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Sample records for optically detected magnetic

  1. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2007-12-11

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  2. Detecting magnetically guided atoms with an optical cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Albrecht; Hessmo, Björn; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2006-01-15

    We show that a low-finesse cavity can be efficient for detecting neutral atoms. The low finesse can be compensated for by decreasing the mode waist of the cavity. We have used a near-concentric resonator with a beam waist of 12 microm and a finesse of only 1100 to detect magnetically guided Rb atoms with a detection sensitivity of 0.1 atom in the mode volume. For future experiments on single-atom detection and cavity QED applications, it should be beneficial to use miniaturized optical resonators integrated on atom chips.

  3. Detecting magnetically guided atoms with an optical cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Haase, Albrecht; Hessmo, Björn; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    We show that a low finesse cavity can be efficient for detecting neutral atoms. The low finesse can be compensated for by decreasing the mode waist of the cavity. We have used a near concentric resonator with a beam waist of 12$\\mu$m and a finesse of only 1100 to detect magnetically guided Rb atoms with a detection sensitivity of 0.1 atom in the mode volume. For future experiments on single atom detection and cavity QED applications, it should be very beneficial to use miniaturized optical re...

  4. An optically detected magnetic resonance spectrometer with tunable laser excitation and wavelength resolved infrared detection

    CERN Document Server

    Negyedi, M; Gyüre, B; Dzsaber, S; Kollarics, S; Rohringer, P; Pichler, T; Simon, F

    2016-01-01

    We present the development and performance of an optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) spectrometer. The spectrometer represents advances over similar instruments in three areas: i) the exciting light is a tunable laser source which covers much of the visible light range, ii) the optical signal is analyzed with a spectrograph, iii) the emitted light is detected in the near-infrared domain. The need to perform ODMR experiments on single-walled carbon nanotubes motivated the present development and we demonstrate the utility of the spectrometer on this material. The performance of the spectrometer is critically compared to similar instruments. The present development opens the way to perform ODMR studies on various new materials such as molecules and luminescent quantum dots where the emission is in the near-infrared range and requires a well-defined excitation wavelength and analysis of the scattered light.

  5. Optically detected magnetic resonance studies on {pi}-conjugate polymers and novel carbon allotropes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partee, J.

    1999-02-12

    This report describes the following: introduction to photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance (PLDMR); introduction to {pi}-conjugated systems; PLDMR measurements on poly(p-phenylene)-type ladder polymers; PLMDR measurements on poly(p-phenylene ethylene); and PLDMR measurements on C{sub 70}, polythiophene, poly(p-phenylene vinylene) and Dan-40. Appendices to this report describe: Operation of ODMR (optically detected magnetic resonance) spectrometer; ODMR system parameters; and Special purpose circuitry.

  6. Harmonic detection of magnetic resonance for sensitivity improvement of optical atomic magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbaran, M.; Tehranchi, M. M.; Hamidi, S. M.; Khalkhali, S. M. H.

    2017-02-01

    Highly sensitive atomic magnetometers use optically detected magnetic resonance of atomic spins to measure extremely weak magnetic field changes. The magnetometer sensitivity is directly proportional to the ratio of intensity to line-shape of the resonance signal. To obtain narrower resonance signal, we implemented harmonic detection of magnetic resonance method in Mx configuration. The nonlinear spin polarization dynamics in detection of the higher harmonics were employed in phenomenological Bloch equations. The measured and simulated harmonic components of the resonance signals in frequency domain yielded significantly narrower line-width accompanying much improved sensitivity. Our results confirm the sensitivity improvement by a factor of two in optical atomic magnetometer via second harmonic signal which can open a new insight in the weak magnetic field measurement system design.

  7. Fiber optic quench detection via optimized Rayleigh Scattering in high-field YBCO accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, Gene [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-02-17

    Yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) coated conductors are known for their ability to operate in the superconducting state at relatively high temperatures, even above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K). When these same conductors are operated at lower temperatures, they are able to operate in much higher magnetic fields than traditional superconductors like NiTi or Nb3Sn. Thus, YBCO superconducting magnets are one of the primary options for generating the high magnetic fields needed for future high energy physics devices. Due to slow quench propagation, quench detection remains one of the primary limitations to YBCO magnets. Fiber optic sensing, based upon Rayleigh scattering, has the potential for spatial resolution approaching the wavelength of light, or very fast temporal resolution at low spatial resolution, and a continuum of combinations in between. This project has studied, theoretically and experimentally, YBCO magnets and Rayleigh scattering quench detection systems to demonstrate feasibility of the systems for YBCO quench protection systems. Under this grant an experimentally validated 3D quench propagation model was used to accurately define the acceptable range of spatial and temporal resolutions for effective quench detection in YBCO magnets and to evaluate present-day and potentially improved YBCO conductors. The data volume and speed requirements for quench detection via Rayleigh scattering required the development of a high performance fiber optic based quench detection/data acquisition system and its integration with an existing voltage tap/thermo-couple based system. In this project, optical fibers are tightly co-wound into YBCO magnet coils, with the fiber on top of the conductor as turn-to-turn insulation. Local changes in the temperature or strain of the conductor are sensed by the optical fiber, which is in close thermal and mechanical contact with the conductor. Intrinsic imperfections in the fiber reflect Rayleigh

  8. Optically detected electron paramagnetic resonance by microwave modulated magnetic circular dichroism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börger, Birgit; Bingham, Stephen J.; Gutschank, Jörg; Schweika, Marc Oliver; Suter, Dieter; Thomson, Andrew J.

    1999-11-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) can be detected optically, with a laser beam propagating perpendicular to the static magnetic field. As in conventional EPR, excitation uses a resonant microwave field. The detection process can be interpreted as coherent Raman scattering or as a modulation of the laser beam by the circular dichroism of the sample oscillating at the microwave frequency. The latter model suggests that the signal should show the same dependence on the optical wavelength as the MCD signal. We check this for two different samples [cytochrome c-551, a metalloprotein, and ruby (Cr3+:Al2O3)]. In both cases, the observed wavelength dependence is almost identical to that of the MCD signal. A quantitative estimate of the amplitude of the optically detected EPR signal from the MCD also shows good agreement with the experimental results.

  9. Detecting De-gelation through Tissue Using Magnetically Modulated Optical Nanoprobes (MagMOONs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, KhanhVan T; Anker, Jeffrey N

    2014-12-15

    Alginate gels are widely used for drug delivery and implanted devices. The rate at which these gels break down is important for controlling drug release. Since the de-gelation may be different in vivo, monitoring this process in situ is essential. However, it is challenging to monitor the gel through tissue due to optical scattering and tissue autofluorescence. Herein we describe a method to detect through tissue the chemically-induced changes in viscosity and de-gelation process of alginate gels using magnetically modulated optical nanoprobes (MagMOONs). The MagMOONs are fluorescent magnetic microspheres coated with a thin layer of opaque metal on one hemisphere. The metal layer prevents excitation and emission light from passing through one side of the MagMOONs, which creates orientation-dependent fluorescence intensity. The magnetic particles also align in an external magnetic field and give blinking signals when they rotate to follow an external modulated magnetic field. The blinking signals from these MagMOONs are distinguished from background autofluorescence and can be tracked on a single particle level in the absence of tissue, or for an ensemble average of particles blinking through tissue. When these MagMOONs are dispersed in calcium alginate gel, they become sensors for detecting gel degradation upon addition of either ammonium ion or alginate lyase. Our results show MagMOONs start blinking approximately 10 minutes after 2 mg/mL alginate lyase addition and this blinking is clearly detected even through up to 4 mm chicken breast. This approach can potentially be employed to detect bacterial biofilm formation on medical implants by sensing specific proteases that either activate a related function or regulate biofilm formation. It can also be applied to other biosensors and drug delivery systems based on enzyme-catalyzed breakdown of gel components.

  10. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang-Hwan Kim

    2003-12-12

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms.

  11. Fiber-Optic Magnetic-Field-Strength Measurement System for Lightning Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurecki, Jay; Scully, Robert; Davis, Allen; Kirkendall, Clay; Bucholtz, Frank

    2011-01-01

    A fiber-optic sensor system is designed to measure magnetic fields associated with a lightning stroke. Field vector magnitudes are detected and processed for multiple locations. Since physical limitations prevent the sensor elements from being located in close proximity to highly conductive materials such as aluminum, the copper wire sensor elements (3) are located inside a 4-cubic-in. (.66-cubic-cm) plastic housing sensor head and connected to a fiber-optic conversion module by shielded cabling, which is limited to the shortest length feasible. The signal path between the conversion module and the avionics unit which processes the signals are fiber optic, providing enhanced immunity from electromagnetic radiation incident in the vicinity of the measurements. The sensors are passive, lightweight, and much smaller than commercial B-dot sensors in the configuration which measures a three-dimensional magnetic field. The system is expandable, and provides a standard-format output signal for downstream processing. Inside of the sensor head, three small search coils, each having a few turns on a circular form, are mounted orthogonally inside the non-metallic housing. The fiber-optic conversion module comprises three interferometers, one for each search coil. Each interferometer has a high bandwidth optical phase modulator that impresses the signal received from its search coil onto its output. The output of each interferometer travels by fiber optic cable to the avionics unit, and the search coil signal is recovered by an optical phase demodulator. The output of each demodulator is fed to an analog-to-digital converter, whose sampling rate is determined by the maximum expected rate of rise and peak signal magnitude. The output of the digital processor is a faithful reproduction of the coil response to the incident magnetic field. This information is provided in a standard output format on a 50-ohm port that can be connected to any number of data collection and processing

  12. Optically detected magnetic resonance study of a type-II GaAs/AlAs multiple quantum well

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kesteren, H. W.; Cosman, E. C.; Greidanus, F. J. A. M.; Dawson, P.; Moore, K. J.; Foxon, C. T.

    1988-07-01

    In a type-II GaAs/AlAs multiple quantum well three optically detected magnetic resonance lines and two level anticrossings were observed. Two of the resonance lines and the two level anticrossings are in agreement with the electronic level scheme of the heavy-hole exciton. The third resonance line is in accordance with a magnetic spin resonance of an unbound electron. These optically detected magnetic resonance measurements open up the possibility to obtain detailed information about the excitons in and the band structure of type-II quantum wells.

  13. Optical detection of NMR J-spectra at zero magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, M P; Crawford, C W; Pines, A; Wemmer, D E; Knappe, S; Kitching, J; Budker, D

    2009-07-01

    Scalar couplings of the form JI(1) x I(2) between nuclei impart valuable information about molecular structure to nuclear magnetic-resonance spectra. Here we demonstrate direct detection of J-spectra due to both heteronuclear and homonuclear J-coupling in a zero-field environment where the Zeeman interaction is completely absent. We show that characteristic functional groups exhibit distinct spectra with straightforward interpretation for chemical identification. Detection is performed with a microfabricated optical atomic magnetometer, providing high sensitivity to samples of microliter volumes. We obtain 0.1 Hz linewidths and measure scalar-coupling parameters with 4-mHz statistical uncertainty. We anticipate that the technique described here will provide a new modality for high-precision "J spectroscopy" using small samples on microchip devices for multiplexed screening, assaying, and sample identification in chemistry and biomedicine.

  14. Optical detection of NMR J-spectra at zero magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Ledbetter, M P; Pines, A; Wemmer, D E; Knappe, S; Kitching, J; Budker, D

    2009-01-01

    Scalar couplings of the form J I_1 \\cdot I_2 between nuclei impart valuable information about molecular structure to nuclear magnetic-resonance spectra. Here we demonstrate direct detection of J-spectra due to both heteronuclear and homonuclear J-coupling in a zero-field environment where the Zeeman interaction is completely absent. We show that characteristic functional groups exhibit distinct spectra with straightforward interpretation for chemical identification. Detection is performed with a microfabricated optical atomic magnetometer, providing high sensitivity to samples of microliter volumes. We obtain 0.1 Hz linewidths and measure scalar-coupling parameters with 4-mHz statistical uncertainty. We anticipate that the technique described here will provide a new modality for high-precision "J spectroscopy" using small samples on microchip devices for multiplexed screening, assaying, and sample identification in chemistry and biomedicine.

  15. All-optical detection of magnetization precession in tunnel junctions under applied voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yuta; Suzuki, Kazuya; Sugihara, Atsushi; Kamimaki, Akira; Iihama, Satoshi; Ando, Yasuo; Mizukami, Shigemi

    2017-02-01

    An all-optical time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect measurement of a micron-sized tunnel junction with a CoFeB electrode was performed. The femtosecond (fs) laser-induced magnetization precession was clearly observed at various magnetic field angles. The frequency f and relaxation time τ of the magnetization precession varied with the voltage applied via a MgO barrier. The precession dynamics were in accordance with Kittel’s ferromagnetic resonance mode, and the voltage-induced changes in f and τ were well explained by the voltage-induced change in the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of -36 fJ/Vm.

  16. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance Studies on π-conjugated semiconductor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance (ODMR) techniques were used to investigate the dynamics of excitons and charge carriers in π-conjugated organic semiconductors. Degradation behavior of the negative spin-1/2 electroluminescence-detected magnetic resonance (ELDMR) was observed in Alq3 devices. The increase in the resonance amplitude implies an increasing bipolaron formation during degradation, which might be the result of growth of charge traps in the device. The same behavior of the negative spin-1/2 ELDMR was observed in 2wt% Rubrene doped Tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminium (Alq3) devices. However, with increasing injection current, a positive spin-1/2 ELDMR, together with positive spin 1 triplet powder patterns at ΔmS=±1 and ΔmS=±2, emerges. Due to the similarities in the frequency dependences of single and double modulated ELDMR and the photoluminescence-detected magnetic resonance (PLDMR) results in poly[2-methoxy-5-(2 -ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenyl ene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) films, the mechanism for this positive spin-1/2 ELDMR was assigned to enhanced triplet-polaron quenching under resonance conditions. The ELDMR in rubrene doped Alq3 devices provides a path to investigate charge distribution in the device under operational conditions. Combining the results of several devices with different carrier blocking properties and the results from transient EL, it was concluded trions not only exist near buffer layer but also exist in the electron transport layer. This TPQ model can also be used to explain the positive spin-1/2 PLDMR in poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films at low temperature and in MEH-PPV films at various temperatures up to room temperature. Through quantitative analysis, TE-polaron quenching (TPQ) model is shown having the ability to explain most behaviors of the positive spin-1/2 resonance. Photocurrent detected magnetic resonance (PCDMR) studies on MEH-PPV devices revealed a novel transient resonance signal. The signal

  17. Broadband, large-area microwave antenna for optically detected magnetic resonance of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Kento; Monnai, Yasuaki; Saijo, Soya; Fujita, Ryushiro; Ishi-Hayase, Junko; Itoh, Kohei M., E-mail: kitoh@appi.keio.ac.jp; Abe, Eisuke, E-mail: e-abe@keio.jp [School of Fundamental Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Watanabe, Hideyuki [Correlated Electronics Group, Electronics and Photonics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 5, 1-1-1, Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    We report on a microwave planar ring antenna specifically designed for optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond. It has the resonance frequency at around 2.87 GHz with the bandwidth of 400 MHz, ensuring that ODMR can be observed under external magnetic fields up to 100 G without the need of adjustment of the resonance frequency. It is also spatially uniform within the 1-mm-diameter center hole, enabling the magnetic-field imaging in the wide spatial range. These features facilitate the experiments on quantum sensing and imaging using NV centers at room temperature.

  18. Magneto-optical detection of magnetic nanobeads in a microfluidic channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donolato, Marco; Vavassori, Paolo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2013-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the Browinan relaxation frequency of a magnetic nanobeads suspension in microfluidic system using a novel magneto-optical method. We demonstrate that by lock-in analysis of the signal produced on a photodetector by the light transmitted through the particle...

  19. Optical detection of nanoparticle agglomeration in a living system under the influence of a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Robert, E-mail: robert.mueller@ipht-jena.de [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Stranik, Ondrej [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Schlenk, Florian; Werner, Sebastian [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Institute of Pharmacy, Friedrich Schiller University, Otto-Schott-Str. 41, 07745 Jena (Germany); Malsch, Daniéll [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Fischer, Dagmar [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Institute of Pharmacy, Friedrich Schiller University, Otto-Schott-Str. 41, 07745 Jena (Germany); Fritzsche, Wolfgang [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Nanoparticles are important in diagnosis and therapy. In order to apply their potential, an understanding of the behavior of particles in the body is crucial. However, in vitro experiments usually do not mimic the dynamic conditions of the in vivo situation. The aim of our work was an in vivo observation of particle transport in chicken egg vessels in the presence of a magnetic field by particle tracking. For that we demonstrate the spatial resolution of our observations in a vein and a temporal resolution by observation of the cardiac cycle in an artery. Microscopic images were recorded in dark field reflection and fluorescence mode. - Highlights: • Optically accessible blood circulation in hen's egg CAV model. • Observation of transport of magnetic particles in chicken egg vessels. • Irreversibility of agglomerates after removing the magnetic field.

  20. Fast and sensitive medical diagnostic protocol based on integrating circular current lines for magnetic washing and optical detection of fluorescent magnetic nanobeads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaiyam Sharma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs are increasingly being used as ‘magnetic labels’ in medical diagnostics. Practical applications of MNPs necessitate reducing their non-specific interactions with sensor surfaces that result in noise in measurements. Here we describe the design and implementation of a sensing platform that incorporates circular shaped current lines that reduce non-specific binding by enabling the “magnetic washing” of loosely attached MNPs attached to the senor surface. Generating magnetic fields by passing electrical currents through the circular shaped current lines enabled the capture and collection of fluorescent MNPs that was more efficient and effective than straight current lines reported to-date. The use of fluorescent MNPs allows their optical detection rather than with widely used magnetoresistive sensors. As a result our approach is not affected by magnetic noise due to the flow of currents. Our design is expected to improve the speed, accuracy, and sensitivity of MNPs based medical diagnostics.

  1. Optical magnetic detection of single-neuron action potentials using quantum defects in diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Barry, J F; Schloss, J M; Glenn, D R; Song, Y; Lukin, M D; Park, H; Walsworth, R L

    2016-01-01

    A key challenge for neuroscience is noninvasive, label-free sensing of action potential (AP) dynamics in whole organisms with single-neuron resolution. Here, we present a new approach to this problem: using nitrogen-vacancy (NV) quantum defects in diamond to measure the time-dependent magnetic fields produced by single-neuron APs. Our technique has a unique combination of features: (i) it is noninvasive, as the light that probes the NV sensors stays within the biocompatible diamond chip and does not enter the organism, enabling activity monitoring over extended periods; (ii) it is label-free and should be widely applicable to most organisms; (iii) it provides high spatial and temporal resolution, allowing precise measurement of the AP waveforms and conduction velocities of individual neurons; (iv) it directly determines AP propagation direction through the inherent sensitivity of NVs to the associated AP magnetic field vector; (v) it is applicable to neurons located within optically opaque tissue or whole org...

  2. Lab-on-a-disc agglutination assay for protein detection by optomagnetic readout and optical imaging using nano- and micro-sized magnetic beads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddin, Rokon; Burger, Robert; Donolato, Marco;

    2016-01-01

    We present a biosensing platform for the detection of proteins based on agglutination of aptamer coated magnetic nano- or microbeads. The assay, from sample to answer, is integrated on an automated, low-cost microfluidic disc platform. This ensures fast and reliable results due to a minimum...... of manual steps involved. The detection of the target protein was achieved in two ways: (1) optomagnetic readout using magnetic nanobeads (MNBs); (2) optical imaging using magnetic microbeads (MMBs). The optomagnetic readout of agglutination is based on optical measurement of the dynamics of MNB aggregates...... whereas the imaging method is based on direct visualization and quantification of the average size of MMB aggregates. By enhancing magnetic particle agglutination via application of strong magnetic field pulses, we obtained identical limits of detection of 25 pM with the same sample-to-answer time (15 min...

  3. Magnetic Force Between Magnetic Nano Probes at Optical Frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Guclu, Caner; Capolino, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy based on the interaction of static magnetic materials was demonstrated in the past with resolutions in the order of nanometers. Measurement techniques based on forces between electric dipoles oscillating at optical frequencies have been also demonstrated leading to the standard operation of the scanning force microscope (SFM). However the investigations of a SFM based on the magnetic force generated by magnetic dipole moments oscillating at optical frequencies has not been tackled yet. With this goal in mind we establish a theoretical model towards observable magnetic force interaction between two magnetically polarizable nanoparticles at optical frequency and show such a force to be in the order of piconewtons which could be in principle detected by conventional microscopy techniques. Two possible principles for conceiving magnetically polarizable nano probes able to generate strong magnetic dipoles at optical frequency are investigated based on silicon nanoparticles and on clusters...

  4. Non-intrusive tunable resonant microwave cavity for optical detected magnetic resonance of NV centres in nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Floch, Jean-Michel; Bradac, Carlo; Volz, Thomas; Tobar, Michael E.; Castelletto, Stefania

    2013-12-01

    Optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in nanodiamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres is usually achieved by applying a microwave field delivered by micron-size wires, strips or antennas directly positioned in very close proximity (~ μm) of the nanodiamond crystals. The microwave field couples evanescently with the ground state spin transition of the NV centre (2.87 GHz at zero magnetic field), which results in a reduction of the centre photoluminescence. We propose an alternative approach based on the construction of a dielectric resonator. We show that such a resonator allows for the efficient detection of NV spins in nanodiamonds without the constraints associated to the laborious positioning of the microwave antenna next to the nanodiamonds, providing therefore improved flexibility. The resonator is based on a tunable Transverse Electric Mode in a dielectric-loaded cavity, and we demonstrate that the resonator can detect single NV centre spins in nanodiamonds using less microwave power than alternative techniques in a non-intrusive manner. This method can achieve higher precision measurement of ODMR of paramagnetic defects spin transition in the micro to millimetre-wave frequency domain. Our approach would permit the tracking of NV centres in biological solutions rather than simply on the surface, which is desirable in light of the recently proposed applications of using nanodiamonds containing NV centres for spin labelling in biological systems with single spin and single particle resolution.

  5. Magnetic-Optical Filter

    CERN Document Server

    Formicola, I; Pinto, C; Cerulo, P

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic-Optical Filter (MOF) is an instrument suited for high precision spectral measurements for its peculiar characteristics. It is employed in Astronomy and in the field of the telecommunications (it is called FADOF there). In this brief paper we summarize its fundamental structure and functioning.

  6. Optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) studies of fullerene-doped pi-conjugated polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinar, Joseph; Lane, P. A.

    1995-12-01

    The X-band photoluminescence (PL) and PL-detected magnetic resonance (PLDMR) of C60- and C70-doped pristine 2,5-dihexoxy poly(p-phenylene vinylene) (DHOPPV), poly(3-dodecyl thiophene) (P3DT), and 2,5-dibutoxy poly(p-phenylene ethynylene) (DBOPPE) are described and discussed. While light (approximately 0.1 mol.%) doping of pristine DHOPPV sharply weakens the PL, it strongly enhances the PL-enhancing polaron and triplet exciton resonances, which are very weak in the undoped film. The polaron PLDMR is attributed to magnetic resonance enhancement of nonradiative trapped polaron pair recombination, which reduces the polaron population and consequently the rate at which they nonradiatively quench singlet excitons. Its behavior in 0.1 mol.% C60:DHOPPV is discussed in relation to the potential effects of C60-counterions, including the photogeneration of trapped polaron pairs at the expense of singlet excitons, and the fission of singlet excitons to such pairs. The emergence of the triplet resonance is discussed in relation to intersystem crossing from the singlet to the triplet manifold induced by the C60 dopant. At higher doping levels, the polaron and triplet exciton resonances weaken with increasing C60 content. The reduced polaron resonance is discussed in relation to the smaller relative change in the polaron population at the field for resonance, and the potential effects of the dissociation of the polaron pairs. The behavior of C70-doped pristine DHOPPV at up to 1 mol.% C70 is qualitatively similar to that of C60: DHOPPV, but the polaron resonance in P3DT and DBOPPE is less sensitive to C60. The triplet resonance is almost completely suppressed even in lightly doped P3DT and DBOPPE, which is attributed to quenching by the injected polarons.

  7. Magnetic hyperbolic optical metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Sergey S; Wong, Zi Jing; Pshenay-Severin, Ekaterina; O'Brien, Kevin; Neshev, Dragomir N; Kivshar, Yuri S; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-04-13

    Strongly anisotropic media where the principal components of electric permittivity or magnetic permeability tensors have opposite signs are termed as hyperbolic media. Such media support propagating electromagnetic waves with extremely large wave vectors exhibiting unique optical properties. However, in all artificial and natural optical materials studied to date, the hyperbolic dispersion originates solely from the electric response. This restricts material functionality to one polarization of light and inhibits free-space impedance matching. Such restrictions can be overcome in media having components of opposite signs for both electric and magnetic tensors. Here we present the experimental demonstration of the magnetic hyperbolic dispersion in three-dimensional metamaterials. We measure metamaterial isofrequency contours and reveal the topological phase transition between the elliptic and hyperbolic dispersion. In the hyperbolic regime, we demonstrate the strong enhancement of thermal emission, which becomes directional, coherent and polarized. Our findings show the possibilities for realizing efficient impedance-matched hyperbolic media for unpolarized light.

  8. Magnetic hyperbolic optical metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Kruk, Sergey S; Pshenay-Severin, Ekaterina; O'Brien, Kevin; Neshev, Dragomir N; Kivshar, Yuri S; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Strongly anisotropic media where the principal components of the electric permittivity and/or magnetic permeability tensor have opposite signs are termed as hyperbolic media. Such media support propagating electromagnetic waves with extremely large wavevectors, and therefore they exhibit unique optical properties. However in all artificial and natural optical structures studied to date the hyperbolic dispersion originates solely from their electric response. This restricts functionality of these materials for only one polarization of light and inhibits impedance matching with free space. Such restrictions can be overcome in media having components of opposite signs in both electric and magnetic tensors. Here we present the first experimental demonstration of the magnetic hyperbolic dispersion in three-dimensional metamaterials. We measure experimentally metamaterial's dispersion and trace the topological transition between the elliptic and hyperbolic regimes. We experimentally demonstrate that due to the uniq...

  9. Moderate plasma treatment enhances the quality of optically detected magnetic resonance signals of nitrogen-vacancy centres in nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoma, Shingo; Igarashi, Ryuji; Shirakawa, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate that a moderate plasma treatment increases the quality of optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) signals from negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy centres in nanodiamonds (NDs). We measured the statistics of the ODMR spectra of 50-nm-size NDs before and after plasma treatment. We then evaluated each ODMR spectrum in terms of fluorescence and ODMR intensities, line width and signal-to-noise (SN) ratio. Our results showed that plasma treatment for more than 10 min contributes to higher-quality ODMR signals, i.e. signals that are brighter, stronger, sharper and have a higher SN ratio. We showed that such signal improvement is due to alteration of the surface chemical states of the NDs by the plasma treatment. Our study contributes to the advancement of biosensing applications using ODMR of NDs.

  10. A magnetic nanoparticle-clustering biosensor for blu-ray based optical detection of small-molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jaeyoung; Donolato, Marco; Antunes, Paula Soares Martins

    2014-01-01

    by adopting an inhibition mechanism. Next, frequency-dependent optical measurements enabled us to resolve signals depending on the cluster size. Lastly, a low-cost and miniaturized optical readout setup was established by implementing a Blu-ray pickup head. Consequently, our low-cost optical biosensor using...... dependent behavior of signals in micromolar ranges (Fig. 5). These results support that our MNP-clustering optical biosensor is capable of specific and quantitative detection of small-molecules....

  11. Hanle Detection for Optical Clocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the strong inhomogeneous spatial polarization and intensity distribution of spontaneous decay fluorescence due to the Hanle effect, we propose and demonstrate a universe Hanle detection configuration of electron-shelving method for optical clocks. Experimental results from Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard with electron-shelving method show that a designed Hanle detection geometry with optimized magnetic field direction, detection laser beam propagation and polarization direction, and detector position can improve the fluorescence collection rate by more than one order of magnitude comparing with that of inefficient geometry. With the fixed 423 nm fluorescence, the improved 657 nm optical frequency standard signal intensity is presented. The potential application of the Hanle detection geometry designed for facilitating the fluorescence collection for optical lattice clock with a limited solid angle of the fluorescence collection has been discussed. The Hanle detection geometry is also effective for ion detection in ion optical clock and quantum information experiments. Besides, a cylinder fluorescence collection structure is designed to increase the solid angle of the fluorescence collection in Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 tesla detects more lesions in acute optic neuritis than at 1.5 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten; Rostrup, Egill; Frederiksen, Jette L

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: We sought to assess whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3.0 T detects more brain lesions in acute optic neuritis (ON) than MRI at 1.5 T. MATERIALS AND METHODS:: Twenty-eight patients with acute ON were scanned at both field-strengths using fast-fluid-attenuated inversion recov...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 tesla detects more lesions in acute optic neuritis than at 1.5 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten; Rostrup, Egill; Frederiksen, Jette L;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: We sought to assess whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3.0 T detects more brain lesions in acute optic neuritis (ON) than MRI at 1.5 T. MATERIALS AND METHODS:: Twenty-eight patients with acute ON were scanned at both field-strengths using fast-fluid-attenuated inversion recov...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 tesla detects more lesions in acute optic neuritis than at 1.5 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten; Rostrup, Egill; Frederiksen, Jette L.;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: We sought to assess whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3.0 T detects more brain lesions in acute optic neuritis (ON) than MRI at 1.5 T. MATERIALS AND METHODS:: Twenty-eight patients with acute ON were scanned at both field-strengths using fast-fluid-attenuated inversion...

  15. Optical magnetic detection of single-neuron action potentials using NV-diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Matthew; Barry, John; Schloss, Jennifer; Glenn, David; Walsworth, Ron

    2016-05-01

    A key challenge for neuroscience is noninvasive, label-free sensing of action potential dynamics in whole organisms with single-neuron resolution. Here, we report a new approach to this problem: using nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers in diamond to measure the time-dependent magnetic fields produced by single-neuron action potentials. We demonstrate our method using excised single neurons from two invertebrate species, marine worm and squid; and then by single-neuron action potential magnetic sensing exterior to whole, live, opaque marine worms for extended periods with no adverse effect. The results lay the groundwork for real-time, noninvasive 3D magnetic mapping of functional mammalian neuronal networks.

  16. Orientational dependence of optically detected magnetic resonance signals in laser-driven atomic magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Simone; Dolgovskiy, Vladimir; Scholtes, Theo; Grujić, Zoran D.; Lebedev, Victor; Weis, Antoine

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the dependence of lock-in-demodulated M_x-magnetometer signals on the orientation of the static magnetic field B0 of interest. Magnetic resonance spectra for 2400 discrete orientations of B0 covering a 4π solid angle have been recorded by a PC-controlled steering and data acquisition system. Off-line fits by previously derived lineshape functions allow us to extract the relevant resonance parameters (shape, amplitude, width, and phase) and to represent their dependence on the orientation of B0 with respect to the laser beam propagation direction. We have performed this study for two distinct M_x-magnetometer configurations, in which the rf-field is either parallel or perpendicular to the light propagation direction. The results confirm well the algebraic theoretical model functions. We suggest that small discrepancies are related to hitherto uninvestigated atomic alignment contributions.

  17. Lab-on-a-disc agglutination assay for protein detection by optomagnetic readout and optical imaging using nano- and micro-sized magnetic beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Rokon; Burger, Robert; Donolato, Marco; Fock, Jeppe; Creagh, Michael; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Boisen, Anja

    2016-11-15

    We present a biosensing platform for the detection of proteins based on agglutination of aptamer coated magnetic nano- or microbeads. The assay, from sample to answer, is integrated on an automated, low-cost microfluidic disc platform. This ensures fast and reliable results due to a minimum of manual steps involved. The detection of the target protein was achieved in two ways: (1) optomagnetic readout using magnetic nanobeads (MNBs); (2) optical imaging using magnetic microbeads (MMBs). The optomagnetic readout of agglutination is based on optical measurement of the dynamics of MNB aggregates whereas the imaging method is based on direct visualization and quantification of the average size of MMB aggregates. By enhancing magnetic particle agglutination via application of strong magnetic field pulses, we obtained identical limits of detection of 25pM with the same sample-to-answer time (15min 30s) using the two differently sized beads for the two detection methods. In both cases a sample volume of only 10µl is required. The demonstrated automation, low sample-to-answer time and portability of both detection instruments as well as integration of the assay on a low-cost disc are important steps for the implementation of these as portable tools in an out-of-lab setting.

  18. Possible identification of zinc-vacancy-donor-impurity complexes in zinc telluride by optically detected magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittebierre, J.; Cox, R. T.

    1986-08-01

    Application of the optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) technique to donor-acceptor recombination luminescence in donor-doped ZnTe crystals shows the presence of two acceptor centers having noncubic symmetry. One of these centers, labeled At, has precisely trigonal symmetry C3. In terms of a spin Hamiltonian for an effective spin S=1/2, its g factors are gzz=2.664 and gxx=gyy~=0, where z corresponds to a direction. The other center, labeled Am, has mirror symmetry CS, with gzz=2.540 and gxx~=gyy~=0.25, where the z axis is inclined at 6.7° to in a \\{110\\} plane. The g factors are interpreted by considering the effect of a low-symmetry crystal field on a J=(3/2) (Γ8) hole in ZnTe. Hyperfine splittings of magnitude 190×10-4 cm-1 for At and 180×10-4 cm-1 for Am are observed in the ODMR spectra and attributed to interactions with three equivalent or nearly equivalent Te nuclei. Center At is observed in chlorine-doped ZnTe; center Am is observed in aluminum-doped ZnTe and is very likely the acceptor called AC, known by its bound-exciton line at 2.369 eV. It is proposed that these single-acceptor centers are double-acceptor-single-donor pairs and, more precisely, that the double-acceptor constituent is the zinc vacancy. That is, the trigonal center At is VZnClTe and the mirror-symmetry center Am is VZnAlZn. If this interpretation is correct, the electronic properties of vacancy centers in ZnTe are remarkably different from those of the well-known VZn-donor-impurity associates (the ``A centers'') in ZnSe and ZnS. Whereas the latter centers are very deep centers with large pseudo-Jahn-Teller distortions, centers At and Am in ZnTe are of shallow or intermediate depth, retain the full symmetry of the vacancy-impurity complex, and have unquenched orbital angular momentum. Finally, it is suggested that the detection of zinc-vacancy acceptors in donor-doped ZnTe may help one to understand the difficulty of producing n-type material.

  19. Phase-resolved detection of the spin Hall angle by optical ferromagnetic resonance in perpendicularly magnetized thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capua, Amir; Wang, Tianyu; Yang, See-Hun; Rettner, Charles; Phung, Timothy; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2017-02-01

    The conversion of charge current to spin current by the spin Hall effect is of considerable current interest from both fundamental and technological perspectives. Measurement of the spin Hall angle, especially for atomically thin systems with large magnetic anisotropies, is not straightforward. Here we demonstrate a hybrid phase-resolved optical-electrical ferromagnetic resonance method that we show can robustly determine the spin Hall angle in heavy-metal/ferromagnet bilayer systems with large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We present an analytical model of the ferromagnetic resonance spectrum in the presence of the spin Hall effect, in which the spin Hall angle can be directly determined from the changes in the amplitude response as a function of the spin current that is generated from a dc charge current passing through the heavy-metal layer. Increased sensitivity to the spin current is achieved by operation under conditions for which the magnetic potential is shallowest at the "Smit point." Study of the phase response reveals that the spin Hall angle can be reliably extracted from a simplified measurement that does not require scanning over time or magnetic field but rather only on the dc current. The method is applied to the Pt-Co/Ni/Co system whose spin Hall angle was to date characterized only indirectly and that is especially relevant for spin-orbit torque devices.

  20. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) and Optically-Detected Magnetic Resonance (ODMR) studies on organic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Min [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Organic semiconductors have evolved rapidly over the last decades and currently are considered as the next-generation technology for many applications, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) in flat-panel displays (FPDs) and solid state lighting (SSL), and organic solar cells (OSCs) in clean renewable energy. This dissertation focuses mainly on OLEDs. Although the commercialization of the OLED technology in FPDs is growing and appears to be just around the corner for SSL, there are still several key issues that need to be addressed: (1) the cost of OLEDs is very high, largely due to the costly current manufacturing process; (2) the efficiency of OLEDs needs to be improved. This is vital to the success of OLEDs in the FPD and SSL industries; (3) the lifetime of OLEDs, especially blue OLEDs, is the biggest technical challenge. All these issues raise the demand for new organic materials, new device structures, and continued lower-cost fabrication methods. In an attempt to address these issues, we used solution-processing methods to fabricate highly efficient small molecule OLEDs (SMOLEDs); this approach is costeffective in comparison to the more common thermal vacuum evaporation. We also successfully made efficient indium tin oxide (ITO)-free SMOLEDs to further improve the efficiency of the OLEDs. We employed the spin-dependent optically-detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) technique to study the luminescence quenching processes in OLEDs and organic materials in order to understand the intrinsic degradation mechanisms. We also fabricated polymer LEDs (PLEDs) based on a new electron-accepting blue-emitting polymer and studied the effect of molecular weight on the efficiency of PLEDs. All these studies helped us to better understand the underlying relationship between the organic semiconductor materials and the OLEDs’ performance, and will subsequently assist in further enhancing the efficiency of OLEDs. With strongly improved device performance (in addition to

  1. Measurement of magnetic moment via optical transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidsieck, Alexandra, E-mail: aheidsieck@tum.de; Schmid, Daniel; Gleich, Bernhard

    2016-03-01

    The magnetic moment of nanoparticles is an important property for drug targeting and related applications as well as for the simulation thereof. However, the measurement of the magnetic moment of nanoparticles, nanoparticle–virus-complexes or microspheres in solution can be difficult and often yields unsatisfying or incomparable results. To measure the magnetic moment, we designed a custom measurement device including a magnetic set-up to observe nanoparticles indirectly via light transmission in solution. We present a simple, cheap device of manageable size, which can be used in any laboratory as well as a novel evaluation method to determine the magnetic moment of nanoparticles via the change of the optical density of the particle suspension in a well-defined magnetic gradient field. In contrast to many of the established measurement methods, we are able to observe and measure the nanoparticle complexes in their natural state in the respective medium. The nanoparticles move along the magnetic gradient and thereby away from the observation point. Due to this movement, the optical density of the fluid decreases and the transmission increases over time at the measurement location. By comparing the measurement with parametric simulations, we can deduce the magnetic moment from the observed behavior. - Highlights: • Performance of a direct detection camera in the context of off-axis electron holography has been evaluated. • A measurement device to indirectly observe magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is described. • MNPs can be observed in the respective medium via light transmission. • An evaluation method to determine the magnetic moment of the MNPs is presented. • The magnetic moment can be deduced from the observed change in optical density.

  2. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    1997-01-01

    Since 1965, Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance has provided researchers with timely expositions of fundamental new developments in the theory of, experimentation with, and application of magnetic and optical resonance.

  3. Optical fibers with composite magnetic coating for magnetic field sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radojevic, V.; Nedeljkovic, D.; Talijan, N. E-mail: ntalijan@elab.tmf.bg.ac.yu; Trifunovic, D.; Aleksic, R

    2004-05-01

    The investigated system for optical fiber sensor was multi-mode optical fiber with magnetic composite coating. Polymer component of composite coating was poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate)-EVA, and the magnetic component was powder of SmCo{sub 5} permanent magnet in form of single domain particles. The influence of the applied external magnetic field on the change of intensity of the light signal propagated through optical fiber was investigated.

  4. Optical fibers with composite magnetic coating for magnetic field sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radojevic, V.; Nedeljkovic, D.; Talijan, N.; Trifunovic, D.; Aleksic, R.

    2004-05-01

    The investigated system for optical fiber sensor was multi-mode optical fiber with magnetic composite coating. Polymer component of composite coating was poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate)-EVA, and the magnetic component was powder of SmCo5 permanent magnet in form of single domain particles. The influence of the applied external magnetic field on the change of intensity of the light signal propagated through optical fiber was investigated.

  5. Bacteriorhodopsin: Tunable Optical Nonlinear Magnetic Response

    CERN Document Server

    Bovino, F A; Sibilia, C; Giardina, M; Váró, G; Gergely, C

    2011-01-01

    We report on a strong and tunable magnetic optical nonlinear response of Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) under "off resonance" femtosecond (fs) pulse excitation, by detecting the polarization map of the noncollinear second harmonic signal of an oriented BR film, as a function of the input beam power. BR is a light-driven proton pump with a unique photochemistry initiated by the all trans retinal chromophore embedded in the protein. An elegant application of this photonic molecular machine has been recently found in the new area of optogenetics, where genetic expression of BR in brain cells conferred a light responsivity to the cells enabling thus specific stimulation of neurons. The observed strong tunable magnetic nonlinear response of BR might trigger promising applications in the emerging area of pairing optogenetics and functional magnetic resonance imaging susceptible to provide an unprecedented complete functional mapping of neural circuits.

  6. Electrical, Magnetic, and Optical Measurement Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides tools necessary for electrical, magnetic, and optical characterization of bulk and thin-film materials. This includes the ability to determine the...

  7. Phosphorescence and optically detected magnetic resonance of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and its complexes with [d(CGACGTCG)]2 and [d(GGCCAATTGG)]2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay; Ozarowski, Andrzej; Maki, August H

    2002-05-21

    Phosphorescence and optical detection of magnetic resonance (ODMR) is used to study the excited triplet state of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenyl indole (DAPI) and its complexes with the oligonucleotides [d(CGACGTCG)](2) and [d(GGCCAATTGG)](2), where binding occurs by intercalation between GC base pairs and by minor groove insertion, respectively. Weaker binding of DAPI to phosphate is also detected, and the triplet state of this complex is characterized. Intercalation with [d(CGACGTCG)](2) produces a phosphorescence redshift, while groove binding with [d(GGCCAATTGG)](2) leads to a blueshift. Both binding modes give rise to a small decrease in the zero-field splitting (zfs) of the DAPI triplet state. The largest redshift and zfs decrease are found for the phosphate complex. The phosphorescence lifetimes are shorter by an order of magnitude than that of indole or tryptophan as expected for the lower triplet state energy, E(00), of DAPI. The lifetimes agree well with a correlation with E(00) introduced by Siebrand [Siebrand, W. (1966) J. Chem. Phys. 44, 4055-4057] except for the [d(GGCCAATTGG)](2) minor groove complex with a lifetime that is about 20% too long. The longer lifetime is attributed to distortion of the amidino groups in this complex, resulting in less efficient intersystem crossing.

  8. Radiation necrosis of the optic chiasm, optic tract, hypothalamus, and upper pons after radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma, detected by gadolinium-enhanced, T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachibana, O.; Yamaguchi, N.; Yamashima, T.; Yamashita, J. (Univ. of Kanazawa School of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-10-01

    A 26-year-old woman was treated for a prolactin secreting pituitary adenoma by surgery and radiotherapy (5860 rads). Fourteen months later, she developed right hemiparesis and dysarthria. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan using gadolinium contrast showed a small, enhanced lesion in the upper pons. Seven months later, she had a sudden onset of loss of vision, and radiation optic neuropathy was diagnosed. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan showed widespread gadolinium-enhanced lesions in the optic chiasm, optic tract, and hypothalamus. Magnetic resonance imaging is indispensable for the early diagnosis of radiation necrosis, which is not visualized by radiography or computed tomography.

  9. Transient Grating Spectroscopy in Magnetic Thin Films : Simultaneous Detection of Elastic and Magnetic Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janusonis, J.; Jansma, T.; Chang, C. L.; Liu, Qi; Gatilova, A.; Lomonosov, A. M.; Shalagatskyi, V.; Pezeril, T.; Temnov, V. V.; Tobey, R. I.

    2016-01-01

    Surface magnetoelastic waves are coupled elastic and magnetic excitations that propagate along the surface of a magnetic material. Ultrafast optical techniques allow for a non-contact excitation and detection scheme while providing the ability to measure both elastic and magnetic components individu

  10. A cerium oxide nanoparticle-based device for the detection of chronic inflammation via optical and magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaittanis, Charalambos; Santra, Santimukul; Asati, Atul; Perez, J. Manuel

    2012-03-01

    Monitoring of microenvironmental parameters is critical in healthcare and disease management. Harnessing the antioxidant activity of nanoceria and the imaging capabilities of iron oxide nanoparticles in a device setup, we were able to image changes in the device's aqueous milieu. The device was able to convey and process changes in the microenvironment's pH and reactive oxygen species' concentration, distinguishing physiological from abnormal levels. As a result under physiological and transient inflammatory conditions, the device's fluorescence and magnetic resonance signals, emanating from multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles, were similar. However, under chronic inflammatory conditions that are usually associated with high local concentrations of reactive oxygen species and pH decrease, the device's output was considerably different. Specifically, the device's fluorescence emission significantly decreased, while the magnetic resonance signal T2 increased. Further studies identified that the changes in the device's output are attributed to inactivation of the sensing component's nanoceria that prevents it from successfully scavenging the generated free radicals. Interestingly, the buildup of free radical excess led to polymerization of the iron oxide nanoparticle's coating, with concomitant formation of micron size aggregates. Our studies indicate that a nanoceria-based device can be utilized for the monitoring of pro-inflammatory biomarkers, having important applications in the management of numerous ailments while eliminating nanoparticle toxicity issues.Monitoring of microenvironmental parameters is critical in healthcare and disease management. Harnessing the antioxidant activity of nanoceria and the imaging capabilities of iron oxide nanoparticles in a device setup, we were able to image changes in the device's aqueous milieu. The device was able to convey and process changes in the microenvironment's pH and reactive oxygen species' concentration

  11. Optical detection in microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2009-01-01

    Optical detection schemes continue to be favoured for measurements in microfluidic systems. A selection of the latest progress mainly within the last two years is critically reviewed. Emphasis is on integrated solutions, such as planar waveguides, coupling schemes to the outside world, evanescent...... to ease commercialisation of the devices. This work will hopefully result in more commercial products that benefit from integrated optics, because the impact on commercial devices so far has been modest....

  12. Magnetic field concentrator for probing optical magnetic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Wróbel, Piotr; Szoplik, Tomasz

    2010-12-06

    Development of all dielectric and plasmonic metamaterials with a tunable optical frequency magnetic response creates a need for new inspection techniques. We propose a method of measuring magnetic responses of such metamaterials within a wide range of optical frequencies with a single probe. A tapered fiber probe with a radially corrugated metal coating concentrates azimuthally polarized light in the near-field into a subwavelength spot the longitudinal magnetic field component which is much stronger than the perpendicular electric one. The active probe may be used in a future scanning near-field magnetic microscope for studies of magnetic responses of subwavelength elementary cells of metamaterials.

  13. Distributed optical fiber dynamic magnetic field sensor based on magnetostriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi, Ali; Newson, Trevor P

    2014-05-01

    A distributed optical fiber sensor is introduced which is capable of quantifying multiple magnetic fields along a 1 km sensing fiber with a spatial resolution of 1 m. The operation of the proposed sensor is based on measuring the magnetorestrictive induced strain of a nickel wire attached to an optical fiber. The strain coupled to the optical fiber was detected by measuring the strain-induced phase variation between the backscattered Rayleigh light from two segments of the sensing fiber. A magnetic field intensity resolution of 0.3 G over a bandwidth of 50-5000 Hz was demonstrated.

  14. Magnetic Trapping of Molecules via Optical Loading and Magnetic Slowing

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Hsin-I; Hemmerling, Boerge; Piskorski, Julia; Doyle, John M

    2013-01-01

    Calcium monofluoride (CaF) is magnetically slowed and trapped using optical pumping. Starting from a collisionally cooled slow beam, CaF with an initial velocity of ~ 30 m/s is slowed via magnetic forces as it enters a 800 mK deep magnetic trap. Employing two-stage optical pumping, CaF is irreversibly loaded into the trap via two scattered photons. We observe a trap lifetime exceeding 500 ms, limited by background collisions. This method paves the way for cooling and magnetic trapping of chemically diverse molecules without closed cycling transitions.

  15. Optics in magnetic multilayers and nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Visnovsky, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    In the continuing push toward optical computing, the focus remains on finding and developing the right materials. Characterizing materials, understanding the behavior of light in these materials, and being able to control the light are key players in the search for suitable optical materials. Optics in Magnetic Multilayers and Nanostructures presents an accessible introduction to optics in anisotropic magnetic media.While most of the literature presents only final results of the complicated formulae for the optics in anisotropic media, this book provides detailed explanations and full step-by-step derivations that offer insight into the procedure and reveal any approximations. Based on more than three decades of experimental research on the subject, the author explains the basic concepts of magnetooptics; nonreciprocal wave propagation; the simultaneous effect of crystalline symmetry and arbitrarily oriented magnetization on the form of permittivity tensors; spectral dependence of permittivity; multilayers at...

  16. Ultra-sensitive Magnetic Microscopy with an Optically Pumped Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jin; Savukov, Igor

    2016-04-01

    Optically pumped magnetometers (OPMs) based on lasers and alkali-metal vapor cells are currently the most sensitive non-cryogenic magnetic field sensors. Many applications in neuroscience and other fields require high-resolution, high-sensitivity magnetic microscopic measurements. In order to meet this demand we combined a cm-size spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) OPM and flux guides (FGs) to realize an ultra-sensitive FG-OPM magnetic microscope. The FGs serve to transmit the target magnetic flux to the OPM thus improving both the resolution and sensitivity to small magnetic objects. We investigated the performance of the FG-OPM device using experimental and numerical methods, and demonstrated that an optimized device can achieve a unique combination of high resolution (80 μm) and high sensitivity (8.1 pT/). In addition, we also performed numerical calculations of the magnetic field distribution in the FGs to estimate the magnetic noise originating from the domain fluctuations in the material of the FGs. We anticipate many applications of the FG-OPM device such as the detection of micro-biological magnetic fields; the detection of magnetic nano-particles; and non-destructive testing. From our theoretical estimate, an FG-OPM could detect the magnetic field of a single neuron, which would be an important milestone in neuroscience.

  17. Ultra-sensitive Magnetic Microscopy with an Optically Pumped Magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jin; Savukov, Igor

    2016-04-22

    Optically pumped magnetometers (OPMs) based on lasers and alkali-metal vapor cells are currently the most sensitive non-cryogenic magnetic field sensors. Many applications in neuroscience and other fields require high-resolution, high-sensitivity magnetic microscopic measurements. In order to meet this demand we combined a cm-size spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) OPM and flux guides (FGs) to realize an ultra-sensitive FG-OPM magnetic microscope. The FGs serve to transmit the target magnetic flux to the OPM thus improving both the resolution and sensitivity to small magnetic objects. We investigated the performance of the FG-OPM device using experimental and numerical methods, and demonstrated that an optimized device can achieve a unique combination of high resolution (80 μm) and high sensitivity (8.1 pT/). In addition, we also performed numerical calculations of the magnetic field distribution in the FGs to estimate the magnetic noise originating from the domain fluctuations in the material of the FGs. We anticipate many applications of the FG-OPM device such as the detection of micro-biological magnetic fields; the detection of magnetic nano-particles; and non-destructive testing. From our theoretical estimate, an FG-OPM could detect the magnetic field of a single neuron, which would be an important milestone in neuroscience.

  18. Detection and localisation of magnetic objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrell, Y.; Naus, H.W.L.

    2007-01-01

    Detection and localisation of hidden magnetic objects is studied. The concomitant disturbance of the earth magnetic field is exploited. Magnetic fields and or gradients are measured with a number of sensors. Two point models for magnetic fields are selected for the analysis: the magnetic dipole and

  19. Toward contrast-enhanced, optically-detected NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriles, Carlos; Pagliero, Daniela

    2011-03-01

    Optical detection of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) takes place via a two-step process that relies on the interaction between optical photons and electrons on the one hand, and the hyperfine coupling between electrons and nuclear spins on the other. The latter depends on the material system under consideration while the former is dominated by the difference between the illumination and optical transition wavelengths. Here we use optical Faraday rotation to monitor nuclear spins in real time after resonant radio-frequency excitation at high-magnetic field. Comparison between inductively and optically detected NMR spectra in model sample fluids indicates that each of these mechanisms can lead to alternate forms of spectral contrast. Extension of these findings may find application in solvent suppression protocols, sensitivity-enhanced NMR of metalloproteins, or the characterization of molecular orbitals in diamagnetic systems. We acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation.

  20. Magnetic optical scatterers and backaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwadrin, A.

    2014-01-01

    Within the scope of the thesis we address the following questions: 1. What should the LDOS for a dipole with an electric-dipole allowed transition actually be if one would have a hypothetical magnetic mirror or magnetic and electric metasurface? 2. Up to what point are effective ε and μ derived from

  1. Investigation of the lowest triplet state of the pyrochlorophyllide a-apomyoglobin complex by zero-field optically detected magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, R.H. (Boston Univ., MA); Hanlon, E.B.; Boxer, S.G.

    1982-06-04

    The zero-field fluorescence-detected triplet state magnetic resonance spectra have been obtained for the pyrochlorophyllide a-apomyoglobin complex at 2 K. The triplet state zero-field splittings and spin sublevel dynamics were detected on the resolved features of the structured low-temperature fluorescence. Structured fluorescence is not observed for pyrochlorophyllide a in an organic matrix under identical conditions. These data are interpreted in terms of the local binding site of the pyrochlorophyllide a chromophore in the protein and the low-temperature conformation of the protein matrix. 15 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  2. Optical and acoustical UAV detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christnacher, Frank; Hengy, Sébastien; Laurenzis, Martin; Matwyschuk, Alexis; Naz, Pierre; Schertzer, Stéphane; Schmitt, Gwenael

    2016-10-01

    Recent world events have highlighted that the proliferation of UAVs is bringing with it a new and rapidly increasing threat for national defense and security agencies. Whilst many of the reported UAV incidents seem to indicate that there was no terrorist intent behind them, it is not unreasonable to assume that it may not be long before UAV platforms are regularly employed by terrorists or other criminal organizations. The flight characteristics of many of these mini- and micro-platforms present challenges for current systems which have been optimized over time to defend against the traditional air-breathing airborne platforms. A lot of programs to identify cost-effective measures for the detection, classification, tracking and neutralization have begun in the recent past. In this paper, lSL shows how the performance of a UAV detection and tracking concept based on acousto-optical technology can be powerfully increased through active imaging.

  3. Optical magnetism and optical activity in nonchiral planar plasmonic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guozhou; Li, Qiang; Yang, Lizhen; Wu, Lijun

    2016-07-01

    We investigate optical magnetism and optical activity in a simple planar metamolecule composed of double U-shaped metal split ring resonators (SRRs) twisted by 90° with respect to one another. Compared to a single SRR, the resonant energy levels are split and strong magnetic response can be observed due to inductive and conductive coupling. More interestingly, the nonchiral structures exhibit strong optical gyrotropy (1100°/λ) under oblique incidence, benefiting from the strong electromagnetic coupling. A chiral molecule model is proposed to shed light on the physical origin of optical activity. These artificial chiral metamaterials could be utilized to control the polarization of light and promise applications in enantiomer sensing-based medicine, biology, and drug development.

  4. Remote optical detection using microcantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachter, E.A.; Thundat, T.; Oden, P.I.; Warmack, R.J. [Health Sciences Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Datskos, P.G.; Sharp, S.L. [Consultec Scientific, Inc., Knoxville, Tennessee 37932 (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The feasibility of microcantilever-based optical detection is demonstrated. Microcantilevers may provide a simple means for developing single-element and multielement infrared sensors that are smaller, more sensitive, and lower in cost than quantum well, thermoelectric, or bolometric sensors. Here we specifically report here on an evaluation of laboratory prototypes that are based on commercially available microcantilevers, such as those used in atomic force microscopy. In this work, optical transduction techniques were used to measure microcantilever response to remote sources of thermal energy. The noise equivalent power at 20 Hz for room temperature microcantilevers was found to be approximately 3.5 nW/{radical}Hz, with a specific detectivity of 3.6{times}10{sup 7} cm Hz{sup 1/2}/W, when an uncoated microcantilever was irradiated by a low-power diode laser operating at 786 nm. Operation is shown to be possible from dc to kHz frequencies, and the effect of cantilever shape and the role of absorptive coatings are discussed. Finally, spectral response in the midinfrared is evaluated using both coated and uncoated microcantilevers. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Magnetic field induced optical vortex beam rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Shuai; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Bao-Sen

    2015-01-01

    Light with orbital angular momentum (OAM) has drawn a great deal of attention for its important applications in the fields of precise optical measurements and high capacity optical communications. Here we adopt a method to study the rotation of a light beam, which is based on magnetic field induced circular birefringence in warm 87Rb atomic vapor. The dependence of the rotation angle to the intensity of the magnetic field makes it appropriate for weak magnetic field measurement. We derive a detail theoretical description that is in well agreement with the experimental observations. The experiment shows here provides a new method for precise measurement of magnetic field intensity and expands the application of OAM-carrying light.

  6. Detection of magnetic nanoparticles with magnetoencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Wenyan [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Xu, Guizhi [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin, 300130 (China); Sclabassi, Robert J. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Zhu Jiangang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Carnegie Melon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Bagic, Anto [Department of Neurology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Sun Mingui [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)], E-mail: mrsun@neuronet.pitt.edu

    2008-04-15

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) have been widely utilized in biomedical applications due to their extremely high sensitivity to magnetic signals. The present study explores the feasibility of a new type of nanotechnology-based imaging method using standard clinical magnetoencephalographic (MEG) systems equipped with SQUID sensors. Previous studies have shown that biological targets labeled with non-toxic, magnetized nanoparticles can be imaged by measuring the magnetic field generated by these particles. In this work, we demonstrate that (1) the magnetic signals from certain nanoparticles can be detected without magnetization using standard clinical MEG, (2) for some types of nanoparticles, only bound particles produce detectable signals, and (3) the magnetic field of particles several hours after magnetization is significantly stronger than that of un-magnetized particles. These findings hold promise in facilitating the potential application of magnetic nanoparticles to in vivo tumor imaging. The minimum amount of nanoparticles that produce detectable signals is predicted by theoretical modeling and computer simulation.

  7. Capillary Electrophoresis - Optical Detection Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepaniak, M. J.

    2001-08-06

    Molecular recognition systems are developed via molecular modeling and synthesis to enhance separation performance in capillary electrophoresis and optical detection methods for capillary electrophoresis. The underpinning theme of our work is the rational design and development of molecular recognition systems in chemical separations and analysis. There have been, however, some subtle and exciting shifts in our research paradigm during this period. Specifically, we have moved from mostly separations research to a good balance between separations and spectroscopic detection for separations. This shift is based on our perception that the pressing research challenges and needs in capillary electrophoresis and electrokinetic chromatography relate to the persistent detection and flow rate reproducibility limitations of these techniques (see page 1 of the accompanying Renewal Application for further discussion). In most of our work molecular recognition reagents are employed to provide selectivity and enhance performance. Also, an emerging trend is the use of these reagents with specially-prepared nano-scale materials. Although not part of our DOE BES-supported work, the modeling and synthesis of new receptors has indirectly supported the development of novel microcantilevers-based MEMS for the sensing of vapor and liquid phase analytes. This fortuitous overlap is briefly covered in this report. Several of the more significant publications that have resulted from our work are appended. To facilitate brevity we refer to these publications liberally in this progress report. Reference is also made to very recent work in the Background and Preliminary Studies Section of the Renewal Application.

  8. Electronic, magnetic, and optical materials

    CERN Document Server

    Fulay, Pradeep

    2013-01-01

    Technological aspects of ferroelectric, piezoelectric and pyroelectric materials are discussed in detail, in a way that should allow the reader to select an optimal material for a particular application. The basics of magnetostatics are described clearly, as are a wide range of magnetic properties of materials … .-Tony Harker, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London

  9. Fiber Optic Magnetic Sensor Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-28

    Michelson inter- ferometric fiber optical point temperature sensor (Appendix B). The sensor has potential applicntion to non-invnsive and high...3roeniheaingUsing similar techniques, to for monolithic circuits. Lange couplers have been fabricated on alumina substrates. The: re- Fig 3 illustrates

  10. Magnetic bearing optical delay line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dool, T.C. van den; Kamphues, F.G.; Fouss, B.; Henrioulle, K.; Hogenhuis, H.

    2004-01-01

    TNO TPD, in close cooperation with Micromega-Dynamics and Dutch Space, has developed an advanced Optical Delay Line (ODL) for use in PRIMA, GENIE and other ground based interferometers. The delay line design is modular and flexible, which makes scaling for other applications a relatively easy task.

  11. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance contains three articles which review quite fundamentally different aspects of coherent spectroscopy. An enormous variety of effects can be observed when optical and spin resonances are coupled, usually by a combination of radio frequency and laser irradiation. The first article reviews these effects and pays particular attention to developing a theoretical framework which is as similar as possible for the optical and spin cases. Subsequent articles examine deuterium relaxation in molecular solids, and the spatiotemporal growth of multiple spin coheren

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foram Gala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies.

  13. Magnetic and optical bistability in tetrairon(III) single molecule magnets functionalized with azobenzene groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Thazhe Kootteri; Poneti, Giordano; Sorace, Lorenzo; Rodriguez-Douton, Maria Jesus; Barra, Anne-Laure; Neugebauer, Petr; Costantino, Luca; Sessoli, Roberta; Cornia, Andrea

    2012-07-21

    Tetrairon(III) complexes known as "ferric stars" have been functionalized with azobenzene groups to investigate the effect of light-induced trans-cis isomerization on single-molecule magnet (SMM) behaviour. According to DC magnetic data and EPR spectroscopy, clusters dispersed in polystyrene (4% w/w) exhibit the same spin (S = 5) and magnetic anisotropy as bulk samples. Ligand photoisomerization, achieved by irradiation at 365 nm, has no detectable influence on static magnetic properties. However, it induces a small but significant acceleration of magnetic relaxation as probed by AC susceptometry. The pristine behaviour can be almost quantitatively recovered by irradiation with white light. Our studies demonstrate that magnetic and optical bistability can be made to coexist in SMM materials, which are of current interest in molecular spintronics.

  14. Optical and Magnetic Trapping of Potassium 39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensher, Jason; Cornell, Eric; Cataliotti, Francesco; Fort, Chiara; Marin, Francesco; Prevedelli, Marco; Inguscio, Massimo; Ricci, Leonardo; Tino, Guglielmo

    1998-05-01

    We present measurments of optical trapping and cooling and magnetic trapping of ^39K in a double-MOT apparatus. (Optics Lett. 21, 290(1996)) We have measured light-assisted collisional loss rates from our second MOT over a range of trap light intensities. At an intensity of 10 mW/cm^2 we find a loss rate parameter β of 2 x 10-11 cc/s. β increases with trap light intensity and is consistent with the values measured by Williamson and Walker (JOSA B 12, 1393 (1995)). We also present studies of the temperature of atoms in a MOT of ^39K. Under certain conditions of repump light intensity and trap light detuning we measure temperatures nearly as low as the Doppler Limit. Finally, we report on prelimiary results of magnetic trapping in which we have trapped several 10^7 atoms in a quadrupole magnetic trap.

  15. Optical fibre line failure detecting

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Feng

    2013-01-01

    With the development of modern communications, in order to meet the needs of social development and technological progress the optical fibre communications has become the main communication medium for its high reliability and security. Fibre-optic cable is the channel for signal transmission. It is an important component in the entire fibre-optic network. Once the fibre-optic cable fault happened, the entire communication system would be impacted seriously. When fault occurs, it is important ...

  16. Selectively driving optical magnetism (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Norbert F.; Manna, Uttam; Parker, John A.; lee, Jung-Hoon; Deng, Tiansong; Shepherd, Nolan; Weizmann, Yossef

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that one can create a magnetic field by passing a DC or AC electric current through a coil of conductor (i.e., a wire); a phenomenon described by the Maxwell-Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction. NMR or ESR (nuclear magnetic resonance or electron spin resonance) spectroscopies involve the interaction of a spin (nuclear or electron, respectively) with a magnetic field. Mathematically, these phenomena can be understood as the curl of the electric field (i.e., the current or spin) producing a (time varying) magnetic field or vise versa. Thus, one should also be able to induce a magnetic response in nano- and meso-scale materials by exploiting Maxwell-Faraday's law of induction through the design of the structure, by employing an electric field with instantaneous curl or do both to produce an instantaneous circulating (or displacement) current. Here we employ cylindrical vector beams with azimuthal polarization to create an angular (cylindrical) electric field, and selectively induce a magnetic response in metal nanoparticle-based nanomaterials at optical frequencies. This time-varying magnetic field at optical frequencies is induced in systems that do not possess spin or orbital angular momentum. Moreover, with the vector beam spectroscopy we also selectively drive electric dipole modes by excitation with a radially polarized light, and show that the strength of the electric and magnetic modes can be equal in magnitude in individual metal nano-structures. This work opens new opportunities for selective spectroscopic investigation of "dark modes" and Fano resonances in nanomaterials, metamaterials and control of nanomaterial excitations and dynamics.

  17. A Magnetic Sensor System for Biological Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Fuquan

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic biosensors detect biological targets through sensing the stray field of magnetic beads which label the targets. Commonly, magnetic biosensors employ the “sandwich” method to immobilize biological targets, i.e., the targets are sandwiched between a bio-functionalized sensor surface and bio-functionalized magnetic beads. This method has been used very successfully in different application, but its execution requires a rather elaborate procedure including several washing and incubation steps. This dissertation investigates a new magnetic biosensor concept, which enables a simple and effective detection of biological targets. The biosensor takes advantage of the size difference between bare magnetic beads and compounds of magnetic beads and biological targets. First, the detection of super-paramagnetic beads via magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) sensors is implemented. Frequency modulation is used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, enabling the detection of a single magnetic bead. Second, the concept of the magnetic biosensor is investigated theoretically. The biosensor consists of an MTJ sensor, which detects the stray field of magnetic beads inside of a trap on top of the MTJ. A microwire between the trap and the MTJ is used to attract magnetic beads to the trapping well by applying a current to it. The MTJ sensor’s output depends on the number of beads inside the trap. If biological targets are in the sample solution, the beads will form bead compounds consisting of beads linked to the biological targets. Since bead compounds are larger than bare beads, the number of beads inside the trapping well will depend on the presence of biological targets. Hence, the output of the MTJ sensor will depend on the biological targets. The dependences of sensor signals on the sizes of the MTJ sensor, magnetic beads and biological targets are studied to find the optimum constellations for the detection of specific biological targets. The optimization is demonstrated

  18. Magnetic isotope effect on kinetic parameters and quantum beats of radical pairs in micellar solution studied by optically detected esr using pulsed microwave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahama, Yasutaka; Sakaguchi, Yoshio

    2008-01-17

    We investigated the quantum beats, the oscillation between singlet and triplet states of radical pairs induced by the microwave field resonant to one of the component radicals. They were observed as the alternation of the yields of the component radicals by a nanosecond time-resolved optical absorption with the X-band (9.15 GHz) resonant microwave pulse. This technique was applied to the photochemical reaction of benzophenone, benzophenone-d(10), and benzophenone-carbonyl-(13)C in a sodium dodecylsulfate micellar solution with a step-by-step increase of the resonant microwave pulse width. The yields of the component radicals showed alternation with an increase of the microwave pulse width. This indicates that the radical pair retains spin coherence in the micellar solution. The magnetic isotope effect on the amplitude of the quantum beat was observed. The MW effect on the quantum beat of BP-(13)C decreases from 80% to 60% of that of BP by irradiation of the pi-pulse MW due to spin-locking. The kinetic parameters were also determined using the X- or Ku-band (17.44 GHz) region. They are almost similar to each other except for the intersystem recombination rate in the system of BP-(13)C, which may be slightly higher than those in other systems.

  19. Magnetic-field-compensation optical vector magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoyan, Aram; Shmavonyan, Svetlana; Khanbekyan, Alen; Khanbekyan, Karen; Marinelli, Carmela; Mariotti, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    A concept for an optical magnetometer used for the measurement of magnitude and direction of a magnetic field (B-field) in two orthogonal directions is developed based on double scanning of a B-field to compensate the measured field to zero value, which is monitored by a resonant magneto-optical process in an unshielded atomic vapor cell. Implementation of the technique using the nonlinear Hanle effect on the D2 line of rubidium demonstrates viability and efficiency of the proposed concept. The ways to enhance characteristics of the suggested technique and optimize its performance, as well as the possible extension to three-axis magnetometry, are discussed.

  20. Parametric Amplification For Detecting Weak Optical Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Chen, Chien; Chakravarthi, Prakash

    1996-01-01

    Optical-communication receivers of proposed type implement high-sensitivity scheme of optical parametric amplification followed by direct detection for reception of extremely weak signals. Incorporates both optical parametric amplification and direct detection into optimized design enhancing effective signal-to-noise ratios during reception in photon-starved (photon-counting) regime. Eliminates need for complexity of heterodyne detection scheme and partly overcomes limitations imposed on older direct-detection schemes by noise generated in receivers and by limits on quantum efficiencies of photodetectors.

  1. Magneto-optic studies of magnetic oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehring, Gillian A., E-mail: g.gehring@shef.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Alshammari, Marzook S.; Score, David S.; Neal, James R.; Mokhtari, Abbas; Fox, A. Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15

    A brief review of the use of magneto-optic methods to study magnetic oxides is given. A simple method to obtain the magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) of a thin film on a transparent substrate is described. The method takes full account of multiple reflections in the film and substrate. Examples of the magneto-optic spectra of Co-doped ZnO, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and GdMnO{sub 3} are given. The Maxwell-Garnett method is used to describe the effects of metallic cobalt inclusions in Co:ZnO samples, and the change of the MCD spectra of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} at the Verwey temperature is discussed. Data showing different MCD signals at different energies is presented for GdMnO{sub 3}.

  2. Optical detection of glyphosate in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Góes, R. E.; Possetti, G. R. C.; Muller, M.; Fabris, J. L.

    2017-04-01

    This work shows preliminary results of the detection of Glyphosate in water by using optical fiber spectroscopy. A colloid with citrate-caped silver nanoparticles was employed as substrate for the measurements. A cross analysis between optical absorption and inelastic scattering evidenced a controlled aggregation of the sample constituents, leading to the possibility of quantitative detection of the analyte. The estimate limit of detection for Glyphosate in water for the proposed sensing scheme was about 1.7 mg/L.

  3. Magnetic biosensor system to detect biological targets

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Fuquan

    2012-09-01

    Magneto-resistive sensors in combination with magnetic beads provide sensing platforms, which are small in size and highly sensitive. These platforms can be fully integrated with microchannels and electronics to enable devices capable of performing complex tasks. Commonly, a sandwich method is used that requires a specific coating of the sensor\\'s surface to immobilize magnetic beads and biological targets on top of the sensor. This paper concerns a micro device to detect biological targets using magnetic concentration, magnetic as well as mechanical trapping and magnetic sensing. Target detection is based on the size difference between bare magnetic beads and magnetic beads with targets attached. This method remedies the need for a coating layer and reduces the number of steps required to run an experiment. © 2012 IEEE.

  4. A microfabricated optically-pumped magnetic gradiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, D.; Perry, A. R.; Krzyzewski, S. P.; Geller, S.; Kitching, J.; Knappe, S.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the development of a microfabricated atomic magnetic gradiometer based on optical spectroscopy of alkali atoms in the vapor phase. The gradiometer, which operates in the spin-exchange relaxation free regime, has a length of 60 mm and cross sectional diameter of 12 mm, and consists of two chip-scale atomic magnetometers which are interrogated by a common laser light. The sensor can measure differences in magnetic fields, over a 20 mm baseline, of 10 fT/ Hz1 /2 at frequencies above 20 Hz. The maximum rejection of magnetic field noise is 1000 at 10 Hz. By use of a set of compensation coils wrapped around the sensor, we also measure the sensor sensitivity at several external bias field strengths up to 150 mG. This device is useful for applications that require both sensitive gradient field information and high common-mode noise cancellation.

  5. Optical Detection Theory for Laser Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osche, Gregory R.

    2002-07-01

    A comprehensive treatment of the fundamentals of optical detection theory Laser system applications are becoming more numerous, particularly in the fields of communications and remote sensing. Filling a significant gap in the literature, Optical Detection Theory for Laser Applications addresses the theoretical aspects of optical detection and associated phenomenologies, describing the fundamental optical, statistical, and mathematical principles of the modern laser system. The book is especially valuable for its extensive treatment of direct detection statistics, which has no analog in radar detection theory and which has never before been compiled in a cohesive manner in a single book. Coverage includes: * A review of mathematical statistics and statistical decision theory * Performance of truncated and untruncated coherent and direct detection systems using Huygens-Fresnel and Gaussian beam theories * Rough surface scatter and atmospheric propagation effects * Single-pulse detection statistics for direct and coherent detection systems * Multi-pulse detection statistics for direct and coherent detection systems Supported by additional comments providing further insights into the physics or mathematics discussed and an extensive list of classic references, Optical Detection Theory for Laser Applications comprises a much-needed reference for the professional scientist or engineer, as well as a solid textbook for advanced students.

  6. Electrical detection of magnetization reversal without auxiliary magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejník, K.; Novák, V.; Wunderlich, J.; Jungwirth, T.

    2015-05-01

    First-generation magnetic random access memories based on anisotropic magnetoresistance required magnetic fields for both writing and reading. Modern all-electrical read/write memories use instead nonrelativistic spin transport connecting the storing magnetic layer with a reference ferromagnet. Recent studies have focused on electrical manipulation of magnetic moments by relativistic spin torques requiring no reference ferromagnet. Here we report the observation of a counterpart magnetoresistance effect in such a relativistic system which allows us to electrically detect the sign of the magnetization without an auxiliary magnetic field or ferromagnet. We observe the effect in a geometry in which the magnetization of a uniaxial (Ga,Mn)As epilayer is set either parallel or antiparallel to a current-induced nonequilibrium spin polarization of carriers. In our structure, this linear-in-current magnetoresistance reaches 0.2% at current density of 106Acm -2 .

  7. Magnetic Sensing with Ferrofluid and Fiber Optic Connectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Homa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple, cost effective and sensitive fiber optic magnetic sensor fabricated with ferrofluid and commercially available fiber optic components is described in this paper. The system uses a ferrofluid infiltrated extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI interrogated with an infrared wavelength spectrometer to measure magnetic flux density. The entire sensing system was developed with commercially available components so it can be easily and economically reproduced in large quantities. The device was tested with two different ferrofluid types over a range of magnetic flux densities to verify performance. The sensors readily detected magnetic flux densities in the range of 0.5 mT to 12.0 mT with measurement sensitivities in the range of 0.3 to 2.3 nm/mT depending on ferrofluid type. Assuming a conservative wavelength resolution of 0.1 nm for state of the art EFPI detection abilities, the estimated achievable measurement resolution is on the order 0.04 mT. The inherent small size and basic structure complimented with the fabrication ease make it well-suited for a wide array of research, industrial, educational and military applications.

  8. Compact electrically detected magnetic resonance setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Eckardt

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR is a commonly used technique for the study of spin-dependent transport processes in semiconductor materials and electro-optical devices. Here, we present the design and implementation of a compact setup to measure EDMR, which is based on a commercially available benchtop electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectrometer. The electrical detection part uses mostly off-the-shelf electrical components and is thus highly customizable. We present a characterization and calibration procedure for the instrument that allowed us to quantitatively reproduce results obtained on a silicon-based reference sample with a “large-scale” state-of-the-art instrument. This shows that EDMR can be used in novel contexts relevant for semiconductor device fabrication like clean room environments and even glove boxes. As an application example, we present data on a class of environment-sensitive objects new to EDMR, semiconducting organic microcrystals, and discuss similarities and differences to data obtained for thin-film devices of the same molecule.

  9. Picosecond Photon Echoes Detected by Optical Mixing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, Wim H.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1978-01-01

    Picosecond photon echoes are shown to be easily detected by optical mixing. The synchronized picosecond excitation and probe pulses are generated by amplifying pulses from two dye lasers, synchronously pumped by a mode-locked argon-ion laser. The technique is used to study optical dephasing in the o

  10. A microfluidic based optical particle detection method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, James; Chen, Lu; Nayyar, Rakesh; Aitchison, Stewart

    2012-03-01

    An optical particle detection and analysis method is presented. This method combines the capillary microfluidics, integrated optics and novel image acquisition and analysis algorithms to form the basis of a portable or handheld cytometer instrument. Experimental results provided shows the testing results are closely matched with conventional flow cytometer data.

  11. Optical detection of pores in adipocyte membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanina, I. Yu.; Doubrovski, V. A.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2013-08-01

    Structures that can be interpreted as cytoplasm droplets leaking through the membrane are experimentally detected on the membranes of adipocytes using optical digital microscopy. The effect of an aqueous alcohol solution of brilliant green on the amount and sizes of structures is studied. It is demonstrated that the optical irradiation of the adipocytes that are sensitized with the aid of the brilliant green leads to an increase in the amount of structures (pores) after the irradiation. The experimental results confirm the existence of an earlier-proposed effect of photochemical action on the sensitized cells of adipose tissue that involves additional formation of pores in the membrane of the sensitized cell under selective optical irradiation. The proposed method for the detection of micropores in the membrane of adipose tissue based on the detection of the cytoplasm droplets leaking from the cell can be considered as a method for the optical detection of nanosized pores.

  12. Detection and optical imaging of induced convection under the action of static gradient magnetic field in a non-conducting diamagnetic fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Morarka, Amit R

    2016-01-01

    The report elaborates experimental observations of magnetically induced convection in a non- conducting diamagnetic fluid. Suspension of Deionized (DI) water and Lycopodium pollen grains was used as the fluid in a test tube. Permanent magnets having field strength of 0.12T each were used to provide the static gradient magnetic field. The convections were visually observed and recorded using travelling microscope attached with a web camera. Various geometrical configurations of magnets in the vicinity of test tube were used which provided different types of orientation of convective flows in the test tube. Convections were observed over a range of fluid volumes from 0.2ml-10ml. The experimentally observed results provide proof of concept that irrespective of the weak interactions of diamagnetic fluids with magnetic fields, these effects can be easily observed and recorded with the use of low tech laboratory equipments.

  13. Developments in distributed optical fiber detection technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wei; Zhu, Qianxia; You, Tianrong

    2014-12-01

    The distributed optical fiber detection technology plays an important role in many fields, such as key regional security monitoring, pipeline maintenance and communication cable protection. It is superior to the traditional detector, and has a good prospect. This paper presents an overview of various distributed optical fiber sensors. At first, some related technologies of the optical fiber detection schemes are introduced in respect of sensing distance, real-time ability, signal strength, and system complexity; and the advantages and limitations of fiber gratings sensors, reflection-based optical fiber sensors, and interference- based optical fiber sensors are discussed. Then some advanced distributed optical fiber detection systems are mentioned. And the double-loop Sagnac distributed system is improved by adding photoelectric modulators and depolarizers. In order to denoise and enhance the original signal, a spectral subtraction-likelihood ratio method is improved. The experiment results show the spatial resolution is +/-15m per kilometer. Finally, based on the development trends of optical fiber detection technology at home and abroad, development tendency and application fields are predicted.

  14. Detection Range of Airborne Magnetometers in Magnetic Anomaly Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengjing Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Airborne magnetometers are utilized for the small-range search, precise positioning, and identification of the ferromagnetic properties of underwater targets. As an important performance parameter of sensors, the detection range of airborne magnetometers is commonly set as a fixed value in references regardless of the influences of environment noise, target magnetic properties, and platform features in a classical model to detect airborne magnetic anomalies. As a consequence, deviation in detection ability analysis is observed. In this study, a novel detection range model is proposed on the basis of classic detection range models of airborne magnetometers. In this model, probability distribution is applied, and the magnetic properties of targets and the environment noise properties of a moving submarine are considered. The detection range model is also constructed by considering the distribution of the moving submarine during detection. A cell-averaging greatest-of-constant false alarm rate test method is also used to calculate the detection range of the model at a desired false alarm rate. The detection range model is then used to establish typical submarine search probabilistic models. Results show that the model can be used to evaluate not only the effects of ambient magnetic noise but also the moving and geomagnetic features of the target and airborne detection platform. The model can also be utilized to display the actual operating range of sensor systems.

  15. Combined hostile fire and optics detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brännlund, Carl; Tidström, Jonas; Henriksson, Markus; Sjöqvist, Lars

    2013-10-01

    Snipers and other optically guided weapon systems are serious threats in military operations. We have studied a SWIR (Short Wave Infrared) camera-based system with capability to detect and locate snipers both before and after shot over a large field-of-view. The high frame rate SWIR-camera allows resolution of the temporal profile of muzzle flashes which is the infrared signature associated with the ejection of the bullet from the rifle. The capability to detect and discriminate sniper muzzle flashes with this system has been verified by FOI in earlier studies. In this work we have extended the system by adding a laser channel for optics detection. A laser diode with slit-shaped beam profile is scanned over the camera field-of-view to detect retro reflection from optical sights. The optics detection system has been tested at various distances up to 1.15 km showing the feasibility to detect rifle scopes in full daylight. The high speed camera gives the possibility to discriminate false alarms by analyzing the temporal data. The intensity variation, caused by atmospheric turbulence, enables discrimination of small sights from larger reflectors due to aperture averaging, although the targets only cover a single pixel. It is shown that optics detection can be integrated in combination with muzzle flash detection by adding a scanning rectangular laser slit. The overall optics detection capability by continuous surveillance of a relatively large field-of-view looks promising. This type of multifunctional system may become an important tool to detect snipers before and after shot.

  16. Metallic magnetic bolometers for particle detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandler, S.R.; Enss, C.; Lanou, R.E.; Maris, H.J.; More, T.; Porter, F.S.; Seidel, G.M. (Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States))

    1993-11-01

    The magnetization of localized spins in metals is discussed as a sensor for the low temperature calorimetric detection of particles. The magnetization of localized paramagnetic ions in metals can be used as a very sensitive sensor for the calorimetric detection of particles at low temperatures. The strong coupling of the localized spins to the conduction electrons results in very fast thermal equilibration between the two systems. Even though the concentration of spins must be kept small in metals to avoid spin-spin coupling by indirect exchange, the metallic magnetic bolometer can achieve very high sensitivities. In general, the sensitivity increases very rapidly with decreasing temperature.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in optic nerve lesions with multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo; Kakisu, Yonetsugu; Adachi, Emiko (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the optic nerve was performed in 10 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) using short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) pulse sequences, and the results were compared with the visual evoked potentials (VEP). The 10 patients had optic neuritis in the chronic or remitting phase together with additional symptoms or signs allowing a diagnosis of clinically definite or probable MS. Sixteen optic nerves were clinically affected and 4 were unaffected. MRI was performed using a 0.5 tesla supeconducting unit, and multiple continuous 5 mm coronal and axial STIR images were obtained. A lesion was judged to be present if a focal or diffuse area of increased signal intensity was detectd in the optic nerve. In VEP, a delay in peak latency or no P 100 component was judged to be abnormal. With regard to the clinically affected optic nerves, MRI revealed a region of increased signal intensity in 14/16 (88%) and the VEP was abnormal in 16/16 (100%). In the clinically unaffected optic nerves, MRI revealed an increased signal intensity in 2/4 (50%). One of these nerves had an abnormal VEP and the other had a VEP latency at the upper limit of normal. The VEP was abnormal in 1/4 (25%). In the clinically affected optic nerves, the degree of loss of visual acuity was not associated with the longitudinal extent of the lesions shown by MRI. The mean length was 17.5 mm in optic nerves with a slight disturbance of visual acuity and 15.0 mm in nerves with severe visual loss. MRI using STIR pulse sequences was found to be almost as sensitive as VEP in detecting both clinically affected and unaffected optic nerve lesions in patients with MS, and was useful in visualizing the location or size of the lesions. (author).

  18. A new magnetic sensor with Mach-Zehnder/Sagnac optical fiber interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuguang LI; Xinwan LI; Xin WANG; Jianping CHEN

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new structure for magnetic sensor with Mach-Zehnder/Sagnac optical fiber interferometer. The magnetostrictive optical fiber sensor is placed in one of the two arms of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer, which can detect the optic phase shift by testing the length difference of the arm caused by environmental magnetic field. Because of forward and backward transmission in the arms, the Mach-Zehnder/ Sagnac optical fiber interferometer can deduce twice exactly of the phase shift proportional to the length difference as Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Theoretically, description of the Mach-Zehnder/Sagnac interferometer is given, and some main issues in the magnetic field sensor with optical fiber interferometer are demonstrated with experiments. The magnetic sensors are implemented using the proposed methods.

  19. Detection of magnetic nanoparticles for clinical interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis the possibilities of detection of magnetic nanoparticles for clinical interventions are investigated. Detection of these particles in, for example, the sentinel lymph node procedure, is a good alternative for the radionuclide based methods currently in use. The thesis shows that the m

  20. Chemical shift selective magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve in patients with acute optic neuritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, H.B.W.; Thomsen, C.; Frederiksen, J.; Henriksen, O.; Olesen, J.

    Optic neuritis is often the first manifestion of multiple sclerosis (MS). Sixteen patients with acute optic neuritis and one patient with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging, using a chemical shift selective double spin echo sequence. In 3 of the 16 patients, abnormalities were seen. In one patient with bilateral symptoms, signal hyperintensity and swelling of the right side of the chiasm were found. In another patient the optic nerve was found diffusely enlarged with only a marginally increased signal in the second echo. In the third patient an area of signal hyperintensity and swelling was seen in the left optic nerve. In the patient with BIH the subarachnoid space which surrounds the optic nerves was enlarged. Even using this refined pulse sequence, avoiding the major artefact in imaging the optic nerve, the chemical shift artefact, lesions were only shown in 3/16 (19%) of the patients with optic neuritis. Nevertheless, the presented chemical shift selective double spin echo sequence may be of great value for detection of retrobulbar lesions.

  1. Optical detection dental disease using polarized light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, Matthew J. (Livermore, CA); Colston, Jr., Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Sathyam, Ujwal S. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Fried, Daniel (San Francisco, CA)

    2003-01-01

    A polarization sensitive optical imaging system is used to detect changes in polarization in dental tissues to aid the diagnosis of dental disease such as caries. The degree of depolarization is measured by illuminating the dental tissue with polarized light and measuring the polarization state of the backscattered light. The polarization state of this reflected light is analyzed using optical polarimetric imaging techniques. A hand-held fiber optic dental probe is used in vivo to direct the incident beam to the dental tissue and collect the reflected light. To provide depth-resolved characterization of the dental tissue, the polarization diagnostics may be incorporated into optical coherence domain reflectometry and optical coherence tomography (OCDR/OCT) systems, which enables identification of subsurface depolarization sites associated with demineralization of enamel or bone.

  2. Polarization-dependent optical reflection ultrasonic detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoyi; Huang, Zhiyu; Wang, Guohe; Li, Wenzhao; Li, Changhui

    2017-03-01

    Although ultrasound transducers based on commercial piezoelectric-material have been widely used, they generally have limited bandwidth centered at the resonant frequency. Currently, several pure-optical ultrasonic detection methods have gained increasing interest due to their wide bandwidth and high sensitivity. However, most of them require customized components (such as micro-ring, SPR, Fabry-Perot film, etc), which limit their broad implementations. In this study, we presented a simple pure-optical ultrasound detection method, called "Polarization-dependent Reflection Ultrasonic Detection" (PRUD). It detects the intensity difference between two polarization components of the probe beam that is modulated by ultrasound waves. PRUD detect the two components by using a balanced detector, which effectively suppressed much of the unwanted noise. We have achieved the sensitivity (noise equivalent pressure) to be 1.7kPa, and this can be further improved. In addition, like many other pure-optical ultrasonic detection methods, PRUD also has a flat and broad bandwidth from almost zero to over 100MHz. Besides theoretical analysis, we did a phantom study by imaging a tungsten filament to demonstrate the performance of PRUD. We believe this simple and economic method will attract both researchers and engineers in optical and ultrasound fields.

  3. Investigation of magnetic microdiscs for bacterial pathogen detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Torres, Keisha Y.; Garraud, Nicolas; Arnold, David P.; McLamore, Eric S.

    2016-05-01

    Despite strict regulations to control the presence of human pathogens in our food supply, recent foodborne outbreaks have heightened public concern about food safety and created urgency to improve methods for pathogen detection. Herein we explore a potentially portable, low-cost system that uses magnetic microdiscs for the detection of bacterial pathogens in liquid samples. The system operates by optically measuring the rotational dynamics of suspended magnetic microdiscs functionalized with pathogen-binding aptamers. The soft ferromagnetic (Ni80Fe20) microdiscs exhibit a closed magnetic spin arrangement (i.e. spin vortex) with zero magnetic stray field, leading to no disc agglomeration when in free suspension. With very high surface area for functionalization and volumes 10,000x larger than commonly used superparamagnetic nanoparticles, these 1.5-μm-diameter microdiscs are well suited for tagging, trapping, actuating, or interrogating bacterial targets. This work reports a wafer-level microfabrication process for fabrication of 600 million magnetic microdiscs per substrate and measurement of their rotational dynamics response. Additionally, the biofunctionalization of the microdiscs with DNA aptamers, subsequent binding to E. coli bacteria, and their magnetic manipulation is reported.

  4. Self-Assembly of an Optically-Responsive Polydiacetylene-Coating on Iron Ferrite Magnetic Nanoparticles for Tumor Detection and Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Vivian

    Nanoparticles are a promising diagnostic agent with applications in tumor imaging and targeted cancer treatment. They can offer multifunctional properties by combining imaging methods to improve cancer diagnosis, treatment, and disease monitoring. Two such complementary tools are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence imaging. In this thesis, a dual solvent exchange approach was chosen to facilitate the self-assembly of amphiphilic diacetylene monomers onto hydrophobic iron ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Various concentrations of the diacetylene monomers, 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (PCDA) and 10,12-heptacosadiynoic acid (HCDA), were coated onto ˜14 nm iron ferrite MNPs. The diacetylene monomer coating were cross-linked to a stable blue colored polydiacetylene (PDA) coating after applying UV light. The resulting PDA-MNP hybrid displayed characteristic chromogenic and fluorogenic in response to thermal stress. This novel multifunctional nanoparticle system holds exciting potential for dual-modality diagnostics applications.

  5. Magnetic colloid by PLA: Optical, magnetic and thermal transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, B. K.; Shahi, A. K.; Gopal, Ram

    2015-08-01

    Ferrofluids of cobalt and cobalt oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have been successfully synthesized using liquid phase-pulse laser ablation (LP-PLA) in ethanol and double distilled water, respectively. The mechanism of laser ablation in liquid media and formation process for Co target in double distilled water (DDW) and ethanol are speculated based on the reactions between laser generated highly nascent cobalt species and vaporized solvent media in a confined high temperature and pressure at the plume-surrounding liquid interface region. Optical absorption, emission, vibrational and rotational properties have been investigated using UV-vis absorption, photoluminescence (PL) and Fourier transform-infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopy, respectively. In this study optical band gap of cobalt oxide ferrofluids has been engineered using different pulse energy of Nd:YAG laser in the range of (2.80-3.60 eV). Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) is employed to determine the magnetic properties of ferrofluids of cobalt and cobalt oxide NPs while their thermal conductivities are examined using rotating disc method. Ferrofluids have gained enormous curiosity due to many technological applications, i.e. drug delivery, coolant and heating purposes.

  6. Magnetic Lenz lenses increase the limit-of-detection in nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Spengler, Nils; Meissner, Markus V; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Korvink, Jan G

    2016-01-01

    A high NMR detection sensitivity is indispensable when dealing with mass and volume-limited samples, or whenever a high spatial resolution is required. The use of miniaturised RF coils is a proven way to increase sensitivity, but may be impractical and is not applicable to every experimental situation. We present the use of magnetic lenses, denoted as Lenz lenses due to their working principle, to focus the magnetic flux of a macroscopic RF coil into a smaller volume and thereby locally enhance the sensitivity of the NMR experiment - at the expense of the total sensitive volume. Besides focusing, such lenses facilitate re-guiding or re-shaping of magnetic fields much like optical lenses do with light beams. For the first time we experimentally demonstrate the use of Lenz lenses in magnetic resonance and provide a compact mathematical description of the working principle. Through simulations we show that optimal arrangements can be found.

  7. Thin film detection of High Energy Materials: Optical Pumping Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Barthwal, Sachin

    2014-01-01

    We present our work on High Energy Material detection based on thin film of Lithium using the phenomenon of Optical Pumping. The Li atoms present in the thin film are optically pumped to one of the ground hyperfine energy levels so that they can no more absorb light from the resonant light source. Now in presence of a RF signal, which quantifies the ambient magnetic field, this polarized atomic system is again randomized thus making it reabsorb the resonant light. This gives a quantified measurement of the magnetic field surrounding the thin film detector. This is then mapped to the presence of magnetic HEM and hence the HEM are detected. Our approach in this regard starts with verifying the stability of Lithium atoms in various solvents so as to get a suitable liquid medium to form a thin film. In this regard, various UV-visible characterization spectra are presented to finally approach a stable system for the detection. We have worked on around 10 polar and non- polar solvents to see the stability criteria....

  8. Magnetic microwires a magneto-optical study

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhik, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    PrefaceKerr Effect as Method of Investigation of Magnetization Reversal in Magnetic Wires Cold-Drawn Fe-Rich Amorphous Wire Conventional Co-Rich Amorphous WireInteraction Between Glass-Covered MicrowiresCircular Magnetic Bistability in Co-Rich Amorphous Microwires Effect of High-Frequency Driving Current on Magnetization Reversal in Co-Rich Amorphous MicrowiresRelation Between Surface Magnetization Reversal and Magnetoimpedance Helical Magnetic Structure Magnetization Reversal in Crossed Magnetic Field Visualization of Barkhausen Jump Magnetizatio

  9. Defect detection for end surface of ferrite magnetic tile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jiayuan; Wang, Yuwei; Wang, Keyi

    2016-09-01

    A visual automatic detection method is proposed for defect detection on end surface of ferrite magnetic tile to tackle the disadvantages generated by human work which has low efficiency and unstable accuracy. Because the defects on end surface of ferrite magnetic tile with dark colors and low contrasts are negative for defect detection, uniform illumination is provided by LED light source and a dedicated optical system is designed to extract defects conveniently. The approach uses comparison of the fitting and actual edge curves to detect defects mainly with most defects located on the edge. Firstly improved adaptive median filter is used as the image preprocessing. Subsequently the appropriate threshold is calculated by Otsu algorithm based on the extreme points in the gray-level histogram to segment the preprocessing image. Then the Sobel operator can be used to extract the edge of end surface precisely. Finally through comparing the ideal fitting and actual edge curves of end surface, to detect the defects with some relevant features. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme could detect defects on the end surface of ferrite magnetic tile efficiency and accurately with 93.33% accuracy rate, 2.30% false acceptance rate and 8.45% correct rejection rate.

  10. Optical flow based finger stroke detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhongdi; Li, Bin; Wang, Kongqiao

    2010-07-01

    Finger stroke detection is an important topic in hand based Human Computer Interaction (HCI) system. Few research studies have carried out effective solutions to this problem. In this paper, we present a novel approach for stroke detection based on mono vision. Via analyzing the optical flow field within the finger area, our method is able to detect finger stroke under various camera position and visual angles. We present a thorough evaluation for each component of the algorithm, and show its efficiency and effectiveness on solving difficult stroke detection problems.

  11. Tunable magneto-optic modulation based on magnetically responsive nanostructured magnetic fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Xue-Kun; Pu Sheng-Li; Wang Lun-Wei; Wang Xiang; Yu Guo-Jun; Ji Hong-Zhu

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic fluid is a kind of functional composite material with nanosized structure and unique optical properties.The tunable magneto-optic modulation of magnetic fluid under external magnetic field,achieved by adjusting the polarization direction of incident light,is investigated theoretically and experimentally in this work.The corresponding modulation depth and response time are obtained.The accompanying mechanisms are clarified by using the theory of dichroism of magnetic fluid and the aggregation/disintegration processes of magnetic particles within magnetic fluid when the external magnetic field turns on/off.

  12. Optical Magnetic Induction Tomography of the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmugi, Luca; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-04-01

    Atrial Fibrillation (AF) affects a significant fraction of the ageing population, causing a high level of morbidity and mortality. Despite its significance, the causes of AF are still not uniquely identified. This, combined with the lack of precise diagnostic and guiding tools, makes the clinical treatment of AF sub-optimal. We identify magnetic induction tomography as the most promising technique for the investigation of the causes of fibrillation and for its clinical practice. We therefore propose a novel optical instrument based on optical atomic magnetometers, fulfilling the requirements for diagnostic mapping of the heart’s conductivity. The feasibility of the device is here discussed in view of the final application. Thanks to the potential of atomic magnetometers for miniaturisation and extreme sensitivity at room temperature, a new generation of compact and non-invasive diagnostic instrumentation, with both bedside and intra-operative operation capability, is envisioned. Possible scenarios both in clinical practice and biomedical research are then discussed. The flexibility of the system makes it promising also for application in other fields, such as neurology and oncology.

  13. OPAD data analysis. [Optical Plumes Anomaly Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntine, Wray L.; Kraft, Richard; Whitaker, Kevin; Cooper, Anita E.; Powers, W. T.; Wallace, Tim L.

    1993-01-01

    Data obtained in the framework of an Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) program intended to create a rocket engine health monitor based on spectrometric detections of anomalous atomic and molecular species in the exhaust plume are analyzed. The major results include techniques for handling data noise, methods for registration of spectra to wavelength, and a simple automatic process for estimating the metallic component of a spectrum.

  14. Fibre optic sensors for mine hazard detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, T; Wang, C; Wei, Y; Zhao, Y; Shang, Y; Wang, Z [Laser Institute of Shandong Academy of Science (China); Huo, D [Shandong Micro-Sensor Photonics Limited, 19 Keyuan Road, Jinan, Shandong province, 250014 (China); Ning, Y, E-mail: tongyuliu@hotmail.co [Intelligent Sensor Systems Limited, Rockley Manor, Rockley, Wiltshire (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    We report the development of a comprehensive safety monitoring solution for coal mines. A number of fibre optic sensors have been developed and deployed for safety monitoring of mine roof integrity and hazardous gases. The FOS-based mine hazard detection system offers unique advantages of intrinsic safety, multi-location and multi-parameter monitoring. They can be potentially used to build expert systems for mine hazard early detection and prevention.

  15. Optical fiber applied to radiation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junior, Francisco A.B.; Costa, Antonella L.; Oliveira, Arno H. de; Vasconcelos, Danilo C., E-mail: fanbra@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: heeren@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: danilochagas@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    In the last years, the production of optical fibers cables has make possible the development of a range of spectroscopic probes for in situ analysis performing beyond nondestructive tests, environmental monitoring, security investigation, application in radiotherapy for dose monitoring, verification and validation. In this work, a system using an optical fiber cable to light signal transmission from a NaI(Tl) radiation detector is presented. The innovative device takes advantage mainly of the optical fibers small signal attenuation and immunity to electromagnetic interference to application for radiation detection systems. The main aim was to simplify the detection system making it to reach areas where the conventional device cannot access due to its lack of mobility and external dimensions. Some tests with this innovative system are presented and the results stimulate the continuity of the researches. (author)

  16. Magnetic Anomaly Detection by Remote Means

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-21

    effort we have demonstrated the detection of Xe using the remote Radar REMPI technique and the excitation of Xe atoms remotely using UV laser pulses...unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Research on the possibility of detecting magnetic anomalies remotely using laser excitation of a... using laser excitation of a naturally occurring atomic or molecular species in air has focused on the use of Xe129. Although Xe129 is only present in

  17. Far-field mapping of the longitudinal magnetic and electric optical fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ecoffey, C

    2013-01-01

    In this letter, we demonstrate the experimental mapping of the longitudinal magnetic and electric optical fields with a standard scanning microscope that involves a high numerical aperture far-field objective. The imaging concept relies upon the insertion of an azimuthal or a radial polarizer within the detection path of the microscope which acts as an optical electromagnetic filter aimed at transmitting selectively to the detector the signal from the magnetic or electric longitudinal fields present in the detection volume, respectively. The resulting system is thus versatile, non invasive, of high resolution, and shows high detection efficiencies. Magnetic optical properties of physical and biological micro and nano-structures may thus be revealed with a far-field microscope.

  18. Optical Conductivity of Anisotropic Quantum Dots in Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Kang-Xian; CHEN Chuan-Yu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Optical conductivity of anisotropic double-parabolic quantum dots is investigated with the memory-function approach, and the analytic expression for the optical conductivity is derived. With characteristic parameterspertaining to GaAs, the numerical results are presented. It is shown that: (1) the larger the optical phonon frequency ωLO, the stronger the peak intensity of the optical conductivity, and the more asymmetric the shape of the optical conductivity; (2) the magnetic field enhances the optical conductivity for levels l = 0 and l = 1, with or without electron-LO-phonon interactions; (3) the larger the quantum dot thickness lz, the smaller the optical conductivity σ(ω).

  19. Iron free permanent magnet systems for charged particle beam optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, S.M.; Halbach, K.

    1995-09-03

    The strength and astounding simplicity of certain permanent magnet materials allow a wide variety of simple, compact configurations of high field strength and quality multipole magnets. Here we analyze the important class of iron-free permanent magnet systems for charged particle beam optics. The theory of conventional segmented multipole magnets formed from uniformly magnetized block magnets placed in regular arrays about a circular magnet aperture is reviewed. Practical multipole configurations resulting are presented that are capable of high and intermediate aperture field strengths. A new class of elliptical aperture magnets is presented within a model with continuously varying magnetization angle. Segmented versions of these magnets promise practical high field dipole and quadrupole magnets with an increased range of applicability.

  20. Phosphorescence and zero-field optically detected magnetic resonance studies of the lowest excited triplet states of organometallic diimine complexes. 1. (Rh(bpy)/sub 3/)/sup 3 +/ and (Rh(phen)/sub 3/)/sup 3 +/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komada, Y.; Yamauchi, S.; Hirota, N.

    1986-11-20

    The authors have made spectroscopic and optically detected magnetic resonance studies on /sup 3/..pi pi..* (Rh(bpy)/sub 3/)/sup 3 +/ and (Rh(phen)/sub 3/)/sup 3 +/ at liquid helium temperature. They have observed a well-resolved phosphorescence spectrum of (Rh(phen)/sub 3/)(BF/sub 4/)/sub 3/ that resembles that of 1,10-phenanthroline except for changes in some vibrational frequencies. The triplet lifetimes of the Rh complexes were compared with those of the Cd and Ir complexes in the light of the effect of d..pi..* states. Zero-field (zf) ODMR signals of the /sup 3/..pi pi..*Rh complexes were observed, and triplet sublevel properties, such as zf splittings (zfs) and radiative and nonradiative decay rate constants, were obtained. Very interestingly, small zfs (3-5 GHz) were observed, contrary to previous estimates. Rationalization of this observation is given. On the basis of the obtained data they discuss the structures, zf schemes, and radiative and nonradiative mechanisms in the /sup 3/..pi pi..* Rh complexes.

  1. Phosphorescence and zero-field optically detected magnetic resonance studies of (nd){sup 10} transition-metal complexes. 1. ZnX{sub 2}(phen) (X = Cl, Br, I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Azumi, Tohru [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)] [and others

    1992-08-06

    In order to elucidate the effect of (nd){sup 10} central metal ions on the properties of the low-lying excited states of metal complexes, spectroscopic and optically detected magnetic resonance studies on the phenanthroline (phen) localized {sup 3}{pi}{pi}* states of ZnX{sub 2}(phen) (X = Cl, Br, I) were carried out. Comparison of the properties of the spin sublevels of ZnX{sub 2}(phen) with those of the uncoordinated 1, 10-phenanthroline yielded several noteworthy features: (a) the phosphorescence spectra of ZnX{sub 2}(phen) complexes very closely resemble that of the uncoordinated phen molecule, (b) the magnitudes of the zero-field splittings follow the ordering phen > ZnCl{sub 2}(phen) replacing the z sublevel (in-plane component) as the dominant decay channel in uncoordinated phen. These experimental results have been interpreted systematically and satisfactorily by a model invoking Heitler-London type mixing of LLCT (halogen p-orbitals to phen charge transfer) electronic configurations with the phen locally excited electronic configuration. 31 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Optical sensor for rapid microbial detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Adhami, Mustafa; Tilahun, Dagmawi; Rao, Govind; Kostov, Yordan

    2016-05-01

    In biotechnology, the ability to instantly detect contaminants is key to running a reliable bioprocess. Bioprocesses are prone to be contaminated by cells that are abundant in our environment; detection and quantification of these cells would aid in the preservation of the bioprocess product. This paper discusses the design and development of a portable kinetics fluorometer which acts as a single-excitation, single-emission photometer that continuously measures fluorescence intensity of an indicator dye, and plots it. Resazurin is used as an indicator dye since the viable contaminant cells reduce Resazurin toResorufin, the latter being strongly fluorescent. A photodiode detects fluorescence change by generating current proportional to the intensity of the light that reached it, and a trans-impedance differential op-amp ensures amplification of the photodiodes' signal. A microfluidic chip was designed specifically for the device. It acts as a fully enclosed cuvette, which enhances the Resazurin reduction rate. E. coli in LB media, along with Resazurin were injected into the microfluidic chip. The optical sensor detected the presence of E. coli in the media based on the fluorescence change that occurred in the indicator dye in concentrations as low as 10 CFU/ml. A method was devised to detect and determine an approximate amount of contamination with this device. This paper discusses application of this method to detect and estimate sample contamination. This device provides fast, accurate, and inexpensive means to optically detect the presence of viable cells.

  3. Magnetic energy harvesting and concentration at distance by transformation optics

    CERN Document Server

    Navau, Carles; Sanchez, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic energy is one the main agents powering our society: generating energy in power plants, keeping information in magnetic memories, moving our devices with motors. All of these applications require a certain spatial distribution of magnetic energy, for example concentrating it in a transformer core or in a magnetic sensor. We introduce in this work a way to collect magnetic energy and distribute it in space with unprecedented efficiency and flexibility, allowing very large concentration of magnetic energy in a free space region, an enhanced magnetic coupling between two magnetic sources, and the transfer of magnetic energy from a source to a given distant point separated by empty space. All these features are achieved with a single device, a magnetic shell designed by transformation optics.

  4. Periodic optical variability of radio-detected ultracool dwarfs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, L. K.; Golden, A.; Singh, Navtej; Sheehan, B.; Butler, R. F. [Centre for Astronomy, National University of Ireland, Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Hallinan, G. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Boyle, R. P. [Vatican Observatory Research Group, Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Zavala, R. T., E-mail: lkh@astro.caltech.edu [United States Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    A fraction of very low mass stars and brown dwarfs are known to be radio active, in some cases producing periodic pulses. Extensive studies of two such objects have also revealed optical periodic variability, and the nature of this variability remains unclear. Here, we report on multi-epoch optical photometric monitoring of six radio-detected dwarfs, spanning the ∼M8-L3.5 spectral range, conducted to investigate the ubiquity of periodic optical variability in radio-detected ultracool dwarfs. This survey is the most sensitive ground-based study carried out to date in search of periodic optical variability from late-type dwarfs, where we obtained 250 hr of monitoring, delivering photometric precision as low as ∼0.15%. Five of the six targets exhibit clear periodicity, in all cases likely associated with the rotation period of the dwarf, with a marginal detection found for the sixth. Our data points to a likely association between radio and optical periodic variability in late-M/early-L dwarfs, although the underlying physical cause of this correlation remains unclear. In one case, we have multiple epochs of monitoring of the archetype of pulsing radio dwarfs, the M9 TVLM 513–46546, spanning a period of 5 yr, which is sufficiently stable in phase to allow us to establish a period of 1.95958 ± 0.00005 hr. This phase stability may be associated with a large-scale stable magnetic field, further strengthening the correlation between radio activity and periodic optical variability. Finally, we find a tentative spin-orbit alignment of one component of the very low mass binary, LP 349–25.

  5. Optical Properties of Fe3O4 Magnetic Fluid from Iron Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitaningrum, A.; Taufiq, A.; Hidayat, A.; Sunaryono; Hidayat, N.; Samian

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays, a high sensitive sensor for the magnetic field has become an essential tool that vastly desired in several fields, especially in biomedical application. Therefore, the development of preparing material for the magnetic sensor becomes crucial to be conducted. In this experimnet, we propose the use of Fe3O4 magnetic fluid prepared from a local iron sand in Indonesia as a material for a magnetic sensor. In this work, optical activities of the Fe3O4 magnetic fluid as the effect of magneto-optics were performed under varying external magnetic field. The polarization direction change of the laser was detected as a function of the external magnetic field with the exponential function. Moreover, the intensity collected by a photodetector exhibited a linear correlation with the external magnetic field. These phenomena become strong evidence that the prepared Fe3O4 magnetic fluid opens potential to be applicated further as sensors, especially as a high sensitive optics-based sensor for the magnetic field.

  6. Helioseismic Detection of Emerging Magnetic Flux

    CERN Document Server

    Ilonidis, Stathis; Kosovichev, Alexander G

    2012-01-01

    Investigating the properties of magnetic flux emergence is one of the most important problems of solar physics. In this study we present a newly developed deep-focus time-distance measurement scheme which is able to detect strong emerging flux events in the deep solar interior, before the flux becomes visible on the surface. We discuss in detail the differences between our method and previous methods, and demonstrate step-by-step how the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio is increased. The method is based on detection of perturbations in acoustic phase travel times determined from cross-covariances of solar oscillations observed on the surface. We detect strong acoustic travel-time reductions of an order of 12 - 16 seconds at a depth of 42 - 75 Mm. These acoustic anomalies are detected 1 - 2 days before high peaks in the photospheric magnetic flux rate implying that the average emerging speed is 0.3 - 0.6 km/s. The results of this work contribute to our understanding of solar magnetism and benefit space weather fore...

  7. Direct optical nanoscopy with axially localized detection

    CERN Document Server

    Bourg, N; Dupuis, G; Barroca, T; Bon, P; Lécart, S; Fort, E; Lévêque-Fort, S

    2014-01-01

    Evanescent light excitation is widely used in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to confine light and reduce background noise. Herein we propose a method of exploiting evanescent light in the context of emission. When a fluorophore is located in close proximity to a medium with a higher refractive index, its near-field component is converted into light that propagates beyond the critical angle. This so-called Supercritical Angle Fluorescence (SAF) can be captured using a hig-NA objective and used to determine the axial position of the fluorophore with nanometer precision. We introduce a new technique for 3D nanoscopy that combines direct STochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (dSTORM) imaging with dedicated detection of SAF emission. We demonstrate that our approach of a Direct Optical Nanoscopy with Axially Localized Detection (DONALD) yields a typical isotropic 3D localization precision of 20 nm.

  8. Optical Detection of Life on Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Sara

    2009-01-01

    We describe what is known about the atmospheric properties (Teff, lob g, [FelH]) and fundamental properties (mass, age, and metal content) of nearby stars and how they influence the habitable zones and habitable eras of these stars. We then take an observer's point of view to assess the ability of optical telescopes to detect photosynthetic or methanogenic life on planets orbiting these stars.

  9. Highly Sensitive Fiber-Optic Faraday-Effect Magnetic Field Sensor Based on Yttrium Iron Garnet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The principle and performance of a fiber-optic Faraday-effect magnetic-field sensor based on an yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and two flux concentrations are described. A single polarization maintaining optical fiber links the sensor head to the source and detection system, in which the technique of phase shift cancellation is used to cancel the phase shift that accumulate in the optical fiber. Flux concentrators were exploited to enhance the YIG crystal magneto optic sensitivity .The sensor system exhibited a noise-equivalent field of 8 and a 3 dB bandwidth of ~10 MHz.

  10. Optic disc detection using ant colony optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Marcy A.; Monteiro, Fernando C.

    2012-09-01

    The retinal fundus images are used in the treatment and diagnosis of several eye diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. This paper proposes a new method to detect the optic disc (OD) automatically, due to the fact that the knowledge of the OD location is essential to the automatic analysis of retinal images. Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) is an optimization algorithm inspired by the foraging behaviour of some ant species that has been applied in image processing for edge detection. Recently, the ACO was used in fundus images to detect edges, and therefore, to segment the OD and other anatomical retinal structures. We present an algorithm for the detection of OD in the retina which takes advantage of the Gabor wavelet transform, entropy and ACO algorithm. Forty images of the retina from DRIVE database were used to evaluate the performance of our method.

  11. X-ray detection using magnetic calorimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenefeld, J. E-mail: e62@urz.uni-heidelberg.de; Enss, C.; Fleischmann, A.; Sollner, J.; Horst, K.; Adams, J.S.; Kim, Y.H.; Seidel, G.M.; Bandler, S.R

    2000-04-07

    Using a magnetic calorimeter, we have obtained an energy resolution of 13 eV in the detection of 6 keV X-rays. The calorimeter consisted of a 50 {mu}m diameter, 25 {mu}m thick Au sensor doped with 300 ppm Er. A 100x100 {mu}m square, 8 {mu}m thick Au absorber was attached to the sensor. At the operating temperature of 33 mK and with a field of 3 mT, the calorimeter had a heat capacity of 1.3x10{sup -12} J/K. With a magnetic calorimeter optimized for X-ray detection an order of magnitude improvement in resolution should be possible.

  12. Zero-field optical manipulation of magnetic ions in semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, R C; Mikkelsen, M H; Tang, J-M; Gossard, A C; Flatté, M E; Awschalom, D D

    2008-03-01

    Controlling and monitoring individual spins is desirable for building spin-based devices, as well as implementing quantum information processing schemes. As with trapped ions in cold gases, magnetic ions trapped on a semiconductor lattice have uniform properties and relatively long spin lifetimes. Furthermore, diluted magnetic moments in semiconductors can be strongly coupled to the surrounding host, permitting optical or electrical spin manipulation. Here we describe the zero-field optical manipulation of a few hundred manganese ions in a single gallium arsenide quantum well. Optically created mobile electron spins dynamically generate an energy splitting of the ion spins and enable magnetic moment orientation solely by changing either photon helicity or energy. These polarized manganese spins precess in a transverse field, enabling measurements of the spin lifetimes. As the magnetic ion concentration is reduced and the manganese spin lifetime increases, coherent optical control and readout of single manganese spins in gallium arsenide should be possible.

  13. Portable Biomarker Detection with Magnetic Nanotags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Drew A; Wang, Shan X; Murmann, Boris; Gaster, Richard S

    2010-08-03

    This paper presents a hand-held, portable biosensor platform for quantitative biomarker measurement. By combining magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) tags with giant magnetoresistive (GMR) spin-valve sensors, the hand-held platform achieves highly sensitive (picomolar) and specific biomarker detection in less than 20 minutes. The rapid analysis and potential low cost make this technology ideal for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics. Furthermore, this platform is able to detect multiple biomarkers simultaneously in a single assay, creating a promising diagnostic tool for a vast number of applications.

  14. Blood clot detection using magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Hafsa; Friedman, Bruce; Berwin, Brent; Shi, Yipeng; Ness, Dylan B.; Weaver, John B.

    2017-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis, the development of blood clots in the peripheral veins, is a very serious, life threatening condition that is prevalent in the elderly. To deliver proper treatment that enhances the survival rate, it is very important to detect thrombi early and at the point of care. We explored the ability of magnetic particle spectroscopy (MSB) to detect thrombus via specific binding of aptamer functionalized magnetic nanoparticles with the blood clot. MSB uses the harmonics produced by nanoparticles in an alternating magnetic field to measure the rotational freedom and, therefore, the bound state of the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles’ relaxation time for Brownian rotation increases when bound [A.M. Rauwerdink and J. B. Weaver, Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 1 (2010)]. The relaxation time can therefore be used to characterize the nanoparticle binding to thrombin in the blood clot. For longer relaxation times, the approach to saturation is more gradual reducing the higher harmonics and the harmonic ratio. The harmonic ratios of nanoparticles conjugated with anti-thrombin aptamers (ATP) decrease significantly over time with blood clot present in the sample medium, compared with nanoparticles without ATP. Moreover, the blood clot removed from the sample medium produced a significant MSB signal, indicating the nanoparticles are immobilized on the clot. Our results show that MSB could be a very useful non-invasive, quick tool to detect blood clots at the point of care so proper treatment can be used to reduce the risks inherent in deep vein thrombosis.

  15. Characterizing and imaging magnetic nanoparticles by optical magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, A.; Colombo, S.; Dolgovskiy, V.; Grujić, Z. D.; Lebedev, V.; Zhang, J.

    2017-01-01

    We review our ongoing work on deploying optical (atomic) magnetometry for measuring the magnetic response of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) samples, yielding MNP size distributions, and other sample parameters like Néel relaxation time τ, saturation magnetisation Ms , anisotropy constant K and magnetic susceptibility χ. We address magnetorelaxation (MRX) signals, in which the decaying magnetisation M(t) following a magnetising pulse is recorded by a single atomic magnetometer or by a novel magnetic source imaging camera (MSIC) allowing spatially resolved MRX studies of distributed MNP samples. We further show that optical magnetometers can be used for a direct measurement of the M(H) and dM/dH(H) dependencies of MNP samples, the latter forming the basis for an optical magnetometer implementation of the MPI (Magnetic Particle Imaging) method. All experiments are in view of developing biomedical imaging modalities.

  16. Optical investigation of effective permeability of dilute magnetic dielectrics with magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Ananya, E-mail: banerjee.ananya2008@gmail.com; Sarkar, A. [Dept. of Physics, Bijoy Krishna Girls’ College, 5/3 M.G. Road, Howrah 711101, W.B. (India)

    2016-05-06

    The prime objective of this paper is to investigate the magnetic nature of dilute magnetic dielectrics (DMD) under variation of external magnetic field. The said variation is studied over developed nano-sized Gadolinium Oxide as a DMD system. The observed experimental field variation of the effective magnetic permeability is analyzed results of optical experiment. The experiment records the variation of Brewster angle of incident polarized LASER beam from the surface of developed DMD specimen with applied out of plane external magnetic field. The effective refractive index and hence relative magnetic permeability were estimated following electro-magnetic theory. The overall results obtained and agreement between theory and experiment are good.

  17. Drugs of abuse detection in saliva based on actuated optical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jie; Li, Zhenyu; Jiang, Hong; Wang, Wenlong; Wu, Yixuan

    2014-12-01

    There has been a considerable increase in the abuse of drugs during the past decade. Combing drug use with driving is very dangerous. More than 11% of drivers in a roadside survey tested positive for drugs, while 18% of drivers killed in accidents tested positive for drugs as reported in USA, 2007. Toward developing a rapid drug screening device, we use saliva as the sample, and combining the traditional immunoassays method with optical magnetic technology. There were several methods for magnetic nanoparticles detection, such as magnetic coils, SQUID, microscopic imaging, and Hall sensors. All of these methods were not suitable for our demands. By developing a novel optical scheme, we demonstrate high-sensitivity detection in saliva. Drugs of abuse are detected at sub-nano gram per milliliter levels in less than 120 seconds. Evanescent wave principle has been applied to sensitively monitor the presence of magnetic nanoparticles on the binding surface. Like the total internal reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM), evanescent optical field is generated at the plastic/fluid interface, which decays exponentially and penetrates into the fluid by only a sub-wavelength distance. By disturbance total internal reflection with magnetic nanoparticles, the optical intensity would be influenced. We then detected optical output by imaging the sensor surface onto a CCD camera. We tested four drugs tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), methamphetamine (MAMP), ketamine (KET), morphine (OPI), using this technology. 100 ng mL-1 sensitivity was achieved, and obvious evidence showed that this results could be improved in further researches.

  18. Fiber optical magnetic field sensor for power generator monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willsch, Michael; Bosselmann, Thomas; Villnow, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Inside of large electrical engines such as power generators and large drives, extreme electric and magnetic fields can occur which cannot be measured electrically. Novel fiber optical magnetic field sensors are being used to characterize the fields and recognize inner faults of large power generators.

  19. Optically detected ESR and low magnetic field signals from spin triads: 2-imidazoline-1-oxyl derivatives in X-irradiated alkane liquids as a method to study three-spin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviridenko, Fyodor B; Stass, Dmitri V; Kobzeva, Tatyana V; Tretyakov, Evgeny V; Klyatskaya, Svetlana V; Mshvidobadze, Elena V; Vasilevsky, Sergey F; Molin, Yuri N

    2004-03-10

    This contribution reports the design and synthesis of a series of spin-labeled charge acceptors to produce three-spin systems of "radical ion/biradical ion" type in X-irradiated alkane liquids. This opens the way to study spin triads in experimental conditions, in which short-lived radical ion pairs are conventionally studied, thus offering optically detected techniques such as magneto-resonance OD ESR and level-crossing MARY spectroscopy. The structure of the synthesized 2-imidazoline-1-oxyl derivatives is A-Sp-R, where A is a positive or negative charge acceptor, R is a stable radical, and Sp is a hydrocarbon bridge. The set of 20+ compounds represent a convenient tool to construct experimental three-spin systems with various properties, e.g. with the "third" spin introduced into one or the other partner of the radical ion pair. The degree of exchange coupling between the two paramagnetic fragments in the biradical ion has been demonstrated to strongly depend on the type of the radical fragment R and the structure of the bridge Sp. As a result, a series of acceptors with systematically reduced exchange interaction has been synthesized, and optimal systems for the observation of low magnetic field effect have been found. In the most favorable case, an OD ESR signal from a spin triad living as short as ca. 100 ns has been registered as a single unresolved line. The exchange integral for this biradical anion (9) was estimated from OD ESR and ESR experiments to be ca. 10(3) G by the order of magnitude, which is much greater than the hyperfine couplings in the biradical ion but much smaller than the thermal energy kT.

  20. Magnetic liquids under high electric fields as optical diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, Jonas P; Smolyaninova, Vera N

    2016-01-01

    We show and give examples of how unidirectional propagation of light rays in the limit of geometric optics could arise in some magnetic fluids due to the magnetoelectric effect under weak DC magnetic fields and strong DC electric fields around half of their dielectric breakdown. For such liquids as kerosene and transformer oils, one-way propagation of light may occur for 30 nm diameter magnetic nanoparticles (e.g. cobalt) and concentrations of 2% or larger.

  1. Magnetic liquids under high electric fields as broadband optical diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jonas P.; Smolyaninov, Igor I.; Smolyaninova, Vera N.

    2016-10-01

    We show that unidirectional propagation of light rays in the limit of geometric optics could arise in some magnetic fluids due to the magnetoelectric effect under weak DC magnetic fields and strong DC electric fields around half of their dielectric breakdown. For such liquids as kerosene and transformer oils, one-way propagation of light may occur for 30-nm-diameter magnetic nanoparticles (e.g., cobalt) and concentrations of 2 % or larger.

  2. Fiber Optic Thermal Detection of Composite Delaminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Winfree, William P.

    2011-01-01

    A recently developed technique is presented for thermographic detection of delaminations in composites by performing temperature measurements with fiber optic Bragg gratings. A single optical fiber with multiple Bragg gratings employed as surface temperature sensors was bonded to the surface of a composite with subsurface defects. The investigated structure was a 10-ply composite specimen with prefabricated delaminations of various sizes and depths. Both during and following the application of a thermal heat flux to the surface, the individual Bragg grating sensors measured the temporal and spatial temperature variations. The data obtained from grating sensors were analyzed with thermal modeling techniques of conventional thermography to reveal particular characteristics of the interested areas. Results were compared and found to be consistent with the calculations using numerical simulation techniques. Also discussed are methods including various heating sources and patterns, and their limitations for performing in-situ structural health monitoring.

  3. Optical and infrared detection using microcantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oden, P.I.; Datskos, P.G.; Warmack, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics; Wachter, E.A.; Thundat, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The feasibility of micromechanical optical and infrared (IR) detection using microcantilevers is demonstrated. Microcantilevers provide a simple means for developing single- and multi-element sensors for visible and infrared radiation that are smaller, more sensitive and lower in cost than quantum or thermal detectors. Microcantilevers coated with a heat absorbing layer undergo bending due to the differential stress originating from the bimetallic effect. Bending is proportional to the amount of heat absorbed and can be detected using optical or electrical methods such as resistance changes in piezoresistive cantilevers. The microcantilever sensors exhibit two distinct thermal responses: a fast one ({theta}{sub 1}{sup thermal} < ms) and a slower one ({tau}{sub 2}{sup thermal} {approximately} 10 ms). A noise equivalent temperature difference, NEDT = 90 mK was measured. When uncoated microcantilevers were irradiated by a low-power diode laser ({lambda} = 786 nm) the noise equivalent power, NEP, was found to be 3.5nW/{radical}Hz which corresponds to a specific detectivity, D*, of 3.6 {times} 10{sup 7} cm {center_dot} {radical}Hz/W at a modulation frequency of 20 Hz.

  4. Optical Writing of Magnetic Properties by Remanent Photostriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iurchuk, V; Schick, D; Bran, J; Colson, D; Forget, A; Halley, D; Koc, A; Reinhardt, M; Kwamen, C; Morley, N A; Bargheer, M; Viret, M; Gumeniuk, R; Schmerber, G; Doudin, B; Kundys, B

    2016-09-02

    We present an optically induced remanent photostriction in BiFeO_{3}, resulting from the photovoltaic effect, which is used to modify the ferromagnetism of Ni film in a hybrid BiFeO_{3}/Ni structure. The 75% change in coercivity in the Ni film is achieved via optical and nonvolatile control. This photoferromagnetic effect can be reversed by static or ac electric depolarization of BiFeO_{3}. Hence, the strain dependent changes in magnetic properties are written optically, and erased electrically. Light-mediated straintronics is therefore a possible approach for low-power multistate control of magnetic elements relevant for memory and spintronic applications.

  5. Optical Writing of Magnetic Properties by Remanent Photostriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iurchuk, V.; Schick, D.; Bran, J.; Colson, D.; Forget, A.; Halley, D.; Koc, A.; Reinhardt, M.; Kwamen, C.; Morley, N. A.; Bargheer, M.; Viret, M.; Gumeniuk, R.; Schmerber, G.; Doudin, B.; Kundys, B.

    2016-09-01

    We present an optically induced remanent photostriction in BiFeO3 , resulting from the photovoltaic effect, which is used to modify the ferromagnetism of Ni film in a hybrid BiFeO3/Ni structure. The 75% change in coercivity in the Ni film is achieved via optical and nonvolatile control. This photoferromagnetic effect can be reversed by static or ac electric depolarization of BiFeO3 . Hence, the strain dependent changes in magnetic properties are written optically, and erased electrically. Light-mediated straintronics is therefore a possible approach for low-power multistate control of magnetic elements relevant for memory and spintronic applications.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of luxury perfusion of the optic nerve head in anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yovel, Oren S; Katz, Miriam; Leiba, Hana

    2012-09-01

    A 49-year-old woman with painless reduction in visual acuity in her left eye was found to have nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). Fluorescein angiography revealed optic disc capillary leakage consistent with "luxury perfusion." Contrast-enhanced FLAIR magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed marked enhancement of the left optic disc. Resolution of the optic disc edema and the MRI abnormalities followed a similar time course. This report appears unique in documenting the MRI findings of luxury perfusion in NAION.

  7. A Model of Magneto-mechano-optical Transfer in Fibre-optic Magnetic Sensors with Magnetostrictive Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ji-yan; SI Yong-min

    2004-01-01

    Fibre-optic magnetic sensors with magnetostrictive films are used as all-fibre Mach-Zehnder interferometer to detect the optical phase shift, which is caused by the magnetostriction-induced strains transferred from the msgnetostrictive film to the fibre. A theoretical model based on the plane strain approximation and uniform axial strain is developed to determine the magneto-mechano-optical transfer relations in this kind of sensors. The expression for the model is presented as well as relation of the phase shift in the fibre to the magnetic and elastic properties of the magnetostrictive film coated on the fibre. And from the model, the thickness of the film has significant influence on the phase shift.

  8. Plasmon nanoparticle superlattices as optical-frequency magnetic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaeian, Hadiseh; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2012-07-02

    Nanocrystal superlattices have emerged as a new platform for bottom-up metamaterial design, but their optical properties are largely unknown. Here, we investigate their emergent optical properties using a generalized semi-analytic, full-field solver based on rigorous coupled wave analysis. Attention is given to superlattices composed of noble metal and dielectric nanoparticles in unary and binary arrays. By varying the nanoparticle size, shape, separation, and lattice geometry, we demonstrate the broad tunability of superlattice optical properties. Superlattices composed of spherical or octahedral nanoparticles in cubic and AB(2) arrays exhibit magnetic permeabilities tunable between 0.2 and 1.7, despite having non-magnetic constituents. The retrieved optical parameters are nearly polarization and angle-independent over a broad range of incident angles. Accordingly, nanocrystal superlattices behave as isotropic bulk metamaterials. Their tunable permittivities, permeabilities, and emergent magnetism may enable new, bottom-up metamaterials and negative index materials at visible frequencies.

  9. Optical "anti-transient" detected by MASTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisenko, D.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Lipunov, V.; Balanutsa, P.; Yecheistov, V.; Tiurina, N.; Kornilov, V.; Belinski, A.; Shatskiy, N.; Chazov, V.; Kuznetsov, A.; Zimnukhov, D.; Krushinsky, V.; Zalozhnih, I.; Popov, A.; Bourdanov, A.; Punanova, A.; Ivanov, K.; Yazev, S.; Budnev, N.; Konstantinov, E.; Chuvalaev, O.; Poleshchuk, V.; Gress, O.; Parkhomenko, A.; Tlatov, A.; Dormidontov, D.; Senik, V.; Yurkov, V.; Sergienko, Y.; Varda, D.; Sinyakov, E.; Shurpakov, S.; Shumkov, V.; Podvorotny, P.; Levato, H.; Saffe, C.; Mallamaci, C.; Lopez, C.; Podest, F.

    2013-02-01

    We have started the search for the disappearing stars (optical "anti-transients", OATs) in the MASTER database. The first result is the detection of a deep (~3.5 magnitudes) fading of the bright star TYC 2505-672-1 whose variability was previously unknown. This star has the coordinates 09 53 10.00 +33 53 52.7 and magnitudes V=10.71, B=12.51 in Tycho2 catalogue and J=7.61, H=6.78, K=6.57 in 2MASS.

  10. Novel Detection of Optical Orbital Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-16

    Spreeuw, J. P . Woerdman, “ Orbital angular momentum of light and the transformation of Laguerre-Gaussian laser modes,” Phys. Rev. A, 45(11), 8185-8189...AFRL-RD-PS- AFRL-RD-PS TR-2014-0045 TR-2014-0045 Novel Detection of Optical Orbital Angular Momentum David Voelz Klipsch... Orbital Angular Momentum FA9451-13-1-0261 GR0004113 David Voelz Klipsch School of ECE New Mexico State University MSC 3-O, PO Box 30001 Las Cruces, NM

  11. Optical detection of microcystin produced by cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ammar, R.; Nabok, A.; Hashim, A.; Smith, T.

    2013-06-01

    Microcystin (MC-LR) produced by cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) was detected in direct immunoassay with specific monoclonal antibody MC10E7 using an optical method of Total Internal Reflection Ellipsometry (TIRE). The minimal detected concentration of MC-LR of 0.1 ng/ml is a remarkable achievement for direct immunoassay against such low molecular weight analyte molecule. The study of binding kinetics of MC-LR to MC10E7 antibody allowed the evaluation of the association constant KA of about 108 (l/Mol) typical for highly specific immune reactions. Concentration of MC-LR in aqueous solutions was reduced using an absorbent made of polyelectrolyte-coated microparticles functionalized with MC10E7 antibodies.

  12. Optical Characterization of Oligonucleotide DNA Influenced by Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Maryam Banihashemian

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available UV-VIS spectroscopic analysis of oligonucleotide DNA exposed to different magnetic fields was performed in order to investigate the relationship between DNA extinction coefficients and optical parameters according to magnetic-field strength. The results with the oligonucleotides adenine-thymine 100 mer (AT-100 DNA and cytosine-guanine 100 mer (CG-100 DNA indicate that the magnetic field influences DNA molar extinction coefficients and refractive indexes. The imaginary parts of the refractive index and molar extinction coefficients of the AT-100 and CG-100 DNA decreased after exposure to a magnetic field of 750 mT due to cleavage of the DNA oligonucleotides into smaller segments.

  13. Controllable Optical Bistability in a Crystal of Molecular Magnets System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ji-Bing; LU Xin-You; HAO Xiang-Ying; SI Liu-Gang; YANG Xiao-Xue

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the formation of opticai bistability (OB) in a crystal of molecular magnets contained in a unidirectional ring cavity. The crystal is subjected to one de magnetic field and two (probe and coupling) ac resonant magnetic field. The results show that OB can be controlled efficiently by adjusting the intensity of the control field, the detuning of probe magnetic field and the cooperation parameter. Furthermore, within certain parameter range, the optical multistablity (OM) can also be observed in the crystal medium. This investigation can be used for designing new types of nonelectronic devices for realizing switching process.

  14. Magneto-optical color imaging of magnetic field distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Nagakubo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The magneto-optical (MO imaging technique allows magnetic field distributions to be observed in real-time. In this paper, we demonstrate a MO color imaging technique that allows quantitative values of magnetic fields to be determined by the naked eye. MO color imaging is realized using a MO imaging plate, which contains a bismuth-substituted iron garnet film. The imaging plate was prepared by the metal organic decomposition method, and a light source consisting of green and yellow light-emitting diodes or a white light-emitting diode. MO color imaging of the magnetic field distribution of a commercial ferrite magnet is demonstrated.

  15. Optically induced interaction of magnetic moments in hybrid metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroshnichenko, Andrey E; Luk'yanchuk, Boris; Maier, Stefan A; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2012-01-24

    We propose a novel type of hybrid metal-dielectric structures composed of silicon nanoparticles and split-ring resonators for advanced control of optically induced magnetic response. We reveal that a hybrid "metamolecule" may exhibit a strong distance-dependent magnetic interaction that may flip the magnetization orientation and support "antiferromagnetic" ordering in a hybrid metamaterial created by a periodic lattice of such metamolecules. The propagation of magnetization waves in the hybrid structures opens new ways for manipulating artificial "antiferromagnetic" ordering at high frequencies. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. Direct optical nanoscopy with axially localized detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourg, N.; Mayet, C.; Dupuis, G.; Barroca, T.; Bon, P.; Lécart, S.; Fort, E.; Lévêque-Fort, S.

    2015-09-01

    Evanescent light excitation is widely used in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to confine light and reduce background noise. Here, we propose a method of exploiting evanescent light in the context of emission. When a fluorophore is located in close proximity to a medium with a higher refractive index, its near-field component is converted into light that propagates beyond the critical angle. This so-called supercritical-angle fluorescence can be captured using a high-numerical-aperture objective and used to determine the axial position of the fluorophore with nanometre precision. We introduce a new technique for three-dimensional nanoscopy that combines direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) with dedicated detection of supercritical-angle fluorescence emission. We demonstrate that our approach of direct optical nanoscopy with axially localized detection (DONALD) typically yields an isotropic three-dimensional localization precision of 20 nm within an axial range of ∼150 nm above the coverslip.

  17. Optical coherent and envelope detection for photonic wireless communication links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prince, Kamau; Zibar, Darko; Yu, Xianbin;

    We present two novel optical detection techniques for radio over fiber (RoF) communication links. Firstly, we present recent results obtained with optical digital coherent detection of optical phase-modulated ROF signals supporting error-free transmission over 25 km standard SMF with BPSK and QPSK...

  18. Nonlinear optical and magneto-optical effects in non-spherical magnetic granular composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Xu(须萍); Zhenya Li(李振亚)

    2004-01-01

    The magnetization-induced nonlinear optical and nonlinear magneto-optical properties in a magnetic metal-insulator composite are studied based on a tensor effective medium approximation with shape factor and Taylcr-expansion method. There is a weakly nonlinear relation between electric displacement D and elcctric field E in the composite. The results of our studies on the effective dielectric tensor and the nonlinear susceptibility tensor in a magnetic nanocomposite are surveyed. It is shown that such a metal-insulator composite exhibits the enhancements of optical and magneto-optical nonlinearity. The frequencies at which the enhancements occur, and the amplitude of the enhancement factors depend on the concentration and shape of the magnetic grains.

  19. Novel Readout Method for Molecular Diagnostic Assays Based on Optical Measurements of Magnetic Nanobead Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donolato, Marco; Antunes, Paula Soares Martins; Bejhed, Rebecca S.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate detection of DNA coils formed from a Vibrio cholerae DNA target at picomolar concentrations using a novel optomagnetic approach exploiting the dynamic behavior and optical anisotropy of magnetic nanobead (MNB) assemblies. We establish that the complex second harmonic optical...... transmission spectra of MNB suspensions measured upon application of a weak uniaxial AC magnetic field correlate well with the rotation dynamics of the individual MNBs. Adding a target analyte to the solution leads to the formation of permanent MNB clusters, namely, to the suppression of the dynamic MNB...... behavior. We prove that the optical transmission spectra are highly sensitive to the formation of permanent MNB clusters and, thereby to the target analyte concentration. As a specific clinically relevant diagnostic case, we detect DNA coils formed via padlock probe recognition and isothermal rolling...

  20. Nanoaperture optical tweezer with magnetic force characterization of magnetic nanoparticles (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haitian; Jones, Steven; Choi, Byoung-Chul; Gordon, Reuven

    2016-09-01

    Double nanohole optical tweezers allow for trapping of nanoparticles down to single digit nanometer range, including individual proteins, viruses, DNA fragments and quantum dots. Here we demonstrate dual magnetic force / optical force analysis for the characterization of magnetic nanoparticles. From this single platform we can isolate individual nanoparticles and determine their size, permeability, remanence and permittivity. This is of interest for characterizing magnetic nanoparticles in mixtures, isolating ones of desired characteristics and pick-and-place assembly of magnetic nanoparticles in nanoscale magnetic devices. The magnetic nanoparticle is characterized by analysis of the optical transmission through a double-nanohole aperture with an applied magnetic gradient force. The optical transmission step at trapping, autocorrelation of transmission intensity, distribution of transmission values and variations with applied magnetic field amplitude provide information of individual magnetic nanoparticles that allows for determining their individual material characteristics. The values obtained agree well with past published values for iron oxide, and the size distribution over repeated measurements matches well with scanning electron microscope characterization (and manufacturer specifications).

  1. Detecting eavesdropping activity in fiber optic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Gregory G.

    The secure transmission of data is critical to governments, military organizations, financial institutions, health care providers and other enterprises. The primary method of securing in-transit data is though data encryption. A number of encryption methods exist but the fundamental approach is to assume an eavesdropper has access to the encrypted message but does not have the computing capability to decrypt the message in a timely fashion. Essentially, the strength of security depends on the complexity of the encryption method and the resources available to the eavesdropper. The development of future technologies, most notably quantum computers and quantum computing, is often cited as a direct threat to traditional encryption schemes. It seems reasonable that additional effort should be placed on prohibiting the eavesdropper from coming into possession of the encrypted message in the first place. One strategy for denying possession of the encrypted message is to secure the physical layer of the communications path. Because the majority of transmitted information is over fiber-optic networks, it seems appropriate to consider ways of enhancing the integrity and security of the fiber-based physical layer. The purpose of this research is to investigate the properties of light, as they are manifested in single mode fiber, as a means of insuring the integrity and security of the physical layer of a fiber-optic based communication link. Specifically, the approach focuses on the behavior of polarization in single mode fiber, as it is shown to be especially sensitive to fiber geometry. Fiber geometry is necessarily modified during the placement of optical taps. The problem of detecting activity associated with the placement of an optical tap is herein approached as a supervised machine learning anomaly identification task. The inputs include raw polarization measurements along with additional features derived from various visualizations of the raw data (the inputs are

  2. Interplay Between Optical Bianisotropy and Magnetism in Plasmonic Metamolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liuyang; Ma, Tzuhsuan; Yang, Seung-Cheol; Kim, Dong-Kwan; Lee, Gaehang; Shi, Jinwei; Martinez, Irving; Yi, Gi-Ra; Shvets, Gennady; Li, Xiaoqin

    2016-07-13

    The smallness of natural molecules and atoms with respect to the wavelength of light imposes severe limits on the nature of their optical response. For example, the well-known argument of Landau and Lifshitz and its recent extensions that include chiral molecules show that the electric dipole response dominates over the magneto-electric (bianisotropic) and an even smaller magnetic dipole optical response for all natural materials. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that both these responses can be greatly enhanced in plasmonic nanoclusters. Using atomic force microscopy nanomanipulation technique, we assemble a plasmonic metamolecule that is designed for strong and simultaneous optical magnetic and magneto-electric excitation. Angle-dependent scattering spectroscopy is used to disentangle the two responses and to demonstrate that their constructive/destructive interplay causes strong directional scattering asymmetry. This asymmetry is used to extract both magneto-electric and magnetic dipole responses and to demonstrate their enhancement in comparison to ordinary atomistic materials.

  3. Optically induced magnetization in diluted magnetic quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Peter, A. [Government Arts College, Melur 625 106, Madurai (India)], E-mail: a_johnpeter@rediffmail.com; Lily Mary Eucharista, K. [Arul Anandar College, Karumathur 625 514, Madurai (India)

    2009-03-15

    We report the effect of intense laser field on donor impurities in a semimagnetic Cd{sub 1-x{sub in}}Mn{sub x{sub in}}Te/Cd{sub 1-x{sub out}}Mn{sub x{sub out}}Te quantum dot. The spin polaronic energy of different Mn{sup 2+} is evaluated for different dot radii using a mean field theory in the presence of laser field. Magnetization is calculated for various concentrations of Mn{sup 2+} ions with different dot sizes. Significant magnetization of Mn spins can be obtained through the formation of polarized exciton magnetic polarons (EMPs). A rapid decrease of the laser dressed donor ionization energy for different values of dot sizes with increasing field intensity is predicted. Also, it is found that the polarization of EMPs increases rapidly at higher excitation energies.

  4. On-chip optical detection of laser cooled atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinto-Su, P; Tscherneck, M; Holmes, M; Bigelow, N

    2004-10-18

    We have used an optical fiber based system to implement optical detection of atoms trapped on a reflective "atom-chip". A fiber pair forms an emitter-detector setup that is bonded to the atom-chip surface to optically detect and probe laser cooled atoms trapped in a surface magneto-optical trap. We demonstrate the utility of this scheme by measuring the linewidth of the Cs D2 line at different laser intensities.

  5. Magnetic and Magneto-Optical Properties in Paramagnetic NdF3 Under High Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; LIU Gong-Qiang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we first theoretically report the magnetic and magneto-optical properties in paramagnetic media under high external magnetic field. Considering the action of the external magnetic field He and indirect exchange interaction Hv, the characteristic of the magnetic saturation and the property of the Faraday rotation to be nonlinear with external magnetic field are presented in paramagnetic NdF3. In terms of our theory, the indirect exchange interaction plays an important role in the magnetization M and the Faraday rotation θ in NdF3 under high external magnetic field. The theory is in good agreement with experimental results. On the other hand, a reasonable explanation for the temperature dependence of the ratio of the Verdet constant to the magnetic susceptibility V/x is obtained.

  6. Optical Algorithm for Cloud Shadow Detection Over Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    5] R. Amin, A. Gilerson, J. Zhou, B. Gross, F. Moshary, and S. Ahmed, "Im- pacts of atmospheric corrections on algal bloom detection techniques...optical algorithms to detect and classify harmful algal blooms from space. His current research interests include optical algorithm development...algorithm, remote sensing, shadow detection 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT Unclassified b. ABSTRACT Unclassified c. THIS PAGE

  7. Magnetic Scanometric DNA Microarray Detection of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Degrading Bacteria for Environmental Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mei-Lin; Jaramillo, Gerardo; Hristova, Krassimira R.; Horsley, David A.

    2010-01-01

    A magnetoresistive biosensing platform based on a single magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) scanning probe and DNA microarrays labeled with magnetic particles has been developed to provide an inexpensive, sensitive and reliable detection of DNA. The biosensing platform was demonstrated on a DNA microarray assay for quantifying bacteria capable of degrading methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE), where concentrations as low as 10 pM were detectable. Synthetic probe bacterial DNA was immobilized on a microarray glass slide surface, hybridized with the 48 base pair long biotinylated target DNA and subsequently incubated with streptavidin-coated 2.8 μm diameter magnetic particles. The biosensing platform then makes use of a micron-sized MTJ sensor that was raster scanned across a 3 mm by 5 mm glass slide area to capture the stray magnetic field from the tagged DNA and extract two dimensional magnetic field images of the microarray. The magnetic field output is then averaged over each 100 μm diameter DNA array spot to extract the magnetic spot intensity, analogous to the fluorescence spot intensity used in conventional optical scanners. The magnetic scanning result is compared with results from a commercial laser scanner and particle coverage optical counting to demonstrate the dynamic range and linear sensitivity of the biosensing platform as a potentially inexpensive, sensitive and portable alternative for DNA microarray detection for field applications. PMID:20889328

  8. Multimodal optical imaging for detecting breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rakesh; Khan, Ashraf; Wirth, Dennis; Kamionek, Michal; Kandil, Dina; Quinlan, Robert; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2012-06-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate wide-field and high-resolution multimodal optical imaging, including polarization, reflectance, and fluorescence for the intraoperative detection of breast cancer. Lumpectomy specimens were stained with 0.05 mg/ml aqueous solution of methylene blue (MB) and imaged. Wide-field reflectance images were acquired between 390 and 750 nm. Wide-field fluorescence images were excited at 640 nm and registered between 660 and 750 nm. High resolution confocal reflectance and fluorescence images were excited at 642 nm. Confocal fluorescence images were acquired between 670 nm and 710 nm. After imaging, the specimens were processed for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histopathology. Histological slides were compared with wide-field and high-resolution optical images to evaluate correlation of tumor boundaries and cellular morphology, respectively. Fluorescence polarization imaging identified the location, size, and shape of the tumor in all the cases investigated. Averaged fluorescence polarization values of tumor were higher as compared to normal tissue. Statistical analysis confirmed the significance of these differences. Fluorescence confocal imaging enabled cellular-level resolution. Evaluation and statistical analysis of MB fluorescence polarization values registered from single tumor and normal cells demonstrated higher fluorescence polarization from cancer. Wide-field high-resolution fluorescence and fluorescence polarization imaging shows promise for intraoperative delineation of breast cancers.

  9. Optical atomic magnetometry for magnetic induction tomography of the heart

    CERN Document Server

    Deans, Cameron; Hussain, Sarah; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-01-01

    We report on the use of radio-frequency optical atomic magnetometers for magnetic induction tomography measurements. We demonstrate the imaging of dummy targets of varying conductivities placed in the proximity of the sensor, in an unshielded environment at room-temperature and without background subtraction. The images produced by the system accurately reproduce the characteristics of the actual objects. Furthermore, we perform finite element simulations in order to assess the potential for measuring low-conductivity biological tissues with our system. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of an instrument based on optical atomic magnetometers for magnetic induction tomography imaging of biological samples, in particular for mapping anomalous conductivity in the heart.

  10. Plasmonic enhancement of ultrafast all-optical magnetization reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochergin, Vladimir; Neely, Lauren N.; Allin, Leigh J.; Kochergin, Eugene V.; Wang, Kang L.

    2011-10-01

    Ultrafast all optical magnetization switching in GdFeCo layers on the basis of Inverse Faraday Effect (IFE) was demonstrated recently and suggested as a possible path toward next generation magnetic data storage medium with much faster writing time. However, to date, the demonstrations of ultrafast all-optical magnetization switching were performed with powerful femtosecond lasers, hardly useful for practical applications in data storage and data processing. Here we show that utilization of IFE enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures enables fast all-optical magnetization switching with smaller/cheaper laser sources with longer pulse durations. Our modeling results predict significant enhancement of IFE around all major types of plasmonic nanostructures for a circularly polarized incident light. Unlike the IFE in uniform bulk materials, nonzero value of IFE is predicted in plasmonic nanostructures even with a linearly polarized excitation. Experimentally, all-optical magnetization switching at 20 times lower laser fluence and roughly 100 times lower value of laser fluence/pulse duration ratio is demonstrated in plasmonic samples to verify the model predictions. The path to achieve higher levels of enhancement experimentally is discussed.

  11. Design and performance of magnetic heads for magneto-optic recording with magnetic field modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruigrok, J. J. M.; Greidanus, F. J. A. M.; Godlieb, W. F.; Spruit, J. H. M.

    1988-04-01

    In magneto-optic recording, the most direct way to overwrite stored information is to switch the magnetization in a laser-heated region of the magneto-optic layer by means of an alternating magnetic field generated by a magnetic head. The heat dissipation in the head and the necessary voltage and current amplitude associated with fast switching, the desired high field, and a large head-to-medium distance make high demands upon the head design and the current source, respectively. Design criteria and numerical and experimental results for some circularly symmetric head configurations are presented.

  12. Shape anisotropy enhanced optomagnetic measurement for prostate-specific antigen detection via magnetic chain formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Bo; Wetterskog, Erik; Qiu, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a homogeneous biosensor for the detection of multivalent targets by combination of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) chains and a low-cost 405 nm laser-based optomagnetic system. The MNP chains are assembled in a rotating magnetic field and stabilized by multivalent target molecules...... anisotropy), and directly increasing the optomagnetic signal (via optical shape anisotropy). We achieve a limit of detection (LOD) of 5.5 pM (0.82 ng/mL) for the detection of a model multivalent molecule, biotinylated anti-streptavidin, in PBS. For the measurements of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in 50...

  13. Non-enzymatic glucose detection using magnetic nanoemulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahendran, V.; Philip, John, E-mail: philip@igcar.gov.in [SMARTS, Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2014-09-22

    We probe the optical properties and intermolecular interactions in magnetically responsive nanoemulsions in the presence of glucose. The equilibrium interdroplet distance between the emulsion droplets in an one-dimensional array increases by several nanometers in the presence of glucose because of intermolecular hydrogen bonding with sodium dodecyl sulphate molecules at the oil-water interface that gives rise to stretched lamellae-like structure. The observed large red shift in the diffracted Bragg peak (∼50–100 nm) and the linear response in the glucose concentration range of 0.25–25 mM offer a simple, fast, and cost effective non-enzymatic approach for glucose detection.

  14. Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography detection method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, M J; Sathyam, U S; Colston, B W; DaSilva, L B; Fried, D; Ragadio, J N; Featherstone, J D B

    1999-05-12

    This study demonstrates the potential of polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) for non-invasive in vivo detection and characterization of early, incipient caries lesions. PS-OCT generates cross-sectional images of biological tissue while measuring the effect of the tissue on the polarization state of incident light. Clear discrimination between regions of normal and demineralized enamel is first shown in PS-OCT images of bovine enamel blocks containing well-characterized artificial lesions. High-resolution, cross-sectional images of extracted human teeth are then generated that clearly discriminate between the normal and carious regions on both the smooth and occlusal surfaces. Regions of the teeth that appeared to be demineralized in the PS-OCT images were verified using histological thin sections examined under polarized light microscopy. The PS-OCT system discriminates between normal and carious regions by measuring the polarization state of the back-scattered 1310 nm light, which is affected by the state of demineralization of the enamel. Demineralization of enamel increases the scattereing coefficient, thus depolarizing the incident light. This study shows that PS-OCT has great potential for the detection, characterization, and monitoring of incipient caries lesions.

  15. Persistent optically induced magnetism in oxygen-deficient strontium titanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, W D; Ambwani, P; Bombeck, M; Thompson, J D; Haugstad, G; Leighton, C; Crooker, S A

    2014-05-01

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is a foundational material in the emerging field of complex oxide electronics. Although its bulk electronic and optical properties are rich and have been studied for decades, SrTiO3 has recently become a renewed focus of materials research catalysed in part by the discovery of superconductivity and magnetism at interfaces between SrTiO3 and other non-magnetic oxides. Here we illustrate a new aspect to the phenomenology of magnetism in SrTiO3 by reporting the observation of an optically induced and persistent magnetization in slightly oxygen-deficient bulk SrTiO3-δ crystals using magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry. This zero-field magnetization appears below ~18 K, persists for hours below 10 K, and is tunable by means of the polarization and wavelength of sub-bandgap (400-500 nm) light. These effects occur only in crystals containing oxygen vacancies, revealing a detailed interplay between magnetism, lattice defects, and light in an archetypal complex oxide material.

  16. Optical Magnetic Response in a Single Metal Nanobrick

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jianwei

    2011-01-01

    Anti-symmetric localized surface plasmons are demonstrated on a single silver nanostrip sandwiched by SiC layers. By employing the resonance of anti-symmetric localized surface plasmons, we enable single metal nanobricks to produce optical magnetism, in the blue and violet light range, as well as in a part of the ultraviolet light range. The physical mechanism is explained.

  17. Serial Magnetization Transfer Imaging in Acute Optic Neuritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, S. J.; Toosy, A. T.; Jones, S. J.; Altmann, D. R.; Miszkiel, K. A.; MacManus, D. G.; Barker, G. J.; Plant, G. T.; Thompson, A. J.; Miller, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    In serial studies of multiple sclerosis lesions, reductions in magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) are thought to be due to demyelination and axonal loss, with later rises due to remyelination. This study followed serial changes in MTR in acute optic neuritis in combination with clinical and electrophysiological measurements to determine if the MTR…

  18. Integration of agglutination assay for protein detection in microfluidic disc using Blu-ray optical pickup unit and optical fluid scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddin, Rokon; Burger, Robert; Donolato, Marco;

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel strategy for thrombin detection by combining a magnetic bead based agglutination assay and low-cost microfluidic disc. The detection method is based on an optomagnetic readout system implemented using a Blu-ray optical pickup unit (OPU) as main optoelectronic component. The assay...

  19. Integration of agglutination assay for protein detection in microfluidic disc using Blu-ray optical pickup unit and optical fluid scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddin, Rokon; Burger, Robert; Donolato, Marco;

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel strategy for thrombin detection by combining a magnetic bead based agglutination assay and low-cost microfluidic disc. The detection method is based on an optomagnetic readout system implemented using a Blu-ray optical pickup unit (OPU) as main optoelectronic component. The ass...

  20. Optical hyperpolarization and NMR detection of $^{129}$Xe on a microfluidic chip

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez-Martinez, Ricardo; Rosenbluh, Michael; Donley, Elizabeth A; Knappe, Svenja; Seltzer, Scott J; Ring, Hattie L; Bajaj, Vikram S; Kitching, John

    2014-01-01

    Optically hyperpolarized $^{129}$Xe gas has become a powerful contrast agent in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging, with applications ranging from studies of the human lung to the targeted detection of biomolecules. Equally attractive is its potential use to enhance the sensitivity of microfluidic NMR experiments, in which small sample volumes yield poor sensitivity. Unfortunately, most $^{129}$Xe polarization systems are large and non-portable. Here we present a microfabricated chip that optically polarizes $^{129}$Xe gas. We have achieved $^{129}$Xe polarizations greater than 0.5$\\%$ at flow rates of several microliters per second, compatible with typical microfluidic applications. We employ in situ optical magnetometry to sensitively detect and characterize the $^{129}$Xe polarization at magnetic fields of 1 $\\mu$T. We construct the device using standard microfabrication techniques, which will facilitate its integration with existing microfluidic platforms. This device may enable the...

  1. Optical coherent detection Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensor based on orthogonal polarization diversity reception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muping Song; Bin Zhao; Xianmin Zhang

    2005-01-01

    In Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensor, using optical coherent detection to detect Brillouin scattering optical signal is a good method, but there exists the polarization correlated detection problem. A novel detecting scheme is presented and demonstrated experimentally, which adopts orthogonal polarization diversity reception to resolve the polarization correlated detection problem. A laser is used as pump and reference light sources, a microwave electric-optical modulator (EOM) is adopted to produce frequency shift reference light, a polarization controller is used to control the polarization of the reference light which is changed into two orthogonal polarization for two adjacent acquisition periods. The Brillouin scattering light is coherently detected with the reference light, and the Brillouin scattering optical signal is taken out based on Brillouin frequency shift. After electronic processing, better Brillouin distributed sensing signal is obtained. A 25-km Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensor is achieved.

  2. Detection of quadrupole relaxation in an optically pumped cesium vapour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabeu, E.; Tornos, J.

    1985-10-01

    The relaxation of quadrupole orientation induced by means of optical pumping in a cesium vapour is experimentally studied, and the results are compared to the theoretical predictions. The optical detection process of this type of orientation is also discussed as a function of the polarization and spectral profile of the detection light.

  3. Synchronous phase detection for optical fiber interferometric sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, I J; Phillips, R L

    1983-08-01

    A system has been developed to accurately detect phase signals produced in optical interferometric sensors. The system employs optical heterodyning and synchronously detects optical phase by feeding back an error signal to a phase modulator in the reference leg of the interferometer. This system is seen to have properties similar to a phase-locked loop. The system is mathematically analyzed and a simple second-order model developed which accurately predicts the system response.

  4. Magneto-optical cellular chip model for intracellular orientational-dynamic-activity detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Y.; Iwasaka, M.; Kurita, S.; Owada, N.

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, a magneto-optical cellular chip model (MoCCM) was developed to detect intracellular dynamics in macromolecules by using magneto-optical effects. For the purpose of cell-measurement under strong static magnetic fields of up to 10 T, we constructed a cellular chip model, which was a thin glass plate with a well for a cell culture. A cell line of osteoblast MC3T3-E1 was incubated in the glass well, and the well, 0.3 mm in depth, was sealed by a cover glass when the MoCCM was set in a fiber optic system. An initial intensity change of the polarized light transmission, which dispersed perpendicular to the cell's attaching surface, was collected for 10 to 60 min, and then magnetic fields were applied parallel and perpendicular to the surface and light direction, respectively. The magnetic birefringence signals that originated from the magnetic orientation of intracellular molecules such as cytoskeletons apparently appeared when the magnetic fields were constant at 10 T. A statistical analysis with 15 experiments confirmed that the cellular components under 10 T magnetic fields caused a stronger alignment, which was transferred into polarizing light intensity that increased more than the case before exposure. Cellular conditions such as generation and cell density affected the magnetic birefringence signals.

  5. Optical and Magnetic Properties of Fe-Doped GaN Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors Prepared by MOCVD Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAG Zhi-Kuo; ZHANG Rong; CUI Xu-Gao; XIU Xiang-Qian; ZHANG Guo-Yu; XIE Zi-Li; GU Shu-Lin; SHI Yi; ZHENG You-Dou

    2008-01-01

    @@ Fe-doped GaN thin films are grown on c-sapphires by metal organic chemical vapour deposition method (MOCVD).Crystalline quality and phase purity are characterized by x-ray diffraction and Raman scattering measurements.There are no detectable second phases formed during growth and no significant degradation in crystalline quality as Fe ions are doped. Fe-related optical transitions are observed in photoluminescence spectra. Magnetic measurements reveal that the films show room-temperature ferromagnetic behaviour. The ferromagnetism may originate from carrier-mediated Fe-doped CaN diluted magnetic semiconductors or nanoscale iron dusters and Fe-N compounds which we have not detected.

  6. Optical Manipulation of Single Magnetic Beads in a Microwell Array on a Digital Microfluidic Chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decrop, Deborah; Brans, Toon; Gijsenbergh, Pieter; Lu, Jiadi; Spasic, Dragana; Kokalj, Tadej; Beunis, Filip; Goos, Peter; Puers, Robert; Lammertyn, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    The detection of single molecules in magnetic microbead microwell array formats revolutionized the development of digital bioassays. However, retrieval of individual magnetic beads from these arrays has not been realized until now despite having great potential for studying captured targets at the individual level. In this paper, optical tweezers were implemented on a digital microfluidic platform for accurate manipulation of single magnetic beads seeded in a microwell array. Successful optical trapping of magnetic beads was found to be dependent on Brownian motion of the beads, suggesting a 99% chance of trapping a vibrating bead. A tailor-made experimental design was used to screen the effect of bead type, ionic buffer strength, surfactant type, and concentration on the Brownian activity of beads in microwells. With the optimal conditions, the manipulation of magnetic beads was demonstrated by their trapping, retrieving, transporting, and repositioning to a desired microwell on the array. The presented platform combines the strengths of digital microfluidics, digital bioassays, and optical tweezers, resulting in a powerful dynamic microwell array system for single molecule and single cell studies.

  7. Optical Signatures from Magnetic 2-D Electron Gases in High Magnetic Fields to 60 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crooker, S.A.; Kikkawa, J.M.; Awschalom, D.D.; Smorchikova, I.P.; Samarth, N.

    1998-11-08

    We present experiments in the 60 Tesla Long-Pulse magnet at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) focusing on the high-field, low temperature photoluminescence (PL) from modulation-doped ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se single quantum wells. High-speed charge-coupled array detectors and the long (2 second) duration of the magnet pulse permit continuous acquisition of optical spectra throughout a single magnet shot. High-field PL studies of the magnetic 2D electron gases at temperatures down to 350mK reveal clear intensity oscillations corresponding to integer quantum Hall filling factors, from which we determine the density of the electron gas. At very high magnetic fields, steps in the PL energy are observed which correspond to the partial unlocking of antiferromagnetically bound pairs of Mn2+ spins.

  8. Chemical shift selective magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve in patients with acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Thomsen, C; Frederiksen, J

    1988-01-01

    of the 16 patients, abnormalities were seen. In one patient with bilateral symptoms, signal hyperintensity and swelling of the right side of the chiasm were found. In another patient the optic nerve was found diffusely enlarged with only a marginally increased signal in the second echo. In the third patient......Optic neuritis is often the first manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS). Sixteen patients with acute optic neuritis and one patient with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging, using a chemical shift selective double spin echo sequence. In 3...... an area of signal hyperintensity and swelling was seen in the left optic nerve. In the patient with BIH the subarachnoid space which surrounds the optic nerves was enlarged. Even using this refined pulse sequence, avoiding the major artefact in imaging the optic nerve, the chemical shift artefact, lesions...

  9. The Galactic Magnetic Field and UHECR Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Farrar, Glennys R; Khurana, Deepak; Sutherland, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A good model of the Galactic magnetic field is crucial for estimating the Galactic contribution in dark matter and CMB-cosmology studies, determining the sources of UHECRs, and also modeling the transport of Galactic CRs since the halo field provides an important escape route for by diffusion along its field lines. We briefly review the observational foundations of the Jansson-Farrar 2012 model for the large scale structure of the GMF, underscoring the robust evidence for a N-to-S directed, spiraling halo field. New results on the lensing effect of the GMF on UHECRs are presented, displaying multiple images and dramatic magnification and demagnification that varies with source direction and CR rigidity.

  10. Cavity-enhanced optical detection of carbon nanotube Brownian motion

    CERN Document Server

    Stapfner, S; Hunger, D; Weig, E M; Reichel, J; Favero, I

    2012-01-01

    Optical cavities with small mode volume are well-suited to detect the vibration of sub-wavelength sized objects. Here we employ a fiber-based, high-finesse optical microcavity to detect the Brownian motion of a freely suspended carbon nanotube at room temperature under vacuum. The optical detection resolves deflections of the oscillating tube down to 50pm/Hz^1/2. A full vibrational spectrum of the carbon nanotube is obtained and confirmed by characterization of the same device in a scanning electron microscope. Our work successfully extends the principles of high-sensitivity optomechanical detection to molecular scale nanomechanical systems.

  11. THE PARALLEL CONFOCAL DETECTING SYSTEM USING OPTICAL FIBER PLATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective Focusing on the problem such as slow scanning speed, complex system design and low light efficiency, a new parallel confocal 3D profile detecting method based on optical fiber technology, which realizes whole-field confocal detecting, is proposed. Methods The optical fiber plate generates an 2D point light source array, which splits one light beam into N2 subbeams and act the role of pinholes as point source and point detecting to filter the stray light and reflect light. By introducing the construction and working principle of the multi-beam 3D detecting system, the feasibility is investigated. Results Experiment result indicates that the optical fiber technology is applicable in rotation. The measuring parameters that influence the detecting can easily be adapted to satisfy different requirments of measurement. Compared with the conventional confocal method, the parallel confocal detecting system using optical fiber plate is simple in the mechanism, the measuring field is larger and the speed is faster.

  12. A magnetic biosensor system for detection of E. coli

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Fuquan

    2013-07-01

    This work describes a device for detecting E. coli bacteria by manipulating superparamagnetic beads to a sensing area and immobilizing them in a trapping well. The trapping well replaces the biochemical immobilization layer, which is commonly used in magnetic biosensor systems. A concept exploiting the volume difference between bare magnetic beads and magnetic bead-bioanalyte compounds is utilized to detect E. coli bacteria. Trapped beads are detected by the help of a tunnel magneto-resistive sensor. Frequency modulation is employed, in order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, enabling the detection of individual superparamagnetic beads of 2.8 μm in diameter. Replacing the biochemical immobilization layer by the trapping well greatly simplifies the detection process. After applying the mixture of E. coli and magnetic beads to the biosensor system, bacteria detection is achieved in a single step, within a few minutes. © 2013 IEEE.

  13. Optical fibre bragg gratings based magnetic force measurement of magnetic bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Guoping; Zhou, Zude; Hu, Yefa; Zhou, Jianhua

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic bearings are typical electromechanical systems of high performance. Current-displacement-force relationship between stator and rotor is an important research topic of magnetic bearings. The critical issue is to realize magnetic force online dynamic measurement. This paper presents a novel method on magnetic force measurement of magnetic bearings with optical fibre bragg gratings (FBG), which realizes a non-contact and online force measurement with simple configuration, good noise immunity even when the rotor is running. A novel micro force transducer is designed and fabricated, which is mounted within the stator magnetic pole. To obtain current-displacement-force relationship a FBG based magnetic force measurement test rig is setup to simulate magnetic bearing working states as the stator coils currents, air gap between stator and rotor, rotor speed is adjustable. Magnetic force is measured under three classifications of test conditions and test results are presented. The measurement data show good consistency with the theory analysis and calculation, which means that the FBG based magnetic force measurement is available and of good accuracy.

  14. Enhanced optical magnetism for reversed optical binding forces between silicon nanoparticles in the visible region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Taka-Aki; Tsuchimoto, Yuta; Zaccaria, Remo Proietti; Toma, Andrea; Portela, Alejandro; Hara, Masahiko

    2017-01-09

    We perform a comprehensive numerical analysis on the optical binding forces of a multiple-resonant silicon nanodimer induced by the normal illumination of a plane wave in the visible region. The silicon nanodimer provides either repulsive or attractive forces in water while providing only attractive forces in air. The enhancement of the magnetic dipole mode is attributed to the generation of repulsive forces. The sign (attractive/repulsive) and the amplitude of the optical forces are controlled by incident polarization and separation distance between the silicon nanoparticles. These optomechanical effects demonstrate a key step toward the optical sorting and assembly of silicon nanoparticles.

  15. Imaging of Her2-targeted magnetic nanoparticles for breast cancer detection: comparison of SQUID-detected magnetic relaxometry and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolphi, Natalie L; Butler, Kimberly S; Lovato, Debbie M; Tessier, T E; Trujillo, Jason E; Hathaway, Helen J; Fegan, Danielle L; Monson, Todd C; Stevens, Tyler E; Huber, Dale L; Ramu, Jaivijay; Milne, Michelle L; Altobelli, Stephen A; Bryant, Howard C; Larson, Richard S; Flynn, Edward R

    2012-01-01

    Both magnetic relaxometry and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to detect and locate targeted magnetic nanoparticles, noninvasively and without ionizing radiation. Magnetic relaxometry offers advantages in terms of its specificity (only nanoparticles are detected) and the linear dependence of the relaxometry signal on the number of nanoparticles present. In this study, detection of single-core iron oxide nanoparticles by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-detected magnetic relaxometry and standard 4.7 T MRI are compared. The nanoparticles were conjugated to a Her2 monoclonal antibody and targeted to Her2-expressing MCF7/Her2-18 (breast cancer cells); binding of the nanoparticles to the cells was assessed by magnetic relaxometry and iron assay. The same nanoparticle-labeled cells, serially diluted, were used to assess the detection limits and MR relaxivities. The detection limit of magnetic relaxometry was 125 000 nanoparticle-labeled cells at 3 cm from the SQUID sensors. T(2)-weighted MRI yielded a detection limit of 15 600 cells in a 150 µl volume, with r(1) = 1.1 mm(-1) s(-1) and r(2) = 166 mm(-1) s(-1). Her2-targeted nanoparticles were directly injected into xenograft MCF7/Her2-18 tumors in nude mice, and magnetic relaxometry imaging and 4.7 T MRI were performed, enabling direct comparison of the two techniques. Co-registration of relaxometry images and MRI of mice resulted in good agreement. A method for obtaining accurate quantification of microgram quantities of iron in the tumors and liver by relaxometry was also demonstrated. These results demonstrate the potential of SQUID-detected magnetic relaxometry imaging for the specific detection of breast cancer and the monitoring of magnetic nanoparticle-based therapies.

  16. The impact of optic nerve movement on optic nerve magnetic resonance diffusion parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Moodley

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Optic nerve diffusion imaging is a useful investigational tool of optic nerve microstructure, but is limited by eye-movement-induced optic nerve movement and artifacts from surrounding cerebrospinal fluid, fat, bone and air. Attempts at improving patient cooperation, thus voluntarily limiting eye movement during a standard diffusion imagingsequence, are usually futile. The aim of this study was to establish the impact of optic nerve movement on clinical diffusion parameters of the optic nerve.Method: Twenty-nine healthy volunteers with intact vision and intact conjugate gaze were recruited and subjected to magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI and diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI of the optic nerves. Twenty right eyes had nerve tracking done using single-shot echo-planar imaging at 20 time points over 3 minutes. Optic nerve movement measurements were correlated with diffusion parameters of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC, mean diffusivity (MD, fractional anisotropy (FA and anisotropic index(AI using Spearman’s rank correlation.Results: No significant correlations were noted between optic nerve movement parameters and ADC in the axial plane and MD of the optic nerve. Low to moderate negative correlations were noted between optic nerve movement parameters and AI and FA and positive correlation with ADC in the radial plane.Conclusion: Optic nerve movement documented during the timespan of standard diffusion sequences (DWI and DTI has a negative effect on the anisotropic diffusion parameters of the optic nerve. With greater eye movement, optic nerve diffusion appears less anisotropic owing to greater radial diffusion.

  17. High performance fiber-based optical coherent detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Youming

    The sensitivity of signal detection is of major interest for optical high speed communication systems and LIght Detection And Ranging (lidar) systems. Sensitive receivers in fiber-optical networks can reduce transmitter power or amplifier amplification requirements and extend link spans. High receiver sensitivity allows links to be established over long distances in deep space satellite communication systems and large atmospheric attenuation to be overcome in terrestrial free space communications. For lidar systems, the sensitivity of signal detection determines how far and how accurately the lidar can detect the remote objects. Optical receivers employ either coherent or direct detection. In addition to amplitude, coherent detection extracts frequency and phase information from received signals, whereas direct detection extracts the received pulse amplitude only. In theory, coherent detection should yield the highest receiver sensitivity. Another possible technique to improve detection sensitivity is to employ a fiber preamplifier. This technique has been successfully demonstrated in direct detection systems but not in the coherent detection systems. Due to the existence of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) inside the amplifier, the sensitivity of coherent detection varies with the data rate or pulse rate. For this reason, optically preamplified coherent detection is not used in applications as commonly as optically preamplified direct detection. We investigate the performance of coherent detection employing a fiber amplifier and time-domain-filter. The fiber amplifier is used as the optical preamplifier of the coherent detection system. To reduce the noise induced by the preamplifier to a maximum extent, we investigate the noise properties for both a single pass amplifier and a double pass amplifier. The relative intensity noise and linewidth broadening caused by ASE have been experimentally characterized. The results show that the double pass amplifier has

  18. Pulse-driven magnetoimpedance sensor detection of cardiac magnetic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsuke Nakayama

    Full Text Available This study sought to establish a convenient method for detecting biomagnetic activity in the heart. Electrical activity of the heart simultaneously induces a magnetic field. Detection of this magnetic activity will enable non-contact, noninvasive evaluation to be made. We improved the sensitivity of a pulse-driven magnetoimpedance (PMI sensor, which is used as an electric compass in mobile phones and as a motion sensor of the operation handle in computer games, toward a pico-Tesla (pT level, and measured magnetic fields on the surface of the thoracic wall in humans. The changes in magnetic field detected by this sensor synchronized with the electric activity of the electrocardiogram (ECG. The shape of the magnetic wave was largely altered by shifting the sensor position within 20 mm in parallel and/or perpendicular to the thoracic wall. The magnetic activity was maximal in the 4th intercostals near the center of the sterna. Furthermore, averaging the magnetic activity at 15 mm in the distance between the thoracic wall and the sensor demonstrated magnetic waves mimicking the P wave and QRS complex. The present study shows the application of PMI sensor in detecting cardiac magnetic activity in several healthy subjects, and suggests future applications of this technology in medicine and biology.

  19. Pulse-driven magnetoimpedance sensor detection of cardiac magnetic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Shinsuke; Sawamura, Kenta; Mohri, Kaneo; Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to establish a convenient method for detecting biomagnetic activity in the heart. Electrical activity of the heart simultaneously induces a magnetic field. Detection of this magnetic activity will enable non-contact, noninvasive evaluation to be made. We improved the sensitivity of a pulse-driven magnetoimpedance (PMI) sensor, which is used as an electric compass in mobile phones and as a motion sensor of the operation handle in computer games, toward a pico-Tesla (pT) level, and measured magnetic fields on the surface of the thoracic wall in humans. The changes in magnetic field detected by this sensor synchronized with the electric activity of the electrocardiogram (ECG). The shape of the magnetic wave was largely altered by shifting the sensor position within 20 mm in parallel and/or perpendicular to the thoracic wall. The magnetic activity was maximal in the 4th intercostals near the center of the sterna. Furthermore, averaging the magnetic activity at 15 mm in the distance between the thoracic wall and the sensor demonstrated magnetic waves mimicking the P wave and QRS complex. The present study shows the application of PMI sensor in detecting cardiac magnetic activity in several healthy subjects, and suggests future applications of this technology in medicine and biology.

  20. Optical and magnetization studies on europium based iron pnictides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapf, Sina Maria Ute

    2015-07-01

    The investigations carried out in the framework of this thesis mainly concentrate on europium based iron pnictides. These are a peculiar member of the 122 family as they develop at low temperatures (∝20K) an additional magnetic order of the local rare earth moments. Therefore, europium based iron pnictides provide a unique platform to study the interplay of structural, magnetic and electronic effects in high-temperature superconductors. For this challenging purpose, we have employed SQUID magnetometry and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy on EuFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2} single crystals. By systematic studies of the in- and out-of-plane magnetic properties of a series of single crystals, we derived the complex magnetic phase diagram of europium based iron pnictides, which contains an A-type antiferromagnetic and a re-entrant spin glass phase. Furthermore, we have investigated the magneto-optical properties of EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, revealing a much more complex magnetic detwinning process than expected. These studies demonstrate a remarkable interdependence between magnetic, electronic and structural effects that might be very important to understand the unconventional superconductivity in these fascinating materials.

  1. Detecting atoms trapped in an optical lattice using a tapered optical nanofiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, T; Busch, Th

    2014-12-29

    Optical detection of structures with dimensions smaller than an optical wavelength requires devices that work on scales beyond the diffraction limit. Here we present the possibility of using a tapered optical nanofiber as a detector to resolve individual atoms trapped in an optical lattice in the Mott insulator phase. We show that the small size of the fiber combined with an enhanced photon collection rate can allow for the attainment of large and reliable measurement signals.

  2. Magnetic ordering induced giant optical property change in tetragonal BiFeO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wen-Yi; Ding, Hang-Chen; Gong, Shi Jing; Wan, Xiangang; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic ordering could have significant influence on band structures, spin-dependent transport, and other important properties of materials. Its measurement, especially for the case of antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering, however, is generally difficult to be achieved. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of magnetic ordering detection using a noncontact and nondestructive optical method. Taking the tetragonal BiFeO3 (BFO) as an example and combining density functional theory calculations with tight-binding models, we find that when BFO changes from C1-type to G-type AFM phase, the top of valance band shifts from the Z point to Γ point, which makes the original direct band gap become indirect. This can be explained by Slater-Koster parameters using the Harrison approach. The impact of magnetic ordering on band dispersion dramatically changes the optical properties. For the linear ones, the energy shift of the optical band gap could be as large as 0.4 eV. As for the nonlinear ones, the change is even larger. The second-harmonic generation coefficient d33 of G-AFM becomes more than 13 times smaller than that of C1-AFM case. Finally, we propose a practical way to distinguish the two AFM phases of BFO using the optical method, which is of great importance in next-generation information storage technologies.

  3. Detecting gas molecules via atomic magnetization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heechae; Lee, Minho; Kim, Seungchul; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2014-09-14

    Adsorptions of gas molecules were found to alter the directions and magnitudes of magnetic moments of transition metal (Co, Fe) atoms adsorbed on graphene. Using first-principles calculations, we demonstrated that magnetism of surface atoms can be used to identify the kind of existing gas molecules via spin-reorientation and/or demagnetizations caused by the reconfigurations of 3d electron energy levels of Co and Fe. We suggest for the first time that magnetic properties of transition metal-embedded nanostructures can be used in highly selective gas-sensing applications.

  4. Using optical soliton stability for magnetic field measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şchiopu, IonuÅ£ Romeo; ǎgulinescu, Andrei, Dr; Marinescu, Andrei

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we propose a novel optical method for measuring the circular magnetic field. In practice, many situations may appear in which there are difficulties in measuring the magnetic field, as inside coils, motors etc., where the magnetic field lines are circular or elliptical. The proposed method, applied for measuring the current on high voltage lines, strongly benefits from the advantages that it offers as compared to classical solutions based on the inductive principle. Some of the advantages of optoelectronic and optic measurement methods have a real importance. These advantages consist in: avoiding the use of energy intensive materials (Cu, Fe etc.), reducing the weight of the measuring system, reducing at the minimum the fire danger due to the use of paper-oil insulation in high voltage devices etc. The novelty of our proposed method consists in using the electromagnetic radiation in ultrashort pulses, having a relatively large frequency band and a much improved resistance to external perturbations, for measuring the circular magnetic field generated from the current of high voltage lines, inside power transformers or high power motors.

  5. Cavity-enhanced optical Hall effect in two-dimensional free charge carrier gases detected at terahertz frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, S; Schöche, S; Darakchieva, V; Kühne, P; Carlin, J-F; Grandjean, N; Herzinger, C M; Schubert, M; Hofmann, T

    2015-06-15

    The effect of a tunable, externally coupled Fabry-Perot cavity to resonantly enhance the optical Hall effect signatures at terahertz frequencies produced by a traditional Drude-like two-dimensional electron gas is shown and discussed in this Letter. As a result, the detection of optical Hall effect signatures at conveniently obtainable magnetic fields, for example, by neodymium permanent magnets, is demonstrated. An AlInN/GaN-based high-electron mobility transistor structure grown on a sapphire substrate is used for the experiment. The optical Hall effect signatures and their dispersions, which are governed by the frequency and the reflectance minima and maxima of the externally coupled Fabry-Perot cavity, are presented and discussed. Tuning the externally coupled Fabry-Perot cavity strongly modifies the optical Hall effect signatures, which provides a new degree of freedom for optical Hall effect experiments in addition to frequency, angle of incidence, and magnetic field direction and strength.

  6. Validation of a novel fiber optic strain gauge in a cryogenic and high magnetic field environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Scott; Lakrimi, M.'hamed; Thomas, Adrian M.; Gao, Yunxin; Blakes, Hugh; Gibbens, Paul; Looi, Mengche

    2010-10-01

    We report on the first operation of an easy to use low cost novel fiber optic strain gauge (FOSG) in cryogenic and magnetic field environments. The FOSGs were mounted on a superconducting coil and resin impregnated. The gauges detected resin shrinkage upon curing. On cooldown, the FOSG monitored the thermal contraction strains of the coil and the electromagnetic strain during energization. The coil was deliberately quenched, in excess of 175 times, and again the FOSG detected the quenches and measured the thermal expansion-induced strains and subsequent re-cooling of the coil after a quench. Agreement with FEA predictions was very good.

  7. Optical Properties of Graphene in Magnetic and Electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Chiun-Yan; Huang, Yao-Kung; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Optical properties of graphene are explored by using the generalized tight-binding model. The main features of spectral structures, the form, frequency, number and intensity, are greatly enriched by the complex relationship among the interlayer atomic interactions, the magnetic quantization and the Coulomb potential energy. Absorption spectra have the shoulders, asymmetric peaks and logarithmic peaks, coming from the band-edge states of parabolic dispersions, the constant-energy loops and the saddle points, respectively. The initial forbidden excitation region is only revealed in even-layer AA stacking systems. Optical gaps and special structures can be generated by an electric field. The delta-function-like structures in magneto-optical spectra, which present the single, twin and double peaks, are associated with the symmetric, asymmetric and splitting Landau-level energy spectra, respectively. The single peaks due to the non-tilted Dirac cones exhibit the nearly uniform intensity. The AAB stacking possesses...

  8. Production and detection of atomic hexadecapole at Earth's magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, V M; Auzinsh, M; Gawlik, W; Grisins, P; Higbie, J M; Jackson Kimball, D F; Krzemien, L; Ledbetter, M P; Pustelny, S; Rochester, S M; Yashchuk, V V; Budker, D

    2008-07-21

    Optical magnetometers measure magnetic fields with extremely high precision and without cryogenics. However, at geomagnetic fields, important for applications from landmine removal to archaeology, they suffer from nonlinear Zeeman splitting, leading to systematic dependence on sensor orientation. We present experimental results on a method of eliminating this systematic error, using the hexadecapole atomic polarization moment. In particular, we demonstrate selective production of the atomic hexadecapole moment at Earth's magnetic field and verify its immunity to nonlinear Zeeman splitting. This technique promises to eliminate directional errors in all-optical atomic magnetometers, potentially improving their measurement accuracy by several orders of magnitude.

  9. The simulation study on optical target laser active detection performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-chun; Hou, Zhao-fei; Fan, Youchen

    2014-12-01

    According to the working principle of laser active detection system, the paper establishes the optical target laser active detection simulation system, carry out the simulation study on the detection process and detection performance of the system. For instance, the performance model such as the laser emitting, the laser propagation in the atmosphere, the reflection of optical target, the receiver detection system, the signal processing and recognition. We focus on the analysis and modeling the relationship between the laser emitting angle and defocus amount and "cat eye" effect echo laser in the reflection of optical target. Further, in the paper some performance index such as operating range, SNR and the probability of the system have been simulated. The parameters including laser emitting parameters, the reflection of the optical target and the laser propagation in the atmosphere which make a great influence on the performance of the optical target laser active detection system. Finally, using the object-oriented software design methods, the laser active detection system with the opening type, complete function and operating platform, realizes the process simulation that the detection system detect and recognize the optical target, complete the performance simulation of each subsystem, and generate the data report and the graph. It can make the laser active detection system performance models more intuitive because of the visible simulation process. The simulation data obtained from the system provide a reference to adjust the structure of the system parameters. And it provides theoretical and technical support for the top level design of the optical target laser active detection system and performance index optimization.

  10. System and Method for Multi-Wavelength Optical Signal Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlone, Thomas D. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The system and method for multi-wavelength optical signal detection enables the detection of optical signal levels significantly below those processed at the discrete circuit level by the use of mixed-signal processing methods implemented with integrated circuit technologies. The present invention is configured to detect and process small signals, which enables the reduction of the optical power required to stimulate detection networks, and lowers the required laser power to make specific measurements. The present invention provides an adaptation of active pixel networks combined with mixed-signal processing methods to provide an integer representation of the received signal as an output. The present invention also provides multi-wavelength laser detection circuits for use in various systems, such as a differential absorption light detection and ranging system.

  11. Magneto-optic detection system with noise cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, G. W.; Guisinger, J. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    In a magneto-optic readout system, a polarized beam of light from a laser is subjected to the magneto-optical effect of a magnetic record medium, and then passed through an analyzer which resolves the beam into two orthogonal vector components so oriented that the two components are of equal amplitude when the angle of rotation due to the magneto-optic effect is zero. Separate photodetectors produce two output signals which are proportional to the amplitudes of the vector components. The two output signals are combined in a differential amplifier through separate logarithmic transfer circuits to produce an output signal proportional to the ratio of the two original detector signals.

  12. Enhanced Magnetic Trap Loading and Coupled Optical Resonance Spectroscopy in Strontium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Daniel S.; Reschovsky, Benjamin J.; Pisenti, Neal C.; Campbell, Gretchen K.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate a technique to improve the loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap using a 688 nm de-pump laser on the 3P1 - 3S1 transition. Strontium degenerate gas experiments typically use a magnetic trap continuously loaded from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT) operating on the 461 nm line. A slow (~1:50,000) leak from the MOT transition populates the magnetically trapped 3P2 state and the 3P1 state in a 1:2 ratio. Pumping 3P1 atoms into 3P2 accelerates magnetic trap loading. For this purpose, we stabilize a 688 nm laser using Coupled Optical Resonance Laser Locking (COReLL) to the 679 nm, 688 nm, and 707 nm lines. The technique allows us to lock multiple lasers while only detecting absorption on the 707 nm transition. Error signals are generated with incommensurate frequency modulation of the pump beams. Preliminary application of the 688 nm laser to our 88Sr MOT results in 20% enhancement of magnetic trap atom number. We discuss the limitations of the loading rate enhancement and the potential for loading enhancement with other repumping strategies.

  13. Mobile Passive Optical Imager for Remote Gas Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Tunable filters based on electro-optic effect have shown great potential in detecting gas concentration through obtaining its absorption spectrum. In filter-based...

  14. Three-dimensional optical metamaterials as model systems for longitudinal and transverse magnetic coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Giessen, Harald

    2008-12-22

    In this paper, we demonstrate that metamaterials represent model systems for longitudinal and transverse magnetic coupling in the optical domain. In particular, such coupling can lead to fully parallel or antiparallel alignment of the magnetic dipoles at the lowest frequency resonance. Also, we present the design scheme for constructing three-dimensional metamaterials with solely magnetic interaction. Our concept could pave the way for achieving rather complicated magnetic materials with desired arrangements of magnetic dipoles at optical frequencies.

  15. Compressive sensing holography based on optical heterodyne detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Youjun; Zhou, Dingfu; Yuan, Sheng; Wei, Yayun; Wang, Mengting; Zhou, Xin

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, compressive sensing holography based on optical heterodyne detection is presented, which can photograph the hologram of an object. The complex hologram is composed of a sine-hologram and a cosine-hologram. A single pixel photoelectric conversion element is used to detect the time-varying optical field which contains the amplitude and phase information of the transmitted light, and a simulation result is demonstrated further by recording the Fresnel hologram of a complex amplitude object.

  16. Scanning a DNA molecule for bound proteins using hybrid magnetic and optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn T J van Loenhout

    Full Text Available The functional state of the genome is determined by its interactions with proteins that bind, modify, and move along the DNA. To determine the positions and binding strength of proteins localized on DNA we have developed a combined magnetic and optical tweezers apparatus that allows for both sensitive and label-free detection. A DNA loop, that acts as a scanning probe, is created by looping an optically trapped DNA tether around a DNA molecule that is held with magnetic tweezers. Upon scanning the loop along the λ-DNA molecule, EcoRI proteins were detected with ~17 nm spatial resolution. An offset of 33 ± 5 nm for the detected protein positions was found between back and forwards scans, corresponding to the size of the DNA loop and in agreement with theoretical estimates. At higher applied stretching forces, the scanning loop was able to remove bound proteins from the DNA, showing that the method is in principle also capable of measuring the binding strength of proteins to DNA with a force resolution of 0.1 pN/[Formula: see text]. The use of magnetic tweezers in this assay allows the facile preparation of many single-molecule tethers, which can be scanned one after the other, while it also allows for direct control of the supercoiling state of the DNA molecule, making it uniquely suitable to address the effects of torque on protein-DNA interactions.

  17. Scanning a DNA molecule for bound proteins using hybrid magnetic and optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loenhout, Marijn T J; De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Flebus, Benedetta; den Blanken, Johan F; Zweifel, Ludovit P; Hooning, Koen M; Kerssemakers, Jacob W J; Dekker, Cees

    2013-01-01

    The functional state of the genome is determined by its interactions with proteins that bind, modify, and move along the DNA. To determine the positions and binding strength of proteins localized on DNA we have developed a combined magnetic and optical tweezers apparatus that allows for both sensitive and label-free detection. A DNA loop, that acts as a scanning probe, is created by looping an optically trapped DNA tether around a DNA molecule that is held with magnetic tweezers. Upon scanning the loop along the λ-DNA molecule, EcoRI proteins were detected with ~17 nm spatial resolution. An offset of 33 ± 5 nm for the detected protein positions was found between back and forwards scans, corresponding to the size of the DNA loop and in agreement with theoretical estimates. At higher applied stretching forces, the scanning loop was able to remove bound proteins from the DNA, showing that the method is in principle also capable of measuring the binding strength of proteins to DNA with a force resolution of 0.1 pN/[Formula: see text]. The use of magnetic tweezers in this assay allows the facile preparation of many single-molecule tethers, which can be scanned one after the other, while it also allows for direct control of the supercoiling state of the DNA molecule, making it uniquely suitable to address the effects of torque on protein-DNA interactions.

  18. Detecting endotoxin with a flow cytometry-based magnetic aptasensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Ming-Yan; Chen, Li-Juan; Jiang, Hao; Tan, Lin; Luo, Zhao-Feng; Wang, Yan-Mei

    2014-12-01

    Endotoxin, which is also known as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is a marker for intruding gram-negative pathogens. It is essential to detect endotoxin quickly and sensitively in a complex milieu. A new flow cytometry (FCM)-based magnetic aptasensor assay that employs two endotoxin-binding aptamers and magnetic beads has been developed to detect endotoxin. The endotoxin-conjugated sandwich complex on magnetic beads was observed by scanning confocal laser microscopy. The resulting magnetic aptasensor rapidly detected (endotoxin within a broad dynamic detection range of 10(-8) to 10(0)mg/ml in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA), RNA, sucrose, and glucose, which are most likely to coexist with endotoxin in the majority of biological liquids. Only 2 μl of magnetic aptasensor was required to quantify the endotoxin solution. Furthermore, the magnetic aptasensor could be regenerated seven times and still presented an outstanding response to the endotoxin solution. Therefore, the magnetic aptasensor exhibited high sensitivity, selectivity, and reproducibility, thereby serving as a powerful tool for the quality control and high-throughput detection of endotoxin in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

  19. Fiber optic macro-bend based sensor for detection of metal loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weijie; Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Luo, Mingzhang; Huynh, Quyen; Song, Gangbing

    2017-04-01

    Metal loss in metallic structures, often as a result of corrosion, is a severe problem across multiple industries. Catastrophic consequence of structural failure due to such loss of structural metal requires an accurate determination and assessment of corrosion. Widely used electrochemical methods can only suggest the likelihood of the metal loss due to corrosion while failing to provide a quantitative measure of the accumulated amount of corrosion. Due to its unique advantages such as small size, light weight, resistance to electromagnetic interference and corrosion, fiber optic sensing technique has been emerging as a promising alternative for most sensing applications. In this paper, a novel type of ferromagnetic distance-based metal loss sensor is proposed based on the principle of fiber optic macro-bend loss. The proposed sensor is composed of the bended optical fiber, the magnet and a spring. The magnet is connected to the spring and the fiber bend is attached to the spring in such a way that the movement of the magnet will induce a change in bending radius of the optical fiber. Metal loss in the monitored sample increases the distance between the magnet and the metal surface and thereby reducing the magnetic force. A change in magnetic force will lead to the variation in light intensity loss of the fiber optic macro-bend, thus metal loss, such as in the form of corrosion pits, can be detected by the proposed metal loss sensor. The practicality of the proposed distance sensor for metal loss measurement is validated through scanning the fabricated corrosion samples.

  20. Magneto-Optic Fiber Bragg Gratings with Application to High-Resolution Magnetic Field Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-Jian Wu; Ying Yang; Kun Qiu

    2008-01-01

    Magneto-optic fiber Bragg gratings (MFBG) based on magneto-optic materials have a lot of potential applications for sensing and optical signal processing. The transmission and reflection spectra of guided optical waves in the MFBG are investigated. According to the sensitivity of MFBG spectral lines to the magneto-optic coupling intensity varying with applied magnetic field, a novel magnetic field sensor of high-resolution up to 0.01 nm/(kA/m) is predicted.

  1. An atomic spin precession detection method based on electro-optic modulation in an all-optical K-Rb hybrid atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanhui; Liu, Xuejing; Li, Yang; Yao, Han; Dai, Lingling; Yang, Biyao; Ding, Ming

    2017-07-01

    We present an ultrahigh-sensitivity electro-optic modulator (EOM) detection method for detecting the atomic Larmor precession in an all-optical K-Rb hybrid atomic magnetometer operating in the spin-exchange relaxation-free regime. A magnetic field sensitivity of ~10 f T Hz-1/2 has been achieved by optimizing the probe laser parameters and the EOM modulation conditions, which is comparable to that with the Faraday modulation method and has a better performance than the balanced polarimetry method in the low frequency range. The EOM detection method in the atomic magnetometer presents several advantages, such as simple structure, no extra magnetic noise, moderate thermal effect, high measurement sensitivity and reliable stability. It is demonstrated to be feasible for the improved compactness and simplicity of atomic magnetic field measurement devices in the future.

  2. Radiation-induced optic neuropathy: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guy, J.; Mancuso, A.; Beck, R.; Moster, M.L.; Sedwick, L.A.; Quisling, R.G.; Rhoton, A.L. Jr.; Protzko, E.E.; Schiffman, J. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Optic neuropathy induced by radiation is an infrequent cause of delayed visual loss that may at times be difficult to differentiate from compression of the visual pathways by recurrent neoplasm. The authors describe six patients with this disorder who experienced loss of vision 6 to 36 months after neurological surgery and radiation therapy. Of the six patients in the series, two had a pituitary adenoma and one each had a metastatic melanoma, multiple myeloma, craniopharyngioma, and lymphoepithelioma. Visual acuity in the affected eyes ranged from 20/25 to no light perception. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed sellar and parasellar recurrence of both pituitary adenomas, but the intrinsic lesions of the optic nerves and optic chiasm induced by radiation were enhanced after gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) administration and were clearly distinguishable from the suprasellar compression of tumor. Repeated MR imaging showed spontaneous resolution of gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of the optic nerve in a patient who was initially suspected of harboring recurrence of a metastatic malignant melanoma as the cause of visual loss. The authors found the presumptive diagnosis of radiation-induced optic neuropathy facilitated by MR imaging with gadolinium-DTPA. This neuro-imaging procedure may help avert exploratory surgery in some patients with recurrent neoplasm in whom the etiology of visual loss is uncertain.

  3. Vortex magnetic structure in circularly magnetized microwires as deduced from magneto-optical Kerr measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2014-02-14

    The magneto-optic Kerr effect has been employed to determine the magnetization process and estimate the domain structure of microwires with circular magnetic anisotropy. The diameter of microwires was 8 μm, and pieces 2 cm long were selected for measurements. The analysis of the local surface longitudinal and transverse hysteresis loops has allowed us to deduce a vortex magnetic structure with axial core and circular external shell. Moreover, a bamboo-like surface domain structure is confirmed with wave length of around 10 to 15 μm and alternating chirality in adjacent circular domains. The width of the domain wall is estimated to be less than 3 μm. Finally, closure domain structures with significant helical magnetization component are observed extending up to around 1000 μm from the end of the microwire.

  4. Fiber Optic Detection of Ammonia Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kalvoda

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Bathochromic shifts accompanying the formation of several bivalent metallic complexes containing 5-(4’-dimethylaminophenylimino quinolin-8-one (L1, and 7-chlore-5(4’-diethylamino-2-methylphenylimino quinolin-8-one (L2 ligands in ethanol solutions were evaluated by VIS-NIR spectroscopy. The [L1-Cu-L1] sulphide complex was selected as a reagent for further tests on optical fibres. Samples of multimode siloxane-clad fused-silica fibre were sensitized by diffusing an ethanol/chloroform solution of the dye into the cladding polymer, and tested by VIS-NIR optical spectroscopy (12 cm long fibre sections, and optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR; 20 ns laser pulses, wavelength 850 nm, 120 m long fibre sensitized within the interval 104–110 m. A well-resolved absorption band of the reagent could be identified in the absorption spectra of the fibres. After exposure to dry ammonia/nitrogen gas with increasing ammonia concentration (0–4000 ppm, the short fibre samples showed subsequent decay of NIR optical absorption; saturation was observed for higher ammonia levels. The concentration resolution r ? 50 ppm and forward response time t90 ? 30 sec were obtained within the interval 0–1000 ppm. The OTDR courses showed an enhancement of the back-scattered light intensity coming from the sensitized region after diffusion of the initial reagent, and decay after exposure to concentrated ammonia/nitrogen gas (10000 ppm.

  5. Magnetic Microstructures of 2:17 Type Sm(Co,Fe,Cu,Zr)z Magnets Detected by Magnetic Force Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Ailin; Guo Zhaohui; Li Wei; Han Baoshan

    2006-01-01

    The magnetic microstructures of 2:17 type Sm(Co,Fe,Cu,Zr)z magnets were detected by magnetic force microscopy.Comparing the microstructures of the specimens coated with and without Ta thin film before and after heat-treatment, it is found that: (a) as a protection layer, Ta coating layer about 20 nm thick can effectively restrain Sm volatilization under high temperature;(b) the stress built in the 2:17 type Sm-Co magnets during specimen preparation only affects some local parts of the domain structures;(c) the magnetic microstructures vary largely for specimens heat-treated at high temperature without Ta film coating due to Sm volatilization.In addition, by comparing with high coercivity Fe-Pt point tips, it is found that the Co-Cr thin-film tips are not suitable for detecting the magnetic microstructures of strong permanent magnets.

  6. An Optical Biosensor for Bacillus Cereus Spore Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengquan; Tom, Harry W. K.

    2005-03-01

    We demonstrate a new transduction scheme for optical biosensing. Bacillus cereus is a pathogen that may be found in food and dairy products and is able to produce toxins and cause food poisoning. It is related to Bacillus anthracis (anthrax). A CCD array covered with micro-structured glass coverslip is used to detect the optical resonant shift due to the binding of the antigen (bacillus cereus spore) to the antibody (polyclonal antibody). This novel optical biosensor scheme has the potential for detecting 10˜100 bioagents in a single device as well as the potential to test for antigens with multiple antibody tests to avoid ``false positives.''

  7. Optical detection of radio waves through a nanomechanical transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagci, Tolga; Simonsen, A; Schmid, Silvan;

    2013-01-01

    Low-loss transmission and sensitive recovery of weak radio-frequency (rf) and microwave signals is an ubiquitous technological challenge, crucial in fields as diverse as radio astronomy, medical imaging, navigation and communication, including those of quantum states. Efficient upconversion of rf-signals...... to an optical carrier would allow transmitting them via optical fibers instead of copper wires dramatically reducing losses, and give access to the mature toolbox of quantum optical techniques, routinely enabling quantum-limited signal detection. Research in the field of cavity optomechanics [1, 2] has shown...... reflected off its metallized surface. The circuit acts as an antenna; the voltage signals it induces are detected as an optical phase shift with quantum-limited sensitivity. The corresponding half-wave voltage is in the microvolt range, orders of magnitude below that of standard optical modulators...

  8. [Portable magnetometers for detecting magnetic pathogenic zones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomaev, G V; Vodenikov, S K; Vasil'ev, M Iu

    1997-01-01

    Perspective magnetometers needed to solve many problems of electromagnetic ecology are presented. A magnetometer block scheme is presented, its work and engineering philosophy described. High thermal stability and linear characteristics of the device are ensured by the compensation measurements. Results of measuring the attenuation of magnetic field of the Earth inside various objects by the magnetometer are presented.

  9. Electrical detection of magnetization dynamics via spin rectification effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Michael; Gui, Yongsheng; Hu, Can-Ming

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the current status of a frontier in dynamic spintronics and contemporary magnetism, in which much progress has been made in the past decade, based on the creation of a variety of micro and nanostructured devices that enable electrical detection of magnetization dynamics. The primary focus is on the physics of spin rectification effects, which are well suited for studying magnetization dynamics and spin transport in a variety of magnetic materials and spintronic devices. Intended to be intelligible to a broad audience, the paper begins with a pedagogical introduction, comparing the methods of electrical detection of charge and spin dynamics in semiconductors and magnetic materials respectively. After that it provides a comprehensive account of the theoretical study of both the angular dependence and line shape of electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), which is summarized in a handbook format easy to be used for analysing experimental data. We then review and examine the similarity and differences of various spin rectification effects found in ferromagnetic films, magnetic bilayers and magnetic tunnel junctions, including a discussion of how to properly distinguish spin rectification from the spin pumping/inverse spin Hall effect generated voltage. After this we review the broad applications of rectification effects for studying spin waves, nonlinear dynamics, domain wall dynamics, spin current, and microwave imaging. We also discuss spin rectification in ferromagnetic semiconductors. The paper concludes with both historical and future perspectives, by summarizing and comparing three generations of FMR spectroscopy which have been developed for studying magnetization dynamics.

  10. Quantification of rolling circle amplified DNA using magnetic nanobeads and a Blu-ray optical pick-up unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donolato, Marco; Antunes, Paula Soares Martins; Gómez del a Torre, Teresa Zardán

    2015-01-01

    We present the first implementation of a Blu-ray optical pickup unit (OPU) for the high-performance low-cost readout of a homogeneous assay in a multichamber microfluidic disc with a chamber thickness of 600 μm. The assay relies on optical measurements of the dynamics of magnetic nanobeads...... the optimum magnetic bead concentration to 0.1 mg/mL and have measured the response vs. concentration of DNA coils formed from Escherichia Coli. We have found a limit of detection of 10 pM and a dynamic range of about two orders of magnitude, which is comparable to the performance obtained using costly...

  11. Automatic Detection of Magnetic delta in Sunspot Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Padinhatteeri, Sreejith; Bloomfield, D Shaun; Gallagher, Peter T

    2015-01-01

    Large and magnetically complex sunspot groups are known to be associated with flares. To date, the Mount Wilson scheme has been used to classify sunspot groups based on their morphological and magnetic properties. The most flare prolific class, the delta sunspot-group, is characterised by opposite polarity umbrae within a common penumbra, separated by less than 2 degrees. In this article, we present a new system, called the Solar Monitor Active Region Tracker - Delta Finder (SMART-DF), that can be used to automatically detect and classify magnetic deltas in near-realtime. Using continuum images and magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), we first estimate distances between opposite polarity umbrae. Opposite polarity pairs having distances of less that 2 degrees are then identified, and if these pairs are found to share a common penumbra, they are identified as a magnetic delta configuration. The algorithm was compared to manual delta detect...

  12. Synthesis of streptavidin-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles for DNA detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong Peijun, E-mail: skygpj@zjnu.cn; Peng Zheyang; Wang Yao; Qiao Ru; Mao Weixing; Qian Haisheng; Zhang Mengya; Li Congcong; Shi Shenyuan [College of Chemistry and Life Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University (China)

    2013-04-15

    In this paper, we report a fabrication of streptavidin-coated magnetic nanoparticles used for DNA detection. Initially, amino-functionalized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with high saturation magnetization are prepared by a photopolymerization method using allylamine as monomer. It is followed by covalent immobilization of streptavidin onto the particle surface via a two-step reaction using glutaraldehyde as coupling agent. Streptavidin-coated magnetic nanoparticles are characterized and further tested for their ability to capture DNA target after binding biotinylated oligonucleotide probes. The results show that the products ({approx}27.2 nm) have a maximum biotin-binding capacity of 0.71 nmol mg{sup -1} when the immobilization reaction is conducted with a mass ratio of streptavidin to magnetic carriers above 0.2 in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4) for 24 h. In addition, highly negative {zeta}-potential and good magnetic susceptibility of the nanocomposites make them applicable for DNA collection and detection, which is verified by the results from the preliminary application of streptavidin-coated magnetic nanoparticles in DNA detection. Therefore, the magnetic nanoparticles provide a promising approach for rapid collection and detection of gene.

  13. Novel optical devices based on the tunable refractive index of magnetic fluid and their characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Yong, E-mail: zhaoyong@ise.neu.edu.cn [College of Information Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Zhang Yuyan [College of Information Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Shenyang Institute of Engineering, Shenyang 110136 (China); Lv Riqing; Wang Qi [College of Information Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2011-12-15

    As a new type of functional material, magnetic fluid (MF) is a stable colloid of magnetic nanoparticles, dressed with surfactant and dispersed in the carrier liquid uniformly. The MF has many unique optical properties, and the most important one is its tunable refractive index property. This paper summarizes the properties of the MF refractive index and the related optical devices. The refractive index can be easily controlled by external magnetic field, temperature, and so on. But the tunable refractive index of MF has a relaxation effect. As a result, the response time is more than milliseconds and the MF is only suitable for low speed environment. Compared with the traditional optical devices, the magnetic fluid based optical devices have the tuning ability. Compared with the tunable optical devices (the electro-optic devices (LiNbO{sub 3}) of more than 10 GHz modulation speed, acoustic-optic devices (Ge) of more than 20 MHz modulation speed), the speed of the magnetic fluid based optical devices is low. Now there are many applications of magnetic fluid based on the refractive index in the field of optical information communication and sensing technology, such as tunable beam splitter, optical-fiber modulator, tunable optical gratings, tunable optical filter, optical logic device, tunable interferometer, and electromagnetic sensor. With the development of the research and application of magnetic fluid,a new method, structure and material to improve the response time can be found, which will play an important role in the fields of optical information communication and sensing technology. - Highlights: > Magnetic fluid is a new type of functional material, which has many unique optical properties. > We summarize the tunable refractive index property and the related optical devices. > Refractive index can be easily controlled by external magnetic field, temperature and so on. > There are many applications in the field of optical communication and sensing technology

  14. Submerged turbulence detection with optical satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Carl H; Bondur, Valery G; Leung, Pak T; Prandke, H; Vithanage, D

    2007-01-01

    During fall periods in 2002, 2003 and 2004 three major oceanographic expeditions were carried out in Mamala Bay, Hawaii. These were part of the RASP Remote Anthropogenic Sensing Program. Ikonos and Quickbird optical satellite images of sea surface glint revealed ~100 m spectral anomalies in km^2 averaging patches in regions leading from the Honolulu Sand Island Municipal Outfall diffuser to distances up to 20 km. To determine the mechanisms behind this phenomenon, the RASP expeditions monitored the waters adjacent to the outfall with an array of hydrographic, optical and turbulence microstructure sensors in anomaly and ambient background regions. Drogue tracks and mean turbulence parameters for 2x10^4 microstructure patches were analyzed to understand complex turbulence, fossil turbulence and zombie turbulence near-vertical internal wave transport processes. The dominant mechanism appears to be generic to stratified natural fluids including planet and star atmospheres and is termed beamed zombie turbulence ma...

  15. Photodiode Based Detection for Multiple Trap Optical Tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Dino

    This thesis is concerned with the position tracking of microscopic, optically trapped particles and the quantification of the forces acting on them. A new detection method for simultaneous, three-dimensional tracking of multiple particles is presented, its performance is evaluated, and its...... usefulness is illustrated in specific application examples. Optical traps enable contact-less, all-optical manipulation of microscopic objects. Over the last decades, this laser-based micro-manipulation tool has facilitated numerous exciting discoveries within biology and physics, and it is today regarded...... as one of the workhorses of biophysical research. There exists a variety of implementations of optical traps, from simple single traps to complex multiple traps with engineered three-dimensional light fields. In comparison to single beam optical traps, multiple beam optical traps offer more freedom...

  16. Bats use magnetite to detect the earth's magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Richard A; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Doak, Thomas G; Wikelski, Martin

    2008-02-27

    While the role of magnetic cues for compass orientation has been confirmed in numerous animals, the mechanism of detection is still debated. Two hypotheses have been proposed, one based on a light dependent mechanism, apparently used by birds and another based on a "compass organelle" containing the iron oxide particles magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)). Bats have recently been shown to use magnetic cues for compass orientation but the method by which they detect the Earth's magnetic field remains unknown. Here we use the classic "Kalmijn-Blakemore" pulse re-magnetization experiment, whereby the polarity of cellular magnetite is reversed. The results demonstrate that the big brown bat Eptesicus fuscus uses single domain magnetite to detect the Earths magnetic field and the response indicates a polarity based receptor. Polarity detection is a prerequisite for the use of magnetite as a compass and suggests that big brown bats use magnetite to detect the magnetic field as a compass. Our results indicate the possibility that sensory cells in bats contain freely rotating magnetite particles, which appears not to be the case in birds. It is crucial that the ultrastructure of the magnetite containing magnetoreceptors is described for our understanding of magnetoreception in animals.

  17. Bats use magnetite to detect the earth's magnetic field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Holland

    Full Text Available While the role of magnetic cues for compass orientation has been confirmed in numerous animals, the mechanism of detection is still debated. Two hypotheses have been proposed, one based on a light dependent mechanism, apparently used by birds and another based on a "compass organelle" containing the iron oxide particles magnetite (Fe(3O(4. Bats have recently been shown to use magnetic cues for compass orientation but the method by which they detect the Earth's magnetic field remains unknown. Here we use the classic "Kalmijn-Blakemore" pulse re-magnetization experiment, whereby the polarity of cellular magnetite is reversed. The results demonstrate that the big brown bat Eptesicus fuscus uses single domain magnetite to detect the Earths magnetic field and the response indicates a polarity based receptor. Polarity detection is a prerequisite for the use of magnetite as a compass and suggests that big brown bats use magnetite to detect the magnetic field as a compass. Our results indicate the possibility that sensory cells in bats contain freely rotating magnetite particles, which appears not to be the case in birds. It is crucial that the ultrastructure of the magnetite containing magnetoreceptors is described for our understanding of magnetoreception in animals.

  18. Detection of a single magnetic dot using a Planar Hall sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chui, K.M. [Information Storage Materials Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 (Singapore); Adeyeye, A.O. [Information Storage Materials Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 (Singapore)]. E-mail: kunleadeyeye@nus.edu.sg; Li, Mo-Huang [Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, 31 Biopolis Way, The Nanos, 04-01, 138669 (Singapore)

    2007-03-15

    We have successfully demonstrated the detection of pseudo-magnetic beads placed on top of 4x4 {mu}m{sup 2} and 5x5 {mu}m{sup 2} Planar Hall trilayer (Si/Co{sub 10nm} /Cu{sub 2nm} /NiFe{sub 10nm}) sensors. The sensor and the pseudo-magnetic beads were fabricated using a combination of e-beam and optical lithography techniques. Magneto-transport measurements detect the presence of dots placed on top of the PHE junction, even to the limit of single-dot. We observed that the PHE response is very sensitive to changes in the density of coverage of the sensing area with pseudo-magnetic beads. We attribute this effect to the direct coupling between the dots and the sensing layer below.

  19. Planar Microfluidic System Based on Electrophoresis for Detection of 130-nm Magnetic Labels for Biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Tsukasa; Morimoto, Yoshitaka; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2011-04-01

    Superparamagnetic beads (SPBs) used as magnetic labels offer potential for the realization of high sensitivity and low cost biosensors for point of care treatment (POCT). For better biomolecular affinity and higher sensitivity, it is desirable to use sub-200-nm-diameter SPBs comparable in size to actual biomolecules. However, the detection of small concentrations of such SPBs by magnetoresistive devices is extremely challenging due to small magnetic response of SPBs. As a solution to these limitations, we describe a simple detecting procedure where the capture of micro-SPBs by immobilized nano-target SPBs due to self-assembly induced by an external magnetic field, which was monitored under an optical microscope. Here we describe biosensing system based on self-assembly of micro-SPBs by nanoSPBs targets using a system without external pumps, thereby enabling greater miniaturization and portability.

  20. Sub-optical resolution of single spins using magnetic resonance imaging at room temperature in diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, Chang; Kolesov, Roman; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrishnan; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Hemmer, Philip R; 10.1016/j.jlumin.2009.12.006

    2010-01-01

    There has been much recent interest in extending the technique of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) down to the level of single spins with sub-optical wavelength resolution. However, the signal to noise ratio for images of individual spins is usually low and this necessitates long acquisition times and low temperatures to achieve high resolution. An exception to this is the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color center in diamond whose spin state can be detected optically at room temperature. Here we apply MRI to magnetically equivalent NV spins in order to resolve them with resolution well below the optical wavelength of the readout light. In addition, using a microwave version of MRI we achieved a resolution that is 1/270 size of the coplanar striplines, which define the effective wavelength of the microwaves that were used to excite the transition. This technique can eventually be extended to imaging of large numbers of NVs in a confocal spot and possibly to image nearby dark spins via their mutual magnetic interactio...

  1. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MRDTI) of the optic nerve and optic radiations at 3T in children with neurofibromatosis type I (NF-1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippi, Christopher G.; Nickerson, Joshua P. [University of Vermont School of Medicine-FAHC, Department of Radiology, Burlington, VT (United States); Bos, Aaron [University of Vermont School of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States); Salmela, Michael B. [University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Koski, Chris J. [James Madison University, Department of Political Sciences, Harrisonburg, VA (United States); Cauley, Keith A. [University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Worcester, MA (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Optic pathway glioma (OPG) is a characteristic hallmark of neurofibromatosis type I (NF-I). To evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MRDTI) at 3T to detect abnormalities of the optic nerves and optic radiations in children with NF-I. 3-T MRDTI was prospectively performed in 9 children with NF-I (7 boys, 2 girls, average age 7.8 years, range 3-17 years) and 44 controls (25 boys, 19 girls, average age 8.1 years, range 3-17 years). Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity were determined by region-of-interest analysis for the optic nerves and radiations. Statistical analysis compared controls to NF-I patients. Two NF-I patients had bilateral optic nerve gliomas, three had chiasmatic gliomas and four had unidentified neurofibromatosis objects (UNOs) along the optic nerve pathways. All NF-I patients had statistically significant decreases in FA and elevations in mean diffusivity in the optic nerves and radiations compared to age-matched controls. MRDTI can evaluate the optic pathways in children with NF-I. Statistically significant abnormalities were detected in the diffusion tensor metrics of the optic nerves and radiations in children with NF-I compared to age-matched controls. (orig.)

  2. Theoretical investigation of magnetic and optical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proshchenko, Vitaly

    This thesis presents the theoretical investigation of physical properties of pure and transition metal doped semiconductor nanostructures. First we study optical and energy (the density of states) spectra for Cd mSem clusters of various sizes and shapes, such as spheres, cubes, nanorods, and nanotubes. This work requires a careful computational analysis where a proper exchange-correlation functional has to be chosen to fit the experimental data. The next part of the thesis deals with the magnetic properties of manganese doped CdSe, ZnSe, ZnS, and CdS quantum dots (QDs). We theoretically explain the effect of dual luminescence and show that in the case with CdSe quantum dots the luminescence becomes tunable by a QD size. We also study the concentration dependence of magnetic order and optical transitions in Mn doped CdSe nanocrystals. Room temperature d0 ferromagnetism is studied in ZnS quantum dots and nanowires in Chapter 4. To find the magnetization of the medium and large size nanocrystals we introduce the surface-bulk (SB) model. We show that the condensation of Zn vacancies into a single droplet takes place which leads to the week d0 ferromagnetism in ZnS nanocrystals. In the last Chapter we study electronic, optical, and charge transport properties of two new holey 2D materials, ELH-g-C2N-H and ELH-g-C2N-Br with hydrogen and bromine side-groups, respectively. Since the two 2D crystals under study have not been synthesized yet, we provide the stability analysis and prove that the calculated crystal structures correspond to the global energy minimum criterion.

  3. Magnetic-based biomolecule detection using giant magnetoresistance sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinis, G.; Jamalieh, M.; Cardoso, F.; Cardoso, S.; Keplinger, F.; Giouroudi, I.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a novel microfluidic chip for in-vitro detection of biomolecules tagged by magnetic microparticles (MAPs) suspended in a static fluid. The system consists of two microfluidic channels: a reference channel in which bare MAPs are suspended and a detection channel in which magnetically tagged biomolecules are suspended (LMAPs). The LMAPs are functionalized MAPs (of the same magnetic volume as the ones in the reference channel) with attached biomolecules. The overall, non-magnetic volume of the LMAPs is greater than that of the bare MAPs. Current carrying microconductors are positioned underneath the channels in order to impose a magnetic field gradient to the MAPs and LMAPs and move them from the inlet to the outlet of the channels without flow. The innovative aspect of the proposed method is that the induced velocity on the MAPs and LMAPs, while imposed to the same magnetic field gradient, is inversely proportional to their overall, non-magnetic volume. This is due to the enhanced Stokes drag force exerted on the LMAPs, resulting from the greater volume and altered hydrodynamic shape. This induced velocity is measured by utilizing Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) sensor pairs fabricated underneath the first and the last microconductors. Detected differences in velocity between the LMAPs and the reference MAPs indicate the presence of biomolecules in the static liquid sample. We also present a novel method for signal acquisition and demodulation: expensive function generators, data acquisition devices, and lock-in amplifiers were substituted by a generic PC sound card and an algorithm combining the Fast Fourier Transform of the signal with a peak detection routine. Experiments with functionalized MAPs and magnetically tagged Escherichia coli (representing the LMAPs) were carried out as a proof of concept. In order to identify the detection limit of the GMR sensor, single MAP (2.8 μm diameter) detection was performed.

  4. Advanced optical position sensors for magnetically suspended wind tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, S.

    1985-01-01

    A major concern to aerodynamicists has been the corruption of wind tunnel test data by model support structures, such as stings or struts. A technique for magnetically suspending wind tunnel models was considered by Tournier and Laurenceau (1957) in order to overcome this problem. This technique is now implemented with the aid of a Large Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (LMSBS) and advanced position sensors for measuring model attitude and position within the test section. Two different optical position sensors are discussed, taking into account a device based on the use of linear CCD arrays, and a device utilizing area CID cameras. Current techniques in image processing have been employed to develop target tracking algorithms capable of subpixel resolution for the sensors. The algorithms are discussed in detail, and some preliminary test results are reported.

  5. Selective detection of antibodies in microstructured polymer optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Bo Damm; Hoiby, P.E.; Emiliyanov, Grigoriy Andreev

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate selective detection of fluorophore labeled antibodies from minute samples probed by a sensor layer of complementary biomolecules immobilized inside the air holes of microstructured Polymer Optical Fiber (mPOF). The fiber core is defined by a ring of 6 air holes and a simple procedure...... was applied to selectively capture either α-streptavidin or α-CRP antibodies inside these air holes. A sensitive and easy-to-use fluorescence method was used for the optical detection. Our results show that mPOF based biosensors can provide reliable and selective antibody detection in ultra small sample...

  6. Selective detection of antibodies in microstructured polymer optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jesper; Hoiby, Poul; Emiliyanov, Grigoriy; Bang, Ole; Pedersen, Lars; Bjarklev, Anders

    2005-07-25

    We demonstrate selective detection of fluorophore labeled antibodies from minute samples probed by a sensor layer of complementary biomolecules immobilized inside the air holes of microstructured Polymer Optical Fiber (mPOF). The fiber core is defined by a ring of 6 air holes and a simple procedure was applied to selectively capture either alpha-streptavidin or alpha-CRP antibodies inside these air holes. A sensitive and easy-to-use fluorescence method was used for the optical detection. Our results show that mPOF based biosensors can provide reliable and selective antibody detection in ultra small sample volumes.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic transection of the optic chiasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Nunzio, M.; McAuliffe, W.; Chakera, T.M.H. [Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, WA (Australia). Department of Diagnostic Radiology

    1997-05-01

    Traumatic lesions of the visual pathways are an uncommon, but well recognized complication of head injury. Optimal visualization of such lesions is probably best achieved using multiplanar magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. A case of complete sagittal transection of the optic chiasm using MR imaging is reported. This has been rarely documented in the literature. Computerized tomography demonstrated a basal skull fracture extending through the sphenoid sinus and into the floor of the pituitary fossa. However, MRI is advocated as the optimal imaging modality for the diagnosis of traumatic lesions of suprasellar structures, perhaps obviating the need for future investigations. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Optical and magnetic properties of PAA@Fe nanocomposite films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-jing Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A simple method to fabricate porous anodic alumina films embedded with Fe is reported. The films exhibit vivid structural colors and magnetic properties after being synthesized by an ac electrodeposition method. The optical properties of the samples can be effectively tuned by varying the oxidation time of aluminum. The coercivity mechanism of the Fe nanowires in our case is consistent with fanning reversal mode. PAA@Fe films can be used in many areas including decoration, display and multifunctional anti-counterfeiting applications.

  9. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila Using Fiber Optic Microchannel Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samla Gauri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on the detection of Aeromonas hydrophila using fiber optic microchannel biosensor. Microchannel was fabricated by photolithography method. The fiber optic was chosen as signal transmitting medium and light absorption characteristic of different microorganisms was investigated for possible detection. Experimental results showed that Aeromonas hydrophila can be detected at the region of UV-Vis spectra between 352 nm and 354 nm which was comparable to measurement provided by UV spectrophotometer and also theoretical calculation by Beer-Lambert Absorption Law. The entire detection can be done in less than 10 minutes using a total volume of 3 μL only. This result promises good potential of this fiber optic microchannel sensor as a reliable, portable, and disposable sensor.

  10. Ultra-sensitive broad-dynamic range optical magnetometer with instance response to magnetic field changes

    CERN Document Server

    Wlodarczyk, Przemyslaw; Zachorowski, Jerzy; Lipinski, Marcin

    2012-01-01

    We investigate one of the most sensitive devices for measuring magnetic fields, the, so-called, AMOR magnetometer. The device exploits a specific nonlinear optical phenomenon (amplitude-modulated nonlinear magneto-optical rotation) for ultra-precise magnetic field detection. It allows measuring the field with a sensitivity of 10^-14 T/Hz^-1/2 within a dynamic range of 10-4 T. Such high sensitivity and the dynamic range covering the Earth magnetic field are desired in context of many practical application of the device. By elaborating the electronic model of the magnetometer we study its different characteristics in various arrangements. It allows us to optimize the device regarding different requirements, e.g., technical simplicity, data processing, etc. It is shown that the device may be automated operating it in the self-oscillation mode. Particularly, we show that the magnetometer instantly responses to the magnetic field change. Our numerical analyses are confirmed with experimental results obtained in on...

  11. Electro-optical detection of charged particles

    CERN Document Server

    Semertzidis, Y K; Kowalski, L A; Kraus, D E; Larsen, R; Lazarus, D M; Magurno, B; Nikas, D; Ozben, C; Srinivasan-Rao, T; Tsang, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    We have made the first observation of a charged particle beam by means of its electro-optical effect on the polarization of laser light in a LiNbO sub 3 crystal. The modulation of the laser light during the passage of a pulsed electron beam was observed using a fast photodiode and a digital oscilloscope. The fastest rise time measured, 120 ps, was obtained in the single shot mode and was limited by the bandwidth of the oscilloscope and the associated electronics. This technology holds good for detectors of greatly improved spatial and temporal resolution for single relativistic charged particles as well as particle beams.

  12. Magnetic field concentration with coaxial silicon nanocylinders in the optical spectral range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baryshnikova, Kseniia V.; Novitsky, Andrey; Evlyukhin, Andrey B.

    2017-01-01

    Possibility of magnetic energy accumulation inside silicon nanoparticles atthe conditions of resonant optical responses is investigated theoretically. Themagnetic field distributions inside silicon nanocylinders with and withoutcoaxial through holes are calculated using full-wave numerical approach....... It isdemonstrated that such systems can be used for control and manipulation ofoptical magnetic fields providing their enhancement up to 26 times at thecondition of optical resonances. Obtained results can be used for realizationof nanoantennas and nanolasers, in which magnetic optical transitions playsignificant...

  13. Nanostructured optical microchips for cancer biomarker detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianhua; He, Yuan; Wei, Jianjun; Que, Long

    2012-01-01

    Herein we report the label-free detection of a cancer biomarker using newly developed arrayed nanostructured Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) microchips. Specifically, the prostate cancer biomarker free prostate-specific antigen (f-PSA) has been detected with a mouse anti-human PSA monoclonal antibody (mAb) as the receptor. Experiments found that the limit-of-detection of current nanostructured FPI microchip for f-PSA is about 10 pg/mL and the upper detection range for f-PSA can be dynamically changed by varying the amount of the PSA mAb immobilized on the sensing surface. The control experiments have also demonstrated that the immunoassay protocol used in the experiments shows excellent specificity and selectivity, suggesting the great potential to detect the cancer biomarkers at trace levels in complex biofluids. In addition, given its nature of low cost, simple-to-operation and batch fabrication capability, the arrayed nanostructured FPI microchip-based platform could provide an ideal technical tool for point-of-care diagnostics application and anticancer drug screen and discovery.

  14. Detection of the Magnetic Easy Direction in Steels Using Induced Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgard M. Silva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Conventional manufacturing processes cause plastic deformation that leads to magnetic anisotropy in processed materials. A deeper understanding of materials characterization under rotational magnetization enables engineers to optimize the overall volume, mass, and performance of devices such as electrical machines in industry. Therefore, it is important to find the magnetic easy direction of the magnetic domains in a simple and straightforward manner. The Magnetic easy direction can be obtained through destructive tests such as the Epstein frame method and the Single Sheet Tester by taking measurements in regions of irreversible magnetization usually called domains. In the present work, samples of rolled SAE 1045 steel (formed by perlite and ferrite microstructures were submitted to induced magnetic fields in the reversibility region of magnetic domains to detect the magnetic easy direction. The magnetic fields were applied to circular samples with different thicknesses and angles varying from 0° to 360° with steps of 45°. A square sample with a fixed thickness was also tested. The results showed that the proposed non-destructive approach is promising to evaluate the magnetic anisotropy in steels independently of the geometry of the sample. The region studied presented low induction losses and was affected by magnetic anisotropy, which did not occur in other works that only took into account regions of high induction losses.

  15. DIAGNOdent: an optical method for caries detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussi, A; Hibst, R; Paulus, R

    2004-01-01

    The onset of caries is characterized by demineralization of dental hard tissues. Optimal fluoridation with respective oral hygiene habits and diet may stop the progression of a lesion and even allow for its remineralization. The aim of modern dentistry must be a preventive approach rather than invasive repair of the disease. This is possible only with early detection and respective preventive measures. Some of today's diagnostic tools are not sensitive enough to detect this early onset of destruction. Tools based on fluorescence could have the possibility to overcome this problem. This overview will focus on today's knowledge of one possible tool, the DIAGNOdent.

  16. Detection of molecules and cells using nuclear magnetic resonance with magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rümenapp, Christine, E-mail: ruemenapp@tum.de [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Gleich, Bernhard [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Mannherz, Hans Georg [Abteilung für Anatomie und Molekulare Embryologie, Ruhr Universität Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Haase, Axel [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    For the detection of small molecules, proteins or even cells in vitro, functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements can be applied. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with the size of 5–7 nm were functionalised with antibodies to detect two model systems of different sizes, the protein avidin and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the model organism. The synthesised magnetic nanoparticles showed a narrow size distribution, which was determined using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The magnetic nanoparticles were functionalised with the according antibodies via EDC/NHS chemistry. The binding of the antigen to magnetic nanoparticles was detected through the change in the NMR T{sub 2} relaxation time at 0.5 T (≈21.7 MHz). In case of a specific binding the particles cluster and the T{sub 2} relaxation time of the sample changes. The detection limit in buffer for FITC-avidin was determined to be 1.35 nM and 10{sup 7} cells/ml for S. cerevisiae. For fluorescent microscopy the avidin molecules were labelled with FITC and for the detection of S. cerevisiae the magnetic nanoparticles were additionally functionalised with rhodamine. The binding of the particles to S. cerevisiae and the resulting clustering was also seen by transmission electron microscopy.

  17. Magnetic field concentration with coaxial silicon nanocylinders in optical spectral range

    CERN Document Server

    Baryshnikova, Kseniia V; Shalin, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    Possibility of magnetic energy accumulation inside silicon nanoparticles at the conditions of resonant optical responses is investigated theoretically. The magnetic field distributions inside silicon nanocylinders with and without coaxial through holes are calculated using full-wave numerical approach. It is demonstrated that such systems can be used for control and manipulation of optical magnetic fields providing their enhancement up to 26 times at the condition of optical resonances. Obtained results can be used for realization of nanoantennas and nanolasers, in which magnetic optical transitions play significant roles.

  18. Plasmonic nanoantennas for multipurpose particle manipulation and enhanced optical magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxworthy, Brian James

    surface, likely by means of fs-augmented near-field gradient forces. Using this particle-fusing behavior as inspiration, a novel class of "capped" nanoantennas is designed, and their plasmonic response is theoretically investigated. The specific example of capped-bowtie nanoantennas (c-BNAs) is chosen, and it is shown that the c-BNAs have the unique ability to simultaneously enhance both magnetic and electric fields by more than three and four orders of magnitude, respectively. This ability improves on currently available designs that enhance magnetic fields at the expense of a mitigated electric response. The spectral response of the c-BNAs is dominated by two distinct resonant peaks: one in the visible (VIS) and one in the near-infrared (NIR), and the spectral behavior of the c-BNAs is examined as a function of cap thickness, bowtie gap spacing, and c-BNA array spacing. Finally, a new pillar-bowtie nanoantenna (p-BNA) design, comprising Au BNA arrays suspended on 500 nm tall SiO2 pillars, is introduced as a candidate system to show, for the first time, that the mechanical degree of freedom (DOF) can be used to create in situ reconfigurable plasmonic nanoantennas. Reconfigurability is achieved using electron-beam manipulation in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), whereby the electron beam induces strong electromagnetic gradient forces in the p-BNA gap that causes the two arms to deform toward the common gap center. In characterizing this behavior as a function of SEM accelerating voltage and magnification, design curves are produced that enable controlled, repeatable fabrication of nanoantennas with gap sizes as small as 5 nm by actuation of the mechanical DOF of the pillars. As a proof of this novel design principle, the optical response of two, 10 x 10 modified p-BNA regions comprising 5- and 15-nm gap antennas is characterized using spatially localized reflection spectroscopy based on a supercontinuum optical source. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  19. Amplifier Noise Based Optical Steganography with Coherent Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ben; Chang, Matthew P.; Caldwell, Naomi R.; Caldwell, Myles E.; Prucnal, Paul R.

    2014-12-01

    We summarize the principle and experimental setup of optical steganography based on amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise. Using ASE noise as the signal carrier, optical steganography effectively hides a stealth channel in both the time domain and the frequency domain. Coherent detection is used at the receiver of the stealth channel. Because ASE noise has short coherence length and random phase, it only interferes with itself within a very short range. Coherent detection requires the stealth transmitter and stealth receiver to precisely match the optical delay,which generates a large key space for the stealth channel. Several methods to further improve optical steganography, signal to noise ratio, compatibility with the public channel, and applications of the stealth channel are also summarized in this review paper.

  20. Optical detection of radio waves through a nanomechanical transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagci, T.; Simonsen, A.; Schmid, Silvan

    2014-01-01

    by the cooperativity. For the highest observed cooperativity of 6,800, this leads to a projected noise temperature of 40 mK and a sensitivity limit of 5 pV Hz-1/2. Our approach to all-optical, ultralow-noise detection of classical electronic signals sets the stage for coherent up-conversion of low-frequency quantum......Low-loss transmission and sensitive recovery of weak radio-frequency and microwave signals is a ubiquitous challenge, crucial in radio astronomy, medical imaging, navigation, and classical and quantum communication. Efficient up-conversion of radio-frequency signals to an optical carrier would...... enable their transmission through optical fibres instead of through copper wires, drastically reducing losses, and would give access to the set of established quantum optical techniques that are routinely used in quantum-limited signal detection. Research in cavity optomechanics has shown...

  1. Francisella tularensis detection using magnetic labels and a magnetic biosensor based on frequency mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Martin H.F. [Institute for Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg (Germany); Krause, Hans-Joachim [Institute of Bio-and Nanosystems (IBN-2), Research Center Juelich (Germany); Hartmann, Markus [Institute for Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg (Germany); Miethe, Peter [SENOVA GmbH, Jena (Germany); Oster, Juergen [chemagen GmbH, Baesweiler (Germany); Keusgen, Michael [Institute for Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg (Germany)]. E-mail: Keusgen@staff.uni-marburg.de

    2007-04-15

    A biosensor that uses resonant coils with a special frequency-mixing technique and magnetic beads as detectable labels has been established for the detection of Francisella tularensis, the causative agent for tularemia. The detection principle is based on a sandwich immunoassay using an anti-Ft antibody for immunofiltration immobilized to ABICAP[reg] polyethylene filters, and biotinylated with streptavidin-coated magnetic beads as labels. The linear detection range of this biosensor was found to be 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} cfu F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) per ml. Tested sample matrices were physiological PBS buffer and rabbit serum.

  2. Generalized Optical Theorem Detection in Random and Complex Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Jing

    The problem of detecting changes of a medium or environment based on active, transmit-plus-receive wave sensor data is at the heart of many important applications including radar, surveillance, remote sensing, nondestructive testing, and cancer detection. This is a challenging problem because both the change or target and the surrounding background medium are in general unknown and can be quite complex. This Ph.D. dissertation presents a new wave physics-based approach for the detection of targets or changes in rather arbitrary backgrounds. The proposed methodology is rooted on a fundamental result of wave theory called the optical theorem, which gives real physical energy meaning to the statistics used for detection. This dissertation is composed of two main parts. The first part significantly expands the theory and understanding of the optical theorem for arbitrary probing fields and arbitrary media including nonreciprocal media, active media, as well as time-varying and nonlinear scatterers. The proposed formalism addresses both scalar and full vector electromagnetic fields. The second contribution of this dissertation is the application of the optical theorem to change detection with particular emphasis on random, complex, and active media, including single frequency probing fields and broadband probing fields. The first part of this work focuses on the generalization of the existing theoretical repertoire and interpretation of the scalar and electromagnetic optical theorem. Several fundamental generalizations of the optical theorem are developed. A new theory is developed for the optical theorem for scalar fields in nonhomogeneous media which can be bounded or unbounded. The bounded media context is essential for applications such as intrusion detection and surveillance in enclosed environments such as indoor facilities, caves, tunnels, as well as for nondestructive testing and communication systems based on wave-guiding structures. The developed scalar

  3. Cold atom trap with zero residual magnetic field: the ac magneto-optical trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Matthew; Murray, Andrew James

    2008-10-24

    A novel atom trap is described using alternating current to generate the magnetic B field, together with high speed polarization switching of the damping laser field. This combination produces a trap as effective as a standard magneto-optical trap (MOT), with the advantage that the average B field is zero. No net current is hence induced in surrounding conductive elements, and the B field produced by the ac MOT is found to switch off >300 times faster than a conventional MOT. New experiments can hence be performed, including charged particle probing or detection of the cold target ensemble.

  4. Planar Hall effect sensor for magnetic micro- and nanobead detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejsing, L.; Hansen, M. F.; Menon, A. K.; Ferreira, H. A.; Graham, D. L.; Freitas, P. P.

    2004-06-01

    Magnetic bead sensors based on the planar Hall effect in thin films of exchange-biased permalloy have been fabricated and characterized. Typical sensitivities are 3 μV/Oe mA. The sensor response to an applied magnetic field has been measured without and with coatings of commercially available 2 μm and 250 nm magnetic beads used for bioapplications (Micromer-M and Nanomag-D, Micromod, Germany). Detection of both types of beads and single bead detection of 2 μm beads is demonstrated, i.e., the technique is feasible for magnetic biosensors. Single 2 μm beads yield 300 nV signals at 10 mA and 15 Oe applied field.

  5. The optical detection unit for Baikal-GVD neutrino telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avrorin A.D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The first stage of the GVD-cluster composed of five strings was deployed in April 2014. Each string consists of two sections with 12 optical modules per section. A section is the basic detection unit of the Baikal neutrino telescope. We will describe the section design, review its basic elements – optical modules, FADC readout units, slow control and calibration systems, and present selected results for section in-situ tests in Lake Baikal.

  6. Optical detection of radio waves through a nanomechanical transducer

    CERN Document Server

    Bagci, T; Schmid, S; Villanueva, L G; Zeuthen, E; Appel, J; Taylor, J M; Sørensen, A; Usami, K; Schliesser, A; Polzik, E S

    2013-01-01

    Low-loss transmission and sensitive recovery of weak radio-frequency (rf) and microwave signals is an ubiquitous technological challenge, crucial in fields as diverse as radio astronomy, medical imaging, navigation and communication, including those of quantum states. Efficient upconversion of rf-signals to an optical carrier would allow transmitting them via optical fibers dramatically reducing losses, and give access to the mature toolbox of quantum optical techniques, routinely enabling quantum-limited signal detection. Research in the field of cavity optomechanics has shown that nanomechanical oscillators can couple very strongly to either microwave or optical fields. An oscillator accommodating both functionalities would bear great promise as the intermediate platform in a radio-to-optical transduction cascade. Here, we demonstrate such an opto-electro-mechanical transducer utilizing a high-Q nanomembrane. A moderate voltage bias (<10V) is sufficient to induce strong coupling between the voltage fluct...

  7. Coherent population trapping magnetometer by differential detecting magneto-optic rotation effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Yi; Gu, Si-Hong

    2016-09-01

    A pocket coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic magnetometer scheme that uses a vertical cavity surface emitting laser as a light source is proposed and experimentally investigated. Using the differential detecting magneto-optic rotation effect, a CPT spectrum with the background canceled and a high signal-to-noise ratio is obtained. The experimental results reveal that the sensitivity of the proposed scheme can be improved by half an order, and the ability to detect weak magnetic fields is extended one-fold. Therefore, the proposed scheme is suited to realize a pocket-size CPT magnetometer. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11304362 and 61434005).

  8. Photodiode Based Detection for Multiple Trap Optical Tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Dino

    This thesis is concerned with the position tracking of microscopic, optically trapped particles and the quantification of the forces acting on them. A new detection method for simultaneous, three-dimensional tracking of multiple particles is presented, its performance is evaluated, and its...... usefulness is illustrated in specific application examples. Optical traps enable contact-less, all-optical manipulation of microscopic objects. Over the last decades, this laser-based micro-manipulation tool has facilitated numerous exciting discoveries within biology and physics, and it is today regarded...

  9. Efficient Fiber Optic Detection of Trapped Ion Fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    VanDevender, A P; Amini, J; Leibfried, D; Wineland, D J

    2010-01-01

    Integration of fiber optics may play a critical role in the development of quantum information processors based on trapped ions and atoms by enabling scalable collection and delivery of light and coupling trapped ions to optical microcavities. We trap 24Mg+ ions in a surface-electrode Paul trap that includes an integrated optical fiber for detecting 280-nm fluorescence photons. The collection numerical aperture is 0.37 and total collection efficiency is 2.1 %. The ion can be positioned between 80 \\mum and 100 \\mum from the tip of the fiber by use of an adjustable rf-pseudopotential.

  10. Microstructured Optical Fiber for X-ray Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHaven, Stanton L.

    2009-01-01

    A novel scintillating optical fiber is presented using a composite micro-structured quartz optical fiber. Scintillating materials are introduced into the multiple inclusions of the fiber. This creates a composite optical fiber having quartz as a cladding with an organic scintillating material core. X-ray detection using these fibers is compared to a collimated cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. Results show a good correlation between the fiber count rate trend and that of the CdTe detector.

  11. Few Atom Detection and Manipulation Using Optical Nanofibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deasy, Kieran; Watkins, Amy; Morrissey, Michael; Schmidt, Regine; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    We study the coupling of spontaneously emitted photons from laser-cooled 85Rb atoms to the guided modes of an optical nanofibre to demonstrate the potential such fibres offer as tools for detecting and manipulating cold atoms, even when the number of atoms is very small. We also demonstrate the integration of an optical nanofibre into an absorption spectroscopy setup, showcasing the ability of the evanescent field around nanofibres to interact with atoms in close proximity to the fibre. In principle, trapping of single atoms in engineered optical potentials on the surface of the fibre should facilitate entanglement between distant atoms mediated via the guided modes of the nanofibre.

  12. Low Cost Optical Sensing Device for Fuel Detection in Ships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Papadopoulou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present work the development of a new, very low cost, simple to manufacture and use, optical sensing device for remote, on line detection of the type of fuels used in ships, is presented. The main goal of this optical sensing device is the on line detection of the fuel optical absorption that is used by the ship. The basic operating principle of the proposed sensor is based on different absorption in the range of visible spectrum between bunker diesel and fuel oil. Experimental measurements, using monochromatic laser light or white led light, have shown that the proposed sensor can distinguish very accurately the difference between the two types of oil, giving the advantage to detect the type of fuel.

  13. LLNL electro-optical mine detection program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, C.; Aimonetti, W.; Barth, M.; Buhl, M.; Bull, N.; Carter, M.; Clark, G.; Fields, D.; Fulkerson, S.; Kane, R. [and others

    1994-09-30

    Under funding from the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) and the US Marine Corps (USMC), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has directed a program aimed at improving detection capabilities against buried mines and munitions. The program has provided a national test facility for buried mines in arid environments, compiled and distributed an extensive data base of infrared (IR), ground penetrating radar (GPR), and other measurements made at that site, served as a host for other organizations wishing to make measurements, made considerable progress in the use of ground penetrating radar for mine detection, and worked on the difficult problem of sensor fusion as applied to buried mine detection. While the majority of our effort has been concentrated on the buried mine problem, LLNL has worked with the U.S.M.C. on surface mine problems as well, providing data and analysis to support the COBRA (Coastal Battlefield Reconnaissance and Analysis) program. The original aim of the experimental aspect of the program was the utilization of multiband infrared approaches for the detection of buried mines. Later the work was extended to a multisensor investigation, including sensors other than infrared imagers. After an early series of measurements, it was determined that further progress would require a larger test facility in a natural environment, so the Buried Object Test Facility (BOTF) was constructed at the Nevada Test Site. After extensive testing, with sensors spanning the electromagnetic spectrum from the near ultraviolet to radio frequencies, possible paths for improvement were: improved spatial resolution providing better ground texture discrimination; analysis which involves more complicated spatial queueing and filtering; additional IR bands using imaging spectroscopy; the use of additional sensors other than IR and the use of data fusion techniques with multi-sensor data; and utilizing time dependent observables like temperature.

  14. Passive Optical Detection of a Vibrating Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    medium from the incident side without change in frequency; reflectance is the fraction of the incident flux that is reflected.” Nicodemus defines more... differenced the images Figure 2. Bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of spectralon (approximately Lambertian) and grass. (Reprinted...However, we have raised more questions than we have answered. For example, what fraction of the detected intensity modulation is from surface normal

  15. Integrated Micro-Optical Fluorescence Detection System for Microfluidic Electrochromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; ARNOLD,DON W.; ASBILL,RANDOLPH E.; BAILEY,CHRISTOPHER G.; CARTER,TONY RAY; KEMME,SHANALYN A.; MATZKE,CAROLYN M.; SAMORA,SALLY; SWEATT,WILLIAM C.; WARREN,MIAL E.; WENDT,JOEL R.

    1999-09-16

    The authors describe the design and microfabrication of an extremely compact optical system as a key element in an integrated capillary-channel electrochromatograph with laser induced fluorescence detection. The optical design uses substrate-mode propagation within the fused silica substrate. The optical system includes a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) array, two high performance microlenses and a commercial photodetector. The microlenses are multilevel diffractive optics patterned by electron beam lithography and etched by reactive ion etching in fused silica. Two generations of optical subsystems are described. The first generation design is integrated directly onto the capillary channel-containing substrate with a 6 mm separation between the VCSEL and photodetector. The second generation design separates the optical system onto its own module and the source to detector length is further compressed to 3.5 mm. The systems are designed for indirect fluorescence detection using infrared dyes. The first generation design has been tested with a 750 nm VCSEL exciting a 10{sup -4} M solution of CY-7 dye. The observed signal-to-noise ratio of better than 100:1 demonstrates that the background signal from scattered pump light is low despite the compact size of the optical system and meets the system sensitivity requirements.

  16. Tumor margin detection using optical biopsy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Li, Jiyou; Li, Zhongwu; Zhou, Lixin; Chen, Ke; Pu, Yang; He, Yong; Zhu, Ke; Li, Qingbo; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to use the Resonance Raman (RR) and fluorescence spectroscopic technique for tumor margin detection with high accuracy based on native molecular fingerprints of breast and gastrointestinal (GI) tissues. This tumor margins detection method utilizes advantages of RR spectroscopic technique in situ and in real-time to diagnose tumor changes providing powerful tools for clinical guiding intraoperative margin assessments and postoperative treatments. The tumor margin detection procedures by RR spectroscopy were taken by scanning lesion from center or around tumor region in ex-vivo to find the changes in cancerous tissues with the rim of normal tissues using the native molecular fingerprints. The specimens used to analyze tumor margins include breast and GI carcinoma and normal tissues. The sharp margin of the tumor was found by the changes of RR spectral peaks within 2 mm distance. The result was verified using fluorescence spectra with 300 nm, 320 nm and 340 nm excitation, in a typical specimen of gastric cancerous tissue within a positive margin in comparison with normal gastric tissues. This study demonstrates the potential of RR and fluorescence spectroscopy as new approaches with labeling free to determine the intraoperative margin assessment.

  17. Researches on Magnetic Localization for Detecting Capsule in Gastrointestinal Tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Wen-hui; YAN Guo-zheng; GUO Xu-dong; WANG Kun-dong

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the capsule detection for examination of gastrointestinal (GI) tract became a novel noninvasive system, but it was still a problem for capsule's location.This paper examined various technologies used for measuring position based on magnetic method of the capsule in GI tract, while some new methods were investigated and their efficiency and complexity were analyzed.The results show that the radio frequency location is only practicable, but the tri-coil stimulating magnetic method and magnetic marker method can help to acquire a high precise, simplified, efficient and localized device.

  18. Magnetic focusing immunosensor for the detection of Salmonella typhimurium in foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivarnik, Philip E.; Cao, He; Letcher, Stephen V.; Pierson, Arthur H.; Rand, Arthur G.

    1999-01-01

    From 1988 through 1992 Salmonellosis accounted for 27% of the total reported foodborne disease outbreaks and 57% of the outbreaks in which the pathogen was identified. The prevalence of Salmonellosis and the new requirements to monitor the organism as a marker in pathogen reduction programs will drive the need for rapid, on-site testing. A compact fiber optic fluorometer using a red diode laser as an excitation source and fiber probes for analyte detection has been constructed and used to measure Salmonella. The organisms were isolated with anti-Salmonella magnetic beads and were labeled with a secondary antibody conjugated to a red fluorescent dye. The response of the system was proportional to the concentration of Salmonella typhimurium from 3.2 X 105 colony forming units (CFU)/ml to 1.6 X 107 CFU/ml. The system was developed to utilize a fiber-optic magnetic focusing problem that attracted the magnetic microspheres to the surface of a sample chamber directly in front of the excitation and emission fibers. The signal obtained from a homogenous suspension of fluorescent magnetic microspheres was 9 to 10 picowatts. After focusing, the signal from the fluorescent labeled magnetic microspheres increased to 200 picowatts, approximately 20 times greater than the homogeneous suspension. The magnetic focusing assay detected 1.59 X 105 colony forming units/ml of Salmonella typhimurium cultured in growth media. The process of magnetic focusing in front of the fibers has the potential to reduce the background fluorescence from unbound secondary antibodies, eliminating several rinsing steps, resulting in a simple rapid assay.

  19. Optically-detected spin-echo method for relaxation times measurements in a Rb atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharavipour, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Radojičić, I. S.; Krmpot, A. J.; Jelenković, B. M.; Mileti, G.

    2017-06-01

    We introduce and demonstrate an experimental method, optically-detected spin-echo (ODSE), to measure ground-state relaxation times of a rubidium (Rb) atomic vapor held in a glass cell with buffer-gas. The work is motivated by our studies on high-performance Rb atomic clocks, where both population and coherence relaxation times (T 1 and T 2, respectively) of the ‘clock transition’ (52S1/2 | {F}g = 1,{m}F=0> ≤ftrightarrow | {F}g=2,{m}F=0> ) are relevant. Our ODSE method is inspired by classical nuclear magnetic resonance spin-echo method, combined with optical detection. In contrast to other existing methods, like continuous-wave double-resonance (CW-DR) and Ramsey-DR, principles of the ODSE method allow suppression of decoherence arising from the inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field across the vapor cell, thus enabling measurements of intrinsic relaxation rates, as properties of the cell alone. Our experimental result for the coherence relaxation time, specific for the clock transition, measured with the ODSE method is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction, and the ODSE results are validated by comparison to those obtained with Franzen, CW-DR and Ramsey-DR methods. The method is of interest for a wide variety of quantum optics experiments with optical signal readout.

  20. Highly sensitive detection of protein biomarkers via nuclear magnetic resonance biosensor with magnetically engineered nanoferrite particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeun, Minhong; Park, Sungwook; Lee, Hakho; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    Magnetic-based biosensors are attractive for on-site detection of biomarkers due to the low magnetic susceptibility of biological samples. Here, we report a highly sensitive magnetic-based biosensing system that is composed of a miniaturized nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) device and magnetically engineered nanoferrite particles (NFPs). The sensing performance, also identified as the transverse relaxation (R2) rate, of the NMR device is directly related to the magnetic properties of the NFPs. Therefore, we developed magnetically engineered NFPs (MnMg-NFP) and used them as NMR agents to exhibit a significantly improved R2 rate. The magnetization of the MnMg-NFPs was increased by controlling the Mn and Mg cation concentration and distribution during the synthesis process. This modification of the Mn and Mg cation directly contributed to improving the R2 rate. The miniaturized NMR system, combined with the magnetically engineered MnMg-NFPs, successfully detected a small amount of infectious influenza A H1N1 nucleoprotein with high sensitivity and stability.

  1. Improved Imaging of Magnetically Labeled Cells Using Rotational Magnetomotive Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Cimalla

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a reliable and robust method for magnetomotive optical coherence tomography (MM-OCT imaging of single cells labeled with iron oxide particles. This method employs modulated longitudinal and transverse magnetic fields to evoke alignment and rotation of anisotropic magnetic structures in the sample volume. Experimental evidence suggests that magnetic particles assemble themselves in elongated chains when exposed to a permanent magnetic field. Magnetomotion in the intracellular space was detected and visualized by means of 3D OCT as well as laser speckle reflectometry as a 2D reference imaging method. Our experiments on mesenchymal stem cells embedded in agar scaffolds show that the magnetomotive signal in rotational MM-OCT is significantly increased by a factor of ~3 compared to previous pulsed MM-OCT, although the solenoid’s power consumption was 16 times lower. Finally, we use our novel method to image ARPE-19 cells, a human retinal pigment epithelium cell line. Our results permit magnetomotive imaging with higher sensitivity and the use of low power magnetic fields or larger working distances for future three-dimensional cell tracking in target tissues and organs.

  2. Application of binary optical element to infrared hyperspectral detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Qiang(孙强); YU; Bin(于斌); LIU; Yuling(刘玉玲); LU; Zhenwu(卢振武); CHEN; Bo(陈波); WANG; Zhaoqi(王肇圻); MU; Guoguang(母国光)

    2003-01-01

    Binary optical element (BOE) is applied to infrared hyperspectral detector. A new type of infrared hyperspectral detecting image system is designed based on the characteristics of abundant color-dispersion of BOE, and an example of combining refractive-diffractive zoom optical system with Cassegrain system is presented. The system not only has simple structure, long back-working distance and few requirements for material but also can increase the image resolution, abilities of accepting ray energy and registration. Consequently, by adding an appropriate stare array detector to the system, the detecting precision can be raised.

  3. Optical detection of terahertz using nonlinear parametric upconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M Jalal; Chen, Jerry C; Kaushik, Sumanth

    2008-12-01

    We extend our work to perform sensitive, room-temperature optical detection of terahertz (THz) by using nonlinear parametric upconversion. THz radiation at 700 GHz is mixed with pump light at 1,550 nm in a bulk GaAs crystal to generate an idler wave at 1,555.6 nm. The idler is separated, coupled into optical fiber, and detected using a gated Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode. The resulting THz detector has a power sensitivity of 4.5 pW/Hz and a timing resolution of 1 ns.

  4. Digital lock-in detection of site-specific magnetism in magnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskel, Daniel; Lang, Jonathan C.; Srajer, George

    2008-07-22

    The polarization and diffraction characteristics of x-rays incident upon a magnetic material are manipulated to provide a desired magnetic sensitivity in the material. The contrast in diffracted intensity of opposite helicities of circularly polarized x-rays is measured to permit separation of magnetic signals by element type and by atomic environment. This allows for the direct probing of magnetic signals from elements of the same species in nonequivalent atomic environments to better understand the behavior and characteristics of permanent magnetic materials. By using known crystallographic information together with manipulation of the polarization of x-rays having energies tuned near element-specific electronic excitations and by detecting and comparing the incident and diffracted photons at the same frequency, more accurate magnetic measurements can be made over shorter observation periods.

  5. Detection of Target ssDNA Using a Microfabricated Hall Magnetometer with Correlated Optical Readout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Hira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensing biological agents at the genomic level, while enhancing the response time for biodetection over commonly used, optics-based techniques such as nucleic acid microarrays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs, is an important criterion for new biosensors. Here, we describe the successful detection of a 35-base, single-strand nucleic acid target by Hall-based magnetic transduction as a mimic for pathogenic DNA target detection. The detection platform has low background, large signal amplification following target binding and can discriminate a single, 350 nm superparamagnetic bead labeled with DNA. Detection of the target sequence was demonstrated at 364 pM (<2 target DNA strands per bead target DNA in the presence of 36 μM nontarget (noncomplementary DNA (<10 ppm target DNA using optical microscopy detection on a GaAs Hall mimic. The use of Hall magnetometers as magnetic transduction biosensors holds promise for multiplexing applications that can greatly improve point-of-care (POC diagnostics and subsequent medical care.

  6. Optical biopsy - a new armamentarium to detect disease using light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yang; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    Optical spectroscopy has been considered a promising method for cancer detection for past thirty years because of its advantages over the conventional diagnostic methods of no tissue removal, minimal invasiveness, rapid diagnoses, less time consumption and reproducibility since the first use in 1984. It offers a new armamentarium. Human tissue is mainly composed of extracellular matrix of collagen fiber, proteins, fat, water, and epithelial cells with key molecules in different structures. Tissues contain a number of key fingerprint native endogenous fluorophore molecules, such as tryptophan, collagen, elastin, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and porphyrins. It is well known that abnormalities in metabolic activity precede the onset of a lot of main diseases: carcinoma, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer, and Parkinson's disease, etc. Optical spectroscopy may help in detecting various disorders. Conceivably the biochemical or morphologic changes that cause the spectra variations would appear earlier than the histological aberration. Therefore, "optical biopsy" holds a great promise as clinical tool for diagnosing early stage of carcinomas and other deceases by combining with available photonic technology (e.g. optical fibers, photon detectors, spectrographs spectroscopic ratiometer, fiber-optic endomicroscope and nasopharyngoscope) for in vivo use. This paper focuses on various methods available to detect spectroscopic changes in tissues, for example to distinguish cancerous prostate tissues and/or cells from normal prostate tissues and/or cells. The methods to be described are fluorescence, stokes shift, scattering, Raman, and time-resolved spectroscopy will be reviewed. The underlying physical and biological basis for these optical approaches will be discussed with examples. The idea is to present some of the salient works to show the usefulness and methods of Optical Biopsy for cancer detection and

  7. Vector magneto-optical sensor based on transparent magnetic films with cubic crystallographic symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogachev, A. E.; Vetoshko, P. M.; Gusev, N. A.; Kozhaev, M. A.; Prokopov, A. R.; Popov, V. V.; Dodonov, D. V.; Shumilov, A. G.; Shaposhnikov, A. N.; Berzhansky, V. N.; Zvezdin, A. K.; Belotelov, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    The concept of vector magneto-optical magnetometry is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The key element of the vector magnetometer is a transparent high Faraday activity magnetic film with a cubic crystal lattice. Magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the film leads to the three dimensional trajectory of the film magnetization when the magnetization is rotated by the control magnetic field. It makes the magnetization sensitive to all three components of the external magnetic field. This field can be found from the harmonic composition of the Faraday rotation dependence on the azimuth angle of the control magnetic field. The demonstrated vector magnetometer is promising for mapping and visualization of ultra small magnetic fields.

  8. Methods to detect faulty splices in the superconducting magnet system of the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, R.; Bellesia, B.; Lasheras, N.Catalan; Dahlerup-Petersen, K.; Denz, R.; Robles, C.; Koratzinos, M.; Pojer, M.; Ponce, L.; Saban, R.; Schmidt, R.; /CERN /Fermilab /Moscow, INR /Cracow, INP

    2009-05-01

    The incident of 19 September 2008 at the LHC was caused by a faulty inter-magnet splice of about 200 n{Omega} resistance. Cryogenic and electrical techniques have been developed to detect other abnormal splices, either between or inside the magnets. The existing quench protection system can be used to detect internal splices with R > 20 n{Omega}. Since this system does not cover the bus between magnets, the cryogenic system is used to measure the rate of temperature rise due to ohmic heating. Accuracy of a few mK/h, corresponding to a few Watts, has been achieved, allowing detection of excess resistance, if it is more than 40 n{Omega} in a cryogenic subsector (two optical cells). Follow-up electrical measurements are made in regions identified by the cryogenic system. These techniques have detected two abnormal internal magnet splices of 100 n{Omega} and 50 n{Omega} respectively. In 2009, this ad hoc system will be replaced with a permanent one to monitor all splices at the n{Omega} level.

  9. Methods to detect faulty splices in the superconducting magnet system of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, R; Catalan Lasheras, N; Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Denz, R; Robles, C; Koratzinos, M; Pojer, M; Ponce, L; Saban, R; Schmidt, R; Siemko, A; Solfaroli Camillocci, M; Thiesen, H; Vergara Fernandez, A; Flora, R H; Charifoulline, Z; Bednarek, M; Górnicki, E; Jurkiewicz, P; Kapusta, P; Strait, J

    2010-01-01

    The incident of 19 September 2008 at the LHC was caused by a faulty inter-magnet splice of about 200 nΩ resistance. Cryogenic and electrical techniques have been developed to detect other abnormal splices, either between or inside the magnets. The existing quench protection system can be used to detect internal splices with R>20 nΩ. Since this system does not cover the bus between magnets, the cryogenic system is used to measure the rate of temperature rise due to ohmic heating. Accuracy of a few mK/h, corresponding to a few Watts, has been achieved, allowing detection of excess resistance, if it is more than 40 nΩ in a cryogenic subsector (two optical cells). Follow-up electrical measurements are made in regions identified by the cryogenic system. These techniques have detected two abnormal internal magnet splices of 100 nΩ and 50 nΩ respectively. In 2009, this ad hoc system will be replaced with a permanent one to monitor all splices at the nΩ level.

  10. Fingerprint fake detection by optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Sven; Breithaupt, Ralph; Koch, Edmund

    2013-03-01

    The most established technique for the identification at biometric access control systems is the human fingerprint. While every human fingerprint is unique, fingerprints can be faked very easily by using thin layer fakes. Because commercial fingerprint scanners use only a two-dimensional image acquisition of the finger surface, they can only hardly differentiate between real fingerprints and fingerprint fakes applied on thin layer materials. A Swept Source OCT system with an A-line rate of 20 kHz and a lateral and axial resolution of approximately 13 μm, a centre wavelength of 1320 nm and a band width of 120 nm (FWHM) was used to acquire fingerprints and finger tips with overlying fakes. Three-dimensional volume stacks with dimensions of 4.5 mm x 4 mm x 2 mm were acquired. The layering arrangement of the imaged finger tips and faked finger tips was analyzed and subsequently classified into real and faked fingerprints. Additionally, sweat gland ducts were detected and consulted for the classification. The manual classification between real fingerprints and faked fingerprints results in almost 100 % correctness. The outer as well as the internal fingerprint can be recognized in all real human fingers, whereby this was not possible in the image stacks of the faked fingerprints. Furthermore, in all image stacks of real human fingers the sweat gland ducts were detected. The number of sweat gland ducts differs between the test persons. The typical helix shape of the ducts was observed. In contrast, in images of faked fingerprints we observe abnormal layer arrangements and no sweat gland ducts connecting the papillae of the outer fingerprint and the internal fingerprint. We demonstrated that OCT is a very useful tool to enhance the performance of biometric control systems concerning attacks by thin layer fingerprint fakes.

  11. Flexible-rate optical packet generation/detection and label swapping for optical label switching networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhongying; Li, Juhao; Tian, Yu; Ge, Dawei; Zhu, Paikun; Chen, Yuanxiang; Chen, Zhangyuan; He, Yongqi

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, optical label switching (OLS) gains lots of attentions due to its intrinsic advantages to implement protocol, bit-rate, granularity and data format transparency packet switching. In this paper, we propose a novel scheme to realize flexible-rate optical packet switching for OLS networks. At the transmitter node, flexible-rate packet is generated by parallel modulating different combinations of optical carriers generated from the optical multi-carrier generator (OMCG), among which the low-speed optical label occupies one carrier. At the switching node, label is extracted and re-generated in label processing unit (LPU). The payloads are switched based on routing information and new label is added after switching. At the receiver node, another OMCG serves as local oscillators (LOs) for optical payloads coherent detection. The proposed scheme offers good flexibility for dynamic optical packet switching by adjusting the payload bandwidth and could also effectively reduce the number of lasers, modulators and receivers for packet generation/detection. We present proof-of-concept demonstrations of flexible-rate packet generation/detection and label swapping in 12.5 GHz grid. The influence of crosstalk for cascaded label swapping is also investigated.

  12. Optical biosensor for simultaneous detection of captan and organophosphorus compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Young-Kee; Oh, Byung-Keun; Song, Sun-Young; Lee, Won Hong

    2003-05-01

    The optical biosensor consisting of GST and acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-immobilized gel film was developed to detect captan and organophosphorus compounds simultaneously in contaminated water. The sensing scheme was based on the measurement of decrease of products formation (s-(2,4-dinitrobenzene) glutathione and alpha-naphthol by GST and AChE, respectively) due to the inhibition by captan and organophosphorus compounds. The absorbance of s-(2,4-dinitrobenzene) glutathione and alpha-naphthol was detected at 400 and 500 nm, respectively, by a proposed optical biosensor system. It was observed that AChE was inhibited by both captan and organophosphorus compounds, and GST was inhibited only by captan. The simultaneous detection and quantification of captan and organophosphorus compounds could be successfully achieved by the proposed sensor system. The proposed biosensor could successfully detect the captan and organophosphorus compounds concentration from 0 to 2 ppm.

  13. Detection of Abnormal Events via Optical Flow Feature Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel algorithm is proposed to detect abnormal events in video streams. The algorithm is based on the histogram of the optical flow orientation descriptor and the classification method. The details of the histogram of the optical flow orientation descriptor are illustrated for describing movement information of the global video frame or foreground frame. By combining one-class support vector machine and kernel principal component analysis methods, the abnormal events in the current frame can be detected after a learning period characterizing normal behaviors. The difference abnormal detection results are analyzed and explained. The proposed detection method is tested on benchmark datasets, then the experimental results show the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  14. In vivo imaging of melanoma-implanted magnetic nanoparticles using contrast-enhanced magneto-motive optical Doppler tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Park, Kibeom; Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun

    2016-06-01

    We conducted an initial feasibility study using real-time magneto-motive optical Doppler tomography (MM-ODT) with enhanced contrast to investigate the detection of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) magnetic nanoparticles implanted into in vivo melanoma tissue. The MM-ODT signals were detected owing to the phase shift of the implanted magnetic nanoparticles, which occurred due to the action of an applied magnetic field. An amplifier circuit-based solenoid was utilized for generating high-intensity oscillating magnetic fields. The MM-ODT system was confirmed as an effective in vivo imaging method for detecting melanoma tissue, with the performance comparable to those of conventional optical coherence tomography and optical Doppler tomography methods. Moreover, the optimal values of the SPIO nanoparticles concentration and solenoid voltage for obtaining the uppermost Doppler velocity were derived as well. To improve the signal processing speed for real-time imaging, we adopted multithread programming techniques and optimized the signal path. The results suggest that this imaging modality can be used as a powerful tool to identify the intracellular and extracellular SPIO nanoparticles in melanoma tissues in vivo.

  15. A system for respiratory motion detection using optical fibers embedded into textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, L T; Weber, S; Honda, Y; Thiel, T; Narbonneau, F; Luth, T C

    2008-01-01

    In this contribution, a first prototype for mobile respiratory motion detection using optical fibers embedded into textiles is presented. The developed system consists of a T-shirt with an integrated fiber sensor and a portable monitoring unit with a wireless communication link enabling the data analysis and visualization on a PC. A great effort is done worldwide to develop mobile solutions for health monitoring of vital signs for patients needing continuous medical care. Wearable, comfortable and smart textiles incorporating sensors are good approaches to solve this problem. In most of the cases, electrical sensors are integrated, showing significant limits such as for the monitoring of anaesthetized patients during Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). OFSETH (Optical Fibre Embedded into technical Textile for Healthcare) uses optical sensor technologies to extend the current capabilities of medical technical textiles.

  16. LHC Optics Measurement with Proton Tracks Detected by the Roman Pots of the TOTEM Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00062364; Aspell, P; Atanassov, I; Avati, V; Baechler, J; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Bossini, E; Bottigli, U; Bozzo, M; Brücken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F S; Catanesi, M G; Covault, C; Csanád, M; Csörgö, T; Deile, M; Doubek, M; Eggert, K; Eremin, V; Ferro, F; Fiergolski, A; Garcia, F; Georgiev, V; Giani, S; Grzanka, L; Hammerbauer, J; Heino, J; Hilden, T; Karev, A; Kašpar, J; Kopal, J; Kundrát, V; Lami, S; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Leszko, T; Lippmaa, E; Lippmaa, J; Lokajíček, M V; Losurdo, L; Lo Vetere, M; Lucas Rodríguez, F; Macrí, M; Mäki, T; Mercadante, A; Minafra, N; Minutoli, S; Nemes, F; Niewiadomski, H; Oliveri, E; Oljemark, F; Orava, R; Oriunno, M; Österberg, K; Palazzi, P; Peroutka, Z; Procházka, J; Quinto, M; Radermacher, E; Radicioni, E; Ravotti, F; Robutti, E; Ropelewski, L; Ruggiero, G; Saarikko, H; Scribano, A; Smajek, J; Snoeys, W; Sziklai, J; Taylor, C; Turini, N; Vacek, V; Welti, J; Whitmore, J; Wyszkowski, P; Zielinski, K

    2014-10-28

    Precise knowledge of the beam optics at the LHC is crucial to fulfil the physics goals of the TOTEM experiment, where the kinematics of the scattered protons is reconstructed with the near-beam telescopes -- so-called Roman Pots (RP). Before being detected, the protons' trajectories are influenced by the magnetic fields of the accelerator lattice. Thus precise understanding of the proton transport is of key importance for the experiment. A novel method of optics evaluation is proposed which exploits kinematical distributions of elastically scattered protons observed in the RPs. Theoretical predictions, as well as Monte Carlo studies, show that the residual uncertainty of this optics estimation method is smaller than 0.25 percent.

  17. Periodic Optical Variability of Radio Detected Ultracool Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, Leon K; Boyle, Richard P; Golden, Aaron; Singh, Navtej; Sheehan, Brendan; Zavala, Robert T; Butler, Ray F

    2013-01-01

    A fraction of very low mass stars and brown dwarfs are known to be radio active, in some cases producing periodic pulses. Extensive studies of two such objects have also revealed optical periodic variability and the nature of this variability remains unclear. Here we report on multi-epoch optical photometric monitoring of six radio detected dwarfs, spanning the $\\sim$M8 - L3.5 spectral range, conducted to investigate the ubiquity of periodic optical variability in radio detected ultracool dwarfs. This survey is the most sensitive ground-based study carried out to date in search of periodic optical variability from late-type dwarfs, where we obtained 250 hours of monitoring, delivering photometric precision as low as $\\sim$0.15%. Five of the six targets exhibit clear periodicity, in all cases likely associated with the rotation period of the dwarf, with a marginal detection found for the sixth. Our data points to a likely association between radio and optical periodic variability in late-M/early-L dwarfs, alth...

  18. Rolled-up magnetic sensor: nanomembrane architecture for in-flow detection of magnetic objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönch, Ingolf; Makarov, Denys; Koseva, Radinka; Baraban, Larysa; Karnaushenko, Daniil; Kaiser, Claudia; Arndt, Karl-Friedrich; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2011-09-27

    Detection and analysis of magnetic nanoobjects is a crucial task in modern diagnostic and therapeutic techniques applied to medicine and biology. Accomplishment of this task calls for the development and implementation of electronic elements directly in fluidic channels, which still remains an open and nontrivial issue. Here, we present a novel concept based on rolled-up nanotechnology for fabrication of multifunctional devices, which can be straightforwardly integrated into existing fluidic architectures. We apply strain engineering to roll-up a functional nanomembrane consisting of a magnetic sensor element based on [Py/Cu](30) multilayers, revealing giant magnetoresistance (GMR). The comparison of the sensor's characteristics before and after the roll-up process is found to be similar, allowing for a reliable and predictable method to fabricate high-quality ultracompact GMR devices. The performance of the rolled-up magnetic sensor was optimized to achieve high sensitivity to weak magnetic fields. We demonstrate that the rolled-up tube itself can be efficiently used as a fluidic channel, while the integrated magnetic sensor provides an important functionality to detect and respond to a magnetic field. The performance of the rolled-up magnetic sensor for the in-flow detection of ferromagnetic CrO(2) nanoparticles embedded in a biocompatible polymeric hydrogel shell is highlighted.

  19. Coherent optical ultrasound detection with rare-earth ion dopants

    CERN Document Server

    Tay, Jian Wei; Longdell, Jevon

    2010-01-01

    We describe theoretical and experimental demonstration for optical detection of ultrasound using a spectral hole engraved in cryogenically cooled rare-earth ion doped solids. Our method utilizes the dispersion effects due to the spectral hole to perform phase to amplitude modulation conversion. Like previous approaches using spectral holes it has the advantage of detection with large \\'etendue. The method also has the benefit that high sensitivity can be obtained with moderate absorption contrast for the spectral holes.

  20. Processing of Graphene combining Optical Detection and Scanning Probe Lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmermann Sören

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental setup tailored for robotic processing of graphene with in-situ vision based control. A robust graphene detection approach is presented applying multiple image processing operations of the visual feedback provided by a high-resolution light microscope. Detected graphene flakes can be modified using a scanning probe based lithographical process that is directly linked to the in-situ optical images. The results of this process are discussed with respect to further application scenarios.

  1. Parametric studies of magnetic-optic imaging using finite-element models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, C.; Udpa, L.; Xuan, L.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Thorne, D.; Shih, W.

    2000-05-01

    Magneto-optic imaging is a relatively new sensor application of bubble memory technology to NDI. The Magneto-Optic Imager (MOI) uses a magneto-optic (MO) sensor to produce analog images of magnetic flux leakage from surface and subsurface defects. The flux leakage is produced by eddy current induction techniques in nonferrous metals and magnetic yokes are used in ferromagnetic materials. The technique has gained acceptance in the aircraft maintenance industry for use to detect surface-breaking cracks and corrosion. Until recently, much of the MOI development has been empirical in nature since the electromagnetic processes that produce images are rather complex. The availability of finite element techniques to numerically solve Maxwell's equations, in conjunction with MOI observations, allows greater understanding of the capabilities of the instrument. In this paper, we present a systematic set of finite element calculations along with MOI measurements on specific defects to quantify the current capability of the MOI as well as its desired performance. Parametric studies including effects of liftoff and proximity of edges are also studied.—This material is based upon work supported by the Federal Aviation Administration under Contract #DTFA03-98-D-00008, Delivery Order #IA013 and performed at Iowa State University's Center for NDE as part of the Center for Aviation Systems Reliability program.

  2. Integrated optical biosensor for rapid detection of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathesz, Anna; Valkai, Sándor; Újvárosy, Attila; Aekbote, Badri; Sipos, Orsolya; Stercz, Balázs; Kocsis, Béla; Szabó, Dóra; Dér, András

    2016-02-01

    In medical diagnostics, rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria from body fluids is one of the basic issues. Most state-of-the-art methods require optical labeling, increasing the complexity, duration and cost of the analysis. Therefore, there is a strong need for developing selective sensory devices based on label-free techniques, in order to increase the speed, and reduce the cost of detection. In a recent paper, we have shown that an integrated optical Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a highly sensitive all-optical device made of a cheap photopolymer, can be used as a powerful lab-on-a-chip tool for specific, labelfree detection of proteins. By proper modifications of this technique, our interferometric biosensor was combined with a microfluidic system allowing the rapid and specific detection of bacteria from solutions, having the surface of the sensor functionalized by bacterium-specific antibodies. The experiments proved that the biosensor was able to detect Escherichia coli bacteria at concentrations of 106 cfu/ml within a few minutes, that makes our device an appropriate tool for fast, label-free detection of bacteria from body fluids such as urine or sputum. On the other hand, possible applications of the device may not be restricted to medical microbiology, since bacterial identification is an important task in microbial forensics, criminal investigations, bio-terrorism threats and in environmental studies, as well.

  3. Real-Time Detection of Optical Transients with RAPTOR

    CERN Document Server

    Borozdin, K N; Galassi, M; McGowan, K; Starr, D; Vestrand, W T; White, R; Wozniak, P R; Wren, J; Borozdin, Konstantin; Brumby, Steven; Galassi, Mark; Gowan, Katherine Mc; Starr, Dan; White, Robert; Wozniak, Przemyslaw; Wren, James

    2002-01-01

    Fast variability of optical objects is an interesting though poorly explored subject in modern astronomy. Real-time data processing and identification of transient celestial events in the images is very important for such study as it allows rapid follow-up with more sensitive instruments. We discuss an approach which we have developed for the RAPTOR project, a pioneering closed-loop system combining real-time transient detection with rapid follow-up. RAPTOR's data processing pipeline is able to identify and localize an optical transient within seconds after the observation. The testing we performed so far have been confirming the effectiveness of our method for the optical transient detection. The software pipeline we have developed for RAPTOR can easily be applied to the data from other experiments.

  4. Pyridine Vapors Detection by an Optical Fibre Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Fernandez-Gutiérrez

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available An optical fibre sensor has been implemented towards pyridine vapors detection;to achieve this, a novel vapochromic material has been used, which, in solid state, suffers achange in colour from blue to pink-white in presence of pyridine vapours. This complex isadded to a solution of PVC (Poly Vinyl Chloride, TBP (Tributylphosphate andtetrahydrofuran (THF, forming a plasticized matrix; by dip coating technique, the sensingmaterial is fixed onto a cleaved ended optical fibre. The fabrication process was optimizedin terms of number of dips and dipping speed, evaluating the final devices by dynamicrange. Employing a reflection set up, the absorbance spectra and changes in the reflectedoptical power of the sensors were registered to determine their response. A linear relationbetween optical power versus vapor concentration was obtained, with a detection limit of 1ppm (v/v.

  5. Detailed noise statistics for an optically preamplified direct detection receiver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Søren Lykke; Mikkelsen, Benny; Durhuus, Terji

    1995-01-01

    We describe the exact statistics of an optically preamplified direct detection receiver by means of the moment generating function. The theory allows an arbitrary shaped electrical filter in the receiver circuit. The moment generating function (MGF) allows for a precise calculation of the error...

  6. Optical heterodyne detected velocity modulation molecular ionic spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Guanglong; YANG Xiaohua; YING Xuping; LIU Gang; HUANG Yunxia; CHEN Yangqin

    2004-01-01

    Optical heterodyne detected velocity modulation molecular ionic spectroscopy is presented and employed to observe the rovibrantional spectra of and That the lineshape of OH-VMS is of the second derivative of Gaussian profile and its sensitivity is 3.5×10-8 are theoretically analyzed, and they are both in good agreement with our experimental results.

  7. Improved axial position detection in optical tweezers measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Jakob Kisbye; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Oddershede, Lene

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the axial position detection of a trapped microsphere in an optical trap by using a quadrant photodiode. By replacing the photodiode with a CCD camera, we obtain detailed information on the light scattered by the microsphere. The correlation of the interference pattern with the axial...

  8. Prospects of Optical Single Atom Detection for Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaideep

    2015-10-01

    We will discuss the prospects of optically detecting single atoms captured in a cryogenic thin film of a noble gas such as neon. This proposed detection scheme, when coupled with a recoil separator, could be used to measure rare nuclear reactions relevant for nuclear astrophysics. In particular, we will focus on the 22Ne(α, n)25Mg reaction, which is an important source of neutrons for the s-process. Noble gas solids are an attractive medium because they are optically transparent and provide efficient, pure, stable, & chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of atomic and molecular species. Atoms embedded inside of noble gas solids have a fluorescence spectrum that is often significantly shifted from its absorption spectrum. This makes possible the detection of individual fluorescence photons against a background of intense excitation light, which can be suppressed using the appropriate optical filters. We will report on our efforts to optically detect single Yb atoms in solid Ne. Yb is an ideal candidate for initial studies because it emits a strong green fluorescence when excited by blue light and it has an atomic structure that very closely resembles that of Mg. This work is supported by funds from Michigan State University.

  9. A nonenzymatic optical immunoassay strategy for detection of Salmonella infection based on blue silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qian; Zhao, Guangying; Dou, Wenchao

    2015-10-22

    A novel nonenzymatic optical immunoassay strategy was for the first time designed and utilized for sensitive detection of antibody to Salmonella pullorum and Salmonella gallinarum (S. pullorum and S. gallinarum) in serum. The optical immunoassay strategy was based on blue silica nanoparticles (Blue-SiNps) and magnetic beads (MB). To construct such an optical immunoassay system, the Blue-SiNPs were first synthesized by inverse microemulsion method, characterized by SEM, Zeta potential and FTIR. Two nanostructures including Blue-SiNPs and MB were both functionalized with antibody against S. pullorum and S. gallinarum (anti-PG) without using enzyme labeled antibody. Anti-PG functionalized blue silica nanoparticles (IgG-Blue-SiNps) were used as signal transduction labels, while anti-PG functionalized magnetic beads (IgG-MB) were selected to separate and enrich the final sandwich immune complexes. In the process of detecting negative serum, a sandwich immunocomplex is formed between the IgG-MB and IgG-Blue-SiNPs. With the separation of the immunocomplex using an external magnetic field, the final plaque displayed bright blue color. While in the detection of infected serum, IgG-MB and anti-PG formed sandwich immunocomplexes, IgG-Blue-SiNPs were unable to bind to the limited sites of the antigen, and a light brown plaque was displayed in the bottom of microplate well. Stable results were obtained with an incubation time of 60 min at room temperature, and different colors corresponding to different results can be directly detected with naked eye. The reaction of IgG-Blue-SiNPs with S. pullorum was inhibited by 1:100 dilution of positive chicken serum. Such a simple immunoassay holds great potential as sensitive, selective and point-of-care (POC) tool for diagnosis of other biological molecules.

  10. Fiber-optic polarization diversity detection for rotary probe optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Anthony M D; Pahlevaninezhad, Hamid; Yang, Victor X D; Lam, Stephen; MacAulay, Calum; Lane, Pierre

    2014-06-15

    We report a polarization diversity detection scheme for optical coherence tomography with a new, custom, miniaturized fiber coupler with single mode (SM) fiber inputs and polarization maintaining (PM) fiber outputs. The SM fiber inputs obviate matching the optical lengths of the X and Y OCT polarization channels prior to interference and the PM fiber outputs ensure defined X and Y axes after interference. Advantages for this scheme include easier alignment, lower cost, and easier miniaturization compared to designs with free-space bulk optical components. We demonstrate the utility of the detection system to mitigate the effects of rapidly changing polarization states when imaging with rotating fiber optic probes in Intralipid suspension and during in vivo imaging of human airways.

  11. Theory of pulsed reaction yield detected magnetic resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nasibulov, E.A.; Kulik, L.V.; Kaptein, R.; Ivanov, K.L.

    2012-01-01

    We propose pulse sequences for Reaction Yield Detected Magnetic Resonance (RYDMR), which are based on refocusing the zero-quantum coherences in radical pairs by non-selective microwave pulses and using the population of a radical pair singlet spin state as an observable. The new experiments are

  12. A Portable and Autonomous Magnetic Detection Platform for Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés S. Piedade

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a prototype of a platform for biomolecular recognition detection. The system is based on a magnetoresistive biochip that performs biorecognition assays by detecting magnetically tagged targets. All the electronic circuitry for addressing, driving and reading out signals from spin-valve or magnetic tunnel junctions sensors is implemented using off-the-shelf components. Taking advantage of digital signal processing techniques, the acquired signals are processed in real time and transmitted to a digital analyzer that enables the user to control and follow the experiment through a graphical user interface. The developed platform is portable and capable of operating autonomously for nearly eight hours. Experimental results show that the noise level of the described platform is one order of magnitude lower than the one presented by the previously used measurement set-up. Experimental results also show that this device is able to detect magnetic nanoparticles with a diameter of 250 nm at a concentration of about 40 fM. Finally, the biomolecular recognition detection capabilities of the platform are demonstrated by performing a hybridization assay using complementary and non-complementary probes and a magnetically tagged 20mer single stranded DNA target.

  13. Optical Detection of Organic Chemical Biosignatures at Hydrothermal Vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, P. G.; Lane, A. L.; Bhartia, R.; Hug, W. H.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a non-contact, optical life detection instrument that can detect organic chemical biosignatures in a number of different environments, including dry land, shallow aqueous, deep marine or in ice. Hence, the instrument is appropriate as a biosignature survey tool both for Mars exploration or in situ experiments in an ice-covered ocean such as one might wish to explore on Europa. Here, we report the results we obtained on an expedition aboard the Russian oceanographic vessel Akademik Mstislav Keldysh to hydrothermal vent sites in the Pacific Ocean using our life detection instrument MCDUVE, a multichannel, deep ultraviolet excitation fluorescence detector. MCDUVE detected organic material distribution on rocks near the vent, as well as direct detection of organisms, both microbial and microscopic. We also were able to detect organic material issuing directly from vent chimneys, measure the organic signature of the water column as we ascended, and passively observe the emission of light directly from some vents.

  14. Evanescent Wave Fiber Optic Biosensor for Salmonella Detection in Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun K. Bhunia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is a major food-borne pathogen of world-wide concern. Sensitive and rapid detection methods to assess product safety before retail distribution are highly desirable. Since Salmonella is most commonly associated with poultry products, an evanescent wave fiber-optic assay was developed to detect Salmonella in shell egg and chicken breast and data were compared with a time-resolved fluorescence (TRF assay. Anti-Salmonella polyclonal antibody was immobilized onto the surface of an optical fiber using biotin-avidin interactions to capture Salmonella. Alexa Fluor 647-conjugated antibody (MAb 2F-11 was used as the reporter. Detection occurred when an evanescent wave from a laser (635 nm excited the Alexa Fluor and the fluorescence was measured by a laser-spectrofluorometer at 710 nm. The biosensor was specific for Salmonella and the limit of detection was established to be 103 cfu/mL in pure culture and 104 cfu/mL with egg and chicken breast samples when spiked with 102 cfu/mL after 2–6 h of enrichment. The results indicate that the performance of the fiber-optic sensor is comparable to TRF, and can be completed in less than 8 h, providing an alternative to the current detection methods.

  15. Gravitational wave detection with optical lattice atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Kolkowitz, Shimon; Langellier, Nicholas; Lukin, Mikhail D; Walsworth, Ronald L; Ye, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We propose a space-based gravitational wave detector consisting of two spatially separated, drag-free satellites sharing ultra-stable optical laser light over a single baseline. Each satellite contains an optical lattice atomic clock, which serves as a sensitive, narrowband detector of the local frequency of the shared laser light. A synchronized two-clock comparison between the satellites will be sensitive to the effective Doppler shifts induced by incident gravitational waves (GWs) at a level competitive with other proposed space-based GW detectors, while providing complementary features. The detected signal is a differential frequency shift of the shared laser light due to the relative velocity of the satellites, rather than a phase shift arising from the relative satellite positions, and the detection window can be tuned through the control sequence applied to the atoms' internal states. This scheme enables the detection of GWs from continuous, spectrally narrow sources, such as compact binary inspirals, ...

  16. MEMS-based extreme adaptive optics for planet detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macintosh, B A; Graham, J R; Oppenheimer, B; Poyneer, L; Sivaramakrishnan, A; Veran, J

    2005-11-18

    The next major step in the study of extrasolar planets will be the direct detection, resolved from their parent star, of a significant sample of Jupiter-like extrasolar giant planets. Such detection will open up new parts of the extrasolar planet distribution and allow spectroscopic characterization of the planets themselves. Detecting Jovian planets at 5-50 AU scale orbiting nearby stars requires adaptive optics systems and coronagraphs an order of magnitude more powerful than those available today--the realm of ''Extreme'' adaptive optics. We present the basic requirements and design for such a system, the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI.) GPI will require a MEMS-based deformable mirror with good surface quality, 2-4 micron stroke (operated in tandem with a conventional low-order ''woofer'' mirror), and a fully-functional 48-actuator-diameter aperture.

  17. Decoding of digital magnetic recording with longitudinal magnetization of a tape from a magneto-optical image of stray fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisovskii, F. V.; Mansvetova, E. G.

    2017-05-01

    For digital magnetic recording of encoded information with longitudinal magnetization of the tape, the connection between the domain structure of a storage medium and magneto-optical image of its stray fields obtained using a magnetic film with a perpendicular anisotropy and a large Faraday rotation has been studied. For two-frequency binary code without returning to zero, an algorithm is developed, that allows uniquely decoding of the information recorded on the tape based on analysis of an image of stray fields.

  18. On the size-dependent magnetism and all-optical magnetization switching of transition-metal silicide nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glushkov, G. I.; Tuchin, A. V.; Popov, S. V.; Bityutskaya, L. A., E-mail: me144@phys.vsu.ru [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Theoretical investigations of the electronic structure, synthesis, and all-optical magnetization switching of transition-metal silicide nanostructures are reported. The magnetic moment of the nanostructures is studied as a function of the silicide cluster size and configuration. The experimentally demonstrated magnetization switching of nanostructured nickel silicide by circularly polarized light makes it possible to create high-speed storage devices with high density data recording.

  19. Constraining Large-Scale Solar Magnetic Field Models with Optical Coronal Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Davila, J. M.; Jones, S. I.

    2015-12-01

    Scientific success of the Solar Probe Plus (SPP) and Solar Orbiter (SO) missions will depend to a large extent on the accuracy of the available coronal magnetic field models describing the connectivity of plasma disturbances in the inner heliosphere with their source regions. We argue that ground based and satellite coronagraph images can provide robust geometric constraints for the next generation of improved coronal magnetic field extrapolation models. In contrast to the previously proposed loop segmentation codes designed for detecting compact closed-field structures above solar active regions, we focus on the large-scale geometry of the open-field coronal regions located at significant radial distances from the solar surface. Details on the new feature detection algorithms will be presented. By applying the developed image processing methodology to high-resolution Mauna Loa Solar Observatory images, we perform an optimized 3D B-line tracing for a full Carrington rotation using the magnetic field extrapolation code presented in a companion talk by S.Jones at al. Tracing results are shown to be in a good qualitative agreement with the large-scalie configuration of the optical corona. Subsequent phases of the project and the related data products for SSP and SO missions as wwll as the supporting global heliospheric simulations will be discussed.

  20. A subwavelength plasmonic metamolecule exhibiting magnetic-based optical Fano resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Farbod; Monticone, Francesco; Le, Khai Q.; Liu, Xing-Xiang; Hartsfield, Thomas; Alù, Andrea; Li, Xiaoqin

    2013-02-01

    The lack of symmetry between electric and magnetic charges, a fundamental consequence of the small value of the fine-structure constant, is directly related to the weakness of magnetic effects in optical materials. Properly tailored plasmonic nanoclusters have been proposed recently to induce artificial optical magnetism based on the principle that magnetic effects are indistinguishable from specific forms of spatial dispersion of permittivity at optical frequencies. In a different context, plasmonic Fano resonances have generated a great deal of interest, particularly for use in sensing applications that benefit from sharp spectral features and extreme field localization. In the absence of natural magnetism, optical Fano resonances have so far been based on purely electric effects. In this Letter, we demonstrate that a subwavelength plasmonic metamolecule consisting of four closely spaced gold nanoparticles supports a strong magnetic response coupled to a broad electric resonance. Small structural asymmetries in the assembled nanoring enable the interaction between electric and magnetic modes, leading to the first observation of a magnetic-based Fano scattering resonance at optical frequencies. Our findings are supported by excellent agreement with simulations and analytical calculations, and represent an important step towards the quest for artificial magnetism and negative refractive index metamaterials at optical frequencies.

  1. FUZZY FAULT DETECTION FOR PERMANENT MAGNET SYNCHRONOUS GENERATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Selvaganesan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Faults in engineering systems are difficult to avoid and may result in serious consequences. Effective fault detection and diagnosis can improve system reliability and avoid expensive maintenance. In this paper fuzzy system based fault detection scheme for permanent magnet synchronous generator is proposed. The sequence current components like positive and negative sequence currents are used as fault indicators and given as inputs to fuzzy fault detector. Also, the fuzzy inference system is created and rule base is evaluated, relating the sequence current component to the type of faults. These rules are fired for specific changes in sequence current component and the faults are detected. The feasibility of the proposed scheme for permanent magnet synchronous generator is demonstrated for different types of fault under various operating conditions using MATLAB/Simulink.

  2. Ultrafast Radiation Detection by Modulation of an Optical Probe Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernon, S P; Lowry, M E

    2006-02-22

    We describe a new class of radiation sensor that utilizes optical interferometry to measure radiation-induced changes in the optical refractive index of a semiconductor sensor medium. Radiation absorption in the sensor material produces a transient, non-equilibrium, electron-hole pair distribution that locally modifies the complex, optical refractive index of the sensor medium. Changes in the real (imaginary) part of the local refractive index produce a differential phase shift (absorption) of an optical probe used to interrogate the sensor material. In contrast to conventional radiation detectors where signal levels are proportional to the incident energy, signal levels in these optical sensors are proportional to the incident radiation energy flux. This allows for reduction of the sensor form factor with no degradation in detection sensitivity. Furthermore, since the radiation induced, non-equilibrium electron-hole pair distribution is effectively measured ''in place'' there is no requirement to spatially separate and collect the generated charges; consequently, the sensor risetime is of the order of the hot-electron thermalization time {le} 10 fs and the duration of the index perturbation is determined by the carrier recombination time which is of order {approx} 600 fs in, direct-bandgap semiconductors, with a high density of recombination defects; consequently, the optical sensors can be engineered with sub-ps temporal response. A series of detectors were designed, and incorporated into Mach Zehnder and Fabry-Perot interferometer-based detection systems: proof of concept, lower detection sensitivity, Mach-Zehnder detectors were characterized at beamline 6.3 at SSRL; three generations of high sensitivity single element and imaging Fabry-Perot detectors were measured at the LLNL Europa facility. Our results indicate that this technology can be used to provide x-ray detectors and x-ray imaging systems with single x-ray sensitivity and S

  3. A fiber optic biosensor for the detection of TNT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shriver-Lake, L.C.; Breslin, K.A.; Golden, J.P.; Choi, J.; Ligler, F.S. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering; Judd, L. [Geo-Centers Inc., Fort Washington, MD (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Explosives are one of many hazardous waste problems of concern to the Department of Defense. Defective storage facilities or byproducts of weapons manufacture have led to contamination of soil and water with explosives. Most explosives are toxic, thus posing an ecological and human health hazard. The ability to do on-site or down-stream detection of explosives will be invaluable for site characterization and remediation by saving both time and money. The evanescent wave fiber optic biosensor that was developed at NRL has been modified for the detection of trinitrotoluene (TNT), by developing a competitive immunoassay on the surface of an optical probe. A fluorescently-labeled analog of TNT, trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNB), was used as the competitor. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed to determine the best fluorescently-labeled competitor available to be able to achieve high sensitivity in the fiber optic assay. For the competition assay, 7.5 ng/ml Cyanine 5-ethylenediamine-labeled TNB (Cy5-EDA-TNB) was exposed to an antibody-coated optical fiber generating specific signal above background that corresponds to the 100% or reference signal. Inhibition of this signal was observed in the presence of TNT with the percent inhibition proportional to the TNT concentration in the sample. Detection sensitivities in aqueous solutions containing 10 ng/ml TNT (8 ppb) have been achieved using this system.

  4. Fiber optic biosensor for the detection of TNT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriver-Lake, Lisa C.; Breslin, Kristen A.; Golden, Joel P.; Judd, Linda L.; Choi, John; Ligler, Frances S.

    1995-01-01

    Explosives are one of many hazardous waste problems of concern to the Department of Defense. Defective storage facilities or byproducts of weapons manufacture have led to contamination of soil and water with explosives. Most explosives are toxic, thus posing an ecological and human health hazard. The ability to do on-site or down-stream detection of explosives will be invaluable for site characterization and remediation by saving both time and money. The evanescent wave fiber optic biosensor that was developed at NRL has been modified for the detection of trinitrotoluene (TNT), by developing a competitive immunoassay on the surface of an optical probe. A fluorescently labelled analog of TNT, trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNB), was used as the competitor. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed to determine the best fluorescently labeled competitor available to be able to achieve high sensitivity in the fiber optic assay. For the competition assay, 7.5 ng/ml Cyanine 5-ethylenediamine-labelled TNB (Cy5-EDA-TNB) was exposed to an antibody-coated optical fiber generating specific signal above background that corresponds to the 100% or reference signal. Inhibition of this signal was observed in the presence of TNT with the percent inhibition proportional to the TNT concentration in the sample. Detection sensitivities in aqueous solutions containing 10 ng/ml TNT (8 ppb) have been achieved using this system.

  5. Optical and magnetic characterization of theranostic magnetite particles (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cialla-May, Dana; Patze, Sophie; Mueller, Robert; Weber, Karina; Popp, Jürgen

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have a major role as contrast agent in diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring. In order to research on MNP exposition, degradation and elimination of those nano composites as well as the consequences of the MNP exposition in relation with social economic relevant diseases (cancer, infectious diseases), the comprehensive characterization of magnetic and structural properties is of high importance. Within this contribution, the magnetic characterization of theranostic relevant MNPs is introduced. Applying a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), it is found, that the nanocomposites show superparamagnetic behavior and the recorded data confirm iron oxide cores (magnetite/maghemite). Employing Raman spectroscopy, the typical fingerprint information of magnetite is detected. By increasing the laser power, the transition to maghemite and hematite due to the oxidation of the magnetic core is illustrated. Moreover, IR spectroscopy is applied to characterize the coating material e.g. starch or other biocompatible polymers. To determine the stability of MNPs as well as the MNP's elimination under physiological conditions, different buffer systems were tested i.e. simulated body fluid (SBF) and artificial lysosomal fluid (ALF). The investigated MNPs are stable in SBF; thus, the stability in blood after injection of the contrast agent is guaranteed. Finally, the storage in ALF leads to a complete decomposition of the MNPs, which reflects the conditions in lysosomes and guarantee for a fast MNP elimination. Acknowledgement: We thank the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), Germany as well as the Project Management Jülich (PTJ), Germany for funding the research project NanoBEL (03XP0003F).

  6. Magnetic Particle Detection (MPD) for In-Vitro Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minard, Kevin R.; Littke, Matthew H.; Wang, Wei; Xiong, Yijia; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-05-15

    In-vitro tests intended for evaluating the potential health effects of magnetic nanoparticles generally require an accurate measure of cell dose to promote the consistent use and interpretation of biological response. Here, a simple low-cost inductive sensor is developed for quickly determining the total mass of magnetic nanoparticles that is bound to the plasma membrane and internalized by cultured cells. Sensor operation exploits an oscillating magnetic field (f0 = 250 kHz) together with the nonlinear response of particle magnetization to generate a harmonic signal (f3 = 750 kHz) that varies linearly with particulate mass (R2 > 0.999) and is sufficiently sensitive for detecting ~ 100 ng of carboxyl-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles in under a second. When exploited for measuring receptor-mediated nanoparticle uptake in RAW 264.7 macrophages, results show that achieved dosimetry performance is comparable with relatively expensive analytical techniques that are much more time-consuming and labor-intensive to perform. Described sensing is therefore potentially better suited for low-cost in-vitro assays that require fast and quantitative magnetic particle detection.

  7. Optical spectroscopy for the detection of ischemic tissue injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, Stavros [Livermore, CA; Fitzgerald, Jason [Sacramento, CA; Troppmann, Christoph [Sacramento, CA; Michalopoulou, Andromachi [Athens, GR

    2009-09-08

    An optical method and apparatus is utilized to quantify ischemic tissue and/or organ injury. Such a method and apparatus is non-invasive, non-traumatic, portable, and can make measurements in a matter of seconds. Moreover, such a method and apparatus can be realized through optical fiber probes, making it possible to take measurements of target organs deep within a patient's body. Such a technology provides a means of detecting and quantifying tissue injury in its early stages, before it is clinically apparent and before irreversible damage has occurred.

  8. Quantum dots microstructured optical fiber for x-ray detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHaven, S. L.; Williams, P. A.; Burke, E. R.

    2016-02-01

    A novel concept for the detection of x-rays with microstructured optical fibers containing quantum dots scintillation material comprised of zinc sulfide nanocrystals doped with magnesium sulfide is presented. These quantum dots are applied inside the microstructured optical fibers using capillary action. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The results of the fiber light output and associated effects of an acrylate coating and the quantum dots application technique are discussed.

  9. Non-contact optical sensor for detection of glucose concentration using a magneto-optic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozana, Nisan; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Anand, Arun; Javidi, Baharam; Polani, Sagi; Schwarz, Ariel; Shemer, Amir; García, Javier; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we aim to experimentally verify a speckle based technique for non-contact measurement of glucose concentration in blood stream while the vision for the final device aims to contain a single wristwatch-style device containing an AC (alternating) electro-magnet generated by a solenoid, a laser and a camera. The experiments presented in work are performed in-vitro in order to verify the effects that are responsible for the operation principle. When a glucose substance is inserted into a solenoid generating an alternating magnetic field it exhibits Faraday rotation which affects the temporal changes of the secondary speckle patterns distribution. The temporal frequency resulting from the AC magnetic field was found to have a lock-in amplification role which increased the observability of the relatively small magneto-optic effect. Experimental results to support the proposed concept are presented.

  10. Magnetic protein microspheres as dynamic contrast agents for magnetomotive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Freddy T.; Dibbern, Elizabeth M.; Chaney, Eric J.; Oldenburg, Amy L.; Suslick, Kenneth S.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2008-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging biomedical imaging modality that has been developed over the last 15 years. More recently, OCT has been used for the intraoperative imaging of tumor margins in breast cancer and axillary lymph nodes providing a real time in-vivo assessment of the tissue morphology. Traditional OCT images are limited by only being able to observe morphological structures. As diagnostic medicine continues to push for earlier detection, one must develop functional imaging modalities that would detect molecular information in-vivo allowing a real-time microscopic analysis of the tissue specimen. A novel modality of OCT called magnetomotive-OCT (MMOCT) has been developed by our group, employing an induced modulated magnetic field with a magnetic contrast agent to create the added contrast to structural OCT images. Modified protein microspheres with a BSA protein shell functionalized with RGD peptide sequences for targeting and an oil core have been designed and synthesized. Magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4) and Nile Red dye have been encapsulated into its oil core. These microspheres have previously been demonstrated to target cancer cells by functionalizing them with a layer of RGD peptides and could be functionalized with monoclonal antibodies. Preliminary results show that these magnetic microspheres, which are 2.0- 5.0 microns in size, are readily detectable under MM-OCT when embedded in a 5% agarose gel, in a 3-D scaffold of macrophage cells previously incubated with the microspheres, and when injected in-vivo into a tumor from an NMUcarcinogen rat animal model for breast cancer.

  11. Frequency Mixing Magnetic Detection Scanner for Imaging Magnetic Particles in Planar Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyobong; Lim, Eul-Gyoon; Jeong, Jae-Chan; Chang, Jiho; Shin, Sung-Woong; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2016-06-09

    The setup of a planar Frequency Mixing Magnetic Detection (p-FMMD) scanner for performing Magnetic Particles Imaging (MPI) of flat samples is presented. It consists of two magnetic measurement heads on both sides of the sample mounted on the legs of a u-shaped support. The sample is locally exposed to a magnetic excitation field consisting of two distinct frequencies, a stronger component at about 77 kHz and a weaker field at 61 Hz. The nonlinear magnetization characteristics of superparamagnetic particles give rise to the generation of intermodulation products. A selected sum-frequency component of the high and low frequency magnetic field incident on the magnetically nonlinear particles is recorded by a demodulation electronics. In contrast to a conventional MPI scanner, p-FMMD does not require the application of a strong magnetic field to the whole sample because mixing of the two frequencies occurs locally. Thus, the lateral dimensions of the sample are just limited by the scanning range and the supports. However, the sample height determines the spatial resolution. In the current setup it is limited to 2 mm. As examples, we present two 20 mm × 25 mm p-FMMD images acquired from samples with 1 µm diameter maghemite particles in silanol matrix and with 50 nm magnetite particles in aminosilane matrix. The results show that the novel MPI scanner can be applied for analysis of thin biological samples and for medical diagnostic purposes.

  12. Optically detected NMR of optically hyperpolarized 31P neutral donors in 28Si

    CERN Document Server

    Steger, M; Yang, A; Saeedi, K; Hayden, M E; Thewalt, M L W; Itoh, K M; Riemann, H; Abrosimov, N V; Becker, P; Pohl, H -J

    2010-01-01

    The electron and nuclear spins of the shallow donor 31P are promising qubit candidates invoked in many proposed Si-based quantum computing schemes. We have recently shown that the near-elimination of inhomogeneous broadening in highly isotopically enriched 28Si enables an optical readout of both the donor electron and nuclear spins by resolving the donor hyperfine splitting in the near-gap donor bound exciton transitions. We have also shown that pumping these same transitions can very quickly produce large electron and nuclear hyperpolarizations at low magnetic fields, where the equilibrium electron and nuclear polarizations are near zero. Here we show preliminary results of the measurement of 31P neutral donor NMR parameters using this optical nuclear hyperpolarization mechanism for preparation of the 31P nuclear spin system, followed by optical readout of the resulting nuclear spin population after manipulation with NMR pulse sequences. This allows for the observation of single-shot NMR signals with very hi...

  13. Automatic Detection of Magnetic δ in Sunspot Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padinhatteeri, Sreejith; Higgins, Paul A.; Bloomfield, D. Shaun; Gallagher, Peter T.

    2016-01-01

    Large and magnetically complex sunspot groups are known to be associated with flares. To date, the Mount Wilson scheme has been used to classify sunspot groups based on their morphological and magnetic properties. The most flare-prolific class, the δ sunspot group, is characterised by opposite-polarity umbrae within a common penumbra, separated by less than 2∘. In this article, we present a new system, called the Solar Monitor Active Region Tracker-Delta Finder (SMART-DF), which can be used to automatically detect and classify magnetic δs in near-realtime. Using continuum images and magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), we first estimate distances between opposite-polarity umbrae. Opposite-polarity pairs with distances of less that 2∘ are then identified, and if these pairs are found to share a common penumbra, they are identified as a magnetic δ configuration. The algorithm was compared to manual δ detections reported by the Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC), operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). SMART-DF detected 21 out of 23 active regions (ARs) that were marked as δ spots by NOAA during 2011 - 2012 (within {±} 60° longitude). SMART-DF in addition detected five ARs that were not announced as δ spots by NOAA. The near-realtime operation of SMART-DF resulted in many δs being identified in advance of NOAA's daily notification. SMART-DF will be integrated into SolarMonitor (www.solarmonitor.org) and the near-realtime information will be available to the public.

  14. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection.

  15. Structural, optical, magnetic and photocatalytic properties of Co doped CuS diluted magnetic semiconductor nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreelekha, N.; Subramanyam, K. [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502 (India); Department of Physics, Raghu Engineering College, Visakhapatnam, Andrapradesh 531162 (India); Amaranatha Reddy, D. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Institute for Functional Materials, Pusan National University, Busan 609735 (Korea, Republic of); Murali, G. [Department of BIN Fusion Technology & Department of Polymer-Nano Science and Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk (Korea, Republic of); Ramu, S. [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502 (India); Rahul Varma, K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley (United States); Vijayalakshmi, R.P., E-mail: vijayaraguru@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502 (India)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Cu{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}S nanoparticles were synthesized via chemical co-precipitation method. • Structural, band gap, magnetization and photocatalysis studies were carried out. • All the doped samples exhibited intrinsic room temperature ferromagnetism. • Effect of magnetic properties on photocatalytic activity was analyzed. • CuS:Co nanoparticles may find applications in photocatalytic and spintronic devices. - Abstract: Pristine and Co doped covellite CuS nanoparticles were synthesized in aqueous solution by facile chemical co-precipitation method with Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic Acid (EDTA) as a stabilizing agent. EDAX measurements confirmed the presence of Co in the CuS host lattice. Hexagonal crystal structure of pure and Co doped CuS nanoparticles were authenticated by XRD patterns. TEM images indicated that sphere-shape of nanoparticles through a size ranging from 5 to 8 nm. The optical absorption edge moved to higher energies with increase in Co concentration as indicated by UV–vis spectroscopy. Magnetic measurements revealed that bare CuS sample show sign of diamagnetic character where as in Co doped nanoparticles augmentation of room temperature ferromagnetism was observed with increasing doping precursor concentrations. Photocatalytic performance of the pure and Co doped CuS nanoparticles were assessed by evaluating the degradation rate of rhodamine B solution under sun light irradiation. The 5% Co doped CuS nanoparticles provide evidence for high-quality photocatalytic activity.

  16. Optical fiber temperature sensor based on wavelength-dependent detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang Li(李志刚); Zhenhui Du(杜振辉); Baoguang Wang(王宝光); Chengzhi Jiang(蒋诚志)

    2004-01-01

    Semiconductor fiber temperature sensors have been used widely in many fields, but most of them pick up temperature by measuring the optical intensity of certain fixed narrow-band in absorption spectrum.Furthermore, they are sensitive to the loss of optical intensity and the fluctuation of light source power.The novel temperature measurement system proposed in this paper is based on the semiconductor absorption theory and the spectral analysis of method. To measure temperature, the sensor model detects not the certain narrow-band spectrum but the most spectra of the optical absorption edge. Therefore the measurement accuracy and the stability can be improved greatly. Experimental results are in agreement with theoretical analysis results perfectly.

  17. Damage monitoring and impact detection using optical fiber vibration sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y. C.; Han, K. S.

    2002-06-01

    Intensity-based optical fiber vibrations sensors (OFVSs) are used in damage monitoring of fiber-reinforced plastics, in vibration sensing, and location of impacts. OFVSs were constructed by placing two cleaved fiber ends in a capillary tube. This sensor is able to monitor structural vibrations. For vibration sensing, the optical fiber sensor was mounted on the carbon fiber reinforced composite beam, and its response was investigated for free and forced vibration. For locating impact points, four OFVSs were placed at chosen positions and the different arrival times of impact-generated vibration signals were recorded. The impact location can be determined from these time delays. Indentation and tensile tests were performed with the measurement of the optical signal and acoustic emission (AE). The OFVSs accurately detected both free and forced vibration signals. Accurate locations of impact were determined on an acrylate plate. It was found that damage information, comparable in quality to AE data, could be obtained from the OFVS signals.

  18. Smart optical distance sensor for automatic welding detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Michael; Rinner, Stefan; Ettemeyer, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we describe a simple and cost-effective method and measuring device for automatic detection of welding. The sensor is to be used in automatic darkening filters (ADF) of welding helmets protecting the operator from intensive hazardous UV radiation. For reasons discussed in detail below, conventional sensor principles used in ADF are being out-dated. Here, we critically revise some alternatives and propose an approach comprising an optical distance sensor. Its underlying principle is triangulation with two pin-hole cameras. The absence of optical components such as lenses results in very low cost. At first, feasibility is tested with optical simulations. Additionally, we present measurement results that prove the practicability of our proposal.

  19. Quench Detection and Protection of the MQT Type Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Teng, M

    1998-01-01

    The LHC design as from version 5 is equipped with tuning, trim and skew quadrupoles with similar cross-section designs (MQT). To qualify the quench detection and magnet protection needs, several compu tational methods have been applied. They range from global calculation of a uniform adiabatic temperature rise to more refined simulations, including the Quaber simulation package which is also applie d for quench calculations on the main magnets. A very important parameter is the quench propagation velocity, on which the Quaber simulations rely. An attempt was made to simulate the physics of the p ropagation itself, taking into account the temperature dependence of the wire parameters with the Quenchprop algorithm described in this report. The calculated results were compared with those from ex periments on a single wire. Further results of measurements on prototype magnets will allow fine-tuning of the program parameters.

  20. A streak camera based fiber optic pulsed polarimetry technique for magnetic sensing to sub-mm resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. J.; Weber, T. E.

    2016-11-01

    The technique of fiber optic pulsed polarimetry, which provides a distributed (local) measurement of the magnetic field along an optical fiber, has been improved to the point where, for the first time, photocathode based optical detection of backscatter is possible with sub-mm spatial resolutions. This has been realized through the writing of an array of deterministic fiber Bragg gratings along the fiber, a so-called backscatter-tailored optical fiber, producing a 34 000-fold increase in backscatter levels over Rayleigh. With such high backscatter levels, high repetition rate lasers are now sufficiently bright to allow near continuous field sensing in both space and time with field resolutions as low as 0.005 T and as high as 170 T over a ˜mm interval given available fiber materials.

  1. Spontaneous Involution of a Non-Optic Astrocytoma in Neurofibromatosis Type I: Serial Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cakirer, S. [Istanbul Sisli Etfal Hospital (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology; Karaarslan, E. [VKV American Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology

    2004-10-01

    A patient with neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) was followed-up with serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies over a period of 6 years. A contrast-enhancing lesion of the internal capsule, histologically proven to be pilocytic astrocytoma through stereotactic brain biopsy with mass effect and associated edema, was detected to reveal spontaneous involution on follow-up MRI studies. Although spontaneous regression of gliomas of the optic pathway-hypothalamus in patients with NF1 is relatively common in the literature, spontaneous involution of non-optic (i.e. areas other than optic pathways and hypothalamus) gliomas is rarely reported. Conservative management with follow-up MRI studies should be considered for non-optic glial tumors and tumor-like masses in patients with NF1, and surgical treatment should not be considered unless the lesions exhibit a rapid or unrelenting growth on serial MRI studies or produce significant clinical deterioration.

  2. A streak camera based fiber optic pulsed polarimetry technique for magnetic sensing to sub-mm resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R J; Weber, T E

    2016-11-01

    The technique of fiber optic pulsed polarimetry, which provides a distributed (local) measurement of the magnetic field along an optical fiber, has been improved to the point where, for the first time, photocathode based optical detection of backscatter is possible with sub-mm spatial resolutions. This has been realized through the writing of an array of deterministic fiber Bragg gratings along the fiber, a so-called backscatter-tailored optical fiber, producing a 34 000-fold increase in backscatter levels over Rayleigh. With such high backscatter levels, high repetition rate lasers are now sufficiently bright to allow near continuous field sensing in both space and time with field resolutions as low as 0.005 T and as high as 170 T over a ∼mm interval given available fiber materials.

  3. Stokes-vector direct detection for optical communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, William; Li, An; Che, Di; Yuan, Feng; Khodakarami, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    To cope with the exponential growth of the Internet traffic, optical communications has advanced by leaps and bounds. For several decades, Intensity modulation with direct detection (IM-DD) dominates the commercial short-reach optical communications. However, when upgrading the data-rate distance product to 1000 Gb/s·km per wavelength and beyond, IM-DD faces severe performance barrier. Aiming to improve the electrical SE and extend the transmission distance, advanced DD modulation formats have been proposed through a so-called self-coherent (SCOH) approach, where a carrier is transmitted together with the signal to achieve a linear mapping between the electrical baseband signal and the optical field. In that way, the impact of the CD can be removed from the received signal, greatly extending the transmission distance of the DD system. Particularly, Stokes-vector direct detection (SV-DD) has been proposed to realize linear complex optical channels as well as enhance the electrical spectral efficiency and transmission reach. In this talk, we present the principle and discuss the performance of SV-DD systems.

  4. The Direct Detectability of Giant Exoplanets in the Optical

    CERN Document Server

    Greco, Johnny P

    2015-01-01

    (abridged) Motivated by the possibility that an optical coronagraph will be put on WFIRST/AFTA, we present an exploration of the general character of the direct detectability of extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) in the optical. We quantify a planet's direct detectability by the fraction of its orbit for which it is in an observable configuration--defined to be its observability fraction ($f_{obs}$). Using a suite of Monte Carlo experiments, we study the dependence of $f_{obs}$ upon various technological and astrophysical parameters, including the inner working angle (IWA) and minimum achievable contrast ($C_{min}$) of the direct-imaging observatory; the planet's scattering phase function, geometric albedo, single-scattering albedo, radius, and distance from Earth; and the semi-major axis distribution of EGPs. We assume cloud-free, homogeneous atmospheres and calculate phase functions for a given geometric or single-scattering albedo, assuming various scattering mechanisms. We find that the often-assumed Lambert...

  5. Optical detection of parasitic protozoa in sol-gel matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livage, Jacques; Barreau, J. Y.; Da Costa, J. M.; Desportes, I.

    1994-10-01

    Whole cell parasitic protozoa have been entrapped within sol-gel porous silica matrices. Stationary phase promastigote cells of Leishmania donovani infantum are mixed with a silica sol before gelation occurs. They remain trapped within the growing oxide network and their cellular organization appears to be well preserved. Moreover protozoa retain their antigenic properties in the porous gel. They are still able to detect parasite specific antibodies in serum samples from infected patients via an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Antigen- antibody associations occurring in the gel are optically detected via the reactions of a peroxidase conjugate with ortho-phenylenediamine leading to the formation of a yellow coloration. A clear-cut difference in optical density is measured between positive and negative sera. Such an entrapment of antigenic species into porous sol-gel matrices avoids the main problems due to non specific binding and could be advantageously used in diagnostic kits.

  6. Resonant optical transducers for in-situ gas detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Tiziana C; Cole, Garrett; Goddard, Lynford

    2016-06-28

    Configurations for in-situ gas detection are provided, and include miniaturized photonic devices, low-optical-loss, guided-wave structures and state-selective adsorption coatings. High quality factor semiconductor resonators have been demonstrated in different configurations, such as micro-disks, micro-rings, micro-toroids, and photonic crystals with the properties of very narrow NIR transmission bands and sensitivity up to 10.sup.-9 (change in complex refractive index). The devices are therefore highly sensitive to changes in optical properties to the device parameters and can be tunable to the absorption of the chemical species of interest. Appropriate coatings applied to the device enhance state-specific molecular detection.

  7. Fluorescent optical fibre chemosensor for the detection of mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T. Hien; Wren, Stephen P.; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

    2016-11-01

    This work aims to develop a stable, compact and portable fibre optic sensing system which is capable of real time detection of the mercury ion (II), Hg2+. A novel fluorescent polymeric material for Hg2+ detection, based on a coumarin derivative (acting as the fluorophore) and an azathia crown ether moiety (acting as the mercury ion receptor), has been designed and synthesized. The material was covalently attached to the distal end of an optical fibre and exhibited a significant increase in fluorescence intensity in response to Hg2+ in the μM concentration range via a photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism. The sensor has also demonstrated a high selectivity for Hg2+ over other metal ions. A washing protocol was identified for sensor regeneration, allowing the probe to be re-used. The approach developed in this work can also be used for the preparation of sensors for other heavy metals.

  8. Cholesterol detection using optical fiber sensor based on intensity modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiyanto, Moh; Suhariningsih; Yasin, Moh

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the research is to detect the concentration of cholesterol by using the principle that a laser beam propagation is guided by optical fiber bundle in term of intensity profile through solution with vary concentrations of cholesterol from 0 to 300 ppm. The mechanism of cholesterol concentration detection is the propagation of He-Ne laser beam with wavelength of 632.5 nm through a fiber optic bundle and a solution of cholesterol, then is reflected by a flat mirror and enters receiving fiber. This signal is captured by a silicon detector (SL-818, Newport) in the form of output voltage. The result showed that the output voltage decrease linearly with the increase of concentration of cholesterol with a sensitivity of 0.0004 mV/ppm and the linearity more than 97%.

  9. Detection of cortical optical changes during seizure activity using optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornelas, Danielle; Hasan, Md.; Gonzalez, Oscar; Krishnan, Giri; Szu, Jenny I.; Myers, Timothy; Hirota, Koji; Bazhenov, Maxim; Binder, Devin K.; Park, Boris H.

    2017-02-01

    Electrophysiology has remained the gold standard of neural activity detection but its resolution and high susceptibility to noise and motion artifact limit its efficiency. Imaging techniques, including fMRI, intrinsic optical imaging, and diffuse optical imaging, have been used to detect neural activity, but rely on indirect measurements such as changes in blood flow. Fluorescence-based techniques, including genetically encoded indicators, are powerful techniques, but require introduction of an exogenous fluorophore. A more direct optical imaging technique is optical coherence tomography (OCT), a label-free, high resolution, and minimally invasive imaging technique that can produce depth-resolved cross-sectional and 3D images. In this study, we sought to examine non-vascular depth-dependent optical changes directly related to neural activity. We used an OCT system centered at 1310 nm to search for changes in an ex vivo brain slice preparation and an in vivo model during 4-AP induced seizure onset and propagation with respect to electrical recording. By utilizing Doppler OCT and the depth-dependency of the attenuation coefficient, we demonstrate the ability to locate and remove the optical effects of vasculature within the upper regions of the cortex from in vivo attenuation calculations. The results of this study show a non-vascular decrease in intensity and attenuation in ex vivo and in vivo seizure models, respectively. Regions exhibiting decreased optical changes show significant temporal correlation to regions of increased electrical activity during seizure. This study allows for a thorough and biologically relevant analysis of the optical signature of seizure activity both ex vivo and in vivo using OCT.

  10. Periodic reversal of magneto-optic Faraday rotation on uniaxial birefringence crystal with ultrathin magnetic films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. W. Su

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental approach of inclined incidence magneto-optic Faraday effect observed in the polar plane is applied. Three samples containing ferromagnetic cobalt ultrathin films on a semiconductor zinc oxide (0001 single crystal substrate with in-plane and out-of-plane anisotropy are evaluated. Through the fine adjustment of crossed polarizers in the magneto-optic effect measurement completely recorded the detail optical and magneto-optical responses from the birefringent crystal substrate and the magnetic film, especially for the signal induced from the substrate with uniaxial optical axis. The angle dependency of interference phenomena periodically from the optical and magneto-optical responses is attributed to the birefringence even in the absence of a magnetic field. The new type of observation finds that the transmission Faraday intensity in the oblique incidence includes a combination of polarization rotations, which results from optical compensation from the substrate and magneto-optical Faraday effects from the film. The samples grown at different rates and examined by this method exhibit magnetic structure discriminations. This result can be applied in the advanced polarized-light technologies to enhance the spatial resolution of magnetic surfaces with microstructural information under various magnetic field direction.

  11. Optic nerve atrophy and retinal nerve fibre layer thinning following optic neuritis: evidence that axonal loss is a substrate of MRI-detected atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trip, S Anand; Schlottmann, Patricio G; Jones, Stephen J; Li, Wai-Yung; Garway-Heath, David F; Thompson, Alan J; Plant, Gordon T; Miller, David H

    2006-05-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of brain atrophy are often considered to be a marker of axonal loss in multiple sclerosis (MS) but evidence is limited. Optic neuritis is a common manifestation of MS and results in optic nerve atrophy. Retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) imaging is a non-invasive way of detecting axonal loss following optic neuritis. We hypothesise that if the optic nerve atrophy that develops following optic neuritis is contributed to by axonal loss, it will correlate with thinning of the RNFL. Twenty-five patients were studied at least 1 year after a single unilateral attack of optic neuritis without recurrence, with a selection bias towards incomplete recovery. They had MR quantification of optic nerve cross-sectional area and optic nerve lesion length, as well as optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurement of mean RNFL thickness and macular volume, quantitative visual testing, and visual evoked potentials (VEPs). Fifteen controls were also studied. Significant optic nerve atrophy (mean decrease 30% versus controls), RNFL thinning (mean decrease 33% versus controls), and macular volume loss occurred in patients' affected eyes when compared with patients' unaffected eyes and healthy controls. The optic nerve atrophy was correlated with the RNFL thinning, macular volume loss, visual acuity, visual field mean deviation, and whole field VEP amplitude but not latency. These findings suggest that axonal loss contributes to optic nerve atrophy following a single attack of optic neuritis. By inference, axonal loss due to other post-inflammatory brain lesions is likely to contribute to the global MRI measure of brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis.

  12. Experimental constraint on dark matter detection with optical atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wcisło, P.; Morzyński, P.; Bober, M.; Cygan, A.; Lisak, D.; Ciuryło, R.; Zawada, M.

    2016-12-01

    The total mass density of the Universe appears to be dominated by dark matter. However, beyond its gravitational interactions at the galactic scale, little is known about its nature1. Several proposals have been advanced in recent years for the detection of dark matter2-4. In particular, a network of atomic clocks could be used to search for transient indicators of hypothetical dark matter5 in the form of stable topological defects; for example, monopoles, strings or domain walls6. The clocks become desynchronized when a dark-matter object sweeps through the network. This pioneering approach5 requires a comparison between at least two distant optical atomic clocks7-9. Here, by exploiting differences in the susceptibilities of the atoms and the cavity to the fine-structure constant10,11, we show that a single optical atomic clock12 is already sensitive to dark-matter events. This implies that existing optical atomic clocks13,14 can serve as a global topological-defect dark-matter observatory, without any further developments in experimental apparatus or the need for long phase-noise-compensated optical-fibre links15. Using optical atomic clocks, we explored a new dimension of astrophysical observations by constraining the strength of atomic coupling to hypothetical dark-matter cosmic objects. Under the conditions of our experiments, the degree of constraint was found to exceed the previously reported limits16 by more than three orders of magnitude.

  13. Optical aptasensors for quantitative detection of small biomolecules: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chunjing; Dai, Shuang; Wang, Lei

    2014-09-15

    Aptasensors are aptamer-based biosensors with excellent recognition capability towards a wide range of targets. Specially, there have been ever-growing interests in the development of aptasensors for the detection of small molecules. This phenomenon is contributed to two reasons. On one hand, small biomolecules play an important role in living organisms with many kinds of biological function, such as antiarrhythmic effect and vasodilator activity of adenosine. On the other hand, the concentration of small molecules can be an indicator for disease diagnosis, for example, the concentration of ATP is closely associated with cell injury and cell viability. As a potential analysis tool in the construction of aptasensors, optical analysis has attracted much more interest of researchers due to its high sensitivity, quick response and simple operation. Besides, it promises the promotion of aptasensors in performance toward a new level. Review the development of optical aptasensors for small biomolecules will give readers an overall understanding of its progress and provide some theoretical guidelines for its future development. Hence, we give a mini-review on the advance of optical aptasensors for small biomolecules. This review focuses on recent achievements in the design of various optical aptasensors for small biomolecules, containing fluorescence aptasensors, colorimetric aptasensors, chemiluminescence aptasensors and other optical aptasensors.

  14. Traffic Monitoring without single Car Detection from optical airborne Images

    OpenAIRE

    Zeller, Klaus; Hinz, Stefan; Rosenbaum, Dominik; Leitloff, Jens; Reinartz, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This article describes several methods for traffic monitoring from airborne optical remote sensing data. These methods classify the traffic into free flowing traffic, traffic congestion and traffic jam. Furthermore a method is explained, which provides information about the average speed of dense traffic on a defined part of the road. All methods gather the information directly from image features, without the use of single vehicle detection. The classification of the traffic is done by st...

  15. Analytical applications of MD-FIA-optical detection systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A brief introduction of recent research works in our laboratory concerning microdialysis(MD) based on optical detection combined with FIA is made in this mini-review. A biosensor system has been designed and realized the real time in vivo monitoring of some important clinic substances such as calcium, uric acid. The system has also been used to study the in vitro binding of drug-protein.

  16. Biomarker detection of global infectious diseases based on magnetic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carinelli, Soledad; Martí, Mercè; Alegret, Salvador; Pividori, María Isabel

    2015-09-25

    Infectious diseases affect the daily lives of millions of people all around the world, and are responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths, mostly in the developing world. Although most of these major infectious diseases are treatable, the early identification of individuals requiring treatment remains a major issue. The incidence of these diseases would be reduced if rapid diagnostic tests were widely available at the community and primary care level in low-resource settings. Strong research efforts are thus being focused on replacing standard clinical diagnostic methods, such as the invasive detection techniques (biopsy or endoscopy) or expensive diagnostic and monitoring methods, by affordable and sensitive tests based on novel biomarkers. The development of new methods that are needed includes solid-phase separation techniques. In this context, the integration of magnetic particles within bioassays and biosensing devices is very promising since they greatly improve the performance of a biological reaction. The diagnosis of clinical samples with magnetic particles can be easily achieved without pre-enrichment, purification or pretreatment steps often required for standard methods, simplifying the analytical procedures. The biomarkers can be specifically isolated and preconcentrated from complex biological matrixes by magnetic actuation, increasing specificity and the sensitivity of the assay. This review addresses these promising features of the magnetic particles for the detection of biomarkers in emerging technologies related with infectious diseases affecting global health, such as malaria, influenza, dengue, tuberculosis or HIV.

  17. Hybrid magnetic – Semiconductor nanocomposites: optical, magnetic and nanosecond dynamical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emam, A.N.; Girgis, E.; Mostafa, A.A. [National Research Center, Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Guirguis, O.W. [Biophysics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Mohamed, M.B., E-mail: monabmohamed@gmail.com [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); NanoTech Egypt for Photoelectronics, Dreamland, Giza (Egypt)

    2015-07-15

    A series of colloidal CdSe quantum dots doped with different concentration of cobalt ions has been prepared via organometallic pyrolysis of a mixture of cadmium stearate and cobalt dithiocarbazate. The conditions required for successful doping depend on the source of cobalt ions and the dopant concentration. The structure and morphology of the prepared nanocrystals have been characterized using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). Slight shift in the interplaner space was observed in the XRD pattern of the doped nanocrystals. Formation of separate cobalt nanoclusters has been observed in the TEM images upon increasing the cobalt concentration more than 2% of the original cadmium concentration. This was confirmed by magnetic measurements of the prepared samples. Room-temperature ferromagnetism has been observed, in which the switching field increases as the cobalt ratio increases. Increasing the cobalt ratio more than 5% increases the coercivity due to formation of Co{sup 0} nanoclusters. Moreover, the presence of localized magnetic ions in semiconductor QDs leads to strong exchange interactions between sp band electrons and the magnetic ions d electrons. This would influence the optical properties such as absorption, emission, as well as nanosecond relaxation dynamics. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Hybrid semiconductor-magnetic nanostructure was prepared via chemical method. • Room-temperature ferromagnetism for hybrid CdSe–Co quantum dots has been observed. • Co{sup +2} ions induces slight shift in the interplaner space distance of the doped QDs. • Hybrid CdSe–Co QDs have better quantum yield than pure CdSe QDs. • Hybrid CdSe–Co nanocrystals have faster electron-hole dynamics than pure CdSe QDs.

  18. FOLATE-TARGETED OPTICAL AND MAGNETIC RESONANCE DUALMODALITY PCL-b-PEG MICELLES FOR TUMOR IMAGING*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-ming Sun; Jin-xia Xu; Jian-bin Tang; Mei-hua Sui; You-qing Shen

    2011-01-01

    A biodegradable tumor targeting nano-probe based on poly(ε-caprolactone)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) block copolymer (PCL-b-PEG)micelle functionalized with a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent diethylenetriaminepenmacetic acid-gadolinium (DTPA-Gd3+) on the shell and a near-infrared (NIR) dye in the core for magnetic resonance and optical dual-modality imaging was prepared. The longitudinal relaxivity (r1) of the PCL-b-PEGDTPA-Gd3+ micelle was 13.4 (mmol/L)-1s-1, three folds of that of DTPA-Gd3+, and higher than that of many polymeric contrast agents with similar structures. The in vivo optical imaging of a nude mouse bearing xenografied breast tumor showed that the dual-modality micelle preferentially accumulated in the tumor via the folic acid-mediated active targeting and the passive accumulation by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. The results iadicated that the dualmodality micelle is a promising nano-probe for cancer detection and diagnosis.

  19. Change detection in very high resolution multisensor optical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano Correa, Yady T.; Bovolo, Francesca; Bruzzone, Lorenzo

    2014-10-01

    This work aims at developing an approach to the detection of changes in multisensor multitemporal VHR optical images. The main steps of the proposed method are: i) multisensor data homogenization; and ii) change detection in multisensor multitemporal VHR optical images. The proposed approach takes advantage of: the conversion to physical quantities suggested by Pacifici et. al.1 , the framework for the design of systems for change detection in VHR images presented by Bruzzone and Bovolo2 and the framework for unsupervised change detection presented by Bovolo and Bruzzone3. Multisensor data homogenization is achieved during pre-processing by taking into account differences in both radiometric and geometric dimensions. Whereas change detection was approached by extracting proper features from multisensor images such that they result to be comparable (at a given level of abstraction) even if extracted from images acquired by different sensors. In order to illustrate the results, a data set made up of a QuickBird and a WorldView-2 images - acquired in 2006 and 2010 respectively - over an area located in the Trentino region of Italy were used. However, the proposed approach is thought to be exportable to multitemporal images coming from passive sensors other than the two mentioned above. The experimental results obtained on the QuickBird and WorlView-2 image pair are accurate. Thus opening to further experiments on multitemporal images acquired by other sensors.

  20. Quantum dots as optical labels for ultrasensitive detection of polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akshath, Uchangi Satyaprasad; Shubha, Likitha R; Bhatt, Praveena; Thakur, Munna Singh

    2014-07-15

    Considering the fact that polyphenols have versatile activity in-vivo, its detection and quantification is very much important for a healthy diet. Laccase enzyme can convert polyphenols to yield mono/polyquinones which can quench Quantum dots fluorescence. This phenomenon of charge transfer from quinones to QDs was exploited as optical labels to detect polyphenols. CdTe QD may undergo dipolar interaction with quinones as a result of broad spectral absorption due to multiple excitonic states resulting from quantum confinement effects. Thus, "turn-off" fluorescence method was applied for ultrasensitive detection of polyphenols by using laccase. We observed proportionate quenching of QDs fluorescence with respect to polyphenol concentration in the range of 100 µg to 1 ng/mL. Also, quenching of the photoluminescence was highly efficient and stable and could detect individual and total polyphenols with high sensitivity (LOD-1 ng/mL). Moreover, proposed method was highly efficient than any other reported methods in terms of sensitivity, specificity and selectivity. Therefore, a novel optical sensor was developed for the detection of polyphenols at a sensitive level based on the charge transfer mechanism.

  1. Optical, electrical, and magnetic field studies of organic materials for light emitting diodes and photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basel, Tek Prasad

    We studied optical, electrical, and magnetic field responses of films and devices based on organic semiconductors that are used for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and photovoltaic (OPV) solar cell applications. Our studies show that the hyperfine interaction (HFI)-mediated spin mixing is the key process underlying various magnetic field effects (MFE) and spin transport in aluminum tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)[Alq3]-based OLEDs and organic spin-valve (OSV). Conductivity-detected magnetic resonance in OLEDs and magneto-resistance (MR) in OSVs show substantial isotope dependence. In contrast, isotope-insensitive behavior in the magneto-conductance (MC) of same devices is explained by the collision of spin ½ carriers with triplet polaron pairs. We used steady state optical spectroscopy for studying the energy transfer dynamics in films and OLEDs based on host-guest blends of the fluorescent polymer and phosphorescent molecule. We have also studied the magnetic-field controlled color manipulation in these devices, which provide a strong proof for the `polaron-pair' mechanism underlying the MFE in organic devices. The critical issue that hampers organic spintronics device applications is significant magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) at room temperature (RT). Whereas inorganic spin valves (ISVs) show RT magneto-resistance, MR>80%, however, the devices do not exhibit electroluminescence (EL). In contrast, OLEDs show substantive EL emission, and are particularly attractive because of their flexibility, low cost, and potential for multicolor display. We report a conceptual novel hybrid organic/inorganic spintronics device (h-OLED), where we employ both ISV with large MR at RT, and OLED that has efficient EL emission. We investigated the charge transfer process in an OPV solar cell through optical, electrical, and magnetic field measurements of thin films and devices based on a low bandgap polymer, PTB7 (fluorinated poly-thienothiophene-benzodithiophene). We found that

  2. Magnetic microtraps for cavity QED, Bose-Einstein condensates, and atom optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Benjamin L.

    The system comprised of an atom strongly coupled to photons, known as cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED), provides a rich experimental setting for quantum information processing, both in the implementation of quantum logic gates and in the development of quantum networks. Moreover, studies of cavity QED will help elucidate the dynamics of continuously observed open quantum systems with quantum-limited feedback. To achieve these goals in cavity QED, a neutral atom must be tightly confined inside a high-finesse cavity with small mode volume for long periods of time. Microfabricated wires on a substrate---known as an atom chip---can create a sufficiently high-curvature magnetic potential to trap atoms in the Lamb-Dicke regime. We have recently integrated an optical fiber Fabry-Perot cavity with such a device. The microwires allow the on-chip collection and laser cooling of neutral atoms, and allow the magnetic waveguiding of these atoms to an Ioffe trap inside the cavity mode. Magnetically trapped intracavity atoms have been detected with this cavity QED system. A similar experiment employing microdisks and photonic bandgap cavities is nearing completion. With these more exotic cavities, a robust and scalable atom-cavity chip system will deeply probe the strong coupling regime of cavity QED with magnetically trapped atoms. Atom chips have found great success in producing and manipulating Bose-Einstein condensates and in creating novel atom optical elements. An on-chip BEC has been attained in a miniaturized system incorporating an atom chip designed for atom interferometry and for studies of Josephson effects of a BEC in a double-well potential. Using similar microfabrication techniques, we created and demonstrated a specular magnetic atom mirror formed from a standard computer hard drive. This device, in conjunction with micron-sized charged circular pads, can produce a 1-D ring trap which may prove useful for studying Tonks gases in a ring geometry and for

  3. Detecting compaction disequilibrium with anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwehr, Kurt; Tauxe, Lisa; Driscoll, Neal; Lee, Homa

    2006-11-01

    In clay-rich sediment, microstructures and macrostructures influence how sediments deform when under stress. When lithology is fairly constant, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) can be a simple technique for measuring the relative consolidation state of sediment, which reflects the sediment burial history. AMS can reveal areas of high water content and apparent overconsolidation associated with unconformities where sediment overburden has been removed. Many other methods for testing consolidation and water content are destructive and invasive, whereas AMS provides a nondestructive means to focus on areas for additional geotechnical study. In zones where the magnetic minerals are undergoing diagenesis, AMS should not be used for detecting compaction state. By utilizing AMS in the Santa Barbara Basin, we were able to identify one clear unconformity and eight zones of high water content in three cores. With the addition of susceptibility, anhysteretic remanent magnetization, and isothermal remanent magnetization rock magnetic techniques, we excluded 3 out of 11 zones from being compaction disequilibria. The AMS signals for these three zones are the result of diagenesis, coring deformation, and burrows. In addition, using AMS eigenvectors, we are able to accurately show the direction of maximum compression for the accumulation zone of the Gaviota Slide.

  4. Optical properties of semiconductor nanostructures in magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grochol, M.

    2007-04-03

    In this work, the near bandgap linear optical properties of semiconductor quantum structures under applied magnetic field are investigated. First, the exciton theory is developed starting with the one-electron Hamiltonian in a crystal, continuing with the Luttinger and Bir-Pikus Hamiltonian, and ending with the exciton Hamiltonian in the envelope function approximation. Further, concentrating on the quantum well and thus assuming strong confinement in the growth direction, the motion parallel and perpendicular to the xy-plane is factorized leading to the well-known single sublevel approximation. A magnetic field perpendicular to the xy-plane is applied, and a general theorem describing the behavior of the energy eigenvalues is derived. The strain calculation within the isotropic elasticity approach is described in detail. The Schroedinger equation is solved numerically for both the full model and the factorization with artificially generated disorder potentials. Furthermore the statistical properties of the disorder in a real quantum well have been analyzed. In particular, temperature dependent photoluminescence spectra and diamagnetic shift statistics, have been compared with the experimental ones and very good agreement has been found. The second part of this thesis deals predominantly with highly symmetrical structures embedded in the quantum well: namely quantum rings and dots. First, adopting an ansatz for the wave function, the Hamiltonian matrix is derived discussing which matrix elements are non-zero according to the symmetry of the potential. Additionally, the expectation values of the current and magnetization operators are evaluated. Then, concentrating on the case of the highest (circular) symmetry, the model of zero width ring is introduced. Within this model the close relation between the oscillatory component of the exciton energy (exciton Aharonov-Bohm effect) and the persistent current is revealed. Examples for different material systems follow

  5. Are Optical Gas Imaging Technologies Effective For Methane Leak Detection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, Arvind P; Wang, Jingfan; Brandt, Adam R

    2017-01-03

    Concerns over mitigating methane leakage from the natural gas system have become ever more prominent in recent years. Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed regulations requiring use of optical gas imaging (OGI) technologies to identify and repair leaks. In this work, we develop an open-source predictive model to accurately simulate the most common OGI technology, passive infrared (IR) imaging. The model accurately reproduces IR images of controlled methane release field experiments as well as reported minimum detection limits. We show that imaging distance is the most important parameter affecting IR detection effectiveness. In a simulated well-site, over 80% of emissions can be detected from an imaging distance of 10 m. Also, the presence of "superemitters" greatly enhance the effectiveness of IR leak detection. The minimum detectable limits of this technology can be used to selectively target "superemitters", thereby providing a method for approximate leak-rate quantification. In addition, model results show that imaging backdrop controls IR imaging effectiveness: land-based detection against sky or low-emissivity backgrounds have higher detection efficiency compared to aerial measurements. Finally, we show that minimum IR detection thresholds can be significantly lower for gas compositions that include a significant fraction nonmethane hydrocarbons.

  6. Static magnetic Faraday rotation spectroscopy combined with a differential scheme for OH detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weixiong; Deng, Lunhua; Qian, Xiaodong; Fang, Bo; Gai, Yanbo; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Weijun

    2015-04-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) radical plays a critical role in atmospheric chemistry due to its high reactivity with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other trace gaseous species. Because of its very short life time and very low concentration in the atmosphere, interference-free high sensitivity in-situ OH monitoring by laser spectroscopy represents a real challenge. Faraday rotation spectroscopy (FRS) relies on the particular magneto-optic effect observed for paramagnetic species, which makes it capable of enhancing the detection sensitivity and mitigation of spectral interferences from diamagnetic species in the atmosphere. When an AC magnetic field is used, the Zeeman splitting of the molecular absorption line (and thus the magnetic circular birefringence) is modulated. This provides an 'internal modulation' of the sample, which permits to suppress the external noise like interference fringes. An alternative FRS detection scheme is to use a static magnetic field (DC-field) associated with laser wavelength modulation to effectively modulate the Zeeman splitting of the absorption lines. In the DC field case, wavelength modulation of the laser frequency can provide excellent performance compared to most of the sensing systems based on direct absorption and wavelength modulation spectroscopy. The dimension of the DC solenoid is not limited by the resonant frequency of the RLC circuit, which makes large dimension solenoid coil achievable and the absorption base length could be further increased. By employing a combination of the environmental photochemical reactor or smog chamber with multipass absorption cell, one can lower the minimum detection limit for high accuracy atmospheric chemistry studies. In this paper, we report on the development of a DC field based FRS in conjunction with a balanced detection scheme for OH radical detection at 2.8 μm and the construction of OH chemistry research platform which combined a large dimension superconducting magnetic coil with the

  7. Salmonella detection in a microfluidic channel using orbiting magnetic beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Matt; Mills, Zachary; Owen, Drew; Hanasoge, Srinivas; Hesketh, Peter; Alexeev, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    We use three-dimensional simulations to model the detection of salmonella in a complex fluid sample in a microfluidic channel. Salmonella is captured using magnetic microbeads orbiting around soft ferromagnetic discs at the microchannel bottom subjected to a rotating external magnetic field. Numerical simulations are used to model the dynamics of salmonella and microbeads throughout the detection process. We examine the effect of the channel geometry on the salmonella capture, and the forces applied to the salmonella as it is dragged through the fluid after capture. Our findings guide the design of a lab-on-a-chip device to be used for detection of salmonella in food samples in a way that ensures that salmonella captured by orbiting microbeads are preserved until they can be extracted from the system for testing, and are not washed away by the fluid flow or damaged due to the experience of excessive stresses. Such a device is needed to detect bacteria at the food source and prevention of consumption of contaminated food, and also can be used for the detection of a variety of biomaterials of interest from complex fluid samples. Support from USDA and NSF is gratefully acknowledged.

  8. All-optical four-state magnetization reversal in (Ga,Mn)As ferromagnetic semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Kapetanakis, M D; Piermarocchi, C; Wang, J; Perakis, I E

    2011-01-01

    Using density matrix equations of motion and a tight-binding band calculation, we predict all-optical switching between four metastable magnetic states of (III,Mn)As ferromagnets. This switching is initiated non-thermally within 100fs, during nonlinear coherent photoexcitation. For a single optical pulse, magnetization reversal is completed after $\\sim$100 ps and controlled by the coherent femtosecond photoexcitation. Our predicted switching comes from magnetic nonlinearities triggered by a femtosecond magnetization tilt that is sensitive to un--adiabatic light--induced spin interactions.

  9. Fiber optic magnetic field sensor based on the TbDyFe rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feifei; Jiang, Yi

    2014-08-01

    We present, and experimentally demonstrate, a fiber optic magnetic field sensor for the measurement of a weak alternating magnetic field, based on a TbDyFe rod. The fiber optic magnetic field sensor is constructed in a Michelson interferometer configuration, and the phase-generated carrier demodulation is used to obtain the time-varying phase shift induced by the applied magnetic field. A high sensitivity of up to 3.6 × 10-2 V μT - 1 (rms) with a resolution of 23 pT/√Hz (rms) at 50 Hz is achieved. Experimental results show that the sensor exhibits excellent linearity and reversibility.

  10. Growth of magnetic cobalt/chromium nano-arrays by atom-optical lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atoneche, F; Malik, D; Kirilyuk, A; Toonen, A J; Etteger, A F van; Rasing, Th, E-mail: f.atoneche@science.ru.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-07-06

    Arrays of magnetic cobalt/chromium (Co-Cr) nanolines are grown by depositing an atomic beam of Co-Cr alloy through a laser standing wave (SW) at {lambda}/2 = 212.8 nm onto a substrate. During deposition, only the chromium atoms are resonantly affected by the optical potential created by the SW, causing a periodic modulation of the chromium concentration and consequently of the magnetic properties. Magnetic force microscopy and magneto-optical Kerr effect studies reveal a patterned magnetic structure on the substrate surface.

  11. Growth of magnetic cobalt/chromium nano-arrays by atom-optical lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atoneche, F.; Malik, D.; Kirilyuk, A.; Toonen, A. J.; van Etteger, A. F.; Rasing, Th

    2011-07-01

    Arrays of magnetic cobalt/chromium (Co-Cr) nanolines are grown by depositing an atomic beam of Co-Cr alloy through a laser standing wave (SW) at λ/2 = 212.8 nm onto a substrate. During deposition, only the chromium atoms are resonantly affected by the optical potential created by the SW, causing a periodic modulation of the chromium concentration and consequently of the magnetic properties. Magnetic force microscopy and magneto-optical Kerr effect studies reveal a patterned magnetic structure on the substrate surface.

  12. Magnetic induction-induced resistive heating of optical fibers and gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, John; Naqshbandi, Masood; Cook, Kevin; Huyang, George

    2013-03-15

    Magnetic induction heating of optical fibers packaged with a steel plate is studied using a fiber Bragg grating. The dependence on the induced wavelength shift with magnetic field is obtained for a commercially available induction heater. More than a 300°C temperature rise is observed within seconds. The potential of magnetic induction as an efficient and rapid means of modulating devices and as a novel approach to potential optical based magnetic field and current sensing is proposed and discussed. The extension of the ideas into micro and nanophotonics is described.

  13. Optics effects of splitting dipole magnets into several thin lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Leunissen, L H A

    1998-01-01

    The evaluation of the dynamic aperture and the calculation of non linear optics parameters have been made so far with the simplest model of dipole, i.e. a single thin lens positioned at the centre of each thick dipole. It was shown recently that the non-linear chromaticity decreases significantly when the thick lens is represented by two thin lenses or more instead of one. In this note the study is extended to amplitude detuning and dynamic aperture. Unlike the observation reported on non-linear chromatic detuning we find no significant changes for the dynamic aperture and amplitude d etuning when the dipole magnets are split in more than one thin lens. Furthermore, non-uniform azimuthal distribution of the multipoles inside the dipole is shown not to change the above-mentio ned results. In both cases, the influence of the beta-funtions is expected to give large effect for a given dipole. However, integrated over one cell this effect is shown to compensate to a large extent. erture reported on non-linear chro...

  14. Optical tomographic detection of rheumatoid arthritis with computer-aided classification schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Christian D.; Klose, Alexander D.; Netz, Uwe; Beuthan, Jürgen; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2009-02-01

    A recent research study has shown that combining multiple parameters, drawn from optical tomographic images, leads to better classification results to identifying human finger joints that are affected or not affected by rheumatic arthritis RA. Building up on the research findings of the previous study, this article presents an advanced computer-aided classification approach for interpreting optical image data to detect RA in finger joints. Additional data are used including, for example, maximum and minimum values of the absorption coefficient as well as their ratios and image variances. Classification performances obtained by the proposed method were evaluated in terms of sensitivity, specificity, Youden index and area under the curve AUC. Results were compared to different benchmarks ("gold standard"): magnet resonance, ultrasound and clinical evaluation. Maximum accuracies (AUC=0.88) were reached when combining minimum/maximum-ratios and image variances and using ultrasound as gold standard.

  15. Controlling and detecting spin correlations of ultracold atoms in optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotzky, Stefan; Chen, Yu-Ao; Schnorrberger, Ute; Cheinet, Patrick; Bloch, Immanuel

    2010-12-31

    We report on the controlled creation of a valence bond state of delocalized effective-spin singlet and triplet dimers by means of a bichromatic optical superlattice. We demonstrate a coherent coupling between the singlet and triplet states and show how the superlattice can be employed to measure the singlet-fraction employing a spin-blockade effect. Our method provides a reliable way to detect and control nearest-neighbor spin correlations in many-body systems of ultracold atoms. Being able to measure these correlations is an important ingredient in studying quantum magnetism in optical lattices. We furthermore employ a SWAP operation between atoms which are part of different triplets, thus effectively increasing their bond-length. Such a SWAP operation provides an important step towards the massively parallel creation of a multiparticle entangled state in the lattice.

  16. Magneto-transport and optical control of magnetization in organic systems: From polymers to molecule-based magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdag, Kadriye Deniz

    Organic systems can be synthesized to have various impressive properties such as room temperature magnetism, electrical conductivity as high as conventional metals and magnetic field dependent transport. In this dissertation, we report comprehensive experimental studies in two different classes of organic systems, V-Cr Prussian blue molecule-based magnets and polyaniline nanofiber networks. The first system, V-Cr Prussian blue magnets, belongs to a family of cyano-bridged bi-metallic compounds which display a broad range of interesting photoinduced magnetic properties. A notable example for optically controllable molecule-based magnets is Co-Fe Prussian blue magnet (Tc ˜ 12 K), which exhibits light-induced changes in between magnetic states together with glassy behavior. In this dissertation, the first reports of reversible photoinduced magnetic phenomena in V-Cr Prussian blue analogs and the analysis of its AC and DC magnetization behavior are presented. Optical excitation of V-Cr Prussian blue, one of the few room temperature molecule-based magnets, with UV light (lambda = 350 nm) suppresses magnetization, whereas subsequent excitation with green light (lambda = 514 nm) increases magnetization. The partial recovery effect of green light is observed only when the sample is previously UV-irradiated. Moreover the photoinduced state has a long lifetime at low temperatures (tau > 106 s at T = 10 K) indicating that V-Cr Prussian blue reaches a hidden metastable state upon illumination with UV light. The effects of optical excitation are maintained up to 200 K and completely erased when the sample is warmed above 250 K. Results of detailed magnetic studies and the likely microscopic mechanisms for the photo illumination effects on magnetic properties are discussed. The second organic system, polyaniline nanofiber networks, was synthesized via dilute polymerization and studied at low and high electric and magnetic fields for temperatures 2 K--250 K for their magneto

  17. Optical magnetism and plasmonic Fano resonances in metal-insulator-metal oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verre, R; Yang, Z J; Shegai, T; Käll, M

    2015-03-11

    The possibility of achieving optical magnetism at visible frequencies using plasmonic nanostructures has recently been a subject of great interest. The concept is based on designing structures that support plasmon modes with electron oscillation patterns that imitate current loops, that is, magnetic dipoles. However, the magnetic resonances are typically spectrally narrow, thereby limiting their applicability in, for example, metamaterial designs. We show that a significantly broader magnetic response can be realized in plasmonic pentamers constructed from metal-insulator-metal (MIM) sandwich particles. Each MIM unit acts as a magnetic meta-atom and the optical magnetism is rendered quasi-broadband through hybridization of the in-plane modes. We demonstrate that scattering spectra of individual MIM pentamers exhibit multiple Fano resonances and a broad subradiant spectral window that signals the magnetic interaction and a hierarchy of coupling effects in these intricate three-dimensional nanoparticle oligomers.

  18. Detection of HIV-1 antigen based on magnetic tunnel junction sensor and magnetic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Li, L; Zhou, Y; Pong, P W T

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, it is evidenced that the individuals newly infected HIV are transmitting the virus prior to knowing their HIV status. Identifying individuals that are early in infection with HIV antibody negative (window period) remains problematic. In the newly infected individuals, HIV antigen p24 is usually present in their serum or plasma 7-10 days before the HIV antibody. After antibody production initiates, the p24 antigen is bound into immune complexes. That means the detectable p24 antigens in serum/plasma are short-lived, and their amount is in the pg/ml range. Thus, a rapid quantitative bio-detection system with high-sensitivity is required to achieve early disease diagnosis. Magnetoresistive (MR) biosensor with ultra-high sensitivity possesses great potential in this area. In this study, a p24 detection assay using MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) sensor and 20-nm magnetic nanoparticles is reported.

  19. Fiber Optic Sensors For Detection of Toxic and Biological Threats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Yuan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Protection of public and military personnel from chemical and biological warfareagents is an urgent and growing national security need. Along with this idea, we havedeveloped a novel class of fiber optic chemical sensors, for detection of toxic and biologicalmaterials. The design of these fiber optic sensors is based on a cladding modificationapproach. The original passive cladding of the fiber, in a small section, was removed and thefiber core was coated with a chemical sensitive material. Any change in the opticalproperties of the modified cladding material, due to the presence of a specific chemicalvapor, changes the transmission properties of the fiber and result in modal powerredistribution in multimode fibers. Both total intensity and modal power distribution (MPDmeasurements were used to detect the output power change through the sensing fibers. TheMPD technique measures the power changes in the far field pattern, i.e. spatial intensitymodulation in two dimensions. Conducting polymers, such as polyaniline and polypyrrole,have been reported to undergo a reversible change in conductivity upon exposure tochemical vapors. It is found that the conductivity change is accompanied by optical propertychange in the material. Therefore, polyaniline and polypyrrole were selected as the modifiedcladding material for the detection of hydrochloride (HCl, ammonia (NH3, hydrazine(H4N2, and dimethyl-methl-phosphonate (DMMP {a nerve agent, sarin stimulant},respectively. Several sensors were prepared and successfully tested. The results showeddramatic improvement in the sensor sensitivity, when the MPD method was applied. In thispaper, an overview on the developed class of fiber optic sensors is presented and supportedwith successful achieved results.

  20. Detection and characterisation of anthropogenic pieces by magnetic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodot, Emilie; Munschy, Marc; Benevent, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    Human activities have let many anthropogenic objects buried under our feet. Some of these like explosive devices left after the World Wars turn out to be a threat to safety or environment. Others must be perfectly localised in case of construction work, for example gas pipe. Geophysics and more specifically magnetic cartography (many of these items are magnetic) can obviously help to locate them. We already use this method on daily basis to detect UXO (unexploded ordnance) but less than 10% of the unearthed objects are actually bombs or shells. Detection and mostly characterisation methods must be improved in order to reduce this proportion. On the field there are a few things we can do to increase data qualities. Characterisation may be improved by multiple scale prospections. We search a large area with our usual and rather fast method then we achieve high definition cartographies of small interesting areas (upon the object to characterise). In the case of measurements in an urban environment for example, data are distorted. The traffic (train, tramway, cars…) produces temporal variations of the magnetic field. This effect can be lessened, sometimes even removed by the use of a fixed scalar magnetic sensor. Data treatment is another key as regards the characterisation. Tools such as analytic signal or derivative are frequently used at the first degree. We will see that in a synthetic case the second and third degree bring even more information. A new issue appeared recently about pipes. Can we localise very precisely (less than 10 cm uncertainty) a gas pipe? Horizontally we can but due to our inversion method we still have troubles with the depth accuracy. Our final concern is about the amplitude of some anomalies. Potential methods equations are based on the fact that the anomaly norm must be minor to magnetic field norm. Sometimes this is not the case but vector magnetometry is a lead to solve this problem.

  1. Magnetic field-induced spectroscopy of forbidden optical transitions with application to lattice-based optical atomic clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I; Oates, C W; Hoyt, C W; Barber, Z W; Hollberg, L

    2006-03-01

    We develop a method of spectroscopy that uses a weak static magnetic field to enable direct optical excitation of forbidden electric-dipole transitions that are otherwise prohibitively weak. The power of this scheme is demonstrated using the important application of optical atomic clocks based on neutral atoms confined to an optical lattice. The simple experimental implementation of this method--a single clock laser combined with a dc magnetic field--relaxes stringent requirements in current lattice-based clocks (e.g., magnetic field shielding and light polarization), and could therefore expedite the realization of the extraordinary performance level predicted for these clocks. We estimate that a clock using alkaline-earth-like atoms such as Yb could achieve a fractional frequency uncertainty of well below 10(-17) for the metrologically preferred even isotopes.

  2. A survey on object detection in optical remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gong; Han, Junwei

    2016-07-01

    Object detection in optical remote sensing images, being a fundamental but challenging problem in the field of aerial and satellite image analysis, plays an important role for a wide range of applications and is receiving significant attention in recent years. While enormous methods exist, a deep review of the literature concerning generic object detection is still lacking. This paper aims to provide a review of the recent progress in this field. Different from several previously published surveys that focus on a specific object class such as building and road, we concentrate on more generic object categories including, but are not limited to, road, building, tree, vehicle, ship, airport, urban-area. Covering about 270 publications we survey (1) template matching-based object detection methods, (2) knowledge-based object detection methods, (3) object-based image analysis (OBIA)-based object detection methods, (4) machine learning-based object detection methods, and (5) five publicly available datasets and three standard evaluation metrics. We also discuss the challenges of current studies and propose two promising research directions, namely deep learning-based feature representation and weakly supervised learning-based geospatial object detection. It is our hope that this survey will be beneficial for the researchers to have better understanding of this research field.

  3. Optical Fiber Nanotips Coated with Molecular Beacons for DNA Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambra Giannetti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Optical fiber sensors, thanks to their compactness, fast response and real-time measurements, have a large impact in the fields of life science research, drug discovery and medical diagnostics. In recent years, advances in nanotechnology have resulted in the development of nanotools, capable of entering the single cell, resulting in new nanobiosensors useful for the detection of biomolecules inside living cells. In this paper, we provide an application of a nanotip coupled with molecular beacons (MBs for the detection of DNA. The MBs were characterized by hybridization studies with a complementary target to prove their functionality both free in solution and immobilized onto a solid support. The solid support chosen as substrate for the immobilization of the MBs was a 30 nm tapered tip of an optical fiber, fabricated by chemical etching. With this set-up promising results were obtained and a limit of detection (LOD of 0.57 nM was reached, opening up the possibility of using the proposed nanotip to detect mRNAs inside the cytoplasm of living cells.

  4. Baseline Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Optic Nerve Provides Limited Predictive Information on Short-Term Recovery after Acute Optic Neuritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Sebastian; Kaschka, Iris; Utz, Kathrin S.; Huhn, Konstantin; Lämmer, Alexandra; Lämmer, Robert; Waschbisch, Anne; Kloska, Stephan; Lee, De-Hyung; Doerfler, Arnd; Linker, Ralf A.

    2015-01-01

    Background In acute optic neuritis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may help to confirm the diagnosis as well as to exclude alternative diagnoses. Yet, little is known on the value of optic nerve imaging for predicting clinical symptoms or therapeutic outcome. Purpose To evaluate the benefit of optic nerve MRI for predicting response to appropriate therapy and recovery of visual acuity. Methods Clinical data as well as visual evoked potentials (VEP) and MRI results of 104 patients, who were treated at the Department of Neurology with clinically definite optic neuritis between December 2010 and September 2012 were retrospectively reviewed including a follow up within 14 days. Results Both length of the Gd enhancing lesion (r = -0.38; p = 0.001) and the T2 lesion (r = -0.25; p = 0.03) of the optic nerve in acute optic neuritis showed a medium correlation with visual acuity after treatment. Although visual acuity pre-treatment was little but nonsignificantly lower if Gd enhancement of the optic nerve was detected via orbital MRI, improvement of visual acuity after adequate therapy was significantly better (0.40 vs. 0.24; p = 0.04). Intraorbitally located Gd enhancing lesions were associated with worse visual improvement compared to canalicular, intracranial and chiasmal lesions (0.35 vs. 0.54; p = 0.02). Conclusion Orbital MRI is a broadly available, valuable tool for predicting the improvement of visual function. While the accurate individual prediction of long-term outcomes after appropriate therapy still remains difficult, lesion length of Gd enhancement and T2 lesion contribute to its prediction and a better short-term visual outcome may be associated with detection and localization of Gd enhancement along the optic nerve. PMID:25635863

  5. Baseline magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve provides limited predictive information on short-term recovery after acute optic neuritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Berg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In acute optic neuritis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may help to confirm the diagnosis as well as to exclude alternative diagnoses. Yet, little is known on the value of optic nerve imaging for predicting clinical symptoms or therapeutic outcome. PURPOSE: To evaluate the benefit of optic nerve MRI for predicting response to appropriate therapy and recovery of visual acuity. METHODS: Clinical data as well as visual evoked potentials (VEP and MRI results of 104 patients, who were treated at the Department of Neurology with clinically definite optic neuritis between December 2010 and September 2012 were retrospectively reviewed including a follow up within 14 days. RESULTS: Both length of the Gd enhancing lesion (r = -0.38; p = 0.001 and the T2 lesion (r = -0.25; p = 0.03 of the optic nerve in acute optic neuritis showed a medium correlation with visual acuity after treatment. Although visual acuity pre-treatment was little but nonsignificantly lower if Gd enhancement of the optic nerve was detected via orbital MRI, improvement of visual acuity after adequate therapy was significantly better (0.40 vs. 0.24; p = 0.04. Intraorbitally located Gd enhancing lesions were associated with worse visual improvement compared to canalicular, intracranial and chiasmal lesions (0.35 vs. 0.54; p = 0.02. CONCLUSION: Orbital MRI is a broadly available, valuable tool for predicting the improvement of visual function. While the accurate individual prediction of long-term outcomes after appropriate therapy still remains difficult, lesion length of Gd enhancement and T2 lesion contribute to its prediction and a better short-term visual outcome may be associated with detection and localization of Gd enhancement along the optic nerve.

  6. First Simultaneous Detection of Moving Magnetic Features in Photospheric Intensity and Magnetic Field Data

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Goode, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The formation and the temporal evolution of a bipolar moving magnetic feature (MMF) was studied with high spatial and temporal resolution. The photometric properties were observed with the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory using a broadband TiO filter (705.7 nm), while the magnetic field was analyzed using the spectropolarimetric data obtained by Hinode. For the first time, we observed a bipolar MMF simultaneously in intensity images and magnetic field data, and studied the details of its structure. The vector magnetic field and the Doppler velocity of the MMF were also studied. A bipolar MMF having its positive polarity closer to the negative penumbra formed being accompanied by a bright, filamentary structure in the TiO data connecting the MMF and a dark penumbral filament. A fast downflow (<2km/s) was detected at the positive polarity. The vector magnetic field obtained from the full Stokes inversion revealed that a bipolar MMF has a U-shaped magnetic field configuration. Our observation...

  7. FIRST SIMULTANEOUS DETECTION OF MOVING MAGNETIC FEATURES IN PHOTOSPHERIC INTENSITY AND MAGNETIC FIELD DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Goode, Philip, E-mail: eklim@bbso.njit.edu [Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314-9672 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The formation and the temporal evolution of a bipolar moving magnetic feature (MMF) was studied with high-spatial and temporal resolution. The photometric properties were observed with the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory using a broadband TiO filter (705.7 nm), while the magnetic field was analyzed using the spectropolarimetric data obtained by Hinode. For the first time, we observed a bipolar MMF simultaneously in intensity images and magnetic field data, and studied the details of its structure. The vector magnetic field and the Doppler velocity of the MMF were also studied. A bipolar MMF with its positive polarity closer to the negative penumbra formed, accompanied by a bright, filamentary structure in the TiO data connecting the MMF and a dark penumbral filament. A fast downflow ({<=}2 km s{sup -1}) was detected at the positive polarity. The vector magnetic field obtained from the full Stokes inversion revealed that a bipolar MMF has a U-shaped magnetic field configuration. Our observations provide a clear intensity counterpart of the observed MMF in the photosphere, and strong evidence of the connection between the MMF and the penumbral filament as a serpentine field.

  8. Noncontact speckle-based optical sensor for detection of glucose concentration using magneto-optic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozana, Nisan; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Anand, Arun; Javidi, Baharam; Polani, Sagi; Schwarz, Ariel; Shemer, Amir; Garcia, Javier; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2016-06-01

    We experimentally verify a speckle-based technique for noncontact measurement of glucose concentration in the bloodstream. The final device is intended to be a single wristwatch-style device containing a laser, a camera, and an alternating current (ac) electromagnet generated by a solenoid. The experiments presented are performed in vitro as proof of the concept. When a glucose substance is inserted into a solenoid generating an ac magnetic field, it exhibits Faraday rotation, which affects the temporal changes of the secondary speckle pattern distributions. The temporal frequency resulting from the ac magnetic field was found to have a lock-in amplification role, which increased the observability of the relatively small magneto-optic effect. Experimental results to support the proposed concept are presented.

  9. Magneto-optical studies of magnetization processes in high-Tc superconductors structure.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasko-Vlasox, V. K.

    1998-12-02

    Magneto-optical imaging is a powerful tool for nondestructive quality control and scientific research through visualization of magnetic fields around any magnetic flux or current carrying sample. It allows real time observations of domain structures and their transformations in magnetics, static and dynamic field patterns due to inhomogeneous currents in electric circuits and superconductors, and reveals distortions of the fields due to defects. In addition to qualitative pictures showing different details in the intensities of the magneto-optical images, one can obtain quantitative maps of field distributions and retrieve values of the underlying currents or magnetization variations. In this review we discuss the advantages of magneto-optics for studies of superconductors, show its place among other techniques, and report recent results in magneto-optical investigations of high temperature superconductors (HTS).

  10. Tailoring the optical bandgap and magnetization of cobalt ferrite thin films through controlled zinc doping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepanshu Sharma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this report, the tuning of the optical bandgap and saturation magnetization of cobalt ferrite (CFO thin films through low doping of zinc (Zn has been demonstrated. The Zn doped CFO thin films with doping concentrations (0 to 10% have been synthesized by ultrasonic assisted chemical vapour deposition technique. The optical bandgap varies from 1.48 to 1.88 eV and saturation magnetization varies from 142 to 221 emu/cc with the increase in the doping concentration and this change in the optical and magnetic properties is attributed to the change in the relative population of the Co2+ at the tetrahedral and octahedral sites. Raman study confirms the decrease in the population of Co2+ at tetrahedral sites with controlled Zn doping in CFO thin films. A quantitative analysis has been presented to explain the observed variation in the optical bandgap and saturation magnetization.

  11. Simultaneous imaging of magnetic field and temperature distributions by magneto optical indicator microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hanju; Jeon, Sunghoon; Friedman, Barry; Lee, Kiejin

    2017-01-01

    We report a simultaneous imaging method of the temperature and the magnetic field distributions based on the magneto optical indicator microscopy. The present method utilizes an optical indicator composed of a bismuth-substituted yttrium iron garnet thin film, and visualizes the magnetic field and temperature distributions through the magneto-optical effect and the temperature dependent optical absorption of the garnet thin film. By using a printed circuit board that carries an electric current as a device under test, we showed that the present method can visualize the magnetic field and temperature distribution simultaneously with a comparable temperature sensitivity (0.2 K) to that of existing conventional thermal imagers. The present technique provides a practical way to get a high resolution magnetic and thermal image at the same time, which is valuable in investigating how thermal variation results in a change of the operation state of a micrometer sized electronic device or material. PMID:28252018

  12. Estimation of the detectability of optical orphan afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, Y C; Dai, Z G

    2006-01-01

    Considering two main assumptions: no sideways expansion and the distribution of half-opening angle of jetted ejecta of gamma-ray bursts, we estimate the detectability of optical orphan afterglows. We show that the former assumption leads to more orphans to be detected while the latter greatly depresses the detectability compared with one single opening angle $\\theta_j=0.1$ model. We also consider the influence of other parameters, and find that the effects of ejecta energy $E_j$, post-jet-break temporal index $-\\alpha_2$ and the distribution of half-opening angle of the jet are important while the index of electron energy distribution $p$, electron energy equipartition factor $\\epsilon_e$ and environment density $n$ are insignificant. If the $E_j$ and $\\alpha_2$ are determined by other methods, one can constrain the distribution of half-opening angle of jets by observation of orphan afterglows.

  13. Miniature endoscopic optical coherence tomography for calculus detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Meng-Chun; Lin, Chun-Li; Kung, Che-Yen; Huang, Yi-Fung; Kuo, Wen-Chuan

    2015-08-20

    The effective treatment of periodontitis involves the detection and removal of subgingival dental calculus. However, subgingival calculus is more difficult to detect than supragingival calculus because it is firmly attached to root surfaces within periodontal pockets. To achieve a smooth root surface, clinicians often remove excessive amounts of root structure because of decreased visibility. In addition, enamel pearl, a rare type of ectopic enamel formation on the root surface, can easily be confused with dental calculus in the subgingival environment. In this study, we developed a fiber-probe swept-source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) technique and combined it with the quantitative measurement of an optical parameter [standard deviation (SD) of the optical coherence tomography (OCT) intensity] to differentiate subgingival calculus from sound enamel, including enamel pearl. Two-dimensional circumferential images were constructed by rotating the miniprobe (0.9 mm diameter) while acquiring image lines, and the adjacent lines in each rotation were stacked to generate a three-dimensional volume. In OCT images, compared to sound enamel and enamel pearls, dental calculus showed significant differences (Pcalculus.

  14. Maximum Likelihood Sequence Detection Receivers for Nonlinear Optical Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel N. Maggio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The space-time whitened matched filter (ST-WMF maximum likelihood sequence detection (MLSD architecture has been recently proposed (Maggio et al., 2014. Its objective is reducing implementation complexity in transmissions over nonlinear dispersive channels. The ST-WMF-MLSD receiver (i drastically reduces the number of states of the Viterbi decoder (VD and (ii offers a smooth trade-off between performance and complexity. In this work the ST-WMF-MLSD receiver is investigated in detail. We show that the space compression of the nonlinear channel is an instrumental property of the ST-WMF-MLSD which results in a major reduction of the implementation complexity in intensity modulation and direct detection (IM/DD fiber optic systems. Moreover, we assess the performance of ST-WMF-MLSD in IM/DD optical systems with chromatic dispersion (CD and polarization mode dispersion (PMD. Numerical results for a 10 Gb/s, 700 km, and IM/DD fiber-optic link with 50 ps differential group delay (DGD show that the number of states of the VD in ST-WMF-MLSD can be reduced ~4 times compared to an oversampled MLSD. Finally, we analyze the impact of the imperfect channel estimation on the performance of the ST-WMF-MLSD. Our results show that the performance degradation caused by channel estimation inaccuracies is low and similar to that achieved by existing MLSD schemes (~0.2 dB.

  15. Automated Detection and Tracking of Solar Magnetic Bright Points

    CERN Document Server

    Crockett, P J; Mathioudakis, M; Keenan, F P

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic Bright Points (MBPs) in the internetwork are among the smallest objects in the solar photosphere and appear bright against the ambient environment. An algorithm is presented that can be used for the automated detection of the MBPs in the spatial and temporal domains. The algorithm works by mapping the lanes through intensity thresholding. A compass search, combined with a study of the intensity gradient across the detected objects, allows the disentanglement of MBPs from bright pixels within the granules. Object growing is implemented to account for any pixels that might have been removed when mapping the lanes. The images are stabilized by locating long-lived objects that may have been missed due to variable light levels and seeing quality. Tests of the algorithm employing data taken with the Swedish Solar Telescope (SST), reveal that ~90% of MBPs within a 75"x 75" field of view are detected.

  16. Fully automated procedure for ship detection using optical satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbane, C.; Pecoul, E.; Demagistri, L.; Petit, M.

    2009-01-01

    Ship detection from remote sensing imagery is a crucial application for maritime security which includes among others traffic surveillance, protection against illegal fisheries, oil discharge control and sea pollution monitoring. In the framework of a European integrated project GMES-Security/LIMES, we developed an operational ship detection algorithm using high spatial resolution optical imagery to complement existing regulations, in particular the fishing control system. The automatic detection model is based on statistical methods, mathematical morphology and other signal processing techniques such as the wavelet analysis and Radon transform. This paper presents current progress made on the detection model and describes the prototype designed to classify small targets. The prototype was tested on panchromatic SPOT 5 imagery taking into account the environmental and fishing context in French Guiana. In terms of automatic detection of small ship targets, the proposed algorithm performs well. Its advantages are manifold: it is simple and robust, but most of all, it is efficient and fast, which is a crucial point in performance evaluation of advanced ship detection strategies.

  17. Digital balanced detection for fast optical computerized tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz, Rehan; Ozanyan, Krikor B.

    2006-10-01

    Analogue Balanced Photo-detection has found extensive usage in high- sensitivity small signal applications e.g. coherent heterodyne detection. It is particularly effective for laser intensity noise removal. Nevertheless, the high cost of the commercially available analogue systems makes them unsuitable for multi-channel applications, such as fast tomography. In this paper a flexible, scalable, inexpensive and compact solution for multi channel digital balanced detection is presented. The proposed system has two components: an analogue front-end, comprising a differential photodiode amplifier for minimizing the external interference noise, and a digital balanced noise remover. The latter component initially calculates a balancing factor (BF) from the average power ratio of the signal and reference photocurrents, measured with the object removed from the signal path. Three digital balancing algorithms (DBAx) are considered for subsequent processing. In DBA1, BF is directly used in real-time ratiometric calculations. In DBA2, the BF is adjusted in real time by monitoring the window-averaged power of the received photocurrents. In DBA3, first the baseline is removed using differentiation and then ratiometric detection is performed. Using the digital alternative only one measurement of the reference beam is necessary for single-source, multi-channel detection systems. The data from multiple channels are processed in parallel by pipelined hardware, configured as a state machine. The proposed system leads to a fast optical computerized tomography system using digital balanced detection.

  18. Optical detection of the quantization of collective atomic motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahms, Nathan; Botter, Thierry; Schreppler, Sydney; Brooks, Daniel W C; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2012-03-30

    We directly measure the quantized collective motion of a gas of thousands of ultracold atoms, coupled to light in a high-finesse optical cavity. We detect strong asymmetries, as high as 3:1, in the intensity of light scattered into low- and high-energy motional sidebands. Owing to high cavity-atom cooperativity, the optical output of the cavity contains a spectroscopic record of the energy exchanged between light and motion, directly quantifying the heat deposited by a quantum position measurement's backaction. Such backaction selectively causes the phonon occupation of the observed collective modes to increase with the measurement rate. These results, in addition to providing a method for calibrating the motion of low-occupation mechanical systems, offer new possibilities for investigating collective modes of degenerate gases and for diagnosing optomechanical measurement backaction.

  19. SQUID-Detected Magnetic Resonance Imaging in MicroteslaFields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moessle, Michael; Hatridge, Michael; Clarke, John

    2006-08-14

    amplitude in MRI using laser polarized noble gases such as {sup 3}He or {sup 129}Xe (10-12). Hyperpolarized gases were used successfully to image the human lung in fields on the order of several mT (13-15). To overcome the sensitivity loss of Faraday detection at low frequencies, ultrasensitive magnetometers based on the Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) (16) are used to detect NMR and MRI signals (17-24). Recently, SQUID-based MRI systems capable of acquiring in vivo images have appeared. For example, in the 10-mT system of Seton et al. (18) signals are coupled to a SQUID via a superconducting tuned circuit, while Clarke and coworkers (22, 25, 26) developed a system at 132 {micro}T with an untuned input circuit coupled to a SQUID. In a quite different approach, atomic magnetometers have been used recently to detect the magnetization (27) and NMR signal (28) of hyperpolarized gases. This technique could potentially be used for low-field MRI in the future. The goal of this review is to summarize the current state-of-the-art of MRI in microtesla fields detected with SQUIDs. The principles of SQUIDs and NMR are briefly reviewed. We show that very narrow NMR linewidths can be achieved in low magnetic fields that are quite inhomogeneous, with illustrative examples from spectroscopy. After describing our ultralow-field MRI system, we present a variety of images. We demonstrate that in microtesla fields the longitudinal relaxation T{sub 1} is much more material dependent than is the case in high fields; this results in a substantial improvement in 'T{sub 1}-weighted contrast imaging'. After outlining the first attempts to combine microtesla NMR with magnetoencephalography (MEG) (29), we conclude with a discussion of future directions.

  20. Tapered optical fiber sensor for chemical pollutants detection in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irigoyen, Maite; Sánchez-Martin, Jose Antonio; Bernabeu, Eusebio; Zamora, Alba

    2017-04-01

    Three tapered silica optical fibers, uncoated and coated with metallic (Al or Cu) and dielectric layers (TiO2), are employed to determine the presence of oil and Hazardous and Noxious Substances (HNS from now on) in water, by means of the measurement of their spectral transmittance. With our experimental assembly, the presence of oil and HNS spills can be detected employing the three different kinds of tapers, since the complete range of refractive indices of the pollutants (1.329-1.501) is covered with these tapers. The most suitable spectral range to detect the presence of a chemical pollutant in seawater has been identified and a complete spectral characterization of the three types of optical fiber tapers has been carried out. The results obtained show that, in general terms, these devices working together can be employed for the early detection of oil and HNS spills in seawater in a marine industrial environment. These sensors have many advantages, such as its low cost, its simplicity and versatility (with interesting properties as quick response and repeatability), and especially that they can be self-cleaned with seawater in motion.

  1. Multiplexed detection of biological agents using optical microchip sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatta, D.; McDonnell, M. B.; Perkins, E.

    2010-10-01

    A multi-channel optical microchip sensor system suitable for real-time, label-free detection of a wide range of biological agents is presented. SpectroSensTM chips containing multiple high-precision planar Bragg gratings are exploited as lowcost, robust refractive index sensors. Sensitivity to biological agents is conferred by functionalising individual sensing regions with different antibodies selected against numerous targets of interest. Antigen binding to the surfaceimmobilised antibodies results in localised changes in refractive index; upon laser-induced interrogation of the sensing region via optical fibres, these antibody-antigen interactions manifest as increases in wavelength of light reflected from the sensor chip. Real-time detection of multiple biological agents including bacterial cells/spores, viruses and toxins has been demonstrated. Further improvements to sensor performance including physical and chemical methods are also investigated. This multi-analyte capability highlights the potential use of this sensing technology in applications ranging from bio-hazard detection for defence purposes to point-of-care clinical diagnostics.

  2. All optical contention detection and resolution for asynchronous variable length optical packets switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Rim; Farhat, Amel; Menif, Mourad

    2016-04-01

    We proposed a novel 2×2 all optical packet switching router architecture supporting asynchronous, labelled and variablelength packet. A proof of concept through Matlab Simulink simulation is validated. Then we discussed the three possible scenarios to demonstrate the contention resolution technique based on deflection routing. We have showing that the contending packet is detected and forwarded according FIFO (First In First Out) strategy to another output.

  3. The Magnetic Physical Optics Scattered Field in Terms of a Line Integral

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meincke, Peter; Breinbjerg, Olav; Jørgensen, Erik

    2000-01-01

    An exact line integral representation Is derived for the magnetic physical optics field scattered by a perfectly electrically conducting planar plate illuminated by a magnetic Hertzian dipole. A numerical example is presented to illustrate the exactness of the line integral representation...

  4. Optically probed symmetry breaking in the chiral magnet Cu2OSeO3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, R. B.; Vergara, I.; Schaefer, S. D.; Bischoff, D.; Aqeel, A.; Palstra, T. T. M.; Grueninger, M.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the linear optical properties of the chiral magnet Cu2OSeO3, specifically associated with the absence of inversion symmetry, the chiral crystallographic structure, and magnetic order. Through spectroscopic ellipsometry, we observe local crystal-field excitations below the charge-transfe

  5. An Exact Line Integral Representation of the Magnetic Physical Optics Scattered Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meincke, Peter; Breinbjerg, Olav; Jørgensen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    An exact line integral representation is derived for the magnetic physical optics field scattered by a perfectly electrically conducting planar plate illuminated by electric or magnetic Hertzian dipoles. The positions of source and observation points can be almost arbitrary. Numerical examples...

  6. Simulation of a tunable optically pumped terahertz intersubband laser with diluted magnetic semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popadić, M.; Milanović, V.; Ikonić, Z.; Indijn, D.

    2006-01-01

    A simulation of an optically pumped laser based on a ZnSe/Zn1−yCdySe double quantum well with a Zn1−xMnxSe diluted magnetic semiconductor barrier is presented. Giant Zeeman splitting in diluted magnetic semiconductors leads to splitting of electronic states, which in turn leads to tunability of lase

  7. Faraday rotation and magneto-optical figure of merit for the magnetite magnetic fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalandadze L.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, using magnetite magnetic fluids as examples, we consider the optical and magneto-optical properties of magnetic fluids based on particles of magnetic oxides, for the optical constants of the material of which, n and k , the relation k2 ≺≺ n2 holds. In this work the Faraday rotation is represented within the theoretical Maxwell-Garnett model. A theoretical analysis has shown that Faraday rotation for magnetic fluids is related to the Faraday rotation on the material of particles by the simple relation. According to this result  in specific experimental conditions the values of the Faraday rotation prorate to q , which is the occupancy of the volume of the magnetic fluid with magnetic particles and spectral dependences of effect in magnetic fluid and in the proper bulk magnetic are similar. We also show that the values of the magneto-optical figure of merit for ultrafine medium and for the bulk material are equal.

  8. Dynamic Vehicle Detection via the Use of Magnetic Field Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markevicius, Vytautas; Navikas, Dangirutis; Zilys, Mindaugas; Andriukaitis, Darius; Valinevicius, Algimantas; Cepenas, Mindaugas

    2016-01-19

    The vehicle detection process plays the key role in determining the success of intelligent transport management system solutions. The measurement of distortions of the Earth's magnetic field using magnetic field sensors served as the basis for designing a solution aimed at vehicle detection. In accordance with the results obtained from research into process modeling and experimentally testing all the relevant hypotheses an algorithm for vehicle detection using the state criteria was proposed. Aiming to evaluate all of the possibilities, as well as pros and cons of the use of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) sensors in the transport flow control process, we have performed a series of experiments with various vehicles (or different series) from several car manufacturers. A comparison of 12 selected methods, based on either the process of determining the peak signal values and their concurrence in time whilst calculating the delay, or by measuring the cross-correlation of these signals, was carried out. It was established that the relative error can be minimized via the Z component cross-correlation and Kz criterion cross-correlation methods. The average relative error of vehicle speed determination in the best case did not exceed 1.5% when the distance between sensors was set to 2 m.

  9. Single spin detection by magnetic resonance force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugar, D; Budakian, R; Mamin, H J; Chui, B W

    2004-07-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is well known as a powerful technique for visualizing subsurface structures with three-dimensional spatial resolution. Pushing the resolution below 1 micro m remains a major challenge, however, owing to the sensitivity limitations of conventional inductive detection techniques. Currently, the smallest volume elements in an image must contain at least 10(12) nuclear spins for MRI-based microscopy, or 10(7) electron spins for electron spin resonance microscopy. Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) was proposed as a means to improve detection sensitivity to the single-spin level, and thus enable three-dimensional imaging of macromolecules (for example, proteins) with atomic resolution. MRFM has also been proposed as a qubit readout device for spin-based quantum computers. Here we report the detection of an individual electron spin by MRFM. A spatial resolution of 25 nm in one dimension was obtained for an unpaired spin in silicon dioxide. The measured signal is consistent with a model in which the spin is aligned parallel or anti-parallel to the effective field, with a rotating-frame relaxation time of 760 ms. The long relaxation time suggests that the state of an individual spin can be monitored for extended periods of time, even while subjected to a complex set of manipulations that are part of the MRFM measurement protocol.

  10. Dynamic Vehicle Detection via the Use of Magnetic Field Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vytautas Markevicius

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The vehicle detection process plays the key role in determining the success of intelligent transport management system solutions. The measurement of distortions of the Earth’s magnetic field using magnetic field sensors served as the basis for designing a solution aimed at vehicle detection. In accordance with the results obtained from research into process modeling and experimentally testing all the relevant hypotheses an algorithm for vehicle detection using the state criteria was proposed. Aiming to evaluate all of the possibilities, as well as pros and cons of the use of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR sensors in the transport flow control process, we have performed a series of experiments with various vehicles (or different series from several car manufacturers. A comparison of 12 selected methods, based on either the process of determining the peak signal values and their concurrence in time whilst calculating the delay, or by measuring the cross-correlation of these signals, was carried out. It was established that the relative error can be minimized via the Z component cross-correlation and Kz criterion cross-correlation methods. The average relative error of vehicle speed determination in the best case did not exceed 1.5% when the distance between sensors was set to 2 m.

  11. Modeling and Control of Magnetic Fluid Deformable Mirrors for Adaptive Optics Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zhizheng; Ben Amara, Foued

    2013-01-01

    Modeling and Control of Magnetic Fluid Deformable Mirrors for Adaptive Optics Systems presents a novel design of wavefront correctors based on magnetic fluid deformable mirrors (MFDM) as well as corresponding control algorithms. The presented wavefront correctors are characterized by their linear, dynamic response. Various mirror surface shape control algorithms are presented along with experimental evaluations of the performance of the resulting adaptive optics systems. Adaptive optics (AO) systems are used in various fields of application to enhance the performance of optical systems, such as imaging, laser, free space optical communication systems, etc. This book is intended for undergraduate and graduate students, professors, engineers, scientists and researchers working on the design of adaptive optics systems and their various emerging fields of application. Zhizheng Wu is an associate professor at Shanghai University, China. Azhar Iqbal is a research associate at the University of Toronto, Canada. Foue...

  12. Dual collection mode optical microscope with single-pixel detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, A. D.; Clemente, P.; Fernández-Alonso, Mercedes; Tajahuerce, E.; Lancis, J.

    2015-07-01

    In this work we have developed a single-pixel optical microscope that provides both re ection and transmission images of the sample under test by attaching a diamond pixel layout DMD to a commercial inverted microscope. Our system performs simultaneous measurements of re ection and transmission modes. Besides, in contrast with a conventional system, in our single-element detection system both images belong, unequivocally, to the same plane of the sample. Furthermore, we have designed an algorithm to modify the shape of the projected patterns that improves the resolution and prevents the artifacts produced by the diamond pixel architecture.

  13. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography with dual-balanced detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, En; Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Si; Luo, Yuemei; Wang, Nanshuo; Wang, Xianghong; Liu, Linbo

    2016-03-01

    We developed a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system employing dual-balanced detection (DBD) for direct current term suppression and SNR enhancement, especially for auto-autocorrelation artifacts reduction. The DBD was achieved by using a beam splitter to building a free-space Michelson interferometer, which generated two interferometric spectra with a phase difference of π. These two phase-opposed spectra were guided to the spectrometer through two single mode fibers of the 8 fiber v-groove array and acquired by ultizing the upper two lines of a three-line CCD camera. We rotated this fiber v-groove array by 1.35 degrees to focus two spectra onto the first and second line of the CCD camera. Two spectra were aligned by optimum spectrum matching algorithm. By subtracting one spectrum from the other, this dual-balanced detection system achieved a direct current term suppression of ~30 dB, SNR enhancement of ~3 dB, and auto-autocorrelation artifacts reduction of ~10 dB experimentally. Finally we respectively validated the feasibility and performance of dual-balanced detection by imaging a glass plate and swine corneal tissue ex vivo. The quality of images obtained using dual-balanced detection was significantly improved with regard to the conventional single-detection (SD) images.

  14. Multistage optical smoke detection approach for smoke alarm systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truc Kim Thi; Kim, Jong-Myon

    2013-05-01

    We propose a novel multistage smoke detection algorithm based on inherent optical characteristics such as diffusion, color, and texture of smoke. Moving regions in a video frame are detected by an approximate median background subtraction method using the diffusion behavior of smoke. These moving regions are segmented by a fuzzy C-means (FCM) clustering algorithm that uses the hue and saturation components of moving pixels in the hue-saturation-intensity color space. A decision rule is used to select candidate smoke regions from smoke-colored FCM clusters. An object tracking approach is employed in the candidate smoke region to detect candidate smoke objects in the video frame, and image texture parameters are extracted from these objects using a gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). The thirteen GLCM features are selected to constitute the feature vector by applying principal components analysis, resulting in high-accuracy smoke detection. Finally, a back propagation neural network is utilized as a classifier to discriminate smoke and nonsmoke using the selected feature vector. Experimental results using a standard experimental dataset of video clips demonstrate that the proposed approach outperforms state-of-the-art smoke detection approaches in terms of accuracy, making real-life implementation feasible.

  15. Detecting single DNA molecule interactions with optical microcavities (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Detecting molecules and their interactions lies at the heart of all biosensor devices, which have important applications in health, environmental monitoring and biomedicine. Achieving biosensing capability at the single molecule level is, moreover, a particularly important goal since single molecule biosensors would not only operate at the ultimate detection limit by resolving individual molecular interactions, but they could also monitor biomolecular properties which are otherwise obscured in ensemble measurements. For example, a single molecule biosensor could resolve the fleeting interaction kinetics between a molecule and its receptor, with immediate applications in clinical diagnostics. We have now developed a label-free biosensing platform that is capable of monitoring single DNA molecules and their interaction kinetics[1], hence achieving an unprecedented sensitivity in the optical domain, Figure 1. We resolve the specific contacts between complementary oligonucleotides, thereby detecting DNA strands with less than 2.4 kDa molecular weight. Furthermore we can discern strands with single nucleotide mismatches by monitoring their interaction kinetics. Our device utilizes small glass microspheres as optical transducers[1,2, 3], which are capable of increasing the number of interactions between a light beam and analyte molecules. A prism is used to couple the light beam into the microsphere. Ourr biosensing approach resolves the specific interaction kinetics between single DNA fragments. The optical transducer is assembled in a simple three-step protocol, and consists of a gold nanorod attached to a glass microsphere, where the surface of the nanorod is further modified with oligonucleotide receptors. The interaction kinetics of an oligonucleotide receptor with DNA fragments in the surrounding aqueous solution is monitored at the single molecule level[1]. The light remains confined inside the sphere where it is guided by total internal reflections along a

  16. Simplified analytic formula for magneto-optical Kerr effects in ultrathin magnetic films.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, C.-Y.

    1998-06-10

    Expressions are presented for various magneto-optical Kerr effects in the ultrathin film limit with arbitrary magnetization direction by considering the multiple reflections within an optically thin film. The Kerr effect of p- and s-polarization consists of products of two factors: the prefactor, dependent only on the optical parameters of the system, and the main factor of the polar Kerr effect for normal incidence in the ultrathin limit.

  17. A porous silicon optical microcavity for sensitive bacteria detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Sha; Huang Jianfeng; Cai Lintao, E-mail: lt.cai@siat.ac.cn [CAS Key Lab of Health Informatics, Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Cancer Nanotechnology, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055 (China)

    2011-10-21

    A porous silicon microcavity (PSM) is highly sensitive to subtle interface changes due to its high surface area, capillary condensation ability and a narrow resonance peak ({approx}10 nm). Based on the well-defined optical properties of a PSM, we successfully fabricated a bacteria detection chip for molecular or subcellular analysis by surface modification using undecylenic acid (UA), and the specific recognition binding of vancomycin to the D-alanyl-D-alanine of bacteria. The red shift of the PSM resonance peak showed a good linear relationship with bacteria concentration ranging from 100 to 1000 bacteria ml{sup -1} at the level of relative standard deviation of 0.994 and detection limit of 20 bacteria ml{sup -1}. The resulting PSM sensors demonstrated high sensitivity, good reproducibility, fast response and low cost for biosensing.

  18. Chirality detection of enantiomers using twisted optical metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Askarpour, Amir N.; Sun, Liuyang; Shi, Jinwei; Li, Xiaoqin; Alù, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Many naturally occurring biomolecules, such as amino acids, sugars and nucleotides, are inherently chiral. Enantiomers, a pair of chiral isomers with opposite handedness, often exhibit similar physical and chemical properties due to their identical functional groups and composition, yet show different toxicity to cells. Detecting enantiomers in small quantities has an essential role in drug development to eliminate their unwanted side effects. Here we exploit strong chiral interactions with plasmonic metamaterials with specifically designed optical response to sense chiral molecules down to zeptomole levels, several orders of magnitude smaller than what is typically detectable with conventional circular dichroism spectroscopy. In particular, the measured spectra reveal opposite signs in the spectral regime directly associated with different chiral responses, providing a way to univocally assess molecular chirality. Our work introduces an ultrathin, planarized nanophotonic interface to sense chiral molecules with inherently weak circular dichroism at visible and near-infrared frequencies. PMID:28120825

  19. Chirality detection of enantiomers using twisted optical metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Askarpour, Amir N.; Sun, Liuyang; Shi, Jinwei; Li, Xiaoqin; Alù, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Many naturally occurring biomolecules, such as amino acids, sugars and nucleotides, are inherently chiral. Enantiomers, a pair of chiral isomers with opposite handedness, often exhibit similar physical and chemical properties due to their identical functional groups and composition, yet show different toxicity to cells. Detecting enantiomers in small quantities has an essential role in drug development to eliminate their unwanted side effects. Here we exploit strong chiral interactions with plasmonic metamaterials with specifically designed optical response to sense chiral molecules down to zeptomole levels, several orders of magnitude smaller than what is typically detectable with conventional circular dichroism spectroscopy. In particular, the measured spectra reveal opposite signs in the spectral regime directly associated with different chiral responses, providing a way to univocally assess molecular chirality. Our work introduces an ultrathin, planarized nanophotonic interface to sense chiral molecules with inherently weak circular dichroism at visible and near-infrared frequencies.

  20. State-selective all-optical detection of Rydberg atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Karlewski, Florian; Grimmel, Jens; Sándor, Nóra; Fortágh, and József

    2015-01-01

    We present an all-optical protocol for detecting population in a selected Rydberg state of alkali atoms. The detection scheme is based on the interaction of an ensemble of ultracold atoms with two laser pulses: one weak probe pulse which is resonant with the transition between the ground state and the first excited state, and a pulse with high intensity which couples the first excited state to the selected Rydberg state. We show that by monitoring the absorption signal of the probe laser over time, one can deduce the initial population of the Rydberg state. Furthermore, it is shown that - for suitable experimental conditions - the dynamical absorption curve contains information on the initial coherence between the ground state and the selected Rydberg state. We present the results of a proof-of-principle measurement performed on a cold gas of $^{87}$Rb atoms. The method is expected to find application in quantum computing protocols based on Rydberg atoms.

  1. Amylin Detection with a Miniature Optical-Fiber Based Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaowen; Ann, Matsko; Hughes, Adam; Reeves, Mark

    We present results of a biosensor based on shifts in the localized surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles self-assembled on the end of an optical fiber. This system allows for detection of protein expression in low sensing volumes and for scanning in cell cultures and tissue samples. Positive and negative controls were done using biotin/avidin and the BSA/Anti-BSA system. These demonstrate that detection is specific and sensitive to nanomolar levels. Sensing of amylin, an important protein for pancreatic function, was performed with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. The measured data demonstrates the difference in sensitivity to the two types of antibodies, and titration experiments establish the sensitivity of the sensor. Further experiments demonstrate that the sensor can be regenerated and then reused.

  2. Interplay of structural, optical and magnetic properties in Gd doped CeO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soni, S.; Dalela, S., E-mail: sdphysics@rediffmail.com [Department of Pure & Applied Physics, University of Kota, Kota-324007, Rajasthan (India); Kumar, Sudish [Department of Physics, Mohan Lal Sukhadia University, Udaipur, Rajasthan (India); Meena, R. S. [National Physical Laboratory, Pusa, New-Delhi (India); Vats, V. S. [Department of Physics, Govt. College, Dhaliara (India)

    2015-06-24

    In this research wok systematic investigation on the synthesis, characterization, optical and magnetic properties of Ce{sub 1-x}Gd{sub x}O{sub 2} (where x=0.02, 0.04, 0.06, and 0.10) synthesized using the Solid-state method. Structural, Optical and Magnetic properties of the samples were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy and VSM. Fluorite structure is confirmed from the XRD measurement on Gd doped CeO{sub 2} samples. Magnetic studies showed that the Gd doped polycrystalline samples display room temperature ferromagnetism and the ferromagnetic ordering strengthens with the Gd concentration.

  3. Magnetization reversal in coupled magneto-optical BiDy-iron garnet films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucera, M. E-mail: kucera@karlov.mff.cuni.cz; Gerber, R.; Teggart, B.J

    2000-09-01

    New magneto-optical properties of (BiDy){sub 3}(FeGa){sub 5}O{sub 12} garnet films prepared by pulsed laser deposition are reported. Double-layer films of fine granular microstructure have been prepared by varying oxygen pressure during the deposition process. The individual layers exhibited different magnetic compensation temperatures. The magneto-optical hysteresis loops confirmed that the layers are magnetically coupled. Such a coupling, described here and observed in the granular oxide garnet materials for the first time, represents a new switching system as an alternative to exchange-coupled magnetic metallic thin layers.

  4. Multipolar third-harmonic generation driven by optically-induced magnetic resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnova, Daria A; Smirnov, Lev A; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the third-harmonic generation from high-index dielectric nanoparticles and discuss the basic features and multipolar nature of the parametrically generated electromagnetic fields near the Mie-type optical resonances in silicon particles. By combining both analytical and numerical methods, we study the nonlinear scattering from simple nanoparticle geometries such as spheres and disks driven by the magnetic dipole resonance. We reveal the approaches for manipulating and directing the resonantly enhanced nonlinear emission with subwavelength all-dielectric structures that can be of a particular interest for a design of nonlinear optical antennas and engineering the magnetic optical nonlinear response at nanoscale.

  5. Breast cancer detection using phase contrast diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Qizhi; Li, Changqing; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Fajardo, Laurie L.; Jiang, Huabei

    2007-02-01

    In this report, a phase-contrast diffuse optical tomography system, which can measure the refractive indices of human breast masses in vivo, is described. To investigate the utility of phase-contrast diffuse optical tomography (PCDOT) for differentiation of malignant and benign breast masses in humans, and to compare PCDOT with conventional diffuse optical tomography (DOT) for analysis of breast masses in humans. 35 breast masses were imaged in 33 patients (mean age = 51 years; range 22-80 years) using PCDOT. Images characterizing the tissue refractive index, absorption and scattering of breast masses were obtained with a finite element-based reconstruction algorithm. The accuracies of absorption and scattering images were compared with images of refractive index in light of the pathology results. Absorption and scattering images were unable to accurately discriminate benign from malignant lesions. Malignant lesions tended to have decreased refractive index allowing them to discriminate from benign lesions in most cases. The sensitivity, specificity, false positive value, and overall accuracy for refractive index were 81.8%, 70.8%, 29.2%, and 74.3%, respectively. Overall we show that benign and malignant breast masses in humans demonstrate different refractive index and differences in refractive index properties can be used to discriminate benign from malignant masses in patients with high accuracy. This opens up a new avenue for improved breast cancer detection using NIR diffusing light.

  6. Self-Homodyne Detection in Optical Communication Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J. Puttnam

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We review work on self-homodyne detection (SHD for optical communication systems. SHD uses a transmitted pilot-tone (PT, originating from the transmitter laser, to exploit phase noise cancellation at a coherent receiver and to enable transmitter linewidth tolerance and potential energy savings. We give an overview of SHD performance, outlining the key contributors to the optical signal-to-noise ratio penalty compared to equivalent intradyne systems, and summarize the advantages, differences and similarities between schemes using polarization-division multiplexed PTs (PDM-SHD and those using space-division multiplexed PTs (SDM-SHD. For PDM-SHD, we review the extensive work on the transmission of advanced modulation formats and techniques to minimize the trade-off with spectral efficiency, as well as recent work on digital SHD, where the SHD receiver is combined with an polarization-diversity ID front-end receiver to provide both polarization and modulation format alignment. We then focus on SDM-SHD systems, describing experimental results using multi-core fibers (MCFs with up to 19 cores, including high capacity transmission with broad-linewidth lasers and experiments incorporating SDM-SHD in networking. Additionally, we discuss the requirement for polarization tracking of the PTs at the receiver and path length alignment and review some variants of SHD before outlining the future challenges of self-homodyne optical transmission and gaps in current knowledge.

  7. Method of detecting luminescent target ions with modified magnetic microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Kaminski, Michael D

    2014-05-13

    This invention provides methods of using modified magnetic microspheres to extract target ions from a sample in order to detect their presence in a microfluidic environment. In one or more embodiments, the microspheres are modified with molecules on the surface that allow the target ions in the sample to form complexes with specific ligand molecules on the microsphere surface. In one or more embodiments, the microspheres are modified with molecules that sequester the target ions from the sample, but specific ligand molecules in solution subsequently re-extract the target ions from the microspheres into the solution, where the complexes form independent of the microsphere surface. Once the complexes form, they are exposed to an excitation wavelength light source suitable for exciting the target ion to emit a luminescent signal pattern. Detection of the luminescent signal pattern allows for determination of the presence of the target ions in the sample.

  8. Optical probe of Heisenberg-Kitaev magnetism in α -RuCl3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandilands, Luke J.; Sohn, C. H.; Park, H. J.; Kim, So Yeun; Kim, K. W.; Sears, Jennifer A.; Kim, Young-June; Noh, Tae Won

    2016-11-01

    We report a temperature-dependent optical spectroscopic study of the Heisenberg-Kitaev magnet α -RuCl3 . Our measurements reveal anomalies in the optical response near the magnetic ordering temperature. At higher temperatures, we observe a redistribution of spectral weight over a broad energy range that is associated with nearest-neighbor spin-spin correlations. This finding is consistent with highly frustrated magnetic interactions and in agreement with theoretical expectations for this class of material. The optical data also reveal significant electron-hole interaction effects, including a bound excitonic state. These results demonstrate a clear coupling between charge and spin degrees of freedom and provide insight into the properties of thermally disordered Heisenberg-Kitaev magnets.

  9. Non-Intrusive Magneto-Optic Detecting System for Investigations of Air Switching Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Guogang; Dong, Jinlong; Liu, Wanying; Geng, Yingsan

    2014-07-01

    In current investigations of electric arc plasmas, experiments based on modern testing technology play an important role. To enrich the testing methods and contribute to the understanding and grasping of the inherent mechanism of air switching arcs, in this paper, a non-intrusive detecting system is described that combines the magneto-optic imaging (MOI) technique with the solution to inverse electromagnetic problems. The detecting system works in a sequence of main steps as follows: MOI of the variation of the arc flux density over a plane, magnetic field information extracted from the magneto-optic (MO) images, arc current density distribution and spatial pattern reconstruction by inverting the resulting field data. Correspondingly, in the system, an MOI set-up is designed based on the Faraday effect and the polarization properties of light, and an intelligent inversion algorithm is proposed that involves simulated annealing (SA). Experiments were carried out for high current (2 kA RMS) discharge cases in a typical low-voltage switchgear. The results show that the MO detection system possesses the advantages of visualization, high resolution and response, and electrical insulation, which provides a novel diagnostics tool for further studies of the arc.

  10. Fiber optic system design for vehicle detection and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedoma, Jan; Zboril, Ondrej; Fajkus, Marcel; Zavodny, Petr; Kepak, Stanislav; Bednarek, Lukas; Martinek, Radek; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Fiber optic interferometers belong to a group of highly sensitive and precise devices enabling to measure small changes in the deformation shapes, changes in pressure, temperature, vibration and so on. The basis of their activity is to evaluate the number of fringes over time, not changes in the intensity of the optical signal. The methodology described in the article is based on using the interferometer to monitor traffic density. The base of the solution is a Mach-Zehnder interferometer operating with single-mode G.652 optical fiber at the wavelength of 1550 nm excited by a DFB laser. The power distribution of the laser light into the individual arms of the interferometer is in the ratio 1:1. Realized measuring scheme was terminated by an optical receiver including InGaAs PIN photodiode. Registered signal from the photodetector was through 8 Hz high pass filter fed to the measuring card that captures the analog input voltage using an application written in LabView development environment. The interferometer was stored in a waterproof box and placed at the side of the road. Here panned individual transit of cars in his environs. Vertically across the road was placed in contact removable belt simulating a retarder, which was used when passing cars to create sufficient vibration response detecting interferometer. The results demonstrated that the individual vehicles passing around boxing showed characteristic amplitude spectra, which was unique for each object, and had sufficient value signal to noise ratio (SNR). The signal was processed by applications developed for the amplitude-frequency spectrum. Evaluated was the maximum amplitude of the signal and compared to the noise. The results were verified by repeated transit of the different types of cars.

  11. Optical transmission versus ac magnetization measurements for monitoring colloidal Ni nanorod rotational dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, M.; Tschöpe, A.

    2017-01-01

    Ni nanorods with an average length transmission of nanorod colloidal dispersions in alternating magnetic fields were measured and analyzed with the objective of comparing the intrinsic Brownian relaxation times obtained with the two methods. The different physical origin of the measured signal, related to different moments of the orientation distribution function, and the non-linear effects expected for the large magnetic moments of the Ni nanorods at common field amplitudes required a comprehensive modelling. The time-dependent magnetization and optical transmission in ac magnetic fields was derived by numerical solution of the Fokker-Planck equation. The simulated time-dependent magnetization and optical transmission at a given frequency and field amplitude were analyzed analogous to experimental data to determine characteristic relaxation frequencies. Empirical relationships were derived which enabled extraction of the intrinsic Brownian relaxation time from the characteristic frequencies measured in the non-linear regime. Despite large differences in the characteristic frequencies obtained from magnetization and optical transmission measurements, the retrieved intrinsic Brownian relaxation times were found to agree well. The potential of ac magnetic field-dependent optical transmission for biosensing applications was demonstrated by monitoring the adsorption of the protein gelatine on the nanorod labels.

  12. Engineering Rules for Optical Generation and Detection of High Speed Wireless Millimeter-wave Band Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caballero Jambrina, Antonio; Zibar, Darko; Sambaraju, Rakesh

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the design requirements for 40 Gbit/s wireless generation and detection in the millimeter-wave band, combining baseband optical I/Q modulation and coherent detection with wireless optical heterodyning generation and single-side band electro-optical modulation....

  13. An integrated CMOS detection system for optical short-pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Gun; Hong, Nam-Pyo; Choi, Young-Wan

    2014-03-01

    We present design of a front-end readout system consisting of charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) and pulse shaper for detection of stochastic and ultra-small semiconductor scintillator signal. The semiconductor scintillator is double sided silicon detector (DSSD) or avalanche photo detector (APD) for high resolution and peak signal reliability of γ-ray or X-ray spectroscopy. Such system commonly uses low noise multichannel CSA. Each CSA in multichannel includes continuous reset system based on tens of MΩ and charge-integrating capacitor in feedback loop. The high value feedback resistor requires large area and huge power consumption for integrated circuits. In this paper, we analyze these problems and propose a CMOS short pulse detection system with a novel CSA. The novel CSA is composed of continuous reset system with combination of diode connected PMOS and 100 fF. This structure has linearity with increased input charge quantity from tens of femto-coulomb to pico-coulomb. Also, the front-end readout system includes both slow and fast shapers for detecting CSA output and preventing pile-up distortion. Shaping times of fast and slow shapers are 150 ns and 1.4 μs, respectively. Simulation results of the CMOS detection system for optical short-pulse implemented in 0.18 μm CMOS technology are presented.

  14. Optical monitoring and detection of spinal cord ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rickson C Mesquita

    Full Text Available Spinal cord ischemia can lead to paralysis or paraparesis, but if detected early it may be amenable to treatment. Current methods use evoked potentials for detection of spinal cord ischemia, a decades old technology whose warning signs are indirect and significantly delayed from the onset of ischemia. Here we introduce and demonstrate a prototype fiber optic device that directly measures spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. This technical advance in neurological monitoring promises a new standard of care for detection of spinal cord ischemia and the opportunity for early intervention. We demonstrate the probe in an adult Dorset sheep model. Both open and percutaneous approaches were evaluated during pharmacologic, physiological, and mechanical interventions designed to induce variations in spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. The induced variations were rapidly and reproducibly detected, demonstrating direct measurement of spinal cord ischemia in real-time. In the future, this form of hemodynamic spinal cord diagnosis could significantly improve monitoring and management in a broad range of patients, including those undergoing thoracic and abdominal aortic revascularization, spine stabilization procedures for scoliosis and trauma, spinal cord tumor resection, and those requiring management of spinal cord injury in intensive care settings.

  15. Configuration of electro-optic fire source detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Ram Z.; Steiner, Zeev; Hofman, Nir

    2007-04-01

    The recent fighting activities in various parts of the world have highlighted the need for accurate fire source detection on one hand and fast "sensor to shooter cycle" capabilities on the other. Both needs can be met by the SPOTLITE system which dramatically enhances the capability to rapidly engage hostile fire source with a minimum of casualties to friendly force and to innocent bystanders. Modular system design enable to meet each customer specific requirements and enable excellent future growth and upgrade potential. The design and built of a fire source detection system is governed by sets of requirements issued by the operators. This can be translated into the following design criteria: I) Long range, fast and accurate fire source detection capability. II) Different threat detection and classification capability. III) Threat investigation capability. IV) Fire source data distribution capability (Location, direction, video image, voice). V) Men portability. ) In order to meet these design criteria, an optimized concept was presented and exercised for the SPOTLITE system. Three major modular components were defined: I) Electro Optical Unit -Including FLIR camera, CCD camera, Laser Range Finder and Marker II) Electronic Unit -including system computer and electronic. III) Controller Station Unit - Including the HMI of the system. This article discusses the system's components definition and optimization processes, and also show how SPOTLITE designers successfully managed to introduce excellent solutions for other system parameters.

  16. Detection of acute cerebral hemorrhage in rabbits by magnetic induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, J.; Jin, G.; Qin, M.X. [College of Biomedical Engineering and Medical Imaging, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China, College of Biomedical Engineering and Medical Imaging, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Wan, Z.B. [Experimental Animal Center, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China, Experimental Animal Center, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Wang, J.B.; Wang, C.; Guo, W.Y. [College of Electronic Engineering, Xidian University, Xi' an, China, College of Electronic Engineering, Xidian University, Xi' an (China); Xu, L.; Ning, X.; Xu, J.; Pu, X.J.; Chen, M.S. [College of Biomedical Engineering and Medical Imaging, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China, College of Biomedical Engineering and Medical Imaging, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Zhao, H.M. [Experimental Animal Center, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China, Experimental Animal Center, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2014-02-17

    Acute cerebral hemorrhage (ACH) is an important clinical problem that is often monitored and studied with expensive devices such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography. These devices are not readily available in economically underdeveloped regions of the world, emergency departments, and emergency zones. We have developed a less expensive tool for non-contact monitoring of ACH. The system measures the magnetic induction phase shift (MIPS) between the electromagnetic signals on two coils. ACH was induced in 6 experimental rabbits and edema was induced in 4 control rabbits by stereotactic methods, and their intracranial pressure and heart rate were monitored for 1 h. Signals were continuously monitored for up to 1 h at an exciting frequency of 10.7 MHz. Autologous blood was administered to the experimental group, and saline to the control group (1 to 3 mL) by injection of 1-mL every 5 min. The results showed a significant increase in MIPS as a function of the injection volume, but the heart rate was stable. In the experimental (ACH) group, there was a statistically significant positive correlation of the intracranial pressure and MIPS. The change of MIPS was greater in the ACH group than in the control group. This high-sensitivity system could detect a 1-mL change in blood volume. The MIPS was significantly related to the intracranial pressure. This observation suggests that the method could be valuable for detecting early warning signs in emergency medicine and critical care units.

  17. Detection of 610-MHz radio emission from hot magnetic stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, P.; Wade, G. A.; Sundqvist, J. O.; Oberoi, D.; Grunhut, J. H.; ud-Doula, A.; Petit, V.; Cohen, D. H.; Oksala, M. E.; David-Uraz, A.

    2015-09-01

    We have carried out a study of radio emission from a small sample of magnetic O- and B-type stars using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, with the goal of investigating their magnetospheres at low frequencies. These are the lowest frequency radio measurements ever obtained of hot magnetic stars. The observations were taken at random rotational phases in the 1390 and the 610 MHz bands. Out of the eight stars, we detect five B-type stars in both the 1390 and the 610 MHz bands. The three O-type stars were observed only in the 1390 MHz band, and no detections were obtained. We explain this result as a consequence of free-free absorption by the free-flowing stellar wind exterior to the confined magnetosphere. We also study the variability of individual stars. One star - HD 133880 - exhibits remarkably strong and rapid variability of its low-frequency flux density. We discuss the possibility of this emission being coherent emission as reported for CU Vir by Trigilio et al.

  18. a New Application of a Fiber Optic Gyro in Magnetic Borehole Logging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, J. B.; Leven, M.; Steveling, E.

    2002-12-01

    A borehole magnetometer from the Institute of Geophysics, University of Goettingen, Germany, was employed in Hole 1203A on Detroit Seamount. The tool consists of three fluxgate sensors which log the two horizontal (X, Y) and the vertical (Z) component of the magnetic induction with depth. For the first time, a fiber optic angular rate sensor was employed in a borehole tool to measure the rotation history during a log run in combination with fluxgate sensors. This rate sensor is an unconventional gyro since it does not have a spinning wheel. This is why it is free from the effects of gravity-induced errors, and with no moving parts, this sensor is insensitive to shock and vibration. It detects and measures angular rates by measuring the frequency difference between two contra-rotating light beams. A magnetic log was run in Hole 1203A on Detroit seamount from the rig floor to the total depth at 925 mbsf. The rotation history of the tool is determined by the accumulation of the rate during a log run. In Hole 1203A the tool rotated almost 60 times about its vertical body axis between the rig floor and the bottom of the hole. On its run back to the floor the tool followed nearly the same rotation history as on the downward run. Aligning to the ship axis and double checking the orientation with the initial orientation enabled changes in the heading of the ship and the Earth's rotation, which also affects the angular rate to be taken into account. It revealed that the difference between the initial and final orientation was less than 5 degrees. During the log run many strongly magnetized layers were encountered in the volcanic basement, which correlate well with sequences of massive and pillowed basalts recovered in the drill core. The anomalous field variations of the vertical component always points towards negative values, which indicates a general magnetic polarisation direction parallel to the present geomagnetic field. The natural remanent magnetization and

  19. Rapid pathogen detection with bacterial-assembled magnetic mesoporous silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Youn; Lee, Jiho; Lee, Hye Sun; Chang, Jeong Ho

    2014-03-15

    We report rapid and accurate pathogen detection by coupling with high efficiency magnetic separation of pathogen by Ni(2+)-heterogeneous magnetic mesoporous silica (Ni-HMMS) and real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. Ni-HMMS was developed with a significant incorporation of Fe particles within the silica mesopores by programmed thermal hydrogen reaction and functionalized with Ni(2+) ion on the surface by the wet impregnation process. High abundant Ni(2+) ions on the Ni-HMMS surface were able to assemble with cell wall component protein NikA (nickel-binding membrane protein), which contains several pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli O157:H7. NikA protein expression experiment showed the outstanding separation rate of the nikA gene-overexpressed E. coli (pSY-Nik) when comparing with wild-type E. coli (44.5 ± 13%) or not over-expressed E. coli (pSY-Nik) (53.2 ± 2.7%). Moreover, Ni-HMMS showed lower obstacle effect by large reaction volume (10 mL) than spherical core/shell-type silica magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with Ni(2+) (ca. 40 nm-diameters). Finally, the Ni-HMMS was successfully assessed to separate pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 and applied to direct and rapid RT-PCR to quantitative detection at ultralow concentration (1 Log10 cfu mL(-1)) in the real samples (milk and Staphylococcus aureus culture broth) without bacterial amplification and DNA extraction step.

  20. Structural; morphological; optical and magnetic properties of Mn doped ferromagnetic ZnO thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, R.; Neogi, S. K.; Banerjee, Aritra; Bandyopadhyay, S.

    2012-12-01

    The structural, optical and magnetic properties of the Zn1-xMnxO (0 disorder developed in the samples due to Mn doping. The films are of single phase in nature; no formation of any secondary phase has been detected from structural analysis. Absence of magnetic impurity phase in these films has been confirmed from morphological study also. Increasing tendency of lattice parameters and unit cell volume has been observed with increasing Mn doping concentration. The incorporation of Mn2+ ions introduces disorder in the system. That also leads to slight degradation in crystalline quality of the films with increasing doping. The grain size reduces with increase in Mn doping proportion. The band gaps shows red shift with doping and the width of localized states shows an increasing tendency with doping concentration. It is due to the formation of impurity band and trapping of Mn atoms, which leads to the generation of the defect states within the forbidden band. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra show gradual decrease of intensity of exitonic and defect related peaks with increasing Mn doping. Defect mediated intrinsic ferromagnetism has been observed even at room temperature for 5 at% Mn doped ZnO film. The strong presence of antiferromagnetic (AFM) interaction reduces the observed ferromagnetic moments.

  1. Structural, optical, magnetic and photocatalytic properties of Co doped CuS diluted magnetic semiconductor nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreelekha, N.; Subramanyam, K.; Amaranatha Reddy, D.; Murali, G.; Ramu, S.; Rahul Varma, K.; Vijayalakshmi, R. P.

    2016-08-01

    Pristine and Co doped covellite CuS nanoparticles were synthesized in aqueous solution by facile chemical co-precipitation method with Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic Acid (EDTA) as a stabilizing agent. EDAX measurements confirmed the presence of Co in the CuS host lattice. Hexagonal crystal structure of pure and Co doped CuS nanoparticles were authenticated by XRD patterns. TEM images indicated that sphere-shape of nanoparticles through a size ranging from 5 to 8 nm. The optical absorption edge moved to higher energies with increase in Co concentration as indicated by UV-vis spectroscopy. Magnetic measurements revealed that bare CuS sample show sign of diamagnetic character where as in Co doped nanoparticles augmentation of room temperature ferromagnetism was observed with increasing doping precursor concentrations. Photocatalytic performance of the pure and Co doped CuS nanoparticles were assessed by evaluating the degradation rate of rhodamine B solution under sun light irradiation. The 5% Co doped CuS nanoparticles provide evidence for high-quality photocatalytic activity.

  2. Effects of varying surfactant chain lengths on the magnetic, optical and hyperthermia properties of ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rablau, Corneliu; Vaishnava, Prem; Regmi, Rajesh; Sudakar, Chandran; Black, Correy; Lawes, Gavin; Naik, Ratna; Lavoie, Melissa; Kahn, David

    2009-03-01

    We report studies of the structural, magnetic, magneto-thermal and magneto-optic properties of dextran, oleic acid, lauric acid and myristic acid surfacted Fe3O4 nanoparticles of hydrodynamic sizes ranging from 32 nm to 92 nm. All the samples showed saturation magnetization of ˜50 emu/g, significantly smaller than the bulk value for Fe3O4, together with superparamagnetic behavior. The ac magnetization measurements on the dextran coated nanoparticles showed frequency dependent blocking temperature, consistent with superparamgnetic blocking. The ferrofluid heating rates in a 250 Gauss, 100 kHz ac magnetic field varied with the chain lengths of the surfactants, with higher heating rates for longer chains. DC-magnetic-field-induced light scattering patterns produced by two orthogonal He-Ne laser beams passing through the ferrofluid sample revealed different optical signatures for different surfactants.

  3. Ferrofluid thin films as optical gaussmeters proposed for field and magnetic moment sensing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swapna S Nair; S Rajesh; V S Abraham; M R Anantharaman

    2011-04-01

    Ferrofluids belonging to the series, NiFe1−Fe2O4 and ZnFe1−Fe2O4, were synthesized using cold co-precipitation. Liquid films of these ferrofluids were prepared by encapsulating the ferrofluids in between two optically smooth and ultrasonically cleaned glass plates. Magnetic field induced laser transmission through these ferrofluid films has been investigated. Magnetic field values can be calibrated in terms of output laser power in the low field region in which the variation is linear. This set up can be used as a cheap optical gaussmeter in the low field regime. Using the same set-up, the saturation magnetization of the sample used can also be calculated with a sample that is pre-characterized. Hence both magnetization of the sample, as well as applied magnetic field can be sensed and calculated with a precalibrated sample.

  4. Electronic structures and magnetic/optical properties of metal phthalocyanine complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Shintaro; Suzuki, Atsushi, E-mail: suzuki@mat.usp.ac.jp; Oku, Takeo [Department of Materials Science, The University of Shiga Prefecture. 2500 Hassaka, Hikone, Shiga 522-8533 (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    Electronic structures and magnetic / optical properties of metal phthalocyanine complexes were studied by quantum calculations using density functional theory. Effects of central metal and expansion of π orbital on aromatic ring as conjugation system on the electronic structures, magnetic, optical properties and vibration modes of infrared and Raman spectra of metal phthalocyanines were investigated. Electron and charge density distribution and energy levels near frontier orbital and excited states were influenced by the deformed structures varied with central metal and charge. The magnetic parameters of chemical shifts in {sup 13}C-nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 13}C-NMR), principle g-tensor, A-tensor, V-tensor of electric field gradient and asymmetry parameters derived from the deformed structures with magnetic interaction of nuclear quadruple interaction based on electron and charge density distribution with a bias of charge near ligand under crystal field.

  5. Nonreciprocal phase shift caused by magnetic-thermal coupling of a polarization maintaining fiber optic gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dengwei; Zhao, Yuxiang; Fu, Wenlan; Zhou, Wenqing; Liu, Cheng; Shu, Xiaowu; Che, Shuangliang

    2014-03-15

    A theory for nonreciprocal phase shift caused by cross coupling generated in a polarization maintaining (PM) fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) under the combined action of magnetic and temperature fields is proposed. The magnetic-thermal coupling in the FOG originates from the interaction of the magnetic field, fiber twist, birefringence caused by thermal stress, and the intrinsic and bending birefringence of the fiber. The cross coupling changes with temperature. When the PM fiber has a diameter of 250 μm, beat length of 3 mm, length of 500 m, twist rate of 1  rad/m, and optical source wavelength of 1310 nm, the maximum degree of magnetic-thermal coupling generated by a 1 mT radial magnetic field within the temperature range of -20°C  to 60°C is -5.47%.

  6. All fiber magnetic field sensor with Ferrofluid-filled tapered microstructured optical fiber interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ming; Huang, Can; Liu, Danhui; Jin, Wei; Zhu, Tao

    2015-08-10

    An ultra-compact optical fiber magnetic field sensor based on a microstructured optical fiber (MOF) modal interference and ferrofluid (FF) has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The magnetic field sensor was fabricated by splicing a tapered germanium-doped index guided MOF with six big holes injected with FF to two conventional single-mode fibers. The transmission spectra of the proposed sensor under different magnetic field intensities have been measured and theoretically analyzed. Due to an efficient interaction between the magnetic nanoparticles in FF and the excited cladding mode, the magnetic field sensitivity reaches up to117.9pm/mT with a linear range from 0mT to 30mT. Moreover, the fabrication process of the proposed sensor is simple, easy and cost-effective. Therefore, it will be a promising candidate for military, aviation industry, and biomedical applications, especially, for the applications where the space is limited.

  7. Theory, simulation and experimental results of the acoustic detection of magnetization changes in superparamagnetic iron oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borgert Jörn

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Magnetic Particle Imaging is a novel method for medical imaging. It can be used to measure the local concentration of a tracer material based on iron oxide nanoparticles. While the resulting images show the distribution of the tracer material in phantoms or anatomic structures of subjects under examination, no information about the tissue is being acquired. To expand Magnetic Particle Imaging into the detection of soft tissue properties, a new method is proposed, which detects acoustic emissions caused by magnetization changes in superparamagnetic iron oxide. Methods Starting from an introduction to the theory of acoustically detected Magnetic Particle Imaging, a comparison to magnetically detected Magnetic Particle Imaging is presented. Furthermore, an experimental setup for the detection of acoustic emissions is described, which consists of the necessary field generating components, i.e. coils and permanent magnets, as well as a calibrated microphone to perform the detection. Results The estimated detection limit of acoustic Magnetic Particle Imaging is comparable to the detection limit of magnetic resonance imaging for iron oxide nanoparticles, whereas both are inferior to the theoretical detection limit for magnetically detected Magnetic Particle Imaging. Sufficient data was acquired to perform a comparison to the simulated data. The experimental results are in agreement with the simulations. The remaining differences can be well explained. Conclusions It was possible to demonstrate the detection of acoustic emissions of magnetic tracer materials in Magnetic Particle Imaging. The processing of acoustic emission in addition to the tracer distribution acquired by magnetic detection might allow for the extraction of mechanical tissue parameters. Such parameters, like for example the velocity of sound and the attenuation caused by the tissue, might also be used to support and improve ultrasound imaging. However, the method

  8. Theory, simulation and experimental results of the acoustic detection of magnetization changes in superparamagnetic iron oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleich, Bernhard; Weizenecker, Jürgen; Borgert, Jörn

    2011-06-29

    Magnetic Particle Imaging is a novel method for medical imaging. It can be used to measure the local concentration of a tracer material based on iron oxide nanoparticles. While the resulting images show the distribution of the tracer material in phantoms or anatomic structures of subjects under examination, no information about the tissue is being acquired. To expand Magnetic Particle Imaging into the detection of soft tissue properties, a new method is proposed, which detects acoustic emissions caused by magnetization changes in superparamagnetic iron oxide. Starting from an introduction to the theory of acoustically detected Magnetic Particle Imaging, a comparison to magnetically detected Magnetic Particle Imaging is presented. Furthermore, an experimental setup for the detection of acoustic emissions is described, which consists of the necessary field generating components, i.e. coils and permanent magnets, as well as a calibrated microphone to perform the detection. The estimated detection limit of acoustic Magnetic Particle Imaging is comparable to the detection limit of magnetic resonance imaging for iron oxide nanoparticles, whereas both are inferior to the theoretical detection limit for magnetically detected Magnetic Particle Imaging. Sufficient data was acquired to perform a comparison to the simulated data. The experimental results are in agreement with the simulations. The remaining differences can be well explained. It was possible to demonstrate the detection of acoustic emissions of magnetic tracer materials in Magnetic Particle Imaging. The processing of acoustic emission in addition to the tracer distribution acquired by magnetic detection might allow for the extraction of mechanical tissue parameters. Such parameters, like for example the velocity of sound and the attenuation caused by the tissue, might also be used to support and improve ultrasound imaging. However, the method can also be used to perform imaging on its own.

  9. Engineered materials for all-optical helicity-dependent magnetic switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangin, S.; Gottwald, M.; Lambert, C.-H.; Steil, D.; Uhlíř, V.; Pang, L.; Hehn, M.; Alebrand, S.; Cinchetti, M.; Malinowski, G.; Fainman, Y.; Aeschlimann, M.; Fullerton, E. E.

    2014-03-01

    The possibility of manipulating magnetic systems without applied magnetic fields have attracted growing attention over the past fifteen years. The low-power manipulation of the magnetization, preferably at ultrashort timescales, has become a fundamental challenge with implications for future magnetic information memory and storage technologies. Here we explore the optical manipulation of the magnetization in engineered magnetic materials. We demonstrate that all-optical helicity-dependent switching (AO-HDS) can be observed not only in selected rare earth-transition metal (RE-TM) alloy films but also in a much broader variety of materials, including RE-TM alloys, multilayers and heterostructures. We further show that RE-free Co-Ir-based synthetic ferrimagnetic heterostructures designed to mimic the magnetic properties of RE-TM alloys also exhibit AO-HDS. These results challenge present theories of AO-HDS and provide a pathway to engineering materials for future applications based on all-optical control of magnetic order.

  10. Optical detection of sepsis markers using liquid crystal based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCamley, Maureen K.; Artenstein, Andrew W.; Opal, Steven M.; Crawford, Gregory P.

    2007-02-01

    A liquid crystal based biosensor for the detection and diagnosis of sepsis is currently in development. Sepsis, a major clinical syndrome with a significant public health burden in the US due to a large elderly population, is the systemic response of the body to a localized infection and is defined as the combination of pathologic infection and physiological changes. Bacterial infections are responsible for 90% of cases of sepsis in the US. Currently there is no bedside diagnostic available to positively identify sepsis. The basic detection scheme employed in a liquid crystal biosensor contains attributes that would find value in a clinical setting, especially for the early detection of sepsis. Utilizing the unique properties of liquid crystals, such as birefringence, a bedside diagnostic is in development which will optically report the presence of biomolecules. In a septic patient, an endotoxin known as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is released from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and can be found in the blood stream. It is hypothesized that this long chained molecule will cause local disruptions to the open surface of a sensor containing aligned liquid crystal. The bulk liquid crystal ampli.es these local changes at the surface due to the presence of the sepsis marker, providing an optical readout through polarizing microscopy images. Liquid crystal sensors consisting of both square and circular grids, 100-200 μm in size, have been fabricated and filled with a common liquid crystal material, 5CB. Homeotropic alignment was confirmed using polarizing microscopy. The grids were then contacted with either saline only (control), or saline with varying concentrations of LPS. Changes in the con.guration of the nematic director of the liquid crystal were observed through the range of concentrations tested (5mg/mL - 1pg/mL) which have been confirmed by a consulting physician as clinically relevant levels.

  11. Magnetic Bead Based Immunoassay for Autonomous Detection of Toxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Y; Hara, C A; Knize, M G; Hwang, M H; Venkatesteswaran, K S; Wheeler, E K; Bell, P M; Renzi, R F; Fruetel, J A; Bailey, C G

    2008-05-01

    As a step towards toward the development of a rapid, reliable analyzer for bioagents in the environment, we are developing an automated system for the simultaneous detection of a group of select agents and toxins. To detect toxins, we modified and automated an antibody-based approach previously developed for manual medical diagnostics that uses fluorescent eTag{trademark} reporter molecules and is suitable for highly multiplexed assays. Detection is based on two antibodies binding simultaneously to a single antigen, one of which is labeled with biotin while the other is conjugated to a fluorescent eTag{trademark} through a cleavable linkage. Aqueous samples are incubated with the mixture of antibodies along with streptavidin-coated magnetic beads coupled to a photo-activatable porphyrin complex. In the presence of antigen, a molecular complex is formed where the cleavable linkage is held in proximity to the photoactivable group. Upon excitation at 680 nm, free radicals are generated, which diffuse and cleave the linkage, releasing the eTags{trademark}. Released eTags{trademark} are analyzed using capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection. Limits of detection for ovalbumin and botulinum toxoid individually were 4 ng/mL (or 80 pg) and 16 ng/mL (or 320 pg), respectively, using the manual assay. In addition, we demonstrated the use of pairs of antibodies from different sources in a single assay to decrease the rate of false positives. Automation of the assay was demonstrated on a flow-through format with higher LODs of 125 ng/mL (or 2.5 ng) each of a mixture of ovalbumin and botulinum toxoid. This versatile assay can be easily modified with the appropriate antibodies to detect a wide range of toxins and other proteins.

  12. Optically switched magnetism in photovoltaic perovskite CH3NH3(Mn:Pb)I3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Náfrádi, B.; Szirmai, P.; Spina, M.; Lee, H.; Yazyev, O. V.; Arakcheeva, A.; Chernyshov, D.; Gibert, M.; Forró, L.; Horváth, E.

    2016-11-01

    The demand for ever-increasing density of information storage and speed of manipulation boosts an intense search for new magnetic materials and novel ways of controlling the magnetic bit. Here, we report the synthesis of a ferromagnetic photovoltaic CH3NH3(Mn:Pb)I3 material in which the photo-excited electrons rapidly melt the local magnetic order through the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interactions without heating up the spin system. Our finding offers an alternative, very simple and efficient way of optical spin control, and opens an avenue for applications in low-power, light controlling magnetic devices.

  13. Noninvasive optical detection of carotenoid antioxidants in the human retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifzadeh, Mohsen

    wavelengths, respectively, results in pixel intensity maps which are used to quantify the macular pigment levels. The results obtained to date show that optical imaging approaches are very promising, that they are well suited for clinical applications, and that they may well lead to a widely used, early screening technology of subjects based on a non-invasive, rapid, precise, and objective optical detection technology.

  14. Damage detection and characterization using fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glisic, Branko; Sigurdardottir, Dorotea; Yao, Yao; Hubbell, David

    2013-04-01

    Fiber optic sensors (FOS) have significantly evolved and have reached their market maturity during the last decade. Their widely recognized advantages are high precision, long-term stability, and durability. But in addition to these advantageous performances, FOS technologies allow for affordable instrumentation of large areas of structure enabling global large-scale monitoring based on long-gauge sensors and integrity monitoring based on distributed sensors. These two approaches are particularly suitable for damage detection and characterization, i.e., damage localization and to certain extent quantification and propagation, as illustrated by two applications presented in detail in this paper: post-tensioned concrete bridge and segmented concrete pipeline. Early age cracking was detected, localized and quantified in the concrete deck of a pedestrian bridge using embedded long-gauge FOS. Post-tensioning of deck closed the cracks; however, permanent weakening in a bridge joint occurred due to cracking and it was identified and quantified. The damage was confirmed using embedded distributed FOS and a separate load test of the bridge. Real-size concrete pipeline specimens and surrounding soil were equipped with distributed FOS and exposed to permanent ground displacement in a large-scale testing facility. Two tests were performed on different pipeline specimens. The sensors bonded on the pipeline specimens successfully detected and localized rupture of pipeline joints, while the sensors embedded in the soil were able to detect and localize the failure plane. Comparison with strain-gauges installed on the pipeline and visual inspection after the test confirmed accurate damage detection and characterization.

  15. Magnetically remote-controlled optical sensor spheres for monitoring oxygen or pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistlberger, Günter; Koren, Klaus; Borisov, Sergey M; Klimant, Ingo

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic sensor macrospheres (MagSeMacs), i.e., stainless steel spheres coated with optical chemical sensors, are presented as an alternative to existing optical sensor patches and fiber-optical dip-probes. Such spheres can either be reversibly attached to the tip of an optical fiber (dip-probe) or trapped inside a vessel for read-out through the side wall. Moving the magnetic separator at the exterior enables measurements at varying positions with a single sensor. Moreover, the sensor's replacement is rapid and contactless. We measured dissolved oxygen or pH in stirred liquids, rotating flasks, and 24-well plates with a SensorDish-reader device for parallel cell culture monitoring. In these applications, MagSeMacs proved to be advantageous over conventional sensor patches and magnetic optical sensor particles because of their magnetism, spherical shape, reflectance, and size. These properties resulted in strong but reversible fixation, magnetic remote-controllability, short response times, high signal intensities, and simplified handling.

  16. Using optical coherence tomography to detect peripheral pulmonary thrombi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG Cheng; WANG Wei; ZHONG Nan-shan; ZENG Guang-qiao; WU Hua

    2012-01-01

    Background Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a new imaging technique capable of obtaining high-resolution intravascular images of small vessels and has been widely used in interventional cardiology.However,application of OCT in peripheral pulmonary arteries in patients has been seldom documented.Methods Three patients who were highly suspected peripheral pulmonary arteries thrombi and had undergone CT pulmonary angiography but tested negative for thrombi in peripheral pulmonary arteries were enrolled.Subsequently,OCT imaging was performed in peripheral pulmonary arteries.The patients received more than three-month anticoagulative treatment if thrombi were detected by OCT.Thereafter,OCT re-evaluation of the thrombolized blood vessels detected earlier was performed.The changes of thrombi before and after anticoagulative treatment were compared.Results Three patients underwent OCT imaging of peripheral pulmonary arteries.Thrombi were found in most of imaged vessels in these patients.Red and white thrombi can be differentiated,according to features of the thrombus on OCT images.After anticoagulation treatment,these patients' symptoms and hypoxemia improved.Repeated OCT imaging showed that most thrombi disappeared or became smaller.Conclusion OCT may be used as a potential tool for detecting peripheral pulmonary artery thrombi and differentiating red thrombi from white ones.

  17. Passive radiation detection using optically active CMOS sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosiek, Luke; Schalk, Patrick D.

    2013-05-01

    Recently, there have been a number of small-scale and hobbyist successes in employing commodity CMOS-based camera sensors for radiation detection. For example, several smartphone applications initially developed for use in areas near the Fukushima nuclear disaster are capable of detecting radiation using a cell phone camera, provided opaque tape is placed over the lens. In all current useful implementations, it is required that the sensor not be exposed to visible light. We seek to build a system that does not have this restriction. While building such a system would require sophisticated signal processing, it would nevertheless provide great benefits. In addition to fulfilling their primary function of image capture, cameras would also be able to detect unknown radiation sources even when the danger is considered to be low or non-existent. By experimentally profiling the image artifacts generated by gamma ray and β particle impacts, algorithms are developed to identify the unique features of radiation exposure, while discarding optical interaction and thermal noise effects. Preliminary results focus on achieving this goal in a laboratory setting, without regard to integration time or computational complexity. However, future work will seek to address these additional issues.

  18. Detection of early seizures by diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Hajihashemi, M. Reza; Zhou, Junli; Carney, Paul R.; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-03-01

    In epilepsy it has been challenging to detect early changes in brain activity that occurs prior to seizure onset and to map their origin and evolution for possible intervention. Besides, preclinical seizure experiments need to be conducted in awake animals with images reconstructed and displayed in real-time. We demonstrate using a rat model of generalized epilepsy that diffuse optical tomography (DOT) provides a unique functional neuroimaging modality for noninvasively and continuously tracking brain activities with high spatiotemporal resolution. We developed methods to conduct seizure experiments in fully awake rats using a subject-specific helmet and a restraining mechanism. For the first time, we detected early hemodynamic responses with heterogeneous patterns several minutes preceding the electroencephalographic seizure onset, supporting the presence of a "pre-seizure" state both in anesthetized and awake rats. Using a novel time-series analysis of scattering images, we show that the analysis of scattered diffuse light is a sensitive and reliable modality for detecting changes in neural activity associated with generalized seizure. We found widespread hemodynamic changes evolving from local regions of the bilateral cortex and thalamus to the entire brain, indicating that the onset of generalized seizures may originate locally rather than diffusely. Together, these findings suggest DOT represents a powerful tool for mapping early seizure onset and propagation pathways.

  19. Optical and magnetic properties of a transparent garnet film for atomic physics experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Saito

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the optical and magnetic properties of a transparent magnetic garnet with a particular focus on its applications to atomic physics experiments. The garnet film used in this study was a magnetically soft material that was originally designed for a Faraday rotator at optical communication wavelengths in the near infrared region. The film had a thickness of 2.1 μm and a small optical loss at a wavelength of λ=780 nm resonant with Rb atoms. The Faraday effect was also small and, thus, barely affected the polarization of light at λ=780 nm. In contrast, large Faraday rotation angles at shorter wavelengths enabled us to visualize magnetic domains, which were perpendicularly magnetized in alternate directions with a period of 3.6 μm. We confirmed the generation of an evanescent wave on the garnet film, which can be used for the optical observation and manipulation of atoms on the surface of the film. Finally, we demonstrated a magnetic mirror for laser-cooled Rb atoms using the garnet film.

  20. Magnetic field induced optical gain in a dilute nitride quaternary semiconductor quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mageshwari, P. Uma; Peter, A. John; Lee, Chang Woo

    2016-10-01

    Effects of magnetic field strength on the electronic and optical properties are brought out in a Ga0.661In0.339N0.0554As0.9446/GaAs quantum dot for the applications of desired wavelength in opto-electronic devices. The band alignment is obtained using band anticrossing model and the model solid theory. The magnetic field dependent electron-heavy hole transition energies with the dot radius in a GaInNAs/GaAs quantum dot are investigated. The magnetic field induced oscillator strength as a function of dot radius is studied. The resonant peak values of optical absorption coefficients and the changes of refractive index with the application of magnetic field strength in a GaInNAs/GaAs quantum dot are obtained. The magnetic field induced threshold current density and the maximum optical gain are found in a GaInNAs/GaAs quantum dot. The results show that the optimum wavelength for fibre optical communication networks can be obtained with the variation of applied magnetic field strength and the outcomes may be useful for the design of efficient lasers based on the group III-N-V semiconductors.

  1. Optical and magnetic properties of a transparent garnet film for atomic physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Mari; Tajima, Ryoichi; Kiyosawa, Ryota; Nagata, Yugo; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Ishibashi, Takayuki; Hatakeyama, Atsushi

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the optical and magnetic properties of a transparent magnetic garnet with a particular focus on its applications to atomic physics experiments. The garnet film used in this study was a magnetically soft material that was originally designed for a Faraday rotator at optical communication wavelengths in the near infrared region. The film had a thickness of 2.1 μm and a small optical loss at a wavelength of λ =780 nm resonant with Rb atoms. The Faraday effect was also small and, thus, barely affected the polarization of light at λ =780 nm. In contrast, large Faraday rotation angles at shorter wavelengths enabled us to visualize magnetic domains, which were perpendicularly magnetized in alternate directions with a period of 3.6 μm. We confirmed the generation of an evanescent wave on the garnet film, which can be used for the optical observation and manipulation of atoms on the surface of the film. Finally, we demonstrated a magnetic mirror for laser-cooled Rb atoms using the garnet film.

  2. Measuring human ventilation for apnoea detection using an optical encoder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, G M; Webster, J G

    1998-08-01

    We have designed, built and tested a proof-of-concept system based on optical encoder technology for measuring adult or infant ventilation. It uses change in chest circumference to provide an indirect measure of ventilation. The Hewlett-Packard HEDS-9720 optical encoder senses displacement of its matching codestrip. It yields a resolution of 0.17 mm and is accurate to 0.008 mm over a 10 mm test distance. The encoder is mounted on a nylon web belt wrapped around the torso and responds to changes in circumference. Motion of the code strip during respiration is converted to direction of movement (inhalation or exhalation) as well as magnitude of circumference change. Use of two sensor bands, one on the chest and one on the abdomen, may allow detection of obstructive apnoea in which there is no air flow out of or into the subject despite respiratory movement. Applications of this technology include infant apnoea monitoring as well as long-term adult monitoring.

  3. Optical Detection and Analysis of Pictor A's Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Gentry, Eric S

    2014-01-01

    New images from the Hubble Space Telescope of the FRII radio galaxy Pictor A reveal a number of jet knot candidates which coincide with previously detected radio and x-ray knots. Previous observations in x-ray and radio bands show the entire jet to be 1.9' long, with interesting variability, but an optical component was previously unknown. The discovered optical component is faint, and knot candidates must be teased out from a bright host galaxy. Using three broadband filters, we extract knot fluxes and upper-bounds on the flux for multiple knot candidates at wavelengths of 1600nm, 814nm and 475nm. We find that the data suggest that localized particle re-accleration events followed by synchrotron emission could explain the observed knot candidates, but those electrons could not supply enough x-ray flux to match prior observations. Our data provide key evidence suggesting a second, higher energy electron population which was previously hypothesized, but could not be confirmed.

  4. Development of a flaw detection material for the magnetic particle method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnokova, A. A.; Kalayeva, S. Z.; Ivanova, V. A.

    2017-08-01

    The issues of increasing the effectiveness of the magnetic particle method of nondestructive testing by using a new flaw detection material is considered in the paper. The requirements for flaw detection materials are determined, which ensure the effectiveness of the inspection method. A new flaw detection material - magnetic fluids from iron-containing waste products - has been developed.

  5. Detection of typhoid fever by diatom-based optical biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Viji; Muthukumar, Anbazhagi; Nagamony, Ponpandian; Chinnuswamy, Viswanathan

    2017-06-02

    Surface-modified diatom substrates are employed for the development of immunocomplex-based optical biosensor for diagnosis of typhoid. Biosensor has been prepared by covalent immobilization of Salmonella typhi antibody onto the crosslinked diatom substrates via glutaraldehyde. Photoluminescent (PL) studies revealed good specificity and ability of conjugated diatom substrates to distinguish complementary (S. typhi) and non-complementary (Escherichia coli) antigens. The immunocomplexed biosensor showed detection limit of 10 pg. The excellent performance of biosensor is associated to its large surface-to-volume ratio, good photoluminescent property, and biocompatibility of diatom frustules, which enhances the antibody immobilization and facilitates the nucleophilic electron transfer between antibody and conjugated diatom surface. Hence, immunocomplexed diatom substrates are considered to be a suitable platform for the environmental monitoring of water-borne pathogen S. typhi.

  6. Brain metastasis detection by resonant Raman optical biopsy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Cheng, Gangge; Zhou, Lixin; Zhang, Chunyuan; Pu, Yang; Li, Zhongwu; Liu, Yulong; Li, Qingbo; Wang, Wei; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-03-01

    Resonant Raman (RR) spectroscopy provides an effective way to enhance Raman signal from particular bonds associated with key molecules due to changes on a molecular level. In this study, RR is used for detection of human brain metastases of five kinds of primary organs of lung, breast, kidney, rectal and orbital in ex-vivo. The RR spectra of brain metastases cancerous tissues were measured and compared with those of normal brain tissues and the corresponding primary cancer tissues. The differences of five types of brain metastases tissues in key bio-components of carotene, tryptophan, lactate, alanine and methyl/methylene group were investigated. The SVM-KNN classifier was used to categorize a set of RR spectra data of brain metastasis of lung cancerous tissues from normal brain tissue, yielding diagnostic sensitivity and specificity at 100% and 75%, respectively. The RR spectroscopy may provide new moleculebased optical probe tools for diagnosis and classification of brain metastatic of cancers.

  7. Remote measurement of microwave distribution based on optical detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Zhong; Ding, Wenzheng; Yang, Sihua; Chen, Qun, E-mail: redrocks-chenqun@hotmail.com, E-mail: xingda@scnu.edu.cn; Xing, Da, E-mail: redrocks-chenqun@hotmail.com, E-mail: xingda@scnu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)

    2016-01-04

    In this letter, we present the development of a remote microwave measurement system. This method employs an arc discharge lamp that serves as an energy converter from microwave to visible light, which can propagate without transmission medium. Observed with a charge coupled device, quantitative microwave power distribution can be achieved when the operators and electronic instruments are in a distance from the high power region in order to reduce the potential risk. We perform the experiments using pulsed microwaves, and the results show that the system response is dependent on the microwave intensity over a certain range. Most importantly, the microwave distribution can be monitored in real time by optical observation of the response of a one-dimensional lamp array. The characteristics of low cost, a wide detection bandwidth, remote measurement, and room temperature operation make the system a preferred detector for microwave applications.

  8. Crack detection using multimode fiber optical time domain reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanser, Keith H.; Voss, Karl F.

    1994-09-01

    Results of measurements of longitudinal and transverse crack growth using multimode fiber optical time domain reflectometry are presented. Crack detection thresholds less than 0.1 millimeter are readily achieved with OTDR. A sensor package design has been developed to provide controllable directional response characteristics. In particular, a method to eliminate the orientation angle problem and yield omnidirectional sensor response characteristics has been discovered. Results are reported on a novel all-fiber sensor capable of sensing 10 micrometers crack displacements while surviving and sensing 150% strains and displacements of 6 mm. Transmission measurements of the sensor using white light are also reported. The method is suitable for distributed sensing applications covering large areas of structures and adaptable to response enhancements required for real time structural monitoring at rates on the order of hundreds of Hertz. Applications include bridges, buildings, main-steam pipelines, and offshore platforms.

  9. Design Ammonia Gas Detection System by Using Optical Fiber Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Bushra. R. Mhdi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Design study and construction of Ammonia gas detection using a fiber as a sensor to based on evanescent wave sensing technique was investigated. Multi-mode fiber type (PCS with core diameter (600μm and (50cm length used where plastic clad was removed by chemical etching for effective sensing area which coated with sol-gel film to enhance its absorption characteristics to evanescent wave around the optical spectrum emitted from halogen lamp measurements through different temperature rang (25-60oc with and without air using as a carrier to ammonia molecules are investigated. Finally sensing efficiency are monitored to ammonia gas it affected to different temperature and environmental condition are studied and our result are compatible to scientific publishes

  10. Highly sensitive optical sensor system for blood leakage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Jie, Chen; Sanae, Mizuno; Touma, Yasunori

    A highly sensitive method for the detection of blood leakage has been developed, and a practical sensor system for blood concentration measurement has been constructed. The present method is based on the attenuation of laser light by blood cells. The effects of the fluctuations of the incident laser light power are eliminated by normalizing the attenuated light intensity by the incident light intensity. A part of the incident laser light is reflected by a beam splitter mounted at the entrance of the test cell, of which the power is measured to provide base data for normalization. The optical path is extended to enhance sensitivity by using a pair of side mirrors. This multi-reflection method is very effective to increase sensitivity; the maximum sensitivity obtained for blood concentration is about 4 X 10 -6 by volume, which is significantly higher than that of the conventional sensors.

  11. A portable cell-based optical detection device for rapid detection of Listeria and Bacillus toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Pratik; Banada, Padmapriya P.; Rickus, Jenna L.; Morgan, Mark T.; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2005-11-01

    A mammalian cell-based optical biosensor was built to detect pathogenic Listeria and Bacillus species. This sensor measures the ability of the pathogens to infect and induce cytotoxicity on hybrid lymphocyte cell line (Ped-2E9) resulting in the release of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) that can be detected optically using a portable spectrophotometer. The Ped-2E9 cells were encapsulated in collagen gel matrices and grown in 48-well plates or in specially designed filtration tube units. Toxin preparations or bacterial cells were introduced and ALP release was assayed after 3-5 h. Pathogenic L. monocytogenes strains or the listeriolysin toxins preparation showed cytotoxicity ranging from 55% - 92%. Toxin preparations (~20 μg/ml) from B. cereus strains showed 24 - 98% cytotoxicity. In contrast, a non-pathogenic L. innocua (F4247) and a B. substilis induced only 2% and 8% cytotoxicity, respectively. This cell-based detection device demonstrates its ability to detect the presence of pathogenic Listeria and Bacillus species and can potentially be used onsite for food safety or in biosecurity application.

  12. Optical and magneto-optical studies of martensitic transformation in Ni-Mn-Ga magnetic shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beran, L.; Cejpek, P.; Kulda, M.; Antos, R.; Holy, V.; Veis, M., E-mail: veis@karlov.mff.cuni.cz [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Ke Karlovu 5, 12116 Prague (Czech Republic); Straka, L. [Laboratory of Engineering Materials, Aalto University, PL 14200, FIN-00076 Aalto (Finland); Heczko, O. [Institute of Physics ASCR, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-05-07

    Optical and magneto-optical properties of single crystal of Ni{sub 50.1}Mn{sub 28.4}Ga{sub 21.5} magnetic shape memory alloy during its transformation from martensite to austenite phase were systematically studied. Crystal orientation was approximately along (100) planes of parent cubic austenite. X-ray reciprocal mapping confirmed modulated 10 M martensite phase. Temperature depended measurements of saturation magnetization revealed the martensitic transformation at 335 K during heating. Magneto-optical spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry were measured in the sample temperature range from 297 to 373 K and photon energy range from 1.2 to 6.5 eV. Magneto-optical spectra of polar Kerr rotation as well as the spectra of ellipsometric parameter Ψ exhibited significant changes when crossing the transformation temperature. These changes were assigned to different optical properties of Ni-Mn-Ga in martensite and austenite phases due to modification of electronic structure near the Fermi energy during martensitic transformation.

  13. CLOUD DETECTION OF OPTICAL SATELLITE IMAGES USING SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-Y. Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cloud covers are generally present in optical remote-sensing images, which limit the usage of acquired images and increase the difficulty of data analysis, such as image compositing, correction of atmosphere effects, calculations of vegetation induces, land cover classification, and land cover change detection. In previous studies, thresholding is a common and useful method in cloud detection. However, a selected threshold is usually suitable for certain cases or local study areas, and it may be failed in other cases. In other words, thresholding-based methods are data-sensitive. Besides, there are many exceptions to control, and the environment is changed dynamically. Using the same threshold value on various data is not effective. In this study, a threshold-free method based on Support Vector Machine (SVM is proposed, which can avoid the abovementioned problems. A statistical model is adopted to detect clouds instead of a subjective thresholding-based method, which is the main idea of this study. The features used in a classifier is the key to a successful classification. As a result, Automatic Cloud Cover Assessment (ACCA algorithm, which is based on physical characteristics of clouds, is used to distinguish the clouds and other objects. In the same way, the algorithm called Fmask (Zhu et al., 2012 uses a lot of thresholds and criteria to screen clouds, cloud shadows, and snow. Therefore, the algorithm of feature extraction is based on the ACCA algorithm and Fmask. Spatial and temporal information are also important for satellite images. Consequently, co-occurrence matrix and temporal variance with uniformity of the major principal axis are used in proposed method. We aim to classify images into three groups: cloud, non-cloud and the others. In experiments, images acquired by the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+ and images containing the landscapes of agriculture, snow area, and island are tested. Experiment results demonstrate

  14. Cloud Detection of Optical Satellite Images Using Support Vector Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuan-Yi; Lin, Chao-Hung

    2016-06-01

    Cloud covers are generally present in optical remote-sensing images, which limit the usage of acquired images and increase the difficulty of data analysis, such as image compositing, correction of atmosphere effects, calculations of vegetation induces, land cover classification, and land cover change detection. In previous studies, thresholding is a common and useful method in cloud detection. However, a selected threshold is usually suitable for certain cases or local study areas, and it may be failed in other cases. In other words, thresholding-based methods are data-sensitive. Besides, there are many exceptions to control, and the environment is changed dynamically. Using the same threshold value on various data is not effective. In this study, a threshold-free method based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) is proposed, which can avoid the abovementioned problems. A statistical model is adopted to detect clouds instead of a subjective thresholding-based method, which is the main idea of this study. The features used in a classifier is the key to a successful classification. As a result, Automatic Cloud Cover Assessment (ACCA) algorithm, which is based on physical characteristics of clouds, is used to distinguish the clouds and other objects. In the same way, the algorithm called Fmask (Zhu et al., 2012) uses a lot of thresholds and criteria to screen clouds, cloud shadows, and snow. Therefore, the algorithm of feature extraction is based on the ACCA algorithm and Fmask. Spatial and temporal information are also important for satellite images. Consequently, co-occurrence matrix and temporal variance with uniformity of the major principal axis are used in proposed method. We aim to classify images into three groups: cloud, non-cloud and the others. In experiments, images acquired by the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) and images containing the landscapes of agriculture, snow area, and island are tested. Experiment results demonstrate the detection

  15. Light Magnetic Dark Matter in Direct Detection Searches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Kouvaris, Christoforos; Panci, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    We study a fermionic Dark Matter particle carrying magnetic dipole moment and analyze its impact on direct detection experiments. In particular we show that it can accommodate the DAMA, CoGeNT and CRESST experimental results. Assuming conservative bounds, this candidate is shown not to be ruled out...... by the CDMS, XENON and PICASSO experiments. We offer an analytic understanding of how the long-range interaction modifies the experimental allowed regions, in the cross section versus Dark Matter mass parameter space, with respect to the typically assumed contact interaction. Finally, in the context...... of a symmetric Dark Matter sector, we determine the associated thermal relic density, and further provide relevant constraints imposed by indirect searches and colliders....

  16. Molecular imaging by optically-detected electron spin resonance of nitrogen-vacancies in nanodiamond

    CERN Document Server

    Hegyi, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging refers to a class of noninvasive biomedical imaging techniques with the sensitivity and specificity to image biochemical variations in-vivo. An ideal molecular imaging technique visualizes a biochemical target according to a range of criteria, including high spatial and temporal resolution, high contrast relative to non-targeted tissues, depth-independent penetration into tissue, lack of harm to the organism under study, and low cost. Because no existing molecular imaging modality is ideal for all purposes, new imaging approaches are needed. Here we demonstrate a novel molecular imaging approach, called nanodiamond imaging, that uses nanodiamonds containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers as an imaging agent, and image nanodiamond targets in pieces of chicken breast. Nanodiamonds can be tagged with biologically active molecules so they bind to specific receptors; their distribution can then be quantified in-vivo via optically-detected magnetic resonance of the NVs. In effect, we are demo...

  17. Refractive index detection of liquid based on magneto-optical surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanfen; Tang, Tingting; Li, Jie; Luo, Li

    2016-09-01

    We propose a refractive index sensor applied in liquid detection based on magneto-optical surface plasmon resonance. The device is made of a prism-coupling system, which consists of a prism and a CeYIG/Au/liquid waveguide. Systematic simulations using the finite element method and 4  ×  4 transfer matrix methods are implemented to calculate the figure of merit (FOM) of sensitivity. Calculation results show that a FOM of 5.022/RIU for refractive index variation from 1.330 to 1.345 can be obtained when the incident wavelength is 980 nm. The proposed structure can achieve high angular sensitivity for the magnetic field of the proposed structure concentrated in the sensing medium. Meanwhile, our sensor, with gold as the bottom layer, is a better hydrophily for the molecular self-assembly technique compared with other conventional sensors, which makes it more practical in applications.

  18. Guided Wave and Damage Detection in Composite Laminates Using Different Fiber Optic Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Fucai Li; Hideaki Murayama; Kazuro Kageyama; Takehiro Shirai

    2009-01-01

    Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD) sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber r...

  19. Optical and magnetic properties of nitrogen ion implanted MgO single crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Chun-Ming; Gu Hai-Quan; Xiang Xia; Zhang Yan; Jiang Yong; Chen Meng; Zu Xiao-Tao

    2011-01-01

    The microstructure, optical property and magnetism of nitrogen ion implanted single MgO crystals are studied.A parallel investigation is also performed in an iron ion implanted single MgO sample as a reference. Large structural,optical and magnetic differences are obtained between the nitrogen and iron implanted samples. Room temperature ferromagnetism with a fairly large coercivity field of 300 Oe (1 Oe=79.5775 A/m), a remanence of 38% and a slightly changed optical absorption is obtained in the sample implanted using nitrogen with a dose of 1×1018 ions/cm2. Transition metal contamination and defects induced magnetism can be excluded when compared with those of the iron ion implanted sample, and the nitrogen doping is considered to be the main origin of ferromagnetism.

  20. Magnetic and optical properties of the nickel thin film deposited by GLAD technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potočnik Jelena M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, nickel thin film was deposited on glass sample using Glancing Angle Deposition (GLAD technique, to a thickness of 1 μm. Glass sample was positioned 15 degrees with respect to the nickel vapor flux. The nickel thin film was characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM, Magneto- Optical Kerr effect Microscopy and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry. According to an AFM cross-section imaging, it was found that the nickel thin film has a columnar structure. The values of the coercively, obtained from the magnetic hysteresis loops, were analyzed as a function of the sample rotation in the magnetic field. It was found that the direction of magnetization easy axis lies toward the structure growth. Optical properties of the nickel thin film were studied at the wavelength of 455 nm. From the shape of the refractive index and the extinction coefficient diagrams could be concluded that the nickel thin film has an optical anisotropy.

  1. Theoretical study of optical conductivity of graphene with magnetic and nonmagnetic adatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Muhammad Aziz; Siregar, Syahril; Rusydi, Andrivo

    2014-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of the optical conductivity of graphene with magnetic and nonmagnetic adatoms. First, by introducing an alternating potential in a pure graphene, we demonstrate a gap formation in the density of states and the corresponding optical conductivity. We highlight the distinction between such a gap formation and the so-called Pauli blocking effect. Next, we apply this idea to graphene with adatoms by introducing magnetic interactions between the carrier spins and the spins of the adatoms. Exploring various possible ground-state spin configurations of the adatoms, we find that the antiferromagnetic configuration yields the lowest total electronic energy and is the only configuration that forms a gap. Furthermore, we analyze four different circumstances leading to similar gaplike structures and propose a means to interpret the magneticity and the possible orderings of the adatoms on graphene solely from the optical conductivity data. We apply this analysis to the recently reported experimental data of oxygenated graphene.

  2. Control of light scattering by nanoparticles with optically-induced magnetic responses

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Wei; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2013-01-01

    Conventional approaches to control and shape the scattering patterns of light generated by different nanostructures are mostly based on engineering of their electric response due to the fact that most metallic nanostructures support electric resonances in the optical frequency range. Recently, fuelled by the fast development in the fields of metamaterials and plasmonics, artificial optically-induced magnetic responses have been demonstrated for various nanostructures. This kind of response can be employed to provide an extra degree of freedom for the efficient control and shaping of the scattering patterns of nanoparticles and nanoantennas. Here we review the recent progress in this research direction of nanoparticle scattering shaping and control through the interference of both electric and optically-induced magnetic responses. We discuss the magnetic resonances supported by various structures in different spectral regimes, and then summarize the original results on the scattering shaping involving both ele...

  3. Optical position measurement for a large gap magnetic suspension system: Design and performance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Sharon S.; Clemmons, James I., Jr.; Shelton, Kevin J.; Duncan, Walter C.

    1994-01-01

    An optical measurement system (OMS) has been designed and tested for a large gap magnetic suspension system (LGMSS). The LGMSS will be used to study control laws for magnetic suspension systems for vibration isolation and pointing applications. The LGMSS features six degrees of freedom and consists of a planar array of electromagnets that levitate and position a cylindrical element containing a permanent magnet core. The OMS provides information on the location and orientation of the element to the LGMSS control system to stabilize suspension. The hardware design of this optical sensing system and the tracking algorithms are presented. The results of analyses and experiments are presented that define the accuracy limits of the optical sensing system and that quantify the errors in position estimation.

  4. Detection of acute cerebral hemorrhage in rabbits by magnetic induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sun

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute cerebral hemorrhage (ACH is an important clinical problem that is often monitored and studied with expensive devices such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography. These devices are not readily available in economically underdeveloped regions of the world, emergency departments, and emergency zones. We have developed a less expensive tool for non-contact monitoring of ACH. The system measures the magnetic induction phase shift (MIPS between the electromagnetic signals on two coils. ACH was induced in 6 experimental rabbits and edema was induced in 4 control rabbits by stereotactic methods, and their intracranial pressure and heart rate were monitored for 1 h. Signals were continuously monitored for up to 1 h at an exciting frequency of 10.7 MHz. Autologous blood was administered to the experimental group, and saline to the control group (1 to 3 mL by injection of 1-mL every 5 min. The results showed a significant increase in MIPS as a function of the injection volume, but the heart rate was stable. In the experimental (ACH group, there was a statistically significant positive correlation of the intracranial pressure and MIPS. The change of MIPS was greater in the ACH group than in the control group. This high-sensitivity system could detect a 1-mL change in blood volume. The MIPS was significantly related to the intracranial pressure. This observation suggests that the method could be valuable for detecting early warning signs in emergency medicine and critical care units.

  5. Communication: atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ((3))) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ((2))).

  6. Improved detection of magnetic signals by a MEMS sensor using stochastic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-May, Agustín L; Tapia, Jesus A; Domínguez-Nicolás, Saúl M; Juarez-Aguirre, Raul; Gutierrez-D, Edmundo A; Flores, Amira; Figueras, Eduard; Manjarrez, Elias

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the behavior of the electrical output response of a magnetic field sensor based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology under different levels of controlled magnetic noise. We explored whether a particular level of magnetic noise applied on the vicinity of the MEMS sensor can improve the detection of subthreshold magnetic fields. We examined the increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of such detected magnetic fields as a function of the magnetic noise intensity. The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph between the SNR and the applied magnetic noise. This finding shows that the application of an intermediate level of noise in the environment of a MEMS magnetic field sensor improves its detection capability of subthreshold signals via the stochastic resonance phenomenon.

  7. Magnetic, electronic, and optical properties of double perovskite Bi2FeMnO6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Towfiq; Chen, Aiping; Yarotski, Dmitry A.; Trugman, Stuart A.; Jia, Quanxi; Zhu, Jian-Xin

    2017-03-01

    Double perovskite Bi2FeMnO6 is a potential candidate for the single-phase multiferroic system. In this work, we study the magnetic, electronic, and optical properties in BFMO by performing the density functional theory calculations and experimental measurements of magnetic moment. We also demonstrate the strain dependence of magnetization. More importantly, our calculations of electronic and optical properties reveal that the onsite local correlation on Mn and Fe sites is critical to the gap opening in BFMO, which is a prerequisite condition for the ferroelectric ordering. Finally, we calculate the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectra of Fe and Mn ions (L2 and L3 edges) in BFMO.

  8. Coupling field maps of combined function bending magnets to linear optics for the SESAME storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Milanese, A

    2013-01-01

    This note provides several analyses of the combined function bending magnets of the SESAME storage ring. The objective is to develop tools to couple the magnetic design to the linear optics specifications. Such tools can be used to carry out a 3D field optimization, at the design phase and following magnetic measurements, in particular in order to fine tune the end shims on the poles. The analyses take as input field maps on the midplane, which are then processed in different ways to obtain linear transfer matrices for the optics, in the horizontal and vertical planes. Some peculiarities of this kind of magnet are also highlighted, for example, the slight variation of gradient along the arc. For convenience, the relative codes and scripts are included in the appendix.

  9. A New Application of A Fiber Optic Technique In Magnetic Borehole Logging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, J. B.; Leven, M.; Steveling, E.; Shipboard Party Leg 197, Odp

    A borehole magnetometer from the Institute of Geophysics, University of Goettingen, Germany, was employed in Hole 1203A on Detroit Seamount. The tool consists of three fluxgate sensors which log the two horizontal (X, Y) and the vertical (Z) compo- nent of the magnetic flux density at depth. For the first time, a fiber optic angular rate sensor was employed in a borehole tool to measure the rotation history during a log run. This rate sensor is an unconventional gyro since it does not have a spinning wheel. It has a small volume, low weight and requires only little power (2VA). Free from the effects of gravity-induced errors, and with no moving parts, this sensor is insensitive to shock and vibration. It detects and measures angular rates by measuring the fre- quency difference between two contra-rotating light beams. These travel through a fiber coil 110 m in length to a detector, which converts the light into an output signal for the electronics. A magnetic log was run in Hole 1203A on Detroit seamount from the rig floor to the total depth at 925 mbsf. For the first time the angular rate about the vertical spin axis was measured using the fiber optic gyro in combination with flux- gate sensors. The rotation history of the tool is determined by the accumulation of the rate during a log run. Before starting the log run the magnetic components of the tool were aligned to the ship axis on the rig floor. In Hole 1203A the tool rotated almost 60 times about its vertical body axis between the rig floor and the bottom of the hole. On its run back to the floor the tool followed nearly the same rotation history as on the downward run. After the tool was returned to the rig floor, it was aligned again to double check the orientation with the initial orientation. This check enabled changes in the heading of the ship and the Earth's rotation, which also affects the angular rate, to be taken into account. Preliminary results indicate that the difference between the initial and

  10. Stress-induced birefringence in elastomers doped with ferrofluid magnetic particles: Mechanical and optical investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sena, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa postal 66318, Sao Paulo, SP 05315-970 (Brazil); Bailey, C. [Liquid Crystal Institute, Kent State University, P.O. Box 5190, Kent, OH 44242-0001 (United States); Godinho, M.H. [Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia e CENIMAT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Quinta da Torre, P-2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Figueirinhas, J.L. [CFMC, Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649 003 Lisbon (Portugal); Palffy-Muhoray, P. [Liquid Crystal Institute, Kent State University, P.O. Box 5190, Kent, OH 44242-0001 (United States); Figueiredo Neto, A.M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa postal 66318, Sao Paulo, SP 05315-970 (Brazil)]. E-mail: afigueiredo@if.usp.br

    2006-05-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles from magnetic colloidal suspensions were incorporated in the urethane/urea elastomer (PU/PBDO) by adding to the prepolymers solution in toluene diverse amounts of magnetite grains. It is shown that ferrofluid grains can be efficiently incorporated into the elastomer according to this procedure. Mechanical and optical experiments performed show that the elastomer preparation procedure (casting) introduces a structural anisotropy on the optically isotropic sample. This fact is put in evidence by the measurements of the Young's moduli and orientation of the sample's optical axis under stress. The dependence of the phase shift of both the pure and ferrofluid-doped elastomer samples under strain is linear, and the strain-optic coefficient is show to be linear with the ferrofluid concentration.

  11. Deep cooling of optically trapped atoms implemented by magnetic levitation without transverse confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Zhou, Tianwei; Zhai, Yueyang; Xiang, Jinggang; Luan, Tian; Huang, Qi; Yang, Shifeng; Xiong, Wei; Chen, Xuzong

    2017-05-01

    We report a setup for the deep cooling of atoms in an optical trap. The deep cooling is implemented by eliminating the influence of gravity using specially constructed magnetic coils. Compared to the conventional method of generating a magnetic levitating force, the lower trap frequency achieved in our setup provides a lower limit of temperature and more freedoms to Bose gases with a simpler solution. A final temperature as low as ˜ 6 nK is achieved in the optical trap, and the atomic density is decreased by nearly two orders of magnitude during the second stage of evaporative cooling. This deep cooling of optically trapped atoms holds promise for many applications, such as atomic interferometers, atomic gyroscopes, and magnetometers, as well as many basic scientific research directions, such as quantum simulations and atom optics.

  12. Optical fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer for microorganism growth detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohui; Jiang, Mingshun; Sui, Qingmei; Luo, Shuyang; Geng, Xiangyi

    2016-07-01

    An optical fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) based on hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) for microorganism growth detection is proposed and demonstrated. The FPI is formed by splicing both ends of a short section of HCPCF to SMFs and cleaving the SMF pigtail to a proper length. By measuring the fringe contrast of interference pattern, the refractive index (RI) changes of analyte during microorganism growth can be obtained. RI response of the sensor was investigated theoretically and experimentally. It shows linear response with sensitivity of -136 dB/RIU and good repeatability. Temperature response was also tested and the result confirms the low temperature cross-sensitivity of the sensor. Detection of yeast growth in liquid medium by the FPI sensor was conducted and the result shows the characteristic of typical yeast growth curve. With its advantages of high RI sensitivity, low temperature cross-sensitivity, capability for real-time measurement and so on, this FPI sensor has great potential in biosensing.

  13. Peptide-modified optical filters for detecting protease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian, Kristopher A; Böcking, Till; Gaus, Katharina; Gal, Michael; Gooding, J Justin

    2007-11-01

    The organic derivatization of silicon-based nanoporous photonic crystals is presented as a method to immobilize peptides for the detection of protease enzymes in solution. A narrow-line-width rugate filter, a one-dimensional photonic crystal, is fabricated that exhibits a high-reflectivity optical resonance that is sensitive to small changes in the refractive index at the pore walls. To immobilize peptide in the pore of the photonic crystal, the hydrogen-terminated silicon surface was first modified with the alkene 10-succinimidyl undecenoate via hydrosilylation. The monolayer with the succinimide ester moiety at the distal end served the dual function of protecting the underlying silicon from oxidation as well as providing a surface suitable for subsequent derivatization with amines. The surface was further modified with 1-aminohexa(ethylene glycol) (EG(6)) to resist nonspecific adsorption of proteins common in complex biological samples. The distal hydroxyl of the EG(6) is activated using the solid-phase coupling reagent disuccinimidyl carbonate for selective immobilization of peptides as protease recognition elements. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis reveals high activation and coupling efficiency at each stage of the functionalization. Exposure of the peptide-modified crystals to the protease subtilisin in solution causes a change in the refractive index, resulting in a shift of the resonance to shorter wavelengths, indicating cleavage of organic material within the pores. The lowest detected concentration of enzyme was 37 nM (7.4 pmol in 200 microL).

  14. Improvements of the optical detection setup of COLLAPS

    CERN Document Server

    Sailer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In Collinear Laser Spectroscopy of rare isotopes it is crucial to keep the background of the measurements low. Using photomultiplier tubes for those measurements, the dark count rate should be as low as possible and the signal gain high. Therefore, it is important to use the right type of photomultiplier tubes for the purpose of single photon detection with a low signal rate. Thus, I tested several different types of photomultiplier tubes for their dark count rates and noise to signal separation. The results have identified the most suitable type of photomultiplier tubes, but further measuring for verification might be necessary. Therefore, it is very important to keep the photomultiplier tubes shut from light. Exposing the photocathode to light implies life-long damage and increased background for several days. So far, when dismounting one of these photomultiplier tubes from the setup, a big cage around the optical detection setup was covered into black sheets to keep it as dark as possible inside. Still, th...

  15. Optical humidity detection based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Keke; Liu, Shixuan; Chen, Shizhe; Zhao, Qiang; Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Xuanqun; Wang, Wenyan; Wu, Yushang

    2017-02-01

    Humidity is an important environmental parameter, which is difficult to be measured accurately and quickly using traditional measurement methods. Under the environment of low temperature or high humidity, traditional humidity and temperature sensor has shortages in humidity measurement accuracy, corresponding time and wet fade speed. To solve these problems, this paper proposes a method to measure the environmental humidity with wavelength modulation technology and harmonic detection technology based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. H2O molecular absorption line near 1392 nm is selected as the characteristic spectra. The effects of temperature, pressure and water concentration on the absorption spectrum width, the wavelength modulation coefficient and the amplitude of the harmonic signal are analyzed. Humidity and temperature sensor is modified using temperature and pressure compensation model, and the influence of the water concentration variation is eliminated by the iterative algorithm. The new humidity and temperature sensor prototype is developed, and the structure of the optical system is simple, which is easy to be adjusted. The response frequency of the humidity detection is 40 Hz. The experiment was carried out for 3 months at Qingdao national basic weather station. Experimental results show that the consistency of the humidity and temperature data is very good, which can proves the validity of the humidity measurement technology.

  16. Magnetic Diagnostics of the Solar Corona: Synthesizing Optical and Radio Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, R.; White, S. M.; Judge, P. G.

    2017-09-01

    In this contribution we review the current state-of-the-art of coronal magnetometry, in both optical and radio domains. We address the achievable objectives and the challenges of present measurement techniques and interpretation tools. In particular, we focus on the role that these observations can play for constraining and validating numerical models of the global coronal magnetic field. With regard to optical techniques, we mainly focus on the use of M1 diagnostics, further developing the theory of the formation of their polarization signatures in the magnetized corona.

  17. Far-field head-media optical interaction in heat-assisted magnetic recording

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Ruoxi; Klemmer, Timothy; Olson, Heidi; Zhang, Deming; Perry, Tyler; Yin, Huaqing; Hipwell, Roger; Thiele, Jan-Ulrich; Tang, Huan; Seigler, Mike

    2015-01-01

    We have used a plane-wave expansion method to theoretically study the far-field head-media optical interaction in HAMR. For the ASTC media stack specifically, we notice the outstanding sensitivity related to interlayer's optical thickness for media reflection and magnetic layer's light absorption. With 10-nm interlayer thickness change, the recording layer absorption can be changed by more than 25%. The 2-D results are found to correlate well with full 3-D model and magnetic recording tests on flyable disc with different interlayer thickness.

  18. Control of Optical Transitions with Magnetic Fields in Weakly Bound Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    McGuyer, B H; Iwata, G Z; Skomorowski, W; Moszynski, R; Zelevinsky, T

    2015-01-01

    Forbidden optical transitions in weakly bound $^{88}$Sr$_2$ molecules become strongly enabled with moderate applied magnetic fields. We report the control of transition strengths by five orders of magnitude and measurements of highly nonlinear Zeeman shifts, which we explain with an accurate {\\it ab initio} model. Mixed quantization in an optical lattice enables the experimental procedure. Our observation of formerly inaccessible $f$-parity excited states offers a new avenue for improving theoretical models for divalent atom dimers. Furthermore, magnetically enabled transitions may lead to an extremely precise subradiant molecular lattice clock.

  19. Electronic structures and magnetic and optical properties of Co-Al alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Rhee, J Y; Kudryavtsev, Y V; Lee, Y P

    1999-01-01

    The electronic structures, the magnetic moments and the optical conductivity spectra of the Co sub 1 sub - sub x Al sub x (x=0.5, 0.4375, and 0.375) alloys were calculated using the tight-binding linearized-muffin-tin-orbital method. The supercell method was employed to calculate the properties of the alloys with the off-stoichiometric concentrations. The calculated magnetic moments were in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. The inclusion of corrections for both the real and the imaginary parts of the self-energy markedly improved the agreement between the experimental and calculated the optical conductivity spectra.

  20. Analysis of the static magnetic field-dependent optical transmission of Ni nanorod colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Florian; Gratz, Micha; Tschöpe, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    The magnetic field-dependent optical transmission of dilute Ni nanorod aqueous suspensions was investigated. A series of four samples of nanorods were synthesized using the AAO template method and processed to stable colloids. The distributions of their length and diameter were characterized by analysis of TEM images and revealed average diameters of ˜25 nm and different lengths in the range of 60 nm-1100 nm. The collinear magnetic and optical anisotropy was studied by static field-dependent transmission measurements of linearly polarized light parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field direction. The experimental results were modelled assuming the field-dependent orientation distribution function of a superparamagnetic ensemble for the uniaxial ferromagnetic nanorods in liquid dispersion and extinction cross sections for longitudinal and transversal optical polarization derived from different approaches, including the electrostatic approximation and the separation of variables method, both applied to spheroidal particles, as well as finite element method simulations of spheroids and capped cylindrical particles. The extinction cross sections were compared to reveal the differences associated with the approximations of homogeneous polarization and/or particle shape. The consequences of these approximations for the quantitative analysis of magnetic field-dependent optical transmission measurements were investigated and a reliable protocol derived. Furthermore, the changes in optical cross sections induced by electromagnetic interaction between two nanorods in parallel end-to-end and side-by-side configuration as a function of their separation were studied.