WorldWideScience

Sample records for optical tweezers ii

  1. Optical tweezers principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Philip; Volpe, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Combining state-of-the-art research with a strong pedagogic approach, this text provides a detailed and complete guide to the theory, practice and applications of optical tweezers. In-depth derivation of the theory of optical trapping and numerical modelling of optical forces are supported by a complete step-by-step design and construction guide for building optical tweezers, with detailed tutorials on collecting and analysing data. Also included are comprehensive reviews of optical tweezers research in fields ranging from cell biology to quantum physics. Featuring numerous exercises and problems throughout, this is an ideal self-contained learning package for advanced lecture and laboratory courses, and an invaluable guide to practitioners wanting to enter the field of optical manipulation. The text is supplemented by www.opticaltweezers.org, a forum for discussion and a source of additional material including free-to-download, customisable research-grade software (OTS) for calculation of optical forces, dig...

  2. Optical tweezers stretching of chromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pope, L.H.; Bennink, Martin L.; Greve, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Recently significant success has emerged from exciting research involving chromatin stretching using optical tweezers. These experiments, in which a single chromatin fibre is attached by one end to a micron-sized bead held in an optical trap and to a solid surface or second bead via the other end,

  3. an optical tweezer based study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shankar Ghosh

    2006-11-12

    Nov 12, 2006 ... Liquid-Solid interface. Liquid-liquid interface. Shankar Ghosh. Motion of a sphere in an .... Bare mass of a colloidal sphere ∼ 10^15Kg. Note : The effective mass scales with viscosity and not with the density. Shankar Ghosh. Motion of a sphere in an oscillatory boundary layer: an optical tweezer based study ...

  4. Characterizing conical refraction optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, C.; McDougall, C.; Rafailov, E.; McGloin, D.

    2014-12-01

    Conical refraction occurs when a beam of light travels through an appropriately cut biaxial crystal. By focussing the conically refracted beam through a high numerical aperture microscope objective, conical refraction optical tweezers can be created, allowing for particle manipulation in both Raman spots and in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings. We present a thorough quantification of the trapping properties of such a beam, focussing on the trap stiffness and how this varies with trap power and trapped particle location. We show that the lower Raman spot can be thought of as a single-beam optical gradient force trap, while radiation pressure dominates in the upper Raman spot, leading to optical levitation rather than trapping. Particles in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings experience a lower trap stiffness than particles in the lower Raman spot but benefit from rotational control.

  5. Biaxial crystal-based optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, Oleg V.; Maksimyak, Andrew P.; Maksimyak, Peter P.

    2010-01-01

    We suggest an optical tweezer setup based on an optically biaxial crystal. To control movements of opaque particles, we use shifts. The results of experimental studies are reported which are concerned with this laser tweezer setup. We demonstrate a movement of microparticles of toner using...... a singular-optical trap, rotation of particles due to orbital angular momentum of the field, and converging or diverging of two different traps when changing transmission plane of polariser at the input of our polarisation interferometer....

  6. Optical tweezers and paradoxes in electromagnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeifer, Robert N C; Nieminen, Timo A; Heckenberg, Norman R; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2011-01-01

    The widespread application of optical forces and torques has contributed to renewed interest in the fundamentals of the electromagnetic force and torque, including long-standing paradoxes such as the Abraham–Minkowski controversy and the angular momentum density of a circularly polarized plane wave. We discuss the relationship between these electromagnetic paradoxes and optical tweezers. In particular, consideration of possible optical tweezers experiments to attempt to resolve these paradoxes strongly suggests that they are beyond experimental resolution, yielding identical observable results in all cases

  7. Quantum computation architecture using optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitenberg, Christof; Kuhr, Stefan; Mølmer, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We present a complete architecture for scalable quantum computation with ultracold atoms in optical lattices using optical tweezers focused to the size of a lattice spacing. We discuss three different two-qubit gates based on local collisional interactions. The gates between arbitrary qubits...... quantum computing....

  8. Optical tweezers study life under tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Furqan M; Block, Steven M

    2011-05-31

    Optical tweezers have become one of the primary weapons in the arsenal of biophysicists, and have revolutionized the new field of single-molecule biophysics. Today's techniques allow high-resolution experiments on biological macromolecules that were mere pipe dreams only a decade ago.

  9. Theory of optical-tweezers forces near a plane interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutra, Rafael de Sousa; Neto, P. A. Maia; Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Optical-tweezers experiments in molecular and cell biology often take place near the surface of the microscope slide that defines the bottom of the sample chamber. There, as elsewhere, force measurements require forcecalibrated tweezers. In bulk, one can calculate the tweezers force from first pr...

  10. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  11. Optical tweezers for the micromanipulation of plant cytoplasm and organelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hawes, C.; Osterrieder, A.; Sparkes, I.A.; Ketelaar, T.

    2010-01-01

    Laser tweezers, often known as optical tweezers or optical traps, permit the capturing and micromanipulation of microscopic particles along X, Y and Z axes using the radiation pressure generated by a focused laser beam, normally in the infrared region of the spectrum. For trapping to be successful,

  12. Miniaturized Optical Tweezers Through Fiber-End Microfabrication

    KAUST Repository

    Liberale, Carlo

    2014-07-30

    Optical tweezers represent a powerful tool for a variety of applications both in biology and in physics, and their miniaturization and full integration is of great interest so as to reduce size (towards portable systems), and to minimize the required intervention from the operator. Optical fibers represent a natural solution to achieve this goal, and here we review the realization of single-fiber optical tweezers able to create a purely optical three-dimensional trap. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.

  13. Miniaturized Optical Tweezers Through Fiber-End Microfabrication

    KAUST Repository

    Liberale, Carlo; Cojoc, Gheorghe; Rajamanickam, Vijayakumar; Ferrara, Lorenzo; Bragheri, Francesca; Minzioni, Paolo; Perozziello, Gerardo; Candeloro, Patrizio; Cristiani, Ilaria; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers represent a powerful tool for a variety of applications both in biology and in physics, and their miniaturization and full integration is of great interest so as to reduce size (towards portable systems), and to minimize the required intervention from the operator. Optical fibers represent a natural solution to achieve this goal, and here we review the realization of single-fiber optical tweezers able to create a purely optical three-dimensional trap. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.

  14. LMM Holographic Optical Tweezers (HOT) Module, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to expand the capabilities of the LMM for colloidal and other research by developing a holographic optical tweezers (HOT) module, allowing solid-state...

  15. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that explores the DNA interaction properties of proteins involved in a wide range of fundamental biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. We use optical tweezers to capture and stretch a single DNA molecule in the presence of proteins that bind DNA and alter its mechanical properties. We quantitatively characterize the DNA binding mechanisms of proteins in order to provide a detailed understanding of their function. In this work, we focus on proteins involved in replication of Escherichia coli (E. coli ), endogenous eukaryotic retrotransposons Ty3 and LINE-1, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA polymerases replicate the entire genome of the cell, and bind both double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during DNA replication. The replicative DNA polymerase in the widely-studied model system E. coli is the DNA polymerase III subunit alpha (DNA pol III alpha). We use optical tweezers to determine that UmuD, a protein that regulates bacterial mutagenesis through its interactions with DNA polymerases, specifically disrupts alpha binding to ssDNA. This suggests that UmuD removes alpha from its ssDNA template to allow DNA repair proteins access to the damaged DNA, and to facilitate exchange of the replicative polymerase for an error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase that inserts nucleotides opposite the lesions, so that bacterial DNA replication may proceed. This work demonstrates a biophysical mechanism by which E. coli cells tolerate DNA damage. Retroviruses and retrotransposons reproduce by copying their RNA genome into the nuclear DNA of their eukaryotic hosts. Retroelements encode proteins called nucleic acid chaperones, which rearrange nucleic acid secondary structure and are therefore required for successful replication. The chaperone activity of these proteins requires strong binding affinity for both single- and double-stranded nucleic

  16. Optical tweezers force measurements to study parasites chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Pozzo, L. Y.; Fontes, A.; Almeida, D. B.; Stahl, C. V.; Santos-Mallet, J. R.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Feder, D.; Ayres, D. C.; Giorgio, S.; Cesar, C. L.

    2009-07-01

    In this work, we propose a methodology to study microorganisms chemotaxis in real time using an Optical Tweezers system. Optical Tweezers allowed real time measurements of the force vectors, strength and direction, of living parasites under chemical or other kinds of gradients. This seems to be the ideal tool to perform observations of taxis response of cells and microorganisms with high sensitivity to capture instantaneous responses to a given stimulus. Forces involved in the movement of unicellular parasites are very small, in the femto-pico-Newton range, about the same order of magnitude of the forces generated in an Optical Tweezers. We applied this methodology to investigate the Leishmania amazonensis (L. amazonensis) and Trypanossoma cruzi (T. cruzi) under distinct situations.

  17. Control and manipulation of cold atoms in optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muldoon, Cecilia; Brandt, Lukas; Dong Jian; Stuart, Dustin; Brainis, Edouard; Himsworth, Matthew; Kuhn, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped by laser light are among the most promising candidates for storing and processing information in a quantum computer or simulator. The application certainly calls for a scalable and flexible scheme for addressing and manipulating the atoms. We have now made this a reality by implementing a fast and versatile method to dynamically control the position of neutral atoms trapped in optical tweezers. The tweezers result from a spatial light modulator (SLM) controlling and shaping a large number of optical dipole-force traps. Trapped atoms adapt to any change in the potential landscape, such that one can rearrange and randomly access individual sites within atom-trap arrays. (paper)

  18. Dynamic optical tweezers based assay for monitoring early drug resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xiaojing; Zhu, Siwei; Feng, Jie; Zhang, Yuquan; Min, Changjun; Yuan, X-C

    2013-01-01

    In this letter, a dynamic optical tweezers based assay is proposed and investigated for monitoring early drug resistance with Pemetrexed-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. The validity and stability of the method are verified experimentally in terms of the physical parameters of the optical tweezers system. The results demonstrate that the proposed technique is more convenient and faster than traditional techniques when the capability of detecting small variations of the response of cells to a drug is maintained. (letter)

  19. Magneto-optical tweezers built around an inverted microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claudet, Cyril; Bednar, Jan

    2005-01-01

    We present a simple experimental setup of magneto-optical tweezers built around an inverted microscope. Two pairs of coils placed around the focal point of the objective generate a planar-rotating magnetic field that is perpendicular to the stretching direction. This configuration allows us to control the rotary movement of a paramagnetic bead trapped in the optical tweezers. The mechanical design is universal and can be simply adapted to any inverted microscope and objective. The mechanical configuration permits the use of a rather large experimental cell and the simple assembly and disassembly of the magnetic attachment

  20. Scanning probe and optical tweezer investigations of biomolecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigby-Singleton, Shellie

    2002-01-01

    A complex array of intermolecular forces controls the interactions between and within biological molecules. The desire to empirically explore the fundamental forces has led to the development of several biophysical techniques. Of these, the atomic force microscope (AFM) and the optical tweezers have been employed throughout this thesis to monitor the intermolecular forces involved in biomolecular interactions. The AFM is a well-established force sensing technique capable of measuring biomolecular interactions at a single molecule level. However, its versatility has not been extrapolated to the investigation of a drug-enzyme complex. The energy landscape for the force induced dissociation of the DHFR-methotrexate complex was studied. Revealing an energy barrier to dissociation located ∼0.3 nm from the bound state. Unfortunately, the AFM has a limited range of accessible loading rates and in order to profile the complete energy landscape alternative force sensing instrumentation should be considered, for example the BFP and optical tweezers. Thus, this thesis outlines the development and construction an optical trap capable of measuring intermolecular forces between biomolecules at the single molecule level. To demonstrate the force sensing abilities of the optical set up, proof of principle measurements were performed which investigate the interactions between proteins and polymer surfaces subjected to varying degrees of argon plasma treatment. Complementary data was gained from measurements performed independently by the AFM. Changes in polymer resistance to proteins as a response to changes in polymer surface chemistry were detected utilising both AFM and optical tweezers measurements. Finally, the AFM and optical tweezers were employed as ultrasensitive biosensors. Single molecule investigations of the antibody-antigen interaction between the cardiac troponin I marker and its complementary antibody, reveals the impact therapeutic concentrations of heparin have

  1. Multispectral optical tweezers for molecular diagnostics of single biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Corey; Fardad, Shima; Sincore, Alex; Vangheluwe, Marie; Baudelet, Matthieu; Richardson, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Optical trapping of single biological cells has become an established technique for controlling and studying fundamental behavior of single cells with their environment without having "many-body" interference. The development of such an instrument for optical diagnostics (including Raman and fluorescence for molecular diagnostics) via laser spectroscopy with either the "trapping" beam or secondary beams is still in progress. This paper shows the development of modular multi-spectral imaging optical tweezers combining Raman and Fluorescence diagnostics of biological cells.

  2. Dynamic array generation and pattern formation for optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, P.C.; Glückstad, J.

    2000-01-01

    The generalised phase contrast approach is used for the generation of optical arrays of arbitrary beam shape, suitable for applications in optical tweezers for the manipulation of biological specimens. This approach offers numerous advantages over current techniques involving the use of computer......-generated holograms or diffractive optical elements. We demonstrate a low-loss system for generating intensity patterns suitable for the trapping and manipulation of small particles or specimens....

  3. Probing DNA with micro- and nanocapillaries and optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbock, L J; Otto, O; Skarstam, D R; Jahn, S; Chimerel, C; Gornall, J L; Keyser, U F

    2010-01-01

    We combine for the first time optical tweezer experiments with the resistive pulse technique based on capillaries. Quartz glass capillaries are pulled into a conical shape with tip diameters as small as 27 nm. Here, we discuss the translocation of λ-phage DNA which is driven by an electrophoretic force through the nanocapillary. The resulting change in ionic current indicates the folding state of single λ-phage DNA molecules. Our flow cell design allows for the straightforward incorporation of optical tweezers. We show that a DNA molecule attached to an optically trapped colloid is pulled into a capillary by electrophoretic forces. The detected electrophoretic force is in good agreement with measurements in solid-state nanopores.

  4. Spin dynamics and Kondo physics in optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yiheng; Lester, Brian J.; Brown, Mark O.; Kaufman, Adam M.; Long, Junling; Ball, Randall J.; Isaev, Leonid; Wall, Michael L.; Rey, Ana Maria; Regal, Cindy A.

    2016-05-01

    We propose to use optical tweezers as a toolset for direct observation of the interplay between quantum statistics, kinetic energy and interactions, and thus implement minimum instances of the Kondo lattice model in systems with few bosonic rubidium atoms. By taking advantage of strong local exchange interactions, our ability to tune the spin-dependent potential shifts between the two wells and complete control over spin and motional degrees of freedom, we design an adiabatic tunneling scheme that efficiently creates a spin-singlet state in one well starting from two initially separated atoms (one atom per tweezer) in opposite spin state. For three atoms in a double-well, two localized in the lowest vibrational mode of each tweezer and one atom in an excited delocalized state, we plan to use similar techniques and observe resonant transfer of two-atom singlet-triplet states between the wells in the regime when the exchange coupling exceeds the mobile atom hopping. Moreover, we argue that such three-atom double-tweezers could potentially be used for quantum computation by encoding logical qubits in collective spin and motional degrees of freedom. Current address: Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA.

  5. Acoustical and optical radiation pressure and the development of single beam acoustical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jean-Louis; Marchiano, Régis; Baresch, Diego

    2017-07-01

    Studies on radiation pressure in acoustics and optics have enriched one another and have a long common history. Acoustic radiation pressure is used for metrology, levitation, particle trapping and actuation. However, the dexterity and selectivity of single-beam optical tweezers are still to be matched with acoustical devices. Optical tweezers can trap, move and position micron size particles, biological samples or even atoms with subnanometer accuracy in three dimensions. One limitation of optical tweezers is the weak force that can be applied without thermal damage due to optical absorption. Acoustical tweezers overcome this limitation since the radiation pressure scales as the field intensity divided by the speed of propagation of the wave. However, the feasibility of single beam acoustical tweezers was demonstrated only recently. In this paper, we propose a historical review of the strong similarities but also the specificities of acoustical and optical radiation pressures, from the expression of the force to the development of single-beam acoustical tweezers.

  6. Acoustical and optical radiation pressure and the development of single beam acoustical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Jean-Louis; Marchiano, Régis; Baresch, Diego

    2017-01-01

    Studies on radiation pressure in acoustics and optics have enriched one another and have a long common history. Acoustic radiation pressure is used for metrology, levitation, particle trapping and actuation. However, the dexterity and selectivity of single-beam optical tweezers are still to be matched with acoustical devices. Optical tweezers can trap, move and position micron size particles, biological samples or even atoms with subnanometer accuracy in three dimensions. One limitation of optical tweezers is the weak force that can be applied without thermal damage due to optical absorption. Acoustical tweezers overcome this limitation since the radiation pressure scales as the field intensity divided by the speed of propagation of the wave. However, the feasibility of single beam acoustical tweezers was demonstrated only recently. In this paper, we propose a historical review of the strong similarities but also the specificities of acoustical and optical radiation pressures, from the expression of the force to the development of single-beam acoustical tweezers. - Highlights: • Studies on radiation pressure in acoustics and optics have enriched one another and have a long common history. • Acoustic radiation pressure is used for metrology, levitation, particle trapping and actuation. • However, the dexterity and selectivity of single-beam optical tweezers are still to be matched with acoustical devices. • Optical tweezers can trap, move and positioned micron size particles with subnanometer accuracy in three dimensions. • One limitation of optical tweezers is the weak force that can be applied without thermal damage due to optical absorption. • Acoustical tweezers overcome this limitation since the force scales as the field intensity divided by its propagation speed. • However, the feasibility of single beam acoustical tweezers was demonstrated only recently. • We propose a review of the strong similarities but also the specificities of acoustical

  7. Design and construction of an optical compact and affordable tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, M.C.; Perez Moret, Y.; Arronte, M.; Ponce, L.

    2009-01-01

    The following paper presents a new design allowing a reduction on the amount of required optical elements for the construction of the optical tweezers, which results in a compact and affordable system. The latter is composed by a 40 mW Nd: YAG (532 nm) laser and commercially available optics and mounts. A virtual instrument, developed using Lab View 8.0, controls both a XYZ table and a web camera for visualizing. The quality of the laser beam at the end of optical system was characterized using the knife-edge method, resulting in a Gaussian shaped (TEM00) intensity profile. It is presented as well the necessary information to align and calibrate each optical element. (Author)

  8. Exact theory of optical tweezers and its application to absolute calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutra, Rafael de Sousa; Viana, Nathan B.; Maia Neto, Paulo A.

    2017-01-01

    Optical tweezers have become a powerful tool for basic and applied research in cell biology. Here, we describe an experimentally verified theory for the trapping forces generated by optical tweezers based on first principles that allows absolute calibration. For pedagogical reasons, the steps tha...

  9. Measuring microscopic forces and torques using optical tweezers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mc

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info McLaren_2009.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 2976 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name McLaren_2009.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Measuring microscopic forces... and torques using optical tweezers M.G. McLaren1,2, A. Forbes2,3,4 and E. Sideras-Haddad2 1 CSIR National Laser Centre 2 School of Physics, University of Witwatersrand 3 School of Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal 4 School of Physics, University...

  10. Kinect the dots: 3D control of optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, Lucy; Preece, Daryl; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2013-01-01

    Holographically generated optical traps confine micron- and sub-micron sized particles close to the center of focused light beams. They also provide a way of trapping multiple particles and moving them in three dimensions. However, in many systems the user interface is not always advantageous or intuitive especially for collaborative work and when depth information is required. We discuss and evaluate a set of multi-beam optical tweezers that utilize off the shelf gaming technology to facilitate user interaction. We use the Microsoft Kinect sensor bar as a way of getting the user input required to generate arbitrary optical force fields and control optically trapped particles. We demonstrate that the system can also be used for dynamic light control. (paper)

  11. Microrheology with optical tweezers: data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassieri, Manlio; Warren, Rebecca L; Cooper, Jonathan M; Evans, R M L; Bailey, Nicholas J

    2012-01-01

    We present a data analysis procedure that provides the solution to a long-standing issue in microrheology studies, i.e. the evaluation of the fluids' linear viscoelastic properties from the analysis of a finite set of experimental data, describing (for instance) the time-dependent mean-square displacement of suspended probe particles experiencing Brownian fluctuations. We report, for the first time in the literature, the linear viscoelastic response of an optically trapped bead suspended in a Newtonian fluid, over the entire range of experimentally accessible frequencies. The general validity of the proposed method makes it transferable to the majority of microrheology and rheology techniques. (paper)

  12. Optical alignment and confinement of an ellipsoidal nanorod in optical tweezers: a theoretical study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trojek, Jan; Chvátal, Lukáš; Zemánek, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 7 (2012), s. 1224-1236 ISSN 1084-7529 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0348; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : ellipsoidal nanorod * optical tweezers * Rayleigh approximation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.665, year: 2012

  13. Acoustical and optical radiation pressures and the development of single beam acoustical tweezers

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas , Jean-Louis; Marchiano , Régis; Baresch , Diego

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Studies on radiation pressure in acoustics and optics have enriched one another and have a long common history. Acoustic radiation pressure is used for metrology, levitation, particle trapping and actuation. However, the dexterity and selectivity of single-beam optical tweezers are still to be matched with acoustical devices. Optical tweezers can trap, move and positioned micron size particles, biological samples or even atoms with subnanometer accuracy in three dimens...

  14. Single and dual fiber nano-tip optical tweezers: trapping and analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Decombe , Jean-Baptiste; Huant , Serge; Fick , Jochen

    2013-01-01

    International audience; An original optical tweezers using one or two chemically etched fiber nano-tips is developed. We demonstrate optical trapping of 1 micrometer polystyrene spheres at optical powers down to 2 mW. Harmonic trap potentials were found in the case of dual fiber tweezers by analyzing the trapped particle position fluctuations. The trap stiffness was deduced using three different models. Consistent values of up to 1 fN/nm were found. The stiffness linearly decreases with decre...

  15. Combined holographic-mechanical optical tweezers: Construction, optimization, and calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanes, Richard D. L.; Jenkins, Matthew C.; Egelhaaf, Stefan U.

    2009-08-01

    A spatial light modulator (SLM) and a pair of galvanometer-mounted mirrors (GMM) were combined into an optical tweezers setup. This provides great flexibility as the SLM creates an array of traps, which can be moved smoothly and quickly with the GMM. To optimize performance, the effect of the incidence angle on the SLM with respect to phase and intensity response was investigated. Although it is common to use the SLM at an incidence angle of 45°, smaller angles give a full 2π phase shift and an output intensity which is less dependent on the magnitude of the phase shift. The traps were calibrated using an active oscillatory technique and a passive probability distribution method.

  16. Combined holographic-mechanical optical tweezers: Construction, optimization, and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanes, Richard D. L.; Jenkins, Matthew C.; Egelhaaf, Stefan U.

    2009-01-01

    A spatial light modulator (SLM) and a pair of galvanometer-mounted mirrors (GMM) were combined into an optical tweezers setup. This provides great flexibility as the SLM creates an array of traps, which can be moved smoothly and quickly with the GMM. To optimize performance, the effect of the incidence angle on the SLM with respect to phase and intensity response was investigated. Although it is common to use the SLM at an incidence angle of 45 deg., smaller angles give a full 2π phase shift and an output intensity which is less dependent on the magnitude of the phase shift. The traps were calibrated using an active oscillatory technique and a passive probability distribution method.

  17. Finding trap stiffness of optical tweezers using digital filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendarez-Rangel, Pedro; Morales-Cruzado, Beatriz; Sarmiento-Gómez, Erick; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Francisco G

    2018-02-01

    Obtaining trap stiffness and calibration of the position detection system is the basis of a force measurement using optical tweezers. Both calibration quantities can be calculated using several experimental methods available in the literature. In most cases, stiffness determination and detection system calibration are performed separately, often requiring procedures in very different conditions, and thus confidence of calibration methods is not assured due to possible changes in the environment. In this work, a new method to simultaneously obtain both the detection system calibration and trap stiffness is presented. The method is based on the calculation of the power spectral density of positions through digital filters to obtain the harmonic contributions of the position signal. This method has the advantage of calculating both trap stiffness and photodetector calibration factor from the same dataset in situ. It also provides a direct method to avoid unwanted frequencies that could greatly affect calibration procedure, such as electric noise, for example.

  18. Investigation of shape memory of red blood cells using optical tweezers and quantitative phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Nelson; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2012-03-01

    RBC has been shown to possess shape memory subsequent to shear-induced shape transformation. However, this property of RBC may not be generalized to all kinds of stresses. Here, we report our observation on the action of radiation pressure forces on RBC's shape memory using optical manipulation and quantitative phase microscopy (OMQPM). QPM, based on Mach-Zehnder interferrometry, allowed measurement of dynamic changes of shape of RBC in optical tweezers at different trapping laser powers. In high power near-infrared optical tweezers (>200mW), the RBC was found to deform significantly due to optical forces. Upon removal of the tweezers, hysteresis in recovering its original resting shape was observed. In very high power tweezers or long-term stretching events, shape memory was almost erased. This irreversibility of the deformation may be due to temperature rise or stress-induced phase transformation of lipids in RBC membrane.

  19. Flocking multiple microparticles with automatically controlled optical tweezers: solutions and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haoyao; Wang, Can; Lou, Yunjiang

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents an efficient approach to achieve microparticles flocking with robotics and optical tweezers technologies. All particles trapped by optical tweezers can be automatically moved toward a predefined region without collision. The main contribution of this paper lies in the proposal of several solutions to the flocking manipulation of microparticles in microenvironments. First, a simple flocking controller is proposed to generate the desired positions and velocities for particles' movement. Second, a velocity saturation method is implemented to prevent the desired velocities from exceeding a safe limit. Third, a two-layer control architecture is proposed for the motion control of optical tweezers. This architecture can help make many robotic manipulations achievable under microenvironments. The proposed approach with these solutions can be applied to many bioapplications especially in cell engineering and biomedicine. Experiments on yeast cells with a robot-tweezers system are finally performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  20. Optical trapping of a spherically symmetric sphere in the ray-optics regime: a model for optical tweezers upon cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Yiren; Hsu Long; Chi Sien

    2006-01-01

    Since their invention in 1986, optical tweezers have become a popular manipulation and force measurement tool in cellular and molecular biology. However, until recently there has not been a sophisticated model for optical tweezers on trapping cells in the ray-optics regime. We present a model for optical tweezers to calculate the optical force upon a spherically symmetric multilayer sphere representing a common biological cell. A numerical simulation of this model shows that not only is the magnitude of the optical force upon a Chinese hamster ovary cell significantly three times smaller than that upon a polystyrene bead of the same size, but the distribution of the optical force upon a cell is also much different from that upon a uniform particle, and there is a 30% difference in the optical trapping stiffness of these two cases. Furthermore, under a small variant condition for the refractive indices of any adjacent layers of the sphere, this model provides a simple approximation to calculate the optical force and the stiffness of an optical tweezers system

  1. iTweezers: optical micromanipulation controlled by an Apple iPad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, R W; Gibson, G; Padgett, M J; Carberry, D; Picco, L; Miles, M

    2011-01-01

    The 3D interactive manipulation of multiple particles with holographic optical tweezers is often hampered by the control system. We use a multi-touch interface implemented on an Apple iPad to overcome many of the limitations of mouse-based control, and demonstrate an elegant and intuitive interface to multi-particle manipulation. This interface connects to the tweezers system hardware over a wireless network, allowing it to function as a remote monitor and control device. (technical note)

  2. Temperature control and measurement with tunable femtosecond optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Dipankar; Goswami, Debabrata

    2016-09-01

    We present the effects of wavelength dependent temperature rise in a femtosecond optical tweezers. Our experiments involve the femtosecond trapping laser tunable from 740-820 nm at low power 25 mW to cause heating in the trapped volume within a homogeneous solution of sub micro-molar concentration of IR dye. The 780 nm high repetition rate laser acts as a resonant excitation source which helps to create the local heating effortlessly within the trapping volume. We have used both position autocorrelation and equipartion theorem to evaluate temperature at different wavelength having different absorption coefficient. Fixing the pulse width in the temporal domain gives constant bandwidth at spatial domain, which makes our system behave as a tunable temperature rise device with high precision. This observation leads us to calculate temperature as well as viscosity within the vicinity of the trapping zone. A mutual energy transfer occurs between the trapped bead and solvents that leads to transfer the thermal energy of solvents into the kinetic energy of the trap bead and vice-versa. Thus hot solvated molecules resulting from resonant and near resonant excitation of trapping wavelength can continuously dissipate heat to the trapped bead which will be reflected on frequency spectrum of Brownian noise exhibited by the bead. Temperature rise near the trapping zone can significantly change the viscosity of the medium. We observe temperature rise profile according to its Gaussian shaped absorption spectrum with different wavelength.

  3. A computational tool to characterize particle tracking measurements in optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Michael A; Bowen, Warwick P

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present a computational tool for optical tweezers which calculates the particle tracking signal measured with a quadrant detector and the shot-noise limit to position resolution. The tool is a piece of Matlab code which functions within the freely available Optical Tweezers Toolbox. It allows the measurements performed in most optical tweezer experiments to be theoretically characterized in a fast and easy manner. The code supports particles with arbitrary size, any optical fields and any combination of objective and condenser, and performs a full vector calculation of the relevant fields. Example calculations are presented which show the tracking signals for different particles, and the shot-noise limit to position sensitivity as a function of the effective condenser NA. (paper)

  4. Micro-rheology on (polymer-grafted) colloids using optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutsche, C; Elmahdy, M M; Kegler, K; Semenov, I; Stangner, T; Otto, O; Ueberschaer, O; Kremer, F; Keyser, U F; Krueger, M; Rauscher, M; Weeber, R; Harting, J; Kim, Y W; Lobaskin, V; Netz, R R

    2011-01-01

    Optical tweezers are experimental tools with extraordinary resolution in positioning (± 1 nm) a micron-sized colloid and in the measurement of forces (± 50 fN) acting on it-without any mechanical contact. This enables one to carry out a multitude of novel experiments in nano- and microfluidics, of which the following will be presented in this review: (i) forces within single pairs of colloids in media of varying concentration and valency of the surrounding ionic solution, (ii) measurements of the electrophoretic mobility of single colloids in different solvents (concentration, valency of the ionic solution and pH), (iii) similar experiments as in (i) with DNA-grafted colloids, (iv) the nonlinear response of single DNA-grafted colloids in shear flow and (v) the drag force on single colloids pulled through a polymer solution. The experiments will be described in detail and their analysis discussed.

  5. Near-field enhanced optical tweezers utilizing femtosecond-laser nanostructured substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsifaki, D. G., E-mail: dkotsif@eie.gr; Kandyla, M. [Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation, 48 Vasileos Constantinou Avenue, 11635 Athens (Greece); Lagoudakis, P. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-23

    We present experimental evidence of plasmonic-enhanced optical tweezers, of polystyrene beads in deionized water in the vicinity of metal-coated nanostructures. The optical tweezers operate with a continuous wave near-infrared laser. We employ a Cu/Au bilayer that significantly improves dissipation of heat generated by the trapping laser beam and avoid de-trapping from heat convection currents. We investigate the improvement of the optical trapping force and the effective trapping quality factor, and observe an exponential distance dependence of the trapping force from the nanostructures, indicative of evanescent plasmonic enhancement.

  6. Single and dual fiber nano-tip optical tweezers: trapping and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decombe, Jean-Baptiste; Huant, Serge; Fick, Jochen

    2013-12-16

    An original optical tweezers using one or two chemically etched fiber nano-tips is developed. We demonstrate optical trapping of 1 micrometer polystyrene spheres at optical powers down to 2 mW. Harmonic trap potentials were found in the case of dual fiber tweezers by analyzing the trapped particle position fluctuations. The trap stiffness was deduced using three different models. Consistent values of up to 1 fN/nm were found. The stiffness linearly decreases with decreasing light intensity and increasing fiber tip-to-tip distance.

  7. Fiber based optical tweezers for simultaneous in situ force exertion and measurements in a 3D polyacrylamide gel compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ti, Chaoyang; Thomas, Gawain M; Ren, Yundong; Zhang, Rui; Wen, Qi; Liu, Yuxiang

    2015-07-01

    Optical tweezers play an important role in biological applications. However, it is difficult for traditional optical tweezers based on objective lenses to work in a three-dimensional (3D) solid far away from the substrate. In this work, we develop a fiber based optical trapping system, namely inclined dual fiber optical tweezers, that can simultaneously apply and measure forces both in water and in a 3D polyacrylamide gel matrix. In addition, we demonstrate in situ, non-invasive characterization of local mechanical properties of polyacrylamide gel by measurements on an embedded bead. The fiber optical tweezers measurements agree well with those of atomic force microscopy (AFM). The inclined dual fiber optical tweezers provide a promising and versatile tool for cell mechanics study in 3D environments.

  8. Mechanical properties of stored red blood cells using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Adriana; Alexandre de Thomaz, Andre; de Ysasa Pozzo, Liliana; de Lourdes Barjas-Castro, Maria; Brandao, Marcelo M.; Saad, Sara T. O.; Barbosa, Luiz Carlos; Cesar, Carlos Lenz

    2005-08-01

    We have developed a method for measuring the red blood cell (RBC) membrane overall elasticity μ by measuring the deformation of the cells when dragged at a constant velocity through a plasma fluid by an optical tweezers. The deformability of erythrocytes is a critical determinant of blood flow in the microcirculation. We tested our method and hydrodynamic models, which included the presence of two walls, by measuring the RBC deformation as a function of drag velocity and of the distance to the walls. The capability and sensitivity of this method can be evaluated by its application to a variety of studies, such as, the measurement of RBC elasticity of sickle cell anemia patients comparing homozygous (HbSS), including patients taking hydroxyrea (HU) and heterozygous (HbAS) with normal donors and the RBC elasticity measurement of gamma irradiated stored blood for transfusion to immunosupressed patients as a function of time and dose. These studies show that the technique has the sensitivity to discriminate heterozygous and homozygous sickle cell anemia patients from normal donors and even follow the course of HU treatment of Homozygous patients. The gamma irradiation studies show that there is no significant change in RBC elasticity over time for up to 14 days of storage, regardless of whether the unit was irradiated or not, but there was a huge change in the measured elasticity for the RBC units stored for more than 21 days after irradiation. These finds are important for the assessment of stored irradiated RBC viability for transfusion purposes because the present protocol consider 28 storage days after irradiation as the limit for the RBC usage.

  9. Substrate-dependent cell elasticity measured by optical tweezers indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousafzai, Muhammad S.; Ndoye, Fatou; Coceano, Giovanna; Niemela, Joseph; Bonin, Serena; Scoles, Giacinto; Cojoc, Dan

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, cell elasticity has been widely investigated as a potential label free indicator for cellular alteration in different diseases, cancer included. Cell elasticity can be locally measured by pulling membrane tethers, stretching or indenting the cell using optical tweezers. In this paper, we propose a simple approach to perform cell indentation at pN forces by axially moving the cell against a trapped microbead. The elastic modulus is calculated using the Hertz-model. Besides the axial component, the setup also allows us to examine the lateral cell-bead interaction. This technique has been applied to measure the local elasticity of HBL-100 cells, an immortalized human cell line, originally derived from the milk of a woman with no evidence of breast cancer lesions. In addition, we have studied the influence of substrate stiffness on cell elasticity by performing experiments on cells cultured on two substrates, bare and collagen-coated, having different stiffness. The mean value of the cell elastic modulus measured during indentation was 26±9 Pa for the bare substrate, while for the collagen-coated substrate it diminished to 19±7 Pa. The same trend was obtained for the elastic modulus measured during the retraction of the cell: 23±10 Pa and 13±7 Pa, respectively. These results show the cells adapt their stiffness to that of the substrate and demonstrate the potential of this setup for low-force probing of modifications to cell mechanics induced by the surrounding environment (e.g. extracellular matrix or other cells).

  10. Graded-index fiber tip optical tweezers: numerical simulation and trapping experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yuan; Ye, Ai-Yan; Wu, Yu; Rao, Yun-Jiang; Yao, Yao; Xiao, Song

    2013-07-01

    Optical fiber tweezers based on a graded-index multimode fiber (GIMMF) tip is proposed. Light propagation characteristics and gradient force distribution near the GIMMF tip are numerically investigated, which are further compared with that of optical fiber tips based on conventional single mode fibers. The simulated results indicated that by selecting optimal GIMMF length, the gradient force of the GIMMF tip tweezers is about 4 times higher than that of the SMF tip tweezers with a same shape. To prove the feasibility of such a new concept, optical trapping of yeast cells with a diameter of ~5 μm using the chemically-etched GIMMF tip is experimentally demonstrated and the trapping force is also calculated.

  11. Manipulation of Nanoparticles Using Dark-Field-Illumination Optical Tweezers with Compensating Spherical Aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin-Hua, Zhou; Run-Zhe, Tao; Zhi-Bin, Hu; Min-Cheng, Zhong; Zi-Qiang, Wang; Yin-Mei, Li; Jun, Cai

    2009-01-01

    Based on our previous investigation of optical tweezers with dark field illumination [Chin. Phys. Lett. 25(2008)329], nanoparticles at large trap depth are better viewed in wide field and real time for a long time, but with poor forces. Here we present the mismatched tube length to compensate for spherical aberration of an oil-immersion objective in a glass-water interface in an optical tweezers system for manipulating nanoparticles. In this way, the critical power of stable trapping particles is measured at different trap depths. It is found that trap depth is enlarged for trapping nanoparticles and trapping forces are enhanced at large trap depth. According to the measurement, 70-nm particles are manipulated in three dimensions and observed clearly at large appropriate depth. This will expand applications of optical tweezers in a nanometre-scale colloidal system. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  12. Optical tweezers in concentrated colloidal dispersions : Manipulating and imaging individual particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, Dirk Leo Joep

    2004-01-01

    Using a laser beam that is focused down to a diffraction-limited spot, particles with a size ranging from several nanometers up to tens of micrometers can be trapped and manipulated. This technique, known as "optical tweezers" or "optical trapping", has been used in a wide variety of

  13. Optically-driven red blood cell rotor in linearly polarized laser tweezers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have constructed a dual trap optical tweezers set-up around an inverted microscope where both the traps can be independently controlled and manipulated in all the three dimensions. Here we report our observations on rotation of red blood cells (RBCs) in a linearly polarized optical trap. Red blood cells deform and ...

  14. Light distribution analysis of optical fibre probe-based near-field optical tweezers using FDTD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B H; Yang, L J; Wang, Y [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Heilongjiang, Harbin, 150001 (China)], E-mail: richelaw@163.com

    2009-09-01

    Optical fibre probe-based near-field optical tweezers overcomes the diffraction limit of conventional optical tweezers, utilizing strong mechanical forces and torque associated with highly enhanced electric fields to trap and manipulate nano-scale particles. Near-field evanescent wave generated at optical fibre probe decays rapidly with the distance that results a significant reduced trapping volume, thus it is necessary to analyze the near-field distribution of optical fibre probe. The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is applied to characterize the near-field distribution of optical fibre probe. In terms of the distribution patterns, depolarization and polarization, the near-field distributions in longitudinal sections and cross-sections of tapered metal-coated optical fibre probe are calculated. The calculation results reveal that the incident polarized wave becomes depolarized after exiting from the nano-scale aperture of probe. The near-field distribution of the probe is unsymmetrical, and the near-field distribution in the cross-section vertical to the incident polarized wave is different from that in the cross-section parallel to the incident polarized wave. Moreover, the polarization of incident wave has a great impact on the light intensity distribution.

  15. Mechanical and electrical properties of red blood cells using optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontes, A; Castro, M L Barjas; Brandão, M M; Fernandes, H P; Huruta, R R; Costa, F F; Saad, S T O; Thomaz, A A; Pozzo, L Y; Barbosa, L C; Cesar, C L

    2011-01-01

    Optical tweezers are a very sensitive tool, based on photon momentum transfer, for individual, cell by cell, manipulation and measurements, which can be applied to obtain important properties of erythrocytes for clinical and research purposes. Mechanical and electrical properties of erythrocytes are critical parameters for stored cells in transfusion centers, immunohematological tests performed in transfusional routines and in blood diseases. In this work, we showed methods, based on optical tweezers, to study red blood cells and applied them to measure apparent overall elasticity, apparent membrane viscosity, zeta potential, thickness of the double layer of electrical charges and adhesion in red blood cells

  16. Numerical study of the properties of optical vortex array laser tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chun-Fu; Chu, Shu-Chun

    2013-11-04

    Chu et al. constructed a kind of Ince-Gaussian modes (IGM)-based vortex array laser beams consisting of p x p embedded optical vortexes from Ince-Gaussian modes, IG(e)(p,p) modes [Opt. Express 16, 19934 (2008)]. Such an IGM-based vortex array laser beams maintains its vortex array profile during both propagation and focusing, and is applicable to optical tweezers. This study uses the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method to study the properties of the IGM-based vortex array laser tweezers while it traps dielectric particles. This study calculates the resultant force exerted on the spherical dielectric particles of different sizes situated at the IGM-based vortex array laser beam waist. Numerical results show that the number of trapping spots of a structure light (i.e. IGM-based vortex laser beam), is depended on the relation between the trapped particle size and the structure light beam size. While the trapped particle is small comparing to the beam size of the IGM-based vortex array laser beams, the IGM-based vortex array laser beams tweezers are suitable for multiple traps. Conversely, the tweezers is suitable for single traps. The results of this study is useful to the future development of the vortex array laser tweezers applications.

  17. tweezercalib 2.0: Faster version of MatLab package for precise calibration of optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Martin; Tolic-Nørrelykke, Iva Marija; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    We present a vectorized version of the MatLab (MathWorks Inc) package tweezercalib for calibration of optical tweezers with precision. The calibration is based on the power spectrum of the Brownian motion of a dielectric bead trapped in the tweezers. Precision is achieved by accounting for a number...

  18. Actin and myosin regulate cytoplasm stiffness in plant cells: a study using optical tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, van der H.S.; Ruijter, de N.C.A.; Emons, A.M.C.; Ketelaar, T.

    2010-01-01

    Here, we produced cytoplasmic protrusions with optical tweezers in mature BY-2 suspension cultured cells to study the parameters involved in the movement of actin filaments during changes in cytoplasmic organization and to determine whether stiffness is an actin-related property of plant cytoplasm.

  19. Construction and actuation of a microscopic gear assembly formed using optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung-Dae; Lee, Yong-Gu

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of micrometer-sized parts is an important manufacturing process; any development in it could potentially change the current manufacturing practices for micrometer-scale devices. Due to the lack of reliable microassembly techniques, these devices are often manufactured using silicon, which includes etching and depositions with little use of assembly processes. The result is the requirement of specialized manufacturing conditions with hazardous byproducts and limited applications where only simple mechanisms are allowed. Optical tweezers are non-contact type manipulators that are very suitable for assembling microparts and solve one of the most difficult problems for microassembly, which is the sticking of the physical manipulator to the micropart. Although contact type manipulators can be surface modified to be non-sticky, this involves extra preprocessing—optical tweezers do not require such additional efforts. The weakness of using optical tweezers is that the permanent assembly of parts is not possible as only very small forces can be applied. We introduce an advanced microassembly environment with the combined use of optical tweezers and a motorized microtip, where the former is used to position two parts and the latter is used to introduce deformation in the parts so that they form a strongly fitted assembly. (paper)

  20. Optical tweezers and surface plasmon resonance combination system based on the high numerical aperture lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xuchen; Zhang, Bei; Lan, Guoqiang; Wang, Yiqiao; Liu, Shugang

    2015-11-01

    Biology and medicine sample measurement takes an important role in the microscopic optical technology. Optical tweezer has the advantage of accurate capture and non-pollution of the sample. The SPR(surface plasmon resonance) sensor has so many advantages include high sensitivity, fast measurement, less consumption of sample and label-free detection of biological sample that the SPR sensing technique has been used for surface topography, analysis of biochemical and immune, drug screening and environmental monitoring. If they combine, they will play an important role in the biological, chemical and other subjects. The system we propose use the multi-axis cage system, by using the methods of reflection and transmiss ion to improve the space utilization. The SPR system and optical tweezer were builtup and combined in one system. The cage of multi-axis system gives full play to its accuracy, simplicity and flexibility. The size of the system is 20 * 15 * 40 cm3 and thus the sample can be replaced to switch between the optical tweezers system and the SPR system in the small space. It means that we get the refractive index of the sample and control the particle in the same system. In order to control the revolving stage, get the picture and achieve the data stored automatically, we write a LabVIEW procedure. Then according to the data from the back focal plane calculate the refractive index of the sample. By changing the slide we can trap the particle as optical tweezer, which makes us measurement and trap the sample at the same time.

  1. Micro-rheology and interparticle interactions in aerosols probed with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Jonathan P.; Power, Rory M.; Cai, Chen; Simpson, Stephen H.

    2014-09-01

    Using optical tweezers for micro-rheological investigations of a surrounding fluid has been routinely demonstrated. In this work, we will demonstrate that rheological measurements of the bulk and surface properties of aerosol particles can be made directly using optical tweezers, providing important insights into the phase behavior of materials in confined environments and the rate of molecular diffusion in viscous phases. The use of holographic optical tweezers to manipulate aerosol particles has become standard practice in recent years, providing an invaluable tool to investigate particle dynamics, including evaporation/ condensation kinetics, chemical aging and phase transformation. When combined with non-linear Raman spectroscopy, the size and refractive index of a particle can be determined with unprecedented accuracy viscosity and surface tension of particles can be measured directly in the under-damped regime at low viscosity. In the over-damped regime, we will show that viscosity measurements can extend close to the glass transition, allowing measurements over an impressive dynamic range of 12 orders of magnitude in relaxation timescale and viscosity. Indeed, prior to the coalescence event, we will show how the Brownian trajectories of trapped particles can yield important and unique insights into the interactions of aerosol particles.

  2. Fabrication of quartz microcylinders by laser interference lithography for angular optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santybayeva, Zhanna; Meghit, Afaf; Desgarceaux, Rudy; Teissier, Roland; Pichot, Frederic; de Marin, Charles; Charlot, Benoit; Pedaci, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    The use of optical tweezers (OTs) and spin angular momentum transfer to birefringent particles allows new mechanical measurements in systems where torque and rotation are relevant parameters at the single-molecule level. There is a growing interest in developing simple, fast, and inexpensive protocols to produce a large number of submicron scale cylinders of quartz, a positive uniaxial birefringent crystal, to be employed for such angular measurements in OTs. Here, we show that laser interference lithography, a method well known for its simplicity, fulfills these requirements and produces quartz cylindrical particles that we successfully use to apply and measure optical torque in the piconewton nm range in an optical torque wrench.

  3. Optical macro-tweezers: trapping of highly motile micro-organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thalhammer, G; Steiger, R; Bernet, S; Ritsch-Marte, M

    2011-01-01

    Optical micromanipulation stands for contact-free handling of microscopic particles by light. Optical forces can manipulate non-absorbing objects in a large range of sizes, e.g., from biological cells down to cold atoms. Recently much progress has been made going from the micro- down to the nanoscale. Less attention has been paid to going the other way, trapping increasingly large particles. Optical tweezers typically employ a single laser beam tightly focused by a microscope objective of high numerical aperture to stably trap a particle in three dimensions (3D). As the particle size increases, stable 3D trapping in a single-beam trap requires scaling up the optical power, which eventually induces adverse biological effects. Moreover, the restricted field of view of standard optical tweezers, dictated by the use of high NA objectives, is particularly unfavorable for catching actively moving specimens. Both problems can be overcome by traps with counter-propagating beams. Our 'macro-tweezers' are especially designed to trap highly motile organisms, as they enable three-dimensional all-optical trapping and guiding in a volume of 2 × 1 × 2 mm 3 . Here we report for the first time the optical trapping of large actively swimming organisms, such as for instance Euglena protists and dinoflagellates of up to 70 µm length. Adverse bio-effects are kept low since trapping occurs outside high intensity regions, e.g., focal spots. We expect our approach to open various possibilities in the contact-free handling of 50–100 µm sized objects that could hitherto not be envisaged, for instance all-optical holding of individual micro-organisms for taxonomic identification, selective collecting or tagging

  4. Scanning a DNA molecule for bound proteins using hybrid magnetic and optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn T J van Loenhout

    Full Text Available The functional state of the genome is determined by its interactions with proteins that bind, modify, and move along the DNA. To determine the positions and binding strength of proteins localized on DNA we have developed a combined magnetic and optical tweezers apparatus that allows for both sensitive and label-free detection. A DNA loop, that acts as a scanning probe, is created by looping an optically trapped DNA tether around a DNA molecule that is held with magnetic tweezers. Upon scanning the loop along the λ-DNA molecule, EcoRI proteins were detected with ~17 nm spatial resolution. An offset of 33 ± 5 nm for the detected protein positions was found between back and forwards scans, corresponding to the size of the DNA loop and in agreement with theoretical estimates. At higher applied stretching forces, the scanning loop was able to remove bound proteins from the DNA, showing that the method is in principle also capable of measuring the binding strength of proteins to DNA with a force resolution of 0.1 pN/[Formula: see text]. The use of magnetic tweezers in this assay allows the facile preparation of many single-molecule tethers, which can be scanned one after the other, while it also allows for direct control of the supercoiling state of the DNA molecule, making it uniquely suitable to address the effects of torque on protein-DNA interactions.

  5. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of single nanostructures using standing-wave Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mu-ying; He, Lin; Chen, Gui-hua; Yang, Guang; Li, Yong-qing

    2017-08-01

    Optical tweezers integrated with Raman spectroscopy allows analyzing a single trapped micro-particle, but is generally less effective for individual nano-sized objects in the 10-100 nm range. The main challenge is the weak gradient force on nanoparticles that is insufficient to overcome the destabilizing effect of scattering force and Brownian motion. Here, we present standing-wave Raman tweezers for stable trapping and sensitive characterization of single isolated nanostructures with a low laser power by combining a standing-wave optical trap (SWOT) with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This scheme has stronger intensity gradients and balanced scattering forces, and thus is more stable and sensitive in measuring nanoparticles in liquid with 4-8 fold increase in the Raman signals. It can be used to analyze many nanoparticles that cannot be measured with single-beam Raman tweezers, including individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), graphene flakes, biological particles, polystyrene beads (100 nm), SERS-active metal nanoparticles, and high-refractive semiconductor nanoparticles with a low laser power of a few milliwatts. This would enable sorting and characterization of specific SWCNTs and other nanoparticles based on their increased Raman fingerprints.

  6. Neural Network for Image-to-Image Control of Optical Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Anderson, Robert C.; Weiland, Kenneth E.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.

    2004-01-01

    A method is discussed for using neural networks to control optical tweezers. Neural-net outputs are combined with scaling and tiling to generate 480 by 480-pixel control patterns for a spatial light modulator (SLM). The SLM can be combined in various ways with a microscope to create movable tweezers traps with controllable profiles. The neural nets are intended to respond to scattered light from carbon and silicon carbide nanotube sensors. The nanotube sensors are to be held by the traps for manipulation and calibration. Scaling and tiling allow the 100 by 100-pixel maximum resolution of the neural-net software to be applied in stages to exploit the full 480 by 480-pixel resolution of the SLM. One of these stages is intended to create sensitive null detectors for detecting variations in the scattered light from the nanotube sensors.

  7. Crosstalk elimination in the detection of dual-beam optical tweezers by spatial filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, Dino; Oddershede, Lene B.; Reihani, S. Nader S.

    2014-01-01

    In dual-beam optical tweezers, the accuracy of position and force measurements is often compromised by crosstalk between the two detected signals, this crosstalk leading to systematic and significant errors on the measured forces and distances. This is true both for dual-beam optical traps where the splitting of the two traps is done by polarization optics and for dual optical traps constructed by other methods, e.g., holographic tweezers. If the two traps are orthogonally polarized, most often crosstalk is minimized by inserting polarization optics in front of the detector; however, this method is not perfect because of the de-polarization of the trapping beam introduced by the required high numerical aperture optics. Here we present a simple and easy-to-implement method to efficiently eliminate crosstalk. The method is based on spatial filtering by simply inserting a pinhole at the correct position and is highly compatible with standard back focal plane photodiode based detection of position and force. Our spatial filtering method reduces crosstalk up to five times better than polarization filtering alone. The effectiveness is dependent on pinhole size and distance between the traps and is here quantified experimentally and reproduced by theoretical modeling. The method here proposed will improve the accuracy of force-distance measurements, e.g., of single molecules, performed by dual-beam optical traps and hence give much more scientific value for the experimental efforts

  8. Photodiode Based Detection for Multiple Trap Optical Tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Dino

    This thesis is concerned with the position tracking of microscopic, optically trapped particles and the quantification of the forces acting on them. A new detection method for simultaneous, three-dimensional tracking of multiple particles is presented, its performance is evaluated, and its...... usefulness is illustrated in specific application examples. Optical traps enable contact-less, all-optical manipulation of microscopic objects. Over the last decades, this laser-based micro-manipulation tool has facilitated numerous exciting discoveries within biology and physics, and it is today regarded...

  9. Counter-propagating dual-trap optical tweezers based on linear momentum conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Huguet, J. M.; Ritort, F.

    2013-01-01

    We present a dual-trap optical tweezers setup which directly measures forces using linear momentum conservation. The setup uses a counter-propagating geometry, which allows momentum measurement on each beam separately. The experimental advantages of this setup include low drift due to all-optical manipulation, and a robust calibration (independent of the features of the trapped object or buffer medium) due to the force measurement method. Although this design does not attain the high-resolution of some co-propagating setups, we show that it can be used to perform different single molecule measurements: fluctuation-based molecular stiffness characterization at different forces and hopping experiments on molecular hairpins. Remarkably, in our setup it is possible to manipulate very short tethers (such as molecular hairpins with short handles) down to the limit where beads are almost in contact. The setup is used to illustrate a novel method for measuring the stiffness of optical traps and tethers on the basis of equilibrium force fluctuations, i.e., without the need of measuring the force vs molecular extension curve. This method is of general interest for dual trap optical tweezers setups and can be extended to setups which do not directly measure forces.

  10. Counter-propagating dual-trap optical tweezers based on linear momentum conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Huguet, J. M. [Small Biosystems Lab, Dept. de Fisica Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ritort, F. [Small Biosystems Lab, Dept. de Fisica Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ciber-BBN de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-04-15

    We present a dual-trap optical tweezers setup which directly measures forces using linear momentum conservation. The setup uses a counter-propagating geometry, which allows momentum measurement on each beam separately. The experimental advantages of this setup include low drift due to all-optical manipulation, and a robust calibration (independent of the features of the trapped object or buffer medium) due to the force measurement method. Although this design does not attain the high-resolution of some co-propagating setups, we show that it can be used to perform different single molecule measurements: fluctuation-based molecular stiffness characterization at different forces and hopping experiments on molecular hairpins. Remarkably, in our setup it is possible to manipulate very short tethers (such as molecular hairpins with short handles) down to the limit where beads are almost in contact. The setup is used to illustrate a novel method for measuring the stiffness of optical traps and tethers on the basis of equilibrium force fluctuations, i.e., without the need of measuring the force vs molecular extension curve. This method is of general interest for dual trap optical tweezers setups and can be extended to setups which do not directly measure forces.

  11. Single-atom trapping and transport in DMD-controlled optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Dustin; Kuhn, Axel

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate the trapping and manipulation of single neutral atoms in reconfigurable arrays of optical tweezers. Our approach offers unparalleled speed by using a Texas instruments digital micro-mirror device as a holographic amplitude modulator with a frame rate of 20 000 per second. We show the trapping of static arrays of up to 20 atoms, as well as transport of individually selected atoms over a distance of 25 μm with laser cooling and 4 μm without. We discuss the limitations of the technique and the scope for technical improvements.

  12. Calibration of optical tweezers with positional detection in the back focal plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolic-Nørrelykke, S.F.; Schäffer, E.; Howard, J.

    2006-01-01

    We explain and demonstrate a new method of force and position calibrations for optical tweezers with back-focal-plane photodetection. The method combines power spectral measurements of thermal motion and the response to a sinusoidal motion of a translation stage. It consequently does not use...... and precise: true values are returned, with small error bars. We tested this experimentally, near and far from surfaces in the lateral directions. Both position and force calibrations were accurate to within 3%. To calibrate, we moved the sample with a piezoelectric translation stage, but the laser beam could...

  13. Laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells with optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Shuxun; Wang Xiaolin; Sun Dong [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Cheng Jinping; Han Cheng, Shuk [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Kong, Chi-Wing [Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Consortium, and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, LKS Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Li, Ronald A. [Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Consortium, and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, LKS Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Center of Cardiovascular Research, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10029 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    We report a study on the laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) at the single-cell level. Cells were manipulated by optical tweezers and fused under irradiation with pulsed UV laser at 355 nm. Successful fusion was indicated by green fluorescence protein transfer. The influence of laser pulse energy on the fusion efficiency was investigated. The fused products were viable as gauged by live cell staining. Successful fusion of hESCs with somatic cells was also demonstrated. The reported fusion outcome may facilitate studies of cell differentiation, maturation, and reprogramming.

  14. Accurate measurement of microscopic forces and torques using optical tweezers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    McLaren, M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available and tweezing systems have found widespread application across diverse fields in science, from applied biology to fundamental physics. In this article the authors outline the design and construction of an optical trapping and tweezing system, and show how...

  15. Tunable Optical Tweezers for Wavelength-dependent Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-23

    have been studied in an optical levitation scheme over short laser wavelength ranges20 and for dye-loaded di- electric particles.21 In the first case...M. Block, IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 2, 1066 (1996). 7K. Dholakia, W. M. Lee, L. Paterson, M. P. MacDonald, I. Andreev, P. Mthunzi, C. T. A...Brown, R. F. Marchington, and A. C. Riches, IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 13, 1646 (2007). 8K. Dholakia, M. P. MacDonald, P. Zemanek, and T

  16. Improved axial position detection in optical tweezers measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Jakob Kisbye; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Oddershede, Lene

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the axial position detection of a trapped microsphere in an optical trap by using a quadrant photodiode. By replacing the photodiode with a CCD camera, we obtain detailed information on the light scattered by the microsphere. The correlation of the interference pattern with the axial...... position displays complex behavior with regions of positive and negative interference. By analyzing the scattered light intensity as a function of the axial position of the trapped sphere, we propose a simple method to increase the sensitivity and control the linear range of axial position detection....

  17. An optical tweezer in asymmetrical vortex Bessel-Gaussian beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotlyar, V. V.; Kovalev, A. A., E-mail: alexeysmr@mail.ru; Porfirev, A. P. [Image Processing Systems Institute, 151 Molodogvardeiskaya St., 443001 Samara (Russian Federation); Department of Technical cybernetics, Samara State Aerospace University, Samara 443086 (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-14

    We study an optical micromanipulation that comprises trapping, rotating, and transporting 5-μm polystyrene microbeads in asymmetric Bessel-Gaussian (BG) laser beams. The beams that carry orbital angular momentum are generated by means of a liquid crystal microdisplay and focused by a microobjective with a numerical aperture of NA = 0.85. We experimentally show that given a constant topological charge, the rate of microparticle motion increases near linearly with increasing asymmetry of the BG beam. Asymmetric BG beams can be used instead of conventional Gaussian beam for trapping and transferring live cells without thermal damage.

  18. Holographic optical tweezers for object manipulations at an air-liquid surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesacher, Alexander; Fürhapter, Severin; Maurer, Christian; Bernet, Stefan; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2006-06-26

    We investigate holographic optical tweezers manipulating micro-beads at a suspended air-liquid interface. Axial confinement of the particles in the two-dimensional interface is maintained by the interplay between surface tension and gravity. Therefore, optical trapping of the micro-beads is possible even with a long distance air objective. Efficient micro-circulation of the liquid can be induced by fast rotating beads, driven by the orbital angular momentum transfer of incident Laguerre-Gaussian (doughnut) laser modes. Our setup allows various ways of creating a tailored dynamic flow of particles and liquid within the surface. We demonstrate examples of surface manipulations like efficient vortex pumps and mixers, interactive particle flow steering by arrays of vortex pumps, the feasibility of achieving a "clocked" traffic of micro beads, and size-selective guiding of beads along optical "conveyor belts".

  19. Using electrical and optical tweezers to facilitate studies of molecular motors†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, Mark E.; Sun, Yujie; Bau, Haim H.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2013-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis was used to stretch and suspend actin filaments across a trench etched between two electrodes patterned on a glass slide. Optical tweezers were used to bring a motor protein-coated bead into close proximity to a pre-selected, suspended actin filament, facilitating the attachment of the myosin-coated bead to the filament. The clearance beneath the filament allowed the bead to move freely along and around its filamentous track, unhindered by solid surfaces. Using defocused images, the three-dimensional position of the bead was tracked as a function of time to obtain its trajectory. Experiments were carried out with myosin V and myosin X. Both motor proteins followed left-handed helical paths with the myosin X motor exhibiting a shorter pitch than the myosin V. The combined use of electrostatic and optical tweezers facilitates the preparation of motility assays with suspended tracks. Variants of this technique will enable higher complexity experiments in vitro to better understand the behavior of motors in cells. PMID:19506758

  20. Using electrical and optical tweezers to facilitate studies of molecular motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, Mark E; Sun, Yujie; Bau, Haim H; Goldman, Yale E

    2009-06-28

    Dielectrophoresis was used to stretch and suspend actin filaments across a trench etched between two electrodes patterned on a glass slide. Optical tweezers were used to bring a motor protein-coated bead into close proximity to a pre-selected, suspended actin filament, facilitating the attachment of the myosin-coated bead to the filament. The clearance beneath the filament allowed the bead to move freely along and around its filamentous track, unhindered by solid surfaces. Using defocused images, the three-dimensional position of the bead was tracked as a function of time to obtain its trajectory. Experiments were carried out with myosin V and myosin X. Both motor proteins followed left-handed helical paths with the myosin X motor exhibiting a shorter pitch than the myosin V. The combined use of electrostatic and optical tweezers facilitates the preparation of motility assays with suspended tracks. Variants of this technique will enable higher complexity experiments in vitro to better understand the behavior of motors in cells.

  1. Application of optical tweezers and excimer laser to study protoplast fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantawang, Titirat; Samipak, Sompid; Limtrakul, Jumras; Chattham, Nattaporn

    2015-07-01

    Protoplast fusion is a physical phenomenon that two protoplasts come in contact and fuse together. Doing so, it is possible to combine specific genes from one protoplast to another during fusion such as drought resistance and disease resistance. There are a few possible methods to induce protoplast fusion, for example, electrofusion and chemical fusion. In this study, chemical fusion was performed with laser applied as an external force to enhance rate of fusion and observed under a microscope. Optical tweezers (1064 nm with 100X objective N.A. 1.3) and excimer laser (308 nm LMU-40X-UVB objective) were set with a Nikon Ti-U inverted microscope. Samples were prepared by soaking in hypertonic solution in order to induce cell plasmolysis. Elodea Canadensis and Allium cepa plasmolysed leaves were cut and observed under microscope. Concentration of solution was varied to induce difference turgor pressures on protoplasts pushing at cell wall. Free protoplasts in solution were trapped by optical tweezers to study the effect of Polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution. PEG was diluted by Ca+ solution during the process to induced protoplast cell contact and fusion. Possibility of protoplast fusion by excimer laser was investigated and found possible. Here we report a novel tool for plant cell fusion using excimer laser. Plant growth after cell fusion is currently conducted.

  2. A study of red blood cell deformability in diabetic retinopathy using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Thomas J.; Richards, Christopher J.; Bhatnagar, Rhythm; Pavesio, Carlos; Agrawal, Rupesh; Jones, Philip H.

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) in which high blood sugar levels cause swelling, leaking and occlusions in the blood vessels of the retina, often resulting in a loss of sight. The microvascular system requires red blood cells (RBCs) to undergo significant cellular deformation in order to pass through vessels whose diameters are significantly smaller than their own. There is evidence to suggest that DM impairs the deformability of RBCs, and this loss of deformability has been associated with diabetic kidney disease (or nephropathy) - another microvascular complication of DM. However, it remains unclear whether reduced deformability of RBCs correlates with the presence of DR. Here we present an investigation into the deformability of RBCs in patients with diabetic retinopathy using optical tweezers. To extract a value for the deformability of RBCs we use a dual-trap optical tweezers set-up to stretch individual RBCs. RBCs are trapped directly (i.e. without micro-bead handles), so rotate to assume a `side-on' orientation. Video microscopy is used to record the deformation events, and shape analysis software is used to determine parameters such as initial and maximum RBC length, allowing us to calculate the deformability for each RBC. A small decrease in deformability of diabetes cells subject to this stretching protocol is observed when compared to control cells. We also report on initial results on three dimensional imaging of individual RBCs using defocussing microscopy.

  3. Auto- and cross-power spectral analysis of dual trap optical tweezer experiments using Bayesian inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hansen, Yann; Mehlich, Alexander; Pelz, Benjamin; Rief, Matthias; Netz, Roland R

    2012-09-01

    The thermal fluctuations of micron-sized beads in dual trap optical tweezer experiments contain complete dynamic information about the viscoelastic properties of the embedding medium and-if present-macromolecular constructs connecting the two beads. To quantitatively interpret the spectral properties of the measured signals, a detailed understanding of the instrumental characteristics is required. To this end, we present a theoretical description of the signal processing in a typical dual trap optical tweezer experiment accounting for polarization crosstalk and instrumental noise and discuss the effect of finite statistics. To infer the unknown parameters from experimental data, a maximum likelihood method based on the statistical properties of the stochastic signals is derived. In a first step, the method can be used for calibration purposes: We propose a scheme involving three consecutive measurements (both traps empty, first one occupied and second empty, and vice versa), by which all instrumental and physical parameters of the setup are determined. We test our approach for a simple model system, namely a pair of unconnected, but hydrodynamically interacting spheres. The comparison to theoretical predictions based on instantaneous as well as retarded hydrodynamics emphasizes the importance of hydrodynamic retardation effects due to vorticity diffusion in the fluid. For more complex experimental scenarios, where macromolecular constructs are tethered between the two beads, the same maximum likelihood method in conjunction with dynamic deconvolution theory will in a second step allow one to determine the viscoelastic properties of the tethered element connecting the two beads.

  4. Direct observation of processive exoribonuclease motion using optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Furqan M; Koslover, Daniel J; Luisi, Ben F; Block, Steven M

    2015-12-08

    Bacterial RNases catalyze the turnover of RNA and are essential for gene expression and quality surveillance of transcripts. In Escherichia coli, the exoribonucleases RNase R and polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) play critical roles in degrading RNA. Here, we developed an optical-trapping assay to monitor the translocation of individual enzymes along RNA-based substrates. Single-molecule records of motion reveal RNase R to be highly processive: one molecule can unwind over 500 bp of a structured substrate. However, enzyme progress is interrupted by pausing and stalling events that can slow degradation in a sequence-dependent fashion. We found that the distance traveled by PNPase through structured RNA is dependent on the A+U content of the substrate and that removal of its KH and S1 RNA-binding domains can reduce enzyme processivity without affecting the velocity. By a periodogram analysis of single-molecule records, we establish that PNPase takes discrete steps of six or seven nucleotides. These findings, in combination with previous structural and biochemical data, support an asymmetric inchworm mechanism for PNPase motion. The assay developed here for RNase R and PNPase is well suited to studies of other exonucleases and helicases.

  5. The Simulation of the stabilizing process of glass nanoparticle in optical tweezer using series of laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho Quang Quy; Hoang Dinh Hai

    2012-01-01

    In this article the stable region and stabilizing process of dielectric particle in fluid by the optical tweezer using the series of laser pulses are investigated. The influence of the repetition period and number of laser pulses on the radial variance of particle and the so-called stable space-time pillar is simulated and discussed. (author)

  6. Optical tweezers and non-ratiometric fluorescent-dye-based studies of respiration in sperm mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Timothy; Shi, Linda Z; Zhu, Qingyuan; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Berns, Michael W

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how the mitochondrial membrane potential affects sperm motility using laser tweezers and a non-ratiometric fluorescent probe, DiOC 6 (3). A 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 continuous wave laser was used to trap motile sperm at a power of 450 mW in the trap spot. Using customized tracking software, the curvilinear velocity (VCL) and the escape force from the laser tweezers were measured. Human (Homo sapiens), dog (Canis lupis familiaris) and drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) sperm were treated with DiOC 6 (3) to measure the membrane potential in the mitochondria-rich sperm midpieces. Sperm from all three species exhibited an increase in fluorescence when treated with the DiOC 6 (3). When a cyanide inhibitor (CCCP) of aerobic respiration was applied, sperm of all three species exhibited a reduction in fluorescence to pre-dye levels. With respect to VCL and escape force, the CCCP had no effect on dog or human sperm, suggesting a major reliance upon anaerobic respiration (glycolysis) for ATP in these two species. Based on the preliminary study on drill sperm, CCCP caused a drop in the VCL, suggesting potential reliance on both glycolysis and aerobic respiration for motility. The results demonstrate that optical trapping in combination with DiOC 6 (3) is an effective way to study sperm motility and energetics

  7. Optical tweezers and non-ratiometric fluorescent-dye-based studies of respiration in sperm mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Timothy; Shi, Linda Z.; Zhu, Qingyuan; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Berns, Michael W.

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how the mitochondrial membrane potential affects sperm motility using laser tweezers and a non-ratiometric fluorescent probe, DiOC6(3). A 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 continuous wave laser was used to trap motile sperm at a power of 450 mW in the trap spot. Using customized tracking software, the curvilinear velocity (VCL) and the escape force from the laser tweezers were measured. Human (Homo sapiens), dog (Canis lupis familiaris) and drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) sperm were treated with DiOC6(3) to measure the membrane potential in the mitochondria-rich sperm midpieces. Sperm from all three species exhibited an increase in fluorescence when treated with the DiOC6(3). When a cyanide inhibitor (CCCP) of aerobic respiration was applied, sperm of all three species exhibited a reduction in fluorescence to pre-dye levels. With respect to VCL and escape force, the CCCP had no effect on dog or human sperm, suggesting a major reliance upon anaerobic respiration (glycolysis) for ATP in these two species. Based on the preliminary study on drill sperm, CCCP caused a drop in the VCL, suggesting potential reliance on both glycolysis and aerobic respiration for motility. The results demonstrate that optical trapping in combination with DiOC6(3) is an effective way to study sperm motility and energetics.

  8. Rapid feedback control and stabilization of an optical tweezers with a budget microcontroller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nino, Daniel; Wang, Haowei; N Milstein, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Laboratories ranging the scientific disciplines employ feedback control to regulate variables within their experiments, from the flow of liquids within a microfluidic device to the temperature within a cell incubator. We have built an inexpensive, yet fast and rapidly deployed, feedback control system that is straightforward and flexible to implement from a commercially available Arduino Due microcontroller. This is in comparison with the complex, time-consuming and often expensive electronics that are commonly implemented. As an example of its utility, we apply our feedback controller to the task of stabilizing the main trapping laser of an optical tweezers. The feedback controller, which is inexpensive yet fast and rapidly deployed, was implemented from hacking an open source Arduino Due microcontroller. Our microcontroller based feedback system can stabilize the laser intensity to a few tenths of a per cent at 200 kHz, which is an order of magnitude better than the laser's base specifications, illustrating the utility of these devices. (paper)

  9. Optical Tweezers-Based Measurements of Forces and Dynamics at Microtubule Ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baclayon, Marian; Kalisch, Svenja-Marei; Hendel, Ed; Laan, Liedewij; Husson, Julien; Munteanu, E Laura; Dogterom, Marileen

    2017-01-01

    Microtubules are dynamic cytoskeletal polymers that polymerize and depolymerize while interacting with different proteins and structures within the cell. The highly regulated dynamic properties as well as the pushing and pulling forces generated by dynamic microtubule ends play important roles in processes such as in cell division. For instance, microtubule end-binding proteins are known to affect dramatically the dynamic properties of microtubules, and cortical dyneins are known to mediate pulling forces on microtubule ends. We discuss in this chapter our efforts to reconstitute these systems in vitro and mimic their interactions with structures within the cell using micro-fabricated barriers. Using an optical tweezers setup, we investigate the dynamics and forces of microtubules growing against functionalized barriers in the absence and presence of end-binding proteins and barrier-attached motor proteins. This setup allows high-speed as well as nanometer and piconewton resolution measurements on dynamic microtubules.

  10. Rapid feedback control and stabilization of an optical tweezers with a budget microcontroller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nino, Daniel; Wang, Haowei; N Milstein, Joshua, E-mail: josh.milstein@utoronto.ca [Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto Mississauga, Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6 (Canada)

    2014-09-01

    Laboratories ranging the scientific disciplines employ feedback control to regulate variables within their experiments, from the flow of liquids within a microfluidic device to the temperature within a cell incubator. We have built an inexpensive, yet fast and rapidly deployed, feedback control system that is straightforward and flexible to implement from a commercially available Arduino Due microcontroller. This is in comparison with the complex, time-consuming and often expensive electronics that are commonly implemented. As an example of its utility, we apply our feedback controller to the task of stabilizing the main trapping laser of an optical tweezers. The feedback controller, which is inexpensive yet fast and rapidly deployed, was implemented from hacking an open source Arduino Due microcontroller. Our microcontroller based feedback system can stabilize the laser intensity to a few tenths of a per cent at 200 kHz, which is an order of magnitude better than the laser's base specifications, illustrating the utility of these devices. (paper)

  11. Probing the micro-rheological properties of aerosol particles using optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, Rory M; Reid, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    The use of optical trapping techniques to manipulate probe particles for performing micro-rheological measurements on a surrounding fluid is well-established. Here, we review recent advances made in the use of optical trapping to probe the rheological properties of trapped particles themselves. In particular, we review observations of the continuous transition from liquid to solid-like viscosity of sub-picolitre supersaturated solution aerosol droplets using optical trapping techniques. Direct measurements of the viscosity of the particle bulk are derived from the damped oscillations in shape following coalescence of two particles, a consequence of the interplay between viscous and surface forces and the capillary driven relaxation of the approximately spheroidal composite particle. Holographic optical tweezers provide a facile method for the manipulation of arrays of particles allowing coalescence to be controllably induced between two micron-sized aerosol particles. The optical forces, while sufficiently strong to confine the composite particle, are several orders of magnitude weaker than the capillary forces driving relaxation. Light, elastically back-scattered by the particle, is recorded with sub-100 ns resolution allowing measurements of fast relaxation (low viscosity) dynamics, while the brightfield image can be used to monitor the shape relaxation extending to times in excess of 1000 s. For the slowest relaxation dynamics studied (particles with the highest viscosity) the presence and line shape of whispering gallery modes in the cavity enhanced Raman spectrum can be used to infer the relaxation time while serving the dual purpose of allowing the droplet size and refractive index to be measured with accuracies of ±0.025% and ±0.1%, respectively. The time constant for the damped relaxation can be used to infer the bulk viscosity, spanning from the dilute solution limit to a value approaching that of a glass, typically considered to be >10 12

  12. Probing the micro-rheological properties of aerosol particles using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Rory M.; Reid, Jonathan P.

    2014-07-01

    The use of optical trapping techniques to manipulate probe particles for performing micro-rheological measurements on a surrounding fluid is well-established. Here, we review recent advances made in the use of optical trapping to probe the rheological properties of trapped particles themselves. In particular, we review observations of the continuous transition from liquid to solid-like viscosity of sub-picolitre supersaturated solution aerosol droplets using optical trapping techniques. Direct measurements of the viscosity of the particle bulk are derived from the damped oscillations in shape following coalescence of two particles, a consequence of the interplay between viscous and surface forces and the capillary driven relaxation of the approximately spheroidal composite particle. Holographic optical tweezers provide a facile method for the manipulation of arrays of particles allowing coalescence to be controllably induced between two micron-sized aerosol particles. The optical forces, while sufficiently strong to confine the composite particle, are several orders of magnitude weaker than the capillary forces driving relaxation. Light, elastically back-scattered by the particle, is recorded with sub-100 ns resolution allowing measurements of fast relaxation (low viscosity) dynamics, while the brightfield image can be used to monitor the shape relaxation extending to times in excess of 1000 s. For the slowest relaxation dynamics studied (particles with the highest viscosity) the presence and line shape of whispering gallery modes in the cavity enhanced Raman spectrum can be used to infer the relaxation time while serving the dual purpose of allowing the droplet size and refractive index to be measured with accuracies of ±0.025% and ±0.1%, respectively. The time constant for the damped relaxation can be used to infer the bulk viscosity, spanning from the dilute solution limit to a value approaching that of a glass, typically considered to be >1012 Pa s, whilst

  13. Optical tweezers with 2.5 kHz bandwidth video detection for single-colloid electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Oliver; Gutsche, Christof; Kremer, Friedrich; Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2008-02-01

    We developed an optical tweezers setup to study the electrophoretic motion of colloids in an external electric field. The setup is based on standard components for illumination and video detection. Our video based optical tracking of the colloid motion has a time resolution of 0.2ms, resulting in a bandwidth of 2.5kHz. This enables calibration of the optical tweezers by Brownian motion without applying a quadrant photodetector. We demonstrate that our system has a spatial resolution of 0.5nm and a force sensitivity of 20fN using a Fourier algorithm to detect periodic oscillations of the trapped colloid caused by an external ac field. The electrophoretic mobility and zeta potential of a single colloid can be extracted in aqueous solution avoiding screening effects common for usual bulk measurements.

  14. Dynamic measurements and simulations of airborne picolitre-droplet coalescence in holographic optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bzdek, Bryan R.; Reid, Jonathan P.; Collard, Liam; Sprittles, James E.; Hudson, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    We report studies of the coalescence of pairs of picolitre aerosol droplets manipulated with holographic optical tweezers, probing the shape relaxation dynamics following coalescence by simultaneously monitoring the intensity of elastic backscattered light (EBL) from the trapping laser beam (time resolution on the order of 100 ns) while recording high frame rate camera images (time resolution <10 μs). The goals of this work are to: resolve the dynamics of droplet coalescence in holographic optical traps; assign the origin of key features in the time-dependent EBL intensity; and validate the use of the EBL alone to precisely determine droplet surface tension and viscosity. For low viscosity droplets, two sequential processes are evident: binary coalescence first results from the overlap of the optical traps on the time scale of microseconds followed by the recapture of the composite droplet in an optical trap on the time scale of milliseconds. As droplet viscosity increases, the relaxation in droplet shape eventually occurs on the same time scale as recapture, resulting in a convoluted evolution of the EBL intensity that inhibits quantitative determination of the relaxation time scale. Droplet coalescence was simulated using a computational framework to validate both experimental approaches. The results indicate that time-dependent monitoring of droplet shape from the EBL intensity allows for robust determination of properties such as surface tension and viscosity. Finally, the potential of high frame rate imaging to examine the coalescence of dissimilar viscosity droplets is discussed.

  15. Dynamic measurements and simulations of airborne picolitre-droplet coalescence in holographic optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bzdek, Bryan R.; Reid, Jonathan P., E-mail: j.p.reid@bristol.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Collard, Liam [Department of Mathematics, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Sprittles, James E. [Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Hudson, Andrew J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-07

    We report studies of the coalescence of pairs of picolitre aerosol droplets manipulated with holographic optical tweezers, probing the shape relaxation dynamics following coalescence by simultaneously monitoring the intensity of elastic backscattered light (EBL) from the trapping laser beam (time resolution on the order of 100 ns) while recording high frame rate camera images (time resolution <10 μs). The goals of this work are to: resolve the dynamics of droplet coalescence in holographic optical traps; assign the origin of key features in the time-dependent EBL intensity; and validate the use of the EBL alone to precisely determine droplet surface tension and viscosity. For low viscosity droplets, two sequential processes are evident: binary coalescence first results from the overlap of the optical traps on the time scale of microseconds followed by the recapture of the composite droplet in an optical trap on the time scale of milliseconds. As droplet viscosity increases, the relaxation in droplet shape eventually occurs on the same time scale as recapture, resulting in a convoluted evolution of the EBL intensity that inhibits quantitative determination of the relaxation time scale. Droplet coalescence was simulated using a computational framework to validate both experimental approaches. The results indicate that time-dependent monitoring of droplet shape from the EBL intensity allows for robust determination of properties such as surface tension and viscosity. Finally, the potential of high frame rate imaging to examine the coalescence of dissimilar viscosity droplets is discussed.

  16. Trapping, manipulation and rapid rotation of NBD-C8 fluorescent single microcrystals in optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GALAUP, Jean-Pierre; RODRIGUEZ-OTAZO, Mariela; AUGIER-CALDERIN, Angel; LAMERE; Jean-Francois; FERY-FORGUES, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    We have built an optical tweezers experiment based on an inverted microscope to trap and manipulate single crystals of micro or sub-micrometer size made from fluorescent molecules of 4-octylamino-7-nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD-C8). These single crystals have parallelepiped shapes and exhibit birefringence properties evidenced through optical experiments between crossed polarizers in a polarizing microscope. The crystals are uniaxial with their optical axis oriented along their largest dimension. Trapped in the optical trap, the organic micro-crystals are oriented in such a way that their long axis is along the direction of the beam propagation, and their short axis follows the direction of the linear polarization. Therefore, with linearly polarized light, simply rotating the light polarization can orient the crystal. When using circularly or only elliptically polarized light, the crystal can spontaneously rotate and reach rotation speed of several hundreds of turns per second. A surprising result has been observed: when the incident power is growing up, the rotation speed increases to reach a maximum value and then decreases even when the power is still growing up. Moreover, this evolution is irreversible. Different possible explanations can be considered. The development of a 3D control of the crystals by dynamical holography using liquid crystal spatial modulators will be presented and discussed on the basis of the most recent results obtained. (Author)

  17. Cell manipulation tool with combined microwell array and optical tweezers for cell isolation and deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Gou, Xue; Chen, Shuxun; Yan, Xiao; Sun, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Isolation from rare cells and deposition of sorted cells with high accuracy for further study are critical to a wide range of biomedical applications. In the current paper, we report an automated cell manipulation tool with combined optical tweezers and a uniquely designed microwell array, which functions for recognition, isolation, assembly, transportation and deposition of the interesting cells. The microwell array allows the passive hydrodynamic docking of cells, while offering the opportunity to inspect the interesting cell phenotypes with high spatio-temporal resolution based on the flexible image processing technique. In addition, dynamic and parallel cell manipulation in three dimensions can realize the target cell levitation from microwell and pattern assembly with multiple optical traps. Integrated with the programmed motorized stage, the optically levitated and assembled cells can be transported and deposited to the predefined microenvironment, so the tool can facilitate the integration of other on-chip functionalities for further study without removing these isolated cells from the chip. Experiments on human embryonic stem cells and yeast cells are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed cell manipulation tool. Besides the application to cell isolation and deposition, three other biological applications with this tool are also presented. (paper)

  18. A polypeptide-DNA hybrid with selective linking capability applied to single molecule nano-mechanical measurements using optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Moayed

    Full Text Available Many applications in biosensing, biomaterial engineering and single molecule biophysics require multiple non-covalent linkages between DNA, protein molecules, and surfaces that are specific yet strong. Here, we present a novel method to join proteins and dsDNA molecule at their ends, in an efficient, rapid and specific manner, based on the recently developed linkage between the protein StrepTactin (STN and the peptide StrepTag II (ST. We introduce a two-step approach, in which we first construct a hybrid between DNA and a tandem of two STs peptides (tST. In a second step, this hybrid is linked to polystyrene bead surfaces and Maltose Binding Protein (MBP using STN. Furthermore, we show the STN-tST linkage is more stable against forces applied by optical tweezers than the commonly used biotin-Streptavidin (STV linkage. It can be used in conjunction with Neutravidin (NTV-biotin linkages to form DNA tethers that can sustain applied forces above 65 pN for tens of minutes in a quarter of the cases. The method is general and can be applied to construct other surface-DNA and protein-DNA hybrids. The reversibility, high mechanical stability and specificity provided by this linking procedure make it highly suitable for single molecule mechanical studies, as well as biosensing and lab on chip applications.

  19. Normal and system lupus erythematosus red blood cell interactions studied by double trap optical tweezers: direct measurements of aggregation forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlova, Maria D.; Lyubin, Eugeny V.; Zhdanov, Alexander G.; Rykova, Sophia Yu.; Sokolova, Irina A.; Fedyanin, Andrey A.

    2012-02-01

    Direct measurements of aggregation forces in piconewton range between two red blood cells in pair rouleau are performed under physiological conditions using double trap optical tweezers. Aggregation and disaggregation properties of healthy and pathologic (system lupus erythematosis) blood samples are analyzed. Strong difference in aggregation speed and behavior is revealed using the offered method which is proposed to be a promising tool for SLE monitoring at single cell level.

  20. Dynamic translocation of ligand-complexed DNA through solid-state nanopores with optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sischka, Andy; Spiering, Andre; Anselmetti, Dario; Khaksar, Maryam; Laxa, Miriam; Koenig, Janine; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the threading and controlled translocation of individual lambda-DNA (λ-DNA) molecules through solid-state nanopores with piconewton force sensitivity, millisecond time resolution and picoampere ionic current sensitivity with a set-up combining quantitative 3D optical tweezers (OT) with electrophysiology. With our virtually interference-free OT set-up the binding of RecA and single peroxiredoxin protein molecules to λ-DNA was quantitatively investigated during dynamic translocation experiments where effective forces and respective ionic currents of the threaded DNA molecule through the nanopore were measured during inward and outward sliding. Membrane voltage-dependent experiments of reversible single protein/DNA translocation scans yield hysteresis-free, asymmetric single-molecule fingerprints in the measured force and conductance signals that can be attributed to the interplay of optical trap and electrostatic nanopore potentials. These experiments allow an exact localization of the bound protein along the DNA strand and open fascinating applications for label-free detection of DNA-binding ligands, where structural and positional binding phenomena can be investigated at a single-molecule level.

  1. Label-free detection of HIV-1 infected cells via integration of optical tweezers and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugongolo, Masixole Yvonne; Ombinda-Lemboumba, Saturnin; Noto, Luyanda Lunga; Maaza, Malik; Mthunzi-Kufa, Patience

    2018-02-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is currently detected using conventional qualitative and quantitative tests to determine the presence or absence of HIV in blood samples. However, the approach of these tests detects the presence of either viral antibodies or viral RNA that require labelling which may be costly, sophisticated and time consuming. A label-free approach of detecting the presence of HIV is therefore desirable. Of note optical tweezers can be coupled with other technologies including spectroscopy, which also investigates light-matter interactions. For example, coupling of optical tweezers with luminescence spectroscopy techniques has emerged as a powerful tool in biology for micro-manipulation, detection and analysis of individual cells. Integration of optical techniques has enabled studying biological particles in a label-free manner, whilst detecting functional groups and other essential molecules within mixed populations of cells. In the current study, an optical trapping system coupled to luminescence spectroscopy was utilised to detect the presence of HIV infection in TZM-bl cells in vitro. This was performed by infecting TZM-bl cells with the ZM53 HIV-1 pseudovirus, and incubating them for 48 hours prior analysis. The differences between infected and uninfected cells were thereafter displayed as shown by the spectrographs obtained. Combination of these two techniques has a potential in the field of infectious disease diagnostics.

  2. Energetics, kinetics, and pathway of SNARE folding and assembly revealed by optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongli

    2017-07-01

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) are universal molecular engines that drive membrane fusion. Particularly, synaptic SNAREs mediate fast calcium-triggered fusion of neurotransmitter-containing vesicles with plasma membranes for synaptic transmission, the basis of all thought and action. During membrane fusion, complementary SNAREs located on two apposed membranes (often called t- and v-SNAREs) join together to assemble into a parallel four-helix bundle, releasing the energy to overcome the energy barrier for fusion. A long-standing hypothesis suggests that SNAREs act like a zipper to draw the two membranes into proximity and thereby force them to fuse. However, a quantitative test of this SNARE zippering hypothesis was hindered by difficulties to determine the energetics and kinetics of SNARE assembly and to identify the relevant folding intermediates. Here, we first review different approaches that have been applied to study SNARE assembly and then focus on high-resolution optical tweezers. We summarize the folding energies, kinetics, and pathways of both wild-type and mutant SNARE complexes derived from this new approach. These results show that synaptic SNAREs assemble in four distinct stages with different functions: slow N-terminal domain association initiates SNARE assembly; a middle domain suspends and controls SNARE assembly; and rapid sequential zippering of the C-terminal domain and the linker domain directly drive membrane fusion. In addition, the kinetics and pathway of the stagewise assembly are shared by other SNARE complexes. These measurements prove the SNARE zippering hypothesis and suggest new mechanisms for SNARE assembly regulated by other proteins. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  3. Optical tweezers for measuring the interaction of the two single red blood cells in flow condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kisung; Muravyov, Alexei; Semenov, Alexei; Wagner, Christian; Priezzhev, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Aggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) is an intrinsic property of blood, which has direct effect on the blood viscosity and therefore affects overall the blood circulation throughout the body. It is attracting interest for the research in both fundamental science and clinical application. Despite of the intensive research, the aggregation mechanism is remaining not fully clear. Recent advances in methods allowed measuring the interaction between single RBCs in a well-defined configuration leading the better understanding of the mechanism of the process. However the most of the studies were made on the static cells. Thus, the measurements in flow mimicking conditions are missing. In this work, we aim to study the interaction of two RBCs in the flow conditions. We demonstrate the characterization of the cells interaction strength (or flow tolerance) by measuring the flow velocity to be applied to separate two aggregated cells trapped by double channel optical tweezers in a desired configuration. The age-separated cells were used for this study. The obtained values for the minimum flow velocities needed to separate the two cells were found to be 78.9 +/- 6.1 μm/s and 110 +/- 13 μm/s for old and young cells respectively. The data obtained is in agreement with the observations reported by other authors. The significance of our results is in ability for obtaining a comprehensible and absolute physical value characterizing the cells interaction in flow conditions (not like the Aggregation Index measured in whole blood suspensions by other techniques, which is some abstract parameter)

  4. Investigation into local cell mechanics by atomic force microscopy mapping and optical tweezer vertical indentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coceano, G; Yousafzai, M S; Ma, W; Ndoye, F; Venturelli, L; Hussain, I; Bonin, S; Niemela, J; Scoles, G; Cojoc, D; Ferrari, E

    2016-02-12

    Investigating the mechanical properties of cells could reveal a potential source of label-free markers of cancer progression, based on measurable viscoelastic parameters. The Young's modulus has proved to be the most thoroughly studied so far, however, even for the same cell type, the elastic modulus reported in different studies spans a wide range of values, mainly due to the application of different experimental conditions. This complicates the reliable use of elasticity for the mechanical phenotyping of cells. Here we combine two complementary techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical tweezer microscopy (OTM), providing a comprehensive mechanical comparison of three human breast cell lines: normal myoepithelial (HBL-100), luminal breast cancer (MCF-7) and basal breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells. The elastic modulus was measured locally by AFM and OTM on single cells, using similar indentation approaches but different measurement parameters. Peak force tapping AFM was employed at nanonewton forces and high loading rates to draw a viscoelastic map of each cell and the results indicated that the region on top of the nucleus provided the most meaningful results. OTM was employed at those locations at piconewton forces and low loading rates, to measure the elastic modulus in a real elastic regime and rule out the contribution of viscous forces typical of AFM. When measured by either AFM or OTM, the cell lines' elasticity trend was similar for the aggressive MDA-MB-231 cells, which were found to be significantly softer than the other two cell types in both measurements. However, when comparing HBL-100 and MCF-7 cells, we found significant differences only when using OTM.

  5. Holographic Raman Tweezers Controlled by Hand Gestures and Voice Commands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomori, Z.; Antalík, M.; Kesa, P.; Kaňka, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Šerý, Mojmír; Bernatová, Silvie; Zemánek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3, 2B (2013), s. 331-336 ISSN 2160-8881 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Holographic Optical Tweezers * Raman Tweezers * Natural User Interface * Leap Motion * Gesture Camera Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  6. Single-cell adhesion probed in-situ using optical tweezers: A case study with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelain, Mickaël; Rouxhet, Paul G.; Pignon, Frédéric; Magnin, Albert; Piau, Jean-Michel

    2012-06-01

    A facile method of using optical trapping to measure cell adhesion forces is presented and applied to the adhesion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on glass, in contact with solutions of different compositions. Trapping yeast cells with optical tweezers (OT) is not perturbed by cell wall deformation or cell deviation from a spherical shape. The trapping force calibration requires correction not only for the hydrodynamic effect of the neighboring wall but also for spherical aberrations affecting the focal volume and the trap stiffness. Yeast cells trapped for up to 5 h were still able to undergo budding but showed an increase of doubling time. The proportion of adhering cells showed the expected variation according to the solution composition. The detachment force varied in the same way. This observation and the fact that the detachment stress was exerted parallel to the substrate surface point to the role of interactions involving solvated macromolecules. Both the proportion of adhering cells and the removal force showed a distribution which, in our experimental conditions, must be attributed to a heterogeneity of surface properties at the cell level or at the subcellular scale. As compared with magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy, and more conventional ways of studying cell adhesion (shear-flow cells), OT present several advantages that are emphasized in this paper.

  7. Digital optical computer II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, Peter S.; Stone, Richard V.

    1991-12-01

    OptiComp is currently completing a 32-bit, fully programmable digital optical computer (DOC II) that is designed to operate in a UNIX environment running RISC microcode. OptiComp's DOC II architecture is focused toward parallel microcode implementation where data is input in a dual rail format. By exploiting the physical principals inherent to optics (speed and low power consumption), an architectural balance of optical interconnects and software code efficiency can be achieved including high fan-in and fan-out. OptiComp's DOC II program is jointly sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO), NASA space station group and Rome Laboratory (USAF). This paper not only describes the motivational basis behind DOC II but also provides an optical overview and architectural summary of the device that allows the emulation of any digital instruction set.

  8. Single-Molecule Manipulation of Double-Stranded DNA Using Optical Tweezers: Interaction Studies of DNA with RecA and YOYO-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennink, Martin L.; Scharer, Orlando D.; Kanaar, Ronald; Sakata-Sogawa, Kumiko; Schins, J.M.; Kanger, Johannes S.; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1999-01-01

    By using optical tweezers and a specially designed flow cell with an integrated glass micropipette, we constructed a setup similar to that of Smith et al. (Science 271:795-799, 1996) in which an individual double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecule can be captured between two polystyrene beads. The first

  9. Power spectrum analysis with least-squares fitting: Amplitude bias and its elimination, with application to optical tweezers and atomic force microscope cantilevers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørlykke, Simon F.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    of the characteristic frequency and the diffusion coefficient. We give analytical results for the weight-dependent bias for the wide class of systems whose dynamics is described by a linear (integro)differential equation with additive noise, white or colored. Examples are optical tweezers with hydrodynamic self...

  10. Methodological challenges of optical tweezers-based X-ray fluorescence imaging of biological model organisms at synchrotron facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergucht, Eva; Brans, Toon; Beunis, Filip; Garrevoet, Jan; Bauters, Stephen; De Rijcke, Maarten; Deruytter, David; Janssen, Colin; Riekel, Christian; Burghammer, Manfred; Vincze, Laszlo

    2015-07-01

    Recently, a radically new synchrotron radiation-based elemental imaging approach for the analysis of biological model organisms and single cells in their natural in vivo state was introduced. The methodology combines optical tweezers (OT) technology for non-contact laser-based sample manipulation with synchrotron radiation confocal X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microimaging for the first time at ESRF-ID13. The optical manipulation possibilities and limitations of biological model organisms, the OT setup developments for XRF imaging and the confocal XRF-related challenges are reported. In general, the applicability of the OT-based setup is extended with the aim of introducing the OT XRF methodology in all research fields where highly sensitive in vivo multi-elemental analysis is of relevance at the (sub)micrometre spatial resolution level.

  11. Three-Dimensional Optical Trapping of a Plasmonic Nanoparticle using Low Numerical Aperture Optical Tweezers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Šiler, Martin; Trojek, Jan; Chvátal, Lukáš; Karásek, Vítězslav; Paták, Aleš; Pokorná, Zuzana; Mika, Filip; Zemánek, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, JAN 29 (2015), 08106:1-9 ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : discrete-dipole approximation * gold nanoparticles * radiation forces * spectroscopy Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 5.228, year: 2015

  12. Backbone Brackets and Arginine Tweezers delineate Class I and Class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, V. Joachim; Schroeder, Michael; Labudde, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    The origin of the machinery that realizes protein biosynthesis in all organisms is still unclear. One key component of this machinery are aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRS), which ligate tRNAs to amino acids while consuming ATP. Sequence analyses revealed that these enzymes can be divided into two complementary classes. Both classes differ significantly on a sequence and structural level, feature different reaction mechanisms, and occur in diverse oligomerization states. The one unifying aspect of both classes is their function of binding ATP. We identified Backbone Brackets and Arginine Tweezers as most compact ATP binding motifs characteristic for each Class. Geometric analysis shows a structural rearrangement of the Backbone Brackets upon ATP binding, indicating a general mechanism of all Class I structures. Regarding the origin of aaRS, the Rodin-Ohno hypothesis states that the peculiar nature of the two aaRS classes is the result of their primordial forms, called Protozymes, being encoded on opposite strands of the same gene. Backbone Brackets and Arginine Tweezers were traced back to the proposed Protozymes and their more efficient successors, the Urzymes. Both structural motifs can be observed as pairs of residues in contemporary structures and it seems that the time of their addition, indicated by their placement in the ancient aaRS, coincides with the evolutionary trace of Proto- and Urzymes. PMID:29659563

  13. Using optical tweezers for measuring the interaction forces between human bone cells and implant surfaces: System design and force calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Martin; Madgavkar, Ashwin; Stjerndahl, Maria; Wu, Yanrong; Tan, Weihong; Duran, Randy; Niehren, Stefan; Mustafa, Kamal; Arvidson, Kristina; Wennerberg, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Optical tweezers were used to study the interaction and attachment of human bone cells to various types of medical implant materials. Ideally, the implant should facilitate cell attachment and promote migration of the progenitor cells in order to decrease the healing time. It is therefore of interest, in a controlled manner, to be able to monitor the cell adhesion process. Results from such studies would help foresee the clinical outcome of integrating medical implants. The interactions between two primary cell culture models, human gingival fibroblasts and bone forming human osteoblast cells, and three different implant materials, glass, titanium, and hydroxyapatite, were studied. A novel type of optical tweezers, which has a newly designed quadrant detector and a powerful 3 W laser was constructed and force calibrated using two different methods: one method in which the stiffness of the optical trap was obtained by monitoring the phase lag between the trap and the moved object when imposing a forced oscillation on the trapped object and another method in which the maximum trapping force was derived from the critical velocity at which the object escapes the trap. Polystyrene beads as well as cells were utilized for the calibrations. This is the first time that cells have been used directly for these types of force calibrations and, hence, direct measurements of forces exerted on cells can be performed, thus avoiding the difficulties often encountered when translating the results obtained from cell measurements to the calibrations obtained with reference materials. This more straightforward approach represents an advantage in comparison to established methods

  14. Multimodal in vivo blood flow sensing combining particle image velocimetry and optical tweezers-based blood steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Robert; Sugden, Wade W.; Siekmann, Arndt F.; Denz, Cornelia

    2018-02-01

    All higher developed organisms contain complex hierarchical networks of arteries, veins and capillaries. These constitute the cardiovascular system responsible for supplying nutrients, gas and waste exchange. Diseases related to the cardiovascular system are among the main causes for death worldwide. In order to understand the processes leading to arteriovenous malformation, we studied hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), which has a prevalence of 1:5000 worldwide and causes internal bleeding. In zebrafish, HHT is induced by mutation of the endoglin gene involved in HHT and observed to reduce red blood cell (RBC) flow to intersegmental vessels (ISVs) in the tail due to malformations of the dorsal aorta (DA) and posterior cardinal vein (PCV). However, these capillaries are still functional. Changes in the blood flow pattern are observed from in vivo data from zebrafish embryos through particle image velocimetry (PIV). Wall shear rates (WSRs) and blood flow velocities are obtained non-invasively with millisecond resolution. We observe significant increases of blood flow velocity in the DA for endoglin-deficient zebrafish embryos (mutants) at 3 days post fertilization. In the PCV, this increase is even more pronounced. We identified an increased similarity between the DA and the PCV of mutant fish compared to siblings, i.e., unaffected fish. To counteract the reduced RBC flow to ISVs we implement optical tweezers (OT). RBCs are steered into previously unperfused ISVs showing a significant increase of RBC count per minute. We discuss limitations with respect to biocompatibility of optical tweezers in vivo and determination of in vivo wall shear stress (WSS) connected to normal and endoglin-deficicent zebrafish embryos.

  15. Dual-mode optical fiber-based tweezers for robust trapping and manipulation of absorbing particles in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Souvik; Kanti Saha, Tushar; Kumar, Avinash; Bera, Sudipta K.; Banerjee, Ayan

    2017-12-01

    We develop an optical tweezers system using a single dual-mode optical fiber where mesoscopic absorbing particles can be trapped in three dimensions and manipulated employing photophoretic forces. We generate a superposition of fundamental and first order Hermite-Gaussian beam modes by the simple innovation of coupling a laser into a commercial optical fiber designed to be single mode for a wavelength higher than that of the laser. We achieve robust trapping of the absorbing particles for hours using both the pure fundamental and superposition mode beams and attain large manipulation velocities of ˜5 mm s-1 in the axial direction and ˜0.75 mm s-1 in the radial direction. We then demonstrate that the superposition mode is more effective in trapping and manipulation compared to the fundamental mode by around 80%, which may be increased several times by the use of a pure first order Hermite-Gaussian mode. The work has promising implications for trapping and spectroscopy of aerosols in air using simple optical fiber-based traps.

  16. Optical tweezers for the measurement of binding forces: system description and application for the study of E. coli adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallman, Erik G.; Schedin, Staffan; Andersson, Magnus J.; Jass, Jana; Axner, Ove

    2003-06-01

    Optical tweezers together with a position sensitive detection system allows measurements of forces in the pN range between micro-sized biological objects. A prototype force measurement system has been constructed around in inverted microscope with an argon-ion pumped Ti:sapphire laser as light source for optical trapping. A trapped particle in the focus of the high numerical aperture microscope-objective behaves like an omni-directional mechanical spring if an external force displaces it. The displacement from the equilibrium position is a measure of the exerted force. For position detection of the trapped particle (polystyrene beads), a He-Ne laser beam is focused a small distance below the trapping focus. An image of the bead appears as a distinct spot in the far field, monitored by a photosensitive detector. The position data is converted to a force measurement by a calibration procedure. The system has been used for measuring the binding forces between E-coli bacterial adhesin and their receptor sugars.

  17. Developing a New Biophysical Tool to Combine Magneto-Optical Tweezers with Super-Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaokun Zhou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel experimental setup in which magnetic and optical tweezers are combined for torque and force transduction onto single filamentous molecules in a transverse configuration to allow simultaneous mechanical measurement and manipulation. Previously we have developed a super-resolution imaging module which, in conjunction with advanced imaging techniques such as Blinking assisted Localisation Microscopy (BaLM, achieves localisation precision of single fluorescent dye molecules bound to DNA of ~30 nm along the contour of the molecule; our work here describes developments in producing a system which combines tweezing and super-resolution fluorescence imaging. The instrument also features an acousto-optic deflector that temporally divides the laser beam to form multiple traps for high throughput statistics collection. Our motivation for developing the new tool is to enable direct observation of detailed molecular topological transformation and protein binding event localisation in a stretching/twisting mechanical assay that previously could hitherto only be deduced indirectly from the end-to-end length variation of DNA. Our approach is simple and robust enough for reproduction in the lab without the requirement of precise hardware engineering, yet is capable of unveiling the elastic and dynamic properties of filamentous molecules that have been hidden using traditional tools.

  18. Two-point active microrheology in a viscous medium exploiting a motional resonance excited in dual-trap optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Shuvojit; Kumar, Randhir; Banerjee, Ayan

    2018-04-01

    Two-point microrheology measurements from widely separated colloidal particles approach the bulk viscosity of the host medium more reliably than corresponding single-point measurements. In addition, active microrheology offers the advantage of enhanced signal to noise over passive techniques. Recently, we reported the observation of a motional resonance induced in a probe particle in dual-trap optical tweezers when the control particle was driven externally [Paul et al., Phys. Rev. E 96, 050102(R) (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevE.96.050102]. We now demonstrate that the amplitude and phase characteristics of the motional resonance can be used as a sensitive tool for active two-point microrheology to measure the viscosity of a viscous fluid. Thus, we measure the viscosity of viscous liquids from both the amplitude and phase response of the resonance, and demonstrate that the zero crossing of the phase response of the probe particle with respect to the external drive is superior compared to the amplitude response in measuring viscosity at large particle separations. We compare our viscosity measurements with those using a commercial rheometer and obtain an agreement ˜1 % . The method can be extended to viscoelastic material where the frequency dependence of the resonance may provide further accuracy for active microrheological measurements.

  19. Laser microbeams for DNA damage induction, optical tweezers for the search on blood pressure relaxing drugs: contributions to ageing research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigaravicius, P.; Monajembashi, S.; Hoffmann, M.; Altenberg, B.; Greulich, K. O.

    2009-08-01

    One essential cause of human ageing is the accumulation of DNA damages during lifetime. Experimental studies require quantitative induction of damages and techniques to visualize the subsequent DNA repair. A new technique, the "immuno fluorescent comet assay", is used to directly visualize DNA damages in the microscope. Using DNA repair proteins fluorescently labeled with green fluorescent protein, it could be shown that the repair of the most dangerous DNA double strand breaks starts with the inaccurate "non homologous end joining" pathway and only after 1 - 1 ½ minutes may switch to the more accurate "homologous recombination repair". One might suggest investigating whether centenarians use "homologous recombination repair" differently from those ageing at earlier years and speculate whether it is possible, for example by nutrition, to shift DNA repair to a better use of the error free pathway and thus promote healthy ageing. As a complementary technique optical tweezers, and particularly its variant "erythrocyte mediated force application", is used to simulate the effects of blood pressure on HUVEC cells representing the inner lining of human blood vessels. Stimulating one cell induces in the whole neighbourhood waves of calcium and nitric oxide, known to relax blood vessels. NIFEDIPINE and AMLODIPINE, both used as drugs in the therapy of high blood pressure, primarily a disease of the elderly, prolong the availability of nitric oxide. This partially explains their mode of action. In contrast, VERAPAMILE, also a blood pressure reducing drug, does not show this effect, indicating that obviously an alternative mechanism must be responsible for vessel relaxation.

  20. Investigation of gel formation and volatilization of acetate acid in magnesium acetate droplets by the optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xi-Juan; Wang, Yang; Cai, Chen; Pang, Shu-Feng; Ma, Jia-Bi; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2018-07-05

    Hygroscopicity and volatility of single magnesium acetate (MgAc 2 ) aerosol particles at various relative humidities (RHs) are studied by a single-beam optical tweezers, and refractive indices (RIs) and morphology are characterized by cavity enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Gel formation and volatilization of acetate acid (HAc) in MgAc 2 droplets are observed. Due to the formation of amorphous gel structure, water transposition in droplets at RH magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH) 2 ) inclusions are formed in MgAc 2 droplets due to the volatilization of HAc, and whispering gallery modes (WGMs) of MgAc 2 droplets in the Raman spectrum quench after 50,000 s. In sharp contrast, after 86,000 s at RH ≈ 70%, NaAc droplets are in well-mixed liquid states, containing soluble sodium hydroxide (NaOH). At this state, the RI of NaAc droplet is increased, and the quenching of WGMs is not observable. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Leishmania amazonensis chemotaxis under glucose gradient studied by the strength and directionality of forces measured with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ysasa Pozzo, Liliana; Fontes, Adriana; de Thomaz, André A.; Barbosa, Luiz Carlos; Ayres, Diana Copi; Giorgio, Selma; Cesar, Carlos Lenz

    2007-02-01

    Chemotaxis is the mechanism microorganisms use to sense the environment surrounding them and to direct their movement towards attractive, or away from the repellent, chemicals. The biochemical sensing is almost the only way for communication between unicellular organisms. Prokaryote and Eukaryote chemotaxis has been mechanically studied mainly by observing the directionality and timing of the microorganisms movements subjected to a chemical gradient, but not through the directionality and strength of the forces it generates. To observe the vector force of microorganisms under a chemical gradient we developed a system composed of two large chambers connected by a tiny duct capable to keep the chemical gradient constant for more than ten hours. We also used the displacements of a microsphere trapped in an Optical Tweezers as the force transducer to measure the direction and the strength of the propulsion forces of flagellum of the microorganism under several gradient conditions. A 9μm diameter microsphere particle was trapped with a Nd:YAG laser and its movement was measured through the light scattered focused on a quadrant detector. We observed the behavior of the protozoa Leishmania amazonensis (eukaryote) under several glucose gradients. This protozoa senses the gradient around it by swimming in circles for three to five times following by tumbling, and not by the typical straight swimming/tumbling of bacteria. Our results also suggest that force direction and strength are also used to control its movement, not only the timing of swimming/tumbling, because we observed a higher force strength clearly directed towards the glucose gradient.

  2. Cooperative effects between color centers in diamond: applications to optical tweezers and optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradac, Carlo; Prasanna Venkatesh, B.; Besga, Benjamin; Johnsson, Mattias; Brennen, Gavin; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel; Volz, Thomas; Juan, Mathieu L.

    2017-08-01

    Since the early work by Ashkin in 1970,1 optical trapping has become one of the most powerful tools for manipulating small particles, such as micron sized beads2 or single atoms.3 Interestingly, both an atom and a lump of dielectric material can be manipulated through the same mechanism: the interaction energy of a dipole and the electric field of the laser light. In the case of atom trapping, the dominant contribution typically comes from the allowed optical transition closest to the laser wavelength while it is given by the bulk polarisability for mesoscopic particles. This difference lead to two very different contexts of applications: one being the trapping of small objects mainly in biological settings,4 the other one being dipole traps for individual neutral atoms5 in the field of quantum optics. In this context, solid state artificial atoms present the interesting opportunity to combine these two aspects of optical manipulation. We are particularly interested in nanodiamonds as they constitute a bulk dielectric object by themselves, but also contain artificial atoms such as nitrogen-vacancy (NV) or silicon-vacancy (SiV) colour centers. With this system, both regimes of optical trapping can be observed at the same time even at room temperature. In this work, we demonstrate that the resonant force from the optical transition of NV centres at 637 nm can be measured in a nanodiamond trapped in water. This additional contribution to the total force is significant, reaching up to 10%. In addition, due to the very large density of NV centres in a sub-wavelength crystal, collective effects between centres have an important effect on the magnitude of the resonant force.6 The possibility to observe such cooperatively enhanced optical force at room temperature is also theoretically confirmed.7 This approach may enable the study of cooperativity in various nanoscale solid-state systems and the use of atomic physics techniques in the field of nano-manipulation and opto-mechanics.

  3. An optical tweezer-based study of antimicrobial activity of silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is achieved by monitoring the fluctuations of an optically trapped polystyrene bead immersed in it. Examining the changes in the fluctuation pattern of the bead with time provides an accurate characterization of the reduction in the microbial activity. Here, we report on the effect of addition of silver nanoparticles on ...

  4. Non-spherical gold nanoparticles trapped in optical tweezers: Shape matters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Šiler, Martin; Trojek, Jan; Chvátal, Lukáš; Karásek, Vítězslav; Zemánek, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 7 (2015), s. 8179-8189 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-16195S; GA TA ČR TE01020233; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : discrete-dipole approximation * anisotropic particles * plasmon-resonance * gaussian beams * microparticles * spectroscopy Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.148, year: 2015

  5. Studying effect of carrier fluid viscosity in magnetite based ferrofluids using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitha, S.; Iyengar, Shruthi S.; Ananthamurthy, Sharath; Bhattacharya, Sarbari

    2018-02-01

    Ferrofluids with varying viscosities of carrier fluids have been prepared with magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation and characterized using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). They were found to be nearly spherical in shape with an almost uniform size of 13nm. The superparamagnetic nature of the water based ferrofluids at room temperature was established by SQUID magnetometry. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) was carried out to establish the size of the nanoparticle clusters in the ferrofluids synthesized. The results indicate an increase in cluster size with increase in carrier fluid viscosity. This is supported by results from Raman Spectroscopy. A further attempt to characterise these ferrofluids was made by studying the behaviour of well characterised non-magnetic micron sized probes that are optically trapped while suspended in the ferrofluid. An increase in carrier fluid viscosity results in a decrease in corner frequency when only the carrier fluid is used as the suspending medium. When the magnetic component is also present the corner frequency is higher than with just the carrier fluid. This relative increase happens at all laser powers at the trapping plane. This trend is also found to be independent of the size and material of the probe particle. Comparisons of various parameters that influence optical trapping lead us to believe that the enhancement could be due to a directed motion of the magnetic clusters in the presence of an optical trap.

  6. Counting Unfolding Events in Stretched Helices with Induced Oscillation by Optical Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacabac, Rommel Gaud; Otadoy, Roland

    Correlation measures based on embedded probe fluctuations, single or paired, are now widely used for characterizing the viscoelastic properties of biological samples. However, more robust applications using this technique are still lacking. Considering that the study of living matter routinely demonstrates new and complex phenomena, mathematical and experimental tools for analysis have to catch up in order to arrive at newer insights. Therefore, we derive ways of probing non-equilibrium events in helical biopolymers provided by stretching beyond thermal forces. We generalize, for the first time, calculations for winding turn probabilities to account for unfolding events in single fibrous biopolymers and globular proteins under tensile stretching using twin optical traps. The approach is based on approximating the ensuing probe fluctuations as originating from a damped harmonic oscillator under oscillatory forcing.

  7. Independent trapping and manipulation of microparticles using dexterous acoustic tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtney, Charles R. P.; Demore, Christine E. M.; Wu, Hongxiao; Cochran, Sandy; Grinenko, Alon; Wilcox, Paul D.; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2014-01-01

    An electronically controlled acoustic tweezer was used to demonstrate two acoustic manipulation phenomena: superposition of Bessel functions to allow independent manipulation of multiple particles and the use of higher-order Bessel functions to trap particles in larger regions than is possible with first-order traps. The acoustic tweezers consist of a circular 64-element ultrasonic array operating at 2.35 MHz which generates ultrasonic pressure fields in a millimeter-scale fluid-filled chamber. The manipulation capabilities were demonstrated experimentally with 45 and 90-μm-diameter polystyrene spheres. These capabilities bring the dexterity of acoustic tweezers substantially closer to that of optical tweezers

  8. Gradient forces on double-negative particles in optical tweezers using Bessel beams in the ray optics regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Leonardo A; Hernández-Figueroa, Hugo E

    2010-11-08

    Gradient forces on double negative (DNG) spherical dielectric particles are theoretically evaluated for v-th Bessel beams supposing geometrical optics approximations based on momentum transfer. For the first time in the literature, comparisons between these forces for double positive (DPS) and DNG particles are reported. We conclude that, contrary to the conventional case of positive refractive index, the gradient forces acting on a DNG particle may not reverse sign when the relative refractive index n goes from |n|>1 to |n|<1, thus revealing new and interesting trapping properties.

  9. Proceedings of the OPTELACIC 2009. VI International TECNOLASER Event. II Meeting of Optic, Life and Heritage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-04-01

    The Center of Applied Technologies and Nuclear Development (CEADEN) and the Cuban Physical Society (SCF) celebrated the VI International Workshop Tecnolaser, T ECNOLASER 2009 , and the II International Meeting Optics, Life and Heritage in the CAPITOLIO, Havana, Cuba, the week of 13-16 April 2009, under the general lemma O ptics and Laser Technology in Science, Industry and Culture . Main Topics for Tecnolaser Session: Laser technology, optics, processing of images, and spectroscopy in medicine, biology, chemistry, nonotechnology and industry; Electronics, mechanics and automation associated to optics and laser techniques; Development and construction of laser installations, instruments and optic elements; Optoelectronic, photonic and fiber optic; Processing of materials with laser; Optic techniques of measurement and spectroscopy and Optic tweezers. Main Topics for Optics, Life and Heritage: Optics and Light in Life Sciences; Environmental Analysis by Means of Optics, Image Processing, or Laser spectroscopy; Optics, Laser, Image Processing or Spectroscopy in Heritage Conservation and Restauration; Optics and Holography in Art; Archaeological and Museological Optics Applications; Hand drawn holography and Biophotonic

  10. Studies of viral DNA packaging motors with optical tweezers: a comparison of motor function in bacteriophages φ29, λ, and T4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas E.; Fuller, Derek N.; Raymer, Dorian M.; Rickgauer, Peter; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Anderson, Dwight L.; Catalano, Carlos E.; Kottadiel, Vishal; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2007-09-01

    A key step in the assembly of many viruses is the packaging of double-stranded DNA into a viral procapsid (an empty protein shell) by the action of an ATP-powered portal motor complex. We have developed methods to measure the packaging of single DNA molecules into single viral proheads in real time using optical tweezers. We can measure DNA binding and initiation of translocation, the DNA translocation dynamics, and the filling of the capsid against resisting forces. In addition to studying bacteriophage φ29, we have recently extended these methods to study the E. coli bacteriophages λ and T4, two important model systems in molecular biology. The three systems have different capsid sizes/shapes, genome lengths, and biochemical and structural differences in their packaging motors. Here, we compare and contrast these three systems. We find that all three motors translocate DNA processively and generate very large forces, each exceeding 50 piconewtons, ~20x higher force than generated by the skeletal muscle myosin 2 motor. This high force generation is required to overcome the forces resisting the confinement of the stiff, highly charged DNA at high density within the viral capsids. However, there are also striking differences between the three motors: they exhibit different DNA translocation rates, degrees of static and dynamic disorder, responses to load, and pausing and slipping dynamics.

  11. Optoelectronic Tweezers for Microparticle and Cell Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming Chiang (Inventor); Chiou, Pei-Yu (Inventor); Ohta, Aaron T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An optical image-driven light induced dielectrophoresis (DEP) apparatus and method are described which provide for the manipulation of particles or cells with a diameter on the order of 100 micromillimeters or less. The apparatus is referred to as optoelectric tweezers (OET) and provides a number of advantages over conventional optical tweezers, in particular the ability to perform operations in parallel and over a large area without damage to living cells. The OET device generally comprises a planar liquid-filled structure having one or more portions which are photoconductive to convert incoming light to a change in the electric field pattern. The light patterns are dynamically generated to provide a number of manipulation structures that can manipulate single particles and cells or group of particles/cells. The OET preferably includes a microscopic imaging means to provide feedback for the optical manipulation, such as detecting position and characteristics wherein the light patterns are modulated accordingly.

  12. Miniature Optical Isolator, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address NASA's need for compact optical isolators, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to continue the development of a new Miniature Optical Isolator...

  13. Fiberless Optical Gyroscope, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a radical new approach for to the design and fabrication of a fiber-less Interferometric Optical Gyroscope (IOG) that enables the production of a...

  14. Flatland optics. II. Basic experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, A W; Wang, D; Pe'er, A; Friesem, A A

    2001-05-01

    In "Flatland optics: fundamentals" [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 17, 1755 (2000)] we described the basic principles of two-dimensional (2D) optics and showed that a wavelength lambda in three-dimensional (3D) space (x,y,z) may appear in Flatland (x,z) as a wave with another wavelength, lambda = lambda/cosalpha. The tilt angle alpha can be modified by a 3D (Spaceland) individual who then is able to influence the 2D optics in a way that must appear to be magical to 2D Flatland individuals-in the spirit of E. A. Abbott's science fiction story [Flatland, a Romance of Many Dimensions, 6th ed. (Dover, New York, 1952)] of 1884. We now want to establish the reality or objectivity of the 2D wavelength lambda by some basic experiments similar to those that demonstrated roughly 200 years ago the wave nature of light. Specifically, we describe how to measure the 2D wavelength lambda by mean of five different arrangements that involve Young's biprism configuration, Talbot's self-imaging effect, measuring the focal length of a Fresnel zone plate, and letting light be diffracted by a double slit and by a grating. We also performed experiments with most of these arrangements. The results reveal that the theoretical wavelength, as predicted by our Flatland optics theory, does indeed coincide with the wavelength lambda as measured by Flatland experiments. Finally, we present an alternative way to understand Flatland optics in the spatial frequency domains of Flatland and Spaceland.

  15. Acoustic tweezers: patterning cells and microparticles using standing surface acoustic waves (SSAW).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinjie; Ahmed, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Lawit, Aitan; Huang, Tony Jun

    2009-10-21

    Here we present an active patterning technique named "acoustic tweezers" that utilizes standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW) to manipulate and pattern cells and microparticles. This technique is capable of patterning cells and microparticles regardless of shape, size, charge or polarity. Its power intensity, approximately 5x10(5) times lower than that of optical tweezers, compares favorably with those of other active patterning methods. Flow cytometry studies have revealed it to be non-invasive. The aforementioned advantages, along with this technique's simple design and ability to be miniaturized, render the "acoustic tweezers" technique a promising tool for various applications in biology, chemistry, engineering, and materials science.

  16. Photoacoustic tweezers with a pulsed laser: theory and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zharov, V P; Malinsky, T V; Kurten, R C

    2005-01-01

    A novel noninvasive optical technique for manipulating particles and cells is presented that utilizes laser-generated forces in an absorbing medium surrounding the particles or cells. In this technique, a laser pulse creates near-object acoustic waves, which during interaction with the objects lead to then being moved or trapped. The main optical schemes are considered, and a theory is presented for this new optical tool, namely photoacoustic (PA) tweezer with pulsed laser. The magnitudes of forces acting on polystyrene particles suspended in water were estimated as a function of the particles' properties for circular and ring geometries of the laser beam. Results of our preliminary experiments demonstrated proof that the manipulation, trapping and even rotation of cells is possible with PA tweezers

  17. Synthesis, structure, and properties of a series of chiral tweezer-diamine complexes consisting of an achiral zinc(II) bisporphyrin host and chiral diamine guest: induction and rationalization of supramolecular chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahma, Sanfaori; Ikbal, Sk Asif; Rath, Sankar Prasad

    2014-01-06

    We report here the synthesis, structure, and spectroscopic properties of a series of supramolecular chiral 1:1 tweezer-diamine complexes consisting of an achiral Zn(II) bisporphyrin (Zn2DPO) host and five different chiral diamine guests, namely, (R)-diaminopropane (DAP), (1S,2S)-diaminocyclohexane (CHDA), (S)-phenylpropane diamine (PPDA), (S)-phenyl ethylenediamine (PEDA), and (1R,2R)-diphenylethylene diamine (DPEA). The solid-state structures are preserved in solution, as reflected in their (1)H NMR spectra, which also revealed the remarkably large upfield shifts of the NH2 guest protons with the order Zn2DPO·DAP > Zn2DPO·CHDA > Zn2DPO·PPDA> Zn2DPO·PEDA ≫ Zn2DPO·DPEA, which happens to be the order of binding constants of the respective diamines with Zn2DPO. As the bulk of the substituent at the chiral center of the guest ligand increases, the Zn-Nax distance of the tweezer-diamine complex also increases, which eventually lowers the binding of the guest ligand toward the host. Also, the angle between the two porphyrin rings gradually increases with increasing bulk of the guest in order to accommodate the guest within the bisporphyrin cavity with minimal steric clash. The notably high amplitude bisignate CD signal response by Zn2DPO·DAP, Zn2DPO·CHDA, and Zn2DPO·PPDA can be ascribed to the complex's high stability and the formation of a unidirectional screw as observed in the X-ray structures of the complexes. A relatively lower value of CD amplitude shown by Zn2DPO·PEDA is due to the lower stability of the complex. The projection of the diamine binding sites of the chiral guest would make the two porphyrin macrocycles oriented in either a clockwise or anticlockwise direction in order to minimize host-guest steric clash. In sharp contrast, Zn2DPO·DPEA shows a very low amplitude bisignate CD signal due to the presence of both left- (dictated by the pre-existing chirality of (1R,2R)-DPEA) and right-handed screws (dictated by the steric differentiation at

  18. Potential-well model in acoustic tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Shih-Tsung; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2010-06-01

    Standing-wave acoustic tweezers are popularly used for non-invasive and non-contact particle manipulation. Because of their good penetration in biological tissue, they also show promising prospects for in vivo applications. According to the concept of an optical vortex, we propose an acoustics-vortex- based trapping model of acoustic tweezers. A four-element 1-MHz planar transducer was used to generate 1-MHz sine waves at 1 MPa, with adjacent elements being driven with a pi/2-rad phase difference. Each element was a square with a side length of 5.08 mm, with kerfs initially set at 0.51 mm. An acoustic vortex constituting the spiral motion of an acoustic wave around the beam axis was created, with an axial null. Applying Gor'kov's theory in the Rayleigh regime yielded the potential energy and radiation force for use in subsequent analysis. In the transverse direction, the vortex structure behaved as a series of potential wells that tended to drive a suspended particle toward the beam axis. They were highly fragmented in the near field that is very close to the transducer where there was spiral interference, and well-constructed in the far field. We found that the significant trapping effect was only present between these two regions in the transverse direction--particles were free to move along the beam axis, and a repulsive force was observed in the outer acoustic vortex. Because the steepness of the potential gradient near an axial null dominates the trapping effect, the far field of the acoustic vortex is inappropriate for trapping. Particles too close to the transducer are not sufficiently trapped because of the fragmented potential pattern. We suggest that the ideal distance from the transducer for trapping particles is in front of one-fourth of the Rayleigh distance, based on the superposition of the wavefronts. The maximum trapping force acting on a 13-mum polystyrene sphere in the produced acoustic vortex was 50.0 pN, and it was possible to trap

  19. The Use of Raman Tweezers and Chemometric Analysis to Discriminate the Urological Cell Lines, PC-3, LNCaP, BPH and MGH-U1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, T. J.; Hughes, C.; Ward, A. D.; Gazi, E.; Faria, E. Correia; Clarke, N. W.; Brown, M.; Snook, R.; Gardner, P.

    2008-11-01

    Here we report on investigations into using Raman optical tweezers to analyse both live and chemically fixed prostate and bladder cells. Spectra were subjected to chemometric analysis to discriminate and classify the cell types based on their spectra. Subsequent results revealed the potential of Raman tweezers as a potential clinical diagnostic tool.

  20. Holographic Raman tweezers controlled by multi-modal natural user interface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomori, Z.; Keša, P.; Nikorovič, M.; Kaňka, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Šerý, Mojmír; Bernatová, Silvie; Valušová, E.; Antalík, M.; Zemánek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 1 (2016), 015602:1-9 ISSN 2040-8978 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14069 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : holographic optical tweezers * Raman microspectroscopy * human-computer interface Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.741, year: 2016

  1. Nano-optical conveyor belt, part II: Demonstration of handoff between near-field optical traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuxin; Ryan, Jason; Hansen, Paul; Cheng, Yao-Te; Lu, Tsung-Ju; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2014-06-11

    Optical tweezers have been widely used to manipulate biological and colloidal material, but the diffraction limit of far-field optics makes focused beams unsuitable for manipulating nanoscale objects with dimensions much smaller than the wavelength of light. While plasmonic structures have recently been successful in trapping nanoscale objects with high positioning accuracy, using such structures for manipulation over longer range has remained a significant challenge. In this work, we introduce a conveyor belt design based on a novel plasmonic structure, the resonant C-shaped engraving (CSE). We show how long-range manipulation is made possible by means of handoff between neighboring CSEs, and we present a simple technique for controlling handoff by rotating the polarization of laser illumination. We experimentally demonstrate handoff between a pair of CSEs for polystyrene spheres 200, 390, and 500 nm in diameter. We then extend this technique and demonstrate controlled particle transport down a 4.5 μm long "nano-optical conveyor belt."

  2. Acoustic tweezers via sub-time-of-flight regime surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David J; Devendran, Citsabehsan; Ma, Zhichao; Ng, Jia Wei; Neild, Adrian; Ai, Ye

    2016-07-01

    Micrometer-scale acoustic waves are highly useful for refined optomechanical and acoustofluidic manipulation, where these fields are spatially localized along the transducer aperture but not along the acoustic propagation direction. In the case of acoustic tweezers, such a conventional acoustic standing wave results in particle and cell patterning across the entire width of a microfluidic channel, preventing selective trapping. We demonstrate the use of nanosecond-scale pulsed surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with a pulse period that is less than the time of flight between opposing transducers to generate localized time-averaged patterning regions while using conventional electrode structures. These nodal positions can be readily and arbitrarily positioned in two dimensions and within the patterning region itself through the imposition of pulse delays, frequency modulation, and phase shifts. This straightforward concept adds new spatial dimensions to which acoustic fields can be localized in SAW applications in a manner analogous to optical tweezers, including spatially selective acoustic tweezers and optical waveguides.

  3. The CLASS blazar survey - II. Optical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caccianiga, A; Marcha, MJ; Anton, S; Mack, KH; Neeser, MJ

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the optical properties of the objects selected in the CLASS blazar survey. Because an optical spectrum is now available for 70 per cent of the 325 sources present in the sample, a spectral classification, based on the appearance of the emission/absorption lines, is possible. A

  4. SU-G-TeP3-07: On the Development of Mechano-Biological Assessment of Leukemia Cells Using Optical Tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brost, E; Brooks, J; Piepenburg, J; Watanabe, Y; Hui, S [Therapeutic Radiology and Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Chakraborty, S; Das, T [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems Department of New Materials and Biosystems Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India); Green, A [Department of Physics, University of Saint Thomas, Saint Paul, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Patients with BCR-ABL (Ph +ve) acute lymphoblastic leukemia are at very high risk of relapse and mortality. In line with the NIH mission to understand the physical and biological processes, we seek to report mechano-biological method to assessment and distinguish treated/untreated leukemia cells. Methods: BCR-ABL leukemia cell populations and silica microspheres were trapped in a 100x magnification optical trapping system (λ=660 nm, 70 mW). Light refracted through the trapped sample was collected in the back focal plane by a quadrant detector to measure the positions of individual cells. The sample was driven at a known frequency and amplitude with a flexure translation stage, and the target’s response was recorded. The measured response was calibrated using the known driving parameters, and information about cell movements due to mechano-biological effects was extracted. Two leukemia cell populations were tested: a control group and a group treated with 2 Gy. Results: The mechano-biological movements of 10 microspheres, control cells, and treated cells were tracked over a ∼30 minute window at 1 minute intervals. The microsphere population did not see significant change in mechano-biological movements over the testing interval and remained constant. The control cell population saw a two-fold rise in activity that peaked around 1200 seconds, then dropped off sharply. The treated cell population saw a two-fold rise in activity that peaked at 400 seconds, and dropped off slowly. Conclusion: The investigated technique allows for direct measurement the movements of a trapped object due to mechano-biological effects such as thermal and extracellular motion. When testing microspheres, the mechano-biological activity remained constant over time due to the lack of biological factors. In both the control and treated cell populations, the mechano-biological activity was increased, possibly due to mitochondrial activation. This extra activity decreased over time

  5. Optical Landing Hazard Sensor, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Visidyne's Phase I effort has established through modeling and analysis that a unique concept for an active optical 3-D Imager (or Imaging LADAR) has high potential...

  6. Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor Array, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — VIP Sensors proposes to develop a Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor Array System for measuring air flow pressure at multiple points on the skin of aircrafts for Flight...

  7. Determination of the refractive index of insoluble organic extracts from atmospheric aerosol over the visible wavelength range using optical tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Shepherd

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Optical trapping combined with Mie spectroscopy is a new technique used to record the refractive index of insoluble organic material extracted from atmospheric aerosol samples over a wide wavelength range. The refractive index of the insoluble organic extracts was shown to follow a Cauchy equation between 460 and 700 nm for organic aerosol extracts collected from urban (London and remote (Antarctica locations. Cauchy coefficients for the remote sample were for the Austral summer and gave the Cauchy coefficients of A  =  1.467 and B  =  1000 nm2 with a real refractive index of 1.489 at a wavelength of 589 nm. Cauchy coefficients for the urban samples varied with season, with extracts collected during summer having Cauchy coefficients of A  =  1.465  ±  0.005 and B  =  4625  ±  1200 nm2 with a representative real refractive index of 1.478 at a wavelength of 589 nm, whilst samples extracted during autumn had larger Cauchy coefficients of A  =  1.505 and B  =  600 nm2 with a representative real refractive index of 1.522 at a wavelength of 589 nm. The refractive index of absorbing aerosol was also recorded. The absorption Ångström exponent was determined for woodsmoke and humic acid aerosol extract. Typical values of the Cauchy coefficient for the woodsmoke aerosol extract were A  =  1.541  ±  0.03 and B  =  14 800  ±  2900 nm2, resulting in a real refractive index of 1.584  ±  0.007 at a wavelength of 589 nm and an absorption Ångström exponent of 8.0. The measured values of refractive index compare well with previous monochromatic or very small wavelength range measurements of refractive index. In general, the real component of the refractive index increases from remote to urban to woodsmoke. A one-dimensional radiative-transfer calculation of the top-of-the-atmosphere albedo was applied to model an atmosphere

  8. Characterization of optical systems for the ALPS II experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spector, Aaron D.; Baehre, Robin; Willke, Benno; Hannover Univ.

    2016-09-01

    ALPS II is a light shining through a wall style experiment that will use the principle of resonant enhancement to boost the conversion and reconversion probabilities of photons to relativistic WISPs. This will require the use of long baseline low-loss optical cavities. Very high power build up factors in the cavities must be achieved in order to reach the design sensitivity of ALPS II. This necessitates a number of different sophisticated optical and control systems to maintain the resonance and ensure maximal coupling between the laser and the cavity. In this paper we report on the results of the characterization of these optical systems with a 20m cavity and discuss the results in the context of ALPS II.

  9. Optical properties of infrared FELs from the FELI Facility II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, K.; Okuma, S.; Oshita, E. [Free Electron Laser Institute, Osaka (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The FELI Facility II has succeeded in infrared FEL oscillation at 1.91 {mu} m using a 68-MeV, 40-A electron beam from the FELI S-band linac in February 27, 1995. The FELI Facility II is composed of a 3-m vertical type undulator ({lambda}u=3.8cm, N=78, Km a x=1.4, gap length {ge}20mm) and a 6.72-m optical cavity. It can cover the wavelength range of 1-5{mu}m. The FELs can be delivered from the optical cavity to the diagnostics room through a 40-m evacuated optical pipeline. Wavelength and cavity length dependences of optical properties such as peak power, average power, spectrum width, FEL macropulse, FEL transverse profile are reported.

  10. Synthesis and Guest Recognition of Switchable Pt-Salphen Based Molecular Tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorien Benda

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular tweezers are artificial receptors that have an open cavity generated by two recognition units pre-organized by a spacer. Switchable molecular tweezers, using a stimuli-responsive spacer, are particularly appealing as prototypes of the molecular machines that combine mechanical motion and allosteric recognition properties. In this present study, the synthesis of switchable molecular tweezers composed of a central terpyridine unit substituted in 4,4″ positions by two Pt(II-salphen complexes is reported. The terpyridine ligand can be reversibly converted upon Zn(II coordination from a free ‘U’-shaped closed form to a coordinated ‘W’ open form. This new substitution pattern enables a reverse control of the mechanical motion compared to the previously reported 6,6″ substituted terpyridine-based tweezers. Guest binding studies with aromatic guests showed an intercalation of coronene in the cavity created by the Pt-salphen moieties in the closed conformation. The formation of 1:1 host-guest complex was investigated by a combination of NMR studies and DFT calculations.

  11. Astronomical optical interferometry, II: Astrophysical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankov S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical interferometry is entering a new age with several ground- based long-baseline observatories now making observations of unprecedented spatial resolution. Based on a great leap forward in the quality and quantity of interferometric data, the astrophysical applications are not limited anymore to classical subjects, such as determination of fundamental properties of stars; namely, their effective temperatures, radii, luminosities and masses, but the present rapid development in this field allowed to move to a situation where optical interferometry is a general tool in studies of many astrophysical phenomena. Particularly, the advent of long-baseline interferometers making use of very large pupils has opened the way to faint objects science and first results on extragalactic objects have made it a reality. The first decade of XXI century is also remarkable for aperture synthesis in the visual and near-infrared wavelength regimes, which provided image reconstructions from stellar surfaces to Active Galactic Nuclei. Here I review the numerous astrophysical results obtained up to date, except for binary and multiple stars milliarcsecond astrometry, which should be a subject of an independent detailed review, taking into account its importance and expected results at microarcsecond precision level. To the results obtained with currently available interferometers, I associate the adopted instrumental settings in order to provide a guide for potential users concerning the appropriate instruments which can be used to obtain the desired astrophysical information.

  12. Optical system for laser triggering of PBFA II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamil, R.A.; Seamons, L.O.; Schanwald, L.P.; Gerber, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The PBFA II laser triggering optical system consists of nearly 300 optical components. These optics must be sufficiently precise to preserve the laser beam quality, as well as to equally distribute the energy of the UV laser beam to the 36, 5.5 MV gas-filled switches at precisely the same instant. Both index variation and cleanliness of the air long the laser path must be controlled. The manual alignment system is capable of alignment to better than the acceptable error of 200 microradians (laser to switches). A technique has been devised to ease the alignment procedure by using a special high gain video camera and a tool alignment telescope to view retroreflective tape targets having optical brightness gains over white surfaces of 10/sup 3/. The camera is a charge-coupled detector intensified by a double microchannel plate having an optical gain of between 10/sup 4/ and 10/sup 5/

  13. Four-dimensional optical manipulation of colloidal particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, Peter John; Daria, Vincent Ricardo Mancao; Glückstad, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    years ago. Bringing together many landmark papers on the field, Optical Tweezers: Methods and Applications covers the techniques and uses of optical tweezers. Each section is introduced by a brief commentary, setting the papers into their historical and contemporary contexts. The first two sections...... of the best in the field, this compendium presents important historical and current developments of optical tweezers in a range of scientific areas, from the manipulation of bacteria to the treatment of DNA....

  14. The Optical Design of the PEP-II Injection Beamlines

    CERN Document Server

    Fieguth, T

    1996-01-01

    The optical design of the PEP-II electron and positron Injection Beamlines is described. Use of the existing high power, low emittance beams available from the SLC damping rings require that pulsed extraction of 9.0 GeV electrons and 3.1 GeV positrons for injection into the PEP-II rings occur in the early sectors of the accelerator. More than 5 kilometers of new beam transport lines have been designed and are being constructed to bring these beams to their respective rings. The optical design maximizes the tolerance to errors especially to those contributing to beam size and position jitter. Secondly, the design minimizes costs by utilizing existing components or component designs and minimizing the number required. Here we discuss important attributes including choice of lattice, specification of error tolerances, including errors in construction, alignment, field errors, power supply stability, and orbit correction.

  15. The Optical Design of the PEP-II Injection Beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fieguth, Ted

    2003-05-23

    The optical design of the PEP-II electron and positron Injection Beamlines is described. Use of the existing high power, low emittance beams available from the SLC damping rings require that pulsed extraction of 9.0 GeV electrons and 3.1 GeV positrons for injection into the PEP-II rings occur in the early sectors of the accelerator. More than 5 kilometers of new beam transport lines have been designed and are being constructed to bring these beams to their respective rings. The optical design maximizes the tolerance to errors especially to those contributing to beam size and position jitter. Secondly, the design minimizes costs by utilizing existing components or component designs and minimizing the number required. Here we discuss important attributes including choice of lattice, specification of error tolerances, including errors in construction, alignment, field errors, power supply stability, and orbit correction.

  16. An Instrument for Inspecting Aspheric Optical Surfaces and Components, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is a Phase II SBIR proposal to develop an extremely versatile optical inspection tool for aspheric optical components and optics that are not easily inspected...

  17. Laser startup optics for Baseball II and future mirror machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, A.M.; Chargin, A.K.; Brown, N.J.

    1975-01-01

    The laser startup system for Baseball II-T uses a 300-J CO 2 laser to hit a 100-μ diameter pellet with a laser power density on the order of 10 13 W/cm 2 . The laser is a 20-cm diameter unstable resonator transversely excited (TEA) oscillator. The beam is split and then focused using off-axis parabolas. The symmetric configuration and central obscuration of the CO 2 beam allow coaxial alignment and pellet detection optics. This experiment primarily uses commercially available systems and components. Optical elements were fabricated both by direct machining and standard polishing techniques. The laser and optical systems are directly scalable to reactor requirements using demonstrated technologies

  18. Identification of individual biofilm-forming bacterial cells using Raman tweezers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samek, Ota; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Šiler, Martin; Šerý, Mojmír; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Hrubanová, Kamila; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, V.; Růžička, F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 5 (2015), 051038:1-6 ISSN 1083-3668 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/1687; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Raman tweezers * Staphylococcus epidermidis * biofilm Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.556, year: 2015

  19. A revolution in optical manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grier, D. G.

    2004-01-01

    Optical tweezers use the forces exerted by a strongly focused beam of light to trap and move objects ranging in size from tens of nanometers to tens of micrometers. Since their introduction in 1986, the optical tweezer has become an important tool for research in the fields of biology, physical chemistry and soft condensed matter physics. Recent advances promise to take optical tweezers out of the laboratory and into the mainstream of manufacturing and diagnostics; they may even become consumer products. The next generation of single-beam optical trap offers revolutionary new opportunities for fundamental and applied research. (author)

  20. Soft magnetic tweezers: a proof of principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosconi, Francesco; Allemand, Jean François; Croquette, Vincent

    2011-03-01

    We present here the principle of soft magnetic tweezers which improve the traditional magnetic tweezers allowing the simultaneous application and measurement of an arbitrary torque to a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule. They take advantage of a nonlinear coupling regime that appears when a fast rotating magnetic field is applied to a superparamagnetic bead immersed in a viscous fluid. In this work, we present the development of the technique and we compare it with other techniques capable of measuring the torque applied to the DNA molecule. In this proof of principle, we use standard electromagnets to achieve our experiments. Despite technical difficulties related to the present implementation of these electromagnets, the agreement of measurements with previous experiments is remarkable. Finally, we propose a simple way to modify the experimental design of electromagnets that should bring the performances of the device to a competitive level.

  1. Final Report: Posttest Analysis of Omega II Optical Specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newlander, C D; Fisher, J H

    2007-01-01

    Preliminary posttest analyses have been completed on optical specimens exposed during the Omega II test series conducted on 14 July 2006. The Omega Facility, located at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester was used to produce X-ray environments through the interaction of intense pulsed laser radiation upon germanium-loaded silica aerogels. The optical specimen testing was supported by GH Systems through experiment design, pre- and post-test analyses, specimen acquisition, and overall technical experience. The test specimens were fabricated and characterized by Surface Optics Corporation (SOC), San Diego, CA and were simple protected gold coatings on silica substrates. Six test specimens were exposed, five filtered with thin beryllium foil filters, and one unfiltered which was exposed directly to the raw environment. The experimental objectives were: (1) demonstrate that tests of optical specimens could be performed at the Omega facility; (2) evaluate the use and survivability of beryllium foil filters as a function of thickness; (3) obtain damage data on optical specimens which ranged from no damage to damage; (4) correlate existing thermal response models with the damage data; (5) evaluate the use of the direct raw environment upon the specimen response and the ability/desirability to conduct sensitive optical specimen tests using the raw environment; and (6) initiate the development of a protocol for performing optical coatings/mirror tests. This report documents the activities performed by GH Systems in evaluating and using the environments provided by LLNL, the PUFFTFT analyses performed using those environments, and the calculated results compared to the observed and measured posttest data

  2. Monolithic, High-Speed Fiber-Optic Switching Array for Lidar, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA SBIR Phase II effort will develop a 1 x 10 prototype non-mechanical fiber optic switch for use with high power lasers. The proposed optical device is a...

  3. A feasibility study of in vivo applications of single beam acoustic tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ying; Lee, Changyang; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk

    2014-01-01

    Tools that are capable of manipulating micro-sized objects have been widely used in such fields as physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Several devices, including optical tweezers, atomic force microscope, micro-pipette aspirator, and standing surface wave type acoustic tweezers have been studied to satisfy this need. However, none of them has been demonstrated to be suitable for in vivo and clinical studies. Single beam acoustic tweezers (SBAT) is a technology that uses highly focused acoustic beam to trap particles toward the beam focus. Its feasibility was first theoretically and experimentally demonstrated by Lee and Shung several years ago. Since then, much effort has been devoted to improving this technology. At present, the tool is capable of trapping a microparticle as small as 1 μm, as well as a single red blood cell. Although in comparing to other microparticles manipulating technologies, SBAT has advantages of providing stronger trapping force and deeper penetration depth in tissues, and producing less tissue damage, its potential for in vivo applications has yet been explored. It is worth noting that ultrasound has been used as a diagnostic tool for over 50 years and no known major adverse effects have been observed at the diagnostic energy level. This paper reports the results of an initial attempt to assess the feasibility of single beam acoustic tweezers to trap microparticles in vivo inside of a blood vessel. The acoustic intensity of SBAT under the trapping conditions that were utilized was measured. The mechanical index and thermal index at the focus of acoustic beam were found to be 0.48 and 0.044, respectively, which meet the standard of commercial diagnostic ultrasound system.

  4. A feasibility study of in vivo applications of single beam acoustic tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying, E-mail: yli582@usc.edu; Lee, Changyang; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk [NIH Transducer Resource Center and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-1111 (United States)

    2014-10-27

    Tools that are capable of manipulating micro-sized objects have been widely used in such fields as physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Several devices, including optical tweezers, atomic force microscope, micro-pipette aspirator, and standing surface wave type acoustic tweezers have been studied to satisfy this need. However, none of them has been demonstrated to be suitable for in vivo and clinical studies. Single beam acoustic tweezers (SBAT) is a technology that uses highly focused acoustic beam to trap particles toward the beam focus. Its feasibility was first theoretically and experimentally demonstrated by Lee and Shung several years ago. Since then, much effort has been devoted to improving this technology. At present, the tool is capable of trapping a microparticle as small as 1 μm, as well as a single red blood cell. Although in comparing to other microparticles manipulating technologies, SBAT has advantages of providing stronger trapping force and deeper penetration depth in tissues, and producing less tissue damage, its potential for in vivo applications has yet been explored. It is worth noting that ultrasound has been used as a diagnostic tool for over 50 years and no known major adverse effects have been observed at the diagnostic energy level. This paper reports the results of an initial attempt to assess the feasibility of single beam acoustic tweezers to trap microparticles in vivo inside of a blood vessel. The acoustic intensity of SBAT under the trapping conditions that were utilized was measured. The mechanical index and thermal index at the focus of acoustic beam were found to be 0.48 and 0.044, respectively, which meet the standard of commercial diagnostic ultrasound system.

  5. The development of MOSA-II multichannel optical spectrum analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Li; Yang Zhoujing; Fang Shuyao

    1989-01-01

    The MOSA-II Multichannel Optical Spectrum Analyzer is a high-perfor mance, easy-to-use measurment system for extremely rapid spectral data acquistion, processing and presentation. It consists of four parts: vidicon, data acquiring and timing circuit, the correcting circuit for the geometric distortion and the non-uniform distortion of the vidicon, IBMPC/XT and color plotter. The system has the following functions: single spectrum acquisition, continuous acquisition of multi-spectra, noise reduction, math, operations (including addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division) and geometric transform action of the spectra, and 3D-presentation of the spectra on both the color screen and the plotter. The absolute sensitivity of the system is 18 Photons/sec · mm 2 . The access time for data acquisition is 64 μs/per channel and the spectrum range is 1800 A - 8000A, the geometric distortion<2%, the amplitude error<5%

  6. Manipulation of Nano-/Micro Particles Using Light-Actuated Marangoni Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cunjing; Varanakkottu, Subramanyan; Hardt, Steffen; Nano-; Microfluidics, Center of Smart Interfaces, TU Darmstadt Team

    2015-11-01

    The ability to manipulate and produce patterns of nano-/micro objects has been of great interest from both a fundamental and an application point of view. Here we demonstrate particle patterning using an optical landscape and optical nanoparticle manipulation based on light-actuated Marangoni tweezers. A liquid film with a photosurfactant which exists in two isomeric states (cis and trans) is employed for that purpose. Under multiple laser spots created by diffractive optical elements from a He-Cd laser, cis-rich regions with higher surface tension than unexposed trans-rich regions are created, resulting in converging Marangoni flows directing particles attached to the liquid surface toward the irradiated area. 10 μm polystyrene particles and 600 nm λ-DNA molecules distributed over the liquid surface move to the nearest laser spot and can be arranged in specific patterns. Furthermore, 100 nm polystyrene particles and 20 nm quantum dots can also be trapped, and the 100 nm particles can be driven along quite complex trajectories. Compared to conventional optical tweezers, the corresponding power requirements are much lower.

  7. 77 FR 27081 - II-VI, Incorporated, Infrared Optics-Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg, Pennsylvania; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ..., Infrared Optics--Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg, Pennsylvania; Notice of Affirmative Determination Regarding... Assistance (TAA) applicable to workers and former workers of II-VI, Incorporated, Infrared Optics--Saxonburg...). The workers were engaged in employment related to the production of infrared and CO 2 laser optics...

  8. Graphene-edge dielectrophoretic tweezers for trapping of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Avijit; Zhang, Yao; Grassi, Roberto; Nadappuram, Binoy Paulose; Edel, Joshua B; Low, Tony; Koester, Steven J; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2017-11-30

    The many unique properties of graphene, such as the tunable optical, electrical, and plasmonic response make it ideally suited for applications such as biosensing. As with other surface-based biosensors, however, the performance is limited by the diffusive transport of target molecules to the surface. Here we show that atomically sharp edges of monolayer graphene can generate singular electrical field gradients for trapping biomolecules via dielectrophoresis. Graphene-edge dielectrophoresis pushes the physical limit of gradient-force-based trapping by creating atomically sharp tweezers. We have fabricated locally backgated devices with an 8-nm-thick HfO 2 dielectric layer and chemical-vapor-deposited graphene to generate 10× higher gradient forces as compared to metal electrodes. We further demonstrate near-100% position-controlled particle trapping at voltages as low as 0.45 V with nanodiamonds, nanobeads, and DNA from bulk solution within seconds. This trapping scheme can be seamlessly integrated with sensors utilizing graphene as well as other two-dimensional materials.

  9. Molecular tweezers with varying anions: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, Som; Wilch, Constanze; Gersthagen, Thomas; Talbiersky, Peter; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Hanni, Matti; Sánchez-García, Elsa; Ochsenfeld, Christian; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Schrader, Thomas

    2013-07-05

    Selective binding of the phosphate-substituted molecular tweezer 1a to protein lysine residues was suggested to explain the inhibition of certain enzymes and the aberrant aggregation of amyloid petide Aβ42 or α-synuclein, which are assumed to be responsible for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, respectively. In this work we systematically investigated the binding of four water-soluble tweezers 1a-d (substituted by phosphate, methanephosphonate, sulfate, or O-methylenecarboxylate groups) to amino acids and peptides containing lysine or arginine residues by using fluorescence spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The comparison of the experimental results with theoretical data obtained by a combination of QM/MM and ab initio(1)H NMR shift calculations provides clear evidence that the tweezers 1a-c bind the amino acid or peptide guest molecules by threading the lysine or arginine side chain through the tweezers' cavity, whereas in the case of 1d the guest molecule is preferentially positioned outside the tweezer's cavity. Attractive ionic, CH-π, and hydrophobic interactions are here the major binding forces. The combination of experiment and theory provides deep insight into the host-guest binding modes, a prerequisite to understanding the exciting influence of these tweezers on the aggregation of proteins and the activity of enzymes.

  10. Active locking and entanglement in type II optical parametric oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquín; de Valcárcel, Germán J.; Navarrete-Benlloch, Carlos

    2018-02-01

    Type II optical parametric oscillators are amongst the highest-quality sources of quantum-correlated light. In particular, when pumped above threshold, such devices generate a pair of bright orthogonally-polarized beams with strong continuous-variable entanglement. However, these sources are of limited practical use, because the entangled beams emerge with different frequencies and a diffusing phase difference. It has been proven that the use of an internal wave-plate coupling the modes with orthogonal polarization is capable of locking the frequencies of the emerging beams to half the pump frequency, as well as reducing the phase-difference diffusion, at the expense of reducing the entanglement levels. In this work we characterize theoretically an alternative locking mechanism: the injection of a laser at half the pump frequency. Apart from being less invasive, this method should allow for an easier real-time experimental control. We show that such an injection is capable of generating the desired phase locking between the emerging beams, while still allowing for large levels of entanglement. Moreover, we find an additional region of the parameter space (at relatively large injections) where a mode with well defined polarization is in a highly amplitude-squeezed state.

  11. Time Inter-Comparison Using Transportable Optical Combs, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AOSense proposes a free-space, two-way optical time transfer system compatible with global-scale synchronization of current-generation optical atomic clocks. In...

  12. Application of laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy techniques to the monitoring of single cell response to stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, James W.; Liu, Rui; Matthews, Dennis L.

    2012-06-01

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) combines optical trapping with micro-Raman spectroscopy to enable label-free biochemical analysis of individual cells and small biological particles in suspension. The integration of the two technologies greatly simplifies the sample preparation and handling of suspension cells for spectroscopic analysis in physiologically meaningful conditions. In our group, LTRS has been used to study the effects of external perturbations, both chemical and mechanical, on the biochemistry of the cell. Single cell dynamics can be studied by performing longitudinal studies to continuously monitor the response of the cell as it interacts with its environment. The ability to carry out these measurements in-vitro makes LTRS an attractive tool for many biomedical applications. Here, we discuss the use of LTRS to study the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutics and bacteria cells to antibiotics and show that the life cycle and apoptosis of the cells can be detected. These results show the promise of LTRS for drug discovery/screening, antibiotic susceptibility testing, and chemotherapy response monitoring applications. In separate experiments, we study the response of red blood cells to the mechanical forces imposed on the cell by the optical tweezers. A laser power dependent deoxygenation of the red blood cell in the single beam trap is reported. Normal, sickle cell, and fetal red blood cells have a different behavior that enables the discrimination of the cell types based on this mechanochemical response. These results show the potential utility of LTRS for diagnosing and studying red blood cell diseases.

  13. Fiber Optic Temperature Sensors for Thermal Protection Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase 1, Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS), in collaboration with North Carolina State University, successfully demonstrated a Fiber Bragg...

  14. Optimal design of tweezer control for chimera states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omelchenko, Iryna; Omel'chenko, Oleh E.; Zakharova, Anna; Schöll, Eckehard

    2018-01-01

    Chimera states are complex spatio-temporal patterns which consist of coexisting domains of spatially coherent and incoherent dynamics in systems of coupled oscillators. In small networks, chimera states usually exhibit short lifetimes and erratic drifting of the spatial position of the incoherent domain. A tweezer feedback control scheme can stabilize and fix the position of chimera states. We analyze the action of the tweezer control in small nonlocally coupled networks of Van der Pol and FitzHugh-Nagumo oscillators, and determine the ranges of optimal control parameters. We demonstrate that the tweezer control scheme allows for stabilization of chimera states with different shapes, and can be used as an instrument for controlling the coherent domains size, as well as the maximum average frequency difference of the oscillators.

  15. Light Weight, Scalable Manufacturing of Telescope Optics, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's future X-ray astronomy missions will require X-ray optics that have large effective areas, are lightweight, and cost effective. Recent X-ray telescopes, such...

  16. Improved Large Segmented Optics Fabrication Using Magnetorheological Finishing, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Primary mirrors for large aperture telescopes (> 10 m) are collections of smaller (1-2 m), typically hexagonal, often aspheric, optical segments. NASA's next...

  17. Airy acoustical-sheet spinner tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2016-09-01

    The Airy acoustical beam exhibits parabolic propagation and spatial acceleration, meaning that the propagation bending angle continuously increases before the beam trajectory reaches a critical angle where it decays after a propagation distance, without applying any external bending force. As such, it is of particular importance to investigate its properties from the standpoint of acoustical radiation force, spin torque, and particle dynamics theories, in the development of novel particle sorting techniques and acoustically mediated clearing systems. This work investigates these effects on a two-dimensional (2D) circular absorptive structure placed in the field of a nonparaxial Airy "acoustical-sheet" (i.e., finite beam in 2D), for potential applications in surface acoustic waves and acousto-fluidics. Based on the characteristics of the acoustic field, the beam is capable of manipulating the circular cylindrical fluid cross-section and guides it along a transverse or parabolic trajectory. This feature of Airy acoustical beams could lead to a unique characteristic in single-beam acoustical tweezers related to acoustical sieving, filtering, and removal of particles and cells from a section of a small channel. The analysis developed here is based on the description of the nonparaxial Airy beam using the angular spectrum decomposition of plane waves in close association with the partial-wave series expansion method in cylindrical coordinates. The numerical results demonstrate the ability of the nonparaxial Airy acoustical-sheet beam to pull, propel, or accelerate a particle along a parabolic trajectory, in addition to particle confinement in the transverse direction of wave propagation. Negative or positive radiation force and spin torque causing rotation in the clockwise or the anticlockwise direction can occur depending on the nondimensional parameter ka (where k is the wavenumber and a is the radius) and the location of the cylinder in the beam. Applications in

  18. 77 FR 36579 - II-VI, Inc., Infrared Optics-Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg, PA; Leased Workers From Adecco, Carol...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ...., Infrared Optics-Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg, PA; Leased Workers From Adecco, Carol Harris, Unlimited Staffing, and Staffmark, Working On-Site at II-VI, Inc., Infrared Optics-Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg, PA... workers and former workers of II-VI, Inc., Infrared Optics-Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg, Pennsylvania...

  19. Light at work: The use of optical forces for particle manipulation, sorting, and analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jonáš, Alexandr; Zemánek, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 24 (2008), s. 4813-4851 ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06007; GA MŠk OC08034 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : microfluidics * optical chromatography and sorting * optical force and torque * optical tweezers and micro-manipulation / Optical tweezers and micro-manipulation / Raman microspectroscopy * Raman microspectroscopy Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.509, year: 2008

  20. In Situ Raman Spectroscopy of COOH-Functionalized SWCNTs Trapped with Optoelectronic Tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Pauzauskie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optoelectronic tweezers (OETs were used to trap and deposit aqueous dispersions of carboxylic-acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube bundles. Dark-field video microscopy was used to visualize the dynamics of the bundles both with and without virtual electrodes, showing rapid accumulation of carbon nanotubes when optical virtual electrodes are actuated. Raman microscopy was used to probe SWCNT materials following deposition onto metallic fiducial markers as well as during trapping. The local carbon nanotube concentration was observed to increase rapidly during trapping by more than an order of magnitude in less than one second due to localized optical dielectrophoresis forces. This combination of enrichment and spectroscopy with a single laser spot suggests a broad range of applications in physical, chemical, and biological sciences.

  1. Natural user interface as a supplement of the holographic Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomori, Zoltan; Kanka, Jan; Kesa, Peter; Jakl, Petr; Sery, Mojmir; Bernatova, Silvie; Antalik, Marian; Zemánek, Pavel

    2014-09-01

    Holographic Raman tweezers (HRT) manipulates with microobjects by controlling the positions of multiple optical traps via the mouse or joystick. Several attempts have appeared recently to exploit touch tablets, 2D cameras or Kinect game console instead. We proposed a multimodal "Natural User Interface" (NUI) approach integrating hands tracking, gestures recognition, eye tracking and speech recognition. For this purpose we exploited "Leap Motion" and "MyGaze" low-cost sensors and a simple speech recognition program "Tazti". We developed own NUI software which processes signals from the sensors and sends the control commands to HRT which subsequently controls the positions of trapping beams, micropositioning stage and the acquisition system of Raman spectra. System allows various modes of operation proper for specific tasks. Virtual tools (called "pin" and "tweezers") serving for the manipulation with particles are displayed on the transparent "overlay" window above the live camera image. Eye tracker identifies the position of the observed particle and uses it for the autofocus. Laser trap manipulation navigated by the dominant hand can be combined with the gestures recognition of the secondary hand. Speech commands recognition is useful if both hands are busy. Proposed methods make manual control of HRT more efficient and they are also a good platform for its future semi-automated and fully automated work.

  2. High-Frequency Flush Mounted Miniature LOX Fiber-Optic Pressure Sensor II, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations has teamed with the University of Alabama, Huntsville, to develop a miniature flush-mounted fiber-optic pressure sensor that will allow accurate,...

  3. Macaque accessory optic system: II. Connections with the pretectum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baleydier, C.; Magnin, M.; Cooper, H.M.

    1990-01-01

    Connections of the accessory optic system (AOS) with the pretectum are described in the macaque monkey. Injections of tritiated amino acids in the pretectum demonstrate a major contralateral projection to the dorsal (DTN), lateral (LTN), and medial (MTN) terminal nuclei of the AOS and a sparser projection to the ipsilateral LTN. Injections of retrograde tracers, Fast Blue (FB), or wheat germ agglutinin horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) plus nonconjugated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the LTN show that the pretectal-LTN projection originates from two nuclei. The main source of pretectal efferents to the LTN is from the pretectal olivary nucleus (OPN) and is entirely contralateral. This projection, which appears unique to primates, originates from the large multipolar cells of the OPN. In addition to this projection, the nucleus of the optic tract (NOT) projects to the ipsilateral LTN, as in nonprimates. Injection of WGA-HRP in the pretectum shows a reciprocal predominantely ipsilateral projection from the LTN to the pretectum. Retinas were observed after injection of FB in the LTN. The retinal ganglion cells projecting to the AOS are mainly distributed near the fovea and in the nasal region of the contralateral eye, suggesting a nasotemporal pattern of decussation. The demonstration of a direct connection between LTN and OPN forces to a reconsideration of the functional role of the AOS. Previous descriptions of luminance responsive cells in the LTN support a possible participation of this nucleus in the control of the pupillary light reflex

  4. Laser tweezers: spectroscopy of optically trapped micron-sized particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, K.M.; Livett, M.K.; Nugent, K.W. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Information is often obtained about biological systems by analysis of single cells in the system. The optimum conditions for this analysis are when the cells are living and in their natural surroundings as they will be performing their normal functions and interactions. Analysis of cells can be difficult due to their mobility. Laser tweezing is a non contact method that can be employed to overcome this problem and provides a powerful tool in the analysis of functions and interactions at single cell level. In this investigation Raman spectra of a molecule of {beta} - carotene, dissolved in microdroplets of oil was obtained. The droplets were trapped using Nd-YAG beam and a low intensity Ar{sup +} beam was used to analyse the trapped particles. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Laser tweezers: spectroscopy of optically trapped micron-sized particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, K M; Livett, M K; Nugent, K W [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1997-12-31

    Information is often obtained about biological systems by analysis of single cells in the system. The optimum conditions for this analysis are when the cells are living and in their natural surroundings as they will be performing their normal functions and interactions. Analysis of cells can be difficult due to their mobility. Laser tweezing is a non contact method that can be employed to overcome this problem and provides a powerful tool in the analysis of functions and interactions at single cell level. In this investigation Raman spectra of a molecule of {beta} - carotene, dissolved in microdroplets of oil was obtained. The droplets were trapped using Nd-YAG beam and a low intensity Ar{sup +} beam was used to analyse the trapped particles. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Microrheology of concentrated DNA solutions using optical tweezers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . In this work, we report the determination of microrheological properties of concentrated, double-stranded calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) solutions using passive, laser-scattering based particle-tracking methodology. From power spectral analysis, ...

  7. Construction of an optical tweezer for nanometer scale rheology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    at a distance from a second lens (L2), to achieve slight overfilling of the laser beam at the entrance ... by IR radiation. To achieve stable and ... polymer solutions such as polyethylene oxide in water or suspension of silica parti- cles in ethylene ...

  8. Fundamentals of physics II electromagnetism, optics, and quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Shankar, R

    2016-01-01

    R. Shankar, a well-known physicist and contagiously enthusiastic educator, was among the first to offer a course through the innovative Open Yale Course program. His popular online video lectures on introductory physics have been viewed over a million times. In this second book based on his online Yale course, Shankar explains essential concepts, including electromagnetism, optics, and quantum mechanics. The book begins at the simplest level, develops the basics, and reinforces fundamentals, ensuring a solid foundation in the principles and methods of physics. It provides an ideal introduction for college-level students of physics, chemistry, and engineering; for motivated AP Physics students; and for general readers interested in advances in the sciences.

  9. Integration of Magneto-Optical Materials for Novel Optical Devices & Magnetophotonic Crystals, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This work proposes to capitalize on our Phase I success in monolithically integrating magneto-optic and magnetic materials with semiconductor platforms in order to...

  10. Hydrodynamic cavitation in microsystems. II. Simulations and optical observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, M.; Pellone, C.; Zermatten, P. J.; Ayela, F.

    2012-04-01

    Numerical calculations in the single liquid phase and optical observations in the two-phase cavitating flow regime have been performed on microdiaphragms and microventuris fed with deionized water. Simulations have confirmed the influence of the shape of the shrinkage upon the contraction of the jet, and so on the localisation of possible cavitating area downstream. Observations of cavitating flow patterns through hybrid silicon-pyrex microdevices have been performed either via a laser excitation with a pulse duration of 6 ns, or with the help of a high-speed camera. Recorded snapshots and movies are presented. Concerning microdiaphragms, it is confirmed that very high shear rates downstream the diaphragms are the cause of bubbly flows. Concerning microventuris, a gaseous cavity forms on a boundary downstream the throat. As a consequence of a microsystem instability, the cavity displays a high frequency pulsation. Low values Strouhal numbers are associated to such a sheet cavitation. Moreover, when the intensity of the cavitating flow is reduced, there is a mismatch between the frequency of the pulsation of the cavity and the frequency of shedded clouds downstream the channel. That may be the consequence of viscous effects limiting the impingement of a re-entrant liquid jet on the attached cavity.

  11. Recent Achievements on Photovoltaic Optoelectronic Tweezers Based on Lithium Niobate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel García-Cabañes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This review presents an up-dated summary of the fundamentals and applications of optoelectronic photovoltaic tweezers for trapping and manipulation of nano-objects on the surface of lithium niobate crystals. It extends the contents of previous reviews to cover new topics and developments which have emerged in recent years and are marking the trends for future research. Regarding the theoretical description of photovoltaic tweezers, detailed simulations of the electrophoretic and dielectrophoretic forces acting on different crystal configurations are discussed in relation to the structure of the obtained trapping patterns. As for the experimental work, we will pay attention to the manipulation and patterning of micro-and nanoparticles that has experimented an outstanding progress and relevant applications have been reported. An additional focus is now laid on recent work about micro-droplets, which is a central topic in microfluidics and optofluidics. New developments in biology and biomedicine also constitute a relevant part of the review. Finally, some topics partially related with photovoltaic tweezers and a discussion on future prospects and challenges are included.

  12. 77 FR 21586 - II-VI, Incorporated, Infrared Optics-Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg, PA; Notice of Affirmative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ..., Infrared Optics--Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg, PA; Notice of Affirmative Determination Regarding... Assistance (TAA) applicable to workers and former workers of II-VI, Incorporated, Infrared Optics--Saxonburg...). The workers were engaged in employment related to the production of infrared and CO 2 laser optics...

  13. Time-domain scanning optical mammography: II. Optical properties and tissue parameters of 87 carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosenick, Dirk; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Moesta, K Thomas; Mucke, Joerg; Schlag, Peter M; Rinneberg, Herbert

    2005-01-01

    Within a clinical trial on scanning time-domain optical mammography reported on in a companion publication (part I), craniocaudal and mediolateral projection optical mammograms were recorded from 154 patients, suspected of having breast cancer. Here we report on in vivo optical properties of the subset of 87 histologically validated carcinomas which were visible in optical mammograms recorded at two or three near-infrared wavelengths. Tumour absorption and reduced scattering coefficients were derived from distributions of times of flight of photons recorded at the tumour site employing the model of diffraction of photon density waves by a spherical inhomogeneity, located in an otherwise homogeneous tissue slab. Effective tumour radii, taken from pathology, and tumour location along the compression direction, deduced from off-axis optical scans of the tumour region, were included in the analysis as prior knowledge, if available. On average, tumour absorption coefficients exceeded those of surrounding healthy breast tissue by a factor of about 2.5 (670 nm), whereas tumour reduced scattering coefficients were larger by about 20% (670 nm). From absorption coefficients at 670 nm and 785 nm total haemoglobin concentration and blood oxygen saturation were deduced for tumours and surrounding healthy breast tissue. Apart from a few outliers total haemoglobin concentration was observed to be systematically larger in tumours compared to healthy breast tissue. In contrast, blood oxygen saturation was found to be a poor discriminator for tumours and healthy breast tissue; both median values of blood oxygen saturation are the same within their statistical uncertainties. However, the ratio of total haemoglobin concentration over blood oxygen saturation further improves discrimination between tumours and healthy breast tissue. For 29 tumours detected in optical mammograms recorded at three wavelengths (670 nm, 785 nm, 843 nm or 884 nm), scatter power was derived from transport

  14. Optical investigations and control of spindynamics in Mn doped II-VI quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The present thesis deals with the spin of charge carriers confined in CdSe/ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) closely linked to the polarization of emitted photons. II-VI material systems can be adequately mixed with the B-group element manganese. Such semimagnetic nanostructures offer a number of characteristic optical and electronic features. This is caused by an exchange interaction between the spin of optically excited carriers and the 3d electrons of the Mn ions. Within the framework of this thesis addressing of well defined spin states was realized by optical excitation of charge carriers. The occupation of different spin states was detected by the degree of polarization of the emitted photoluminescence (PL) light. For that purpose different optical methods of time-resolved and time-integrated spectroscopy as well as investigations in magnetic fields were applied. (orig.)

  15. Novel optics for conditioning neutron beams. II Focussing neutrons with a 'lobster-eye' optic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allman, B.E.; Cimmino, A.; Griffin, S.L.; Klein, A.G.; Nugent, K.A.

    1998-01-01

    Square-channel capillary, or 'Lobster-eye' arrays have been shown to be the optimum geometry for array optics. This configuration leads to a novel class of conditioning devices for X-ray and neutron beams. We present the first results of the focussing of neutrons with a Pb glass square-channel array. (authors)

  16. Neuro-evolutionary computing paradigm for Painlevé equation-II in nonlinear optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Sufyan; Awais, Muhammad; Ul Islam Ahmad, Siraj; Asif Zahoor Raja, Muhammad

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the numerical treatment of the Painlevé equation-II arising in physical models of nonlinear optics through artificial intelligence procedures by incorporating a single layer structure of neural networks optimized with genetic algorithms, sequential quadratic programming and active set techniques. We constructed a mathematical model for the nonlinear Painlevé equation-II with the help of networks by defining an error-based cost function in mean square sense. The performance of the proposed technique is validated through statistical analyses by means of the one-way ANOVA test conducted on a dataset generated by a large number of independent runs.

  17. Accuracy and Mechanistic Details of Optical Printing of Single Au and Ag Nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gargiulo, J.; Violi, I.L.; Cerrota, S.; Chvátal, Lukáš; Cortés, E.; Perassi, E.M.; Diaz, F.; Zemánek, Pavel; Stefani, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 10 (2017), s. 9678-9688 ISSN 1936-0851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : colloidal patterning * nanofabrication * optical forces * optical tweezers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 13.942, year: 2016

  18. Nonlinear optical properties of systems based on ruthenium(II) tetra-15-crown-5-phthalocyaninate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishina, A.D.; Gorbunova, Yu.G.; Enakieva, Yu.Yu.; Krivenko, T.V.; Savel'ev, V.V.; Vannikov, A.V.; Tsivadze, A.Yu.

    2008-01-01

    The third-order nonlinear optical properties of the ruthenium (II) complex with tetra-15-crown-5-phthalocyanine and axially coordinated triethylenediamine molecules (R 4 Pc)Ru(TED) 2 were analyzed by means of the z-scanning technique. A solution of (R 4 Pc)Ru(TED) 2 in tetrachloroethane was exposed to nanosecond laser pulses at a wavelength of 1064 nm. It was found that the third-order molecular polarizability of the Ru(II) complex is 4.5 x 10 -32 cm 4 /C (esu). The polarizability per molecule increases by a factor of 3.6 when the single molecule occurs in a supramolecular assembly of (R 4 Pc)Ru(TED) 2 complexes. The photoelectric and photorefractive properties at 1064 nm of polymer composites, determined by the supramolecular assemblies that exhibits optical absorption and photoelectric sensitivity in the near IR region, are reported [ru

  19. Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic characterization and nonlinear optical properties of Co(II)- picolinate complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamer, Ömer, E-mail: omertamer@sakarya.edu.tr; Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf

    2015-11-15

    A cobalt(II) complex of picolinate was synthesized, and its structure was fully characterized by the applying of X-ray diffraction method as well as FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV–vis spectroscopies. In order to both support the experimental results and convert study to more advanced level, density functional theory calculations were performed by using B3LYP level. Single crystal X-ray structural analysis shows that cobalt(II) ion was located to the center of distorted octahedral geometry. The C=O, C=C and C=N stretching vibrations were found as highly active and strong peaks, inducing the molecular charge transfer within Co(II) complex. The small energy gap between frontier molecular orbital energies was another indicator of molecular charge transfer interactions within Co(II) complex. The nonlinear optical properties of Co(II) complex were investigated at DFT/B3LYP level, and the hypepolarizability parameter was found to be decreased due to the presence of inversion symmetry. The natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was performed to investigate molecular stability, hyperconjugative interactions, intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and bond strength for Co(II) complex. Finally, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and spin density distributions for Co(II) complex were evaluated. - Highlights: • Co(II) complex of picolinate was prepared. • Its FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV–vis spectra were measured. • DFT calculations were performed to support experimental results. • Small HOMO-LUMO energy gap is an indicator of molecular charge transfer. • Spin density localized on Co(II) as well as O and N atoms.

  20. Transferring diffractive optics from research to commercial applications: Part II - size estimations for selected markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Robert

    2014-04-01

    In a series of two contributions, decisive business-related aspects of the current process status to transfer research results on diffractive optical elements (DOEs) into commercial solutions are discussed. In part I, the focus was on the patent landscape. Here, in part II, market estimations concerning DOEs for selected applications are presented, comprising classical spectroscopic gratings, security features on banknotes, DOEs for high-end applications, e.g., for the semiconductor manufacturing market and diffractive intra-ocular lenses. The derived market sizes are referred to the optical elements, itself, rather than to the enabled instruments. The estimated market volumes are mainly addressed to scientifically and technologically oriented optical engineers to serve as a rough classification of the commercial dimensions of DOEs in the different market segments and do not claim to be exhaustive.

  1. Optical properties of Amorphous Semiconductors Part- II: Theory and analysis of optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogarth, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    The atomic and band structural properties of solids have been studied. Reflectance is concerned in spectroscopic measurement of transmission and absorption, since the incident light intensity must be corrected for the loss of light by reflection and which does not penetrate beyond the surface of the material studied.The procedure for estimating E opt and n from the absorption edge of an amorphous semiconductor has been discussed. In high refractive index glasses there is a general correlation between n and the density of the glasses and in designing a particular glass for an optical purpose this can provide a useful guide to composition. The Gladstone-Dale refractivity and the Newton-Drude refractivity have been calculated for different value of b and these relations have been tested for telluride semiconducting glasses and give reasonable agreement in estimations of n directly from the density ρ. 33 refs., 10 figs

  2. Optical fiber chemiluminescence sensor for iron (II) ion based on immobilized luminol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alipao, Arthur A.; Sevilla, Fortunato III.

    1999-01-01

    A chemiluminescence (CL) sensor for iron (II) was developed based on the catalytic action of the analyte on the CL reaction between luminol and oxygen. The reagents were immobilized on a cellulose membrane and set on a reaction cell which was coupled by means of an optical fiber to a spectrofluorometer. The concentration of iron(II) was quantified by measuring the intensity of the light generated from the CL reaction. The response of the sensor system was rapid and highly reproducible. Good sensitivity was displayed by the sensor system over the five orders of magnitude of iron(II) ion concentration. The calibration curve consisted of two portions: (1) a linear range at lower concentrations (7.5 x 10 -7 M to 1.0 x 10 -4 M) exhibiting a positive slope arising from a catalytic action, and (2) a linear range at higher concentrations (5.0 x 10 -2 M to 2.5 x 10 -4 M) wherein the slope is negative due to an inhibitory action of iron(II) on the CL reaction. The sensor system was highly selective for iron(II) ions. (Author)

  3. Holographic Raman tweezers controlled by multi-modal natural user interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomori, Zoltán; Keša, Peter; Nikorovič, Matej; Valušová, Eva; Antalík, Marián; Kaňka, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Šerý, Mojmír; Bernatová, Silvie; Zemánek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Holographic optical tweezers provide a contactless way to trap and manipulate several microobjects independently in space using focused laser beams. Although the methods of fast and efficient generation of optical traps are well developed, their user friendly control still lags behind. Even though several attempts have appeared recently to exploit touch tablets, 2D cameras, or Kinect game consoles, they have not yet reached the level of natural human interface. Here we demonstrate a multi-modal ‘natural user interface’ approach that combines finger and gaze tracking with gesture and speech recognition. This allows us to select objects with an operator’s gaze and voice, to trap the objects and control their positions via tracking of finger movement in space and to run semi-automatic procedures such as acquisition of Raman spectra from preselected objects. This approach takes advantage of the power of human processing of images together with smooth control of human fingertips and downscales these skills to control remotely the motion of microobjects at microscale in a natural way for the human operator. (paper)

  4. Massive ordering and alignment of cylindrical micro-objects by photovoltaic optoelectronic tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvira, Iris; Muñoz-Martínez, Juan F; Barroso, Álvaro; Denz, Cornelia; Ramiro, José B; García-Cabañes, Angel; Agulló-López, Fernando; Carrascosa, Mercedes

    2018-01-01

    Optical tools for manipulation and trapping of micro- and nano-objects are a fundamental issue for many applications in nano- and biotechnology. This work reports on the use of one such method, known as photovoltaic optoelectronics tweezers, to orientate and organize cylindrical microcrystals, specifically elongated zeolite L, on the surface of Fe-doped LiNbO 3 crystal plates. Patterns of aligned zeolites have been achieved through the forces and torques generated by the bulk photovoltaic effect. The alignment patterns with zeolites parallel or perpendicular to the substrate surface are highly dependent on the features of light distribution and crystal configuration. Moreover, dielectrophoretic chains of zeolites with lengths up to 100 μm have often been observed. The experimental results of zeolite trapping and alignment have been discussed and compared together with theoretical simulations of the evanescent photovoltaic electric field and the dielectrophoretic potential. They demonstrate the remarkable capabilities of the optoelectronic photovoltaic method to orientate and pattern anisotropic microcrystals. The combined action of patterning and alignment offers a unique tool to prepare functional nanostructures with potential applications in a variety of fields such as nonlinear optics or plasmonics.

  5. Solar radio bursts of spectral type II, coronal shocks, and optical coronal transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, A.; Dryer, M.

    1981-01-01

    An examination is presented of the association of solar radio bursts of spectral type II and coronal shocks with solar flare ejecta observed in H-alpha, the green coronal line, and white-light coronagraphs. It is suggested that fast-moving optical coronal transients should for the most part be identified with piston-type phenomena well behind the outward-traveling shock waves that generate type II radio bursts. A general model is presented which relates type II radio bursts and coronal shocks to optically observed ejecta and consists of three main velocity regimes: (1) a quasi-hemispherical shock wave moving outward from the flare at speeds of 1000-2000 km/sec and Alfven Mach number of about 1.5; (2) the velocity of the piston driving the shock, on the order of 0.8 that of the shock; and (3) the regime of the slower-moving H-alpha ejecta, with velocities of 300-500 km/sec.

  6. Probing the mechanical properties, conformational changes, and interactions of nucleic acids with magnetic tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Franziska; Ermann, Niklas; Lipfert, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Nucleic acids are central to the storage and transmission of genetic information. Mechanical properties, along with their sequence, both enable and fundamentally constrain the biological functions of DNA and RNA. For small deformations from the equilibrium conformations, nucleic acids are well described by an isotropic elastic rod model. However, external forces and torsional strains can induce conformational changes, giving rise to a complex force-torque phase diagram. This review focuses on magnetic tweezers as a powerful tool to precisely determine both the elastic parameters and conformational transitions of nucleic acids under external forces and torques at the single-molecule level. We review several variations of magnetic tweezers, in particular conventional magnetic tweezers, freely orbiting magnetic tweezers and magnetic torque tweezers, and discuss their characteristic capabilities. We then describe the elastic rod model for DNA and RNA and discuss conformational changes induced by mechanical stress. The focus lies on the responses to torque and twist, which are crucial in the mechanics and interactions of nucleic acids and can directly be measured using magnetic tweezers. We conclude by highlighting several recent studies of nucleic acid-protein and nucleic acid-small-molecule interactions as further applications of magnetic tweezers and give an outlook of some exciting developments to come. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Performance of the upgraded LTP-II at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Light Source; Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Domning, Edward E.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2008-01-01

    The next generation of synchrotrons and free electron laser facilities requires x-ray optical systems with extremely high performance, generally of diffraction limited quality. Fabrication and use of such optics requires adequate, highly accurate metrology and dedicated instrumentation. Previously, we suggested ways to improve the performance of the Long Trace Profiler (LTP), a slope measuring instrument widely used to characterize x-ray optics at long spatial wavelengths. The main way is use of a CCD detector and corresponding technique for calibration of photo-response non-uniformity [J. L. Kirschman, et al., Proceedings of SPIE 6704, 67040J (2007)]. The present work focuses on the performance and characteristics of the upgraded LTP-II at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory. This includes a review of the overall aspects of the design, control system, the movement and measurement regimes for the stage, and analysis of the performance by a slope measurement of a highly curved super-quality substrate with less than 0.3 microradian (rms)slope variation

  8. Electronic band structures and optical properties of type-II superlattice photodetectors with interfacial effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Peng-Fei; Mou, Shin; Chuang, Shun Lien

    2012-01-30

    The electronic band structures and optical properties of type-II superlattice (T2SL) photodetectors in the mid-infrared (IR) range are investigated. We formulate a rigorous band structure model using the 8-band k · p method to include the conduction and valence band mixing. After solving the 8 × 8 Hamiltonian and deriving explicitly the new momentum matrix elements in terms of envelope functions, optical transition rates are obtained through the Fermi's golden rule under various doping and injection conditions. Optical measurements on T2SL photodetectors are compared with our model and show good agreement. Our modeling results of quantum structures connect directly to the device-level design and simulation. The predicted doping effect is readily applicable to the optimization of photodetectors. We further include interfacial (IF) layers to study the significance of their effect. Optical properties of T2SLs are expected to have a large tunable range by controlling the thickness and material composition of the IF layers. Our model provides an efficient tool for the designs of novel photodetectors.

  9. MONSTIR II: A 32-channel, multispectral, time-resolved optical tomography system for neonatal brain imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Robert J., E-mail: robert.cooper@ucl.ac.uk; Magee, Elliott; Everdell, Nick; Magazov, Salavat; Varela, Marta; Airantzis, Dimitrios; Gibson, Adam P.; Hebden, Jeremy C. [Biomedical Optics Research Laboratory, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    We detail the design, construction and performance of the second generation UCL time-resolved optical tomography system, known as MONSTIR II. Intended primarily for the study of the newborn brain, the system employs 32 source fibres that sequentially transmit picosecond pulses of light at any four wavelengths between 650 and 900 nm. The 32 detector channels each contain an independent photo-multiplier tube and temporally correlated photon-counting electronics that allow the photon transit time between each source and each detector position to be measured with high temporal resolution. The system's response time, temporal stability, cross-talk, and spectral characteristics are reported. The efficacy of MONSTIR II is demonstrated by performing multi-spectral imaging of a simple phantom.

  10. Elaboration and optical properties of type-II ZnTe on ZnSe heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najjar, Rita, E-mail: rita.najjar@cea.f [CEA-CNRS group ' Nanophysique et semiconducteurs' , Institut NEEL-CNRS, BP166, 25 rue des martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Andre, Regis; Besombes, Lucien; Bougerol, Catherine; Tatarenko, Serge; Mariette, Henri [CEA-CNRS group ' Nanophysique et semiconducteurs' , Institut NEEL-CNRS, BP166, 25 rue des martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2009-11-25

    Special growth conditions are presented in this work, in order to produce ZnTe/ZnSe type-II quantum dots and preserve them during the capping stage. A detailed study emphasizes the high sensitivity of the sample structure to Se/Zn ratio as opposed to other growth parameters. It is shown that nominally identical samples can evolve into two-dimensional quantum well or quantum dot plane, depending on which element is in excess. Transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and optical characterizations evidence this phenomenon.

  11. Improvement of PEP-II Linear Optics with a MIA-Derived Virtual Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerio, B.; Colgate U.

    2006-01-01

    In several past studies, model independent analysis, in conjunction with a virtual accelerator model, has been successful in improving PEP-II linear geometric optics. In many cases, optics improvement yielded an increase in machine luminosity. In this study, an updated characterization of linear optics is presented. With the PEP-II beam position monitor (BPM) system, four independent beam centroid orbits were extracted and used to determine phase advances and linear Green's functions among BPM locations. A magnetic lattice model was then constructed with a singular value decomposition-enhanced least-square fitting of phase advances and Green's functions, which are functions of quadrupole strengths, sextupole feed-downs, as well as BPM errors, to the corresponding measured quantities. The fitting process yielded a machine model that matched the measured linear optics of the real machine and was therefore deemed the virtual accelerator. High beta beat, as well as linear coupling, was observed in both LER and HER of the virtual accelerator. Since there was higher beta beating in LER, focus was shifted to the improvement of this ring. By adjusting select quadrupoles of the virtual LER and fitting the resulting beta functions and phase advances to those of the desired lattice, the average beta beat of the virtual machine was effectively reduced. The new magnet configuration was dialed into LER on August 10, 2006, and beta beat was reduced by a factor of three. After fine tuning HER to match the improved LER for optimal collision, a record peak luminosity of 12.069 x 10 33 cm -2 s -1 was attained on August 16, 2006

  12. Advanced Design of the First Quasi-optical Transmission Line for ECRH at TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, A.; Likin, K.; Martin, R.

    1999-01-01

    TJ-II plasma start-up and heating are made by electron cyclotron resonance waves at the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency. The microwave power of the gyrotrons is transmitted by two quasi-optical transmission lines. The first line launches the microwave power under fixed injection geometry, i. e. there is no a possibility to change the launching angle the wave polarization. Due to the long distance between the last focusing mirror and the center TJ-II vessel the beam is quite wide at plasma border. The second line has a moveable mirror installed inside the TJ-II vessel. To get high absorption efficiency and a narrow energy deposition profile the internal mirror focuses the wave beam at plasma center. The beam width is about 2 cm. To get more flexibility in experiments on heating and current drive the first transmission line needs to be upgraded. The designs is presented in this report. It includes and internal mirror to focus the beam and to change the injection angle. A polarizer consisting in two corrugated mirrors will be incorporated to get any wave polarization. Two mirrors with an array of coupling holes and calorimetric measurements of the energy absorbed in the barrier window will permit the estimation of the microwave power launched the TJ-II. (Author) 13 refs

  13. Turnable Semiconductor Laser Spectroscopy in Hollow Optical Waveguides, Phase II SBIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory J. Fetzer, Ph.D.

    2001-12-24

    In this study a novel optical trace gas sensor based on a perforated hollow waveguide (PHW) was proposed. The sensor has been given the acronym ESHOW for Environmental Sensor using Hollow Optical Waveguides. Realizations of the sensor have demonstrated rapid response time (<2s), low minimum detection limits (typically around 3 x 10-5 absorbance). Operation of the PHW technology has been demonstrated in the near-infrared (NIR) and mid0infrared (MIR) regions of the spectrum. Simulation of sensor performance provided in depth understanding of the signals and signal processing required to provide high sensitivity yet retain rapid response to gas changes. A dedicated sensor electronics and software foundation were developed during the course of the Phase II effort. Commercial applications of the sensor are ambient air and continuous emissions monitoring, industrial process control and hazardous waste site monitoring. There are numerous other applications for such a sensor including medical diagnosis and treatment, breath analysis for legal purposes, water quality assessment, combustion diagnostics, and chemical process control. The successful completion of Phase II resulted in additional funding of instrument development by the Nations Institute of Heath through a Phase I SBIR grant and a strategic teaming relationship with a commercial manufacture of medical instrumentation. The purpose of the NIH grant and teaming relationship is to further develop the sensor to monitor NO in exhaled breath for the purposes of asthma diagnosis.

  14. The Unique Optical Design of the CTI-II Survey Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Mark R.; McGraw, J. T.; MacFarlane, M.

    2006-12-01

    The CCD/Transit Instrument with Innovative Instrumentation (CTI-II) is being developed for precision ground-based astrometric and photometric astronomical observations. The 1.8m telescope will be stationary, near-zenith pointing and will feature a CCD-mosaic array operated in time-delay and integrate (TDI) mode to image a continuous strip of the sky in five bands. The heart of the telescope is a Nasmyth-like bent-Cassegrain optical system optimized to produce near diffraction-limited images with near zero distortion over a circular1.42 deg field. The optical design includes an f/2.2 parabolic ULE primary with no central hole salvaged from the original CTI telescope and adds the requisite hyperbolic secondary, a folding flat and a highly innovative all-spherical, five lens corrector which includes three plano surfaces. The reflective and refractive portions of the design have been optimized as individual but interdependent systems so that the same reflective system can be used with slightly different refractive correctors. At present, two nearly identical corrector designs are being evaluated, one fabricated from BK-7 glass and the other of fused silica. The five lens corrector consists of an air-spaced triplet separated from follow-on air-spaced doublet. Either design produces 0.25 arcsecond images at 83% encircled energy with a maximum of 0.0005% distortion. The innovative five lens corrector design has been applied to other current and planned Cassegrain, RC and super RC optical systems requiring correctors. The basic five lens approach always results in improved performance compared to the original designs. In some cases, the improvement in image quality is small but includes substantial reductions in distortion. In other cases, the improvement in image quality is substantial. Because the CTI-II corrector is designed for a parabolic primary, it might be especially useful for liquid mirror telescopes. We describe and discuss the CTI-II optical design with respect

  15. The Intrinsically X-Ray-weak Quasar PHL 1811. II. Optical and UV Spectra and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighly, Karen M.; Halpern, Jules P.; Jenkins, Edward B.; Casebeer, Darrin

    2007-11-01

    This is the second of two papers reporting observations and analysis of the unusually bright (mb=14.4), luminous (MB=-25.5), nearby (z=0.192) narrow-line quasar PHL 1811. The first paper reported that PHL 1811 is intrinsically X-ray-weak and presented a spectral energy distribution (SED). Here we present HST STIS optical and UV spectra, and ground-based optical spectra. The optical and UV line emission is very unusual. There is no evidence for forbidden or semiforbidden lines. The near-UV spectrum is dominated by very strong Fe II and Fe III, and unusual low-ionization lines such as Na I D and Ca II H and K are observed. High-ionization lines are very weak; C IV has an equivalent width of 6.6 Å, a factor of ~5 smaller than measured from quasar composite spectra. An unusual feature near 1200 Å can be deblended in terms of Lyα, N V, Si II, and C III* using the blueshifted C IV profile as a template. Photoionization modeling shows that the unusual line emission can be explained qualitatively by the unusually soft SED. Principally, a low gas temperature results in inefficient emission of collisionally excited lines, including the semiforbidden lines generally used as density diagnostics. The emission resembles that of high-density gas; in both cases this is a consequence of inefficient cooling. PHL 1811 is very unusual, but we note that quasar surveys may be biased against finding similar objects. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. These observations are associated with proposal 9181. Based on observations obtained at Kitt Peak National Observatory, a division of the National Optical Astronomy Observatories, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  16. Precision PEP-II optics measurement with an SVD-enhanced Least-Square fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Y. T.; Cai, Y.

    2006-03-01

    A singular value decomposition (SVD)-enhanced Least-Square fitting technique is discussed. By automatic identifying, ordering, and selecting dominant SVD modes of the derivative matrix that responds to the variations of the variables, the converging process of the Least-Square fitting is significantly enhanced. Thus the fitting speed can be fast enough for a fairly large system. This technique has been successfully applied to precision PEP-II optics measurement in which we determine all quadrupole strengths (both normal and skew components) and sextupole feed-downs as well as all BPM gains and BPM cross-plane couplings through Least-Square fitting of the phase advances and the Local Green's functions as well as the coupling ellipses among BPMs. The local Green's functions are specified by 4 local transfer matrix components R12, R34, R32, R14. These measurable quantities (the Green's functions, the phase advances and the coupling ellipse tilt angles and axis ratios) are obtained by analyzing turn-by-turn Beam Position Monitor (BPM) data with a high-resolution model-independent analysis (MIA). Once all of the quadrupoles and sextupole feed-downs are determined, we obtain a computer virtual accelerator which matches the real accelerator in linear optics. Thus, beta functions, linear coupling parameters, and interaction point (IP) optics characteristics can be measured and displayed.

  17. Optical investigations and control of spindynamics in Mn doped II-VI quantum dots; Optische Untersuchung und Kontrolle der Spindynamik in Mn dotierten II-VI Quantenpunkten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Thomas

    2009-05-13

    The present thesis deals with the spin of charge carriers confined in CdSe/ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) closely linked to the polarization of emitted photons. II-VI material systems can be adequately mixed with the B-group element manganese. Such semimagnetic nanostructures offer a number of characteristic optical and electronic features. This is caused by an exchange interaction between the spin of optically excited carriers and the 3d electrons of the Mn ions. Within the framework of this thesis addressing of well defined spin states was realized by optical excitation of charge carriers. The occupation of different spin states was detected by the degree of polarization of the emitted photoluminescence (PL) light. For that purpose different optical methods of time-resolved and time-integrated spectroscopy as well as investigations in magnetic fields were applied. (orig.)

  18. Porphyrin-functionalized porous polysulfone membrane towards an optical sensor membrane for sorption and detection of cadmium(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Lizhi, E-mail: zhaolizhi_phd@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Separation Membranes and Membrane Processes, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Li, Min; Liu, Manman; Zhang, Yuecong [State Key Laboratory of Separation Membranes and Membrane Processes, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Wu, Chenglin [School of Pharmaceutical and Chemical Engineering, Taizhou University, Taizhou 317000, Zhejiang Province (China); Zhang, Yuzhong, E-mail: zhangyz2004cn@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Separation Membranes and Membrane Processes, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • An optical sensor membrane is prepared by TMPyP and PNaSS-grafted PSF membrane. • The optical sensor membrane shows enhanced sorption for cadmium(II). • Visual and spectrophotometric detection can be achieved. • The functional membrane exhibits good stability and reusability. - Abstract: In this study, an optical sensor membrane was prepared for sorption and detection of cadmium(II) (Cd(II)) in aqueous solution. A polyanion, poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PNaSS), was grafted onto the chloromethylated polysulfone (CMPSF) microporous membrane via surface-initiated ATRP. 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-N-methylpyridyl) porphyrin p-toluenesulfonate (TMPyP) was immobilized onto the PNaSS-grafted polysulfone (PSF-PNaSS) membrane through electrostatic interaction. The TMPyP-functionalized membrane exhibited an enhanced sorption for, and distinct color and spectral response to cadmium(II) (Cd(II)) in aqueous solution. Larger immobilization capacity of TMPyP on the membrane led to stronger sorption for Cd(II), and smaller one made the optical sensor have a faster (in minutes) and more sensitive response to the ion. The detection limit study indicated that the functional membrane with proper amount of TMPyP (<0.5 mg/g) could still have color and spectral response to Cd(II) solutions at an extreme low concentration (10{sup −4} mg/L). The optical sensor membrane exhibited good stability and reusability which made it efficient for various sorptive removal and detection applications.

  19. Optimized systems for energy efficient optical tweezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampmann, R.; Kleindienst, R.; Grewe, A.; Bürger, Elisabeth; Oeder, A.; Sinzinger, S.

    2013-03-01

    Compared to conventional optics like singlet lenses or even microscope objectives advanced optical designs help to develop properties specifically useful for efficient optical tweezers. We present an optical setup providing a customized intensity distribution optimized with respect to large trapping forces. The optical design concept combines a refractive double axicon with a reflective parabolic focusing mirror. The axicon arrangement creates an annular field distribution and thus clears space for additional integrated observation optics in the center of the system. Finally the beam is focused to the desired intensity distribution by a parabolic ring mirror. The compact realization of the system potentially opens new fields of applications for optical tweezers such as in production industries and micro-nano assembly.

  20. Combined Electrical, Optical and Nuclear Investigations of Impurities and Defects in II-VI Semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % IS325 \\\\ \\\\ To achieve well controlled bipolar conductivity in II-VI semiconductors represents a fundamental problem in semiconductor physics. The doping problems are controversely discussed, either in terms of self compensation or of compensation and passivation by unintentionally introduced impurities. \\\\ \\\\It is the goal of our experiments at the new ISOLDE facility, to shed new light on these problems and to look for ways to circumvent it. For this aim the investigation of impurities and native defects and the interaction between each other shall be investigated. The use of radioactive ion beams opens the access to controlled site selective doping of only one sublattice via nuclear transmutation. The compensating and passivating mechanisms will be studied by combining nuclear, electrical and optical methods like Perturbed Angular Correlation~(PAC), Hall Effect~(HE), Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy~(DLTS), Photoluminescence Spectroscopy~(PL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). \\\\ \\\\We intend to ...

  1. ALFALFA DISCOVERY OF THE NEARBY GAS-RICH DWARF GALAXY LEO P. II. OPTICAL IMAGING OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J.; Haurberg, Nathalie C.; Van Sistine, Angela; Young, Michael D. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Adams, Elizabeth A. K. [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cannon, John M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Skillman, Evan D.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W., E-mail: rhode@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: slaz@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: riccardo@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: betsey@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    We present results from ground-based optical imaging of a low-mass dwarf galaxy discovered by the ALFALFA 21 cm H I survey. Broadband (BVR) data obtained with the WIYN 3.5 m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) are used to construct color-magnitude diagrams of the galaxy's stellar population down to V{sub o} {approx} 25. We also use narrowband H{alpha} imaging from the KPNO 2.1 m telescope to identify a H II region in the galaxy. We use these data to constrain the distance to the galaxy to be between 1.5 and 2.0 Mpc. This places Leo P within the Local Volume but beyond the Local Group. Its properties are extreme: it is the lowest-mass system known that contains significant amounts of gas and is currently forming stars.

  2. Optical characterization of CdSe/ZnTe type-II interfaces for photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richters, Jan-Peter; Bleuse, Joel [CEA-CNRS group ' ' Nanophysique et semiconducteurs' ' , CEA-Grenoble, INAC, SP2M, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble (France); Gerard, Lionel; Andre, Regis [CEA-CNRS group ' ' Nanophysique et semiconducteurs' ' , Institut Neel, CNRS, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2012-07-01

    Solar cells based on direct bandgap semiconductors (GaAs,CdTe,CdSe..) show an efficient light absorption compared to silicon solar cells. This is an advantage for material savings due to thinner absorbers, but it also comes with the drawback of higher losses due to efficient radiative electron-hole recombination. Such losses could be prevented through the use of type-II interfaces which separate electrons and holes within the active area, similar to a p-n junction. We report a study of CdSe/ZnTe samples showing such an interface. The CdSe bandgap (1.7 eV) is well adapted to the solar spectrum and its lattice parameter mismatch with ZnTe is exceptionally low. We have grown, by MBE, different kinds of samples like CdSe/ZnTe 2D interfaces and superlattices and present time-resolved spectroscopy results which specify the efficiency of the electron-hole separation in these type-II structures. The measured decay time can be above 100 ns for the interface optical transition, i.e. 3 orders of magnitude slower than the typical PL decay time for the constitutive materials taken separately.

  3. Magneto-optical observation of twisted vortices in type-II superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indenbom, M. V.; van der Beek, C. J.; Berseth, V.; Benoit, W.; D'Anna, G.; Erb, A.; Walker, E.; Flükiger, R.

    1997-02-01

    When magnetic flux penetrates a type-II superconductor, it does so as quantized flux lines or vortex lines, so called because each is surrounded by a supercurrent vortex. Interactions between such vortices lead to a very rich and well characterized phenomenology for this 'mixed state'. But an outstanding question remains: are individual vortex lines 'strong', or can they easily be cut and made to pass through one another? The concept of vortex cutting was originally proposed to account for dissipation observed in superconducting wires oriented parallel to an applied magnetic field, where the vortex lines and transport current should be in a force-free configuration1-6. Previous experiments, however, have been unable to establish the vortex topology in the force-free configuration or the size of the energy barrier for vortex cutting. Here we report magneto-optical images of YBa2Cu3O7-δ samples in the force-free configuration which show that thousands of vortex lines can twist together to form highly stable structures. In some cases, these 'vortex twisters' interact with one another to produce wave-like dynamics. Our measurements also determine directly the current required to initiate vortex cutting, and show that it is much higher than that needed to overcome the pinning of vortices by material defects. This implies that thermodynamic phases of entangled vortices7-10 are intrinsically stable and may occupy a significant portion of the mixed-state phase diagram for type-II superconductors.

  4. Comparative Study of Optical and RF Communication Systems for a Mars Mission - Part II. Unified Value Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, H.; Layland, J.; Lesh, J.; Wilson, K.; Sue, M.; Rascoe, D.; Lansing, F.; Wilhelm, M.; Harcke, L.; Chen, C.; hide

    1997-01-01

    In this Par-II report of the Advanced Communications Benefits study, two critical metrics for comparing the benefits of utilizing X-band, Ka-band and Optical frequencies for supporting generic classes of Martian exploration missions have been evaluated.

  5. Optical characterization and blu-ray recording properties of metal(II) azo barbituric acid complex films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.Y. [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)], E-mail: xyli@siom.ac.cn; Wu, Y.Q. [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Lab of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry (Heilongjiang University), Ministry of Education, Haerbin 150080 (China)], E-mail: yqwu@siom.ac.cn; Gu, D.D.; Gan, F.X. [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2009-02-25

    Smooth thin films of nickel(II), cobalt(II) and zinc(II) complexes with azo barbituric acid were prepared by the spin-coating method. Absorption spectra of the thin films on K9 glass substrates in 300-700 nm wavelength region were measured. Optical constants (complex refractive index N = n + ik) of the thin films prepared on single-crystal silicon substrates in 275-695 nm wavelength region were investigated on rotating analyzer-polarizer type of scanning ellipsometer, and dielectric constant {epsilon} ({epsilon} = {epsilon}{sub 1} + i{epsilon}{sub 2}) as well as absorption coefficient {alpha} of thin films were calculated at 405 nm. In addition, static optical recording properties of the cobalt(II) complex thin film with an Ag reflective layer was carried out using a 406.7 nm blue-violet laser and a high numerical aperture (NA) of 0.90. Clear recording marks with high reflectivity contrast (>60%) at proper laser power and pulse width were obtained, and the size of recording mark was as small as 250 nm. The results indicate that these metal(II) complexes are promising organic recording medium for the blu-ray optical storage system.

  6. Bulky melamine-based Zn-porphyrin tweezer as a CD probe of molecular chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Ana G; Vantomme, Ghislaine; Negrón-Abril, Yashira L; Lubian, Elisa; Saielli, Giacomo; Menegazzo, Ileana; Cordero, Roselynn; Proni, Gloria; Nakanishi, Koji; Carofiglio, Tommaso; Berova, Nina

    2011-10-01

    The transfer of chirality from a guest molecule to an achiral host is the subject of significant interest especially when, upon chiral induction, the chiroptical response of the host/guest complex can effectively report the absolute configuration (AC) of the guest. For more than a decade, dimeric metalloporphyrin hosts (tweezers) have been successfully applied as chirality probes for determination of the AC for a wide variety of chiral synthetic compounds and natural products. The objective of this study is to investigate the utility of a new class of melamine-bridged Zn-porphyrin tweezers as sensitive AC reporters. A combined approach based on an experimental CD analysis and a theoretical prediction of the prevailing interporphyrin helicity demonstrates that these tweezers display favorable properties for chiral recognition. Herein, we discuss the application of the melamine-bridged tweezer to the chiral recognition of a diverse set of chiral guests, such as 1,2-diamines, α-amino-esters and amides, secondary alcohols, and 1,2-amino-alcohols. The bulky periphery and the presence of a rigid porphyrin linkage lead, in some cases, to a more enhanced CD sensitivity than that reported earlier with other tweezers. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Nano-funnels as electro-osmotic ``tweezers and pistons''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanqian; Panyukov, Sergey; Zhou, Jinsheng; Menard, Laurent D.; Ramsey, J. Michael; Rubinstien, Michael

    2014-03-01

    An electric field is used to force a DNA molecule into a nano-channel by compensating the free energy penalty that results from the reduced conformational entropy of the confined macromolecule. Narrow nano-channels require high critical electric fields to achieve DNA translocation, leading to short dwell times of DNA in these channels. We demonstrate that nano-funnels integrated with nano-channels reduce the free energy barrier and lower the critical electric field required for DNA translocation. A focused electric field within the funnel increases the electric force on the DNA, compresses the molecule, and increases the osmotic pressure at the nano-channel entrance. This ``electro-osmotic piston'' forces the molecule into the nano-channel at lower electric fields than those observed without the funnel. Appropirately designed nano-funnels can also function as tweezers that allow manipulation of the position of the DNA molecule. The predictions of our theory describing double-stranded DNA behavior in nano-funnel - nano-channel devices are consistent with experimental results. Thanks for the financial support from NSF (DMR-1309892, DMR-1121107, DMR-1122483), NIH (1-P50-HL107168, 1-P01-HL108808-01A1, R01HG02647), NHGRI and CF Foundation.

  8. Atomic data of Ti II from laser produced Ti plasmas by optical emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refaie, A.I.; Farrag, A.A.; El Sharkawy, H.; El Sherbini, T.M.

    2005-06-01

    In the present study, the emission spectrum of titanium produced from laser induced plasma has been measured at different distances from the target. The Titanium target is irradiated by using the high power Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ=1064 nm) that generates energy 750 mJ/pulse of duration rate 6 ns and repetition rate 10 Hz in vacuum and at different distances. The variation of the distance from the target affects the measured plasma parameters, i.e. the electron density, the ion temperature and the velocity distribution. The electron density increases with the increase of the distance from the target. At a distance 0.6 mm from the target it decreases to 2.28·10 16 cm -3 . The temperature increases with the distance from the get until a distance of 1 mm, after that it decreases. It is found that the plasma velocity increases with the distance then it decreases again. Then, Energy levels and transition probabilities for 3d 2 4p →(3d 2 4s + 3d 3 ) lines have been determined by measurement of emission line intensities from an optically thin laser produced plasma of Ti II in vacuum. Calculations with intermediate coupling using Hartree-Fock wave functions have been carried out in order to place the experimental data on an absolute scale and also to evaluate the lifetimes. The plasma parameters in different regions of the plasma plume have been measured and used to obtain further transition probabilities. (author)

  9. Optical trapping of carbon nanotubes and graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vasi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We study optical trapping of nanotubes and graphene. We extract the distribution of both centre-of-mass and angular fluctuations from three-dimensional tracking of these optically trapped carbon nanostructures. The optical force and torque constants are measured from auto and cross-correlation of the tracking signals. We demonstrate that nanotubes enable nanometer spatial, and femto-Newton force resolution in photonic force microscopy by accurately measuring the radiation pressure in a double frequency optical tweezers. Finally, we integrate optical trapping with Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrating the use of a Raman and photoluminescence tweezers by investigating the spectroscopy of nanotubes and graphene flakes in solution. Experimental results are compared with calculations based on electromagnetic scattering theory.

  10. Development of a Novel Fiber Optic Sensor Combined with a Fluorescence Turn-on Probe for Cu (II Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Existing staining-based methodology for the detection of metal ions is not well suited for real-time or in situ use. This is a significant problem, given that these ions can have a considerable impact on both human health and the environment. Thus, there is growing interest and need for simple, rapid and in-situ monitoring techniques for the purpose of detecting various target analytes (e.g. heavy metals, which is of a significant importance in many fields ranging from environmental monitoring to the study of intracellular processes. Among various sensors developed, optical fiber-optic sensors (FOS, based on fluorescence, are one class of sensors that address this goal [1]. Optical fibers are ideal for environmental sensing applications because of their ability to transmit optical signals to and from the sensing region without the use of free-space optics. In this work, we present, for the first time, a simple FOS incorporating novel fluorescence turn-on mechanism [2] that could detect Cu (II as low as 10−4 M. Traditionally, fluorescence quenching or “turn-off” was used to detect Cu (II [3]. In recent years, fluorescence “turn-on” emerges as a preferable tool. The developed fiber-optic sensor has two fiber leads and one probe head. One fiber lead includes 6 fibers for He-Ne laser excitation light delivery (e-fibers. Another fiber lead has one receiving fiber (r-fiber connected to an Ocean Optics QE65000 scientific grade spectrometer, which is interrogated by a computer via USB connection. The SpectroSuite software is used to observe and to record all spectra. The probe head combines all fibers together to form a coaxial structure with the r-fiber placed in the center. The key component in the proposed fluorescent sensing system is a probe prepared by binding a receptor containing a zwitterionic chromophore (M1, through noncovalent interactions, to the fluorescent polymer (P1 resulting in quenching its emission. The sensing mechanism

  11. A Smart DNA Tweezer for Detection of Human Telomerase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaowen; Wang, Lei; Li, Kan; Huang, Qihong; Jiang, Wei

    2018-03-06

    Reliable and accurate detection of telomerase activity is crucial to better understand its role in cancer cells and to further explore its function in cancer diagnosis and treatment. Here, we construct a smart DNA tweezer (DT) for detection of telomerase activity. The DT is assembled by three specially designed single-stranded oligonucleotides: a central strand dually labeled with donor/acceptor fluorophores and two arm strands containing overhangs complementary to telomerase reaction products (TRPs). It can get closed through hybridization with TRPs and get reopen through strand displacement reaction by TRPs' complementary sequences. First, under the action of telomerase, telomerase binding substrates (TS) are elongated to generate TRPs ended with telomeric repeats (TTAGGG) n . TRPs hybridize with the two arm overhangs cooperatively and strain DT to closed state, inducing an increased fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiency, which is utilized for telomerase activity detection. Second, upon introduction of a removal strand (RS) complementary to TRPs, the closed DT is relaxed to open state via the toehold-mediated strand displacement, inducing a decreased FRET efficiency, which is utilized for determination of TRP length distribution. The detection limit of telomerase activity is equivalent to 141 cells/μL for HeLa cells, and telomerase-active cellular extracts can be differentiated from telomerase-inactive cellular extracts. Furthermore, TRPs owning 1, 2, 3, 4, and ≥5 telomeric repeats are identified to account for 25.6%, 20.5%, 15.7%, 12.5%, and 25.7%, respectively. The proposed strategy will offer a new approach for reliable, accurate detection of telomerase activity and product length distribution for deeper studying its role and function in cancer.

  12. Optical traps with geometric aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roichman, Yael; Waldron, Alex; Gardel, Emily; Grier, David G.

    2006-01-01

    We assess the influence of geometric aberrations on the in-plane performance of optical traps by studying the dynamics of trapped colloidal spheres in deliberately distorted holographic optical tweezers. The lateral stiffness of the traps turns out to be insensitive to moderate amounts of coma, astigmatism, and spherical aberration. Moreover holographic aberration correction enables us to compensate inherent shortcomings in the optical train, thereby adaptively improving its performance. We also demonstrate the effects of geometric aberrations on the intensity profiles of optical vortices, whose readily measured deformations suggest a method for rapidly estimating and correcting geometric aberrations in holographic trapping systems

  13. Precision Membrane Optical Shell (PMOS) Technology for RF/Microwave to Lightweight LIDAR Apertures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Membrane Optical Shell Technology (MOST) is an innovative combination of 1) very low areal density (40 to 200g/m2) optically smooth (<20 nm rms), metallic coated...

  14. Silicon Carbide Lightweight Optics With Hybrid Skins for Large Cryo Telescopes, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optical Physics Company (OPC) has developed new silicon carbide (SiC) foam-based optics with hybrid skins that are composite, athermal and lightweight (FOCAL) that...

  15. Optical polarimetric and near-infrared photometric study of the RCW95 Galactic H II region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-González, J.; Roman-Lopes, A.; Santos, F. P.; Franco, G. A. P.; Santos, J. F. C.; Maia, F. F. S.; Sanmartim, D.

    2018-02-01

    We carried out an optical polarimetric study in the direction of the RCW 95 star-forming region in order to probe the sky-projected magnetic field structure by using the distribution of linear polarization segments which seem to be well aligned with the more extended cloud component. A mean polarization angle of θ = 49.8° ± 7.7°7 was derived. Through the spectral dependence analysis of polarization it was possible to obtain the total-to-selective extinction ratio (RV) by fitting the Serkowski function, resulting in a mean value of RV = 2.93 ± 0.47. The foreground polarization component was estimated and is in agreement with previous studies in this direction of the Galaxy. Further, near-infrared (NIR) images from Vista Variables in the Via Láctea (VVV) survey were collected to improve the study of the stellar population associated with the H II region. The Automated Stellar Cluster Analysis algorithm was employed to derive structural parameters for two clusters in the region, and a set of PAdova and TRieste Stellar Evolution Code (PARSEC) isochrones was superimposed on the decontaminated colour-magnitude diagrams to estimate an age of about 3 Myr for both clusters. Finally, from the NIR photometry study combined with spectra obtained with the Ohio State Infrared Imager and Spectrometer mounted at the Southern Astrophysics Research Telescope we derived the spectral classification of the main ionizing sources in the clusters associated with IRAS 15408-5356 and IRAS 15412-5359, both objects classified as O4V stars.

  16. Uncharged water-soluble porphyrin tweezers as a supramolecular sensor for α-amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villari, Valentina; Mineo, Placido; Micali, Norberto; Angelini, Nicola; Vitalini, Daniele; Scamporrino, Emilio

    2007-01-01

    The binding between uncharged cobalt porphyrin tweezers and L-amino acids in aqueous solutions is studied by means of UV-vis and circular dichroism spectroscopy. By varying the length of the aliphatic bridge between the two porphyrin units, the number of cobalt ions in the porphyrin cores and the pH of the solution, the chirality induction phenomenon has been investigated. The binding of the amino acid to the porphyrin seems to occur via a coordination mechanism between the metal and the nitrogen of the amino group; the steric, hydrophobic and π-π interactions operate to stabilize the complexes. The chirogenesis displays an opposite behaviour in the presence of aromatic guests with respect to the non-aromatic ones. Moreover, the UV-vis and the induced circular dichroism spectral changes suggest that the amino acid arrangement in the tweezers is determined by many factors, so that, unlike in organic solvent, the porphyrin tweezers in aqueous solution allow for two different arrangements of the same aromatic amino acid. The experimental findings indicate that the porphyrins tweezers reported in the paper are promising in opening perspectives toward their application as a selective molecular sensor in aqueous solutions directly

  17. Applying torque to the Escherichia coli flagellar motor using magnetic tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oene, Maarten M.; Dickinson, Laura E.; Cross, Bronwen; Pedaci, Francesco; Lipfert, Jan; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor of Escherichia coli is a nanoscale rotary engine essential for bacterial propulsion. Studies on the power output of single motors rely on the measurement of motor torque and rotation under external load. Here, we investigate the use of magnetic tweezers, which in principle allow the application and active control of a calibrated load torque, to study single flagellar motors in Escherichia coli. We manipulate the external load on the motor by adjusting the magnetic field experienced by a magnetic bead linked to the motor, and we probe the motor’s response. A simple model describes the average motor speed over the entire range of applied fields. We extract the motor torque at stall and find it to be similar to the motor torque at drag-limited speed. In addition, use of the magnetic tweezers allows us to force motor rotation in both forward and backward directions. We monitor the motor’s performance before and after periods of forced rotation and observe no destructive effects on the motor. Our experiments show how magnetic tweezers can provide active and fast control of the external load while also exposing remaining challenges in calibration. Through their non-invasive character and straightforward parallelization, magnetic tweezers provide an attractive platform to study nanoscale rotary motors at the single-motor level. PMID:28266562

  18. Molecular tweezers modulate 14-3-3 protein-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, David; Rose, Rolf; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Bartel, Maria; Ramirez-Anguita, Juan Manuel; Dutt, Som; Wilch, Constanze; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Schrader, Thomas; Ottmann, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Supramolecular chemistry has recently emerged as a promising way to modulate protein functions, but devising molecules that will interact with a protein in the desired manner is difficult as many competing interactions exist in a biological environment (with solvents, salts or different sites for the target biomolecule). We now show that lysine-specific molecular tweezers bind to a 14-3-3 adapter protein and modulate its interaction with partner proteins. The tweezers inhibit binding between the 14-3-3 protein and two partner proteins—a phosphorylated (C-Raf) protein and an unphosphorylated one (ExoS)—in a concentration-dependent manner. Protein crystallography shows that this effect arises from the binding of the tweezers to a single surface-exposed lysine (Lys214) of the 14-3-3 protein in the proximity of its central channel, which normally binds the partner proteins. A combination of structural analysis and computer simulations provides rules for the tweezers' binding preferences, thus allowing us to predict their influence on this type of protein-protein interactions.

  19. Applying torque to the Escherichia coli flagellar motor using magnetic tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oene, M.M.; Dickinson, L.E.; Cross, B.; Pedaci, F.; Lipfert, J.; Dekker, N.H.

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor of Escherichia coli is a nanoscale rotary engine essential for bacterial propulsion. Studies on the power output of single motors rely on the measurement of motor torque and rotation under external load. Here, we investigate the use of magnetic tweezers, which in

  20. An adjustable multi-scale single beam acoustic tweezers based on ultrahigh frequency ultrasonic transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoyang; Lam, Kwok Ho; Chen, Ruimin; Chen, Zeyu; Yu, Ping; Chen, Zhongping; Shung, K Kirk; Zhou, Qifa

    2017-11-01

    This paper reports the fabrication, characterization, and microparticle manipulation capability of an adjustable multi-scale single beam acoustic tweezers (SBAT) that is capable of flexibly changing the size of "tweezers" like ordinary metal tweezers with a single-element ultrahigh frequency (UHF) ultrasonic transducer. The measured resonant frequency of the developed transducer at 526 MHz is the highest frequency of piezoelectric single crystal based ultrasonic transducers ever reported. This focused UHF ultrasonic transducer exhibits a wide bandwidth (95.5% at -10 dB) due to high attenuation of high-frequency ultrasound wave, which allows the SBAT effectively excite with a wide range of excitation frequency from 150 to 400 MHz by using the "piezoelectric actuator" model. Through controlling the excitation frequency, the wavelength of ultrasound emitted from the SBAT can be changed to selectively manipulate a single microparticle of different sizes (3-100 μm) by using only one transducer. This concept of flexibly changing "tweezers" size is firstly introduced into the study of SBAT. At the same time, it was found that this incident ultrasound wavelength play an important role in lateral trapping and manipulation for microparticle of different sizes. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2637-2647. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Reflective optics II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Mar. 27-29, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsch, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on reflective optics are presented. Individual topics addressed include: measurement of the effect of particulate contamination on X-ray reflectivity; design optimization of astrometric reflectors; application of supersmooth optics to extrasolar planet detection; all-reflective spectrometer design of the Infrared Space Observatory; manufacturing the Keck 10-meter telescope structure and drives; advanced reflective optical systems for ground-based laboratory collimators; design of a catadioptric lens for long-range oblique aerial reconnaissance; development of a three-mirror, wide-field sensor; low-cost, lightweight, large-aperture laser transmitter/receiver; fabrication of the airborne optical adjunct mirrors; manufacturing simulation for precision optical fabrication of large mirrors; rapid optical fabrication technology for ultralightweight quartz-glass mirrors; cryogenic testing of reflective optical component and telescope systems

  2. Reflective optics II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Mar. 27-29, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsch, Dietrich G.

    1989-10-01

    Various papers on reflective optics are presented. Individual topics addressed include: measurement of the effect of particulate contamination on X-ray reflectivity; design optimization of astrometric reflectors; application of supersmooth optics to extrasolar planet detection; all-reflective spectrometer design of the Infrared Space Observatory; manufacturing the Keck 10-meter telescope structure and drives; advanced reflective optical systems for ground-based laboratory collimators; design of a catadioptric lens for long-range oblique aerial reconnaissance; development of a three-mirror, wide-field sensor; low-cost, lightweight, large-aperture laser transmitter/receiver; fabrication of the airborne optical adjunct mirrors; manufacturing simulation for precision optical fabrication of large mirrors; rapid optical fabrication technology for ultralightweight quartz-glass mirrors; cryogenic testing of reflective optical component and telescope systems.

  3. Influence of post-deposition annealing on structural, morphological and optical properties of copper (II) acetylacetonate thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Khalek, H; El-Samahi, M I; El-Mahalawy, Ahmed M

    2018-05-21

    In this study, the effect of thermal annealing under vacuum conditions on structural, morphological and optical properties of thermally evaporated copper (II) acetylacetonate, cu(acac) 2 , thin films were investigated. The copper (II) acetylacetonate thin films were deposited using thermal evaporation technique at vacuum pressure ~1 × 10 -5  mbar. The deposited films were thermally annealed at 323, 373, 423, and 473 K for 2 h in vacuum. The thermogravimetric analysis of cu(acac) 2 powder indicated a thermal stability of cu(acac) 2 up to 423 K. The effects of thermal annealing on the structural properties of cu(acac) 2 were evaluated employing X-ray diffraction method and the analysis showed a polycrystalline nature of the as-deposited and annealed films with a preferred orientation in [1¯01] direction. Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) technique was used to negate the decomposition of copper (II) acetylacetonate during preparation or/and annealing up to 423 K. The surface morphology of the prepared films was characterized by means of field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). A significant enhancement of the morphological properties of cu(acac) 2 thin films was obtained till the annealing temperature reaches 423 K. The variation of optical constants that estimated from spectrophotometric measurements of the prepared thin films was investigated as a function of annealing temperature. The annealing process presented significantly impacted the nonlinear optical properties such as third-order optical susceptibility χ (3) and nonlinear refractive index n 2 of cu(acac) 2 thin films. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Polarization ray tracing in anisotropic optically active media. II. Theory and physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClain, S.C.; Hillman, L.W.; Chipman, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Refraction, reflection, and amplitude relations are derived that apply to polarization ray tracing in anisotropic, optically active media such as quartz. The constitutive relations for quartz are discussed. The refractive indices and polarization states associated with the two modes of propagation are derived as a function of wave direction. A procedure for refracting at any uniaxial or optically active interface is derived that computes both the ray direction and the wave direction. A method for computing the optical path length is given, and Fresnel transmission and ref lection equations are derived from boundary conditions on the electromagnetic fields. These ray-tracing formulas apply to uniaxial, optically active media and therefore encompass uniaxial, non-optically active materials and isotropic, optically active materials

  5. Code division multiple-access techniques in optical fiber networks. II - Systems performance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Jawad A.; Brackett, Charles A.

    1989-08-01

    A technique based on optical orthogonal codes was presented by Salehi (1989) to establish a fiber-optic code-division multiple-access (FO-CDMA) communications system. The results are used to derive the bit error rate of the proposed FO-CDMA system as a function of data rate, code length, code weight, number of users, and receiver threshold. The performance characteristics for a variety of system parameters are discussed. A means of reducing the effective multiple-access interference signal by placing an optical hard-limiter at the front end of the desired optical correlator is presented. Performance calculations are shown for the FO-CDMA with an ideal optical hard-limiter, and it is shown that using a optical hard-limiter would, in general, improve system performance.

  6. Nanostructured Fiber Optic Cantilever Arrays and Hybrid MEMS Sensors for Chemical and Biological Detection, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advancements in nano-/micro-scale sensor fabrication and molecular recognition surfaces offer promising opportunities to develop miniaturized hybrid fiber optic and...

  7. TIFR Near Infrared Imaging Camera-II on the 3.6 m Devasthal Optical Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baug, T.; Ojha, D. K.; Ghosh, S. K.; Sharma, S.; Pandey, A. K.; Kumar, Brijesh; Ghosh, Arpan; Ninan, J. P.; Naik, M. B.; D’Costa, S. L. A.; Poojary, S. S.; Sandimani, P. R.; Shah, H.; Krishna Reddy, B.; Pandey, S. B.; Chand, H.

    Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) Near Infrared Imaging Camera-II (TIRCAM2) is a closed-cycle Helium cryo-cooled imaging camera equipped with a Raytheon 512×512 pixels InSb Aladdin III Quadrant focal plane array (FPA) having sensitivity to photons in the 1-5μm wavelength band. In this paper, we present the performance of the camera on the newly installed 3.6m Devasthal Optical Telescope (DOT) based on the calibration observations carried out during 2017 May 11-14 and 2017 October 7-31. After the preliminary characterization, the camera has been released to the Indian and Belgian astronomical community for science observations since 2017 May. The camera offers a field-of-view (FoV) of ˜86.5‧‧×86.5‧‧ on the DOT with a pixel scale of 0.169‧‧. The seeing at the telescope site in the near-infrared (NIR) bands is typically sub-arcsecond with the best seeing of ˜0.45‧‧ realized in the NIR K-band on 2017 October 16. The camera is found to be capable of deep observations in the J, H and K bands comparable to other 4m class telescopes available world-wide. Another highlight of this camera is the observational capability for sources up to Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) W1-band (3.4μm) magnitudes of 9.2 in the narrow L-band (nbL; λcen˜ 3.59μm). Hence, the camera could be a good complementary instrument to observe the bright nbL-band sources that are saturated in the Spitzer-Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) ([3.6] ≲ 7.92 mag) and the WISE W1-band ([3.4] ≲ 8.1 mag). Sources with strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission at 3.3μm are also detected. Details of the observations and estimated parameters are presented in this paper.

  8. Data transmission optical link for LLRF TESLA project part II: application for BER measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Jalmuzna, Wojciech; Olowski, Krzysztof; Perkuszewski, Karol; Zielinski, Jerzy; Kierzkowski, Krzysztof

    2006-02-01

    It may be predicted now, even assuming a very conservative approach, that the next generation of the Low Level RF control systems for future accelerators will use extensively such technologies like: very fast programmable circuits equipped with DSP, embedded PC and optical communication I/O functionalities, as well as multi-gigabit optical transmission of measurement data and control signals.

  9. Thermal tuning of spectral emission from optically trapped liquid-crystal droplet resonators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jonáš, A.; Pilát, Zdeněk; Ježek, Jan; Bernatová, Silvie; Fořt, Tomáš; Zemánek, Pavel; Aas, M.; Kiraz, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 9 (2017), s. 1855-1864 ISSN 0740-3224 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14069; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : emission spectroscopy * drops * optical tweezers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 1.843, year: 2016

  10. Photonic Torque Microscopy of the Nonconservative Force Field for Optically Trapped Silicon Nanowires

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Irrera, A.; Maggazu, A.; Artoni, P.; Simpson, Stephen Hugh; Hanna, S.; Jones, P.H.; Priolo, F.; Gucciardi, P. G.; Marago, O.M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 7 (2016), s. 4181-4188 ISSN 1530-6984 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : optical tweezers * silicon nanowires * nonequilibrium dynamics * Brownian motion Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 12.712, year: 2016

  11. Thermally induced passage and current of particles in a highly unstable optical potential

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ryabov, A.; Zemánek, Pavel; Filip, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 4 (2016), 042108:1-9 ISSN 2470-0045 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Brownian movement * Electron transitions * Optical tweezers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.366, year: 2016

  12. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieu, Jean Paul

    1975-01-01

    Optics, Parts 1 and 2 covers electromagnetic optics and quantum optics. The first part of the book examines the various of the important properties common to all electromagnetic radiation. This part also studies electromagnetic waves; electromagnetic optics of transparent isotropic and anisotropic media; diffraction; and two-wave and multi-wave interference. The polarization states of light, the velocity of light, and the special theory of relativity are also examined in this part. The second part is devoted to quantum optics, specifically discussing the classical molecular theory of optical p

  13. Chiral particles in the dual-beam optical trap

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Hernández, R.J.; Simpson, Stephen Hugh; Mazzulla, A.; Cipparrone, G.; Zemánek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 23 (2016), 26382:1-10 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14069; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-16195S; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : optical tweezers * optical manipulation * liquid crystals * chiral media Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016

  14. Fabrication and optical properties of type-II InP/InAs nanowire/quantum-dot heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xia; Li, Junshuai; Wu, Yao; Li, Bang; Ren, Xiaomin [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing, 100876 (China)

    2016-02-15

    The growth and optical properties of InAs quantum dots on a pure zinc blende InP nanowire are investigated. The quantum dots are formed in Stranski-Krastanov mode and exhibit pure zinc blende crystal structure. A substantial blueshift of the dots peak with a cube-root dependence on the excitation power is observed, suggesting a type-II band alignment. The peak position of dots initially red-shifts and then blue-shifts with increasing temperature, which is attributed to the carrier redistribution among the quantum dots. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Sol-gel based optical sensor for determination of Fe (II): a novel probe for iron speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi-Maybodi, Abdolraouf; Rezaei, Vida; Rastegarzadeh, Saadat

    2015-02-05

    A highly selective optical sensor for Fe (II) ions was developed based on entrapment of a sensitive reagent, 2,4,6-tri(2-pyridyl)-s-triazine (TPTZ), in a silica sol-gel thin film coated on a glass substrate. The thin films fabricated based on tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) as precursor, sol-gel pH∼3, water:alkoxyde ratio of 4:1 and TPTZ concentration of 0.112 mol L(-1). The influence of sol-gel parameters on sensing behavior of the fabricated sensor was also investigated. The fabricated sensor can be used for determination of Fe (II) ion with an outstanding high selectivity over a dynamic range of 5-115 ng mL(-1) and a detection limit of 1.68 ng mL(-1). It also showed reproducible results with relative standard deviation of 3.5% and 1.27% for 10 and 90 ng mL(-1) of Fe (II), respectively, along with a fast response time of ∼120 s. Total iron also was determined after reduction of Fe (III) to Fe (II) using ascorbic acid as reducing agent. Then, the concentration of Fe (III) was calculated by subtracting the concentration of Fe (II) from the total iron concentration. Interference studies showed a good selectivity for Fe (II) with trapping TPTZ into sol-gel matrix and appropriately adjusting the structure of doped sol-gel. The sensor was compared with other sensors and was applied to determine iron in different water samples with good results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. High-Resolution Detector for At-Wavelength Metrology of X-Ray Optics, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Since the launch of the first X-ray focusing telescope in 1963, the development of grazing incidence X-ray optics has been crucial to the development of the field of...

  17. Single Molecule Instrument for Surface Enhanced Raman Optical Activity of Biomolecules, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Stereochemistry is an essential element of our organic life. Only certain enantiomers are useful as drugs for the human body. Raman optical activity (ROA) provides...

  18. Development of Novel, Optically-Based Instrumentation for Aircraft System Testing and Control, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design, build and evaluate a prototype of a compact, robust, optically-based sensor for making temperature and multi-species concentration measurements...

  19. The Affordable Pre-Finishing of Silicon Carbide for Optical Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Large aperture, lightweight optical mirror technologies are critical for the future of lightweight telescopes and their attendant missions to explore the planets in...

  20. Rugged Low Temperature Actuators for Tunable Fabry Perot Optical Filters, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Why are rugged, low temperature actuator materials important? By themselves, they are useless; however, when fabricated into thin films and integrated into optical...

  1. Three-Dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography (3D OCT), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Applied Science Innovations, Inc. proposes a new tool of 3D optical coherence tomography (OCT) for cellular level imaging at video frame rates and dramatically...

  2. In-Space Distributed Fiber Optic Hydrogen Leak Sensor, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Broadband Photonics Inc. proposes development of a patent-pending distributed fiber optic sensor for in-space hydrogen leak detection. Reliable and fast detection of...

  3. THE RADIO AND OPTICAL LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION OF QUASARS. II. THE SDSS SAMPLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singal, J.; Petrosian, V.; Stawarz, Ł.; Lawrence, A.

    2013-01-01

    We determine the radio and optical luminosity evolutions and the true distribution of the radio-loudness parameter R, defined as the ratio of the radio to optical luminosity, for a set of more than 5000 quasars combining Sloan Digital Sky Survey optical and Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST) radio data. We apply the method of Efron and Petrosian to access the intrinsic distribution parameters, taking into account the truncations and correlations inherent in the data. We find that the population exhibits strong positive evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with somewhat greater radio evolution than optical. With the luminosity evolutions accounted for, we determine the density evolutions and local radio and optical luminosity functions. The intrinsic distribution of the radio-loudness parameter R is found to be quite different from the observed one and is smooth with no evidence of a bimodality in radio loudness for log R ≥ –1. The results we find are in general agreement with the previous analysis of Singal et al., which used POSS-I optical and FIRST radio data.

  4. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Ninth Edition Optics: Ninth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommen

  5. Some fundamental problems relating to optical fibres. II. The ultimate bandwidth performance of optical fibre transmission lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambling, W.A.

    1977-01-01

    Optical fibre transmission lines can be divided broadly into two types, namely single mode and multimode. The bandwidth of the former is limited by the variation in group velocity with frequency caused by mode dispersion and material dispersion, with predicted values of tens of gigahertz over tens of kilometres for a monochromatic carrier, falling to approximately l GHz over 1km for a typical injection laser. Multimode fibres have the additional limitation of group delay between the various propagating modes. Several schemes have been suggested for reducing this effect, such as: (a) exciting only a few modes (ideally one) in a fibre exhibiting no mode conversion, (b) inducing coupling between bound modes but not into radiating modes, and (c) equalizing the mode velocities by means of a suitable refractive index profile. Most effort is presently being devoted to (c) and it has been shown that the optimum profile is affected by leaky modes and material dispersion. By operating at a wavelength in the region of 1.25μm the effect of material dispersion can be greatly reduced and bandwidths in excess of 1 GHz over 1km might be expected, even with sources of large linewidth. (author)

  6. Sirepo: a web-based interface for physical optics simulations - its deployment and use at NSLS-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakitin, Maksim S.; Chubar, Oleg; Moeller, Paul; Nagler, Robert; Bruhwiler, David L.

    2017-08-01

    "Sirepo" is an open source cloud-based software framework which provides a convenient and user-friendly web-interface for scientific codes such as Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW) running on a local machine or a remote server side. SRW is a physical optics code allowing to simulate the synchrotron radiation from various insertion devices (undulators and wigglers) and bending magnets. Another feature of SRW is a support of high-accuracy simulation of fully- and partially-coherent radiation propagation through X-ray optical beamlines, facilitated by so-called "Virtual Beamline" module. In the present work, we will discuss the most important features of Sirepo/SRW interface with emphasis on their use for commissioning of beamlines and simulation of experiments at National Synchrotron Light Source II. In particular, "Flux through Finite Aperture" and "Intensity" reports, visualizing results of the corresponding SRW calculations, are being routinely used for commissioning of undulators and X-ray optical elements. Material properties of crystals, compound refractive lenses, and some other optical elements can be dynamically obtained for the desired photon energy from the databases publicly available at Argonne National Lab and at Lawrence Berkeley Lab. In collaboration with the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) of BNL, a library of samples for coherent scattering experiments has been implemented in SRW and the corresponding Sample optical element was added to Sirepo. Electron microscope images of artificially created nanoscale samples can be uploaded to Sirepo to simulate scattering patterns created by synchrotron radiation in different experimental schemes that can be realized at beamlines.

  7. Rapid formation of size-controllable multicellular spheroids via 3D acoustic tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kejie; Wu, Mengxi; Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; Chan, Chung Yu; Mao, Zhangming; Li, Sixing; Ren, Liqiang; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-07-05

    The multicellular spheroid is an important 3D cell culture model for drug screening, tissue engineering, and fundamental biological research. Although several spheroid formation methods have been reported, the field still lacks high-throughput and simple fabrication methods to accelerate its adoption in drug development industry. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) based cell manipulation methods, which are known to be non-invasive, flexible, and high-throughput, have not been successfully developed for fabricating 3D cell assemblies or spheroids, due to the limited understanding on SAW-based vertical levitation. In this work, we demonstrated the capability of fabricating multicellular spheroids in the 3D acoustic tweezers platform. Our method used drag force from microstreaming to levitate cells in the vertical direction, and used radiation force from Gor'kov potential to aggregate cells in the horizontal plane. After optimizing the device geometry and input power, we demonstrated the rapid and high-throughput nature of our method by continuously fabricating more than 150 size-controllable spheroids and transferring them to Petri dishes every 30 minutes. The spheroids fabricated by our 3D acoustic tweezers can be cultured for a week with good cell viability. We further demonstrated that spheroids fabricated by this method could be used for drug testing. Unlike the 2D monolayer model, HepG2 spheroids fabricated by the 3D acoustic tweezers manifested distinct drug resistance, which matched existing reports. The 3D acoustic tweezers based method can serve as a novel bio-manufacturing tool to fabricate complex 3D cell assembles for biological research, tissue engineering, and drug development.

  8. Optical observations of the nearby galaxy IC342 with narrow band [SII] and hα filters. II - detection of 16 optically-identified supernova remnant candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučetić M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the detection of 16 optical supernova remnant (SNR candidates in the nearby spiral galaxy IC342. The candidates were detected by applying the [Sii]/Hα ratio criterion on observations made with the 2 m RCC telescope at Rozhen National Astronomical Observatory in Bulgaria. In this paper, we report the coordinates, diameters, Hα and [S ii] fluxes for 16 SNRs detected in two fields of view in the IC342 galaxy. Also, we estimate the contamination of total Hα flux from SNRs in the observed portion of IC342 to be 1.4%. This would represent the fractional error when the star formation rate (SFR for this galaxy is derived from the total galaxy’s Hα emission.

  9. Orthogonal Operation of Constitutional Dynamic Networks Consisting of DNA-Tweezer Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Liang; Wang, Shan; Cecconello, Alessandro; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Willner, Itamar

    2017-12-26

    Overexpression or down-regulation of cellular processes are often controlled by dynamic chemical networks. Bioinspired by nature, we introduce constitutional dynamic networks (CDNs) as systems that emulate the principle of the nature processes. The CDNs comprise dynamically interconvertible equilibrated constituents that respond to external triggers by adapting the composition of the dynamic mixture to the energetic stabilization of the constituents. We introduce a nucleic acid-based CDN that includes four interconvertible and mechanically triggered tweezers, AA', BB', AB' and BA', existing in closed, closed, open, and open configurations, respectively. By subjecting the CDN to auxiliary triggers, the guided stabilization of one of the network constituents dictates the dynamic reconfiguration of the structures of the tweezers constituents. The orthogonal and reversible operations of the CDN DNA tweezers are demonstrated, using T-A·T triplex or K + -stabilized G-quadruplex as structural motifs that control the stabilities of the constituents. The implications of the study rest on the possible applications of input-guided CDN assemblies for sensing, logic gate operations, and programmed activation of molecular machines.

  10. Design and optimization of arrays of neodymium iron boron-based magnets for magnetic tweezers applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacchia, Nicholas A.; Valentine, Megan T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Research Laboratory, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We present the design methodology for arrays of neodymium iron boron (NdFeB)-based magnets for use in magnetic tweezers devices. Using finite element analysis (FEA), we optimized the geometry of the NdFeB magnet as well as the geometry of iron yokes designed to focus the magnetic fields toward the sample plane. Together, the magnets and yokes form a magnetic array which is the basis of the magnetic tweezers device. By systematically varying 15 distinct shape parameters, we determined those features that maximize the magnitude of the magnetic field gradient as well as the length scale over which the magnetic force operates. Additionally, we demonstrated that magnetic saturation of the yoke material leads to intrinsic limitations in any geometric design. Using this approach, we generated a compact and light-weight magnetic tweezers device that produces a high field gradient at the image plane in order to apply large forces to magnetic beads. We then fabricated the optimized yoke and validated the FEA by experimentally mapping the magnetic field of the device. The optimization data and iterative FEA approach outlined here will enable the streamlined design and construction of specialized instrumentation for force-sensitive microscopy.

  11. Design and optimization of arrays of neodymium iron boron-based magnets for magnetic tweezers applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacchia, Nicholas A; Valentine, Megan T

    2015-05-01

    We present the design methodology for arrays of neodymium iron boron (NdFeB)-based magnets for use in magnetic tweezers devices. Using finite element analysis (FEA), we optimized the geometry of the NdFeB magnet as well as the geometry of iron yokes designed to focus the magnetic fields toward the sample plane. Together, the magnets and yokes form a magnetic array which is the basis of the magnetic tweezers device. By systematically varying 15 distinct shape parameters, we determined those features that maximize the magnitude of the magnetic field gradient as well as the length scale over which the magnetic force operates. Additionally, we demonstrated that magnetic saturation of the yoke material leads to intrinsic limitations in any geometric design. Using this approach, we generated a compact and light-weight magnetic tweezers device that produces a high field gradient at the image plane in order to apply large forces to magnetic beads. We then fabricated the optimized yoke and validated the FEA by experimentally mapping the magnetic field of the device. The optimization data and iterative FEA approach outlined here will enable the streamlined design and construction of specialized instrumentation for force-sensitive microscopy.

  12. Raman Tweezers as a Diagnostic Tool of Hemoglobin-Related Blood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Rusciano

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents the development of a Raman Tweezers system for detecting hemoglobin-related blood disorders at a single cell level. The study demonstrates that the molecular fingerprint insight provided by Raman analysis holds great promise for distinguishing between healthy and diseased cells in the field of biomedicine. Herein a Raman Tweezers system has been applied to investigate the effects of thalassemia, a blood disease quite diffuse in the Mediterranean Sea region. By resonant excitation of hemoglobin Raman bands, we examined the oxygenation capability of normal, alpha- and beta-thalassemic erythrocytes. A reduction of this fundamental red blood cell function, particularly severe for beta-thalassemia, has been found. Raman spectroscopy was also used to draw hemoglobin distribution inside single erythrocytes; the results confirmed the characteristic anomaly (target shape, occurring in thalassemia and some other blood disorders. The success of resonance Raman spectroscopy for thalassemia detection reported in this review provide an interesting starting point to explore the application of a Raman Tweezers system in the analysis of several blood disorders.

  13. Magnetic tweezers optimized to exert high forces over extended distances from the magnet in multicellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaggi, L.; Pasakarnis, L.; Brunner, D.; Aegerter, C. M.

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic tweezers are mainly divided into two classes depending on the ability of applying torque or forces to the magnetic probe. We focused on the second category and designed a device composed by a single electromagnet equipped with a core having a special asymmetric profile to exert forces as large as 230 pN-2.8 μm Dynabeads at distances in excess of 100 μm from the magnetic tip. Compared to existing solutions our magnetic tweezers overcome important limitations, opening new experimental paths for the study of a wide range of materials in a variety of biophysical research settings. We discuss the benefits and drawbacks of different magnet core characteristics, which led us to design the current core profile. To demonstrate the usefulness of our magnetic tweezers, we determined the microrheological properties inside embryos of Drosophila melanogaster during the syncytial stage. Measurements in different locations along the dorsal-ventral axis of the embryos showed little variation, with a slight increase in cytoplasm viscosity at the periphery of the embryos. The mean cytoplasm viscosity we obtain by active force exertion inside the embryos is comparable to that determined passively using high-speed video microrheology.

  14. Experience with the lathe cut Bausch & Lomb Soflens: Part II--Power and optics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, B A; Levinson, A

    1978-04-01

    Ten familiar spin cast and ten lathe cut Bausch & Lomb SOFLENS contact lenses were measured as to their power on a lensometer and on an eye. Both quality of the optics and quantitative measurements were considered. Lens flexure and the presence of a fluid lens between the posterior surface of the contact lens and the anterior cornea is indicated for both lenses to explain differences between power of the lens in air and on the eye. The spin cast lens design appears to create a quantitatively larger fluid lens, and one which will add positive optical power to the lens/eye system. Either from this and/or additional factors, the lathe cut lens appears to give improved optical performance both in air and on the eye.

  15. Thermo-optically induced reorganizations in the main light harvesting antenna of plants. II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jens Kai; Varkonyi, Zsuzsanna; Kovacs, Laszlo

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the circular dichroism spectral transients associated with the light-induced reversible reorganizations in chirally organized macrodomains of pea thylakoid membranes and loosely stacked lamellar aggregates of the main chlorophyll a/b light harvesting complexes (LHCII) isolated...... from the same membranes. These reorganizations have earlier been assigned to originate from a thermo-optic effect. According to the thermo-optic mechanism, fast local thermal transients due to dissipation of the excess excitation energy induce elementary structural changes in the close vicinity...

  16. The at-wavelength metrology facility for UV- and XUV-reflection and diffraction optics at BESSY-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfers, F.; Bischoff, P.; Eggenstein, F.; Erko, A.; Gaupp, A.; Künstner, S.; Mast, M.; Schmidt, J.-S.; Senf, F.; Siewert, F.; Sokolov, A.; Zeschke, Th.

    2016-01-01

    A technology center for the production of high-precision reflection gratings has been established. Within this project a new optics beamline and a versatile reflectometer for at-wavelength characterization of UV- and XUV-reflection gratings and other (nano-) optical elements has been set up at BESSY-II. The Plane Grating Monochromator beamline operated in collimated light (c-PGM) is equipped with an SX700 monochromator, of which the blazed gratings (600 and 1200 lines mm−1) have been recently exchanged for new ones of improved performance produced in-house. Over the operating range from 10 to 2000 eV this beamline has very high spectral purity achieved by (i) a four-mirror arrangement of different coatings which can be inserted into the beam at different angles and (ii) by absorber filters for high-order suppression. Stray light and scattered radiation is removed efficiently by double sets of in situ exchangeable apertures and slits. By use of in- and off-plane bending-magnet radiation the beamline can be adjusted to either linear or elliptical polarization. One of the main features of a novel 11-axes reflectometer is the possibility to incorporate real life-sized gratings. The samples are adjustable within six degrees of freedom by a newly developed UHV-tripod system carrying a load up to 4 kg, and the reflectivity can be measured between 0 and 90° incidence angle for both s- and p-polarization geometry. This novel powerful metrology facility has gone into operation recently and is now open for external users. First results on optical performance and measurements on multilayer gratings will be presented here. PMID:26698047

  17. Preparation of a novel pH optical sensor using orange (II) based on agarose membrane as support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Rouhollah; Hosseini, Mohammad; Amraei, Ahmadreza; Mohammadzadeh, Ali

    2016-04-01

    A novel and cost effective optical pH sensor was prepared using covalent immobilization of orange (II) indicator on the agarose membrane as solid support. The fabricated optical sensor was fixed into a sample holder of a spectrophotometer instrument for pH monitoring. Variables affecting sensor performance including pH of dye bonding to agarose membrane and dye concentration were optimized. The sensor responds to the pH changes in the range of 3.0-10.0 with a response time of 2.0 min and appropriate reproducibility (RSD ≤ 0.9%). No significant variation was observed on sensor response after increasing the ionic strength in the range of 0.0-0.5M of sodium chloride. Determination of pH using the proposed optical sensor is quick, simple, inexpensive, selective and sensitive in the pH range of 3.0-10.0. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Eighth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommended for engineering st

  19. Amalgamation based optical and colorimetric sensing of mercury(II) ions with silver graphene oxide nanocomposite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamali, Khosro Zangeneh; Pandikumar, Alagarsamy; Jayabal, Subramaniam; Huang, Nay Ming; Ramaraj, Ramasamy; Lim, Hong Ngee; Ong, Boon Hoong; Bien, Chia Sheng Daniel; Kee, Yeh Yee

    2016-01-01

    The article describes a facile method for the preparation of a conjugate composed of silver nanoparticles and graphene oxide (Ag GO) via chemical reduction of silver precursors in the presence of graphene oxide (GO) while sonicating the solution. The Ag GO was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The nanocomposite undergoes a color change from yellow to colorless in presence of Hg(II), and this effect is based on the disappearance of the localized surface plasmon resonance absorption of the AgNPs due to the formation of silver-mercury amalgam. The presence of GO, on the other hand, prevents the agglomeration of the AgNPs and enhances the stability of the nanocomposite material in solution. Hence, the probe represents a viable optical probe for the determination of mercury(II) ions in that it can be used to visually detect Hg(II) concentrations as low as 100 μM. The instrumental LOD is 338 nM. (author)

  20. Neutron optics experiments at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Atominstitut Wien

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jericha, E.; Badurek, G.; Baron, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Jaekel, M.; Klepp, J.; Rofner, A.; Sponar, S.; Trinker, M.; Villa, M.; Rauch, H.

    2004-01-01

    We present the layout and characteristics of the 3 neutron optics instruments located at the beam ports of the Vienna TRIGA reactor (hosted by the Atominstitut of the Austrian Universities, Vienna University of Technology) and the most recent experiments performed thereon. (author)

  1. Wavelength-selective bleaching of the optical spectra of trapped electrons in organic glasses. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraszczak, J.; Willard, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    Further resolution of the inhomogeneous optical spectra of trapped electrons (e - /sub t/) in organic glasses has been obtained from wavelength selective bleaching and thermal decay studies on 3-methylpentane-d 14 (3MP-d 14 ) and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (MTHF) following γ irradiation in the temperature region of 20 K, and limits on the degree of resolution achievable have been indicated. Exposure of 3MP-d 14 to light of wavelengths >2100 nm (from a tunable laser) reduces the optical densities at the bleaching wavelength and longer to zero, while ''peeling off'' a portion of the O.D. at all shorter wavelengths but leaving the remainder of the spectrum unaffected. The fraction of the integrated optical spectrum, ∫OD d (eV), removed by bleaching at each wavelength tested, and also by thermal decay, is equivalent to the fraction of the total e - /sub t/ spins removed and measured by ESR. 1064 nm light bleaches the spectrum nearly uniformly, confirming that the spectra of all of the e - /sub t/ have blue tails with similar ease of bleaching. Heretofore unobserved low temperature thermal decay of e - /sub t/ occurs at 20 and 40 K (20% of the spin concentration in 30 min, 35% in 3h). The rate of decay of the optical spectrum decreases with decreasing wavelength of observation (2.5, 2.2, 1.8, and 1.5 μ), but at each wavelength is the same at 40 K as at 20 K, consistent

  2. Optical properties and quantum confinement of nanocrystalline II-IV semiconductor particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijken, Albert van

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis, experiments are described that were performed on suspensions of nanocrystalline II-IV semiconductor particles.The object of this research is to study quantum size effects in relation to the luminescence properties of these particles. A pre-requisite for performing studies of

  3. Singlet oxygen oxygenation of enol ethers; the synthesis of optically active 1,2-dioxetanes. II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, E.W.; Wynberg, H.

    1979-01-01

    (+)-(Methoxymethylene)fenchane I (R = H, R1 = OMe) on singlet O oxidn. gave dioxetanes II and III, which on thermal decompn. underwent chemiluminescence in which (+)-fenchone was the only chemiluminescent species at lmax 420 nm. Photosensitized oxygenation of I (R = OMe, R1 = H) also gave 2 isomeric

  4. Space Density Of Optically-Selected Type II Quasars From The SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Reinabelle; Zakamska, N. L.; Strauss, M. A.; Green, J.; Krolik, J. H.; Shen, Y.; Richards, G. T.

    2007-12-01

    Type II quasars are luminous Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) whose central regions are obscured by large amounts of gas and dust. In this poster, we present a catalog of 887 type II quasars with redshifts z<0.83 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), selected based on their emission lines, and derive the 1/Vmax [OIII] 5007 luminosity function from this sample. Since some objects may not be included in the sample because they lack strong emission lines, the derived luminosity function is only a lower limit. We also derive the [OIII] 5007 luminosity function for a sample of type I (broad-line) quasars in the same redshift range. Taking [OIII] 5007 luminosity as a tracer of intrinsic luminosity in both type I and type II quasars, we obtain lower limits to the type II quasar fraction as a function of [OIII] 5007 luminosity, from L[OIII] = 108.3 to 1010 Lsun, which roughly correspond to bolometric luminosities of 1044 to 1046 erg/s.

  5. MSM optical detector on the basis of II-type ZnSe/ZnTe superlattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetzov, P. I., E-mail: pik218@ire216.msk.su; Averin, S. V., E-mail: sva278@ire216.msk.su; Zhitov, V. A.; Zakharov, L. Yu.; Kotov, V. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kotel’nikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics (Fryazino Branch) (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    On the basis of a type-II ZnSe/ZnTe superlattice, a MSM (metal—semiconductor–metal) photodetector is fabricated and investigated. The detector features low dark currents and a high sensitivity. The spectral characteristic of the detector provides the possibility of the selective detection of three separate spectral portions of visible and near-infrared radiation.

  6. Infrared Spectra and Optical Constants of Astronomical Ices: II. Ethane and Ethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Gerakines, Perry A.; Moore, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopic observations have established the presence of hydrocarbon ices on Pluto and other TNOs, but the abundances of such molecules cannot be deduced without accurate optical constants (n, k) and reference spectra. In this paper we present our recent measurements of near- and mid-infrared optical constants for ethane (C2H6) and ethylene (C2H4) in multiple ice phases and at multiple temperatures. As in our recent work on acetylene (C2H2), we also report new measurements of the index of refraction of each ice at 670 nm. Comparisons are made to earlier work where possible, and electronic versions of our new results are made available.

  7. Transition operators in electromagnetic-wave diffraction theory. II - Applications to optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahne, G. E.

    1993-01-01

    The theory developed by Hahne (1992) for the diffraction of time-harmonic electromagnetic waves from fixed obstacles is briefly summarized and extended. Applications of the theory are considered which comprise, first, a spherical harmonic expansion of the so-called radiation impedance operator in the theory, for a spherical surface, and second, a reconsideration of familiar short-wavelength approximation from the new standpoint, including a derivation of the so-called physical optics method on the basis of quasi-planar approximation to the radiation impedance operator, augmented by the method of stationary phase. The latter includes a rederivation of the geometrical optics approximation for the complete Green's function for the electromagnetic field in the presence of a smooth- and a convex-surfaced perfectly electrically conductive obstacle.

  8. Optical fiber Bragg gratings. Part II. Modeling of finite-length gratings and grating arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaro, Vittorio M N; Diana, Roberto; Armenise, Mario N

    2002-09-01

    A model of both uniform finite-length optical fiber Bragg gratings and grating arrays is presented. The model is based on the Floquet-Bloch formalism and allows rigorous investigation of all the physical aspects in either single- or multiple-periodic structures realized on the core of a monomodal fiber. Analytical expressions of reflectivity and transmittivity for both single gratings and grating arrays are derived. The influence of the grating length and the index modulation amplitude on the reflected and transmitted optical power for both sinusoidal and rectangular profiles is evaluated. Good agreement between our method and the well-known coupled-mode theory (CMT) approach has been observed for both single gratings and grating arrays only in the case of weak index perturbation. Significant discrepancies exist there in cases of strong index contrast because of the increasing approximation of the CMT approach. The effects of intragrating phase shift are also shown and discussed.

  9. Asymptotic solutions of numerical transport problems in optically thick, diffusive regimes II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, E.W.; Morel, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    In a recent article (Larsen, Morel, and Miller, J. Comput. Phys. 69, 283 (1987)), a theoretical method is described for assessing the accuracy of transport differencing schemes in highly scattering media with optically thick spatial meshes. In the present article, this method is extended to enable one to determine the accuracy of such schemes in the presence of numerically unresolved boundary layers. Numerical results are presented that demonstrate the validity and accuracy of our analysis. copyright 1989 Academic Press, Inc

  10. Parallel computing in experimental mechanics and optical measurement: A review (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianyi; Kemao, Qian

    2018-05-01

    With advantages such as non-destructiveness, high sensitivity and high accuracy, optical techniques have successfully integrated into various important physical quantities in experimental mechanics (EM) and optical measurement (OM). However, in pursuit of higher image resolutions for higher accuracy, the computation burden of optical techniques has become much heavier. Therefore, in recent years, heterogeneous platforms composing of hardware such as CPUs and GPUs, have been widely employed to accelerate these techniques due to their cost-effectiveness, short development cycle, easy portability, and high scalability. In this paper, we analyze various works by first illustrating their different architectures, followed by introducing their various parallel patterns for high speed computation. Next, we review the effects of CPU and GPU parallel computing specifically in EM & OM applications in a broad scope, which include digital image/volume correlation, fringe pattern analysis, tomography, hyperspectral imaging, computer-generated holograms, and integral imaging. In our survey, we have found that high parallelism can always be exploited in such applications for the development of high-performance systems.

  11. Determining the structure-mechanics relationships of dense microtubule networks with confocal microscopy and magnetic tweezers-based microrheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yali; Valentine, Megan T

    2013-01-01

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is essential in maintaining the shape, strength, and organization of cells. Its spatiotemporal organization is fundamental for numerous dynamic biological processes, and mechanical stress within the MT cytoskeleton provides an important signaling mechanism in mitosis and neural development. This raises important questions about the relationships between structure and mechanics in complex MT structures. In vitro, reconstituted cytoskeletal networks provide a minimal model of cell mechanics while also providing a testing ground for the fundamental polymer physics of stiff polymer gels. Here, we describe our development and implementation of a broad tool kit to study structure-mechanics relationships in reconstituted MT networks, including protocols for the assembly of entangled and cross-linked MT networks, fluorescence imaging, microstructure characterization, construction and calibration of magnetic tweezers devices, and mechanical data collection and analysis. In particular, we present the design and assembly of three neodymium iron boron (NdFeB)-based magnetic tweezers devices optimized for use with MT networks: (1) high-force magnetic tweezers devices that enable the application of nano-Newton forces and possible meso- to macroscale materials characterization; (2) ring-shaped NdFeB-based magnetic tweezers devices that enable oscillatory microrheology measurements; and (3) portable magnetic tweezers devices that enable direct visualization of microscale deformation in soft materials under applied force. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Optical radiation measurements II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Mar. 27, 28, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, James M.

    1989-09-01

    The present conference discusses topics in the characterization of imaging radiometers, laboratory instrumentation, field and spacecraft instrumentation, and quantum and thermal standard detectors. Attention is given to UV radiometric imaging, dual-color radiometer imagery, a novel diode-array radiometer, a novel reference spectrophotometer, radiance calibration of spherical integrators, instrumentation for measurement of spectral goniometric reflectance, and a real-time IR background discrimination radiometer. Also discussed are a multichannel radiometer for atmosphere optical property measurements, the UV spectroradiometric output of a turbojet, characterizations of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment scanning radiometers, total-radiation thermometry, future directions in Si photodiode self-calibration, and radiometric quality Ge photodiodes.

  13. Optical photon transport in powdered-phosphor scintillators. Part II. Calculation of single-scattering transport parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poludniowski, Gavin G. [Joint Department of Physics, Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT, United Kingdom and Centre for Vision Speech and Signal Processing (CVSSP), Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Evans, Philip M. [Centre for Vision Speech and Signal Processing (CVSSP), Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo methods based on the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) have previously been used to model light transport in powdered-phosphor scintillator screens. Physically motivated guesses or, alternatively, the complexities of Mie theory have been used by some authors to provide the necessary inputs of transport parameters. The purpose of Part II of this work is to: (i) validate predictions of modulation transform function (MTF) using the BTE and calculated values of transport parameters, against experimental data published for two Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb screens; (ii) investigate the impact of size-distribution and emission spectrum on Mie predictions of transport parameters; (iii) suggest simpler and novel geometrical optics-based models for these parameters and compare to the predictions of Mie theory. A computer code package called phsphr is made available that allows the MTF predictions for the screens modeled to be reproduced and novel screens to be simulated. Methods: The transport parameters of interest are the scattering efficiency (Q{sub sct}), absorption efficiency (Q{sub abs}), and the scatter anisotropy (g). Calculations of these parameters are made using the analytic method of Mie theory, for spherical grains of radii 0.1-5.0 {mu}m. The sensitivity of the transport parameters to emission wavelength is investigated using an emission spectrum representative of that of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb. The impact of a grain-size distribution in the screen on the parameters is investigated using a Gaussian size-distribution ({sigma}= 1%, 5%, or 10% of mean radius). Two simple and novel alternative models to Mie theory are suggested: a geometrical optics and diffraction model (GODM) and an extension of this (GODM+). Comparisons to measured MTF are made for two commercial screens: Lanex Fast Back and Lanex Fast Front (Eastman Kodak Company, Inc.). Results: The Mie theory predictions of transport parameters were shown to be highly sensitive to both grain size

  14. Growth and characterization of dichlorobis L-proline Zn(II): A semiorganic nonlinear optical single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydia Caroline, M.; Kandasamy, A.; Mohan, R.; Vasudevan, S.

    2009-02-01

    A semiorganic nonlinear optical material dichlorobis L-proline Zn (II) (DBLPZ), with molecular formula [ZnCl 2(C 5H 9NO 2) 2], has been synthesized from mixed solvents of deionised water and methanol. Single crystals of DBLPZ were successfully grown by the slow evaporation method at an ambient temperature. Single-crystal X-ray diffractometer was utilized to measure unit cell parameters and to confirm the crystal structure. The powder X-ray diffraction pattern of the grown DBLPZ has been indexed. The modes of vibration of different molecular groups present in the sample were identified by the FTIR spectral analysis. The optical transmittance window and the lower cutoff wavelength of the DBLPZ have been identified by UV-vis-NIR studies. Thermal stability of the DBLPZ was determined from TG/DTA/DSC curves, which indicate that the material is stable up to 242.3 °C. The existence of second harmonic generation signals was observed using Nd:YAG laser with fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm possessing SHG efficiency of 0.5 times of KDP and hence it can be a potential material for the frequency-doubling process.

  15. C60 Recognition from Extended Tetrathiafulvalene Bis-acetylide Platinum(II) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastien, Guillaume; Dron, Paul I; Vincent, Manon; Canevet, David; Allain, Magali; Goeb, Sébastien; Sallé, Marc

    2016-11-18

    The favorable spatial organization imposed by the square planar 4,4'-di(tert-butyl)-2,2'-bipyridine (dbbpy) platinum(II) complex associated with the electronic and shape complementarity of π-extended tetrathiafulvalene derivatives (exTTF) toward fullerenes is usefully exploited to construct molecular tweezers, which display good affinities for C 60 .

  16. Physical optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim Il Gon; Lee, Seong Su; Jang, Gi Wan

    2012-07-01

    This book indicates physical optics with properties and transmission of light, mathematical expression of wave like harmonic wave and cylindrical wave, electromagnetic theory and light, transmission of light with Fermat principle and Fresnel equation, geometrical optics I, geometrical optics II, optical instrument such as stops, glasses and camera, polarized light like double refraction by polarized light, interference, interference by multiple reflections, diffraction, solid optics, crystal optics such as Faraday rotation and Kerr effect and measurement of light. Each chapter has an exercise.

  17. Physical optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim Il Gon; Lee, Seong Su; Jang, Gi Wan

    2012-07-15

    This book indicates physical optics with properties and transmission of light, mathematical expression of wave like harmonic wave and cylindrical wave, electromagnetic theory and light, transmission of light with Fermat principle and Fresnel equation, geometrical optics I, geometrical optics II, optical instrument such as stops, glasses and camera, polarized light like double refraction by polarized light, interference, interference by multiple reflections, diffraction, solid optics, crystal optics such as Faraday rotation and Kerr effect and measurement of light. Each chapter has an exercise.

  18. Optical design of a reaction chamber for weakly absorbed light. II. Parallel mirrors, multitravel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devaney, J.J.; Finch, F.T.

    1975-06-01

    This report outlines the possibilities to be found using one or more diffraction-limited high-quality light beams to activate a weakly absorbing gas in a regime where the diffraction spread can be controlled by converging optical devices to within a ratio of √2 of the minimum at the beam waist (corresponding lengths between converging elements are within twice the Rayleigh range). Our designs use plane or cylindrical parallel mirrors down which a light beam is repeatedly reflected. In the first design variation, the beam is re-reflected up the parallel mirrors to the entrance aperture where it can be returned repeatedly for a number of multiply reflecting ''travels'' up and down the parallel mirror reaction chamber. In the second variation, the return of the beam after each multiply reflecting ''travel'' down the chamber is external to the chamber and is achieved by two mirror reflections. For diffraction control the return mirrors can be made converging. For multiple laser excitation, any of the external return mirrors can be replaced by a laser. The advantage of these designs is a high degree of uniformity of chamber illumination with a reasonably high number of passes. Drawbacks of the designs are the large space needed for beam return (many tens of meters for some parameters) and (common to all high optical quality chambers) the figuring and reflectivity demands on the mirrors. (U.S.)

  19. Incorporation of amphiphilic ruthenium(II) ammine complexes into Langmuir-Blodgett thin films with switchable quadratic nonlinear optical behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubekeur-Lecaque, Leïla; Coe, Benjamin J; Harris, James A; Helliwell, Madeleine; Asselberghs, Inge; Clays, Koen; Foerier, Stijn; Verbiest, Thierry

    2011-12-19

    Nine nonlinear optical (NLO) chromophores with pyridinium electron acceptors have been synthesized by complexing new proligands with {Ru(II)(NH(3))(5)}(2+) electron-donor centers. The presence of long alkyl/fluoroalkyl chain substituents imparts amphiphilic properties, and these cationic complexes have been characterized as their PF(6)(-) salts by using various techniques including electronic absorption spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Each complex shows three reversible/quasireversible redox processes; a Ru(III/II) oxidation and two ligand-based reductions. The energies of the intense visible d → π* metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) absorptions correlate to some extent with the ligand reduction potentials. (1)H NMR spectroscopy also provides insights into the relative electron-withdrawing strengths of the new ligands. Single crystal X-ray structures have been determined for two of the proligand salts and one complex salt, [Ru(II)(NH(3))(5)(4-C(16)H(33)PhQ(+))]Cl(3)·3.25H(2)O (PhQ(+) = N-phenyl-4,4'-bipyridinium), showing centrosymmetric packing structures in each case. The PF(6)(-) analogue of the latter complex has been used to deposit reproducibly high-quality, multilayered Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) thin films. These films show a strong second harmonic generation (SHG) response from a 1064 nm laser; their MLCT absorbance increases linearly with the number of layers (N) and I(2ω)/I(ω)(2) (I(2ω) = intensity at 532 nm; I(ω) = intensity at 1064 nm) scales quadratically with N, consistent with homogeneous deposition. LB films on indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass show electrochemically induced switching of the SHG response, with a decrease in activity of about 50% on Ru(II) → Ru(III) oxidation. This effect is reversible, but reproducible over only a few cycles before the signal from the Ru(II) species diminishes. This work extrapolates our original solution studies (Coe, B. J. et al. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed.1999, 38, 366) to the first demonstration of

  20. Theoretical study of diaquamalonatozinc(II) single crystal for applications in non-linear optical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Mitesh; Rai, Vineet Kumar

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the present paper is to employ theoretical methods to investigate the zero field splitting (ZFS) parameter and to investigate the position of the dopant in the host. These theoretical calculations have been compared with the empirical results. The superposition model (SPM) with the microscopic spin-Hamiltonian (MSH) theory and the coefficient of fractional parentage have been employed to investigate the dopant manganese(II) ion substitution in the diaquamalonatozinc(II) (DAMZ) single crystal. The magnetic parameters, viz. g-tensor and D-tensor, has been determined by using the ORCA program package developed by F Neese et al. The unrestricted Kohn-Sham orbitals-based Pederson-Khanna (PK) as the unperturbed wave function is observed to be the most suitable for the computational calculation of spin-orbit tensor (D^{SO}) of the axial ZFS parameter D. The effects of spin-spin dipolar couplings are taken into account. The unrestricted natural orbital (UNO) is used for the calculation of spin-spin dipolar contributions to the ZFS tensor. A comparative study of the quantum mechanical treatment of Pederson-Khanna (PK) with coupled perturbation (CP) is reported in the present study. The unrestricted Kohn-Sham-based natural orbital with Pederson-Khanna-type of perturbation approach validates the experimental results in the evaluation of ZFS parameters. The theoretical results are appropriate with the experimental ones and indicate the interstitial occupancy of Mn^{2+} ion in the host matrix.

  1. Optical spectrum of HDE 226868 = Cygnus X-1. II. Spectrophotometry and mass estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gies, D.R.; Bolton, C.T.

    1986-01-01

    In part I of this series, Gies and Bolton (1982) have presented the results of radial velocity measures of 78 high-dispersion spectrograms of HDE 226868 = Cyg X-1. For the present study, 55 of the best plates considered by Gies and Bolton were selected to form 10 average spectra. An overall mean spectrum with S/N ratio = 300 was formed by coadding the 10 averaged spectra. There is no evidence for statistically significant variations of the spectral type about the mean value of 09.7 Iab, and all the absorption line strengths are normal for the spectral type. Evidence is presented that the He II lambda 4846 emission line is formed in the stellar wind above the substellar point on the visible star. Probable values regarding the mass for the visible star and its companion are 33 and 16 solar masses, respectively. Theoretical He II lambda 4686 emission line profiles are computed for the focused stellar wind model for the Cyg X-1 system considered by Friend and Castor (1982). 105 references

  2. Measurements of Extensive Aerosol Optical Properties During TexAQS II: Implications for PM Compliance and Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, M. E.; Atkinson, D. B.; Luke, W. T.

    2007-12-01

    In 2000, the Houston-Galveston Area (HGA) was designated as a non-attainment area for several criteria air pollutants by the US EPA. In order to meet the requirements of the federal Clean Air Act, the Second Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS II) was designed to update the State Implementation Plan (SIP) by providing scientific air quality data over 18 months from June 2005 to October 2006. The data presented here was collected as part of the Texas Radical and Aerosol Measurement Program (TRAMP), a substudy of TexAQS II. Bulk aerosol optical properties were measured for six weeks atop the 60 m high Southwest Moody Tower on the University of Houston campus. The measurements were collected using a cavity ring-down transmissometer/nephelometer (CRDT/N) and consisted of the extensive aerosol coefficients: extinction (bext) at 532 and 1064 nm and scattering (bscat) at 530nm. In addition to daily and whole study averages and calculated mass values, positive correlations between the 1064 nm extinction and 532 nm absorption (babs = bext - bscat) values are displayed for this study period for the first time. Correlation between the particle scattering coefficient and the sum of AMS measured (UNH - PI: R. Griffin) sulfate and organic particle mass concentrations as well as covariance between optical properties and O3, CO and NOx values (ARL/NOAA - PI: W. Luke) are also examined. No correlation is expected between coarse particles (PM10), which are typically primary biogenic suspended soil minerals or windblown dust, and high ozone concentrations. Ozone levels are highest during periods of low wind when coarse particulate is likely to be at a minimum. On the other hand, secondary particles and O3 should be correlated on short time scales because both species tend to have the same precursors, NOx and VOC's, and formation of particles is favored during stagnant conditions. Fine particles (PM2.5) should also correlate with CO since both species have a common emission source. Wind

  3. Wave function analysis of type-II self-assembled quantum dot structures using magneto-optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy, Marcio Peron Franco de; Nakaema, Marcelo K.K.; Gomes, Paulo F.; Iikawa, Fernando; Brasil, Maria Jose S.P.; Bortoleto, Jose Roberto R.; Cotta, Monica A.; Ribeiro, Evaldo; Medeiros-Ribeiro, Gilberto; Marques, Gilmar E.; Bittencourt, A.C.R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Recently, self-assembled quantum dots have attracted considerable attention for their potential for device applications. Type II interface, in particular, present interesting properties due to the space separation of the carriers. One of the carriers is confined at the lower band gap layer and the other remains at the barrier layers and is only localized by the Coulomb attraction. An essential information for using type II quantum wells and quantum dots on technological applications is the localization of the carrier wave function, which is an experimentally difficult parameter to be measured. Some techniques have been proposed to map the wave functions in quantum dots such as magneto-tunneling spectroscopy and near- field scanning optical microscopy. These techniques involve however a very complex experimental apparatus and sample processing. The magneto-exciton transition can be used as an alternative tool to investigate the exciton wave function distribution, since this distribution has a strong influence on the diamagnetic shift and Zeeman splitting. In this work, we present magneto-optical studies of In P/GaAs type II self-assembled quantum dots, where the electron is strongly confined at the In P, while the hole is weakly localized at the GaAs barrier due to the Coulombic attraction from the electrons. This scenery is very distinct from type I systems. The weaker hole confinement should alter the valence band mixing resulting in a different valence band contribution on the Zeeman splitting as compared to type I systems. Based on the results of the magneto-exciton emission from the wetting layer and from the individual dots, we obtained interesting results concerning the wave function distribution in our system. We discuss the localization of the hole wave function along the growth direction based on the measured Zeeman splitting and the in-plane wave function distribution, based on the observed diamagnetic shift. A remarkable result is that the

  4. Magnetic tweezers with high permeability electromagnets for fast actuation of magnetic beads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, La; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim [Institute of Bioelectronics (ICS-8/PGI-8), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    As a powerful and versatile scientific instrument, magnetic tweezers have been widely used in biophysical research areas, such as mechanical cell properties and single molecule manipulation. If one wants to steer bead position, the nonlinearity of magnetic properties and the strong position dependence of the magnetic field in most magnetic tweezers lead to quite a challenge in their control. In this article, we report multi-pole electromagnetic tweezers with high permeability cores yielding high force output, good maneuverability, and flexible design. For modeling, we adopted a piece-wise linear dependence of magnetization on field to characterize the magnetic beads. We implemented a bi-linear interpolation of magnetic field in the work space, based on a lookup table obtained from finite element simulation. The electronics and software were custom-made to achieve high performance. In addition, the effects of dimension and defect on structure of magnetic tips also were inspected. In a workspace with size of 0.1 × 0.1 mm{sup 2}, a force of up to 400 pN can be applied on a 2.8 μm superparamagnetic bead in any direction within the plane. Because the magnetic particle is always pulled towards a tip, the pulling forces from the pole tips have to be well balanced in order to achieve control of the particle’s position. Active video tracking based feedback control is implemented, which is able to work at a speed of up to 1 kHz, yielding good maneuverability of the magnetic beads.

  5. Electrostatically self-assembled films containing II-VI semiconductor nanoparticles: Optical and electrical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryajaya; Nabok, A.V.; Tsargorodskaya, A.; Hassan, A.K.; Davis, F.

    2008-01-01

    CdS and ZnS semiconducting colloid nanoparticles were deposited as thin films using the technique of electrostatic self-assembly. The process of alternative deposition of Poly-allylamine Hydrochloride (PAH) and CdS (or ZnS) layers were monitored with a novel optical method of total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE). The fitting of TIRE spectra allowed the evaluation of the parameter (thickness, refractive index and extinction coefficients) of all consecutively deposited layers. I-V characteristics of the films obtained were studied in sandwich structures on Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) conductive electrodes using the mercury probe technique. The presence of CdS (or ZnS) nanoparticles in the polyelectrolyte films leads to a switching behaviour, which may be attributed to the resonance electron tunneling via semiconducting nanoparticles

  6. Biomedical signals and sensors II linking acoustic and optic biosignals and biomedical sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Kaniusas, Eugenijus

    2015-01-01

    The book set develops a bridge between physiologic mechanisms and diagnostic human engineering. While the first volume is focused on the interface between physiologic mechanisms and the resultant biosignals, this second volume is devoted to the interface between biosignals and biomedical sensors. That is, in the first volume, the physiologic mechanisms determining biosignals are described from the basic cellular level up to their advanced mutual coordination level. This second volume, considers the genesis of acoustic and optic biosignals and the associated sensing technology from a strategic point of view. As a novelty, this book discusses heterogeneous biosignals within a common frame. This frame comprises both the biosignal formation path from the biosignal source at the physiological level to biosignal propagation in the body, and the biosignal sensing path from the biosignal transmission in the sensor applied on the body up to its conversion to a, usually electric, signal. Some biosignals arise in the co...

  7. Time-resolved optical studies of wide-gap II-VI semiconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong

    ZnSe and ZnSe-based quantum well and superlattice structures are potential candidates for light emitting devices and other optical devices such as switches and modulators working in the blue-green wavelength range. Carrier dynamics studies of these structures are important in evaluating device performance as well as understanding the underlying physical processes. In this thesis, a carrier dynamics investigation is conducted for temperature from 77K to 295K on CdZnSSe/ZnSSe single quantum well structure (SQW) and ZnSe/ZnSTe superlattice fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Two experimental techniques with femtosecond time resolution are used in this work: up-conversion technique for time- resolved photoluminescence (PL) and pump-probe technique for time-resolved differential absorption studies. For both heterostructures, the radiative recombination is dominated by exciton transition due to the large exciton binding energy as a result of quantum confinement effect. The measured decay time of free exciton PL in CdZnSSe/ZnSSe SQW increases linearly with increasing temperature which agrees with the theoretical prediction by considering the conservation of momentum requirement for radiative recombination. However, the recombination of free carriers is also observed in CdZnSSe/ZnSSe SQW for the whole temperature range studied. On the other hand, in ZnSe/ZnSTe superlattice structures, the non- radiative recombination processes are non-negligible even at 77K and become more important in higher temperature range. The relaxation processes such as spectral hole burning, carrier thermalization and hot-carrier cooling are observed in ZnSe/ZnSTe superlattices at room temperature (295K) by the femtosecond pump-probe measurements. A rapid cooling of the thermalized hot- carrier from 763K to 450K within 4ps is deduced. A large optical nonlinearity (i.e., the induced absorption change) around the heavy-hole exciton energy is also obtained.

  8. THE OPTICAL VARIABILITY OF SDSS QUASARS FROM MULTI-EPOCH SPECTROSCOPY. II. COLOR VARIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Hengxiao; Gu, Minfeng, E-mail: hxguo@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: gumf@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the optical/ultraviolet (UV) color variations for a sample of 2169 quasars based on multi-epoch spectroscopy in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data releases seven (DR7) and nine (DR9). To correct the systematic difference between DR7 and DR9 due to the different instrumental setup, we produced a correction spectrum by using a sample of F-stars observed in both DR7 and DR9. The correction spectrum was then applied to quasars when comparing the spectra of DR7 with DR9. In each object, the color variation was explored by comparing the spectral index of the continuum power-law fit on the brightest spectrum with the faintest one, and also by the shape of their difference spectrum. In 1876 quasars with consistent color variations from two methods, we found that most sources (1755, ∼94%) show the bluer-when-brighter (BWB) trend, and the redder-when-brighter (RWB) trend is detected in only 121 objects (∼6%). The common BWB trend is supported by the composite spectrum constructed from bright spectra, which is bluer than that from faint spectra, and also by the blue composite difference spectrum. The correction spectrum is proven to be highly reliable by comparing the composite spectrum from corrected DR9 and original DR7 spectra. Assuming that the optical/UV variability is triggered by fluctuations, the RWB trend can likely be explained if the fluctuations occur first in the outer disk region, and the inner disk region has not yet fully responded when the fluctuations are being propagated inward. In contrast, the common BWB trend implies that the fluctuations likely more often happen first in the inner disk region.

  9. Quasi-Optical Transmission Lines for ECRH on TJ-II Stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, A.; Likin, K.; Martin, R.; Cappa, A.; Cepero, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Two mirror lines are used to transmit ht microwave power from the powerful microwave generators to the TJ-II plasmas. Both lines have been tested at nominal power level and they are now in operation. This paper is devoted to the final design of the transmission lines and their testing. Before starting operation at high power level measurements of the wave beam parameters at low power level were made. Two horn antennae were designed to simulate the gyrotron output. Numerical simulations of the far field radiation pattern of the antennae were made, a computer code based on Huygens diffraction theory was developed to simulate the propagation of the beam along a mirror line. A comparison of the theoretical and the experimental results is also presented here. (Author)

  10. Thin film interference optics for imaging the O II 834-A airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seely, John F.; Hunter, William R.

    1991-01-01

    Normal incidence thin film interference mirrors and filters have been designed to image the O II 834-A airglow. It is shown that MgF2 is a useful spacer material for this wavelength region. The mirrors consist of thin layers of MgF2 in combination with other materials that are chosen to reflect efficiently in a narrow band centered at 834 A. Peak reflectance of 60 percent can be obtained with a passband 200 A wide. Al/MgF2/Si and Al/MgF2/SiC interference coatings have been designed to reflect 834 A and to absorb the intense H I 1216 A airglow. An In/MgF2/In interference filter is designed to transmit 834 A and attenuate 1216 A radiation. Interference photocathode coatings for rejecting 1216 A radiation are also discussed.

  11. HoloHands: games console interface for controlling holographic optical manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, C.; McPherson, M.; McDougall, C.; McGloin, D.

    2013-03-01

    The increasing number of applications for holographic manipulation techniques has sparked the development of more accessible control interfaces. Here, we describe a holographic optical tweezers experiment which is controlled by gestures that are detected by a Microsoft Kinect. We demonstrate that this technique can be used to calibrate the tweezers using the Stokes drag method and compare this to automated calibrations. We also show that multiple particle manipulation can be handled. This is a promising new line of research for gesture-based control which could find applications in a wide variety of experimental situations.

  12. HoloHands: games console interface for controlling holographic optical manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C; McPherson, M; McDougall, C; McGloin, D

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of applications for holographic manipulation techniques has sparked the development of more accessible control interfaces. Here, we describe a holographic optical tweezers experiment which is controlled by gestures that are detected by a Microsoft Kinect. We demonstrate that this technique can be used to calibrate the tweezers using the Stokes drag method and compare this to automated calibrations. We also show that multiple particle manipulation can be handled. This is a promising new line of research for gesture-based control which could find applications in a wide variety of experimental situations. (paper)

  13. Direct measurement of the temperature profile close to an optically trapped absorbing particle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šiler, Martin; Ježek, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Pilát, Zdeněk; Zemánek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 5 (2016), s. 870-873 ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP205/12/P868 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : gold nanoparticles * fluorescence * spectroscopy * tweezers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.416, year: 2016

  14. Microfluidic devices for analysis and active optical sorting of individual cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Jan; Pilát, Zdeněk; Šerý, Mojmír; Kaňka, Jan; Samek, Ota; Bernatová, Silvie; Zemánek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2013), s. 55-59 ISSN 0447-6441 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/433; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA ČR GAP205/11/1687 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : microfluidic * cell sorting * optical tweezers * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  15. Rotation, oscillation and hydrodynamic synchronization of optically trapped oblate spheroidal microparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arzola, Alejandro V.; Jákl, Petr; Chvátal, Lukáš; Zemánek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 13 (2014), s. 16207-1621 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12018 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : orbital angular-momentum * lineary polarized-light * ellipsoidal molecules * microscopic particles * Gaussian beams * tweezers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.488, year: 2014

  16. Probing cytoplasmic organization and the actin cytoskeleton of plant cells with optical tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, T.; Honing, van der H.S.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2010-01-01

    In interphase plant cells, the actin cytoskeleton is essential for intracellular transport and organization. To fully understand how the actin cytoskeleton functions as the structural basis for cytoplasmic organization, both molecular and physical aspects of the actin organization have to be

  17. Scanning Probe Optical Tweezers: a new tool to study DNA-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisstede, J.H.G.

    2006-01-01

    The main goal of the work described in this thesis is to construct a microscope in which OT and scanning probe microscopy (SPM) are combined, to be able to localize proteins while simultaneously controlling the tension within the DNA molecule. This apparatus enables the study of the effect of

  18. Investigating the effect of cell substrate on cancer cell stiffness by optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousafzai, Muhammad Sulaiman; Coceano, Giovanna; Bonin, Serena; Niemela, Joseph; Scoles, Giacinto; Cojoc, Dan

    2017-07-26

    The mechanical properties of cells are influenced by their microenvironment. Here we report cell stiffness alteration by changing the cell substrate stiffness for isolated cells and cells in contact with other cells. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is used to prepare soft substrates with three different stiffness values (173, 88 and 17kPa respectively). Breast cancer cells lines, namely HBL-100, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 with different level of aggressiveness are cultured on these substrates and their local elasticity is investigated by vertical indentation of the cell membrane. Our preliminary results show an unforeseen behavior of the MDA-MB-231 cells. When cultured on glass substrate as isolated cells, they are less stiff than the other two types of cells, in agreement with the general statement that more aggressive and metastatic cells are softer. However, when connected to other cells the stiffness of MDA-MB-231 cells becomes similar to the other two cell lines. Moreover, the stiffness of MDA-MB-231 cells cultured on soft PDMS substrates is significantly higher than the stiffness of the other cell types, demonstrating thus the strong influence of the environmental conditions on the mechanical properties of the cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Raman spectroscopy of single nanoparticles in a double-nanohole optical tweezer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Steven; Al Balushi, Ahmed A; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    A double nanohole in a metal film was used to trap nanoparticles (20 nm diameter) and simultaneously record their Raman spectrum using the trapping laser as the excitation source. This allowed for the identification of characteristic Stokes lines for titania and polystyrene nanoparticles, showing the capability for material identification of nanoparticles once trapped. Increased Raman signal was observed for the trapping of multiple nanoparticles. This system combines the benefits of nanoparticle isolation and manipulation with unique identification. (fast track communication)

  20. Raman Spectroscopy of Single Nanoparticles in a Double-Nanohole Optical Tweezer System

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Steven; Balushi, Ahmed A. Al; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    A double nanohole in a metal film was used to trap nanoparticles (20 nm diameter) and simultaneously record their Raman spectrum using the trapping laser as the excitation source. This allowed for the identification of characteristic Stokes lines for titania and polystyrene nanoparticles, showing the capability for material identification of nanoparticles once trapped. Increased Raman signal is observed for the trapping of multiple nanoparticles. This system combines the benefits of nanoparti...

  1. Calibration of trapping force and response function of optical tweezers in viscoelastic media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Mario; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2007-01-01

    , 594) is not possible as the viscoelastic properties of the bio-active medium are a priori unknown. Here, we present an approach that neither requires explicit assumptions about the size of the trapped particle nor about the viscoelastic properties of the medium. Instead, the interaction between...... the medium and the trapped particle is described in a general manner, through velocity and acceleration memory. Our method is applicable to general, at least locally homogeneous, viscoelastic media. The procedure combines active and passive approaches by the application of Onsager's regression hypothesis...

  2. FDTD simulation of trapping nanowires with linearly polarized and radially polarized optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Wu, Xiaoping

    2011-10-10

    In this paper a model of the trapping force on nanowires is built by three dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and Maxwell stress tensor methods, and the tightly focused laser beam is expressed by spherical vector wave functions (VSWFs). The trapping capacities on nanoscale-diameter nanowires are discussed in terms of a strongly focused linearly polarized beam and radially polarized beam. Simulation results demonstrate that the radially polarized beam has higher trapping efficiency on nanowires with higher refractive indices than linearly polarized beam.

  3. Using optical tweezers to relate the chemical and mechanical cross-bridge cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Walter; Sleep, John

    2004-12-29

    In most current models of muscle contraction there are two translational steps, the working stroke, whereby an attached myosin cross-bridge moves relative to the actin filament, and the repriming step, in which the cross-bridge returns to its original orientation. The development of single molecule methods has allowed a more detailed investigation of the relationship of these mechanical steps to the underlying biochemistry. In the normal adenosine triphosphate cycle, myosin.adenosine diphosphate.phosphate (M.ADP.Pi) binds to actin and moves it by ca. 5 nm on average before the formation of the end product, the rigor actomyosin state. All the other product-like intermediate states tested were found to give no net movement indicating that M.ADP.Pi alone binds in a pre-force state. Myosin states with bound, unhydrolysed nucleoside triphosphates also give no net movement, indicating that these must also bind in a post-force conformation and that the repriming, post- to pre-transition during the forward cycle must take place while the myosin is dissociated from actin. These observations fit in well with the structural model in which the working stroke is aligned to the opening of the switch 2 element of the ATPase site.

  4. Using optical tweezers to relate the chemical and mechanical cross-bridge cycles.

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen, Walter; Sleep, John

    2004-01-01

    In most current models of muscle contraction there are two translational steps, the working stroke, whereby an attached myosin cross-bridge moves relative to the actin filament, and the repriming step, in which the cross-bridge returns to its original orientation. The development of single molecule methods has allowed a more detailed investigation of the relationship of these mechanical steps to the underlying biochemistry. In the normal adenosine triphosphate cycle, myosin.adenosine diphosph...

  5. In situ single-atom array synthesis using dynamic holographic optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosub; Lee, Woojun; Lee, Han-gyeol; Jo, Hanlae; Song, Yunheung; Ahn, Jaewook

    2016-01-01

    Establishing a reliable method to form scalable neutral-atom platforms is an essential cornerstone for quantum computation, quantum simulation and quantum many-body physics. Here we demonstrate a real-time transport of single atoms using holographic microtraps controlled by a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator. For this, an analytical design approach to flicker-free microtrap movement is devised and cold rubidium atoms are simultaneously rearranged with 2N motional degrees of freedom, representing unprecedented space controllability. We also accomplish an in situ feedback control for single-atom rearrangements with the high success rate of 99% for up to 10 μm translation. We hope this proof-of-principle demonstration of high-fidelity atom-array preparations will be useful for deterministic loading of N single atoms, especially on arbitrary lattice locations, and also for real-time qubit shuttling in high-dimensional quantum computing architectures. PMID:27796372

  6. Particle jumps between optical traps in a one-dimensional (1D) optical lattice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, Aug 2 (2010), 083001:1-20 ISSN 1367-2630 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06007; GA MŠk OC08034 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : stochastic resonance * brownian-motion * tweezers * forces * manipulation * calibration * separation * interface * diffusion * tracking Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.849, year: 2010

  7. Optical manipulation of aerosol droplets using a holographic dual and single beam trap

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Šiler, Martin; Ježek, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Zemánek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 22 (2013), s. 4601-4604 ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP205/11/P294; GA ČR GPP205/12/P868; GA MŠk LH12018; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : optical tweezers * optical manipulation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.179, year: 2013

  8. Optical forces induced behavior of a particle in a non-diffracting vortex beam

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šiler, Martin; Jákl, Petr; Brzobohatý, Oto; Zemánek, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 22 (2012), s. 24304-24319 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP205/11/P294; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk LH12018 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : optical vortex beam * tweezers * optical forces Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.546, year: 2012

  9. Spectral tuning of lasing emission from optofluidic droplet microlasers using optical stretching

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aas, M.; Jonáš, A.; Kiraz, A.; Ježek, Jan; Brzobohatý, Oto; Pilát, Zdeněk; Zemánek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 18 (2013), s. 21380-21394 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP205/11/P294; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA TA ČR TA03010642 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Microcavities * Dye lasers * Optical tweezers * Optical manipulation * Fluorescence, laser-induced Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.525, year: 2013

  10. Optical observations on the CRIT-II Critical Ionization Velocity Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.C.; Wescott, E.M.; Haerendel, G.; Valenzuela, A.

    1990-01-01

    A rocket borne Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) experiment was carried out from Wallops Island at dusk on May 4, 1989. Two barium shaped charges were released below the solar terminator (to prevent photoionization) at altitudes near 400 km. The ambient ionospheric electron density was 5x10 5 cm -3 . The neutral barium jet was directed upwards and at an angle of nominally 45 degrees to B which gives approximately 3x10 23 neutrals with super critical velocity. Ions created by a CIV process in the region of the neutral jet would travel up along B into sunlight where they can be detected optically. Well defined ion clouds (max. brightness 750 R) were observed in both releases. An ionization rate of 0.8%s -1 (125s ionization time constant) can account for the observed ion cloud near the release field line, but the ionization rate falls off with increasing distance from the release. It is concluded that a CIV process was present in the neutral jet out to about 50 km from the release, which is significantly further than allowed by current theories

  11. Anion-π aromatic neutral tweezers complexes: are they stable in polar solvents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lozano, Marta; Otero, Nicolás; Hermida-Ramón, Jose M; Estévez, Carlos M; Mandado, Marcos

    2011-03-17

    The impact of the solvent environment on the stabilization of the complexes formed by fluorine (T-F) and cyanide (T-CN) substituted tweezers with halide anions has been investigated theoretically. The study was carried out using computational methodologies based on density functional theory (DFT) and symmetry adapted perturbation theory (SAPT). Interaction energies were obtained at the M05-2X/6-31+G* level. The obtained results show a large stability of the complexes in solvents with large dielectric constant and prove the suitability of these molecular tweezers as potential hosts for anion recognition in solution. A detailed analysis of the effects of the solvent on the electron withdrawing ability of the substituents and its influence on the complex stability has been performed. In particular, the interaction energy in solution was split up into intermonomer and solvent-complex terms. In turn, the intermonomer interaction energy was partitioned into electrostatic, exchange, and polarization terms. Polar resonance structures in T-CN complexes are favored by polar solvents, giving rise to a stabilization of the intermonomer interaction, the opposite is found for T-F complexes. The solvent-complex energy increases with the polarity of the solvent in T-CN complexes, nonetheless the energy reaches a maximum and then decreases slowly in T-F complexes. An electron density analysis was also performed before and after complexation, providing an explanation to the trends followed by the interaction energies and their different components in solution.

  12. New approaches in the design of magnetic tweezers–current magnetic tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessalova, Valentina [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 1-2, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Perov, Nikolai [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 1-2, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Nevskogo 14, 236004 Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Rodionova, Valeria [Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Nevskogo 14, 236004 Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology ' MISiS' , Leninsky Prospect 4, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-01

    The main advantages of the magnetic tweezers are the low price and simplicity of use. However the range of their application is reduced due to shortcomings like, for example, the remanent induction of the core and interaction between ferromagnetic cores. We present the new design of magnetic tweezers–Current Magnetic Tweezers (CMT) that allow particle manipulation by means of the magnetic field generated by the electric currents flowing through the non-magnetic wires. Arranging wires in different geometric shapes allows the particle movement either in two or three dimensions. Forces acting on the magnetic particles with the magnetic moment of 2·10{sup −11} A m{sup 2} at distances up to 1 mm had been experimentally measured. It is established that a current of about 1 A at a 1 mm distance generates force of (approximately) 3 pN which is consistent with theoretical estimates. - Highlights: • We suggest the idea and the results of the test the prototype based on 3 wire's system that allows manipulation of nanoparticles on XY plane.

  13. New approaches in the design of magnetic tweezers–current magnetic tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessalova, Valentina; Perov, Nikolai; Rodionova, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    The main advantages of the magnetic tweezers are the low price and simplicity of use. However the range of their application is reduced due to shortcomings like, for example, the remanent induction of the core and interaction between ferromagnetic cores. We present the new design of magnetic tweezers–Current Magnetic Tweezers (CMT) that allow particle manipulation by means of the magnetic field generated by the electric currents flowing through the non-magnetic wires. Arranging wires in different geometric shapes allows the particle movement either in two or three dimensions. Forces acting on the magnetic particles with the magnetic moment of 2·10 −11 A m 2 at distances up to 1 mm had been experimentally measured. It is established that a current of about 1 A at a 1 mm distance generates force of (approximately) 3 pN which is consistent with theoretical estimates. - Highlights: • We suggest the idea and the results of the test the prototype based on 3 wire's system that allows manipulation of nanoparticles on XY plane.

  14. Bulk crystal growth and nonlinear optical characterization of semiorganic single crystal: Cadmium (II) dibromide L - Proline monohydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakrishnan, T., E-mail: balacrystalgrowth@gmail.com [Crystal Growth Laboratory, PG & Research Department of Physics, Periyar EVR College (Autonomous), Tiruchirappalli, 620 023, Tamil Nadu (India); Sathiskumar, S. [Crystal Growth Laboratory, PG & Research Department of Physics, Periyar EVR College (Autonomous), Tiruchirappalli, 620 023, Tamil Nadu (India); Ramamurthi, K. [Crystal Growth and Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, SRM University, Kattankulathur, 603 203, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu (India); Thamotharan, S. [Department of Bioinformatics, School of Chemical and Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur, 613 401 (India)

    2017-01-15

    Single crystal of a novel metal organic nonlinear optical (NLO) cadmium (II) dibromide L - proline monohydrate (CBLPM) of size 7 × 7 × 5 mm{sup 3} was grown from slow evaporation technique. Single crystal X – ray diffraction analysis reveals that the crystal belongs to orthorhombic system with lattice parameters a = 10.1891 (8) Å, b = 13.4961 (11) Å, c = 7.4491 (5) Å and space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. The powder X – ray diffraction pattern of CBLPM was recorded and the X – ray diffraction peaks were indexed. The various functional groups of CBLPM were identified by the FT – IR and FT – Raman spectral analyses. The optical transmittance window and lower cut off wavelength of CBLPM were identified from UV – Vis – NIR studies. The mechanical strength of the grown crystal was estimated using Vickers microhardness test. Dielectric constant and dielectric loss measurements were carried out at different temperatures in the frequency range of 50 Hz - 2 MHz. The photoluminescence spectrum was recorded in the wavelength range 200–400 nm and the estimated optical band gap was ∼4.1 eV. Etching studies were carried out for different etching time. Thermal stability of CBLPM was determined using thermogravimetric analysis. Laser induced damage threshold study was carried out for the grown crystal using Nd:YAG laser. Size dependent second harmonic generation efficiency of the grown crystal was determined by Kurtz and Perry powder technique with different particle size using Nd:YAG laser with wavelength 1064 nm. Second harmonic generation efficiency of the powdered CBLPM crystal was ∼2.3 times that of potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate. - Highlights: • CBLPM crystal belongs to orthorhombic crystal system with space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1.} • Transmittance of CBLPM is ∼80% in the 650–1100 nm range. • Powder SHG efficiency of CBLPM increases with increase in particle size. • SHG efficiency of 0.57 μm size powdered CBLPM is ∼2

  15. Integrated optics and optoelectronics II; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Jose, CA, Sept. 17-19, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Ka-Kha

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on integrated optics and optoelectronics discusses proton- and ion-exchange technologies, radiation effects on GaAs optical system FET devices and on the dynamical behavior of LiNbO3 switching devices, advanced lightwave components and concepts, advanced optical interconnects concepts, advanced aircraft and engine control, IOCs for fiber-optic gyroscopes, and commercial integrated optical devices. Attention is given to integrated optical devices for high-data-rate serial-to-parallel conversion, the design of novel integrated optic devices using depressed index waveguides, and a low-loss L-band microwave fiber-optic link for control of a T/R module. Topics addressed include the temperature and modulation dependence of spectral linewidth in distributed Bragg reflector laser diodes, length-minimization design considerations in photonic integrated circuits incorporating directional couplers, and the photochemical formation of polymeric optical waveguides and devices for optical interconnection applications

  16. Electron-impact excitation of Fe II: Effective collision strengths for optically allowed fine-structure transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsbottom, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of Fe II. We consider specifically the optically allowed lines for transitions from the 3d 6 4s and 3d 7 even parity configuration states to the 3d 6 4p odd parity configuration levels. The parallel suite of Breit-Pauli codes are utilized to compute the collision cross-sections where relativistic effects are included explicitly in both the target and the scattering approximation. A total of 100 LS or 262-jj levels formed from the basis configurations 3d 6 4s, 3d 7 and 3d 6 4p were included in the wavefunction representation of the target, including all doublet, quartet and sextet terms. The Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths are computed across a wide range of electron temperatures from 100 to 100,000 K, temperatures of importance in astrophysical and plasma applications. A detailed comparison is made with previous works and significant differences were found to occur for some of the transitions considered. We conclude that in order to obtain converged collision strengths and effective collision strengths for these allowed transitions it is necessary to include contributions from partial waves up to L = 50 explicitly in the calculation, and in addition, account for contributions from even higher partial waves through a 'top up' procedure.

  17. Evaluation of the optical design of laser Thomson scattering diagnostics for high-temperature EAST tokamak and low-temperature MAP-II divertor simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kado, Shinichiro; Scotti, Filippo; Xi Xiaoqi; Zhao Junyu

    2009-01-01

    The optical design of the laser Thomson scattering (LTS) system for EAST tokamak is now on-going. Based on the Visible YAG laser TVTS system developed in the MAP-II (material and plasma) steady-state linear divertor/edge plasma simulator at the University of Tokyo, the required specification and the applicability of the VIS-YAG-TVTS system was evaluated in terms of the photon number to be collected by the fiber light-guide to a spectrometer and the reciprocal linear dispersion of the spectrometer. Then, the possible design of the optical system was proposed. (author)

  18. Vectorial optical fields fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Polarization is a vector nature of light that plays an important role in optical science and engineering. While existing textbook treatments of light assume beams with spatially homogeneous polarization, there is an increasing interest in vectorial optical fields with spatially engineered states of polarization. New effects and phenomena have been predicted and observed for light beams with these unconventional polarization states. This edited review volume aims to provide a comprehensive overview and summarize the latest developments in this important emerging field of optics. This book will cover the fundamentals including mathematical and physical descriptions, experimental generation, manipulation, focusing, propagation, and the applications of the engineered vectorial optical fields in focal field engineering, plasmonic focusing and optical antenna, single molecular imaging, optical tweezers/trapping, as well as optical measurements and instrumentations. Readership: Students, professionals, post-graduat...

  19. Thermally induced micro-motion by inflection in optical potential

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šiler, Martin; Jákl, Petr; Brzobohatý, Oto; Ryabov, A.; Filip, R.; Zemánek, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, MAY (2017), s. 1-8, č. článku 1697. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : molecular motors * brownian-motion * manipulation * efficiency * tweezers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  20. Experimental and theoretical determination of optical binding forces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Čižmár, T.; Karásek, Vítězslav; Šiler, Martin; Dholakia, K.; Zemánek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 24 (2010), s. 25389-25402 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0348; GA MŠk OC08034; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06007; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : optical binding forces * micro-particles * inter-particle effects * optical manipulation * optical tweezers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.749, year: 2010

  1. Development of a dual joystick-controlled laser trapping and cutting system for optical micromanipulation of chromosomes inside living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsono, Marcellinus S; Zhu, Qingyuan; Shi, Linda Z; Duquette, Michelle; Berns, Michael W

    2013-02-01

    A multi-joystick robotic laser microscope system used to control two optical traps (tweezers) and one laser scissors has been developed for subcellular organelle manipulation. The use of joysticks has provided a "user-friendly" method for both trapping and cutting of organelles such as chromosomes in live cells. This innovative design has enabled the clean severing of chromosome arms using the laser scissors as well as the ability to easily hold and pull the severed arm using the laser tweezers. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Synthesis, spectral and third-order nonlinear optical properties of terpyridine Zn(II) complexes based on carbazole derivative with polyether group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ming; Liu, Yanqiu; Wang, Hui; Luo, Junshan; Li, Dandan; Zhang, Shengyi; Li, Shengli; Wu, Jieying; Tian, Yupeng

    2015-01-01

    Four novel Zn(II) terpyridine complexes (ZnLCl2, ZnLBr2, ZnLI2, ZnL(SCN)2) based on carbazole derivative group were designed, synthesized and fully characterized. Their photophysical properties including absorption and one-photon excited fluorescence, two-photon absorption (TPA) and optical power limiting (OPL) were further investigated systematically and interpreted on the basis of theoretical calculations (TD-DFT). The influences of different solvents on the absorption and One-Photon Excited Fluorescence (OPEF) spectral behavior, quantum yields and the lifetime of the chromophores have been investigated in detail. The third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties were investigated by open/closed aperture Z-scan measurements using femtosecond pulse laser in the range from 680 to 1080 nm. These results revealed that ZnLCl2 and ZnLBr2 exhibited strong two-photon absorption and ZnLCl2 showed superior optical power limiting property.

  3. A novel method of adrenaline concentration detection using fiber optical biosensor based on the catalysis of iron(II) phthalocyanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuan; Huang, Jun; Li, Mingtian; Wang, Bin

    2008-12-01

    As an effective alternative to the nature enzyme, metallophthalocyanine (MPc), having the advantages of easy accessibility, good stability and low cost, are used as catalyzer for the adrenaline (AD) oxidation. In this paper, the oxidation of AD by dioxygen using iron(II) phthalocyanine (FePc) as the catalyst was studied by electronic absorption spectra. The experimental results indicate that the oxidation product of AD catalyzed by FePc is adrenochrome with characteristic peaks at 298 nm and 267 nm. The catalytic activities of FePc are evaluated by the ratios of the absorbance at 298 nm of adrenochrome. The optimal concentration, pH and temperature for the oxidation of AD are 5.0×10-5 M, 8.0 and 55 oC, respectively. By using lock-in technology, the fiber optic adrenaline biosensor based on FePc catalysis and fluorescence quenching was fabricated and studied. A linear relationship between φ, the phase delay of the sensor head, and AD concentration was observed in the range of 2.0×10-6 to 9.0×10-6 M and 2.0×10-5 to 9.0×10-5 M. The standard deviation (SD) values are 4.7×10-8 (n = 5) and 5.9×10-7 (n = 5) M, respectively, while the detection limit is 4.0×10-7 M. The biosensor has the response time of about 15 min and the preferred reproducibility and stability.

  4. Optimization of particle trapping and patterning via photovoltaic tweezers: role of light modulation and particle size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matarrubia, J; García-Cabañes, A; Plaza, J L; Agulló-López, F; Carrascosa, M

    2014-01-01

    The role of light modulation m and particle size on the morphology and spatial resolution of nano-particle patterns obtained by photovoltaic tweezers on Fe : LiNbO 3 has been investigated. The impact of m when using spherical as well as non-spherical (anisotropic) nano-particles deposited on the sample surface has been elucidated. Light modulation is a key parameter determining the particle profile contrast that is optimum for spherical particles and high-m values (m ∼ 1). The minimum particle periodicities reachable are also investigated obtaining periodic patterns up to 3.5 µm. This is a value at least one order of magnitude shorter than those obtained in previous reported experiments. Results are successfully explained and discussed in light of the previous reported models for photorefraction including nonlinear carrier transport and dielectrophoretic trapping. From the results, a number of rules for particle patterning optimization are derived. (paper)

  5. Interrogating the activities of conformational deformed enzyme by single-molecule fluorescence-magnetic tweezers microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; He, Yufan; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the impact of fluctuating enzyme conformation on enzymatic activity is critical in understanding the structure–function relationship and enzymatic reaction dynamics. Different from studying enzyme conformations under a denaturing condition, it is highly informative to manipulate the conformation of an enzyme under an enzymatic reaction condition while monitoring the real-time enzymatic activity changes simultaneously. By perturbing conformation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecules using our home-developed single-molecule total internal reflection magnetic tweezers, we successfully manipulated the enzymatic conformation and probed the enzymatic activity changes of HRP in a catalyzed H2O2–amplex red reaction. We also observed a significant tolerance of the enzyme activity to the enzyme conformational perturbation. Our results provide a further understanding of the relation between enzyme behavior and enzymatic conformational fluctuation, enzyme–substrate interactions, enzyme–substrate active complex formation, and protein folding–binding interactions. PMID:26512103

  6. High-force NdFeB-based magnetic tweezers device optimized for microrheology experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun; Valentine, Megan T

    2012-05-01

    We present the design, calibration, and testing of a magnetic tweezers device that employs two pairs of permanent neodymium iron boron magnets surrounded by low-carbon steel focusing tips to apply large forces to soft materials for microrheology experiments. Our design enables the application of forces in the range of 1-1800 pN to ∼4.5 μm paramagnetic beads using magnet-bead separations in the range of 0.3-20 mm. This allows the use of standard coverslips and sample geometries. A high speed camera, custom LED-based illumination scheme, and mechanically stabilized measurement platform are employed to enable the measurement of materials with viscoelastic moduli as high as ∼1 kPa.

  7. High-force NdFeB-based magnetic tweezers device optimized for microrheology experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Jun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Biomolecular Science and Engineering Program, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Valentine, Megan T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    We present the design, calibration, and testing of a magnetic tweezers device that employs two pairs of permanent neodymium iron boron magnets surrounded by low-carbon steel focusing tips to apply large forces to soft materials for microrheology experiments. Our design enables the application of forces in the range of 1-1800 pN to {approx}4.5 {mu}m paramagnetic beads using magnet-bead separations in the range of 0.3-20 mm. This allows the use of standard coverslips and sample geometries. A high speed camera, custom LED-based illumination scheme, and mechanically stabilized measurement platform are employed to enable the measurement of materials with viscoelastic moduli as high as {approx}1 kPa.

  8. Micro-particle manipulation by single beam acoustic tweezers based on hydrothermal PZT thick film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Benpeng; Xu, Jiong; Li, Ying; Wang, Tian; Xiong, Ke; Lee, Changyang; Yang, Xiaofei; Shiiba, Michihisa; Takeuchi, Shinichi; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk

    2016-03-01

    Single-beam acoustic tweezers (SBAT), used in laboratory-on-a-chip (LOC) device has promising implications for an individual micro-particle contactless manipulation. In this study, a freestanding hydrothermal PZT thick film with excellent piezoelectric property (d 33 = 270pC/N and k t = 0.51) was employed for SBAT applications and a press-focusing technology was introduced. The obtained SBAT, acting at an operational frequency of 50MHz, a low f-number (∼0.9), demonstrated the capability to trap and manipulate a micro-particle sized 10μm in the distilled water. These results suggest that such a device has great potential as a manipulator for a wide range of biomedical and chemical science applications.

  9. Micro-particle manipulation by single beam acoustic tweezers based on hydrothermal PZT thick film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benpeng Zhu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Single-beam acoustic tweezers (SBAT, used in laboratory-on-a-chip (LOC device has promising implications for an individual micro-particle contactless manipulation. In this study, a freestanding hydrothermal PZT thick film with excellent piezoelectric property (d33 = 270pC/N and kt = 0.51 was employed for SBAT applications and a press-focusing technology was introduced. The obtained SBAT, acting at an operational frequency of 50MHz, a low f-number (∼0.9, demonstrated the capability to trap and manipulate a micro-particle sized 10μm in the distilled water. These results suggest that such a device has great potential as a manipulator for a wide range of biomedical and chemical science applications.

  10. Micro-particle manipulation by single beam acoustic tweezers based on hydrothermal PZT thick film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Benpeng, E-mail: benpengzhu@hust.edu.cn [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Xu, Jiong; Yang, Xiaofei [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Li, Ying; Lee, Changyang; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk [Department of Biomedical Engineering and NIH Transducer Resource Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-1111 (United States); Wang, Tian; Xiong, Ke [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory of Acoustic and Photonic Materials and Devices of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Shiiba, Michihisa; Takeuchi, Shinichi [Medical Engineering Course, Graduate School of Engineering, Toin University of Yokohama, Yokohama 225-8501 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Single-beam acoustic tweezers (SBAT), used in laboratory-on-a-chip (LOC) device has promising implications for an individual micro-particle contactless manipulation. In this study, a freestanding hydrothermal PZT thick film with excellent piezoelectric property (d{sub 33} = 270 pC/N and k{sub t} = 0.51) was employed for SBAT applications and a press-focusing technology was introduced. The obtained SBAT, acting at an operational frequency of 50 MHz, a low f-number (∼0.9), demonstrated the capability to trap and manipulate a micro-particle sized 10μm in the distilled water. These results suggest that such a device has great potential as a manipulator for a wide range of biomedical and chemical science applications.

  11. An active one-particle microrheometer: incorporating magnetic tweezers to total internal reflection microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiangjun; Hua, Li; Wu, Chi; Ngai, To

    2013-03-01

    We present a novel microrheometer by incorporating magnetic tweezers in the total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM) that enables measuring of viscoelastic properties of materials near solid surface. An evanescent wave generated by a solid∕liquid interface in the TIRM is used as the incident light source in the microrheometer. When a probe particle (of a few micrometers diameter) moves near the interface, it can interact with the evanescent field and reflect its position with respect to the interface by the scattered light intensity. The exponential distance dependence of the evanescent field, on the one hand, makes this technique extremely sensitive to small changes from z-fluctuations of the probe (with a resolution of several nanometers), and on the other, it does not require imaging of the probe with high lateral resolution. Another distinct advantage is the high sensitivity in determining the z position of the probe in the absence of any labeling. The incorporated magnetic tweezers enable us to effectively manipulate the distance of the embedded particle from the interface either by a constant or an oscillatory force. The force ramp is easy to implement through a coil current ramp. In this way, the local viscous and elastic properties of a given system under different confinements can therefore be measured by resolving the near-surface particle motion. To test the feasibility of applying this microrheology to soft materials, we measured the viscoelastic properties of sucrose and poly(ethylene glycol) solutions and compared the results to bulk rheometry. In addition, we applied this technique in monitoring the structure and properties of deformable microgel particles near the flat surface.

  12. THE OPTICAL STRUCTURE OF THE STARBURST GALAXY M82. II. NEBULAR PROPERTIES OF THE DISK AND INNER WIND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westmoquette, M. S.; Smith, L. J.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Gallagher, J. S.; Trancho, G.; Bastian, N.

    2009-01-01

    In this second paper of the series, we present the results from optical Gemini-North GMOS-IFU and WIYN DensePak IFU spectroscopic observations of the starburst and inner wind zones of M82, with a focus on the state of the T ∼ 10 4 K ionized interstellar medium. Our electron density maps show peaks of a few 1000 cm -3 (implying very high thermal pressures), local small spatial-scale variations, and a falloff in the minor axis direction. We discuss the implications of these results with regards to the conditions/locations that may favor the escape of individual cluster winds that ultimately power the large-scale superwind. Our findings, when combined with the body of literature built up over the last decade on the state of the interstellar medium (ISM) in M82, imply that the starburst environment is highly fragmented into a range of clouds from small/dense clumps with low-filling factors ( e ∼> 10 4 cm -3 ) to larger filling factor, less dense gas. The most compact clouds seem to be found in the cores of the star cluster complexes, whereas the cloud sizes in the inter-complex region are larger. These dense clouds are bathed with an intense radiation field and embedded in an extensive high temperature (T ∼> 10 6 K), X-ray-emitting ISM that is a product of the high star formation rates in the starburst zones of M82. The near-constant state of the ionization state of the ∼10 4 K gas throughout the M82 starburst zone can be explained as a consequence of the small cloud sizes, which allow the gas conditions to respond quickly to any changes. In Paper I, we found that the observed emission lines are composed of multiple components, including a broad (FWHM ∼ 150-350 km s -1 ) feature that we associate with emission from turbulent mixing layers on the surfaces of the gas clouds, resulting from the interaction of the fast wind outflows from the synchrotron self-Comptons. The large number of compact clouds and wind sources provides an ideal environment for broad line

  13. Nonlinear optical and G-Quadruplex DNA stabilization properties of novel mixed ligand copper(II) complexes and coordination polymers: Synthesis, structural characterization and computational studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekhar, Bathula; Bodavarapu, Navya; Sridevi, M.; Thamizhselvi, G.; RizhaNazar, K.; Padmanaban, R.; Swu, Toka

    2018-03-01

    The present study reports the synthesis and evaluation of nonlinear optical property and G-Quadruplex DNA Stabilization of five novel copper(II) mixed ligand complexes. They were synthesized from copper(II) salt, 2,5- and 2,3- pyridinedicarboxylic acid, diethylenetriamine and amide based ligand (AL). The crystal structure of these complexes were determined through X-ray diffraction and supported by ESI-MAS, NMR, UV-Vis and FT-IR spectroscopic methods. Their nonlinear optical property was studied using Gaussian09 computer program. For structural optimization and nonlinear optical property, density functional theory (DFT) based B3LYP method was used with LANL2DZ basis set for metal ion and 6-31G∗ for C,H,N,O and Cl atoms. The present work reveals that pre-polarized Complex-2 showed higher β value (29.59 × 10-30e.s.u) as compared to that of neutral complex-1 (β = 0.276 × 10-30e.s.u.) which may be due to greater advantage of polarizability. Complex-2 is expected to be a potential material for optoelectronic and photonic technologies. Docking studies using AutodockVina revealed that complex-2 has higher binding energy for both G-Quadruplex DNA (-8.7 kcal/mol) and duplex DNA (-10.1 kcal/mol). It was also observed that structure plays an important role in binding efficiency.

  14. Supramolecular Properties of Triazole-containing Two Armed Peptidomimetics: From Organogelators to Nucleotide-binding Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Tin Ki

    obtain a clearer picture on the mode of association of these two series of branched peptidomimetics, the length of the tripeptidomimetic arms was truncated to a dipeptide, and the amino acid, valine, was used for further studies. Both the two new candidates, 88-K-V2 and 89-B-V2, were shown to dimerize in chloroform as shown from vapor pressure osmometry (VPO) studies. 1H NMR titration experiments indicated a better dimerization strength for the latter candidate due to the intermolecular pi-pi interactions offered by its benzene ring in addition to the intermolecular hydrogen bonding by the amides and triazole units. H/D exchange and 2D NMR experiments, and molecular modeling revealed that 88-K-V2 dimerized through the formation of antiparallel beta-strands whereas formation of parallel beta-strands took place in 89-B-V2. Compound 88-K-V2 was found to form 1:1 complexes with chloride (Ka 640 M-1) and monobasic diethyl phosphate (DEP) ion (Ka 810 M-1) in chloroform. Interestingly, 89-B-V 2 was shown to form the usual 1:1 complex with the former ion (Ka 970 M-1) while forming an unexpected 2:1 complex with the latter with positive cooperativity. It was observed that both the amides and triazole protons were involved in anion-binding. In the 88-K-V2-DEP complex, the host formed a helix-like structure that wrapped around the anion located at the center of the complex as determined by 2D NMR and molecular modeling studies. Finally, further structural modification of 88-K-V2 gave a water-soluble nucleotide-binding tweezer 93-K-R2·4TFA . This tweezer consisted of four arginines (R), two triazole units, two pyrene probes and a small hydrophilic ethanolamine tail. Fluorescence study showed that this tweezer was able to form 1:1 complexes with different nucleotides in water with similar binding strength regardless of the number of phosphate groups present in the nucleotides. Moleular modeling suggested that such a charge-independent binding behavior was due to the similar number

  15. Space Telescope and Optical Reverberation Mapping Project. II. Swift and HST Reverberation Mapping of the Accretion Disk of NGC 5548

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelson, R.; Gelbord, J.M.; Horne, K.; McHardy, I.M.; Peterson, B.M.; Arévalo, P.; Breeveld, A.A.; De Rosa, G.; Evans, P.A.; Goad, M.R.; Kriss, G.A.; Brandt, W.N.; Gehrels, N.; Grupe, D.; Kennea, J.A.; Kochanek, C.S.; Nousek, J.A.; Papadakis, I.; Siegel, M.; Starkey, D.; Uttley, P.; Vaughan, S.; Young, S.; Barth, A.J.; Bentz, M.C.; Brewer, B.J.; Crenshaw, D.M.; Dalla Bontà, E.; De Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Denney, K.D.; Dietrich, M.; Ely, J.; Fausnaugh, M.M.; Grier, C.J.; Hall, P.B.; Kaastra, J.; Kelly, B.C.; Korista, K.T.; Lira, P.; Mathur, S.; Netzer, H.; Pancoast, A.; Pei, L.; Pogge, R.W.; Schimoia, J.S.; Treu, T.; Vestergaard, M.; Villforth, C.; Yan, H.; Zu, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Recent intensive Swift monitoring of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 yielded 282 usable epochs over 125 days across six UV/optical bands and the X-rays. This is the densest extended active galactic nucleus (AGN) UV/optical continuum sampling ever obtained, with a mean sampling rate <0.5 day.

  16. Minimizing measurement uncertainties of coniferous needle-leaf optical properties, part II: experimental set-up and error analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yanez Rausell, L.; Malenovsky, Z.; Clevers, J.G.P.W.; Schaepman, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    We present uncertainties associated with the measurement of coniferous needle-leaf optical properties (OPs) with an integrating sphere using an optimized gap-fraction (GF) correction method, where GF refers to the air gaps appearing between the needles of a measured sample. We used an optically

  17. New experimental diffractive-optical data on E.Land's Retinex mechanism in human color vision: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauinger, N.

    2007-09-01

    A better understanding of the color constancy mechanism in human color vision [7] can be reached through analyses of photometric data of all illuminants and patches (Mondrians or other visible objects) involved in visual experiments. In Part I [3] and in [4, 5 and 6] the integration in the human eye of the geometrical-optical imaging hardware and the diffractive-optical hardware has been described and illustrated (Fig.1). This combined hardware represents the main topic of the NAMIROS research project (nano- and micro- 3D gratings for optical sensors) [8] promoted and coordinated by Corrsys 3D Sensors AG. The hardware relevant to (photopic) human color vision can be described as a diffractive or interference-optical correlator transforming incident light into diffractive-optical RGB data and relating local RGB onto global RGB data in the near-field behind the 'inverted' human retina. The relative differences at local/global RGB interference-optical contrasts are available to photoreceptors (cones and rods) only after this optical pre-processing.

  18. Objective-lens-free Fiber-based Position Detection with Nanometer Resolution in a Fiber Optical Trapping System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ti, Chaoyang; Ho-Thanh, Minh-Tri; Wen, Qi; Liu, Yuxiang

    2017-10-13

    Position detection with high accuracy is crucial for force calibration of optical trapping systems. Most existing position detection methods require high-numerical-aperture objective lenses, which are bulky, expensive, and difficult to miniaturize. Here, we report an affordable objective-lens-free, fiber-based position detection scheme with 2 nm spatial resolution and 150 MHz bandwidth. This fiber based detection mechanism enables simultaneous trapping and force measurements in a compact fiber optical tweezers system. In addition, we achieved more reliable signal acquisition with less distortion compared with objective based position detection methods, thanks to the light guiding in optical fibers and small distance between the fiber tips and trapped particle. As a demonstration of the fiber based detection, we used the fiber optical tweezers to apply a force on a cell membrane and simultaneously measure the cellular response.

  19. OTELO SURVEY: DEEP BVRI BROADBAND PHOTOMETRY OF THE GROTH STRIP. II. OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF X-RAY EMITTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povic, M.; Perez GarcIa, A. M.; Bongiovanni, A.; Castaneda, H.; Lorenzo, M. Fernandez; Lara-Lopez, M. A.; Sanchez-Portal, M.; Cepa, J.; Alfaro, E.; Gallego, J.; Gonzalez-Serrano, J. I.; Gonzalez, J. J.

    2009-01-01

    The Groth field is one of the sky regions that will be targeted by the OSIRIS Tunable Filter Emission Line Object survey in the optical 820 nm and 920 nm atmospheric windows. In the present paper, public Chandra X-ray data with total exposure time of 200 ks are analyzed and combined with optical broadband data of the Groth field, in order to study a set of optical structural parameters of the X-ray emitters and its relation with X-ray properties. To this aim, we processed the raw, public X-ray data using the Chandra Interactive Analysis of Observations, and determined and analyzed different structural parameters, in order to produce a morphological classification of X-ray sources. We present the morphology of 340 X-ray emitters with optical counterpart detected. Objects have been classified by X-ray type using a diagnostic diagram relating X-ray-to-optical ratio (X/O) to hardness ratio. We did not find any clear correlation between X-ray and morphological types. We analyzed the angular clustering of X-ray sources with optical counterpart using two-point correlation functions. A significant positive angular clustering was obtained from a preliminary analysis of four subsamples of the X-ray sources catalog. The clustering signal of the optically extended counterparts is similar to that of strongly clustered populations like red and very red galaxies, suggesting that the environment plays an important role in active galactic nuclei phenomena. Finally, we combined optical structural parameters with other X-ray and optical properties, and we confirmed an anticorrelation between the X/O ratio and the Abraham concentration index, which might suggest that early-type galaxies have lower Eddington rates than those of late-type galaxies.

  20. Characterization of photoactivated singlet oxygen damage in single-molecule optical trap experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Markita P; McCall, Patrick M; Qi, Zhi; Chemla, Yann R

    2009-10-21

    Optical traps or "tweezers" use high-power, near-infrared laser beams to manipulate and apply forces to biological systems, ranging from individual molecules to cells. Although previous studies have established that optical tweezers induce photodamage in live cells, the effects of trap irradiation have yet to be examined in vitro, at the single-molecule level. In this study, we investigate trap-induced damage in a simple system consisting of DNA molecules tethered between optically trapped polystyrene microspheres. We show that exposure to the trapping light affects the lifetime of the tethers, the efficiency with which they can be formed, and their structure. Moreover, we establish that these irreversible effects are caused by oxidative damage from singlet oxygen. This reactive state of molecular oxygen is generated locally by the optical traps in the presence of a sensitizer, which we identify as the trapped polystyrene microspheres. Trap-induced oxidative damage can be reduced greatly by working under anaerobic conditions, using additives that quench singlet oxygen, or trapping microspheres lacking the sensitizers necessary for singlet state photoexcitation. Our findings are relevant to a broad range of trap-based single-molecule experiments-the most common biological application of optical tweezers-and may guide the development of more robust experimental protocols.

  1. Experimental comparison of particle interaction measurement techniques using optical traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, Timothy P.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Molecke, Ryan A.

    2008-01-01

    Optical tweezers has become a powerful and common tool for sensitive determination of electrostatic interactions between colloidal particles. Recently, two techniques, 'blinking' tweezers and direct force measurements, have become increasingly prevalent in investigations of inter-particle potentials. The 'blinking' tweezers method acquires physical statistics of particle trajectories to determine drift velocities, diffusion coefficients, and ultimately colloidal forces as a function of the center-center separation of two particles. Direct force measurements monitor the position of a particle relative to the center of an optical trap as the separation distance between two continuously trapped particles is gradually decreased. As the particles near each other, the displacement from the trap center for each particle increases proportional to the inter-particle force. Although commonly employed in the investigation of interactions of colloidal particles, there exists no direct comparison of these experimental methods in the literature. In this study, an experimental apparatus was developed capable of performing both methods and is used to quantify electrostatic potentials between particles in several particle/solvent systems. Comparisons are drawn between the experiments conducted using the two measurement techniques, theory, and existing literature. Forces are quantified on the femto-Newton scale and results agree well with literature values

  2. Holographic Optical Element-Based Laser Diode Source System for Direct Metal Deposition in Space, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To meet the challenges of rapid prototyping, direct hardware fabrication, and on-the-spot repairs on the ground and on NASA space platforms, Physical Optics...

  3. High Quality, Low-Scatter SiC Optics Suitable for Space-based UV & EUV Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SSG Precision Optronics proposes the development and demonstration of a new optical fabrication process for the production of EUV quality Silicon Carbide (SiC)...

  4. Real-time observation of the initiation of RNA polymerase II transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Furqan M; Meng, Cong A; Murakami, Kenji; Kornberg, Roger D; Block, Steven M

    2015-09-10

    Biochemical and structural studies have shown that the initiation of RNA polymerase II transcription proceeds in the following stages: assembly of the polymerase with general transcription factors and promoter DNA in a 'closed' preinitiation complex (PIC); unwinding of about 15 base pairs of the promoter DNA to form an 'open' complex; scanning downstream to a transcription start site; synthesis of a short transcript, thought to be about 10 nucleotides long; and promoter escape. Here we have assembled a 32-protein, 1.5-megadalton PIC derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and observe subsequent initiation processes in real time with optical tweezers. Contrary to expectation, scanning driven by the transcription factor IIH involved the rapid opening of an extended transcription bubble, averaging 85 base pairs, accompanied by the synthesis of a transcript up to the entire length of the extended bubble, followed by promoter escape. PICs that failed to achieve promoter escape nevertheless formed open complexes and extended bubbles, which collapsed back to closed or open complexes, resulting in repeated futile scanning.

  5. Acoustical tweezers using single spherically focused piston, X-cut, and Gaussian beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, Farid G

    2015-10-01

    Partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs) satisfying the Helmholtz equation in spherical coordinates are derived for circular spherically focused piston (i.e., apodized by a uniform velocity amplitude normal to its surface), X-cut (i.e., apodized by a velocity amplitude parallel to the axis of wave propagation), and Gaussian (i.e., apodized by a Gaussian distribution of the velocity amplitude) beams. The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral and the addition theorems for the Legendre and spherical wave functions are used to obtain the PWSEs assuming weakly focused beams (with focusing angle α ⩽ 20°) in the Fresnel-Kirchhoff (parabolic) approximation. In contrast with previous analytical models, the derived expressions allow computing the scattering and acoustic radiation force from a sphere of radius a without restriction to either the Rayleigh (a ≪ λ, where λ is the wavelength of the incident radiation) or the ray acoustics (a ≫λ) regimes. The analytical formulations are valid for wavelengths largely exceeding the radius of the focused acoustic radiator, when the viscosity of the surrounding fluid can be neglected, and when the sphere is translated along the axis of wave propagation. Computational results illustrate the analysis with particular emphasis on the sphere's elastic properties and the axial distance to the center of the concave surface, with close connection of the emergence of negative trapping forces. Potential applications are in single-beam acoustical tweezers, acoustic levitation, and particle manipulation.

  6. Synthesis, crystal structure and growth of a new inorganic- organic hybrid compound for nonlinear optical applications: Aquadiiodo (3-aminopropanoic acid) cadmium (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boopathi, K.; Babu, S. Moorthy; Jagan, R.; Ramasamy, P.

    2017-12-01

    The new inorganic-organic hybrid material aquadiiodo (3-aminopropanoic acid) cadmium (II) [ADI (3-AP) Cd] has been successfully synthesized and good quality crystals have been grown by slow evaporation solution technique. The structure was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction at room temperature. The compound crystallizes in monoclinic crystal system with centro symmetric space group P21/c and four molecules in the unit cell. The structure of the title compound was further confirmed by 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis. FT-IR spectroscopy was used to confirm the presence of various functional groups in the compound. The transmittance and optical parameters of the crystal were studied by UV- Visible-NIR spectroscopy. The thermal stability of the grown crystal was evaluated using thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses. Mechanical hardness has been identified by Vickers micro hardness study and work hardening coefficient was calculated. Dielectric measurement was carried out as a function of frequency and results are discussed. The growth mechanism of the crystal was assessed by chemical etching studies. The third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility of [ADI (3-AP) Cd] was derived using the Z-scan technique, and it was 3.24955 × 10-8 esu. The positive nonlinear refractive index 2.48505 × 10-11 m2/W, is an indication of self-defocusing optical nonlinearity of the sample. It is believed that the [ADI (3-AP) Cd] is a promising new candidate for developing efficient nonlinear optical and optical power limiting devices.

  7. Simulation of optical soliton control in micro- and nanoring resonator systems

    CERN Document Server

    Daud, Suzairi; Ali, Jalil

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces optical soliton control in micro- and nanoring resonator systems. It describes how the ring resonator systems can be optimized as optical tweezers for photodetection by controlling the input power, ring radii and coupling coefficients of the systems. Numerous arrangements and configurations of micro and nanoring resonator systems are explained. The analytical formulation and optical transfer function for each model and the interaction of the optical signals in the systems are discussed. This book shows that the models designed are able to control the dynamical behaviour of generated signals.

  8. Determining Central Black Hole Masses in Distant Active Galaxies and Quasars. II. Improved Optical and UV Scaling Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne; Peterson, B. M.

    2006-01-01

    We present four improved empirical relationships useful for estimating the central black hole mass in nearby AGNs and distant luminous quasars alike using either optical or UV single-epoch spectroscopy. These mass-scaling relationships between line widths and luminosity are based on recently...

  9. Inhomogeneous and anisotropic particles in optical traps: Physical behaviour and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, S. H.

    2014-10-01

    Beyond the ubiquitous colloidal sphere, optical tweezers are capable of trapping myriad exotic particles with wildly varying geometries and compositions. This simple fact opens up numerous opportunities for micro-manipulation, directed assembly and characterization of novel nanostructures. Furthermore, the mechanical properties of optical tweezers are transformed by their contents. For example, traps capable of measuring, or applying, femto-Newton scale forces with nanometric spatial resolution can be designed. Analogous, if not superior, angular sensitivity can be achieved, enabling the creation of exquisitely sensitive torque wrenches. These capacities, and others, lead to a multitude of novel applications in the meso- and nanosciences. In this article we review experimental and theoretical work on the relationship between particle geometry, composition and trap properties. A range of associated metrological techniques are discussed.

  10. Local probing and stimulation of neuronal cells by optical manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojoc, Dan

    2014-09-01

    During development and in the adult brain, neurons continuously explore the environment searching for guidance cues, leading to the appropriate connections. Elucidating these mechanisms represents a gold goal in neurobiology. Here, I discuss our recent achievements developing new approaches to locally probe the growth cones and stimulate neuronal cell compartments with high spatial and temporal resolution. Optical tweezers force spectroscopy applied in conjunction with metabolic inhibitors reveals new properties of the cytoskeleton dynamics. On the other hand, using optically manipulated microvectors as functionalized beads or filled liposomes, we demonstrate focal stimulation of neurons by small number of signaling molecules.

  11. AFM picking-up manipulation of the metaphase chromosome fragment by using the tweezers-type probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Keiichiro; Saito, Masato; Shichiri, Motoharu; Sugiyama, Sigeru; Takamura, Yuzuru; Hashiguchi, Gen; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the development of a new procedure based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the analysis of metaphase chromosome. The aim of this study was to obtain detailed information about the specific locations of genes on the metaphase chromosome. In this research, we performed the manipulation of the metaphase chromosome by using novel AFM probes to obtain chromosome fragments of a smaller size than the ones obtained using the conventional methods, such as glass microneedles. We could pick up the fragment of the metaphase chromosome dissected by the knife-edged probe by using our tweezers-type probe

  12. Annular spherically focused ring transducers for improved single-beam acoustical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitri, F. G., E-mail: F.G.Mitri@ieee.org [Chevron, Area 52 Technology—ETC, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87508 (United States)

    2016-02-14

    The use of ultrasonic transducers with a central hollow is suggested for improved single-beam acoustical tweezers applications. Within the framework of the Fresnel-Kirchhoff parabolic approximation, a closed-form partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) for the incident velocity potential (or pressure) field is derived for an annular spherically focused ring (asfr) with uniform vibration across its surface in spherical coordinates. The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral and the addition theorems for the Legendre and spherical wave functions are used to obtain the PWSE assuming a weakly focused beam (with a focusing angle α ≤ 20°). The PWSE allows evaluating the incident field from the finite asfr in 3D. Moreover, the obtained solution allows computing efficiently the acoustic scattering and radiation force on a sphere centered on the beam's axis of wave propagation. The analytical solution is valid for wavelengths largely exceeding the radius of the asfr and when the viscosity of the surrounding fluid can be neglected. Numerical predictions for the beam-forming, scattering, and axial time-averaged radiation force are performed with particular emphasis on the asfr thickness, the axial distance separating the sphere from the center of the transducer, the (non-dimensional) size of the transducer, as well as the sphere's elastic properties without restriction to the long- (i.e., Rayleigh) or the short-wavelength (i.e., ray acoustics) regimes. Potential applications of the present solution are in beam-forming design, particle tweezing, and manipulation due to negative forces using ultrasonic asfr transducers.

  13. Experimental demonstration of optical transport, sorting and self-arrangement using a “tractor beam"

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Karásek, Vítězslav; Šiler, Martin; Chvátal, Lukáš; Čižmár, T.; Zemánek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2013), s. 123-127 ISSN 1749-4885 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0348; GA ČR GPP205/11/P294; GA MŠk LH12018; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : theoretical determination * radiation force * tweezers * binding Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 29.958, year: 2013

  14. Optical sorting of nonspherical and living microobjects in moving interference structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jákl, Petr; Arzola, A. V.; Šiler, Martin; Chvátal, Lukáš; Volke-Sepulveda, K.; Zemánek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 24 (2014), s. 29746-29760 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14069; GA MŠk LH12018; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : standing-wave * forces * microparticles * tweezers * chromatography Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.488, year: 2014

  15. Investigation of detection limits for diffuse optical tomography systems: II. Analysis of slab and cup geometry for breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Ronny; Brendel, Bernhard; Rinneberg, Herbert; Nielsen, Tim

    2009-01-21

    Using a statistical (chi-square) test on simulated data and a realistic noise model derived from the system's hardware we study the performance of diffuse optical tomography systems for fluorescence imaging. We compare the predicted smallest size of detectable lesions at various positions in slab and cup geometry and model how detection sensitivity depends on breast compression and lesion fluorescence contrast. Our investigation shows that lesion detection is limited by relative noise in slab geometry and by absolute noise in cup geometry.

  16. Time-resolved optically-detected magnetic resonance of II-VI diluted-magnetic-semiconductor heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, V.Yu.; Karczewski, G. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Godlewski, M. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Dept. Mathem. and Natural Sci. College of Sci., Card. S. Wyszynski Univ., Warsaw (Poland); Yakovlev, D.R. [Experimental Physics 2, University of Dortmund, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); A. F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, 194017 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Ryabchenko, S.M. [Institute of Physics NAS Ukraine, 03028 Kiev (Ukraine); Waag, A. [Institute of Semiconductor Technology, Braunschweig Technical University, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2007-01-15

    Time-resolved optically-detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) technique was used to study spin dynamics of Mn{sup 2+} ions in (Zn,Mn)Se- and (Cd,Mn)Te-based diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum wells. Times of spin-lattice relaxation have been measured directly from a dynamical shift of exciton luminescence lines after a pulsed impact of 60 GHz microwave radiation. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Optical crop sensor for variable-rate nitrogen fertilization in corn: II - indices of fertilizer efficiency and corn yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jardes Bragagnolo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Generally, in tropical and subtropical agroecosystems, the efficiency of nitrogen (N fertilization is low, inducing a temporal variability of crop yield, economic losses, and environmental impacts. Variable-rate N fertilization (VRF, based on optical spectrometry crop sensors, could increase the N use efficiency (NUE. The objective of this study was to evaluate the corn grain yield and N fertilization efficiency under VRF determined by an optical sensor in comparison to the traditional single-application N fertilization (TSF. With this purpose, three experiments with no-tillage corn were carried out in the 2008/09 and 2010/11 growing seasons on a Hapludox in South Brazil, in a completely randomized design, at three different sites that were analyzed separately. The following crop properties were evaluated: aboveground dry matter production and quantity of N uptake at corn flowering, grain yield, and vegetation index determined by an N-Sensor® ALS optical sensor. Across the sites, the corn N fertilizer had a positive effect on corn N uptake, resulting in increased corn dry matter and grain yield. However, N fertilization induced lower increases of corn grain yield at site 2, where there was a severe drought during the growing period. The VRF defined by the optical crop sensor increased the apparent N recovery (NRE and agronomic efficiency of N (NAE compared to the traditional fertilizer strategy. In the average of sites 1 and 3, which were not affected by drought, VRF promoted an increase of 28.0 and 41.3 % in NAE and NRE, respectively. Despite these results, no increases in corn grain yield were observed by the use of VRF compared to TSF.

  18. Structural and optical properties of tin (II) sulfide thin films deposited using organophosphorus precursor (Ph3PS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assili, Kawther; Alouani, Khaled; Vilanova, Xavier

    2017-02-01

    Tin sulfide (SnS) thin films have been deposited onto glass substrates using triphenylphosphine sulfide (Ph3PS) as a sulfur precursor in a chemical vapor deposition reactor in a temperature range of 250 °C-400 °C. The influence of the sulphidisation temperature in the crystal structure, surface morphology, chemical composition and optical properties has been investigated. X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive analysis of x-rays, and Raman spectroscopy showed that pure SnS thin films have been successfully obtained at 250 °C. All the deposited films were polycrystalline and showed orthorhombic structure, with a preferential orientation according to the direction . The optical measurements showed that the films deposited exhibited a direct allowed transition and have a relatively high absorption coefficient. The presence of mixed tin sulfide phases granted by the variation of the sulphidisation temperature has affected the optical properties of the deposited films. The refractive index (n) and extinction coefficient (k), has low values compared to conventional semiconductor materials. The grown films can be considered as a good light absorbing material and a promising candidate for application in optoelectronic devices.

  19. Effects of Manganese (Ii Sulphate on Structural, Spectral, Optical, Thermal and Mechanical Properties of L-Alanine Sodium Sulphate Single Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Praveena

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available New Non-linear Optical materials have been attracting in the research world for their potential applications in emerging opto-electronic technology. The dipolar nature of amino acid leads to peculiar physical and chemical properties, thus making a good candidate for NLO applications. Single crystals of manganese(II sulphate doped L-Alanine sodium sulphate(LASS has been synthesized by slow evaporation technique. Structural property of the grown crystals are characterized by X-ray powder diffraction,FT-IR spectral analysis conforms all the functional groups. Thermogravity (TG and differential themogravimetric (DTA analysis have been performed to study the thermal stability of the crystals. The second harmonic generation efficiency was measured by Kurtz-Perry powder technique. The transmission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation is analysed through UV-VIS spectrum. Microhardness was measured at different applied load to understand the mechanical stability of the crystal.

  20. Estimation of the specific mass effect in the isotope shifts of energy levels in the optical spectrum of Ba I and Ba II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendrill, L.R.

    1984-01-01

    A graphical method for separating mass and volume effects from purely optical isotope shift data is presented and compared with King's ''bunching'' method. Recent experimental data on isotope shifts for a wide range of spectral lines in the naturally abundant isotopes of Ba I and Ba II are analysed. Some agreement is found with muonic X-ray data concerning the nuclear size for the isotopes 136, 137 and 138, but there is disagreement (over 20%) for the other isotopes. The level isotope shifts are further parameterised in terms of a linear model, and the specific mass effect is decomposed into sums of one-electron and two-electron shift parameters with respect to the inert-gas like ground state of Ba III. (orig.)

  1. Quantifying Force and Viscoelasticity Inside Living Cells Using an Active–Passive Calibrated Optical Trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Christine M.; Maes, Josep; Oddershede, Lene

    2017-01-01

    As described in the previous chapters, optical tweezers have become a tool of precision for in vitro single-molecule investigations, where the single molecule of interest most often is studied in purified form in an experimental assay with a well-controlled fluidic environment. A well-controlled ...... is that the size and refractive properties of the trapped object and the viscoelastic properties of its environment need not be known. We explain the protocol and demonstrate its use with experiments of trapped granules inside live S.pombe cells.......As described in the previous chapters, optical tweezers have become a tool of precision for in vitro single-molecule investigations, where the single molecule of interest most often is studied in purified form in an experimental assay with a well-controlled fluidic environment. A well......-controlled fluidic environment implies that the physical properties of the liquid, most notably the viscosity, are known and the fluidic environment can, for calibrational purposes, be treated as a simple liquid. In vivo, however, optical tweezers have primarily been used as a tool of manipulation and not so often...

  2. A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF GAMMA-RAY BURST OPTICAL EMISSION. II. AFTERGLOW ONSET AND LATE RE-BRIGHTENING COMPONENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang Enwei; Li Liang; Liang Yunfeng; Tang Qingwen; Chen Jiemin; Lu Ruijing; Lue Lianzhong [Department of Physics and GXU-NAOC Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Gao He; Zhang, Bing; Lue Houjun [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Wu Xuefeng [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yi Shuangxi; Dai Zigao [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093 (China); Zhang Jin; Wei Jianyan, E-mail: lew@gxu.edu.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2013-09-01

    We continue our systematic statistical study of various components of gamma-ray burst (GRB) optical light curves. We decompose the early onset bump and the late re-brightening bump with empirical fits and analyze their statistical properties. Among the 146 GRBs that have well-sampled optical light curves, the onset and re-brightening bumps are observed in 38 and 26 GRBs, respectively. It is found that the typical rising and decaying slopes for both the onset and re-brightening bumps are {approx}1.5 and {approx} - 1.15, respectively. No early onset bumps in the X-ray band are detected to be associated with the optical onset bumps, while an X-ray re-brightening bump is detected for half of the re-brightening optical bumps. The peak luminosity is anti-correlated with the peak time L{sub p}{proportional_to}t{sub p}{sup -1.81{+-}0.32} for the onset bumps and L{sub p}{proportional_to}t{sub p}{sup -0.83{+-}0.17} for the re-brightening bumps. Both L{sub p} and the isotropic energy release of the onset bumps are correlated with E{sub {gamma},iso}, whereas no similar correlation is found for the re-brightening bumps. These results suggest that the afterglow onset bumps are likely due to the deceleration of the GRB fireballs. Taking the onset bumps as probes for the properties of the fireballs and their ambient medium, we find that the typical power-law index of the relativistic electrons is 2.5 and the medium density profile behaves as n{proportional_to}r {sup -1} within the framework of the synchrotron external shock models. With the medium density profile obtained from our analysis, we also confirm the correlation between the initial Lorentz factor ({Gamma}{sub 0}) and E{sub iso,{gamma}} in our previous work. The jet component that produces the re-brightening bump seems to be on-axis and independent of the prompt emission jet component. Its typical kinetic energy budget would be about one order of magnitude larger than the prompt emission component, but with a lower {Gamma

  3. LAST II: Differential temporal responses of macular pigment optical density in patients with atrophic age-related macular degeneration to dietary supplementation with xanthophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richer, Stuart; Devenport, Jenny; Lang, John C

    2007-05-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in aging Western societies. The objective of the Lutein Antioxidant Supplementation Trial (LAST) was to determine whether specific dietary interventions increased macular pigment optical density (MPOD) and visual function in patients with atrophic ARMD. The current objective of LAST II is to discern those specific characteristics that increase MPOD, i.e., that might differentiate a responder from a nonresponder. The LAST study was a prospective, 12-month, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled trial conducted at an urban midwestern Veterans Administation Hospital from August 1999 to May 2001. Ninety patients with atrophic ARMD entered the study and were assigned randomly to 1 of 3 groups. Patients in group 1 received 10 mg lutein; in group 2, 10 mg lutein in combination with vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants; and in group 3, maltodextrin placebo. Changes in macular MPOD over time were evaluated. Characteristics potentially influencing MPOD included age, weight (body mass index), initial baseline values of macular pigment, and combining xanthophylls with other nutrients. MPOD increased with supplementation and declined slightly without supplementation (regression slopes not equal to zero in supplemented groups, P < 0.02). The highest increases in MPOD over time occurred in patients with lower baseline values of MPOD. Statistically significant increases in MPOD density were observed in the lutein group for patients with baseline MPOD optical density units and up to 0.2 optical density units in the lutein plus antioxidant group. Further analysis found that none of the subjects' eyes in the lowest quartile of baseline MPOD were in the lowest quartile for change in MPOD. Noteworthy is the observation that those individuals with lowest MPOD, and in greatest need of supplementation, were also most likely to benefit from either the lutein or the lutein plus antioxidant

  4. Axial and transverse acoustic radiation forces on a fluid sphere placed arbitrarily in Bessel beam standing wave tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitri, F.G.

    2014-01-01

    The axial and transverse radiation forces on a fluid sphere placed arbitrarily in the acoustical field of Bessel beams of standing waves are evaluated. The three-dimensional components of the time-averaged force are expressed in terms of the beam-shape coefficients of the incident field and the scattering coefficients of the fluid sphere using a partial-wave expansion (PWE) method. Examples are chosen for which the standing wave field is composed of either a zero-order (non-vortex) Bessel beam, or a first-order Bessel vortex beam. It is shown here, that both transverse and axial forces can push or pull the fluid sphere to an equilibrium position depending on the chosen size parameter ka (where k is the wave-number and a the sphere’s radius). The corresponding results are of particular importance in biophysical applications for the design of lab-on-chip devices operating with Bessel beams standing wave tweezers. Moreover, potential investigations in acoustic levitation and related applications in particle rotation in a vortex beam may benefit from the results of this study. -- Highlights: •The axial and transverse forces on a fluid sphere in acoustical Bessel beams tweezers are evaluated. •The attraction or repulsion to an equilibrium position in the standing wave field is examined. •Potential applications are in particle manipulation using standing waves

  5. Axial and transverse acoustic radiation forces on a fluid sphere placed arbitrarily in Bessel beam standing wave tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitri, F.G., E-mail: mitri@chevron.com

    2014-03-15

    The axial and transverse radiation forces on a fluid sphere placed arbitrarily in the acoustical field of Bessel beams of standing waves are evaluated. The three-dimensional components of the time-averaged force are expressed in terms of the beam-shape coefficients of the incident field and the scattering coefficients of the fluid sphere using a partial-wave expansion (PWE) method. Examples are chosen for which the standing wave field is composed of either a zero-order (non-vortex) Bessel beam, or a first-order Bessel vortex beam. It is shown here, that both transverse and axial forces can push or pull the fluid sphere to an equilibrium position depending on the chosen size parameter ka (where k is the wave-number and a the sphere’s radius). The corresponding results are of particular importance in biophysical applications for the design of lab-on-chip devices operating with Bessel beams standing wave tweezers. Moreover, potential investigations in acoustic levitation and related applications in particle rotation in a vortex beam may benefit from the results of this study. -- Highlights: •The axial and transverse forces on a fluid sphere in acoustical Bessel beams tweezers are evaluated. •The attraction or repulsion to an equilibrium position in the standing wave field is examined. •Potential applications are in particle manipulation using standing waves.

  6. Single molecule measurements of DNA helicase activity with magnetic tweezers and t-test based step-finding analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yeonee; Strub, Marie-Paule; Neuman, Keir C.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers is a versatile and easy to implement single-molecule technique that has become increasingly prevalent in the study of nucleic acid based molecular motors. Here, we provide a description of the magnetic tweezers instrument and guidelines for measuring and analyzing DNA helicase activity. Along with experimental methods, we describe a robust method of single-molecule trajectory analysis based on the Student’s t-test that accommodates continuous transitions in addition to the discrete transitions assumed in most widely employed analysis routines. To illustrate the single-molecule unwinding assay and the analysis routine, we provide DNA unwinding measurements of Escherichia coli RecQ helicase under a variety of conditions (Na+, ATP, temperature, and DNA substrate geometry). These examples reveal that DNA unwinding measurements under various conditions can aid in elucidating the unwinding mechanism of DNA helicase but also emphasize that environmental effects on DNA helicase activity must be considered in relation to in vivo activity and mechanism. PMID:27131595

  7. A new airborne Polar Nephelometer for the measurement of optical and microphysical cloud properties. Part II: Preliminary tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Crépel

    Full Text Available A new optical sensor, the airborne Polar Nephelometer, has been tested in an open wind tunnel. The wind tunnel was operated in cloudy conditions including either cloud water droplets or ice crystals, or a mixture of these particles. The sensor is designed to measure the optical and microphysical parameters of cloud particles sized from a few micrometers to about 500 µm diameter. Basically, the probe measures the scattering phase function of an ensemble of cloud particles which intersect a collimated laser beam near the focal point of a paraboloidal mirror. From the measured scattering phase function the retrieval of the droplet-size spectra and subsequent derived quantities such as liquid water content and size parameters can be calculated using an inversion method. The particle phase discrimination (water droplets/ice particles can be derived from the shape of the scattering phase function and the sensitivity of the probe allows the detection of small ice crystals (typically of 5 µm diameter. The paper describes the preliminary results obtained by the prototype version of the Polar Nephelometer in various cloudy conditions. These results are compared with direct microphysical measurements obtained by usual PMS probes also mounted in the wind tunnel. Complementary results obtained in a cold chamber are presented in order to illustrate the reliability of the Polar Nephelometer in the presence of small ice crystals.

  8. Optical timing receiver for the NASA Spaceborne Ranging System. Part II: high precision event-timing digitizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leskovar, Branko; Turko, Bojan

    1978-08-01

    Position-resolution capabilities of the NASA Spaceborne Laser Ranging System are essentially determined by the timeresolution capabilities of its optical timing receiver. The optical timing receiver consists of a fast photoelectric device; (e.g., photomultiplier or an avalanche photodiode detector), a timing discriminator, a high-precision event-timing digitizer, and a signal-processing system. The time-resolution capabilities of the receiver are determined by the photoelectron time spread of the photoelectric device, the time walk and resolution characteristics of the timing discriminator, and the resolution of the event-timing digitizer. It is thus necessary to evaluate available fast photoelectronic devices with respect to the time-resolution capabilities, and to develop a very low time walk timing discriminator and a high-resolution event-timing digitizer to be used in the high-resolution spaceborne laser ranging system receiver. This part of the report describes the development of a high precision event-timing digitizer. The event-timing digitizer is basically a combination of a very accurate high resolution real time digital clock and an interval timer. The timing digitizer is a high resolution multiple stop clock, counting the time up to 131 days in 19.5 ps increments.

  9. Time-Resolved Transient Optical Absorption Study of Bis(terpyridyl)oligothiophenes and Their Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers with Zn(II) Ion Couplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rais, David; Menšík, Miroslav; Štenclová-Bláhová, Pavla; Svoboda, Jan; Vohlídal, Jiří; Pfleger, Jiří

    2015-06-18

    α,ω-Bis(terpyridyl)oligothiophenes spontaneously assemble with Zn(II) ions giving conjugated constitutional dynamic polymers (dynamers) of the metallo-supramolecular class, which potentially might be utilized in optoelectronics. Their photophysical properties, which are of great importance in this field of application, are strongly influenced by the dynamic morphology. It was assessed in this study by using ultrafast pump-probe optical absorption spectroscopy. We identified and characterized relaxation processes running in photoexcited molecules of these oligomers and dynamers and show impacts of disturbed coplanarity of adjacent rings (twisting the thiophene-thiophene and thiophene-terpyridyl bonds by attached hexyl side groups) and Zn(II) ion couplers on these processes. Major effects are seen in the time constants of rotational relaxation, intersystem crossing, and de-excitation lifetimes. The photoexcited states formed on different repeating units within the same dynamer chain do not interact with each other even at very high excitation density. The method is presented that allows determining the equilibrium fraction of unbound oligothiophene species in a dynamer solution, from which otherwise hardly accessible values of the average degree of polymerization of constitutionally dynamic chains in solution can be estimated.

  10. Numerical modeling of optical coherent transient processes with complex configurations - II. Angled beams with arbitrary phase modulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Tiejun; Tian Mingzhen; Barber, Zeb W.; Randall Babbitt, Wm.

    2004-01-01

    This work is a continuation of the development of the theoretical model for optical coherent transient (OCT) processes with complex configurations. A theoretical model for angled beams with arbitrary phase modulation has been developed based on the model presented in our previous work for the angled beam geometry. A numerical tool has been devised to simulate the OCT processes involving angled beams with the frequency detuning, chirped, and phase-modulated laser pulses. The simulations for pulse shaping and arbitrary waveform generation (AWG) using OCT processes have been performed. The theoretical analysis of programming and probe schemes for pulse shaper and AWG is also presented including the discussions on the rephasing condition and the phase compensation. The results from the analysis, the simulation, and the experiment show very good agreement

  11. Evolution of colloidal dispersions in novel time-varying optical potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, Brian Alan

    Optical traps use forces exerted by a tightly focused light beam to trap objects from tens of nanometers to tens of micrometers in size. Since their introduction in 1986, optical tweezers have become very useful to biology, chemistry, and soft condensed-matter physics. Work presented here, promises to advance optical tweezers not only in fundamental scientific research, but also in applications outside of the laboratory and into the mainstream of miniaturized manufacturing and diagnostics. By providing unprecedented access to the mesoscopic world, a new generation of optical traps, called Dynamic Holographic Optical Tweezers (HOTs) offers revolutionary new opportunities for fundamental and applied research. To demonstrate this technique, HOTs will be used to pump particles via a new method of transport called Optical Peristalsis (OP). OP is efficient method for transporting mesoscopic objects in three dimensions using short repetitive sequences of holographic optical trapping patterns. Transport in this process is analogous to peristaltic pumping, with the configurations of optical traps mimicking states of a peristaltic pump. While not limited to the deterministic particle transport, OP, can also be a platform to investigate the stochastic limit of particle transport. Advances in recent years have demonstrated that a variety of time-varying perturbations can induce drift in a diffusive system without exerting an overall force. Among these, are thermal ratchet models in which the system is subjected to time-varying energy landscapes that break spatiotemporal symmetry and thereby induce drift. Typically, the potential energy landscape is chosen to be the sawtooth potential. This work describes an alternate class of symmetric thermal ratchet models, that are not sawtooth, and demonstrates their efficacy in biasing the diffusion of colloidal spheres in both the stochastic and deterministic limits. Unlike previous models, each state in this thermal ratchet consists of

  12. Synthesis, structural, and optical properties of type-II ZnO–ZnS core–shell nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sookhakian, M., E-mail: m.sokhakian@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Amin, Y.M. [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Basirun, W.J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Nanotechnology and Catalysis Research Centre (NanoCat), Institute of Postgraduate Studies, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Tajabadi, M.T. [Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Kamarulzaman, N. [Centre for Nanomaterials Research Institute of Science, Level 3 Block C (Old Engineering Building), Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-01-15

    We demonstrate a facile one-step method for the preparation of ZnO–ZnS core–shell type-II nanostructures, pure ZnS quantum dots and pure ZnO nanoparticles with different experimental conditions. Treatment with sodium hydroxide as a capping agent is investigated systematically during the synthesis of ZnS quantum dots (QDs). The thickness of the ZnS shell is controlled by the concentration of the sodium sulphide during the synthesis of ZnO–ZnS core–shell nanostructures. The morphology and structure of samples are verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The UV–vis absorption spectra of the pure ZnS QDs exhibit a blue shift in the absorption edge due to the quantum confinement effect. The PL emission spectra of the ZnO–ZnS core–shell nanostructure are compared with the ZnO nanoparticles. The ZnO–ZnS core–shell nanostructures show decrease in the UV and green emissions with the appearance of a blue emission, which are not found in the ZnO nanoparticles. -- Highlights: • It has synthesised ZnO–ZnS core–shell type II in one-step for the first time. • The as-synthesised samples were characterised by using XRD, UV–vis. • The photoluminescence properties of ZnO–ZnS core–shell was compared with ZnO. • The UV and green emission in the PL spectrum of ZnO–ZnS core–shell decreased. • The blue emission in the PL spectrum of ZnO–ZnS core–shell appeared.

  13. Synthesis, structural, and optical properties of type-II ZnO–ZnS core–shell nanostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sookhakian, M.; Amin, Y.M.; Basirun, W.J.; Tajabadi, M.T.; Kamarulzaman, N.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a facile one-step method for the preparation of ZnO–ZnS core–shell type-II nanostructures, pure ZnS quantum dots and pure ZnO nanoparticles with different experimental conditions. Treatment with sodium hydroxide as a capping agent is investigated systematically during the synthesis of ZnS quantum dots (QDs). The thickness of the ZnS shell is controlled by the concentration of the sodium sulphide during the synthesis of ZnO–ZnS core–shell nanostructures. The morphology and structure of samples are verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The UV–vis absorption spectra of the pure ZnS QDs exhibit a blue shift in the absorption edge due to the quantum confinement effect. The PL emission spectra of the ZnO–ZnS core–shell nanostructure are compared with the ZnO nanoparticles. The ZnO–ZnS core–shell nanostructures show decrease in the UV and green emissions with the appearance of a blue emission, which are not found in the ZnO nanoparticles. -- Highlights: • It has synthesised ZnO–ZnS core–shell type II in one-step for the first time. • The as-synthesised samples were characterised by using XRD, UV–vis. • The photoluminescence properties of ZnO–ZnS core–shell was compared with ZnO. • The UV and green emission in the PL spectrum of ZnO–ZnS core–shell decreased. • The blue emission in the PL spectrum of ZnO–ZnS core–shell appeared

  14. Analysis of single-cell differences by use of an on-chip microculture system and optical trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamoto, Y; Inoue, I; Moriguchi, H; Yasuda, K

    2001-09-01

    A method is described for continuous observation of isolated single cells that enables genetically identical cells to be compared; it uses an on-chip microculture system and optical tweezers. Photolithography is used to construct microchambers with 5-microm-high walls made of thick photoresist (SU-8) on the surface of a glass slide. These microchambers are connected by a channel through which cells are transported, by means of optical tweezers, from a cultivation microchamber to an analysis microchamber, or from the analysis microchamber to a waste microchamber. The microchambers are covered with a semi-permeable membrane to separate them from nutrient medium circulating through a "cover chamber" above. Differential analysis of isolated direct descendants of single cells showed that this system could be used to compare genetically identical cells under contamination-free conditions. It should thus help in the clarification of heterogeneous phenomena, for example unequal cell division and cell differentiation.

  15. Development of a Data Reduction Algorithm for Optical Wide Field Patrol (OWL) II: Improving Measurement of Lengths of Detected Streaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun-Youp; Choi, Jin; Roh, Dong-Goo; Park, Maru; Jo, Jung Hyun; Yim, Hong-Suh; Park, Young-Sik; Bae, Young-Ho; Park, Jang-Hyun; Moon, Hong-Kyu; Choi, Young-Jun; Cho, Sungki; Choi, Eun-Jung

    2016-09-01

    As described in the previous paper (Park et al. 2013), the detector subsystem of optical wide-field patrol (OWL) provides many observational data points of a single artificial satellite or space debris in the form of small streaks, using a chopper system and a time tagger. The position and the corresponding time data are matched assuming that the length of a streak on the CCD frame is proportional to the time duration of the exposure during which the chopper blades do not obscure the CCD window. In the previous study, however, the length was measured using the diagonal of the rectangle of the image area containing the streak; the results were quite ambiguous and inaccurate, allowing possible matching error of positions and time data. Furthermore, because only one (position, time) data point is created from one streak, the efficiency of the observation decreases. To define the length of a streak correctly, it is important to locate the endpoints of a streak. In this paper, a method using a differential convolution mask pattern is tested. This method can be used to obtain the positions where the pixel values are changed sharply. These endpoints can be regarded as directly detected positional data, and the number of data points is doubled by this result.

  16. A new concept for the control of a slow-extracted beam in a line with rotational optics: Part II

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, Michael; Pullia, M

    1999-01-01

    The current trend in hadrontherapy is towards high-precision, conformal scanning of tumours with a 'pencil' beam of light ions or protons, delivered by a synchrotron using slow extraction. The particular shape of the slow-extracted beam segment in phase space and the need to vary the beam size in a lattice with rotating optical elements create a special problem for the design of the extraction transfer line and gantry. The design concept presented in this report is based on telescope modules with integer-pi phase advances in both transverse planes. The beam size in the plane of the extraction is controlled by altering the phase advance and hence the rotation of the extracted beam segment in phase space. The vertical beam size is controlled by stepping the vertical betatron amplitude function over a range of values and passing the changed beam size from 'hand-to-hand' through the telescope modules to the various treatment rooms. In the example given, a combined phase shifter and 'stepper', at a point close to ...

  17. A Polypeptide-DNA Hybrid with Selective Linking Capability Applied to Single Molecule Nano-Mechanical Measurements Using Optical Tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moayed, F.; Mashaghi, A.; Tans, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    Many applications in biosensing, biomaterial engineering and single molecule biophysics require multiple non-covalent linkages between DNA, protein molecules, and surfaces that are specific yet strong. Here, we present a novel method to join proteins and dsDNA molecule at their ends, in an

  18. Streak-Camera Measurements with High Currents in PEP-II and Variable Optics in SPEAR3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Weixeng; Fisher, Alan, a Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC

    2008-06-05

    A dual-axis, synchroscan streak camera was used to measure longitudinal bunch profiles in three storage rings at SLAC: the PEP-II low- and high-energy rings, and SPEAR3. At high currents, both PEP rings exhibit a transient synchronous-phase shift along the bunch train due to RF-cavity beam loading. Bunch length and profile asymmetry were measured along the train for a range of beam currents. To avoid the noise inherent in a dual-axis sweep, we accumulated single-axis synchroscan images while applying a 50-ns gate to the microchannel plate. To improve the extinction ratio, an upstream mirror pivoting at 1 kHz was synchronized with the 2kHz MCP gate to deflect light from other bunches off the photocathode. Bunch length was also measured on the HER as a function of beam energy. For SPEAR3 we measured bunch length as a function of single-bunch current for several lattices: achromatic, low-emittance and low momentum compaction. In the first two cases, resistive and reactive impedance components can be extracted from the longitudinal bunch profiles. In the low-alpha configurations, we observed natural bunch lengths approaching the camera resolution, requiring special care to remove instrumental effects, and saw evidence of periodic bursting.

  19. Introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry: a tutorial review. Part II. Practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Amélie; Nonell, Anthony; Todolí Torró, José Luis; Bresson, Carole; Vio, Laurent; Vercouter, Thomas; Chartier, Frédéric

    2015-07-23

    Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are increasingly used to carry out analyses in organic/hydro-organic matrices. The introduction of such matrices into ICP sources is particularly challenging and can be the cause of numerous drawbacks. This tutorial review, divided in two parts, explores the rich literature related to the introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in ICP sources. Part I provided theoretical considerations associated with the physico-chemical properties of such matrices, in an attempt to understand the induced phenomena. Part II of this tutorial review is dedicated to more practical considerations on instrumentation, instrumental and operating parameters, as well as analytical strategies for elemental quantification in such matrices. Two important issues are addressed in this part: the first concerns the instrumentation and optimization of instrumental and operating parameters, pointing out (i) the description, benefits and drawbacks of different kinds of nebulization and desolvation devices and the impact of more specific instrumental parameters such as the injector characteristics and the material used for the cone; and, (ii) the optimization of operating parameters, for both ICP-OES and ICP-MS. Even if it is at the margin of this tutorial review, Electrothermal Vaporization and Laser Ablation will also be shortly described. The second issue is devoted to the analytical strategies for elemental quantification in such matrices, with particular insight into the isotope dilution technique, particularly used in speciation analysis by ICP-coupled separation techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Validation of MODIS derived aerosol optical depth and an investigation on aerosol transport over the South East Arabian Sea during ARMEX-II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aloysius

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of wind and humidity on aerosol optical depth (AOD over the Arabian sea is being investigated using MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Level 3 (Collection-5 and NCEP (National Centres for Environmental Prediction reanalysis data for the second phase of the Arabian Sea Monsoon Experiment (ARMEX-II over the South East Arabian Sea (SEAS in the pre-monsoon period (14 March–10 April 2003. In order to qualify MODIS data for this study, MODIS aerosol parameters were first compared with ship borne Microtops measurements. This showed correlations 0.96–0.97 in the case of spectral AODs and a correlation 0.72 for the angstrom exponents. The daily AOD data from MODIS and winds from NCEP reveal that the ship observed episodic enhancement and decay of AOD at the TSL (Time Series Location during 23 March–6 April 2003 was caused by the southward drift of an aerosol pocket driven by an intensification and reduction of surface pressure in the North Western Arabian Sea with a low altitude convergence prevailing over SEAS. The AOD increase coincided with a decrease in the Angstrom exponent and the fine mode fraction suggesting the pocket being dominated by coarse mode particles. A partial correlation analysis reveals that the lower altitude wind convergence is the most influential atmospheric variable in modulating AOD over the ARMEX-II domain during the TSL period. However, surface winds at a distant zone in the north/north west upwind direction also had a moderate influence, though with a lag of two days. But this effect was minor since the winds were not strong enough to produce marine aerosols matching with the high AODs over the ARMEX-II domain. These findings and the similarity between MODIS column mass concentration and the ship borne QCM (Quartz Crystal Microbalance measured coarse mode mass concentration, suggest that the aerosol pocket was mostly composed of coarse mode mineral dust in the lower atmospheric altitudes

  1. A spectroscopic survey of the youngest field stars in the solar neighborhood . II. The optically faint sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasca, A.; Guillout, P.; Klutsch, A.; Ferrero, R. Freire; Marilli, E.; Biazzo, K.; Gandolfi, D.; Montes, D.

    2018-05-01

    Context. Star formation in the solar neighborhood is mainly traced by young stars in open clusters, associations, and in the field, which can be identified, for example, by their X-ray emission. The determination of stellar parameters for the optical counterparts of X-ray sources is crucial for a full characterization of these stars. Aims: This work extends the spectroscopic study of the RasTyc sample, obtained by the cross-correlation of the Tycho and ROSAT All-Sky Survey catalogs, to stars fainter than V = 9.5 mag and aims to identify sparse populations of young stars in the solar neighborhood. Methods: We acquired 625 high-resolution spectra for 443 presumably young stars with four different instruments in the northern hemisphere. The radial and rotational velocity (vsini) of our targets were measured by means of the cross-correlation technique, which is also helpful to discover single-lined (SB1), double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2), and multiple systems. We used the code ROTFIT to perform an MK spectral classification and to determine the atmospheric parameters (Teff, logg, [Fe/H]) and vsini of the single stars and SB1 systems. For these objects, we used the spectral subtraction of slowly rotating templates to measure the equivalent widths of the Hα and Li I 6708 Å lines, which enabled us to derive their chromospheric activity level and lithium abundance. We made use of Gaia DR1 parallaxes and proper motions to locate the targets in the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram and to compute the space velocity components of the youngest objects. Results: We find a remarkable percentage (at least 35%) of binaries and multiple systems. On the basis of the lithium abundance, the sample of single stars and SB1 systems appears to be mostly ( 60%) composed of stars younger than the members of the UMa cluster. The remaining sources are in the age range between the UMa and Hyades clusters ( 20%) or older ( 20%). In total, we identify 42 very young (PMS-like) stars

  2. Optical and mechanical design of the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) beam-line at Indus-II synchrotron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, N.C.; Jha, S.N.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Sinha, A.K.; Mishra, V.K.; Verma, Vishnu; Ghosh, A.K.

    2002-11-01

    An extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) beam line for x-ray absorption studies using energy dispersive geometry and position sensitive detector is being designed for the INDUS-II Synchrotron source. The beam line would be used for doing x-ray absorption experiments involving measurements of fme structures above the absorption edge of different species of atoms in a material The results of the above experiments would lead to the determination of different important structural parameters of materials viz.. inter-atomic distance. co-ordination number, degree of disorder and radial distribution function etc. The optical design of the beam line has been completed based on the working principle that a single crystal bent in the shape of an ellipse by a crystal bender would act as a dispersing as well as focusing element. The mechanical design of the beam line including the crystal bender has also been completed and discussed here. Calculations have been done to detennine the temperature profile on the different components of the beam line under exposure to synchrotron radiation and proper cooling channels have been designed to bring down the heat load on the components. (author)

  3. Optical particle trapping and dynamic manipulation using spatial light modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, René Lynge

    suitable for optical trapping. A phaseonly spatial light modulator (SLM) is used for the phase encoding of the laser beam. The SLM is controlled directly from a standard computer where phase information is represented as gray-scale image information. Experimentally, both linear and angular movements......This thesis deals with the spatial phase-control of light and its application for optical trapping and manipulation of micron-scale objects. Utilizing the radiation pressure, light exerts on dielectric micron-scale particles, functionality of optical tweezers can be obtained. Multiple intensity...... compression factors of two, which is not achievable with binary phase encoding, have been successfully demonstrated. In addition, the GPC method has been miniaturized and implemented in a planar optical platform and shown to work acceptably, with relatively high visibility. Furthermore, the GPC method has...

  4. Laser Tweezer Controlled Solid Immersion Lens for High Resolution Imaging in Microfluidic and Biological Samples

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Birkbeck, Aaron L; Zlatanovic, Sanja; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Esener, Sadik C

    2005-01-01

    ...). Up to now, solid immersion lens imaging systems have relied upon cantilever-mounted SILs that are difficult to integrate into microfluidic systems and require an extra alignment step with external optics...

  5. Introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry: A tutorial review. Part II. Practical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclercq, Amélie; Nonell, Anthony; Todolí Torró, José Luis; Bresson, Carole; Vio, Laurent; Vercouter, Thomas; Chartier, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: This tutorial review is dedicated to the analysis of organic/hydro-organic matrices by ICP techniques. A state-of-the-art focusing on sample introduction, relevant operating parameters optimization and analytical strategies for elemental quantification is provided. - Highlights: • Practical considerations to perform analyses in organic/hydro-organic matrices. • Description, benefits and drawbacks of recent introduction devices. • Optimization to improve plasma tolerance towards organic/hydro-organic matrices. • Analytical strategies for elemental quantification in organic/hydro-organic matrices. - Abstract: Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are increasingly used to carry out analyses in organic/hydro-organic matrices. The introduction of such matrices into ICP sources is particularly challenging and can be the cause of numerous drawbacks. This tutorial review, divided in two parts, explores the rich literature related to the introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in ICP sources. Part I provided theoretical considerations associated with the physico-chemical properties of such matrices, in an attempt to understand the induced phenomena. Part II of this tutorial review is dedicated to more practical considerations on instrumentation, instrumental and operating parameters, as well as analytical strategies for elemental quantification in such matrices. Two important issues are addressed in this part: the first concerns the instrumentation and optimization of instrumental and operating parameters, pointing out (i) the description, benefits and drawbacks of different kinds of nebulization and desolvation devices and the impact of more specific instrumental parameters such as the injector characteristics and the material used for the cone; and, (ii) the optimization of operating parameters, for both ICP-OES and ICP-MS. Even if it is at the margin of this tutorial review

  6. Introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry: A tutorial review. Part II. Practical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclercq, Amélie, E-mail: amelie.leclercq@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Nonell, Anthony, E-mail: anthony.nonell@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Todolí Torró, José Luis, E-mail: jose.todoli@ua.es [Universidad de Alicante, Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatología, Ap. de Correos, 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Bresson, Carole, E-mail: carole.bresson@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vio, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.vio@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vercouter, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.vercouter@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SEARS, Laboratoire de développement Analytique Nucléaire Isotopique et Elémentaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chartier, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.chartier@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-07-23

    Graphical abstract: This tutorial review is dedicated to the analysis of organic/hydro-organic matrices by ICP techniques. A state-of-the-art focusing on sample introduction, relevant operating parameters optimization and analytical strategies for elemental quantification is provided. - Highlights: • Practical considerations to perform analyses in organic/hydro-organic matrices. • Description, benefits and drawbacks of recent introduction devices. • Optimization to improve plasma tolerance towards organic/hydro-organic matrices. • Analytical strategies for elemental quantification in organic/hydro-organic matrices. - Abstract: Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are increasingly used to carry out analyses in organic/hydro-organic matrices. The introduction of such matrices into ICP sources is particularly challenging and can be the cause of numerous drawbacks. This tutorial review, divided in two parts, explores the rich literature related to the introduction of organic/hydro-organic matrices in ICP sources. Part I provided theoretical considerations associated with the physico-chemical properties of such matrices, in an attempt to understand the induced phenomena. Part II of this tutorial review is dedicated to more practical considerations on instrumentation, instrumental and operating parameters, as well as analytical strategies for elemental quantification in such matrices. Two important issues are addressed in this part: the first concerns the instrumentation and optimization of instrumental and operating parameters, pointing out (i) the description, benefits and drawbacks of different kinds of nebulization and desolvation devices and the impact of more specific instrumental parameters such as the injector characteristics and the material used for the cone; and, (ii) the optimization of operating parameters, for both ICP-OES and ICP-MS. Even if it is at the margin of this tutorial review

  7. EDITORIAL: Nonlinear optical manipulation, patterning and control in nano- and micro-scale systems Nonlinear optical manipulation, patterning and control in nano- and micro-scale systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denz, Cornelia; Simoni, Francesco

    2009-03-01

    Nonlinearities are becoming more and more important for a variety of applications in nanosciences, bio-medical sciences, information processing and photonics. For applications at the crossings of these fields, especially microscopic and nanoscopic imaging and manipulation, nonlinearities play a key role. They may range from simple nonlinear parameter changes up to applications in manipulating, controlling and structuring material by light, or the manipulation of light by light itself. It is this area between basic nonlinear optics and photonic applications that includes `hot' topics such as ultra-resolution optical microscopy, micro- and nanomanipulation and -structuring, or nanophotonics. This special issue contains contributions in this field, many of them from the International Conference on Nonlinear Microscopy and Optical Control held in conjunction with a network meeting of the ESF COST action MP0604 `Optical Micromanipulation by Nonlinear Nanophotonics', 19-22 February 2008, Münster, Germany. Throughout this special issue, basic investigations of material structuring by nonlinear light--matter interaction, light-induced control of nanoparticles, and novel nonlinear material investigation techniques, are presented, covering the basic field of optical manipulation and control. These papers are followed by impressive developments of optical tweezers. Nowadays, optical phase contrast tweezers, twin and especially multiple beam traps, develop particle control in a new dimension: particles can be arranged, sorted and identified with high throughput. One of the most prominent forthcoming applications of optical tweezers is in the field of microfluidics. The action of light on fluids will open new horizons in microfluidic manipulation and control. The field of optical manipulation and control is a very broad field that has developed in an impressive way, in a short time, in Europe with the installation of the MP0604 network. Top researchers from 19 countries are

  8. Optical trapping of colloidal particles and measurement of the defect line tension and colloidal forces in a thermotropic nematic liquid crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smalyukh, I.I.; Kuzmin, A.N.; Kachynski, A.V.; Prasad, P.N.; Lavrentovich, O.D.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate optical trapping and manipulation of transparent microparticles suspended in a thermotropic nematic liquid crystal with low birefringence. We employ the particle manipulation to measure line tension of a topologically stable disclination line and to determine colloidal interaction of particles with perpendicular surface anchoring of the director. The three-dimensional director fields and positions of the particles manipulated by laser tweezers are visualized by fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy

  9. Lectures on light nonlinear and quantum optics using the density matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Rand, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    This book bridges the gap between introductory quantum mechanics and the research front of modern optics and scientific fields that make use of light. While suitable as a reference for the specialist in quantum optics, it also targets non-specialists from other disciplines who need to understand light and its uses in research. It introduces a single analytic tool, the density matrix, to analyze complex optical phenomena encountered in traditional as well as cross-disciplinary research. It moves swiftly in a tight sequence from elementary to sophisticated topics in quantum optics, including optical tweezers, laser cooling, coherent population transfer, optical magnetism, electromagnetically induced transparency, squeezed light, and cavity quantum electrodynamics. A systematic approach starts with the simplest systems—stationary two-level atoms—then introduces atomic motion, adds more energy levels, and moves on to discuss first-, second-, and third-order coherence effects that are the basis for analyzing n...

  10. NIAC Phase II Orbiting Rainbows: Future Space Imaging with Granular Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadrelli, Marco B.; Basinger, Scott; Arumugam, Darmindra; Swartzlander, Grover

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by the light scattering and focusing properties of distributed optical assemblies in Nature, such as rainbows and aerosols, and by recent laboratory successes in optical trapping and manipulation, we propose a unique combination of space optics and autonomous robotic system technology, to enable a new vision of space system architecture with applications to ultra-lightweight space optics and, ultimately, in-situ space system fabrication. Typically, the cost of an optical system is driven by the size and mass of the primary aperture. The ideal system is a cloud of spatially disordered dust-like objects that can be optically manipulated: it is highly reconfigurable, fault-tolerant, and allows very large aperture sizes at low cost. This new concept is based on recent understandings in the physics of optical manipulation of small particles in the laboratory and the engineering of distributed ensembles of spacecraft swarms to shape an orbiting cloud of micron-sized objects. In the same way that optical tweezers have revolutionized micro- and nano-manipulation of objects, our breakthrough concept will enable new large scale NASA mission applications and develop new technology in the areas of Astrophysical Imaging Systems and Remote Sensing because the cloud can operate as an adaptive optical imaging sensor. While achieving the feasibility of constructing one single aperture out of the cloud is the main topic of this work, it is clear that multiple orbiting aerosol lenses could also combine their power to synthesize a much larger aperture in space to enable challenging goals such as exo-planet detection. Furthermore, this effort could establish feasibility of key issues related to material properties, remote manipulation, and autonomy characteristics of cloud in orbit. There are several types of endeavors (science missions) that could be enabled by this type of approach, i.e. it can enable new astrophysical imaging systems, exo-planet search, large apertures

  11. Infrared optical constants of aqueous sulfate-nitrate-ammonium multi-component tropospheric aerosols from attenuated total reflectance measurements: Part II. An examination of mixing rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, Gregory J.; Sokolik, Irina N.; Martin, Scot T.

    2007-01-01

    We examine the performance of several mixing rules that are commonly used in modeling optical constants of aerosol mixtures either in remote sensing or radiation transfer/climate studies employing the new refractive index data reported in Part I. We demonstrate that the optical constants of the considered mixtures are not accurately modeled using pure solute optical constants (e.g., ammonium sulfate optical constants and the optical constants of pure water) due to the complex ion-ion and ion-water interactions. On the other hand, we do find that ternary and quaternary mixtures can be well modeled by applying the mixing rules to lower order multi-component optical constants data, e.g., binary data to determine ternary optical constants, or binary and ternary data to determine quaternary optical constants. By using lower order optical constants data sets, much of the ion-ion and ion-water effects are captured. Both mass-fraction and volume-fraction weighting of the 'component' optical constants yield satisfactory results, performing as well or better than the more complicated mixing rules. These findings will be of practical use in remote sensing and radiation transfer/climate studies as well as help guide the decision on what optical constants measurements will be required

  12. Values of some topographic parameters of optic nerve head obtained by Heidelberg retina tomograph II in volunteers and different stage primary open-angle glaucoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Anguelov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: То assess the values of the top five topographic parameters of optic nerve head (ONH obtained by Heidelberg retina tomograph (HRT II in volunteers and primary open angle glaucoma (POAG patients with different stage of perimetric changes.Methods: 73 eyes (38 volunteers at the age of 56 years ±13, 11 men and 27 women and 170 eyes (90 patients at the age of 66 years ±12, 33 men and 57 women were examined. We performed the comprehensive ophthalmic examination, standard automated perimetry and measurement of the top five topographic parameters of ONH — rim area, rim volume, cup shape measure, height variation contour и mean RNFL thickness. For the purpose of this study we used HRT II.Results: We determine the values of the investigated topographic parameters of the ONH for healthy volunteers (rim area = 1.68±0.22 mm2, rim volume = 0.44±0.07 mm3, cup shape measure = –0.2±0.06, height variation contour = 0.38±0.08 mm and mean RNFL thickness = 0.24±0.03 mm and for the patients in different perimetric glaucoma stages (early stage: rim area = 1.52±0.47 mm2, rim volume = 0.38±0.17 mm3, cup shape measure = –0.14±0.1, height variation contour = 0.36±0.09 mm and mean RNFL thickness = 0.22±0.11 mm; moderate stage: rim area = 1.21±0.46 mm2, rim volume = 0.27±0.17 mm3, cup shape measure = –0.09±0.1, height variation contour = 0.36±0.17 mm and mean RNFL thickness = 0.16±0.12 mm; severe stage: rim area = 0.97±0.01 mm2, rim volume = 0.18±0.17 mm3, cup shape measure = –0.06±0.1, height variation contour = 0.28±0.11 mm and mean RNFL thickness = 0.17±0.11 mm. Hodapp-Parrish-Anderson (H-P-A ’s staging system includes three separate levels (early, moderate and severe of glaucoma according to visual field defects. Each stage is additionally characterized by the values of the top five topographic parameters of the ONH.Conclusion: Early diagnosis, staging and follow-up of POAG are based on both function and

  13. Optics/Optical Diagnostics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optics/Optical Diagnostics Laboratory supports graduate instruction in optics, optical and laser diagnostics and electro-optics. The optics laboratory provides...

  14. Chiral Rayleigh particles discrimination in dynamic dual optical traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carretero, Luis; Acebal, Pablo; Blaya, Salvador

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A chiral optical conveyor belt for enantiomeric separation of nanopar-ticles is numerically demonstrated. • Chiral resolution has been theoretically analyzed for chiral spheres immersed in water. • Electromagnetic fields have been designed for obtaining Chiral selective optical tweezers to separate enantiomers in different spatial regions. - Abstract: A chiral optical conveyor belt for enantiomeric separation of nanoparticles is numerically demonstrated by using different types of counter propagating elliptical Laguerre Gaussian beams with different beam waist and topological charge. The analysis of chiral resolution has been made for particles immersed in water demonstrating that in the analyzed conditions one type of enantiomer is trapped in a deep potential and the others are transported by the chiral conveyor toward another trap located in a different geometrical region.

  15. Near-Field, On-Chip Optical Brownian Ratchets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao-Hua; Huang, Ningfeng; Jaquay, Eric; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2016-08-10

    Nanoparticles in aqueous solution are subject to collisions with solvent molecules, resulting in random, Brownian motion. By breaking the spatiotemporal symmetry of the system, the motion can be rectified. In nature, Brownian ratchets leverage thermal fluctuations to provide directional motion of proteins and enzymes. In man-made systems, Brownian ratchets have been used for nanoparticle sorting and manipulation. Implementations based on optical traps provide a high degree of tunability along with precise spatiotemporal control. Here, we demonstrate an optical Brownian ratchet based on the near-field traps of an asymmetrically patterned photonic crystal. The system yields over 25 times greater trap stiffness than conventional optical tweezers. Our technique opens up new possibilities for particle manipulation in a microfluidic, lab-on-chip environment.

  16. Optically Driven Mobile Integrated Micro-Tools for a Lab-on-a-Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jui Liu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes an optically driven complex micromachine with an Archimedes microscrew as the mechanical power, a sphere as a coupler, and three knives as the mechanical tools. The micromachine is fabricated by two-photon polymerization and is portably driven by optical tweezers. Because the microscrew can be optically trapped and rotates spontaneously, it provides driving power for the complex micro-tools. In other words, when a laser beam focuses on the micromachine, the microscrew is trapped toward the focus point and simultaneously rotates. A demonstration showed that the integrated micromachines are grasped by the optical tweezers and rotated by the Archimedes screw. The rotation efficiencies of the microrotors with and without knives are 1.9 rpm/mW and 13.5 rpm/mW, respectively. The micromachine can also be portably dragged along planed routes. Such Archimedes screw-based optically driven complex mechanical micro-tools enable rotation similar to moving machines or mixers, which could contribute to applications for a biological microfluidic chip or a lab-on-a-chip.

  17. Raman tweezers spectroscopy of live, single red and white blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aseefhali Bankapur

    Full Text Available An optical trap has been combined with a Raman spectrometer to make high-resolution measurements of Raman spectra of optically-immobilized, single, live red (RBC and white blood cells (WBC under physiological conditions. Tightly-focused, near infrared wavelength light (1064 nm is utilized for trapping of single cells and 785 nm light is used for Raman excitation at low levels of incident power (few mW. Raman spectra of RBC recorded using this high-sensitivity, dual-wavelength apparatus has enabled identification of several additional lines; the hitherto-unreported lines originate purely from hemoglobin molecules. Raman spectra of single granulocytes and lymphocytes are interpreted on the basis of standard protein and nucleic acid vibrational spectroscopy data. The richness of the measured spectrum illustrates that Raman studies of live cells in suspension are more informative than conventional micro-Raman studies where the cells are chemically bound to a glass cover slip.

  18. Quantitative optical trapping and optical manipulation of micro-sized objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania Sayed

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available An optical tweezers technique is used for ultraprecise micromanipulation to measure positions of micrometer scale objects with a precision down to the nanometer scale. It consists of a high performance research microscope with motorized scanning stage and sensitive position detection system. Up to 10 traps can be used quasi-simultaneously. Non photodamage optical trapping of Escherichia coli (E. coli bacteria cells of 2 µm in length, as an example of motile bacteria, has been shown in this paper. Also, efficient optical trapping and rotation of polystyrene latex particles of 3 µm in diameter have been studied, as an optical handle for the pick and place of other tiny objects. A fast galvoscanner is used to produce multiple optical traps for manipulation of micro-sized objects and optical forces of these trapped objects quantified and measured according to explanation of ray optics regime. The diameter of trapped particle is bigger than the wavelength of the trapping laser light. The force constant (k has been determined in real time from the positional time series recorded from the trapped object that is monitored by a CCD camera through a personal computer.

  19. Acoustic radiation force on a sphere in standing and quasi-standing zero-order Bessel beam tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitri, F.G.

    2008-01-01

    Starting from the exact acoustic scattering from a sphere immersed in an ideal fluid and centered along the propagation axis of a standing or quasi-standing zero-order Bessel beam, explicit partial-wave representations for the radiation force are derived. A standing or a quasi-standing acoustic field is the result of propagating two equal or unequal amplitude zero-order Bessel beams, respectively, along the same axis but in opposite sense. The Bessel beam is characterized by the half-cone angle β of its plane wave components, such that β = 0 represents a plane wave. It is assumed here that the half-cone angle β for each of the counter-propagating acoustic Bessel beams is equal. Fluid, elastic and viscoelastic spheres immersed in water are treated as examples. Results indicate the capability of manipulating spherical targets based on their mechanical and acoustical properties. This condition provides an impetus for further designing acoustic tweezers operating with standing or quasi-standing Bessel acoustic waves. Potential applications include particle manipulation in micro-fluidic lab-on-chips as well as in reduced gravity environments

  20. Observing dynamics of chromatin fibers in Xenopus egg extracts by single DNA manipulation using a transverse magnetic tweezer setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jie; Skoko, Dunja; Marko, John; Maresca, Tom; Heald, Rebecca

    2005-03-01

    We have studied assembly of chromatin on single DNAs using Xenopus egg extracts and a specially designed magnetic tweezer setup which generates controlled force in the focal plane of the objective, allowing us to visualize and measure DNA extension under a wide range of constant tensions. We found, in the absence of ATP, interphase extracts assembled nucleosomes against DNA tensions of up to 3.5 piconewtons (pN). We observed force-induced disassembly and opening-closing fluctuations indicating our experiments were in mechano-chemical equilibrium. We found that the ATP-depleted reaction can do mechanical work of 27 kcal/mol per nucleosome, providing a measurement of the free energy difference between core histone octamers on and off DNA. Addition of ATP leads to highly dynamic behavior: time courses show processive runs of assembly and disassembly of not observed in the -ATP case, with forces of 2 pN leading to nearly complete fiber disassembly. Our study shows that ATP hydrolysis plays a major role in nucleosome rearrangement and removal, and suggests that chromatin in vivo may be subject to continual assembly and disassembly.

  1. Disrupting self-assembly and toxicity of amyloidogenic protein oligomers by "molecular tweezers" - from the test tube to animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Aida; Bitan, Gal

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, therapy for diseases caused by abnormal protein folding and aggregation (amyloidoses) is limited to treatment of symptoms and provides only temporary and moderate relief to sufferers. The failure in developing successful disease-modifying drugs for amyloidoses stems from the nature of the targets for such drugs - primarily oligomers of amyloidogenic proteins, which are distinct from traditional targets, such as enzymes or receptors. The oligomers are metastable, do not have well-defined structures, and exist in dynamically changing mixtures. Therefore, inhibiting the formation and toxicity of these oligomers likely will require out-of-the-box thinking and novel strategies. We review here the development of a strategy based on targeting the combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions that are key to the assembly and toxicity of amyloidogenic proteins using lysine (K)-specific "molecular tweezers" (MTs). Our discussion includes a survey of the literature demonstrating the important role of K residues in the assembly and toxicity of amyloidogenic proteins and the development of a lead MT derivative called CLR01, from an inhibitor of protein aggregation in vitro to a drug candidate showing effective amelioration of disease symptoms in animal models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

  2. Optical Angular Momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimondo, Ennio

    2004-01-01

    particles and atoms, the rotational frequency shift, the angular momentum in nonlinear optics, and the entanglement of angular momentum. An introductory part contains the historic paper by Poynting mentioned above, and another one by Beth in 1936 where the angular momentum of light was measured through a mechanical detection. It also includes a paper by Allen written in 2002 as a long foreword to a Special Issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics where more recent major developments within this field were illustrated. Both experimental and theoretical aspects of orbital angular momentum are covered, the editors themselves having, in fact, contributed to developments in both aspects. A newcomer to the field will immediately realize the most important issues connected to the generation, propagation and application of laser beams with orbital angular momentum. A reader already acquainted with the main features of the topic may skip the first papers of all the sections listed above, and focus his or her attention to those papers devoted to the more recent developments. This is therefore a book to be considered with great attention by a large community. My only, minor, remark on the choice of the papers reproduced within this book is that applications to solid state physics, such as liquid crystals, are not mentioned. The field keeps expanding. For instance, very recently optical beams bearing optical angular momentum have been recognized as potential systems for doing quantum computation. Optical tweezers have defined a revolution in optical manipulation for research in the fields of biology, physical chemistry and soft condensed matter physics. The angular momentum of light also has applications in atom optics. Good textbooks are essential in establishing and expanding any field; they help broaden the interest in the field and ensure that the next generation of physicists can learn it. The present book satisfies those requirements because it provides to

  3. Effect of temperature on the optical and structural properties of hexadecylamine capped ZnS nanoparticles using Zinc(II) N-ethyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate as single source precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onwudiwe, Damian C., E-mail: dconwudiwe@webmail.co.za [Chemical Resource Beneficiation, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Strydom, Christien [Chemical Resource Beneficiation, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Oluwafemi, Oluwatobi S., E-mail: oluwafemi.oluwatobi@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Walter Sisulu University, Mthatha Campus, Private Bag X1, Mthatha (South Africa); Songca, Sandile P. [Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Walter Sisulu University, P.O. Box 19712, Tecoma, East London (South Africa)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► HDA-capped ZnS nanoparticles were synthesized via thermolysis of a single source precursor. ► Zinc(II) N-ethyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate was used as the single source precursor. ► The growth temperature was varied to study the optical properties of the nanocrystals. ► Change in growth temperature affects the structural properties of the ZnS nanoparticles. ► Hexagonal wurtzite phase was obtained at lower temperatures while cubic sphalerite phase was obtained at higher growth temperatures. -- Abstract: Reported in this work is the synthesis of HDA (hexadecylamine)-capped ZnS nanoparticles by a single source route using Zinc(II) N-ethyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate as a precursor. By varying the growth temperature, the temporal evolution of the optical properties and morphology of the nanocrystals were investigated. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using UV–vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). All the particles exhibited quantum confinement in their optical properties with band edge emission at the early stage of the reaction. The XRD showed transition from hexagonal wurtzite phase to cubic sphalerite phase as the growth temperature increases. The TEM image showed that the particles are small and spherical in shape while the HRTEM image confirmed the crystalline nature of the material.

  4. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Department of Chemistry Bayero University, P. M. B. 3011, Kano, Nigeria. E-mail: hnuhu2000@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and .... water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in acetone. The molar conductance measurement [Table 3] of the complex compounds in.

  5. Optical vortex beams: Generation, propagation and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wen

    An optical vortex (also known as a screw dislocation or phase singularity) is one type of optical singularity that has a spiral phase wave front around a singularity point where the phase is undefined. Optical vortex beams have a lot of applications in areas such as optical communications, LADAR (laser detection and ranging) system, optical tweezers, optical trapping and laser beam shaping. The concepts of optical vortex beams and methods of generation are briefly discussed. The properties of optical vortex beams propagating through atmospheric turbulence have been studied. A numerical modeling is developed and validated which has been applied to study the high order properties of optical vortex beams propagating though a turbulent atmosphere. The simulation results demonstrate the advantage that vectorial vortex beams may be more stable and maintain beam integrity better when they propagate through turbulent atmosphere. As one important application of optical vortex beams, the laser beam shaping is introduced and studied. We propose and demonstrate a method to generate a 2D flat-top beam profile using the second order full Poincare beams. Its applications in two-dimensional flat-top beam shaping with spatially variant polarization under low numerical aperture focusing have been studied both theoretically and experimentally. A novel compact flat-top beam shaper based on the proposed method has been designed, fabricated and tested. Experimental results show that high quality flat-top profile can be obtained with steep edge roll-off. The tolerance to different input beam sizes of the beam shaper is also verified in the experimental demonstration. The proposed and experimentally verified LC beam shaper has the potential to become a promising candidate for compact and low-cost flat-top beam shaping in areas such as laser processing/machining, lithography and medical treatment.

  6. Raman tweezers in microfluidic systems for analysis and sorting of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilát, Zdeněk.; Ježek, Jan; Kaňka, Jan; Zemánek, Pavel

    2014-12-01

    We have devised an analytical and sorting system combining optical trapping with Raman spectroscopy in microfluidic environment, dedicated to identification and sorting of biological objects, such as living cells of various unicellular organisms. Our main goal was to create a robust and universal platform for non-destructive and non-contact sorting of micro-objects based on their Raman spectral properties. This approach allowed us to collect spectra containing information about the chemical composition of the objects, such as the presence and composition of pigments, lipids, proteins, or nucleic acids, avoiding artificial chemical probes such as fluorescent markers. The non-destructive nature of this optical analysis and manipulation allowed us to separate individual living cells of our interest in a sterile environment and provided the possibility to cultivate the selected cells for further experiments. We used a mixture of polystyrene micro-particles and algal cells to test and demonstrate the function of our analytical and sorting system. The devised system could find its use in many medical, biotechnological, and biological applications.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Electroresponsive Materials with Applications In: Part I. Second Harmonic Generation. Part II. Organic-Lanthanide Ion Complexes for Electroluminescence and Optical Amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claude, Charles

    1995-01-01

    Materials for optical waveguides were developed from two different approaches, inorganic-organic composites and soft gel polymers. Inorganic-organic composites were developed from alkoxysilane and organically modified silanes based on nonlinear optical chromophores. Organically modified silanes based on N-((3^' -trialkoxysilyl)propyl)-4-nitroaniline were synthesized and sol-gelled with trimethoxysilane. After a densification process at 190^circC with a corona discharge, the second harmonic of the film was measured with a Nd:YAG laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064nm, d_{33} = 13pm/V. The decay of the second harmonic was expressed by a stretched bi-exponential equation. The decay time (tau _2) was equal to 3374 hours, and was comparable to nonlinear optical systems based on epoxy/Disperse Orange 1. The processing temperature of the organically modified silane was limited to 200^circC due to the decomposition of the organic chromophore. Soft gel polymers were synthesized and characterized for the development of optical waveguides with dc-electrical field assisted phase-matching. Polymers based on 4-nitroaniline terminated poly(ethylene oxide-co-propylene oxide) were shown to exhibit second harmonic generation that were optically phase-matched in an electrical field. The optical signals were stable and reproducible. Siloxane polymers modified with 1-mercapto-4-nitrobenzene and 1-mercapto-4-methylsulfonylstilbene nonlinear optical chromophores were synthesized. The physical and the linear and nonlinear optical properties of the polymers were characterized. Waveguides were developed from the polymers which were optically phase -matched and had an efficiency of 8.1%. The siloxane polymers exhibited optical phase-matching in an applied electrical field and can be used with a semiconductor laser. Organic lanthanide ion complexes for electroluminescence and optical amplifiers were synthesized and characterized. The complexes were characterized for their thermal and

  8. Feasibility of Optical Instruments Based on Multiaperture Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-16

    system may be configured. The optical elements may be nonimaging concentrators (light horns), the field of view (FOV) of which may be controlled by a...RD-RI58 868 FEASIBILITY OF OPTICAL INSTRUMENTS BASED ON i/I MULTIAPERTURE OPTICS (U) FLORIDA UNIV GAINESVILLE DEPT OF NUCLEAR ENGINEERING SCIENCES J D...d Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED ’ 0 Feasibility of Optical Instruments Based on Final Report * CD Multiaperature Optics 615/83 to 9/30

  9. X-ray Spectral Survey of WGACAT Quasars, II: Optical and Radio Properties of Quasars with Low Energy X-ray Cut-offs

    OpenAIRE

    Elvis, Martin; Fiore, Fabrizio; Giommi, Paolo; Padovani, Paolo

    1997-01-01

    We have selected quasars with X-ray colors suggestive of a low energy cut-off, from the ROSAT PSPC pointed archive. We examine the radio and optical properties of these 13 quasars. Five out of the seven quasars with good optical spectra show associated optical absorption lines, with two having high delta-v candidate systems. Two other cut-off quasars show reddening associated with the quasar. We conclude that absorption is highly likely to be the cause of the X-ray cut-offs, and that the abso...

  10. Static and dynamic behavior of two optically bound microparticles in a standing wave

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Karásek, Vítězslav; Šiler, Martin; Trojek, Jan; Zemánek, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 20 (2011), s. 19613-19626 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0348; GA ČR GPP205/11/P294; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : single-beam * binding * particles * nanoparticles * tweezers * matter * forces * light * micromanipulation * manipulation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.587, year: 2011

  11. Orthogonal trapping and sensing with long working distance optics [invited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin; Tauro, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    We are developing a next generation BioPhotonics Workstation to be applied in research on regulated microbial cell growth including their underlying physiological mechanisms, in vivo characterization of cell constituents and manufacturing of nanostructures and meta-materials. The workstation......Photonics Workstation that allows the user to directly control and simultaneously measure a portfolio of important chemical and biological processes. We arc currently able to generate up to 100 powerful optical traps using well-separated objectives, which eliminates the need for high numerical aperture oil or water...... immersion objectives required in conventional optical tweezers. This generates a large field of view and leaves vital space for integrating other enabling tools for probing the trapped particles, such as linear and nonlinear microscopy or micro-spectroscopy. Together with chcmists at another Danish...

  12. Characterization of hydrogel microstructure using laser tweezers particle tracking and confocal reflection imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotlarchyk, M A; Botvinick, E L; Putnam, A J

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogels are commonly used as extracellular matrix mimetics for applications in tissue engineering and increasingly as cell culture platforms with which to study the influence of biophysical and biochemical cues on cell function in 3D. In recent years, a significant number of studies have focused on linking substrate mechanical properties to cell function using standard methodologies to characterize the bulk mechanical properties of the hydrogel substrates. However, current understanding of the correlations between the microstructural mechanical properties of hydrogels and cell function in 3D is poor, in part because of a lack of appropriate techniques. Here we have utilized a laser tracking system, based on passive optical microrheology instrumentation, to characterize the microstructure of viscoelastic fibrin clots. Trajectories and mean square displacements were observed as bioinert PEGylated (PEG: polyethylene glycol) microspheres (1, 2 or 4.7 μm in diameter) diffused within confined pores created by the protein phase of fibrin hydrogels. Complementary confocal reflection imaging revealed microstructures comprised of a highly heterogeneous fibrin network with a wide range of pore sizes. As the protein concentration of fibrin gels was increased, our quantitative laser tracking measurements showed a corresponding decrease in particle mean square displacements with greater resolution and sensitivity than conventional imaging techniques. This platform-independent method will enable a more complete understanding of how changes in substrate mechanical properties simultaneously influence other microenvironmental parameters in 3D cultures.

  13. Mega-pixel PQR laser chips for interconnect, display ITS, and biocell-tweezers OEIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, O'Dae; Yoon, J. H.; Kim, D. K.; Kim, Y. C.; Lee, S. E.; Kim, S. S.

    2008-02-01

    We describe a photonic quantum ring (PQR) laser device of three dimensional toroidal whispering gallery cavity. We have succeeded in fabricating the first genuine mega-pixel laser chips via regular semiconductor technology. This has been realized since the present injection laser emitting surface-normal dominant 3D whispering gallery modes (WGMs) can be operated CW with extremely low operating currents (μA-nA per pixel), together with the lasing temperature stabilities well above 140 deg C with minimal redshifts, which solves the well-known integration problems facing the conventional VCSEL. Such properties unusual for quantum well lasers become usual because the active region, involving vertically confining DBR structure in addition to the 2D concave WGM geometry, induces a 'photonic quantum ring (PQR)-like' carrier distribution through a photonic quantum corral effect. A few applications of such mega-pixel PQR chips are explained as follows: (A) Next-generation 3D semiconductor technologies demand a strategy on the inter-chip and intra-chip optical interconnect schemes with a key to the high-density emitter array. (B) Due to mounting traffic problems and fatalities ITS technology today is looking for a revolutionary change in the technology. We will thus outline how 'SLEEP-ITS' can emerge with the PQR's position-sensing capability. (C) We describe a recent PQR 'hole' laser of convex WGM: Mega-pixel PQR 'hole' laser chips are even easier to fabricate than PQR 'mesa' lasers. Genuine Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam patterns of PQR holes are very promising for biocell manipulations like sorting mouse myeloid leukemia (M1s) cells. (D) Energy saving and 3D speckle-free POR laser can outdo LEDs in view of red GaAs and blue GaN devices fabricated recently.

  14. Optical materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poker, D.B.; Ortiz, C.

    1989-01-01

    This book reports on: Diamond films, Synthesis of optical materials, Structure related optical properties, Radiation effects in optical materials, Characterization of optical materials, Deposition of optical thin films, and Optical fibers and waveguides

  15. Optical RISC computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, Peter S.; Stone, Richard V.; Hessenbruch, John M.; Zeise, Frederick F.

    1993-07-01

    A second generation digital optical computer (DOC II) has been developed which utilizes a RISC based operating system as its host. This 32 bit, high performance (12.8 GByte/sec), computing platform demonstrates a number of basic principals that are inherent to parallel free space optical interconnects such as speed (up to 1012 bit operations per second) and low power 1.2 fJ per bit). Although DOC II is a general purpose machine, special purpose applications have been developed and are currently being evaluated on the optical platform.

  16. Optical micromanipulation of active cells with minimal perturbations: direct and indirect pushing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenlu; Chowdhury, Sagar; Gupta, Satyandra K; Losert, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    The challenge to wide application of optical tweezers in biological micromanipulation is the photodamage caused by high-intensity laser exposure to the manipulated living systems. While direct exposure to infrared lasers is less likely to kill cells, it can affect cell behavior and signaling. Pushing cells with optically trapped objects has been introduced as a less invasive alternative, but the technique includes some exposure of the biological object to parts of the optical tweezer beam. To keep the cells farther away from the laser, we introduce an indirect pushing-based technique for noninvasive manipulation of sensitive cells. We compare how cells respond to three manipulation approaches: direct manipulation, pushing, and indirect pushing. We find that indirect manipulation techniques lessen the impact of manipulation on cell behavior. Cell survival increases, as does the ability of cells to maintain shape and wiggle. Our experiments also demonstrate that indirect pushing allows cell-cell contacts to be formed in a controllable way, while retaining the ability of cells to change shape and move.

  17. An investigation on the effect of gamma-irradiation on the optical absorption spectra in Cu(II) doped ammonium Tetrachlorozincate (ATZC) single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu El-Fadl, A.; Mohamad, G.A.; Abd El-Sttar, M.

    2003-01-01

    Optical transmittance measurements were carried out on Ammonium tetrachlorozincate (ATZC) crystals doped with small concentrations of Cu 2+ ions and irradiated with different doses of gamma-radiation. The absorption coefficient (alpha) and the extinction coefficient (K) of unirradiated and irradiated ATZC crystals were calculated. Valued of the allowed indirect optical energy gap (E g ) of ATZC were calculated as a function of gamma-dose. The effect of gamma irradiation is to increase in the absorption coefficient value and to decrease in E g value. The results could be explained in the fact that gamma irradiation produces defects of ionizing type because of internal irradiation with photon or Compton electrons

  18. The Electromagnetic Counterpart of the Binary Neutron Star Merger LIGO/Virgo GW170817. II. UV, Optical, and Near-infrared Light Curves and Comparison to Kilonova Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Berger, E.; Villar, V. A.; Metzger, B. D.; Nicholl, M.; Chornock, R.; Blanchard, P. K.; Fong, W.; Margutti, R.; Soares-Santos, M.; Alexander, K. D.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Brout, D.; Brown, D. A.; Butler, R. E.; Chen, H. -Y.; Diehl, H. T.; Doctor, Z.; Drout, M. R.; Eftekhari, T.; Farr, B.; Finley, D. A.; Foley, R. J.; Frieman, J. A.; Fryer, C. L.; García-Bellido, J.; Gill, M. S. S.; Guillochon, J.; Herner, K.; Holz, D. E.; Kasen, D.; Kessler, R.; Marriner, J.; Matheson, T.; Neilsen, E. H.; Quataert, E.; Palmese, A.; Rest, A.; Sako, M.; Scolnic, D. M.; Smith, N.; Tucker, D. L.; Williams, P. K. G.; Balbinot, E.; Carlin, J. L.; Cook, E. R.; Durret, F.; Li, T. S.; Lopes, P. A. A.; Lourenço, A. C. C.; Marshall, J. L.; Medina, G. E.; Muir, J.; Muñoz, R. R.; Sauseda, M.; Schlegel, D. J.; Secco, L. F.; Vivas, A. K.; Wester, W.; Zenteno, A.; Zhang, Y.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Banerji, M.; Bechtol, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; Costa, L. N. da; Davis, C.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Johnson, M. D.; Kent, S.; Krause, E.; Kron, R.; Kuehn, K.; Nuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Martini, P.; McMahon, R. G.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Plazas, A. A.; Roe, N.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R. C.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; Yanny, B.; Zuntz, J.

    2017-10-16

    We present UV, optical, and NIR photometry of the first electromagnetic counterpart to a gravitational wave source from Advanced LIGO/Virgo, the binary neutron star merger GW170817. Our data set extends from the discovery of the optical counterpart at $0.47$ days to $18.5$ days post-merger, and includes observations with the Dark Energy Camera (DECam), Gemini-South/FLAMINGOS-2 (GS/F2), and the {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} ({\\it HST}). The spectral energy distribution (SED) inferred from this photometry at $0.6$ days is well described by a blackbody model with $T\\approx 8300$ K, a radius of $R\\approx 4.5\\times 10^{14}$ cm (corresponding to an expansion velocity of $v\\approx 0.3c$), and a bolometric luminosity of $L_{\\rm bol}\\approx 5\\times10^{41}$ erg s$^{-1}$. At $1.5$ days we find a multi-component SED across the optical and NIR, and subsequently we observe rapid fading in the UV and blue optical bands and significant reddening of the optical/NIR colors. Modeling the entire data set we find that models with heating from radioactive decay of $^{56}$Ni, or those with only a single component of opacity from $r$-process elements, fail to capture the rapid optical decline and red optical/NIR colors. Instead, models with two components consistent with lanthanide-poor and lanthanide-rich ejecta provide a good fit to the data, the resulting "blue" component has $M_\\mathrm{ej}^\\mathrm{blue}\\approx 0.01$ M$_\\odot$ and $v_\\mathrm{ej}^\\mathrm{blue}\\approx 0.3$c, and the "red" component has $M_\\mathrm{ej}^\\mathrm{red}\\approx 0.04$ M$_\\odot$ and $v_\\mathrm{ej}^\\mathrm{red}\\approx 0.1$c. These ejecta masses are broadly consistent with the estimated $r$-process production rate required to explain the Milky Way $r$-process abundances, providing the first evidence that BNS mergers can be a dominant site of $r$-process enrichment.

  19. Geometrically unrestricted, topologically constrained control of liquid crystal defects using simultaneous holonomic magnetic and holographic optical manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varney, Michael C. M.; Jenness, Nathan J.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2014-02-01

    Despite the recent progress in physical control and manipulation of various condensed matter, atomic, and particle systems, including individual atoms and photons, our ability to control topological defects remains limited. Recently, controlled generation, spatial translation, and stretching of topological point and line defects have been achieved using laser tweezers and liquid crystals as model defect-hosting systems. However, many modes of manipulation remain hindered by limitations inherent to optical trapping. To overcome some of these limitations, we integrate holographic optical tweezers with a magnetic manipulation system, which enables fully holonomic manipulation of defects by means of optically and magnetically controllable colloids used as "handles" to transfer forces and torques to various liquid crystal defects. These colloidal handles are magnetically rotated around determined axes and are optically translated along three-dimensional pathways while mechanically attached to defects, which, combined with inducing spatially localized nematic-isotropic phase transitions, allow for geometrically unrestricted control of defects, including previously unrealized modes of noncontact manipulation, such as the twisting of disclination clusters. These manipulation capabilities may allow for probing topological constraints and the nature of defects in unprecedented ways, providing the foundation for a tabletop laboratory to expand our understanding of the role defects play in fields ranging from subatomic particle physics to early-universe cosmology.

  20. Raman spectroscopy of individual monocytes reveals that single-beam optical trapping of mononuclear cells occurs by their nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fore, Samantha; Chan, James; Taylor, Douglas; Huser, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We show that laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy of eukaryotic cells with a significantly larger diameter than the tight focus of a single-beam laser trap leads to optical trapping of the cell by its optically densest part, i.e. typically the cell's nucleus. Raman spectra of individual optically trapped monocytes are compared with location-specific Raman spectra of monocytes adhered to a substrate. When the cell's nucleus is stained with a fluorescent live cell stain, the Raman spectrum of the DNA-specific stain is observed only in the nucleus of individual monocytes. Optically trapped monocytes display the same behavior. We also show that the Raman spectra of individual monocytes exhibit the characteristic Raman signature of cells that have not yet fully differentiated and that individual primary monocytes can be distinguished from transformed monocytes based on their Raman spectra. This work provides further evidence that laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy of individual cells provides meaningful biochemical information in an entirely non-destructive fashion that permits discerning differences between cell types and cellular activity

  1. A fast dual wavelength laser beam fluid-less optical CT scanner for radiotherapy 3D gel dosimetry II: dosimetric performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    New clinical radiotherapy dosimetry systems need comprehensive demonstration of measurement quality. Practicality and reliability are other important aspects for clinical dosimeters. In this work the performance of an optical CT scanner for true 3D dosimetry is assessed using a radiochromic gel dosimeter. The fluid-less scanner utilised dual lasers to avoid the necessity for pre-irradiation scans and give greater robustness of image quality, enhancing practicality. Calibration methods using both cuvettes and reconstructed volumes were developed. Dosimetric accuracy was similar for dual and single wavelength measurements, except that cuvette calibration reliability was reduced for dual wavelength without pre-irradiation scanning. Detailed performance parameters were specified for the dosimetry system indicating the suitability for clinical use. The most significant limitations of the system were due to the gel dosimeter rather than the optical CT scanner. Quality assurance guidelines were developed to maintain dosimetry system performance in routine use.

  2. Magnesium acceptor in gallium nitride. II. Koopmans-tuned Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof hybrid functional calculations of its dual nature and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demchenko, D. O.; Diallo, I. C.; Reshchikov, M. A.

    2018-05-01

    The problem of magnesium acceptor in gallium nitride is that experimental photoluminescence measurements clearly reveal a shallow defect state, while most theoretical predictions favor a localized polaronic defect state. To resolve this contradiction, we calculate properties of magnesium acceptor using the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE) hybrid functional, tuned to fulfill the generalized Koopmans condition. We test Koopmans tuning of HSE for defect calculations in GaN using two contrasting test cases: a deep state of gallium vacancy and a shallow state of magnesium acceptor. The obtained parametrization of HSE allows calculations of optical properties of acceptors using neutral defect-state eigenvalues, without relying on corrections due to charged defects in periodic supercells. Optical transitions and vibrational properties of M gGa defect are analyzed to bring the dual (shallow and deep) nature of this defect into accord with experimental photoluminescence measurements of the ultraviolet band in Mg-doped GaN samples.

  3. 32 X 2.5 Gb/s Optical Code Division Multiplexing (O-CDM) For Agile Optical Networking (Phase II) Final Report CRADA No. TC02051.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, C. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mendez, A. J. [Mendez R & D Associates, El Segundo, CA (United States)

    2017-09-08

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (formerly The Regents of the University of California)/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Mendez R & D Associates (MRDA) to develop and demonstrate a reconfigurable and cost effective design for optical code division multiplexing (O-CDM) with high spectral efficiency and throughput, as applied to the field of distributed computing, including multiple accessing (sharing of communication resources) and bidirectional data distribution in fiber-to-the-premise (FTTx) networks.

  4. Optic neuritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retro-bulbar neuritis; Multiple sclerosis - optic neuritis; Optic nerve - optic neuritis ... The exact cause of optic neuritis is unknown. The optic nerve carries visual information from your eye to the brain. The nerve can swell when ...

  5. Measurement of elastic light scattering from two optically trapped microspheres and red blood cells in a transparent medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, Matti; Kauppila, Antti; Karmenyan, Artashes; Myllylä, Risto

    2011-09-15

    Optical tweezers can be used to manipulate small objects and cells. A trap can be used to fix the position of a particle during light scattering measurements. The places of two separately trapped particles can also be changed. In this Letter we present elastic light scattering measurements as a function of scattering angle when two trapped spheres are illuminated with a He-Ne laser. This setup is suitable for trapping noncharged homogeneous spheres. We also demonstrate measurement of light scattering patterns from two separately trapped red blood cells. Two different illumination schemes are used for both samples.

  6. Force-detected nanoscale absorption spectroscopy in water at room temperature using an optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parobek, Alexander; Black, Jacob W.; Kamenetska, Maria; Ganim, Ziad

    2018-04-01

    Measuring absorption spectra of single molecules presents a fundamental challenge for standard transmission-based instruments because of the inherently low signal relative to the large background of the excitation source. Here we demonstrate a new approach for performing absorption spectroscopy in solution using a force measurement to read out optical excitation at the nanoscale. The photoinduced force between model chromophores and an optically trapped gold nanoshell has been measured in water at room temperature. This photoinduced force is characterized as a function of wavelength to yield the force spectrum, which is shown to be correlated to the absorption spectrum for four model systems. The instrument constructed for these measurements combines an optical tweezer with frequency domain absorption spectroscopy over the 400-800 nm range. These measurements provide proof-of-principle experiments for force-detected nanoscale spectroscopies that operate under ambient chemical conditions.

  7. Focusing behavior of the fractal vector optical fields designed by fractal lattice growth model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xu-Zhen; Pan, Yue; Zhao, Meng-Dan; Zhang, Guan-Lin; Zhang, Yu; Tu, Chenghou; Li, Yongnan; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2018-01-22

    We introduce a general fractal lattice growth model, significantly expanding the application scope of the fractal in the realm of optics. This model can be applied to construct various kinds of fractal "lattices" and then to achieve the design of a great diversity of fractal vector optical fields (F-VOFs) combinating with various "bases". We also experimentally generate the F-VOFs and explore their universal focusing behaviors. Multiple focal spots can be flexibly enginnered, and the optical tweezers experiment validates the simulated tight focusing fields, which means that this model allows the diversity of the focal patterns to flexibly trap and manipulate micrometer-sized particles. Furthermore, the recovery performance of the F-VOFs is also studied when the input fields and spatial frequency spectrum are obstructed, and the results confirm the robustness of the F-VOFs in both focusing and imaging processes, which is very useful in information transmission.

  8. Experiment study and FEM simulation on erythrocytes under linear stretching of optical micromanipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Song, Huadong; Zhu, Panpan; Lu, Hao; Tang, Qi

    2017-08-01

    The elasticity of erythrocytes is an important criterion to evaluate the quality of blood. This paper presents a novel research on erythrocytes' elasticity with the application of optical tweezers and the finite element method (FEM) during blood storage. In this work, the erythrocytes with different in vitro times were linearly stretched by trapping force using optical tweezers and the time dependent elasticity of erythrocytes was investigated. The experimental results indicate that the membrane shear moduli of erythrocytes increased with the increasing in vitro time, namely the elasticity was decreasing. Simultaneously, an erythrocyte shell model with two parameters (membrane thickness h and membrane shear modulus H) was built to simulate the linear stretching states of erythrocytes by the FEM, and the simulations conform to the results obtained in the experiment. The evolution process was found that the erythrocytes membrane thicknesses were decreasing. The analysis assumes that the partial proteins and lipid bilayer of erythrocyte membrane were decomposed during the in vitro preservation of blood, which results in thin thickness, weak bending resistance, and losing elasticity of erythrocyte membrane. This study implies that the FEM can be employed to investigate the inward mechanical property changes of erythrocyte in different environments, which also can be a guideline for studying the erythrocyte mechanical state suffered from different diseases.

  9. Combining optical trapping in a microfluidic channel with simultaneous micro-Raman spectroscopy and motion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Penelope F.; Saunter, Christopher D.; Girkin, John M.

    2014-03-01

    Since their invention by Ashkin optical tweezers have demonstrated their ability and versatility as a non-invasive tool for micromanipulation. One of the most useful additions to the basic optical tweezers system is micro-Raman spectroscopy, which permits highly sensitive analysis of single cells or particles. We report on the development of a dual laser system combining two spatial light modulators to holographically manipulate multiple traps (at 1064nm) whilst undertaking Raman spectroscopy using a 532nm laser. We can thus simultaneously trap multiple particles and record their Raman spectra, without perturbing the trapping system. The dual beam system is built around micro-fluidic channels where crystallisation of calcium carbonate occurs on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) beads. The setup is designed to simulate at a microscopic level the reactions that occur on items in a dishwasher, where permanent filming of calcium carbonate on drinking glasses is a problem. Our system allows us to monitor crystal growth on trapped particles in which the Raman spectrum and changes in movement of the bead are recorded. Due to the expected low level of crystallisation on the bead surfaces this allows us to obtain results quickly and with high sensitivity. The long term goal is to study the development of filming on samples in-situ with the microfl.uidic system acting as a model dishwasher.

  10. THE HIGH A{sub V} Quasar Survey: Reddened Quasi-Stellar Objects selected from optical/near-infrared photometry. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krogager, J.-K.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Vestergaard, M. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Geier, S. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Venemans, B. P. [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ledoux, C. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Møller, P. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschildstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Noterdaeme, P. [Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS-UPMC, UMR7095, 98bis bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Kangas, T.; Pursimo, T.; Smirnova, O. [Nordic Optical Telescope, Apartado 474, E-38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma (Spain); Saturni, F. G. [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, Väisäläntie 20, 21500 Piikkiö (Finland)

    2015-03-15

    Quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) whose spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are reddened by dust either in their host galaxies or in intervening absorber galaxies are to a large degree missed by optical color selection criteria like the ones used by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). To overcome this bias against red QSOs, we employ a combined optical and near-infrared (near-IR) color selection. In this paper, we present a spectroscopic follow-up campaign of a sample of red candidate QSOs which were selected from the SDSS and the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS). The spectroscopic data and SDSS/UKIDSS photometry are supplemented by mid-infrared photometry from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. In our sample of 159 candidates, 154 (97%) are confirmed to be QSOs. We use a statistical algorithm to identify sightlines with plausible intervening absorption systems and identify nine such cases assuming dust in the absorber similar to Large Magellanic Cloud sightlines. We find absorption systems toward 30 QSOs, 2 of which are consistent with the best-fit absorber redshift from the statistical modeling. Furthermore, we observe a broad range in SED properties of the QSOs as probed by the rest-frame 2 μm flux. We find QSOs with a strong excess as well as QSOs with a large deficit at rest-frame 2 μm relative to a QSO template. Potential solutions to these discrepancies are discussed. Overall, our study demonstrates the high efficiency of the optical/near-IR selection of red QSOs.

  11. Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume II, Book 2. Central receiver optical model users manual. CDRL item 2. [HELIAKI code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-05-01

    HELIAKI is a FORTRAN computer program which simulates the optical/thermal performance of a central receiver solar thermal power plant for the dynamic conversion of solar-generated heat to electricity. The solar power plant which this program simulates consists of a field of individual sun tracking mirror units, or heliostats, redirecting sunlight into a cavity, called the receiver, mounted atop a tower. The program calculates the power retained by that cavity receiver at any point in time or the energy into the receiver over a year's time using a Monte Carlo ray trace technique to solve the multiple integral equations. An artist's concept of this plant is shown.

  12. Electron spin resonance and optical studies on the radiolysis of carbon tetrachloride. II. Structure and reaction of CClṡ-4 radical anion in tetramethylsilane low-temperature solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Hachizo; Nunome, Keichi

    1991-04-01

    An electron spin resonance (ESR) and optical study of carbon tetrachloride radical anion has been made to provide for a better understanding of the radiolysis of CCl4, following CClṡ+4 cation previously studied. It was found that the anion was metastably trapped in tetramethylsilane (TMS) matrices γ irradiated at 4 or 77 K. The g tensor and the hyperfine coupling tensors of all atoms of the radical were determined from ESR spectral simulation by using 12 CCl4 and the 13C enriched compound: g∥=2.004-5, g1=2.015,(A∥,A⊥) =(24.3,18.3) mT for 13C, (0.9, 0.2) mT for one 35Cl atom, and (A1,A2=A3)=(1.98,0.45) mT for the other three equivalent 35Cl atoms. From these parameters and a consideration on the g anisotropy combined with the optical data, the anion was found to have a predissociating molecular structure (CCl3ṡṡṡCl) ˙- with C3v symmetry, where the unpaired electron occupies A*1γ antibonding orbital. The carbon atom has a large spin density and near sp3 hybridization: ρp=0.62, ρs=0.18, ρp/ρs=3.4, and three Cl atoms and the other Cl atom have the spin densities ρp=0.10 and ρp=0.05, respectively. The species had two optical absorptions at λmax=265 and 370 nm which were assigned to the Eγ-A*1γ and A1γ-A*1γ electronic transitions, respectively. The anion converted to CCl ṡ3 radical by warming to ˜150 K in the TMS matrix. The present results have given unequivocal ESR and optical spectroscopic evidence and support for the assignment of the 370 nm band reported in the radiolyses of organic solutions containing CCl4.

  13. Studies on pigments of the myxomycete Physarum nudum. II. Separation and optical properties of the pigments from plasmodia cultured in darkness

    OpenAIRE

    L. Raczkowski

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the data on Separation and some optical properties of the pigments obtained from the plasmodium of the myxomycete Physarum nudum grown in the dark. Pigment Separation was performed by means of thin-layer chromatography with celulose MN 300 as adsorbent and with the solvent: tert.-butylalcohol, H2O, 3N NH4OH at the ratio 5:2:1 In these conditions the chromatograms revealed 12 coloured bands from which pigments were eluted and their absorption spectra as well as the spectra o...

  14. Launch and capture of a single particle in a pulse-laser-assisted dual-beam fiber-optic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhenhai; She, Xuan; Li, Nan; Hu, Huizhu

    2018-06-01

    The rapid loading and manipulation of microspheres in optical trap is important for its applications in optomechanics and precision force sensing. We investigate the microsphere behavior under coaction of a dual-beam fiber-optic trap and a pulse laser beam, which reveals a launched microsphere can be effectively captured in a spatial region. A suitable order of pulse duration for launch is derived according to the calculated detachment energy threshold of pulse laser. Furthermore, we illustrate the effect of structural parameters on the launching process, including the spot size of pulse laser, the vertical displacement of beam waist and the initial position of microsphere. Our result will be instructive in the optimal design of the pulse-laser-assisted optical tweezers for controllable loading mechanism of optical trap.

  15. Microscopy of biological sample through advanced diffractive optics from visible to X-ray wavelength regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Cojoc, Dan; Emiliani, Valentina; Cabrini, Stefano; Coppey-Moisan, Maite; Ferrari, Enrico; Garbin, Valeria; Altissimo, Matteo

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this report is to demonstrate a unified version of microscopy through the use of advanced diffractive optics. The unified scheme derives from the technical possibility of realizing front wave engineering in a wide range of electromagnetic spectrum. The unified treatment is realized through the design and nanofabrication of phase diffractive elements (PDE) through which wave front beam shaping is obtained. In particular, we will show applications, by using biological samples, ranging from micromanipulation using optical tweezers to X-ray differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy combined with X-ray fluorescence. We report some details on the design and physical implementation of diffractive elements that besides focusing also perform other optical functions: beam splitting, beam intensity, and phase redistribution or mode conversion. Laser beam splitting is used for multiple trapping and independent manipulation of micro-beads surrounding a cell as an array of tweezers and for arraying and sorting microscopic size biological samples. Another application is the Gauss to Laguerre-Gauss mode conversion, which allows for trapping and transfering orbital angular momentum of light to micro-particles immersed in a fluid. These experiments are performed in an inverted optical microscope coupled with an infrared laser beam and a spatial light modulator for diffractive optics implementation. High-resolution optics, fabricated by means of e-beam lithography, are demonstrated to control the intensity and the phase of the sheared beams in x-ray DIC microscopy. DIC experiments with phase objects reveal a dramatic increase in image contrast compared to bright-field x-ray microscopy. Besides the topographic information, fluorescence allows detection of certain chemical elements (Cl, P, Sc, K) in the same setup, by changing the photon energy of the x-ray beam. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Optical constants of quartz, vitreous silica and neutron-irradiated vitreous silica. II. Analysis of the infrared spectrum of vitreous silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaskell, P H [Cambridge Univ. (UK). Cavendish Lab.; Johnson, D W [Pilkington Research and Development Laboratories, Lathom, nr. Ormskirk, Lancashire, UK

    1976-03-01

    Optical constant data for vitreous silica and neutron-irradiated vitreous silica, given in part I are examined in an attempt to gain further knowledge of the structure of the glass. Strong features of the spectrum can be described by band broadening parameters, which are calculated using an extension of the Wilson GF matrix method, and are shown to be quantitatively related to the distribution of Si-O distances and oxygen bond angles obtained from X-ray scattering data. The approximation commonly used to generate the optically active vibrational spectra of glasses, namely to form the product of the vibrational density of states function and a weakly frequency-dependent intensity factor gives a relatively poor representation of the experimental spectrum. The magnitude of 'disorder-induced' absorption in regions well away from the major bands is semi-quantitatively estimated by subtracting the contributions of the major bands. Interpretation of some of the features of this difference spectrum is possible in terms of vibrations of nonbridging oxygen atoms, but if this interpretation is correct, it is necessary to postulate clustering of 'dangling' oxygen atoms, which would not be consistent with a random network model for the structure. An alternative explanation, that the vibrations are framework modes, leads to the conclusion that the preferred configuration in vitreous silica resembles the arrangement of silicon-oxygen tetrahedra in cristobalite.

  17. Extension of geometrical-optics approximation to on-axis Gaussian beam scattering. II. By a spheroidal particle with end-on incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Ren, Kuan Fang; Cai, Xiaoshu; Shen, Jianqi

    2006-07-10

    On the basis of our previous work on the extension of the geometrical-optics approximation to Gaussian beam scattering by a spherical particle, we present a further extension of the method to the scattering of a transparent or absorbing spheroidal particle with the same symmetric axis as the incident beam. As was done for the spherical particle, the phase shifts of the emerging rays due to focal lines, optical path, and total reflection are carefully considered. The angular position of the geometric rainbow of primary order is theoretically predicted. Compared with our results, the Möbius prediction of the rainbow angle has a discrepancy of less than 0.5 degrees for a spheroidal droplet of aspect radio kappa within 0.95 and 1.05 and less than 2 degrees for kappa within 0.89 and 1.11. The flux ratio index F, which qualitatively indicates the effect of a surface wave, is also studied and found to be dependent on the size, refractive index, and surface curvature of the particle.

  18. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization of palladium(II)-orthohydroxyacetophenone azine nano-optical sensor doped in sol–gel matrix and its use as probe for assessment of α-amylase activity in human saliva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sayed, B.A. [Chemistry department, Faculty of Science, al Azhr University, Cairo (Egypt); Abo-Aly, M.M., E-mail: aboalymoh@hotmail.com [Chemistry department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Attia, M.S.; Gamal, S. [Chemistry department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-01-15

    PdAPA (palladium(II)-orthohydroxyacetophenone azine) complex doped in sol–gel matrix is synthesized. It is characterized using UV-visible, infrared spectra and TEM image. A novel, simple, sensitive spectrofluorometric method was developed for measuring the activity of the α-amylase enzyme in human saliva for smokers and non-smokers with age range (17–64 years) based on the quenching of the luminescence intensity at 450 nm of the new synthesized complex characterized by various concentrations of the maltose released from the hydrolysis of starch by α-amylase enzyme and was successfully used as nano-optical sensor. The calibration plot was achieved over the concentration range 4.7×10{sup −6}–9.3×10{sup −10} mol L{sup −1} maltose with a correlation coefficient of 0.996 and a detection minimum limit value of 7.55×10{sup −10} mol L{sup −1}. The method was satisfactorily used for the assessment of the α-amylase activity in a number of human saliva samples for various smokers and non-smoker's volunteers. - Highlights: • The (palladium(II)-orthohydroxyacetophenone azine) complex doped in sol–gel was prepared. • It was used for the assessment of of α-amylase enzyme activity. • By maltose resulting from the reaction of α-amylase enzyme with starch. • A novel, simple, sensitive and precise spectrofluorometric method was developed.

  19. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization of palladium(II)-orthohydroxyacetophenone azine nano-optical sensor doped in sol–gel matrix and its use as probe for assessment of α-amylase activity in human saliva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sayed, B.A.; Abo-Aly, M.M.; Attia, M.S.; Gamal, S.

    2016-01-01

    PdAPA (palladium(II)-orthohydroxyacetophenone azine) complex doped in sol–gel matrix is synthesized. It is characterized using UV-visible, infrared spectra and TEM image. A novel, simple, sensitive spectrofluorometric method was developed for measuring the activity of the α-amylase enzyme in human saliva for smokers and non-smokers with age range (17–64 years) based on the quenching of the luminescence intensity at 450 nm of the new synthesized complex characterized by various concentrations of the maltose released from the hydrolysis of starch by α-amylase enzyme and was successfully used as nano-optical sensor. The calibration plot was achieved over the concentration range 4.7×10 −6 –9.3×10 −10 mol L −1 maltose with a correlation coefficient of 0.996 and a detection minimum limit value of 7.55×10 −10 mol L −1 . The method was satisfactorily used for the assessment of the α-amylase activity in a number of human saliva samples for various smokers and non-smoker's volunteers. - Highlights: • The (palladium(II)-orthohydroxyacetophenone azine) complex doped in sol–gel was prepared. • It was used for the assessment of of α-amylase enzyme activity. • By maltose resulting from the reaction of α-amylase enzyme with starch. • A novel, simple, sensitive and precise spectrofluorometric method was developed.

  20. Propagation-invariant vectorial Bessel beams by use of sub wavelength quantized Pancharatnam-Berry phase optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niv, A.; Biener, G.; Kleiner, V.; Hasman, E.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text:Propagation-invariant scalar fields have been extensively studied both theoretically and experimentally, since they were proposed by Durnin et al. These fields were employed in applications such as optical tweezers and for transport and guiding of microspheres. Although there has recently been considerable theoretical interest in propagation-invariant vectorial beams, experimental studies of such beams have remained somewhat limited. One of the most interesting types of propagation-invariant vectorial beam is the linearly polarized axially symmetric beam (LPASB) [l]. Recently, we introduced and experimentally demonstrated propagation-invariant vectorial Bessel beams with linearly polarized axial symmetry based on quantized Pancharatnam-Berry phase optical elements (QPBOEs) [21 and an axicon. QP-BOEs utilize the geometric phase that accompanies space-variant polarization manipulations to achieve a desired phase modification [31. To test our approach we formed QPBOEs with different polarization orders as computer-generated space-variant sub wavelength gratings upon GaAs wafers for use with 10.6 micron laser radiation. The resultant beams were also transmitted through a polarizer that produced a unique propagation-invariant scalar beam. This beam has a propeller-shaped intensity pattern that can be rotated by simple rotation of the polarizer. We therefore have demonstrated the formation of a vectorial Bessel beam by using simple, lightweight thin elements and exploited that beam to perform a controlled rotation of a propeller-shaped intensity pattern that can be suitable for optical tweezers

  1. Anion-selective interaction and colorimeter by an optical metalloreceptor based on ruthenium(II) 2,2'-biimidazole: hydrogen bonding and proton transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ying; Mo, Hao-Jun; Chen, Jin-Can; Niu, Yan-Li; Zhong, Yong-Rui; Zheng, Kang-Cheng; Ye, Bao-Hui

    2007-08-06

    A new anion sensor [Ru(bpy)2(H2biim)](PF6)2 (1) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine and H2biim = 2,2'-biimidazole) has been developed, in which the Ru(II)-bpy moiety acts as a chromophore and the H2biim ligand as an anion receptor via hydrogen bonding. A systematic investigation shows that 1 is an eligible sensor for various anions. It donates protons for hydrogen bonding to Cl-, Br-, I-, NO3-, HSO4-, H2PO4-, and OAc- anions and further actualizes monoproton transfer to the OAc- anion, changing color from yellow to orange brown. The fluoride ion has a high affinity toward the N-H group of the H2biim ligand for proton transfer, rather than hydrogen bonding, because of the formation of the highly stable HF2- anion, resulting in stepwise deprotonation of the two N-H fragments. These processes are signaled by vivid color changes from yellow to orange brown and then to violet because of second-sphere donor-acceptor interactions between Ru(II)-H2biim and the anions. The significant color changes can be distinguished visually. The processes are not only determined by the basicity of anion but also by the strength of hydrogen bonding and the stability of the anion-receptor complexes. The design strategy and remarkable photophysical properties of sensor 1 help to extend the development of anion sensors.

  2. Studies on pigments of the myxomycete Physarum nudum. II. Separation and optical properties of the pigments from plasmodia cultured in darkness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Raczkowski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the data on Separation and some optical properties of the pigments obtained from the plasmodium of the myxomycete Physarum nudum grown in the dark. Pigment Separation was performed by means of thin-layer chromatography with celulose MN 300 as adsorbent and with the solvent: tert.-butylalcohol, H2O, 3N NH4OH at the ratio 5:2:1 In these conditions the chromatograms revealed 12 coloured bands from which pigments were eluted and their absorption spectra as well as the spectra of fluorescence emission were determined. The isolated pigments differ from one another by their physical properties (different Rf values, localization of absorption maxima, and behaviour in acid solution. Nevertheless, certain analogies perceptible between particular pigments per-mitted to distinguish 3 families of the studied pigments demonstrating similar properties.

  3. Catastrophic optical bulk degradation in high-power single- and multi-mode InGaAs-AlGaAs strained QW lasers: part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Yongkun; Ayvazian, Talin; Brodie, Miles; Lingley, Zachary

    2018-03-01

    High-power single-mode (SM) and multi-mode (MM) InGaAs-AlGaAs strained quantum well (QW) lasers are critical components for both terrestrial and space satellite communications systems. Since these lasers predominantly fail by catastrophic and sudden degradation due to catastrophic optical damage (COD), it is especially crucial for space satellite applications to investigate reliability, failure modes, precursor signatures of failure, and degradation mechanisms of these lasers. Our group reported a new failure mode in MM and SM InGaAs-AlGaAs strained QW lasers in 2009 and 2016, respectively. Our group also reported in 2017 that bulk failure due to catastrophic optical bulk damage (COBD) is the dominant failure mode of both SM and MM lasers that were subject to long-term life-tests. For the present study, we continued our physics of failure investigation by performing long-term life-tests followed by failure mode analysis (FMA) using nondestructive and destructive micro-analytical techniques. We performed long-term accelerated life-tests on state-of-the-art SM and MM InGaAs- AlGaAs strained QW lasers under ACC mode. Our life-tests have accumulated over 25,000 test hours for SM lasers and over 35,000 test hours for MM lasers. We first employed electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique to identify failure modes of degraded SM lasers by observing dark line defects. All the SM failures that we studied showed catastrophic and sudden degradation and all of these failures were bulk failures. Since degradation mechanisms responsible for COBD are still not well understood, we also employed other techniques including focused ion beam (FIB) and high-resolution TEM to further study dark line defects and dislocations in post-aged lasers. Keywor

  4. I. The theory of aberrations of quadrupole focusing arrays. II. Ion optical design of high quality extracted synchrotron beams with application to the bevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meads, Jr, Philip Francis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Applied Science and Technology

    1963-05-15

    In Part One they formulate in a general way the problem of analyzing and evaluating the aberrations of quadrupole magnet beam systems, and of characterizing the shapes and other properties of the beam envelopes in the neighborhood of foci. They consider all aberrations, including those due to misalignments and faulty construction, through third order in small parameters, for quadrupole beam systems. One result of this study is the development of analytic and numerical techniques for treating these aberrations, yielding useful expressions for the comparison of the aberrations of different beam systems. A second result of this study is a comprehensive digital computer program that determines the magnitude and nature of the aberrations of such beam systems. The code, using linear programming techniques, will adjust the parameters of a beam system to obtain specified optical properties and to reduce the magnitude of aberrations that limit the performance of that system. They examine numerically, in detail, the aberrations of two typical beam systems. In Part Two, they examine the problem of extracting the proton beam from a synchrotron of 'H' type magnet construction. They describe the optical studies that resulted in the design of an external beam from the Bevatron that is optimized with respect to linear, dispersive, and aberration properties and that uses beam elements of conservative design. The design of the beam is the result of the collaboration of many people representing several disciplines. They describe the digital computer programs developed to carry out detailed orbit studies which were required because of the existence of large second order aberrations in the beam.

  5. Tuning the structural and optical properties of gold/silver nanoalloys prepared by laser ablation in liquids for ultra-sensitive spectroscopy and optical trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Neri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The plasmon resonance of metallic Au/Ag alloys in the colloidal state was tuned from 400 nm to 500 nm using a laser irradiated technique, performed directly in the liquid state. Interesting optical nonlinearities, trapping effects and spectroscopic enhancements were detected as function of gold concentration in the nanoalloys. In particular a reduction of the limiting threshold was observed by increasing the gold amount. The SERS activity of the Au/Ag alloys was tested in liquid and in solid state in presence of linear carbon chains as probe molecules. The dependence of the increased Raman signals on the nanoparticle Au/Ag atomic ratio is presented and discussed. Finally preliminary studies and prospects for optical and Raman tweezers experiments are discussed.

  6. Mobile quantum sensing with spins in optically trapped nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awschalom, David D.

    2013-03-01

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color center in diamond has emerged as a powerful, optically addressable, spin-based probe of electromagnetic fields and temperature. For nanoscale sensing applications, the NV center's atom-like nature enables the close-range interactions necessary for both high spatial resolution and the detection of fields generated by proximal nuclei, electrons, or molecules. Using a custom-designed optical tweezers apparatus, we demonstrate three-dimensional position control of nanodiamonds in solution with simultaneous optical measurement of electron spin resonance (ESR)[3]. Despite the motion and random orientation of NV centers suspended in the optical trap, we observe distinct peaks in the ESR spectra from the ground-state spin transitions. Accounting for the random dynamics of the trapped nanodiamonds, we model the ESR spectra observed in an applied magnetic field and estimate the dc magnetic sensitivity based on the ESR line shapes to be 50 μT/√{ Hz }. We utilize the optically trapped nanodiamonds to characterize the magnetic field generated by current-carrying wires and ferromagnetic structures in microfluidic circuits. These measurements provide a pathway to spin-based sensing in fluidic environments and biophysical systems that are inaccessible to existing scanning probe techniques, such as the interiors of living cells. This work is supported by AFOSR and DARPA.

  7. Plasmon assisted optical trapping: fundamentals and biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafetinides, Alexandros A.; Makropoulou, Mersini; Tsigaridas, Georgios N.; Gousetis, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    The field of optical trapping has dramatically grown due to implementation in various arenas including physics, biology, medicine and nanotechnology. Certainly, optical tweezers are an invaluable tool to manipulate a variation of particles, such as small dielectric spheres, cells, bacteria, chromosomes and even genes, by highly focused laser beams through microscope. As the main disadvantage of the conventional optical trapping systems is the diffraction limit of the incident light, plasmon assisted nanotrapping is reported as a suitable technique for trapping sub-wavelength metallic or dielectric particles. In this work, firstly, we report briefly on the basic theory of plasmon excitation, focusing on the interaction of nanoscale metallic structures with laser light. Secondly, experimental and numerical simulation results are also presented, demonstrating enhancement of the trapping efficiency of glass or SiO2 substrates, coated with Au and Ag nanostructures, with or without nanoparticles. The optical forces were calculated by measuring the particle's escape velocity calibration method. Finally, representative applications of plasmon assisted optical trapping are reviewed, from cancer therapeutics to fundamental biology and cell nanosurgery.

  8. Ultrasonic-assisted synthesis of nano lead(II) coordination polymer as precursors for preparation of lead(II) oxide nano-structures: Thermal, optical properties and XRD studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavidelaghdam, Elham; Shahverdizadeh, Gholam Hossein; Motameni Tabatabai, Javad; Mirtamizdoust, Babak

    2018-04-01

    Nano structure of a lead (II) coordination polymer [Pb 2 (C 2 Cl 3 O 2 ) 2 (NO 3 ) 2 (C l2 H 8 N 2 ) 2 ] n (1), has been synthesized by a sonochemical method in different concentrations. The nano particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), FT-IR spectroscopy and elemental analyses. The thermal stability of nano structure is closely investigated via thermal gravimetric (TGA), and compared with crystalline structure. The compounds are then heated to 600 °C to produce PbO nano particles. The resulting PbO is characterized through XRD and SEM analyses. Concentration of initial reagents effects on size and morphology of nano-structured compound 1 have been studied and show that low concentrations of initial reagents decreased particles size and leaded to uniform nano particles morphology. The photoluminescence properties of the prepared compound, as crystalline and as nanoparticles, have been investigated. The result showed a good correlation between the size and emission wavelength. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Copper (II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    Valine (2 - amino - 3 – methylbutanoic acid), is a chemical compound containing .... Stability constant (Kf). Gibb's free energy. ) (. 1. −. ∆. Mol. JG. [CuL2(H2O)2] ... synthesis and characterization of Co(ii), Ni(ii), Cu (II), and Zn(ii) complexes with ...

  10. An Optical and Infrared Photometric Study of the Young Open Cluster IC 1805 in the Giant H II Region W4 †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hwankyung; Bessell, Michael S.; Chun, Moo-Young; Yi, Jonghyuk; Nazé, Y.; Lim, Beomdu; Karimov, R.; Rauw, G.; Park, Byeong-Gon; Hur, Hyeonoh

    2017-05-01

    We present deep wide-field optical CCD photometry and mid-infrared Spitzer/IRAC and MIPS 24 μm data for about 100,000 stars in the young open cluster IC 1805. The members of IC 1805 were selected from their location in the various color-color and color-magnitude diagrams, and the presence of Hα emission, mid-infrared excess emission, and X-ray emission. The reddening law toward IC 1805 is nearly normal (R V = 3.05 ± 0.06). However, the distance modulus of the cluster is estimated to be 11.9 ± 0.2 mag (d=2.4+/- 0.2 kpc) from the reddening-free color-magnitude diagrams, which is larger than the distance to the nearby massive star-forming region W3(OH) measured from the radio VLBA astrometry. We also determined the age of IC 1805 ({τ }{MSTO}=3.5 Myr). In addition, we critically compared the age and mass scale from two pre-main-sequence evolution models. The initial mass function with a Salpeter-type slope of Γ = -1.3 ± 0.2 was obtained and the total mass of IC 1805 was estimated to be about 2700 ± 200 {M}⊙ . Finally, we found our distance determination to be statistically consistent with the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution Data Release 1, within the errors. The proper motion of the B-type stars shows an elongated distribution along the Galactic plane, which could be explained by some of the B-type stars being formed in small clouds dispersed by previous episodes of star formation or supernova explosions. The optical imaging data in this article were gathered with two facilities: the AZT-22 1.5 m telescope at Maidanak Astronomical Observatory in Uzbekistan and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l’Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii.

  11. Optical Detectors for Astronomy II : State-of-the-art at the Turn of the Millennium : 4th ESO CCD Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Beletic, James

    2000-01-01

    th The 4 ESO CCO Workshop, Optical Detectors for Astronomy, was held during September 13-16, 1999 at its usual location, the headquarters of the European Southern Observatory in Garching, Germany. We prefer to remember this workshop as a "meeting of friends", who came to Garching to visit ESO and to present their work, rather than a formal meeting. Based on our experience with the 1996 ESO CCO workshop, we deliberately put emphasis on creating an environment that encouraged the participants to stay together and informally exchange ideas. These informal events began with a tour of the BWM auto factory and continued with a reception at "SchloB Beletic", the conference dinner at a real SchloB of the Bavarian International School (where the participants enjoyed basket, baseball, table soccer, rock climbing and eventually dancing) and concluded with a tour of the Paulaner Brewery and dinner at the Seehaus in the Englisher Garten. The lunch "Biergarten", adjacent to the poster session area, was a daily meeting poin...

  12. Use of an optical trap for study of host-pathogen interactions for dynamic live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Jenny M; Castro, Carlos E; Heath, Robert J W; Mansour, Michael K; Cardenas, Michael L; Xavier, Ramnik J; Lang, Matthew J; Vyas, Jatin M

    2011-07-28

    Dynamic live cell imaging allows direct visualization of real-time interactions between cells of the immune system(1, 2); however, the lack of spatial and temporal control between the phagocytic cell and microbe has rendered focused observations into the initial interactions of host response to pathogens difficult. Historically, intercellular contact events such as phagocytosis(3) have been imaged by mixing two cell types, and then continuously scanning the field-of-view to find serendipitous intercellular contacts at the appropriate stage of interaction. The stochastic nature of these events renders this process tedious, and it is difficult to observe early or fleeting events in cell-cell contact by this approach. This method requires finding cell pairs that are on the verge of contact, and observing them until they consummate their contact, or do not. To address these limitations, we use optical trapping as a non-invasive, non-destructive, but fast and effective method to position cells in culture. Optical traps, or optical tweezers, are increasingly utilized in biological research to capture and physically manipulate cells and other micron-sized particles in three dimensions(4). Radiation pressure was first observed and applied to optical tweezer systems in 1970(5, 6), and was first used to control biological specimens in 1987(7). Since then, optical tweezers have matured into a technology to probe a variety of biological phenomena(8-13). We describe a method(14) that advances live cell imaging by integrating an optical trap with spinning disk confocal microscopy with temperature and humidity control to provide exquisite spatial and temporal control of pathogenic organisms in a physiological environment to facilitate interactions with host cells, as determined by the operator. Live, pathogenic organisms like Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus, which can cause potentially lethal, invasive infections in immunocompromised individuals(15, 16) (e.g. AIDS

  13. A hybrid total internal reflection fluorescence and optical tweezers microscope to study cell adhesion and membrane protein dynamics of single living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder-van As, M.I.; Rieger, B.; Joosten, B.; Subramaniam, Vinod; Figdor, Carl; Kanger, Johannes S.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins plays an important role in cell–cell interactions. The onset of the interaction is typically not precisely controlled by current techniques, making especially difficult the visualization of early-stage dynamics. We have developed a novel method where

  14. Two-Dimensional Lead(II) Halide-Based Hybrid Perovskites Templated by Acene Alkylamines: Crystal Structures, Optical Properties, and Piezoelectricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ke-Zhao; Tu, Qing; Zhang, Xu; Han, Qiwei; Liu, Jie; Zauscher, Stefan; Mitzi, David B

    2017-08-07

    A series of two-dimensional (2D) hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite (HOIP) crystals, based on acene alkylamine cations (i.e., phenylmethylammonium (PMA), 2-phenylethylammonium (PEA), 1-(2-naphthyl)methanammonium (NMA), and 2-(2-naphthyl)ethanammonium (NEA)) and lead(II) halide (i.e., PbX 4 2- , X = Cl, Br, and I) frameworks, and their corresponding thin films were fabricated and examined for structure-property relationship. Several new or redetermined crystal structures are reported, including those for (NEA) 2 PbI 4 , (NEA) 2 PbBr 4 , (NMA) 2 PbBr 4 , (PMA) 2 PbBr 4 , and (PEA) 2 PbI 4 . Non-centrosymmetric structures from among these 2D HOIPs were confirmed by piezoresponse force microscopy-especially noteworthy is the structure of (PMA) 2 PbBr 4 , which was previously reported as centrosymmetric. Examination of the impact of organic cation and inorganic layer choice on the exciton absorption/emission properties, among the set of compounds considered, reveals that perovskite layer distortion (i.e., Pb-I-Pb bond angle between adjacent PbI 6 octahedra) has a more global effect on the exciton properties than octahedral distortion (i.e., variation of I-Pb-I bond angles and discrepancy among Pb-I bond lengths within each PbI 6 octahedron). In addition to the characteristic sharp exciton emission for each perovskite, (PMA) 2 PbCl 4 , (PEA) 2 PbCl 4 , (NMA) 2 PbCl 4 , and (PMA) 2 PbBr 4 exhibit separate, broad "white" emission in the long wavelength range. Piezoelectric compounds identified from these 2D HOIPs may be considered for future piezoresponse-type energy or electronic applications.

  15. Pigment organization and their interactions in reaction centers of photosystem II: optical spectroscopy at 6 K of reaction centers with modified pheophytin composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano, M; Shkuropatov, A Y; Permentier, H; de Wijn, R; Hoff, A J; Shuvalov, V A; van Gorkom, H J

    2001-09-25

    Photosystem II reaction centers (RC) with selectively exchanged pheophytin (Pheo) molecules as described in [Germano, M., Shkuropatov, A. Ya., Permentier, H., Khatypov, R. A., Shuvalov, V. A., Hoff, A. J., and van Gorkom, H. J. (2000) Photosynth. Res. 64, 189-198] were studied by low-temperature absorption, linear and circular dichroism, and triplet-minus-singlet absorption-difference spectroscopy. The ratio of extinction coefficients epsilon(Pheo)/epsilon(Chl) for Q(Y) absorption in the RC is approximately 0.40 at 6 K and approximately 0.45 at room temperature. The presence of 2 beta-carotenes, one parallel and one perpendicular to the membrane plane, is confirmed. Absorption at 670 nm is due to the perpendicular Q(Y) transitions of the two peripheral chlorophylls (Chl) and not to either Pheo. The "core" pigments, two Pheo and four Chl absorb in the 676-685 nm range. Delocalized excited states as predicted by the "multimer model" are seen in the active branch. The inactive Pheo and the nearby Chl, however, mainly contribute localized transitions at 676 and 680 nm, respectively, although large CD changes indicate that exciton interactions are present on both branches. Replacement of the active Pheo prevents triplet formation, causes an LD increase at 676 and 681 nm, a blue-shift of 680 nm absorbance, and a bleach of the 685 nm exciton band. The triplet state is mainly localized on the Chl corresponding to B(A) in purple bacteria. Both Pheo Q(Y) transitions are oriented out of the membrane plane. Their Q(X) transitions are parallel to that plane, so that the Pheos in PSII are structurally similar to their homologues in purple bacteria.

  16. Bio-optofluidics and Bio-photonics: Programmable Phase Optics activities at DTU Fotonik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Pedersen, Finn

    We present ongoing research and development activities for constructing a compact next generation BioPhotonics Workstation and a Bio-optofluidic Cell Sorter (cell-BOCS) for all-optical micromanipulation platforms utilizing low numerical aperture beam geometries. Unlike conventional high NA optical...... tweezers, the BioPhotonics workstation is e.g. capable of long range 3D manipulation. This enables a variety of biological studies such as manipulation of intricate microfabricated assemblies or for automated and parallel optofluidic cell sorting. To further reduce its overhead, we propose ways of making...... the BioPhotonics Workstation platform more photon efficient by studying the 3D distribution of the counter propagating beams and utilizing the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method for illuminating the applied spatial light modulators....

  17. Electron spin resonance of nitrogen-vacancy centers in optically trapped nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Viva R.; Alemán, Benjamín J.; Christle, David J.; Cleland, Andrew N.; Awschalom, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Using an optical tweezers apparatus, we demonstrate three-dimensional control of nanodiamonds in solution with simultaneous readout of ground-state electron-spin resonance (ESR) transitions in an ensemble of diamond nitrogen-vacancy color centers. Despite the motion and random orientation of nitrogen-vacancy centers suspended in the optical trap, we observe distinct peaks in the measured ESR spectra qualitatively similar to the same measurement in bulk. Accounting for the random dynamics, we model the ESR spectra observed in an externally applied magnetic field to enable dc magnetometry in solution. We estimate the dc magnetic field sensitivity based on variations in ESR line shapes to be approximately . This technique may provide a pathway for spin-based magnetic, electric, and thermal sensing in fluidic environments and biophysical systems inaccessible to existing scanning probe techniques. PMID:22869706

  18. ITK optical links backup document

    CERN Document Server

    Huffman, B T; The ATLAS collaboration; Flick, T; Ye, J

    2013-01-01

    This document describes the proposed optical links to be used for the ITK in the phase II upgrade. The current R&D for optical links pursued in the Versatile Link group is reviewed. In particular the results demonstrating the radiation tolerance of all the on-detector components are documented. The bandwidth requirements and the resulting numerology are given.

  19. Dynamic analysis of trapping and escaping in dual beam optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenqiang; Hu, Huizhu; Su, Heming; Li, Zhenggang; Shen, Yu

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we simulate the dynamic movement of a dielectric sphere in optical trap. This dynamic analysis can be used to calibrate optical forces, increase trapping efficiency and measure viscous coefficient of surrounding medium. Since an accurate dynamic analysis is based on a detailed force calculation, we calculate all forces a sphere receives. We get the forces of dual-beam gradient radiation pressure on a micron-sized dielectric sphere in the ray optics regime and utilize Einstein-Ornstein-Uhlenbeck to deal with its Brownian motion forces. Hydrodynamic viscous force also exists when the sphere moves in liquid. Forces from buoyance and gravity are also taken into consideration. Then we simulate trajectory of a sphere when it is subject to all these forces in a dual optical trap. From our dynamic analysis, the sphere can be trapped at an equilibrium point in static water, although it permanently fluctuates around the equilibrium point due to thermal effects. We go a step further to analyze the effects of misalignment of two optical traps. Trapping and escaping phenomena of the sphere in flowing water are also simulated. In flowing water, the sphere is dragged away from the equilibrium point. This dragging distance increases with the decrease of optical power, which results in escaping of the sphere with optical power below a threshold. In both trapping and escaping process we calculate the forces and position of the sphere. Finally, we analyze a trapping region in dual optical tweezers.

  20. Review on technology II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mroziewicz, B.

    1986-01-01

    The most important requirements for the spectral properties of photodetectors are reviewed with particular attention to the fiber optics applications. Data on a number of materials are collected and presented. Pros and cons are pointed out for each type of photodetector-photoconductor, p-i-n photodiode and APD. A review is given of the relevant papers presented in the poster session 'Technology II' of the Symposium

  1. Manipulation of nanoparticles and biological samples through enhanced optical forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Benjamin

    Non-invasive optical manipulation of particles has emerged as a powerful and versatile tool for biological study and nanotechnology. We propose and demonstrate large scale nanoparticle assembly using opto-thermal force produced by conventional optical tweezers. This method is shown to allow precise concentration and assembly of particles including carbon-nanotubes, VO2 nanorods, and CdTe quantum dots. Assembled devices were shown to have good contact with patterned electrodes. In addition, we propose and demonstrate a purely optical approach to rotate and align particles using the interaction of polarized light with photonic crystal nanostructures to generate enhanced trapping force. With a weakly focused laser beam we observed efficient trapping and transportation of polystyrene beads with sizes ranging from 10 microm down to 190 nm as well as cancer cell nuclei. In addition, we demonstrated alignment of non-spherical particles using a 1-D photonic crystal structure. Bacterial cells were trapped, rotated and aligned with optical intensity as low as 17 microW/microm 2. This approach can be extended to using 2-D photonic crystal nanostructures for full rotation control.

  2. Theoretical analysis for the optical deformation of emulsion droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapp, David; Taylor, Jonathan M; Lubansky, Alex S; Bain, Colin D; Chakrabarti, Buddhapriya

    2014-02-24

    We propose a theoretical framework to predict the three-dimensional shapes of optically deformed micron-sized emulsion droplets with ultra-low interfacial tension. The resulting shape and size of the droplet arises out of a balance between the interfacial tension and optical forces. Using an approximation of the laser field as a Gaussian beam, working within the Rayleigh-Gans regime and assuming isotropic surface energy at the oil-water interface, we numerically solve the resulting shape equations to elucidate the three-dimensional droplet geometry. We obtain a plethora of shapes as a function of the number of optical tweezers, their laser powers and positions, surface tension, initial droplet size and geometry. Experimentally, two-dimensional droplet silhouettes have been imaged from above, but their full side-on view has not been observed and reported for current optical configurations. This experimental limitation points to ambiguity in differentiating between droplets having the same two-dimensional projection but with disparate three-dimensional shapes. Our model elucidates and quantifies this difference for the first time. We also provide a dimensionless number that indicates the shape transformation (ellipsoidal to dumbbell) at a value ≈ 1.0, obtained by balancing interfacial tension and laser forces, substantiated using a data collapse.

  3. Dynamic investigation of DNA bending and wrapping by type II topoisomerases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qing; Finzi, Laura; Dunlap, David

    2009-11-01

    Type II topoisomerases catalyze DNA decatenation and unwinding which is crucial for cell division, and therefore type II topoisomerases are some of the main targets of anti-cancer drugs. A recent crystal structure shows that, during the catalytic cycle, a yeast type II topoimerase can bend a 10 base pair DNA segment by up to 150 degrees. Bacterial gyrase, another type II topoisomerase, can wrap DNA into a tight 180 degree turn. Bending a stiff polymer like DNA requires considerable energy and could represent the rate limiting step in the catalytic (topological) cycle. Using modified deoxyribonucleotides in PCR reactions, stiffer DNA fragments have been produced and used as substrates for topoisomerase II-mediated relaxation of plectonemes introduced in single molecules using magnetic tweezers. The wrapping ability of gyrase decreases for diamino-purine-substituted DNA in which every base pair has three hydrogen-bonds. The overall rate of relaxation of plectonemes by recombinant human topoisomerase II alpha also decreases. These results reveal the dynamic properties of DNA bending and wrapping by type II topisomerases and suggest that A:T base pair melting is a rate determining step for bending and wrapping.

  4. (II) complexes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    activities of Schiff base tin (II) complexes. Neelofar1 ... Conclusion: All synthesized Schiff bases and their Tin (II) complexes showed high antimicrobial and ...... Singh HL. Synthesis and characterization of tin (II) complexes of fluorinated Schiff bases derived from amino acids. Spectrochim Acta Part A: Molec Biomolec.

  5. Nonlinear optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    Nonlinear optics is the study of the interaction of intense laser light with matter. This book is a textbook on nonlinear optics at the level of a beginning graduate student. The intent of the book is to provide an introduction to the field of nonlinear optics that stresses fundamental concepts and that enables the student to go on to perform independent research in this field. This book covers the areas of nonlinear optics, quantum optics, quantum electronics, laser physics, electrooptics, and modern optics

  6. Force determination in lateral magnetic tweezers combined with TIRF microscopy† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c7nr07344e

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madariaga-Marcos, J.; Hormeño, S.; Pastrana, C. L.; Fisher, G. L. M.; Dillingham, M. S.

    2018-01-01

    Combining single-molecule techniques with fluorescence microscopy has attracted much interest because it allows the correlation of mechanical measurements with directly visualized DNA : protein interactions. In particular, its combination with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF) is advantageous because of the high signal-to-noise ratio this technique achieves. This, however, requires stretching long DNA molecules across the surface of a flow cell to maximize polymer exposure to the excitation light. In this work, we develop a module to laterally stretch DNA molecules at a constant force, which can be easily implemented in regular or combined magnetic tweezers (MT)–TIRF setups. The pulling module is further characterized in standard flow cells of different thicknesses and glass capillaries, using two types of micrometer size superparamagnetic beads, long DNA molecules, and a home-built device to rotate capillaries with mrad precision. The force range achieved by the magnetic pulling module was between 0.1 and 30 pN. A formalism for estimating forces in flow-stretched tethered beads is also proposed, and the results compared with those of lateral MT, demonstrating that lateral MT achieve higher forces with lower dispersion. Finally, we show the compatibility with TIRF microscopy and the parallelization of measurements by characterizing DNA binding by the centromere-binding protein ParB from Bacillus subtilis. Simultaneous MT pulling and fluorescence imaging demonstrate the non-specific binding of BsParB on DNA under conditions restrictive to condensation. PMID:29461549

  7. Quantum optics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agarwal, G. S

    2013-01-01

    .... Focusing on applications of quantum optics, the textbook covers recent developments such as engineering of quantum states, quantum optics on a chip, nano-mechanical mirrors, quantum entanglement...

  8. Crew Cerebral Oxygen Monitor, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II SBIR proposal is aimed at developing a non-invasive, optical method for monitoring crew member state of awareness in operational environments. All...

  9. An Optically Controlled Microscale Elevator Using Plasmonic Janus Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedev, Spas; Carretero-Palacios, Sol; Kühler, Paul; Lohmüller, Theobald; Urban, Alexander S; Anderson, Lindsey J E; Feldmann, Jochen

    2015-04-15

    In this article, we report how Janus particles, composed of a silica sphere with a gold half-shell, can be not only stably trapped by optical tweezers but also displaced controllably along the axis of the laser beam through a complex interplay between optical and thermal forces. Scattering forces orient the asymmetric particle, while strong absorption on the metal side induces a thermal gradient, resulting in particle motion. An increase in the laser power leads to an upward motion of the particle, while a decrease leads to a downward motion. We study this reversible axial displacement, including a hysteretic jump in the particle position that is a result of the complex pattern of a tightly focused laser beam structure above the focal plane. As a first application we simultaneously trap a spherical gold nanoparticle and show that we can control the distance between the two particles inside the trap. This photonic micron-scale "elevator" is a promising tool for thermal force studies, remote sensing, and optical and thermal micromanipulation experiments.

  10. Detecting Casimir torque with an optically levitated nanorod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhujing; Li, Tongcang

    2017-09-01

    The linear momentum and angular momentum of virtual photons of quantum vacuum fluctuations can induce the Casimir force and the Casimir torque, respectively. While the Casimir force has been measured extensively, the Casimir torque has not been observed experimentally though it was predicted over 40 years ago. Here we propose to detect the Casimir torque with an optically levitated nanorod near a birefringent plate in vacuum. The axis of the nanorod tends to align with the polarization direction of the linearly polarized optical tweezer. When its axis is not parallel or perpendicular to the optical axis of the birefringent crystal, it will experience a Casimir torque that shifts its orientation slightly. We calculate the Casimir torque and Casimir force acting on a levitated nanorod near a birefringent crystal. We also investigate the effects of thermal noise and photon recoils on the torque and force detection. We prove that a levitated nanorod in vacuum will be capable of detecting the Casimir torque under realistic conditions, and will be an important tool in precision measurements.

  11. Optical assembly of bio-hybrid micro-robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Álvaro; Landwerth, Shirin; Woerdemann, Mike; Alpmann, Christina; Buscher, Tim; Becker, Maike; Studer, Armido; Denz, Cornelia

    2015-04-01

    The combination of micro synthetic structures with bacterial flagella motors represents an actual trend for the construction of self-propelled micro-robots. The development of methods for fabrication of these bacteria-based robots is a first crucial step towards the realization of functional miniature and autonomous moving robots. We present a novel scheme based on optical trapping to fabricate living micro-robots. By using holographic optical tweezers that allow three-dimensional manipulation in real time, we are able to arrange the building blocks that constitute the micro-robot in a defined way. We demonstrate exemplarily that our method enables the controlled assembly of living micro-robots consisting of a rod-shaped prokaryotic bacterium and a single elongated zeolite L crystal, which are used as model of the biological and abiotic components, respectively. We present different proof-of-principle approaches for the site-selective attachment of the bacteria on the particle surface. The propulsion of the optically assembled micro-robot demonstrates the potential of the proposed method as a powerful strategy for the fabrication of bio-hybrid micro-robots.

  12. Optical propagation in linear media atmospheric gases and particles, solid-state components, and water

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Michael E

    2006-01-01

    PART I: Background Theory and Measurement. 1. Optical Electromagnetics I. 2. Optical Electromagnetics II. 3. Spectroscopy of Matter. 4. Electrodynamics I: Macroscopic Interaction of Light and Matter. 5. Electrodynamics II: Microscopic Interaction of Light and Matter. 6. Experimental Techniques. PART II: Practical Models for Various Media. 7. Optical Propagation in Gases and the Atmosphere of the Earth. 8. Optical Propagation in Solids. 9. Optical Propagation in Liquids. 10. Particle Absorption and Scatter. 11. Propagation Background and Noise

  13. DFT Simulation of Structural and Optical Properties of 9-Aminoacridine Half-Sandwich Ru(II), Rh(III), and Ir(III) Antitumoral Complexes and Their Interaction with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerón-Carrasco, José Pedro; Ruiz, José; Vicente, Consuelo; de Haro, Concepción; Bautista, Delia; Zúñiga, José; Requena, Alberto

    2017-08-08

    In this work, we use DFT-based methods to simulate the chemical structures, optical properties, and interaction with DNA of a recently synthesized chelated C^N 9-aminoacridine arene Ru(II) anticancer agent and two new closely related Rh(III) and Ir(III) complexes using DFT-based methods. Four chemical models and a number of theoretical approaches, which representatively include the PBE0, B97D, ωB97X, ωB97X-D, M06, and M06-L density functionals and the LANL2DZ, def2-SVP, and def2-TZVP basis sets, are tested. The best overall accuracy/cost performance for the optimization process is reached at the ωB97X-D/def2-SVP and M06/def2-SVP levels of theory. Inclusion of explicit solvent molecules (CHCl 3 ) further refines the geometry, while taking into account the crystal network gives no significant improvements of the computed bond distances and angles. The analysis of the excited states reveals that the M06 level matches better the experimental absorption spectra, compared to ωB97X-D. The use of the M06/def2-SVP approach is therefore a well-balanced method to study theoretically the bioactivity of this type of antitumoral complexes, so we couple this TD-DFT approach to molecular dynamics simulations in order to assess their reactivity with DNA. The reported results demonstrate that these drugs could be used to inject electrons into DNA, which might broaden their applications in photoactivated chemotherapy and as new materials for DNA-based electrochemical nanodevices.

  14. Optical Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Woods, Damien; Naughton, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    We consider optical computers that encode data using images and compute by transforming such images. We give an overview of a number of such optical computing architectures, including descriptions of the type of hardware commonly used in optical computing, as well as some of the computational efficiencies of optical devices. We go on to discuss optical computing from the point of view of computational complexity theory, with the aim of putting some old, and some very recent, re...

  15. DUMAND-II progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkes, R.J.; Alexander, C.M.; Aoki, T.; Berson, U.; Bosetti, P.; Bolesta, J.; Boynton, P.E.; Bradner, H.; Camerini, U.; Dye, S.T.; Gergin, E.; Gorham, P.W.; Grieder, P.K.F.; Grogan, W.; Hanada, H.; Harris, D.; Hayashino, T.; Hazen, E.; Ito, M.; Jaworski, M.; Jenko, M.; Kawamoto, H.; Kitamura, T.; Kobayakawa, K.; Kondo, S.; Koske, P.; Learned, J.G.; Ley, C.; Lord, J.J.; Lord, R.; Lozic, T.; March, R.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuno, S.; Mavretic, A.; McCourry, L.; Mignard, M.; Miller, K.; Minkowski, P.; Mitiguy, R.; Mitsui, K.; Narita, S.; Nicklaus, D.

    1993-01-01

    The design, scientific goals, and capabilities of the DUMAND II detector system are described. Construction was authorized by DOE in 1990, and construction of various detector subsystems is under way. Current plans include deployment of the shore cable, junction box and three strings of optical detector modules in 1993, with expansion to the full 9-string configuration about one year later

  16. Investigation on cytoskeleton dynamics for no-adherent cells subjected to point-like stimuli by digital holographic microscopy and holographic optical trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccio, Lisa; Merola, Francesco; Memmolo, Pasquale; Mugnano, Martina; Fusco, Sabato; Netti, Paolo A.; Ferraro, Pietro

    2014-05-01

    Guiding, controlling and studying cellular functions are challenging themes in the biomedical field, as they are fundamental prerequisites for new therapeutic strategies from tissue regeneration to controlled drug delivery. In recent years, multidisciplinary studies in nanotechnology offer new tools to investigate important biophysical phenomena in response to the local physical characteristics of the extracellular environment, some examples are the mechanisms of cell adhesion, migration, communication and differentiation. Indeed for reproducing the features of the extracellular matrix in vitro, it is essential to develop active devices that evoke as much as possible the natural cellular environment. Our investigation is in the framework of studying and clarifying the biophysical mechanisms of the interaction between cells and the microenvironment in which they exist. We implement an optical tweezers setup to investigate cell material interaction and we use Digital Holography as non-invasive imaging technique in microscopy. We exploit Holographic Optical Tweezers arrangement in order to trap and manage functionalized micrometric latex beads to induce mechanical deformation in suspended cells. A lot of papers in literature examine the dynamics of the cytoskeleton when cells adhere on substrates and nowadays well established cell models are based on such research activities. Actually, the natural cell environment is made of a complex extracellular matrix and the single cell behavior is due to intricate interactions with the environment and are strongly correlated to the cell-cell interactions. Our investigation is devoted to understand the inner cell mechanism when it is mechanically stressed by point-like stimulus without the substrate influence.

  17. Engineering Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2008-01-01

    Engineering Optics is a book for students who want to apply their knowledge of optics to engineering problems, as well as for engineering students who want to acquire the basic principles of optics. It covers such important topics as optical signal processing, holography, tomography, holographic radars, fiber optical communication, electro- and acousto-optic devices, and integrated optics (including optical bistability). As a basis for understanding these topics, the first few chapters give easy-to-follow explanations of diffraction theory, Fourier transforms, and geometrical optics. Practical examples, such as the video disk, the Fresnel zone plate, and many more, appear throughout the text, together with numerous solved exercises. There is an entirely new section in this updated edition on 3-D imaging.

  18. The self-orientation of mammalian cells in optical tweezers—the importance of the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perney, Nicolas M B; Horak, Peter; Melvin, Tracy; Hanley, Neil A

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the first evidence showing that eukaryotic cells can be stably trapped in a single focused Gaussian beam with an orientation that is defined by the nucleus. A mammalian eukaryotic cell (in suspension) is trapped and is re-oriented in the focus of a linearly polarized Gaussian beam with a waist of dimension smaller than the radius of the nucleus. The cell reaches a position relative to the focus that is dictated by the nucleus and nuclear components. Our studies illustrate that the force exerted by the optical tweezers at locations within the cell can be predicted theoretically; the data obtained in this way is consistent with the experimental observations. (communication)

  19. Quantitative determination of optical trapping strength and viscoelastic moduli inside living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mas, Josep; Richardson, Andrew Callum; Reihani, S. Nader S.

    2013-01-01

    is viscoelastic, it would be incorrect to use a calibration procedure relying on a viscous environment. Here we demonstrate a method to perform a correct force calibration inside a living cell. This method (theoretically proposed in Fischer and Berg-Sørensen (2007 J. Opt. A: Pure Appl. Opt. 9 S239)) takes......With the success of in vitro single-molecule force measurements obtained in recent years, the next step is to perform quantitative force measurements inside a living cell. Optical traps have proven excellent tools for manipulation, also in vivo, where they can be essentially non-invasive under...... correct wavelength and exposure conditions. It is a pre-requisite for in vivo quantitative force measurements that a precise and reliable force calibration of the tweezers is performed. There are well-established calibration protocols in purely viscous environments; however, as the cellular cytoplasm...

  20. Stretching of red blood cells using an electro-optics trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Md Mozzammel; Moisescu, Mihaela G; Valkai, Sándor; Dér, András; Savopol, Tudor

    2015-01-01

    The stretching stiffness of Red Blood Cells (RBCs) was investigated using a combination of an AC dielectrophoretic apparatus and a single-beam optical tweezer. The experiments were performed at 10 MHz, a frequency high enough to avoid conductivity losses, but below the second turnover point between positive and negative dielectrophoresis. By measuring the geometrical parameters of single healthy human RBCs as a function of the applied voltage, the elastic modulus of RBCs was determined (µ = 1.80 ± 0.5 µN/m) and compared with similar values of the literature got by other techniques. The method is expected to be an easy-to-use, alternative tool to determine the mechano-elastic properties of living cells, and, on this basis, to distinguish healthy and diseased cells.