasonic detection. Further, the FOD sensor is sensitive to the damage-induced fundamental shear horizontal (SH(0)) guided wave that, however, cannot be detected by using the FBG sensor, because the FOD sensor is omnidirectional in ultrasound detection and, in contrast, the FBG sensor is severely direction dependent.

  1. Caudal Zona Incerta/VOP Radiofrequency Lesioning Guided by Combined Stereotactic MRI and Microelectrode Recording for Posttraumatic Midbrain Resting-Kinetic Tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras Lopez, William Omar; Azevedo, Angelo R; Cury, Rubens G; Alencar, Francisco; Neville, Iuri S; Reis, Paul R; Navarro, Jessie; Monaco, Bernardo; da Silva, Fabio E Fernandes; Teixeira, Manoel J; Fonoff, Erich T

    2016-02-01

    Reporting the outcome of two patients who underwent unilateral ablative stereotactic surgery to treat pharmacologic resistant posttraumatic tremor (PTT). We present two patients (31 and 47 years old) with refractory PTT severely affecting their quality of life. Under stereotactic guidance, refined by T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and double-channel multiunit microelectrode recording (MER), three sequential radiofrequency lesions were performed in the caudal zona incerta (cZi) up to the base of thalamus (VOP). Effects of cZi/VOP lesion were prospectively rated with a tremor rating scale. Both patients demonstrated intraoperative tremor suppression with sustained results up to 18 months follow-up, with improvement of 92% and 84%, respectively, on the tremor rating scale. Tremor improvement was associated with enhancement functionality and quality of life for the patients. The patients returned to their work after the procedure. No adverse effects were observed up to the last follow-up. Radiofrequency lesion of the cZi/VOP target was effective for posttraumatic tremor in both cases. The use of T2-weighted images and MER was found helpful in increasing the precision and safety of the procedure, because it leads the RF probe by relying on neighbor structures based on thalamus and subthalamic nucleus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. An easy to produce and economical three-dimensional brain phantom for stereotactic computed tomographic-guided brain biopsy training in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Deepinder S; Ruth, Jeffrey D; Lambert, Gregory; Rossmeisl, John H

    2017-07-01

    To develop and validate a three-dimensional (3D) brain phantom that can be incorporated into existing stereotactic headframes to simulate stereotactic brain biopsy (SBB) and train veterinary surgeons. Experimental study. Canine brain phantoms were fabricated from osteological skull specimens, agarose brain parenchyma, and cheddar and mozzarella cheese molds (simulating meningiomas and gliomas). The neuroradiologic and viscoelastic properties of phantoms were quantified with computed tomography (CT) and oscillatory compression tests, respectively. Phantoms were validated by experienced and novice operators performing SBB on phantoms containing randomly placed, focal targets. Target yield and needle placement error (NPE) were compared between operators. Phantoms were produced in brain parenchyma, and contrast-enhancing tumors of meningeal and glial origin, respectively. The complex moduli of the agarose and cheeses were comparable to the viscoelastic properties of in vivo brain tissues and brain tumors. The overall diagnostic yield of SBB was 88%. Although NPE did not differ between novice (median 3.68 mm; range, 1.46-14.54 mm) and experienced surgeons (median 1.17 mm, range, 0.78-1.58 mm), our results support the relevance of the learning curve associated with the SBB procedure. This 3D phantom replicates anatomical, CT, and tactile features of brain tissues and tumors and can be used to develop the technical skills required to perform SBB. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  3. Multi-layered fabrication of large area PDMS flexible optical light guide sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert; Knopf, George K.; Bordatchev, Evgueni V.

    2017-02-01

    Large area polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) flexible optical light guide sheets can be used to create a variety of passive light harvesting and illumination systems for wearable technology, advanced indoor lighting, non-planar solar light collectors, customized signature lighting, and enhanced safety illumination for motorized vehicles. These thin optically transparent micro-patterned polymer sheets can be draped over a flat or arbitrarily curved surface. The light guiding behavior of the optical light guides depends on the geometry and spatial distribution of micro-optical structures, thickness and shape of the flexible sheet, refractive indices of the constituent layers, and the wavelength of the incident light. A scalable fabrication method that combines soft-lithography, closed thin cavity molding, partial curing, and centrifugal casting is described in this paper for building thin large area multi-layered PDMS optical light guide sheets. The proposed fabrication methodology enables the of internal micro-optical structures (MOSs) in the monolithic PDMS light guide by building the optical system layer-by-layer. Each PDMS layer in the optical light guide can have the similar, or a slightly different, indices of refraction that permit total internal reflection within the optical sheet. The individual molded layers may also be defect free or micro-patterned with microlens or reflecting micro-features. In addition, the bond between adjacent layers is ensured because each layer is only partially cured before the next functional layer is added. To illustrate the scalable build-by-layers fabrication method a three-layer mechanically flexible illuminator with an embedded LED strip is constructed and demonstrated.

  4. The relationship between optical guiding and the relative phase in free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, H.P.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the relationship between the relative phase and optical guiding in the free-electron laser is studied. The relative phase in this case is defined as the shift in the wavenumber from the vacuum value integrated over the interaction length. In terms of the optical guiding of the signal in free-electron lasers, the relative phase must be positive in order for refractive guiding of the signal to occur. The relative phase is studied from the standpoint of the linear stability analysis in both the high- and low-gain regimes, and the qualitative implications in each of these regimes of the relative phase on the refractive guiding of the signal are identical. Specifically, the relative phase is found to be negative at the low-frequency over this band until it turns positive at a frequency approximately 10% below the frequency of peak gain. Thus optical guiding is indicated over a large portion, but not all, of the gain band. A quantitative measure of the optical guiding of the signal is obtained by an analytic formulation of the guiding of the signal. This formulation is based upon a separable beam approximation in which the evolution of the signal is determined by a Green's function analysis. The specific example of interest involves the low-gain regime prior to saturation. In this case, it is shown that the analytic result is in substantial agreement with the calculation of the relative phase

  5. Breast biopsy -- stereotactic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... org/-/media/ACR/Files/Practice-Parameters/stereo-breast.pdf . Updated 2016. Accessed March 14, 2017. Parker C, Umphrey H, Bland K. The role of stereotactic breast biopsy in the management of breast disease. In: Cameron ...

  6. Sky coverage modeling for the whole sky for laser guide star multiconjugate adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lianqi; Andersen, David; Ellerbroek, Brent

    2012-06-01

    The scientific productivity of laser guide star adaptive optics systems strongly depends on the sky coverage, which describes the probability of finding natural guide stars for the tip/tilt wavefront sensor(s) to achieve a certain performance. Knowledge of the sky coverage is also important for astronomers planning their observations. In this paper, we present an efficient method to compute the sky coverage for the laser guide star multiconjugate adaptive optics system, the Narrow Field Infrared Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS), being designed for the Thirty Meter Telescope project. We show that NFIRAOS can achieve more than 70% sky coverage over most of the accessible sky with the requirement of 191 nm total rms wavefront.

  7. Optimization of the SNS magnetism reflectometer neutron-guide optics using Monte Carlo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Klose, F

    2002-01-01

    The magnetism reflectometer at the spallation neutron source SNS will employ advanced neutron optics to achieve high data rate, improved resolution, and extended dynamic range. Optical components utilized will include a multi-channel polygonal curved bender and a tapered neutron-focusing guide section. The results of a neutron beam interacting with these devices are rather complex. Additional complexity arises due to the spectral/time-emission profile of the moderator and non-perfect neutron optical coatings. While analytic formulae for the individual components provide some design guidelines, a realistic performance assessment of the whole instrument can only be achieved by advanced simulation methods. In this contribution, we present guide optics optimizations for the magnetism reflectometer using Monte Carlo simulations. We compare different instrument configurations and calculate the resulting data rates. (orig.)

  8. Optical trapping via guided resonance modes in a Slot-Suzuki-phase photonic crystal lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Martínez, Luis Javier; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2012-03-12

    A novel photonic crystal lattice is proposed for trapping a two-dimensional array of particles. The lattice is created by introducing a rectangular slot in each unit cell of the Suzuki-Phase lattice to enhance the light confinement of guided resonance modes. Large quality factors on the order of 10⁵ are predicted in the lattice. A significant decrease of the optical power required for optical trapping can be achieved compared to our previous design.

  9. Neptunium detector using fiber-optic light guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, W.A.; Killeen, T.E.; Herold, T.R.

    1981-01-01

    A colorimeter has been constructed and installed to detect neptunium (IV) on-line as it elutes from an ion exchange column in a plant process stream. Because of the high radiation and corrosive atmosphere at the monitoring location, the instrument was designed using remote electronics and glass fiber optic cables. The five-foot cables transmit pulsed white light into a glass monitoring window in a containment box and return the transmitted portion to a photosensor. A simple spring clamp was designed to couple the cables to the monitoring window without modifying existing processes. Details of the design, installation, and operational problems are discussed. Other applications and modifications of the present colorimeter for other actinides, as well as preliminary results on a fiber optic spectrophotometer, are presented

  10. Laser guide star adaptive optics at Lick Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Gavel, Donald; Dillon, Daren; Kupke, Renate; Rudy, Alex

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of the adaptive optics system at the Shane telescope (ShaneAO) along with research and development efforts on the technology and algorithms for that will advance AO into wider application for astronomy. Diffraction-limited imaging and spectroscopy from ground based large aperture telescopes will open up the opportunity for unprecedented science advancement. The AO challenges we are targeting are correction down to visible science wavelengths, which demands high-order wa...

  11. Comparison of Wearable Optical See-through and Handheld Devices as Platform for an Augmented Reality Museum Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serubugo, Sule; Skantarova, Denisa; Nielsen, Lasse Kjærsgård

    2017-01-01

    Self-service guides are a common way of providing information about artworks exhibited in museums. Modern advances in handheld mobile applications and wearable optical see-through devices that use augmented reality offer new ways of designing museum guides that are more engaging and interactive...... than traditional self-service guides such as written descriptions or audio guides. In this study we compare wearable (smart glasses) and handheld (smartphone) devices as a platform for an augmented reality museum guide. We have developed a museum guide for both a smartphone and smart glasses that can...... of potentials of these platforms as augmented reality museum guides and suggest promising future work....

  12. Use of Image-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Lieu of Intracavitary Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Inoperable Endometrial Neoplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemmerer, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hernandez, Enrique; Ferriss, James S. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Valakh, Vladimir; Miyamoto, Curtis; Li, Shidong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Micaily, Bizhan, E-mail: bizhan.micaily@tuhs.temple.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Retrospective analysis of patients with invasive endometrial neoplasia who were treated with external beam radiation therapy followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost because of the inability to undergo surgery or brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We identified 11 women with stage I-III endometrial cancer with a median age of 78 years that were not candidates for hysterectomy or intracavitary brachytherapy secondary to comorbidities (91%) or refusal (9%). Eight patients were American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage I (3 stage IA, 5 stage IB), and 3 patients were AJCC stage III. Patients were treated to a median of 4500 cGy at 180 cGy per fraction followed by SBRT boost (600 cGy per fraction Multiplication-Sign 5). Results: The most common side effect was acute grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity in 73% of patients, with no late toxicities observed. With a median follow-up of 10 months since SBRT, 5 patients (45%) experienced locoregional disease progression, with 3 patients (27%) succumbing to their malignancy. At 12 and 18 months from SBRT, the overall freedom from progression was 68% and 41%, respectively. Overall freedom from progression (FFP) was 100% for all patients with AJCC stage IA endometrial carcinoma, whereas it was 33% for stage IB at 18 months. The overall FFP was 100% for International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology grade 1 disease. The estimated overall survival was 57% at 18 months from diagnosis. Conclusion: In this study, SBRT boost to the intact uterus was feasible, with encouragingly low rates of acute and late toxicity, and favorable disease control in patients with early-stage disease. Additional studies are needed to provide better insight into the best management of these clinically challenging cases.

  13. Stereotactic breast biopsy with a biopsy gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, S.H.; Lovin, J.; Luethke, J.; Jobe, W.E.; Hopper, K.D.; Yakes, W.F.

    1989-01-01

    With the recent introduction of stereotactic mammographic localizing devices, the authors have been performing histologic core needle breast biopsies in which the Bard biopsy gun is used in conjunction with sterotactic guidance. The authors have performed 60 breast gun biopsies with 16-gauge and 18-gauge biopsy-cut needles. These biopsies were followed immediately by traditional surgical excision. Pathologic results correlated well in 52 of the 60 patients, including 10 of 13 cancers. Three of the eight negative correlations occurred when diagnosis was made on gun biopsy but not on surgical biopsy. The stereotactic- guided gun biopsies appear to approach the surgical gold standard, decrease patient discomfort and potential disfigurement, lower the cost of breast biopsy, and lower the threshold necessary to perform breast biopsy

  14. Stereotactic radiosurgery with an upper partial denture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayama, Shusaku; Kunieda, Etsuo; Takeda, Atsushi; Takeda, Toshiaki; Oku, Yohei

    2009-01-01

    A 54-year-old male with partial denture underwent stereotactic radiosurgery with an infrared camera-guided system for a metastatic brain tumor arising from lung cancer. Although this method utilizes a biteplate mounted on the upper jaw to detect head movement, the patient only had four teeth in his upper jaw. In order to stabilize the biteplate, the maxillary denture was fixed to the biteplate with an autopolymerizing resin. In addition, the rest-occlusal position of the lower jaw was impressed on the inferior surface of the biteplate with an autopolymerizing resin. To assess reproducibility and stability, the distance between the left and right incus and left and right markers was measured during pre-planning, as well as before and after stereotactic irradiation. Wearing the biteplate ensures the accuracy of radiotherapy planning for the implementation of radiosurgery in patients who have many maxillary teeth missing. However, a large degree of error was observed when the biteplate was removed. (author)

  15. Solitonic guide and multiphoton absorption processes in photopolymerizable materials for optical integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Stephane; Barsella, Alberto; Acker, D.; Sutter, C.; Beyer, N.; Andraud, Chantal; Fort, Alain F.; Dorkenoo, Kokou D.

    2004-09-01

    Up to now, most of the optical integrated devices are realized on glass or III-V substrates and the waveguides are usually obtained by photolithography techniques. We present here a new approach based on the use of photopolymerizable compounds. The conditions of self-written channel creation by solitonic propagation inside the bulk of these photopolymerizable formulations are analyzed. Both experimental and theoretical results of the various stages of self-written guide propagation are presented. A further step has been achieved by using a two-photon absorption process for the polymerization via a confocal microscopy technique. Combined with the solitonic guide creation, this technique allows to draw 3D optical circuits. Finally, by doping the photopolymerizable mixtures with push-pull chromophores having a controlled orientation, it will be possible to create active optical integrated devices.

  16. Optical coherence tomography in guided surgery of GI cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagaynova, Elena V.; Abelevich, Alexander I.; Zagaynov, Vladimir E.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Denisenko, Arkady N.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Snopova, Ludmila B.; Kutis, Irina S.

    2005-04-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a new high spatial resolution, real-time optical imaging modality, known from prior pilot studies for its high sensitivity to invasive cancer. We reported our results in an OCT feasibility study for accurate determination of the proximal border for esophageal carcinoma and the distal border for rectal carcinoma. The OCT study enrolled 19 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma and 24 patients with distal esophageal carcinoma (14 squamous cell carcinomas, 10 adenocarcinomas). During pre-surgery planning endoscopy we performed in vivo OCT imaging of the tumor border at four dial clock axes (12, 3, 6 and 9 o"clock). The OCT border then was marked by an electrocoagulator, or by a methylene blue tattoo. A cold biopsy (from the esophagus) was performed at visual and OCT borders and compared with visual and OCT readings. 27 post-surgery excised specimens were analyzed. OCT borders matched the histopathology in 94% cases in the rectum and 83.3% in the esophagus. In the cases of a mismatch between the OCT and histology borders, a deep tumor invasion occurred in the muscle layer (esophagus, rectum). Because of its high sensitivity to mucosal cancer, OCT can be used for pre-surgery planning and surgery guidance of the proximal border for esophageal carcinoma and the distal border for rectal carcinoma. However, deep invasion in the rectum or esophageal wall has to be controlled by alternative diagnostic modalities.

  17. Development of Z-pinch optical guiding for laser-plasma accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokai, Tomonao; Kando, Masaki; Dewa, Hideki; Kotaki, Hideyuki; Kondo, Shuji; Kanazawa, Shuhei; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2000-01-01

    We have proposed optical guiding of intense laser pulse by fast Z-pinch for channel guided laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). It has been developed based on capillary discharge-pumped X-ray laser technique. The discharge driven by current of 4.8 kA with a rise time of 15 ns through preionized helium gas could produce an uniform guiding channel with good reproducibility. With this new guiding method an intense Ti-Sapphire laser pulse (λ=790 nm, 2.2 TW, 90 fs, 1 x 10 17 W/cm 2 ) was transported through the channel over a distance of 2 cm corresponding to 12.5 times the Rayleigh length. (author)

  18. Stereotactic neurosurgery for tremor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, Johannes D.; Schuurman, Richard; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Esselink, Rianne A. J.; Bosch, D. Andries

    2002-01-01

    The role of the motor thalamus as surgical target in stereotactic neurosurgery for different kinds of tremor is discussed. For tremor in Parkinson's disease. the subthalamic nucleus becomes more and more often the surgical target, because this target also gives relief of other and more

  19. Target localization of 3D versus 4D cone beam computed tomography in lipiodol-guided stereotactic radiotherapy of hepatocellular carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mark; Chiang, Chi Leung; Lee, Venus; Cheung, Steven; Leung, Ronnie; Wong, Matthew; Lee, Frankle; Blanck, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this study was to comparatively evaluate the accuracy of respiration-correlated (4D) and uncorrelated (3D) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in localizing lipiodolized hepatocellular carcinomas during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). 4D-CBCT scans of eighteen HCCs were acquired during free-breathing SBRT following trans-arterial chemo-embolization (TACE) with lipiodol. Approximately 1320 x-ray projections per 4D-CBCT were collected and phase-sorted into ten bins. A 4D registration workflow was followed to register the reconstructed time-weighted average CBCT with the planning mid-ventilation (MidV) CT by an initial bone registration of the vertebrae and then tissue registration of the lipiodol. For comparison, projections of each 4D-CBCT were combined to synthesize 3D-CBCT without phase-sorting. Using the lipiodolized tumor, uncertainties of the treatment setup estimated from the absolute and relative lipiodol position to bone were analyzed separately for 4D- and 3D-CBCT. Qualitatively, 3D-CBCT showed better lipiodol contrast than 4D-CBCT primarily because of a tenfold increase of projections used for reconstruction. Motion artifact was observed to subside in 4D-CBCT compared to 3D-CBCT. Group mean, systematic and random errors estimated from 4D- and 3D-CBCT agreed to within 1 mm in the cranio-caudal (CC) and 0.5 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP) and left-right (LR) directions. Systematic and random errors are largest in the CC direction, amounting to 4.7 mm and 3.7 mm from 3D-CBCT and 5.6 mm and 3.8 mm from 4D-CBCT, respectively. Safety margin calculated from 3D-CBCT and 4D-CBCT differed by 2.1, 0.1 and 0.0 mm in the CC, AP, and LR directions. 3D-CBCT is an adequate alternative to 4D-CBCT when lipoid is used for localizing HCC during free-breathing SBRT. Similar margins are anticipated with 3D- and 4D-CBCT.

  20. Stereotactic Target point Verification in Actual Treatment Position of Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Hyong Geun; Lee, Hyun Koo

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : Authors tried to enhance the safety and accuracy of radiosurgery by verifying stereotactic target point in actual treatment position prior to irradiation. Materials and Methods : Before the actual treatment, several sections of anthropomorphic head phantom were used to create a condition of unknown coordinated of the target point. A film was sand witched between the phantom sections and punctured by sharp needle tip. The tip of the needle represented the target point. The head phantom was fixed to the stereotactic ring and CT scan was done with CT localizer attached to the ring. After the CT scanning, the stereotactic coordinates of the target point were determined. The head phantom was secured to accelerator's treatment couch and the movement of laser isocenter to the stereotactic coordinates determined by CT scanning was performed using target positioner. Accelerator's anteroposterior and lateral portal films were taken using angiographic localizers. The stereotactic coordinates determined by analysis of portal films were compared with the stereotactic coordinates previously determined by CT scanning. Following the correction of discrepancy, the head phantom was irradiated using a stereotactic technique of several arcs. After the irradiation, the film which was sand witched between the phantom sections was developed and the degree of coincidence between the center of the radiation distribution with the target point represented by the hole in the film was measured. In the treatment of actual patients, the way of determining the stereotactic coordinates with CT localizers and angiographic localizers between two sets of coordinates, we proceeded to the irradiation of the actual patient. Results : In the phantom study, the agreement between the center of the radiation distribution and the localized target point was very good. By measuring optical density profiles of the sand witched film along axes that intersected the target point, authors could confirm

  1. Near-to-eye electroholography via guided-wave acousto-optics for augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Sundeep; Savidis, Nickolaos; Datta, Bianca; Smalley, Daniel; Bove, V. Michael

    2017-03-01

    Near-to-eye holographic displays act to directly project wavefronts into a viewer's eye in order to recreate 3-D scenes for augmented or virtual reality applications. Recently, several solutions for near-to-eye electroholography have been proposed based on digital spatial light modulators in conjunction with supporting optics, such as holographic waveguides for light delivery; however, such schemes are limited by the inherent low space-bandwidth product available with current digital SLMs. In this paper, we depict a fully monolithic, integrated optical platform for transparent near-to-eye holographic display requiring no supporting optics. Our solution employs a guided-wave acousto-optic spatial light modulator implemented in lithium niobate in conjunction with an integrated Bragg-regime reflection volume hologram.

  2. Definitive Upfront Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Combined with Image-Guided, Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IG-IMRT or IG-IMRT Alone for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Chi

    Full Text Available Image-guided (IG intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT enables maximal tumor margin reduction for the sparing of organs at risk (OARs when used to treat locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC with definitive chemo-radiation. It also allows for the incorporation of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR into the treatment regimen. Here, we describe our initial experience in combining definitive upfront SABR to the primary lesion with chemo-radiation delivered with conventionally fractionated IG-IMRT to the remaining regional disease; along with clinical outcome following chemo-radiation with conventionally fractionated IG-IMRT alone in the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC.The clinical outcome of 29 patients with locally advanced NSCLC who underwent conventionally fractionated IG-IMRT, or definitive upfront SABR followed by IG-IMRT combined with chemotherapy (induction, concurrent, or both was retrospectively reviewed.After a median follow up of 23.7 months, the median overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS were 19.8 and 11.3 months, respectively. The 2 year local, regional, and distant control was 60%, 62%, and 38%, respectively. No local failure was observed in 3 patients following SABR + IG-IMRT while 6/26 patients failed locally following IG-IMRT alone. SABR + IG-IMRT was well tolerated. No ≥ grade 3 radiation-related toxicity was observed.Definitive upfront SABR followed by IG-IMRT in selected patients with locally advanced NSCLC warrants further investigation in future clinical trials, while chemo-radiation with IG-IMRT alone was well tolerated.

  3. Guided acoustic and optical waves in silicon-on-insulator for Brillouin scattering and optomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Sarabalis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We numerically study silicon waveguides on silica showing that it is possible to simultaneously guide optical and acoustic waves in the technologically important silicon on insulator (SOI material system. Thin waveguides, or fins, exhibit geometrically softened mechanical modes at gigahertz frequencies with phase velocities below the Rayleigh velocity in glass, eliminating acoustic radiation losses. We propose slot waveguides on glass with telecom optical frequencies and strong radiation pressure forces resulting in Brillouin gains on the order of 500 and 50 000 W−1m−1 for backward and forward Brillouin scattering, respectively.

  4. Modeling update for the Thirty Meter Telescope laser guide star dual-conjugate adaptive optics system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, Luc; Wang, Lianqi; Ellerbroek, Brent

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes the modeling efforts undertaken in the past couple of years to derive wavefront error (WFE) performance estimates for the Narrow Field Infrared Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS), which is the facility laser guide star (LGS) dual-conjugate adaptive optics (AO) system for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). The estimates describe the expected performance of NFIRAOS as a function of seeing on Mauna Kea, zenith angle, and galactic latitude (GL). They have been developed through a combination of integrated AO simulations, side analyses, allocations, lab and lidar experiments.

  5. Common-path low-coherence interferometry fiber-optic sensor guided microincision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kang; Kang, Jin U.

    2011-09-01

    We propose and demonstrate a common-path low-coherence interferometry (CP-LCI) fiber-optic sensor guided precise microincision. The method tracks the target surface and compensates the tool-to-surface relative motion with better than +/-5 μm resolution using a precision micromotor connected to the tool tip. A single-fiber distance probe integrated microdissector was used to perform an accurate 100 μm incision into the surface of an Intralipid phantom. The CP-LCI guided incision quality in terms of depth was evaluated afterwards using three-dimensional Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography imaging, which showed significant improvement of incision accuracy compared to free-hand-only operations.

  6. Use of thin films obtained by electron beam evaporation as optical wave guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobre, S.A.A.; Oliveira, C.A.S. de; Freire, G.F.de O.

    1986-01-01

    Thin films evaporated by electron beam for the fabrication of planar optical waveguides were used. The tested materials were aluminium oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) and tantalum pentoxide (Ta 2 O 5 ). The effect of annealing conditions on the film absorption was investigated for Ta 2 O 5 . The Al 2 O 3 films were characterized by the method of guided modes, in terms of refractive index measurements and film thickness. Atenuation measurements were also carried out. (M.C.K.) [pt

  7. Optical Design of COATLI: A Diffraction-Limited Visible Imager with Fast Guiding and Active Optics Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Fernández, J.; Cuevas, S.; Watson, A. M.

    2018-04-01

    We present the optical design of COATLI, a two channel visible imager for a comercial 50 cm robotic telescope. COATLI will deliver diffraction-limited images (approximately 0.3 arcsec FWHM) in the riz bands, inside a 4.2 arcmin field, and seeing limited images (approximately 0.6 arcsec FWHM) in the B and g bands, inside a 5 arcmin field, by means of a tip-tilt mirror for fast guiding, and a deformable mirror for active optics, both located on two optically transferred pupil planes. The optical design is based on two collimator-camera systems plus a pupil transfer relay, using achromatic doublets of CaF2 and S-FTM16 and one triplet of N-BK7 and CaF2. We discuss the effciency, tolerancing, thermal behavior and ghosts. COATLI will be installed at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional in Sierra San Pedro Mártir, Baja California, Mexico, in 2018.

  8. Theory-Guided Design of Organic Electro-Optic Materials and Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Benight

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Integrated (multi-scale quantum and statistical mechanical theoretical methods have guided the nano-engineering of controlled intermolecular electrostatic interactions for the dramatic improvement of acentric order and thus electro-optic activity of melt-processable organic polymer and dendrimer electro-optic materials. New measurement techniques have permitted quantitative determination of the molecular order parameters, lattice dimensionality, and nanoscale viscoelasticity properties of these new soft matter materials and have facilitated comparison of theoretically-predicted structures and thermodynamic properties with experimentally-defined structures and properties. New processing protocols have permitted further enhancement of material properties and have facilitated the fabrication of complex device structures. The integration of organic electro-optic materials into silicon photonic, plasmonic, and metamaterial device architectures has led to impressive new performance metrics for a variety of technological applications.

  9. Imaging osteoarthritis in the knee joints using x-ray guided diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qizhi; Yuan, Zhen; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2010-02-01

    In our previous studies, near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography (DOT) had been successfully applied to imaging osteoarthritis (OA) in the finger joints where significant difference in optical properties of the joint tissues was evident between healthy and OA finger joints. Here we report for the first time that large joints such as the knee can also be optically imaged especially when DOT is combined with x-ray tomosynthesis where the 3D image of the bones from x-ray is incorporated into the DOT reconstruction as spatial a priori structural information. This study demonstrates that NIR light can image large joints such as the knee in addition to finger joints, which will drastically broaden the clinical utility of our x-ray guided DOT technique for OA diagnosis.

  10. Wave-guided Optical Waveguides tracked and coupled using dynamic diffractive optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael

    With light’s miniscule momentum, shrinking robotics down to the micro- and nano-scale regime creates opportunities for exploiting optical forces and near-field light delivery in advanced actuation and control atthe smallest physical dimensions. Advancing light-driven nano- or micro-actuation requ......With light’s miniscule momentum, shrinking robotics down to the micro- and nano-scale regime creates opportunities for exploiting optical forces and near-field light delivery in advanced actuation and control atthe smallest physical dimensions. Advancing light-driven nano- or micro...... waveguides (WOWs) [2]. As the WOWs are optically trapped and maneuvered in 3D-space, it is important to maintain efficient light-coupling through these free-standing waveguides within their operating volume [3]. We propose the use ofdynamic diffractive techniques to create focal spots that will track...... and couple to the WOWs during full volume operation. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to encode the necessary diffractive phase patterns to generate the multiple and dynamic coupling spots. The method is initially tested for a single WOW and we have experimentally demonstrated dynamic tracking...

  11. Imaged-guided liver stereotactic body radiotherapy using VMAT and real-time adaptive tumor gating. Concerns about technique and preliminary clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llacer-Moscardo, Carmen; Riou, Olivier; Azria, David; Bedos, Ludovic; Ailleres, Norbert; Quenet, Francois; Rouanet, Philippe; Ychou, Marc; Fenoglietto, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Motion management is a major challenge in abdominal SBRT. We present our study of SBRT for liver tumors using intrafraction motion review (IMR) allowing simultaneous KV information and MV delivery to synchronize the beam during gated RapidArc treatment. Between May 2012 and March 2015, 41 patients were treated by liver SBRT using gated RapidArc technique in a Varian Novalis Truebeam STx linear accelerator. PTV was created by expanding 5 mm from the ITV. Dose prescription ranged from 40 to 50 Gy in 5-10 fractions. The prescribed dose and fractionation were chosen depending on hepatic function and dosimetric results. Thirty-four patients with a minimal follow-up of six months were analyzed for local control and toxicity. Accuracy for tumor repositioning was evaluated for the first ten patients. With a median follow-up of 13 months, the treatment was well tolerated and no patient presented RILD, perforation or gastrointestinal bleeding. Acute toxicity was found in 3 patients with G1 abdominal pain, 2 with G1 nausea, 10 with G1 asthenia and 1 with G2 asthenia. 6 patients presented asymptomatic transitory perturbation of liver enzymes. In-field local control was 90.3% with 7 complete responses, 14 partial responses and 7 stabilisations. 3 patients evolved "in field". 12 patients had an intrahepatic progression "out of field". Mean intrafraction deviation of fiducials in the craneo-caudal direction was 0.91 mm (0-6 mm). The clinical tolerance and oncological outcomes were favorable when using image-guided liver SBRT with real-time adaptive tumor gating.

  12. Use of FDG-PET to guide dose prescription heterogeneity in stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancers with volumetric modulated arc therapy: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques de Figueiredo, Bénédicte; Antoine, Mikael; Trouette, Renaud; Lagarde, Philippe; Petit, Adeline; Lamare, Frédéric; Hatt, Mathieu; Fernandez, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess if FDG-PET could guide dose prescription heterogeneity and decrease arbitrary location of hotspots in SBRT. For three patients with stage I lung cancer, a CT-simulation and a FDG-PET were registered to define respectively the PTV CT and the biological target volume (BTV). Two plans involving volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) were calculated. The first plan delivered 4 × 12 Gy within the PTV CT and the second plan, with SIB, 4 × 12 Gy and 13.8 Gy (115% of the prescribed dose) within the PTV CT and the BTV respectively. The Dmax-PTV CT had to be inferior to 60 Gy (125% of the prescribed dose). Plans were evaluated through the D95%, D99% and Dmax-PTV CT , the D2 cm, the R50% and R100% and the dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between the isodose 115% and BTV. DSC allows verifying the location of the 115% isodose (ideal value = 1). The mean PTV CT and BTV were 36.7 (±12.5) and 6.5 (±2.2) cm 3 respectively. Both plans led to similar target coverage, same doses to the OARs and equivalent fall-off of the dose outside the PTV CT . On the other hand, the location of hotspots, evaluated through the DSC, was improved for the SIB plans with a mean DSC of 0.31 and 0.45 for the first and the second plans respectively. Use of PET to decrease arbitrary location of hotspots is feasible with VMAT and SIB for lung cancer

  13. Use of FDG-PET to guide dose prescription heterogeneity in stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancers with volumetric modulated arc therapy: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Figueiredo, Bénédicte Henriques; Antoine, Mikael; Trouette, Renaud; Lagarde, Philippe; Petit, Adeline; Lamare, Frédéric; Hatt, Mathieu; Fernandez, Philippe

    2014-12-23

    The aim of this study was to assess if FDG-PET could guide dose prescription heterogeneity and decrease arbitrary location of hotspots in SBRT. For three patients with stage I lung cancer, a CT-simulation and a FDG-PET were registered to define respectively the PTVCT and the biological target volume (BTV). Two plans involving volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) were calculated. The first plan delivered 4 × 12 Gy within the PTV(CT) and the second plan, with SIB, 4 × 12 Gy and 13.8 Gy (115% of the prescribed dose) within the PTV(CT) and the BTV respectively. The Dmax-PTV(CT) had to be inferior to 60 Gy (125% of the prescribed dose). Plans were evaluated through the D95%, D99% and Dmax-PTV(CT), the D2 cm, the R50% and R100% and the dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between the isodose 115% and BTV. DSC allows verifying the location of the 115% isodose (ideal value = 1). The mean PTV(CT) and BTV were 36.7 (±12.5) and 6.5 (±2.2) cm3 respectively. Both plans led to similar target coverage, same doses to the OARs and equivalent fall-off of the dose outside the PTV(CT). On the other hand, the location of hotspots, evaluated through the DSC, was improved for the SIB plans with a mean DSC of 0.31 and 0.45 for the first and the second plans respectively. Use of PET to decrease arbitrary location of hotspots is feasible with VMAT and SIB for lung cancer.

  14. Implantação estereotáxica de eletrodos profundos por ressonância magnética para cirurgia de epilepsia MRI-guided stereotactic implantation of depth electrodes in epilepsy surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MURILO S. MENESES

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Apresentamos o caso de uma paciente com epilepsia refratária ao tratamento medicamentoso e submetida à monitorização em vídeo-eletrencefalografia por eletrodos de profundidade intracerebrais. A história, o exame clínico, a ressonância magnética (RM, a vídeo-eletrencefalografia e o estudo neuropsicológico não foram suficientes para a determinação da área cerebral de origem das crises convulsivas. Eletrodos de profundidade intracerebrais colocados por estereotaxia guiada por RM possibilitaram o registro de forma muito clara da atividade epileptiforme, determinando com precisão a área cerebral epileptogênica a ser removida por cirurgia. Após lobectomia temporal anterior direita com amígdalo-hipocampectomia realizada há três meses, a paciente permanece sem crises convulsivas. Segundo informações obtidas durante o último Congresso da Liga Brasileira de Epilepsia, esta é a primeira cirurgia estereotáxica para colocação de eletrodos de profundidade intracerebrais em epilepsia no Brasil.We present the case of a 40-year-old woman with refractory epilepsy since aged 18, who was submitted to video-EEG monitoring with intracerebral depth electrodes. The clinical history and examination, magnetic resonance image (MRI, video-EEG and neuropsychological study did not allow the determination of the cerebral onset of epileptic seizures. Depth electrodes inserted by MRI-guided stereotaxis allowed the recording of the epileptic activity and thus showed quite accurately the area of the brain to be surgically resected. She underwent a right anterior temporal lobectomy with amygdalohippocampectomy. The immediate postoperative period was uneventful and she is without epileptic seizures after three months of follow-up. The average pre-operative free-seizure period was two weeks. To our knowledge, this is the first stereotactic surgery for insertion of depth intracerebral electrodes in epilepsy in Brazil.

  15. Diffuse optical tomography for breast cancer imaging guided by computed tomography: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikejiang, Reheman; Zhang, Wei; Li, Changqing

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has attracted attentions in the last two decades due to its intrinsic sensitivity in imaging chromophores of tissues such as hemoglobin, water, and lipid. However, DOT has not been clinically accepted yet due to its low spatial resolution caused by strong optical scattering in tissues. Structural guidance provided by an anatomical imaging modality enhances the DOT imaging substantially. Here, we propose a computed tomography (CT) guided multispectral DOT imaging system for breast cancer imaging. To validate its feasibility, we have built a prototype DOT imaging system which consists of a laser at the wavelength of 650 nm and an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera. We have validated the CT guided DOT reconstruction algorithms with numerical simulations and phantom experiments, in which different imaging setup parameters, such as projection number of measurements and width of measurement patch, have been investigated. Our results indicate that an air-cooling EMCCD camera is good enough for the transmission mode DOT imaging. We have also found that measurements at six angular projections are sufficient for DOT to reconstruct the optical targets with 2 and 4 times absorption contrast when the CT guidance is applied. Finally, we have described our future research plan on integration of a multispectral DOT imaging system into a breast CT scanner.

  16. Fiber Optic Force Sensors for MRI-Guided Interventions and Rehabilitation: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordachita, Iulian I.; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Liu, Xuan; Seifabadi, Reza; Xu, Sheng; Wood, Bradford; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provides both anatomical imaging with excellent soft tissue contrast and functional MRI imaging (fMRI) of physiological parameters. The last two decades have witnessed the manifestation of increased interest in MRI-guided minimally invasive intervention procedures and fMRI for rehabilitation and neuroscience research. Accompanying the aspiration to utilize MRI to provide imaging feedback during interventions and brain activity for neuroscience study, there is an accumulated effort to utilize force sensors compatible with the MRI environment to meet the growing demand of these procedures, with the goal of enhanced interventional safety and accuracy, improved efficacy and rehabilitation outcome. This paper summarizes the fundamental principles, the state of the art development and challenges of fiber optic force sensors for MRI-guided interventions and rehabilitation. It provides an overview of MRI-compatible fiber optic force sensors based on different sensing principles, including light intensity modulation, wavelength modulation, and phase modulation. Extensive design prototypes are reviewed to illustrate the detailed implementation of these principles. Advantages and disadvantages of the sensor designs are compared and analyzed. A perspective on the future development of fiber optic sensors is also presented which may have additional broad clinical applications. Future surgical interventions or rehabilitation will rely on intelligent force sensors to provide situational awareness to augment or complement human perception in these procedures. PMID:28652857

  17. Fiber Optic Force Sensors for MRI-Guided Interventions and Rehabilitation: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hao; Iordachita, Iulian I; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Liu, Xuan; Seifabadi, Reza; Xu, Sheng; Wood, Bradford; Fischer, Gregory S

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provides both anatomical imaging with excellent soft tissue contrast and functional MRI imaging (fMRI) of physiological parameters. The last two decades have witnessed the manifestation of increased interest in MRI-guided minimally invasive intervention procedures and fMRI for rehabilitation and neuroscience research. Accompanying the aspiration to utilize MRI to provide imaging feedback during interventions and brain activity for neuroscience study, there is an accumulated effort to utilize force sensors compatible with the MRI environment to meet the growing demand of these procedures, with the goal of enhanced interventional safety and accuracy, improved efficacy and rehabilitation outcome. This paper summarizes the fundamental principles, the state of the art development and challenges of fiber optic force sensors for MRI-guided interventions and rehabilitation. It provides an overview of MRI-compatible fiber optic force sensors based on different sensing principles, including light intensity modulation, wavelength modulation, and phase modulation. Extensive design prototypes are reviewed to illustrate the detailed implementation of these principles. Advantages and disadvantages of the sensor designs are compared and analyzed. A perspective on the future development of fiber optic sensors is also presented which may have additional broad clinical applications. Future surgical interventions or rehabilitation will rely on intelligent force sensors to provide situational awareness to augment or complement human perception in these procedures.

  18. Theoretical comparison of light scattering and guided wave coupling in multilayer coated optical components with random interface roughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elson, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    In this work, we use first-order perturbation theory to calculate and then compare the (1) angular distribution of incident light scattered from a multilayer-coated optical component and (2) the angular distribution of incident light coupled into guided waves supported by the multilayer component. The incident beam is assumed to be a monochromatic plane wave and the scattering/coupling is assumed to be caused by roughness at the interfaces of the optical component. Numerical results show that for high quality (low root mean square roughness) optical components, comparison of the relative amounts of incident energy (1) scattered out of the specular beam and (2) coupled into guided waves are comparable. It follows that the guided wave energy will further contribute to the scattered field via radiative decay or be converted to heat. Thus, this work can help provide an estimation of when guided wave coupling can occur along with the expected magnitude. (orig.)

  19. Diffractive beam shaping, tracking and coupling for wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Aabo, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    techniques to create multiple focal spots that can be coupled into light manipulated WOWs. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to project the necessary phase to generate the multiple coupling light spots. We incorporate a diffractive setup in our Biophotonics Workstation (BWS) and demonstrate......We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). The full strength of this structure-mediated paradigm can be harnessed by addressing multiple WOWs and manipulating them to work in tandem. We propose the use of diffractive...

  20. Stereotactic radiotherapy in pediatric indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernier-Chastagner, V.; Supiot, S.; Carrie, C.; Helfre, S.

    2012-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy is a very high precision procedure, which has been limited to radiosurgery for a long time. Technological improvements allowed the development of radiotherapy in stereotactic conditions, leading to a lot of innovations. Previously indicated for cerebral pathologies, this procedure is now developed for extra-cerebral locations. In paediatrics, stereotactic radiotherapy is still limited, delivered precociously, due to the possibility of long-term late effects that needs to be addressed. This review reports the different useful conditions, technical evolutions, and the current validated paediatric indications, with differences from adults, and future directions. (authors)

  1. Two-dimensional wavelet transform for reliability-guided phase unwrapping in optical fringe pattern analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sikun; Wang, Xiangzhao; Su, Xianyu; Tang, Feng

    2012-04-20

    This paper theoretically discusses modulus of two-dimensional (2D) wavelet transform (WT) coefficients, calculated by using two frequently used 2D daughter wavelet definitions, in an optical fringe pattern analysis. The discussion shows that neither is good enough to represent the reliability of the phase data. The differences between the two frequently used 2D daughter wavelet definitions in the performance of 2D WT also are discussed. We propose a new 2D daughter wavelet definition for reliability-guided phase unwrapping of optical fringe pattern. The modulus of the advanced 2D WT coefficients, obtained by using a daughter wavelet under this new daughter wavelet definition, includes not only modulation information but also local frequency information of the deformed fringe pattern. Therefore, it can be treated as a good parameter that represents the reliability of the retrieved phase data. Computer simulation and experimentation show the validity of the proposed method.

  2. The Laser Guide Star System for Adaptive Optics at Subaru Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayano, Y.; Saito, Y.; Ito, M.; Saito, N.; Akagawa, K.; Takazawa, A.; Ito, M.; Wada, S.; Takami, H.; Iye, M.

    We report on the current status of developing the new laser guide star (LGS) system for the Subaru adaptive optics (AO) system. We have three major subsystems: the laser unit, the relay optical fiber and the laser launching telescope. A 4W-class all-solid-state 589nm laser has been developed as a light source for sodium laser guide star. We use two mode-locked Nd:YAG lasers operated at the wavelength of 1064nm and 1319nm to generate sum-frequency conversion into 589nm. The side-LD pumped configuration is used for the mode-locked Nd:YAG lasers. We have carefully considered the thermal lens effect in the cavity to achieve a high beam quality with TEM00; M2 = 1.06. The mode-locked frequency is selected at 143 MHz. We obtained the output powers of 16.5 W and 5.0 W at 1064nm and 1319 nm. Sum frequency generated by mixing two synchronized Nd:YAG mode-locked pulsed beams is precisely tuned to the sodium D2 line by thermal control of the etalon in the 1064nm Nd:YAG laser by observing the maximum fluorescence intensity of heated sodium vapor cell. The maximum output power at 589.159 nm reaches to 4.6 W using a PPMgOSLT crystal as a nonlinear optical crystal. And the output power can be maintained within a stability of +/- 1.2% for more than 3 days without optical damage. We developed a single-mode photonic crystal fiber (PCF) to relay the laser beam from laser clean room, in which the laser unit is located on the Nasmyth platform, to the laser launching telescope mounted behind the secondary mirror of Subaru Telescope. The photonic crystal fiber has solid pure silica core with the mode field diameter of 14 micron, which is relatively larger than that of the conventional step-index type single mode fiber. The length of the PCF is 35m and transmission loss due to the pure silica is 10dB/km at 589nm, which means PCF transmits 92% of the laser beam. We have preliminary achieved 75% throughput in total. Small mode-locked pulse width in time allows us to transmit the high

  3. Stereotactic aspiration for hypertensive pontine hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahama, Hidetoshi; Morii, Ken; Sato, Mitsuya; Sekiguchi, Kentaro; Sato, Susumu

    1989-01-01

    Recently, CT-guided stereotactic aspiration has been attempted as a useful method for hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage. Since the CT scanner was introduced in our clinic, we have experienced 55 cases with hypertensive pontine hemorrhage. We carried out stereotactic aspiration in nine cases consisting of four men and five women, ranging in age from 34 to 66 years. Operation was performed between 4 and 22 days after the hemorrhage (mean: 7.7 days). On the other hand, 46 cases were conservatively treated. They consisted of 31 men and 15 women, aged from 31 to 79 years, with a mean age of 55.5 years. The purpose of this study is to review the outcome at three months after the onset, and then to evaluate the clinical value of this method for hypertensive pontine hemorrhage. We have analyzed the outcome from the viewpoint of consciousness level, CT classification, and maximum transverse hematoma diameter on CT scan. In the present study, there was a statistically significant correlation between consciousness level and outcome in the conservative group. The outcome in the operated-on group tended to be superior to that in the conservatively treated group. Particularly, in cases of Japan Coma Scale 10 to 100, functionally favorable effects were considered to be obtained by stereotactic aspiration. According to CT classification, operation was considered to have exerted functionally favorable effects on unilateral basis tegmentum type and bilateral tegmentum type. The conservatively treated group showed a statistically significant correlation between maximum transverse hematoma diameter and outcome. A favorable prognosis was considered to be induced by operation in cases of 22 to 28 mm in maximum transverse hematoma diameter. (author)

  4. Wavefront error budget development for the Thirty Meter Telescope laser guide star adaptive optics system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, Luc; Wang, Lianqi; Ellerbroek, Brent

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the modeling effort undertaken to derive the wavefront error (WFE) budget for the Narrow Field Infrared Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS), which is the facility, laser guide star (LGS), dual-conjugate adaptive optics (AO) system for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). The budget describes the expected performance of NFIRAOS at zenith, and has been decomposed into (i) first-order turbulence compensation terms (120 nm on-axis), (ii) opto-mechanical implementation errors (84 nm), (iii) AO component errors and higher-order effects (74 nm) and (iv) tip/tilt (TT) wavefront errors at 50% sky coverage at the galactic pole (61 nm) with natural guide star (NGS) tip/tilt/focus/astigmatism (TTFA) sensing in J band. A contingency of about 66 nm now exists to meet the observatory requirement document (ORD) total on-axis wavefront error of 187 nm, mainly on account of reduced TT errors due to updated windshake modeling and a low read-noise NGS wavefront sensor (WFS) detector. A detailed breakdown of each of these top-level terms is presented, together with a discussion on its evaluation using a mix of high-order zonal and low-order modal Monte Carlo simulations.

  5. User-guided segmentation for volumetric retinal optical coherence tomography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xin; Chao, Jennifer R.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Despite the existence of automatic segmentation techniques, trained graders still rely on manual segmentation to provide retinal layers and features from clinical optical coherence tomography (OCT) images for accurate measurements. To bridge the gap between this time-consuming need of manual segmentation and currently available automatic segmentation techniques, this paper proposes a user-guided segmentation method to perform the segmentation of retinal layers and features in OCT images. With this method, by interactively navigating three-dimensional (3-D) OCT images, the user first manually defines user-defined (or sketched) lines at regions where the retinal layers appear very irregular for which the automatic segmentation method often fails to provide satisfactory results. The algorithm is then guided by these sketched lines to trace the entire 3-D retinal layer and anatomical features by the use of novel layer and edge detectors that are based on robust likelihood estimation. The layer and edge boundaries are finally obtained to achieve segmentation. Segmentation of retinal layers in mouse and human OCT images demonstrates the reliability and efficiency of the proposed user-guided segmentation method. PMID:25147962

  6. Guiding flying-spot laser transepithelial phototherapeutic keratectomy with optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Yokogawa, Hideaki; Tang, Maolong; Chamberlain, Winston; Zhang, Xinbo; Huang, David

    2017-04-01

    To analyze transepithelial phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK) results using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and develop a model to guide the laser dioptric and depth settings. Casey Eye Institute, Portland, Oregon, USA. Prospective nonrandomized case series. Patients with superficial corneal opacities and irregularities had transepithelial PTK with a flying-spot excimer laser by combining wide-zone myopic and hyperopic astigmatic ablations. Optical coherence tomography was used to calculate corneal epithelial lenticular masking effects, guide refractive laser settings, and measure opacity removal. The laser ablation efficiency and the refractive outcome were investigated using multivariate linear regression models. Twenty-six eyes of 20 patients received PTK to remove opacities and irregular astigmatism due to scar, dystrophy, radial keratotomy, or previous corneal surgeries. The uncorrected distance visual acuity and corrected distance visual acuity were significantly improved (P laser ablation depths were 31.3% (myopic ablation) and 63.0% (hyperopic ablation) deeper than the manufacturer's nomogram. The spherical equivalent of the corneal epithelial lenticular masking effect was 0.73 diopter ± 0.61 (SD). The refractive outcome highly correlated to the laser settings and epithelial lenticular masking effect (Pearson R = 0.96, P < .01). The ablation rate of granular dystrophy opacities appeared to be slower. Smoothing ablation under masking fluid was needed to prevent focal steep islands in these cases. The OCT-measured ablation depth efficiency could guide opacity removal. The corneal epithelial lenticular masking effect could refine the spherical refractive nomogram to achieve a better refractive outcome after transepithelial ablation. Copyright © 2017 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) / Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT): Benefit to Irish patients and Irish Healthcare Economy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cagney, DN

    2017-01-01

    Cancer incidence across Europe is projected to rise rapidly over the next decade. This rising cancer incidence is mirrored by increasing use of and indications for stereotactic radiation. This paper seeks to summarize the exponential increase in indications for stereotactic radiotherapy as well as the evolving economic advantages of stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy

  8. Apparatus for stereotactic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koslow, M.A.M.

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus for stereotactic surgery consisting of a probe and a computerized tomographic scanning system is described. The scanning system comprises a display and means for reconstructing cross-sectional images on the display using data from partial circumferential scans of source and detectors. It operates on the data with an algorithm that provides the difference between the local values of the linear attenuation coefficient and average of these values within a circle centered at each reconstruction point. The scanning system includes a means of maintaining the frames of reference of the probe and scanning system rigid with respect to one another. The position of the probe, which may be a cryogenic probe, with respect to the actual anatomical structure of the body, particularly a human head, may thus be viewed by the surgeon. (author)

  9. Stereotactic treatment. Definitions and literature overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontenla, D.P.

    2008-01-01

    The topics discussed include, among others, the following: Radiosurgery definitions; Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT); Available uncertainties in SRS; Gamma knife; Linac-based SRS; Components of a radiosurgery system; Stereotactic hardware (brain lab); m3 linac attachment; Radiosurgery - clinical procedure; Cancer management; Rationale for SRT; Role of radiosurgery in the management of intracranial tumors; Indications for stereotactic SRS/SRT; Physical components required for SRS/SRT; Stereotactic patient set-up; Stereotactic CT scan for SRS; Physical components required for SRT: Relocatable head frame (GTC); Patient immobilization; Treatment planning system; Basic requirements for SRS dosimetry (Linac based); Stereotactic set-up QA (Linac); Stereotactic frames and QA; Beam dose measurements; Dose evaluation tools; Phantoms. (P.A.)

  10. Automatic online and real-time tumour motion monitoring during stereotactic liver treatments on a conventional linac by combined optical and sparse monoscopic imaging with kilovoltage x-rays (COSMIK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertholet, Jenny; Toftegaard, Jakob; Hansen, Rune; Worm, Esben S.; Wan, Hanlin; Parikh, Parag J.; Weber, Britta; Høyer, Morten; Poulsen, Per R.

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop, validate and clinically demonstrate fully automatic tumour motion monitoring on a conventional linear accelerator by combined optical and sparse monoscopic imaging with kilovoltage x-rays (COSMIK). COSMIK combines auto-segmentation of implanted fiducial markers in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) projections and intra-treatment kV images with simultaneous streaming of an external motion signal. A pre-treatment CBCT is acquired with simultaneous recording of the motion of an external marker block on the abdomen. The 3-dimensional (3D) marker motion during the CBCT is estimated from the auto-segmented positions in the projections and used to optimize an external correlation model (ECM) of internal motion as a function of external motion. During treatment, the ECM estimates the internal motion from the external motion at 20 Hz. KV images are acquired every 3 s, auto-segmented, and used to update the ECM for baseline shifts between internal and external motion. The COSMIK method was validated using Calypso-recorded internal tumour motion with simultaneous camera-recorded external motion for 15 liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) patients. The validation included phantom experiments and simulations hereof for 12 fractions and further simulations for 42 fractions. The simulations compared the accuracy of COSMIK with ECM-based monitoring without model updates and with model updates based on stereoscopic imaging as well as continuous kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM) at 10 Hz without an external signal. Clinical real-time tumour motion monitoring with COSMIK was performed offline for 14 liver SBRT patients (41 fractions) and online for one patient (two fractions). The mean 3D root-mean-square error for the four monitoring methods was 1.61 mm (COSMIK), 2.31 mm (ECM without updates), 1.49 mm (ECM with stereoscopic updates) and 0.75 mm (KIM). COSMIK is the first combined kV/optical real-time motion

  11. MRI-Guided Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy of Malignant and Benign Breast Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilis Ntziachristos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the clinical implementation of a novel hybrid system that combines magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and near-infrared (NIR optical measurements for the noninvasive study of breast cancer in vivo. Fourteen patients were studied with a MR-NIR prototype imager and spectrometer. A diffuse optical tomographic scheme employed the MR images as a priori information to implement an image-guided NIR localized spectroscopic scheme. All patients who entered the study also underwent gadolinium-enhanced MRI and biopsy so that the optical findings were crossvalidated with MR readings and histopathology. The technique quantified the oxy-and deoxyhemoglobin of five malignant and nine benign breast lesions in vivo. Breast cancers were found with decreased oxygen saturation and higher blood concentration than most benign lesions. The average hemoglobin concentration ([H] of cancers was 0.130±0.100 mM, and the average hemoglobin saturation (Y was 60±9% compared to [H]=0.018±0.005 mM and Y=69±6% of background tissue. Fibroadenomas exhibited high hemoglobin concentration [H]=0.060±0.010 mM and mild decrease in oxygen saturation Y=67±2%. Cysts and other normal lesions were easily differentiated based on intrinsic contrast information. This novel optical technology can be a significant add-on in MR examinations and can be used to characterize functional parameters of cancers with diagnostic and treatment prognosis potential. It is foreseen that the technique can play a major role in functional activation studies of brain and muscle as well.

  12. Quantitative assessment of inter-observer variability in target volume delineation on stereotactic radiotherapy treatment for pituitary adenoma and meningioma near optic tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Ogita, Mikio; Yamashita, Koichi; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Shiomi, Hiroya; Tsubokura, Takuji; Kodani, Naohiro; Nishimura, Takuya; Aibe, Norihiro; Udono, Hiroki; Nishikata, Manabu; Baba, Yoshimi

    2011-01-01

    To assess inter-observer variability in delineating target volume and organs at risk in benign tumor adjacent to optic tract as a quality assurance exercise. We quantitatively analyzed 21 plans made by 11 clinicians in seven CyberKnife centers. The clinicians were provided with a raw data set (pituitary adenoma and meningioma) including clinical information, and were asked to delineate the lesions and create a treatment plan. Their contouring and plans (10 adenoma and 11 meningioma plans), were then compared. In addition, we estimated the influence of differences in contouring by superimposing the respective contours onto a default plan. The median planning target volume (PTV) and the ratio of the largest to the smallest contoured volume were 9.22 cm 3 (range, 7.17 - 14.3 cm 3 ) and 1.99 for pituitary adenoma, and 6.86 cm 3 (range 6.05 - 14.6 cm 3 ) and 2.41 for meningioma. PTV volume was 10.1 ± 1.74 cm 3 for group 1 with a margin of 1 -2 mm around the CTV (n = 3) and 9.28 ± 1.8 cm 3 (p = 0.51) for group 2 with no margin (n = 7) in pituitary adenoma. In meningioma, group 1 showed larger PTV volume (10.1 ± 3.26 cm 3 ) than group 2 (6.91 ± 0.7 cm 3 , p = 0.03). All submitted plan keep the irradiated dose to optic tract within the range of 50 Gy (equivalent total doses in 2 Gy fractionation). However, contours superimposed onto the dose distribution of the default plan indicated that an excessive dose 23.64 Gy (up to 268% of the default plan) in pituitary adenoma and 24.84 Gy (131% of the default plan) in meningioma to the optic nerve in the contours from different contouring. Quality assurance revealed inter-observer variability in contour delineation and their influences on planning for pituitary adenoma and meningioma near optic tract

  13. 3-D dosimetric evaluation of 2.5 mm HD120 multileaf system for intensity modulated stereotactic radiosurgery using optical CT based polymer gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuu, C-S; Kessel, Jack; Xu, Y

    2009-01-01

    A Trilogy TX equipped with a 2.5 mm HD120 multileaf collimator system is available for the treatment of radiosurgery and IMRT. In this study, we evaluated the 3-D dosimetric impact of leaf width on an IMRT radiosurgery plan by comparing the target coverage and the dose gradient around the target, produced from both a 2.5 mm HD120 high-definition MLC system and a 5mm-leaf-width millennium 120 MLC system, using an optical CT based polymer gel dosimetry system. The 2.5 mm MLC improves target conformity and surrounding tissue sparing when compared to that of 5 mm MLC.

  14. Spontaneous Coronary Dissection: “Live Flash” Optical Coherence Tomography Guided Angioplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Angela Pimenta; Fernandes, Renato Gil dos Santos Pinto; Neves, David Cintra Henriques Silva; Patrício, Lino Manuel Ribeiro; de Aguiar, José Eduardo Chambel

    2016-01-01

    Optical Coherence tomography (OCT) is a light-based imaging modality which shows tremendous potential in the setting of coronary imaging. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an infrequent cause of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The diagnosis of SCAD is made mainly with invasive coronary angiography, although adjunctive imaging modalities such as computed tomography angiography, IVUS, and OCT may increase the diagnostic yield. The authors describe a clinical case of a young woman admitted with the diagnosis of ACS. The ACS was caused by SCAD detected in the coronary angiography and the angioplasty was guided by OCT. OCT use in the setting of SCAD has been already described and the true innovation in this case was this unique use of OCT. The guidance of angioplasty with live and short images was very useful as it allowed clearly identifying the position of the guidewires at any given moment without the use of prohibitive amounts of contrast. PMID:26989520

  15. GUIDE 7. A general program for evaluating the properties of scintillation and Cerenkov counter optical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massam, T.

    1976-01-01

    GUIDE 7 is a design tool for optical systems which are constructed predominantly from reflecting surfaces. A wide range of surface forms and qualities may be chosen and there is provision for the user to extend the range of applicability of the program. Available facilities include estimation of light collection efficiencies, simulation of the space-time intensity distributions of photons arriving at a detector, optimization of the parameters of focusing systems. The report gives a complete description of the program, including user-defined routines. A large-area time-of-flight counter and ray-tracing for a parabolic mirror are treated as examples, detailing the input data and showing the corresponding output. The derivation of the vector algorithms used in the program is also included. (Auth.)

  16. Enhancing early bladder cancer detection with fluorescence-guided endoscopic optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y. T.; Xie, T. Q.; Du, C. W.; Bastacky, S.; Meyers, S.; Zeidel, M. L.

    2003-12-01

    We report an experimental study of the possibility of enhancing early bladder cancer diagnosis with fluorescence-image-guided endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT). After the intravesical instillation of a 10% solution of 5-aminolevulinic acid, simultaneous fluorescence imaging (excitation of 380-420 nm, emission of 620-700 nm) and OCT are performed on rat bladders to identify the photochemical and morphological changes associated with uroepithelial tumorigenesis. The preliminary results of our ex vivo study reveal that both fluorescence and OCT can identify early uroepithelial cancers, and OCT can detect precancerous lesions (e.g., hyperplasia) that fluorescence may miss. This suggests that a cystoscope combining 5-aminolevulinic acid fluorescence and OCT imaging has the potential to enhance the efficiency and sensitivity of early bladder cancer diagnosis.

  17. Design of pre-optics for laser guide star wavefront sensor for the ELT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muslimov, Eduard; Dohlen, Kjetil; Neichel, Benoit; Hugot, Emmanuel

    2017-12-01

    In the present paper, we consider the optical design of a zoom system for the active refocusing in laser guide star wavefront sensors. The system is designed according to the specifications coming from the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT)-HARMONI instrument, the first-light, integral field spectrograph for the European (E)-ELT. The system must provide a refocusing of the laser guide as a function of telescope pointing and large decentring of the incoming beam. The system considers four moving lens groups, each of them being a doublet with one aspherical surface. The advantages and shortcomings of such a solution in terms of the component displacements and complexity of the surfaces are described in detail. It is shown that the system can provide the median value of the residual wavefront error of 13.8-94.3 nm and the maximum value <206 nm, while the exit pupil distortion is 0.26-0.36% for each of the telescope pointing directions.

  18. Localization techniques in resection of deep seated cavernous angiomas - review and reevaluation of frame based stereotactic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotty, P J; Ewelt, C; Sarikaya-Seiwert, S; Steiger, H-J; Vesper, J; Hänggi, D

    2013-04-01

    Providing high accuracy is crucial in neurosurgery especially for resection of deep seated small cerebral pathologies such as cavernous angiomas. The goal of the present series was to reevaluate the feasibility, accuracy, efficacy and safety of frame-based, stereotactically guided resection for patients suffering from small deep-seated cavernous angiomas. Additionally a review of the literature on navigational tools in cavernoma surgery is provided comparing different navigation strategies. Ten patients with deep-seated, small intracranial, cavernous angiomas being subject to frame-based, stereotactically aided resection are included in this survey. Based on the stereotactic-fused image, set entry and target point aimed at the rim of the cavernoma were calculated. A minicraniotomy (Assets and drawbacks of the stereotactic-aided approach were evaluated, patients were analyzed for surgery-related neurological deficits and completeness of resection. Complete resection was achieved in all ten patients verified by post-surgery MRI imaging. The surgical procedure itself was only slightly aggravated by the stereotactic equipment. No adverse events such as bleedings or infections were observed in our series. Stereotactically guided, minimally invasive resection of deep seated and small cavernous angiomas is accurate and effective. The frame-based stereotactic guidance requires some additional time and effort which seems justified only for deep seated and small cavernous angiomas. Frameless neuronavigation is a common tool in cavernoma surgery and its spatial resolution is sufficient for the majority of cases.

  19. Resection of deep-seated gliomas using neuroimaging for stereotactic placement of guidance catheters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Kengo; Higashi, Hisato; Tomita, Susumu; Furuta, Tomohisa; Ohmoto, Takashi [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-03-01

    A simple computed tomography- (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided stereotactic method for guided microsurgical resection of either deep-seated gliomas or tumors adjacent to an eloquent area is described. The technique employs the Brown-Roberts-Wells stereotactic system and twist drills, 2.7 mm in diameter, for the stereotactic placement of 2.4 mm diameter scaled guidance catheters through the calvaria. In a patient with a deep-seated small glioma, less than 2 cm diameter, one catheter was implanted into the center of the enhanced mass through the cerebral cortex. In the other 14 patients, three to six catheters were used which made the tumor border clearer. After implantation of the guidance catheters, the stereotactic frame was removed and a standard open craniotomy performed. Target localization is not affected by brain movement, which is inevitable during open surgery. The tumor involved the frontal lobe in eight patients, the parietal lobe in two, and the thalamus in five. In all cases the lesion was quickly localized and radical removal was acheived. Neurological complications occurred in only one patient who suffered transient hemiparesis after the resection of a lesion in the pyramidal tract. The results demonstrate that microsurgery combined with CT- or MR imaging-guided stereotactic placement of guidance catheters is a new option for surgery of deep-seated gliomas or tumors adjacent to an eloquent area. (author).

  20. Emerging technologies in stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lijun; Wang, Lei; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Sahgal, Arjun

    2017-09-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) stems from the initial developments of intra-cranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Despite similarity in their names and clinical goals of delivering a sufficiently high tumoricidal dose, maximal sparing of the surrounding normal tissues and a short treatment course, SBRT technologies have transformed from the early days of body frame-based treatments with X-ray verification to primarily image-guided procedures with cone-beam CT or stereoscopic X-ray systems and non-rigid body immo-bilization. As a result of the incorporation of image-guidance systems and multi-leaf col-limators into mainstream linac systems, and treatment planning systems that have also evolved to allow for routine dose calculations to permit intensity modulated radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), SBRT has disseminated rapidly in the community to manage many disease sites that include oligometastases, spine lesions, lung, prostate, liver, renal cell, pelvic tumors, and head and neck tumors etc. In this article, we review the physical principles and paradigms that led to the widespread adoption of SBRT practice as well as technical caveats specific to individual SBRT technologies. From the perspective of treatment delivery, we categorically described (I) C-arm linac-based SBRT technologies; (II) robotically manipulated X-band CyberKnife® technology; and (III) emerging specialized systems for SBRT that include integrated MRI-linear accelerators and the imaged-guided Gamma Knife Perfexion Icon system with expanded multi-isocenter treatments of skull-based tumors, head-and-neck and cervical-spine lesions.

  1. Guided access cavity preparation using cone-beam computed tomography and optical surface scans - an ex vivo study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchgreitz, J; Buchgreitz, M; Mortensen, D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate ex vivo, the accuracy of a preparation procedure planned for teeth with pulp canal obliteration (PCO) using a guide rail concept based on a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan merged with an optical surface scan. METHODOLOGY: A total of 48 teeth were mounted in acrylic bloc...

  2. Non-contact radio frequency shielding and wave guiding by multi-folded transformation optics method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madni, Hamza Ahmad; Zheng, Bin; Yang, Yihao; Wang, Huaping; Zhang, Xianmin; Yin, Wenyan; Li, Erping; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-11-14

    Compared with conventional radio frequency (RF) shielding methods in which the conductive coating material encloses the circuits design and the leakage problem occurs due to the gap in such conductive material, non-contact RF shielding at a distance is very promising but still impossible to achieve so far. In this paper, a multi-folded transformation optics method is proposed to design a non-contact device for RF shielding. This "open-shielded" device can shield any object at a distance from the electromagnetic waves at the operating frequency, while the object is still physically open to the outer space. Based on this, an open-carpet cloak is proposed and the functionality of the open-carpet cloak is demonstrated. Furthermore, we investigate a scheme of non-contact wave guiding to remotely control the propagation of surface waves over any obstacles. The flexibilities of such multi-folded transformation optics method demonstrate the powerfulness of the method in the design of novel remote devices with impressive new functionalities.

  3. The history of stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasak, John M; Gorecki, John P

    2009-08-01

    Stereotactic neurosurgery originated from the pioneering work of Horsley and Clarke, who developed a stereotactic apparatus to study the monkey brain in 1908. Spiegel and Wycis applied this technology to the human brain in 1947, which ultimately lead to the development of multiple stereotactic neurosurgical devices during the 1950s. It was Lars Leksell of Sweden, however, who envisioned stereotactic radiosurgery. Leksell developed the gamma knife to treat intracranial lesions in a noninvasive fashion. His work stimulated worldwide interest and created the field of stereotactic radiosurgery.

  4. Stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Simon S. [Univ. Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Case Comprehensive Cancer Center; Teh, Bin S. [The Methodist Hospital Cancer Center and Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States). Weill Cornell Medical College; Lu, Jiade J. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schefter, Tracey E. (eds.) [Colorado Univ., Aurora, CO (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-11-01

    Comprehensive an up-to-date account of the physical/technological, biological, and clinical aspects of SBRT. Examines in detail retrospective studies and prospective clinical trials for various organ sites from around the world. Written by world-renowned experts in SBRT from North America, Asia and Europe. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as an innovative treatment for various primary and metastatic cancers, and the past five years have witnessed a quantum leap in its use. This book provides a comprehensive and up-to-date account of the physical/technological, biological, and clinical aspects of SBRT. It will serve as a detailed resource for this rapidly developing treatment modality. The organ sites covered include lung, liver, spine, pancreas, prostate, adrenal, head and neck, and female reproductive tract. Retrospective studies and prospective clinical trials on SBRT for various organ sites from around the world are examined, and toxicities and normal tissue constraints are discussed. This book features unique insights from world-renowned experts in SBRT from North America, Asia, and Europe. It will be necessary reading for radiation oncologists, radiation oncology residents and fellows, medical physicists, medical physics residents, medical oncologists, surgical oncologists, and cancer scientists.

  5. Stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzevic, Dario; Legcevic, Jelena; Splavski, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vestibular schwannomas (acoustic neuromas) are common benign tumours that arise from the Schwann cells of the vestibular nerve. Management options include observation with neuroradiological follow-up, microsurgical resection and stereotactic radiotherapy. OBJECTIVES: To assess...... the effect of stereotactic radiotherapy compared to observation, microsurgical resection, any other treatment modality, or a combination of two or more of the above approaches for vestibular schwannoma. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL......; Web of Science; CAB Abstracts; ISRCTN and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 24 July 2014. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) exploring the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy compared with observation alone, microsurgical...

  6. Stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, G.; Daisne, J.F.; Thillays, F.

    2012-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is now well implanted in the radiotherapy treatment tools of brain metastasis. The dose can be delivered in one or multiple sessions. Results seem equivalent. CT scan and MRI imaging are required to delineate and calculate dosimetry. Doses are variable according to the size of the metastases, localization, pathology or equipment. Stabilization or reduction of tumour size is the rules after stereotactic treatment. Impact in terms of overall survival is more difficult to apprehend because of the general context of the disease. Many questions remain unresolved, such as the usefulness of whole brain irradiation, adaptation of the treatment schedule to tumour pathophysiology, role of stereotactic treatment after surgery of metastases, etc. (authors)

  7. Patients burden in stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralik, G.; Fribertova, M.; Trosanova, D.; Kolarcikova, E.

    2009-01-01

    Radiosurgery is one time application of High radiation to a stereotactically defined volume. Treatment delivery involves multiple stereotactically targeted, arced fields. The goal of Radiosurgery is to deliver a high dose to target, while only a minimum dose is delivered to adjacent normal tissue that are just a few millimeters away . Stereotactic Radiosurgery on linac has been employed at St. Elisabeth Cancer Institute in Bratislava since 1993. Until July 31,2008, 1 030 subjects have been treated including patients with brain tumors, metastases, recurrent tumours, and A V malformations, using Leibinger stereotaxy collimators or Mimic MLC system on a Linac accelerator. The presentation shows dose delivery to risk organs in different indications. (authors)

  8. Stereotactic biopsy of cerebellar lesions: straight versus oblique frame positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick-Weller, Johanna; Brawanski, Nina; Dinc, Nazife; Behmanesh, Bedjahn; Kammerer, Sara; Dubinski, Daniel; Seifert, Volker; Marquardt, Gerhard; Weise, Lutz

    2017-10-26

    Biospies of brain lesions with unknown entity are an everyday procedure among many neurosurgical departments. Biopsies can be performed frame-guided or frameless. However, cerebellar lesions are a special entity with a more complex approach. All biopsies in this study were performed stereotactically frame guided. Therefore, only biopsies of cerebellar lesions were included in this study. We compared whether the frame was attached straight versus oblique and we focused on diagnostic yield and complication rate. We evaluated 20 patients who underwent the procedure between 2009 and 2017. Median age was 56.5 years. 12 (60%) Patients showed a left sided lesion, 6 (30%) showed a lesion in the right cerebellum and 2 (10%) patients showed a midline lesion. The stereotactic frame was mounted oblique in 12 (60%) patients and straight in 8 (40%) patients. Postoperative CT scan showed small, clinically silent blood collection in two (10%) of the patients, one (5%) patient showed haemorrhage, which caused a hydrocephalus. He received an external ventricular drain. In both patients with small haemorrhage the frame was positioned straight, while in the patient who showed a larger haemorrhage the frame was mounted oblique. In all patients a final histopathological diagnosis was established. Cerebellar lesions of unknown entity can be accessed transcerebellar either with the stereotactic frame mounted straight or oblique. Also for cerebellar lesions the procedure shows a high diagnostic yield with a low rate of severe complications, which need further treatment.

  9. US-guided diffuse optical tomography for breast lesions: the reliability of clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Ji Youn; Youn, Jung Hyun; Kim, Myung Hyun; Koo, Hye Ryoung; Kim, Soo Jin; Sohn, Yu-Mee; Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    To prospectively assess the reliability of US-guided diffuse optical tomography (US-DOT) using interobserver agreement for the diagnosis of breast lesions with individual real-time imaging and to assess the interobserver agreement of conventional sonography (US) combined with US-DOT for differentiation between benignity and malignancy breast lesions. An Institutional Review Board approved this study, and all subjects provided written informed consent. 122 breast lesions in 111 patients evaluated with US-guided core biopsy were included. Assessments with US and US-DOT for cases subjected to biopsy were obtained by two radiologists using individual real-time imaging prior to biopsy and were prospectively recorded by each performer. With DOT, the total haemoglobin concentration (THC) for each breast lesion was measured. Histopathological results from US-guided biopsies were used as a reference standard. To assess measurement interobserver agreement, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and the Bland-Altman plot were used for THC in US-DOT and the kappa values and ROC analysis were used to evaluate the diagnostic performances of the US BI-RADS final assessment in US and combined US and US-DOT. Of 122 US-guided core biopsied lesions, 83 (68.0%) were diagnosed as benign, and 39 (32.0%) as malignant. Excellent correlation was seen in the THC in US-DOT (ICC score 0.796; 95% confidence interval, 0.708-0.857). The interobserver agreement in BI-RADS final assessment with US and US-DOT (almost perfect; {kappa} = 0.8618) was improved compared with that of US (substantial agreement, {kappa} = 0.6574). However, the overall areas under the ROC curve did not show significant differences between US and combined US and US-DOT, 0.8894 and 0.8975, respectively (P = 0.981). The reliability of THC in US-DOT showed excellent correlation in overall real-time performance. Although the inter-observer agreement for BI-RADS final assessment of US was improved by using US-DOT, the

  10. Stereotactic radiosurgery: incision less surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Victor M.; Palma, Raul B.

    1997-01-01

    Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) involves the application of focused high dose, high energy radiation to precisely (stereotactically) localized targets in the head without opening the skull for the purpose of destroying pathologic tissues like tumors, and also for producing discrete lesions for the relief of certain functional disorders. This procedure was pioneered by Lars Leksel in the 1950s and has progressively been refined with the development of more powerful computer technology and more precise and safer radiation delivery systems. The used of the Linear Accelerator (LINAC)- based radiosurgery system would be the most cost-effective and appropriate system for this treatment

  11. Stereotactic Radiosurgery - Gamma Knife

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DE, Adler JR Jr, Ewend MG. Image-guided robotic radiosurgery. In: Winn RH, ed. Youmans Neurological Surgery . ... by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is ...

  12. Evaluation of stability of stereotactic space defined by cone-beam CT for the Leksell Gamma Knife Icon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlDahlawi, Ismail; Prasad, Dheerendra; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2017-05-01

    The Gamma Knife Icon comes with an integrated cone-beam CT (CBCT) for image-guided stereotactic treatment deliveries. The CBCT can be used for defining the Leksell stereotactic space using imaging without the need for the traditional invasive frame system, and this allows also for frameless thermoplastic mask stereotactic treatments (single or fractionated) with the Gamma Knife unit. In this study, we used an in-house built marker tool to evaluate the stability of the CBCT-based stereotactic space and its agreement with the standard frame-based stereotactic space. We imaged the tool with a CT indicator box using our CT-simulator at the beginning, middle, and end of the study period (6 weeks) for determining the frame-based stereotactic space. The tool was also scanned with the Icon's CBCT on a daily basis throughout the study period, and the CBCT images were used for determining the CBCT-based stereotactic space. The coordinates of each marker were determined in each CT and CBCT scan using the Leksell GammaPlan treatment planning software. The magnitudes of vector difference between the means of each marker in frame-based and CBCT-based stereotactic space ranged from 0.21 to 0.33 mm, indicating good agreement of CBCT-based and frame-based stereotactic space definition. Scanning 4-month later showed good prolonged stability of the CBCT-based stereotactic space definition. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. Extracranial Stereotactic Radioablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papie, Lech; Timmerman, Robert; Desrosiers, Colleen; Randall, Marcus [Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2003-12-01

    Extracranial stereotactic radioablation (ESR) involves treating well-demarcated targeted tissues (e.g. tumor with minimal margin for set-up uncertainties) with very large doses of radiation in single or a few fractions with the intent of causing profound late tissue damage within the targeted volume. In such circumstances, considerable effort must be taken to reduce non-target tissue exposure to the high dose levels in order to prevent late complications to involved organs. Consequently, the following conditions for effective delivery of the ESR techniques have to be satisfied: 1) delivery of a high dose per fraction, i.e. 10-24 Gy; 2) delivery of only a few fractions per course of treatment (e.g. 1-4); 3) shaping of the prescription isodose surface conformally to the target surface; 4) delivery of a non-uniform dose distribution within the target with the highest dose in centrally located regions of hypoxia; 5) rapid fall-off of dose from the target volume to healthy tissue in all directions. In this paper it is shown that high doses per fraction in few fractions can be delivered to a variety of locations with both efficacy and acceptable toxicity (conditions 1 and 2). Conformal shaping of the high isodose surfaces is best accomplished by employing many beams (5-10) each with carefully milled apertures precisely coincident with the target projection (condition 3). Beam intensity modulation creating parabolic beam entrance fluence profiles both concentrates the highest dose in central regions of tumor hypoxia and increases fall-off gradients outside of the target (conditions 4 and 5). It is also shown that isotropic, highly non-coplanar beam arrangements avoiding oppositional fields allow more optimal fall-off gradients to normal tissue as opposed to coplanar treatments (condition 5)

  14. Stereotactic radiosurgery for hemangioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Yamada, Yasushi; Kida, Yoshihisa; Iwakoshi, Takayasu; Yoshimoto, Masayuki [Komaki City Hospital, Aichi (Japan). Gamma Knife Center

    2001-12-01

    We evaluated the treatment results of Gamma Knife radiosurgery for intracranial hemanigioblastoma of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome or sporadic disease. Stereotactic radiosurgery was performed in 20 patients with 35 hemangioblastomas over a 9-year interval. The mean age of the patients was 48.5 years (range, 18-79 years). The volume of the tumors varied from 0.03 to 19 ml (mean, 3.0 ml), and the mean tumor margin dose was 17.8 Gy (range, 14-24 Gy). Clinical and neuroimaging follow-up was obtained 6 to 58 months (mean 26.2 months) after radiosurgery. Thirty-one (89%) of 35 tumors were controlled locally. Two tumors (6%) disappeared and 11 (31%) decreased in size during follow-up period. Eighteen (52%) remained unchanged in size. Three out of four enlarged tumors were resected surgically after radiosurgery. Another tumor was resected surgically to improve the patient's symptoms of nausea and vomiting caused by persistent perifocal edema in spite of reduced tumor volume. Only one patient, who had a tumor in the 4th ventricle arising from the brainstem, died 12 months after radiosurgery. Although the treated tumor remained stable in size, he developed aspiration pneumonia due to brainstem dysfunction caused by perifocal edema. All tumors less than 1 cm in diameter did not progress during follow-up period. For small hemangioblastomas, radiosurgery is a safe and effective option to control disease. If a large tumor is treated by radiosurgery, careful observation of the patient's neurological condition is necessary. (author)

  15. Stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy: Dose prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlienger, M.; Lartigau, E.; Nataf, F.; Mornex, F.; Latorzeff, I.; Lisbona, A.; Mahe, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article was the study of the successive steps permitting the prescription of dose in stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy, which includes radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The successive steps studied are: the choice of stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy among the therapeutic options, based on curative or palliative treatment intent, then the selection of lesions according to size/volume, pathological type and their number permitting the choice between radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, which have the same methodological basis. Clinical experience has determined the level of dose to treat the lesions and limit the irradiation of healthy adjacent tissues and organs at risk structures. The last step is the optimization of the different parameters to obtain a safe compromise between the lesion dose and healthy adjacent structures. Study of dose-volume histograms, coverage indices and 3D imaging permit the optimization of irradiation. For lesions close to or included in a critical area, the prescribed dose is planned using the inverse planing method. Implementation of the successively described steps is mandatory to insure the prescription of an optimized dose. The whole procedure is based on the delineation of the lesion and adjacent healthy tissues. There are sometimes difficulties to assess the delineation and the volume of the target, however improvement of local control rates and reduction of secondary effects are the proof that the totality of the successive procedures are progressively improved. In practice, stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy is a continually improved treatment method, which constantly benefits from improvements in the choice of indications, imaging, techniques of irradiation, planing/optimization methodology and irradiation technique and from data collected from prolonged follow-up. (authors)

  16. Image-guided modified deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) corneal transplant using intraoperative optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yuankai K.; LaBarbera, Michael; Ehlers, Justis P.; Srivastava, Sunil K.; Dupps, William J.

    2015-03-01

    Deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) is an alternative to full-thickness corneal transplant and has advantages including the absence of allograft rejection; shortened duration of topical corticosteroid treatment and reduced associated risk of glaucoma, cataract, or infection; and enables use of grafts with poor endothelial quality. DALK begins by performing a trephination of approximately 80% stromal thickness, as measured by pachymetry. After removal of the anterior stoma, a needle is inserted into the residual stroma to inject air or viscoelastic to dissect Descemet's membrane. These procedures are inherently difficult and intraoperative rates of Descemet's membrane perforation between 4-39% have been reported. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides high-resolution images of tissue microstructures in the cornea, including Descemet's membrane, and allows quantitation of corneal layer thicknesses. Here, we use crosssectional intraoperative OCT (iOCT) measurements of corneal thickness during surgery and a novel micrometeradjustable biopsy punch to precision-cut the stroma down to Descemet's membrane. Our prototype cutting tool allows us to establish a dissection plane at the corneal endothelium interface, mitigates variability in cut-depths as a result of tremor, reduces procedure complexity, and reduces complication rates. iOCT-guided modified DALK procedures were performed on 47 cadaveric porcine eyes by non-experts and achieved a perforation rate of ~5% with a mean corneal dissection time care.

  17. Artifact reduction method in ultrasound-guided diffuse optical tomography using exogenous contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Biswal, Nrusingh; Aguirre, Andres; Zhu, Quing

    2011-04-01

    In diffuse optical tomography (DOT), a typical perturbation approach requires two sets of measurements obtained at the lesion breast (lesion or target site) and a contra-lateral location of the normal breast (reference site) for image reconstruction. For patients who have a small amount of breast tissue, the chest-wall underneath the breast tissue at both sites affects the imaging results. In this group of patients, the perturbation, which is the difference between measurements obtained at the lesion and reference sites, may include the information of background mismatch which can generate artifacts or affect the reconstructed quantitative absorption coefficient of the lesion. Also, for patients who have a single breast due to prior surgery, the contra-lateral reference is not available. To improve the DOT performance or overcome its limitation, we introduced a new method based on an exogenous contrast agent and demonstrate its performance using animal models. Co-registered ultrasound was used to guide the lesion localization. The results have shown that artifacts caused by background mismatch can be reduced significantly by using this new method.

  18. Pathologic contrast enhancement of cerebral lesions: A comparative study using stereotactic CT, stereotactic MR imaging, and stereotactic biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earnest, F. IV; Kelly, P.J.; Scheithauer, B.; Kall, B.; Cascino, T.L.; Ehman, R.L.; Forbes, G.

    1986-01-01

    The author compared the pattern and degree of Gd-DTPA dimeglumine contrast enhancement demonstrated on stereotactic MR images with that seen on stereotactic CT images obtained after conventional iodinated contrast agent enhancement and with histopathologic findings on sequential stereotactic brain biopsies. Stereotactic biopsies of the areas that enhanced on CT or MR imaging revealed tumor tissue with neovascularity. Tumor tissue with no or mild neovascularity did not enhance with contrast agent administration. Isolated tumor cells were frequently found beyond the margins of some primary brain neoplasms defined by contrast agent-enhanced MR imaging and CT. The histopathologic findings associated with pathologic contrast agent enhancement are presented

  19. A stereotactic adapter compatible with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacak, R.K.; Law, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    One application of computed-tomographic (CT) scanners is the localization of intracranial targets for stereotactic surgery. Unfortunately, conventional stereotactic devices affixed to the patient cause artifacts which obscure anatomic features in CT images. The authors describe the initial phase of a project to eliminate this problem by using an adapter that is free of metallic objects. Localization of the target point relative to the coordinate system of a Leksell stereotactic frame is achieved from CT image measurements

  20. Multiple brain metastases irradiation with Eleka Axesse stereotactic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, P. V.; Polovnikov, E. S.; Orlov, K. Yu.; Krutko, A. V.; Kirilova, I. A.; Moskalev, A. V.; Filatova, E. V.; Zheravin, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    Brain metastases are one of the factors complicating the treatment of a malignant tumor. Radiation therapy, especially radiosurgery, plays an important role in the modern treatment practice. During 2011-2016, 32 patients (from 29 to 67 years old) with multiple brain metastases underwent the treatment with SRS or SRT in our center. The number of secondary lesions varied from 2 to 11. Eight patients underwent microsurgery resection. Seven patients had recurrence after whole brain radiotherapy. Thirty patient underwent single fraction SRS and two patients with large metastases (bigger than 3 cm) underwent fractionated SRT. The treatment was done with dedicated linear accelerator stereotactic system Elekta Axesse (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden). Different stereotactic fixation devices were used, namely, Leksell G frame, non-invasive HeadFIX frame, and reinforced thermoplastic mask (IMRT perforation). All treatments included a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique and of Inage Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) technique. All lesions were treated from a single isocenter, which allowed reducing the treatment time and overall dose to the patient's body. All patients suffered the treatment satisfactorily. No adverse reactions or complications were met in any case during or right after the treatment. Different stereotactic fixation devices and modern treatment techniques allowed creating an optimal, safe and comfortable way for patient treatment. The treatment time was from 15 to 50 minutes. Patient position verification after or during the treatment demonstrated good accuracy for all fixation types and low level of intrafraction motion.

  1. Incidence and Outcomes of Optical Zone Enlargement and Recentration After Previous Myopic LASIK by Topography-Guided Custom Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinstein, Dan Z; Archer, Timothy J; Carp, Glenn I; Stuart, Alastair J; Rowe, Elizabeth L; Nesbit, Andrew; Moore, Tara

    2018-02-01

    To report the incidence, visual and refractive outcomes, optical zone enlargement, and recentration using topography-guided CRS-Master TOSCA II software with the MEL 80 excimer laser (Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Jena, Germany) after primary myopic laser refractive surgery. Retrospective analysis of 73 eyes (40 patients) with complaints of night vision disturbances due to either a decentration or small optical zone following a primary myopic laser refractive surgery procedure using the MEL 80 laser. Multiple ATLAS topography scans were imported into the CRS-Master software for topography-guided ablation planning. The topography-guided re-treatment procedure was performed as either a LASIK flap lift, a new LASIK flap, a side cut only, or photorefractive keratectomy. Axial curvature maps were analyzed using a fixed grid and set of concentric circles superimposed to measure the topographic optical zone diameter and centration. Follow-up was 12 months. The incidence of use in the population of myopic treatments during the study period was 0.79% (73 of 9,249). The optical zone diameter was increased by 11% from a mean of 5.65 to 6.32 mm, with a maximum change of 2 mm in one case. Topographic decentration was reduced by 64% from a mean of 0.58 to 0.21 mm. There was a 44% reduction in spherical aberration, 53% reduction in coma, and 39% reduction in total higher order aberrations. A subjective improvement in night vision symptoms was reported by 93%. Regarding efficacy, 82% of eyes reached 20/20 and 100% reached 20/32 (preoperative CDVA was 20/20 or better in 90%). Regarding safety, no eyes lost two lines of CDVA and 27% gained one line. Regarding predictability, 71% of re-treatments were within ±0.50 diopters. Topography-guided ablation was effective in enlarging the optical zone, recentering the optical zone, and reducing higher order aberrations. Topography-guided custom ablation appears to be an effective method for re-treatment procedures of symptomatic patients after

  2. Validating atlas-guided DOT: a comparison of diffuse optical tomography informed by atlas and subject-specific anatomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Robert J; Caffini, Matteo; Dubb, Jay; Fang, Qianqian; Custo, Anna; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Fischl, Bruce; Wells, William; Dan, Ippeita; Boas, David A

    2012-09-01

    We describe the validation of an anatomical brain atlas approach to the analysis of diffuse optical tomography (DOT). Using MRI data from 32 subjects, we compare the diffuse optical images of simulated cortical activation reconstructed using a registered atlas with those obtained using a subject's true anatomy. The error in localization of the simulated cortical activations when using a registered atlas is due to a combination of imperfect registration, anatomical differences between atlas and subject anatomies and the localization error associated with diffuse optical image reconstruction. When using a subject-specific MRI, any localization error is due to diffuse optical image reconstruction only. In this study we determine that using a registered anatomical brain atlas results in an average localization error of approximately 18 mm in Euclidean space. The corresponding error when the subject's own MRI is employed is 9.1 mm. In general, the cost of using atlas-guided DOT in place of subject-specific MRI-guided DOT is a doubling of the localization error. Our results show that despite this increase in error, reasonable anatomical localization is achievable even in cases where the subject-specific anatomy is unavailable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Intracranial Tumors : Early Experience with Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Chang Ok; Chung, Sang Sup; Chu, Sung Sil; Kim, Young Soo; Yoon, Do Heum; Kim, Sun Ho; Loh, John Juhn; Kim, Gwi Eon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-06-15

    Between August 1988 and December 1991, 24 patients with intracranial tumors were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery(RS) using a 10 MV linear accelerator at Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine. There were 5 meningiomas, 3 craniopharyngiomas, 9 glial tumors, 2 solitary metastases, 2 acoustic neurinomas, 2 pineal tumors, and 1 non-Hodgkin Iymphoma. Ten patients were treated as primary treatment after diagnosis with stereotactic biopsy or neuroimaging study. Nine patients underwent RS for post-op. residual tumors and three patients as a salvage treatment for recurrence after external irradiation. Two patients received RS as a boost followed by fractionated conventional radiotherapy. Among sixteen patients who were followed more than 6 months with neuroimage, seven patients (2 meningiomas, 4 benign glial tumors, one non-Hodgkin lymphoma) showed complete response on neuroimage after RS and nine patients showed decreased tumor size. There was no acute treatment related side reaction. Late complications include three patients with symptomatic peritumoral braid edema and one craniopharyngioma with optic chiasmal injury. Through this early experience, we conclude that stereotactically directed single high doses of irradiation to the small intracranial tumors is effective for tumor control. However, in order to define the role of radiosurgery in the management of intracranial tumors, we should get the long-term results available to demonstrate the benefits versus potential complications of this therapeutic modality.

  4. Visual outcome after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy of benign anterior skull base tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Wiencke, Anne Katrine; Munck af Rosenschold, Per

    2014-01-01

    To determine visual outcome including the occurrence of radiation induced optic neuropathy (RION) as well as tumor control after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) of benign anterior skull base meningiomas or pituitary adenomas. Thirty-nine patients treated with FSRT for anterior...

  5. Stereotactic lesioning for mental illness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M.-C.; Lee, T.-K.

    2008-01-01

    The authors report stereotactically created lesioning by radiofrequency or Cyberknife radiosurgery for patients with mental illness. Since 1993, thirty-eight patients have undergone stereotactic psychosurgery for medically intractable mental illnesses. Two patients had aggressive behavior. Twenty-five patients suffered from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and ten patients had depression. Another patient suffered from atypical psychosis. Bilateral amygdalotomy and subcaudate tractotomy were done for aggressive behavior. Limbic leucotomy or anterior cingulotomy was done for CCD and subcaudate tractotomy with or without cingulotomy was done for depression. In twenty-three patients, the lesions were made by a radiofrequency (RF) lesion generator. In fifteen cases, the lesions were made with Cyberknife Radiosurgery (CKRS). The Overt Aggression Scale (OAS) declined from 8 to 2 with clinical improvement during follow up period. With long-term follow up (meaning 57 months) in 25 OCDs, the mean Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Score (YBOCS) declined from 34 to 13 (n = 25). The Hamilton Depression scale (HAMD) for ten patients with depression declined from 38.5 to 10.5 (n = 10). There was no operative mortality and no significant morbidity except one case with transient urinary incontinence. Authors suggest that stereotactic psychosurgery by RF and CKRS could be a safe and effective means of treating some medically intractable mental illnesses. (author)

  6. Linac based radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackie, T.R.

    2008-01-01

    The following topics were discussed: Definition of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT); Stereo market; Indications for SRS/SRT; History of linac-based SRS/SRT; Variety of systems; QA for SRS; Localization; and Imaging. (P.A.)

  7. Optical Spectroscopy to Guide Photodynamic Therapy of Head and Neck Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, Dominic J.; Karakullukcu, M. Baris; Kruijt, Bastiaan; Kanick, Stephen Chad; van Veen, Robert P. L.; Amelink, Arjen; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Witjes, Max J. H.; Tan, I. Bing

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to other interstitial applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT), optical guidance or monitoring in the head and neck is at a very early stage of development. The present paper reviews the use of optical approaches, in particular optical spectroscopy, that have been used or have the

  8. Advancing adaptive optics technology: Laboratory turbulence simulation and optimization of laser guide stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampy, Rachel A.

    Since Galileo's first telescope some 400 years ago, astronomers have been building ever-larger instruments. Yet only within the last two decades has it become possible to realize the potential angular resolutions of large ground-based telescopes, by using adaptive optics (AO) technology to counter the blurring effects of Earth's atmosphere. And only within the past decade have the development of laser guide stars (LGS) extended AO capabilities to observe science targets nearly anywhere in the sky. Improving turbulence simulation strategies and LGS are the two main topics of my research. In the first part of this thesis, I report on the development of a technique for manufacturing phase plates for simulating atmospheric turbulence in the laboratory. The process involves strategic application of clear acrylic paint onto a transparent substrate. Results of interferometric characterization of the plates are described and compared to Kolmogorov statistics. The range of r0 (Fried's parameter) achieved thus far is 0.2--1.2 mm at 650 nm measurement wavelength, with a Kolmogorov power law. These plates proved valuable at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics at University of California, Santa Cruz, where they have been used in the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics testbed, during integration and testing of the Gemini Planet Imager, and as part of the calibration system of the on-sky AO testbed named ViLLaGEs (Visible Light Laser Guidestar Experiments). I present a comparison of measurements taken by ViLLaGEs of the power spectrum of a plate and the real sky turbulence. The plate is demonstrated to follow Kolmogorov theory well, while the sky power spectrum does so in a third of the data. This method of fabricating phase plates has been established as an effective and low-cost means of creating simulated turbulence. Due to the demand for such devices, they are now being distributed to other members of the AO community. The second topic of this thesis pertains to understanding and

  9. GLAS: engineering a common-user Rayleigh laser guide star for adaptive optics on the William Herschel Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Gordon; Abrams, Don Carlos; Apostolakos, Nikolaos; Bassom, Richard; Blackburn, Colin; Blanken, Maarten; Cano Infantes, Diego; Chopping, Alan; Dee, Kevin; Dipper, Nigel; Elswijk, Eddy; Enthoven, Bernard; Gregory, Thomas; ter Horst, Rik; Humphreys, Ron; Idserda, Jan; Jolley, Paul; Kuindersma, Sjouke; McDermid, Richard; Morris, Tim; Myers, Richard; Pico, Sergio; Pragt, Johan; Rees, Simon; Rey, Jürg; Reyes, Marcos; Rutten, René; Schoenmaker, Ton; Skvarc, Jure; Tromp, Niels; Tulloch, Simon; Veninga, Auke

    2006-06-01

    The GLAS (Ground-layer Laser Adaptive-optics System) project is to construct a common-user Rayleigh laser beacon that will work in conjunction with the existing NAOMI adaptive optics system, instruments (near IR imager INGRID, optical integral field spectrograph OASIS, coronagraph OSCA) and infrastructure at the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) on La Palma. The laser guide star system will increase sky coverage available to high-order adaptive optics from ~1% to approaching 100% and will be optimized for scientific exploitation of the OASIS integral-field spectrograph at optical wavelengths. Additionally GLAS will be used in on-sky experiments for the application of laser beacons to ELTs. This paper describes the full range of engineering of the project ranging through the laser launch system, wavefront sensors, computer control, mechanisms, diagnostics, CCD detectors and the safety system. GLAS is a fully funded project, with final design completed and all equipment ordered, including the laser. Integration has started on the WHT and first light is expected summer 2006.

  10. Fast and Simple Method for Evaluation of Polarization Correction to Propagation Constant of Arbitrary Order Guided Modes in Optical Fibers with Arbitrary Refractive Index Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Bourdine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents fast and simple method for evaluation of polarization correction to scalar propagation constant of arbitrary order guided modes propagating over weakly guiding optical fibers. Proposed solution is based on earlier on developed modified Gaussian approximation extended for analysis of weakly guiding optical fibers with arbitrary refractive index profile in the core region bounded by single solid outer cladding. Some results are presented that illustrate the decreasing of computational error during the estimation of propagation constant when polarization corrections are taken into account. Analytical expressions for the first and second derivatives of polarization correction are derived and presented.

  11. Natural Silk as a Photonics Component: a Study on Its Light Guiding and Nonlinear Optical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Kujala, Sami; Mannila, Anna; Karvonen, Lasse; Kieu, Khanh; Sun, Zhipei

    2016-01-01

    Silk fibers are expected to become a pathway to biocompatible and bioresorbable waveguides, which could be used to deliver localized optical power for various applications, e.g., optical therapy or imaging inside living tissue. Here, for the first time, the linear and nonlinear optical properties of natural silk fibers have been studied. The waveguiding properties of silk fibroin of largely unprocessed Bombyx mori silkworm silk are assessed using two complementary methods, and found to be on ...

  12. System for diffusing light from an optical fiber or light guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitland, Duncan J [Pleasant Hill, CA; Wilson, Thomas S [San Leandro, CA; Benett, William J [Livermore, CA; Small, IV, Ward [

    2008-06-10

    A system for diffusing light from an optical fiber wherein the optical fiber is coupled to a light source, comprising forming a polymer element adapted to be connected to the optical fiber and incorporating a scattering element with the polymer element wherein the scattering element diffuses the light from the polymer element. The apparatus of the present invention comprises a polymer element operatively connected to the optical fiber and a scattering element operatively connected with the shape polymer element that diffuses the light from the polymer element.

  13. A simulation of the optical attenuation of TPB coated light-guide detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B J P

    2013-01-01

    This note is provided as a supplementary section to accompany the paper [1] which has been included in these proceedings. It describes some simple simulations which were performed in order to understand the attenuation behaviors of acrylic light-guides operated in air and argon, which were characterized in [2]. Whilst these simulations are only at the level of sophistication of a toy model, they illustrate interesting non-exponential light attenuation effects and the differences between operating light-guide based detectors in argon and air environments. We investigate the effects of surface absorption, surface roughness and wavelength dependence, and use a model tuned on the light-guide attenuation curve measured in air to make a prediction of the light-guide attenuation curve in argon. This curve is compared with data from a liquid argon test stand, and an improvement over a simple exponential model is observed

  14. Does the insertion of a gel-based marker at stereotactic breast biopsy allow subsequent wire localizations to be carried out under ultrasound guidance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, M.A.; James, J.J.; Cornford, E.J.; Hamilton, L.J.; Burrell, H.C.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether the insertion of a gel-based marker at the time of stereotactic breast biopsy allows subsequent preoperative localization to be performed under ultrasound guidance. Materials and methods: One hundred consecutive women who underwent either a 10 G stereotactic vacuum-assisted breast biopsy or 14 G stereotactic core biopsy with marker placement, followed by wire localization and surgical excision were identified. All had mammographic abnormalities not initially visible with ultrasound. The method of preoperative localization was recorded and its success judged with reference to the wire position on the post-procedure films relative to the mammographic abnormality and the marker. Histopathology data were reviewed to ensure the lesion had been adequately excised. Results: Eighty-three women (83%) had a successful ultrasound-guided wire localization. Successful ultrasound-guided localization was more likely after stereotactic vacuum biopsy (86%) compared to stereotactic core biopsy (68%), although this did not quite reach statistical significance (p = 0.06). Conclusion: The routine placement of a gel-based marker after stereotactic breast biopsy facilitates preoperative ultrasound-guided localization.

  15. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: current strategies and future development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as the standard treatment for medically inoperable early-staged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The local control rate after SBRT is over 90%. Some forms of tumour motion management and image-guided radiation delivery techniques are the prerequisites for fulfilment of its goal to deliver a high radiation dose to the tumour target without overdosing surrounding normal tissues. In this review, the current strategies of tumour motion management will be discussed, followed by an overview of various image-guided radiotherapy (RT) systems and devices available for clinical practice. Besides medically inoperable stage I NSCLC, SBRT has also been widely adopted for treatment of oligometastasis involving the lungs. Its possible applications in various other cancer illnesses are under extensive exploration. The progress of SBRT is critically technology-dependent. With advancement of technology, the ideal of personalised, effective and yet safe SBRT is already on the horizon. PMID:27606082

  16. Computed tomography-controlled stereotactic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Keizo; Shichijo, Fumio; Gyoten, Tetsuya; Tomida, Keisuke; Miyake, Hajime

    1986-01-01

    A single use of coordinate system of computed tomography (CT) scanner is utilized for CT-controlled stereotactic surgery. Depth, direction and readjustment of target trajectory were defined by known values of cursor number in CT images and numbers of the sliding table indicator. We loaded calculation formulas into hand held computer to obtain immediate answers. Stereotactic apparatus consisted two main parts: the patient's head fixation and probe holder. Surgery was performed in cases of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage for evacuation of the hematomas successfully. Target accuracy was satisfactory. With further advance of this surgery, automatic stereotactic control with a special robot machine seeing possible. (author)

  17. Stereotactic imaging in functional neurosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirabayashi, Hidehiro

    2012-07-01

    Background: The birth of stereotactic functional neurosurgery in 1947 was to a great extent dependent on the development of ventriculography. The last decades have witnessed a renaissance of functional stereotactic neurosurgery in the treatment of patients with movement disorders. Initially, these procedures were largely based on the same imaging technique that had been used since the birth of this technique, and that is still used in some centers. The introduction of new imaging modalities such as Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provided new potentials, but also new challenges for accurate identification and visualisation of the targets in the basal ganglia and the thalamus with an urge to thoroughly evaluate and optimize the stereotactic targeting technique, as well as evaluate accurately in stereotactic space the location and extent of stereotactic Radiofrequency (RF) lesions and the position of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. Aims: To study the differences between CT and MRI regarding indirect atlas coordinates in thalamic and pallidal procedures and to evaluate and validate visualisation of the pallidum and the subthalamic nucleus in view of direct targeting irrespective of atlas-derived coordinates. Furthermore, to evaluate the contribution of RF parameters on the size of stereotactic lesions, as well as the impact of size and location on clinical outcome. Method: The coordinates in relation to the landmarks of the 3{sup rd} ventricle of the targets in the pallidum and ventrolateral thalamus were compared between CT and MRI in 34 patients. In another 48 patients direct visualization of the pallidum was evaluated and compared to indirect atlas based targeting. The possibility and versatility of visualizing the Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) on short acquisition MRI were evaluated in a multicentre study, and the use of alternative landmarks in identification of the STN was demonstrated in another study. In 46 patients CT and

  18. Stereotactic imaging in functional neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabayashi, Hidehiro

    2012-01-01

    Background: The birth of stereotactic functional neurosurgery in 1947 was to a great extent dependent on the development of ventriculography. The last decades have witnessed a renaissance of functional stereotactic neurosurgery in the treatment of patients with movement disorders. Initially, these procedures were largely based on the same imaging technique that had been used since the birth of this technique, and that is still used in some centers. The introduction of new imaging modalities such as Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provided new potentials, but also new challenges for accurate identification and visualisation of the targets in the basal ganglia and the thalamus with an urge to thoroughly evaluate and optimize the stereotactic targeting technique, as well as evaluate accurately in stereotactic space the location and extent of stereotactic Radiofrequency (RF) lesions and the position of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. Aims: To study the differences between CT and MRI regarding indirect atlas coordinates in thalamic and pallidal procedures and to evaluate and validate visualisation of the pallidum and the subthalamic nucleus in view of direct targeting irrespective of atlas-derived coordinates. Furthermore, to evaluate the contribution of RF parameters on the size of stereotactic lesions, as well as the impact of size and location on clinical outcome. Method: The coordinates in relation to the landmarks of the 3 rd ventricle of the targets in the pallidum and ventrolateral thalamus were compared between CT and MRI in 34 patients. In another 48 patients direct visualization of the pallidum was evaluated and compared to indirect atlas based targeting. The possibility and versatility of visualizing the Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) on short acquisition MRI were evaluated in a multicentre study, and the use of alternative landmarks in identification of the STN was demonstrated in another study. In 46 patients CT and MRI

  19. Cognitive outcome after stereotactic amygdalohippocampectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtěch, Zdeněk; Krámská, Lenka; Malíková, Hana; Seltenreichová, Kateřina; Procházka, Tomáš; Kalina, Miroslav; Liščák, Roman

    2012-06-01

    We sought to determine the neuropsychological outcome after stereotactic radiofrequency amygdalohippocampectomy performed for intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. The article describes the cases of 31 patients who were evaluated using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised and the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised prior to, and one year after, surgery. Patients showed increases in their mean Full Scale, Verbal and Performance IQ scores of 4, 3 and 4 IQ points respectively (pmemory performance - with a mean increase of 1, 3 and 0 MQ points in Global, Verbal and Visual memory respectively (pmemory improved in 3 (10.3%) patients, verbal memory in 1 (3.4%) and 1 patient (3.3%) showed deterioration in visual memory. Our results provide evidence for unchanged memory in patients with MTLE after the procedure. No verbal memory deterioration was detected in any of our patients, while improvements were found in intellectual performance. The results suggest that stereotactic radiofrequency amygdalahippocampectomy could be superior to open surgery in terms of its neurocognitive outcomes. A larger randomised trial of these approaches is justified. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging-guided liver stereotactic body radiation therapy: A comparison between modulated tri-cobalt-60 teletherapy and linear accelerator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishan, Amar U; Cao, Minsong; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Mikaeilian, Argin G; Tenn, Stephen; Rwigema, Jean-Claude M; Sheng, Ke; Low, Daniel A; Kupelian, Patrick A; Steinberg, Michael L; Lee, Percy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric feasibility of liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using a teletherapy system equipped with 3 rotating (60)Co sources (tri-(60)Co system) and a built-in magnetic resonance imager (MRI). We hypothesized tumor size and location would be predictive of favorable dosimetry with tri-(60)Co SBRT. The primary study population consisted of 11 patients treated with SBRT for malignant hepatic lesions whose linear accelerator (LINAC)-based SBRT plans met all mandatory Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 1112 organ-at-risk (OAR) constraints. The secondary study population included 5 additional patients whose plans did not meet the mandatory constraints. Patients received 36 to 60 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Tri-(60)Co system SBRT plans were planned with ViewRay system software. All patients in the primary study population had tri-(60)Co SBRT plans that passed all RTOG constraints, with similar planning target volume coverage and OAR doses to LINAC plans. Mean liver doses and V10Gy to the liver, although easily meeting RTOG 1112 guidelines, were significantly higher with tri-(60)Co plans. When the 5 additional patients were included in a univariate analysis, the tri-(60)Co SBRT plans were still equally able to pass RTOG constraints, although they did have inferior ability to pass more stringent liver and kidney constraints (P < .05). A multivariate analysis found the ability of a tri-(60)Co SBRT plan to meet these constraints depended on lesion location and size. Patients with smaller or more peripheral lesions (as defined by distance from the aorta, chest wall, liver dome, and relative lesion volume) were significantly more likely to have tri-(60)Co plans that spared the liver and kidney as well as LINAC plans did (P < .05). It is dosimetrically feasible to perform liver SBRT with a tri-(60)Co system with a built-in MRI. Patients with smaller or more peripheral lesions are more likely to have optimal liver

  1. Automatic online and real-time tumour motion monitoring during stereotactic liver treatments on a conventional linac by combined optical and sparse monoscopic imaging with kilovoltage x-rays (COSMIK)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertholet, Jenny; Toftegaard, Jakob; Hansen, Rune

    2018-01-01

    during the CBCT is estimated from the auto-segmented positions in the projections and used to optimize an external correlation model (ECM) of internal motion as a function of external motion. During treatment, the ECM estimates the internal motion from the external motion at 20 Hz. KV images are acquired...... every 3 s, auto-segmented, and used to update the ECM for baseline shifts between internal and external motion. The COSMIK method was validated using Calypso-recorded internal tumour motion with simultaneous camera-recorded external motion for 15 liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) patients....... The validation included phantom experiments and simulations hereof for 12 fractions and further simulations for 42 fractions. The simulations compared the accuracy of COSMIK with ECM-based monitoring without model updates and with model updates based on stereoscopic imaging as well as continuous kilovoltage...

  2. Initial clinical results of linac stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for pituitary adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsumori, Michihide; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Alexander, Eben; Kaiser, Ursula B.; Richardson, Gary E.; McL Black, Peter; Loeffler, Jay S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the initial clinical results of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for pituitary adenomas with regard to tumor control and toxicity of the treatment, thus evaluate the feasibility of these technique for the treatment of pituitary adenomas. Subjects and Methods: 48 patients with either inoperable, recurrent or residual pituitary adenoma who underwent either SRS or SRT at the Brigham and Women's Hospital between 9/89 and 9/95 were analyzed. Of these, 18 received treatment with SRS, and 30 received SRT. SRS was contraindicated for the patients in whom the minimal distance of the target and optic chiasm or optic nerve was less than 5 mm. Patient characteristics were similar in the two groups, with the exception of tumor volume and previous irradiation. Median tumor volumes were 1.8 cm 3 and 7.7 cm 3 for SRS and SRT, respectively. Three of the SRS and none of the SRT patients had a history of previous external radiation therapy. Both SRS and SRT were performed by the use of dedicated stereotactic 6-MV linear accelerator with a treatment plan designed using a dedicated software. Doses were prescribed to the isodose distribution that covered the identified target. Dose and normalization used for SRS varied from 1000 cGy at 85 % isodose line to 1800 cGy at 80 % isodose line. For SRT patients, total dose of 4500 cGy was normalized at 90 or 95 % isodose line and this was delivered in 25 fractions of 180 cGy daily dose. Results: Local control: There was 1 case of local failure in each of SRS and SRT series (median follow up 42.5 months and 22 month, respectively). CNS adverse effects: There were 3 SRS cases in whom a ring enhancement in the temporal lobe was observed in follow-up MRI. (median follow up 32 months). Of these, one resolved spontaneously, whereas the other 2 lesion persisted and considered to be radiation necrosis. None of them required surgical intervention to date. These were observed in the

  3. Superior target delineation for stereotactic body radiotherapy of bone metastases from renal cell carcinoma on MRI compared to CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Fieke M.; Van Der Velden, Joanne M.; Gerlich, Anne S.; Kotte, Alexis N.T.J.; Eppinga, Wietse S.C.; Kasperts, Nicolien; Verlaan, Jorrit J.; Pameijer, Frank A.; Kerkmeijer, Linda G.W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) there has been a treatment shift towards targeted therapy, which has resulted in improved overall survival. Therefore, there is a need for better local control of the tumor and its metastases. Image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in

  4. Stereotactic Neurosurgical Treatment Options for Childhood Craniopharyngioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eTrippel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Craniopharyngioma are the most common non glial tumors in childhood. The results of different studies indicate that radical excision surgery is not an appropriate treatment strategy for childhood craniopharyngioma with hypothalamic involvement. Stereotactic neurosurgery provides save, minimal invasive and cost efficient options in the treatment of childhood craniopharyngioma. In this review a summary of the contribution of the stereotactic neurosurgery in the interdisciplinary treatment regime of childhood craniopharyngioma will be given and discussed in detail.

  5. Monteris AXiiiS Stereotactic Miniframe for Intracranial Biopsy: Precision, Feasibility, and Ease of Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjila, Sunil; Knudson, Kathleen E; Johnson, Carleton; Sloan, Andrew E

    2016-06-01

    Stereotactic biopsy is an important and minimally invasive technique used for a variety of indications in neurosurgery. Initially, this technique required a frame, but recently there have been a number of newer, less cumbersome approaches to biopsy including robotic arms, fixed arms, and, more recently, skull-mounted miniframes. Miniframes are attractive because they are disposable and low profile. However, the relatively limited degree of freedom offered by currently available devices necessitates a preplanned burr hole, which in turn limits flexibility and multiple trajectories. The AXiiiS device is a skull-mounted, magnetic resonance imaging-compatible miniframe that provides a similar degree of freedom with a frame while maintaining a low-profile, disposable platform. To assess the image-guided trajectory alignment accuracy using AXiiiS stereotactic miniframe biopsy of intracranial lesions. The accuracy of the AXiiiS device is compared with the Navigus Trajectory Guide as platforms. After approval by our institutional review board, medical records of 10 neurosurgical patients with intracranial pathologies were chosen for AXiiiS stereotactic miniframe biopsy, and histological correlation was obtained. Ten reported cases demonstrate the precision and ease of using the AXiiiS stereotactic miniframe for biopsy of intracranial lesions in conjunction with preoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Multiple trajectories and angles have been used with precision and safety. The AXiiiS stereotactic miniframe is a feasible, safe, and disposable platform for multitrajectory intracranial biopsies. Compared with existing platforms, this novel device provides a more stable base and wider limits of trajectory angles with comparable accuracy and precision.

  6. Stereotactic IMRT using a MMLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoban, P.; Short, R.; Biggs, D.; Rose, A.; Smee, R.; Schneider, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The leaf width of the multileaf collimator (MLC) used for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT ) largely determines the resolution of the intensity maps that define the entire profile of each beam. In turn it is this resolution, and consequently the achievable degree of beam modulation, that determines the ability to conform the 3D dose distribution to complex target volumes. As such, the leaf width is of more importance than in fixed-field MLC treatments where only the beam edges are affected.A Radionics micro-multileaf collimator (MMLC) with 4 mm leaf width, attached to a Siemens Primus linear accelerator, is in use for stereotactic IMRT at PbWH. Treatment planning is performed with the XPlan system including an integrated IMRT module. Cases treated have so far been with conventional fractionation, including both malignant and benign cranial lesions. Meningiomas in particular often require a complex dose distribution because of their en-plaque nature and/or proximity to the brainstem. Stereotactic localisation and fixation is with the Gill-Thomas-Cosman head-ring or Head and Neck localiser. Cases are typically planned both for fixed-field treatment and IMRT, with IMRT being used if significant benefit is seen. IMRT treatment with the Siemens MLC is also an option. A quality assurance system has been set up, including a flowchart/checklist and phantom dosimetry using TLDs. As expected, treatment plans show IMRT with the MMLC to consistently be the best option dosimetrically. In particular, for a given target coverage there is always better sparing of nearby organs at risk (OARs) with MMLC rather than MLC-based IMRT. Adjustments such as the inclusion of a margin around the target volume or an increase in the penalty for target underdosage improve coverage for MLC plans but generally at the expense of increased OAR involvement. MMLC IMRT treatments commonly require 30-50 fields and can be delivered in approximately 10-15 minutes using an autosequence

  7. Linear accelerator based stereotactic radiosurgery with micro multi-leaf collimator : technological advancement in precision radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayananda, S.; Kinhikar, R.A.; Saju, Sherley; Deshpande, D.D.; Jalali, R.; Sarin, R.; Shrivastava, S.K.; Dinshaw, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) is an advancement on precision radiotherapy, in which stereo tactically guided localized high dose is delivered to the lesion (target) in a single fraction, while sparing the surrounding normal tissue. Radiosurgery has been used to treat variety of benign and malignant lesions as well as functional disorders in brain such as arteriovenous malformation (AVM), acoustic neuroma, solitary primary brain tumor, single metastasis, pituitary adenoma etc

  8. Image-guided urologic surgery: intraoperative optical imaging and tissue interrogation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Joseph C.

    2017-02-01

    Emerging optical imaging technologies can be integrated in the operating room environment during minimally invasive and open urologic surgery, including oncologic surgery of the bladder, prostate, and kidney. These technologies include macroscopic fluorescence imaging that provides contrast enhancement between normal and diseased tissue and microscopic imaging that provides tissue characterization. Optical imaging technologies that have reached the clinical arena in urologic surgery are reviewed, including photodynamic diagnosis, near infrared fluorescence imaging, optical coherence tomography, and confocal laser endomicroscopy. Molecular imaging represents an exciting future arena in conjugating cancer-specific contrast agents to fluorophores to improve the specificity of disease detection. Ongoing efforts are underway to translate optimal targeting agents and imaging modalities, with the goal to improve cancer-specific and functional outcomes.

  9. Clinical application of CT-controlled stereotactic aspiration for intracerebral hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Weijian; Zhuge Qichuan; Zheng Rongyuan; Guo Xianzhong; Zhong Ming; Wu Jinsen; Qu Xuanxing

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical application of CT-controlled stereotactic aspiration for intracerebral hematoma. Methods: CT-guided stereotactic system was installed on the CT bed, and checked against a standard of the coordinate. According to controlled CT scan, the target can be adjusted at any time in the operation. 860 patients with cerebral hematoma underwent CT-controlled stereotactic aspiration. Of the 860 cases, basal ganglion hematoma was present in 408, thalamus and posterior limb of internal capsule hematoma in 136, cerebral lobe hematoma in 261, cerebellar hematoma in 5, ventricular hemorrhage in 10, midbrain and pons hemorrhage in 37, and medulla hemorrhage in 3. Results: Easy drainage of hematoma by aspiration was achieved in 586 cases, stickiness of hematoma with clearing away more than 50% was performed in 202 and less than 50% in 68. The operation duration ranged from 25 to 120 minutes (average 45 minutes). 693 cases survived and 167 cases died. According to the evaluation by active day life (ADL) after 3 months in survivors, ADL 1-2, ADL 3, ADL 4 and ADL 5 results were achieved in 378 cases, 166 cases, 107 cases, and 28 cases, respectively. In addition, 14 cases were lost beyond recall. Conclusion: CT-controlled stereotactic aspiration for intracerebral hematoma is a handy, less invasive, and safe procedure with high accuracy and curative effect, it is worth while popularizing the procedure

  10. Guidelines for safe practice of stereotactic body (ablative) radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foote, Matthew; Barry, Tamara; Bailey, Michael; Smith, Leigh; Seeley, Anna; Siva, Shankar; Hegi-Johnson, Fiona; Booth, Jeremy; Ball, David; Thwaites, David

    2015-01-01

    The uptake of stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR) / stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) worldwide has been rapid. The Australian and New Zealand Faculty of Radiation Oncology (FRO) assembled an expert panel of radiation oncologists, radiation oncology medical physicists and radiation therapists to establish guidelines for safe practice of SABR. Draft guidelines were reviewed by a number of international experts in the field and then distributed through the membership of the FRO. Members of the Australian Institute of Radiography and the Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine were also asked to comment on the draft. Evidence-based recommendations (where applicable) address aspects of departmental staffing, procedures and equipment, quality assurance measures, as well as organisational considerations for delivery of SABR treatments. Central to the guidelines is a set of key recommendations for departments undertaking SABR. These guidelines were developed collaboratively to provide an educational guide and reference for radiation therapy service providers to ensure appropriate care of patients receiving SABR.

  11. Target identification for stereotactic thalamotomy using diffusion tractography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsigmond Tamás Kincses

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stereotactic targets for thalamotomy are usually derived from population-based coordinates. Individual anatomy is used only to scale the coordinates based on the location of some internal guide points. While on conventional MR imaging the thalamic nuclei are indistinguishable, recently it has become possible to identify individual thalamic nuclei using different connectivity profiles, as defined by MR diffusion tractography. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigated the inter-individual variation of the location of target nuclei for thalamotomy: the putative ventralis oralis posterior (Vop and the ventral intermedius (Vim nucleus as defined by probabilistic tractography. We showed that the mean inter-individual distance of the peak Vop location is 7.33 mm and 7.42 mm for Vim. The mean overlap between individual Vop nuclei was 40.2% and it was 31.8% for Vim nuclei. As a proof of concept, we also present a patient who underwent Vop thalamotomy for untreatable tremor caused by traumatic brain injury and another patient who underwent Vim thalamotomy for essential tremor. The probabilistic tractography indicated that the successful tremor control was achieved with lesions in the Vop and Vim respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our data call attention to the need for a better appreciation of the individual anatomy when planning stereotactic functional neurosurgery.

  12. Comparison of optical quality after implantable collamer lens implantation and wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Ting; Zhou, Zhou; Luo, Wu-Qiang; He, Wen-Jing; Agbedia, Owhofasa; Wang, Jiang-Xia; Huang, Jian-Zhong; Gao, Xin; Kong, Min; Li, Min; Li, Li

    2018-01-01

    To compare the optical quality after implantation of implantable collamer lens (ICL) and wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (WG-LASIK). The study included 40 eyes of 22 patients with myopia who accepted ICL implantation and 40 eyes of 20 patients with myopia who received WG-LASIK. Before surgery and three months after surgery, the objective scattering index (OSI), the values of modulation transfer function (MTF) cutoff frequency, Strehl ratio, and the Optical Quality Analysis System (OQAS) values (OVs) were accessed. The higher order aberrations (HOAs) data including coma, trefoil, spherical, 2 nd astigmatism and tetrafoil were also obtained. For patients with pupil size LASIK group, significant improvements in visual acuities were found postoperatively, with a significant reduction in spherical equivalent ( P LASIK group, the OSI significantly increased from 0.68±0.43 preoperatively to 0.91±0.53 postoperatively (Wilcoxon signed ranks test, P =0.000). None of the mean MTF cutoff frequency, Strehl ratio, OVs showed statistically significant changes in both ICL and WG-LASIK groups. In the ICL group, there were no statistical differences in the total HOAs for either 4 mm-pupil or 6 mm-pupil. In the WG-LASIK group, the HOA parameters increased significantly at 4 mm-pupil. The total ocular HOAs, coma, spherical and 2 nd astigmatism were 0.12±0.06, 0.06±0.03, 0.00±0.03, 0.02±0.01, respectively. After the operation, these values were increased into 0.16±0.07, 0.08±0.05, -0.04±0.04, 0.03±0.01 respectively (Wilcoxon signed ranks test, all P LASIK group. ICL implantation has a less disturbance to optical quality than WG-LASIK. The OQAS is a valuable complementary measurement to the wavefront aberrometers in evaluating the optical quality.

  13. Dynamic diffraction-limited light-coupling of 3D-maneuvered wave-guided optical waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villangca, Mark; Bañas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2014-07-28

    We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). As the WOWs are maneuvered in 3D space, it is important to maintain efficient light coupling through the waveguides within their operating volume. We propose the use of dynamic diffractive techniques to create diffraction-limited spots that will track and couple to the WOWs during operation. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to encode the necessary diffractive phase patterns to generate the multiple and dynamic coupling spots. The method is initially tested for a single WOW and we have experimentally demonstrated dynamic tracking and coupling for both lateral and axial displacements.

  14. Dynamic diffraction-limited light-coupling of 3D-maneuvered wave-guided optical waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin

    2014-01-01

    We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). As the WOWs are maneuvered in 3D space, it is important to maintain efficient light coupling through the waveguides within their operating volume. We propose the use...... of dynamic diffractive techniques to create diffraction-limited spots that will track and couple to the WOWs during operation. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to encode the necessary diffractive phase patterns to generate the multiple and dynamic coupling spots. The method is initially tested...... for a single WOW and we have experimentally demonstrated dynamic tracking and coupling for both lateral and axial displacements....

  15. Microscope-integrated intraoperative optical coherence tomography-guided small-incision lenticule extraction: New surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Namrata; Urkude, Jayanand; Chaniyara, Manthan; Titiyal, Jeewan S

    2017-10-01

    We describe the surgical technique of microscope-integrated intraoperative optical coherence tomography (OCT)-guided small-incision lenticule extraction. The technique enables manual tracking of surgical instruments and identification of the desired dissection plane. It also helps discern the relation between the dissector and the intrastromal lenticule. The dissection plane becomes hyperreflective on dissection, ensuring complete separation of the intrastromal lenticule from the overlying and underlying stroma. Inadvertent posterior plane entry, cap-lenticule adhesion, incomplete separation of the lenticule, creation of a false plane, and lenticule remnants may be recognized intraoperatively so corrective steps can be taken immediately. In cases with a hazy overlying cap, microscope-integrated intraoperative OCT enables localization and extraction of the lenticule. The technique is helpful for inexperienced surgeons, especially in cases with low amplitudes of refractive errors, ie, thin lenticules. Copyright © 2017 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A linac-based stereotactic irradiation technique of uveal melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieckmann, Karin; Bogner, Joachim; Georg, Dietmar; Zehetmayer, Martin; Kren, Gerhard; Poetter, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a stereotactic irradiation technique for uveal melanomas performed at a linac, based on a non-invasive eye fixation and eye monitoring system. Methods: For eye immobilization a light source system is integrated in a standard stereotactic mask system in front of the healthy eye: During treatment preparation (computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging) as well as for treatment delivery, patients are instructed to gaze at the fixation light source. A mini-video camera monitors the pupil center position of the diseased eye. For treatment planning and beam delivery standard stereotactic radiotherapy equipment is used. If the pupil center deviation from a predefined 'zero-position' exceeds 1 mm (for more than 2 s), treatment delivery is interrupted. Between 1996 and 1999 60 patients with uveal melanomas, where (i) tumor height exceeded 7 mm, or (ii) tumor height was more than 3 mm, and the central tumor distance to the optic disc and/or the macula was less than 3 mm, have been treated. A total dose of 60 or 70 Gy has been given in 5 fractions within 10 days. Results: The repositioning accuracy in the mask system is 0.47±0.36 mm in rostral-occipital direction, 0.75±0.52 mm laterally, and 1.12±0.96 mm in vertical direction. An eye movement analysis performed for 23 patients shows a pupil center deviation from the 'zero' position<1 mm in 91% of all cases investigated. In a theoretical analysis, pupil center deviations are correlated with GTV 'movements'. For a pupil center deviation of 1 mm (rotation of the globe of 5 degree sign ) the GTV is still encompassed by the 80% isodose in 94%. Conclusion: For treatments of uveal melanomas, linac-based stereotactic radiotherapy combined with a non-invasive eye immobilization and monitoring system represents a feasible, accurate and reproducible method. Besides considerable technical requirements, the complexity of the treatment technique demands an interdisciplinary team continuously dedicated to this

  17. Optical spectra of phthalocyanines and related compounds a guide for beginners

    CERN Document Server

    Isago, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    This book displays how optical (absorption, emission, and magnetic circular dichroism) spectra of phthalocyanines and related macrocyclic dyes can be varied from their prototypical ones depending on conditions. As these compounds can be involved in colorful chemistry (which might be driven by impurities in solvents), their spectra behave like the sea-god Proteus in their mutability. Therefore, those who have been engaged with phthalocyanines for the first time, including even educated professional researchers and engineers, may have been embarrassed by the deceptive behavior of their compounds and could have, in the worst cases, given up their projects. This book is aimed not merely at reviewing the optical spectra, but also at helping such people, particularly beginners, to figure them out by showing some examples of their prototypical spectra and their variations in several situations. For the purpose of better understanding, the book also provides an introduction to their theoretical backgrounds as graphic...

  18. A guide to radiation protection in the use of X-ray optics equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bines, W.P.

    1986-01-01

    A booklet has been produced by a Working Group convened by the Health and Safety Executive to provide practical guidance for all who might be involved in work with X-ray optics equipment, such as designers, manufacturers, users, maintenance workers, inspectors, radiation protection advisers and supervisors. The particular radiation protection aspects described include those in connection with enclosure design and inspection, inter locks, tube shields, shutters and cover plates, administrative controls, monitoring and repair and maintenance of equipment. (UK)

  19. Bladder cancer diagnosis with fluorescence-image-guided optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. G.; Durand, D. B.; Adler, H.; Pan, Y. T.

    2006-02-01

    A fluorescence-image-guided OCT (FIG-OCT) system is described, and its ability to enhance the sensitivity and specificity is examined in an animal bladder cancer model. Total 97 specimens were examined by fluorescence imaging, OCT and histological microscopy. The sensitivity and specificity of FIG-OCT is 100% and 93% respectively, compared to 79% and 53% for fluorescence imaging, while the OCT examination time has been dramatically decreased by 3~4 times. In combination of endoscopic OCT, FIG-OCT is a promising technique for effective early bladder cancer diagnosis.

  20. The value of image coregistration during stereotactic radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, T; Maruyama, K; Igaki, H; Tago, M; Saito, N

    2009-05-01

    Coregistration of any neuroimaging studies into treatment planning for stereotactic radiosurgery became easily applicable using the Leksell Gamma Knife 4C, a new model of gamma knife. The authors investigated the advantage of this image processing. Since installation of the Leksell Gamma Knife 4C at the authors' institute, 180 sessions of radiosurgery were performed. Before completion of planning, coregistration of frameless images of other modalities or previous images was considered to refine planning. Treatment parameters were compared for planning before and after refinement by use of coregistered images. Coregistered computed tomography clarified the anatomical structures indistinct on magnetic resonance imaging. Positron emission tomography visualized lesions disclosing metabolically high activity. Coregistration of prior imaging distinguished progressing lesions from stable ones. Diffusion-tensor tractography was integrated for lesions adjacent to the corticospinal tract or the optic radiation. After refinement of planning in 36 sessions, excess treated volume decreased (p = 0.0062) and Paddick conformity index improved (p < 0.001). Maximal dose to the white matter tracts was decreased (p < 0.001). Image coregistration provided direct information on anatomy, metabolic activity, chronological changes, and adjacent critical structures. This gathered information was sufficiently informative during treatment planning to supplement ambiguous information on stereotactic images, and was useful especially in reducing irradiation to surrounding normal structures.

  1. Omnidirectional piezo-optical ring sensor for enhanced guided wave structural health monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor; Roman, Catalin; Lin, Bin; Frankforter, Erik

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for the detection of ultrasonic waves from acoustic emission events using piezoelectric wafer ac3tive sensors (PWAS) and optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing combined with mechanical resonance amplification principles. The method is best suited for detecting the out-of-plane motion of the AE wave with preference for a certain frequency that can be adjusted by design. Several issues are discussed: (a) study the mode shapes of the sensors under different resonance frequencies in order to understand the behavior of the ring in a frequency band of interest; (b) comparison of analytical results and mode shapes with FEM predictions; (c) choice of the final piezo-optical ring sensor shape; (d) testing of the piezo-optical ring sensor prototype; (e) discussion of the ring-sensor test results in comparison with conventional results from PWAS and FBG sensors mounted directly on the test structure. The paper ends with summary, conclusions, and suggestions for further work. (paper)

  2. Two-step reconstruction method using global optimization and conjugate gradient for ultrasound-guided diffuse optical tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Behnoosh; Zhu, Quing

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a promising method for characterizing malignant and benign lesions in the female breast. We introduce a new two-step algorithm for DOT inversion in which the optical parameters are estimated with the global optimization method, genetic algorithm. The estimation result is applied as an initial guess to the conjugate gradient (CG) optimization method to obtain the absorption and scattering distributions simultaneously. Simulations and phantom experiments have shown that the maximum absorption and reduced scattering coefficients are reconstructed with less than 10% and 25% errors, respectively. This is in contrast with the CG method alone, which generates about 20% error for the absorption coefficient and does not accurately recover the scattering distribution. A new measure of scattering contrast has been introduced to characterize benign and malignant breast lesions. The results of 16 clinical cases reconstructed with the two-step method demonstrates that, on average, the absorption coefficient and scattering contrast of malignant lesions are about 1.8 and 3.32 times higher than the benign cases, respectively.

  3. Stability of percutaneously implanted markers for lung stereotactic radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Gitte Bjørnsen Fredberg; Josipovic, Mirjana; Von Der Recke, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stability of complex markers implanted into lung tumors throughout a course of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Fifteen patients referred for lung SBRT were prospectively included. Radio-opaque markers were implanted percutaneously, guided...... mm in one or more registrations throughout the SBRT course. This is the first study to evaluate stability of complex markers implanted percutaneously into lung tumors for image guidance in SBRT. We conclude that the observed stability of marker position within the tumor indicates that complex markers...... can be used as surrogates for tumor position during a short course of SBRT as long as the uncertainties related to their position within the tumor are incorporated into the planning target volume....

  4. [Value of the optical coherence tomography in the treatment guided of the stent failure. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, Enrico; Tellez, Alejandro; Ochoa, Jorge; Ortíz, José E

    2014-01-01

    Since the advent of bare metal and drug-eluting stents, the surgical revascularization have declined considerably, however the thrombosis and in-stent restenosis are important complications of these devices. There are several factors that predispose to thrombosis and in-stent restenosis. Conventional angiography has serious limitations to determine the causes of stent failure. Optical coherence tomography is a very sensitive technique to determine the cause of thrombosis and in-stent restenosis. Copyright © 2013 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Locating the displacement of the steel wire implantation with the stereotactic mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jie; Xu Jianmin; Sun Guomin; Sun Guoping; Zang Da; Zhou Dongxian; Mai Peicheng

    2007-01-01

    that the calcification was located in the gland body, which got destruction from the surgical electrical electrotome. The excisionscope should be extended and the short term reexamination is recommended to make sure the complete excision of the calcification. Conclusion: It is the gold standard method that implanting the steel wire with the stereotactic mammography to guide the surgical dissecting technique to diagnose non-palpable breast lesion (NPBL). Thorough understanding of the displacement manifestation of implanting steel wire with stereotactic technique and the treatment methods will be helpful in the surgical dissecting guidance. (authors)

  6. Stereotactic radiotherapy in oligometastatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Thomas A C; Corkum, Mark T; Louie, Alexander V

    2017-09-01

    Oligometastatic cancer describes a disease state somewhere between localized and metastatic cancer. Proposed definitions of oligometastatic disease have typically used a cut-off of five or fewer sites of disease. Treatment of oligometastatic disease should have the goal of long-term local control, and in selected cases, disease remission. While several retrospective cohorts argue for surgical excision of limited metastases (metastasectomy) as the preferred treatment option for several clinical indications, limited randomized data exists for treating oligometastases. Alternatively, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is a radiotherapy technique that combines high radiation doses per fraction with precision targeting with the goal of achieving long-term local control of treated sites. Published cohort studies of SABR have demonstrated excellent local control rates of 70-90% in oligometastatic disease, with long-term survival in some series approaching 20-40%. A recent randomized phase 2 clinical trial by Gomez et al. demonstrated significantly improved progression free survival with aggressive consolidative therapy (surgery, radiotherapy ± chemotherapy or SABR) in oli-gometastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). As additional randomized controlled trials are ongoing to determine the efficacy of SABR in oligometastatic disease, SABR is increasingly being used within routine clinical practice. This review article aims to sum-marize the history and current paradigm of the oligometastatic state, review recently pub-lished literature of SABR in oligometastatic cancer and discuss ongoing trials and future directions in this context.

  7. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for craniopharyngiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Frank, Claudia; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Rhein, Bernhard; Wannenmacher, Michael; Debus, Juergen

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate outcome and toxicity after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) in patients with craniopharyngiomas. Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients with craniopharyngiomas were treated with FSRT between May 1989 and February 2001. Median age was 33.5 years (range: 5-57 years). Nine patients received FSRT after surgery as primary treatment, and 17 patients were irradiated for recurrent tumor or progressive growth after initial surgery. Median target dose was 52.2 Gy (range: 50.0-57.6 Gy) with conventional fractionation. Follow-up included MRI and neurologic, ophthalmologic, and endocrinologic examinations. Results: The median follow-up was 43 months (range: 7-143 months). The actuarial local control rate and actuarial overall survival rates were 100% and 100%, respectively, at 5 years and 100% and 83%, respectively, at 10 years. Four patients showed complete response, 14 patients showed partial response, and 8 patients remained stable. In 5 patients, vision improved after radiation therapy. Acute toxicity was mild. One patient required cyst drainage 3 months after radiotherapy. Late toxicity after radiotherapy included impairment of hormone function in 3 out of 18 patients at risk. We did not observe any vision impairment, radionecrosis, or secondary malignancies. Conclusions: FSRT is effective and safe in the treatment of cystic craniopharyngiomas. Toxicity is extremely low using this conformal technique

  8. Stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamoto, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Tomio; Matsutani, Masao; Takakura, Kintomo; Terahara, Atsuro (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1992-03-01

    Since stereotactic radiosurgery using a gamma knife was developed in 1968 by Leksell, it has been used with increasing frequency in Japan. During the period from June 19, 1990 through December 20, 1991, 218 patients have been treated with stereotactic radiosurgery using a gamma knife. Of them, 116 had vascular lesions (116), including arteriovenous malformation (114), dural arteriovenous malformation (one), and cerebral aneurysm (one); and the other 102 had tumorous lesions, including acoustic neurinoma (48), meningioma (26), pituitary tumor (11), metastatic tumor (7), germ cell tumor (3), glioma (2), hemangioblastoma (2), chordoma (one), craniopharyngioma (one), and trigeminal neurinoma (one). In this article, candidates of stereotactic radiosurgery using a gamma knife are discussed, with particular attention to clinical results of the aforementioned 218 patients. (N.K.) 54 refs.

  9. Comparison of optical quality after implantable collamer lens implantation and wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Ting Liu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the optical quality after implantation of implantable collamer lens (ICL and wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (WG-LASIK. METHODS: The study included 40 eyes of 22 patients with myopia who accepted ICL implantation and 40 eyes of 20 patients with myopia who received WG-LASIK. Before surgery and three months after surgery, the objective scattering index (OSI, the values of modulation transfer function (MTF cutoff frequency, Strehl ratio, and the Optical Quality Analysis System (OQAS values (OVs were accessed. The higher order aberrations (HOAs data including coma, trefoil, spherical, 2nd astigmatism and tetrafoil were also obtained. For patients with pupil size <6 mm, HOAs data were analyzed for 4 mm-pupil diameter. For patients with pupil size ≥6 mm, HOAs data were calculated for 6 mm-pupil diameter. Visual acuity, refraction, pupil size and intraocular pressures were also recorded. RESULTS: In both ICL and WG-LASIK group, significant improvements in visual acuities were found postoperatively, with a significant reduction in spherical equivalent (P< 0.001. After the ICL implantation, the OSI decreased slightly from 2.34±1.92 to 2.24±1.18 with no statistical significance (P=0.62. While in WG-LASIK group, the OSI significantly increased from 0.68±0.43 preoperatively to 0.91±0.53 postoperatively (Wilcoxon signed ranks test, P=0.000. None of the mean MTF cutoff frequency, Strehl ratio, OVs showed statistically significant changes in both ICL and WG-LASIK groups. In the ICL group, there were no statistical differences in the total HOAs for either 4 mm-pupil or 6 mm-pupil. In the WG-LASIK group, the HOA parameters increased significantly at 4 mm-pupil. The total ocular HOAs, coma, spherical and 2nd astigmatism were 0.12±0.06, 0.06±0.03, 0.00±0.03, 0.02±0.01, respectively. After the operation, these values were increased into 0.16±0.07, 0.08±0.05, -0.04±0.04, 0.03±0.01 respectively (Wilcoxon signed ranks test

  10. Antiresonant guiding in a poly(methyl-methacrylate) hollow-core optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markos, Christos; Nielsen, Kristian; Bang, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Strong antiresonant reflecting optical waveguiding is demonstrated in a novel poly (methyl-methacrylate) (PMMA) hollow-core fiber. The transmission spectrum of the fiber was characterized using a supercontinuum source and it revealed distinct resonances with resonant dips as strong as ~20 d......B in the wavelength range 480-900 nm, where PMMA has low absorption. The total propagation loss of the fiber was measured to have a minimum of ~45 dB m-1 at around 500 nm. The thermal sensitivity of the fiber is 256 ± 16 pm °C-1, defined as the red-shift of the resonances per °C, which is three times higher than...... the sensitivity of polymer fiber Bragg gratings....

  11. Antiresonant guiding in a poly(methyl-methacrylate) hollow-core optical fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markos, Christos; Nielsen, Kristian; Bang, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Strong antiresonant reflecting optical waveguiding is demonstrated in a novel poly (methyl-methacrylate) (PMMA) hollow-core fiber. The transmission spectrum of the fiber was characterized using a supercontinuum source and it revealed distinct resonances with resonant dips as strong as ∼20 dB in the wavelength range 480–900 nm, where PMMA has low absorption. The total propagation loss of the fiber was measured to have a minimum of ∼45 dB m −1 at around 500 nm. The thermal sensitivity of the fiber is 256 ± 16 pm °C −1 , defined as the red-shift of the resonances per °C, which is three times higher than the sensitivity of polymer fiber Bragg gratings. (paper)

  12. Homing peptide guiding optical molecular imaging for the diagnosis of bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-feng; Pang, Jian-zhi; Liu, Jie-hao; Zhao, Yang; Jia, Xing-you; Li, Jun; Liu, Reng-xin; Wang, Wei; Fan, Zhen-wei; Zhang, Zi-qiang; Yan, San-hua; Luo, Jun-qian; Zhang, Xiao-lei

    2014-11-01

    Background: The limitations of primary transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBt) have led the residual tumors rates as high as 75%. The intraoperative fluorescence imaging offers a great potential for improving TURBt have been confirmed. So we aim to distinguish the residual tumors and normal mucosa using fluorescence molecular imaging formed by conjugated molecule of the CSNRDARRC bladder cancer homing peptide with fluorescent dye. The conjugated molecule was abbreviated FIuo-ACP. In our study, we will research the image features of FIuo-ACP probe targeted bladder cancer for fluorescence molecular imaging diagnosis for bladder cancer in vivo and ex vivo. Methods: After the FIuo-ACP probe was synthetized, the binding sites, factors affecting binding rates, the specificity and the targeting of Fluo-ACP labeled with bladder cancer cells were studied respectively by laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM), immunofluorescence and multispectral fluorescence ex vivo optical molecular imaging system. Results: The binding sites were located in nucleus and the binding rates were correlated linearly with the dose of probe and the grade of pathology. Moreover, the probe has a binding specificity with bladder cancer in vivo and ex vivo. Tumor cells being labeled by the Fluo-ACP, bright green spots were observed under LSCM. The tissue samples and tumor cells can be labeled and identified by fluorescence microscope. Optical molecular imaging of xenograft tumor tissues was exhibited as fluorescent spots under EMCCD. Conclusion: The CSNRDARRC peptides might be a useful bladder cancer targeting vector. The FIuo-ACP molecular probe was suitable for fluorescence molecular imaging diagnosis for bladder cancer in vivo and ex vivo.

  13. Hypofractionated stereotactic irradiation. Basic and clinical researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibamoto, Yuta; Miyakawa, Akifumi; Iwata, Hiromitsu; Otsuka, Shinya; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Ayakawa, Shiho

    2011-01-01

    Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) has a number of biological advantages over single-session radiosurgery. An apparent trend is seen in the clinic towards shift from the latter to the former; however, there is no adequate model to convert single doses to hypofractionated doses. The linear-quadratic model overestimates the effect of single-fraction radiation. This should be kept in mind in evaluating the doses of stereotactic irradiation. ''Biological effective dose'' should not be used in radiosurgery and hypofractionated SRT. Clinically, we have used 3- to 10-fraction SRT for acoustic neuroma and benign skull base tumors using cyberknife and tomotherapy. Preliminary results are encouraging. (author)

  14. New CT-aided stereotactic neurosurgery technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, H.M.; Truong, T.K.; Reed, I.S.; Slater, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    In this communication, a new technique for CT-aided stereotactic neurosurgery is presented. The combination of specially designed hardware and software provides a fast, simple, and versatile tool for the accurate insertion of a probe into the human brain. This system is portable and can be implemented on any CT computer system. The complete procedure to perform the CT-aided stereotactic neurosurgery technique is presented. Experimental results are given which demonstrate the power of the method. Finally, the key algorithms for realizing this technique are described in the Appendix

  15. Noninvasive patient fixation for extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohr, Frank; Debus, Juergen; Frank, Claudia; Herfarth, Klaus; Pastyr, Otto; Rhein, Bernhard; Bahner, Malte L.; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Wannenmacher, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the setup accuracy that can be achieved with a novel noninvasive patient fixation technique based on a body cast attached to a recently developed stereotactic body frame during fractionated extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one CT studies (≥ 20 slices, thickness: 3 mm) from 5 patients who were immobilized in a body cast attached to a stereotactic body frame for treatment of para medullary tumors in the thoracic or lumbar spine were evaluated with respect to setup accuracy. The immobilization device consisted of a custom-made wrap-around body cast that extended from the neck to the thighs and a separate head mask, both made from Scotchcast. Each CT study was performed immediately before or after every second or third actual treatment fraction without repositioning the patient between CT and treatment. The stereotactic localization system was mounted and the isocenter as initially located stereo tactically was marked with fiducials for each CT study. Deviation of the treated isocenter as compared to the planned position was measured in all three dimensions. Results: The immobilization device can be easily handled, attached to and removed from the stereotactic frame and thus enables treatment of multiple patients with the same stereotactic frame each day. Mean patient movements of 1.6 mm ± 1.2 mm (laterolateral [LL]), 1.4 mm ± 1.0 mm (anterior-posterior [AP]), 2.3 mm ± 1.3 mm (transversal vectorial error [VE]) and < slice thickness = 3 mm (cranio caudal [CC]) were recorded for the targets in the thoracic spine and 1.4 mm ± 1.0 mm (LL), 1.2 mm ± 0.7 mm (AP), 1.8 mm ± 1.2 mm (VE), and < 3 mm (CC) for the lumbar spine. The worst case deviation was 3.9 mm for the first patient with the target in the thoracic spine (in the LL direction). Combining those numbers (mean transversal VE for both locations and maximum CC error of 3 mm), the mean three-dimensional vectorial patient movement and thus the mean overall

  16. Interactive computer graphics for stereotactic neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, J.H.; Davis, J.R.; Gahbauer, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    A microcomputer (IBM PC/AT) system has been developed to incorporate multiple image sources for stereotactic neurosurgery. Hard copy data is calibrated and captured with a video camera and frame grabber. Line contours are generated automatically on the basis of gray scale density or digitized manually. Interactive computer graphics provide a format with acceptable speed and accuracy for stereotactic neurosurgery. The ability to dimensionally integrate existing image data from multiple sources for target selection makes preoperative scans and scanner compatible head holders unnecessary. The system description and examples of use for brain tumor biopsy and brachytherapy ware presented

  17. Stereotactic radiation therapy: a second gold standard in the treatment of early-stage lung cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santini B, Alejandro; Valdez C, Cristian; Sepulveda A, Veronica; Baeza L, Ricardo; Bustos, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer death in the world. Although in Chile this is not the case, the northern regions of the country show higher incidence and mortality rates than the other Chilean regions. In recent years screening guides for lung cancer with low-dose scanner have begun to be established, and most of the medical societies involved in this subject have already settled the selection criteria. At the same time new techniques of treatment for these patients have developed, with highly sophisticated radiotherapy such as SBRT (Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy) and SBART (Stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy) that are revealing extremely encouraging results and augur significant changes in the coming years. In the present review we analyze the current work, their results, and the future of this treatment modality

  18. An improved optical flow tracking technique for real-time MR-guided beam therapies in moving organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachiu, C.; Papadakis, N.; Ries, M.; Moonen, C.; de Senneville, B. Denis

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) guided high intensity focused ultrasound and external beam radiotherapy interventions, which we shall refer to as beam therapies/interventions, are promising techniques for the non-invasive ablation of tumours in abdominal organs. However, therapeutic energy delivery in these areas becomes challenging due to the continuous displacement of the organs with respiration. Previous studies have addressed this problem by coupling high-framerate MR-imaging with a tracking technique based on the algorithm proposed by Horn and Schunck (H and S), which was chosen due to its fast convergence rate and highly parallelisable numerical scheme. Such characteristics were shown to be indispensable for the real-time guidance of beam therapies. In its original form, however, the algorithm is sensitive to local grey-level intensity variations not attributed to motion such as those that occur, for example, in the proximity of pulsating arteries. In this study, an improved motion estimation strategy which reduces the impact of such effects is proposed. Displacements are estimated through the minimisation of a variation of the H and S functional for which the quadratic data fidelity term was replaced with a term based on the linear L1norm, resulting in what we have called an L2-L1 functional. The proposed method was tested in the livers and kidneys of two healthy volunteers under free-breathing conditions, on a data set comprising 3000 images equally divided between the volunteers. The results show that, compared to the existing approaches, our method demonstrates a greater robustness to local grey-level intensity variations introduced by arterial pulsations. Additionally, the computational time required by our implementation make it compatible with the work-flow of real-time MR-guided beam interventions. To the best of our knowledge this study was the first to analyse the behaviour of an L1-based optical flow functional in an applicative context: real-time MR

  19. Robust frameless stereotactic localization in extra-cranial radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido; Spadea, Maria Francesca; Bassanini, Fabio; Tagaste, Barbara; Garibaldi, Cristina; Orecchia, Roberto; Pedotti, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    In the field of extra-cranial radiotherapy, several inaccuracies can make the application of frameless stereotactic localization techniques error-prone. When optical tracking systems based on surface fiducials are used, inter- and intra-fractional uncertainties in marker three-dimensional (3D) detection may lead to inexact tumor position estimation, resulting in erroneous patient setup. This is due to the fact that external fiducials misdetection results in deformation effects that are poorly handled in a rigid-body approach. In this work, the performance of two frameless stereotactic localization algorithms for 3D tumor position reconstruction in extra-cranial radiotherapy has been specifically tested. Two strategies, unweighted versus weighted, for stereotactic tumor localization were examined by exploiting data coming from 46 patients treated for extra-cranial lesions. Measured isocenter displacements and rotations were combined to define isocentric procedures, featuring 6 degrees of freedom, for correcting patient alignment (isocentric positioning correction). The sensitivity of the algorithms to uncertainties in the 3D localization of fiducials was investigated by means of 184 numerical simulations. The performance of the implemented isocentric positioning correction was compared to conventional point-based registration. The isocentric positioning correction algorithm was tested on a clinical dataset of inter-fractional and intra-fractional setup errors, which was collected by means of an optical tracker on the same group of patients. The weighted strategy exhibited a lower sensitivity to fiducial localization errors in simulated misalignments than those of the unweighted strategy. Isocenter 3D displacements provided by the weighted strategy were consistently smaller than those featured by the unweighted strategy. The peak decrease in median and quartile values of isocenter 3D displacements were 1.4 and 2.7 mm, respectively. Concerning clinical data, the

  20. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieu, Jean Paul

    1975-01-01

    Optics, Parts 1 and 2 covers electromagnetic optics and quantum optics. The first part of the book examines the various of the important properties common to all electromagnetic radiation. This part also studies electromagnetic waves; electromagnetic optics of transparent isotropic and anisotropic media; diffraction; and two-wave and multi-wave interference. The polarization states of light, the velocity of light, and the special theory of relativity are also examined in this part. The second part is devoted to quantum optics, specifically discussing the classical molecular theory of optical p

  1. Tip-tilt compensation: Resolution limits for ground-based telescopes using laser guide star adaptive optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivier, S.S.; Max, C.E.; Gavel, D.T.; Brase, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The angular resolution of long-exposure images from ground-based telescopes equipped with laser guide star adaptive optics systems is fundamentally limited by the the accuracy with which the tip-tilt aberrations introduced by the atmosphere can be corrected. Assuming that a natural star is used as the tilt reference, the residual error due to tilt anisoplanatism can significantly degrade the long-exposure resolution even if the tilt reference star is separated from the object being imaged by a small angle. Given the observed distribution of stars in the sky, the need to find a tilt reference star quite close to the object restricts the fraction of the sky over which long-exposure images with diffraction limited resolution can be obtained. In this paper, the authors present a comprehensive performance analysis of tip-tilt compensation systems that use a natural star as a tilt reference, taking into account properties of the atmosphere and of the Galactic stellar populations, and optimizing over the system operating parameters to determine the fundamental limits to the long-exposure resolution. Their results show that for a ten meter telescope on Mauna Kea, if the image of the tilt reference star is uncorrected, about half the sky can be imaged in the V band with long-exposure resolution less than 60 milli-arc-seconds (mas), while if the image of the tilt reference star is fully corrected, about half the sky can be imaged in the V band with long-exposure resolution less than 16 mas. Furthermore, V band images long-exposure resolution of less than 16 mas may be obtained with a ten meter telescope on Mauna Kea for unresolved objects brighter than magnitude 22 that are fully corrected by a laser guide star adaptive optics system. This level of resolution represents about 70% of the diffraction limit of a ten meter telescope in the V band and is more than a factor of 45 better than the median seeing in the V band on Mauna Kea

  2. Development of a guiding system and visual feedback real-time controller for the high-speed self-align optical cable winding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Kang, Hyun Kyoo; Shin, Kee Hyun

    2008-01-01

    Recently, the demand for the optical cable has been rapidly growing because of the increasing number of internet users and the high speed internet data transmission required. But the present optical cable winding systems have some serious problems such as pile-up and collapse of cables usually near the flange of the bobbin in the process of cables winding. To reduce the pile-up collapse in cable winding systems, a new guiding system is developed for a high-speed self-align cable winding. First, mathematical models for the winding process and bobbin shape fault compensation were proposed, the winding mechanism was analyzed and synchronization logics for the motions of winding, traversing, and the guiding were created. A prototype cable winding systems was manufactured to validate the new guiding system and the suggested logic. Experiment results showed that the winding system with the developed guiding system outperformed the system without the guiding system in reducing pile-up and collapse in high-speed winding

  3. Wannier–Stark electro-optical effect, quasi-guided and photonic modes in 2D macroporous silicon structures with SiO_2 coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karachevtseva, L.; Goltviansky, Yu.; Sapelnikova, O.; Lytvynenko, O.; Stronska, O.; Bo, Wang; Kartel, M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The IR absorption spectra of oxidized macroporous silicon were studied. • The Wannier–Stark electro-optical effect on Si-SiO_2 boundary was confirmed. • An additional electric field of quasi-guided optical modes was evaluated. • The photonic modes and band gaps were measured as peculiarities in absorption spectra. - Abstract: Opportunities to enhance the properties of structured surfaces were demonstrated on 2D macroporous silicon structures with SiO_2 coatings. We investigated the IR light absorption oscillations in macroporous silicon structures with SiO2 coatings 0–800 nm thick. The Wannier–Stark electro-optical effect due to strong electric field on Si-SiO_2boundary and an additional electric field of quasi-guided optical modes were taken into account. The photonic modes and band gaps were also considered as peculiarities in absorbance spectra of macroporous silicon structures with a thick SiO_2 coating. The photonic modes do not coincide with the quasi-guided modes in the silicon matrix and do not appear in absorption spectra of 2D macroporous silicon structures with surface nanocrystals.

  4. SU-F-P-23: Setup Uncertainties for the Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Q; Vigneri, P; Madu, C; Potters, L [Northwell Health, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Cao, Y; Jamshidi, A [Northwell Health, Lake Success, NY (United States); Klein, E [Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Lake Success, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The Exactrack X-ray system with six degree-of-freedom (6DoF) adjustment ability can be used for setup of lung stereotactic body radiation therapy. The setup uncertainties from ExacTrack 6D system were analyzed. Methods: The Exactrack X-ray 6D image guided radiotherapy system is used in our clinic. The system is an integration of 2 subsystems: (1): an infrared based optical position system and (2) a radiography kV x-ray imaging system. The infrared system monitors reflective body markers on the patient’s skin to assistant in the initial setup. The radiographic kV devices were used for patient positions verification and adjustment. The position verification was made by fusing the radiographs with the digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) images generated by simulation CT images using 6DoF fusion algorithms. Those results were recorded in our system. Gaussian functions were used to fit the data. Results: For 37 lung SBRT patients, the image registration results for the initial setup by using surface markers and for the verifications, were measured. The results were analyzed for 143 treatments. The mean values for the lateral, longitudinal, vertical directions were 0.1, 0.3 and 0.3mm, respectively. The standard deviations for the lateral, longitudinal and vertical directions were 0.62, 0.78 and 0.75mm respectively. The mean values for the rotations around lateral, longitudinal and vertical directions were 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 degrees respectively, with standard deviations of 0.36, 0.34, and 0.42 degrees. Conclusion: The setup uncertainties for the lung SBRT cases by using Exactrack 6D system were analyzed. The standard deviations of the setup errors were within 1mm for all three directions, and the standard deviations for rotations were within 0.5 degree.

  5. SU-F-P-23: Setup Uncertainties for the Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Q; Vigneri, P; Madu, C; Potters, L; Cao, Y; Jamshidi, A; Klein, E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The Exactrack X-ray system with six degree-of-freedom (6DoF) adjustment ability can be used for setup of lung stereotactic body radiation therapy. The setup uncertainties from ExacTrack 6D system were analyzed. Methods: The Exactrack X-ray 6D image guided radiotherapy system is used in our clinic. The system is an integration of 2 subsystems: (1): an infrared based optical position system and (2) a radiography kV x-ray imaging system. The infrared system monitors reflective body markers on the patient’s skin to assistant in the initial setup. The radiographic kV devices were used for patient positions verification and adjustment. The position verification was made by fusing the radiographs with the digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) images generated by simulation CT images using 6DoF fusion algorithms. Those results were recorded in our system. Gaussian functions were used to fit the data. Results: For 37 lung SBRT patients, the image registration results for the initial setup by using surface markers and for the verifications, were measured. The results were analyzed for 143 treatments. The mean values for the lateral, longitudinal, vertical directions were 0.1, 0.3 and 0.3mm, respectively. The standard deviations for the lateral, longitudinal and vertical directions were 0.62, 0.78 and 0.75mm respectively. The mean values for the rotations around lateral, longitudinal and vertical directions were 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 degrees respectively, with standard deviations of 0.36, 0.34, and 0.42 degrees. Conclusion: The setup uncertainties for the lung SBRT cases by using Exactrack 6D system were analyzed. The standard deviations of the setup errors were within 1mm for all three directions, and the standard deviations for rotations were within 0.5 degree.

  6. Optical coherence tomography-guided laser microsurgery for blood coagulation with continuous-wave laser diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feng-Yu; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Wang, Zu-Yi; Chi, Chun-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chan, Ming-Che; Lee, Ya-Ju

    2015-11-16

    Blood coagulation is the clotting and subsequent dissolution of the clot following repair to the damaged tissue. However, inducing blood coagulation is difficult for some patients with homeostasis dysfunction or during surgery. In this study, we proposed a method to develop an integrated system that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser microsurgery for blood coagulation. Also, an algorithm for positioning of the treatment location from OCT images was developed. With OCT scanning, 2D/3D OCT images and angiography of tissue can be obtained simultaneously, enabling to noninvasively reconstruct the morphological and microvascular structures for real-time monitoring of changes in biological tissues during laser microsurgery. Instead of high-cost pulsed lasers, continuous-wave laser diodes (CW-LDs) with the central wavelengths of 450 nm and 532 nm are used for blood coagulation, corresponding to higher absorption coefficients of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. Experimental results showed that the location of laser exposure can be accurately controlled with the proposed approach of imaging-based feedback positioning. Moreover, blood coagulation can be efficiently induced by CW-LDs and the coagulation process can be monitored in real-time with OCT. This technology enables to potentially provide accurate positioning for laser microsurgery and control the laser exposure to avoid extra damage by real-time OCT imaging.

  7. Optical confinement and light guiding in high dielectric contrast materials systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foresi, James S.

    A study of silicon photonic devices, including waveguides and microcavities, is presented in this thesis. The high index difference of Silicon-On-Insulator materials is used to design submicron devices capable of light localization and routing. Losses due to interface roughness between the high and low index materials are measured to be 40dB/cm. An analysis of lithographically induced interface roughness is performed and a method for evaluating nanometer-scale roughness is presented. High index differences lead to compact bends and power splitters. Bends of 2.0μm radius are measured to have losses less than 0.5dB. Splitting angles of 5o with losses less than 1.5dB are demonstrated. The bends and splitters are the most compact devices of their kind. The design, fabrication and analysis of two light confining devices in the SOI system are presented: photonic band gap (PBG) and microdisk microcavities. A PBG waveguide microcavity with minimum dimensions of 0.10μm is fabricated and transmission measurements reveal cavity Q's of 265, a resonant wavelength of 1564nm, and a modal volume of 0.27/mu m3. This is the first demonstration of PBG resonance at optical frequencies. The PBG microcavity volume is two orders of magnitude smaller than has been achieved in other microcavity devices. Microdisk and microring resonators are demonstrated. A waveguide-coupled microring is shown to operate as a channel dropping filter with Q's of 250 and a free spectral range of 25nm. The application of the microcavity devices to spontaneous emission control of erbium-doped silicon is analyzed. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  8. Optical Coherence Tomography for Retinal Surgery: Perioperative Analysis to Real-Time Four-Dimensional Image-Guided Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar M; Keller, Brenton; Viehland, Christian; Shen, Liangbo; Seider, Michael I; Izatt, Joseph A; Toth, Cynthia A

    2016-07-01

    Magnification of the surgical field using the operating microscope facilitated profound innovations in retinal surgery in the 1970s, such as pars plana vitrectomy. Although surgical instrumentation and illumination techniques are continually developing, the operating microscope for vitreoretinal procedures has remained essentially unchanged and currently limits the surgeon's depth perception and assessment of subtle microanatomy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized clinical management of retinal pathology, and its introduction into the operating suite may have a similar impact on surgical visualization and treatment. In this article, we review the evolution of OCT for retinal surgery, from perioperative analysis to live volumetric (four-dimensional, 4D) image-guided surgery. We begin by briefly addressing the benefits and limitations of the operating microscope, the progression of OCT technology, and OCT applications in clinical/perioperative retinal imaging. Next, we review intraoperative OCT (iOCT) applications using handheld probes during surgical pauses, two-dimensional (2D) microscope-integrated OCT (MIOCT) of live surgery, and volumetric MIOCT of live surgery. The iOCT discussion focuses on technological advancements, applications during human retinal surgery, translational difficulties and limitations, and future directions.

  9. Macular laser photocoagulation guided by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography versus fluorescein angiography for diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallego-Pinazo R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Gallego-Pinazo1,2, Ana Marina Suelves-Cogollos1, Rosa Dolz-Marco1, J Fernando Arevalo3, Salvador García-Delpech1, J Luis Mullor4, Manuel Díaz-Llopis1,2,51Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia, Spain; 2Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras, Valencia, Spain; 3Retina and Vitreous Service, Clinical Ophthalmology Center, Caracas, Venezuela; 4Unit of Experimental Ophthalmology, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia, Spain; 5University of Valencia, Faculty of Medicine, Valencia, SpainBackground: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT and fluorescein angiography (FA in the guidance of macular laser photocoagulation for diabetic macular edema.Methods: This was a prospective interventional clinical comparative pilot study. Forty eyes from 24 consecutive patients with diabetic macular edema were allocated to receive laser photocoagulation guided by SD-OCT or FA. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, central macular thickness, and retinal volume were assessed at baseline and two months after treatment.Results: Subjects treated using FA-guided laser improved BCVA from the logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR 0.52 ± 0.2 to 0.37 ± 0.2 (P < 0.001, and decreased mean central macular thickness from 397.25 ± 139.1 to 333.50 ± 105.7 µm (P < 0.001 and retinal volume from 12.61 ± 1.6 to 10.94 ± 1.4 mm3 (P < 0.001. Subjects treated using SD-OCT guided laser had improved BCVA from 0.48 ± 0.2 to 0.33 ± 0.2 logMAR (P < 0.001, and decreased mean central macular thickness from 425.90 ± 149.6 to 353.4 ± 140 µm (P < 0.001 and retinal volume from 12.38 ± 2.1 to 11.53 ± 1.1 mm3 (P < 0.001. No significant differences between the groups were found in two-month BCVA (P = 0.505, two-month central macular thickness (P = 0.660, or two-month retinal volume (P = 0.582.Conclusion: The short-term results of this pilot study

  10. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Ninth Edition Optics: Ninth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommen

  11. The use of single fraction Leksell stereotactic radiosurgery in the treatment of uveal melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennie, I. [Univ. of Sheffield, Dept. of Ophthalmology and Orthoptics (United Kingdom); Forster, D.; Kemeny, A. [Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Dept. of Neurosurgery (United Kingdom); Walton, L. [Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Dept. of Medical Physics (United Kingdom); Kunkler, I. [Weston Park Hospital, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    1996-11-01

    Fourteen patients with posterior uveal melanomas were treated using single fraction stereotactic radiosurgery. In each case a dose of 70 Gy was administered to the periphery of the tumour. Regression of the tumour has been observed in 13 patients, whilst the lesion has remained unchanged in one patient. The visual acuity has deteriorated in all 14 patients. Significant radiation induced adverse reactions were noted in 13 patients and include; retinopathy, optic neuropathy, rubeosis iridis, and secondary glaucoma. Two patients have required enucleation because of intractable rubeotic glaucoma. One patient has died from proven metastases. Although stereotactic radiosurgery appears to be a practical and effective method of treating uveal melanomas, its usefulness is limited by a high incidence of radiation induced adverse reactions. Further works is required to refine the current treatment protocol and establish an optimal prescription dose. (au) 30 refs.

  12. The use of single fraction Leksell stereotactic radiosurgery in the treatment of uveal melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennie, I.; Forster, D.; Kemeny, A.; Walton, L.; Kunkler, I.

    1996-01-01

    Fourteen patients with posterior uveal melanomas were treated using single fraction stereotactic radiosurgery. In each case a dose of 70 Gy was administered to the periphery of the tumour. Regression of the tumour has been observed in 13 patients, whilst the lesion has remained unchanged in one patient. The visual acuity has deteriorated in all 14 patients. Significant radiation induced adverse reactions were noted in 13 patients and include; retinopathy, optic neuropathy, rubeosis iridis, and secondary glaucoma. Two patients have required enucleation because of intractable rubeotic glaucoma. One patient has died from proven metastases. Although stereotactic radiosurgery appears to be a practical and effective method of treating uveal melanomas, its usefulness is limited by a high incidence of radiation induced adverse reactions. Further works is required to refine the current treatment protocol and establish an optimal prescription dose. (au) 30 refs

  13. Optical coherence tomography image-guided smart laser knife for surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katta, Nitesh; McElroy, Austin B; Estrada, Arnold D; Milner, Thomas E

    2018-03-01

    Surgical oncology can benefit from specialized tools that enhance imaging and enable precise cutting and removal of tissue without damage to adjacent structures. The combination of high-resolution, fast optical coherence tomography (OCT) co-aligned with a nanosecond pulsed thulium (Tm) laser offers advantages over conventional surgical laser systems. Tm lasers provide superior beam quality, high volumetric tissue removal rates with minimal residual thermal footprint in tissue, enabling a reduction in unwanted damage to delicate adjacent sub-surface structures such as nerves or micro-vessels. We investigated such a combined Tm/OCT system with co-aligned imaging and cutting beams-a configuration we call a "smart laser knife." A blow-off model that considers absorption coefficients and beam delivery systems was utilized to predict Tm cut depth, tissue removal rate and spatial distribution of residual thermal injury. Experiments were performed to verify the volumetric removal rate predicted by the model as a function of average power. A bench-top, combined Tm/OCT system was constructed using a 15W 1940 nm nanosecond pulsed Tm fiber laser (500 μJ pulse energy, 100 ns pulse duration, 30 kHz repetition rate) for removing tissue and a swept source laser (1310 ± 70 nm, 100 kHz sweep rate) for OCT imaging. Tissue phantoms were used to demonstrate precise surgery with blood vessel avoidance. Depth imaging informed cutting/removal of targeted tissue structures by the Tm laser was performed. Laser cutting was accomplished around and above phantom blood vessels while avoiding damage to vessel walls. A tissue removal rate of 5.5 mm 3 /sec was achieved experimentally, in comparison to the model prediction of approximately 6 mm 3 /sec. We describe a system that combines OCT and laser tissue modification with a Tm laser. Simulation results of the tissue removal rate using a simple model, as a function of average power, are in good agreement with experimental

  14. Neuropsychological outcomes following stereotactic laser amygdalohippocampectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenway, Melanie R F; Lucas, John A; Feyissa, Anteneh M; Grewal, Sanjeet; Wharen, Robert E; Tatum, William O

    2017-10-01

    The objective was to analyze neuropsychological testing data from 15 patients before and after stereotactic laser ablation surgery for temporal lobe epilepsy and to describe the seizure outcomes after stereotactic laser ablation surgery. A retrospective review of 15 patients who underwent stereotactic laser ablation and who also underwent neuropsychological testing before and after surgery was performed. Verbal and visual memory was assessed in all 15 patients using California Verbal Learning Test and Wechsler Memory Scale IV. Naming was assessed in 9 of 15 patients using the Boston Naming Test. Statistical analysis was performed to determine clinically significant changes using previously validated reliable change indices and proprietary Advanced Clinical Solutions software. Seizure outcome data were evaluated using Engel classification. Postsurgery neuropsychological evaluation demonstrated that all 15 patients experienced at least 1 clinically significant decline in either verbal or visual memory. Ten patients in this series, including five with dominant-hemisphere surgery, demonstrated decline in delayed memory for narrative information (Logical Memory II). By contrast, the Boston Naming Test demonstrated more favorable results after surgery. Two of nine patients demonstrated a clinically significant increase in naming ability, and only one of nine patients demonstrated a clinically significant decline in naming ability. With at least 6months of follow-up after surgery, 33% reported seizure freedom. Stereotactic laser ablation can result in clinically significant and meaningful decline in verbal and visual memory when comparing patients to their own presurgical baseline. Naming ability, conversely, is much less likely to be impacted by stereotactic laser ablation and may improve after the procedure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Treatment of Sarcoma Lung Metastases with Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D. Lindsay

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The most common site of sarcoma metastasis is the lung. Surgical resection of pulmonary metastases and chemotherapy are treatment options that have been employed, but many patients are poor candidates for these treatments for multiple host or tumor-related reasons. In this group of patients, radiation might provide a less morbid treatment alternative. We sought to evaluate the efficacy of radiotherapy in the treatment of metastatic sarcoma to the lung. Methods. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT was used to treat 117 pulmonary metastases in 44 patients. Patients were followed with serial computed tomography imaging of the chest. The primary endpoint was failure of control of a pulmonary lesion as measured by continued growth. Radiation-associated complications were recorded. Results. The majority of patients (84% received a total dose of 50 Gy per metastatic nodule utilizing an image-guided SBRT technique. The median interval follow-up was 14.2 months (range 1.6–98.6 months. Overall survival was 82% at two years and 50% at five years. Of 117 metastatic nodules treated, six nodules showed failure of treatment (95% control rate. Twenty patients (27% developed new metastatic lesions and underwent further SBRT. The side effects of SBRT included transient radiation pneumonitis n=6, cough n=2, rib fracture n=1, chronic pain n=1, dermatitis n=1, and dyspnea n=1. Conclusion. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is an effective and safe treatment for the ablation of pulmonary metastasis from sarcoma. Further work is needed to evaluate the optimal role of SBRT relative to surgery or chemotherapy for treatment of metastatic sarcoma.

  16. Hypofractionation Regimens for Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Large Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jiankui; Wang, Jian Z.; Lo, Simon; Grecula, John C.; Ammirati, Mario; Montebello, Joseph F.; Zhang Hualin; Gupta, Nilendu; Yuh, William T.C.; Mayr, Nina A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate equivalent regimens for hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) for brain tumor treatment and to provide dose-escalation guidance to maximize the tumor control within the normal brain tolerance. Methods and Materials: The linear-quadratic model, including the effect of nonuniform dose distributions, was used to evaluate the HSRT regimens. The α/β ratio was estimated using the Gammaknife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) and whole-brain radiotherapy experience for large brain tumors. The HSRT regimens were derived using two methods: (1) an equivalent tumor control approach, which matches the whole-brain radiotherapy experience for many fractions and merges it with the GKSRS data for few fractions; and (2) a normal-tissue tolerance approach, which takes advantages of the dose conformity and fractionation of HSRT to approach the maximal dose tolerance of the normal brain. Results: A plausible α/β ratio of 12 Gy for brain tumor and a volume parameter n of 0.23 for normal brain were derived from the GKSRS and whole-brain radiotherapy data. The HSRT prescription regimens for the isoeffect of tumor irradiation were calculated. The normal-brain equivalent uniform dose decreased as the number of fractions increased, because of the advantage of fractionation. The regimens for potential dose escalation of HSRT within the limits of normal-brain tolerance were derived. Conclusions: The designed hypofractionated regimens could be used as a preliminary guide for HSRT dose prescription for large brain tumors to mimic the GKSRS experience and for dose escalation trials. Clinical studies are necessary to further tune the model parameters and validate these regimens

  17. Neurosymptomatic carvenous sinus meningioma: a 15-years experience with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, Sebastião Francisco Miranda; Marta, Gustavo Nader; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2014-01-01

    The tumor removal of Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas usually results in severe neurological deficits. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) are advanced modalities of radiotherapy for treatment of patients with inoperable and symptomatic CSMs. The authors evaluated the long term symptomatology, the image findings, and the toxicity of patients with CSMs treated with SRS or SRT. From 1994 to 2009, 89 patients with symptomatic CSMs were treated with SRS or SRT. The indication was based on tumour volume and or proximity to the optic chiasm. The median single dose of SRS was 14 Gy, while the SRT total dose, ranged from 50.4 to 54 Gy fractionated in 1.8-2 Gy/dose. The median follow-up period lasted 73 months. The clinical and radiological improvement was the same despite the method of radiotherapy; 41.6% (SRS) and 48.3% (SRT) of patients treated. The disease-free survivals were 98.8%, 92.3% and 92.3%, in 5, 10, and 15 years, respectively. There was no statistical difference in relation to the symptoms and image findings between both methods. According to the Common Toxicity Criteria, 7% of the patients presented transient optic neuropathy during 3 months (grade 2) and recovered with dexamethasone, 2 patients had trigeminal neuropathy (grade 2) and improved rapidly, and one patient presented total occlusion of the internal carotid artery without neurological deficit (grade 2). Temporary lethargy and headache (grade 1) were the most frequent immediate complications. No severe complications occurred. Stereotactic Radiosurgery and fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy were equally safe and effective in the management of symptomatic CSMs

  18. Is it sufficient to repeat LINEAR accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery in choroidal melanoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furdova, A; Horkovicova, K; Justusova, P; Sramka, M

    One day session LINAC based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) at LINAC accelerator is a method of "conservative" attitude to treat the intraocular malignant uveal melanoma. We used model Clinac 600 C/D Varian (system Aria, planning system Corvus version 6.2 verification IMRT OmniPro) with 6 MeV X by rigid immobilization of the eye to the Leibinger frame. The stereotactic treatment planning after fusion of CT and MRI was optimized according to the critical structures (lens, optic nerve, also lens and optic nerve at the contralateral side, chiasm). The first plan was compared and the best plan was applied for therapy at C LINAC accelerator. The planned therapeutic dose was 35.0 Gy by 99 % of DVH (dose volume histogram). In our clinical study in the group of 125 patients with posterior uveal melanoma treated with SRS, in 2 patients (1.6 %) was repeated SRS indicated. Patient age of the whole group ranged from 25 to 81 years with a median of 54 TD was 35.0 Gy. In 2 patients after 5 year interval after stereotactic radiosurgery for uveal melanoma stage T1, the tumor volume increased to 50 % of the primary tumor volume and repeated SRS was necessary. To find out the changes in melanoma characteristics after SRS in long term interval after irradiation is necessary to follow up the patient by an ophthalmologist regularly. One step LINAC based stereotactic radiosurgery with a single dose 35.0 Gy is one of treatment options to treat T1 to T3 stage posterior uveal melanoma and to preserve the eye globe. In some cases it is possible to repeat the SRS after more than 5 year interval (Fig. 8, Ref. 23).

  19. Evaluation of a mammographic stereotactic device for localization, fine-needle aspiration cytologic studies, and core biopsy of suspicious lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, L.J.; Davey, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    Mammography-guided interventional breast procedures, such as preoperative localization, fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), and core biopsy of suspicious lesions, require accurate three-dimensional localization. The authors have evaluated a prototype stereotactic mammography device for localizing abnormalities with both phantom and clinical studies. Twenty-six localizations on a phantom were within 0.5 mm +- 0.93 (standard deviation) from the lesions; accuracy in clinical procedures was within 0.6 mm +- 0.8. Procedures are performed an average of 8 minutes faster with this device. They are prospectively evaluating mammography-guided FNAC and core biopsy of suspicious lesions in 100 patients. Results of FNAC performed without the stereotactic device agreed with results of open surgical biopsy in six of eight patients; results of core biopsy agreed in seven of eight

  20. Comparison of the air-Q intubating laryngeal airway and the cobra perilaryngeal airway as conduits for fiber optic-guided intubation in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, Karim K; Youssef, Maha M I; ElZayyat, Nashwa S

    2014-10-01

    One of the methods proposed in cases of difficult airway management in children is using a supraglottic airway device as a conduit for tracheal intubation. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of the Air-Q Intubating Laryngeal Airway (Air-Q) and the Cobra Perilaryngeal Airway (CobraPLA) to function as a conduit for fiber optic-guided tracheal intubation in pediatric patients. A total of 60 children with ages ranging from 1 to 6 years, undergoing elective surgery, were randomized to have their airway managed with either an Air-Q or CobraPLA. Outcomes recorded were the success rate, time and number of attempts required for fiber optic-guided intubation and the time required for device removal after intubation. We also recorded airway leak pressure (ALP), fiber optic grade of glottic view and occurrence of complications. Both devices were successfully inserted in all patients. The intubation success rate was comparable with the Air-Q and the CobraPLA (96.7% vs. 90%), as was the first attempt success rate (90% vs. 80%). The intubation time was significantly longer with the CobraPLA (29.5 ± 10.9 s vs. 23.2 ± 9.8 s; P fiber optic grade of glottic view was comparable with the two devices. The CobraPLA was associated with a significantly higher incidence of blood staining of the device on removal and post-operative sore throat. Both the Air-Q and CobraPLA can be used effectively as a conduit for fiber optic-guided tracheal intubation in children. However, the Air-Q proved to be superior due to a shorter intubation time and less airway morbidity compared with the CobraPLA.

  1. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Eighth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommended for engineering st

  2. Preliminary experience with frameless stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buatti, John M.; Bova, Frank J.; Friedman, William A.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Marcus, Robert B.; Zuofeng, Li; Mendenhall, William M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To report our initial clinical experience using a novel high-precision frameless stereotactic radiotherapy system in 50 patients who have received 1271 treatments. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients ranging in age from 2 to 72 yr were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Thirty-two were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy alone, and 18 had stereotactic radiotherapy interdigitated as a boost in addition to standard irradiation. Pathologies treated included meningioma (13), low grade astrocytoma (10), germinoma (9), craniopharyngioma (4), schwannoma (2), and pituitary adenoma (2). Two additional patients had miscellaneous benign neoplasms and 8 patients had the technique used as a dose escalation strategy for malignant lesions including chordoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor, sarcoma, and anaplastic oligoastrocytoma. Treatment reproducibility was initially gauged by comparing the bite plate position using infrared light emitting diodes (irleds) with the stereotactic radiosurgery reference system. This test of accuracy consisted of 10 bite plate repositionings for each patient and 100 readings of each of the 6 irleds on the bite plate at each new position. Each of the 1271 patient treatments was monitored for continuous digital position, and a reading was made before treating each arc of radiation. We chose 0.3 mm translation and 0.3 degrees rotation as the maximum tolerated misalignment before treating each arc. Results: With a mean follow-up of 9 mo, no patient had a marginal or distal failure. One patient with a malignant glioma had central disease progression. Acute side effects were minimal. In 3 of 9 low grade astrocytomas, a marked increase in imaging enhancement and edema occurred in the first year after treatment that resolved with steroids. The initial test of accuracy revealed bite plate reproducibility as follows. Translational errors (mm): Anterior-posterior, 0.06 ± 0.06; lateral, 0.03 ± 0.05; axial, 0.07 ± 0

  3. Image-guided intraocular injection using multimodality optical coherence tomography and fluorescence confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy in rodent ophthalmological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrones, Benjamin D.; Benavides, Oscar R.; Leeburg, Kelsey C.; Mehanathan, Sankarathi B.; Levine, Edward M.; Tao, Yuankai K.

    2018-02-01

    Intraocular injections are routinely performed for delivery of anti-VEGF and anti-inflammatory therapies in humans. While these injections are also performed in mice to develop novel models of ophthalmic diseases and screen novel therapeutics, the injection location and volume are not well-controlled and reproducible. We overcome limitations of conventional injections methods by developing a multimodality, long working distance, non-contact optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) system for retinal imaging before and after injections. Our OCT+cSLO system combines a custom-built spectraldomain OCT engine (875+/-85 nm) with 125 kHz line-rate with a modified commercial cSLO with a maximum frame-rate of 30 fps (512 x 512 pix.). The system was designed for an overlapping OCT+cSLO field-of-view of 1.1 mm with a 7.76 mm working distance to the pupil. cSLO excitation light sources and filters were optimized for simultaneous GFP and tdTomato imaging. Lateral resolution was 3.02 µm for OCT and 2.74 μm for cSLO. Intravitreal injections of 5%, 10%, and 20% intralipid with Alex Fluor 488 were manually injected intraocularly in C57BL/6 mice. Post-injection imaging showed structural changes associated with retinal puncture, including the injection track, a retinal elevation, and detachment of the posterior hyaloid. OCT enables quantitative analysis of injection location and volumes whereas complementary cSLO improves specificity for identifying fluorescently labeled injected compounds and transgenic cells. The long working distance of our non-contact OCT+cSLO system is uniquely-suited for concurrent imaging with intraocular injections and may be applied for imaging of ophthalmic surgical dynamics and real-time image-guided injections.

  4. Multimodal imaging NMR-{sup 99m}Tc-MIBI Spect to guide stereotactic biopsy: a case report; A propos d'un cas d'intervention neurochirurgicale guidee par l'imagerie multi-modalite IRM-TEMP au {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prigent-Le Jeune, F.; Coste, E.; Perez, S.; Lecouffe, P.; Steinling, M. [Hopital Roger Salengro, CHRU, Service Central de Medecine Nucleaire, UF de Neurologie, 59 - Lille (France); Dubois, F.; Blond, S. [Hopital Roger Salengro, CHRU, Service de Neurologie, 59 - Lille (France)

    2001-03-01

    Multimodal imaging is the simultaneous and co-registered use of images issued from different modalities in order to improve the information quality and the pathology diagnosis. We have developed a registration method between cerebral {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI tomo-scintigraphy and MRI, easy to use in standard clinical practice for cerebral glioma follow up. This paper presents the follow-up of a patient, having an abnormal tracer uptake without any clinical or neuro-morphological disorder. The registered images helped the neurosurgeon to define the stereotactic biopsy trajectory according to the abnormal uptake area position. The histological analysis demonstrated a high grade recurrence. This clinical case confirms the contribution of the multimodal imaging, in the pre-operative planning of neurosurgical stereotactic biopsy, in order to accurately localize the tumour recurrence on the anatomical images. (authors)

  5. Stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obedian, E.; Lotbiniere, A.C.J. de; Haffty, B.G.; Piepmeier, J.M.; Fischer, D.B.; Knisely, J.P.S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluates the influence of several prognostic factors on overall survival and progression free survival in patients undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases. Materials and Methods: Records of 61 coecutive patients with pathologically confirmed extra-cranial malignancies undergoing SRS at Yale University School of Medicine between 12/18/91 and 7/2/96 were reviewed. All patients underwent head frame localization and CT and/or MRI based treatment planning. Outcome was analyzed with respect to age, number of lesions, size of lesions, location of lesions, site and stage of primary tumor, status of primary tumor at time of SRS, history of whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT), surgery, and/or chemotherapy prior to or after SRS, delay in SRS from diagnosis of brain metastases, dose of radiation delivered, and brain metastasis free interval. Both overall survival and progression free survival were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Tests for statistical significance were performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Median follow-up was 29 months. 3% ((8(61))) of patients displayed evidence of progressive disease at the site of SRS, and 87% ((53(61))) of patients have died. Overall and progression free survival rates for the entire cohort of patients were 43.8% and 89.5% at 1 year and 11.1% and 71.4% at 2 years, respectively. Patients undergoing SRS for a solitary brain metastasis had a significant improvement in overall survival with 1 year survival rates of 52.6% vs. 32.7% for patients undergoing SRS for more than 1 brain metastasis (p=0.002). Patients who presented with progressive systemic disease at the time of SRS had an inferior overall survival with a 1 year survival rate of 15.4% compared to patients with presumed/known stable disease who had a 1 year survival rate of 51.5%/54.2% (p<0.001). Patients treated for cerebral metastases had a higher progression free survival compared to patients undergoing SRS

  6. Stereotactic Bragg peak proton radiosurgery method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjellberg, R.N.

    1979-01-01

    A brief description of the technical aspects of a stereotactic Bragg peak proton radiosurgical method for the head is presented. The preparatory radiographic studies are outlined and the stereotactic instrument and positioning of the patient are described. The instrument is so calibrated that after corrections for soft tissue and bone thickness, the Bragg peak superimposes upon the intracranial target. The head is rotated at specific intervals to allow predetermined portals of access for the beam path, all of which converge on the intracranial target. Normally, portals are arranged to oppose and overlap from both sides of the head. Using a number of beams (in sequence) on both sides of the head, the target dose is far greater than the path dose. The procedure normally takes 3/2-2 hours, following which the patient can walk away. (Auth./C.F.)

  7. Stereotactic radiosurgery: basic concepts and current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaur, Maheep Singh

    2016-01-01

    Term Stereotactic Radiosurgery was coined by Prof Lars Leksell in 1951 as concept. Leksell's experimented together with the radiobiologist Borje Larsson in Uppsala, on trying to develop 'stereotactic radiosurgery', aimed at lesioning in the central brain in functional operations such as thalamotomy and capsulotomy. Clinical experiments using a proton beam were initiated at the Gustav Werner Institute in Uppsala, and a few patients had been treated. Experiences from these led Leksell to design a multi-source 'beam knife', which became ready for use in 1967 as the first 'Gamma Knife' and installed at the private hospital Sophiahammet in Stockholm as a clinical research unit. Moving from functional neurosurgery today Gamma knife is used for a wide range on brain tumors, vascular malformations and functional disorders. Introduction of newer technology in navigation and radiation delivery has made it possible to do whole body Radiosurgery. Various technologies, basic principles, radiobiological aspects and applications will be discussed. (author)

  8. New stereotactic X-ray knife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barish, R.J.; Barish, S.V.

    1988-01-01

    For many years, the irradiation of small volumes of tissue in the brain to necrotizing doses has been investigated as a non-invasive alternative to neurosurgery. We propose a new system in which a precisely machined helmet serves as a multi-port focussed X-ray collimator when it is itself irradiated by a conventional medical linear accelerator run in the electron mode. When the collimator is attached to a stereotactic frame, the geometric accuracy of delivering small radiation fields to the brain is limited primarily by the accuracy of the stereotactic localization, and is relatively independent of the positional stability of the accelerator. Field sizes as small as two millimeters are readily achievable. The problem of low dose rate associated with these small fields is overcome by the use of high electron beam currents

  9. Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Jennifer L; Li, Gordon; Shaffer, Jenny L; Azoulay, Melissa I; Gibbs, Iris C; Nagpal, Seema; Soltys, Scott G

    2018-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Standard therapy depends on patient age and performance status but principally involves surgical resection followed by a 6-wk course of radiation therapy given concurrently with temozolomide chemotherapy. Despite such treatment, prognosis remains poor, with a median survival of 16 mo. Challenges in achieving local control, maintaining quality of life, and limiting toxicity plague treatment strategies for this disease. Radiotherapy dose intensification through hypofractionation and stereotactic radiosurgery is a promising strategy that has been explored to meet these challenges. We review the use of hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with newly diagnosed and recurrent glioblastoma. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  10. Stereotactic radiosurgery planning with ictal SPECT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerly, T.; RMIT University, Bundoora, VIC; Geso, M.; O'Keefe, G.; Smith, R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper is motivated by a clinical requirement to utilise ictal SPECT images for target localisation in stereotactic radiosurgery treatment planning using the xknife system which only supports CT and MRI images. To achieve this, the SPECT images were converted from raw (pixel data only) format into a part 10 compliant DICOM CT fileset. The minimum requirements for the recasting of a raw format image as DICOM CT or MRI data set are described in detail. The method can be applied to the importation of raw format images into any radiotherapy treatment planning system that supports CT or MRI import. It is demonstrated that the combination of the low spatial resolution SPECT images, depicting functional information, with high spatial resolution MRI images, which show the structural information, is suitable for stereotactic radiosurgery treatment planning. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  11. A Prospective Cohort Study of Gated Stereotactic Liver Radiation Therapy Using Continuous Internal Electromagnetic Motion Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Esben S; Høyer, Morten; Hansen, Rune

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: Intrafraction motion can compromise the treatment accuracy in liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Respiratory gating can improve treatment delivery; however, gating based on external motion surrogates is inaccurate. The present study reports the use of Calypso-based internal...... electromagnetic motion monitoring for gated liver SBRT. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Fifteen patients were included in a study of 3-fraction respiratory gated liver SBRT guided by 3 implanted electromagnetic transponders. The planning target volume was created by a 5-mm axial and 7-mm (n = 12) or 10-mm (n = 3...

  12. Target migration from re-inflation of adjacent atelectasis during lung stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Bijing; Verma, Vivek; Zheng, Dandan; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Bennion, Nathan R; Bhirud, Abhijeet R; Poole, Maria A; Zhen, Weining

    2017-06-10

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a widely accepted option for the treatment of medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Herein, we highlight the importance of interfraction image guidance during SBRT. We describe a case of early-stage NSCLC associated with segmental atelectasis that translocated 15 mm anteroinferiorly due to re-expansion of the adjacent segmental atelectasis following the first fraction. The case exemplifies the importance of cross-sectional image-guided radiotherapy that shows the intended target, as opposed to aligning based on rigid anatomy alone, especially in cases associated with potentially "volatile" anatomic areas.

  13. Characterizing the Utility and Limitations of Repurposing an Open-Field Optical Imaging Device for Fluorescence-Guided Surgery in Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lindsay S; Rosenthal, Eben L; Chung, Thomas K; de Boer, Esther; Patel, Neel; Prince, Andrew C; Korb, Melissa L; Walsh, Erika M; Young, E Scott; Stevens, Todd M; Withrow, Kirk P; Morlandt, Anthony B; Richman, Joshua S; Carroll, William R; Zinn, Kurt R; Warram, Jason M

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of U.S. Food and Drug Administration-cleared devices designed for indocyanine green-based perfusion imaging to identify cancer-specific bioconjugates with overlapping excitation and emission wavelengths. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated potential for fluorescence-guided surgery, but the time and cost of the approval process may impede clinical translation. To expedite this translation, we explored the feasibility of repurposing existing optical imaging devices for fluorescence-guided surgery. Consenting patients (n = 15) scheduled for curative resection were enrolled in a clinical trial evaluating the safety and specificity of cetuximab-IRDye800 (NCT01987375). Open-field fluorescence imaging was performed preoperatively and during the surgical resection. Fluorescence intensity was quantified using integrated instrument software, and the tumor-to-background ratio characterized fluorescence contrast. In the preoperative clinic, the open-field device demonstrated potential to guide preoperative mapping of tumor borders, optimize the day of surgery, and identify occult lesions. Intraoperatively, the device demonstrated robust potential to guide surgical resections, as all peak tumor-to-background ratios were greater than 2 (range, 2.2-14.1). Postresection wound bed fluorescence was significantly less than preresection tumor fluorescence (P open-field imaging device was successfully repurposed to distinguish cancer from normal tissue in the preoperative clinic and throughout surgical resection. This study illuminated the potential for existing open-field optical imaging devices with overlapping excitation and emission spectra to be used for fluorescence-guided surgery. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  14. Radiocromic film, TLD, OSL and 'Paracas Phantom' by dosimetric intercomparation in stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paucar Jauregui, R.; Condori Marcos, P.; Vidarte Garcia, F.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In Peru, one deals to patients with arteriovenous malformations or cerebral tumors by means of stereotactic radiosurgery, using fine photon beams of high energy of 6 MeV, generated by a linear accelerator Varian 2100 Clinac CD of the Complejo Hospitalario San Pablo in Lima, Peru. In this work we describes the 'Dosimetric Intercomparation System of the Quality Assurance Program in Stereotactic Radiosurgery of the Complejo Hospitalario San Pablo (DIS)'. The DIS allows to guarantee application of the doses with high accuracy. It shows the good performance of the Local DIS's components: dosimetry of radiocromics films, dosimetry termoluminiscent (TLD), dosimetry of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and an anthropomorphic phantom of head constructed locally, denominated 'Paracas Phantom'. Also, in the International DIS practiced with The University of Texas Md Anderson Cancer Center, stands out results within the ranges: a) Dose to the center of the target (RDS/Institution): 0,95-1,05; b) Treated volumen (Measured/Institution): 0,75 - 1,05; c) Ratio of measure treated volume to target volume: 1,00 - 2,00; and d) Minimum dose to target (Minimum dose/Prescription dose): >0,90. It concludes that the DIS is important for the good decision making on the radiological safety of the patients dealt with stereotactic radiosurgery. (author)

  15. Stereotactic Radiotherapy by 6MV Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oho, Yoon Kyeong; Kim, Mi Hee; Gil, Hak Jun [Catholic University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    1988-12-15

    Eight patients with intracranial tumors or arteriovenous malformation (AVM)s which were less than 3 cm in diameter were treated by a technique of stereotactic radiotherapy during the 4 months period from July 1988 through October 1988 at the Division of Radiation Therapy, Kang-Nam St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic University Medical College. The patients were diagnosed as AVMs in 3 cases, acoustic neurinoma, craniopharyngioma (recurrent), hemangioblastoma, pineocytoma, and pituitary microadenoma in each case. There are several important factors in this procedure, such as localization system, portal, field size, radiation dose, and perioperative supportive care. It is suggested that stereotactic radiotherapy may be performed safely with a radiation dose of 12-30 Gy. So this noninvasive procedure can be used to treat unresectable intracranial tumors or AVMs. Of these, clinical symptoms had been regressed in AVMs in 2 cases at 3 months and 2 months after Stereotactic radiotherapy, one of whom was confirmed slightly regressed on the follow-up angiogram. And also craniopharyngioma and pineocytoma was minimally regressed on 3 month follow-up CT.

  16. Stereotactic Radiotherapy by 6MV Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oho, Yoon Kyeong; Kim, Mi Hee; Gil, Hak Jun

    1988-01-01

    Eight patients with intracranial tumors or arteriovenous malformation (AVM)s which were less than 3 cm in diameter were treated by a technique of stereotactic radiotherapy during the 4 months period from July 1988 through October 1988 at the Division of Radiation Therapy, Kang-Nam St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic University Medical College. The patients were diagnosed as AVMs in 3 cases, acoustic neurinoma, craniopharyngioma (recurrent), hemangioblastoma, pineocytoma, and pituitary microadenoma in each case. There are several important factors in this procedure, such as localization system, portal, field size, radiation dose, and perioperative supportive care. It is suggested that stereotactic radiotherapy may be performed safely with a radiation dose of 12-30 Gy. So this noninvasive procedure can be used to treat unresectable intracranial tumors or AVMs. Of these, clinical symptoms had been regressed in AVMs in 2 cases at 3 months and 2 months after Stereotactic radiotherapy, one of whom was confirmed slightly regressed on the follow-up angiogram. And also craniopharyngioma and pineocytoma was minimally regressed on 3 month follow-up CT

  17. Stereotactic radiation therapy for large vestibular schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandl, Ellen S.; Meijer, Otto W.M.; Slotman, Ben J.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Peerdeman, Saskia M.

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the morbidity and tumor-control rate in the treatment of large vestibular schwannomas (VS) after stereotactic radiation therapy in our institution. Material and methods: Twenty-five consecutive patients (17 men, 8 women) with large VS (diameter 3.0 cm or larger), treated with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) between 1992 and 2007, were retrospectively studied after a mean follow-up period of three years with respect to tumor-control rate and complications. Results: Actuarial 5-year maintenance of pre-treatment hearing level probability of 30% was achieved. Five of 17 patients suffered permanent new facial nerve dysfunction. The actuarial 5-year facial nerve preservation probability was 80%. Permanent new trigeminal nerve neuropathy occurred in two of 15 patients, resulting in an actuarial 5-year trigeminal nerve preservation probability of 85%. Tumor progression occurred in four of 25 (16%) patients. The overall 5-year tumor control probability was 82%. Conclusion: Increased morbidity rates were found in patients with large VS treated with SRT or SRS compared to the published series on regular sized VS and other smaller retrospective studies on large VS.

  18. Stereotactic irradiation for metastatic brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Ryutaro

    2017-01-01

    First, this paper reviewed the latest findings of stereotactic irradiation (STI) for metastatic brain tumors. Then, it described the results of randomized controlled trials for single or a few (2-4) metastasis in the following comparison tests: (1) comparison between whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone group and (WBRT + STI) group, (2) comparison between STI alone group and (STI + WBRT) group, (3) comparison between STI alone group and (tumorectomy + WBRT) group, (4) comparison between (STI + WBRT) group and (tumorectomy + WBRT) group, and (5) between (tumorectomy + WBRT) group and (tumorectomy + STI) group. Among these, STI alone without WBRT has obtained a certain consensus. Against multiple metastatic brain tumors of 5 or more, when considering cognitive impairment and QOL loss by adding WBRT, it is general consensus that STI alone may be sufficient. At the authors' institution, cyber knife (CK) was introduced in 2008 and nearly 300 stereotactic radiotherapy for metastatic brain tumors have been performed annually. By adopting a robot arm and development of a lesion tracking system, the positional correction against the deviation of the bone margin of the skull is guaranteed in real time to ensure accuracy during irradiation, and hypofractionated stereotactic irradiation becomes easier. (A.O.)

  19. A deterministic guide for material and mode dependence of on-chip electro-optic modulator performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Rubab; Suer, Can; Ma, Zhizhen; Sarpkaya, Ibrahim; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Agarwal, Ritesh; Sorger, Volker J.

    2017-10-01

    Electro-optic modulation is a key function in optical data communication and possible future optical computing engines. The performance of modulators intricately depends on the interaction between the actively modulated material and the propagating waveguide mode. While high-performing modulators were demonstrated before, the approaches were taken as ad-hoc. Here we show the first systematic investigation to incorporate a holistic analysis for high-performance and ultra-compact electro-optic modulators on-chip. We show that intricate interplay between active modulation material and optical mode plays a key role in the device operation. Based on physical tradeoffs such as index modulation, loss, optical confinement factors and slow-light effects, we find that bias-material-mode regions exist where high phase modulation and high loss (absorption) modulation is found. This work paves the way for a holistic design rule of electro-optic modulators for on-chip integration.

  20. Preliminary experience with frameless stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buatti, John M.; Bova, Francis J.; Friedman, William A.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Marcus, Robert B.; Mickle, J. Parker; Ellis, Thomas L.; Mendenhall, William M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To report initial clinical experience with a novel high-precision stereotactic radiotherapy system. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients ranging in age from 2 to 82 years received a total of 1426 treatments with the University of Florida frameless stereotactic radiotherapy system. Of the total, 39 (65%) were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) alone, and 21 (35%) received SRT as a component of radiotherapy. Pathologic diagnoses included meningiomas (15 patients), low-grade astrocytomas (11 patients), germinomas (9 patients), and craniopharyngiomas (5 patients). The technique was used as means of dose escalation in 11 patients (18%) with aggressive tumors. Treatment reproducibility was measured by comparing bite plate positioning registered by infrared light-emitting diodes (IRLEDs) with the stereotactic radiosurgery reference system, and with measurements from each treatment arc for the 1426 daily treatments (5808 positions). We chose 0.3 mm vector translation error and 0.3 deg. rotation about each axis as the maximum tolerated misalignment before treating each arc. Results: With a mean follow-up of 11 months, 3 patients had recurrence of malignant disease. Acute side effects were minimal. Of 11 patients with low grade astrocytomas, 4 (36%) had cerebral edema and increased enhancement on MR scans in the first year, and 2 required steroids. All had resolution and marked tumor involution on follow-up imaging. Bite plate reproducibility was as follows. Translational errors: anterior-posterior, 0.01 ± 0.10; lateral, 0.02 ± 0.07; axial, 0.01 ± 0.10. Rotational errors (degrees): anterior-posterior, 0.00 ± 0.03; lateral, 0.00 ± 0.06; axial, 0.01 ± 0.04. No patient treatment was delivered beyond the maximum tolerated misalignment. Daily treatment was delivered in approximately 15 min per patient. Conclusion: Our initial experience with stereotactic radiotherapy using the infrared camera guidance system was good. Patient selection and treatment

  1. Automated location detection of injection site for preclinical stereotactic neurosurgery procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Wu, Hemmings C. H.

    2017-03-01

    Currently, during stereotactic neurosurgery procedures, the manual task of locating the proper area for needle insertion or implantation of electrode/cannula/optic fiber can be time consuming. The requirement of the task is to quickly and accurately find the location for insertion. In this study we investigate an automated method to locate the entry point of region of interest. This method leverages a digital image capture system, pattern recognition, and motorized stages. Template matching of known anatomical identifiable regions is used to find regions of interest (e.g. Bregma) in rodents. For our initial study, we tackle the problem of automatically detecting the entry point.

  2. Value of stereotactic radiosurgery in patients with multiple brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jie; Lin Zhiguo; Li Qingguo; Shen Hong

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the prognostic factors and evaluate the effect of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with multiple brain metastases. Methods: Comparison was made in 53 such patients treated by stereotactic radiosurgery plus radiotherapy and 53 treated by radiotherapy alone. Patients were matched-paired according to the following criteria: age, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) before treatment, extent of systemic cancer and number of brain metastasis. Forty patients had stereotactic radiosurgery, 13 patients stereotactic fractionated radiosurgery. In the stereotactic radiosurgery group, the patients were given a mean marginal dose of 20 Gy. Methods of stereotactic fractionated radiosurgery was 4-12 Gy per fraction , twice a week to a total dose of 15-30 Gy. Whole brain radiotherapy was given immediately after stereotactic radiosurgery. For patients treated by radiotherapy alone, the entire brain was treated by 30-40 Gy in 3-4 weeks. Results: The median survival was 11.6 months in stereotactic radiosurgery plus radiotherapy and 6.7 months in radiotherapy alone. The one year survival rate and one year local control rate were 44.3%, 17.1% and 50.9%, 13. 2%. Those with KPS increased after treatment gave 1-year survivals of 69.8% and 30.2%, respectively. The validity rates in CT or MRI three months after treatment were 82.0% and 55.0%. The difference in the two groups was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.01). 23.3% of death in the stereotactic radiosurgery plus radiotherapy group was due to brain metastasis vs 51.0% in the radiotherapy alone group (P < 0.05). Complication of the two groups was similar. Conclusion: Stereotactic radiosurgery plus radiotherapy is superior to radiotherapy alone for multiple brain metastases in improving the local control and ultimate outcome

  3. Characteristics of a novel treatment system for linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ning; Li, Haisen; Song, Kwang; Chin-Snyder, Karen; Qin, Yujiao; Kim, Jinkoo; Bellon, Maria; Gulam, Misbah; Gardner, Stephen; Doemer, Anthony; Devpura, Suneetha; Gordon, James; Chetty, Indrin; Siddiqui, Farzan; Ajlouni, Munther; Pompa, Robert; Hammoud, Zane; Simoff, Michael; Kalkanis, Steven; Movsas, Benjamin; Siddiqui, M Salim

    2015-07-08

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the dosimetric properties and accuracy of a novel treatment platform (Edge radiosurgery system) for localizing and treating patients with frameless, image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Initial measurements of various components of the system, such as a comprehensive assessment of the dosimetric properties of the flattening filter-free (FFF) beams for both high definition (HD120) MLC and conical cone-based treatment, positioning accuracy and beam attenuation of a six degree of freedom (6DoF) couch, treatment head leakage test, and integrated end-to-end accuracy tests, have been performed. The end-to-end test of the system was performed by CT imaging a phantom and registering hidden targets on the treatment couch to determine the localization accuracy of the optical surface monitoring system (OSMS), cone-beam CT (CBCT), and MV imaging systems, as well as the radiation isocenter targeting accuracy. The deviations between the percent depth-dose curves acquired on the new linac-based system (Edge), and the previously published machine with FFF beams (TrueBeam) beyond D(max) were within 1.0% for both energies. The maximum deviation of output factors between the Edge and TrueBeam was 1.6%. The optimized dosimetric leaf gap values, which were fitted using Eclipse dose calculations and measurements based on representative spine radiosurgery plans, were 0.700 mm and 1.000 mm, respectively. For the conical cones, 6X FFF has sharper penumbra ranging from 1.2-1.8 mm (80%-20%) and 1.9-3.8 mm (90%-10%) relative to 10X FFF, which has 1.2-2.2mm and 2.3-5.1mm, respectively. The relative attenuation measurements of the couch for PA, PA (rails-in), oblique, oblique (rails-out), oblique (rails-in) were: -2.0%, -2.5%, -15.6%, -2.5%, -5.0% for 6X FFF and -1.4%, -1.5%, -12.2%, -2.5%, -5.0% for 10X FFF, respectively, with a slight decrease in attenuation versus field size. The systematic

  4. Differentiation of healthy and malignant tissue in colon cancer patients using optical spectroscopy: A tool for image-guided surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langhout, G.C.; Spliethoff, Jarich; Schmitz, S.J.; Aalbers, A.G.J.; van Velthuysen, M.L.; Hendriks, B.H.W.; Ruers, Theo J.M.; Kuhlmann, K.F.D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgery for colorectal cancer aims for complete tumor resection. Optical-based techniques can identify tumor and surrounding tissue through the tissue specific optical properties, absorption and scattering, which are both influenced by the biochemical and morphological composition of the

  5. Dosimetric impact of a frame-based strategy in stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldeland, Einar; Ramberg, Christina; Arnesen, Marius Roethe; Helland, Aaslaug; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Malinen, Eirik

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Technological innovations have taken stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) from frame-based strategies to image-guided strategies. In this study, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images acquired prior to SBRT of patients with lung tumors was used to study the dosimetric impact of a pure frame-based strategy. Material and methods. Thirty patients with inoperable lung tumors were retrospectively analyzed. All patients had received CBCT-guided SBRT with 3 fractions of 15 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) margin including immobilization in a stereotactic body frame (SBF). Using the set-up corrections from the co-registration of the CBCT with the planning CT, all individual dose plans were recalculated with an isocenter position equal to the initial set-up position. Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) parameters of the recalculated dose plans were then analyzed. Results. The simulated plans showed that 88% of all fractions resulted in minimum 14.5 Gy to the internal target volume (ITV). For the simulated summed treatment (3 fractions per patient), 83% of the patients would minimum receive the prescription dose (45 Gy) to 100% of the ITV and all except one would receive the prescription dose to more than 90% of the ITV. Conclusions. SBRT including SBF, but without image guidance, results in appropriate dose coverage in most cases, using the current margins. With image guidance, margins for SBRT of lung tumors could possibly be reduced

  6. Image-guided procedures in brain biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, K; Yanaka, K; Meguro, K; Narushima, K; Iguchi, M; Nakai, Y; Nose, T

    1999-07-01

    Image-guided procedures, such as computed tomography (CT)-guided stereotactic and ultrasound-guided methods, can assist neurosurgeons in localizing the relevant pathology. The characteristics of image-guided procedures are important for their appropriate use, especially in brain biopsy. This study reviewed the results of various image-guided brain biopsies to ascertain the advantages and disadvantages. Brain biopsies assisted by CT-guided stereotactic, ultrasound-guided, Neuronavigator-guided, and the combination of ultrasound and Neuronavigator-guided procedures were carried out in seven, eight, one, and three patients, respectively. Four patients underwent open biopsy without a guiding system. Twenty of 23 patients had a satisfactory diagnosis after the initial biopsy. Three patients failed to have a definitive diagnosis after the initial procedure, one due to insufficient volume sampling after CT-guided procedure, and two due to localization failure by ultrasound because the lesions were nonechogenic. All patients who underwent biopsy using the combination of ultrasound and Neuronavigator-guided methods had a satisfactory result. The CT-guided procedure provided an efficient method of approaching any intracranial target and was appropriate for the diagnosis of hypodense lesions, but tissue sampling was sometimes not sufficient to achieve a satisfactory diagnosis. The ultrasound-guided procedure was suitable for the investigation of hyperdense lesions, but was difficult to localize nonechogenic lesions. The combination of ultrasound and Neuronavigator methods improved the diagnostic accuracy even in nonechogenic lesions such as malignant lymphoma. Therefore, it is essential to choose the most appropriate guiding method for brain biopsy according to the radiological nature of the lesions.

  7. Solid craniopharyngiomas treated by stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backlund, E.-O.

    1979-01-01

    The radiological changes of solid craniopharyngiomas treated by stereotactic radiosurgery have been followed. Nine cases are considered, the patients having received gamma radiation treatment with a dose distribution permitting no part of the tumour to receive doses less than 2-3 Gy. Target doses were 20 to 50 Gy. Tumour shrinkage was registered and no complications which could be attributed with certainty to the irradiation were encountered. The results did not allow an optimal single dose to be determined with accuracy but vaguely indicated that lower doses than those used are sufficient for desired effect on the tumour without jeopardizing its surroundings. (Auth./C.F.)

  8. CT-guided percutaneous laser disc decompression with Ceralas D, a diode laser with 980-nm wavelength and 200-μm fiber optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevargez, A.; Groenemeyer, D.W.H.; Czerwinski, F.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the compact, portable Ceralas-D diode laser (CeramOptec; 980+30 nm wavelength, 200-μm optical fiber) concerning clinical usefulness, handling, and clinical results in the CT-guided treatment of herniated lumbar discs. The positioning of the canula in intradiscal space, the placement of the laser fiber into the disc through the lying canula, and the vaporization itself were carried out under CT-guidance. Due to the thin fiber optic, it was possible to use a thin 23-gauge canula. The laser procedure was performed in 0.1- to 1-s shots with 1-s pulse pause and 4-W power output. A total of 1650-2300 J was applied on each percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD). Results in 26 patients were established with a visual-analogue scale (VAS). On the follow-up examinations, 46% of the patients were absolutely pain free (>85% VAS) and fully active in everyday life after 4 postoperative weeks. Thirty-one percent of patients were relieved of the leg pain but had occasional back pain without sensorimotor impairment. Fifteen percent sensed a slight alleviation (>50% VAS) of the radiate pain. Eight percent did not experience radicular or pseudo-radicular pain alleviation (<25% VAS). Cerales-D proves to be an efficient tool for CT-guided PLDD on non-sequestered herniated lumbar discs. (orig.)

  9. MR-guided breast biopsy and hook wire marking using a low-field (0.23 T) scanner with optical instrument tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto; Reinikainen, Heli; Blanco Sequeiros, Andreas M.; Ojala, Risto; Paeaekkoe, Eija; Tervonen, Osmo; Vaara, Teuvo

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility of MR-guided percutaneous breast biopsy (LCNB) and breast hook wire marking in a low-field (0.23 T) MRI system with optical instrument tracking. MR-guided core biopsy and/or hook wire marking was performed on 13 lesions observable at MR imaging only. Seven breast LCNBs and 10 hook wire markings were performed under MR guidance on 11 patients. The diagnosis was confirmed by excision biopsy or mastectomy in 12 lesions and with histopathological and cytological diagnosis and 12-month clinical follow-up in one lesion. All lesions seen in the high-field scanner were also successfully identified and targeted in the low-field scanner. The following procedures were typically technically successful. There were difficulties due to unsatisfactory functioning of some core biopsy guns. Detailed description of low-field MR guidance and optical tracking in breast biopsies is provided. The procedure seems accurate and safe and provides means to obtain a histological diagnosis of a breast lesion only seen with MRI. The low-field biopsy system is comparable to the high-field MRI system. MR-compatible biopsy guns need to be improved. (orig.)

  10. Stereotactic Fractionated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Juxtapapillary Choroidal Melanoma: The McGill University Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Wassia, Rolina; Dal Pra, Alan; Shun, Kitty; Shaban, Ahmed; Corriveau, Christine; Edelstein, Chaim; Deschenes, Jean; Ruo, Russel; Patrocinio, Horacio; Cury, Fabio L.B.; DeBlois, François; Shenouda, George

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report our experience with linear accelerator-based stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of 50 consecutive patients diagnosed with juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma and treated with linear accelerator-based stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy between April 2003 and December 2009. Patients with small to medium sized lesions (Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study classification) located within 2 mm of the optic disc were included. The prescribed radiation dose was 60 Gy in 10 fractions. The primary endpoints included local control, enucleation-free survival, and complication rates. Results: The median follow-up was 29 months (range, 1–77 months). There were 31 males and 29 females, with a median age of 69 years (range, 30–92 years). Eighty-four percent of the patients had medium sized lesions, and 16% of patients had small sized lesions. There were four cases of local progression (8%) and three enucleations (6%). Actuarial local control rates at 2 and 5 years were 93% and 86%, respectively. Actuarial enucleation-free survival rates at 2 and 5 years were 94% and 84%, respectively. Actuarial complication rates at 2 and 5 years were 33% and 88%, respectively, for radiation-induced retinopathy; 9.3% and 46.9%, respectively, for dry eye; 12% and 53%, respectively, for cataract; 30% and 90%, respectively, for visual loss [Snellen acuity (decimal equivalent), <0.1]; 11% and 54%, respectively, for optic neuropathy; and 18% and 38%, respectively, for neovascular glaucoma. Conclusions: Linear accelerator-based stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy using 60 Gy in 10 fractions is safe and has an acceptable toxicity profile. It has been shown to be an effective noninvasive treatment for juxtapapillary choroidal melanomas.

  11. Stereotactic Fractionated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Juxtapapillary Choroidal Melanoma: The McGill University Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Wassia, Rolina; Dal Pra, Alan; Shun, Kitty; Shaban, Ahmed [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Montreal General Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Corriveau, Christine [Department of Ophthalmology, Notre Dame Hospital, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Edelstein, Chaim; Deschenes, Jean [Department of Ophthalmology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Ruo, Russel; Patrocinio, Horacio [Department of Medical Physics, Montreal General Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Cury, Fabio L.B. [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Montreal General Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); DeBlois, Francois [Department of Medical Physics, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Shenouda, George, E-mail: george.shenouda@muhc.mcgill.ca [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Montreal General Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To report our experience with linear accelerator-based stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of 50 consecutive patients diagnosed with juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma and treated with linear accelerator-based stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy between April 2003 and December 2009. Patients with small to medium sized lesions (Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study classification) located within 2 mm of the optic disc were included. The prescribed radiation dose was 60 Gy in 10 fractions. The primary endpoints included local control, enucleation-free survival, and complication rates. Results: The median follow-up was 29 months (range, 1-77 months). There were 31 males and 29 females, with a median age of 69 years (range, 30-92 years). Eighty-four percent of the patients had medium sized lesions, and 16% of patients had small sized lesions. There were four cases of local progression (8%) and three enucleations (6%). Actuarial local control rates at 2 and 5 years were 93% and 86%, respectively. Actuarial enucleation-free survival rates at 2 and 5 years were 94% and 84%, respectively. Actuarial complication rates at 2 and 5 years were 33% and 88%, respectively, for radiation-induced retinopathy; 9.3% and 46.9%, respectively, for dry eye; 12% and 53%, respectively, for cataract; 30% and 90%, respectively, for visual loss [Snellen acuity (decimal equivalent), <0.1]; 11% and 54%, respectively, for optic neuropathy; and 18% and 38%, respectively, for neovascular glaucoma. Conclusions: Linear accelerator-based stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy using 60 Gy in 10 fractions is safe and has an acceptable toxicity profile. It has been shown to be an effective noninvasive treatment for juxtapapillary choroidal melanomas.

  12. Clinical accuracy of ExacTrac intracranial frameless stereotactic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerly, T.; Lancaster, C. M.; Geso, M.; Roxby, K. J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this paper, the authors assess the accuracy of the Brainlab ExacTrac system for frameless intracranial stereotactic treatments in clinical practice. Methods: They recorded couch angle and image fusion results (comprising lateral, longitudinal, and vertical shifts, and rotation corrections about these axes) for 109 stereotactic radiosurgery and 166 stereotactic radiotherapy patient treatments. Frameless stereotactic treatments involve iterative 6D image fusion corrections applied until the results conform to customizable pass criteria, theirs being 0.7 mm and 0.5 deg. for each axis. The planning CT slice thickness was 1.25 mm. It has been reported in the literature that the CT slices' thickness impacts the accuracy of localization to bony anatomy. The principle of invariance with respect to patient orientation was used to determine spatial accuracy. Results: The data for radiosurgery comprised 927 image pairs, of which 532 passed (pass ratio of 57.4%). The data for radiotherapy comprised 15983 image pairs, of which 10 050 passed (pass ratio of 62.9%). For stereotactic radiotherapy, the combined uncertainty of ExacTrac calibration, image fusion, and intrafraction motion was (95% confidence interval) 0.290-0.302 and 0.306-0.319 mm in the longitudinal and lateral axes, respectively. The combined uncertainty of image fusion and intrafraction motion in the anterior-posterior coordinates was 0.174-0.182 mm. For stereotactic radiosurgery, the equivalent ranges are 0.323-0.393, 0.337-0.409, and 0.231-0.281 mm. The overall spatial accuracy was 1.24 mm for stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and 1.35 mm for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Conclusions: The ExacTrac intracranial frameless stereotactic system spatial accuracy is adequate for clinical practice, and with the same pass criteria, SRT is more accurate than SRS. They now use frameless stereotaxy exclusively at their center.

  13. Outcomes of microscope-integrated intraoperative optical coherence tomography-guided center-sparing internal limiting membrane peeling for myopic traction maculopathy: a novel technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Atul; Ravani, Raghav; Mehta, Aditi; Simakurthy, Sriram; Dhull, Chirakshi

    2017-07-04

    To evaluate the outcomes of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) with microscope-integrated intraoperative optical coherence tomography (I-OCT)-guided traction removal and center-sparing internal limiting membrane (cs-ILM) peeling. Nine eyes with myopic traction maculopathy as diagnosed on SD-OCT underwent PPV with I-OCT-guided cs-ILM peeling and were evaluated prospectively for resolution of central macular thickness (CMT) and improvement in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and complications, if any, were noted. All patients were followed up for more than 9 months. Resolution of the macular retinoschisis was seen in all nine eyes on SD-OCT. At 36 weeks, there was a significant improvement in mean BCVA from the preoperative BCVA (P = 0.0089) along with a reduction in the CMT from 569.77 ± 263.19 to 166.0 ± 43.91 um (P = 0.0039). None of the eyes showed worsening of BCVA or development of full-thickness macular hole in the intraoperative or follow-up period. PPV with I-OCT-guided cs-ILM peeling helps in complete removal of traction, resolution of retinoschisis and good functional recovery with low intraoperative and postoperative complications.

  14. Metallic stent and stereotactic conformal radiotherapy for hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yu; Wang Ning; Tian Qihe; Guo Zhanwen; Zhang Haibo; Song Liyan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of metallic stent combined with stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) for hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Methods: Fifty-four patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma were analyzed, including 31 treated with stent plus stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (combined group) and 23 with metallic stent alone (control group). Results: The mean survival time of combined group was 11.1 ± 4.6 months, compared with 5.1 ± 2.8 months of the control group, giving a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.01). Conclusion: The combination of metallic stent and stereotactic conformal radiotherapy is more effective than metallic stent alone for unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma. (authors)

  15. Sub-mm Scale Fiber Guided Deep/Vacuum Ultra-Violet Optical Source for Trapped Mercury Ion Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Lin; Burt, Eric A.; Huang, Shouhua; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the functionality of a mercury capillary lamp with a diameter in the sub-mm range and deep ultraviolet (DUV)/ vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation delivery via an optical fiber integrated with the capillary. DUV spectrum control is observed by varying the fabrication parameters such as buffer gas type and pressure, capillary diameter, electrical resonator design, and temperature. We also show spectroscopic data of the 199Hg+ hyper-fine transition at 40.5GHz when applying the above fiber optical design. We present efforts toward micro-plasma generation in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber with related optical design and theoretical estimations. This new approach towards a more practical DUV optical interface could benefit trapped ion clock developments for future ultra-stable frequency reference and time-keeping applications.

  16. Simple and inexpensive method for CT-guided stereotaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, K; Sortland, O; Hauglie-Hanssen, E

    1981-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive method for CT-guided stereotaxy is described. The method requires neither sophisticated computer programs nor additional stereotactic equipment, such as special head holders for the CT, and can be easily obtained without technical assistance. The method is designed to yield the vertical coordinates.

  17. Survival after stereotactic biopsy of malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, R.J.; Lunsford, L.D.; Taylor, F.H.

    1988-01-01

    For many patients with malignant gliomas in inaccessible or functionally important locations, stereotactic biopsy followed by radiation therapy (RT) may be a more appropriate initial treatment than craniotomy and tumor resection. We studied the long term survival in 91 consecutive patients with malignant gliomas diagnosed by stereotactic biopsy: 64 had glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and 27 had anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). Sixty-four per cent of the GBMs and 33% of the AAs involved deep or midline cerebral structures. The treatment prescribed after biopsy, the tumor location, the histological findings, and the patient's age at presentation (for AAs) were statistically important factors determining patient survival. If adequate RT (tumor dose of 5000 to 6000 cGy) was not prescribed, the median survival was less than or equal to 11 weeks regardless of tumor histology or location. The median survival for patients with deep or midline tumors who completed RT was similar in AA (19.4 weeks) and GBM (27 weeks) cases. Histology was an important predictor of survival only for patients with adequately treated lobar tumors. The median survival in lobar GBM patients who completed RT was 46.9 weeks, and that in lobar AA patients who completed RT was 129 weeks. Cytoreductive surgery had no statistically significant effect on survival. Among the clinical factors examined, age of less than 40 years at presentation was associated with prolonged survival only in AA patients. Constellations of clinical features, tumor location, histological diagnosis, and treatment prescribed were related to survival time

  18. Multimedia educational services in stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazioglou, M.; Theodorou, K.; Kappas, C.

    1999-01-01

    The computer-based learning methods in medicine have been well established as stand-alone learning systems. Recently, these systems were enriched with the use of telematics technology to provide distance learning capabilities. Stereotactic radiotherapy is more of the most representative advanced radiotherapy techniques. Due to the multidisciplinary character of the technique and the rapid evolution of technology implemented, the demands in training have increased. The potential of interactive multimedia and Internet technologies for the achievement of distance learning capabilities in this domain are investigated. The realization of a computer-based educational program in stereotactic radiotherapy in a multimedia format is a new application in the computer-aided distance learning field. The system is built according to a client and server architecture, based on the Internet infrastructure, and composed of server nodes. The impact of the system may be described in terms of: time and transportation costs saving, flexibility in training (scheduling, rate and subject selection), online communication and interaction with experts, cost effective access to material (delivery or access by a large number of users and revision of the material by avoiding and database development. (authors)

  19. Quantum optics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agarwal, G. S

    2013-01-01

    ..., quantum metrology, spin squeezing, control of decoherence and many other key topics. Readers are guided through the principles of quantum optics and their uses in a wide variety of areas including quantum information science and quantum mechanics...

  20. Stereotactic radiofrequency amygdalohippocampectomy: Two years of good neuropsychological outcomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malíková, H.; Krámská, L.; Vojtěch, Z.; Lukavský, Jiří; Liščák, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 3 (2013), s. 423-432 ISSN 0920-1211 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : temporal lobe epilepsy * stereotactic surgery * neuropsychology outcome Subject RIV: AN - Psychology Impact factor: 2.190, year: 2013

  1. Accuracy of marketing claims by providers of stereotactic radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Amol K; Lam, Edwin; Makary, Martin A; Deweese, Theodore L; Pawlik, Timothy M; Pronovost, Peter J; Herman, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer advertising by industry has been criticized for encouraging overuse of unproven therapies, but advertising by health care providers has not been as carefully scrutinized. Stereotactic radiation therapy is an emerging technology that has sparked controversy regarding the marketing campaigns of some manufacturers. Given that this technology is also being heavily advertised on the Web sites of health care providers, the accuracy of providers' marketing claims should be rigorously evaluated. We reviewed the Web sites of all U.S. hospitals and private practices that provide stereotactic radiation using two leading brands of stereotactic radiosurgery technology. Centers were identified by using data from the manufacturers. Centers without Web sites were excluded. The final study population consisted of 212 centers with online advertisements for stereotactic radiation. Web sites were evaluated for advertisements that were inconsistent with advertising guidelines provided by the American Medical Association. Most centers (76%) had individual pages dedicated to the marketing of their brand of stereotactic technology that frequently contained manufacturer-authored images (50%) or text (55%). Advertising for the treatment of tumors that have not been endorsed by professional societies was present on 66% of Web sites. Centers commonly claimed improved survival (22%), disease control (20%), quality of life (17%), and toxicity (43%) with stereotactic radiation. Although 40% of Web sites championed the center's regional expertise in delivering stereotactic treatments, only 15% of Web sites provided data to support their claims. Provider advertisements for stereotactic radiation were prominent and aggressive. Further investigation of provider advertising, its effects on quality of care, and potential oversight mechanisms is needed.

  2. Cerebral control and survival after stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, Elmar Till

    2014-01-01

    This retrospective study, including 275 patients who underwent stereotactic radiotherapy due to brain metastases between 2003 and 2008, investigates influencing factors regarding cerebral control and survival, symptomatic effects and a potential benefit for patients older than 70 years. We were able to identify risk factors for remote brain failure which leads to a therapeutic recommendation. Furthermore we confirm a positive symptomatic effect and a benefit of stereotactic readiotherapy for patients over 70 years.

  3. A neurosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy dedicated PACS for conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefkopoulos, D.; Bocquiault, P.; Levrier, M.; Merienne, L.; Schlienger, M.

    1995-01-01

    To realise conformal cerebral stereotactic irradiations we use a Neurosurgery/stereotactic dedicated PACS between two distant hospitals. It connects the stereotactic neurosurgery planification imaging system NEUROAXIS (Sopelem-Sofretec/Ste Anne Hospital) with the dosimetric TPS ARTEMIS-3D/Dosigray (Tenon Hospital). NEUROAXIS is a computer aided stereotactic biopsies and stereo-electroencephalographies, used by surgeons in operating room. The system determines the precise location data for Talairach radiological equipment (X ray source at 5 meters from film) and the geometry of scanner and MRI stereotactical referentials. It provides a full set of features for lesion localization, geometrical computations, surgical planifications, picture archiving, stereotactic angiography, CT and MRI image processing and networking. It sends images through the French public digital network ISDN (NUMERIS/France Telecom : 2x64 Kbits/s) from Ste Anne to Tenon Hospital. Stereotactic angiographic and CT images are reformatted into the DOSIGRAY image processing environment where 3-D dose distributions, displays and DVHs are computed to determine the optimal treatment. ARTEMIS-3D/Dosigray is a TPS for stereotactic radiotherapy devised by the Tenon Hospital for clinical methodology and 3D dose calculations, optimization software development and the Dosigray company for multimodality imaging, (2D(3D)) computer graphics for dose and anatomical representation and data networking. Communication within the radiation oncology department is provided by local area ETHERNET network, linking heterogeneous systems (Vaxstations-3200; Decstation (5000(240))) by means of different protocols. The works in progress are to send back via the same network the 3-D dose matrix to Neurosurgery department NEUROAXIS system. Our PACS is used since six months to treat patients. It has permitted to improve the treatment quality in comparison with our first version TPS ARTEMIS-3D

  4. Quality assurance for MR stereotactic imaging for three Siemens scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozubikova, P.; Novotny, J. Jr.; Kulhova, K.; Mihalova, P.; Tamasova, J.; Veselsk, T.

    2014-01-01

    Quality assurance of stereotactic imaging, especially with MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), is a complex issue. It can be divided in the basic verification and commissioning of a particular new scanner or a new scanning MRI protocol that is being implemented into a clinical practice and the routine quality assurance performed for each single radiosurgical case. The aim of this study was geometric distortion assessment in MRI with a special PTGR (Physikalisch-Technische Gesellschaft fuer Radiologie - GmbH, Tuebingen, Germany) target phantom. PTGR phantom consists of 21 three-dimensional cross-hairs filled with contrast medium. Cross hairs are positioned at known Leksell coordinates with a precision of better than 0.1 mm and covering the whole stereotactic space. The phantom can be fixed in the Leksell stereotactic frame and thus stereotactic imaging procedures can be reproduced following exactly the same steps as for a real patient, including also the stereotactic image definition in the Leksell GammaPlan. Since the geometric position (stereotactic coordinates) of each cross-hair is known based on the construction of the phantom, it can be compared with the actual measured Leksell coordinates based on the stereotactic MRI. Deviations between expected and actual coordinates provide information about the level of distortion. The measured distortions proved satisfactory accuracy precision for stereotactic localization at 1.5 T Siemens Magnetom Avanto scanner, Siemens Magnetom Symphony scanner and 3T Siemens Magnetom Skyra scanner (Na Homolce Hospital, Prague). The mean distortion for these MR scanners for standard imaging protocol (T1 weighted 3D images) were 0.8 mm, 1.1 mm and 1.1 mm and maximum distortions were 1.3 mm, 1.9 mm and 2.2 mm, respectively.There was detected dependence of the distortions on the slice orientation and the type of imaging protocol. Image distortions are also property of each particular scanner, the worst distortion were observed for 3T

  5. Linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Lema, Leonor; Lopez-Garcia, Marisa; Maceira-Rozas, Maria; Munoz-Garzon, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is accepted as an alternative for patients with refractory trigeminal neuralgia, but existing evidence is fundamentally based on the Gamma Knife, which is a specific device for intracranial neurosurgery, available in few facilities. Over the last decade it has been shown that the use of linear accelerators can achieve similar diagnostic accuracy and equivalent dose distribution. To assess the effectiveness and safety of linear-accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of patients with refractory trigeminal neuralgia. We carried out a systematic search of the literature in the main electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Knowledge, Cochrane, Biomed Central, IBECS, IME, CRD) and reviewed grey literature. All original studies on the subject published in Spanish, French, English, and Portuguese were eligible for inclusion. The selection and critical assessment was carried out by 2 independent reviewers based on pre-defined criteria. In view of the impossibility of carrying out a pooled analysis, data were analyzed in a qualitative way. Eleven case series were included. In these, satisfactory pain relief (BIN I-IIIb or reduction in pain = 50) was achieved in 75% to 95.7% of the patients treated. The mean time to relief from pain ranged from 8.5 days to 3.8 months. The percentage of patients who presented with recurrences after one year of follow-up ranged from 5% to 28.8%. Facial swelling or hypoesthesia, mostly of a mild-moderate grade appeared in 7.5% - 51.9% of the patients. Complete anaesthesia dolorosa was registered in only study (5.3%). Cases of hearing loss (2.5%), brainstem edema (5.8%), and neurotrophic keratoplasty (3.5%) were also isolated. The results suggest that stereotactic radiosurgery with linear accelerators could constitute an effective and safe therapeutic alternative for drug-resistant trigeminal neuralgia. However, existing studies leave important doubts as to optimal treatment doses or the

  6. Accuracy and feasibility of frameless stereotactic and robot-assisted CT-based puncture in interventional radiology. A comparative phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoffner, R.; Widmann, G.; Bale, R.; Augschoell, C.; Boehler, D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of frameless stereotactic and robot-assisted puncture in vitro based on computed tomography (CT) imaging with a slice thickness of 1, 3, and 5 mm. Materials and Methods: 300 punctures were carried out with help of the Atlas aiming device guided by the optical navigation system Stealth Station TREONplus and 150 punctures were guided by the robotic assistance system Innomotion. Conically shaped rods were punctured with Kirschner wires. The accuracy was evaluated on the basis of control CTs by measuring the Euclidean distance between the wire tip and target and the normal distance between the target and wire. Results: With the Stealth Station a mean Euclidean distance of 1.94±0.912, 2.2±1.136, and 2.74±1.166 mm at a slice thickness of 1, 3 and 5 mm, respectively, was reached. The mean normal distance was 1.64±0.919, 1.84±1.189, and 2.48±1.196 mm, respectively. The Innomotion system resulted in a mean Euclidean distance of 1.69±0.772, 1.91±0.673, and 2.30±0.881 mm, respectively, while the mean normal distance was (1.42±0.78), 1.60±0.733, and 1.98±1.002 mm, respectively. A statistical significance between accuracies with both systems with 1 mm and 3 mm slices could not be detected (p > 0.05). At a slice thickness of 5 mm, the robot was significantly more accurate, but not as accurate as when using thinner slices (p < 0.05). The procedure time is longer for the Innomotion system (∝30 vs. ∝18 min), and the practicability is higher with the Stealth Station. (orig.)

  7. Low-Cost, Fiber-Optic Hydrogen Gas Detector Using Guided-Wave, Surface-Plasmon Resonance in Chemochromic Thin Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.; Haberman, D.P.; Hishmeh, G.A.; Ciszek, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    Low-cost, hydrogen-gas-leak detectors are needed for many hydrogen applications, such as hydrogen-fueled vehicles where several detectors may be required in different locations on each vehicle. A fiber-optic leak detector could be inherently safer than conventional detectors, because it would remove all detector electronics from the vicinity of potential leaks. It would also provide freedom from electromagnetic interference, a serious problem in fuel-cell-powered electric vehicles. This paper describes the design of a fiber-optic, surface-plasmon-resonance hydrogen detector, and efforts to make it more sensitive, selective, and durable. Chemochromic materials, such as tungsten oxide and certain Lanthanide hydrides, can reversibly react with hydrogen in air while exhibiting significant changes in their optical properties. Thin films of these materials applied to a sensor at the end of an optical fiber have been used to detect low concentrations of hydrogen gas in air. The coatings include a thin silver layer in which the surface plasmon is generated, a thin film of the chemochromic material, and a catalytic layer of palladium that facilitates the reaction with hydrogen. The film thickness is chosen to produce a guided-surface plasmon wave along the interface between the silver and the chemochromic material. A dichroic beam-splitter separates the reflected spectrum into a portion near the resonance and a portion away from the resonance, and directs these two portions to two separate photodiodes. The electronic ratio of these two signals cancels most of the fiber transmission noise and provides a stable hydrogen signal

  8. A new method of surgical navigation for orthognathic surgery: optical tracking guided free-hand repositioning of the maxillomandibular complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Biao; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Hao; Shen, Steve G F; Wang, Xudong

    2014-03-01

    In bimaxillary orthognathic surgery, the positioning of the maxilla and the mandible is typically accomplished via 2-splint technique, which may be the sources of several types of inaccuracy. To overcome the limitations of the 2-splint technique, we developed a new navigation method, which guided the surgeon to free-hand reposition the maxillomandibular complex as a whole intraoperatively, without the intermediate splint. In this preliminary study, the feasibility was demonstrated. Five patients with dental maxillofacial deformities were enrolled. Before the surgery, 3-dimensional planning was conducted and imported into a navigation system. During the operation, a tracker was connected to the osteotomized maxillomandibular complex via a splint. The navigation system tracked the movement of the complex and displayed it on the screen in real time to guide the surgeon to reposition the complex. The postoperative result was compared with the plan by analyzing the measured distances between the maxillary landmarks and reference planes, as determined from computed tomography data. The mean absolute errors of the maxillary position were clinically acceptable (<1.0 mm). Preoperative preparation time was reduced to 100 minutes on average. All patients were satisfied with the aesthetic results. This navigation method without intraoperative image registration provided a feasible means of transferring virtual planning to the real orthognathic surgery. The real-time position of the maxillomandibular complex was displayed on a monitor to visually guide the surgeon to reposition the complex. In this method, the traditional model surgery and the intermediate splint were discarded, and the preoperative preparation was simplified.

  9. Ultrasound-Guided Optical Tomographic Imaging of Malignant and Benign Breast Lesions: Initial Clinical Results of 19 Cases1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Quing; Huang, Minming; Chen, NanGuang; Zarfos, Kristen; Jagjivan, Bipin; Kane, Mark; Hedge, Poornima; Kurtzman, H. Scott

    2003-01-01

    Abstract The diagnosis of solid benign and malignant tumors presents a unique challenge to all noninvasive imaging modalities. Ultrasound is used in conjunction with mammography to differentiate simple cysts from solid lesions. However, the overlapping appearances of benign and malignant lesions make ultrasound less useful in differentiating solid lesions, resulting in a large number of benign biopsies. Optical tomography using near-infrared diffused light has great potential for imaging functional parameters of 1) tumor hemoglobin concentration, 2) oxygen saturation, and 3) metabolism, as well as other tumor distinguishing characteristics. These parameters can differentiate benign from malignant lesions. However, optical tomography, when used alone, suffers from low spatial resolution and target localization uncertainty due to intensive light scattering. Our aim is to combine diffused light imaging with ultrasound in a novel way for the detection and diagnosis of solid lesions. Initial findings of two earlystage invasive carcinomas, one combined fibroadenoma and fibrocystic change with scattered foci of lobular neoplasia/lobular carcinoma in situ, and 16 benign lesions are reported in this paper. The invasive cancer cases reveal about two-fold greater total hemoglobin concentration (mean 119 µmol) than benign cases (mean 67 µmol), and suggest that the discrimination of benign and malignant breast lesions might be enhanced by this type of achievable optical quantification with ultrasound localization. Furthermore, the small invasive cancers are well localized and have wavelength-dependent appearance in optical absorption maps, whereas the benign lesions appear diffused and relatively wavelength-independent. PMID:14670175

  10. Ultrasound-Guided Optical Tomographic Imaging of Malignant and Benign Breast Lesions: Initial Clinical Results of 19 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quing Zhu

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of solid benign and malignant tumors presents a unique challenge to all noninvasive imaging modalities. Ultrasound is used in conjunction with mammography to differentiate simple cysts from solid lesions. However, the overlapping appearances of benign and malignant lesions make ultrasound less useful in differentiating solid lesions, resulting in a large number of benign biopsies. Optical tomography using near-infrared diffused light has great potential for imaging functional parameters of 1 tumor hemoglobin concentration, 2 oxygen saturation, 3 metabolism, as well as other tumor distinguishing characteristics. These parameters can differentiate benign from malignant lesions. However, optical tomography, when used alone, suffers from low spatial resolution and target localization uncertainty due to intensive light scattering. Our aim is to combine diffused light imaging with ultrasound in a novel way for the detection and diagnosis of solid lesions. Initial findings of two earlystage invasive carcinomas, one combined fibroadenoma and fibrocystic change with scattered foci of lobular neoplasia/lobular carcinoma in situ, 16 benign lesions are reported in this paper. The invasive cancer cases reveal about two-fold greater total hemoglobin concentration (mean 119 μmol than benign cases (mean 67 μmol, suggest that the discrimination of benign and malignant breast lesions might be enhanced by this type of achievable optical quantification with ultrasound localization. Furthermore, the small invasive cancers are well localized and have wavelength-dependent appearance in optical absorption maps, whereas the benign lesions appear diffused and relatively wavelength-independent.

  11. Visual outcome, endocrine function and tumor control after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy of craniopharyngiomas in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Munck Af Rosenschöld, Per; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to examine visual outcome, endocrine function and tumor control in a prospective cohort of craniopharyngioma patients, treated with fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixteen adult patients with craniopharyngiomas were...... eligible for analysis. They were treated with linear accelerator-based FSRT during 1999-2015. In all cases, diagnosis was confirmed by histological analysis. The prescription dose to the tumor was 54 Gy (median, range 48-54) in 1.8 or 2.0 Gy per fraction, and the maximum radiation dose to the optic nerves.......7-13.1) for visual outcome, endocrine function, and tumor control, respectively. RESULTS: Visual acuity impairment was present in 10 patients (62.5%) and visual field defects were present in 12 patients (75%) before FSRT. One patient developed radiation-induced optic neuropathy at seven years after FSRT. Thirteen...

  12. Post-Vacuum-Assisted Stereotactic Core Biopsy Clip Displacement: A Comparison Between Commercially Available Clips and Surgical Clip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Peggy; Dumas, Sandra; Albert, Arianne; Gordon, Paula

    2018-02-01

    The placement of localization clips following percutaneous biopsy is a standard practice for a variety of situations. Subsequent clip displacement creates challenges for imaging surveillance and surgical planning, and may cause confusion amongst radiologists and between surgeons and radiologists. Many causes have been attributed for this phenomenon including the commonly accepted "accordion effect." Herein, we investigate the performance of a low cost surgical clip system against 4 commercially available clips. We retrospectively reviewed 2112 patients who underwent stereotactic vacuum-assisted core biopsy followed by clip placement between January 2013 and June 2016. The primary performance parameter compared was displacement >10 mm following vacuum-assisted stereotactic core biopsy. Within the group of clips that had displaced, the magnitude of displacement was compared. There was a significant difference in displacement among the clip types (P < .0001) with significant pairwise comparisons between pediatric surgical clips and SecureMark (38% vs 28%; P = .001) and SenoMark (38% vs 27%; P = .0001) in the proportion displaced. The surgical clips showed a significant magnitude of displacement of approximately 25% greater average distance displaced. As a whole, the commercial clips performed better than the surgical clip after stereotactic vacuum-assisted core biopsy suggesting the surrounding outer component acts to anchor the central clip and minimizes clip displacement. The same should apply to tomosynthesis-guided biopsy. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Stereotactic body radiation therapy for spinal metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, D; Martinage, G; Mirabel, X; Lacornerie, T; Makhloufi, S; Faivre, J-C; Thureau, S; Lartigau, É

    2016-10-01

    After the liver and lungs, bones are the third most common sites of cancer metastasis. Palliative radiotherapy for secondary bone tumours helps relieve pain, improve the quality of life and reduce the risk of fractures. Stereotactic body radiotherapy can deliver high radiation doses with very tight margins, which has significant advantages when treating tumours close to the spinal cord. Strict quality control is essential as dose gradient at the edge of the spinal cord is important. Optimal schedule is not defined. A range of dose-fractionation schedules have been used. Pain relief and local control are seen in over 80%. Toxicity rates are low, although vertebral fracture may occur. Ongoing prospective studies will help clarify its role in the management of oligometastatic patients. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Stereotactic radiosurgery using a linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyuma, Yoshikazu; Hayashi, Akimune; Kitamura, Tatsuo; Yamashita, Koosuke; Muranishi, Hisayuki; Hioki, Minoru [Kanagawa Cancer Center, Yokohama (Japan)

    1992-07-01

    A basic and clinical study of radiosurgery using the linear accelerator (Linac) system for unremovable deep-seated brain tumors is reported. A Komai stereotactic ring was used to locate the target coordinates. The patient was laid on the Linac treatment table and held in the head fixation system. Irradiation was given in five positions. The dose profile by film dosimetry and Rando phantom was satisfactory. Seventeen tumors in 14 patients were treated. Clinical or histological diagnoses were nine metastases, one benign and two malignant gliomas, one meningioma, and one carcinopharyngioma. Tumor sizes were between 8 and 30 mm. Doses were between 12 and 30 Gy. Computed tomographic evaluation after 3 months of 12 tumors in 11 survivors showed one complete remission, three partial remission, six no change, and two partial deterioration. For progressive tumors, Linac radiosurgery results are excellent. (author).

  15. Stereotactic radiosurgery. The role of charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, R.P.; Schulte, R.W.M.; Slater, J.D.; Miller, D.W.; Slater, J.M. [Loma Linda Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Medicine

    1999-08-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery using charged-particle beams has been the subject of biomedical research and clinical development for more than 50 years. Charged particles of proton mass or greater manifest unique physical properties that can be used to place a high dose of radiation preferentially within the boundaries of a deeply located intracranial target volume. Since 1954, nearly 10 000 patients have been treated using this technique. Treated disorders include pituitary tumors, vascular malformations, primary and metastatic brain tumors, and subfoveal neovascularization. Charged-particle radiosurgery is particularly advantageous for the conformal treatment of large and/or irregularly shaped lesions, or for the treatment of lesions located in front of or adjacent to sensitive brain structures. (orig.)

  16. Stereotactic radiosurgery. The role of charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, R.P.; Schulte, R.W.M.; Slater, J.D.; Miller, D.W.; Slater, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery using charged-particle beams has been the subject of biomedical research and clinical development for more than 50 years. Charged particles of proton mass or greater manifest unique physical properties that can be used to place a high dose of radiation preferentially within the boundaries of a deeply located intracranial target volume. Since 1954, nearly 10 000 patients have been treated using this technique. Treated disorders include pituitary tumors, vascular malformations, primary and metastatic brain tumors, and subfoveal neovascularization. Charged-particle radiosurgery is particularly advantageous for the conformal treatment of large and/or irregularly shaped lesions, or for the treatment of lesions located in front of or adjacent to sensitive brain structures. (orig.)

  17. Laser Cutting of CFRP with a Fibre Guided High Power Nanosecond Laser Source - Influence of the Optical Fibre Diameter on Quality and Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluemel, S.; Bastick, S.; Staehr, R.; Jaeschke, P.; Suttmann, O.; Overmeyer, L.

    For the development of a robot based laser cutting process of automotive 3D parts consisting of carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP), investigations with a newly developed fibre guided nanosecond pulsed laser with an average power of PL = 1.5 kW were conducted. In order to investigate the best combination of quality and process time 2 different optical fibres were used, with diameters of df = 400 μm and df = 600 μm. The main differences between the two setups are the resulting focal diameter and the maximum available pulse energy up to EP = 80 mJ. In a first instance, a comparable investigation was performed with both fibres for a constant pulse overlap. For each fibre the minimum required line energy was investigated and cuts were performed, distributed over the complete parameter range of the laser source. The influences of the fibre diameter on the quality and efficiency of the cutting process are summarized and discussed.

  18. Air-guided photonic-crystal-fiber pulse-compression delivery of multimegawatt femtosecond laser output for nonlinear-optical imaging and neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanin, Aleksandr A.; Fedotov, Il'ya V.; Sidorov-Biryukov, Dmitrii A.; Doronina-Amitonova, Lyubov V.; Ivashkina, Olga I.; Zots, Marina A.; Sun, Chi-Kuang; Ömer Ilday, F.; Fedotov, Andrei B.; Anokhin, Konstantin V.; Zheltikov, Aleksei M.

    2012-03-01

    Large-core hollow photonic-crystal fibers (PCFs) are shown to enable a fiber-format air-guided delivery of ultrashort infrared laser pulses for neurosurgery and nonlinear-optical imaging. With an appropriate dispersion precompensation, an anomalously dispersive 15-μm-core hollow PCF compresses 510-fs, 1070-nm light pulses to a pulse width of about 110 fs, providing a peak power in excess of 5 MW. The compressed PCF output is employed to induce a local photodisruption of corpus callosum tissues in mouse brain and is used to generate the third harmonic in brain tissues, which is captured by the PCF and delivered to a detector through the PCF cladding.

  19. Immediate and intermediate-term results of optical coherence tomography guided atherectomy in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease: Initial results from the VISION trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cawich, Ian; Paixao, Andre R.M.; Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos; Lendel, Vasili; Rodriguez-Araujo, Gerardo; Rollefson, William A.; Mego, David M.; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Background: Long-term patency rates for percutaneous peripheral arterial interventions are suboptimal. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) guided atherectomy may yield superior patency by optimizing plaque removal while preserving the tunica media and adventitia. Methods: The VISION study is a multicenter prospective study of patients with peripheral arterial disease undergoing OCT guided atherectomy with the Pantheris™ device. In 11 patients enrolled in a single center, we report procedural and clinical outcomes, at 30 days and 6 months. Results: The mean age was 63 ± 11 years and 73% (n = 8) were men. The target lesion was in the superficial femoral artery in 82% (n = 9) of the patients. Mean stenosis severity was 87% ± 10% and mean lesion length was 39 ± 31 mm. Procedural success was observed in all patients with no device related complications. Mean post-atherectomy stenosis was 18% ± 15%. Almost all excised tissue consisted of intimal plaque (94%). At 30 days, significant improvements in Rutherford class, VascuQoL scores and ABI were observed, 0.9 ± 0.8 vs. 3.1 ± 0.7 (p = 0.01), 4.9 ± 1.9 vs. 3.6 ± 1.5 (p = 0.03) and 1.04 ± 0.19 vs. 0.80 ± 0.19 (p < 0.01) respectively. At 6 months, there were significant improvements in Rutherford class (1.0 ± 1.0 vs. 3.1 ± 0.7, p = 0.01) and ABI (0.93 ± 0.19 versus 0.80 ± 0.19, p = 0.02) but not in VascuQoL scores (3.7 ± 1.4 versus 3.6 ± 1.5, p = 0.48). Target lesion revascularization occurred in 18% (n = 2) of the patients. Conclusion: OCT guided atherectomy resulted in high procedural success, no device related complications and encouraging results up to 6 months. Histological analysis suggested little injury to the media and adventitia. Larger studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of this approach. - Highlights: • OCT- guided atherectomy may yield superior patency by optimizing plaque removal and preserving the tunica media and adventitia. • OCT guided atherectomy resulted in high procedural

  20. Immediate and intermediate-term results of optical coherence tomography guided atherectomy in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease: Initial results from the VISION trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cawich, Ian; Paixao, Andre R.M. [Arkansas Heart Hospital, Peripheral Vascular Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States); Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos [Citizens Memorial Heart and Vascular Institute, Bolivar, MO (United States); University of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Lendel, Vasili; Rodriguez-Araujo, Gerardo; Rollefson, William A.; Mego, David M. [Arkansas Heart Hospital, Peripheral Vascular Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States); Cilingiroglu, Mehmet, E-mail: Cilingiroglumehmet@gmail.com [Arkansas Heart Hospital, Peripheral Vascular Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States); Koc University, School of Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2016-10-15

    Background: Long-term patency rates for percutaneous peripheral arterial interventions are suboptimal. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) guided atherectomy may yield superior patency by optimizing plaque removal while preserving the tunica media and adventitia. Methods: The VISION study is a multicenter prospective study of patients with peripheral arterial disease undergoing OCT guided atherectomy with the Pantheris™ device. In 11 patients enrolled in a single center, we report procedural and clinical outcomes, at 30 days and 6 months. Results: The mean age was 63 ± 11 years and 73% (n = 8) were men. The target lesion was in the superficial femoral artery in 82% (n = 9) of the patients. Mean stenosis severity was 87% ± 10% and mean lesion length was 39 ± 31 mm. Procedural success was observed in all patients with no device related complications. Mean post-atherectomy stenosis was 18% ± 15%. Almost all excised tissue consisted of intimal plaque (94%). At 30 days, significant improvements in Rutherford class, VascuQoL scores and ABI were observed, 0.9 ± 0.8 vs. 3.1 ± 0.7 (p = 0.01), 4.9 ± 1.9 vs. 3.6 ± 1.5 (p = 0.03) and 1.04 ± 0.19 vs. 0.80 ± 0.19 (p < 0.01) respectively. At 6 months, there were significant improvements in Rutherford class (1.0 ± 1.0 vs. 3.1 ± 0.7, p = 0.01) and ABI (0.93 ± 0.19 versus 0.80 ± 0.19, p = 0.02) but not in VascuQoL scores (3.7 ± 1.4 versus 3.6 ± 1.5, p = 0.48). Target lesion revascularization occurred in 18% (n = 2) of the patients. Conclusion: OCT guided atherectomy resulted in high procedural success, no device related complications and encouraging results up to 6 months. Histological analysis suggested little injury to the media and adventitia. Larger studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of this approach. - Highlights: • OCT- guided atherectomy may yield superior patency by optimizing plaque removal and preserving the tunica media and adventitia. • OCT guided atherectomy resulted in high procedural

  1. Vagus nerve stimulation and stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Kensuke

    2005-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation and stereotactic radiosurgery represent novel and less invasive therapeutics for medically intractable epilepsy. Chronic stimulation of the left vagus nerve with implanted generator and electrodes inhibits seizure susceptibility of the cerebral cortices. While the underlying mechanisms of the effect remains to be further elucidated, the efficacy and safety of vagus nerve stimulation have been established by randomized clinical trials in the United States and European countries. It has been widely accepted as a treatment option for patients with medically intractable epilepsy and for whom brain surgery is not indicated. The primary indication of vagus nerve stimulation in the clinical trials was localization-related epilepsy in adult patients but efficacy in a wide range of patient groups such as generalized epilepsy and children has been reported. Improvements in daytime alertness, mood, higher cognitive functions and overall quality of life have been reported other than the effect on epileptic seizures. Since the devices are not approved for clinical use in Japan by the Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry, there exist barriers to provide this treatment to patients at present. Stereotactic radiosurgery has been used for temporal lobe epilepsy and hypothalamic hamartoma, but it is still controversial whether the therapy is more effective and less invasive than brain surgery. Promising results of gamma knife radiosurgery for medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis have been reported essentially from one French center. Results from others were not as favorable. There seems to be an unignorable risk of brain edema and radiation necrosis when the delivered dose over the medial temporal structures is high enough to abolish epileptic seizures. A randomized clinical trial comparing different marginal doses is ongoing in the United States. Clinical trials like this, technical advancement and standardization

  2. Dosimetric evaluation of proton stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Byung Jun; Shin, Dong Ho; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Jeong, Hojin; Lee, Se Byeong

    2011-01-01

    Surgical excision, conventional external radiotherapy, and chemotherapy could prolong survival in patients with small intracranial tumors. However, surgical excision for meningiomas located in the region of the base of skull or re-resection is often difficult. Moreover, treatment is needed for patients with recurrent tumors or postoperative residual tumors. Conventional external radiotherapy is popular and has significantly increased for treating brain tumors. Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective alternative treatment technique to microsurgical resection such as benign brain tumor or vestibular Schwannomas. In general, the dose to OAR of 3D conformal plan is lower than that of conformal arc and dynamic conformal arc plans. However, any of OARs was not reached to tolerance dose. Although mean dose of the healthy brain tissue for 3D conformal plan was slightly higher than that of arc plans, the doses of the healthy brain tissue at V10 and V20 were significantly low for dynamic conformal arc plan. The dosimetric differences were the greatest at lower doses. In contrast, 3D conformal plan was better spare at higher doses. In this study, a dosimetric evaluation of proton stereotactic radiosurgery for brain lesion tumors was using fixed and arc beams. A brass block fitted to the PTV structure was modeled for dynamic conformal collimator. Although all treatment plans offer a very good coverage of the PTV, we found that proton arc plans had significantly better conformity to the PTV than static 3D conformal plan. The V20 dose of normal brain for dynamic conformal arc therapy is dramatically reduced compare to those for other therapy techniques.

  3. A current perspective on stereotactic body radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong JC

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Julian C Hong, Brian G Czito, Christopher G Willett, Manisha Palta Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Pancreatic cancer is a formidable malignancy with poor outcomes. The majority of patients are unable to undergo resection, which remains the only potentially curative treatment option. The management of locally advanced (unresectable pancreatic cancer is controversial; however, treatment with either chemotherapy or chemoradiation is associated with high rates of local tumor progression and metastases development, resulting in low survival rates. An emerging local modality is stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT, which uses image-guided, conformal, high-dose radiation. SBRT has demonstrated promising local control rates and resultant quality of life with acceptable rates of toxicity. Over the past decade, increasing clinical experience and data have supported SBRT as a local treatment modality. Nevertheless, additional research is required to further evaluate the role of SBRT and improve upon the persistently poor outcomes associated with pancreatic cancer. This review discusses the existing clinical experience and technical implementation of SBRT for pancreatic cancer and highlights the directions for ongoing and future studies. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, stereotactic body radiation therapy, SBRT, radiation therapy

  4. Functional MRI for immediate monitoring stereotactic thalamotomy in a patient with essential tremor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Schaaf, Maike; Krug, Barbara; Lackner, Klaus; Maarouf, Mohammed; Hunsche, Stefan; Sturm, Volker; Lasek, Kathrin; Wedekind, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    The effect of stereotactic thalamotomy was assessed with pre- and postoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) under motor stimulation. A patient with unilateral essential tremor (ET) of the left arm underwent stereotactically guided thalamotomy of the right ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus (VIM). FMRI was done directly before and after surgery on a 1.5-Tesla scanner. The stimulation paradigm was maintainance of the affected arm in an extended position and hand clenching being performed in a block design manner. Statistical analysis was done with Brain Voyager 2000. After thalamotomy the tremor diminished completely. As a difference between the pre- and postoperative fMRI, a significant activation was found in the VIM contralateral to the activation site, adjacent to the inferior olivary nucleus contralateral to the activation site and in the dorsal cingulum. In conclusion, fMRI can detect the functional effect of thalamotomy for tremor treatment. Direct postoperative fMRI provides a sufficient method for estimating the effect of thalamotomy immediately after intervention. The importance of the intermediate thalamic nucleus and the olivary nucleus in tremor generation is supported by our findings. (orig.)

  5. Visibility of solid and liquid fiducial markers used for image-guided radiation therapy on optical coherence tomography: an esophageal phantom study (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelvehgaran, Pouya; Alderliesten, Tanja; Weda, Jelmer J. A.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; Faber, Dirk J.; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; van Herk, Marcel B.; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is used in operable and inoperable esophageal cancer patients. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fiducial marker placement allows improved translation of the disease extent on endoscopy to computed tomography (CT) images used for RT planning and enables image-guided RT. However, microscopic tumor extent at the time of RT planning is unknown. Endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a high-resolution (10-30µm) imaging modality with the potential for accurately determining the longitudinal disease extent. Visibility of fiducial markers on OCT is crucial for integrating OCT findings with the RT planning CT. We investigated the visibility on OCT (NinePoint Medical, Inc.) of 13 commercially available solid (Visicoil, Gold Anchor, Flexicoil, Polymark, and QLRAD) and liquid (BioXmark, Lipiodol, and Hydrogel) fiducial markers of different diameter. We designed and manufactured a set of dedicated Silicone-based esophageal phantoms to perform imaging in a controlled environment. The esophageal phantoms consist of several layers with different TiO2 concentrations to simulate the scattering properties of a typical healthy human esophagus. Markers were placed at various depths (0.5, 1.1, 2.0, and 3.0mm). OCT imaging allowed detection of all fiducial markers and phantom layers. The signal to background ratio was 6-fold higher for the solid fiducial markers than the liquid fiducial markers, yet OCT was capable of visualizing all 13 fiducial markers at all investigated depths. We conclude that RT fiducial markers can be visualized with OCT. This allows integration of OCT findings with CT for image-guided RT.

  6. Stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of brain metastases; results from a single institution experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, D

    2013-09-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is frequently used for the treatment of brain metastases. This study provides a retrospective evaluation of patients with secondary lesions of the brain treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) at our institution.

  7. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with acromegaly: an interim single-centre audit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roug, Anne Stidsholt; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh; Juhler, M

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in acromegaly in a retrospective analysis.......To evaluate the effect of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in acromegaly in a retrospective analysis....

  8. Canadian Optically-guided approach for Oral Lesions Surgical (COOLS) trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poh, Catherine F; Durham, J Scott; Brasher, Penelope M; Anderson, Donald W; Berean, Kenneth W; MacAulay, Calum E; Lee, J Jack; Rosin, Miriam P

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is a major health problem worldwide. The 5-year survival rate ranges from 30-60%, and has remained unchanged in the past few decades. This is mainly due to late diagnosis and high recurrence of the disease. Of the patients who receive treatment, up to one third suffer from a recurrence or a second primary tumor. It is apparent that one major cause of disease recurrence is clinically unrecognized field changes which extend beyond the visible tumor boundary. We have previously developed an approach using fluorescence visualization (FV) technology to improve the recognition of the field at risk surrounding a visible oral cancer that needs to be removed and preliminary results have shown a significant reduction in recurrence rates. This paper describes the study design of a randomized, multi-centre, double blind, controlled surgical trial, the COOLS trial. Nine institutions across Canada will recruit a total of 400 patients with oral severe dysplasia or carcinoma in situ (N = 160) and invasive squamous cell carcinoma (N = 240). Patients will be stratified by participating institution and histology grade and randomized equally into FV-guided surgery (experimental arm) or white light-guided surgery (control arm). The primary endpoint is a composite of recurrence at or 1 cm within the previous surgery site with 1) the same or higher grade histology compared to the initial diagnosis (i.e., the diagnosis used for randomization); or 2) further treatment due to the presence of severe dysplasia or higher degree of change at follow-up. This is the first randomized, multi-centre trial to validate the effectiveness of the FV-guided surgery. In this paper we described the strategies, novelty, and challenges of this unique trial involving a surgical approach guided by the FV technology. The success of the trial requires training, coordination, and quality assurance across multiple sites within Canada. The COOLS trial, an example of translational research, may result in

  9. Utilization of Field Enhancement in Plasmonic Waveguides for Subwavelength Light-Guiding, Polarization Handling, Heating, and Optical Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Daoxin; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Wei

    2015-10-09

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted intensive attention for many applications in recent years because of the field enhancement at the metal/dielectric interface. First, this strong field enhancement makes it possible to break the diffraction limit and enable subwavelength optical waveguiding, which is desired for nanophotonic integrated circuits with ultra-high integration density. Second, the field enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures occurs only for the polarization mode whose electric field is perpendicular to the metal/dielectric interface, and thus the strong birefringence is beneficial for realizing ultra-small polarization-sensitive/selective devices, including polarization beam splitters, and polarizers. Third, plasmonic nanostructures provide an excellent platform of merging electronics and photonics for some applications, e.g., thermal tuning, photo-thermal detection, etc. Finally, the field enhancement at the metal/dielectric interface helps a lot to realize optical sensors with high sensitivity when introducing plasmonic nanostrutures. In this paper, we give a review for recent progresses on the utilization of field enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures for these applications, e.g., waveguiding, polarization handling, heating, as well as optical sensing.

  10. Utilization of Field Enhancement in Plasmonic Waveguides for Subwavelength Light-Guiding, Polarization Handling, Heating, and Optical Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daoxin Dai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted intensive attention for many applications in recent years because of the field enhancement at the metal/dielectric interface. First, this strong field enhancement makes it possible to break the diffraction limit and enable subwavelength optical waveguiding, which is desired for nanophotonic integrated circuits with ultra-high integration density. Second, the field enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures occurs only for the polarization mode whose electric field is perpendicular to the metal/dielectric interface, and thus the strong birefringence is beneficial for realizing ultra-small polarization-sensitive/selective devices, including polarization beam splitters, and polarizers. Third, plasmonic nanostructures provide an excellent platform of merging electronics and photonics for some applications, e.g., thermal tuning, photo-thermal detection, etc. Finally, the field enhancement at the metal/dielectric interface helps a lot to realize optical sensors with high sensitivity when introducing plasmonic nanostrutures. In this paper, we give a review for recent progresses on the utilization of field enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures for these applications, e.g., waveguiding, polarization handling, heating, as well as optical sensing.

  11. Disabling amnestic syndrome following stereotactic laser ablation of a hypothalamic hamartoma in a patient with a prior temporal lobectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Zubkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 19-year-old man with cortical dysplasia and intractable focal seizures underwent a right temporal lobectomy. A hypothalamic hamartoma was subsequently recognized, and he then underwent MRI-guided stereotactic laser ablation. Unfortunately, he sustained damage to the bilateral medial mammillary bodies and suffered significant memory loss. We review laser ablation therapy for hypothalamic hamartomas and the anatomy of the memory network. We postulate that his persistent memory disorder resulted from a combination of the right temporal lobectomy and injury to the bilateral medial mammillary bodies.

  12. Cranial nerve threshold for thermal injury induced by MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU): preliminary results on an optic nerve model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnof, Sagi; Zibly, Zion; Cohen, Zvi; Shaw, Andrew; Schlaff, Cody; Kassel, Neal F

    2013-04-01

    Future clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) are moving toward the management of different intracranial pathologies. We sought to validate the production, safety, and efficacy of thermal injury to cranial nerves generated by MRgHIFU. In this study, five female domestic pigs underwent a standard bifrontal craniectomy under general anesthesia. Treatment was then given using an MRgHIFU system to induce hyperthermic ablative sonication (6 to 10 s; 50 to 2000 J.) Histological analyses were done to confirm nerve damage; temperature measured on the optic nerve was approximately 53.4°C (range: 39°C to 70°C.) Histology demonstrated a clear definition between a necrotic, transitional zone, and normal tissue. MRgHIFU induces targeted thermal injury to nervous tissue within a specific threshold of 50°C to 60°C with the tissue near the sonication center yielding the greatest effect; adjacent tissue showed minimal changes. Additional studies utilizing this technology are required to further establish accurate threshold parameters for optic nerve thermo-ablation.

  13. SU-E-T-296: Dosimetric Analysis of Small Animal Image-Guided Irradiator Using High Resolution Optical CT Imaging of 3D Dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Y; Qian, X; Wuu, C; Adamovics, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To verify the dosimetric characteristics of a small animal image-guided irradiator using a high-resolution of optical CT imaging of 3D dosimeters. Methods: PRESAEGE 3D dosimeters were used to determine dosimetric characteristics of a small animal image-guided irradiator and compared with EBT2 films. Cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters with 7cm height and 6cm diameter were placed along the central axis of the beam. The films were positioned between 6×6cm 2 cubed plastic water phantoms perpendicular to the beam direction with multiple depths. PRESAGE dosimeters and EBT2 films were then irradiated with the irradiator beams at 220kVp and 13mA. Each of irradiated PRESAGE dosimeters named PA1, PA2, PB1, and PB2, was independently scanned using a high-resolution single laser beam optical CT scanner. The transverse images were reconstructed with a 0.1mm high-resolution pixel. A commercial Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner was used for readout of irradiated EBT2 films at a 0.4mm pixel resolution. PDD curves and beam profiles were measured for the irradiated PRESAGE dosimeters and EBT2 films. Results: The PDD agreements between the irradiated PRESAGE dosimeter PA1, PA2, PB1, PB2 and the EB2 films were 1.7, 2.3, 1.9, and 1.9% for the multiple depths at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40 and 50mm, respectively. The FWHM measurements for each PRESAEGE dosimeter and film agreed with 0.5, 1.1, 0.4, and 1.7%, respectively, at 30mm depth. Both PDD and FWHM measurements for the PRESAGE dosimeters and the films agreed overall within 2%. The 20%–80% penumbral widths of each PRESAGE dosimeter and the film at a given depth were respectively found to be 0.97, 0.91, 0.79, 0.88, and 0.37mm. Conclusion: Dosimetric characteristics of a small animal image-guided irradiator have been demonstrated with the measurements of PRESAGE dosimeter and EB2 film. With the high resolution and accuracy obtained from this 3D dosimetry system, precise targeting small animal irradiation can be achieved

  14. INTER- AND INTRAFRACTION MOTION FOR STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY IN DOGS AND CATS USING A MODIFIED BRAINLAB FRAMELESS STEREOTACTIC MASK SYSTEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Sonja; Zwingenberger, Allison; Hansen, Katherine; Pfeiffer, Isabella; Théon, Alain; Kent, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Precise and accurate patient positioning is necessary when doing stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to ensure adequate dosing to the tumor and sparing of normal tissues. This prospective cross-sectional study aimed to assess feasibility of a commercially available modified frameless SRS positioning system for use in veterinary radiotherapy patients with brain tumors. Fifty-one dogs and 12 cats were enrolled. Baseline and verification CT images were acquired. The verification CT images from 32 dogs and five cats had sufficient images for fusion to baseline CT images. A rigid box-based fusion was performed to determine interfraction motion. Forty-eight dogs and 11 cats were assessed for intrafraction motion by cine CT. Seventy percent of dogs and 60% of cats had interfraction 3D vector translational shifts >1 mm, with mean values of 1.9 mm in dogs, and 1.8 mm in cats. In dogs muscle wasting was weakly correlated with translational shifts. The maximum angular interfraction motion observed was 6.3° (roll), 3.5° (pitch), and 3.3° (yaw). There was no correlation between angular interfraction motion and weight, brachycephaly, or muscle wasting. Fifty-seven percent of dogs and 50% of cats had respiration-related intrafraction motion. Of these, 4.5% of dogs and 10% of cats had intrafraction motion >1 mm. This study demonstrates the modified Brainlab system is feasible for SRS in dogs and cats. The smaller cranial size and difference in anatomy increases setup uncertainty in some animals beyond limits usually accepted in SRS. Image-guided positioning is recommended to achieve clinically acceptable setup accuracy (<1 mm) for SRS. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  15. Stereotactic localization and visualization of the subthalamic nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Wei-gao; WANG Hai-yang; LIN Zhi-guo; SHEN Hong; CHEN Xiao-guang; FU Yi-li; GAO Wen-peng

    2009-01-01

    Background The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is widely recognized as one of the most important and commonly targeted nuclei in stereotactic and functional neurosurgery. The success of STN surgery depends on accuracy in target determination. Construction of a digitalized atlas of STN based on stereotactic MRI will play an instrumental role in the accuracy of anatomical localization. The aim of this study was to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) target location of STN in stereotactic space and construct a digitalized atlas of STN to accomplish the visualization of the STN on stereotactic MRI, thus providing clinical guidance on the precise anatomical localization of STN.Methods One hundred and twenty healthy people volunteered to be scanned by 1.5 Tesla MRI scanning with 1-mm-thick slice in the standard stereotactic space between 2005 and 2006. One adult male was selected for 3D reconstruction of STN. The precess of 3D reconstruction included identification, manual segmentation, extraction,conservation and reconstruction.Results There was a significant correlation between the coordinates and age (P <0.05). The volume of left STN was significantly larger than the right STN, and there was a significant negative correlation between volume and age (P <0.05).The surface of the STN nucleus after 3D reconstruction appeared smooth, natural and realistic. The morphological feature of STN on the individual brain could be visualized directly in 3D. The 3D reconstructed STN could be rotated,zoomed and displayed at any direction in the stereotactic space. The anteroposterior diameter of the STN nucleus was longer than the vertical and transverse diameters in 3D space. The 3D reconstruction of STN manifested typical structure of the "dual lens".Conclusions The visualization of individual brain atlas based on stereotactic MRI is feasible. However, software for automated segmentation, extraction and registration of MR images need to be further developed.

  16. Proton Stereotactic Radiosurgery for the Treatment of Benign Meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halasz, Lia M., E-mail: lhalasz@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bussiere, Marc R.; Dennis, Elizabeth R.; Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chapman, Paul H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Given the excellent prognosis for patients with benign meningiomas, treatment strategies to minimize late effects are important. One strategy is proton radiation therapy (RT), which allows less integral dose to normal tissue and greater homogeneity than photon RT. Here, we report the first series of proton stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) used for the treatment of meningiomas. Methods and Materials: We identified 50 patients with 51 histologically proven or image- defined, presumed-benign meningiomas treated at our institution between 1996 and 2007. Tumors of <4 cm in diameter and located {>=}2 mm from the optic apparatus were eligible for treatment. Indications included primary treatment (n = 32), residual tumor following surgery (n = 8), and recurrent tumor following surgery (n = 10). The median dose delivered was 13 Gray radiobiologic equivalent (Gy[RBE]) (range, 10.0-15.5 Gy[RBE]) prescribed to the 90% isodose line. Results: Median follow-up was 32 months (range, 6-133 months). Magnetic resonance imaging at the most recent follow-up or time of progression revealed 33 meningiomas with stable sizes, 13 meningiomas with decreased size, and 5 meningiomas with increased size. The 3-year actuarial tumor control rate was 94% (95% confidence interval, 77%-98%). Symptoms were improved in 47% (16/ 34) of patients, unchanged in 44% (15/34) of patients, and worse in 9% (3/34) of patients. The rate of potential permanent adverse effects after SRS was 5.9% (3/51 patients). Conclusions: Proton SRS is an effective therapy for small benign meningiomas, with a potentially lower rate of long-term treatment-related morbidity. Longer follow-up is needed to assess durability of tumor control and late effects.

  17. The role of stereotactic radiosurgery in the treatment of malignant skull base tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Robert C.; Foote, Robert L.; Coffey, Robert J.; Gorman, Deborah A.; Earle, John D.; Schomberg, Paula J.; Kline, Robert W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic radiosurgery in the treatment of malignant skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Thirty-two patients with 35 newly diagnosed or recurrent malignant skull base tumors ≤33.5 cm 3 were treated using the Leksell Gamma unit. Tumor histologies included: adenoid cystic carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, chondrosarcoma, chordoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, osteogenic sarcoma, and squamous cell carcinoma. Results: After a median follow-up of 2.3 years, 83% ± 15% (±95% confidence interval) of patients experienced a symptomatic response to treatment. Local control at the skull base was 95 ± 9% at 2 years and 78 ± 23% at 3 years. Local-regional control above the clavicles was 75 ± 15% at 1 year and 51 ± 20% at 2 years. Overall and cause specific survival were identical, 82 ± 13% at 1 year, 76 ± 14% at 2 years, and 72 ± 16% at 3 years. One patient developed a radiation-induced optic neuropathy 12 months after radiosurgery. Conclusion: Stereotactic radiosurgery using the Leksell Gamma Unit can provide durable tumor control and symptomatic relief with acceptable toxicity in the majority of patients with malignant tumors 4 cm or less in size involving the skull base. Further evaluation of more patients with longer follow-up is warranted

  18. Clinical results of LINAC-based stereotactic radiosurgery for pituitary adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Julia; Yoshida, Masanori; Shioura, Hiroki; Kawamura, Yasutaka; Ito, Harumi; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Kubota, Toshihiko; Maruyama, Ichiro

    2003-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated our clinical results of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for pituitary adenoma. Between 1995 and 2000, 13 patients were treated with SRS for pituitary adenoma. In all cases, the tumors had already been surgically resected. The adenomas were functional in 5 and non-functional in 8 patients. The median follow-up period was 30 months. SRS was performed with the use of a dedicated stereotactic 10-MV linear accelerator (LINAC). The median dose to the tumor margin was 15 Gy. The dose to the optic apparatus was limited to less than 8 Gy. MR images of 12 patients revealed tumor complete response (CR) in one case and partial response (PR) in 9 cases; in the remaining two patients, tumor size decreased by less than 50%. There was no recognizable regrowth of any of the tumors. In two of four GH-secreting adenomas, hormonal overproduction normalized, while the other two showed reduced hormonal production. One PRL-secreting adenoma did not respond. Reduction of visual acuity and field was seen in one patient. This patient also had a brain infarction. None of the patients developed brain radionecrosis or radiation-induced hypopituitarism. Although further studies based on greater numbers of cases and longer follow-up periods are needed, our results suggest that SRS seems to be a safe, effective treatment for pituitary adenoma. (author)

  19. Design and optical characterization of high-Q guided-resonance modes in the slot-graphite photonic crystal lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Luis Javier; Huang, Ningfeng; Ma, Jing; Lin, Chenxi; Jaquay, Eric; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2013-12-16

    A new photonic crystal structure is generated by using a regular graphite lattice as the base and adding a slot in the center of each unit cell to enhance field confinement. The theoretical Q factor in an ideal structure is over 4 × 10(5). The structure was fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator wafer and optically characterized by transmission spectroscopy. The resonance wavelength and quality factor were measured as a function of slot height. The measured trends show good agreement with simulation.

  20. Recommendations for implementing stereotactic radiotherapy in peripheral stage IA non-small cell lung cancer: report from the Quality Assurance Working Party of the randomised phase III ROSEL study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurkmans, Coen W; Cuijpers, Johan P; Lagerwaard, Frank J; Widder, Joachim; Heide, Uulke A van der; Schuring, Danny; Senan, Suresh

    2009-01-01

    A phase III multi-centre randomised trial (ROSEL) has been initiated to establish the role of stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with operable stage IA lung cancer. Due to rapid changes in radiotherapy technology and evolving techniques for image-guided delivery, guidelines had to be developed in order to ensure uniformity in implementation of stereotactic radiotherapy in this multi-centre study. A Quality Assurance Working Party was formed by radiation oncologists and clinical physicists from both academic as well as non-academic hospitals that had already implemented stereotactic radiotherapy for lung cancer. A literature survey was conducted and consensus meetings were held in which both the knowledge from the literature and clinical experience were pooled. In addition, a planning study was performed in 26 stage I patients, of which 22 were stage 1A, in order to develop and evaluate the planning guidelines. Plans were optimised according to parameters adopted from RTOG trials using both an algorithm with a simple homogeneity correction (Type A) and a more advanced algorithm (Type B). Dose conformity requirements were then formulated based on these results. Based on current literature and expert experience, guidelines were formulated for this phase III study of stereotactic radiotherapy versus surgery. These guidelines can serve to facilitate the design of future multi-centre clinical trials of stereotactic radiotherapy in other patient groups and aid a more uniform implementation of this technique outside clinical trials

  1. Applied optics and optical design

    CERN Document Server

    Conrady, Alexander Eugen

    1957-01-01

    ""For the optical engineer it is an indispensable work."" - Journal, Optical Society of America""As a practical guide this book has no rival."" - Transactions, Optical Society""A noteworthy contribution,"" - Nature (London)Part I covers all ordinary ray-tracing methods, together with the complete theory of primary aberrations and as much of higher aberration as is needed for the design of telescopes, low-power microscopes and simple optical systems. Chapters: Fundamental Equations, Spherical Aberration, Physical Aspect of Optical Images, Chromatic Aberration, Design of Achromatic Object-Glass

  2. Treatment of Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Surgery or Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esengül Koçak Uzel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The management of early-stage Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC has improved recently due to advances in surgical and radiation modalities. Minimally-invasive procedures like Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS lobectomy decreases the morbidity of surgery, while the numerous methods of staging the mediastinum such as endobronchial and endoscopic ultrasound-guided biopsies are helping to achieve the objectives much more effectively. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR has become the frontrunner as the standard of care in medically inoperable early stage NSCLC patients, and has also been branded as tolerable and highly effective. Ongoing researches using SABR are continuously validating the optimal dosing and fractionation schemes, while at the same time instituting its role for both inoperable and operable patients.

  3. A current perspective on stereotactic body radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Julian C; Czito, Brian G; Willett, Christopher G; Palta, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a formidable malignancy with poor outcomes. The majority of patients are unable to undergo resection, which remains the only potentially curative treatment option. The management of locally advanced (unresectable) pancreatic cancer is controversial; however, treatment with either chemotherapy or chemoradiation is associated with high rates of local tumor progression and metastases development, resulting in low survival rates. An emerging local modality is stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), which uses image-guided, conformal, high-dose radiation. SBRT has demonstrated promising local control rates and resultant quality of life with acceptable rates of toxicity. Over the past decade, increasing clinical experience and data have supported SBRT as a local treatment modality. Nevertheless, additional research is required to further evaluate the role of SBRT and improve upon the persistently poor outcomes associated with pancreatic cancer. This review discusses the existing clinical experience and technical implementation of SBRT for pancreatic cancer and highlights the directions for ongoing and future studies.

  4. A new treatment method for brain diseases. Stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirato, Hiroki

    1994-01-01

    This paper deals with stereotactic radiosurgery, a novel medical treatment technique for brain diseases. It is the most sophisticated modality that allows the functional preservation. Recently, CT scan and MRI scan have dramatically changed the diagnostic accuracy of tumor localization in the brain. A device named stereotactic head fixation system makes it possible to localize deep-seated brain diseases with an accuracy of 1-1.5 mm. Using multiple convergent narrow beams of high-energy X-ray, a stereotactic head frame, and a three dimensional computer graphics of CT images, patients with deep-seated nidus can be treated without any complications. Normal tissues would not receive large doses but the center of the nidus is irradiated heavily because of the convergence of X-ray beams. Thus stereotactic radiosurgery is more accurate, effective, and less toxic than conventional radiotherapy and is safer and more effective than surgery for many brain diseases. Small arteriovenous malformation in the brain, which is a fetal disease, and small acoustic neurinomas, in which surgery often causes facial nerve palsy and hearing loss, are presented as good candidates for radiosurgery. For metastatic brain tumors, stereotactic radiosurgery makes such patients free from neurological symptoms, such as difficulty in walking and speaking, in a few days. (N.K.)

  5. Treatment accuracy of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Shaleen; Burke, Kevin; Nalder, Colin; Jarrett, Paula; Mubata, Cephas; A'Hern, Roger; Humphreys, Mandy; Bidmead, Margaret; Brada, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To assess the geometric accuracy of the delivery of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for brain tumours using the Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) relocatable frame. Accuracy of treatment delivery was measured via portal images acquired with an amorphous silicon based electronic portal imager (EPI). Results were used to assess the existing verification process and to review the current margins used for the expansion of clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV). Patients and methods: Patients were immobilized in a GTC frame. Target volume definition was performed on localization CT and MRI scans and a CTV to PTV margin of 5 mm (based on initial experience) was introduced in 3D. A Brown-Roberts-Wells (BRW) fiducial system was used for stereotactic coordinate definition. The existing verification process consisted of an intercomparison of the coordinates of the isocentres and anatomy between the localization and verification CT scans. Treatment was delivered with 6 MV photons using four fixed non-coplanar conformal fields using a multi-leaf collimator. Portal imaging verification consisted of the acquisition of orthogonal images centred through the treatment isocentre. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) created from the CT localization scans were used as reference images. Semi-automated matching software was used to quantify set up deviations (displacements and rotations) between reference and portal images. Results: One hundred and twenty six anterior and 123 lateral portal images were available for analysis for set up deviations. For displacements, the total errors in the cranial/caudal direction were shown to have the largest SD's of 1.2 mm, while systematic and random errors reached SD's of 1.0 and 0.7 mm, respectively, in the cranial/caudal direction. The corresponding data for rotational errors (the largest deviation was found in the sagittal plane) was 0.7 deg. SD (total error), 0.5 deg. (systematic) and 0

  6. Proton beam stereotactic radiosurgery of vestibular schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsh, Griffith R.; Thornton, Allan F.; Chapman, Paul H.; Bussiere, Marc R.; Rabinov, James D.; Loeffler, Jay S.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The proton beam's Bragg peak permits highly conformal radiation of skull base tumors. This study, prompted by reports of transient (30% each) and permanent (10% each) facial and trigeminal neuropathy after stereotactic radiosurgery of vestibular schwannomas with marginal doses of 16-20 Gy, assessed whether proton beam radiosurgery using a marginal dose of only 12 Gy could control vestibular schwannomas while causing less neuropathy. Methods and Materials: Sixty-eight patients (mean age 67 years) were treated between 1992 and 1998. The mean tumor volume was 2.49 cm 3 . The dose to the tumor margin (70% isodose line) was 12 Gy. The prospectively specified follow-up consisted of neurologic evaluation and MRI at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Results: After a mean clinical follow-up of 44 months and imaging follow-up of 34 months in 64 patients, 35 tumors (54.7%) were smaller and 25 (39.1%) were unchanged (tumor control rate 94%; actuarial control rate 94% at 2 years and 84% at 5 years). Three tumors enlarged: one shrank after repeated radiosurgery, one remained enlarged at the time of unrelated death, and one had not been imaged for 4 years in a patient who remained asymptomatic at last follow-up. Intratumoral hemorrhage into one stable tumor required craniotomy that proved successful. Thus, 97% of tumors required no additional treatment. Three patients (4.7%) underwent shunting for hydrocephalus evident as increased ataxia. Of 6 patients with functional hearing ipsilaterally, 1 improved, 1 was unchanged, and 4 progressively lost hearing. Cranial neuropathies were infrequent: persistent facial hypesthesia (2 new, 1 exacerbated; 4.7%); intermittent facial paresthesias (5 new, 1 exacerbated; 9.4%); persistent facial weakness (2 new, 1 exacerbated; 4.7%) requiring oculoplasty; transient partial facial weakness (5 new, 1 exacerbated; 9.4%), and synkinesis (5 new, 1 exacerbated; 9.4%). Conclusion: Proton beam stereotactic radiosurgery of vestibular schwannomas at the

  7. Radiogenic Side Effects After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Photon Radiotherapy of Choroidal Melanoma in 212 Patients Treated Between 1997 and 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunavoelgyi, Roman [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Dieckmann, Karin [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Gleiss, Andreas [Section of Clinical Biometrics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Sacu, Stefan; Kircher, Karl; Georgopoulos, Michael [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Georg, Dietmar [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Zehetmayer, Martin [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Poetter, Richard [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate side effects of hypofractionated stereotactic photon radiotherapy for patients with choroidal melanoma. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and twelve patients with choroidal melanoma unsuitable for ruthenium-106 brachytherapy or local resection were treated stereotactically at the Medical University of Vienna between 1997 and 2007 with a Linac with 6-MV photon beams in five fractions with 10, 12, or 14 Gy per fraction. Examinations for radiogenic side effects were performed at baseline and every 3 months in the first 2 years, then every 6 months until 5 years and then once a year thereafter until 10 years after radiotherapy. Adverse side effects were assessed using slit-lamp examination, funduscopy, gonioscopy, tonometry, and, if necessary, fundus photography and fluorescein angiography. Evaluations of incidence of side effects are based on an actuarial analysis. Results: One hundred and eighty-nine (89.2%) and 168 (79.2%) of the tumors were within 3 mm of the macula and the optic disc, respectively. The five most common radiotherapy side effects were retinopathy and optic neuropathy (114 cases and 107 cases, respectively), cataract development (87 cases), neovascular glaucoma (46 cases), and corneal epithelium defects (41 cases). In total, 33.6%, 38.5%, 51.2%, 75.5%, and 77.6% of the patients were free of any radiation retinopathy, optic neuropathy, cataract, neovascular glaucoma, or corneal epithelium defects 5 years after radiotherapy, respectively. Conclusion: In centrally located choroidal melanoma hypofractionated stereotactic photon radiotherapy shows a low to moderate rate of adverse long-term side effects comparable with those after proton beam radiotherapy. Future fractionation schemes should seek to further reduce adverse side effects rate while maintaining excellent local tumor control.

  8. Radiogenic Side Effects After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Photon Radiotherapy of Choroidal Melanoma in 212 Patients Treated Between 1997 and 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunavoelgyi, Roman; Dieckmann, Karin; Gleiss, Andreas; Sacu, Stefan; Kircher, Karl; Georgopoulos, Michael; Georg, Dietmar; Zehetmayer, Martin; Poetter, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate side effects of hypofractionated stereotactic photon radiotherapy for patients with choroidal melanoma. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and twelve patients with choroidal melanoma unsuitable for ruthenium-106 brachytherapy or local resection were treated stereotactically at the Medical University of Vienna between 1997 and 2007 with a Linac with 6-MV photon beams in five fractions with 10, 12, or 14 Gy per fraction. Examinations for radiogenic side effects were performed at baseline and every 3 months in the first 2 years, then every 6 months until 5 years and then once a year thereafter until 10 years after radiotherapy. Adverse side effects were assessed using slit-lamp examination, funduscopy, gonioscopy, tonometry, and, if necessary, fundus photography and fluorescein angiography. Evaluations of incidence of side effects are based on an actuarial analysis. Results: One hundred and eighty-nine (89.2%) and 168 (79.2%) of the tumors were within 3 mm of the macula and the optic disc, respectively. The five most common radiotherapy side effects were retinopathy and optic neuropathy (114 cases and 107 cases, respectively), cataract development (87 cases), neovascular glaucoma (46 cases), and corneal epithelium defects (41 cases). In total, 33.6%, 38.5%, 51.2%, 75.5%, and 77.6% of the patients were free of any radiation retinopathy, optic neuropathy, cataract, neovascular glaucoma, or corneal epithelium defects 5 years after radiotherapy, respectively. Conclusion: In centrally located choroidal melanoma hypofractionated stereotactic photon radiotherapy shows a low to moderate rate of adverse long-term side effects comparable with those after proton beam radiotherapy. Future fractionation schemes should seek to further reduce adverse side effects rate while maintaining excellent local tumor control.

  9. Radiobiological mechanisms of stereotactic body radiation therapy and stereotactic radiation surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Kim, Won Woo; Park, In Hwan; Kim, Hee Jong; Lee, Eun Jin; Jung, Jae Hoon [Research Center for Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Lawrence Chin Soo; Song, Chang W. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Despite the increasing use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) in recent years, the biological base of these high-dose hypo-fractionated radiotherapy modalities has been elusive. Given that most human tumors contain radioresistant hypoxic tumor cells, the radiobiological principles for the conventional multiple-fractionated radiotherapy cannot account for the high efficacy of SBRT and SRS. Recent emerging evidence strongly indicates that SBRT and SRS not only directly kill tumor cells, but also destroy the tumor vascular beds, thereby deteriorating intratumor microenvironment leading to indirect tumor cell death. Furthermore, indications are that the massive release of tumor antigens from the tumor cells directly and indirectly killed by SBRT and SRS stimulate anti-tumor immunity, thereby suppressing recurrence and metastatic tumor growth. The reoxygenation, repair, repopulation, and redistribution, which are important components in the response of tumors to conventional fractionated radiotherapy, play relatively little role in SBRT and SRS. The linear-quadratic model, which accounts for only direct cell death has been suggested to overestimate the cell death by high dose per fraction irradiation. However, the model may in some clinical cases incidentally do not overestimate total cell death because high-dose irradiation causes additional cell death through indirect mechanisms. For the improvement of the efficacy of SBRT and SRS, further investigation is warranted to gain detailed insights into the mechanisms underlying the SBRT and SRS.

  10. Frameless stereotactic radiosurgery of a solitary liver metastasis using active breathing control and stereotactic ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boda-Heggemann, J.; Walter, C.; Mai, S.; Dobler, B.; Wenz, F.; Lohr, F.; Dinter, D.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: radiosurgery of liver metastases is effective but a technical challenge due to respiration-induced movement. The authors report on the initial experience of the combination of active breathing control (ABC registered ) with stereotactic ultrasound (B-mode acquisition and targeting [BAT registered ]) for frameless radiosurgery. Patient and methods: a patient with a solitary, inoperable liver metastasis from cholangiocellular carcinoma is presented. ABC registered was used for tumor/liver immobilization. Tumor/liver position was controlled and corrected using ultrasound (BAT registered ). The tumor was irradiated with a single dose of 24 Gy. Results: using ABC registered , the motion of the tumor was significantly reduced and the overall positioning error was registered allowed a rapid localization of the lesion during breath hold which could be performed without difficulties for 20 s. Overall treatment time was acceptable (30 min). Conclusion: frameless stereotactic radiotherapy with the combination of ABC registered and BAT registered allows the delivery of high single doses to targets accessible to ultrasound with high precision comparable to a frame-based approach. (orig.)

  11. Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Uveal Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazici, Gozde [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Kiratli, Hayyam [Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Ozyigit, Gokhan; Sari, Sezin Yuce; Cengiz, Mustafa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Tarlan, Bercin [Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miami, Florida (United States); Mocan, Burce Ozgen [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Zorlu, Faruk, E-mail: fzorlu@hacettepe.edu.tr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate treatment results of stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (SRS/FSRT) for uveal melanoma. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 181 patients with 182 uveal melanomas receiving SRS/FSRT between 2007 and 2013. Treatment was administered with CyberKnife. Results: According to Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study criteria, tumor size was small in 1%, medium in 49.5%, and large in 49.5% of the patients. Seventy-one tumors received <45 Gy, and 111 received ≥45 Gy. Median follow-up time was 24 months. Complete and partial response was observed in 8 and 104 eyes, respectively. The rate of 5-year overall survival was 98%, disease-free survival 57%, local recurrence-free survival 73%, distant metastasis-free survival 69%, and enucleation-free survival 73%. There was a significant correlation between tumor size and disease-free survival, SRS/FSRT dose and enucleation-free survival; and both were prognostic for local recurrence-free survival. Enucleation was performed in 41 eyes owing to progression in 26 and complications in 11. Conclusions: The radiation therapy dose is of great importance for local control and eye retention; the best treatment outcome was achieved using ≥45 Gy in 3 fractions.

  12. Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Uveal Melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazici, Gozde; Kiratli, Hayyam; Ozyigit, Gokhan; Sari, Sezin Yuce; Cengiz, Mustafa; Tarlan, Bercin; Mocan, Burce Ozgen; Zorlu, Faruk

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate treatment results of stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (SRS/FSRT) for uveal melanoma. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 181 patients with 182 uveal melanomas receiving SRS/FSRT between 2007 and 2013. Treatment was administered with CyberKnife. Results: According to Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study criteria, tumor size was small in 1%, medium in 49.5%, and large in 49.5% of the patients. Seventy-one tumors received <45 Gy, and 111 received ≥45 Gy. Median follow-up time was 24 months. Complete and partial response was observed in 8 and 104 eyes, respectively. The rate of 5-year overall survival was 98%, disease-free survival 57%, local recurrence-free survival 73%, distant metastasis-free survival 69%, and enucleation-free survival 73%. There was a significant correlation between tumor size and disease-free survival, SRS/FSRT dose and enucleation-free survival; and both were prognostic for local recurrence-free survival. Enucleation was performed in 41 eyes owing to progression in 26 and complications in 11. Conclusions: The radiation therapy dose is of great importance for local control and eye retention; the best treatment outcome was achieved using ≥45 Gy in 3 fractions.

  13. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Poor Performance Status Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubicek, Gregory J., E-mail: kubicek-gregory@cooperhealth.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cooper University Hospital, Camden, New Jersey (United States); Turtz, Alan [Department of Neurological Surgery, Cooper University Hospital, Camden, New Jersey (United States); Xue, Jinyu; Patel, Ashish; Richards, Gregory; LaCouture, Tamara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cooper University Hospital, Camden, New Jersey (United States); Cappelli, Louis; Diestelkamp, Tim [Rowan Graduate School, Camden, New Jersey (United States); Saraiya, Piya [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Cooper University Hospital, Camden, New Jersey (United States); Bexon, Anne [Department of Neurological Surgery, Cooper University Hospital, Camden, New Jersey (United States); Lerman, Nati [Department of Medical Oncology, Cooper University Hospital, Camden, New Jersey (United States); Goldman, Howard Warren [Department of Neurological Surgery, Cooper University Hospital, Camden, New Jersey (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: Patients with poor performance status (PS), usually defined as a Karnofsky Performance Status of 60 or less, were not eligible for randomized stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) studies, and many guidelines suggest that whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is the most appropriate treatment for poor PS patients. Methods and Materials: In this retrospective review of our SRS database, we identified 36 patients with PS of 60 or less treated with SRS for central nervous system (CNS) metastatic disease. PS, as defined by the Karnofsky Performance Status, was 60 (27 patients), 50 (8 patients), or 40 (1 patient). The median number of CNS lesions treated was 3. Results: Median overall survival (OS) was 7.2 months (range, 0.73-25.6 months). Fifteen patients (41%) were alive at 6 months, and 6 patients (16.6%) were alive at 1 year. There was no difference in OS in patients who underwent previous WBRT. There were no local failures or cases of radiation toxicity. Distant CNS failures were seen in 9 patients (25%). Conclusions: Our patients with poor PS had reasonable median OS and relatively low distant CNS failure rates. Patients in this patient population may be ideal candidates for SRS compared with WBRT given the low incidence of distant failure over their remaining lives and the favorable logistics of single-fraction treatment for these patients with debility and their caregivers.

  14. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norihisa, Yoshiki; Nagata, Yasushi; Takayama, Kenji; Matsuo, Yukinori; Sakamoto, Takashi; Sakamoto, Masato; Mizowaki, Takashi; Yano, Shinsuke; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Since 1998, we have treated primary and oligometastatic lung tumors with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The term 'oligometastasis' is used to indicate a small number of metastases limited to an organ. We evaluated our clinical experience of SBRT for oligometastatic lung tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 34 patients with oligometastatic lung tumors were included in this study. The primary involved organs were the lung (n = 15), colorectum (n = 9), head and neck (n = 5), kidney (n = 3), breast (n = 1), and bone (n = 1). Five to seven, noncoplanar, static 6-MV photon beams were used to deliver 48 Gy (n = 18) or 60 Gy (n = 16) at the isocenter, with 12 Gy/fraction within 4-18 days (median, 12 days). Results: The overall survival rate, local relapse-free rate, and progression-free rate at 2 years was 84.3%, 90.0%, and 34.8%, respectively. No local progression was observed in tumors irradiated with 60 Gy. SBRT-related pulmonary toxicities were observed in 4 (12%) Grade 2 cases and 1 (3%) Grade 3 case. Patients with a longer disease-free interval had a greater overall survival rate. Conclusion: The clinical result of SBRT for oligometastatic lung tumors in our institute was comparable to that after surgical metastasectomy; thus, SBRT could be an effective treatment of pulmonary oligometastases

  15. Repeat Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Acoustic Neuromas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Hideyuki; Kondziolka, Douglas; Niranjan, Ajay M.Ch.; Flannery, Thomas J.; Flickinger, John C.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for acoustic neuromas, we assessed tumor control, clinical outcomes, and the risk of adverse radiation effects in patients whose tumors progressed after initial management. Methods and Materials: During a 21-year experience at our center, 1,352 patients underwent SRS as management for their acoustic neuromas. We retrospectively identified 6 patients who underwent SRS twice for the same tumor. The median patient age was 47 years (range, 35-71 years). All patients had imaging evidence of tumor progression despite initial SRS. One patient also had incomplete surgical resection after initial SRS. All patients were deaf at the time of the second SRS. The median radiosurgery target volume at the time of the initial SRS was 0.5 cc and was 2.1 cc at the time of the second SRS. The median margin dose at the time of the initial SRS was 13 Gy and was 11 Gy at the time of the second SRS. The median interval between initial SRS and repeat SRS was 63 months (range, 25-169 months). Results: At a median follow-up of 29 months after the second SRS (range, 13-71 months), tumor control or regression was achieved in all 6 patients. No patient developed symptomatic adverse radiation effects or new neurological symptoms after the second SRS. Conclusions: With this limited experience, we found that repeat SRS for a persistently enlarging acoustic neuroma can be performed safely and effectively.

  16. Quality assurance in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warrington, A.P.; Laing, R.W.; Brada, M.

    1994-01-01

    The recent development of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT), which utilises the relocatable Gill-Thomas-Cosman frame (GTC 'repeat localiser'), requires comprehensive quality assurance (QA). This paper focuses on those QA procedures particularly relevant to fractionated SRT treatments, and which have been derived from the technique used at the Royal Marsden Hospital. They primarily relate to the following: (i) GTC frame fitting, initially in the mould room, and then at each imaging session and treatment fraction; (ii) checking of the linear accelerator beam geometry and alignment lasers; and (iii) setting up of the patient for each fraction of treatment. The precision of the fractionated technique therefore depends on monitoring the GTC frame relocation at each fitting, checking the accuracy of the radiation isocentre of the treatment unit, its coincidence with the patient alignment lasers and the adjustments required to set the patient up accurately. The results of our quality control checks show that setting up to a mean radiation isocentre using precisely set-up alignment lasers can be achievable to within 1 mm accuracy. When this is combined with a mean GTC frame relocatability of 1 mm on the patient, a 2-mm allowance between the prescribed isodose surface and the defined target volume is a realistic safety margin for this technique

  17. Needle placement accuracy during stereotactic localization mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.H.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To derive a mathematical model to describe the relationship between lesion position in the breast and measurements derived from the stereoradiographs to enable more accurate sampling of a lesion during stereotactic mammographic needle placement. Materials and methods: The affect that registration errors have on the accuracy of needle placement when identifying the lesion on the stereoradiographs was investigated using the mathematical model. Results: The focus-to-film distance of the x-ray tube and the horizontal distance of the lesion from the centre of rotation have little effect on error. Registration errors for lesions lying at a greater perpendicular distance in the breast from the centre of rotation produce smaller localization errors when compared with lesions sited closer. Lesion registration errors during marking of the stereoradiographs are exacerbated by decreasing the angle of x-ray tube swing. Conclusions: When problems are encountered in making an accurate registration of the lesion on the stereoradiographs, consider the following error reducing strategies: (1) employ an approach that places the lesion the maximum distance away from the film cassette; (2) avoid reducing the angle of tube swing; and (3) consider sampling superficial and deep to, as well as at, the location indicated. The possibility of erroneous tissue sampling should be borne in mind when reviewing the pathology report.

  18. Imaging of arteriovenous malformation following stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranchida, J.V.; Mehall, C.J.; Slovis, T.L.; Lis-Planells, M.

    1997-01-01

    Background. Stereotactic radiosurgery allows for a high dose of focused radiation to be delivered to a small lesion such as an arteriovenous malformation (AVM). The clinical change and brain response over time to this localized high-dose radiation can be quite striking. Objective. The objective of this study to describe and analyse the imaging changes following radiotherapy for AVMs. Materials and methods. The clinical presentation and the imaging changes following radiotherapy in two patients were studied over the course of 1-2 years. Results. The imaging findings include diffuse low attenuation and contrast enhancement on CT. High-signal lesions were apparent on T2-weighted MR images with prominent contrast enhancement on T1-weighted images. Ring enhancement occurred over time. While new changes appeared over 12 months, these changes diminished during the second year. Conclusion. Radiotherapy induces inflammatory changes that are generally reversible but can lead to parenchymal destruction. These imaging changes are often nonspecific and therefore must be interpreted in light of clinical symptomatology and the time course since treatment. These patients should receive routine MR imaging within 3 months after radiosurgery with follow-up imaging at 6, 12, and 18 months. (orig.). With 8 figs

  19. Immediate and intermediate-term results of optical coherence tomography guided atherectomy in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease: Initial results from the VISION trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawich, Ian; Paixao, Andre R M; Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos; Lendel, Vasili; Rodriguez-Araujo, Gerardo; Rollefson, William A; Mego, David M; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet

    Long-term patency rates for percutaneous peripheral arterial interventions are suboptimal. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) guided atherectomy may yield superior patency by optimizing plaque removal while preserving the tunica media and adventitia. The VISION study is a multicenter prospective study of patients with peripheral arterial disease undergoing OCT guided atherectomy with the Pantheris™ device. In 11 patients enrolled in a single center, we report procedural and clinical outcomes, at 30days and 6months. The mean age was 63±11years and 73% (n=8) were men. The target lesion was in the superficial femoral artery in 82% (n=9) of the patients. Mean stenosis severity was 87%±10% and mean lesion length was 39±31mm. Procedural success was observed in all patients with no device related complications. Mean post-atherectomy stenosis was 18%±15%. Almost all excised tissue consisted of intimal plaque (94%). At 30days, significant improvements in Rutherford class, VascuQoL scores and ABI were observed, 0.9±0.8 vs. 3.1±0.7 (p=0.01), 4.9±1.9 vs. 3.6±1.5 (p=0.03) and 1.04±0.19 vs. 0.80±0.19 (patherectomy resulted in high procedural success, no device related complications and encouraging results up to 6months. Histological analysis suggested little injury to the media and adventitia. Larger studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of this approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Confluence of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy and Tumor Immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Eric Finkelstein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereotactic radiation approaches are gaining more popularity for the treatment of intracranial as well as extracranial tumors in organs such as the liver and lung. Technology, rather than biology, is driving the rapid adoption of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT, also known as stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR, in the clinic due to advances in precise positioning and targeting. Dramatic improvements in tumor control have been demonstrated; however, our knowledge of normal tissue biology response mechanisms to large fraction sizes is lacking. Herein, we will discuss how SABR can induce cellular expression of MHC I, adhesion molecules, costimulatory molecules, heat shock proteins, inflammatory mediators, immunomodulatory cytokines, and death receptors to enhance antitumor immune responses.

  1. Immediate side effects of stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner-Wasik, Maria; Rudoler, Shari; Preston, Peter E.; Downes, Beverly M.; Andrews, David; Corn, Benjamin W.; Rosenstock, Jeffrey; Curran, Walter J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Despite increased utilization of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), the incidence and nature of immediate side effects (ISE) associated with these treatment techniques is not well defined. Materials and Methods: Intracranial lesions in 78 adult patients were treated with SRT or SRS, using a dedicated linear accelerator. They comprised 13 gliomas, 2 ependymomas, 19 metastatic tumors, 15 meningiomas, 12 acoustic neuromas, 4 pituitary adenomas, 1 optic neuroma, 1 chondrosarcoma and 11 arteriovenous malformations (AVM). SRT was used in 51 and SRS in 27 patients. Mean target volume was 9.0 cc. Eleven patients received prior external beam radiation therapy within 2 months before SRT/SRS. Any side effects occurring during and up to two weeks after radiation course were defined as ISE and were graded as mild, moderate or severe. The incidence of ISE and the significance of their association with several pretreatment variables were analyzed. Results: Overall, (28(78)) (35%) patients experienced one or more ISE. Most of ISE (87%) were mild and consisted of nausea (5), dizziness/vertigo (5), seizures (7) and new persistent headaches (17). Two episodes of worsening neurological deficit and 2 of orbital pain were graded as moderate. Two patients experienced severe ISE, requiring hospitalization (1 seizure and 1 worsening neurological deficit). ISE in 5 cases prompted computerized tomography of the brain which revealed increased perilesional edema in 3 cases. The incidence of ISE by diagnosis was as follows: 46% ((6(13))) for gliomas, 50% ((6(12))) for acoustic neuromas, 36% ((4(11))) for AVM, 33% ((5(15))) for meningiomas and 21% ((4(19))) for metastases. Increasing dose to the margin and increasing maximum dose were associated with a higher incidence of ISE (p=0.02 and 0.005, respectively). Prior recent conventional external beam radiation therapy, target volume, number of isocenters, collimator size, dose

  2. Immediate side effects of stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner-Wasik, Maria; Rudoler, Shari; Preston, Peter E.; Hauck, Walter W.; Downes, Beverly M.; Leeper, Dennis; Andrews, David; Corn, Benjamin W.; Curran, Walter J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Despite increased utilization of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), the incidence and nature of immediate side effects (ISE) associated with these treatment techniques are not well defined. We report immediate side effects from a series of 78 patients. Materials and Methods: Intracranial lesions in 78 adult patients were treated with SRT or SRS, using a dedicated linear accelerator. Those lesions included 13 gliomas, 2 ependymomas, 19 metastatic tumors, 15 meningiomas, 12 acoustic neuromas, 4 pituitary adenomas, 1 optic neuroma, 1 chondrosarcoma, and 11 arteriovenous malformations (AVM). SRT was used in 51 and SRS in 27 patients. Mean target volume was 9.0 cc. Eleven patients received prior external-beam radiation therapy within 2 months before SRT/SRS. Any side effects occurring during and up to 2 weeks after the course of radiation were defined as ISE and were graded as mild, moderate, or severe. The incidence of ISE and the significance of their association with several treatment and pretreatment variables were analyzed. Results: Overall, 28 (35%) of 78 patients experienced one or more ISE. Most of the ISE (87%) were mild, and consisted of nausea (in 5), dizziness/vertigo (in 5), seizures (in 6), and new persistent headaches (in 17). Two episodes of worsening neurological deficit and 2 of orbital pain were graded as moderate. Two patients experienced severe ISE, requiring hospitalization (1 seizure and 1 worsening neurological deficit). ISE in 6 cases prompted computerized tomography of the brain, which revealed increased perilesional edema in 3 cases. The incidence of ISE by diagnosis was as follows: 46% (6 of 13) for gliomas, 50% (6 of 12) for acoustic neuromas, 36% (4 of 11) for AVM, 33% (5 of 15) for meningiomas, and 21% (4 of 19) for metastases. A higher incidence of dizziness/vertigo (4 of 12 = 33%) was seen among acoustic neuroma patients than among other patients (p < 0.01). There was no

  3. Optical coherence tomography compared with intravascular ultrasound and with angiography to guide coronary stent implantation (ILUMIEN III: OPTIMIZE PCI): a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ziad A; Maehara, Akiko; Généreux, Philippe; Shlofmitz, Richard A; Fabbiocchi, Franco; Nazif, Tamim M; Guagliumi, Giulio; Meraj, Perwaiz M; Alfonso, Fernando; Samady, Habib; Akasaka, Takashi; Carlson, Eric B; Leesar, Massoud A; Matsumura, Mitsuaki; Ozan, Melek Ozgu; Mintz, Gary S; Ben-Yehuda, Ori; Stone, Gregg W

    2016-11-26

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is most commonly guided by angiography alone. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance has been shown to reduce major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) after PCI, principally by resulting in a larger postprocedure lumen than with angiographic guidance. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides higher resolution imaging than does IVUS, although findings from some studies suggest that it might lead to smaller luminal diameters after stent implantation. We sought to establish whether or not a novel OCT-based stent sizing strategy would result in a minimum stent area similar to or better than that achieved with IVUS guidance and better than that achieved with angiography guidance alone. In this randomised controlled trial, we recruited patients aged 18 years or older undergoing PCI from 29 hospitals in eight countries. Eligible patients had one or more target lesions located in a native coronary artery with a visually estimated reference vessel diameter of 2·25-3·50 mm and a length of less than 40 mm. We excluded patients with left main or ostial right coronary artery stenoses, bypass graft stenoses, chronic total occlusions, planned two-stent bifurcations, and in-stent restenosis. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1:1; with use of an interactive web-based system in block sizes of three, stratified by site) to OCT guidance, IVUS guidance, or angiography-guided stent implantation. We did OCT-guided PCI using a specific protocol to establish stent length, diameter, and expansion according to reference segment external elastic lamina measurements. All patients underwent final OCT imaging (operators in the IVUS and angiography groups were masked to the OCT images). The primary efficacy endpoint was post-PCI minimum stent area, measured by OCT at a masked independent core laboratory at completion of enrolment, in all randomly allocated participants who had primary outcome data. The primary safety endpoint was procedural

  4. Test-retest assessment of cortical activation induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with brain atlas-guided optical topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fenghua; Kozel, F. Andrew; Yennu, Amarnath; Croarkin, Paul E.; McClintock, Shawn M.; Mapes, Kimberly S.; Husain, Mustafa M.; Liu, Hanli

    2012-11-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a technology that stimulates neurons with rapidly changing magnetic pulses with demonstrated therapeutic applications for various neuropsychiatric disorders. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a suitable tool to assess rTMS-evoked brain responses without interference from the magnetic or electric fields generated by the TMS coil. We have previously reported a channel-wise study of combined rTMS/fNIRS on the motor and prefrontal cortices, showing a robust decrease of oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbO2]) at the sites of 1-Hz rTMS and the contralateral brain regions. However, the reliability of this putative clinical tool is unknown. In this study, we develop a rapid optical topography approach to spatially characterize the rTMS-evoked hemodynamic responses on a standard brain atlas. A hemispherical approximation of the brain is employed to convert the three-dimensional topography on the complex brain surface to a two-dimensional topography in the spherical coordinate system. The test-retest reliability of the combined rTMS/fNIRS is assessed using repeated measurements performed two to three days apart. The results demonstrate that the Δ[HbO2] amplitudes have moderate-to-high reliability at the group level; and the spatial patterns of the topographic images have high reproducibility in size and a moderate degree of overlap at the individual level.

  5. Stereotactic radiotherapy for pediatric intracranial germ cell tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zissiadis, Yvonne; Dutton, Sharon; Kieran, Mark; Goumnerova, Liliana; Scott, R. Michael; Kooy, Hanne M.; Tarbell, Nancy J.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Intracranial germ cell tumors are rare, radiosensitive tumors seen most commonly in the second and third decades of life. Radiotherapy alone has been the primary treatment modality for germinomas, and is used with chemotherapy for nongerminomatous tumors. Stereotactic radiotherapy techniques minimize the volume of surrounding normal tissue irradiated and, hence, the late radiation morbidity. This study reports our experience with stereotactic radiotherapy in this group of tumors. Methods and Materials: Between December 1992 and December 1998, 18 patients with intracranial germ cell tumors were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy. A total of 23 histologically proven tumors were treated. Thirteen patients had a histologic diagnosis of germinoma, and 5 patients had germinoma with nongerminomatous elements. Of those patients with a histologic diagnosis of germinoma, 5 had multiple midline tumors. The median age of the patients was 12.9 years (range, 5.6-17.5 years). Results: A boost using stereotactic radiotherapy was delivered to 19 tumors following whole-brain radiation in 8 cases and craniospinal radiation in 11 cases. Three tumors were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy to the tumor volume alone following chemotherapy, and 1 tumor received a boost using stereotactic radiosurgery following craniospinal radiation. A median dose of 2520 cGy (range, 1500-3600) cGy was given to the whole brain, and a median dose of 2160 (range, 2100-2600) cGy was given to the spinal field. The median boost dose to the tumor was 2600 (range, 2160-3600) cGy, given by stereotactic radiotherapy delivered to the 95% isodose line. At a median follow-up time of 40 (range, 12-73) months, no local or marginal recurrences were reported in patients with germinoma. Two patients with nongerminomatous tumors have relapsed. One had elevation of tumor markers only at 37 months following treatment, and the other had persistent disease following chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Eight

  6. Rib fracture following stereotactic body radiotherapy: a potential pitfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanic, Sinisa; Boike, Thomas P; Rule, William G; Timmerman, Robert D

    2011-11-01

    Although the incidence of rib fractures after conventional radiotherapy is generally low (rib fractures are a relatively common complication of stereotactic body radiotherapy. For malignancy adjacent to the chest wall, the incidence of rib fractures after stereotactic body radiotherapy is as high as 10%. Unrecognized bone fractures can mimic bone metastases on bone scintigraphy, can lead to extensive workup, and can even lead to consideration of unnecessary systemic chemotherapy, as treatment decisions can be based on imaging findings alone. Nuclear medicine physicians and diagnostic radiologists should always consider rib fracture in the differential diagnosis.

  7. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for malignant tumors of the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Ю. Аникеева

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy was used for 26 patients at medically inoperable stage I of non-small cell lung cancer with dose escalation of 48-54 Gy prescribed at 90 or 95% isodose level in 3-4 fractions. Nine-months local control and cancer-specific survival were 82.0 and 66.8% respectively, with minimal toxicity. For metastatic lung tumors local control was obtained in 92% cases. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (SBRT is safe and feasible for the treatment of inoperable primary lung cancer and single lung metastasis.

  8. MRI anatomical mapping and direct stereotactic targeting in the subthalamic region: functional and anatomical correspondence in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Coste, Jerome; Ouchchane, Lemlih; Hemm, Simone; Derost, Philippe; Ulla, Miguel; Durif, Franck; Siadoux, Severine; Gabrillargues, Jean; Chazal, Jean

    2007-01-01

    Object Relationships between clinical effects, anatomy, and electrophysiology are not fully understood in DBS of the subthalamic region in Parkinson's disease. We proposed an anatomic study based on direct image-guided stereotactic surgery with a multiple source data analysis. Materials and Methods A manual anatomic mapping was realized on coronal 1.5-Tesla MRI of 15 patients. Biological data were collected under local anesthesia: the spontaneous neuron activities and the clinical efficiency and the appearance of adverse effects. They were related to relevant current values (mA), the benefit threshold (bt, minimal current leading an clear efficiency), the adverse effect threshold (at, minimal current leading an adverse effect) and the stimulation margin (sm = at - bt); they were matched with anatomy. Results We found consistent relationships between anatomy and biological data. The optimal stimulation parameters (low bt + high sm) were noted in the dorsolateral STN. The highest spontaneous neuron activity was found in the ventromedial STN. Dorsolateral (sensorimotor) STN seems the main DBS effector. The highest spontaneous neuron activity seems related to the anterior (rostral) ventromedial (limbic) STN. Conclusion 1.5 Tesla images provide sufficiently detailed subthalamic anatomy for image-guided stereotactic surgery and may aid in understanding DBS mechanisms. (orig.)

  9. Endocrine and visual function after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of perioptic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, M.; Semrau, R.; Mueller, R.P. [Universitaetsklinikum Koeln (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Treuer, H.; Hoevels, M.; Sturm, V. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To find out whether the use of stereotactic techniques for fractionated radiotherapy reduces toxicity to the endocrine and visual system in patients with benign perioptic tumors. Patients and methods: From 1993 to 2009, 29 patients were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The most frequent tumor types were grade I meningioma (n = 11) and pituitary adenoma (n = 10, 7 nonfunctioning, 3 growth hormone-producing). Patients were immobilized with the GTC frame (Radionics, USA) and the planning target volume (PTV; median 24.7, 4.6-58.6 ml) was irradiated with a total dose of 52.2 Gy (range, 45.0-55.8 Gy) in 1.8-Gy fractions using a linear accelerator (6 MeV photons) equipped with a micro-multileaf collimator. Maximum doses to the optic system and pituitary gland were 53.4 Gy (range, 11.5-57.6 Gy) and 53.6 Gy (range, 12.0-57.9 Gy). Results: Median follow-up was 45 months (range, 10-105 months). Local control was achieved in all but 1 patient (actuarial rate 92% at 5 years and 10 years). In 9 of 29 patients (31%), partial remission was observed (actuarial response rate 40% at 5 years and 10 years). In 4 of 26 patients (15%) with at least partial pituitary function, new hormonal deficits developed (actuarial rate 21% at 5 years and 10 years). This rate was significantly higher in patients treated for a larger PTV ( 25 ml: 0% vs. 42% at 5 years and 10 years, p = 0.028). Visual function improved in 4 of 15 patients (27%) who had prior impairment. None of the patients developed treatment-related optic neuropathy, but 2 patients experienced new disease-related visual deficits. Conclusion: Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for benign tumors of the perioptic and sellar region results in satisfactory response and local control rates and does not affect the visual system. The assumption that patients can be spared hypophyseal insufficiency only holds for small tumors. (orig.)

  10. LINAC based stereotactic radiotherapy of uveal melanoma: 4 years clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieckmann, Karin; Georg, Dietmar; Zehetmayer, Martin; Bogner, Joachim; Georgopoulos, Michael; Poetter, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To study local tumor control and radiogenic side effects after fractionated LINAC based stereotactic radiotherapy for selected uveal melanoma. Patients and methods: Between June 1997 and March 2001, 90 patients suffering from uveal melanoma were treated at a LINAC with 6 MV. The head was immobilized with a modified stereotactic frame system (BrainLAB). For stabilization of the eye position a light source was integrated into the mask system in front of the healthy or the diseased eye. A mini-video camera was used for on-line eye movement control. Tumors included in the study were either located unfavorably with respect to macula and optical disc ( 7 mm. Median tumor volume was 305±234 mm 3 (range 70-1430 mm 3 ), and mean tumor height was 5.4±2.3 mm (range 2.7-15.9 mm). Total doses of 70 (single dose 14 Gy at 80% isodose) or 60 Gy (single dose 12 Gy at 80% isodose) were applied in five fractions within 10 days. The first fractionation results in total dose (TD) (2 Gy) of 175 Gy for tumor and 238 Gy for normal tissue, corresponding values for the second fractionation schedule are 135 and 180 Gy, respectively. Results: After a median follow-up of 20 months (range 1-48 months) local control was achieved in 98% (n=88). The mean relative tumor reductions were 24, 27, and 37% after 12, 24 and 36 months. Three patients (3.3%) developed metastases. Secondary enucleation was performed in seven patients (7.7%). Long term side effects were retinopathy (25.5%), cataract (18.9%), optic neuropathy (20%), and secondary neovascular glaucoma (8.8%). Conclusion: Fractionated LINAC based stereotactic photon beam therapy in conjunction with a dedicated eye movement control system is a highly effective method to treat unfavorably located uveal melanoma. Total doses of 60 Gy (single dose 12 Gy) are considered to be sufficient to achieve good local tumor control

  11. Endocrine and visual function after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of perioptic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, M.; Semrau, R.; Mueller, R.P.; Treuer, H.; Hoevels, M.; Sturm, V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To find out whether the use of stereotactic techniques for fractionated radiotherapy reduces toxicity to the endocrine and visual system in patients with benign perioptic tumors. Patients and methods: From 1993 to 2009, 29 patients were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The most frequent tumor types were grade I meningioma (n = 11) and pituitary adenoma (n = 10, 7 nonfunctioning, 3 growth hormone-producing). Patients were immobilized with the GTC frame (Radionics, USA) and the planning target volume (PTV; median 24.7, 4.6-58.6 ml) was irradiated with a total dose of 52.2 Gy (range, 45.0-55.8 Gy) in 1.8-Gy fractions using a linear accelerator (6 MeV photons) equipped with a micro-multileaf collimator. Maximum doses to the optic system and pituitary gland were 53.4 Gy (range, 11.5-57.6 Gy) and 53.6 Gy (range, 12.0-57.9 Gy). Results: Median follow-up was 45 months (range, 10-105 months). Local control was achieved in all but 1 patient (actuarial rate 92% at 5 years and 10 years). In 9 of 29 patients (31%), partial remission was observed (actuarial response rate 40% at 5 years and 10 years). In 4 of 26 patients (15%) with at least partial pituitary function, new hormonal deficits developed (actuarial rate 21% at 5 years and 10 years). This rate was significantly higher in patients treated for a larger PTV ( 25 ml: 0% vs. 42% at 5 years and 10 years, p = 0.028). Visual function improved in 4 of 15 patients (27%) who had prior impairment. None of the patients developed treatment-related optic neuropathy, but 2 patients experienced new disease-related visual deficits. Conclusion: Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for benign tumors of the perioptic and sellar region results in satisfactory response and local control rates and does not affect the visual system. The assumption that patients can be spared hypophyseal insufficiency only holds for small tumors. (orig.)

  12. Ultrasound-guided diffuse optical tomography (DOT) of invasive breast carcinoma: Does tumour total haemoglobin concentration contribute to the prediction of axillary lymph node status?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Qingli, E-mail: qinglizhu@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan 1, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Xiao, Mengsu, E-mail: xiaomengsu_2000@sina.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan 1, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); You, Shanshan, E-mail: shanshan_0531@sina.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan 1, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Zhang, Jing, E-mail: zhang.jing1029@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan 1, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Jiang, Yuxin, E-mail: yuxinjiangxh@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan 1, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Lai, Xingjian, E-mail: lxjpumch@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan 1, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Dai, Qing, E-mail: qingdai_2000@yahoo.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan 1, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: To prospectively study the ultrasound-guided near-infrared diffuse optical tomography (DOT) findings of the total haemoglobin concentration (THC) detected in invasive breast carcinomas and its contribution to the prediction of axillary lymph node (LN) status. Methods: A total of 195 invasive breast carcinomas were prospectively studied with DOT before surgery. Lumpectomy or mastectomy with full axillary nodal dissection was performed. Tumour size and THC level were correlated with LN status by a logistic regression analysis. Results: One hundred twenty-four patients (63.59%) was LN(-) and 71 (36.41%) was LN(+). The average THC was significantly higher in the LN(+) group than in the LN(-) group (252.94 {+-} 69.19 {mu}mol/L versus 203.86 {+-} 83.13 {mu}mol/L, P = 0.01). A multivariate analysis showed an independent relationship between the probability of axillary metastasis, elevated THC level (P = 0.01), and tumour size (P = 0.001). The odds ratio with THC {>=} 140 {mu}mol/L was 13.651 (1.781-104.560), whereas that of tumour size with a 1 cm increment was only 1.777 (1.283-2.246). Conclusions: The THC level and the tumour size are independent and preoperative predictors of axillary nodal status; these variables may improve the diagnosis of patients with lymph node metastasis.

  13. The Performance of the Robo-AO Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics System at the Kitt Peak 2.1 m Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen-Clem, Rebecca; Duev, Dmitry A.; Riddle, Reed; Salama, Maïssa; Baranec, Christoph; Law, Nicholas M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Ramprakash, A. N.

    2018-01-01

    Robo-AO is an autonomous laser guide star adaptive optics (AO) system recently commissioned at the Kitt Peak 2.1 m telescope. With the ability to observe every clear night, Robo-AO at the 2.1 m telescope is the first dedicated AO observatory. This paper presents the imaging performance of the AO system in its first 18 months of operations. For a median seeing value of 1.″44, the average Strehl ratio is 4% in the i\\prime band. After post processing, the contrast ratio under sub-arcsecond seeing for a 2≤slant i\\prime ≤slant 16 primary star is five and seven magnitudes at radial offsets of 0.″5 and 1.″0, respectively. The data processing and archiving pipelines run automatically at the end of each night. The first stage of the processing pipeline shifts and adds the rapid frame rate data using techniques optimized for different signal-to-noise ratios. The second “high-contrast” stage of the pipeline is eponymously well suited to finding faint stellar companions. Currently, a range of scientific programs, including the synthetic tracking of near-Earth asteroids, the binarity of stars in young clusters, and weather on solar system planets are being undertaken with Robo-AO.

  14. Initial clinical results of linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsumori, Michihide; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Alexander, Eben; Kaiser, Ursula B.; Richardson, Gary E.; Black, Peter McL.; Loeffler, Jay S.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the initial clinical results of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for pituitary adenomas with regard to tumor and hormonal control and adverse effects of the treatment. Subjects and Methods: Forty-eight patients with pituitary adenoma who underwent SRS or SRT between September 1989 and September 1995 were analyzed. Of these, 18 received SRS and 30 received SRT. The median tumor volumes were 1.9 cm 3 for SRS and 5.7 cm 3 for SRT. Eleven of the SRS and 18 of the SRT patients were hormonally active at the time of the initial diagnosis. Four of the SRS and none of the SRT patients had a history of prior radiation therapy. Both SRS and SRT were performed using a dedicated stereotactic 6-MV linear accelerator (LINAC). The dose and normalization used for the SRS varied from 1000 cGy at 85% of the isodose line to 1500 cGy at 65% of the isodose line. For SRT patients, a total dose of 4500 cGy at 90% or 95% of the isodose line was delivered in 25 fractions of 180 cGy daily doses. Results: Disease control--The three year tumor control rate was 91.1% (100% for SRS and 85.3% for SRT). Normalization of the hormonal abnormality was achieved in 47% of the 48 patients (33% for SRS and 54% for SRT). The average time required for normalization was 8.5 months for SRS and 18 months for SRT. Adverse effects--The 3-year rate of freedom from central nervous system adverse effects was 89.7% (72.2% for SRS and 100% for SRT). Three patients who received SRS for a tumor in the cavernous sinus developed a ring enhancement in the temporal lobe as shown by follow-up magnetic resonance imaging. Two of these cases were irreversible and were considered to be radiation necrosis. None of the 48 patients developed new neurocognitive or visual disorders attributable to the irradiation. The incidence of endocrinological adverse effects were similar in the two groups, resulting in 3-year rates of freedom from newly

  15. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver tumors. Principles and practical guidelines of the DEGRO Working Group on Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterzing, Florian; Brunner, Thomas B.; Ernst, Iris; Greve, Burkhard; Baus, Wolfgang W.; Herfarth, Klaus; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    This report of the Working Group on Stereotactic Radiotherapy of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) aims to provide a practical guideline for safe and effective stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of liver tumors. The literature on the clinical evidence of SBRT for both primary liver tumors and liver metastases was reviewed and analyzed focusing on both physical requirements and special biological characteristics. Recommendations were developed for patient selection, imaging, planning, treatment delivery, motion management, dose reporting, and follow-up. Radiation dose constraints to critical organs at risk are provided. SBRT is a well-established treatment option for primary and secondary liver tumors associated with low morbidity. (orig.) [de

  16. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Spinal Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Kamran A. [Mayo Medical School, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Stauder, Michael C.; Miller, Robert C.; Bauer, Heather J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Rose, Peter S. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Olivier, Kenneth R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Brinkmann, Debra H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Laack, Nadia N., E-mail: laack.nadia@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Based on reports of safety and efficacy, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of malignant spinal tumors was initiated at our institution. We report prospective results of this population at Mayo Clinic. Materials and Methods: Between April 2008 and December 2010, 85 lesions in 66 patients were treated with SBRT for spinal metastases. Twenty-two lesions (25.8%) were treated for recurrence after prior radiotherapy (RT). The mean age of patients was 56.8 {+-} 13.4 years. Patients were treated to a median dose of 24 Gy (range, 10-40 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). Radiation was delivered with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and prescribed to cover 80% of the planning target volume (PTV) with organs at risk such as the spinal cord taking priority over PTV coverage. Results: Tumor sites included 48, 22, 12, and 3 in the thoracic, lumbar, cervical, and sacral spine, respectively. The mean actuarial survival at 12 months was 52.2%. A total of 7 patients had both local and marginal failure, 1 patient experienced marginal but not local failure, and 1 patient had local failure only. Actuarial local control at 1 year was 83.3% and 91.2% in patients with and without prior RT. The median dose delivered to patients who experienced local/marginal failure was 24 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). No cases of Grade 4 toxicity were reported. In 1 of 2 patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity, SBRT was given after previous radiation. Conclusion: The results indicate SBRT to be an effective measure to achieve local control in spinal metastases. Toxicity of treatment was rare, including those previously irradiated. Our results appear comparable to previous reports analyzing spine SBRT. Further research is needed to determine optimum dose and fractionation to further improve local control and prevent toxicity.

  17. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Spinal Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Stauder, Michael C.; Miller, Robert C.; Bauer, Heather J.; Rose, Peter S.; Olivier, Kenneth R.; Brown, Paul D.; Brinkmann, Debra H.; Laack, Nadia N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Based on reports of safety and efficacy, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of malignant spinal tumors was initiated at our institution. We report prospective results of this population at Mayo Clinic. Materials and Methods: Between April 2008 and December 2010, 85 lesions in 66 patients were treated with SBRT for spinal metastases. Twenty-two lesions (25.8%) were treated for recurrence after prior radiotherapy (RT). The mean age of patients was 56.8 ± 13.4 years. Patients were treated to a median dose of 24 Gy (range, 10–40 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1–5). Radiation was delivered with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and prescribed to cover 80% of the planning target volume (PTV) with organs at risk such as the spinal cord taking priority over PTV coverage. Results: Tumor sites included 48, 22, 12, and 3 in the thoracic, lumbar, cervical, and sacral spine, respectively. The mean actuarial survival at 12 months was 52.2%. A total of 7 patients had both local and marginal failure, 1 patient experienced marginal but not local failure, and 1 patient had local failure only. Actuarial local control at 1 year was 83.3% and 91.2% in patients with and without prior RT. The median dose delivered to patients who experienced local/marginal failure was 24 Gy (range, 18–30 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1–5). No cases of Grade 4 toxicity were reported. In 1 of 2 patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity, SBRT was given after previous radiation. Conclusion: The results indicate SBRT to be an effective measure to achieve local control in spinal metastases. Toxicity of treatment was rare, including those previously irradiated. Our results appear comparable to previous reports analyzing spine SBRT. Further research is needed to determine optimum dose and fractionation to further improve local control and prevent toxicity.

  18. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, T.-W.; Wong, Victy Y.W.; Tung, Stewart Y.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To study the treatment outcome in patients with locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) who were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with non-metastatic, locally recurrent NPC who were treated with curative intent between 1998 and 2002 were retrospectively analyzed. The International Union Against Cancer T-stage distribution at recurrence (rT) was as follows: rT1-14, rT2-7, rT3-3, and rT4-6. All patients were treated with SRT with a daily fractional dose of 2.5-4.5 Gy (median, 3 Gy) in 8-22 fractions (median, 18 fractions). Total equivalent dose (TED) was calculated by the linear-quadratic formula without a time factor correction. Results: The 5-year actuarial overall survival rate, disease-specific survival rate, and local failure-free survival (LFFS) rate for the whole group were 40%, 41.4%, and 56.8%, respectively. The 3-year LFFS rates of rT1-2 and rT3-4 diseases were 65% and 66.7%, respectively. Seven of nine patients who received a TED <55 Gy recurred locally compared with 4 of 21 patients who received ≥55 Gy. Their corresponding 5-year LFFS rates were 22.2% and 75.8% (p = 0.005). The TED was the only factor significant in affecting the local control on univariate analyses. Conclusion: SRT is an effective treatment for locally recurrent NPC. TED ≥55 Gy should be given to secure a higher local control rate. The late complication rates were acceptable for patients with rT1-2 disease. For patients with rT3-4 disease, more works need to be done to further decrease the late complications.

  19. Hypopituitarism after stereotactic radiosurgery for pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiyuan; Lee Vance, Mary; Schlesinger, David; Sheehan, Jason P

    2013-04-01

    Studies of new-onset Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS)-induced hypopituitarism in large cohort of pituitary adenoma patients with long-term follow-up are lacking. We investigated the outcomes of SRS for pituitary adenoma patients with regard to newly developed hypopituitarism. This was a retrospective review of patients treated with SRS at the University of Virginia between 1994 and 2006. A total of 262 patients with a pituitary adenoma treated with SRS were reviewed. Thorough endocrine assessment was performed immediately before SRS and in regular follow-ups. Assessment consisted of 24-hour urine free cortisol (patients with Cushing disease), serum adrenocorticotropic hormone, cortisol, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, growth hormone, testosterone (men), prolactin, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and free T(4). Endocrine remission occurred in 144 of 199 patients with a functioning adenoma. Tumor control rate was 89%. Eighty patients experienced at least 1 axis of new-onset SRS-induced hypopituitarism. The new hypopituitarism rate was 30% based on endocrine follow-up ranging from 6 to 150 months; the actuarial rate of new pituitary hormone deficiency was 31.5% at 5 years after SRS. On univariate and multivariate analyses, variables regarding the increased risk of hypopituitarism included suprasellar extension and higher radiation dose to the tumor margin; there were no correlations among tumor volume, prior transsphenoidal adenomectomy, prior radiation therapy, and age at SRS. SRS provides an effective and safe treatment option for patients with a pituitary adenoma. Higher margin radiation dose to the adenoma and suprasellar extension were 2 independent predictors of SRS-induced hypopituitarism.

  20. Dosimetric performance and array assessment of plastic scintillation detectors for stereotactic radiosurgery quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Jean-Christophe; Thériault, Dany; Guillot, Mathieu; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-01-01

    To compare the performance of plastic scintillation detectors (PSD) for quality assurance (QA) in stereotactic radiosurgery conditions to a microion-chamber (IC), Gafchromic EBT2 films, 60 008 shielded photon diode (SD) and unshielded diodes (UD), and assess a new 2D crosshair array prototype adapted to small field dosimetry. The PSD consists of a 1 mm diameter by 1 mm long scintillating fiber (BCF-60, Saint-Gobain, Inc.) coupled to a polymethyl-methacrylate optical fiber (Eska premier, Mitsubishi Rayon Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Output factors (S(c,p)) for apertures used in radiosurgery ranging from 4 to 40 mm in diameter have been measured. The PSD crosshair array (PSDCA) is a water equivalent device made up of 49 PSDs contained in a 1.63 cm radius area. Dose profiles measurements were taken for radiosurgery fields using the PSDCA and were compared to other dosimeters. Moreover, a typical stereotactic radiosurgery treatment using four noncoplanar arcs was delivered on a spherical phantom in which UD, IC, or PSD was placed. Using the Xknife planning system (Integra Radionics Burlington, MA), 15 Gy was prescribed at the isocenter, where each detector was positioned. Output Factors measured by the PSD have a mean difference of 1.3% with Gafchromic EBT2 when normalized to a 10 × 10 cm(2) field, and 1.0% when compared with UD measurements normalized to the 35 mm diameter cone. Dose profiles taken with the PSD crosshair array agreed with other single detectors dose profiles in spite of the presence of the 49 PSDs. Gamma values comparing 1D dose profiles obtained with PSD crosshair array with Gafchromic EBT2 and UD measured profiles shows 98.3% and 100.0%, respectively, of detector passing the gamma acceptance criteria of 0.3 mm and 2%. The dose measured by the PSD for a complete stereotactic radiosurgery treatment is comparable to the planned dose corrected for its SD-based S(c,p) within 1.4% and 0.7% for 5 and 35 mm diameter cone, respectively. Furthermore

  1. Dosimetric performance and array assessment of plastic scintillation detectors for stereotactic radiosurgery quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagnon, Jean-Christophe; Theriault, Dany; Guillot, Mathieu; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: To compare the performance of plastic scintillation detectors (PSD) for quality assurance (QA) in stereotactic radiosurgery conditions to a microion-chamber (IC), Gafchromic EBT2 films, 60 008 shielded photon diode (SD) and unshielded diodes (UD), and assess a new 2D crosshair array prototype adapted to small field dosimetry. Methods: The PSD consists of a 1 mm diameter by 1 mm long scintillating fiber (BCF-60, Saint-Gobain, Inc.) coupled to a polymethyl-methacrylate optical fiber (Eska premier, Mitsubishi Rayon Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Output factors (S{sub c,p}) for apertures used in radiosurgery ranging from 4 to 40 mm in diameter have been measured. The PSD crosshair array (PSDCA) is a water equivalent device made up of 49 PSDs contained in a 1.63 cm radius area. Dose profiles measurements were taken for radiosurgery fields using the PSDCA and were compared to other dosimeters. Moreover, a typical stereotactic radiosurgery treatment using four noncoplanar arcs was delivered on a spherical phantom in which UD, IC, or PSD was placed. Using the Xknife planning system (Integra Radionics Burlington, MA), 15 Gy was prescribed at the isocenter, where each detector was positioned. Results: Output Factors measured by the PSD have a mean difference of 1.3% with Gafchromic EBT2 when normalized to a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} field, and 1.0% when compared with UD measurements normalized to the 35 mm diameter cone. Dose profiles taken with the PSD crosshair array agreed with other single detectors dose profiles in spite of the presence of the 49 PSDs. Gamma values comparing 1D dose profiles obtained with PSD crosshair array with Gafchromic EBT2 and UD measured profiles shows 98.3% and 100.0%, respectively, of detector passing the gamma acceptance criteria of 0.3 mm and 2%. The dose measured by the PSD for a complete stereotactic radiosurgery treatment is comparable to the planned dose corrected for its SD-based S{sub c,p} within 1.4% and 0.7% for 5 and 35 mm diameter cone

  2. Dosimetric performance and array assessment of plastic scintillation detectors for stereotactic radiosurgery quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagnon, Jean-Christophe; Theriault, Dany; Guillot, Mathieu; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the performance of plastic scintillation detectors (PSD) for quality assurance (QA) in stereotactic radiosurgery conditions to a microion-chamber (IC), Gafchromic EBT2 films, 60 008 shielded photon diode (SD) and unshielded diodes (UD), and assess a new 2D crosshair array prototype adapted to small field dosimetry. Methods: The PSD consists of a 1 mm diameter by 1 mm long scintillating fiber (BCF-60, Saint-Gobain, Inc.) coupled to a polymethyl-methacrylate optical fiber (Eska premier, Mitsubishi Rayon Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Output factors (S c,p ) for apertures used in radiosurgery ranging from 4 to 40 mm in diameter have been measured. The PSD crosshair array (PSDCA) is a water equivalent device made up of 49 PSDs contained in a 1.63 cm radius area. Dose profiles measurements were taken for radiosurgery fields using the PSDCA and were compared to other dosimeters. Moreover, a typical stereotactic radiosurgery treatment using four noncoplanar arcs was delivered on a spherical phantom in which UD, IC, or PSD was placed. Using the Xknife planning system (Integra Radionics Burlington, MA), 15 Gy was prescribed at the isocenter, where each detector was positioned. Results: Output Factors measured by the PSD have a mean difference of 1.3% with Gafchromic EBT2 when normalized to a 10 x 10 cm 2 field, and 1.0% when compared with UD measurements normalized to the 35 mm diameter cone. Dose profiles taken with the PSD crosshair array agreed with other single detectors dose profiles in spite of the presence of the 49 PSDs. Gamma values comparing 1D dose profiles obtained with PSD crosshair array with Gafchromic EBT2 and UD measured profiles shows 98.3% and 100.0%, respectively, of detector passing the gamma acceptance criteria of 0.3 mm and 2%. The dose measured by the PSD for a complete stereotactic radiosurgery treatment is comparable to the planned dose corrected for its SD-based S c,p within 1.4% and 0.7% for 5 and 35 mm diameter cone, respectively

  3. Optical coherence tomography imaging of the basal ganglia: feasibility and brief review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, W. O. Contreras; Ângelos, J. S. [Divisão de Neurocirurgia Funcional, Departamento de Neurologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Martinez, R. C. R. [Laboratório de Neuromodulação e Dor Experimental, Hospital Sírio-Libanes, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Takimura, C. K. [Instituto do Coração, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Teixeira, M. J. [Divisão de Neurocirurgia Funcional, Departamento de Neurologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lemos, P. A. Neto [Instituto do Coração, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fonoff, E. T., E-mail: fonoffet@usp.br [Divisão de Neurocirurgia Funcional, Departamento de Neurologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-09-29

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a promising medical imaging technique that uses light to capture real-time cross-sectional images from biological tissues in micrometer resolution. Commercially available optical coherence tomography systems are employed in diverse applications, including art conservation and diagnostic medicine, notably in cardiology and ophthalmology. Application of this technology in the brain may enable distinction between white matter and gray matter, and obtainment of detailed images from within the encephalon. We present, herein, the in vivo implementation of OCT imaging in the rat brain striatum. For this, two male 60-day-old rats (Rattus norvegicus, Albinus variation, Wistar) were stereotactically implanted with guide cannulas into the striatum to guide a 2.7-French diameter high-definition OCT imaging catheter (Dragonfly™, St. Jude Medical, USA). Obtained images were compared with corresponding histologically stained sections to collect imaging samples. A brief analysis of OCT technology and its current applications is also reported, as well as intra-cerebral OCT feasibility on brain mapping during neurosurgical procedures.

  4. Transnasal stereotactic surgery of pituitary adenomas concomitant with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metyolkina, L; Peresedov, V

    1995-01-01

    Since 1960 we have performed stereotactic transsphenoidal cryohypophysectomy in 70 patients with pituitary adenomas, 42 women and 28 men, aged 11-59 years. The dominant clinical syndrome was acromegaly in 50 patients, galactorrhea in 9, amenorrhea in 5, adiposogenital dystrophy in 4 and gigantism with mild endocrine symptomatology in 2 patients. In 67 patients the histological structure of the tumor was established by biopsy (50 patients with eosinophil adenoma, 10 with mixed-type adenoma, 4 with chromophobe adenoma and 3 with basophil adenoma). Somatotropic hormone, human growth hormone, prolactin, ACTH and 17-ketosteroid levels indicated active/inactive adenomas. In 42 cases the adenoma was only intrasellar, which was confirmed by contrast X-ray investigations, CT scanning, angiography and ophthalmological investigation. Transnasal stereotactic cryohypophysectomy was performed in all 70 cases using a stereotactic apparatus especially designed for operations on the pituitary. All patients (except 2) tolerated the operation well. No complications occurred. Vision deteriorated after operation in 1 patient. Thrombosis of the left middle cerebral artery developed in another patient. All the other patients noted improvement directly after operation - rapid diminution of signs of acromegaly and rapid restoration of normal values in hormonal tests. Six patients with continuing growth of the tumor underwent a second operation 1.5-6 years after the first operation. We conclude from our own clinical experience and information from the literature that transnasal stereotactic cryodestruction is highly effective and relatively safe in the management of pituitary adenoma.

  5. Determination of geometric inaccuracies in stereotactic magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotny, J. Jr.; Novotny, J.; Vymazal, J.

    2001-01-01

    The precision of stereotactic localization and volume determination was examined by using a Leksell's stereotactic frame, Leksell's MRI indicator box and Siemens 1 T MAGNETOM Expert scanner. The distortions in the spatial stereotactic coordinates and errors in volume determination were assessed through measurements employing a special phantom which simulated patient's head with different target volumes. The average geometrical distortion values gave evidence of a satisfactory precision for stereotactic MRI localization (average distortion 0.5 mm). No significant dependence of the magnitude of these distortions on the MRI examination sequence, MRI slice orientation, or spatial position of the measured point in the volume examined was observed. The mean percentage error of the volume determination determined by the technical capabilities of the imaging and treatment planning system was 10% for smaller volumes (below 2000 mm 3 ) and 5% for larger volumes (above 10000 mm 3 ). The subjective errors of volume determination were expressed as the standard deviation of mean volume calculated based on contours recorded by six independent observers (physicians) for each of five selected target volumes (meningioma, metastases, acoustic neurinoma, pituitary adenoma and arteriovenous malformation). The minimum standard deviation for volume recorded by six independent physicians was 5% (for metastases), the maximum value was 40 % (for arteriovenous malformation)

  6. A New System for Neuronavigation and Stereotactic Biopsy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    orientation within the brain. Stereotaxis as a concept in neurosurgery began by Horsley and. Clarke in 1908. The practical application of stereotaxis waited until 1947, when Spiegel and Wycis began their pioneering work. Many giant neurosurgeons find different solution for neuronavigation and stereotactic surgery.[1-5].

  7. Stereotactic gamma irradiation of basilar artery in cat. Preliminary experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, A; Wennerstrand, J; Leksell, D; Backlund, E O [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1978-01-01

    Irradiation of the basilar artery of cats by stereotactic technique was performed with doses varying from 100 to 300 Gy in a gamma unit. Histologically, vascular lesions such as vacuolization, degeneration and desquamation of the endothelium and hyalinization and necrosis of the muscular coat predominated, whereas reparatory reactions were relatively sparse. Thrombosis was completely absent.

  8. A prospective comparison between three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging and ventriculography for target-coordinate determination in frame-based functional stereotactic neurosurgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, P. R.; de Bie, R. M.; Majoie, C. B.; Speelman, J. D.; Bosch, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECT: The purpose of this prospective study was to compare stereotactic coordinates obtained with ventriculography with coordinates derived from stereotactic computer-reconstructed three-dimensional magnetic resonance (3D-MR) imaging in functional stereotactic procedures. METHODS: In 15

  9. Salvage Reirradiaton With Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Recurrent Head-and-Neck Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cengiz, Mustafa; Ozyigit, Goekhan; Yazici, Goezde; Dogan, Ali; Yildiz, Ferah; Zorlu, Faruk; Guerkaynak, Murat; Gullu, Ibrahim H.; Hosal, Sefik; Akyol, Fadil

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we present our results of reirradiation of locally recurrent head-and-neck cancer with image-guided, fractionated, frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy technique. Methods and Materials: From July 2007 to February 2009, 46 patients were treated using the CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA) at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. All patients had recurrent, unresectable, and previously irradiated head-and-neck cancer. The most prominent site was the nasopharynx (32.6%), and the most common histopathology was epidermoid carcinoma. The planning target volume was defined as the gross tumor volume identified on magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. There were 22 female and 24 male patients. Median age was 53 years (range, 19-87 years). The median tumor dose with stereotactic body radiotherapy was 30 Gy (range, 18-35 Gy) in a median of five (range, one to five) fractions. Results: Of 37 patients whose response to therapy was evaluated, 10 patients (27%) had complete tumor regression, 11 (29.8%) had partial response, and 10 (27%) had stable disease. Ultimate local disease control was achieved in 31 patients (83.8%). The overall survival was 11.93 months in median (ranged, 11.4 - 17.4 months), and the median progression free survival was 10.5 months. One-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 41% and 46%, respectively. Grade II or greater long-term complications were observed in 6 (13.3%) patients. On follow-up, 8 (17.3%) patients had carotid blow-out syndrome, and 7 (15.2%) patients died of bleeding from carotid arteries. We discovered that this fatal syndrome occurred only in patients with tumor surrounding carotid arteries and carotid arteries receiving all prescribed dose. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiotherapy is an appealing treatment option for patients with recurrent head-and-neck cancer previously treated with radiation to high doses. Good local control with

  10. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy as an Alternative to Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Eli; Tao, Yebin; Schipper, Matthew J; Bazzi, Latifa; Novelli, Paula M; Devlin, Pauline; Owen, Dawn; Cuneo, Kyle C; Lawrence, Theodore S; Parikh, Neehar D; Feng, Mary

    2018-01-01

    To conduct a large single-institution comparison of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) outcomes in similar groups of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). From 2006 to 2014, 209 patients with 1 to 2 tumors underwent TACE (n=84) to 114 tumors or image guided SBRT (n=125) to 173 tumors. Propensity score analysis with inverse probability of treatment weighting was used to compare outcomes between treatments while adjusting for imbalances in treatment assignment. Local control (LC), toxicity, and overall survival (OS) were retrospectively analyzed. The TACE and SBRT groups were similar with respect to the number of tumors treated per patient, underlying liver disease, and baseline liver function. Patients treated with SBRT were older (65 vs 61 years, P=.01), had smaller tumors (2.3 vs 2.9 cm, P<.001), and less frequently underwent liver transplantation (8% vs 18%, P=.01). The 1- and 2-year LC favored SBRT: 97% and 91%, respectively, for SBRT and 47% and 23% for TACE (hazard ratio 66.5, P<.001). For patients treated with TACE, higher alpha-fetoprotein (hazard ratio 1.11 per doubling, P=.008) and segmental portal vein thrombosis (hazard ratio 9.9, P<.001) were associated with worse LC. Predictors associated with LC after SBRT were not identified. Grade 3+ toxicity occurred after 13% and 8% of TACE and SBRT treatments, respectively (P=.05). There was no difference in OS between patients treated with TACE or SBRT. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a safe alternative to TACE for 1 to 2 tumors and provides better LC, with no observed difference in OS. Prospective comparative trials of TACE and SBRT are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fast-MICP for frameless image-guided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jiann-Der; Huang, Chung-Hsien; Wang, Sheng-Ta; Lin, Chung-Wei; Lee, Shin-Tseng

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In image-guided surgery (IGS) systems, image-to-physical registration is critical for reliable anatomical information mapping and spatial guidance. Conventional stereotactic frame-based or fiducial-based approaches provide accurate registration but are not patient-friendly. This study proposes a frameless cranial IGS system that uses computer vision techniques to replace the frame or fiducials with the natural features of the patient. Methods: To perform a cranial surgery with the proposed system, the facial surface of the patient is first reconstructed by stereo vision. Accuracy is ensured by capturing parallel-line patterns projected from a calibrated LCD projector. Meanwhile, another facial surface is reconstructed from preoperative computed tomography (CT) images of the patient. The proposed iterative closest point (ICP)-based algorithm [fast marker-added ICP (Fast-MICP)] is then used to register the two facial data sets, which transfers the anatomical information from the CT images to the physical space. Results: Experimental results reveal that the Fast-MICP algorithm reduces the computational cost of marker-added ICP (J.-D. Lee et al., ''A coarse-to-fine surface registration algorithm for frameless brain surgery,'' in Proceedings of International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2007, pp. 836-839) to 10% and achieves comparable registration accuracy, which is under 3 mm target registration error (TRE). Moreover, two types of optical-based spatial digitizing devices can be integrated for further surgical navigation. Anatomical information or image-guided surgical landmarks can be projected onto the patient to obtain an immersive augmented reality environment. Conclusion: The proposed frameless IGS system with stereo vision obtains TRE of less than 3 mm. The proposed Fast-MICP registration algorithm reduces registration time by 90% without compromising accuracy.

  12. Fast-MICP for frameless image-guided surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jiann-Der; Huang, Chung-Hsien; Wang, Sheng-Ta; Lin, Chung-Wei; Lee, Shin-Tseng [Department of Electrical Engineering, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Mechatronics, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Neurosurgery and Medical Augmented Reality Research Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, No. 199, Tunghwa Rd., Taipei 105, Taiwan (China)

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: In image-guided surgery (IGS) systems, image-to-physical registration is critical for reliable anatomical information mapping and spatial guidance. Conventional stereotactic frame-based or fiducial-based approaches provide accurate registration but are not patient-friendly. This study proposes a frameless cranial IGS system that uses computer vision techniques to replace the frame or fiducials with the natural features of the patient. Methods: To perform a cranial surgery with the proposed system, the facial surface of the patient is first reconstructed by stereo vision. Accuracy is ensured by capturing parallel-line patterns projected from a calibrated LCD projector. Meanwhile, another facial surface is reconstructed from preoperative computed tomography (CT) images of the patient. The proposed iterative closest point (ICP)-based algorithm [fast marker-added ICP (Fast-MICP)] is then used to register the two facial data sets, which transfers the anatomical information from the CT images to the physical space. Results: Experimental results reveal that the Fast-MICP algorithm reduces the computational cost of marker-added ICP (J.-D. Lee et al., ''A coarse-to-fine surface registration algorithm for frameless brain surgery,'' in Proceedings of International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2007, pp. 836-839) to 10% and achieves comparable registration accuracy, which is under 3 mm target registration error (TRE). Moreover, two types of optical-based spatial digitizing devices can be integrated for further surgical navigation. Anatomical information or image-guided surgical landmarks can be projected onto the patient to obtain an immersive augmented reality environment. Conclusion: The proposed frameless IGS system with stereo vision obtains TRE of less than 3 mm. The proposed Fast-MICP registration algorithm reduces registration time by 90% without compromising accuracy.

  13. Multimodality optical coherence tomography and fluorescence confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for image-guided feedback of intraocular injections in mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Oscar R.; Terrones, Benjamin D.; Leeburg, Kelsey C.; Mehanathan, Sankarathi B.; Levine, Edward M.; Tao, Yuankai K.

    2018-02-01

    Rodent models are robust tools for understanding human retinal disease and function because of their similarities with human physiology and anatomy and availability of genetic mutants. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been well-established for ophthalmic imaging in rodents and enables depth-resolved visualization of structures and image-based surrogate biomarkers of disease. Similarly, fluorescence confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) has demonstrated utility for imaging endogenous and exogenous fluorescence and scattering contrast in the mouse retina. Complementary volumetric scattering and en face fluorescence contrast from OCT and cSLO, respectively, enables cellular-resolution longitudinal imaging of changes in ophthalmic structure and function. We present a non-contact multimodal OCT+cSLO small animal imaging system with extended working distance to the pupil, which enables imaging during and after intraocular injection. While injections are routinely performed in mice to develop novel models of ophthalmic diseases and screen novel therapeutics, the location and volume delivered is not precisely controlled and difficult to reproduce. Animals were imaged using a custom-built OCT engine and scan-head combined with a modified commercial cSLO scan-head. Post-injection imaging showed structural changes associated with retinal puncture, including the injection track, a retinal elevation, and detachment of the posterior hyaloid. When combined with imagesegmentation, we believe OCT can be used to precisely identify injection locations and quantify injection volumes. Fluorescence cSLO can provide complementary contrast for either fluorescently labeled compounds or transgenic cells for improved specificity. Our non-contact OCT+cSLO system is uniquely-suited for concurrent imaging with intraocular injections, which may be used for real-time image-guided injections.

  14. Proton magnetic resonance chemical shift imaging (1H CSI)-directed stereotactic biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, B.-C.; Kim, B.-C.; Kang, J.-K.; Choi, B.-G.; Kim, E.-N.; Baik, H.-M.; Choe, B.-Y.; Naruse, S.

    2001-01-01

    Introduction. To add metabolic information during stereotactic biopsy target selection, the authors adopted proton chemical shift imaging ( 1 H CSI)-directed stereotactic biopsy. Currently, proton single voxel spectroscopy (SVS) technique has been reported in stereotactic biopsy. We performed 1 H CSI in combination with a stereotactic headframe and selected targets according to local metabolic information, and evaluated the pathological results. Patients and Method. The 1 H CSI-directed stereotactic biopsy was performed in four patients. 1 H CSI and conventional Gd-enhancement stereotactic MRI were performed simultaneously after the fitting of a stereotactic frame. After reconstructing the metabolic maps of N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/phosphocreatine (Cr), phosphocholine (Cho)/Cr, and Lactate/Cr ratios, focal areas of increased Cho/Cr ratio and Lac/Cr ratios were selected as target sites in the stereotactic MR images. Result. 1 H CSI is possible with the stereotactic headframe in place. No difficulty was experienced performing 1 H CSI or making a diagnosis. Pathological samples taken from areas of increased Cho/Cr ratios and decreased NAA/Cr ratios provided information upon increased cellularity, mitoses and cellular atypism, and facilitated diagnosis. Pathological samples taken from areas of increased Lac/ Cr ratio snowed predominant feature of necrosis. Conclusion. 1 H CSI was feasible with the stereotactic headframe in place. The final pathological results obtained were concordant with the local metabolic information from 1 H CSI. We believe that 1 H CSI-directed stereotactic biopsy has the potential to significantly improve the accuracy of stereotactic biopsy targeting. (author)

  15. Extracranial doses during stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy measured with thermoluminescent dosimeter in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, I.H.; Lim, D.H.; Kim, S.; Hong, S.; Kim, B.K.; Kang, W-S.; Wu, H.G.; Ha, S.W.; Park, C.I. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Therapeutic Radiology (Korea)

    2000-05-01

    Recently the usage of 3-dimensional non-coplanar radiotherapy technique is increasing. We measured the extracranial dose and its distribution g the above medical procedures to estimate effect of exit doses of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) of the intracranial target lesions using a linac system developed in our hospital. Among over hundred patients who were treated with SRS or FSRT from 1995 to 1998, radiation dosimetry data of 15 cases with SRS and 20 cases with FSRT were analyzed. All patients were adults. Of SRS cases, 11 were male and 4 were female. Vascular malformation cases were 9, benign tumors were 3, and malignant tumors were 3. Of FSRT cases, males were 12 and females were 8. Primary malignant brain tumors were 5, benign tumors were 6, and metastatic brain tumors were 10. Doses were measured with lithium fluoride TLD chips (7.5% Li-6 and 92.5% Li-7; TLD-100, Harshaw/Filtrol, USA). The chips were attached patient's skin at the various extracranial locations during SRS or FSRT. For SRS, 14-25 Gy were delivered with 1-2 isocenters using 12-38 mm circular tertiary collimators with reference to 50-80% isodose line conforming at the periphery of the target lesions. For FSRT, 5-28 fractions were used to deliver 9-56 Gy to periphery with dose maximum of 10-66 Gy. Both procedures used 6 MV X-ray generated from Clinac-18 (Varian, USA). For SRS procedures, extracranial surface doses (relative doses) were 8.07{+-}4.27 Gy (0.31{+-}0.16% Mean{+-}S.D.) at the upper eyelids, 6.13{+-}4.32 Gy (0.24{+-}0.16%) at the submental jaw, 7.80{+-}5.44 Gy (0.33{+-}0.26%) at thyroid, 1.78{+-}0.64 Gy (0.07{+-}0.02%) at breast, 0.75{+-}0.38 Gy (0.03{+-}0.02%) at umbilicus, 0.40{+-}0.07 Gy (0.02{+-}0.01%) at perineum, and 0.46{+-}0.39 Gy (0.02{+-}0.01%) at scrotum. Thus the farther the distance from the brain, the less the dose to the location. In overall the doses were less than 0.3% and thus less detrimental. For FSRT procedures

  16. Comparison of static conformal field with multiple noncoplanar arc techniques for stereotactic radiosurgery or stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Russell J.; Kuchnir, Franca T.; Sweeney, Patrick; Rubin, Steven J.; Dujovny, Manuel; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Chen, George T. Y.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Compare the use of static conformal fields with the use of multiple noncoplanar arcs for stereotactic radiosurgery or stereotactic radiotherapy treatment of intracranial lesions. Evaluate the efficacy of these treatment techniques to deliver dose distributions comparable to those considered acceptable in current radiotherapy practice. Methods and Materials: A previously treated radiosurgery case of a patient presenting with an irregularly shaped intracranial lesion was selected. Using a three-dimensional (3D) treatment-planning system, treatment plans using a single isocenter multiple noncoplanar arc technique and multiple noncoplanar conformal static fields were generated. Isodose distributions and dose volume histograms (DVHs) were computed for each treatment plan. We required that the 80% (of maximum dose) isodose surface enclose the target volume for all treatment plans. The prescription isodose was set equal to the minimum target isodose. The DVHs were analyzed to evaluate and compare the different treatment plans. Results: The dose distribution in the target volume becomes more uniform as the number of conformal fields increases. The volume of normal tissue receiving low doses (> 10% of prescription isodose) increases as the number of static fields increases. The single isocenter multiple arc plan treats the greatest volume of normal tissue to low doses, approximately 1.6 times more volume than that treated by four static fields. The volume of normal tissue receiving high (> 90% of prescription isodose) and intermediate (> 50% of prescription isodose) doses decreases by 29 and 22%, respectively, as the number of static fields is increased from four to eight. Increasing the number of static fields to 12 only further reduces the high and intermediate dose volumes by 10 and 6%, respectively. The volume receiving the prescription dose is more than 3.5 times larger than the target volume for all treatment plans. Conclusions: Use of a multiple noncoplanar

  17. Stereotactically Standard Areas: Applied Mathematics in the Service of Brain Targeting in Deep Brain Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis N. Mavridis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of stereotactically standard areas (SSAs within human brain nuclei belongs to the knowledge of the modern field of stereotactic brain microanatomy. These are areas resisting the individual variability of the nuclear location in stereotactic space. This paper summarizes the current knowledge regarding SSAs. A mathematical formula of SSAs was recently invented, allowing for their robust, reproducible, and accurate application to laboratory studies and clinical practice. Thus, SSAs open new doors for the application of stereotactic microanatomy to highly accurate brain targeting, which is mainly useful for minimally invasive neurosurgical procedures, such as deep brain stimulation.

  18. Stereotactically Standard Areas: Applied Mathematics in the Service of Brain Targeting in Deep Brain Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavridis, Ioannis N

    2017-12-11

    The concept of stereotactically standard areas (SSAs) within human brain nuclei belongs to the knowledge of the modern field of stereotactic brain microanatomy. These are areas resisting the individual variability of the nuclear location in stereotactic space. This paper summarizes the current knowledge regarding SSAs. A mathematical formula of SSAs was recently invented, allowing for their robust, reproducible, and accurate application to laboratory studies and clinical practice. Thus, SSAs open new doors for the application of stereotactic microanatomy to highly accurate brain targeting, which is mainly useful for minimally invasive neurosurgical procedures, such as deep brain stimulation.

  19. Computer-guided laser for neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivukangas, J; Louhisalmi, Y

    1990-01-01

    On the basis of over 40 neurosurgical laser operations, including CO2, Nd-YAG and simultaneous CO2/Nd-YAG laser procedures, a computer-guided system for spatial control of the laser beam has been developed. The pilot laser has several modes: it can direct the neurosurgeon along the central axis of the surgical microscope to stereotactically determined point-like targets or outline selected layers of underlying volume targets onto superficial surfaces such as scalp and cortex and onto the tissue at the appropriate depth. The active treatment laser can be guided by preoperative CT/MRI or intraoperative ultrasound image data for layer-by-layer resection of tumor. The laser system can be connected to the surgical field by rigid stereotactic means or by neuronavigator. In the present system, a special brain surgery adapter coordinates the imaging system and laser to the surgical field. Thus, the laser system can be used for image-guided surgical orientation, for demarcation of lesions and for actual layer-by-layer removal of tumor.

  20. Dose–response of critical structures in the posterior eye segment to hypofractioned stereotactic photon radiotherapy of choroidal melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunavoelgyi, Roman; Georg, Dietmar; Zehetmayer, Martin; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Pötter, Richard; Dörr, Wolfgang; Dieckmann, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To identify modifying factors and dose–/volume–response relationships for the retina and optic nerve related to highly conformal hypofractionated radiotherapy. Patients and methods: Seventy-three patients undergoing hypofractionated stereotactic photon radiotherapy of choroidal melanoma were included in this retrospective study. The volumes of the optic nerve receiving doses of more than 7.5 or 12 Gy, respectively, were defined. Optic nerve circumference included in the 30%, 40%, 50%, or 80% isodose (ON % ) and retina included in 30% or 40% were determined as quantal effects. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed for clinical variables as well as probit analysis to define EDx (doses where a positive response is expected in x% of the cases). Results: Median follow-up was 90.0 (interquartile range 69.0–98.0) months. Fifty-two (71%) and 49 (67%) patients developed radiation retinopathy and optic neuropathy (any grade). Age, length of follow-up and diabetes were significant parameters regarding retinopathy. Optic neuropathy was significantly influenced by age, length of follow-up, and ON 30 . The probability of optic neuropathy (any grade and grade ⩾2) significantly increases with the dose (p ranges from 0.0126 to 0.0211). Conclusion: Treatment planning should aim at minimizing encompassing isodoses particularly in the low dose region, without compromising PTV coverage

  1. Monte Carlo dosimetry for synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy of brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudou, Caroline; Balosso, Jacques; Esteve, Francois; Elleaume, Helene

    2005-01-01

    A radiation dose enhancement can be obtained in brain tumours after infusion of an iodinated contrast agent and irradiation with kilovoltage x-rays in tomography mode. The aim of this study was to assess dosimetric properties of the synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy technique applied to humans (SSR) for preparing clinical trials. We designed an interface for dose computation based on a Monte Carlo code (MCNPX). A patient head was constructed from computed tomography (CT) data and a tumour volume was modelled. Dose distributions were calculated in SSR configuration for various energy beam and iodine content in the target volume. From the calculations, it appears that the iodine-filled target (10 mg ml -1 ) can be efficiently irradiated by a monochromatic beam of energy ranging from 50 to 85 keV. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of stereotactic radiotherapy for treating deep-seated brain tumours with monoenergetic x-rays from a synchrotron

  2. Setup verification in stereotactic radiotherapy using digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Byung Chul; Oh, Do Hoon; Bae, Hoon Sik

    1999-01-01

    To develop a method for verifying a treatment setup in stereotactic radiotherapy by matching portal images to DRRs. Four pairs of orthogonal portal images of one patient immobilized by a thermoplastic mast frame for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy were compared with DRRs. Portal images are obtained in AP (anterior/posterior) and lateral directions with a target localizer box containing fiducial markers attached to a stereotactic frame. DRRs superimposed over a planned isocenter and fiducial markers are printed out on transparent films. And then, they were overlaid over orthogonal portal images by matching anatomical structures. From three different kind of objects (isocenter, fiducial markers, anatomical structure) on DRRs and portal images, the displacement error between anatomical structure and isocenters (overall setup error), and the displacement error between fiducial markers and isocenters (localization error)were measured. Localization errors were 1.5±0.3 mm (lateral), and immobilization errors were 1.9±0.5 mm (AP), 1.9±0.4 mm (lateral). In addition, overall setup errors were 1.6±0.9 mm (AP), 1.3±0.4 mm(lateral). From these orthogonal displacement errors, maximum 3D displacement errors(√(ΔAP) 2 +(ΔLat) 2 ) were found to be 1.7±0.4 mm for localization, 2.6±0.6 mm for immobilization, and 2.3±0.7 mm for overall treatment setup. By comparing orthogonal portal images with DRRs, we find out that it is possible to verify treatment setup directly in stereotactic radiotherapy

  3. Stereotactic body radiotherapy in lung cancer: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Cintra Vita; Ferreira, Paula Pratti Rodrigues; Moraes, Fabio Ynoe de; Neves Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade, E-mail: heloisa.carvalho@hc.fm.usp.br [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia; Gadia, Rafael [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia; Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radiologia e Oncologia. Servico de Radioterapia

    2015-07-15

    For early-stage lung cancer, the treatment of choice is surgery. In patients who are not surgical candidates or are unwilling to undergo surgery, radiotherapy is the principal treatment option. Here, we review stereotactic body radiotherapy, a technique that has produced quite promising results in such patients and should be the treatment of choice, if available. We also present the major indications, technical aspects, results, and special situations related to the technique. (author)

  4. Stereotactic technique of RF antenna implantation for brain hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, H.; Uzuka, T.; Grinev, I.; Tanaka, R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We have tried 13.56 MHz RF interstitial hyperthermia for the patients with malignant brain tumor. The purpose of this report is to assess the complication risk rate and the achievement yield of stereotactic procedure for RF antenna implantation into the deep-seated brain tumor. One hundred and twenty-five patients underwent 144 stereotactic RF antenna implantation procedures for interstitial hyperthermia for malignant brain tumors at Niigata University, Japan. One hundred and eight patients had malignant gliomas (54 primary, 54 recurrent), 24 had metastatic tumors, 5 had malignant lymphomas, 5 had meningiomas and 2 had miscellaneous tumors. Indication of this trial was the tumor with inoperative deep-seated tumor or elderly patients. RF antennas and catheters for thermistor probes were set into the tumor with stereotactic apparatus under local anesthesia. Postoperative CT scan underwent in order to assess the accuracy of antenna setting and to check the complications. The hyperthermic treatment underwent with a single antenna in 85 patients, 2 antennas in 43 patients, 3 in 2, 4 in 12, 5 in 1 and 6 antennas in 1 patient. Appropriate RF antenna positioning was obtained in 138 of 144 procedures (95.8 %). Six patients incurred complications (4.2 %). Three patients suffered intratumoral hemorrhage. RF antennas were set into the inappropriate position in 2 cases, hyperthermia was not achieved. One patient occurred with liquorrhea. However, six patients (4.2 %) incurred complications, stereotactic RF antenna setting was a safe and reliable technique of the hyperthermic treatment for the patients with malignant brain tumors. (author)

  5. Digital imaging improves upright stereotactic core biopsy of mammographic microcalcifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitlock, J.P.L.; Evans, A.J.; Burrell, H.C.; Pinder, S.E.; Ellis, I.O.; Blamey, R.W.; Wilson, A.R.M.

    2000-01-01

    AIM: This comparative study was carried out to assess the effect of using digital images compared to conventional film-screen mammography on the accuracy of core biopsy of microcalcifications using upright stereotactic equipment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The biopsy results from a consecutive series of 104 upright stereotactic 14-gauge core biopsies performed with conventional X-ray (Group A) were compared with 40 biopsies carried out using stereotaxis with digital imaging (Group B). In all cases specimen radiography was performed and analysed for the presence of calcifications. Pathological correlation was then carried out with needle and surgical histology. RESULTS: The use of digital add-on equipment increased the radiographic calcification retrieval rate from 55 to 85% (P < 0.005). The absolute sensitivity of core biopsy in pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) cases rose from 34 to 69% (P < 0.03), with the complete sensitivity increasing from 52 to 94% (P < 0.005). For DCIS with or without an invasive component the absolute sensitivity rose from 41 to 67% (P = 0.052), while the complete sensitivity was 59% before and 86% after the introduction of digital imaging (P < 0.04). CONCLUSION: Digital equipment improves the performance of upright stereotactic core biopsy of microcalcifications, giving a significantly increased success rate in accurately obtaining calcifications. This leads to an improvement in absolute and complete sensitivity of core biopsy when diagnosing DCIS. Whitlock, J.P.L. (2000)

  6. MRI appearance of stereotactic thalamic lesions in Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terada, Kousaku; Asakura, Tetsuhiko; Kasamo, Shizuya; Kusumoto, Kazuhiro; Niiro, Masaki [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Uetsuhara, Kouichi

    1990-04-01

    Stereotactic thalamotomy is a useful method of treatment in selected cases of Parkinsonism. Previously, the consequences of these stereotactic lesions have been assessed by means of their postoperative clinical effects and CT appearances. Now, however, MR imaging allows a clearer, three-dimensional demonstration of the lesion than does CT scanning; its appearance can now be correlated with the results obtained by the use of the radiofrequency method and its clinical effects. The authors have performed postoperative MR imaging on 12 patients with a total of 13 thalamotomies. The early postoperative MR appearance of these lesions is composed of two relatively clear and distinct parts. In T{sub 1}-weighted imaging, there is a central hyper-intense core and a low-intensity area surrounding it. In T{sub 2}-weighted imaging, there is a central hypo-intense core and a high-intensity area surrounding it. The late postoperative MR appearance is a low-intensity spot in T{sub 1}-weighted imaging and a high-intensity spot in T{sub 2}-weighted imaging. MR imaging is very useful for the postoperative evaluation of stereotactic thalamotomy in helping to identify the location of and the chronological change in the radiofrequency lesions. (author).

  7. Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: preliminary results with the CyberKnife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lartigau, Eric; Mirabel, Xavier; Prevost, Bernard; Lacornerie, Thomas; Dubus, Francois; Sarrazin, Thierry

    2009-04-01

    In the field of radiation oncology, equipment for fractionated radiotherapy and single-dose radiosurgery has become increasingly accurate, together with the introduction of robotized treatments. A robot is a device that can be programmed to carry out accurate, repeated and adjusted tasks in a given environment. Treatment of extracranial lesions involves taking into account organ mobility (tumor and healthy tissue) whilst retaining the ability to stereotactically locate the target. New imaging techniques (single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET)) provide further relevant information to slice images (computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI) for target definition. Hypo-fractionated treatments can only be used for curative treatment if the target is accurately defined and tracked during treatment. The CyberKnife is a non-invasive system of radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. For intracranial lesions treated by single-dose radiosurgery, it has been used to treat meningioma, acoustic neuromas, pituitary adenoma, metastases, arteriovenous malformations and refractory pain (trigeminal neuralgia). More than 10,000 patients have been treated worldwide. Currently, the most significant developments are in the field of extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy (lung, liver, reirradiation, prostate, etc.). Clinical results obtained in the CyberKnife Nord-Ouest program after 1 year of experience are presented. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Adrenal Gland Metastases: University of Florence Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casamassima, Franco; Livi, Lorenzo; Masciullo, Stefano; Menichelli, Claudia; Masi, Laura; Meattini, Icro; Bonucci, Ivano; Agresti, Benedetta; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Doro, Raffaela

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a retrospective single-institution outcome after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for adrenal metastases. Methods and Materials: Between February 2002 and December 2009, we treated 48 patients with SBRT for adrenal metastases. The median age of the patient population was 62.7 years (range, 43–77 years). In the majority of patients, the prescription dose was 36 Gy in 3 fractions (70% isodose, 17.14 Gy per fraction at the isocenter). Eight patients were treated with single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery and forty patients with multi-fraction stereotactic radiotherapy. Results: Overall, the series of patients was followed up for a median of 16.2 months (range, 3–63 months). At the time of analysis, 20 patients were alive and 28 patients were dead. The 1- and 2-year actuarial overall survival rates were 39.7% and 14.5%, respectively. We recorded 48 distant failures and 2 local failures, with a median interval to local failure of 4.9 months. The actuarial 1-year disease control rate was 9%; the actuarial 1- and 2-year local control rate was 90%. Conclusion: Our retrospective study indicated that SBRT for the treatment of adrenal metastases represents a safe and effective option with a control rate of 90% at 2 years.

  9. Development of a frameless stereotactic radiosurgery system based on real-time 6D position monitoring and adaptive head motion compensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, Rodney D; Wen Zhifei; Sadinski, Meredith; Farrey, Karl; Yenice, Kamil M [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)], E-mail: rwiersma@uchicago.edu

    2010-01-21

    Stereotactic radiosurgery delivers radiation with great spatial accuracy. To achieve sub-millimeter accuracy for intracranial SRS, a head ring is rigidly fixated to the skull to create a fixed reference. For some patients, the invasiveness of the ring can be highly uncomfortable and not well tolerated. In addition, placing and removing the ring requires special expertise from a neurosurgeon, and patient setup time for SRS can often be long. To reduce the invasiveness, hardware limitations and setup time, we are developing a system for performing accurate head positioning without the use of a head ring. The proposed method uses real-time 6D optical position feedback for turning on and off the treatment beam (gating) and guiding a motor-controlled 3D head motion compensation stage. The setup consists of a central control computer, an optical patient motion tracking system and a 3D motion compensation stage attached to the front of the LINAC couch. A styrofoam head cast was custom-built for patient support and was mounted on the compensation stage. The motion feedback of the markers was processed by the control computer, and the resulting motion of the target was calculated using a rigid body model. If the target deviated beyond a preset position of 0.2 mm, an automatic position correction was performed with stepper motors to adjust the head position via the couch mount motion platform. In the event the target deviated more than 1 mm, a safety relay switch was activated and the treatment beam was turned off. The feasibility of the concept was tested using five healthy volunteers. Head motion data were acquired with and without the use of motion compensation over treatment times of 15 min. On average, test subjects exceeded the 0.5 mm tolerance 86% of the time and the 1.0 mm tolerance 45% of the time without motion correction. With correction, this percentage was reduced to 5% and 2% for the 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm tolerances, respectively.

  10. Development of a frameless stereotactic radiosurgery system based on real-time 6D position monitoring and adaptive head motion compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiersma, Rodney D; Wen Zhifei; Sadinski, Meredith; Farrey, Karl; Yenice, Kamil M

    2010-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery delivers radiation with great spatial accuracy. To achieve sub-millimeter accuracy for intracranial SRS, a head ring is rigidly fixated to the skull to create a fixed reference. For some patients, the invasiveness of the ring can be highly uncomfortable and not well tolerated. In addition, placing and removing the ring requires special expertise from a neurosurgeon, and patient setup time for SRS can often be long. To reduce the invasiveness, hardware limitations and setup time, we are developing a system for performing accurate head positioning without the use of a head ring. The proposed method uses real-time 6D optical position feedback for turning on and off the treatment beam (gating) and guiding a motor-controlled 3D head motion compensation stage. The setup consists of a central control computer, an optical patient motion tracking system and a 3D motion compensation stage attached to the front of the LINAC couch. A styrofoam head cast was custom-built for patient support and was mounted on the compensation stage. The motion feedback of the markers was processed by the control computer, and the resulting motion of the target was calculated using a rigid body model. If the target deviated beyond a preset position of 0.2 mm, an automatic position correction was performed with stepper motors to adjust the head position via the couch mount motion platform. In the event the target deviated more than 1 mm, a safety relay switch was activated and the treatment beam was turned off. The feasibility of the concept was tested using five healthy volunteers. Head motion data were acquired with and without the use of motion compensation over treatment times of 15 min. On average, test subjects exceeded the 0.5 mm tolerance 86% of the time and the 1.0 mm tolerance 45% of the time without motion correction. With correction, this percentage was reduced to 5% and 2% for the 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm tolerances, respectively.

  11. Nelson's syndrome: single centre experience using the linear accelerator (LINAC) for stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Peter J; Williams, Janet R; Smee, Robert I

    2014-09-01

    Nelson's syndrome is a unique clinical phenomenon of growth of a pituitary adenoma following bilateral adrenalectomies for the control of Cushing's disease. Primary management is surgical, with limited effective medical therapies available. We report our own institution's series of this pathology managed with radiation: prior to 1990, 12 patients were managed with conventional radiotherapy, and between 1990 and 2007, five patients underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and two patients fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), both using the linear accelerator (LINAC). Tumour control was equivocal, with two of the five SRS patients having a reduction in tumour volume, one patient remaining unchanged, and two patients having an increase in volume. In the FSRT group, one patient had a decrease in tumour volume whilst the other had an increase in volume. Treatment related morbidity was low. Nelson's syndrome is a challenging clinical scenario, with a highly variable response to radiation in our series. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cushing's disease: a single centre's experience using the linear accelerator (LINAC) for stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, P J; Williams, J R; Smee, R I

    2014-01-01

    Cushing's disease is hypercortisolaemia secondary to an adrenocorticotrophic hormone secreting pituitary adenoma. Primary management is almost always surgical, with limited effective medical interventions available. Adjuvant therapy in the form of radiation is gaining popularity, with the bulk of the literature related to the Gamma Knife. We present the results from our own institution using the linear accelerator (LINAC) since 1990. Thirty-six patients who underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), one patient who underwent fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) and for the purposes of comparison, 13 patients who had undergone conventional radiotherapy prior to 1990, were included in the analysis. Serum cortisol levels improved in nine of 36 (25%) SRS patients and 24 hour urinary free cortisol levels improved in 13 of 36 patients (36.1%). Tumour volume control was excellent in the SRS group with deterioration in only one patient (3%). The patient who underwent FSRT had a highly aggressive tumour refractory to radiation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for skull base tumors: analysis of treatment accuracy using a stereotactic mask fixation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montagnoli Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the accuracy of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT using a stereotactic mask fixation system. Patients and Methods Sixteen patients treated with FSRT were involved in the study. A commercial stereotactic mask fixation system (BrainLAB AG was used for patient immobilization. Serial CT scans obtained before and during FSRT were used to assess the accuracy of patient immobilization by comparing the isocenter position. Daily portal imaging were acquired to establish day to day patient position variation. Displacement errors along the different directions were calculated as combination of systematic and random errors. Results The mean isocenter displacements based on localization and verification CT imaging were 0.1 mm (SD 0.3 mm in the lateral direction, 0.1 mm (SD 0.4 mm in the anteroposterior, and 0.3 mm (SD 0.4 mm in craniocaudal direction. The mean 3D displacement was 0.5 mm (SD 0.4 mm, being maximum 1.4 mm. No significant differences were found during the treatment (P = 0.4. The overall isocenter displacement as calculated by 456 anterior and lateral portal images were 0.3 mm (SD 0.9 mm in the mediolateral direction, -0.2 mm (SD 1 mm in the anteroposterior direction, and 0.2 mm (SD 1.1 mm in the craniocaudal direction. The largest displacement of 2.7 mm was seen in the cranio-caudal direction, with 95% of displacements Conclusions The results indicate that the setup error of the presented mask system evaluated by CT verification scans and portal imaging are minimal. Reproducibility of the isocenter position is in the best range of positioning reproducibility reported for other stereotactic systems.

  14. Utility Estimation of the Manufactured Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Ahn, Jong Ho; Seo, Jeong Min; Shin, Eun Hyeak; Choi, Byeong Gi; Song, Gi Won

    2011-01-01

    Immobilizations used in order to maintain the reproducibility of a patient set-up and the stable posture for a long period are important more than anything else for the accurate treatment when the stereotactic body radiotherapy is underway. So the purpose of this study is to adapt the optimum immobilizations for the stereotactic body radiotherapy by comparing two commercial immobilizations with the self-manufactured immobilizations. Five people were selected for the experiment and three different immobilizations (A: Wing-board, B: BodyFix system, C: Arm up holder with vac-lock) were used to each target. After deciding on the target's most stable respiratory cycles, the targets were asked to wear a goggle monitor and maintain their respiration regularly for thirty minutes to obtain the respiratory signals. To analyze the respiratory signal, the standard deviation and the variation value of the peak value and the valley value of the respiratory signal were separated by time zone with the self-developed program at the hospital and each tie-downs were compared for the estimation by calculating a comparative index using the above. The stability of each immobilizations were measured in consideration of deviation changes studied in each respiratory time lapse. Comparative indexes of each immobilizations of each experimenter are shown to be A: 11.20, B: 4.87, C: 1.63 / A: 3.94, B: 0.67, C: 0.13 / A: 2.41, B: 0.29, C: 0.04 / A: 0.16, B: 0.19, C: 0.007 / A: 35.70, B: 2.37, C: 1.86. And when all five experimenters wore the immobilizations C, the test proved the most stable value while four people wearing A and one man wearing D expressed relatively the most unstable respiratory outcomes. The self-developed immobilizations, so called the arm up holder vac-lock for the stereotactic body radiotherapy is expected to improve the effect of the treatment by decreasing the intra-fraction organ motions because it keeps the respiration more stable than other two immobilizations

  15. CT stereotactic reconstruction of oral cavity interstitial plastic tube implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crispin, V.; Carrasco, P.; Guardino, C.; Lopez, J.; Chust, M.; Arribas, L.; Mengual, J.; Miragall, E.G.; Hernandez, A.; Carrascosa, M.; Cardenal, R.; Guinot, J.; Casana, M.; Prats, C.

    1996-01-01

    The continuous using of CT images in external RT have made us think of its applications for plastic tube interstitial implants in the oral cavity in order to calculate the dose delivered by an interstitial implant at any point of the image and its relationship with local control and complications. Moreover, the outcoming result of the whole treatment depends on whether the irradiated volume up to a prescribed dose includes the CTV or not. None of these objectives may be achieved through the classical film reconstruction. Although film reconstruction appeared as the only accurate method for these purposes in the early eighties, it does not allow us to calculate doses at critical points or volumes. Therefore possible complications over critical tissues surrounding the radioactive implant cannot be taken into account in a precise way. The use of a stereotactic coordinate system could make CT reconstruction as precise as film reconstruction. As our stereotactic frame can be placed over the patient in 'direct' or 'inverse' positions it is really interesting in the applications we are talking about. We also have used a non invasive standard plexiglass helmet commonly used in stereotactic fractionated irradiations in teletherapy. It fits perfectly the patient's head and avoids any movement of the patient during the CT exam. We do parallel slices, approximately perpendicular to the iridium wires (following the Paris System), covering the whole implant helping ourselves with both bone and implant references. The dose-volume histograms and DNR (dose nonuniformity ratio) index defined by Saw et Al are used for intercomparison between the ortogonal and the stereotactic reconstructions. The existence of a minimum in the DNR curve indicates that there is a reference dose rate for this implant which provides an optimal dose distribution. If we calculate which is the minimum of each method, we find they are very close. So, as both methods give very similar results, we can conclude

  16. The use of Brainsuite iCT for frame-based stereotactic procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøth-Rasmussen, Jane; Jespersen, Bo; Brennum, Jannick

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Frame-based stereotactic procedures are the gold standard because of their superior stereotactic accuracy. The procedure used to be in multiple steps and was especially cumbersome and hazardous in intubated patients. A single-step procedure using intraoperative CT was created...

  17. Measurement of relative dose distributions in stereotactic radiosurgery by the polymer-gel dosimeter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný ml., J.; Spěváček, V.; Hrbáček, J.; Judas, L.; Novotný, J.; Dvořák, P.; Tlacháčová, D.; Schmitt, M.; Tintěra, J.; Vymazal, J.; Čechák, T.; Michálek, Jiří; Přádný, Martin; Liščák, R.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 5, - (2004), s. 225-235 ISSN 1024-2651. [International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society Meeting /6./. Kyoto, 22.06.2003-26.06.2003] R&D Projects: GA MZd NC7460 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : stereotactic radiosurgery * polymer-gel dosimeter Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology

  18. Efficient and accurate stereotactic radiotherapy using flattening filter free beams and HexaPOD robotic tables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Hansen, C. R.; Brink, C.

    2016-01-01

    Flattening filter free (FFF) high dose rate beam technique was introduced for brain stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT). Furthermore, a HexaPOD treatment table was introduced for the brain SRS to enable correction of rotational setup errors. 19 filter fl...

  19. Dosimetric verification of stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy dose distributions using Gafchromic EBT3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusumano, Davide, E-mail: davide.cusumano@unimi.it [School of Medical Physics, University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Fumagalli, Maria L. [Health Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan (Italy); Marchetti, Marcello; Fariselli, Laura [Department of Neurosurgery, Radiotherapy Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan (Italy); De Martin, Elena [Health Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    Aim of this study is to examine the feasibility of using the new Gafchromic EBT3 film in a high-dose stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy quality assurance procedure. Owing to the reduced dimensions of the involved lesions, the feasibility of scanning plan verification films on the scanner plate area with the best uniformity rather than using a correction mask was evaluated. For this purpose, signal values dispersion and reproducibility of film scans were investigated. Uniformity was then quantified in the selected area and was found to be within 1.5% for doses up to 8 Gy. A high-dose threshold level for analyses using this procedure was established evaluating the sensitivity of the irradiated films. Sensitivity was found to be of the order of centiGray for doses up to 6.2 Gy and decreasing for higher doses. The obtained results were used to implement a procedure comparing dose distributions delivered with a CyberKnife system to planned ones. The procedure was validated through single beam irradiation on a Gafchromic film. The agreement between dose distributions was then evaluated for 13 patients (brain lesions, 5 Gy/die prescription isodose ~80%) using gamma analysis. Results obtained using Gamma test criteria of 5%/1 mm show a pass rate of 94.3%. Gamma frequency parameters calculation for EBT3 films showed to strongly depend on subtraction of unexposed film pixel values from irradiated ones. In the framework of the described dosimetric procedure, EBT3 films proved to be effective in the verification of high doses delivered to lesions with complex shapes and adjacent to organs at risk.

  20. Field Guide to Radiometry

    CERN Document Server

    Grant, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Written from a systems engineering perspective, this SPIE Field Guide covers topics in optical radiation propagation, material properties, sources, detectors, system components, measurement, calibration, and photometry. The book's organization and extensive collection of diagrams, tables, and graphs will enable the reader to efficiently identify and apply relevant information to radiometric problems arising amid the demands of today's fast-paced technical environment.

  1. Discovery of a Highly Unequal-mass Binary T Dwarf with Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics: A Coevality Test of Substellar Theoretical Models and Effective Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Michael C.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Leggett, S. K.

    2010-10-01

    Highly unequal-mass ratio binaries are rare among field brown dwarfs, with the mass ratio distribution of the known census described by q (4.9±0.7). However, such systems enable a unique test of the joint accuracy of evolutionary and atmospheric models, under the constraint of coevality for the individual components (the "isochrone test"). We carry out this test using two of the most extreme field substellar binaries currently known, the T1 + T6 epsilon Ind Bab binary and a newly discovered 0farcs14 T2.0 + T7.5 binary, 2MASS J12095613-1004008AB, identified with Keck laser guide star adaptive optics. The latter is the most extreme tight binary resolved to date (q ≈ 0.5). Based on the locations of the binary components on the Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram, current models successfully indicate that these two systems are coeval, with internal age differences of log(age) = -0.8 ± 1.3(-1.0+1.2 -1.3) dex and 0.5+0.4 -0.3(0.3+0.3 -0.4) dex for 2MASS J1209-1004AB and epsilon Ind Bab, respectively, as inferred from the Lyon (Tucson) models. However, the total mass of epsilon Ind Bab derived from the H-R diagram (≈ 80 M Jup using the Lyon models) is strongly discrepant with the reported dynamical mass. This problem, which is independent of the assumed age of the epsilon Ind Bab system, can be explained by a ≈ 50-100 K systematic error in the model atmosphere fitting, indicating slightly warmer temperatures for both components; bringing the mass determinations from the H-R diagram and the visual orbit into consistency leads to an inferred age of ≈ 6 Gyr for epsilon Ind Bab, older than previously assumed. Overall, the two T dwarf binaries studied here, along with recent results from T dwarfs in age and mass benchmark systems, yield evidence for small (≈100 K) errors in the evolutionary models and/or model atmospheres, but not significantly larger. Future parallax, resolved spectroscopy, and dynamical mass measurements for 2MASS J1209-1004AB will enable a more

  2. Scoring system predictive of survival for patients undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kress Marie-Adele S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT is an emerging treatment option for liver tumors. This study evaluated outcomes after SBRT to identify prognostic variables and to develop a novel scoring system predictive of survival. Methods The medical records of 52 patients with a total of 85 liver lesions treated with SBRT from 2003 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-four patients had 1 lesion; 27 had 2 or more. Thirteen lesions were primary tumors; 72 were metastases. Fiducials were placed in all patients prior to SBRT. The median prescribed dose was 30 Gy (range, 16 – 50 Gy in a median of 3 fractions (range, 1–5. Results With median follow-up of 11.3 months, median overall survival (OS was 12.5 months, and 1 year OS was 50.8%. In 42 patients with radiographic follow up, 1 year local control was 74.8%. On univariate analysis, number of lesions (p = 0.0243 and active extralesional disease (p  Conclusions SBRT offers a safe and feasible treatment option for liver tumors. A prognostic scoring system based on the number of liver lesions, activity of extralesional disease, and KPS predicts survival following SBRT and can be used as a guide for prospective validation and ultimately for treatment decision-making.

  3. Megavoltage conebeam CT cine as final verification of treatment plan in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudithipudi, Vijay; Gayou, Olivier; Colonias, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    To analyse the clinical impact of megavoltage conebeam computed tomography (MV-CBCT) cine on internal target volume (ITV) coverage in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). One hundred and six patients received lung SBRT. All underwent 4D computed tomography simulation followed by treatment via image guided 3D conformal or intensity modulated radiation. Prior to SBRT, all patients underwent MV-CBCT cine, in which raw projections are displayed as beam's-eye-view fluoroscopic series with the planning target volume (PTV) projected onto each image, enabling verification of tumour motion relative to the PTV and assessment of adequacy of treatment margin. Megavoltage conebeam computed tomography cine was completed 1–2 days prior to SBRT. Four patients (3.8%) had insufficient ITV coverage inferiorly at cine review. All four plans were changed by adding 5 mm on the PTV margin inferiorly. The mean change in PTV volumes was 3.9 cubic centimetres (cc) (range 1.85–6.32 cc). Repeat cine was performed after plan modification to ensure adequate PTV coverage in the modified plans. PTV margin was adequate in the majority of patients with this technique. MV-CBCT cine did show insufficient coverage in a small subset of patients. Insufficient PTV margins may be a function of 4D CT simulation inadequacies or deficiencies in visualizing the ITV inferior border in the full-inhale phase. MV-CBCT cine is a valuable tool for final verification of PTV margins.

  4. Stereotactic Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Lung Metastases from Bone and Soft-tissue Sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frakulli, Rezarta; Salvi, Fabrizio; Balestrini, Damiano; Parisi, Alessandro; Palombarini, Marcella; Cammelli, Silvia; Rocca, Michele; Salone, Mariacristina; Longhi, Alessandra; Ferrari, Stefano; Morganti, Alessio G; Frezza, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate local control and toxicity in a group of patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung metastases (LM) from bone and soft tissue sarcomas. From October 2010 to July 2014, patients with LM from sarcomas not suitable for surgery were treated with daily cone-beam computed tomography-guided SBRT. The dose administered ranged from 30 to 60 Gy in 3-8 fractions. Acute and late toxicity were scored according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. A total of 24 patients with 68 LM from sarcomas were treated with SBRT. The median follow-up after SBRT was 17 months (range=11-51 months). Two-year actuarial lesion local control and overall survival were 85.9% and 66.4%, respectively. No G3 or greater acute and late toxicities were observed. SBRT is a safe and effective treatment for LM from sarcoma and might be used as an alternative option in patients unfit for surgery. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  5. Pelvic re-irradiation using stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR): A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Louise Janet; Lilley, John; Hawkins, Maria A; Henry, Ann M; Dickinson, Peter; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2017-11-01

    To perform a systematic review regarding the use of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for the re-irradiation of recurrent malignant disease within the pelvis, to guide the clinical implementation of this technique. A systematic search strategy was adopted using the MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases. 195 articles were identified, of which 17 were appropriate for inclusion. Studies were small and data largely retrospective. In total, 205 patients are reported to have received pelvic SABR re-irradiation. Dose and fractionation schedules and re-irradiated volumes are highly variable. Little information is provided regarding organ at risk constraints adopted in the re-irradiation setting. Treatment appears well-tolerated overall, with nine grade 3 and six grade 4 toxicities amongst thirteen re-irradiated patients. Local control at one year ranged from 51% to 100%. Symptomatic improvements were also noted. For previously irradiated patients with recurrent pelvic disease, SABR re-irradiation could be a feasible intervention for those who otherwise have limited options. Evidence to support this technique is limited but shows initial promise. Based on the available literature, suggestions for a more formal SABR re-irradiation pathway are proposed. Prospective studies and a multidisciplinary approach are required to optimise future treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary renal cell carcinoma and adrenal metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Gargi; Louie, Alexander V; Pryor, David; Vela, Ian; Lo, Simon S; Teh, Bin S; Siva, Shankar

    2017-09-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and metastatic adrenal lesions continues to rise and present evolving complexities in terms of management. Technical challenges in treatment delivery are compounded by the setting of an ageing patient population with multiple medical co-morbidities. While the standard of care treatment for both primary RCC and oligometastatic adrenal lesions has typically been surgery, a number of patients may be medically or surgically inoperable, and for whom alternative options require consideration. Additionally, in metastatic disease, surgery presents an invasive option, sometimes with unacceptable risks of perioperative morbidity and therefore is considered a less desirable option to some. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an established radiotherapy technique that is rapidly being incorporated into many radiotherapy departments, particu-larly with the increasing availability and capabilities of modern linear accelerators to deliver precise image guided treatment. There are considerable advantages of SBRT including its ability to provide a non-invasive ablative treatment with very few treatment sessions, with emerging evidence showing promising rates of local control (LC) and low associated mor-bidity. This review details the use of SBRT for primary RCC as well as adrenal metastases, focusing on issues including patient selection, technical considerations, and patient out-comes. Furthermore, this review explores some recent insights into the radiobiology of RCC, the immunomodulatory effects of SBRT, and the use of systemic agents with SBRT.

  7. Fractionated stereotactic conformal radiotherapy following conservative surgery in the control of craniopharyngiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Saran, Frank; Traish, Daphne; Soomal, Rubin; Sardell, Susan; Gonsalves, Adam; Ashley, Susan; Warrington, Jim; Burke, Kevin; Mosleh-Shirazi, Amin; Brada, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the technique and results of stereotactically guided conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) in patients with craniopharyngioma after conservative surgery. Methods and materials: Thirty-nine patients with craniopharyngioma aged 3-68 years (median age 18 years) were treated with SCRT between June 1994 and January 2003. All patients were referred for radiotherapy after undergoing one or more surgical procedures. Treatment was delivered in 30-33 daily fractions over 6-6.5 weeks to a total dose of 50 Gy using 6 MV photons. Outcome was assessed prospectively. Results: At a median follow-up of 40 months (range 3-88 months) the 3- and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 97% and 92%, and 3- and 5-year survival 100%. Two patients required further debulking surgery for progressive disease 8 and 41 months after radiotherapy. Twelve patients (30%) had acute clinical deterioration due to cystic enlargement of craniopharyngioma following SCRT and required cyst aspiration. One patient with severe visual impairment prior to radiotherapy had visual deterioration following SCRT. Seven out of 10 patients with a normal pituitary function before SCRT had no endocrine deficits following treatment. Conclusion: SCRT as a high-precision technique of localized RT is suitable for the treatment of incompletely excised craniopharyngioma. The local control, toxicity and survival outcomes are comparable to results reported following conventional external beam RT. Longer follow-up is required to assess long-term efficacy and toxicity, particularly in terms of potential reduction in treatment related late toxicity

  8. Micro-stereotactic frame utilizing bone cement for individual fabrication: an initial investigation of its accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Thomas S.; Lexow, G. Jakob; Blume, Denise; Kluge, Marcel; Lenarz, Thomas; Majdani, Omid

    2017-03-01

    A new method for template-guided cochlear implantation surgery is proposed which has been developed to create a minimally invasive access to the inner ear. A first design of the surgical template was drafted, built, and finally tested regarding its accuracy. For individual finalization of the micro-stereotactic frame bone cement is utilized as this well-known and well-established material suggests ease of use as well as high clinical acceptance and enables both sterile and rapid handling. The new concept includes an alignment device, based on a passive hexapod with manually adjustable legs for temporary fixation of the separate parts in the patient-specific pose until the bone cement is spread and finally cured. Additionally, a corresponding evaluation method was developed to determine the accuracy of the microstereotactic frame in some initial experiments. In total 18 samples of the surgical template were fabricated based on previously planned trajectories. The mean positioning error at the target point was 0.30 mm with a standard deviation of 0.25 mm.

  9. Latching micro optical switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ernest J; Polosky, Marc A

    2013-05-21

    An optical switch reliably maintains its on or off state even when subjected to environments where the switch is bumped or otherwise moved. In addition, the optical switch maintains its on or off state indefinitely without requiring external power. External power is used only to transition the switch from one state to the other. The optical switch is configured with a fixed optical fiber and a movable optical fiber. The movable optical fiber is guided by various actuators in conjunction with a latching mechanism that configure the switch in one position that corresponds to the on state and in another position that corresponds to the off state.

  10. Stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, E-S; Sui, C-B; Wang, T-X; Sun, G-L

    2016-12-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (RS) is a potential option for some patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the pooled seizure-free rate and the time interval to seizure cessation in patients with lesions in the mesial temporal lobe, and who were eligible for either stereotactic or gamma knife RS. We searched the Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases using combinations of the following terms: RS, stereotactic radiosurgery, gamma knife, and TLE. We screened 103 articles and selected 13 for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Significant study heterogeneity was detected; however, the included studies displayed an acceptable level of quality. We show that approximately half of the patients were seizure free over a follow-up period that ranged from 6 months to 9 years [pooled estimate: 50.9% (95% confidence interval: 0.381-0.636)], with an average of 14 months to seizure cessation [pooled estimate: 14.08 months (95% confidence interval: 11.95-12.22 months)]. Nine of 13 included studies reported data for adverse events (AEs), which included visual field deficits and headache (the two most common AEs), verbal memory impairment, psychosis, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and dysphasia. Patients in the individual studies experienced AEs at rates that ranged from 8%, for non-epileptic seizures, to 85%, for headache. Our findings indicate that RS may have similar or slightly less efficacy in some patients compared with invasive surgery. Randomized controlled trials of both treatment regimens should be undertaken to generate an evidence base for patient decision-making. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. MRI-guided trephine biopsy and fine-needle aspiration in the diagnosis of bone lesions in low-field (0.23 T) MRI system using optical instrument tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto; Klemola, Rauli; Ojala, Risto; Jyrkinen, Lasse; Tervonen, Osmo; Lappi-Blanco, Elisa; Soini, Ylermi

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of MRI-guided bone biopsy with optical instrument tracking and evaluate advantage of combined fine-needle aspiration (FNA) with trephine biopsy. Twenty trephine bone biopsies and 13 FNAs were performed under MRI and CT guidance in 14 patients. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. The evaluation of diagnostic accuracy was achieved by comparing the histopathological and cytological diagnosis with current or final diagnosis made during 6-month clinical follow-up. A 0.23-T open MRI scanner with interventional tools (Outlook Proview, Marconi Medical Systems, Cleveland, Ohio) was used. A surface coil was used. For trephine biopsy MRI-compatible bone biopsy set (Daum medical, Schwerin, Germany) was used. The FNA was performed with MRI compatible 20-G needle (Cook, Bloomington, Ind.). The diagnostic accuracy of MRI-guided trephine biopsy was 95%. The FNA sample diagnosis concurred with the histological in 54%. Our results show that MRI guidance in bone biopsies is accurate and safe. It is comparable to CT-guided or open biopsy. The role of combined FNA with bone biopsies remains controversial. (orig.)

  12. High Power Mid-Infrared Generation with a Quasi-Phase Matched GaAs Guided-wave Optical Parametric Oscillator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harris, J

    2000-01-01

    ...-power coherent mid-infrared sources. Considerable effort has been devoted over the past decade to the development of mid-IR coherent sources based on nonlinear optical frequency conversion, e.g...

  13. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Oligometastatic Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muldermans, Jonathan L. [F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Romak, Lindsay B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Kwon, Eugene D. [Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Park, Sean S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Olivier, Kenneth R., E-mail: olivier.kenneth@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To review outcomes of patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer (PCa) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to identify variables associated with local failure. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed records of patients treated with SBRT for oligometastatic PCa. Metastasis control (ie, control of the treated lesion, MC), biochemical progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, and overall survival were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Sixty-six men with 81 metastatic PCa lesions, 50 of which were castrate-resistant, were included in the analysis. Lesions were in bone (n=74), lymph nodes (n=6), or liver (n=1). Stereotactic body radiation therapy was delivered in 1 fraction to 71 lesions (88%), at a median dose of 16 Gy (range, 16-24 Gy). The remaining lesions received 30 Gy in 3 fractions (n=6) or 50 Gy in 5 fractions (n=4). Median follow-up was 16 months (range, 3-49 months). Estimated MC at 2 years was 82%. Biochemical progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, and overall survival were 54%, 45%, and 83%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, only the dose of SBRT was significantly associated with MC; lesions treated with 16 Gy had 58% MC, and those treated with ≥18 Gy had 95% MC at 2 years (P≤.001). At 2 years, MC for lesions treated with 18 Gy (n=21) was 88%. No patient treated with ≥18 Gy in a single fraction or with any multifraction regimen had local failure. Six patients (9%) had grade 1 pain flare, and 2 (3%) had grade 2 pain flare. No grade 2 or greater late toxicities were reported. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer provided optimal metastasis control and acceptable toxicity with doses ≥18 Gy. Biochemical progression-free survival was 54% at 16 months with the inclusion of SBRT in the treatment regimen. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should be considered in

  14. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Oligometastatic Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muldermans, Jonathan L.; Romak, Lindsay B.; Kwon, Eugene D.; Park, Sean S.; Olivier, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To review outcomes of patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer (PCa) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to identify variables associated with local failure. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed records of patients treated with SBRT for oligometastatic PCa. Metastasis control (ie, control of the treated lesion, MC), biochemical progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, and overall survival were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Sixty-six men with 81 metastatic PCa lesions, 50 of which were castrate-resistant, were included in the analysis. Lesions were in bone (n=74), lymph nodes (n=6), or liver (n=1). Stereotactic body radiation therapy was delivered in 1 fraction to 71 lesions (88%), at a median dose of 16 Gy (range, 16-24 Gy). The remaining lesions received 30 Gy in 3 fractions (n=6) or 50 Gy in 5 fractions (n=4). Median follow-up was 16 months (range, 3-49 months). Estimated MC at 2 years was 82%. Biochemical progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, and overall survival were 54%, 45%, and 83%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, only the dose of SBRT was significantly associated with MC; lesions treated with 16 Gy had 58% MC, and those treated with ≥18 Gy had 95% MC at 2 years (P≤.001). At 2 years, MC for lesions treated with 18 Gy (n=21) was 88%. No patient treated with ≥18 Gy in a single fraction or with any multifraction regimen had local failure. Six patients (9%) had grade 1 pain flare, and 2 (3%) had grade 2 pain flare. No grade 2 or greater late toxicities were reported. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with oligometastatic prostate cancer provided optimal metastasis control and acceptable toxicity with doses ≥18 Gy. Biochemical progression-free survival was 54% at 16 months with the inclusion of SBRT in the treatment regimen. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should be considered in

  15. Inter- and Intrafraction Variability in Liver Position in Non-Breath-Hold Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Case, Robert B.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Moseley, Douglas J.; Kim, John; Brock, Kristy K.; Dawson, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The inter- and intrafraction variability of liver position was assessed in patients with liver cancer treated with kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 314 CBCT scans obtained in the treatment position immediately before and after each fraction were evaluated from 29 patients undergoing six-fraction, non-breath-hold stereotactic body radiotherapy for unresectable liver cancer. Off-line, the CBCT scans were sorted into 10 bins, according to the phase of respiration. The liver position (relative to the vertebral bodies) was measured using rigid alignment of the exhale CBCT liver with the exhale planning CT liver, following the alignment of the vertebrae. The interfraction liver position change was measured by comparing the pretreatment CBCT scans, and the intrafraction change was measured from the CBCT scans obtained immediately before and after each fraction. Results: The mean amplitude of liver motion for all patients was 1.8 mm (range, 0.1-5.7), 8.0 mm (range, 0.1-18.8), and 4.3 mm (range 0.1-12.1) in the medial-lateral (ML), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) directions, respectively. The mean absolute ML, CC, and AP interfraction changes in liver position were 2.0 mm (90th percentile, 4.2), 3.5 mm (90th percentile, 7.3), and 2.3 mm (90th percentile, 4.7). The mean absolute intrafraction ML, CC, and AP changes were 1.3 mm (90th percentile, 2.9), 1.6 mm (90th percentile, 3.6), and 1.5 mm (90th percentile, 3.1), respectively. The interfraction changes were significantly larger than the intrafraction changes, with a CC systematic error of 2.9 and 1.1 mm, respectively. The intraobserver reproducibility (σ, n = 29 fractions) was 1.3 mm in the ML, 1.4 mm in the CC, and 1.6 mm in the AP direction. Conclusion: Interfraction liver position changes relative to the vertebral bodies are an important source of geometric uncertainty, providing a rationale for prefraction

  16. Optical Coherence Tomography Guided Percutaneous Coronary Intervention With Nobori Stent Implantation in Patients With Non-ST-Segment-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (OCTACS) Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Lisbeth; Thayssen, Per; Maehara, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    (s). A final OCT was performed in case of reintervention. Six-month OCT follow-up was available in 85 patients. Twenty-three (46%) OCT-guided patients had additional postdilation or stenting. The percentage of acutely malapposed struts was substantially lower in the OCT-guided group (3.4% [interquartile range......, 0.3-7.6] versus 7.8% [interquartile range, 2.3-19.4]; Pinterquartile range, 1.2-9.8] versus 9.0% [interquartile range, 5.5-14.5], P

  17. MO-B-201-00: Motion Management in Current Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    The motion management in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a key to success for a SBRT program, and still an on-going challenging task. A major factor is that moving structures behave differently than standing structures when examined by imaging modalities, and thus require special considerations and employments. Understanding the motion effects to these different imaging processes is a prerequisite for a decent motion management program. The commonly used motion control techniques to physically restrict tumor motion, if adopted correctly, effectively increase the conformity and accuracy of hypofractionated treatment. The effective application of such requires one to understand the mechan