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Sample records for optical trapping raman

  1. Novel microfluidic devices for Raman spectroscopy and optical trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottevaere, Heidi; Liu, Qing; de Coster, Diane; Van Erps, Jürgen; Vervaeke, Michael; Thienpont, Hugo

    2016-09-01

    Traditionally, Raman spectroscopy is done in a specialized lab, with considerable requirements in terms of equipment, time and manual sampling of substances of interest. We present the modeling, the design and the fabrication process of a microfluidic device incorporation Raman spectroscopy, from which one enables confocal Raman measurements on-chip. The latter is fabricated using ultra precision diamond tooling and is tested in a proof-of-concept setup, by for example measuring Raman spectra of urea solutions with various concentrations. If one wants to analyze single cells instead of a sample solution, precautions need to be taken. Since Raman scattering is a weak process, the molecular fingerprint of flowing particles would be hard to measure. One method is to stably position the cell under test in the detection area during acquisition of the Raman scattering such that the acquisition time can be increased. Positioning of cells can be done through optical trapping and leads to an enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and thus a more reliable cell identification. Like Raman spectroscopy, optical trapping can also be miniaturized. We present the modeling, design process and fabrication of a mass-manufacturable polymer microfluidic device for dual fiber optical trapping using two counterpropagating singlemode beams. We use a novel fabrication process that consists of a premilling step and ultraprecision diamond tooling for the manufacturing of the molds and double-sided hot embossing for replication, resulting in a robust microfluidic chip for optical trapping. In a proof-of-concept demonstration, we characterize the trapping capabilities of the hot embossed chip.

  2. Micro-Raman Spectroscopy of Silver Nanoparticle Induced Stress on Optically-Trapped Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankapur, Aseefhali; Krishnamurthy, R. Sagar; Zachariah, Elsa; Santhosh, Chidangil; Chougule, Basavaraj; Praveen, Bhavishna; Valiathan, Manna; Mathur, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    We report here results of a single-cell Raman spectroscopy study of stress effects induced by silver nanoparticles in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). A high-sensitivity, high-resolution Raman Tweezers set-up has been used to monitor nanoparticle-induced biochemical changes in optically-trapped single cells. Our micro-Raman spectroscopic study reveals that hMSCs treated with silver nanoparticles undergo oxidative stress at doping levels in excess of 2 µg/ml, with results of a statistical analysis of Raman spectra suggesting that the induced stress becomes more dominant at nanoparticle concentration levels above 3 µg/ml. PMID:22514708

  3. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of single living cells: principle and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jianliao; Wei, Qing; Wang, Yuzhu; Li, Yong Qing

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the principle and applications of the combination technique of optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy for real-time analysis of single living cells. We demonstrate that the information of each substance inside a captured cell can be retrieved by the Raman spectrum of the cell. The effect of alcohol solution on single human Red Blood Cell (RBC) is investigated using near-infrared laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS). The significant difference between the spectrum of fresh RBC and the spectrum of RBC exposed to alcohol is observed due to the degradation of RBC. We also present the preliminary study result on the diagnosis of colorectal cancer using LTRS system.

  4. Stable optical trapping and sensitive characterization of nanostructures using standing-wave Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mu-ying; Ling, Dong-xiong; Ling, Lin; Li, William; Li, Yong-qing

    2017-01-01

    Optical manipulation and label-free characterization of nanoscale structures open up new possibilities for assembly and control of nanodevices and biomolecules. Optical tweezers integrated with Raman spectroscopy allows analyzing a single trapped particle, but is generally less effective for individual nanoparticles. The main challenge is the weak gradient force on nanoparticles that is insufficient to overcome the destabilizing effect of scattering force and Brownian motion. Here, we present standing-wave Raman tweezers for stable trapping and sensitive characterization of single isolated nanostructures with a low laser power by combining a standing-wave optical trap with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This scheme has stronger intensity gradients and balanced scattering forces, and thus can be used to analyze many nanoparticles that cannot be measured with single-beam Raman tweezers, including individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), graphene flakes, biological particles, SERS-active metal nanoparticles, and high-refractive semiconductor nanoparticles. This would enable sorting and characterization of specific SWCNTs and other nanoparticles based on their increased Raman fingerprints. PMID:28211526

  5. Stable optical trapping and sensitive characterization of nanostructures using standing-wave Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mu-Ying; Ling, Dong-Xiong; Ling, Lin; Li, William; Li, Yong-Qing

    2017-02-01

    Optical manipulation and label-free characterization of nanoscale structures open up new possibilities for assembly and control of nanodevices and biomolecules. Optical tweezers integrated with Raman spectroscopy allows analyzing a single trapped particle, but is generally less effective for individual nanoparticles. The main challenge is the weak gradient force on nanoparticles that is insufficient to overcome the destabilizing effect of scattering force and Brownian motion. Here, we present standing-wave Raman tweezers for stable trapping and sensitive characterization of single isolated nanostructures with a low laser power by combining a standing-wave optical trap with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This scheme has stronger intensity gradients and balanced scattering forces, and thus can be used to analyze many nanoparticles that cannot be measured with single-beam Raman tweezers, including individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), graphene flakes, biological particles, SERS-active metal nanoparticles, and high-refractive semiconductor nanoparticles. This would enable sorting and characterization of specific SWCNTs and other nanoparticles based on their increased Raman fingerprints.

  6. Enhanced Raman sideband cooling of caesium atoms in a vapour-loaded magneto-optical trap

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Y; Feng, G; Nute, J; Piano, S; Hackermuller, L; Ma, J; Xiao, L; Jia, S

    2015-01-01

    We report enhanced three-dimensional degenerated Raman sideband cooling (3D DRSC) of caesium (Cs) atoms in a standard single-cell vapour-loading magneto-optical trap. Our improved scheme involves using a separate repumping laser and optimized lattice detuning. We load $1.5 \\times 10^7$ atoms into the Raman lattice with a detuning of -15.5 GHz (to the ground F = 3 state). Enhanced 3D DRSC is used to cool them from 60 $\\mu$K to 1.7 $\\mu$K within 12 ms and the number of obtained atoms is about $1.2 \\times 10^7$. A theoretical model is proposed to simulate the measured number of trapped atoms. The result shows good agreement with the experimental data. The technique paves the way for loading a large number of ultracold Cs atoms into a crossed dipole trap and efficient evaporative cooling in a single-cell system.

  7. Enhanced Raman sideband cooling of caesium atoms in a vapour-loaded magneto-optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Wu, J.; Feng, G.; Nute, J.; Piano, S.; Hackermüller, L.; Ma, J.; Xiao, L.; Jia, S.

    2015-05-01

    We report enhanced three-dimensional degenerated Raman sideband cooling (3D DRSC) of caesium (Cs) atoms in a standard single-cell vapour-loaded magneto-optical trap. Our improved scheme involves using a separate repumping laser and optimized lattice detuning. We load 1.5 × 107 atoms into the Raman lattice with a detuning of -15.5 GHz (to the ground F = 3 state). Enhanced 3D DRSC is used to cool them from 60 µK to 1.7 µK within 12 ms and the number of obtained atoms is about 1.2 × 107. A theoretical model is proposed to simulate the measured number of trapped atoms. The result shows good agreement with the experimental data. The technique paves the way for loading a large number of ultracold Cs atoms into a crossed dipole trap and efficient evaporative cooling in a single-cell system.

  8. Trapping polarization of light in nonlinear optical fibers: An ideal Raman polarizer

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlov, Victor V; Ania-Castanon, Juan Diego; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The main subject of this contribution is the all-optical control over the state of polarization (SOP) of light, understood as the control over the SOP of a signal beam by the SOP of a pump beam. We will show how the possibility of such control arises naturally from a vectorial study of pump-probe Raman interactions in optical fibers. Most studies on the Raman effect in optical fibers assume a scalar model, which is only valid for high-PMD fibers (here, PMD stands for the polarization-mode dispersion). Modern technology enables manufacturing of low-PMD fibers, the description of which requires a full vectorial model. Within this model we gain full control over the SOP of the signal beam. In particular we show how the signal SOP is pulled towards and trapped by the pump SOP. The isotropic symmetry of the fiber is broken by the presence of the polarized pump. This trapping effect is used in experiments for the design of new nonlinear optical devices named Raman polarizers. Along with the property of improved sig...

  9. Raman spectroscopy of individual monocytes reveals that single-beam optical trapping of mononuclear cells occurs by their nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fore, Samantha; Chan, James; Taylor, Douglas; Huser, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We show that laser-tweezers Raman spectroscopy of eukaryotic cells with a significantly larger diameter than the tight focus of a single beam laser trap leads to optical trapping of the cell by its optically densest part, i.e. typically the cell’s nucleus. Raman spectra of individual optically trapped monocytes are compared with location-specific Raman spectra of monocytes adhered to a substrate. When the cell’s nucleus is stained with a fluorescent live cell stain, the Raman spectrum of the DNA-specific stain is observed only in the nucleus of individual monocytes. Optically trapped monocytes display the same behavior. We also show that the Raman spectra of individual monocytes exhibit the characteristic Raman signature of cells that have not yet fully differentiated and that individual primary monocytes can be distinguished from transformed monocytes based on their Raman spectra. This work provides further evidence that laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy of individual cells provides meaningful biochemical information in an entirely nondestructive fashion that permits discerning differences between cell types and cellular activity. PMID:21984959

  10. Resonance Raman study of the oxygenation cycle of optically trapped single red blood cells in a microfluidic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramser, Kerstin; Logg, Katarina; Enger, Jonas; Goksor, Mattias; Kall, Mikael; Hanstorp, Dag

    2004-10-01

    The average environmental response of red blood cells (RBCs) is routinely measured in ensemble studies, but in such investigations valuable information on the single cell level is obscured. In order to elucidate this hidden information is is important to enable the selection of single cells with certain properties while subsequent dynamics triggered by environmental stimulation are recorded in real time. It is also desirable to manipulate and control the cells under phsyiological conditions. As shown here, this can be achieved by combining optical tweezers with a confocal Raman set-up equipped with a microfluidic system. A micro-Raman set-up is combined with an optical trap with separate optical paths, lasers and objectives, which enables the acquisition of resonance Raman profils of single RBCs. The microfluidic system, giving full control over the media surrounding the cell, consists of a pattern of channels and reservoirs produced by electron beam lithography and moulded in PDMS. Fresh Hepes buffer or buffer containing sodium dithionite are transported through the channels using electro-osmotic flow, while the direct Raman response of the single optically trapped RBC is registered in another reservoir in the middle of the channel. Thus, it is possible to monitor the oxygenation cycle in a single cell and to study photo-induced chemistry. This experimental set-up has high potential for monitoring the drug response or conformational changes caused by other environmental stimuli for many types of single functional cells since "in vivo" conditions can be created.

  11. Non-destructive Identification of Individual Leukemia Cells by Optical Trapping Raman Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J W; Taylor, D S; Lane, S; Zwerdling, T; Tuscano, J; Huser, T

    2007-03-05

    Currently, a combination of technologies is typically required to assess the malignancy of cancer cells. These methods often lack the specificity and sensitivity necessary for early, accurate diagnosis. Here we demonstrate using clinical samples the application of laser trapping Raman spectroscopy as a novel approach that provides intrinsic biochemical markers for the noninvasive detection of individual cancer cells. The Raman spectra of live, hematopoietic cells provide reliable molecular fingerprints that reflect their biochemical composition and biology. Populations of normal T and B lymphocytes from four healthy individuals, and cells from three leukemia patients were analyzed, and multiple intrinsic Raman markers associated with DNA and protein vibrational modes have been identified that exhibit excellent discriminating power for cancer cell identification. A combination of two multivariate statistical methods, principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), was used to confirm the significance of these markers for identifying cancer cells and classifying the data. The results indicate that, on average, 95% of the normal cells and 90% of the patient cells were accurately classified into their respective cell types. We also provide evidence that these markers are unique to cancer cells and not purely a function of differences in their cellular activation.

  12. A microfluidic system enabling Raman measurements of the oxygenation cycle in single optically trapped red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramser, Kerstin; Enger, Jonas; Goksör, Mattias; Hanstorp, Dag; Logg, Katarina; Käll, Mikael

    2005-04-01

    Using a lab-on-a-chip approach we demonstrate the possibility of selecting a single cell with certain properties and following its dynamics after an environmental stimulation in real time using Raman spectroscopy. This is accomplished by combining a micro Raman set-up with optical tweezers and a microfluidic system. The latter gives full control over the media surrounding the cell, and it consists of a pattern of channels and reservoirs defined by electron beam lithography that is moulded into rubber silicon (PDMS). Different buffers can be transported through the channels using electro-osmotic flow, while the resonance Raman response of an optically trapped red blood cell (RBC) is simultaneously registered. This makes it possible to monitor the oxygenation cycle of the cell in real time and to investigate effects like photo-induced chemistry caused by the illumination. The experimental set-up has high potential for in vivo monitoring of cellular drug response using a variety of spectroscopic probes.

  13. Study of dynamical process of heat denaturation in optically trapped single microorganisms by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Changan; Li, Yong-qing; Tang, Wei; Newton, Ronald J.

    2003-11-01

    The development of laser traps has made it possible to investigate single cells and record real-time Raman spectra during a heat-denaturation process when the temperature of the surrounding medium is increased. Large changes in the phenylalanine band (1004 cm-1) of near-infrared spectra between living and heat-treated cells were observed in yeast and Escerichia coli and Enterobacter aerogenes bacteria. This change appears to reflect the change in environment of phenylalanine as proteins within the cells unfold as a result of increasing temperatures. As a comparison, we measured Raman spectra of native and heat-denatured solutions of bovine serum albumin proteins, and a similar change in the phenylalanine band of spectra was observed. In addition, we measured Raman spectra of native and heat-treated solutions of pure phenylalanine molecules; no observable difference in vibrational spectra was observed. These findings may make it possible to study conformational changes in proteins within single cells.

  14. Optical trapping of carbon nanotubes and graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vasi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We study optical trapping of nanotubes and graphene. We extract the distribution of both centre-of-mass and angular fluctuations from three-dimensional tracking of these optically trapped carbon nanostructures. The optical force and torque constants are measured from auto and cross-correlation of the tracking signals. We demonstrate that nanotubes enable nanometer spatial, and femto-Newton force resolution in photonic force microscopy by accurately measuring the radiation pressure in a double frequency optical tweezers. Finally, we integrate optical trapping with Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrating the use of a Raman and photoluminescence tweezers by investigating the spectroscopy of nanotubes and graphene flakes in solution. Experimental results are compared with calculations based on electromagnetic scattering theory.

  15. Fluorescence spectra of atomic ensembles in a magneto-optical trap as an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Seokchan; Kang, Sungsam; Kim, Wook-Rae; Kim, Jung-Ryul; An, Kyungwon

    2015-01-01

    We present a study on characteristics of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) as an optical lattice. Fluorescence spectra of atoms trapped in a MOT with a passively phase-stabilized beam configuration have been measured by means of the photon-counting heterodyne spectroscopy. We observe a narrow Rayleigh peak and well-resolved Raman sidebands in the fluorescence spectra which clearly show that the MOT itself behaves as a three-dimensional optical lattice. Optical-lattice-like properties of the phase-stabilized MOT such as vibrational frequencies and lineshapes of Rayleigh peak and Raman sidebands are investigated systematically for various trap conditions.

  16. Optical trapping of coated microspheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bormuth, V.; Jannasch, A.; Ander, M.; van Kats, C.M.; van Blaaderen, A.; Howard, J.; Schäffer, E.

    2008-01-01

    In an optical trap, micron-sized dielectric particles are held by a tightly focused laser beam. The optical force on the particle is composed of an attractive gradient force and a destabilizing scattering force. We hypothesized that using anti-reflection-coated microspheres would reduce scattering a

  17. Magneto optical trapping of Barium

    CERN Document Server

    De, S; Jungmann, K; Willmann, L

    2008-01-01

    First laser cooling and trapping of the heavy alkaline earth element barium has been achieved based on the strong 6s$^2$ $^1$S$_0$ - 6s6p $^1$P$_1$ transition for the main cooling. Due to the large branching into metastable D-states several additional laser driven transitions are required to provide a closed cooling cycle. A total efficiency of $0.4(1) \\cdot 10^{-2}$ for slowing a thermal atomic beam and capturing atoms into a magneto optical trap was obtained. Trapping lifetimes of more than 1.5 s were observed. This lifetime is shortened at high laser intensities by photo ionization losses. The developed techniques will allow to extend significantly the number of elements that can be optically cooled and trapped.

  18. Characterizing optical dipole trap via fluorescence of trapped cesium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Tao; GENG Tao; YAN Shubin; LI Gang; ZHANG Jing; WANG Junmin; PENG Kunchi; ZHANG Tiancai

    2006-01-01

    Optical dipole trap (ODT) is becoming an important tool of manipulating neutral atoms. In this paper ODT is realized with a far-off resonant laser beam strongly focused in the magneto-optical trap (MOT) of cesium atoms. The light shift is measured by simply monitoring the fluorescence of the atoms in the magneto-optical trap and the optical dipole trap simultaneously. The advantages of our experimental scheme are discussed, and the effect of the beam waist and power on the potential of dipole trap as well as heating rate is analyzed.

  19. Microinstrument gradient-force optical trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, S D; Baskin, R J; Howitt, D G

    1999-10-01

    A micromachined fiber-optic trap is presented. The trap consists of four single-mode, 1064-nm optical intersection. The beam fibers mounted in a micromachined silicon and glass housing. Micromachining provides the necessary precision to align the four optical fibers so that the outputs have a common intersection forms a strong three-dimensional gradient-force trap with trapping forces comparable with that of optical tweezers. Characterization of the multibeam fiber trap is illustrated for capture of polystyrene microspheres, computer simulations of the trap stiffness, and experimental determination of the trapping forces.

  20. Dysprosium magneto-optical traps

    CERN Document Server

    Youn, Seo Ho; Ray, Ushnish; Lev, Benjamin L

    2010-01-01

    Magneto-optical traps (MOTs) of highly magnetic lanthanides open the door to explorations of novel phases of strongly correlated matter such as lattice supersolids and quantum liquid crystals. We recently reported the first MOTs of the five high abundance isotopes of the most magnetic atom, dysprosium. Described here are details of the experimental technique employed for repumper-free Dy MOTs containing up to half a billion atoms. Extensive characterization of the MOTs' properties---population, temperature, loading, metastable decay dynamics, trap dynamics---is provided.

  1. Optical trapping of coated microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormuth, Volker; Jannasch, Anita; Ander, Marcel; van Kats, Carlos M; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Howard, Jonathon; Schäffer, Erik

    2008-09-01

    In an optical trap, micron-sized dielectric particles are held by a tightly focused laser beam. The optical force on the particle is composed of an attractive gradient force and a destabilizing scattering force. We hypothesized that using anti-reflection-coated microspheres would reduce scattering and lead to stronger trapping. We found that homogeneous silica and polystyrene microspheres had a sharp maximum trap stiffness at a diameter of around 800 nm--the trapping laser wavelength in water--and that a silica coating on a polystyrene microsphere was a substantial improvement for larger diameters. In addition, we noticed that homogeneous spheres of a correct size demonstrated anti-reflective properties. Our results quantitatively agreed with Mie scattering calculations and serve as a proof of principle. We used a DNA stretching experiment to confirm the large linear range in detection and force of the coated microspheres and performed a high-force motor protein assay. These measurements show that the surfaces of the coated microspheres are compatible with biophysical assays.

  2. Dynamic array of dark optical traps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daria, V.R.; Rodrigo, P.J.; Glückstad, J.

    2004-01-01

    A dynamic array of dark optical traps is generated for simultaneous trapping and arbitrary manipulation of multiple low-index microstructures. The dynamic intensity patterns forming the dark optical trap arrays are generated using a nearly loss-less phase-to-intensity conversion of a phase-encode...... optical traps for simultaneous manipulation of hollow "air-filled" glass microspheres suspended in an aqueous medium. (C) 2004 American Institute of Physics....

  3. Development and biological applications of optical tweezers and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chang'an

    Optical tweezers is a three-dimensional manipulation tool that employs a gradient force that originates from the single highly focused laser beam. Raman spectroscopy is a molecular analytical tool that can give a highly unique "fingerprint" for each substance by measuring the unique vibrations of its molecules. The combination of these two optical techniques offers a new tool for the manipulation and identification of single biological cells and microscopic particles. In this thesis, we designed and implemented a Laser-Tweezers-Raman-Spectroscopy (LTRS) system, also called the Raman-tweezers, for the simultaneous capture and analysis of both biological particles and non-biological particles. We show that microparticles can be conveniently captured at the focus of a laser beam and the Raman spectra of trapped particles can be acquired with high quality. The LTRS system overcomes the intrinsic Brownian motion and cell motility of microparticles in solution and provides a promising tool for in situ identifying suspicious agents. In order to increase the signal to noise ratio, several schemes were employed in LTRS system to reduce the blank noise and the fluorescence signal coming from analytes and the surrounding background. These techniques include near-infrared excitation, optical levitation, confocal microscopy, and frequency-shifted Raman difference. The LTRS system has been applied for the study in cell biology at the single cell level. With the built Raman-tweezers system, we studied the dynamic physiological processes of single living cells, including cell cycle, the transcription and translation of recombinant protein in transgenic yeast cells and the T cell activation. We also studied cell damage and associated biochemical processes in optical traps, UV radiations, and evaluated heating by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. These studies show that the Raman-tweezers system is feasible to provide rapid and reliable diagnosis of cellular disorders and can be

  4. Opto-mechanical measurement of micro-trap on atom chip via nonlinear cavity enhanced Raman scattering spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    High-gain resonant nonlinear Raman scattering on trapped cold atoms within a high-fineness ring optical cavity is simply explained under a nonlinear opto-mechanical mechanism, and a proposal using it to detect frequency of micro-trap on atom chip is presented. The enhancement of scattering spectrum is due to coherent Raman conversion between two different cavity modes mediated by collective vibrations of atoms through nonlinear opto-mechanical couplings. The physical conditions of this technique are roughly estimated on Rubidium atoms, and a simple quantum analysis as well as a multi-body semiclassical simulation on this nonlinear Raman process is conducted.

  5. Raman gas self-organizing into deep nano-trap lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, M.; Husakou, A.; Chafer, M.; Debord, B.; Gérôme, F.; Benabid, F.

    2016-09-01

    Trapping or cooling molecules has rallied a long-standing effort for its impact in exploring new frontiers in physics and in finding new phase of matter for quantum technologies. Here we demonstrate a system for light-trapping molecules and stimulated Raman scattering based on optically self-nanostructured molecular hydrogen in hollow-core photonic crystal fibre. A lattice is formed by a periodic and ultra-deep potential caused by a spatially modulated Raman saturation, where Raman-active molecules are strongly localized in a one-dimensional array of nanometre-wide sections. Only these trapped molecules participate in stimulated Raman scattering, generating high-power forward and backward Stokes continuous-wave laser radiation in the Lamb-Dicke regime with sub-Doppler emission spectrum. The spectrum exhibits a central line with a sub-recoil linewidth as low as ~14 kHz, more than five orders of magnitude narrower than conventional-Raman pressure-broadened linewidth, and sidebands comprising Mollow triplet, motional sidebands and four-wave mixing.

  6. Raman transitions between hyperfine clock states in a magnetic trap

    CERN Document Server

    Naber, J B; Hubert, T; Spreeuw, R J C

    2016-01-01

    We present our experimental investigation of an optical Raman transition between the magnetic clock states of $^{87}$Rb in an atom chip magnetic trap. The transfer of atomic population is induced by a pair of diode lasers which couple the two clock states off-resonantly to an intermediate state manifold. This transition is subject to destructive interference of two excitation paths, which leads to a reduction of the effective two-photon Rabi-frequency. Furthermore, we find that the transition frequency is highly sensitive to the intensity ratio of the diode lasers. Our results are well described in terms of light shifts in the multi-level structure of $^{87}$Rb. The differential light shifts vanish at an optimal intensity ratio, which we observe as a narrowing of the transition linewidth. We also observe the temporal dynamics of the population transfer and find good agreement with a model based on the system's master equation and a Gaussian laser beam profile. Finally, we identify several sources of decoheren...

  7. Coherent population trapping in a Raman atom interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Bing; Merlet, Sébastien; Santos, Franck Pereira dos

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effect of coherent population trapping (CPT) in an atom inter-ferometer gravimeter based on the use of stimulated Raman transitions. We find that CPT leads to significant phase shifts, of order of a few mrad, which may compromise the accuracy of inertial measurements. We show that this effect is rejected by the k-reversal technique, which consists in averaging inertial measurements performed with two opposite orientations of the Raman wavevector k, provided that internal states at the input of the interferometer are kept identical for both configurations.

  8. Raman Tensor Formalism for Optically Anisotropic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranert, Christian; Sturm, Chris; Schmidt-Grund, Rüdiger; Grundmann, Marius

    2016-03-25

    We present a formalism for calculating the Raman scattering intensity dependent on the polarization configuration for optically anisotropic crystals. It can be applied to crystals of arbitrary orientation and crystal symmetry measured in normal incidence backscattering geometry. The classical Raman tensor formalism cannot be used for optically anisotropic materials due to birefringence causing the polarization within the crystal to be depth dependent. We show that in the limit of averaging over a sufficiently large scattering depth, the observed Raman intensities converge and can be described by an effective Raman tensor given here. Full agreement with experimental results for uniaxial and biaxial crystals is demonstrated.

  9. In Situ Raman Spectroscopy of COOH-Functionalized SWCNTs Trapped with Optoelectronic Tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Pauzauskie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optoelectronic tweezers (OETs were used to trap and deposit aqueous dispersions of carboxylic-acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube bundles. Dark-field video microscopy was used to visualize the dynamics of the bundles both with and without virtual electrodes, showing rapid accumulation of carbon nanotubes when optical virtual electrodes are actuated. Raman microscopy was used to probe SWCNT materials following deposition onto metallic fiducial markers as well as during trapping. The local carbon nanotube concentration was observed to increase rapidly during trapping by more than an order of magnitude in less than one second due to localized optical dielectrophoresis forces. This combination of enrichment and spectroscopy with a single laser spot suggests a broad range of applications in physical, chemical, and biological sciences.

  10. Collisional blockade in microscopic optical dipole traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, N; Reymond, G; Grangier, P

    2002-07-08

    We analyze the operating regimes of a very small optical dipole trap, loaded from a magneto-optical trap, as a function of the atom loading rate, i.e., the number of atoms per second entering the dipole trap. We show that, when the dipole trap volume is small enough, a "collisional blockade" mechanism locks the average number of trapped atoms on the value 0.5 over a large range of loading rates. We also discuss the "weak loading" and "strong loading" regimes outside the blockade range, and we demonstrate experimentally the existence of these three regimes.

  11. Optical and Magnetic Trapping of Potassium 39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensher, Jason; Cornell, Eric; Cataliotti, Francesco; Fort, Chiara; Marin, Francesco; Prevedelli, Marco; Inguscio, Massimo; Ricci, Leonardo; Tino, Guglielmo

    1998-05-01

    We present measurments of optical trapping and cooling and magnetic trapping of ^39K in a double-MOT apparatus. (Optics Lett. 21, 290(1996)) We have measured light-assisted collisional loss rates from our second MOT over a range of trap light intensities. At an intensity of 10 mW/cm^2 we find a loss rate parameter β of 2 x 10-11 cc/s. β increases with trap light intensity and is consistent with the values measured by Williamson and Walker (JOSA B 12, 1393 (1995)). We also present studies of the temperature of atoms in a MOT of ^39K. Under certain conditions of repump light intensity and trap light detuning we measure temperatures nearly as low as the Doppler Limit. Finally, we report on prelimiary results of magnetic trapping in which we have trapped several 10^7 atoms in a quadrupole magnetic trap.

  12. Raman amplification in optical communication systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    Fiber Raman amplifiers are investigated with the purpose of identifying new applications and limitations for their use in optical communication systems. Three main topics are investigated, namely: New applications of dispersion compensating Raman amplifiers, the use Raman amplification to increase...... fiberbaserede Raman-forstærkere med henblik på at identificere både deres begrænsninger og nye anvendelsesmuligheder i optiske kommunikationssystemer. En numerisk forstærkermodel er blevet udviklet for bedre at forstå forstærkerens dynamik, dens gain- og støjbegrænsninger. Modellen bruges til at forudsige...... forstærkerens statiske og dynamiske egenskaber, og det eftervises at dens resultater er i god overensstemmelse med eksperimentelle forstærkermålinger. Dispersions-kompenserende fiber er på grund af sin store udbredelse og fiberens høje Raman gain effektivitet et meget velegnet Raman gain-medium. Tre nye...

  13. Magneto-optical trap for polar molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhl, Benjamin K; Sawyer, Brian C; Wang, Dajun; Ye, Jun

    2008-12-12

    We propose a method for laser cooling and trapping a substantial class of polar molecules and, in particular, titanium (II) oxide (TiO). This method uses pulsed electric fields to nonadiabatically remix the ground-state magnetic sublevels of the molecule, allowing one to build a magneto-optical trap based on a quasicycling J' = J'' -1 transition. Monte Carlo simulations of this electrostatically remixed magneto-optical trap demonstrate the feasibility of cooling TiO to a temperature of 10 micrpK and trapping it with a radiation-pumping-limited lifetime on the order of 80 ms.

  14. High Optical Access Trap 2.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-26

    The High Optical Access (HOA) trap was designed in collaboration with the Modular Universal Scalable Ion-trap Quantum Computer (MUSIQC) team, funded along with Sandia National Laboratories through IARPA's Multi Qubit Coherent Operations (MQCO) program. The design of version 1 of the HOA trap was completed in September 2012 and initial devices were completed and packaged in February 2013. The second version of the High Optical Access Trap (HOA-2) was completed in September 2014 and is available at IARPA's disposal.

  15. Optical trapping and optical binding using cylindrical vector beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Skelton

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on the use of cylindrical vector beams for optical manipulation of micron and sub-micron sized particles using the methods of a single-beam gradient force trap (optical tweezers and an evanescent-field surface trap (optical binding. We have demonstrated a stable interferometric method for the synthesis of cylindrical vector beams (CVBs, and present measurements demonstrating polarization-controlled focal volume shaping using CVBs in an optical tweezers. Furthermore we show how appropriate combinations of CVBs corresponding to superpositions of optical fibre modes can be used for controlled trapping and trafficking of micro- and nanoparticles along a tapered optical fibre.

  16. Optical trapping with Super-Gaussian beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    McLaren, M

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We outline the possibility of optical trapping and tweezing with Super-Gaussian beam profiles. We show that the trapping strength can be tuned continuously by adjusting the order of a Super-Gaussian beam, approaching that of a perfect Gaussian...

  17. Long lifetimes in optical ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Lambrecht, Alexander; Weckesser, Pascal; Debatin, Markus; Karpa, Leon; Schaetz, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    We report on single Barium ions confined in a near-infrared optical dipole trap for up to three seconds in absence of any radio-frequency fields. Additionally, the lifetime in a visible optical dipole trap is increased by two orders of magnitude as compared to the state-of-the-art using an efficient repumping method. We characterize the state-dependent potentials and measure an upper bound for the heating rate in the near-infrared trap. These findings are beneficial for entering the regime of ultracold interaction in atom-ion ensembles exploiting bichromatic optical dipole traps. Long lifetimes and low scattering rates are essential to reach long coherence times for quantum simulations in optical lattices employing many ions, or ions and atoms.

  18. Magneto-optical trapping of diatomic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Hummon, Matthew T; Stuhl, Benjamin K; Collopy, Alejandra L; Xia, Yong; Ye, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The development of the magneto-optical trap revolutionized the fields of atomic and quantum physics by providing a simple method for the rapid production of ultracold, trapped atoms. A similar technique for producing a diverse set of dense, ultracold diatomic molecular species will likewise transform the study of strongly interacting quantum systems, precision measurement, and physical chemistry. We demonstrate one- and two-dimensional transverse laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping of the polar molecule yttrium (II) oxide (YO). Using a quasicycling optical transition we observe transverse Doppler cooling of a YO molecular beam to a temperature of 5 mK, limited by interaction time. With the addition of an oscillating magnetic quadrupole field we demonstrate a transverse magneto-optical trap and achieve temperatures of 2 mK.

  19. Optical Trapping of Gold Nanoparticles in Air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauffred, Liselotte; Taheri, S Mohammad-Reza; Schmitt, Regina; Linke, Heiner; Oddershede, Lene B

    2015-07-08

    Most progress on optical nanoparticle control has been in liquids, while optical control in air has proven more challenging. By utilizing an air chamber designed to have a minimum of turbulence and a single laser beam with a minimum of aberration, we trapped individual 200 to 80 nm gold nanoparticles in air and quantified the corresponding trapping strengths. These results pave the way for construction of metallic nanostructures in air away from surfaces.

  20. Plasmonic optical trapping in biologically relevant media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Roxworthy

    Full Text Available We present plasmonic optical trapping of micron-sized particles in biologically relevant buffer media with varying ionic strength. The media consist of 3 cell-growth solutions and 2 buffers and are specifically chosen due to their widespread use and applicability to breast-cancer and angiogenesis studies. High-precision rheological measurements on the buffer media reveal that, in all cases excluding the 8.0 pH Stain medium, the fluids exhibit Newtonian behavior, thereby enabling straightforward measurements of optical trap stiffness from power-spectral particle displacement data. Using stiffness as a trapping performance metric, we find that for all media under consideration the plasmonic nanotweezers generate optical forces 3-4x a conventional optical trap. Further, plasmonic trap stiffness values are comparable to those of an identical water-only system, indicating that the performance of a plasmonic nanotweezer is not degraded by the biological media. These results pave the way for future biological applications utilizing plasmonic optical traps.

  1. Introduction: Optical trapping and applications feature issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Mariscal, Carlos; McGloin, David

    2013-01-01

    The editors introduce the Biomedical Optics Express feature issue on "Optical Trapping and Applications." The works presented in the papers within this issue include were the focus of the third OTA Topical Meeting that was held on April 14-18, 2013, in Waikoloa, Hawaii.

  2. Optical trapping of gold aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Regina K.; Pedersen, Liselotte Jauffred; Taheri, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol trapping has proven challenging and was only recently demonstrated.1 This was accomplished by utilizing an air chamber designed to have a minimum of turbulence and a laser beam with a minimum of aberration. Individual gold nano-particles with diameters between 80 nm and 200 nm were trappe...

  3. Sideband Raman Cooling of Optical Phonons in Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Xiong, Qihua

    2014-03-01

    Last century has witnessed a tremendous success of laser cooling technology from trapped atomic ions to solid-state optical refrigeration. As one of the laser cooling techniques, sideband Raman cooling plays an important role in quantum ground state preparation, coherent quantum-state manipulation and quantum phenomena study. However, those studies still limited in trapped atomic ions and cavity optomechanics, which need be cooled it below than 0.1 Kelvin even tens of nano-Kelvin due to very low frequency of phonons from several kHz to GHz. Here we report sideband Raman cooling and heating experiments of longitudinal optical phonon (LOP) with a 6.23 THz in semiconductor ZnTe nano-ribbons. By using of red-sideband laser, we cool the LOP from 225 to 55 Kelvin, corresponding to an average occupation number reduced from 0.36 to 0.005. We also observe a LOPs heating from 230 to 384 Kelvin with a blue-sideband pumping. Our experiment opens a possibility of all solid state quantum applications using semiconductor optical phonon mediated coupling at room temperature. We gratefully acknowledge funding from Singapore NRF, MOE and NTU.

  4. Magneto-Optical Trap for Thulium Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Sukachev, D; Chebakov, K; Akimov, A; Kanorsky, S; Kolachevsky, N; Sorokin, V

    2010-01-01

    Thulium atoms are trapped in a magneto-optical trap using a strong transition at 410 nm with a small branching ratio. We trap up to $7\\times10^{4}$ atoms at a temperature of 0.8(2) mK after deceleration in a 40 cm long Zeeman slower. Optical leaks from the cooling cycle influence the lifetime of atoms in the MOT which varies between 0.3 -1.5 s in our experiments. The lower limit for the leaking rate from the upper cooling level is measured to be 22(6) s$^{-1}$. The repumping laser transferring the atomic population out of the F=3 hyperfine ground-state sublevel gives a 30% increase for the lifetime and the number of atoms in the trap.

  5. Surface enhanced Raman optical activity (SEROA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim; Blanch, E.W.

    2008-01-01

    Raman optical activity (ROA) directly monitors the stereochemistry of chiral molecules and is now an incisive probe of biomolecular structure. ROA spectra contain a wealth of information on tertiary folding, secondary structure and even the orientation of individual residues in proteins and nucleic...

  6. An Atom Trap Relying on Optical Pumping

    CERN Document Server

    Bouyer, P; Dahan, M B; Michaud, A; Salomon, C; Dalibard, J

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated a new radiation pressure trap which relies on optical pumping and does not require any magnetic field. It employs six circularly polarized divergent beams and works on the red of a $J_{g} \\longrightarrow J_{e} = J_{g} + 1$ atomic transition with $J_{g} \\geq 1/2$. We have demonstrated this trap with cesium atoms from a vapour cell using the 852 nm $J_{g} = 4 \\longrightarrow J_{e} = 5$ resonance transition. The trap contained up to $3 \\cdot 10^{7}$ atoms in a cloud of $1/\\sqrt{e}$ radius of 330 $\\mu$m.

  7. Nanostructured optical nanofibres for atom trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Daly, Mark; Phelan, Ciarán; Deasy, Kieran; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    We propose an optical dipole trap for cold neutral atoms based on the electric field produced from the evanescent fields in a hollow rectangular slot cut through an optical nanofibre. In particular, we discuss the trap performance in relation to laser-cooled rubidium atoms and show that a far off-resonance, blue-detuned field combined with the attractive surface-atom interaction potential from the dielectric material forms a stable trapping configuration. With the addition of a red-detuned field, we demonstrate how three dimensional confinement of the atoms at a distance of 140 - 200 nm from the fibre surface within the slot can be accomplished. This scheme facilitates optical coupling between the atoms and the nanofibre that could be exploited for quantum communication schemes using ensembles of laser-cooled atoms.

  8. Nanostructured optical nanofibres for atom trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, M.; Truong, V. G.; Phelan, C. F.; Deasy, K.; Chormaic, S. Nic

    2014-05-01

    We propose an optical dipole trap for cold, neutral atoms based on the electric field produced from the evanescent fields in a hollow, rectangular slot cut through an optical nanofibre. In particular, we discuss the trap performance in relation to laser-cooled rubidium atoms and show that a far off-resonance, blue-detuned field combined with the attractive surface-atom interaction potential from the dielectric material forms a stable trapping configuration. With the addition of a red-detuned field, we demonstrate how three dimensional confinement of the atoms at a distance of 140-200 nm from the fibre surface within the slot can be accomplished. This scheme facilitates optical coupling between the atoms and the nanofibre that could be exploited for quantum communication schemes using ensembles of laser-cooled atoms.

  9. In situ viscometry by optical trapping interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzmán, C.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Köszali, R.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate quantitative in situ viscosity measurements by tracking the thermal fluctuations of an optically trapped microsphere subjected to a small oscillatory flow. The measured power spectral density of the sphere's positions displays a characteristic peak at the driving frequency of the f......We demonstrate quantitative in situ viscosity measurements by tracking the thermal fluctuations of an optically trapped microsphere subjected to a small oscillatory flow. The measured power spectral density of the sphere's positions displays a characteristic peak at the driving frequency...

  10. Search for Optical Binding with Shape Phase Holographic Optical Trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roichman, Yohai; Polin, Marco; Cholis, Ilias; Grier, David

    2007-03-01

    Light scattered by an illuminated particle should repel that particle's neighbors through radiation pressure. Nearly two decades ago, Burns, Fournier and Golovchenko (BFG) proposed that the coherent superposition of scattered fields can lead to an attractive interparticle interaction, which they called optical binding. Their pioneering experimental observation has generated considerable interest, most of which has focused on developing the theory for the effect. Accurate measurements of the optical binding force in the BFG geometry have been lacking, however. The need to quantify optical binding forces is particularly acute for colloidal interaction measurements on linear optical traps. We present a new method to directly measure optical binding forces between colloidal spheres that exploits the ability of shape-phase holography to create linear optical traps with accurately specified intensity and phase profiles. Our ability to control the trap's phase profile makes possible precise discrimination between intensity- and field-dependent interactions, i.e. between radiation pressure and optical binding. The same novel technique that allows us to project holographic line traps also can be used to project two- and three-dimensionally structured ring traps, novel Bessel-beam traps, which we also will describe.

  11. Focus issue introduction: optical cooling and trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Antonio A R; Jones, Philip H; Luo, Le; Maragò, Onofrio M

    2015-04-20

    The year 2015 is an auspicious year for optical science, as it is being celebrated as the International Year of Light and Light-Based Technologies. This Focus Issue of the journals Optics Express and Journal of the Optical Society of America B has been organized by the OSA Technical Group on Optical Cooling and Trapping to mark this occasion, and to highlight the most recent and exciting developments in the topics covered by the group. Together this joint Focus Issue features 32 papers, including both experimental and theoretical works, which span this wide range of activities.

  12. Theory of dispersive wave frequency shift via trapping by a soliton in an axially nonuniform optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Judge, Alexander C.; Bang, Ole; de Sterke, Martin

    2010-01-01

    We extend the analytical theory explaining the trapping of normally dispersive waves by a Raman soliton in an axially uniform optical fiber to include axially nonuniform fibers. It is shown how a changing group velocity in such a fiber leads to the same trapping mechanism as for a decelerating...... Raman soliton in a uniform fiber. In contrast to this latter case, where the trapping always leads to a blueshift of the confined radiation, the additional design flexibility inherent in the nonuniform geometry permits the redshift of dispersive waves trapped by an accelerating soliton, which itself may...

  13. Optically trapped and driven paddle-wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asavei, Theodor; Nieminen, Timo A.; Loke, Vincent L. Y.; Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Bowman, Richard; Preece, Daryl; Padgett, Miles J.; Heckenberg, Norman R.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate the control and rotation of an optically trapped object, an optical paddle-wheel, with the rotation direction normal to the beam axis. This is in contrast to the usual situation where the rotation is about the beam axis. The paddle-wheel can be optically driven and moved to any position in the field of view of the microscope, which can be of interest for various biological applications where controlled application of a fluid flow is needed in a particular location and in a specific direction. This is of particular interest in signal transduction studies in cells, especially when a cell is flat and spread out on a surface.

  14. Optical Sensing and Trapping Based on Localized Surface Plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zhiwen

    This project involves the study of novel plasmonic nanodevices that provide unique functionality in optical sensing, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and optical trapping. The first design is based on a coupling system involving double-layered metal nano-strips arrays. This system has the advantages of simple geometry and direct integration with microfluidic chips. The intense optical localization due to field coupling within the system can enhance detection sensitivity of target molecules, especially by virtue of the optical trapping of plasmonic nanoparticles. The optical resonant condition is obtained theoretically through analyzing the SPs modes. Numerical modeling based on two-dimensional (2D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is consistent with the theoretical analysis and demonstrates the feasibility of using this system for optical sensing and trapping. In the second design, a gold nano-ring structure is demonstrated to be an effective approach for plasmonic nano-optical tweezers (PNOTs) for trapping metallic nanoparticles. In our demonstration example, we have optimized a device for SERS operation at the wavelength of 785 nm. Three-dimensional (3D) FDTD techniques have been employed to calculate the optical response, and the optical force distribution have been derived using the Maxwell stress tensor (MST) method. Simulation results indicate that the nano-ring produces a maximum trapping potential well of ~32 kBT on a 20 nm gold nanoparticle. The existence of multiple potential well results in a very large active trapping volume of ~106 nm3 for the target particles. Furthermore, the trapped gold nanoparticles further lead to the formation of nano-gaps that offer a near-field enhancement of ~160 times, resulting in an achievable EF of 108 for SERS. In the third design, we propose a concept of all-optical nano-manipulation. We show that target molecules, after being trapped, can be transferred between the trapping sites within a linear array of

  15. Toward Investigating Optically Trapped Organic Aerosols with CARS Microspectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, L. F.

    2009-12-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change notes the huge uncertainty in the effect that atmospheric aerosols play in determining overall global temperature, specifically in their ability to nucleate clouds. To better understand aerosol chemistry, the novel coupling of gradient force optical trapping with broad bandwidth coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy is being developed to study single particles suspended in air. Building on successful designs employed separately for the techniques, this hybrid technology will be used to explain how the oxidation of organic compounds changes the chemical and physical properties of aerosols. By trapping the particles, an individual aerosol can be studied for up to several days. Using a broad bandwidth pulse for one of the incident beams will result in a Raman vibrational spectrum from every laser pulse. Combined with signal enhancement due to resonance and coherence of nonlinear CARS spectroscopy, this technique will allow for acquisition of data on the millisecond time scale, facilitating the study of dynamic processes. This will provide insights on how aerosols react with and absorb species from the gas phase. These experiments will increase understanding of aerosol oxidation and growth mechanisms and the effects that aerosols have on our atmosphere and climate. Progress in efforts developing this novel technique to study model systems is presented.

  16. Controlled photon emission and Raman transition experiments with a single trapped atom

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, M P A; Beugnon, J; Browaeys, A; Darquié, B; Dingjan, J; Grangier, P; Messin, G; Sortais, Y

    2005-01-01

    We present recent results on the coherent control of an optical transition in a single rubidium atom, trapped in an optical tweezer. We excite the atom using resonant light pulses that are short (4 ns) compared with the lifetime of the excited state (26 ns). By varying the intensity of the laser pulses, we can observe an adjustable number of Rabi oscillations, followed by free decay once the light is switched off. To generate the pulses we have developed a novel laser system based on frequency doubling a telecoms laser diode at 1560 nm. By setting the laser intensity to make a pi-pulse, we use this coherent control to make a high quality triggered source of single photons. We obtain an average single photon rate of 9600 s-1 at the detector. Measurements of the second-order temporal correlation function show almost perfect antibunching at zero delay. In addition, we present preliminary results on the use of Raman transitions to couple the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of our trapped atom. This will ...

  17. Efficient Raman sideband cooling of trapped ions to their motional ground state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, H.; Deng, K.; Xu, Z. T.; Yuan, W. H.; Zhang, J.; Lu, Z. H.

    2017-07-01

    Efficient cooling of trapped ions is a prerequisite for various applications of the ions in precision spectroscopy, quantum information, and coherence control. Raman sideband cooling is an effective method to cool the ions to their motional ground state. We investigate both numerically and experimentally the optimization of Raman sideband cooling strategies and propose an efficient one, which can simplify the experimental setup as well as reduce the number of cooling pulses. Several cooling schemes are tested and compared through numerical simulations. The simulation result shows that the fixed-width pulses and varied-width pulses have almost the same efficiency for both the first-order and the second-order Raman sideband cooling. The optimized strategy is verified experimentally. A single 25Mg+ ion is trapped in a linear Paul trap and Raman sideband cooled, and the achieved average vibrational quantum numbers under different cooling strategies are evaluated. A good agreement between the experimental result and the simulation result is obtained.

  18. Resonance Raman Optical Activity and Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Optical Activity analysis of Cytochrome C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Christian; Abdali, Salim; White, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    High quality Resonance Raman (RR) and resonance Raman Optical Activity (ROA) spectra of cytochrome c were obtained in order to perform full assignment of spectral features of the resonance ROA spectrum. The resonance ROA spectrum of cytochrome c revealed a distinct spectral signature pattern due...... to resonance enhanced skeletal porphyrin vibrations, more pronounced than any contribution from the protein back-bone. Combining the intrinsic resonance enhancement of cytochrome c with surface plasmon enhancement by colloidal silver particles, the Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) and Chiral...... Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (ChERS) spectra of the protein were successfully obtained at very low concentration (as low as 1 µM). The assignment of spectral features was based on the information obtained from the RR and resonance ROA spectra. Excellent agreement between RR and SERRS spectra is reported...

  19. Axial Optical Traps: A New Direction for Optical Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehoshua, Samuel; Pollari, Russell; Milstein, Joshua N

    2015-06-16

    Optical tweezers have revolutionized our understanding of the microscopic world. Axial optical tweezers, which apply force to a surface-tethered molecule by directly moving either the trap or the stage along the laser beam axis, offer several potential benefits when studying a range of novel biophysical phenomena. This geometry, although it is conceptually straightforward, suffers from aberrations that result in variation of the trap stiffness when the distance between the microscope coverslip and the trap focus is being changed. Many standard techniques, such as back-focal-plane interferometry, are difficult to employ in this geometry due to back-scattered light between the bead and the coverslip, whereas the noise inherent in a surface-tethered assay can severely limit the resolution of an experiment. Because of these complications, precision force spectroscopy measurements have adapted alternative geometries such as the highly successful dumbbell traps. In recent years, however, most of the difficulties inherent in constructing a precision axial optical tweezers have been solved. This review article aims to inform the reader about recent progress in axial optical trapping, as well as the potential for these devices to perform innovative biophysical measurements. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Coherence and Raman sideband cooling of a single atom in an optical tweezer

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, J D; Zibrov, A S; Vuletić, V; Lukin, M D

    2012-01-01

    We investigate quantum control of a single atom in an optical tweezer trap created by a tightly focused optical beam. We show that longitudinal polarization components in the dipole trap arising from the breakdown of the paraxial approximation give rise to significant internal-state decoherence. We show that this effect can be mitigated by appropriate choice of magnetic bias field, enabling Raman sideband cooling of a single atom close to its three-dimensional ground state in an optical trap with a beam waist as small as $w=900$ nm. We achieve vibrational occupation numbers of $\\bar{n}_r = 0.01$ and $\\bar{n}_a = 8$ in the radial and axial directions of the trap, corresponding to an rms size of the atomic wavepacket of 24 nm and 270 nm, respectively. This represents a promising starting point for future hybrid quantum systems where atoms are placed in close proximity to surfaces.

  1. Integrated Diffractive Optics for Surface Ion Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streed, Erik; Ghadimi, Moji; Blums, Valdis; Norton, Benjamin; Connor, Paul; Amini, Jason; Volin, Curtis; Lobino, Mirko; Kielpinski, David

    2016-05-01

    Photonic interconnects are a bottleneck to achieving large-scale trapped ion quantum computing. We have modified a Georgia Tech Research Institute microwave chip trap by using e-beam lithography to write reflective diffractive collimating optics (80 μm x 127 μm, f=58.6 μm, λ=369.5nm) on the center electrode. The optics have an NA of 0.55 x 0.73, capturing 13.2% of the solid angle. To evaluate the optics 174Yb+ was loaded by isotope selective photo-ionization from a thermal oven and then shuttled to imaging sites. Near diffraction limited sub-wavelength ion images were obtained with an observed spot sized FWHM of 338 nm x 268 nm vs. a diffraction limit of 336 nm x 257 nm. The total photon collection efficiency was measured to be 5.2+/-1.2%. Coupling into a single mode fiber of up to 2.0+/-0.6% was observed, limited by mismatch in the coupling optics. Image mode quality indicates coupling up to 4% may be possible. Funding from Australian Research Council and IARPA.

  2. Photodiode Based Detection for Multiple Trap Optical Tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Dino

    This thesis is concerned with the position tracking of microscopic, optically trapped particles and the quantification of the forces acting on them. A new detection method for simultaneous, three-dimensional tracking of multiple particles is presented, its performance is evaluated, and its...... usefulness is illustrated in specific application examples. Optical traps enable contact-less, all-optical manipulation of microscopic objects. Over the last decades, this laser-based micro-manipulation tool has facilitated numerous exciting discoveries within biology and physics, and it is today regarded...... as one of the workhorses of biophysical research. There exists a variety of implementations of optical traps, from simple single traps to complex multiple traps with engineered three-dimensional light fields. In comparison to single beam optical traps, multiple beam optical traps offer more freedom...

  3. Reduction of thermal decoherence by optical trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Nobuyuki; Ito, Sosuke; Michimura, Yuta; Aso, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate stable control of a massive oscillator's displacement response to an applied force, an important step towards reveling the quantum behavior of massive objects. In this technique, a suspended mirror is optically trapped via a detuned cavity, and its dissipation is controlled by electrical active feedback on an another mirror, which generates damping forces on the target mirror through optical rigidity. We experimentally demonstrate the technique with a 5-mg suspended mirror, which is a part of a triangular optical cavity. The observed enhancement of the pendulum's resonant frequency is from 2.14 Hz to 1.06 kHz, and the lowest temperature achieved is 15 mK. Using this technique we demonstrate reduction of the thermal decoherence rate, i.e. the inverse time of the absorption of a phonon from the thermal environment, of 60-fold from its bare value.

  4. Measurement of the Length of an Optical Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrbanek, Susan Y.

    2010-01-01

    NASA Glenn has been involved in developing optical trapping and optical micromanipulation techniques in order to develop a tool that can be used to probe, characterize, and assemble nano and microscale materials to create microscale sensors for harsh flight environments. In order to be able to assemble a sensor or probe candidate sensor material, it is useful to know how far an optical trap can reach; that is, the distance beyond/below the stable trapping point through which an object will be drawn into the optical trap. Typically, to measure the distance over which an optical trap would influence matter in a horizontal (perpendicular to beam propagation) direction, it was common to hold an object in one optical trap, place a second optical trap a known distance away, turn off the first optical trap, and note if the object was moved into the second trap when it was turned on. The disadvantage of this technique is that it only gives information of trap influence distance in horizontal (x y) directions. No information about the distance of the influence of the trap is gained in the direction of propagation of the beam (the z direction). A method was developed to use a time-of-flight technique to determine the length along the propagation direction of an optical trap beam over which an object may be drawn into the optical trap. Test objects (polystyrene microspheres) were held in an optical trap in a water-filled sample chamber and raised to a pre-determined position near the top of the sample chamber. Next, the test objects were released by blocking the optical trap beam. The test objects were allowed to fall through the water for predetermined periods of time, at the end of which the trapping beam was unblocked. It was noted whether or not the test object returned to the optical trap or continued to fall. This determination of the length of an optical trap's influence by this manner assumes that the test object falls through the water in the sample chamber at

  5. Magneto-Optical Trapping of Holmium Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Miao, J; Stratis, G; Saffman, M

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate sub-Doppler laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping of the rare earth element Holmium. Atoms are loaded from an atomic beam source and captured in six-beam $\\sigma_+ - \\sigma_-$ molasses using a strong $J=15/2 \\leftrightarrow J=17/2$ cycling transition at $\\lambda=410.5~\\rm nm$. Due to the small difference in hyperfine splittings and Land\\'e $g$-factors in the lower and upper levels of the cooling transition the MOT is self-repumped without additional repump light, and deep sub-Doppler cooling is achieved with the magnetic trap turned on. We measure the leakage out of the cycling transition to metastable states and find a branching ratio $\\sim 10^{-5}$ which is adequate for state resolved measurements on hyperfine encoded qubits.

  6. Nanoscale ablation through optically trapped microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardel, Romain; McLeod, Euan; Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Arnold, Craig B.

    2010-10-01

    The ability to directly create patterns with size scales below 100 nm is important for many applications where the production or repair of high resolution and density features is needed. Laser-based direct-write methods have the benefit of being able to quickly and easily modify and create structures on existing devices, but ablation can negatively impact the overall technique. In this paper we show that self-positioning of near-field objectives through the optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN) method allows for ablation without harming the objective elements. Small microbeads are positioned in close proximity to a substrate where ablation is initiated. Upon ablation, these beads are temporarily displaced from the trap but rapidly return to the initial position. We analyze the range of fluence values for which this process occurs and find that there exists a critical threshold beyond which the beads are permanently ejected.

  7. Bacterial chemotaxis in an optical trap.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Altindal

    Full Text Available An optical trapping technique is implemented to investigate the chemotactic behavior of a marine bacterial strain Vibrio alginolyticus. The technique takes the advantage that the bacterium has only a single polar flagellum, which can rotate either in the counter-clock-wise or clock-wise direction. The two rotation states of the motor can be readily and instantaneously resolved in the optical trap, allowing the flagellar motor switching rate S(t to be measured under different chemical stimulations. In this paper the focus will be on the bacterial response to an impulsive change of chemoattractant serine. Despite different propulsion apparati and motility patterns, cells of V. alginolyticus apparently use a similar response as Escherichia coli to regulate their chemotactic behavior. Specifically, we found that the switching rate S(t of the bacterial motor exhibits a biphasic behavior, showing a fast initial response followed by a slow relaxation to the steady-state switching rate S0. The measured S(t can be mimicked by a model that has been recently proposed for chemotaxis in E. coli. The similarity in the response to the brief chemical stimulation in these two different bacteria is striking, suggesting that the biphasic response may be evolutionarily conserved. This study also demonstrated that optical tweezers can be a useful tool for chemotaxis studies and should be applicable to other polarly flagellated bacteria.

  8. Multiphoton polymerization using optical trap assisted nanopatterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitz, Karl-Heinz; Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Flad, Florian; Schäffer, Eike; Quentin, Ulf; Alexeev, Ilya; Fardel, Romain; Arnold, Craig B.; Schmidt, Michael

    2013-06-01

    In this letter, we show the combination of multiphoton polymerization and optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN) for the additive manufacturing of structures with nanometer resolution. User-defined patterns of polymer nanostructures are deposited on a glass substrate by a 3.5 μm polystyrene sphere focusing IR femtosecond laser pulses, showing minimum feature sizes of λ/10. Feature size depends on the applied laser fluence and the bead surface spacing. A finite element model describes the intensity enhancement in the microbead focus. The results presented suggest that OTAN in combination with multiphoton processing is a viable technique for additive nanomanufacturing with sub-diffraction-limited resolution.

  9. In situ viscometry by optical trapping interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Camilo; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Köszali, Roland; Ecoffet, Carole; Forró, László; Jeney, Sylvia

    2008-11-01

    We demonstrate quantitative in situ viscosity measurements by tracking the thermal fluctuations of an optically trapped microsphere subjected to a small oscillatory flow. The measured power spectral density of the sphere's positions displays a characteristic peak at the driving frequency of the flow, which is simply proportional to the viscosity, when measured in units of the thermal power spectral density at the same frequency. Measurements are validated on different water-glycerol mixtures, as well as in a glycerol gradient, where no a priori knowledge of the solution is used to determine the glycerol concentration.

  10. Population redistribution in optically trapped polar molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Deiglmayr, J; Dulieu, O; Wester, R; Weidemüller, M

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the rovibrational population redistribution of polar molecules in the electronic ground state induced by spontaneous emission and blackbody radiation. As a model system we use optically trapped LiCs molecules formed by photoassociation in an ultracold two-species gas. The population dynamics of vibrational and rotational states is modeled using an ab-initio electric dipole moment function and experimental potential energy curves. Comparison with the evolution of the v"=3 electronic ground state yields good qualitative agreement. The analysis provides important input to assess applications of ultracold LiCs molecules in quantum simulation and ultracold chemistry.

  11. Optical two-beam trap in a polymer microfluidic chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palanco, Marta Espina; Catak, Darmin; Marie, Rodolphe

    2016-01-01

    , single beam optical traps, aka optical tweezers, by far outnumber the existing optical stretchers in research labs throughout the world. The ability to easily construct an optical stretcher setup in a low-cost material would possibly imply more frequent use of the optical stretching technique. Here, we......An optical two-beam trap, composed from two counter propagating laser beams, is an interesting setup due to the ability of the system to trap, hold, and stretch soft biological objects like vesicles or single cells. Because of this functionality, the system was also named "the optical stretcher...

  12. A microfluidic device integrating plasmonic nanodevices for Raman spectroscopy analysis on trapped single living cells

    KAUST Repository

    Perozziello, Gerardo

    2013-11-01

    In this work we developed a microfluidic device integrating nanoplasmonic devices combined with fluidic trapping regions. The microfuidic traps allow to capture single cells in areas where plasmonic sensors are placed. In this way it is possible to perform Enhanced Raman analysis on the cell membranes. Moreover, by changing direction of the flux it is possible to change the orientation of the cell in the trap, so that it is possible to analyze different points of the membrane of the same cell. We shows an innovative procedure to fabricate and assembly the microfluidic device which combine photolithography, focused ion beam machining, and hybrid bonding between a polymer substrate and lid of Calcium fluoride. This procedure is compatible with the fabrication of the plasmonic sensors in close proximity of the microfluidic traps. Moreover, the use of Calcium fluoride as lid allows full compatibility with Raman measurements producing negligible Raman background signal and avoids Raman artifacts. Finally, we performed Raman analysis on cells to monitor their oxidative stress under particular non physiological conditions. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Chiral discrimination in optical trapping and manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, David S.; Andrews, David L.

    2014-10-01

    When circularly polarized light interacts with chiral molecules or nanoscale particles powerful symmetry principles determine the possibility of achieving chiral discrimination, and the detailed form of electrodynamic mechanisms dictate the types of interaction that can be involved. The optical trapping of molecules and nanoscale particles can be described in terms of a forward-Rayleigh scattering mechanism, with trapping forces being dependent on the positioning within the commonly non-uniform intensity beam profile. In such a scheme, nanoparticles are commonly attracted to local potential energy minima, ordinarily towards the centre of the beam. For achiral particles the pertinent material response property usually entails an electronic polarizability involving transition electric dipole moments. However, in the case of chiral molecules, additional effects arise through the engagement of magnetic counterpart transition dipoles. It emerges that, when circularly polarized light is used for the trapping, a discriminatory response can be identified between left- and right-handed polarizations. Developing a quantum framework to accurately describe this phenomenon, with a tensor formulation to correctly represent the relevant molecular properties, the theory leads to exact analytical expressions for the associated energy landscape contributions. Specific results are identified for liquids and solutions, both for isotropic media and also where partial alignment arises due to a static electric field. The paper concludes with a pragmatic analysis of the scope for achieving enantiomer separation by such methods.

  14. Efficient optical trapping and visualization of silver nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosanac, Lana; Aabo, Thomas; Bendix, Pól Martin

    2008-01-01

    We performed efficient optical trapping combined with sensitive optical detection of individual silver nanoparticles. The particles ranging in size from 20 to 275 nm in diameter were trapped in three dimensions using low laser power by minimizing spherical aberrations at the focus. The optical...

  15. Quasi-Magic optical traps for Rydberg atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, S; Saffman, M

    2011-01-01

    We propose blue-detuned optical traps that are suitable for trapping of both ground state and Rydberg excited atoms. Addition of a background compensation field or suitable choice of the trap geometry provides a magic trapping condition for ground and Rydberg atoms at the trap center. Deviations from the magic condition at finite temperature are calculated. Designs that achieve less than 200 kHz differential trap shift between Cs ground and 125s Rydberg states for 10 {\\mu}K Cs atoms are presented. Consideration of the trapping potential and photoionization rates

  16. Optical lattice trap for Kerr solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Hossein; Matsko, Andrey B.; Maleki, Lute

    2017-06-01

    We show theoretically and numerically that dichromatic pumping of a nonlinear microresonator by two continuous wave coherent optical pumps creates an optical lattice trap that results in the localization of intra-cavity Kerr solitons with soliton positions defined by the beat frequency of the two pumps. This phenomenon corresponds to the stabilization of the comb repetition rate. The locking of the second pump, through adiabatic tuning of its frequency, to the comb generated by the first pump allows transitioning to single-soliton states, manipulating the position of Kerr solitons in the cavity, and tuning the frequency comb repetition rate within the locking range. It also explains soliton crystal formation in resonators supporting a dispersive wave emitted as a result of higher-order group velocity dispersion or avoided mode crossing. We show that dichromatic pumping by externally stabilized pumps can be utilized for stabilization of microresonator-based optical frequency combs when the comb span does not cover an octave or a significant fraction thereof and standard self-referencing techniques cannot be employed. Our findings have significant ramifications for high-precision applications of optical frequency combs in spectrally pure signal generation, metrology, and timekeeping.

  17. Femtosecond Optical Trapping of Cells: Efficiency and Viability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Jixian; LI Fang; XING Qirong

    2009-01-01

    The femtosecond optical trapping capability and the effect of femtosecond laser pulses on cell viability were studied. The maximum lateral velocity at which the particles just failed to be trapped, together with the measured average trapping power, were used to calculate the lateral trapping force(Q-value). The viability of the cells after femtosecond laser trapping was ascertained by vital staining. Measurement of the Q-values shows that femtosecond optical tweezers are just as effective as continuous wave optical tweezers. The experiments demonstrate that there is a critical limit for expo-sure time at each corresponding laser power of femtosecond optical tweezers, and femtosecond laser tweezers are safe for optical trapping at low power with short exposure time.

  18. In trap fragmentation and optical characterization of rotaxanes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijs, A. M.; Compagnon, I.; Silva, A.; Hannam, J. S.; Leigh, D. A.; Kay, E. R.; Dugourd, P.

    2010-01-01

    The first experiments on trapped rotaxanes are presented, combining collision induced fragmentation and in-trap laser spectroscopy. The intrinsic optical properties of three rotaxanes and their non-interlocked building blocks (thread and macrocycle) isolated in a quadrupolar ion trap are

  19. Higher order mode optical fiber Raman amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Usuga Castaneda, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    We review higher order mode Raman amplifiers and discuss recent theoretical as well as experimental results including system demonstrations.......We review higher order mode Raman amplifiers and discuss recent theoretical as well as experimental results including system demonstrations....

  20. Magnetic Trapping of Molecules via Optical Loading and Magnetic Slowing

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Hsin-I; Hemmerling, Boerge; Piskorski, Julia; Doyle, John M

    2013-01-01

    Calcium monofluoride (CaF) is magnetically slowed and trapped using optical pumping. Starting from a collisionally cooled slow beam, CaF with an initial velocity of ~ 30 m/s is slowed via magnetic forces as it enters a 800 mK deep magnetic trap. Employing two-stage optical pumping, CaF is irreversibly loaded into the trap via two scattered photons. We observe a trap lifetime exceeding 500 ms, limited by background collisions. This method paves the way for cooling and magnetic trapping of chemically diverse molecules without closed cycling transitions.

  1. Nanofiber-based optical trapping of cold neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Vetsch, Eugen; Mitsch, Rudolf; Reitz, Daniel; Schneeweiss, Philipp; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2012-01-01

    We present experimental techniques and results related to the optimization and characterization of our nanofiber-based atom trap [Vetsch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 203603 (2010)]. The atoms are confined in an optical lattice which is created using a two-color evanescent field surrounding the optical nanofiber. For this purpose, the polarization state of the trapping light fields has to be properly adjusted. We demonstrate that this can be accomplished by analyzing the light scattered by the nanofiber. Furthermore, we show that loading the nanofiber trap from a magneto-optical trap leads to sub-Doppler temperatures of the trapped atomic ensemble and yields a sub-Poissonian distribution of the number of trapped atoms per trapping site.

  2. Multiple Isotope Magneto Optical Trap from a single diode laser

    CERN Document Server

    Valenzuela, V M; Gutierrez, M; Gomez, E; 10.1364/JOSAB.30.001205

    2013-01-01

    We present a Dual Isotope Magneto Optical Trap produced using a single diode laser. We generate all the optical frequencies needed for trapping both species using a fiber intensity modulator. All the optical frequencies are amplified simultaneously using a tapered amplifier. The independent control of each frequency is on the RF side rather than on the optical side. This introduces an enormous simplification for laser cooling applications that often require an acousto-optic modulator for each laser beam. Frequency changing capabilities are limited by the modulator bandwidth (10 GHz). Traps for more isotopes can be simply added by including additional RF frequencies to the modulator.

  3. Optical trapping and manipulation of viruses and bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashkin, A.; Dziedzic, J.M.

    1987-03-20

    Optical trapping and manipulation of viruses and bacteria by laser radiation pressure were demonstrated with single-beam gradient traps. Individual tobacco mosaic viruses and dense oriented arrays of viruses were trapped in aqueous solution with no apparent damage using approximately 120 milliwatts of argon laser power. Trapping and manipulation of single live motile bacteria and Escherichia coli bacteria were also demonstrated in a high-resolution microscope at powers of a few milliwatts.

  4. Efficient Fiber Optic Detection of Trapped Ion Fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    VanDevender, A P; Amini, J; Leibfried, D; Wineland, D J

    2010-01-01

    Integration of fiber optics may play a critical role in the development of quantum information processors based on trapped ions and atoms by enabling scalable collection and delivery of light and coupling trapped ions to optical microcavities. We trap 24Mg+ ions in a surface-electrode Paul trap that includes an integrated optical fiber for detecting 280-nm fluorescence photons. The collection numerical aperture is 0.37 and total collection efficiency is 2.1 %. The ion can be positioned between 80 \\mum and 100 \\mum from the tip of the fiber by use of an adjustable rf-pseudopotential.

  5. Self-trapping of optical beams through thermophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamhot, Yuval; Barak, Assaf; Peleg, Or; Segev, Mordechai

    2010-10-15

    We demonstrate, theoretically and experimentally, self-trapping of optical beams in nanoparticle suspensions by virtue of thermophoresis. We use light to control the local concentration of nanoparticles, and increase their density at the center of the optical beam, thereby increasing the effective refractive index in the beam vicinity, causing the beam to self-trap.

  6. A Novel Gravito-Optical Surface Trap for Neutral Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Chun-Xia; WANG Zhengling; YIN Jian-Ping

    2006-01-01

    @@ We propose a novel gravito-optical surface trap (GOST) for neutral atoms based on one-dimensional intensity gradient cooling. The surface optical trap is composed of a blue-detuned reduced semi-Gaussian laser beam (SGB), a far-blue-detuned dark hollow beam and the gravity field.

  7. Optical two-beam trap in a polymer microfluidic chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palanco, Marta Espina; Catak, Darmin; Marie, Rodolphe;

    2016-01-01

    An optical two-beam trap, composed from two counter propagating laser beams, is an interesting setup due to the ability of the system to trap, hold, and stretch soft biological objects like vesicles or single cells. Because of this functionality, the system was also named "the optical stretcher......" by Jochen Guck, Josep Käs and co-workers some 15 years ago. In a favorable setup, the two opposing laser beams meet with equal intensities in the middle of a fluidic channel in which cells may flow past, be trapped, stretched, and allowed to move on, giving the promise of a high throughput device. Yet......, single beam optical traps, aka optical tweezers, by far outnumber the existing optical stretchers in research labs throughout the world. The ability to easily construct an optical stretcher setup in a low-cost material would possibly imply more frequent use of the optical stretching technique. Here, we...

  8. Optical trapping apparatus, methods and applications using photonic crystal resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, David; Chen, Yih-Fan

    2015-06-16

    A plurality of photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatuses and a plurality optical trapping methods using the plurality of photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatuses include located and formed over a substrate a photonic waveguide that is coupled (i.e., either separately coupled or integrally coupled) with a photonic crystal resonator. In a particular embodiment, the photonic waveguide and the photonic crystal resonator comprise a monocrystalline silicon (or other) photonic material absent any chemical functionalization. In another particular embodiment, the photonic waveguide and the photonic crystal resonator comprise a silicon nitride material which when actuating the photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatus with a 1064 nanometer resonant photonic radiation wavelength (or other resonant photonic radiation wavelength in a range from about 700 to about 1200 nanometers) provides no appreciable heating of an aqueous sample fluid that is analyzed by the photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatus.

  9. Bottle atom trapping configuration by optical dipole forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.M. Aldossary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The bottle beam configuration is a light field created by the interference of a pair of Laguerre–Gauss light beams with zero orbital angular momentum. In this work we show the theoretical study of the bottle beam as well as the use of this beam for the creation of a novel atom optical dipole trap namely the bottle atom trap. In such a trap the resulting dark trapping region is three-dimensional and has a cylindrical symmetry. These promising results show that this trap is a nice candidate for trapping Bose–Einstein condensates and may serve as an optical tweezer mechanism potentially useful for trapping micron-sized dielectric particles.

  10. Optical configurations for photophoretic trap of single particles in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhiyong; Pan, Yong-Le; Wang, Chuji

    2016-10-01

    Since Ashkin's pioneering work in the 1970's, optical trapping (OT) and manipulation have become an indispensable tool in diverse research fields. Today, there are multiple optical trapping schemes in use. In this article, we explore six different optical trapping schemes based on the photophoretic force (PPF). Within these schemes we explore 21 variants differing in such details as laser source, power, beam shape, and focusing optics. We evaluate and rate the trapping quality and performance of the six trapping schemes in terms of four key aspects: simplicity, robustness, flexibility, and efficiency. One of the schemes is novel: we introduce a simple, high quality scheme using a confocal design in which one trapping beam is effectively converted to two counter-propagating beams. The versatility of this new trapping scheme is demonstrated via application of the scheme to cavity ringdown spectroscopy. We hope this exploration of the diversity of PPF trapping schemes will extend applications of OT by providing researchers with information to assist in the selection of specific optical trapping schemes from the first-of-its-kind list of 21 configurations presented herein.

  11. Polarized Raman optical activity of menthol and related molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, L. D.; Hecht, L.; Blyth, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    Polarized and depolarized Raman optical activity spectra of menthol, menthyl chloride, neomenthol and neothiomenthol from 800 to 1500 cm -1 are reported. Despite axial symmetry in all the bonds, the presence of the heteroatoms O or S seems to induce large deviations from the expected ratio of 2:1 between the polarized and depolarized Raman optical activity intensities, but Cl does not. These deviations might originate in large electric quadrupole contributions induced by excited state interactions involving O or S Rydberg p orbitals and valence orbitals on other parts of the molecule. Such interactions appear to undermine the bond polarizability theory of Raman intensities.

  12. Raman Optical Activity and Raman Spectra of Amphetamine Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.; Shim, Irene; White, Peter Cyril

    2012-01-01

    are employed for identification purposes. The DFT calculations show that the most stable conformations are those allowing for close contact between the aromatic ring and the amine hydrogen atoms. The internal rotational barrier within the same amphetamine enanti- omer has a considerable influence on the Raman......-H+ sulfate. According to the present study the AMPH+ ion in aqueous sulfate solution seems to adopt a con- formation in which the phenyl and ammonium groups are in transpositions, similar to what has been found in the solid state....

  13. Evanescent optical trapping of nanoscale particles using slotted tapered optical fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Daly, Mark; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2016-01-01

    While conventional optical trapping techniques can trap objects with submicron dimensions, the underlying limits imposed by the diffraction of light generally restrict their use to larger, or higher refractive index particles. As the index and diameter decrease, the trapping difficulty rapidly increases; hence, the power requirements for stable trapping become so large as to quickly denature the trapped objects in such diffraction-limited systems. Here, we present an evanescent field-based device capable of confining low index nanoscale particles using modest optical powers as low as 1.2 mW, with additional applications in the field of cold atom trapping. Our experiment uses a nanostructured optical micro-nanofibre to trap 200 nm, low-index, fluorescent particles within the structured region, thereby overcoming diffraction limitations. We analyse the trapping potential of this device both experimentally and theoretically, and show how strong optical traps are achieved with low input powers.

  14. Enhancing the strength of an optical trap by truncation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa R M Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Optical traps (tweezers are beginning to be used with increasing efficacy in diverse studies in the biological and biomedical sciences. We report here results of a systematic study aimed at enhancing the efficiency with which dielectric (transparent materials can be optically trapped. Specifically, we investigate how truncation of the incident laser beam affects the strength of an optical trap in the presence of a circular aperture. Apertures of various sizes have been used by us to alter the beam radius, thereby changing the effective numerical aperture and intensity profile. We observe significant enhancement of the radial and axial trap stiffness when an aperture is used to truncate the beam compared to when no aperture was used, keeping incident laser power constant. Enhancement in trap stiffness persists even when the beam intensity profile is modulated. The possibility of applying truncation to multiple traps is explored; to this end a wire mesh is utilized to produce multiple trapping that also alters the effective numerical aperture. The use of a mesh leads to reduction in trap stiffness compared to the case when no wire mesh is used. Our findings lead to a simple-to-implement and inexpensive method of significantly enhancing optical trapping efficiency under a wide range of circumstances.

  15. Integrated optics architecture for trapped-ion quantum information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielpinski, D.; Volin, C.; Streed, E. W.; Lenzini, F.; Lobino, M.

    2016-12-01

    Standard schemes for trapped-ion quantum information processing (QIP) involve the manipulation of ions in a large array of interconnected trapping potentials. The basic set of QIP operations, including state initialization, universal quantum logic, and state detection, is routinely executed within a single array site by means of optical operations, including various laser excitations as well as the collection of ion fluorescence. Transport of ions between array sites is also routinely carried out in microfabricated trap arrays. However, it is still not possible to perform optical operations in parallel across all array sites. The lack of this capability is one of the major obstacles to scalable trapped-ion QIP and presently limits exploitation of current microfabricated trap technology. Here we present an architecture for scalable integration of optical operations in trapped-ion QIP. We show theoretically that diffractive mirrors, monolithically fabricated on the trap array, can efficiently couple light between trap array sites and optical waveguide arrays. Integrated optical circuits constructed from these waveguides can be used for sequencing of laser excitation and fluorescence collection. Our scalable architecture supports all standard QIP operations, as well as photon-mediated entanglement channels, while offering substantial performance improvements over current techniques.

  16. 2D Magneto-optical trapping of diatomic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummon, Matthew T; Yeo, Mark; Stuhl, Benjamin K; Collopy, Alejandra L; Xia, Yong; Ye, Jun

    2013-04-05

    We demonstrate one- and two-dimensional transverse laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping of the polar molecule yttrium (II) oxide (YO). In a 1D magneto-optical trap (MOT), we characterize the magneto-optical trapping force and decrease the transverse temperature by an order of magnitude, from 25 to 2 mK, limited by interaction time. In a 2D MOT, we enhance the intensity of the YO beam and reduce the transverse temperature in both transverse directions. The approach demonstrated here can be applied to many molecular species and can also be extended to 3D.

  17. Colloidal Particle Geometry and Its Effect on Optical Trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Rachael; Levine, Alex

    2008-03-01

    Recent experiments by Wilking and Mason (Europhysics Letters, in press) on the laser trapping of colloids of various shapes (the letters of the alphabet) show that for identical chemistries the trapping force varies wildly with particle shape. In fact, certain shapes do not trap at all. Motivated by these experimental results, we explore the trapping of particle of variable shape using a ray-optics simulation. This numerical tool allows us to perform Monte Carlo integrations of the total trapping forces and torques for a series of objects such as a cross (the letter ``x'') or a beam (the letter ``I''). We find that certain shapes feature bi-stable trapping positions/orientations, and some, indeed, do not allow for trapping at all.

  18. Interference-free optical detection for Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet (Inventor); Fischer, David G (Inventor); Kojima, Jun (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An architecture for spontaneous Raman scattering (SRS) that utilizes a frame-transfer charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor operating in a subframe burst gating mode to realize time-resolved combustion diagnostics is disclosed. The technique permits all-electronic optical gating with microsecond shutter speeds (<5 .mu.s), without compromising optical throughput or image fidelity. When used in conjunction with a pair of orthogonally-polarized excitation lasers, the technique measures time-resolved vibrational Raman scattering that is minimally contaminated by problematic optical background noise.

  19. Optical Tweezers and Optical Trapping Improved for Future Automated Micromanipulation and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Decker, Arthur J.

    2005-01-01

    Optical trap arrays are being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center for holding, manipulating, and optically interrogating arrays of nanotube sensors. The trap arrays, for example, might be used to arrange arrays of chemical sensors for insertion onto a chip in liquid, air, and vacuum environments. Neural-network-controlled spatial light modulators (SLMs) are to generate and control the trap positions and trap profiles in three dimensions.

  20. Anomalous dynamic behaviour of optically trapped high aspect ratio nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Toe, Wen Jun; Angstmann, Christopher; Gao, Qiang; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Henry, Bruce; Reece, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of high aspect ratio nanowires trapped axially in a single gradient force optical tweezers. A power spectrum analysis of the Brownian dynamics reveals a broad spectral resonance of the order of a kHz with peak properties that are strongly dependent on the input trapping power. Modelling of the dynamical equations of motion of the trapped nanowire that incorporate non-conservative effects through asymmetric coupling between translational and rotational degrees of freedom provides excellent agreement with the experimental observations. An associated observation of persistent cyclical motion around the equilibrium trapping position using winding analysis provides further evidence for the influence of non-conservative forces.

  1. Optical Sensors based on Raman Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jernshøj, Kit Drescher

    Formålet med denne afhandling er at give en systematisk og uddybende videnskabelig diskussion af molekylær Raman spredning, som kan danne grundlag for udviklingen af molekylespecifikke optiske sensorer til on-site, ikke-destruktiv måling. Afhandlingen falder i tre dele, to teoriafsnit, hvor første...... del omhandler den tilgangelige molekylære information ved overfladeforstærket resonans Raman spredning (SERRS), samt hvordan adgangen til denne information kan optimeres. Anden del omhandler, hvordan det molekylære informationsindhold kan forøges ved at kombinere polariserede Raman og resonans Raman...... målinger på frie molekyler med multivariat analyse. I tredje og sidste del, som er et eksperimentelt afsnit, præsenteres og diskuteres overfladeforstærkede Raman målinger (SERS) på tre udvalgte pesticider. Afhandlingen indledes med en diskussion af teorien bag SERRS med speciel fokus på den molekylære...

  2. Improved magneto-optical trapping of a diatomic molecule

    CERN Document Server

    McCarron, D J; Steinecker, M H; DeMille, D

    2014-01-01

    We present experimental results from a new scheme for magneto-optically trapping strontium monofluoride (SrF) molecules, which provides increased confinement compared to our original work. The improved trap employs a new approach to magneto-optical trapping presented by M. Tarbutt, \\emph{arXiv preprint} 1409.0244, which provided insight for the first time into the source of the restoring force in magneto-optical traps (MOTs) where the cycling transition includes dark Zeeman sublevels (known as type-II MOTs). We measure a radial spring constant $20\\times$ greater than in our original work with SrF, comparable to the spring constants reported in atomic type-II MOTs. We achieve a trap lifetime $\\tau_{\\rm{MOT}}=136(2)$~ms, over $2\\times$ longer than originally reported for SrF. Finally, we demonstrate further cooling of the trapped molecules by briefly increasing the trapping lasers' detunings. Our trapping scheme remains a straightforward extension of atomic techniques and marks a step towards the direct product...

  3. A new optical trap and repump system for ultracold Strontium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.; Yan, M.; Desalvo, B. J.; Killian, T. C.

    2013-05-01

    Atoms can be trapped at the foci of intense laser beams, which can enable the study of interactions and dynamics of ultracold gases. In this poster, we will describe our new trap design. A large volume pancake-shaped optical dipole trap is initially used for loading large numbers of atoms from a Magneto-Optical Trap. Atoms are then evaporatively cooled and compressed into a superimposed crossed-beam dimple trap. This combination improves the reproducibility of the experiment and shortens the time required to create quantum degenerate samples. In the second part of the poster, we will discuss a new repump scheme for laser cooling of Sr that uses the 5s5p3P2-5p23P2 transition at 481nm. The availability of laser diodes at this wavelength makes this an appealing alternative to other schemes.

  4. Raman Spectroscopy of Single Nanoparticles in a Double-Nanohole Optical Tweezer System

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Steven; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    A double nanohole in a metal film was used to trap nanoparticles (20 nm diameter) and simultaneously record their Raman spectrum using the trapping laser as the excitation source. This allowed for the identification of characteristic Stokes lines for titania and polystyrene nanoparticles, showing the capability for material identification of nanoparticles once trapped. Increased Raman signal is observed for the trapping of multiple nanoparticles. This system combines the benefits of nanoparticle isolation and manipulation with unique identification.

  5. Raman spectroscopy of single nanoparticles in a double-nanohole optical tweezer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Steven; Balushi, Ahmed A. Al; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-10-01

    A double nanohole in a metal film was used to trap nanoparticles (20 nm diameter) and simultaneously record their Raman spectrum using the trapping laser as the excitation source. This allowed for the identification of characteristic Stokes lines for titania and polystyrene nanoparticles, showing the capability for material identification of nanoparticles once trapped. Increased Raman signal was observed for the trapping of multiple nanoparticles. This system combines the benefits of nanoparticle isolation and manipulation with unique identification.

  6. A dynamic magneto-optical trap for atom chips

    CERN Document Server

    Rushton, Jo; Bateman, James; Himsworth, Matt

    2016-01-01

    We describe a dynamic magneto-optical trap (MOT) suitable for the use with vacuum systems in which optical access is limited to a single window. This technique facilitates the long-standing desire of producing integrated atom chips, many of which are likely to have severely restricted optical access compared with conventional vacuum chambers. This "switching-MOT" relies on the synchronized pulsing of optical and magnetic fields at audio frequencies. The trap's beam geometry is obtained using a planar mirror surface, and does not require a patterned substrate or bulky optics inside the vacuum chamber. Central to the design is a novel magnetic field geometry that requires no external quadrupole or bias coils which leads toward a very compact system. We have implemented the trap for $^{85}$Rb and shown that it is capable of capturing 2 million atoms and directly cooling below the Doppler temperature.

  7. Eliminating light shifts in single-atom optical traps

    CERN Document Server

    Hutzler, Nicholas R; Yu, Yichao; Ni, Kang-Kuen

    2016-01-01

    Microscopically controlled neutral atoms in optical tweezers and lattices have led to exciting advances in the study of quantum information and quantum many-body systems. The light shifts of atomic levels from the trapping potential in these systems can result in detrimental effects such as fluctuating dipole force heating, inhomogeneous detunings, and inhibition of laser cooling, which limits the atomic species that can be manipulated. In particular, these light shifts can be large enough to prevent loading into optical tweezers directly from a magneto-optical trap. We present a general solution to these limitations by loading, cooling, and imaging single atoms with temporally alternating beams. Because this technique does not depend on any specific spectral properties, we expect it to enable the optical tweezer method to control nearly any atomic or molecular species that can be laser cooled and optically trapped. Furthermore, we present an analysis of the role of heating and required cooling for single ato...

  8. Optical two-beam trap in a polymer microfluidic chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espina Palanco, Marta; Catak, Darmin; Marie, Rodolphe; Matteucci, Marco; Bilenberg, Brian; Kristensen, Anders; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2016-09-01

    An optical two-beam trap, composed from two counter propagating laser beams, is an interesting setup due to the ability of the system to trap, hold, and stretch soft biological objects like vesicles or single cells. Because of this functionality, the system was also named "the optical stretcher" by Jochen Guck, Josep Käs and co-workers some 15 years ago. In a favorable setup, the two opposing laser beams meet with equal intensities in the middle of a fluidic channel in which cells may flow past, be trapped, stretched, and allowed to move on, giving the promise of a high throughput device. Yet, single beam optical traps, aka optical tweezers, by far outnumber the existing optical stretchers in research labs throughout the world. The ability to easily construct an optical stretcher setup in a low-cost material would possibly imply more frequent use of the optical stretching technique. Here, we will outline the design, the production procedures, and results obtained in a fiber-based experimental setup built within an injection molded microfluidic polymer chip. The microfluidic chip is constructed with a three layer technology in which we ensure both horizontal and vertical focusing of the cells we wish to trap, thereby preventing too many cells to flow below the line of focus of the two counter propagating laser beams that are positioned perpendicular to the direction of flow of the cells. Results will be compared to that from other designs from previous work in the group.

  9. Micromanipulation of sperm by a laser generated optical trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadir, Y.; Wright, W.H.; Vafa, O.; Ord, T.; Asch, R.H.; Berns, M.W. (Univ. of California, Irvine (USA))

    1989-11-01

    The force generated by the radiation pressure of a low power laser beam induces an optical trap which may be used to manipulate sperm. We studied the effect of the optical trap on sperm motility. A Nd:YAG laser beam was coupled to a conventional microscope and focused into the viewing plane by the objective lens. Sperm were caught in the trap and manipulated by a joy stick controlled motorized stage. After different exposure periods, the velocity and patterns were analysed by a computerized image processor. There were minor changes in sperm velocity when exposed to the trap for 30 seconds or less. A gradual decrease in the mean linear velocity was observed after 45 seconds of exposure. This optical micromanipulator may also be useful for studying the force generated by a single spermatozoa and evaluating the influence of drugs on motility.

  10. Raman imaging of biofilms using gold sputtered fiber optic probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Christina Grace Charlet; Manoharan, Hariharan; Subrahmanyam, Aryasomayajula; Sai, V. V. Raghavendra

    2016-12-01

    In this work we report characterization of bacterial biofilm using gold sputtered optical fiber probe as substrates for confocal Raman spectroscopy measurements. The chemical composition and the heterogeneity of biofilms in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) was evaluated. The spatial distribution of bacterial biofilm on the substrates during their growth phase was studied using Raman imaging. Further, the influence of substrate's surface on bacterial adhesion was investigated by studying growth of biofilms on surfaces with hydrophilic and hydrophobic coatings. This study validates the use of gold sputtered optical fiber probes as SERS substrates in confocal microscopic configuration to identify and characterize clinically relevant biofilms.

  11. Optical manipulation with two beam traps in microfluidic polymer systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khoury Arvelo, Maria; Matteucci, Marco; Sørensen, Kristian Tølbøl

    2015-01-01

    An optical trapping system with two opposing laser beams, also known as the optical stretcher, are naturally constructed inside a microfluidic lab-on-chip system. We present and compare two approaches to combine a simple microfluidic system with either waveguides directly written in the microflui...

  12. Developing fibre optic Raman probes for applications in clinical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Oliver; Iping Petterson, Ingeborg E; Day, John C C; Stone, Nick

    2016-04-07

    Raman spectroscopy has been shown by various groups over the last two decades to have significant capability in discriminating disease states in bodily fluids, cells and tissues. Recent development in instrumentation, optics and manufacturing approaches has facilitated the design and demonstration of various novel in vivo probes, which have applicability for myriad of applications. This review focusses on key considerations and recommendations for application specific clinical Raman probe design and construction. Raman probes can be utilised as clinical tools able to provide rapid, non-invasive, real-time molecular analysis of disease specific changes in tissues. Clearly the target tissue location, the significance of spectral changes with disease and the possible access routes to the region of interest will vary for each clinical application considered. This review provides insight into design and construction considerations, including suitable probe designs and manufacturing materials compatible with Raman spectroscopy.

  13. Photodiode Based Detection for Multiple Trap Optical Tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Dino

    This thesis is concerned with the position tracking of microscopic, optically trapped particles and the quantification of the forces acting on them. A new detection method for simultaneous, three-dimensional tracking of multiple particles is presented, its performance is evaluated, and its...... usefulness is illustrated in specific application examples. Optical traps enable contact-less, all-optical manipulation of microscopic objects. Over the last decades, this laser-based micro-manipulation tool has facilitated numerous exciting discoveries within biology and physics, and it is today regarded...

  14. Cold atom trap with zero residual magnetic field: the ac magneto-optical trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Matthew; Murray, Andrew James

    2008-10-24

    A novel atom trap is described using alternating current to generate the magnetic B field, together with high speed polarization switching of the damping laser field. This combination produces a trap as effective as a standard magneto-optical trap (MOT), with the advantage that the average B field is zero. No net current is hence induced in surrounding conductive elements, and the B field produced by the ac MOT is found to switch off >300 times faster than a conventional MOT. New experiments can hence be performed, including charged particle probing or detection of the cold target ensemble.

  15. Reversible quantum optical data storage based on resonant Raman optical field excited spin coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Byoung S

    2008-09-01

    A method of reversible quantum optical data storage is presented using resonant Raman field excited spin coherence, where the spin coherence is stored in an inhomogeneously broadened spin ensemble. Unlike the photon echo method, in the present technique, a 2pi Raman optical rephasing pulse area is used and multimode (parallel) optical channels are available in which the multimode access gives a great benefit to quantum information processors such as quantum repeaters.

  16. Copper ion-exchanged channel waveguides optimization for optical trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshak, A H; Khor, K N; Shahimin, M M; Murad, S A Z

    2013-08-01

    Optical trapping of particles has become a powerful non-mechanical and non-destructive technique for precise particle positioning. The manipulation of particles in the evanescent field of a channel waveguide potentially allows for sorting and trapping of several particles and cells simultaneously. Channel waveguide designs can be further optimized to increase evanescent field prior to the fabrication process. This is crucial in order to make sure that the surface intensity is sufficient for optical trapping. Simulation configurations are explained in detail with specific simulation flow. Discussion on parameters optimization; physical geometry, optical polarization and wavelength is included in this paper. The effect of physical, optical parameters and beam spot size on evanescent field has been thoroughly discussed. These studies will continue toward the development of a novel copper ion-exchanged waveguide as a method of particle sorting, with biological cell propulsion studies presently underway.

  17. Multiple Isotope Magneto Optical Trap from a single diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Eduardo; Valenzuela, Victor; Hamzeloui, Saeed; Gutierrez, Monica

    2013-05-01

    We present a simple design for a Dual Isotope Magneto Optical Trap. The system requires a single diode laser, a fiber modulator and a tapered amplifier to trap and completely control both 85Rb and 87Rb. We generate all the frequencies needed for trapping both species using the fiber intensity modulator. All the frequencies are amplified simultaneously with the tapered amplifier. The position and power of each frequency is now controlled independently on the RF rather than on the optical side. This introduces an enormous simplification for laser cooling that often requires an acousto-optic modulator for each frequency. The range of frequency changes is much bigger than what is available with acousto-optic modulators since in our case is determined by the modulator bandwidth (10 GHz). Additional isotopes can be simply added by including additional RF frequencies to the modulator and extra beams for other uses can be produced the same way. Support from CONACYT, PROMEP and UASLP.

  18. Modeling magneto-optical trapping of CaF molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarbutt, M. R.; Steimle, T. C.

    2015-11-01

    Magneto-optical trapping forces for molecules are far weaker than for alkali-metal atoms because the photon scattering rate is reduced when there are multiple ground states, and because of optical pumping into dark states. The force is further reduced when the upper state has a much smaller Zeeman splitting than the lower state. We use a rate model to estimate the strength of the trapping and damping forces in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) of CaF molecules, using either the A 2Π1 /2-X 2Σ+ transition or the B 2Σ+-X 2Σ+ transition. We identify a mechanism of magneto-optical trapping that arises when, in each beam of the MOT, two laser components with opposite polarizations and different detunings address the same transition. This mechanism produces a strong trapping force even when the upper state has little or no Zeeman splitting. It is the main mechanism responsible for the trapping force when the A 2Π1 /2-X 2Σ+ transition is used.

  19. Modeling magneto-optical trapping of CaF molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Tarbutt, M R

    2015-01-01

    Magneto-optical trapping forces for molecules are far weaker than for alkali atoms because the photon scattering rate is reduced when there are multiple ground states, and because of optical pumping into dark states. The force is further reduced when the upper state has a much smaller Zeeman splitting than the lower state. We use a rate model to estimate the strength of the trapping and damping forces in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) of CaF molecules, using either the A$^{2}\\Pi_{1/2}$ - X$^{2}\\Sigma^{+}$ transition or the B$^{2}\\Sigma^{+}$ - X$^{2}\\Sigma^{+}$ transition. We identify a new mechanism of magneto-optical trapping that arises when, in each beam of the MOT, two laser components with opposite polarizations and different detunings address the same transition. This mechanism produces a strong trapping force even when the upper state has little or no Zeeman splitting. It is the main mechanism responsible for the trapping force when the A$^{2}\\Pi_{1/2}$ - X$^{2}\\Sigma^{+}$ transition is used.

  20. A Raman scattering study of H{sub 2} trapped near O in Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiller, M. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: martin.hiller@phy.tu-dresden.de; Lavrov, E.V.; Weber, J. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Single-crystal silicon wafers exposed to a hydrogen plasma are studied by Raman scattering. Three Raman signals at 3727(1), 3733(1), and 3740(1)cm{sup -1}(T{yields}0 K) are assigned to ro-vibrational modes of H{sub 2} bound to interstitial oxygen (O-H{sub 2}). By monitoring the trapping kinetics of interstitial H{sub 2} at oxygen it is found that ortho- and para-H{sub 2} have similar diffusivities. At 77 K, an ortho-to-para conversion of H{sub 2} within the O-H{sub 2} complex is observed. This conversion occurs with similar kinetics as has been previously observed for isolated interstitial H{sub 2} in Si, and is suggested to be caused by interaction of H{sub 2} with the nuclear magnetic moment of {sup 29}Si.

  1. A simple optical tweezers for trapping polystyrene particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiddiq, Minarni; Nasir, Zulfa; Yogasari, Dwiyana

    2013-09-01

    Optical tweezers is an optical trap. For decades, it has become an optical tool that can trap and manipulate any particle from the very small size like DNA to the big one like bacteria. The trapping force comes from the radiation pressure of laser light which is focused to a group of particles. Optical tweezers has been used in many research areas such as atomic physics, medical physics, biophysics, and chemistry. Here, a simple optical tweezers has been constructed using a modified Leybold laboratory optical microscope. The ocular lens of the microscope has been removed for laser light and digital camera accesses. A laser light from a Coherent diode laser with wavelength λ = 830 nm and power 50 mW is sent through an immersion oil objective lens with magnification 100 × and NA 1.25 to a cell made from microscope slides containing polystyrene particles. Polystyrene particles with size 3 μm and 10 μm are used. A CMOS Thorlabs camera type DCC1545M with USB Interface and Thorlabs camera lens 35 mm are connected to a desktop and used to monitor the trapping and measure the stiffness of the trap. The camera is accompanied by camera software which makes able for the user to capture and save images. The images are analyzed using ImageJ and Scion macro. The polystyrene particles have been trapped successfully. The stiffness of the trap depends on the size of the particles and the power of the laser. The stiffness increases linearly with power and decreases as the particle size larger.

  2. Diamagnetic Raman Optical Activity of Chlorine, Bromine, and Iodine Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šebestík, Jaroslav; Kapitán, Josef; Pačes, Ondřej; Bouř, Petr

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic Raman optical activity of gases provides unique information about their electric and magnetic properties. Magnetic Raman optical activity has recently been observed in a paramagnetic gas (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2012, 51, 11058; Angew. Chem. 2012, 124, 11220). In diamagnetic molecules, it has been considered too weak to be measurable. However, in chlorine, bromine and iodine vapors, we could detect a significant signal as well. Zeeman splitting of electronic ground-state energy levels cannot rationalize the observed circular intensity difference (CID) values of about 10(-4). These are explicable by participation of paramagnetic excited electronic states. Then a simple model including one electronic excited state provides reasonable spectral intensities. The results suggest that this kind of scattering by diamagnetic molecules is a general event observable under resonance conditions. The phenomenon sheds new light on the role of excited states in the Raman scattering, and may be used to probe molecular geometry and electronic structure.

  3. One- and Two-Dimensional Arrays of Double-Well Optical Traps for Cold Atoms or Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Xian-Ming; YIN Jian-Ping

    2004-01-01

    @@ We propose a novel scheme to form one- and two-dimensional arrays of double-well optical dipole traps for cold atoms (or molecules) by using an optical system composed of a binary π-phase grating and a lens illuminated by a plane light wave, and study the relationship between the maximum intensity Imax of each optical well (or the maximum trapping potential Umax for 85Rb atoms) and the relative apertureβ (= a/f) of the lens. We also calculate the intensity gradients of each optical well and their curvatures, and estimate the spontaneous photon-scattering rate of trapped atom in each well, including Rayleigh and Raman scattering rates. Our study shows that the proposed 1D and 2D arrays of double-well traps can be used to prepare 1D and 2D novel optical lattices with cold atoms (or molecules), or form an all-optically integrated atom optical chip, or even to realize an array of all-optical double-well atomic (or molecular) Bose-Einstein condensates by optical-potential evaporative cooling, and so on.

  4. Intensity dependent waiting time for strong electron trapping events in speckle stimulated raman scatter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Harvey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daughton, W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yin, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The onset of Stimulated Raman scatter from an intense laser speckle is the simplest experimentally realizable laser-plasma-interaction environment. Despite this data and recent 3D particle simulations, the controlling mechanism at the onset of backscatter in the kinetic regime when strong electron trapping in the daughter Langmuir wave is a dominant nonlinearity is not understood. This paper explores the consequences of assuming that onset is controlled by large thermal fluctuations. A super exponential dependence of mean reflectivity on speckle intensity in the onset regime is predicted.

  5. Intensity dependent waiting time for strong electron trapping events in speckle stimulated raman scatter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Harvey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daughton, W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yin, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The onset of Stimulated Raman scatter from an intense laser speckle is the simplest experimentally realizable laser-plasma-interaction environment. Despite this data and recent 3D particle simulations, the controlling mechanism at the onset of backscatter in the kinetic regime when strong electron trapping in the daughter Langmuir wave is a dominant nonlinearity is not understood. This paper explores the consequences of assuming that onset is controlled by large thermal fluctuations. A super exponential dependence of mean reflectivity on speckle intensity in the onset regime is predicted.

  6. Optical two-beam traps in microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2016-01-01

    An attractive solution for optical trapping and stretching by means of two counterpropagating laser beams is to embed waveguides or optical fibers in a microfluidic system. The microfluidic system can be constructed in different materials, ranging from soft polymers that may easily be cast...... written waveguides and in an injection molded polymer chip with grooves for optical fibers. (C) 2016 The Japan Society of Applied Physics....

  7. Integrated magneto-optical traps on a chip

    CERN Document Server

    Pollock, S; Laliotis, A; Hinds, E A

    2009-01-01

    We have integrated magneto-optical traps (MOTs) into an atom chip by etching pyramids into a silicon wafer. These have been used to trap atoms on the chip, directly from a room temperature vapor of rubidium. This new atom trapping method provides a simple way to integrate several atom sources on the same chip. It represents a substantial advance in atom chip technology and offers new possibilities for atom chip applications such as integrated single atom or photon sources and molecules on a chip.

  8. A Magneto-Optical Trap for Polar Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Stuhl, Benjamin K; Wang, Dajun; Ye, Jun

    2008-01-01

    We propose a method for laser cooling and trapping a substantial class of polar molecules, and in particular titanium (II) oxide (TiO). This method uses pulsed electric fields to nonadiabatically remix the ground-state magnetic sublevels of the molecule, allowing us to build a magneto-optical trap (MOT) based on a quasi-cycling $J'=J"-1$ transition. Monte-Carlo simulations of this electrostatically remixed MOT (ER-MOT) demonstrate the feasibility of cooling TiO to a temperature of 10 $\\mathrm{\\mu}K$ and trapping it with a radiation-pumping-limited lifetime on the order of 80 ms.

  9. High directivity optical antenna substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongxing; Zhu, Wenqi; Chu, Yizhuo; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2012-08-22

    A two-dimensional array of gold optical antennas integrated with a one-dimensional array of gold strips and mirrors is introduced and fabricated. The experimental results show that this design achieves average surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factors as high as 1.2 × 10(10) , which is more than two orders of magnitude larger than optical antennas without the gold strips and gold mirror.

  10. Single-laser, one beam, tetrahedral magneto-optical trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangeleyn, Matthieu; Griffin, Paul F; Riis, Erling; Arnold, Aidan S

    2009-08-03

    We have realized a 4-beam pyramidal magneto-optical trap ideally suited for future microfabrication. Three mirrors split and steer a single incoming beam into a tripod of reflected beams, allowing trapping in the four-beam overlap volume. We discuss the influence of mirror angle on cooling and trapping, finding optimum efficiency in a tetrahedral configuration. We demonstrate the technique using an ex-vacuo mirror system to illustrate the previously inaccessible supra-plane pyramid MOT configuration. Unlike standard pyramidal MOTs both the pyramid apex and its mirror angle are non-critical and our MOT offers improved molasses free from atomic shadows in the laser beams. The MOT scheme naturally extends to a 2-beam refractive version with high optical access. For quantum gas experiments, the mirror system could also be used for a stable 3D tetrahedral optical lattice.

  11. Silicon Nitride Waveguides for Plasmon Optical Trapping and Sensing Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Huang, Yuewang; Capolino, Filippo; Boyraz, Ozdal

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a silicon nitride trench waveguide deposited with bowtie antennas for plasmonic enhanced optical trapping. The sub-micron silicon nitride trench waveguides were fabricated with conventional optical lithography in a low cost manner. The waveguides embrace not only low propagation loss and high nonlinearity, but also the inborn merits of combining micro-fluidic channel and waveguide together. Analyte contained in the trapezoidal trench channel can interact with the evanescent field from the waveguide beneath. The evanescent field can be further enhanced by plasmonic nanostructures. With the help of gold nano bowtie antennas, the studied waveguide shows outstanding trapping capability on 10 nm polystyrene nanoparticles. We show that the bowtie antennas can lead to 60-fold enhancement of electric field in the antenna gap. The optical trapping force on a nanoparticle is boosted by three orders of magnitude. A strong tendency shows the nanoparticle is likely to move to the high field strength region,...

  12. Magneto-optical Trapping of a Diatomic Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demille, Dave

    2014-05-01

    The magneto-optical trap (MOT) is the workhorse technique for atomic physics in the ultracold regime, serving as the starting point in applications from optical clocks to quantum-degenerate gases. Although MOTs have been used with a wide array of atomic species, realization of a molecular MOT was long considered infeasible. In this talk we will describe the first magneto-optical trap for a molecule, strontium monofluoride (SrF). Our MOT produces the coldest trapped sample of directly-cooled molecules to date, with temperature T ~2.5 mK. The SrF MOT is loaded from a cryogenic buffer-gas beam slowed by laser radiation pressure. Images of laser-induced fluorescence allow us to characterize the trap's properties. Although magneto-optical trapping of diatomic molecules is in its infancy, our results indicate that access to the ultracold regime may be possible for several molecular species, with potential applications from quantum simulation to tests of fundamental symmetries to ultracold chemistry.

  13. A dynamic magneto-optical trap for atom chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Jo; Roy, Ritayan; Bateman, James; Himsworth, Matt

    2016-11-01

    We describe a dynamic magneto-optical trap (MOT) suitable for the use with vacuum systems in which optical access is limited to a single window. This technique facilitates the long-standing desire of producing integrated atom chips, many of which are likely to have severely restricted optical access compared with conventional vacuum chambers. This ‘switching-MOT’ relies on the synchronized pulsing of optical and magnetic fields at audio frequencies. The trap’s beam geometry is obtained using a planar mirror surface, and does not require a patterned substrate or bulky optics inside the vacuum chamber. Central to the design is a novel magnetic field geometry that requires no external quadrupole or bias coils which leads toward a very compact system. We have implemented the trap for 85Rb and shown that it is capable of capturing 2 million atoms and directly cooling below the Doppler temperature.

  14. Investigations of Abrupt Movements of Optically Trapped Water Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Shawntel; McCann, Lowell I.

    2007-03-01

    We have used a single beam optical trap (optical tweezers) to capture individual water droplets in air. A 3-dimensional viewing system consisting of a two axis microscope allows the trapped droplet to be viewed from the top and the side simultaneously. The position of the droplet is determined with a digital camera at a rate up to 700Hz. We have observed abrupt movements along the beam in two situations: As a pure water droplet evaporates, the movements occur at specific size intervals as the diameter decreases. For non-evaporating saltwater droplets the movements rapidly occur for certain ranges of beam power, and not at all for other ranges of power.

  15. Raman-Suppressing Coupling for Optical Parametric Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Maleki, Lute; Matsko, Andrey; Rubiola, Enrico

    2007-01-01

    A Raman-scattering-suppressing input/ output coupling scheme has been devised for a whispering-gallery-mode optical resonator that is used as a four-wave-mixing device to effect an all-optical parametric oscillator. Raman scattering is undesired in such a device because (1) it is a nonlinear process that competes with the desired nonlinear four-wave conversion process involved in optical parametric oscillation and (2) as such, it reduces the power of the desired oscillation and contributes to output noise. The essence of the present input/output coupling scheme is to reduce output loading of the desired resonator modes while increasing output loading of the undesired ones.

  16. Versatile Quadruple-Trap Optical Tweezers for Dual DNA Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Iddo; Laurens, Niels; Vorselen, Daan; Broekmans, Onno D; Biebricher, Andreas S; King, Graeme A; Brouwer, Ineke; Wuite, Gijs J L; Peterman, Erwin J G

    2017-01-01

    Optical manipulation techniques provide researchers the powerful ability to directly move, probe and interrogate molecular complexes. Quadruple optical trapping is an emerging method for optical manipulation and force spectroscopy that has found its primary use in studying dual DNA interactions, but is certainly not limited to DNA investigations. The key benefit of quadruple optical trapping is that two molecular strands can be manipulated independently and simultaneously. The molecular geometries of the strands can thus be controlled and their interactions can be quantified by force measurements. Accurate control of molecular geometry is of critical importance for the analysis of, for example, protein-mediated DNA-bridging, which plays an important role in DNA compaction. Here, we describe the design of a dedicated and robust quadruple optical trapping-instrument. This instrument can be switched straightforwardly to a high-resolution dual trap and it is integrated with microfluidics and single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, making it a highly versatile tool for correlative single-molecule analysis of a wide range of biomolecular systems.

  17. Beyond optical molasses: 3D raman sideband cooling of atomic cesium to high phase-space density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerman; Vuletic; Chin; Chu

    2000-01-17

    We demonstrate a simple, general purpose method to cool neutral atoms. A sample containing 3x10(8) cesium atoms prepared in a magneto-optical trap is cooled and simultaneously spin polarized in 10 ms at a density of 1.1x10(11) cm (-3) to a phase space density nlambda(3)(dB) = 1/500, which is almost 3 orders of magnitude higher than attainable in free space with optical molasses. The technique is based on 3D degenerate Raman sideband cooling in optical lattices and remains efficient even at densities where the mean lattice site occupation is close to unity.

  18. Applied physics: Optical trapping for space mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGloin, David

    2014-02-27

    Might it be possible to create mirrors for space telescopes, using nothing but microscopic particles held in place by light? A study that exploits a technique called optical binding provides a step towards this goal.

  19. Self-trapped optical beams: Spatial solitons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrey A Sukhorukov; Yuri S Kivshar

    2001-11-01

    We present a brief overview of the basic concepts of the theory ofspatial optical solitons, including the soliton stability in non-Kerr media, the instability-induced soliton dynamics, and collision of solitary waves in nonintegrable nonlinear models.

  20. Magneto-optical trapping of a diatomic molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, J. F.; McCarron, D. J.; Norrgard, E. B.; Steinecker, M. H.; Demille, D.

    2014-08-01

    Laser cooling and trapping are central to modern atomic physics. The most used technique in cold-atom physics is the magneto-optical trap (MOT), which combines laser cooling with a restoring force from radiation pressure. For a variety of atomic species, MOTs can capture and cool large numbers of particles to ultracold temperatures (less than ~1 millikelvin) this has enabled advances in areas that range from optical clocks to the study of ultracold collisions, while also serving as the ubiquitous starting point for further cooling into the regime of quantum degeneracy. Magneto-optical trapping of molecules could provide a similarly powerful starting point for the study and manipulation of ultracold molecular gases. The additional degrees of freedom associated with the vibration and rotation of molecules, particularly their permanent electric dipole moments, allow a broad array of applications not possible with ultracold atoms. Spurred by these ideas, a variety of methods has been developed to create ultracold molecules. Temperatures below 1 microkelvin have been demonstrated for diatomic molecules assembled from pre-cooled alkali atoms, but for the wider range of species amenable to direct cooling and trapping, only recently have temperatures below 100 millikelvin been achieved. The complex internal structure of molecules complicates magneto-optical trapping. However, ideas and methods necessary for creating a molecular MOT have been developed recently. Here we demonstrate three-dimensional magneto-optical trapping of a diatomic molecule, strontium monofluoride (SrF), at a temperature of approximately 2.5 millikelvin, the lowest yet achieved by direct cooling of a molecule. This method is a straightforward extension of atomic techniques and is expected to be viable for a significant number of diatomic species. With further development, we anticipate that this technique may be employed in any number of existing and proposed molecular experiments, in applications

  1. Anisotropic optical trapping of ultracold erbium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Lepers, Maxence; Dulieu, Olivier; --,

    2013-01-01

    Ultracold atoms confined in a dipole trap are submitted to a potential whose depth is proportional to the real part of their dynamic dipole polarizability. The atoms also experience photon scattering whose rate is proportional to the imaginary part of their dynamic dipole polarizability. In this article we calculate the complex dynamic dipole polarizability of ground-state erbium, a rare-earth atom that was recently Bose-condensed. The polarizability is calculated with the sum-over-state formula inherent to second-order perturbation theory. The summation is performed on transition energies and transition dipole moments from ground-state erbium, which are computed using the Racah-Slater least-square fitting procedure provided by the Cowan codes. This allows us to predict 9 unobserved odd-parity energy levels of total angular momentum J=5, 6 and 7, in the range 25000-31000 cm-1 above the ground state. Regarding the trapping potential, we find that ground-state erbium essentially behaves like a spherically-symme...

  2. Optical Sensors based on Raman Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jernshøj, Kit Drescher

    Formålet med denne afhandling er at give en systematisk og uddybende videnskabelig diskussion af molekylær Raman spredning, som kan danne grundlag for udviklingen af molekylespecifikke optiske sensorer til on-site, ikke-destruktiv måling. Afhandlingen falder i tre dele, to teoriafsnit, hvor første...... data fra denne type eksperimenter betyde et øget informationsindhold til anvendelse i den multivariate analyse. Diskussionen er bygget op omkring tre forskellige typer klassifikationsproblemer, hvor der i den første type sker en perturbering, som resulterer i enten en nedgang i symmetri eller en...... energiopsplitning for den ene molekylære specie ud af to tilstede i en opløsning. I det andet type klassifikationsproblem bygger det øgede informationsindhold på en forskydning af den elektroniske absorption og endelig i det tredje klassifikationsproblem er det en molekylær aggregering, der finder sted. I...

  3. Optical two-beam traps in microfluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2016-08-01

    An attractive solution for optical trapping and stretching by means of two counterpropagating laser beams is to embed waveguides or optical fibers in a microfluidic system. The microfluidic system can be constructed in different materials, ranging from soft polymers that may easily be cast in a rapid prototyping manner, to hard polymers that could even be produced by injection moulding, or to silica in which waveguides may either be written directly, or with grooves for optical fibers. Here, we review different solutions to the system and also show results obtained in a polymer chip with DUV written waveguides and in an injection molded polymer chip with grooves for optical fibers.

  4. Optical Coherence Tomography and Raman Spectroscopy of the retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J W; Zawadzki, R J; Liu, R; Chan, J; Lane, S; Werner, J S

    2009-01-16

    Imaging the structure and correlating it with the biochemical content of the retina holds promise for fundamental research and for clinical applications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is commonly used to image the 3D structure of the retina and while the added functionality of biochemical analysis afforded by Raman scattering could provide critical molecular signatures for clinicians and researchers, there are many technical challenges to combining these imaging modalities. We present an ex vivo OCT microscope combined with Raman spectroscopy capable of collecting morphological and molecular information about a sample simultaneously. The combined instrument will be used to investigate remaining technical challenges to combine these imaging modalities, such as the laser power levels needed to achieve a Raman signal above the noise level without damaging the sample.

  5. Laser tweezers: spectroscopy of optically trapped micron-sized particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, K.M.; Livett, M.K.; Nugent, K.W. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Information is often obtained about biological systems by analysis of single cells in the system. The optimum conditions for this analysis are when the cells are living and in their natural surroundings as they will be performing their normal functions and interactions. Analysis of cells can be difficult due to their mobility. Laser tweezing is a non contact method that can be employed to overcome this problem and provides a powerful tool in the analysis of functions and interactions at single cell level. In this investigation Raman spectra of a molecule of {beta} - carotene, dissolved in microdroplets of oil was obtained. The droplets were trapped using Nd-YAG beam and a low intensity Ar{sup +} beam was used to analyse the trapped particles. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Characterization of bacterial spore germination using integrated phase contrast microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingbo; Zhang, Pengfei; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-Qing

    2010-05-01

    We present a methodology that combines external phase contrast microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and optical tweezers to monitor a variety of changes during the germination of single Bacillus cereus spores in both nutrient (l-alanine) and non-nutrient (Ca-dipicolinic acid (DPA)) germinants with a temporal resolution of approximately 2 s. Phase contrast microscopy assesses changes in refractility of individual spores during germination, while Raman spectroscopy gives information on changes in spore-specific molecules. The results obtained include (1) the brightness of the phase contrast image of an individual dormant spore is proportional to the level of CaDPA in that spore; (2) the end of the first Stage of germination, revealed as the end of the rapid drop in spore refractility by phase contrast microscopy, precisely corresponds to the completion of the release of CaDPA as revealed by Raman spectroscopy; and (3) the correspondence between the rapid drop in spore refractility and complete CaDPA release was observed not only for spores germinating in the well-controlled environment of an optical trap but also for spores germinating when adhered on a microscope coverslip. Using this latter method, we also simultaneously characterized the distribution of the time-to-complete-CaDPA release (T(release)) of hundreds of individual B. cereus spores germinating with both saturating and subsaturating concentrations of l-alanine and with CaDPA.

  7. A minimal optical trapping and imaging microscopy system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Noemí Hernández Candia

    Full Text Available We report the construction and testing of a simple and versatile optical trapping apparatus, suitable for visualizing individual microtubules (∼25 nm in diameter and performing single-molecule studies, using a minimal set of components. This design is based on a conventional, inverted microscope, operating under plain bright field illumination. A single laser beam enables standard optical trapping and the measurement of molecular displacements and forces, whereas digital image processing affords real-time sample visualization with reduced noise and enhanced contrast. We have tested our trapping and imaging instrument by measuring the persistence length of individual double-stranded DNA molecules, and by following the stepping of single kinesin motor proteins along clearly imaged microtubules. The approach presented here provides a straightforward alternative for studies of biomaterials and individual biomolecules.

  8. Optical particle trapping and dynamic manipulation using spatial light modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, René Lynge

    This thesis deals with the spatial phase-control of light and its application for optical trapping and manipulation of micron-scale objects. Utilizing the radiation pressure, light exerts on dielectric micron-scale particles, functionality of optical tweezers can be obtained. Multiple intensity...... of trapped colloidal micron-sized polystyrene particles and cell structures were accomplished. Furthermore, fixed arrays consisting of up to 25-trapped particles have been generated. Experimentally, ternary phase encoding has been demonstrated, supporting the GPC theory. Binary intensity patterns having...... proven capable of generating a phase pattern from an input amplitude distribution. The birefringent nature of liquid crystals in the SLM is utilized for the generation of an arbitrary two-dimensional state of polarization using two-cascaded SLMs. By means of elliptically polarized light, generated by one...

  9. Studies of Ultracold Strontium Atoms in an Optical Dipole Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, A. J.; Martinez de Escobar, Y. N.; Mickelson, P. G.; Killian, T. C.

    2008-05-01

    We survey recent experiments with ultracold strontium performed in our group. Trapping and cooling occurs in three stages: successive magneto-optical traps (MOTs) operating on 461 nm and 689 nm transitions of strontium, respectively, are loaded to cool atoms to a temperature of 1 μK. Finally, atoms are loaded into a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap (ODT). We examine the loading characteristics, thermalization, and lifetime of atoms held within the ODT. We also perform spectroscopy of atoms held within the ODT. During laser cooling, we are able to manipulate the energy levels of the atoms and shelve them into metastable states using 707 nm and 3 μm lasers. These experiments reveal interesting physics of ultracold strontium.

  10. Magneto-optical trapping of a diatomic molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Barry, J F; Norrgard, E B; Steinecker, M H; DeMille, D

    2014-01-01

    Laser cooling and trapping are central to modern atomic physics. The workhorse technique in cold-atom physics is the magneto-optical trap (MOT), which combines laser cooling with a restoring force from radiation pressure. For a variety of atomic species, MOTs can capture and cool large numbers of particles to ultracold temperatures (<1 mK); this has enabled the study of a wide range of phenomena from optical clocks to ultracold collisions whilst also serving as the ubiquitous starting point for further cooling into the regime of quantum degeneracy. Magneto-optical trapping of molecules could provide a similarly powerful starting point for the study and manipulation of ultracold molecular gases. Here, we demonstrate three-dimensional magneto-optical trapping of a diatomic molecule, strontium monofluoride (SrF), at a temperature of approximately 2.5 mK. This method is expected to be viable for a significant number of diatomic species. Such chemical diversity is desired for the wide array of existing and prop...

  11. Improved magneto-optical trapping of a diatomic molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrgard, Eric; McCarron, Daniel; Steinecker, Matthew; Demille, David

    2015-05-01

    The magneto-optical trap (MOT) is the workhorse technique for atomic physics in the ultracold regime, serving as the starting point in applications from optical clocks to quantum-degenerate gases. Recently, our group demonstrated the first magneto-optical trap for a molecule, strontium monofluoride (SrF). Here, we present experimental results of two variant trapping schemes which improve upon the original work. In the first, recent insights into the origin of the restoring force in Type-II MOTs (rarely used for atoms but requisite for SrF and other candidate molecules) led to a simple change in polarization scheme for the MOT lasers. In the second, states dark to the restoring MOT beams are diabatically transferred to bright states by synchronously reversing the magnetic field gradient and the laser polarization at RF frequencies. Although magneto-optical trapping of diatomic molecules is in its infancy, our results indicate that access to the ultracold regime may be possible for several molecular species, with potential applications from quantum simulation to tests of fundamental symmetries to ultracold chemistry. We acknowledge funding from ARO and ARO (MURI). E.B.N. acknowledges funding from the NSF GRFP.

  12. Optical limiting of niobic tellurite glass induced by self-trapped exciton absorption of the AgCl nanocrystal dopant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO ZhenYu; LIN Jian; JIA TianQin; SUN ZhenRong; WANG ZuGeng

    2009-01-01

    Nioblc tellurite glass doped by silver chloride nanocrystal was prepared with the melting-quenching and heat treatment method, and the self-trapped exciton absorption band of the silver chloride nanocrystal was observed at 532 nm in the UV-visible absorption spectrum. The glass structure chara-cteristics were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, and the mechanism of self-trapped exciton was analyzed by Jahn-Teller model. Its optical limiting was measured with 532 nm picosecond laser pulses, and the corresponding nonlinear absorption coefficient was measured with open-aperture Z-scan. The experimental results showed that optical limiting at 532 nm was attributed to free carrier absorption between the self-trapped state and the continuum band.

  13. Positional stability of holographic optical traps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farré, A.; Shayegan, M.; López-Quesada, C.; Blab, G.; Montes-Usategui, M.; Forde, N.R.; Martín-Badosa, E.

    2011-01-01

    The potential of digital holography for complex manipulation of micron-sized particles with optical tweezers has been clearly demonstrated. By contrast, its use in quantitative experiments has been rather limited, partly due to fluctuations introduced by the spatial light modulator (SLM) that displa

  14. Integration of fluorescence collection optics with a microfabricated surface electrode ion trap

    CERN Document Server

    Brady, Gregory R; Moehring, David L; Stick, Daniel; Highstrete, Clark; Fortier, Kevin M; Blain, Matthew G; Haltli, Raymond A; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro A; Briggs, Ronald D; Wendt, Joel R; Carter, Tony R; Samora, Sally; Kemme, Shanalyn A

    2010-01-01

    We have successfully demonstrated an integrated optical system for collecting the fluorescence from a trapped ion. The system, consisting of an array of transmissive, dielectric micro-optics and an optical fiber array, has been intimately incorporated into the ion trapping chip without negatively impacting trapping performance. Considerations such as our choice of epoxies, vacuum feedthrough, and optical component materials did not degrade the vacuum environment, and we have demonstrated light detection as well as ion trapping and shuttling behavior comparable to trapping chips without integrated optics, with no modification to the control voltages of the trapping chip.

  15. Inhomogeneous broadening of optical transitions of 87Rb atoms in an optical nanofiber trap

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, J; Hoffman, J E; Orozco, L A; Rolston, S L

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate optical trapping of 87Rb atoms using a two-color evanescent field around an optical nanofiber. In our trapping geometry, a blue-detuned traveling wave whose polarization is nearly parallel to the polarization of a red-detuned standing wave produce significant vector light shifts that lead to broadening of the absorption profile of a near-resonant beam at the trapping site. A model that includes scalar, vector, and tensor light shifts of the probe transition $5S_{1/2}$-$5P_{3/2}$ from the trapping beams; weighted by the temperature-dependent position of the atoms in the trap qualitatively describe the observed asymmetric profile, and explained differences with previous experiments that used Cs atoms. The model provides a consistent way to extract the number of atoms in the trap.

  16. Optical cavity integrated surface ion trap for enhanced light collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Francisco M.

    Ion trap systems allow the faithful storage and manipulation of qubits encoded in the energy levels of the ions, and can be interfaced with photonic qubits that can be transmitted to connect remote quantum systems. Single photons transmitted from two remote sites, each entangled with one quantum memory, can be used to entangle distant quantum memories by interfering on a beam splitter. Efficient remote entanglement generation relies upon efficient light collection from single ions into a single mode fiber. This can be realized by integrating an ion trap with an optical cavity and employing the Purcell effect for enhancing the light collection. Remote entanglement can be used as a resource for a quantum repeater for provably secure long-distance communication or as a method for communicating within a distributed quantum information processor. We present the integration of a 1 mm optical cavity with a micro-fabricated surface ion trap. The plano-concave cavity is oriented normal to the chip surface where the planar mirror is attached underneath the trap chip. The cavity is locked using a 780 nm laser which is stabilized to Rubidium and shifted to match the 369 nm Doppler transition in Ytterbium. The linear ion trap allows ions to be shuttled in and out of the cavity mode. The Purcell enhancement of spontaneous emission into the cavity mode would then allow efficient collection of the emitted photons, enabling faster remote entanglement generation.

  17. Mobile quantum sensing with spins in optically trapped nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awschalom, David D.

    2013-03-01

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color center in diamond has emerged as a powerful, optically addressable, spin-based probe of electromagnetic fields and temperature. For nanoscale sensing applications, the NV center's atom-like nature enables the close-range interactions necessary for both high spatial resolution and the detection of fields generated by proximal nuclei, electrons, or molecules. Using a custom-designed optical tweezers apparatus, we demonstrate three-dimensional position control of nanodiamonds in solution with simultaneous optical measurement of electron spin resonance (ESR)[3]. Despite the motion and random orientation of NV centers suspended in the optical trap, we observe distinct peaks in the ESR spectra from the ground-state spin transitions. Accounting for the random dynamics of the trapped nanodiamonds, we model the ESR spectra observed in an applied magnetic field and estimate the dc magnetic sensitivity based on the ESR line shapes to be 50 μT/√{ Hz }. We utilize the optically trapped nanodiamonds to characterize the magnetic field generated by current-carrying wires and ferromagnetic structures in microfluidic circuits. These measurements provide a pathway to spin-based sensing in fluidic environments and biophysical systems that are inaccessible to existing scanning probe techniques, such as the interiors of living cells. This work is supported by AFOSR and DARPA.

  18. Investigation of HIV-1 infected and uninfected cells using the optical trapping technique

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ombinda-Lemboumba, Saturnin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Optical trapping has emerged as an essential tool for manipulating single biological material and performing sophisticated spectroscopy analysis on individual cell. The optical trapping technique has been used to grab and immobilize cells from a...

  19. Controlled cellular fusion using optically trapped plasmonic nano-heaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Azra; Lund, Andreas R.; Semsey, Szabolcs; Oddershede, Lene B.; Bendix, Poul M.

    2016-09-01

    Optically trapped plasmonic nano-heaters are used to mediate efficient and controlled fusion of biological membranes. The fusion method is demonstrated by optically trapping plasmonic nanoparticles located in between vesicle membranes leading to rapid lipid and content mixing. As an interesting application we show how direct control over fusion can be used for studying diffusion of peripheral membrane proteins and their interactions with membranes and for studying protein reactions. Membrane proteins encapsulated in an inert vesicle can be transferred to a vesicle composed of negative lipids by optically induced fusion. Mixing of the two membranes results in a fused vesicle with a high affinity for the protein and we observe immediate membrane tubulation due to the activity of the protein. Fusion of distinct membrane compartments also has applications in small scale chemistry for realizing pico-liter reactions and offers many exciting applications within biology which are discussed here.

  20. Trapping red blood cells in living animals using optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Min-Cheng; Wei, Xun-Bin; Zhou, Jin-Hua; Wang, Zi-Qiang; Li, Yin-Mei

    2013-01-01

    The recent development of non-invasive imaging techniques has enabled the visualization of molecular events underlying cellular processes in live cells. Although microscopic objects can be readily manipulated at the cellular level, additional physiological insight is likely to be gained by manipulation of cells in vivo, which has not been achieved so far. Here we use infrared optical tweezers to trap and manipulate red blood cells within subdermal capillaries in living mice. We realize a non-contact micro-operation that results in the clearing of a blocked microvessel. Furthermore, we estimate the optical trap stiffness in the capillary. Our work expands the application of optical tweezers to the study of live cell dynamics in animals.

  1. Optical two-beam traps in microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2016-01-01

    An attractive solution for optical trapping and stretching by means of two counterpropagating laser beams is to embed waveguides or optical fibers in a microfluidic system. The microfluidic system can be constructed in different materials, ranging from soft polymers that may easily be cast...... in a rapid prototyping manner, to hard polymers that could even be produced by injection moulding, or to silica in which waveguides may either be written directly, or with grooves for optical fibers. Here, we review different solutions to the system and also show results obtained in a polymer chip with DUV...

  2. Forbidden transitions in a magneto-optical trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, M; Haimberger, C; Bigelow, N P

    2003-11-21

    We report the first observation of a nondipole transition in an ultracold atomic vapor. We excite the 3P-4P electric quadrupole (E2) transition in 23Na confined in a magneto-optical trap, and we demonstrate its application to high-resolution spectroscopy by making the first measurement of the hyperfine structure of the 4P(1/2) level and extracting the magnetic dipole constant A=30.6+/-0.1 MHz. We use cw optical-optical double resonance accompanied by photoionization to probe the transition.

  3. On-chip optical trapping for atomic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Maximillian A.; Salim, Evan; Farkas, Daniel; Duggan, Janet; Ivory, Megan; Anderson, Dana

    2014-09-01

    To simplify applications that rely on optical trapping of cold and ultracold atoms, ColdQuanta is developing techniques to incorporate miniature optical components onto in-vacuum atom chips. The result is a hybrid atom chip that combines an in-vacuum micro-optical bench for optical control with an atom chip for magnetic control. Placing optical components on a chip inside of the vacuum system produces a compact system that can be targeted to specific experiments, in this case the generation of optical lattices. Applications that can benefit from this technology include timekeeping, inertial sensing, gravimetry, quantum information, and emulation of quantum many-body systems. ColdQuanta's GlasSi atom chip technology incorporates glass windows in the plane of a silicon atom chip. In conjunction with the in-vacuum micro-optical bench, optical lattices can be generated within a few hundred microns of an atom chip window through which single atomic lattice sites can be imaged with sub-micron spatial resolution. The result is a quantum gas microscope that allows optical lattices to be studied at the level of single lattice sites. Similar to what ColdQuanta has achieved with magneto-optical traps (MOTs) in its miniMOT system and with Bose- Einstein condensates (BECs) in its RuBECi(R) system, ColdQuanta seeks to apply the on-chip optical bench technology to studies of optical lattices in a commercially available, turnkey system. These techniques are currently being considered for lattice experiments in NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) slated for flight on the International Space Station.

  4. Extruded single ring hollow core optical fibers for Raman sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiminis, G.; Rowland, K. J.; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, H.; Spooner, N. A.; Monro, T. M.

    2014-05-01

    In this work we report the fabrication of the first extruded hollow core optical fiber with a single ring of cladding holes. A lead-silicate glass billet is used to produce a preform through glass extrusion to create a larger-scale version of the final structure that is subsequently drawn to an optical fiber. The simple single suspended ring structure allows antiresonance reflection guiding. The resulting fibers were used to perform Raman sensing of liquid samples filling the length of the fiber, demonstrating its potential for fiber sensing applications.

  5. In trap fragmentation and optical characterization of rotaxanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijs, Anouk M; Compagnon, Isabelle; Silva, Alissa; Hannam, Jeffrey S; Leigh, David A; Kay, Euan R; Dugourd, Philippe

    2010-10-21

    The first experiments on trapped rotaxanes are presented, combining collision induced fragmentation and in-trap laser spectroscopy. The intrinsic optical properties of three rotaxanes and their non-interlocked building blocks (thread and macrocycle) isolated in a quadrupolar ion trap are investigated. The excitation and relaxation processes under thermal activation as well as under photo-activation are addressed. The light and collision induced fragmentation pathways show that the degradation mechanisms occurring in the rotaxane are highly dependent on the nature of the thread. In the prospective of operating photoswitchable molecules, photo-activation is achieved in a controlled way by depositing photo-energy in the desired sub-unit of a mechanically interlocked structure.

  6. Tapered optical fibers as tools for probing magneto-optical trap characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel technique for measuring the characteristics of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) for cold atoms by monitoring the spontaneous emission from trapped atoms coupled into the guided mode of a tapered optical nanofiber. We show that the nanofiber is highly sensitive to very small numbers of atoms close to its surface. The size and shape of the MOT, determined by translating the cold atom cloud across the tapered fiber, is in excellent agreement with measurements obtained using the co...

  7. Absorption spectroscopy of single red blood cells in the presence of mechanical deformations induced by optical traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojdyla, Michal; Raj, Saurabh; Petrov, Dmitri

    2012-09-01

    The electronic properties of single human red blood cells under mechanical deformations were investigated using a combination of dual beam optical tweezers and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The mechanical deformations were induced by two near-infrared optical traps with different trapping powers and trap configurations. The deformations were applied in two ways: locally, due to the mechanical forces around the traps, and by stretching the cell by moving the traps in opposite directions. In the presence of local deformations, the single cell undergoes a transition from an oxygenated state to a partially deoxygenated state. This process was found to be reversible and strongly power-dependent. Stretching the cell caused an opposite effect, indicating that the electronic response of the whole cell is dominated by the local interaction with the trapping beams. Results are discussed considering light-induced local heating, the Stark effect, and biochemical alterations due to mechanical forces, and are compared with reports of previous Raman spectroscopy studies. The information gained by the analysis of a single red blood cell's electronic response facilitates the understanding of fundamental physiological processes and sheds further light on the cell's mechanochemistry. This information may offer new opportunities for the diagnosis and treatment of blood diseases.

  8. Microwave-mediated magneto-optical trap for polar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizhou, Xie; Wenhao, Bu; Bo, Yan

    2016-05-01

    Realizing a molecular magneto-optical trap has been a dream for cold molecular physicists for a long time. However, due to the complex energy levels and the small effective Lande g-factor of the excited states, the traditional magneto-optical trap (MOT) scheme does not work very well for polar molecules. One way to overcome this problem is the switching MOT, which requires very fast switching of both the magnetic field and the laser polarizations. Switching laser polarizations is relatively easy, but fast switching of the magnetic field is experimentally challenging. Here we propose an alternative approach, the microwave-mediated MOT, which requires a slight change of the current experimental setup to solve the problem. We calculate the MOT force and compare it with the traditional MOT and the switching MOT scheme. The results show that we can operate a good MOT with this simple setup. Project supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China.

  9. Brain metastasis detection by resonant Raman optical biopsy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Cheng, Gangge; Zhou, Lixin; Zhang, Chunyuan; Pu, Yang; Li, Zhongwu; Liu, Yulong; Li, Qingbo; Wang, Wei; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-03-01

    Resonant Raman (RR) spectroscopy provides an effective way to enhance Raman signal from particular bonds associated with key molecules due to changes on a molecular level. In this study, RR is used for detection of human brain metastases of five kinds of primary organs of lung, breast, kidney, rectal and orbital in ex-vivo. The RR spectra of brain metastases cancerous tissues were measured and compared with those of normal brain tissues and the corresponding primary cancer tissues. The differences of five types of brain metastases tissues in key bio-components of carotene, tryptophan, lactate, alanine and methyl/methylene group were investigated. The SVM-KNN classifier was used to categorize a set of RR spectra data of brain metastasis of lung cancerous tissues from normal brain tissue, yielding diagnostic sensitivity and specificity at 100% and 75%, respectively. The RR spectroscopy may provide new moleculebased optical probe tools for diagnosis and classification of brain metastatic of cancers.

  10. Detecting atoms trapped in an optical lattice using a tapered optical nanofiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, T; Busch, Th

    2014-12-29

    Optical detection of structures with dimensions smaller than an optical wavelength requires devices that work on scales beyond the diffraction limit. Here we present the possibility of using a tapered optical nanofiber as a detector to resolve individual atoms trapped in an optical lattice in the Mott insulator phase. We show that the small size of the fiber combined with an enhanced photon collection rate can allow for the attainment of large and reliable measurement signals.

  11. Optically assisted trapping with high-permittivity dielectric rings: Towards optical aerosol filtration

    CERN Document Server

    Alaee, Rasoul; Rockstuhl, Carsten; Passian, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the transport, trapping, and filtering of nanoparticles is important for many applications. By virtue of their weak response to gravity and their thermal motion, various physical mechanisms can be exploited for such operations on nanoparticles. However, the manipulation based on optical forces is potentially most appealing since it constitutes a highly deterministic approach. Plasmonic nanostructures have been suggested for this purpose, but they possess the disadvantages of locally generating heat and trapping the nanoparticles directly on surface. Here, we propose the use of dielectric rings made of high permittivity materials for trapping nanoparticles. Thanks to their ability to strongly localize the field in space, nanoparticles can be trapped without contact. We use a semi-analytical method to study the ability of these rings to trap nanoparticles. Results are supported by full-wave simulations. Application of the trapping concept to nanoparticle filtration is suggested.

  12. Plasmonic Optical Tweezers toward Molecular Manipulation: Tailoring Plasmonic Nanostructure, Light Source, and Resonant Trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Tatsuya; Tsuboi, Yasuyuki

    2014-09-04

    This Perspective describes recent progress in optical trappings of nanoparticles based on localized surface plasmon. This plasmonic optical trapping has great advantages over the conventional optical tweezers, being potentially applicable for a molecular manipulation technique. We review this novel trapping technique from the viewpoints of (i) plasmonic nanostructure, (ii) the light source for plasmon excitation, and (iii) the polarizability of the trapping target. These findings give us future outlook for plasmonic optical trapping. In addition to a brief review, recent developments on plasmonic optical trapping of soft nanomaterials such as proteins, polymer chains, and DNA will be discussed to point out the important issue for further development on this trapping method. Finally, we explore new directions of plasmonic optical trapping.

  13. Dispersive Optical Interface Based on Nanofiber-Trapped Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Dawkins, S T; Reitz, D; Vetsch, E; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2011-01-01

    We dispersively interface an ensemble of one thousand atoms trapped in the evanescent field surrounding a tapered optical nanofiber. This method relies on the azimuthally-asymmetric coupling of the ensemble with the evanescent field of an off-resonant probe beam, transmitted through the nanofiber. The resulting birefringence and dispersion are significant; we observe a phase shift per atom of $\\sim$\\,1\\,mrad at a detuning of six times the natural linewidth, corresponding to an effective resonant optical density per atom of 2.7\\,%. Moreover, we utilize this strong dispersion to non-destructively determine the number of atoms.

  14. Trapped ions in optical lattices for probing oscillator chain models

    CERN Document Server

    Pruttivarasin, Thaned; Talukdar, Ishan; Kreuter, Axel; Haeffner, Hartmut

    2011-01-01

    We show that a chain of trapped ions embedded in microtraps generated by an optical lattice can be used to study oscillator models related to dry friction and energy transport. Numerical calculations with realistic experimental parameters demonstrate that both static and dynamic properties of the ion chain change significantly as the optical lattice power is varied. Finally, we lay out an experimental scheme to use the spin degree of freedom to probe the phase space structure and quantum critical behavior of the ion chain.

  15. Extremely nonlocal optical nonlinearities in atoms trapped near a waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Shahmoon, Ephraim; Stimming, Hans Peter; Mazets, Igor; Kurizki, Gershon

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear optical phenomena are typically local. Here we predict the possibility of highly nonlocal optical nonlinearities for light propagating in atomic media trapped near a nano-waveguide, where long-range interactions between the atoms can be tailored. When the atoms are in an electromagnetically-induced transparency configuration, the atomic interactions are translated to long-range interactions between photons and thus to highly nonlocal optical nonlinearities. We derive and analyze the governing nonlinear propagation equation, finding a roton-like excitation spectrum for light and the emergence of long-range order in its output intensity. These predictions open the door to studies of unexplored wave dynamics and many-body physics with highly-nonlocal interactions of optical fields in one dimension.

  16. Loading Dynamics and Characteristics of a Far Off-Resonance Optical Dipole Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelson, P. G.; Martinez, Y. N.; Nagel, S. B.; Traverso, A. J.; Killian, T. C.

    2007-10-01

    We implement an optical dipole trap in a crossed beam configuration for experiments with ultracold strontium. Strontium atoms cooled to nearly 1 μK are loaded into the optical dipole trap from a magneto-optical trap operating on the 689 nm intercombination line. Loading dynamics and characteristics of the far off-resonance dipole trap are explored as part of our group's study of ultracold collisions in strontium.

  17. Trap loss in a metastable helium-rubidium magneto-optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, L. J.; Dall, R. G.; Truscott, A. G.

    2010-01-01

    We present results of the study of a simultaneously confined metastable helium (He*) and rubidium magneto-optical trap (MOT). By monitoring the trap decay of the Rb87 MOT with and without a He* MOT present, we find the light-assisted, two-body loss rate to be βRb-He*=(6±2)×10-10cm3/s. Moreover, we find that it is possible to create a large, robust Rb87-He* MOT, opening the possibility of creating a Rb87-He* Bose-Einstein condensate. This would be the first dual-species condensate incorporating an alkali metal ground-state atom and an excited-state noble gas atom.

  18. Raman-induced Spin-Orbit Coupling in Optical Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junru; Huang, Wujie; Shteynas, Boris; Burchesky, Sean; Top, Furkan; Jamison, Alan; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a new scheme for spin-orbit coupling (SOC) of ultracold atoms. Instead of internal (hyperfine) states, two lowest bands in an optical superlattice were used as pseudospins. A Raman process was implemented to provide coupling between pseudospin and momentum. With single internal state and far-detuned beams used, our new scheme will allow convenient generalisation to a wide range of atoms. Pseudospin interaction is tuneable by controlling the superlattice, allowing us to study many-body phenomena in SOC systems such as the stripe phase.

  19. Optical trapping of metal-dielectric nanoparticle clusters near photonic crystal microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Camilo A; Huang, Ningfeng; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2012-09-01

    We predict the formation of optically trapped, metal-dielectric nanoparticle clusters above photonic crystal microcavities. We determine the conditions on particle size and position for a gold particle to be trapped above the microcavity. We then show that strong field redistribution and enhancement near the trapped gold nanoparticle results in secondary trapping sites for a pair of dielectric nanoparticles.

  20. Early dental caries detection using a fibre-optic coupled polarization-resolved Raman spectroscopic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Alex C-T; Hewko, Mark; Sowa, Michael G; Dong, Cecilia C S; Cleghorn, Blaine; Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing

    2008-04-28

    A new fibre-optic coupled polarization-resolved Raman spectroscopic system was developed for simultaneous collection of orthogonally polarized Raman spectra in a single measurement. An application of detecting incipient dental caries based on changes observed in Raman polarization anisotropy was also demonstrated using the developed fibre-optic Raman spectroscopic system. The predicted reduction of polarization anisotropy in the Raman spectra of caries lesions was observed and the results were consistent with those reported previously with Raman microspectroscopy. The capability of simultaneous collection of parallel- and cross-polarized Raman spectra of tooth enamel in a single measurement and the improved laser excitation delivery through fibre-optics demonstrated in this new design illustrates its future clinical potential.

  1. Tuning the structural and optical properties of gold/silver nanoalloys prepared by laser ablation in liquids for ultra-sensitive spectroscopy and optical trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Neri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The plasmon resonance of metallic Au/Ag alloys in the colloidal state was tuned from 400 nm to 500 nm using a laser irradiated technique, performed directly in the liquid state. Interesting optical nonlinearities, trapping effects and spectroscopic enhancements were detected as function of gold concentration in the nanoalloys. In particular a reduction of the limiting threshold was observed by increasing the gold amount. The SERS activity of the Au/Ag alloys was tested in liquid and in solid state in presence of linear carbon chains as probe molecules. The dependence of the increased Raman signals on the nanoparticle Au/Ag atomic ratio is presented and discussed. Finally preliminary studies and prospects for optical and Raman tweezers experiments are discussed.

  2. Raman effect on dark soliton trapping in high birefringence fiber%拉曼增益对高双折射光纤中暗孤子俘获的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫青; 贾维国; 于宇; 张俊萍; 门克内木乐

    2015-01-01

    Not only the interaction between optical pulse and orbital electron but also the interaction between optical pulse and optical phonon needs to be considered when input pulse energy is large. The latter induces the simulated Raman scattering, thus generating the Raman gain. We analyze the effect of Raman gain, especially parallel Raman gain, on dark soliton trapping in high birefringence fiber by analytical method and numerical method. In the first part, we introduce some research results of soliton trapping obtained in recent years. In the second part, the coupled nonlinear Schr?dinger equation including Raman gain is utilized for high birefringence fiber. The trapping threshold of dark soliton with considering the Raman gain is deduced by the Lagrangian approach when input pulse is the dark soliton pulse that the amplitude of two polarized components of the dark soliton are the same (see formula (26)). Fig. 1. shows the relation between threshold and parallel Raman gain according to formula (26) when group velocity mismatching coefficient values are 0.15, 0.3, and 0.5 (vertical Raman gains are all 0.1). In the third part, the propagation of the two orthogonal polarization components of dark soliton is simulated by the fractional Fourier transform method. Figures 2-4 show respectively dark soliton trapping with group velocity mismatching coefficient values of 0.15, 0.3 and 0.5. We consider three situations in which Raman gain is not included and the parallel Raman gains are 0.4 and 0.6 when vertical Raman gains are both 0.1 in different group velocity mismatching coefficient values. We obtain the threshold of dark soliton by numerical method under different conditions and analyze the figures. At the same time, we compare the analytical solution with the numerical solution and discuss the effect of Raman gain on dark soliton trapping. The last part focuses on our conclusion. It is found that the threshold which is obtained by analytical method is smaller than that

  3. Observation of cooperatively enhanced atomic dipole forces from NV centers in optically trapped nanodiamonds

    CERN Document Server

    Juan, M L; Besga, B; Brennen, G; Molina-Terriza, G; Volz, T

    2015-01-01

    Since the early work by Ashkin in 1970, optical trapping has become one of the most powerful tools for manipulating small particles, such as micron sized beads or single atoms. The optical trapping mechanism is based on the interaction energy of a dipole and the electric field of the laser light. In atom trapping, the dominant contribution typically comes from the allowed optical transition closest to the laser wavelength, whereas for mesoscopic particles it is given by the bulk polarizability of the material. These two different regimes of optical trapping have coexisted for decades without any direct link, resulting in two very different contexts of applications: one being the trapping of small objects mainly in biological settings, the other one being dipole traps for individual neutral atoms in the field of quantum optics. Here we show that for nanoscale diamond crystals containing artificial atoms, so-called nitrogen vacancy (NV) color centers, both regimes of optical trapping can be observed at the same...

  4. A Magneto-Optical Trap for Diatomic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Mark; Hummon, Matthew; Collopy, Alejandra; Stuhl, Benjamin; Hemmerling, Boerge; Chae, Eunmi; Drayna, Garrett; Ravi, Aakash; Kuhnert, Maximilian; Petzold, Maurice; Doyle, John; Ye, Jun

    2014-05-01

    The magneto-optical trap (MOT) has long been the workhorse for atomic physics and is a powerful technique to rapidly produce ultracold, dense samples of atoms. Extending this technique to produce cold, dense samples of a diverse set of molecules will revolutionize the study of strongly interacting quantum systems, precision measurement and physical chemistry. In this work, we will report on progress towards the realization of a 3 dimensional MOT for the polar molecule YO. We are implementing a chirped frequency laser slowing scheme, where the buffer gas cooled molecules are slowed to a trappable velocity of 10 m/s. The 3D trapping is generated with a quasi-cycling transition and an oscillating quadrupole magnetic field. Current affiliation: Joint Quantum Institute, NIST and University of Maryland.

  5. Fast Bayesian inference of optical trap stiffness and particle diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Sudipta; Paul, Shuvojit; Singh, Rajesh; Ghosh, Dipanjan; Kundu, Avijit; Banerjee, Ayan; Adhikari, R.

    2017-01-01

    Bayesian inference provides a principled way of estimating the parameters of a stochastic process that is observed discretely in time. The overdamped Brownian motion of a particle confined in an optical trap is generally modelled by the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and can be observed directly in experiment. Here we present Bayesian methods for inferring the parameters of this process, the trap stiffness and the particle diffusion coefficient, that use exact likelihoods and sufficient statistics to arrive at simple expressions for the maximum a posteriori estimates. This obviates the need for Monte Carlo sampling and yields methods that are both fast and accurate. We apply these to experimental data and demonstrate their advantage over commonly used non-Bayesian fitting methods.

  6. Fast Bayesian inference of optical trap stiffness and particle diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Bera, Sudipta; Singh, Rajesh; Ghosh, Dipanjan; Kundu, Avijit; Banerjee, Ayan; Adhikari, R

    2016-01-01

    Bayesian inference provides a principled way of estimating the parameters of a stochastic process that is observed discretely in time. The overdamped Brownian motion of a particle confined in an optical trap is generally modelled by the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and can be observed directly in experiment. Here we present Bayesian methods for inferring the parameters of this process, the trap stiffness and the particle diffusion coefficient, that use exact likelihoods and sufficient statistics to arrive at simple expressions for the maximum a posteriori estimates. This obviates the need for Monte Carlo sampling and yields methods that are both fast and accurate. We apply these to experimental data and demonstrate their advantage over commonly used non-Bayesian fitting methods.

  7. Optical dipole trapping of radium atoms for EDM search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, W. L.; Sulai, I. A.; Parker, R. H.; Bailey, K.; Greene, J. P.; Holt, R. J.; Korsch, W.; Lu, Z.-T.; Mueller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.; Singh, J.

    2010-03-01

    We are developing an EDM search based on laser-cooled and trapped Ra-225 (half-life = 15 d) atoms. Due to octupole deformation of the nucleus, Ra-225 is predicted to be 2-3 orders of magnitude more sensitive to T-violating interactions than Hg-199, which currently sets the most stringent limits in the nuclear sector. Recently, we have succeeded in transferring Ra-226 atoms from a MOT into an optical dipole trap formed by a fiber laser beam at 1550 nm. For the EDM measurement, the cold atoms will be moved into the neighboring vacuum chamber inside magnetic shields where a pair of electrodes apply a 10 kV cm-1electric field. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  8. Optical stretching of giant unilamellar vesicles with an integrated dual-beam optical trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solmaz, Mehmet E; Biswas, Roshni; Sankhagowit, Shalene; Thompson, James R; Mejia, Camilo A; Malmstadt, Noah; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2012-10-01

    We have integrated a dual-beam optical trap into a microfluidic platform and used it to study membrane mechanics in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). We demonstrate the trapping and stretching of GUVs and characterize the membrane response to a step stress. We then measure area strain as a function of applied stress to extract the bending modulus of the lipid bilayer in the low-tension regime.

  9. Simulations and analysis of the Raman scattering and differential Raman scattering/Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of amino acids, peptides and proteins in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalkanen, Karl J.; Nieminen, R. M.; Bohr, Jakob

    2000-01-01

    The Raman and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of amino acids and small peptides in aqueous solution have been simulated by density functional theory and restricted Hartree/Fock methods. The treatment of the aqueous environment in treated in two ways. The water molecules in the first hydration...... shell which strongly interact with the molecule are treated explicitly while the waters in the bulk are treated by a continuum model. The structures are optimized and the harmonic force elds are calculated. The derivatives needed to simulate the Raman and ROA intensities are calculated from first...... principles. The simulated Raman and ROA spectra have been compared to recently meassured spectra on amino acids and peptides. The simulations and understanding from them are used to interpret the Raman and ROA spectra of proteins. A comparison to vibrational absorption (VA) and vibrational circular dichroism...

  10. Cold Atom Source Containing Multiple Magneto-Optical Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Kohel, James; Kellogg, James; Lim, Lawrence; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    An apparatus that serves as a source of a cold beam of atoms contains multiple two-dimensional (2D) magneto-optical traps (MOTs). (Cold beams of atoms are used in atomic clocks and in diverse scientific experiments and applications.) The multiple-2D-MOT design of this cold atom source stands in contrast to single-2D-MOT designs of prior cold atom sources of the same type. The advantages afforded by the present design are that this apparatus is smaller than prior designs.

  11. Nanopatterning on rough surfaces using optically trapped microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Y.-C.; Fardel, R.; Arnold, C. B.

    2011-06-01

    While nanofabricated structures find an increasingly large number of applications, few techniques are able to pattern rough or uneven surfaces, or surfaces with pre-existing structure. In this letter we show that optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN), a near-field laser based technique, is able to produce nanoscale features on surfaces with large roughness but without the need for focus adjustment. Patterning on model surfaces of polyimide with vertical steps greater than 0.5 μm shows a high degree of uniformity, demonstrating that OTAN is a suitable technique to pattern nontraditional surfaces for emerging technologies.

  12. Orthogonal trapping and sensing with long working distance optics [invited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin; Tauro, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    We are developing a next generation BioPhotonics Workstation to be applied in research on regulated microbial cell growth including their underlying physiological mechanisms, in vivo characterization of cell constituents and manufacturing of nanostructures and meta-materials. The workstation......Photonics Workstation that allows the user to directly control and simultaneously measure a portfolio of important chemical and biological processes. We arc currently able to generate up to 100 powerful optical traps using well-separated objectives, which eliminates the need for high numerical aperture oil or water...

  13. Sub-millikelvin dipolar molecules in a radio-frequency magneto-optical trap

    CERN Document Server

    Norrgard, E B; Steinecker, M H; Tarbutt, M R; DeMille, D

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a scheme for magneto-optically trapping strontium monofluoride (SrF) molecules at temperatures one order of magnitude lower and phase space densities three orders of magnitude higher than obtained previously with laser-cooled molecules. In our trap, optical dark states are destabilized by rapidly and synchronously reversing the trapping laser polarizations and the applied magnetic field gradient. The number of molecules and trap lifetime are also significantly improved from previous work by loading the trap with high laser power and then reducing the power for long-term trapping. With this procedure, temperatures as low as 400 $\\mu$K are achieved.

  14. Theoretical comparison of optical traps created by standing wave and single beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemánek, Pavel; Jonáš, Alexandr; Jákl, Petr; Ježek, Jan; Šerý, Mojmír.; Liška, Miroslav

    2003-05-01

    We used generalised Lorenz-Mie scattering theory (GLMT) to compare submicron-sized particle optical trapping in a single focused beam and a standing wave. We focus especially on the study of maximal axial trapping force, minimal laser power necessary for confinement, axial trap position, and axial trap stiffness in dependency on trapped sphere radius, refractive index, and Gaussian beam waist size. In the single beam trap (SBT), the range of refractive indices which enable stable trapping depends strongly on the beam waist size (it grows with decreasing waist). On the contrary to the SBT, there are certain sphere sizes (non-trapping radii) that disable sphere confinement in standing wave trap (SWT) for arbitrary value of refractive index. For other sphere radii we show that the SWT enables confinement of high refractive index particle in wider laser beams and provides axial trap stiffness and maximal axial trapping force at least by two orders and one order bigger than in SBT, respectively.

  15. An ultracold, optically trapped mixture of {87}Rb and metastable {4}He atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Flores, Adonis Silva; Vassen, Wim; Knoop, Steven

    2016-01-01

    We report on the realization of an ultracold (<25~muK) mixture of rubidium ({87}Rb) and metastable triplet helium ({4}He) in an optical dipole trap. Our scheme involves laser cooling in a dual-species magneto-optical trap, simultaneous MW- and RF-induced forced evaporative cooling in a quadrupole magnetic trap, and transfer to a single-beam optical dipole trap. We observe long trapping lifetimes for the doubly spin-stretched spin-state mixture and measure much shorter lifetimes for other spin-state combinations. We discuss prospects for realizing quantum degenerate mixtures of alkali-metal and metastable helium atoms.

  16. Parallel optical trap assisted nanopatterning on rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Y.-C.; Leitz, K.-H.; Fardel, R.; Otto, A.; Schmidt, M.; Arnold, C. B.

    2012-04-01

    There exist many optical lithography techniques for generating nanostructures on hard, flat surfaces over large areas. However, few techniques are able to create such patterns on soft materials or surfaces with pre-existing structure. To address this need, we demonstrate the use of parallel optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN) to provide an efficient and robust direct-write method of producing nanoscale features without the need for focal plane adjustment. Parallel patterning on model surfaces of polyimide with vertical steps greater than 1.5 µm shows a feature size uncertainty better than 4% across the step and lateral positional accuracy of 25 nm. A Brownian motion model is used to describe the positional accuracy enabling one to predict how variation in system parameters will affect the nanopatterning results. These combined results suggest that OTAN is a viable technique for massively parallel direct-write nanolithography on non-traditional surfaces.

  17. Magneto-optical trap for neutral mercury atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hong-Li; Yin Shi-Qi; Liu Kang-Kang; Qian Jun; Xu Zhen; Hong Tao; Wang Yu-Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Due to its low sensitivity to blackbody radiation,neutral mercury is a good candidate for the most accurate optical lattice clock.Here we report the observation of cold mercury atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT).Because of the high vapor pressure at room temperature,the mercury source and the cold pump were cooled down to-40 ℃ and-70 ℃,respectively,to keep the science chamber in an ultra-high vacuum of 6× 10-9 Pa.Limited by the power of the UV cooling laser,the one beam folded MOT configuration was adopted,and 1.5× 105 Hg-202 atoms were observed by fluorescence detection.

  18. Dynamics of submicron aerosol droplets in a robust optical trap formed by multiple Bessel beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanopulos, Ioannis [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens 11635 (Greece); Luckhaus, David; Signorell, Ruth, E-mail: rsignorell@ethz.ch [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Preston, Thomas C. [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantock' s Close, Clifton, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-21

    In this paper, we model the three-dimensional escape dynamics of single submicron-sized aerosol droplets in optical multiple Bessel beam traps. Trapping in counter-propagating Bessel beams (CPBBs) is compared with a newly proposed quadruple Bessel beam (QBB) trap, which consists of two perpendicularly arranged CPBB traps. Calculations are performed for perfectly and imperfectly aligned traps. Mie-theory and finite-difference time-domain methods are used to calculate the optical forces. The droplet escape kinetics are obtained from the solution of the Langevin equation using a Verlet algorithm. Provided the traps are perfectly aligned, the calculations indicate very long lifetimes for droplets trapped either in the CPBB or in the QBB trap. However, minor misalignments that are hard to control experimentally already severely diminish the stability of the CPBB trap. By contrast, such minor misalignments hardly affect the extended droplet lifetimes in a QBB trap. The QBB trap is found to be a stable, robust optical trap, which should enable the experimental investigation of submicron droplets with radii down to 100 nm. Optical binding between two droplets and its potential role in preventing coagulation when loading a CPBB trap is briefly addressed.

  19. Characterization of bacterial spore germination using phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingbo; Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Guiwen; Yu, Jing; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-qing

    2011-05-01

    This protocol describes a method combining phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and optical tweezers to characterize the germination of single bacterial spores. The characterization consists of the following steps: (i) loading heat-activated dormant spores into a temperature-controlled microscope sample holder containing a germinant solution plus a nucleic acid stain; (ii) capturing a single spore with optical tweezers; (iii) simultaneously measuring phase-contrast images, Raman spectra and fluorescence images of the optically captured spore at 2- to 10-s intervals; and (iv) analyzing the acquired data for the loss of spore refractility, changes in spore-specific molecules (in particular, dipicolinic acid) and uptake of the nucleic acid stain. This information leads to precise correlations between various germination events, and takes 1-2 h to complete. The method can also be adapted to use multi-trap Raman spectroscopy or phase-contrast microscopy of spores adhered on a cover slip to simultaneously obtain germination parameters for multiple individual spores.

  20. Raman Probe Based on Optically-Poled Double-Core Fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Anna Chiara; Margulis, Walter; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    A Raman probe based on an optically-poled double-core fiber. In-fiber SHG allows for Raman spectroscopy of DMSO at 532nm when illuminating the fiber with 1064nm light. The fiber structure provides independent excitation and collection paths.......A Raman probe based on an optically-poled double-core fiber. In-fiber SHG allows for Raman spectroscopy of DMSO at 532nm when illuminating the fiber with 1064nm light. The fiber structure provides independent excitation and collection paths....

  1. Tapered optical fibers as tools for probing magneto-optical trap characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrissey, Michael J.; Deasy, Kieran [Department of Applied Physics and Instrumentation, Cork Institute of Technology, Cork (Ireland); Photonics Centre, Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland); Wu Yuqiang; Nic Chormaic, Sile [Photonics Centre, Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland); Department of Physics, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Chakrabarti, Shrabana [Photonics Centre, Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland)

    2009-05-15

    We present a novel technique for measuring the characteristics of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) for cold atoms by monitoring the spontaneous emission from trapped atoms coupled into the guided mode of a tapered optical nanofiber. We show that the nanofiber is highly sensitive to very small numbers of atoms close to its surface. The size and shape of the MOT, determined by translating the cold atom cloud across the tapered fiber, is in excellent agreement with measurements obtained using the conventional method of fluorescence imaging using a charge coupled device camera. The coupling of atomic fluorescence into the tapered fiber also allows us to monitor the loading and lifetime of the trap. The results are compared to those achieved by focusing the MOT fluorescence onto a photodiode and it was seen that the tapered fiber gives slightly longer loading and lifetime measurements due to the sensitivity of the fiber, even when very few atoms are present.

  2. Tapered optical fibers as tools for probing magneto-optical trap characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Michael J.; Deasy, Kieran; Wu, Yuqiang; Chakrabarti, Shrabana; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2009-05-01

    We present a novel technique for measuring the characteristics of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) for cold atoms by monitoring the spontaneous emission from trapped atoms coupled into the guided mode of a tapered optical nanofiber. We show that the nanofiber is highly sensitive to very small numbers of atoms close to its surface. The size and shape of the MOT, determined by translating the cold atom cloud across the tapered fiber, is in excellent agreement with measurements obtained using the conventional method of fluorescence imaging using a charge coupled device camera. The coupling of atomic fluorescence into the tapered fiber also allows us to monitor the loading and lifetime of the trap. The results are compared to those achieved by focusing the MOT fluorescence onto a photodiode and it was seen that the tapered fiber gives slightly longer loading and lifetime measurements due to the sensitivity of the fiber, even when very few atoms are present.

  3. Single fiber optical trapping of a liquid droplet and its application in microresonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihai; Chen, Yunhao; Zhao, Li; Zhang, Yu; Wei, Yong; Zhu, Zongda; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2016-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate an optical trapping of a liquid droplet and its application based on an annular core microstructured optical fiber. We grind and polish the annular core fiber tip to be a special frustum cone shape to make sure the optical force large enough to trap the liquid droplet non-intrusively. The axial and transverse optical trapping forces are simulated. In addition, we investigate the whispering gallery modes resonance characteristic of the trapped liquid droplet as the example of applications. The whispering gallery modes spectrum is sensitive to the size of the micro liquid droplet. Due to the simple construction and flexible manipulation, the fiber-based optical trapping technology for micro liquid droplets trapping, manipulating, and controlling has great application penitential in many fields, such as physics, biology, and interdisciplinary studies.

  4. Design of distributed Raman temperature sensing system based on single-mode optical fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ziheng XU; Deming LIU; Hairong LIU; Qizhen SUN; Zhifeng SUN; Xu ZHANG; Wengang WANG

    2009-01-01

    The distributed optical fiber temperature sensor system based on Raman scattering has developed rapidly since it was invented in 1970s. The optical wavelengths used in most of the distributed temperature optical fiber sensor system based on the Raman scattering are around from 840 to 1330 nm, and the system operates with multimode optical fibers. However, this wavelength range is not suitable for long-distance transmission due to the high attenuation and dispersion of the transmission optical fiber. A novel distributed optical fiber Raman temperature sensor system based on standard single-mode optical fiber is proposed. The system employs the wavelength of 1550 nm as the probe light and the standard communication optical fiber as the sensing medium to increase the sensing distance. This system mainly includes three modules: the probe light transmitting module, the light magnifying and transmission module, and the signal acquisition module.

  5. Analyzing the fundamental properties of Raman amplification in optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Povlsen, Jørn Hedegaard

    2005-01-01

    The Raman response of germanosilicate fibers is presented. This includes not only the material dependence but also the relation between the spatial-mode profile of the light and the Raman response in the time and frequency domain. From the Raman-gain spectrum, information is derived related...

  6. Loading an Optical Trap with Diamond Nanocrystals Containing Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers from a Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jen-Feng; Ji, Peng; Dutt, M. V. Gurudev; D'Urso, Brian R.

    2015-03-01

    We present a simple and effective method of loading particles into an optical trap. Our primary application of this method is loading photoluminescent material, such as diamond nanocrystals containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers, for coupling the mechanical motion of the trapped crystal with the spin of the NV centers. Highly absorptive material at the trapping laser frequency, such as tartrazine dye, is used as media to attach nanodiamonds and burn into a cloud of air-borne particles as the material is swept near the trapping laser focus on a glass slide. Particles are then trapped with the laser used for burning or transferred to a second laser trap at a different wavelength. Evidence of successful loading diamond nanocrystals into the trap presented includes high sensitivity of the photoluminecscence (PL) to the excitation laser and the PL spectra of the optically trapped particles

  7. Recent progress in distributed optical fiber Raman photon sensors at China Jiliang University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zaixuan; Wang, Jianfeng; Li, Yi; Gong, Huaping; Yu, Xiangdong; Liu, Honglin; Jin, Yongxing; Kang, Juan; Li, Chenxia; Zhang, Wensheng; Zhang, Wenping; Niu, Xiaohui; Sun, Zhongzhou; Zhao, Chunliu; Dong, Xinyong; Jin, Shangzhong

    2012-06-01

    A brief review of recent progress in researches, productions and applications of full distributed fiber Raman photon sensors at China Jiliang University (CJLU) is presented. In order to improve the measurement distance, the accuracy, the space resolution, the ability of multi-parameter measurements, and the intelligence of full distributed fiber sensor systems, a new generation fiber sensor technology based on the optical fiber nonlinear scattering fusion principle is proposed. A series of new generation full distributed fiber sensors are investigated and designed, which consist of new generation ultra-long distance full distributed fiber Raman and Rayleigh scattering photon sensors integrated with a fiber Raman amplifier, auto-correction full distributed fiber Raman photon temperature sensors based on Raman correlation dual sources, full distributed fiber Raman photon temperature sensors based on a pulse coding source, full distributed fiber Raman photon temperature sensors using a fiber Raman wavelength shifter, a new type of Brillouin optical time domain analyzers (BOTDAs) integrated with a fiber Raman amplifier for replacing a fiber Brillouin amplifier, full distributed fiber Raman and Brillouin photon sensors integrated with a fiber Raman amplifier, and full distributed fiber Brillouin photon sensors integrated with a fiber Brillouin frequency shifter. The Internet of things is believed as one of candidates of the next technological revolution, which has driven hundreds of millions of class markets. Sensor networks are important components of the Internet of things. The full distributed optical fiber sensor network (Rayleigh, Raman, and Brillouin scattering) is a 3S (smart materials, smart structure, and smart skill) system, which is easy to construct smart fiber sensor networks. The distributed optical fiber sensor can be embedded in the power grids, railways, bridges, tunnels, roads, constructions, water supply systems, dams, oil and gas pipelines and other

  8. Photoacoustic measurements of photokinetics in single optically trapped aerosol droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covert, Paul; Cremer, Johannes; Signorell, Ruth; Thaler, Klemens; Haisch, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    It is well established that interaction of light with atmospheric aerosols has a large impact on the Earth's climate. However, uncertainties in the magnitude of this impact remain large, due in part to broad distributions of aerosol size, composition, and chemical reactivity. In this context, photoacoustic spectroscopy is commonly used to measure light absorption by aerosols. Here, we present photoacoustic measurements of single, optically-trapped nanodroplets to reveal droplet size-depencies of photochemical and physical processes. Theoretical considerations have pointed to a size-dependence in the magnitude and phase of the photoacoustic response from aerosol droplets. This dependence is thought to originate from heat transfer processes that are slow compared to the acoustic excitation frequency. In the case of a model aerosol, our measurements of single particle absorption cross-section versus droplet size confirm these theoretical predictions. In a related study, using the same model aerosol, we also demonstrate a droplet size-dependence of photochemical reaction rates [1]. Within sub-micron sized particles, photolysis rates were observed to be an order of magnitude greater than those observed in larger droplets. [1] J. W. Cremer, K. M. Thaler, C. Haisch, and R. Signorell. Photoacoustics of single laser-trapped nanodroplets for the direct observation of nanofocusing in aerosol photokinetics. Nat. Commun., 7:10941, 2016.

  9. Millikelvin cooling of an optically trapped microsphere in vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Tongcang; Raizen, Mark G

    2011-01-01

    The apparent conflict between general relativity and quantum mechanics remains one of the unresolved mysteries of the physical world. According to recent theories, this conflict results in gravity-induced quantum state reduction of "Schr\\"odinger cats", quantum superpositions of macroscopic observables. In recent years, great progress has been made in cooling micromechanical resonators towards their quantum mechanical ground state. This work is an important step towards the creation of Schr\\"odinger cats in the laboratory, and the study of their destruction by decoherence. A direct test of the gravity-induced state reduction scenario may therefore be within reach. However, a recent analysis shows that for all systems reported to date, quantum superpositions are destroyed by environmental decoherence long before gravitational state reduction takes effect. Here we report optical trapping of glass microspheres in vacuum with high oscillation frequencies, and cooling of the center-of-mass motion from room tempera...

  10. Optical particle trapping and dynamic manipulation using spatial light modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, René Lynge

    spots acting as tweezers beams are generated using phase-only spatial light modulation of an incident laser beam together with a generalized phase contrast (GPC) filter. The GPC method acts as a common-path interferometer, which converts encoded phase information into an appropriate intensity pattern...... suitable for optical trapping. A phaseonly spatial light modulator (SLM) is used for the phase encoding of the laser beam. The SLM is controlled directly from a standard computer where phase information is represented as gray-scale image information. Experimentally, both linear and angular movements...... proven capable of generating a phase pattern from an input amplitude distribution. The birefringent nature of liquid crystals in the SLM is utilized for the generation of an arbitrary two-dimensional state of polarization using two-cascaded SLMs. By means of elliptically polarized light, generated by one...

  11. Saturation of Photoassociation in Cs Magneto-optical Trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jie; WANG Li-Rong; JI Wei-Bang; XIAO Lian-Tuan; JIA Suo-Tang

    2007-01-01

    An ultrahigh resolution photoassociation spectrum of caesium atoms in a magneto-optical trap is presented. Hyperfine structure of the excited state molecule is obtained by using the lock-in method based on modulated cold atoms in this spectrum. Amplitude of resonant lines related to the rotational levels increases with photoassociation laser intensity, and saturation effect of photoassociation of cold atoms is observed in our experiment. The saturation intensity of photoassociation is deduced by fitting the experimental data to a saturation model based on scattering theory. Differences among saturation intensities of different rotational progressions in the v = 55vibrational state of the caesium molecular long-range O-g state have been found.

  12. Single and dual fiber nano-tip optical tweezers: trapping and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Decombe, Jean-Baptiste; Fick, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    An original optical tweezers using one or two chemically etched fiber nano-tips is developed. We demonstrate optical trapping of 1 micrometer polystyrene spheres at optical powers down to 2 mW. Harmonic trap potentials were found in the case of dual fiber tweezers by analyzing the trapped particle position fluctuations. The trap stiffness was deduced using three different models. Consistent values of up to 1 fN/nm were found. The stiffness linearly decreases with decreasing light intensity and increasing fiber tip-to-tip distance.

  13. Single and dual fiber nano-tip optical tweezers: trapping and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decombe, Jean-Baptiste; Huant, Serge; Fick, Jochen

    2013-12-16

    An original optical tweezers using one or two chemically etched fiber nano-tips is developed. We demonstrate optical trapping of 1 micrometer polystyrene spheres at optical powers down to 2 mW. Harmonic trap potentials were found in the case of dual fiber tweezers by analyzing the trapped particle position fluctuations. The trap stiffness was deduced using three different models. Consistent values of up to 1 fN/nm were found. The stiffness linearly decreases with decreasing light intensity and increasing fiber tip-to-tip distance.

  14. Dynamics of trapped atoms around an optical nanofiber probed through polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Pablo; Fatemi, Fredrik K.; Orozco, Luis A.; Rolston, S. L.

    2017-06-01

    The evanescent field outside an optical nanofiber (ONF) can create optical traps for neutral atoms. We present a non-destructive method to characterize such trapping potentials. An off-resonance linearly polarized probe beam that propagates through the ONF experiences a slow axis of polarization produced by trapped atoms on opposite sides along the ONF. The transverse atomic motion is imprinted onto the probe polarization through the changing atomic index of of refraction. By applying a transient impulse, we measure a time-dependent polarization rotation of the probe beam that provides both a rapid and non-destructive measurement of the optical trapping frequencies.

  15. A low background Raman probe for optical biopsy of brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Oliver A. C.; Hutchings, Joanne; Gray, William; Day, John C.

    2014-03-01

    Removal of intrinsic brain tumours is a delicate process, where a high degree of specificity is required to remove all of the tumour tissue without damaging healthy brain. The accuracy of this process can be greatly enhanced by intraoperative guidance. Optical biopsies using Raman spectroscopy are a minimally invasive and lower cost alternative to current guidance methods. A miniature Raman probe for performing optical biopsies of human brain tissue is presented. The probe allows sampling inside a conventional stereotactic brain biopsy system: a needle of length 200mm and inner diameter of 1.8mm. The probe achieves a very low fluorescent background whilst maintaining good collection of Raman signal by employing a miniature stand-off Raman design. To illustrate this, the probe is compared with a Raman probe that uses a pair of optical fibres for collection. The miniature stand-off Raman probe is shown to collect a comparable number of Raman scattered photons, but the fluorescence caused by silica fibres in a Raman needle probe is reduced by a factor of two for Raman shifts under 500 cm-1, and by 30% at 600-700 cm-1. In addition, this design contains only medically approved materials at the distal end. The probe's suitability for use on tissue is demonstrated by discriminating between different types of porcine brain tissue.

  16. Surface enhanced Raman optical activity as an ultra sensitive tool for ligand binding analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Christian; Abdali, Salim

    2007-01-01

    The Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) and Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Optical Activity (SERROA) spectra of myoglobin and the myoglobin-azide complex were measured on very dilute samples (100 nM protein) in order to analyze the sensitivity of SERROA spectroscopy when inducing...

  17. All-oxide Raman-active traps for light and matter: probing redox homeostasis model reactions in aqueous environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandri, Ivano; Depero, L E

    2014-04-09

    Core-shell colloidal crystals can act as very efficient traps for light and analytes. Here it is shown that Raman-active probes can be achieved using SiO2-TiO2 core-shell beads. These systems are successfully tested in monitoring of glutathione redox cycle at physiological concentration in aqueous environment, without need of any interfering enhancers. These materials represent a promising alternative to conventional, metal-based SERS probes for investigating chemical and biochemical reactions under real working conditions. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Tuning the structural and optical properties of gold/silver nano-alloys prepared by laser ablation in liquids for optical limiting, ultra-sensitive spectroscopy, and optical trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, E.; D'Urso, L.; Fazio, E.; Satriano, C.; Donato, M. G.; D'Andrea, C.; Maragò, O. M.; Gucciardi, P. G.; Compagnini, G.; Neri, F.

    2012-12-01

    The plasmon resonance of metallic Au/Ag nano-alloys in the colloidal state was tuned from 400 nm to 500 nm using a laser irradiated technique performed directly in the liquid state. Interesting optical nonlinearities, trapping effects and spectroscopic enhancements were detected by modifying the gold molar fraction in the nano-alloys. In particular a reduction of the limiting threshold was observed by increasing the gold amount. The SERS activity of the Au/Ag alloys was tested in liquid and in solid state in presence of linear carbon chains as probe molecules. The increased Raman signals for nanoparticles with different Au/Ag atomic ratio are presented. Finally, studies and prospects for optical and Raman tweezers experiments are discussed.

  19. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber-optic probes for Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konorov, Stanislav O; Addison, Christopher J; Schulze, H Georg; Turner, Robin F B; Blades, Michael W

    2006-06-15

    We have implemented a new Raman fiber-optic probe design based on a hollow-core photonic-crystal excitation fiber surrounded by silica-core collection fibers. The photonic-crystal fiber offers low attenuation at the pump radiation wavelength, mechanical flexibility, high radiation stability, and low background noise. Because the excitation beam is transmitted through air inside the hollow-core fiber, silica Raman scattering is much reduced, improving the quality of the spectra obtained using probes of this design. Preliminary results show that the new probe design decreases the Raman background from the silica by approximately an order of magnitude compared to solid-core silica Raman probes.

  20. Single Molecule Instrument for Surface Enhanced Raman Optical Activity of Biomolecules Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Stereochemistry is an essential element of our organic life. Only certain enantiomers are useful as drugs for the human body. Raman optical activity (ROA) provides...

  1. Single Molecule Instrument for Surface Enhanced Raman Optical Activity of Biomolecules Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Stereochemistry is an essential element of our organic life. Only certain enantiomers are useful as drugs for the human body. Raman Optical Activity (ROA) and...

  2. Nano-optical trapping of Rayleigh particles and Escherichia coli bacteria with resonant optical antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righini, M; Ghenuche, P; Cherukulappurath, S; Myroshnychenko, V; García de Abajo, F J; Quidant, R

    2009-10-01

    Immobilizing individual living microorganisms at designated positions in space is important to study their metabolism and to initiate an in situ scrutiny of the complexity of life at the nanoscale. While optical tweezers enable the trapping of large cells at the focus of a laser beam, they face difficulties in maintaining them steady and can become invasive and produce substantial damage that prevents preserving the organisms intact for sufficient time to be studied. Here we demonstrate a novel optical trapping scheme that allows us to hold living Escherichia coli bacteria for several hours using moderate light intensities. We pattern metallic nanoantennas on a glass substrate to produce strong light intensity gradients responsible for the trapping mechanism. Several individual bacteria are trapped simultaneously with their orientation fixed by the asymmetry of the antennas. This unprecedented immobilization of bacteria opens an avenue toward observing nanoscopic processes associated with cell metabolism, as well as the response of individual live microorganisms to external stimuli, much in the same way as pluricellular organisms are studied in biology.

  3. Calculation of Raman optical activity spectra for vibrational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutter, Shaun T; Zielinski, François; Popelier, Paul L A; Blanch, Ewan W

    2015-05-01

    By looking back on the history of Raman Optical Activity (ROA), the present article shows that the success of this analytical technique was for a long time hindered, paradoxically, by the deep level of detail and wealth of structural information it can provide. Basic principles of the underlying theory are discussed, to illustrate the technique's sensitivity due to its physical origins in the delicate response of molecular vibrations to electromagnetic properties. Following a short review of significant advances in the application of ROA by UK researchers, we dedicate two extensive sections to the technical and theoretical difficulties that were overcome to eventually provide predictive power to computational simulations in terms of ROA spectral calculation. In the last sections, we focus on a new modelling strategy that has been successful in coping with the dramatic impact of solvent effects on ROA analyses. This work emphasises the role of complementarity between experiment and theory for analysing the conformations and dynamics of biomolecules, so providing new perspectives for methodological improvements and molecular modelling development. For the latter, an example of a next-generation force-field for more accurate simulations and analysis of molecular behaviour is presented. By improving the accuracy of computational modelling, the analytical capabilities of ROA spectroscopy will be further developed so generating new insights into the complex behaviour of molecules.

  4. Origin invariance in vibrational resonance Raman optical activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, Luciano N., E-mail: lnvidal@utfpr.edu.br; Cappelli, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.cappelli@unipi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Università di Pisa, Via Moruzzi 3, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Egidi, Franco [Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Barone, Vincenzo [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-05-07

    A theoretical investigation on the origin dependence of the vibronic polarizabilities, isotropic and anisotropic rotational invariants, and scattering cross sections in Resonance Raman Optical Activity (RROA) spectroscopy is presented. Expressions showing the origin dependence of these polarizabilities were written in the resonance regime using the Franck-Condon (FC) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) approximations for the electronic transition moments. Differently from the far-from-resonance scattering regime, where the origin dependent terms cancel out when the rotational invariants are calculated, RROA spectrum can exhibit some origin dependence even for eigenfunctions of the electronic Hamiltonian. At the FC level, the RROA spectrum is completely origin invariant if the polarizabilities are calculated using a single excited state or for a set of degenerate states. Otherwise, some origin effects can be observed in the spectrum. At the HT level, RROA spectrum is origin dependent even when the polarizabilities are evaluated from a single excited state but the origin effect is expected to be small in this case. Numerical calculations performed for (S)-methyloxirane, (2R,3R)-dimethyloxirane, and (R)-4-F-2-azetidinone at both FC and HT levels using the velocity representation of the electric dipole and quadrupole transition moments confirm the predictions of the theory and show the extent of origin effects and the effectiveness of suggested ways to remove them.

  5. Coherent transfer of optical orbital angular momentum in multi-order Raman sideband generation

    CERN Document Server

    Strohaber, J; Sokolov, A V; Kolomenskii, A A; Paulus, G G; Schuessler, H A

    2012-01-01

    Experimental results from the generation of Raman sidebands using optical vortices are presented. By generating two sets of sidebands originating from different locations in a Raman active crystal, one set containing optical orbital angular momentum and the other serving as a reference, a Young's double slit experiment was simultaneously realized for each sideband. The interference between the two sets of sidebands was used to determine the helicity and topological charge in each order. Topological charges in all orders were found to be discrete and follow selection rules predicted by a cascaded Raman process.

  6. Coherent transfer of optical orbital angular momentum in multi-order Raman sideband generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohaber, J; Zhi, M; Sokolov, A V; Kolomenskii, A A; Paulus, G G; Schuessler, H A

    2012-08-15

    Experimental results from the generation of Raman sidebands using optical vortices are presented. By generating two sets of sidebands originating from different locations in a Raman-active crystal, one set containing optical orbital angular momentum and the other serving as a reference, Young's double slit experiment was simultaneously realized for each sideband. The interference between the two sets of sidebands was used to determine the helicity and topological charge in each order. Topological charges in all orders were found to be discrete and follow selection rules predicted by a cascaded Raman process.

  7. A far-off-resonance optical trap for a Ba$^+$ ion

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, Thomas; Schmidt, Julian; Karpa, Leon; Schaetz, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Optical trapping and ions combine unique advantages of independently striving fields of research. Light fields can form versatile potential landscapes, such as optical lattices, for neutral and charged atoms, avoiding detrimental implications of established radiofrequency (rf) traps while mediating interaction via long range Coulomb forces, controlling and detecting motional and electronic states on the quantum level. Here we show optical trapping of $^{138}$Ba$^{+}$ ions in the absence of rf fields in a far-detuned dipole trap, suppressing photon scattering by three and the related recoil heating by four orders of magnitude. To enhance the prospects for optical as well as hybrid traps, we demonstrate a novel method for stray electric field compensation to a level below 9 mV/m. Our results will be relevant, for example, for ion-atom ensembles, to enable four to five orders of magnitude lower common temperatures, accessing the regime of ultracold interaction and chemistry, where quantum effects are predicted t...

  8. Characterising Conical Refraction Optical Tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, Craig; Rafailov, Edik; McGloin, David

    2014-01-01

    Conical refraction occurs when a beam of light travels through an appropriately cut biaxial crystal. By focussing the conically refracted beam through a high numerical aperture microscope objective, conical refraction optical tweezers can be created, allowing for particle manipulation in both Raman spots and in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings. We present a thorough quantification of the trapping properties of such a beam, focussing on the trap stiffness and how this varies with trap power and trapped particle location. We show that the lower Raman spot can be thought of as a single-beam optical gradient force trap, while radiation pressure dominates in the upper Raman spot, leading to optical levitation rather than trapping. Particles in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings experience a lower trap stiffness than particles in the lower Raman spot but benefit from rotational control.

  9. Attonewton force detection using microspheres in a dual-beam optical trap in high vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjit, Gambhir; Stutz, Jordan H; Cunningham, Mark; Geraci, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    We describe the implementation of laser-cooled silica microspheres as force sensors in a dual-beam optical dipole trap in high vacuum. Using this system we have demonstrated trap lifetimes exceeding several days, attonewton force detection capability, and wide tunability in trapping and cooling parameters. Measurements have been performed with charged and neutral beads to calibrate the sensitivity of the detector. This work establishes the suitability of dual beam optical dipole traps for precision force measurement in high vacuum with long averaging times, and enables future applications including the study of gravitational inverse square law violations at short range, Casimir forces, acceleration sensing, and quantum opto-mechanics.

  10. Magneto-optical trap formed by elliptically polarised light waves for Mg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudnikov, O. N.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.; Goncharov, A. N.

    2016-07-01

    We consider a magneto-optical trap (MOT) formed by elliptically polarised waves for 24Mg atoms on a closed optical 3P2 → 3D3 (λ = 383.8 nm) transition in the ɛ - θ - ɛ¯ configuration of the field. Compared with a known MOT formed by circularly polarised waves (σ+ - σ- configuration), the suggested configuration of the trap formed by fields of ɛ - θ - ɛ¯ configuration allows deeper sub-Doppler cooling of trapped 24Mg atoms, which cannot be implemented in a conventional trap formed by fields of σ+ - σ- configuration.

  11. Scattering of a Tightly Focused Beam by an Optically Trapped Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, James A.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Weiland, Kenneth E.

    2006-01-01

    Near-forward scattering of an optically trapped 5 m radius polystyrene latex sphere by the trapping beam was examined both theoretically and experimentally. Since the trapping beam is tightly focused, the beam fields superpose and interfere with the scattered fields in the forward hemisphere. The observed light intensity consists of a series of concentric bright and dark fringes centered about the forward scattering direction. Both the number of fringes and their contrast depend on the position of the trapping beam focal waist with respect to the sphere. The fringes are caused by diffraction due to the truncation of the tail of the trapping beam as the beam is transmitted through the sphere.

  12. Effects of Spherical Aberration on Optical Trapping Forces for Rayleigh Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Xin-Cheng; LI Zhao-Lin; GUO Hong-Lian; CHENG Bing-Ying; ZHANG Dao-Zhong

    2001-01-01

    The trapping force on Rayleigh particles in an optical tweezers system with an oil immersion objective is calculated by an electromagnetic model. The results indicate that the stability of particles trapped will be affected by spherical aberration, which is caused by refractive difference between objective oil and water solution, when the specimen manipulated is suspended in a water solution. The trapping force and depth of potential well will decrease and the minimum of laser power for ensuring the stability of particles trapped will increase with the enhanced trapping depth.

  13. Theoretical investigation on nonlinear optical effects in laser trapping of dielectric nanoparticles with ultrafast pulsed excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Anita; De, Arijit K

    2016-09-19

    The use of low-power high-repetition-rate ultrafast pulsed excitation in stable optical trapping of dielectric nanoparticles has been demonstrated in the recent past; the high peak power of each pulse leads to instantaneous trapping of a nanoparticle with fast inertial response and the high repetition-rate ensures repetitive trapping by successive pulses However, with such high peak power pulsed excitation under a tight focusing condition, nonlinear optical effects on trapping efficiency also become significant and cannot be ignored. Thus, in addition to the above mentioned repetitive instantaneous trapping, trapping efficiency under pulsed excitation is also influenced by the optical Kerr effect, which we theoretically investigate here. Using dipole approximation we show that with an increase in laser power the radial component of the trapping potential becomes progressively more stable but the axial component is dramatically modulated due to increased Kerr nonlinearity. We justify that the relevant parameter to quantify the trapping efficiency is not the absolute depth of the highly asymmetric axial trapping potential but the height of the potential barrier along the beam propagation direction. We also discuss the optimal excitation parameters leading to the most stable dipole trap. Our results show excellent agreement with previous experiments.

  14. Optical antenna arrays on a fiber facet for in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe, Elizabeth J; Dickey, Michael D; Bao, Jiming; Whitesides, George M; Capasso, Federico

    2009-03-01

    This paper reports a bidirectional fiber optic probe for the detection of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). One facet of the probe features an array of gold optical antennas designed to enhance Raman signals, while the other facet of the fiber is used for the input and collection of light. Simultaneous detection of benzenethiol and 2-[(E)-2-pyridin-4-ylethenyl]pyridine is demonstrated through a 35 cm long fiber. The array of nanoscale optical antennas was first defined by electron-beam lithography on a silicon wafer. The array was subsequently stripped from the wafer and then transferred to the facet of a fiber. Lithographic definition of the antennas provides a method for producing two-dimensional arrays with well-defined geometry, which allows (i) the optical response of the probe to be tuned and (ii) the density of "hot spots" generating the enhanced Raman signal to be controlled. It is difficult to determine the Raman signal enhancement factor (EF) of most fiber optic Raman sensors featuring hot spots because the geometry of the Raman enhancing nanostructures is poorly defined. The ability to control the size and spacing of the antennas enables the EF of the transferred array to be estimated. EF values estimated after focusing a laser directly onto the transferred array ranged from 2.6 x 10(5) to 5.1 x 10(5).

  15. Monitoring the cementitious materials subjected to sulfate attack with optical fiber excitation Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yanfei; Bai, Yun; Muhammed Basheer, P. A.; Boland, John J.; Wang, Jing Jing

    2013-10-01

    Formation of ettringite and gypsum from sulfate attack together with carbonation and chloride ingress have been considered as the most serious deterioration mechanisms of concrete structures. Although electrical resistance sensors and fiber optic chemical sensors could be used to monitor the latter two mechanisms on site, currently there is no system for monitoring the deterioration mechanisms of sulfate attack. In this paper, a preliminary study was carried out to investigate the feasibility of monitoring sulfate attack with optical fiber excitation Raman spectroscopy through characterizing the ettringite and gypsum formed in deteriorated cementitious materials under an optical fiber excitation + objective collection configuration. Bench-mounted Raman spectroscopy analysis was also conducted to validate the spectrum obtained from the fiber-objective configuration. The results showed that the expected Raman bands of ettringite and gypsum in the sulfate-attacked cement paste can be clearly identified by the optical fiber excitation Raman spectrometer and are in good agreement with those identified from bench-mounted Raman spectrometer. Therefore, based on these preliminary results, it is considered that there is a good potential for developing an optical fiber-based Raman system to monitor the deterioration mechanisms of concrete subjected to sulfate attack in the future.

  16. Magic wavelengths for optical cooling and trapping of lithium

    CERN Document Server

    Safronova, M S; Clark, Charles W

    2012-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we identify magic wavelengths for the 2s-2p and 2s-3p transitions in lithium. The ns and np atomic levels have the same ac Stark shifts at the corresponding magic wavelength, which facilitates state-insensitive optical cooling and trapping. Tune-out wavelengths for which the ground-state frequency-dependent polarizability vanishes are also calculated. Differences of these wavelengths between 6Li and 7Li are reported. Our approach uses high-precision, relativistic all-order methods in which all single, double, and partial triple excitations of the Dirac-Fock wave functions are included to all orders of perturbation theory. Recommended values are provided for a large number of Li electric-dipole matrix elements. Static polarizabilities for the 2s, 2p, 3s, 3p, and 3d levels are compared with other theory and experiment where available. Uncertainties of all recommended values are estimated. The magic wavelengths for the uv 2s-3p transition are of particular interest for the pr...

  17. Probing the interaction between two microspheres in a single Gaussian beam optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathi, Praveen; Iyengar, Shruthi Subhash; Lakkegowda, Yogesha; Bhattacharya, Sarbari; Ananthamurthy, Sharath

    2016-09-01

    Interactions between trapped microspheres have been studied in two geometries so far: (i) using line optical tweezers and (ii) in traps using two counter propagating laser beams. In both trap geometries, the stable inter bead separations have been attributed to optical binding. One could also trap two such beads in a single beam Gaussian laser trap. While there are reports that address this configuration through theoretical or simulation based treatments, there has so far been no detailed experimental work that measures the interactions. In this work, we have recorded simultaneously the fluctuation spectra of two beads trapped along the laser propagation direction in a single Gaussian beam trap by measuring the back scattered signal from the trapping and a tracking laser beam that are counter propagating . The backscattering from the trapping laser monitors the bead encountered earlier in the propagation path. The counter propagating tracking laser, on the other hand, is used to monitor the fluctuations of the second bead. Detection is by using quadrant photo detectors placed at either end. The autocorrelation functions of both beads reveal marked departures from that obtained when there is only one bead in the trap. Moreover, the fall-off profiles of the autocorrelation indicates the presence of more than one relaxation time. This indicates a method of detecting the presence of a second bead in a trap without directly carrying out measurements on it. Further, a careful analysis of the relaxation times could also reveal the nature of interactions between the beads.

  18. Fabrication and optical trapping of handling structures for reconfigurable microsphere magnifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Vizsnyiczai, Gaszton; Búzás, András

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of microfabricated supporting structures for maneuvering and supporting polystyrene microspheres for use as magnifying lenses in imaging applications. The supporting structure isolates the trapping light from the magnifier, hence avoiding direct radiation to the sample being...... observed which could be damaging, especially for biological specimens. Using an optical trapping setup, we demonstrate the actuation of a microsphere not held by optical traps, and show the possibility of imaging through such microspheres. © (2013) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation...

  19. Hexapole-compensated magneto-optical trap on a mesoscopic atom chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jöllenbeck, S.; Mahnke, J.; Randoll, R.

    2011-01-01

    Magneto-optical traps on atom chips are usually restricted to small atomic samples due to a limited capture volume caused primarily by distorted field configurations. Here we present a magneto-optical trap based on a millimeter-sized wire structure which generates a magnetic field with minimized...... distortions. Together with the loading from a high-flux two-dimensional magneto-optical trap, we achieve a loading rate of 8.4×1010 atoms/s and maximum number of 8.7×109 captured atoms. The wire structure is placed outside of the vacuum to enable a further adaptation to new scientific objectives. Since all...

  20. Two-dimensional novel optical lattices with multi-well traps for cold atoms or molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junfa Lu; Xianming Ji; Jianping Yin

    2006-01-01

    We propose some new schemes to constitute two-dimensional (2D) array of multi-well optical dipole traps for cold atoms (or molecules) by using an optical system consisting of a binary π-phase grating and a 2D array of rectangle microlens. We calculate the intensity distribution of each optical well in 2D array of multi-well traps and its geometric parameters and so on. The proposed 2D array of multi-well traps can be used to form novel 2D optical lattices with cold atoms (or molecules), and form various novel optical crystals with cold atoms (or molecules), or to perform quantum computing and quantum information processing on an atom chip, even to realize an array of all-optical multi-well atomic (or molecular) BoseEinstein condensates (BECs) on an all-optical integrated atom (or molecule) chip.

  1. Comparative numerical studies of ion traps with integrated optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Podoliak, Nina; Keller, Matthias; Horak, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We study a range of radio-frequency ion trap geometries and investigate the effect of integrating dielectric cavity mirrors on their trapping potential. We aim to identify ion trap and cavity configurations that are best suited for achieving small cavity volumes and thus large ion-photon coupling as required for scalable quantum information networks. In particular, we investigate the trapping potential distortions caused by the dielectric material of the cavity mirrors for different mirror orientations with respect to the trapping electrodes, as well as for mirror misalignment. We also analyze the effect of the mirror material properties such as dielectric constants and surface conductivity, and study the effect of surface charges on the mirrors. The smallest trapping potential distortions are found if the cavities are aligned along the major symmetry axis of the electrode geometries. These cavity configurations also appear to be the most stable with respect to any mirror misalignment.

  2. Optical manipulation of aerosol droplets using a holographic dual and single beam trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Šiler, Martin; Ježek, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Zemánek, Pavel

    2013-11-15

    We present optical trapping and manipulation of pure water and salt water airborne droplets of various sizes ranging from sub-micrometers up to several tens of micrometers in a holographic dual and single beam trap. In the dual beam trap, successful fusion of droplets as well as precise delivery of many droplets and manipulation of multiple droplets are demonstrated. Furthermore, employing the transfer of the orbital angular momentum of light from Laguerre-Gaussian beams, we show that the water droplets orbit around the beam propagation axis and their tangential speed can be controlled by beam waist magnitude. We also demonstrate that sub-micrometer sized pure water droplets can be trapped and manipulated by a single beam trap with a relatively low numerical aperture. In this case, multiple stable trapping positions were observed, both theoretically and experimentally, which were due to the optical intensity oscillations in the focal region of the laser beam.

  3. Enhanced and selective optical trapping in a slot-graphite photonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Aravind; Huang, Ningfeng; Wu, Shao-Hua; Martínez, Luis Javier; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2016-10-03

    Applicability of optical trapping tools for nanomanipulation is limited by the available laser power and trap efficiency. We utilized the strong confinement of light in a slot-graphite photonic crystal to develop high-efficiency parallel trapping over a large area. The stiffness is 35 times higher than our previously demonstrated on-chip, near field traps. We demonstrate the ability to trap both dielectric and metallic particles of sub-micron size. We find that the growth kinetics of nanoparticle arrays on the slot-graphite template depends on particle size. This difference is exploited to selectively trap one type of particle out of a binary colloidal mixture, creating an efficient optical sieve. This technique has rich potential for analysis, diagnostics, and enrichment and sorting of microscopic entities.

  4. Three-dimensional imaging and force characterization of multiple trapped particles in low NA counterpropagating optical traps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindballe, T. B.; Kristensen, M. V.; Kylling, A. P.;

    2011-01-01

    An experimental characterization of the three-dimensional (3D) position and force constants, acting on one or multiple trapped polystyrene beads in a weak counterpropagating beams geometry is reported. The 3D position of the trapped particles is tracked by imaging with two synchronized CMOS cameras....... The maximal transverse stiffnesses, is about 0.1 pN/mm per mW at a beam waist separation of 67 mm whereas the longitudinal stiffness is approximately 20 times lower. The experimental findings are in reasonable agreement with a recent physical-geometric optics calculation....

  5. Optical Trapping Techniques Applied to the Study of Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morss, Andrew J.

    Optical tweezers allow for manipulating micron-sized objects using pN level optical forces. In this work, we use an optical trapping setup to aid in three separate experiments, all related to the physics of the cellular membrane. In the first experiment, in conjunction with Brian Henslee, we use optical tweezers to allow for precise positioning and control of cells in suspension to evaluate the cell size dependence of electroporation. Theory predicts that all cells porate at a transmembrane potential VTMof roughly 1 V. The Schwann equation predicts that the transmembrane potential depends linearly on the cell radius r, thus predicting that cells should porate at threshold electric fields that go as 1/r. The threshold field required to induce poration is determined by applying a low voltage pulse to the cell and then applying additional pulses of greater and greater magnitude, checking for poration at each step using propidium iodide dye. We find that, contrary to expectations, cells do not porate at a constant value of the transmembrane potential but at a constant value of the electric field which we find to be 692 V/cm for K562 cells. Delivering precise dosages of nanoparticles into cells is of importance for assessing toxicity of nanoparticles or for genetic research. In the second experiment, we conduct nano-electroporation—a novel method of applying precise doses of transfection agents to cells—by using optical tweezers in conjunction with a confocal microscope to manipulate cells into contact with 100 nm wide nanochannels. This work was done in collaboration with Pouyan Boukany of Dr. Lee's group. The small cross sectional area of these nano channels means that the electric field within them is extremely large, 60 MV/m, which allows them to electrophoretically drive transfection agents into the cell. We find that nano electroporation results in excellent dose control (to within 10% in our experiments) compared to bulk electroporation. We also find that

  6. Optical trapping of nanoparticles by full solid-angle focusing

    CERN Document Server

    Salakhutdinov, Vsevolod; Carbone, Luigi; Giacobino, Elisabeth; Bramati, Alberto; Leuchs, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    We propose and implement a dipole-trap for nanoparticles that is based on focusing from the full solid angle with a deep parabolic mirror. The key aspect is the generation of a linear-dipole mode. For such a mode, our calculations predict a trapping potential that is deeper and tighter than the potential obtainable with microscope objectives. We demonstrate the trapping of dot-in-rod nanoparticles. From the detected fluorescence photons we obtain intensity correlation functions of second order with $g^{(2)}(0)< 0.5$, suggesting the trapping of a single quantum emitter.

  7. Magic wavelengths for lattice trapped Rubidium four-level active optical clock

    CERN Document Server

    Zang, Xiaorun; Chen, Jingbiao

    2012-01-01

    After pumped from $5s_{1/2}$ ground state to $6p_{1/2}$ state, the population inversion between $6s_{1/2}$ and $5p_{1/2,3/2}$ will be established for Rubidium four-level active optical clock. In this paper, we calculate AC Stark shift due to lattice trapping laser which dominates the frequency shift of clock transition in lattice trapped Rubidium four-level active optical clock. Several blue detuned magic wavelengths are found that can form desired optical lattice trapping potential. When the trapping laser is tuned to the magic wavelength, with 1 MHz frequency uncertainty and 10 kW$\\cdot$cm$^{-2}$ intensity, the frequency uncertainty of clock transition due to AC Stark shift of trapping laser, is estimated to be below 0.05 mHz.

  8. Alternative modes for optical trapping and manipulation using counter-propagating shaped beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palima, Darwin; Lindballe, T.B.; Kristensen, M.V.

    2011-01-01

    Counter-propagating beams have enabled the first stable three-dimensional optical trapping of microparticles and this procedure has been enhanced and developed over the years to achieve independent and interactive manipulation of multiple particles. In this work, we analyse counter-propagating sh......Counter-propagating beams have enabled the first stable three-dimensional optical trapping of microparticles and this procedure has been enhanced and developed over the years to achieve independent and interactive manipulation of multiple particles. In this work, we analyse counter......-propagating shaped-beam traps that depart from the conventional geometry based on symmetric, coaxial counter-propagating beams. We show that projecting shaped beams with separation distances previously considered axially unstable can, in fact, enhance the axial and transverse trapping stiffnesses. We also show...... for optical trapping and manipulation using patterned counter-propagating beams, which still remains to be fully tapped....

  9. Recent Advances of Distributed Optical Fiber Raman Amplifiers in Ultra Wide Wavelength Division Multiplexing Telecommunication Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd El–Naser A. Mohamed

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, many research works have been focused on the fiber optic devices for optical communication systems. One of the main interests is on the optical amplifiers to boost a weak signal in the communication systems. In order to overcome the limitations imposed by electrical regeneration, a means of optical amplification was sought. The competing technology emerged: the first was Raman amplification. One reason was that the optical pump powers required for Raman amplification were significantly higher than that for Erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA, and the pump laser technology could not reliably deliver the required powers. However, with the improvement of pump laser technology Raman amplification is now an important means of expanding span transmission reach and capacity. We have deeply studied an analytical model for optical distributed Raman amplifiers (DRAs in the transmission signal power and pump power within Raman amplification technique in co-pumped, counter-pumped, and bi-directional pumping direction configurations through different types of fiber cable media. The validity of this model was confirmed by using experimental data and numerical simulations.

  10. Pulse Compression And Raman Amplification In Optical Fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Kevin C.

    1988-06-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations on Raman amplification in fibres have been carried out and simultaneous amplification and pulse compression observed. With a fibre design optimised for amplification high gain may be obtained at practical pump power levels.

  11. Enhanced and preferential optical trapping in a slot-graphite photonic crystal (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Aravind; Povinelli, Michelle L.; Wu, Shao-Hua; Huang, Ningfeng

    2016-09-01

    Optical trapping serves as a powerful tool for the manipulation of matter on the nanoscale and ultra-precise measurement of weak forces. However, the applicability of these tools is limited by the available laser power and trap efficiency. We utilized the strong confinement of light in a slot-graphite photonic crystal to develop high-efficiency parallel trapping over a large area. The stiffness is several orders of magnitude higher than conventional optical tweezers and two orders of magnitude higher than our previously demonstrated on-chip, near field traps. We demonstrate the ability to trap both dielectric and metallic nanoparticles of sub-micron size. We find that the growth kinetics of nanoparticle arrays on the slot-graphite template depends on particle size. Smaller particles diffuse more, more readily occupying the available trap sites and inhibiting the trapping of larger particles. Smaller particles also sink more into the holes in the photonic crystal, resulting in stronger mechanical confinement and a deeper potential well. We use these differences to selectively trap one type of particle out of a binary colloidal mixture, creating an efficient optical sieve. This technique has rich potential in the fields of trace analysis, optical diagnostics, and enrichment and sorting of microscopic entities and molecules.

  12. Low frequency Raman scattering for high resolution low temperature optical fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabia, M. K.; Jurdyc, A.-M.; Le Brusq, J.; Champagnon, B.; Vouagner, D.

    2017-09-01

    Raman distributed optical fiber temperature sensors are based on the intensity ratio of the anti-Stokes to the Stokes Raman band at 440 cm-1 of silica. In this paper we predict that the sensitivity of the Raman measurements for low temperatures can be improved by considering the Boson peak in the low frequency Raman scattering domain at 60 cm-1. In this way Raman temperature sensors can be performed down to cryogenic temperatures. It is further shown that the Boson peak is less dependent than the 440 cm-1 band to the polarization of light. For the usual excitation at 1550 nm the anti-Stokes Boson peak at 1536 nm is in the low loss transmission window of the silica fibers.

  13. Optical Stark effect in the four-wave mixing and stimulated Raman spectra of N2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosmuller, H.; She, C. Y.; Huo, Winifred M.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of the optical Stark effect on spectral line shapes in four-wave-mixing Raman spectroscopy (FWMRS) and stimulated Raman spectroscopy (SRS) is investigated experimentally and theoretically. Using an experimental setup capable of rapid alternation between the simultaneous measurement of coherent Stokes Raman spectroscopy and inverse Raman spectroscopy at low and high intensities, together with a sophisticated frequency reference scheme, it was possible to perform a rather direct comparison between Stark-broadened and non-Stark-broadened spectra of both classes of Raman spectroscopies. The results demonstrate that SRS spectra show more Stark shift and broadening than their FWMRS counterparts. A discrepancy with theoretical results is pointed out, and an attempt is made to explain it.

  14. Studying the distribution of deep Raman spectroscopy signals using liquid tissue phantoms with varying optical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardaki, Martha Z; Gardner, Benjamin; Stone, Nicholas; Matousek, Pavel

    2015-08-01

    In this study we employed large volume liquid tissue phantoms, consisting of a scattering agent (Intralipid), an absorption agent (Indian ink) and a synthesized calcification powder (calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP)) similar to that found in cancerous tissues (e.g. breast and prostate), to simulate human tissues. We studied experimentally the magnitude and origin of Raman signals in a transmission Raman geometry as a function of optical properties of the medium and the location of calcifications within the phantom. The goal was to inform the development of future noninvasive cancer screening applications in vivo. The results provide insight into light propagation and Raman scattering distribution in deep Raman measurements, exploring also the effect of the variation of relative absorbance of laser and Raman photons within the phantoms. Most notably when modeling breast and prostate tissues it follows that maximum signals is obtained from the front and back faces of the tissue with the central region contributing less to the measured spectrum.

  15. Fiber optic direct Raman imaging system based on a hollow-core fiber bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, S.; Katagiri, T.; Matsuura, Y.

    2015-03-01

    A Raman imaging system which combined a hollow fiber bundle and a direct imaging technique was constructed for high-speed endoscopic Raman imaging. The hollow fiber bundle is fabricated by depositing a silver thin film on the inner surface of pre-drawn glass capillary bundle. It performs as a fiber optic probe which transmits a Raman image with high signal-to-noise ratio because the propagating light is confined into the air core inducing little light scattering. The field of view on the sample is uniformly irradiated by the excitation laser light via the probe. The back-scattered image is collected by the probe and captured directly by an image sensor. A pair of thin film tunable filters is used to select target Raman band. This imaging system enables flexible and high-speed Raman imaging of biological tissues.

  16. Observation of cold Rb{sub 2} molecules trapped in an optical dipole trap using a laser-pulse-train technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menegatti, Carlos R.; Marangoni, Bruno S.; Marcassa, Luis G. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 369, 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-11-15

    In this work, we have developed and characterized a laser-pulse-train technique to observe cold Rb{sub 2} molecules trapped in an optical dipole trap. The molecules are produced in a magneto-optical trap, and then loaded into a crossed optical dipole trap. The time evolution of the molecular population is obtained by applying a laser pulse train, which photoionizes the ground-state molecules through intermediate molecular bands. Our results show that this technique allows us to obtain a faster data acquisition rate of the time evolution of the molecule population than other techniques.

  17. Scaling the Raman Gain Coefficient of Optical Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Bromage, J; Leng, L

    2002-01-01

    Scaling rules for the Raman gain coefficient are provided with emphasis on the effective area and wavelength dependence. Translation from measurements made at one pump wavelength to other pump wavelengths is demonstrated.......Scaling rules for the Raman gain coefficient are provided with emphasis on the effective area and wavelength dependence. Translation from measurements made at one pump wavelength to other pump wavelengths is demonstrated....

  18. Directional Raman scattering from single molecules in the feed gaps of optical antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongxing; Zhu, Wenqi; Best, Michael D; Camden, Jon P; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2013-05-08

    Controlling light from single emitters is an overarching theme of nano-optics. Antennas are routinely used to modify the angular emission patterns of radio wave sources. "Optical antennas" translate these principles to visible and infrared wavelengths and have been recently used to modify fluorescence from single quantum dots and single molecules. Understanding the properties of single molecules, however, would be advanced were one able to observe their vibrational spectra through Raman scattering in a very reproducible manner but it is a hugely challenging task, as Raman scattering cross sections are very weak. Here we measure for the first time the highly directional emission patterns of Raman scattering from single molecules in the feed gaps of optical antennas fabricated on a chip. More than a thousand single molecule events are observed, revealing that an unprecedented near-unity fraction of optical antennas have single molecule sensitivity.

  19. QUANTITATIVE DETECTION OF ENVIRONMENTALLY IMPORTANT DYES USING DIODE LASER/FIBER-OPTIC RAMAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    A compact diode laser/fiber-optic Raman spectrometer is used for quantitative detection of environmentally important dyes. This system is based on diode laser excitation at 782 mm, fiber optic probe technology, an imaging spectrometer, and state-of-the-art scientific CCD camera. ...

  20. Quantifying Force and Viscoelasticity Inside Living Cells Using an Active–Passive Calibrated Optical Trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Christine M.; Maes, Josep; Oddershede, Lene

    2017-01-01

    -controlled fluidic environment implies that the physical properties of the liquid, most notably the viscosity, are known and the fluidic environment can, for calibrational purposes, be treated as a simple liquid. In vivo, however, optical tweezers have primarily been used as a tool of manipulation and not so often...... for precise quantitative force measurements, due to the unknown value of the spring constant of the optical trap formed within the cell’s viscoelastic cytoplasm.Here, we describe amethod for utilizing optical tweezers for quantitative in vivo force measurements. The experimental protocol and the protocol...... for data analysis rely on two types of experiments, passive observation of the thermal motion of a trapped object inside a living cell, followed by observations of the response of the trapped object when subject to controlled oscillations of the optical trap. One advantage of this calibration method...

  1. Deep cooling of optically trapped atoms implemented by magnetic levitation without transverse confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Zhou, Tianwei; Zhai, Yueyang; Xiang, Jinggang; Luan, Tian; Huang, Qi; Yang, Shifeng; Xiong, Wei; Chen, Xuzong

    2017-05-01

    We report a setup for the deep cooling of atoms in an optical trap. The deep cooling is implemented by eliminating the influence of gravity using specially constructed magnetic coils. Compared to the conventional method of generating a magnetic levitating force, the lower trap frequency achieved in our setup provides a lower limit of temperature and more freedoms to Bose gases with a simpler solution. A final temperature as low as ˜ 6 nK is achieved in the optical trap, and the atomic density is decreased by nearly two orders of magnitude during the second stage of evaporative cooling. This deep cooling of optically trapped atoms holds promise for many applications, such as atomic interferometers, atomic gyroscopes, and magnetometers, as well as many basic scientific research directions, such as quantum simulations and atom optics.

  2. Efficient optical trapping of CdTe quantum dots by femtosecond laser pulses

    KAUST Repository

    Chiang, Weiyi

    2014-12-11

    The development in optical trapping and manipulation has been showing rapid progress, most of it is in the small particle sizes in nanometer scales, substituting the conventional continuous-wave lasers with high-repetition-rate ultrashort laser pulse train and nonlinear optical effects. Here, we evaluate two-photon absorption in optical trapping of 2.7 nm-sized CdTe quantum dots (QDs) with high-repetition-rate femtosecond pulse train by probing laser intensity dependence of both Rayleigh scattering image and the two-photon-induced luminescence spectrum of the optically trapped QDs. The Rayleigh scattering imaging indicates that the two-photon absorption (TPA) process enhances trapping ability of the QDs. Similarly, a nonlinear increase of the two-photon-induced luminescence with the incident laser intensity fairly indicates the existence of the TPA process.

  3. Laser-Based Optical Trap for Remote Sampling of Interplanetary and Atmospheric Particulate Matter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase 1 of this study intends to leverage advances in laser optical trapping technology in order to study the feasibility of a system that could remotely capture a...

  4. Dual focused coherent beams for three-dimensional optical trapping and continuous rotation of metallic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohao; Cheng, Chang; Zhang, Yao; Lei, Hongxiang; Li, Baojun

    2016-07-01

    Metallic nanoparticles and nanowires are extremely important for nanoscience and nanotechnology. Techniques to optically trap and rotate metallic nanostructures can enable their potential applications. However, because of the destabilizing effects of optical radiation pressure, the optical trapping of large metallic particles in three dimensions is challenging. Additionally, the photothermal issues associated with optical rotation of metallic nanowires have far prevented their practical applications. Here, we utilize dual focused coherent beams to realize three-dimensional (3D) optical trapping of large silver particles. Continuous rotation of silver nanowires with frequencies measured in several hertz is also demonstrated based on interference-induced optical vortices with very low local light intensity. The experiments are interpreted by numerical simulations and calculations.

  5. Non-spherical gold nanoparticles trapped in optical tweezers: shape matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Šiler, Martin; Trojek, Jan; Chvátal, Lukáš; Karásek, Vítězslav; Zemánek, Pavel

    2015-04-06

    We present the results of a theoretical analysis focused on three-dimensional optical trapping of non-spherical gold nanoparticles using a tightly focused laser beam (i.e. optical tweezers). We investigate how the wavelength of the trapping beam enhances trapping stiffness and determines the stable orientation of nonspherical nanoparticles in the optical trap which reveals the optimal trapping wavelength. We consider nanoparticles with diameters being between 20 nm and 254 nm illuminated by a highly focused laser beam at wavelength 1064 nm and compare our results based on the coupled-dipole method with published theoretical and experimental data. We demonstrate that by considering the non-spherical morphology of the nanoparticle we can explain the experimentally observed three-dimensional trapping of plasmonic nanoparticles with size higher than 170 nm. These results will contribute to a better understanding of the trapping and alignment of real metal nanoparticles in optical tweezers and their applications as optically controllable nanosources of heat or probes of weak forces and torques.

  6. A study of aliphatic amino acids using simulated vibrational circular dichroism and Raman optical activity spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Ganesan, Aravindhan; Wang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Vibrational optical activity (VOA) spectra, such as vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra, of aliphatic amino acids are simulated using density functional theory (DFT) methods in both gas phase (neutral form) and solution (zwitterionic form), together with their respective infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of the amino acids. The DFT models, which are validated by excellent agreements with the available experimental Raman and ROA spectra of alanine in solution, are employed to study other aliphatic amino acids. The inferred (IR) intensive region (below 2000 cm-1) reveals the signature of alkyl side chains, whereas the Raman intensive region (above 3000 cm-1) contains the information of the functional groups in the amino acids. Furthermore, the chiral carbons of the amino acids (except for glycine) dominate the VCD and ROA spectra in the gas phase, but the methyl group vibrations produce stronger VCD and ROA signals in solution. The C-H related asymmetric vibrations domina...

  7. Optically induced conical intersections in traps for ultracold atoms and molecules.

    OpenAIRE

    Wallis, A.O.G.; Hutson, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    We show that conical intersections can be created in laboratory coordinates by dressing a parabolic trap for ultracold atoms or molecules with a combination of optical and static magnetic fields. The resulting ring trap can support single-particle states with half-integer rotational quantization and many-particle states with persistent flow. Two well-separated atomic or molecular states are brought into near-resonance by an optical field and tuned across each other with an inhomogeneous magne...

  8. Optical trapping via guided resonance modes in a Slot-Suzuki-phase photonic crystal lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Martínez, Luis Javier; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2012-03-12

    A novel photonic crystal lattice is proposed for trapping a two-dimensional array of particles. The lattice is created by introducing a rectangular slot in each unit cell of the Suzuki-Phase lattice to enhance the light confinement of guided resonance modes. Large quality factors on the order of 10⁵ are predicted in the lattice. A significant decrease of the optical power required for optical trapping can be achieved compared to our previous design.

  9. Raman imaging of carious lesions using a hollow optical fiber probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Eriko; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2008-08-10

    Raman spectroscopy using a hollow optical fiber probe with a glass ball lens at the distal end is proposed for detection of early caries lesions. Raman spectroscopy on carious lesions of extracted teeth showed that the probe enables measurement with a high signal-to-noise ratio when combined with a ball lens with a high refractive index. The proposed probe and lens combination detects changes in Raman spectra caused by morphological differences between sound and carious enamel. We also obtained a high-contrast image of an early carious lesion by scanning the tooth surface with the probe.

  10. Multivariate reference technique for quantitative analysis of fiber-optic tissue Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergholt, Mads Sylvest; Duraipandian, Shiyamala; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-12-03

    We report a novel method making use of multivariate reference signals of fused silica and sapphire Raman signals generated from a ball-lens fiber-optic Raman probe for quantitative analysis of in vivo tissue Raman measurements in real time. Partial least-squares (PLS) regression modeling is applied to extract the characteristic internal reference Raman signals (e.g., shoulder of the prominent fused silica boson peak (~130 cm(-1)); distinct sapphire ball-lens peaks (380, 417, 646, and 751 cm(-1))) from the ball-lens fiber-optic Raman probe for quantitative analysis of fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy. To evaluate the analytical value of this novel multivariate reference technique, a rapid Raman spectroscopy system coupled with a ball-lens fiber-optic Raman probe is used for in vivo oral tissue Raman measurements (n = 25 subjects) under 785 nm laser excitation powers ranging from 5 to 65 mW. An accurate linear relationship (R(2) = 0.981) with a root-mean-square error of cross validation (RMSECV) of 2.5 mW can be obtained for predicting the laser excitation power changes based on a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation, which is superior to the normal univariate reference method (RMSE = 6.2 mW). A root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 2.4 mW (R(2) = 0.985) can also be achieved for laser power prediction in real time when we applied the multivariate method independently on the five new subjects (n = 166 spectra). We further apply the multivariate reference technique for quantitative analysis of gelatin tissue phantoms that gives rise to an RMSEP of ~2.0% (R(2) = 0.998) independent of laser excitation power variations. This work demonstrates that multivariate reference technique can be advantageously used to monitor and correct the variations of laser excitation power and fiber coupling efficiency in situ for standardizing the tissue Raman intensity to realize quantitative analysis of tissue Raman measurements in vivo, which is particularly appealing in

  11. Optical diagnosis of dengue virus infection in human blood serum using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, M.; Bilal, M.; Anwar, S.; Rehman, A.; Ahmed, M.

    2013-03-01

    We present the optical diagnosis of dengue virus infection in human blood serum using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra were acquired from 18 blood serum samples using a laser at 532 nm as the excitation source. A multivariate regression model based on partial least-squares regression is developed that uses Raman spectra to predict dengue infection with leave-one-sample-out cross validation. The prediction of dengue infection by our model yields correlation coefficient r2 values of 0.9998 between the predicted and reference clinical results. The model was tested for six unknown human blood sera and found to be 100% accurate in accordance with the clinical results.

  12. Characterisation of a fibre optic Raman probe within a hypodermic needle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iping Petterson, Ingeborg E; Day, John C C; Fullwood, Leanne M; Gardner, Benjamin; Stone, Nick

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the first use of a multifibre Raman probe that fits inside the bore of a hypodermic needle. A Raman probe containing multiple collection fibres provides improved signal collection efficiency in biological samples compared with a previous two-fibre design. Furthermore, probe performance (signal-to-noise ratios) compared favourably with the performance achieved in previous Raman microscope experiments able to distinguish between benign lymph nodes, primary malignancies in lymph nodes and secondary malignancies in lymph nodes. The experimental measurements presented here give an indication of the sampling volume of the Raman needle probe in lymphoid tissues. Liquid tissue phantoms were used that contained scattering medium encompassing a range of scattering properties similar to those of a variety of tissue types, including lymph node tissues. To validate the appropriateness of the phantoms, the sampling depth of the probe was also measured in excised lymph node tissue. More than 50 % of Raman photons collected were found to originate from between the tip of the needle and a depth of 500 μm into the tissue. The needle probe presented here achieves spectral quality comparable to that in numerous studies previously demonstrating Raman disease discrimination. It is expected that this approach could achieve targeted subcutaneous tissue measurements and be viable for use for the in vivo Raman diagnostics of solid organs located within a few centimetres below the skin's surface. Graphical Abstract Schematic of multi-fibre Raman needle probe with disposible tips and proximal optical filtration.

  13. Single beam optical trapping integrated in a confocal microscope for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, K; Brakenhoff, G J

    1991-01-01

    Confocal microscopy is very useful in biology because of its three dimensional imaging capacities and has proven to be an excellent tool to study the 3D organization of, for instance, cell structures. This property of confocal microscopy makes it also very suitable for observation during guidance of the three dimensional manipulation of single cells or cell elements. Therefore we decided to integrate a confocal microscope and a single beam optical manipulator into a single instrument. The advantage of optical manipulation over mechanical techniques is that it is non-invasive and therefore may be applied on living (micro-) organisms and cells. The creation of an effective single beam optical trap requires the use of a high numerical aperture (N.A.) objective to focus the laser beam. In this paper we briefly discuss the vertical or axial force exerted on a sphere in a single beam trap. The axial force on a sphere placed on the optical axis, caused by reflection and refraction, is calculated applying a electromagnetic vector diffraction theory to determine the field distribution in the focal region. One of the results is that the particle also experiences a vertical trapping force towards the focusing lens when it is in the strongly convergent part of the field in addition to the known negative signed trapping force in the divergent part of the field. Further we describe an instrumental approach to realize optical trapping in which the optical trap position is controlled by moving the focusing objective only.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Methods of calibration to optical trapping force upon non-spherical cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youli Yu; Zhenxi Zhang; Zheng Li; Xiaoli Wang

    2006-01-01

    The dynamical equation of a trapping cell is solved to find calibration methods for the trapping force, and two methods are compared by synthetic experiment data. Results indicate that: Boltzmann distribution method (BDM) is available for the force calibration of non-spherical or anisotropic cells in arbitrary trap potential; the mean square displacement method (MSDM) is available only for a symmetric harmonic optical trap. The spatial resolution requirement of the calibration system is about a nanometer. The results agree with the reported experiments.

  15. Motion analysis of optically trapped particles and cells using 2D Fourier analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Martin Verner; Ahrendt, Peter; Lindballe, Thue Bjerring;

    2012-01-01

    Motion analysis of optically trapped objects is demonstrated using a simple 2D Fourier transform technique. The displacements of trapped objects are determined directly from the phase shift between the Fourier transform of subsequent images. Using end-and side-view imaging, the stiffness...... of the trap is determined in three dimensions. The Fourier transform method is simple to implement and applicable in cases where the trapped object changes shape or where the lighting conditions change. This is illustrated by tracking a fluorescent particle and a myoblast cell, with subsequent determination...

  16. Radio Frequency Magneto-Optical Trapping of CaF with High Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderegg, Loïc; Augenbraun, Benjamin L.; Chae, Eunmi; Hemmerling, Boerge; Hutzler, Nicholas R.; Ravi, Aakash; Collopy, Alejandra; Ye, Jun; Ketterle, Wolfgang; Doyle, John M.

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate significantly improved magneto-optical trapping of molecules using a very slow cryogenic beam source and either rf modulated or dc magnetic fields. The rf magneto-optical trap (MOT) confines 1.0 (3 )×105 CaF molecules at a density of 7 (3 )×106 cm-3 , which is an order of magnitude greater than previous molecular MOTs. Near Doppler-limited temperatures of 340 (20 ) μ K are attained. The achieved density enables future work to directly load optical tweezers and create optical arrays for quantum simulation.

  17. Magneto-optical trapping forces for atoms and molecules with complex level structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarbutt, M. R.

    2015-01-01

    Laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping of molecules typically involves multiple transitions driven by several laser frequencies. We analyze how magneto-optical trapping forces depend on the angular momenta, Fl and Fu, and the g-factors, gl and gu, of the lower and upper states. When {{F}l}\\gt {{F}u} the polarizations must be reversed relative to cases where {{F}u}≥slant {{F}l}. The correct choice of circular polarization depends on the sign of gu but not on the sign of gl. If gu is zero there is no trapping force, and the trapping force is very weak whenever gu is small compared to gl, which it usually is when the cooling transition is the 2Σ to 2{{\\Pi }1/2} transition of a molecule. For some molecules, mixing of the excited 2{{\\Pi }1/2} state with a nearby 2Σ excited state can greatly increase gu, leading to stronger trapping forces. A strong trapping force can also be produced by rapidly and synchronously reversing both the magnetic field and the laser polarizations. We simulate a recent experiment on magneto-optical trapping of SrF molecules, and suggest that an alternative choice of laser beam polarizations will strengthen the trapping force.

  18. Observation of single neutral atoms in a large-magnetic-gradient vapour-cell magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; He Jun; Qiu Ying; Yang Bao-Dong; Zhao Jiang-Yan; Zhang Tian-Cai; Wang Jun-Min

    2008-01-01

    Single caesium atoms in a large-magnetic-gradient vapour-cell magneto-optical trap have been identified. The trapping of individual atoms is marked by the steps in fluorescence signal corresponding to the capture or loss of single atoms. The typical magnetic gradient is about 29 mT/cm, which evidently reduces the capture rate of magneto-optical trap.

  19. Construction of a high resolution microscope with conventional and holographic optical trapping capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Jacqualine; Hong, Weili; Mershon, Leslie; Vershinin, Michael

    2013-04-22

    High resolution microscope systems with optical traps allow for precise manipulation of various refractive objects, such as dielectric beads (1) or cellular organelles (2,3), as well as for high spatial and temporal resolution readout of their position relative to the center of the trap. The system described herein has one such "traditional" trap operating at 980 nm. It additionally provides a second optical trapping system that uses a commercially available holographic package to simultaneously create and manipulate complex trapping patterns in the field of view of the microscope (4,5) at a wavelength of 1,064 nm. The combination of the two systems allows for the manipulation of multiple refractive objects at the same time while simultaneously conducting high speed and high resolution measurements of motion and force production at nanometer and piconewton scale.

  20. Numerical analysis of an optical nanoscale particles trapping device based on a slotted nanobeam cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Senlin; Yong, Zhengdong; Shi, Yaocheng; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    A slotted nanobeam cavity (SNC) is utilized to trap a polystyrene (PS) particle with a radius of only 2 nm. The carefully designed SNC shows an ultrahigh Q factor of 4.5 × 107 while maintaining a small mode volume of 0.067(λ/nwater)3. Strongly enhanced optical trapping force is numerically demonstrated when the 2 nm PS particle is introduced into the central, slotted part of the SNC. In the vertical direction, the numerical calculation results show that a trapping stiffness of 0.4 pN/(nm · mW) around the equilibrium position and a trapping potential barrier of ~2000 kBT/mW can be reached. To our best knowledge, the trapping capability (trapping stiffness and trapping potential barrier) of the proposed structure significantly outperforms the theoretical results of those in previously reported work. In addition, the SNC system does not suffer from the metal induced heat issue that restricts the performance of state-of-the-art optical trapping systems involving plasmonic enhancement. Based on the proposed cavity, applications such as lab-on-a-chip platforms for nanoscale particle trapping and analysis can be expected in future. PMID:27786248

  1. Numerical analysis of an optical nanoscale particles trapping device based on a slotted nanobeam cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Senlin; Yong, Zhengdong; Shi, Yaocheng; He, Sailing

    2016-10-01

    A slotted nanobeam cavity (SNC) is utilized to trap a polystyrene (PS) particle with a radius of only 2 nm. The carefully designed SNC shows an ultrahigh Q factor of 4.5 × 107 while maintaining a small mode volume of 0.067(λ/nwater)3. Strongly enhanced optical trapping force is numerically demonstrated when the 2 nm PS particle is introduced into the central, slotted part of the SNC. In the vertical direction, the numerical calculation results show that a trapping stiffness of 0.4 pN/(nm · mW) around the equilibrium position and a trapping potential barrier of ~2000 kBT/mW can be reached. To our best knowledge, the trapping capability (trapping stiffness and trapping potential barrier) of the proposed structure significantly outperforms the theoretical results of those in previously reported work. In addition, the SNC system does not suffer from the metal induced heat issue that restricts the performance of state-of-the-art optical trapping systems involving plasmonic enhancement. Based on the proposed cavity, applications such as lab-on-a-chip platforms for nanoscale particle trapping and analysis can be expected in future.

  2. Submillikelvin Dipolar Molecules in a Radio-Frequency Magneto-Optical Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinecker, Matthew; Norrgard, Eric; McCarron, Daniel; Tarbutt, Michael; Demille, David

    2016-05-01

    The rich level structures of diatomic molecules enable a wide range of experiments in ultracold chemistry, precision measurement, and quantum simulation, but this same structure poses challenges in laser cooling and trapping. Here we present a scheme for magneto-optically trapping SrF molecules by rapidly and synchronously reversing the trapping laser polarizations and the applied magnetic field gradient to destabilize optical dark states. We achieve trapping of SrF at temperatures one order of magnitude lower and phase-space densities 3 orders of magnitude higher than obtained previously with laser-cooled molecules. The number of molecules and trap lifetime are also improved by loading the trap with high laser power and then reducing the power for long-term trapping. With this procedure, temperatures as low as 400 μK are achieved. We are currently pursuing several approaches to increase the phase-space density of the trapped sample, including applying sub-Doppler cooling and improving the efficiency of the laser slowing stage, prior to loading the molecules into a conservative trap. This work is supported by ARO and ARO (MURI). E. B. N. acknowledges support from NSF GRFP.

  3. Simultaneous three-dimensional tracking of individual signals from multi-trap optical tweezers using fast and accurate photodiode detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Dino; Nader, S; Reihani, S; Oddershede, Lene B

    2014-09-22

    Multiple-beam optical traps facilitate advanced trapping geometries and exciting discoveries. However, the increased manipulation capabilities come at the price of more challenging position and force detection. Due to unrivaled bandwidth and resolution, photodiode based detection is preferred over camera based detection in most single/dual-beam optical traps assays. However, it has not been trivial to implement photodiode based detection for multiple-beam optical traps. Here, we present a simple and efficient method based on spatial filtering for parallel photodiode detection of multiple traps. The technique enables fast and accurate 3D force and distance detection of multiple objects simultaneously manipulated by multiple-beam optical tweezers.

  4. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Michael J.; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications. PMID:23945738

  5. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    CERN Document Server

    Morrissey, Michael J; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining ground in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension on this work to molecules will be introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for particular applications.

  6. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Síle Nic Chormaic

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications.

  7. Raman Amplification in WDM Optical Communication Systems: A System Perceptive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuwanshi, Sanjeev Kumar; Srinivas, Talabattula

    2016-12-01

    Statistical study on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) crosstalk has been done by many researchers while ignoring pulse walk-off effect due to analytically unsolvable nonlinear coupled equations. To our knowledge there is no treatise, which deals with pulse walk-off effect except statistically for few cases in case of wideband WDM Raman amplification systems. In this paper, we investigate the effect of group velocity dispersion induced crosstalk. We have tried to solve nonlinear coupled Raman gain equations for few channels by using the numerical technique called finite difference method. Finally we have provided results of the simulation for few cases. It is ever known that pulse walk-off effect (time-dependent effect) is responsible for transient effects hence the modeling has also done in this paper to simulate the effect of abrupt channel addition and removal response.

  8. Optical trapping of metallic Rayleigh particle by combined beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Ke; ZHONG Xian-qiong; XIANG An-ping

    2012-01-01

    Radiation forces and trapping stability of metallic (i.e.gold) Rayleigh particle by combined beam are analyzed,and the combined beam is formed by superimposing two partially coherent off-axis fiat-topped beams.The dependences of radiation forces on off-axis distance parameter,correlation length and particle radius are illustrated by numerical examples.The results show that there exist critical values d0,cand σ0,c for the combined beam.For 0<d ≤ d0,c or 0<σ0 ≤σ0,c the Gaussianlike intensity profile takes place at the geometrical focal plane,so that the transverse gradient force can act as restoring force.As the off-axis distance parameter increases or the correlation length decreases,the maximal intensity,the radiation force and trapping stiffness become smaller,while the transverse and longitudinal trapping ranges become larger.In comparison with a single beam,the combined beam is more favourable for trapping metallic Rayleigh particle owing to the stronger trapping stiffness and the larger trapping range.

  9. Giant magneto-optical Raman effect in a layered transition metal compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jianting; Zhang, Anmin; Fan, Jiahe; Li, Yuesheng; Wang, Xiaoqun; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E W; Zhang, Qingming

    2016-03-01

    We report a dramatic change in the intensity of a Raman mode with applied magnetic field, displaying a gigantic magneto-optical effect. Using the nonmagnetic layered material MoS2 as a prototype system, we demonstrate that the application of a magnetic field perpendicular to the layers produces a dramatic change in intensity for the out-of-plane vibrations of S atoms, but no change for the in-plane breathing mode. The distinct intensity variation between these two modes results from the effect of field-induced broken symmetry on Raman scattering cross-section. A quantitative analysis on the field-dependent integrated Raman intensity provides a unique method to precisely determine optical mobility. Our analysis is symmetry-based and material-independent, and thus the observations should be general and inspire a new branch of inelastic light scattering and magneto-optical applications.

  10. Raman selection rule of surface optical phonon in ZnS nanobelts

    KAUST Repository

    Ho, Chih-Hsiang

    2016-02-18

    We report Raman scattering results of high-quality wurtzite ZnS nanobelts (NBs) grown by chemical vapor deposition. In Raman spectrum, the ensembles of ZnS NBs exhibit first order phonon modes at 274 cm-1 and 350 cm-1, corresponding to A1/E1 transverse optical and A1/E1 longitudinal optical phonons, in addition with strong surface optical (SO) phonon mode at 329 cm-1. The existence of SO band is confirmed by its shift with different surrounding dielectric media. Polarization dependent Raman spectrum was performed on a single ZnS NB and for the first time SO phonon band has been detected on a single nanobelt. Different selection rules of SO phonon modeshown from their corresponding E1/A1 phonon modeswere attributed to the anisotropic translational symmetry breaking on the NB surface.

  11. Microlens-array-enabled on-chip optical trapping and sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xing; Sun, Yuyang; Bu, Jing; Zhu, Siwei; Yuan, X-C

    2011-01-20

    An on-chip optical trapping and sorting system composed of a microchamber and a microlens array (MLA) is demonstrated. The MLA focuses the incident light into multiple confocal spots to trap the particles within the microchamber. The SiO(2)/ZrO(2) solgel material is introduced in the fabrication of MLA for its unique optical and chemical characters. Moreover, in order to prove the effectiveness of the system, experimental demonstration of multibeam trapping and locked-in transport of micropolymer particles in the microchamber is implemented. The system may easily be integrated as microfluidic devices, offering a simple and efficient solution for optical trapping and sorting of biological particles in lab-on-a-chip technologies.

  12. Magneto-Optical Trapping of Ytterbium Atoms with a 398.9 nm Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Peng-Yi; XIONG Zhuan-Xian; LIANG Jie; HE Ling-Xiang; LU Bao-Long

    2008-01-01

    We report the realization of ytterbium magneto-optical trap (MOT) operating on the dipole-allowed 1S0 - 1P1 transition at 398.9nm. The MOT is loaded by a slowed atomic beam produced by a Zeeman slower. All seven stable isotopes of Yb atoms could be trapped separately at different laser detuning values. Over 107 174Yb atoms are collected in the MOT, whereas the atom number of fermionic isotope 171Yb is roughly 2.3 × 106 due to a lower abundance. Without the Zeeman slower, the trapped atom numbers are one order of magnitude lower.Both the even and odd isotopes are recognized as excellent candidates of optical clock transition, so the cooling and trapping of ytterbium atoms by the blue MOT is an important step for building an optical clock.

  13. [New type distributed optical fiber temperature sensor (DTS) based on Raman scattering and its' application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Feng; Liu, Hong-Lin; Zhang, Shu-Qin; Yu, Xiang-Dong; Sun, Zhong-Zhou; Jin, Shang-Zhong; Zhang, Zai-Xuan

    2013-04-01

    Basic principles, development trends and applications status of distributed optical fiber Raman temperature sensor (DTS) are introduced. Performance parameters of DTS system include the sensing optical fiber length, temperature measurement uncertainty, spatial resolution and measurement time. These parameters have a certain correlation and it is difficult to improve them at the same time by single technology. So a variety of key techniques such as Raman amplification, pulse coding technique, Raman related dual-wavelength self-correction technique and embedding optical switching technique are researched to improve the performance of the DTS system. A 1 467 nm continuous laser is used as pump laser and the light source of DTS system (1 550 nm pulse laser) is amplified. When the length of sensing optical fiber is 50 km the Raman gain is about 17 dB. Raman gain can partially compensate the transmission loss of optical fiber, so that the sensing length can reach 50 km. In DTS system using pulse coding technique, pulse laser is coded by 211 bits loop encoder and correlation calculation is used to demodulate temperature. The encoded laser signal is related, whereas the noise is not relevant. So that signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of DTS system can be improved significantly. The experiments are carried out in DTS system with single mode optical fiber and multimode optical fiber respectively. Temperature measurement uncertainty can all reach 1 degrees C. In DTS system using Raman related dual-wavelength self-correction technique, the wavelength difference of the two light sources must be one Raman frequency shift in optical fiber. For example, wavelength of the main laser is 1 550 nm and wavelength of the second laser must be 1 450 nm. Spatial resolution of DTS system is improved to 2 m by using dual-wavelength self-correction technique. Optical switch is embedded in DTS system, so that the temperature measurement channel multiply extended and the total length of the sensing

  14. Surface optical phonon-assisted electron Raman scattering in a semiconductor quantum disc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘翠红; 马本堃; 陈传誉

    2002-01-01

    We have carried out a theoretical calculation of the differential cross section for the electron Raman scatteringprocess associated with the surface optical phonon modes in a semiconductor quantum disc. Electron states are consid-ered to be confined within a quantum disc with infinite potential barriers. The optical phonon modes we have adoptedare the slab phonon modes by taking into consideration the Frohlich interaction between an electron and a phonon.The selection rules for the Raman process are given. Numerical results and a discussion are also presented for variousradii and thicknesses of the disc, and different incident radiation energies.

  15. Raman spectroscopy of optical properties in CdS thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trajić J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of CdS thin films were investigated applying atomic force microscopy (AFM and Raman spectroscopy. CdS thin films were prepared by using thermal evaporation technique under base pressure 2 x 10-5 torr. The quality of these films was investigated by AFM spectroscopy. We apply Raman scattering to investigate optical properties of CdS thin films, and reveal existence of surface optical phonon (SOP mode at 297 cm-1. Effective permittivity of mixture were modeled by Maxwell - Garnet approximation. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 45003

  16. VIBRATIONAL RAMAN OPTICAL-ACTIVITY CALCULATIONS USING LONDON ATOMIC ORBITALS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgaker, T.; Ruud, K.; Bak, Keld L.

    1994-01-01

    Ab initio calculations of Raman differential intensities are presented at the self-consistent field (SCF) level of theory. The electric dipole-electric dipole, electric dipole-magnetic dipole and electric dipole-electric quadrupole polarizability tensors are calculated at the frequency of the inc...

  17. Combining red- and blue-detuned optical traps to form a Lamb-Dicke trap for a single neutral atom

    CERN Document Server

    He, Xiaodong; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2010-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a scheme for strongly radially confining a single neutral atom in a bichromatic far-off resonance optical dipole trap(BFORT) . BFORT is composed of a blue-detuned Laguerre-Gaussian $LG^1_ 0$ beam and a red-detuned Gaussian beam. The trapping radial dimension of a single atom trapped in the Gaussian FORT can be greatly compressed by imposing a blue-detuned Laguerre-Gaussian $LG^1_ 0$ beam with moderate potential depth. By modulating the potential depth of the Gaussian FORT we observed that the resonant and parametric excitation of the oscillatory motion of a single atom in this BFORT and obtained the oscillation frequency that well fits prediction from the theoretical model. The frequency measurement shows that effective trapping dimension can be greatly sharper than that diffraction limited of microscopic objective we used. Then we show that the excess scattering rate due to imposing blue detuned light can be eliminated when single atoms is close to ground-state theoretically. So BF...

  18. Chemical characterization of single micro- and nano-particles by optical catapulting-optical trapping-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, Francisco J.; Fernández-Bravo, Angel; Javier Laserna, J.

    2014-10-01

    Spectral identification of individual micro- and nano-sized particles by the sequential intervention of optical catapulting, optical trapping and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is presented. The three techniques are used for different purposes. Optical catapulting (OC) serves to put the particulate material under inspection in aerosol form. Optical trapping (OT) permits the isolation and manipulation of individual particles from the aerosol, which are subsequently analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Once catapulted, the dynamics of particle trapping depends both on the laser beam characteristics (power and intensity gradient) and on the particle properties (size, mass and shape). Particles are stably trapped in air at atmospheric pressure and can be conveniently manipulated for a precise positioning for LIBS analysis. The spectra acquired from the individually trapped particles permit a straightforward identification of the material inspected. Variability of LIBS signal for the inspection of Ni microspheres was 30% relative standard deviation. OC-OT-LIBS permits the separation of particles in a heterogeneous mixture and the subsequent analysis of the isolated particle of interest. In order to evaluate the sensitivity of the approach, the number of absolute photons emitted by a single trapped particle was calculated. The limit of detection (LOD) for Al2O3 particles was calculated to be 200 attograms aluminium.

  19. Raman Self-Frequency Shift of Dissipative Kerr Solitons in an Optical Microresonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, Maxim; Guo, Hairun; Kordts, Arne; Brasch, Victor; Pfeiffer, Martin H P; Zervas, Michail; Geiselmann, Michael; Kippenberg, Tobias J

    2016-03-11

    The formation of temporal dissipative Kerr solitons in microresonators driven by a continuous-wave laser enables the generation of coherent, broadband, and spectrally smooth optical frequency combs as well as femtosecond pulse sources with compact form factors. Here we report the observation of a Raman-induced soliton self-frequency shift for a microresonator dissipative Kerr soliton also referred to as the frequency-locked Raman soliton. In amorphous silicon nitride microresonator-based single soliton states the Raman effect manifests itself by a spectrum that is sech^{2} in shape and whose center is spectrally redshifted from the continuous wave pump laser. The shift is theoretically described by the first-order shock term of the material's Raman response, and we infer a Raman shock time of ∼20  fs for amorphous silicon nitride. Moreover, we observe that the Raman-induced frequency shift can lead to a cancellation or overcompensation of the soliton recoil caused by the formation of a coherent dispersive wave. The observations are in agreement with numerical simulations based on the Lugiato-Lefever equation with a Raman shock term. Our results contribute to the understanding of Kerr frequency combs in the soliton regime, enable one to substantially improve the accuracy of modeling, and are relevant to the understanding of the fundamental timing jitter of microresonator solitons.

  20. A Linear Ion Trap with an Expanded Inscribed Diameter to Improve Optical Access for Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Vaishnavi; Stokes, Chris; Ferzoco, Alessandra

    2017-08-01

    We report a custom-geometry linear ion trap designed for fluorescence spectroscopy of gas-phase ions at ambient to cryogenic temperatures. Laser-induced fluorescence from trapped ions is collected from between the trapping rods, orthogonal to the excitation laser that runs along the axis of the linear ion trap. To increase optical access to the ion cloud, the diameter of the round trapping rods is 80% of the inscribed diameter, rather than the roughly 110% used to approximate purely quadrupolar electric fields. To encompass as much of the ion cloud as possible, the first collection optic has a 25.4 mm diameter and a numerical aperture of 0.6. The choice of geometry and collection optics yields 107 detected photons/s from trapped rhodamine 6G ions. The trap is coupled to a closed-cycle helium refrigerator, which in combination with two 50 Ohm heaters enables temperature control to below 25 K on the rod electrodes. The purpose of the instrument is to broaden the applicability of fluorescence spectroscopy of gas-phase ions to cases where photon emission is a minority relaxation pathway. Such studies are important to understand how the microenvironment of a chromophore influences excited state charge transfer processes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering: a new optical probe in molecular biophysics and biomedicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, J.; Wittig, B.; Bohr, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Sensitive and detailed molecular structural information plays an increasing role in molecular biophysics and molecular medicine. Therefore, vibrational spectroscopic techniques, such as Raman scattering, which provide high structural information content are of growing interest in biophysical...... of the free electrons in the metal. This effect of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) allows us to push vibrational spectroscopy to new limits in detection sensitivity, lateral resolution, and molecular structural selectivity. This opens up exciting perspectives also in molecular biospectroscopy...... and biomedical research. Raman spectroscopy can be revolutionized when the inelastic scattering process takes place in the very close vicinity of metal nanostructures. Under these conditions, strongly increased Raman signals can be obtained due to resonances between optical fields and the collective oscillations...

  2. Measurement of localized heating in the focus of an optical trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celliers, Peter M. [Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Conia, Jerome [Cell Robotics, Inc., 2715 Broadbent Parkway NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87107 (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Localized heating in the focus of an optical trap operating in water can result in a temperature rise of several kelvins. We present spatially resolved measurements of the refractive-index distribution induced by the localized heating produced in an optical trap and infer the temperature distribution. We have determined a peak temperature rise in water of 4 K in the focus of a 985-nm-wavelength 55-mW laser beam. The localized heating is directly proportional to power and the absorption coefficient. The temperature distribution is in excellent agreement with a model based on the heat equation. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  3. Investigation of HIV-1 infected and uninfected cells using the optical trapping technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombinda-Lemboumba, S.; Malabi, R.; Lugongolo, M. Y.; Thobakgale, S. L.; Manoto, S.; Mthunzi-Kufa, P.

    2017-02-01

    Optical trapping has emerged as an essential tool for manipulating single biological material and performing sophisticated spectroscopy analysis on individual cell. The optical trapping technique has been used to grab and immobilize cells from a tightly focused laser beam emitted through a high numerical aperture objective lens. Coupling optical trapping with other technologies is possible and allows stable sample trapping, while also facilitating molecular, chemical and spectroscopic analysis. For this reason, we are exploring laser trapping combined with laser spectroscopy as a potential non-invasive method of interrogating individual cells with a high degree of specificity in terms of information generated. Thus, for the delivery of as much pathological information as possible, we use a home-build optical trapping and spectroscopy system for real time probing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infected and uninfected single cells. Briefly, our experimental rig comprises an infrared continuous wave laser at 1064 nm with power output of 1.5 W, a 100X high numerical aperture oil-immersion microscope objective used to capture and immobilise individual cell samples as well as an excitation source. Spectroscopy spectral patterns obtained by the 1064 nm laser beam excitation provide information on HIV-1 infected and uninfected cells. We present these preliminary findings which may be valuable for the development of an HIV-1 point of care detection system.

  4. Optical dating in a new light: A direct, non-destructive probe of trapped electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Amit Kumar; Poolton, Nigel R J; Kook, Myungho; Jain, Mayank

    2017-09-26

    Optical dating has revolutionized our understanding of Global climate change, Earth surface processes, and human evolution and dispersal over the last ~500 ka. Optical dating is based on an anti-Stokes photon emission generated by electron-hole recombination within quartz or feldspar; it relies, by default, on destructive read-out of the stored chronometric information. We present here a fundamentally new method of optical read-out of the trapped electron population in feldspar. The new signal termed as Infra-Red Photo-Luminescence (IRPL) is a Stokes emission (~1.30 eV) derived from NIR excitation (~1.40 eV) on samples previously exposed to ionizing radiation. Low temperature (7-295 K) spectroscopic and time-resolved investigations suggest that IRPL is generated from excited-to-ground state relaxation within the principal (dosimetry) trap. Since IRPL can be induced even in traps remote from recombination centers, it is likely to contain a stable (non-fading), steady-state component. While IRPL is a powerful tool to understand details of the electron-trapping center, it provides a novel, alternative approach to trapped-charge dating based on direct, non-destructive probing of chronometric information. The possibility of repeated readout of IRPL from individual traps will open opportunities for dating at sub-micron spatial resolution, thus, marking a step change in the optical dating technology.

  5. Force spectroscopy with dual-trap optical tweezers: molecular stiffness measurements and coupled fluctuations analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, M; Ritort, F

    2012-11-07

    Dual-trap optical tweezers are often used in high-resolution measurements in single-molecule biophysics. Such measurements can be hindered by the presence of extraneous noise sources, the most prominent of which is the coupling of fluctuations along different spatial directions, which may affect any optical tweezers setup. In this article, we analyze, both from the theoretical and the experimental points of view, the most common source for these couplings in dual-trap optical-tweezers setups: the misalignment of traps and tether. We give criteria to distinguish different kinds of misalignment, to estimate their quantitative relevance and to include them in the data analysis. The experimental data is obtained in a, to our knowledge, novel dual-trap optical-tweezers setup that directly measures forces. In the case in which misalignment is negligible, we provide a method to measure the stiffness of traps and tether based on variance analysis. This method can be seen as a calibration technique valid beyond the linear trap region. Our analysis is then employed to measure the persistence length of dsDNA tethers of three different lengths spanning two orders of magnitude. The effective persistence length of such tethers is shown to decrease with the contour length, in accordance with previous studies. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Study of optical phonon modes of CdS nanoparticles using Raman spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajeev R Prabhu; M Abdul Khadar

    2008-06-01

    The reduction in the grain size to nanometer range can bring about radical changes in almost all of the properties of semiconductors. CdS nanoparticles have attracted considerable scientific interest because they exhibit strongly size-dependent optical and electrical properties. In the case of nanostructured materials, confinement of optical phonons can produce noticeable changes in their vibrational spectra compared to those of bulk crystals. In this paper we report the study of optical phonon modes of nanoparticles of CdS using Raman spectroscopy. Nanoparticle sample for the present study was synthesized through chemical precipitation technique. The CdS nanoparticles were then subjected to heat treatment at low temperature (150°C) for extended time intervals. The crystal structure and grain size of the samples were determined using X-ray diffraction and HRTEM. The Raman spectra of the as-prepared and heat treated samples were recorded using conventional Raman and micro-Raman techniques. The spectrum of as prepared sample exhibited an intense, broad peak at 301 cm-1 corresponding to the LO phonon mode. Higher order phonon modes were also observed in the spectra. A noticeable asymmetry in the Raman line shape indicated the effect of phonon confinement. Other features in the spectra are discussed in detail.

  7. Towards optical fibre based Raman spectroscopy for the detection of surgical site infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alex J.; Koziej, Lukasz; Williams, Huw D.; Elson, Daniel S.; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2016-03-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are common post-surgical complications that remain significant clinical problems, as they are associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. As such, there is significant interest in the development of minimally invasive techniques that permit early detection of SSIs. To this end, we are applying a compact, clinically deployable Raman spectrometer coupled to an optical fibre probe to the study of bacteria, with the long term goal of using Raman spectroscopy to detect infection in vivo. Our system comprises a 785 nm laser diode for excitation and a commercial (Ocean Optics, Inc.) Raman spectrometer for detection. Here we discuss the design, optimisation and validation of this system, and describe our first experiences interrogating bacterial cells (Escherichia coli) in vitro.

  8. Investigation of a $^{85}$Rb Dark Magneto-Optical Trap using an Optical Nanofibre

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, L; Tiwari, V B; Chormaic, S Nic

    2013-01-01

    We report here measurements on a dark magneto-optical trap (DMOT) of 85Rb atoms using an optical nanofibre (ONF) with a waist of ∼~1 μm. The DMOT is created using a doughnut-shaped repump beam along with a depump beam for efficient transfer of cold atoms from the bright hyperfine ground state (F=3) into the dark hyperfine ground state (F=2). The fluorescence from the cold 85Rb atoms of the DMOT is detected by coupling it into the fibre-guided modes of the ONF. The measured fractional population of cold atoms in the bright hyperfine ground state (p) is as low as ∼0.04. The dependence of loading rate of DMOT on cooling laser intensity is investigated and also compared with the loading rate of a bright-MOT (BMOT). This work lays the foundation for the use of an ONF for probing of a small number of atoms in an optically-dense cold atomic cloud.

  9. Mode division multiplexing technology for single-fiber optical trapping axial-position adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihai; Wang, Lei; Liang, Peibo; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2013-07-15

    We demonstrate trapped yeast cell axial-position adjustment without moving the optical fiber in a single-fiber optical trapping system. The dynamic axial-position adjustment is realized by controlling the power ratio of the fundamental mode beam (LP01) and the low-order mode beam (LP11) generated in a normal single-core fiber. In order to separate the trapping positions produced by the two mode beams, we fabricate a special fiber tapered tip with a selective two-step method. A yeast cell of 6 μm diameter is moved along the optical axis direction for a distance of ~3 μm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the trapping position adjustment without moving the fiber for single-fiber optical tweezers. The excitation and utilization of multimode beams in a single fiber constitutes a new development for single-fiber optical trapping and makes possible more practical applications in biomedical research fields.

  10. Transient trapping of two microparticles interacting with optical tweezers and cavitation bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Carmona-Sosa, Viridiana

    2015-01-01

    In this work we show that two absorbing microbeads can briefly share the same optical trap. Optical forces pull the particles towards the waist of the trapping beam. However, once a particle reaches the vicinity of the waist, the surrounding liquid is superheated creating an explosion or cavitation bubble that pushes the particle away while lengthening or shortening the trajectories of the surrounding particles. In this way each particle briefly interacts with the beam waist at different times. We find that when two microbeads reach the waist simultaneously, a larger explosion might result in ejection from the trap. We measure the characteristic timescale of two particle coalescence near the waist and find a Poisson decaying exponential probability distribution. The results are consistent with a simple simulation and show why the characteristic timescales for transient trapping of multiple absorbing particles decrease as more objects are added.

  11. Photoassociation inside an optical dipole trap: absolute rate coefficients and Franck-Condon factors

    CERN Document Server

    Wester, R; Mudrich, M; Staudt, M U; Lange, J; Vanhaecke, N; Dulieu, O; Weidemüller, M

    2004-01-01

    We present quantitative measurements of the photoassociation of cesium molecules inside a far-detuned optical dipole trap. A model of the trap depletion dynamics is derived which allows to extract absolute photoassociation rate coefficients for the initial single-photon photoassociation step from measured trap-loss spectra. The sensitivity of this approach is demonstrated by measuring the Franck-Condon modulation of the weak photoassociation transitions into the low vibrational levels of the outer well of the 0g- state that correlates to the 6s+6p3/2 asymptote. The measurements are compared to theoretical predictions. In a magneto-optical trap these transitions have previously only been observed indirectly through ionization of ground state molecules.

  12. Production of rubidium Bose-Einstein condensate in an optically-plugged magnetic quadrupole trap

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Dong-Fang; Kong, Ling-Ran; Li, Kai; Jiang, Kai-Jun

    2016-01-01

    We have experimentally produced rubidium Bose-Einstein condensate in an optically-plugged magnetic quadrupole (OPQ) trap. A far blue-detuned focused laser beam with a wavelength of 532 nm is plugged in the center of the magnetic quadrupole trap to increase the number of trapped atoms and suppress the heating. A radio frequency (RF) evaporative cooling in the magneto-optical hybrid trap is applied to decrease the atom temperature into degeneracy. The atom number of the condensate is $1.2(0.4)\\times10^5$ and the temperature is below 100 nK. We have also studied characteristic behaviors of the condensate, such as phase space density (PSD), condensate fraction and anisotropic expansion.

  13. Development of a graded index microlens based fiber optical trap and its characterization using principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylk, J; Kristensen, M V G; Mazilu, M; Thayil, A K; Mitchell, C A; Campbell, E C; Powis, S J; Gunn-Moore, F J; Dholakia, K

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate a miniaturized single beam fiber optical trapping probe based on a high numerical aperture graded index (GRIN) micro-objective lens. This enables optical trapping at a distance of 200μm from the probe tip. The fiber trapping probe is characterized experimentally using power spectral density analysis and an original approach based on principal component analysis for accurate particle tracking. Its use for biomedical microscopy is demonstrated through optically mediated immunological synapse formation.

  14. Experimental and theoretical comparison of different optical excitation schemes for a compact coherent population trapping Rb vapor clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Z.; Shahriar, M. S.; Tripathi, R.; Pati, G. S.

    2017-08-01

    We have investigated, theoretically as well as experimentally, the relative merits and demerits of using three different optical configurations for a compact coherent population trapping (CPT) vapor clock using 87Rb. These correspond to the following choices of polarizations for the two Raman beams: \\text{lin} \\parallel \\text{lin} , (σ,~σ ), and push-pull optical pumping (PPOP), applied on the D1 manifold. We have used a multi-level atomic model to study the dependence of the CPT spectrum on axial as well as transverse magnetic fields for these three schemes. Corresponding experimental studies have been performed using a laboratory scale CPT clock employing a two cm long, isotopically pure rubidium cell, loaded with a buffer gas. We observed a CPT contrast close to 20% with a sub-kilohertz linewidth by adopting the PPOP scheme. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each of the three optical excitation schemes, and present frequency-stability measurement data for the prototype clock.

  15. Observation of SERS effect in Raman optical activity, a new tool for chiral vibrational spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim

    2006-01-01

    A new tool for chiral vibrational spectroscopy is here reported. A Surface Enhanced effect was observed using Raman Optical Activity (ROA). This observation opens new possibilities for ROA as a tool for vibrational spectroscopy. The combination of surface enhanced effect SE and ROA into SEROA...

  16. Electro-Optical Multichannel Spectrometer for Transient Resonance Raman and Absorption Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karina Benthin; Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn

    1979-01-01

    An optical multichannel system is described, used for time‐dependent absorption measurements in the gas phase and the liquid phase and for resonance Raman spectroscopy of short‐lived transient species in the liquid phase in pulse radiolysis. It consists of either an image converter streak unit or...

  17. New insight into the solution structures of wheat gluten proteins from Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanch, E.W.; Kasarda, D.D.; Hecht, L.

    2003-01-01

    Vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of the wheat proteins a-gliadin (A-gliadin), omega-liadin, and a 30 kDa peptide called T-A-1 from the high molecular weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) Dx5 were measured to obtain new information about their solution structures. The spectral data sho...

  18. New insight into the solution structures of wheat gluten proteins from Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanch, E.W.; Kasarda, D.D.; Hecht, L.

    2003-01-01

    Vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of the wheat proteins a-gliadin (A-gliadin), omega-liadin, and a 30 kDa peptide called T-A-1 from the high molecular weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) Dx5 were measured to obtain new information about their solution structures. The spectral data sho...

  19. Calculation of optical absorption and resonance Raman correlators using time-dependent recursion relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Christian; Mortensen, O. Sonnich; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1996-01-01

    Time-dependent recursion relationships are derived for optical absorption and resonance Raman correlators in the multidimensional harmonic case using a second-quantization formalism. Furthermore, a procedure is given for the calculation of correlators involving a general analytic coordinate depen...... dependence of the transition dipole moment....

  20. Carbon flux from bio-optical profiling floats: Calibrating transmissometers for use as optical sediment traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estapa, Meg; Durkin, Colleen; Buesseler, Ken; Johnson, Rod; Feen, Melanie

    2017-02-01

    Our mechanistic understanding of the processes controlling the ocean's biological pump is limited, in part, by our lack of observational data at appropriate timescales. The "optical sediment trap" (OST) technique utilizes a transmissometer on a quasi-Lagrangian platform to collect sedimenting particles. This method could help fill the observational gap by providing autonomous measurements of particulate carbon (PC) flux in the upper mesopelagic ocean at high spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we used a combination of field measurements and laboratory experiments to test hydrodynamic and zooplankton-swimmer effects on the OST method, and we quantitatively calibrated this method against PC flux measured directly in same-platform, neutrally buoyant sediment traps (NBSTs) during 5 monthly cruises at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site. We found a well-correlated, positive relationship (R2=0.66, n=15) between the OST proxy, and the PC flux measured directly using NBSTs. Laboratory tests showed that scattering of light from multiple particles between the source and detector was unlikely to affect OST proxy results. We found that the carbon-specific attenuance of sinking particles was larger than literature values for smaller, suspended particles in the ocean, and consistent with variable carbon: size relationships reported in the literature for sinking particles. We also found evidence for variability in PC flux at high spatiotemporal resolution. Our results are consistent with the literature on particle carbon content and optical properties in the ocean, and support more widespread use of the OST proxy, with proper site-specific and platform-specific calibration, to better understand variability in the ocean biological pump.

  1. Time-gated optical imaging through turbid media using stimulated Raman scattering: Studies on image contrast

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Divakar Rao; H S Patel; B Jain; P K Gupta

    2005-02-01

    In this paper, we report the development of experimental set-up for timegated optical imaging through turbid media using stimulated Raman scattering. Our studies on the contrast of time-gated images show that for a given optical thickness, the image contrast is better for sample with lower scattering coefficient and higher physical thickness, and that the contrast improves with decreasing value of anisotropy parameters of the scatterers. These results are consistent with time-resolved Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. Flow-dependent double-nanohole optical trapping of 20 nm polystyrene nanospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehtabi-Oskuie, Ana; Bergeron, Jarrah Gerald; Gordon, Reuven

    2012-01-01

    We study the influence of fluid flow on the ability to trap optically a 20 nm polystyrene particle from a stationary microfluidic environment and then hold it against flow. Increased laser power is required to hold nanoparticles as the flow rate is increased, with an empirical linear dependence of 1 μl/(min×mW). This is promising for the delivery of additional nanoparticles to interact with a trapped nanoparticle; for example, to study protein-protein interactions, and for the ability to move the trapped particle in solution from one location to another. PMID:23236587

  3. Magneto-optical Trapping through a Transparent Silicon Carbide Atom Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Huet, Landry; Morvan, Erwan; Sarazin, Nicolas; Pocholle, Jean-Paul; Reichel, Jakob; Guerlin, Christine; Schwartz, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of trapping about one hundred million rubidium atoms in a magneto-optical trap with several of the beams passing through a transparent atom chip mounted on a vacuum cell wall. The chip is made of a gold microcircuit deposited on a silicon carbide substrate, with favorable thermal conductivity. We show how a retro-reflected configuration can efficiently address the chip birefringence issues, allowing atom trapping at arbitrary distances from the chip. We also demonstrate detection through the chip, granting a large numerical aperture. This configuration is compared to other atom chip devices, and some possible applications are discussed.

  4. Optical trapping and rotation of airborne absorbing particles with a single focused laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jinda; Li, Yong-qing, E-mail: liy@ecu.edu [Department of Physics, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27858-4353 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    We measure the periodic circular motion of single absorbing aerosol particles that are optically trapped with a single focused Gaussian beam and rotate around the laser propagation direction. The scattered light from the trapped particle is observed to be directional and change periodically at 0.4–20 kHz. The instantaneous positions of the moving particle within a rotation period are measured by a high-speed imaging technique using a charge coupled device camera and a repetitively pulsed light-emitting diode illumination. The centripetal acceleration of the trapped particle as high as ∼20 times the gravitational acceleration is observed and is attributed to the photophoretic forces.

  5. Interplay between optical, viscous and elastic forces on an optically trapped Brownian particle immersed in a viscoelastic fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Domínguez-García, P; Jeney, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    We provide a detailed study of the interplay between the different interactions which appear in the Brownian motion of a micronsized sphere immersed in a viscoelastic fluid measured with optical trapping interferometry. To explore a wide range of viscous, elastic and optical forces, we analyze two different viscoelastic solutions at various concentrations, which provide a dynamic polymeric structure surrounding the Brownian sphere. Our experiments show that, depending of the fluid, optical forces, even if small, slightly modify the complex modulus at low frequencies. Based on our findings, we propose an alternative methodology to calibrate this kind of experimental set-up when non-Newtonian fluids are used. Understanding the influence of the optical potential is essential for a correct interpretation of the mechanical properties obtained by optically-trapped probe-based studies of biomaterials and living matter.

  6. Interplay between optical, viscous, and elastic forces on an optically trapped Brownian particle immersed in a viscoelastic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-García, P.; Forró, László; Jeney, Sylvia

    2016-10-01

    We provide a detailed study of the interplay between the different interactions which appear in the Brownian motion of a micronsized sphere immersed in a viscoelastic fluid measured with optical trapping interferometry. To explore a wide range of viscous, elastic, and optical forces, we analyze two different viscoelastic solutions at various concentrations, which provide a dynamic polymeric structure surrounding the Brownian sphere. Our experiments show that, depending on the fluid, optical forces, even if small, slightly modify the complex modulus at low frequencies. Based on our findings, we propose an alternative methodology to calibrate this kind of experimental set-up when non-Newtonian fluids are used. Understanding the influence of the optical potential is essential for a correct interpretation of the mechanical properties obtained by optically-trapped probe-based studies of biomaterials and living matter.

  7. Performance study of macro-bending EDFA/Raman hybrid optical fiber amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahran, O.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we present an analytical study of a (macro-bending EDFA)/Raman hybrid optical amplifier. The bending radius is 4 mm with EDFA length 10 m with forward pump power in the range (100-500 mW) and Raman amplifier length (12-55 km) with backward pump power variations (80-200 mW) is considered in our model. Due to bending loss in EDFA, the gain of hybrid amplifier is increased to ~7 dB more than the normal EDFA/Raman hybrid amplifier and the noise figure is decreased by ~2 dB rather than without macro-bending EDFA/Raman hybrid amplifier. The signal to noise ratio (OSNR) calculations shows a better performance of macro-bending EDFA/Raman hybrid amplifier than without macro-bending one. A flat gain is obtained in the signal wavelength region (1560-1600 nm), which is the L-band. The calculated results for macro-bending case are compared with experimental results of normal case by Lee et al., in the L-band showing an increase in the gain, reduction in the noise figure and more gain flatness at the input signal -20 dBm for macro-bending EDFA/Raman hybrid amplifier.

  8. A calibration method for optical trap force by use of electrokinetic phenomena

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youli Yu; Zhenxi Zhang; Xiaolin Zhang

    2006-01-01

    @@ An experimental method for calibration of optical trap force upon cells by use of electrokinetic phenomena is demonstrated.An electronkinetic sample chamber system (ESCS) is designed instead of a common sample chamber and a costly automatism stage,thus the experimental setup is simpler and cheaper.Experiments indicate that the range of the trap force measured by this method is piconewton and sub-piconewton,which makes it fit for study on non-damage interaction between light and biological particles with optical tweezers especially.Since this method is relevant to particle electric charge,by applying an alternating electric field,the new method may overcome the problem of correcting drag force and allow us to measure simultaneously optical trap stiffness and particle electric charge.

  9. Experimental nonlinear dynamical studies in cesium magneto-optical trap using time-series analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anwar, M., E-mail: mamalik2000@gmail.com; Islam, R.; Faisal, M. [National Institute of Lasers and Optronics, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000, PK (Pakistan); Sikandar, M.; Ahmed, M. [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000, PK (Pakistan)

    2015-03-30

    A magneto-optical trap of neutral atoms is essentially a dissipative quantum system. The fast thermal atoms continuously dissipate their energy to the environment via spontaneous emissions during the cooling. The atoms are, therefore, strongly coupled with the vacuum reservoir and the laser field. The vacuum fluctuations as well as the field fluctuations are imparted to the atoms as random photon recoils. Consequently, the external and internal dynamics of atoms becomes stochastic. In this paper, we have investigated the stochastic dynamics of the atoms in a magneto-optical trap during the loading process. The time series analysis of the fluorescence signal shows that the dynamics of the atoms evolves, like all dissipative systems, from deterministic to the chaotic regime. The subsequent disappearance and revival of chaos was attributed to chaos synchronization between spatially different atoms in the magneto-optical trap.

  10. Quantitative determination of optical trapping strength and viscoelastic moduli inside living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mas, Josep; Richardson, Andrew Callum; Reihani, S. Nader S.

    2013-01-01

    With the success of in vitro single-molecule force measurements obtained in recent years, the next step is to perform quantitative force measurements inside a living cell. Optical traps have proven excellent tools for manipulation, also in vivo, where they can be essentially non-invasive under...... correct wavelength and exposure conditions. It is a pre-requisite for in vivo quantitative force measurements that a precise and reliable force calibration of the tweezers is performed. There are well-established calibration protocols in purely viscous environments; however, as the cellular cytoplasm...... as the force constant describing the optical trap, thus paving the way for quantitative force measurements inside the living cell. Here, we determine both the spring constant of the optical trap and the elastic contribution from the cytoplasm, influencing the motion of naturally occurring tracer particles...

  11. Tomographic active optical trapping of arbitrarily shaped objects by exploiting 3-D refractive index maps

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kyoohyun

    2016-01-01

    Optical trapping can be used to manipulate the three-dimensional (3-D) motion of spherical particles based on the simple prediction of optical forces and the responding motion of samples. However, controlling the 3-D behaviour of non-spherical particles with arbitrary orientations is extremely challenging, due to experimental difficulties and the extensive computations. Here, we achieved the real-time optical control of arbitrarily shaped particles by combining the wavefront shaping of a trapping beam and measurements of the 3-D refractive index (RI) distribution of samples. Engineering the 3-D light field distribution of a trapping beam based on the measured 3-D RI map of samples generates a light mould, which can be used to manipulate colloidal and biological samples which have arbitrary orientations and/or shapes. The present method provides stable control of the orientation and assembly of arbitrarily shaped particles without knowing a priori information about the sample geometry. The proposed method can ...

  12. Exploring the physics of efficient optical trapping of dielectric nanoparticles with ultrafast pulsed excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Debjit; Goswami, Debabrata; De, Arijit K

    2015-08-10

    Stable optical trapping of dielectric nanoparticles with low power high-repetition-rate ultrafast pulsed excitation has received considerable attention in recent years. However, the exact role of such excitation has been quite illusive so far since, for dielectric micron-sized particles, the trapping efficiency turns out to be similar to that of continuous-wave excitation and independent of pulse chirping. In order to provide a coherent explanation of this apparently puzzling phenomenon, we justify the superior role of high-repetition-rate pulsed excitation in dielectric nanoparticle trapping which is otherwise not possible with continuous-wave excitation at a similar average power level. We quantitatively estimate the optimal combination of pulse peak power and pulse repetition rate leading to a stable trap and discuss the role of inertial response on the dependence of trapping efficiency on pulse width. In addition, we report gradual trapping of individual quantum dots detected by a stepwise rise in a two-photon fluorescence signal from the trapped quantum dots which conclusively proves individual particle trapping.

  13. Hybrid Quantum System of a Nanofiber Mode Coupled to Two Chains of Optically Trapped Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Zoubi, Hashem

    2010-01-01

    A tapered optical nanofiber simultaneously used to trap and optically interface of cold atoms through evanescent fields constitutes a new and well controllable hybrid quantum system. The atoms are trapped in two parallel 1D optical lattices generated by suitable far blue and red detuned evanescent field modes very close to opposite sides of the nanofiber surface. Collective electronic excitations (excitons) of each of the optical lattices are resonantly coupled to the second lattice forming symmetric and antisymmetric common excitons. In contrast to the inverse cube dependence of the individual atomic dipole-dipole interaction, we analytically find an exponentially decaying coupling strength with distance between the lattices. The resulting symmetric (bright) excitons strongly interact with the resonant nanofiber photons to form fiber polaritons, which can be observed through linear optical spectra. For large enough wave vectors the polariton decay rate to free space is strongly reduced, which should render t...

  14. Integrated design of a compact magneto-optical trap for space applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiuzhi Qu; Bin Wang; Desheng Lü; Jianbo Zhao; Meifeng Ye; Wei Ren; Jingfeng Xiang

    2015-01-01

    In this Letter,we describe an optical assembly that is designed for the engineering application of the atomic laser cooling techniques.Using a folded optical path scheme,we have built a miniaturized,compact magneto-optical trap (CMOT) for an 87Rb atomic fountain clock.Compared with the conventional magneto-optical traps used in other clocks,our system is more robust,more compact,more stable,and saves about 60% laser power.This optical setup has operated for about a year in our fountain system,passed the thermal cycle tests and the mechanical vibration and shock tests,and maintained a high performance without a need for realignment.

  15. Ultrasensitive Detection of a Protein by Optical Trapping in a Photonic-Plasmonic Microcavity

    CERN Document Server

    Santiago-Cordoba, Miguel A; Boriskina, Svetlana V; Vollmer, Frank; Demirel, Melik C

    2012-01-01

    Microcavity and whispering gallery mode (WGM) biosensors derive their sensitivity from monitoring frequency shifts induced by protein binding at sites of highly confined field intensities, where field strengths can be further amplified by excitation of plasmon resonances in nanoparticle layers. Here, we propose a mechanism based on optical trapping of a protein at the site of plasmonic field enhancements for achieving ultra sensitive detection in only microliter-scale sample volumes, and in real-time. We demonstrate femto-Molar sensitivity corresponding to a few 1000s of macromolecules. Simulations based on Mie theory agree well with the optical trapping concept at plasmonic 'hotspots' locations.

  16. Vision feedback driven automated assembly of photopolymerized structures by parallel optical trapping and manipulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan Ryberg; Rodrigo, Peter John

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate how optical trapping and manipulation can be used to assemble microstructures. The microstructures we show being automatically recognized and manipulated are produced using the two-photon polymerization (2PP) technique with submicron resolution. In this work, we show identical shap...... objects by optical trapping when combined with a computer controlled motorized sample stage.......-complementary puzzle pieces being manipulated in a fluidic environment forming space-filling tessellations. By implementation of image analysis to detect the puzzle pieces, we developed a system capable of assembling a puzzle with no user interaction required. This allows for automatic gathering of sparsely scattered...

  17. Dynamic Variation in Protein-Small Molecule Interaction Observed by Double-Nanohole Optical Trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Balushi, Ahmed Al

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of proteins with small molecules is fundamental to their function in living organisms and it is widely studied in drug development. Here we compare optical trapping dynamics of streptavidin and biotinylated streptavidin using a double nanohole optical trap in a metal film. Consistent and clearly distinct behavior is seen between the protein with and without the small molecule binding. The real-time dynamics at the single protein level are accessible with this technique, which also has advantages of not requiring tethering to a surface or the need for exogeneous markers.

  18. Structure and behaviour of proteins, nucleic acids and viruses from vibrational Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barron, L.D.; Blanch, E.W.; McColl, I.H.

    2003-01-01

    On account of its sensitivity to chirality Raman optical activity (ROA), which may be measured as a small difference in vibrational Raman scattering from chiral molecules in right- and left-circularly polarized incident light, is a powerful probe of structure and behaviour of biomolecules...... is especially favourable for fold determination using pattern recognition techniques. This article gives a brief account of the ROA technique and presents the ROA spectra of a selection of proteins, nucleic acids and viruses that illustrate the applications of ROA spectroscopy in biomolecular research....

  19. Optical parametric oscillator-based light source for coherent Raman scattering microscopy: practical overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brustlein, Sophie; Ferrand, Patrick; Walther, Nico; Brasselet, Sophie; Billaudeau, Cyrille; Marguet, Didier; Rigneault, Hervé

    2011-02-01

    We present the assets and constraints of using optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) to perform point scanning nonlinear microscopy and spectroscopy with special emphasis on coherent Raman spectroscopy. The difterent possible configurations starting with one OPO and two OPOs are described in detail and with comments that are intended to be practically useful for the user. Explicit examples on test samples such as nonlinear organic crystal, polystyrene beads, and fresh mouse tissues are given. Special emphasis is given to background-free coherent Raman anti-Stokes scattering (CARS) imaging, including CARS hyperspectral imaging in a fully automated mode with commercial OPOs.

  20. Generating topological optical flux lattices for ultracold atoms by modulated Raman and radio-frequency couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinlong; Xu, Zhi-Fang; You, Li

    2017-01-01

    We propose a scheme to dynamically generate optical flux lattices with nontrivial band topology using amplitude-modulated Raman lasers and radio-frequency (rf) magnetic fields. By tuning the strength of Raman and rf fields, three distinct phases are realized at unit filling for a unit cell. Respectively, these three phases correspond to normal insulator, topological Chern insulator, and semimetal. Nearly nondispersive bands are found to appear in the topological phase, which promises opportunities for investigating strongly correlated quantum states within a simple cold-atom setup. The validity of our proposal is confirmed by comparing the Floquet quasienergies from the evolution operator with the spectrum of the effective Hamiltonian.

  1. Nonlinear optical imaging and Raman microspectrometry of the cell nucleus throughout the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliss, Artem; Kuzmin, Andrey N; Kachynski, Aliaksandr V; Prasad, Paras N

    2010-11-17

    Fundamental understanding of cellular processes at molecular level is of considerable importance in cell biology as well as in biomedical disciplines for early diagnosis of infection and cancer diseases, and for developing new molecular medicine-based therapies. Modern biophotonics offers exclusive capabilities to obtain information on molecular composition, organization, and dynamics in a cell by utilizing a combination of optical spectroscopy and optical imaging. We introduce here a combination of Raman microspectrometry, together with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) nonlinear optical microscopy, to study macromolecular organization of the nucleus throughout the cell cycle. Site-specific concentrations of proteins, DNA, RNA, and lipids were determined in nucleoli, nucleoplasmic transcription sites, nuclear speckles, constitutive heterochromatin domains, mitotic chromosomes, and extrachromosomal regions of mitotic cells by quantitative confocal Raman microspectrometry. A surprising finding, obtained in our study, is that the local concentration of proteins does not increase during DNA compaction. We also demonstrate that postmitotic DNA decondensation is a gradual process, continuing for several hours. The quantitative Raman spectroscopic analysis was corroborated with CARS/TPEF multimodal imaging to visualize the distribution of protein, DNA, RNA, and lipid macromolecules throughout the cell cycle.

  2. Optical fiber Raman-based spectroscopy for oral lesions characterization: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Luis Felipe C. S.; Neto, Lázaro P. M.; Oliveira, Inajara P.; Rangel, João. Lucas; Ferreira, Isabelle; Kitakawa, Dárcio; Martin, Airton A.

    2016-03-01

    In the clinical daily life various lesions of the oral cavity have shown different aspects, generating an inconclusive or doubtful diagnosis. In general, oral injuries are diagnosed by histopathological analysis from biopsy, which is an invasive procedure and does not gives immediate results. In the other hand, Raman spectroscopy technique it is a real time and minimal invasive analytical tool, with notable diagnostic capability. This study aims to characterize, by optical fiber Raman-based spectroscopy (OFRS), normal, inflammatory, potentially malignant, benign and malign oral lesions. Raman data were collected by a Holospec f / 1.8 spectrograph (Kayser Optical Systems) coupled to an optical fiber, with a 785nm laser line source and a CCD Detector. The data were pre-processed and vector normalized. The average analysis and standard deviation was performed associated with cluster analysis and compared to the histopalogical results. Samples of described oral pathological processes were used in the study. The OFRS was efficient to characterized oral lesions and normal mucosa, in which biochemical information related to vibrational modes of proteins, lipids, nucleic acids and carbohydrates were observed. The technique (OFRS) is able to demonstrate biochemical information concern different types of oral lesions showing that Raman spectroscopy could be useful for an early and minimal invasive diagnosis.

  3. Generation of unipolar pulses in a circular Raman-active medium excited by few-cycle optical pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Arkhipov, R M; Babushkin, I; Pakhomov, A V; Tolmachev, Yu A; Rosanov, N N

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically a new possibility of unipolar pulses generation in Raman-active medium excited by a series of few-cycle optical pulses. We consider the case when the Raman-active particles are uniformly distributed along the circle, and demonstrate a possibility to obtain a unipolar rectangular video pulses with an arbitrarily long duration, ranging from a minimum value equal to the natural period of the low frequency vibrations in the Raman-active medium.

  4. Magneto-optical trapping forces for atoms and molecules with complex level structures

    CERN Document Server

    Tarbutt, M R

    2014-01-01

    Laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping of molecules typically involves multiple transitions driven by several laser frequencies. We analyze how magneto-optical trapping forces depend on the angular momenta, $F_l$ and $F_u$, and the g-factors, $g_l$ and $g_u$, of the lower and upper states. When $F_l > F_u$ the polarizations must be reversed relative to cases where $F_u \\ge F_l$. The correct choice of circular polarization depends on the sign of $g_{u}$ but not on the sign of $g_{l}$. If $g_{u}$ is zero there is no trapping force, and the trapping force is very weak whenever $g_u$ is small compared to $g_l$, which it usually is when the cooling transition is the $^{2}\\Sigma$ to $^{2}\\Pi_{1/2}$ transition of a molecule. For some molecules, mixing of the excited $^{2}\\Pi_{1/2}$ state with a nearby $^{2}\\Sigma$ excited state can greatly increase $g_u$, leading to stronger trapping forces. A strong trapping force can also be produced by rapidly and synchronously reversing both the magnetic field and the laser ...

  5. Enhanced Magnetic Trap Loading and Coupled Optical Resonance Spectroscopy in Strontium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Daniel S.; Reschovsky, Benjamin J.; Pisenti, Neal C.; Campbell, Gretchen K.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate a technique to improve the loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap using a 688 nm de-pump laser on the 3P1 - 3S1 transition. Strontium degenerate gas experiments typically use a magnetic trap continuously loaded from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT) operating on the 461 nm line. A slow (~1:50,000) leak from the MOT transition populates the magnetically trapped 3P2 state and the 3P1 state in a 1:2 ratio. Pumping 3P1 atoms into 3P2 accelerates magnetic trap loading. For this purpose, we stabilize a 688 nm laser using Coupled Optical Resonance Laser Locking (COReLL) to the 679 nm, 688 nm, and 707 nm lines. The technique allows us to lock multiple lasers while only detecting absorption on the 707 nm transition. Error signals are generated with incommensurate frequency modulation of the pump beams. Preliminary application of the 688 nm laser to our 88Sr MOT results in 20% enhancement of magnetic trap atom number. We discuss the limitations of the loading rate enhancement and the potential for loading enhancement with other repumping strategies.

  6. Steering, Splitting and Cloning of Optical Beam in a Coherently Driven Raman Gain System

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, Onkar N.; Dey, Tarak N.

    2014-01-01

    We propose an all-optical anti-waveguide mechanism for steering, splitting, and cloning of an optical beam beyond the diffraction-limit. We use a spatially inhomogeneous pump beam to create an anti-waveguide structure in a Doppler broadened N -type four-level Raman gain medium for a co-propagating weak probe beam. We show that a transverse modulated index of refraction and gain due to the spatially dependent pump beam hold the keys to steering, splitting and cloning of an optical beam. We hav...

  7. Stimulated Raman scattering modes in highly elliptical-core optical fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兆民; 顾春明; 林景全; 郑学彦

    1996-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) transmission modes in highly elliptical-core optical fiber of three different structures are experimentally researched.The measuring setup,SRS spectrum and photographs of Stokes modes are given.The observed phenomena are completely different from those on circular-core graded-index optical fiber.The beam sizes of SRS remain constant and SRS light transmits with the characteristics of higher-order.mode.In addition,the experimental results are theoretically explained with fiber-optical dispersion theory and SRS phase matching conditions.Experimental results and theoretical analyses are in good agreement.

  8. Fiber Optic Coupled Raman Based Detection of Hazardous Liquids Concealed in Commercial Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Ramírez-Cedeño

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy has been widely proposed as a technique to nondestructively and noninvasively interrogate the contents of glass and plastic bottles. In this work, Raman spectroscopy is used in a concealed threat scenario where hazardous liquids have been intentionally mixed with common consumer products to mask its appearance or spectra. The hazardous liquids under consideration included the chemical warfare agent (CWA simulant triethyl phosphate (TEP, hydrogen peroxide, and acetone as representative of toxic industrial compounds (TICs. Fiber optic coupled Raman spectroscopy (FOCRS and partial least squares (PLS algorithm analysis were used to quantify hydrogen peroxide in whiskey, acetone in perfume, and TEP in colored beverages. Spectral data was used to evaluate if the hazardous liquids can be successfully concealed in consumer products. Results demonstrated that FOC-RS systems were able to discriminate between nonhazardous consumer products and mixtures with hazardous materials at concentrations lower than 5%.

  9. Characterization of polymer composites by fiber optic Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Bhat, Sanmitra A.; Osbaldiston, Richard; DiTaranto, Marie B.; Smith, Wayne W.; Rose, Jennifer; Liu, Yong-Ming; Shaw, Montgomery

    1999-01-01

    The in-use performance of polymer composites is highly dependent on the polymeric structure, which in turn, is highly dependent on the processing conditions. We have been developing a Fourier transform Raman system capable of high temperature measurements within curing devices through the use of fiber optic probes. The goal is to use real-time spectral data to control heat schedules and ultimately, composite properties. This presentation will describe the development of cure models based on reaction mechanisms for an epoxy resin and a polyimide using IR and Raman spectroscopy. It will also describe correlations between molecular structure and mechanical properties obtained by simultaneous Raman and rheology measurements. In addition, new spectral methods to determine cure kinetics will be presented.

  10. Isotopic hydrogen analysis via conventional and surface-enhanced fiber optic Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LASCOLA, ROBERT

    2004-09-23

    This report describes laboratory development and process plant applications of Raman spectroscopy for detection of hydrogen isotopes in the Tritium Facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a U.S. Department of Energy complex. Raman spectroscopy provides a lower-cost, in situ alternative to mass spectrometry techniques currently employed at SRS. Using conventional Raman and fiber optics, we have measured, in the production facility glove boxes, process mixtures of protium and deuterium at various compositions and total pressures ranging from 1000-4000 torr, with detection limits ranging from 1-2 percent for as low as 3-second integration times. We are currently investigating fabrication techniques for SERS surfaces in order to measure trace (0.01-0.1 percent) amounts of one isotope in the presence of the other. These efforts have concentrated on surfaces containing palladium, which promotes hydrogen dissociation and forms metal hydride bonds, essentially providing a chemical enhancement mechanism.

  11. Raman sorting and identification of single living micro-organisms with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Changan; Chen, De; Li, Yong-Qing

    2005-07-01

    We report on a novel technique for sorting and identification of single biological cells and food-borne bacteria based on laser tweezers and Raman spectroscopy (LTRS). With this technique, biological cells of different physiological states in a sample chamber were identified by their Raman spectral signatures and then they were selectively manipulated into a clean collection chamber with optical tweezers through a microchannel. As an example, we sorted the live and dead yeast cells into the collection chamber and validated this with a standard staining technique. We also demonstrated that bacteria existing in spoiled foods could be discriminated from a variety of food particles based on their characteristic Raman spectra and then isolated with laser manipulation. This label-free LTRS sorting technique may find broad applications in microbiology and rapid examination of food-borne diseases.

  12. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber based multifunctional optical system for trapping, position sensing, and detection of fluorescent particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoj, V K; Murukeshan, V M

    2012-05-15

    We demonstrate a novel multifunctional optical system that is capable of trapping, imaging, position sensing, and fluorescence detection of micrometer-sized fluorescent test particles using hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). This multifunctional optical system for trapping, position sensing, and fluorescent detection is designed such that a near-IR laser light is used to create an optical trap across a liquid-filled HC-PCF, and a 473 nm laser is employed as a source for fluorescence excitation. This proposed system and the obtained results are expected to significantly enable an efficient integrated trapping platform employing HC-PCF for diagnostic biomedical applications.

  13. Two-Color Magneto-Optical Trap with Small Magnetic Field for Ytterbium

    CERN Document Server

    Kawasaki, Akio; Yu, QinQin; Vuletić, Vladan

    2015-01-01

    We report a two-color magneto-optical trap (MOT) for ytterbium atoms operating at a low magnetic field gradient down to 2 G/cm where a conventional MOT using the singlet transition (6s^2 1S0 -> 6s6p 1P1) is unable to trap atoms. By simultaneously applying laser light on both the broad-linewidth singlet transition and the narrow-linewidth triplet transition (6s^2 1S0 -> 6s6p 3P1), we load and trap 4.0 x 10^5 atoms directly from an atomic beam at 700 K. In the two-color MOT, the slowing and trapping functions are separately performed by the singlet transition light and the triplet transition light, respectively. The two-color MOT is highly robust against laser power imbalance even at very low magnetic field gradients.

  14. Cold cesium molecules produced directly in a magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hong-Shan; Ji Zhong-Hua; Yuan Jin-Peng; Zhao Yan-Ting; Ma Jie; Wang Li-Rong; Xiao Lian-Tuan; Jia Suo-Tang

    2011-01-01

    We report on the observation of ultracold ground electric-state cesium molecules produced directly in a magnetooptical trap with a good signal-to-noise ratio.These molecules arise from the photoassociation of magneto-optical trap lasers and they are detected by resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization technology.The production rate of ultracold cesium molecules is up to 4× 104 s-1.We measure the characteristic time of the ground electric-state cesium molecules generated in the experiment and investigate the Cs2+ molecular ion intensity as a function of the trapping laser intensity and the ionization pulse laser energy.We conclude that the production of cold cesium molecules may be enhanced by using appropriate experimental parameters,which is useful for future experiments involving the production and trapping of ultracold ground electric-state molecules.

  15. Demonstration of integrated microscale optics in surface-electrode ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Merrill, J True; Landgren, David; Amini, Jason M; Wright, Kenneth; Doret, S Charles; Pai, C-S; Hayden, Harley; Killian, Tyler; Faircloth, Daniel; Brown, Kenneth R; Harter, Alexa W; Slusher, Richart E

    2011-01-01

    In ion trap quantum information processing, efficient fluorescence collection is critical for fast, high-fidelity qubit detection and ion-photon entanglement. The expected size of future many-ion processors require scalable light collection systems. We report on the development and testing of a microfabricated surface-electrode ion trap with an integrated high numerical aperture (NA) micromirror for fluorescence collection. When coupled to a low NA lens, the optical system is inherently scalable to large arrays of mirrors in a single device. We demonstrate stable trapping and transport of 40Ca+ ions over a 0.63 NA micromirror and observe a factor of 1.9 enhancement in photon collection compared to the planar region of the trap.

  16. Arrays of microscopic magnetic traps for cold atoms and their applications in atom optics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    印建平; 高伟建; 胡建军

    2002-01-01

    A single microscopic magnetic trap for neutral atoms using planar current-carrying wires was proposed and studiedtheoretically by Weinstein et al. In this paper, we propose three structures of composite current-carrying wires to provide1D, 2D and 3D arrays of microscopic magnetic traps for cold alkali atoms. The spatial distributions of magnetic fieldsgenerated by these structures are calculated and the field gradient and curvature in each single microtrap are analysed.Our study shows that arrays of microscopic magnetic traps can be used to provide 1D, 2D or 3D atomic magneticlattices, and even to realize 1D, 2D and 3D arrays of magneto-optical traps, and so on.

  17. Demonstration of integrated microscale optics in surface-electrode ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    True Merrill, J; Brown, Kenneth R [Schools of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Computational Science and Engineering, and Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Volin, Curtis; Landgren, David; Amini, Jason M; Wright, Kenneth; Charles Doret, S; Pai, C-S; Hayden, Harley; Killian, Tyler; Faircloth, Daniel; Harter, Alexa W; Slusher, Richart E, E-mail: curtis.volin@gtri.gatech.edu [Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    In ion trap quantum information processing, efficient fluorescence collection is critical for fast, high-fidelity qubit detection and ion-photon entanglement. The expected size of future many-ion processors requires scalable light collection systems. We report on the development and testing of a microfabricated surface-electrode ion trap with an integrated high-numerical aperture (NA) micromirror for fluorescence collection. When coupled to a low-NA lens, the optical system is inherently scalable to large arrays of mirrors in a single device. We demonstrate the stable trapping and transport of {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ions over a 0.63 NA micromirror and observe a factor of 1.9 enhancement of photon collection compared to the planar region of the trap. (paper)

  18. Toolkit for the Automated Characterization of Optical Trapping Forces on Microscopic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Joseph; Hoeprich, David; Resnick, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Optical traps have been in use in microbiological studies for the past 40 years to obtain noninvasive control of microscopic particles. However, the magnitude of the applied forces is often unknown. Therefore, we have developed an automated data acquisition and processing system which characterizes trap properties for known particle geometries. Extensive experiments and measurements utilizing well-characterized objects were performed and compared to literature to confirm the system's performance. This system will enable the future analysis of a trapped primary cilium, a slender rod-shaped organelle with aspect ratio L/R >30, where `L' is the cilium length and `R' the cilium diameter. The trapping of cilia is of primary importance, as it will lead to the precise measurements of mechanical properties of the organelle and its significance to the epithelial cell. Support from the National Institutes of Health, 1R15DK092716 is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Coherence preservation of a single neutral atom qubit transferred between magic-intensity optical traps

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jiaheng; Guo, Ruijun; Xu, Peng; Wang, Kunpeng; Sheng, Cheng; Liu, Min; Wang, Jin; Derevianko, Andrei; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the coherence of a single mobile atomic qubit can be well preserved during a transfer process among different optical dipole traps (ODTs). This is a prerequisite step in realizing a large-scale neutral atom quantum information processing platform. A qubit encoded in the hyperfine manifold of $^{87}$Rb atom is dynamically extracted from the static quantum register by an auxiliary moving ODT and reinserted into the static ODT. Previous experiments were limited by decoherences induced by the differential light shifts of qubit states. Here we apply a magic-intensity trapping technique which mitigates the detrimental effects of light shifts and substantially enhances the coherence time to $225 \\pm 21\\,\\mathrm{ms}$. The experimentally demonstrated magic trapping technique relies on the previously neglected hyperpolarizability contribution to the light shifts, which makes the light shift dependence on the trapping laser intensity to be parabolic. Because of the parabolic dependence, at a certain ...

  20. Phase-space properties of magneto-optical traps utilising micro-fabricated gratings

    CERN Document Server

    McGilligan, James P; Riis, Erling; Arnold, Aidan S

    2015-01-01

    We have used diffraction gratings to simplify the fabrication, and dramatically increase the atomic collection efficiency, of magneto-optical traps using micro-fabricated optics. The atom number enhancement was mainly due to the increased beam capture volume, afforded by the large area (4cm^2) shallow etch (200nm) binary grating chips. Here we provide a detailed theoretical and experimental investigation of the on-chip magneto-optical trap temperature and density in four different chip geometries using 87Rb, whilst studying effects due to MOT radiation pressure imbalance. With optimal initial MOTs on two of the chips we obtain both large atom number (2x10^7) _and_ sub-Doppler temperatures (50uK) after optical molasses.

  1. Trapping of a microsphere pendulum through cavity-enhanced optical forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Yuqiang; Chormaic, Sile Nic [Physics Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); M Ward, Jonathan [Photonics Centre, Tyndall National Institute, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland); Minogin, Vladimir G, E-mail: yuqiang.wu@tyndall.i [Institute of Spectroscopy, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142190 Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2010-09-01

    Optical forces resulting from evanescently coupled microcavities can produce remarkable mechanical effects on micro- and nanoscale systems. Excitation of the symmetric and antisymmetric modes of the interacting whispering gallery modes (WGM) leads to significant attractive and repulsive forces. Here, we propose a method to spatially trap a microspherical resonator pendulum via the optical forces produced by two simultaneously excited WGMs of a photonic molecule, comprising two microspherical cavities. We discuss how the cavity-enhanced optical force generated in the photonic molecule can create an optomechanical potential of about 5 eV deep and 10 pm wide, which can be used to trap the pendulum at any given equilibrium position by a simple choice of laser frequencies. This result presents opportunities for very precise all-optical self-alignment of microsystems. Frequency splitting of a co-resonant mode from two similar-sized microspheres was observed experimentally and the mechanical characteristics of a microsphere pendulum were also studied.

  2. Damage induced in red blood cells by infrared optical trapping: an evaluation based on elasticity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Marcos A. S.; Moura, Diógenes S.; Fontes, Adriana; de Araujo, Renato E.

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated the damage caused to optically trapped red blood cells (RBCs) after 1 or 2 min of exposure to near-infrared (NIR) laser beams at 785 or 1064 nm. Damage was quantified by measuring cell elasticity using an automatic, real-time, homemade, optical tweezer system. The measurements, performed on a significant number (hundreds) of cells, revealed an overall deformability decrease up to ˜104% after 2 min of light exposure, under 10 mW optical trapping for the 785-nm wavelength. Wavelength dependence of the optical damage is attributed to the light absorption by hemoglobin. The results provided evidence that RBCs have their biomechanical properties affected by NIR radiation. Our findings establish limits for laser applications with RBCs.

  3. Blue-detuned optical ring trap for Bose-Einstein condensates based on conical refraction

    CERN Document Server

    Turpin, A; Loiko, Yu V; Küber, J; Schmaltz, F; Kalkandjiev, T K; Ahufinger, V; Birkl, G; Mompart, J

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel approach for the optical manipulation of neutral atoms in annular light structures produced by the phenomenon of conical refraction occurring in biaxial optical crystals. For a beam focused to a plane behind the crystal, the focal plane exhibits two concentric bright rings enclosing a ring of null intensity called the Poggendorff ring. We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that the Poggendorff dark ring of conical refraction is confined in three dimensions by regions of higher intensity. We derive the positions of the confining intensity maxima and minima and discuss the application of the Poggendorff ring for trapping ultra-cold atoms using the repulsive dipole force of blue-detuned light. We give analytical expressions for the trapping frequencies and potential depths along both the radial and the axial directions. Finally, we present realistic numerical simulations of the dynamics of a $^87$Rb Bose-Einstein condensate trapped inside the Poggendorff ring which are in good a...

  4. Phase-Stable Free-Space Optical Lattices for Trapped Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiegelow, C T; Kaufmann, H; Ruster, T; Schulz, J; Kaushal, V; Hettrich, M; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Poschinger, U G

    2016-01-22

    We demonstrate control of the absolute phase of an optical lattice with respect to a single trapped ion. The lattice is generated by off-resonant free-space laser beams, and we actively stabilize its phase by measuring its ac-Stark shift on a trapped ion. The ion is localized within the standing wave to better than 2% of its period. The locked lattice allows us to apply displacement operations via resonant optical forces with a controlled direction in phase space. Moreover, we observe the lattice-induced phase evolution of spin superposition states in order to analyze the relevant decoherence mechanisms. Finally, we employ lattice-induced phase shifts for inferring the variation of the ion position over the 157  μm range along the trap axis at accuracies of better than 6 nm.

  5. Phase-stable free-space optical lattices for trapped ions

    CERN Document Server

    Schmiegelow, Christian Tomas; Ruster, Thomas; Schulz, Jonas; Kaushal, Vidyut; Hettrich, Max; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand; Poschinger, Ulrich G

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate control of the absolute phase of an optical lattice with respect to a single trapped ion. The lattice is generated by off-resonant free-space laser beams, we actively stabilize its phase by measuring its ac-Stark shift on a trapped ion. The ion is localized within the standing wave to better than 2\\% of its period. The locked lattice allows us to apply displacement operations via resonant optical forces with a controlled direction in phase space. Moreover, we observe the lattice-induced phase evolution of spin superposition states in order to analyze the relevant decoherence mechanisms. Finally, we employ lattice-induced phase shifts for inferring the variation of the ion position over 157~$\\mu$m range along the trap axis at accuracies of better than 6~nm.

  6. Magneto-Optical Trapping of 88Sr atoms with 689 nm Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiang; LIN Bai-Ke; ZHAO Yang; LI Ye; WANG Shao-Kai; WANG Min-Ming; ZANG Er-Jun; LI Tian-Chu; FANG Zhan-Jun

    2011-01-01

    We report the experimental realization of strontium magneto-optical trap(MOT) operating on the intercombination transition lSo-3 P1 at 689nm, namely red MOT. A 689nm laser used for cooling and trapping is injection locked to a master laser, whose linewidth is narrowed to 150 Hz by locking to a high finesse optical reference cavity.88 Sr atoms pre-cooled and trapped by the broad 1SO-1 Pl transition at 461 nm are transferred to the red MOT with the help of a time sequence controller. The transfer ratio is about 20% and the red MOT's temperature is estimated to be less than 20 μK by the time-of-flight(TOF) image analysis.

  7. Prediction of metallic nano-optical trapping forces by finite element-boundary integral method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiao-Min; Xu, Kai-Jiang; Yang, Ming-Lin; Sheng, Xin-Qing

    2015-03-01

    The hybrid of finite element and boundary integral (FE-BI) method is employed to predict nano-optical trapping forces of arbitrarily shaped metallic nanostructures. A preconditioning strategy is proposed to improve the convergence of the iterative solution. Skeletonization is employed to speed up the design and optimization where iteration has to be repeated for each beam configuration. The radiation pressure force (RPF) is computed by vector flux of the Maxwell's stress tensor. Numerical simulations are performed to validate the developed method in analyzing the plasmonic effects as well as the optical trapping forces. It is shown that the proposed method is capable of predicting the trapping forces of complex metallic nanostructures accurately and efficiently.

  8. SOVIET AND POLISH RESEARCH ON THE SELF-TRAPPING OF OPTICAL BEAMS IN NONLINEAR MEDIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical Review Letters in October 1964, was preceded in the Soviet literature by the works of G. A. Askar’yan of the Lebedev Institute and V. I. Talanov of the Scientific-Research Radiophysics Institute at Gor’kiy State University, which were published in June 1962 and 1964, respectively. Since that time Soviet researchers have contributed some 15 papers on various aspects of the self-focusing of optical beams. Significant research on the self-trapping of optical

  9. Spatial refractive index sensor using whispering gallery modes in an optically trapped microsphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, P.; Zijlstra, Peter; van der Molen, K.L.; Mosk, Allard

    2007-01-01

    The authors propose the use of an optically trapped, dye doped polystyrene microsphere for spatial probing of the refractive index at any position in a fluid. Using the dye embedded in the microsphere as an internal broadband excitation source the authors eliminated the need for a tunable excitation

  10. Spatial refractive index sensor using whispering gallery modes in an optically trapped microsphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Peter; Molen, van der Karen L.; Mosk, Allard P.

    2007-01-01

    The authors propose the use of an optically trapped, dye doped polystyrene microsphere for spatial probing of the refractive index at any position in a fluid. Using the dye embedded in the microsphere as an internal broadband excitation source the authors eliminated the need for a tunable excitation

  11. An atomic beam source for fast loading of a magneto-optical trap under high vacuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDowall, P.D.; Hilliard, Andrew; Grünzweig, T.

    2012-01-01

    is capable of loading 90 of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) in less than 7 s while maintaining a low vacuum pressure of 10 -11 Torr. The transverse velocity components of the atomic beam are measured to be within typical capture velocities of a rubidium MOT. Finally, we show that the atomic beam can be turned...

  12. High-flux two-dimensional magneto-optical-trap source for cold lithium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiecke, T.G.; Gensemer, S.D.; Ludewig, A.; Walraven, J.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap (2D MOT) as a beam source for cold Li-6 atoms. The source is side loaded from an oven operated at temperatures in the range 600 less than or similar to T less than or similar to 700 K. The performance is analyzed by loading the atoms into a

  13. Cavity-enhanced optical trapping of bacteria using a silicon photonic crystal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Leest, T.; Caroa, J.

    2013-01-01

    On-chip optical trapping and manipulation of cells based on the evanescent field of photonic structures is emerging as a promising technique, both in research and for applications in broader context. Relying on mass fabrication techniques, the involved integration of photonics and microfluidics allo

  14. Counter-propagating dual-trap optical tweezers based on linear momentum conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, M; Huguet, J M; Ritort, F

    2013-04-01

    We present a dual-trap optical tweezers setup which directly measures forces using linear momentum conservation. The setup uses a counter-propagating geometry, which allows momentum measurement on each beam separately. The experimental advantages of this setup include low drift due to all-optical manipulation, and a robust calibration (independent of the features of the trapped object or buffer medium) due to the force measurement method. Although this design does not attain the high-resolution of some co-propagating setups, we show that it can be used to perform different single molecule measurements: fluctuation-based molecular stiffness characterization at different forces and hopping experiments on molecular hairpins. Remarkably, in our setup it is possible to manipulate very short tethers (such as molecular hairpins with short handles) down to the limit where beads are almost in contact. The setup is used to illustrate a novel method for measuring the stiffness of optical traps and tethers on the basis of equilibrium force fluctuations, i.e., without the need of measuring the force vs molecular extension curve. This method is of general interest for dual trap optical tweezers setups and can be extended to setups which do not directly measure forces.

  15. Extending calibration-free force measurements to optically-trapped rod-shaped samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Català, Frederic; Marsà, Ferran; Montes-Usategui, Mario; Farré, Arnau; Martín-Badosa, Estela

    2017-02-01

    Optical trapping has become an optimal choice for biological research at the microscale due to its non-invasive performance and accessibility for quantitative studies, especially on the forces involved in biological processes. However, reliable force measurements depend on the calibration of the optical traps, which is different for each experiment and hence requires high control of the local variables, especially of the trapped object geometry. Many biological samples have an elongated, rod-like shape, such as chromosomes, intracellular organelles (e.g., peroxisomes), membrane tubules, certain microalgae, and a wide variety of bacteria and parasites. This type of samples often requires several optical traps to stabilize and orient them in the correct spatial direction, making it more difficult to determine the total force applied. Here, we manipulate glass microcylinders with holographic optical tweezers and show the accurate measurement of drag forces by calibration-free direct detection of beam momentum. The agreement between our results and slender-body hydrodynamic theoretical calculations indicates potential for this force-sensing method in studying protracted, rod-shaped specimens.

  16. Counter-propagating dual-trap optical tweezers based on linear momentum conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Huguet, J. M. [Small Biosystems Lab, Dept. de Fisica Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ritort, F. [Small Biosystems Lab, Dept. de Fisica Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ciber-BBN de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-04-15

    We present a dual-trap optical tweezers setup which directly measures forces using linear momentum conservation. The setup uses a counter-propagating geometry, which allows momentum measurement on each beam separately. The experimental advantages of this setup include low drift due to all-optical manipulation, and a robust calibration (independent of the features of the trapped object or buffer medium) due to the force measurement method. Although this design does not attain the high-resolution of some co-propagating setups, we show that it can be used to perform different single molecule measurements: fluctuation-based molecular stiffness characterization at different forces and hopping experiments on molecular hairpins. Remarkably, in our setup it is possible to manipulate very short tethers (such as molecular hairpins with short handles) down to the limit where beads are almost in contact. The setup is used to illustrate a novel method for measuring the stiffness of optical traps and tethers on the basis of equilibrium force fluctuations, i.e., without the need of measuring the force vs molecular extension curve. This method is of general interest for dual trap optical tweezers setups and can be extended to setups which do not directly measure forces.

  17. Design of a high-performance optical tweezer for nanoparticle trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conteduca, D.; Dell'Olio, F.; Ciminelli, C.; Krauss, T. F.; Armenise, M. N.

    2016-04-01

    Integrated optical nanotweezers offer a novel paradigm for optical trapping, as their ability to confine light at the nanoscale leads to extremely high gradient forces. To date, nanotweezers have been realized either as photonic crystal or as plasmonic nanocavities. Here, we propose a nanotweezer device based on a hybrid photonic/plasmonic cavity with the goal of achieving a very high quality factor-to-mode volume ( Q/ V) ratio. The structure includes a 1D photonic crystal dielectric cavity vertically coupled to a bowtie nanoantenna. A very high Q/ V ~ 107 (λ/n)-3 with a resonance transmission T = 29 % at λ R = 1381.1 nm has been calculated by 3D finite element method, affording strong light-matter interaction and making the hybrid cavity suitable for optical trapping. A maximum optical force F = -4.4 pN, high values of stability S = 30 and optical stiffness k = 90 pN/nm W have been obtained with an input power P in = 1 mW, for a polystyrene nanoparticle with a diameter of 40 nm. This performance confirms the high efficiency of the optical nanotweezer and its potential for trapping living matter at the nanoscale, such as viruses, proteins and small bacteria.

  18. Dynamic Simulation of Trapping and Controlled Rotation of a Microscale Rod Driven by Line Optical Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghshenas-Jaryani, Mahdi; Bowling, Alan; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2013-03-01

    Since the invention of optical tweezers, several biological and engineering applications, especially in micro-nanofluid, have been developed. For example, development of optically driven micromotors, which has an important role in microfluidic applications, has vastly been considered. Despite extensive experimental studies in this field, there is a lack of theoretical work that can verify and analyze these observations. This work develops a dynamic model to simulate trapping and controlled rotation of a microscale rod under influence of the optical trapping forces. The laser beam, used in line optical tweezers with a varying trap's length, was modeled based on a ray-optics approach. Herein, the effects of viscosity of the surrounding fluid (water), gravity, and buoyancy were included in the proposed model. The predicted results are in overall agreement with the experimental observation, which make the theoretical model be a viable tool for investigating the dynamic behavior of small size objects manipulated by optical tweezers in fluid environments. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. MCB-1148541.

  19. Optical trapping and tweezing using a spatial light modulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ismail, Y

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available properties within a channel of dimensions of approximately tens to hundreds micrometers achieved by the use of optical tweezing. The basic micro-fluidic channel is made Venturing into the field of Micro-fluidic Page 18 © CSIR 2009...

  20. The Laser Cooling and Magneto-Optical Trapping of the YO Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Mark

    Laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping of neutral atoms has revolutionized the field of atomic physics by providing an elegant and efficient method to produce cold dense samples of ultracold atoms. Molecules, with their strong anisotropic dipolar interaction promises to unlock even richer phenomenon. However, due to their additional vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom, laser cooling techniques have only been extended to a small set of diatomic molecules. In this thesis, we demonstrate the first magneto-optical trapping of a diatomic molecule using a quasi-cycling transition and an oscillating quadrupole magnetic field. The transverse temperature of a cryogenically produced YO beam was reduced from 25 mK to 10 mK via doppler cooling and further reduced to 2 mK with the addition of magneto-optical trapping forces. The optical cycling in YO is complicated by the presence of an intermediate electronic state, as decays through this state lead to optical pumping into dark rotational states. Thus, we also demonstrate the mixing of rotational states in the ground electronic state using microwave radiation. This technique greatly enhances optical cycling, leading to a factor of 4 increase in the YO beam fluorescence and is used in conjunction with a frequency modulated and chirped continuous wave laser to longitudinally slow the YO beam. We generate YO molecules below 10 m/s that are directly loadable into a three-dimensional magneto-optical trap. This mixing technique provides an alternative to maintaining rotational closure and should extend laser cooling to a larger set of molecules.

  1. Luminescence, optical and laser Raman scattering studies on γ -irradiated terbium-doped potassium iodide crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangaru, S.

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports the thermoluminescence (TL), optical absorption and other laser Raman scattering studies performed on terbium-doped KI crystals γ-irradiated at room temperature. Photoluminescence studies confirm the presence of terbium ions in the KI matrix in their trivalent form. Formation of V3- and Z1-centres on F-bleaching of γ-irradiated crystals was observed. The characteristic emission due to Tb3+ ions in the spectral distribution under optically stimulated emission and TL emission confirms the participation of the Tb3+ ions in the recombination process. The Raman bands were identified as the totally symmetric vibration modes of f.c.c. species KI:Tb3+.

  2. Exploiting vibrational strong coupling to make an optical parametric oscillator out of a Raman laser

    CERN Document Server

    del Pino, Javier; Feist, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    When the collective coupling of the rovibrational states in organic molecules and confined electromagnetic modes is sufficiently strong, the system enters into vibrational strong coupling, leading to the formation of hybrid light-matter quasiparticles. In this work we demonstrate theoretically how this hybridization in combination with stimulated Raman scattering can be utilized to widen the capabilities of Raman laser devices. We explore the conditions under which the lasing threshold can be diminished and the system can be transformed into an optical parametric oscillator. Finally, we show how the dramatic reduction of the many final molecular states into two collective excitations can be used to create an all-optical switch with output in the mid-infrared.

  3. Performance optimization of EDFA-Raman hybrid optical amplifier using genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Simranjit; Kaler, R. S.

    2015-05-01

    For the first time, a novel net gain analytical model of EDFA-Raman hybrid optical amplifier (HOA) is designed and optimized the various parameters using genetic algorithm. Our method has shown to be robust in the simultaneous analysis of multiple parameters, such as Raman length, EDFA length and its pump powers, to obtained highest possible gain. The optimized HOA is further investigated and characterized on system level in the scenario of 100×10 Gbps dense wavelength division multiplexed (DWDM) system with 25 GHz interval. With an optimized HOA, a flat gain of >18 dB is obtained from frequency region 187 to 189.5 THz with a gain variation of less than 1.35 dB without using any gain flattened technique. The obtained noise figure is also the lowest value (<2 dB/channel) ever reported for proposed hybrid optical amplifier at reduced channel spacing with acceptable bit error rate.

  4. Exploiting Vibrational Strong Coupling to Make an Optical Parametric Oscillator Out of a Raman Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pino, Javier; Garcia-Vidal, Francisco J.; Feist, Johannes

    2016-12-01

    When the collective coupling of the rovibrational states in organic molecules and confined electromagnetic modes is sufficiently strong, the system enters into vibrational strong coupling, leading to the formation of hybrid light-matter quasiparticles. In this Letter, we demonstrate theoretically how this hybridization in combination with stimulated Raman scattering can be utilized to widen the capabilities of Raman laser devices. We explore the conditions under which the lasing threshold can be diminished and the system can be transformed into an optical parametric oscillator. Finally, we show how the dramatic reduction of the many final molecular states into two collective excitations can be used to create an all-optical switch with output in the midinfrared.

  5. An optically trapped mirror for reaching the standard quantum limit

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Nobuyuki; Aso, Yoichi; Tsubono, Kimio

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of a mechanical oscillator driven by quantum back-action is a fundamental requirement to reach the standard quantum limit (SQL) for force measurement, in optomechanical systems. However, thermal fluctuating force generally dominates a disturbance on the oscillator. In the macroscopic scale, an optical linear cavity including a suspended mirror has been used for the weak force measurement, such as gravitational-wave detectors. This configuration has the advantages of reducing the dissipation of the pendulum (i.e., suspension thermal noise) due to a gravitational dilution by using a thin wire, and of increasing the circulating laser power. However, the use of the thin wire is weak for an optical torsional anti-spring effect in the cavity, due to the low mechanical restoring force of the wire. Thus, there is the trade-off between the stability of the system and the sensitivity. Here, we describe using a triangular optical cavity to overcome this limitation for reaching the SQL. The triangular cav...

  6. Holographic optical traps for atom-based topological Kondo devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccheri, F.; Bruce, G. D.; Trombettoni, A.; Cassettari, D.; Babujian, H.; Korepin, V. E.; Sodano, P.

    2016-07-01

    The topological Kondo (TK) model has been proposed in solid-state quantum devices as a way to realize non-Fermi liquid behaviors in a controllable setting. Another motivation behind the TK model proposal is the demand to demonstrate the quantum dynamical properties of Majorana fermions, which are at the heart of their potential use in topological quantum computation. Here we consider a junction of crossed Tonks-Girardeau gases arranged in a star-geometry (forming a Y-junction), and we perform a theoretical analysis of this system showing that it provides a physical realization of the TK model in the realm of cold atom systems. Using computer-generated holography, we experimentally implement a Y-junction suitable for atom trapping, with controllable and independent parameters. The junction and the transverse size of the atom waveguides are of the order of 5 μm, leading to favorable estimates for the Kondo temperature and for the coupling across the junction. Since our results show that all the required theoretical and experimental ingredients are available, this provides the demonstration of an ultracold atom device that may in principle exhibit the TK effect.

  7. Transient trapping of two microparticles interacting with optical tweezers and cavitation bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Sosa, Viridiana; Quinto-Su, Pedro A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work we show that two absorbing microbeads can briefly share the same optical trap while creating microscopic explosions. Optical forces pull the particles towards the waist of the trapping beam, once a particle reaches the vicinity of the waist, the surrounding liquid is superheated creating an explosion or cavitation bubble that pushes the particle away while lengthening or shortening the trajectories of the surrounding particles. Hence effectively coupling all the trajectories to each cavitation event. We find that when two microbeads reach the waist simultaneously within a distance of 2.9 μ {{m}} from the beam center in the transverse plane, a larger explosion might result in ejection from the trap. The measured maximum radial displacements {{Δ }}{ρ }{{c}} due to cavitation are {{Δ }}{ρ }{{c}}=3.9+/- 2.2 μ {{m}} when the particles reach simultaneously with maximum bubble sizes {R}{{\\max }}=6.2+/- 3.1 μ {{m}}, while for individual cases {{Δ }}{ρ }{{c}} is 2.7+/- 1.2 μ {{m}} and {R}{{\\max }}=4.2+/- 1.6 μ {{m}}. We also measure the characteristic timescale of two particle coalescence which is a measure of the expected time that the particles can stay trapped near the waist. The measurements are fitted by a Poisson decaying exponential probability distribution. A simple one-dimensional model shows that the characteristic timescales for transient trapping of multiple absorbing particles decrease as more objects are added.

  8. Ra{sup +} ion trapping - atomic parity violation measurement and an optical clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Amita; Dijck, Elwin A.; Nunez Portela, Mayerlin; Valappol, Nivedya; Boell, Oliver; Jungmann, Klaus; Onderwater, Cornelis G. G.; Schlesser, Sophie; Timmermans, Rob G.E.; Willmann, Lorenz; Wilschut, Hans W. [University of Groningen, FWN, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-07-01

    A single trapped Ra{sup +} ion has an excellent potential for a precision measurement of the Weinberg mixing angle at low momentum transfer and testing thereby the electroweak running. The absolute frequencies of the transition 7s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-7d{sup 2}D{sub 3/2} at wavelength 828 nm have been determined in {sup 212*214}Ra{sup +} to better than 19 MHz with laser spectroscopy on small samples of ions trapped in a linear Paul trap at the online facility TRIμP of KVI. The measurement of the Weinberg angle requires the localization of the ion within a fraction of an optical wavelength. The current experiments are focused on trapping and laser spectroscopy on a single Ba{sup +} as a precursor for Ra{sup +}. Work towards single ion trapping of Ra{sup +}, including the preparation of an offline {sup 223}Ra source is in progress. Most elements of the setup for single Ra+ ion parity measurement are also well suited for realizing a most stable optical clock.

  9. Raman Tweezers Spectroscopy of Live, Single Red and White Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankapur, Aseefhali; Zachariah, Elsa; Chidangil, Santhosh; Valiathan, Manna; Mathur, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    An optical trap has been combined with a Raman spectrometer to make high-resolution measurements of Raman spectra of optically-immobilized, single, live red (RBC) and white blood cells (WBC) under physiological conditions. Tightly-focused, near infrared wavelength light (1064 nm) is utilized for trapping of single cells and 785 nm light is used for Raman excitation at low levels of incident power (few mW). Raman spectra of RBC recorded using this high-sensitivity, dual-wavelength apparatus has enabled identification of several additional lines; the hitherto-unreported lines originate purely from hemoglobin molecules. Raman spectra of single granulocytes and lymphocytes are interpreted on the basis of standard protein and nucleic acid vibrational spectroscopy data. The richness of the measured spectrum illustrates that Raman studies of live cells in suspension are more informative than conventional micro-Raman studies where the cells are chemically bound to a glass cover slip. PMID:20454686

  10. Raman tweezers spectroscopy of live, single red and white blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aseefhali Bankapur

    Full Text Available An optical trap has been combined with a Raman spectrometer to make high-resolution measurements of Raman spectra of optically-immobilized, single, live red (RBC and white blood cells (WBC under physiological conditions. Tightly-focused, near infrared wavelength light (1064 nm is utilized for trapping of single cells and 785 nm light is used for Raman excitation at low levels of incident power (few mW. Raman spectra of RBC recorded using this high-sensitivity, dual-wavelength apparatus has enabled identification of several additional lines; the hitherto-unreported lines originate purely from hemoglobin molecules. Raman spectra of single granulocytes and lymphocytes are interpreted on the basis of standard protein and nucleic acid vibrational spectroscopy data. The richness of the measured spectrum illustrates that Raman studies of live cells in suspension are more informative than conventional micro-Raman studies where the cells are chemically bound to a glass cover slip.

  11. Probing the dynamics of an optically trapped particle by phase sensitive back focal plane interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Basudev; Haldar, Arijit; Gupta, Ratnesh Kumar; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Banerjee, Ayan

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of an optically trapped particle are often determined by measuring intensity shifts of the back-scattered light from the particle using position sensitive detectors. We present a technique which measures the phase of the back-scattered light using balanced detection in an external Mach-Zender interferometer scheme where we separate out and beat the scattered light from the bead and that from the top surface of our trapping chamber. The technique has improved axial motion resolution over intensity-based detection, and can also be used to measure lateral motion of the trapped particle. In addition, we are able to track the Brownian motion of trapped 1 and 3 $\\mu$m diameter beads from the phase jitter and show that, similar to intensity-based measurements, phase measurements can also be used to simultaneously determine displacements of the trapped bead as well as the spring constant of the trap. For lateral displacements, we have matched our experimental results with a simulation of the overall phas...

  12. A simple technique based on a single optical trap for the determination of bacterial swimming pattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio A Martínez

    Full Text Available Bacterial motility is associated to a wide range of biological processes and it plays a key role in the virulence of many pathogens. Here we describe a method to distinguish the dynamic properties of bacteria by analyzing the statistical functions derived from the trajectories of a bacterium trapped by a single optical beam. The approach is based on the model of the rotation of a solid optically trapped sphere. The technique is easily implemented in a biological laboratory, since with only a small number of optical and electronic components a simple biological microscope can be converted into the required analyzer. To illustrate the functionality of this method, we probed several Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutants that differed from the wild-type with respect to their swimming patterns. In a further application, the motility dynamics of the S. Typhimurium cheV mutant were characterized.

  13. Quantum Theory of Cavityless Feedback Cooling of An Optically Trapped Nanoparticle

    CERN Document Server

    Rodenburg, B; Vamivakas, A N; Bhattacharya, M

    2015-01-01

    We present a quantum theory of cavityless feedback cooling of an optically trapped harmonically oscillating subwavelength dielectric particle, a configuration recently realized in several experiments. Specifically, we derive a Markovian master equation that treats the mechanical as well as optical degrees of freedom quantum mechanically. Employing this equation, we solve for the nanoparticle phonon number dynamics exactly, and extract analytic expressions for the cooling timescale and the steady state phonon number. We present experimental data verifying the predictions of our model in the classical regime, and also demonstrate that quantum ground state preparation is within reach of ongoing experiments. Our work provides a quantitative framework for future theoretical modeling of the cavityless quantum optomechanics of optically trapped dielectric particles.

  14. ACADEMIC TRAINING: Probing nature with high precision; particle traps, laser spectroscopy and optical combs

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    17, 18, 19 June LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Probing nature with high precision; particle traps, laser spectroscopy and optical combs by G. GABRIELSE / Harvard University, USA Experiments with atomic energy scales probe nature and its symmetries with exquisite precision. Particle traps allow the manipulation of single charged particles for months at a time, allow the most accurate comparison of theory and experiment, and promise to allow better measurement of fundamental quantities like the fine structure constant. Ions and atoms can be probed with lasers that are phase locked to microwave frequency standards via optical combs, thus calibrating optical sources in terms of the official cesium second. A series of three lectures will illustrate what can be measured and discuss key techniques.  ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  15. Optical trapping by Laguerre-Gaussian beams: Symmetries, stability and equilibria

    CERN Document Server

    Kiselev, Alexei D

    2016-01-01

    We use the T-matrix formalism in combination with the method of far-field matching to evaluate the optical force exerted by Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) light beams on a spherical (Mie) particle. For both non-vortex and optical vortex LG beams, the theoretical results are used to analyze the optical-force-induced dynamics of the scatterer near the trapping points represented by the equilibrium (zero-force) positions. The regimes of linearized dynamics are described in terms of the stiffness matrix spectrum and the damping constant of the ambient medium. For the purely azimuthal LG beams, the dynamics is found to be locally non-conservative and is characterized by the presence of conditionally stable equilibria (unstable zero-force points that can be stabilized by the ambient damping). The effects related to the Mie resonances that under certain conditions manifest themselves as the points changing the trapping properties of the particles are discussed.

  16. Dynamics analysis of microsphere in a dual-beam fiber-optic trap with transverse offset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinlin; Xiao, Guangzong; Luo, Hui; Xiong, Wei; Yang, Kaiyong

    2016-04-04

    A comprehensive dynamics analysis of microsphere has been presented in a dual-beam fiber-optic trap with transverse offset. As the offset distance between two counterpropagating beams increases, the motion type of the microsphere starts with capture, then spiral motion, then orbital rotation, and ends with escape. We analyze the transformation process and mechanism of the four motion types based on ray optics approximation. Dynamic simulations show that the existence of critical offset distances at which different motion types transform. The result is an important step toward explaining physical phenomena in a dual-beam fiber-optic trap with transverse offset, and is generally applicable to achieving controllable motions of microspheres in integrated systems, such as microfluidic systems and lab-on-a-chip systems.

  17. In-field Raman amplification on coherent optical fiber links for frequency metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clivati, C; Bolognini, G; Calonico, D; Faralli, S; Mura, A; Levi, F

    2015-04-20

    Distributed Raman amplification (DRA) is widely exploited for the transmission of broadband, modulated signals used in data links, but not yet in coherent optical links for frequency metrology, where the requirements are rather different. After preliminary tests on fiber spools, in this paper we deeper investigate Raman amplification on deployed in-field optical metrological links. We actually test a Doppler-stabilized optical link both on a 94 km-long metro-network implementation with multiplexed ITU data channels and on a 180 km-long dedicated fiber haul connecting two cities, where DRA is employed in combination with Erbium-doped fiber amplification (EDFA). The performance of DRA is detailed in both experiments, indicating that it does not introduce noticeable penalties for the metrological signal or for the ITU data channels. We hence show that Raman amplification of metrological signals can be compatible with a wavelength division multiplexing architecture and that it can be used as an alternative or in combination with dedicated bidirectional EDFAs. No deterioration is noticed in the coherence properties of the delivered signal, which attains frequency instability at the 10(-19) level in both cases. This study can be of interest also in view of the undergoing deployment of continental fiber networks for frequency metrology.

  18. Generating Nanostructures with Multiphoton Absorption Polymerization using Optical Trap Assisted Nanopatterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Leitz, Karl-Heinz; Fardel, Romain; Schmidt, Michael; Arnold, Craig B.

    The need to generate sub 100 nm features is of interest for a variety of applications including optics, optoelectronics, and plasmonics. To address this requirement, several advanced optical lithography techniques have been developed based on either multiphoton absorption polymerization or near-field effects. In this paper, we combine strengths from multiphoton absorption and near field using optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN). A Gaussian beam is used to position a microsphere in a polymer precursor fluid near a substrate. An ultrafast laser is focused by that microsphere to induce multiphoton polymerization in the near field, leading additive direct-write nanoscale processing.

  19. Surface transport and stable trapping of particles and cells by an optical waveguide loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellesø, Olav Gaute; Løvhaugen, Pål; Subramanian, Ananth Z; Wilkinson, James S; Ahluwalia, Balpreet Singh

    2012-09-21

    Waveguide trapping has emerged as a useful technique for parallel and planar transport of particles and biological cells and can be integrated with lab-on-a-chip applications. However, particles trapped on waveguides are continuously propelled forward along the surface of the waveguide. This limits the practical usability of the waveguide trapping technique with other functions (e.g. analysis, imaging) that require particles to be stationary during diagnosis. In this paper, an optical waveguide loop with an intentional gap at the centre is proposed to hold propelled particles and cells. The waveguide acts as a conveyor belt to transport and deliver the particles/cells towards the gap. At the gap, the diverging light fields hold the particles at a fixed position. The proposed waveguide design is numerically studied and experimentally implemented. The optical forces on the particle at the gap are calculated using the finite element method. Experimentally, the method is used to transport and trap micro-particles and red blood cells at the gap with varying separations. The waveguides are only 180 nm thick and thus could be integrated with other functions on the chip, e.g. microfluidics or optical detection, to make an on-chip system for single cell analysis and to study the interaction between cells.

  20. Optical trapping of nanoparticles with significantly reduced laser powers by using counter-propagating beams (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chenglong; LeBrun, Thomas W.

    2015-08-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNP) have wide applications ranging from nanoscale heating to cancer therapy and biological sensing. Optical trapping of GNPs as small as 18 nm has been successfully achieved with laser power as high as 855 mW, but such high powers can damage trapped particles (particularly biological systems) as well heat the fluid, thereby destabilizing the trap. In this article, we show that counter propagating beams (CPB) can successfully trap GNP with laser powers reduced by a factor of 50 compared to that with a single beam. The trapping position of a GNP inside a counter-propagating trap can be easily modulated by either changing the relative power or position of the two beams. Furthermore, we find that under our conditions while a single-beam most stably traps a single particle, the counter-propagating beam can more easily trap multiple particles. This (CPB) trap is compatible with the feedback control system we recently demonstrated to increase the trapping lifetimes of nanoparticles by more than an order of magnitude. Thus, we believe that the future development of advanced trapping techniques combining counter-propagating traps together with control systems should significantly extend the capabilities of optical manipulation of nanoparticles for prototyping and testing 3D nanodevices and bio-sensing.

  1. Absorption spectroscopy of cold caesium atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Shu-Bin; Liu Tao; Geng Tao; Zhang Tian-Cai; Peng Kun-Chi; Wang Jun-Min

    2004-01-01

    Absorption spectra of cold caesium atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap are measured around D2 line at 852nm with a weak probe beam. Absorption reduction dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)effect induced by the cooling/trapping field in a V-type three-level system and a gain peak near the cycling transition are clearly observed. Several mechanisms mixed with EIT effect in a normal V-type three-level system are briefly discussed. A simple theoretical analysis based on a dressed-state model is presented for interpretation of the absorption spectra.

  2. Precision measurement and compensation of optical stark shifts for an ion-trap quantum processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häffner, H; Gulde, S; Riebe, M; Lancaster, G; Becher, C; Eschner, J; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Blatt, R

    2003-04-11

    Using optical Ramsey interferometry, we precisely measure the laser-induced ac-Stark shift on the S(1/2)-D(5/2) "quantum bit" transition near 729 nm in a single trapped 40Ca+ ion. We cancel this shift using an additional laser field. This technique is of particular importance for the implementation of quantum information processing with cold trapped ions. As a simple application we measure the atomic phase evolution during a n x 2 pi rotation of the quantum bit.

  3. Raman amplification of Stokes pulse in ultra-small silicon on-insulator optical waveguide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The stimulated Raman amplification of picosecond Stokes pulse is numerically investigated in ultra-small silicon-oninsulator optical waveguide. Numerical results show that we obtain the gain of up to 30-dB for weak Stokes pulse in the copropagation configuration for 10 mm Jength waveguide using high intensity pump optical pulse. The peak gain, pulse width, rise time, and fall time of Stokes pulse will experience the variation course of decaying then increasing with increasing waveguide length. The time delay of output Stokes pulse is controlled by adjusting the initial time delay of both pump and Stokes pulses.

  4. Theoretical analysis on double Rayleigh backscattering noise in optical fibre Raman amplifiers and its suppression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Wen-Ning; Chen Jian-Ping; Li Xin-Wan; Shang Tao

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, amplified double Rayleigh backscattering noise (DRB) in the optical fibre Raman amplifier is analysed. Expressions are presented for both forward pumping and backward pumping schemes. Calculation is performed to show the effective suppression of DRB noise by employing an optical isolator. The optimal position for the isolator is determined and is found to be insensitive to the power levels of the signals and pumps. The results show that a reduction of the DRB noise by almost 2 to 3 orders can be reached.

  5. A dark-line two-dimensional magneto-optical trap of 85Rb atoms with high optical depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanchao; Chen, J F; Liu, Chang; Zhou, Shuyu; Loy, M M T; Wong, G K L; Du, Shengwang

    2012-07-01

    We describe the apparatus of a dark-line two-dimensional (2D) magneto-optical trap (MOT) of (85)Rb cold atoms with high optical depth (OD). Different from the conventional configuration, two (of three) pairs of trapping laser beams in our 2D MOT setup do not follow the symmetry axes of the quadrupole magnetic field: they are aligned with 45° angles to the longitudinal axis. Two orthogonal repumping laser beams have a dark-line volume in the longitudinal axis at their cross over. With a total trapping laser power of 40 mW and repumping laser power of 18 mW, we obtain an atomic OD up to 160 in an electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) scheme, which corresponds to an atomic-density-length product NL = 2.05 × 10(15) m(-2). In a closed two-state system, the OD can become as large as more than 600. Our 2D MOT configuration allows full optical access of the atoms in its longitudinal direction without interfering with the trapping and repumping laser beams spatially. Moreover, the zero magnetic field along the longitudinal axis allows the cold atoms maintain a long ground-state coherence time without switching off the MOT magnetic field, which makes it possible to operate the MOT at a high repetition rate and a high duty cycle. Our 2D MOT is ideal for atomic-ensemble-based quantum optics applications, such as EIT, entangled photon pair generation, optical quantum memory, and quantum information processing.

  6. Chaos-assisted, broadband trapping of light in optical resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, C; Molinari, D; Khan, Y; Ooi, B S; Krauss, T F; Fratalocchi, A

    2012-01-01

    Chaos is a phenomenon that occurs in many aspects of contemporary science. In classical dynamics, chaos is defined as a hypersensitivity to initial conditions. The presence of chaos is often unwanted, as it introduces unpredictability, which makes it difficult to predict or explain experimental results. Conversely, we demonstrate here how chaos can be used to enhance the ability of an optical resonator to store energy. We combine analytic theory with ab-initio simulations and experiments in photonic crystal resonators to show that a chaotic resonator can store six times more energy than its classical counterpart of the same volume. We explain the observed increase with the equipartition of energy among all degrees of freedom of the chaotic resonator, i.e. the cavity modes, which is evident from the convergence of their lifetime towards a single value. A compelling illustration of the theory is provided by demonstrating enhanced absorption in deformed polystyrene microspheres.

  7. All-optical ion generation for ion trap loading

    CERN Document Server

    Sheridan, Kevin; Keller, Matthias; 10.1007/s00340-011-4563-7

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the all-optical generation of ions by photo-ionisation of atoms generated by pulsed laser ablation. A direct comparison between a resistively heated oven source and pulsed laser ablation is reported. Pulsed laser ablation with 10 ns Nd:YAG laser pulses is shown to produce large calcium flux, corresponding to atomic beams produced with oven temperatures greater than 650 K. For an equivalent atomic flux, pulsed laser ablation is shown to produce a thermal load more than one order of magnitude smaller than the oven source. The atomic beam distributions obey Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics with most probable speeds corresponding to temperatures greater than 2200 K. Below a threshold pulse fluence between 280 mJ/cm^2 and 330 mJ/cm^2, the atomic beam is composed exclusively of ground state atoms. For higher fluences ions and excited atoms are generated.

  8. Modified Nonlinear Inverse Synthesis for Optical Links with Distributed Raman Amplification

    CERN Document Server

    Le, Son T; Rosa, Pawel; Ania-Castanon, Juan D; Turitsyn, Sergei K

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear Fourier transform (NFT) and eigenvalue communication with the use of nonlinear signal spectrum (both discrete and continuous), have been recently discussed as a promising transmission method to combat fiber nonlinearity impairments. However, because the NFT-based transmission method employs the integrability property of the lossless nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation (NLSE), the original approach can only be applied directly to optical links with ideal distributed Raman amplification. In this paper, we investigate in details the impact of a non-ideal Raman gain profile on the performance of the nonlinear inverse synthesis (NIS) scheme, in which the transmitted information is encoded directly onto the continuous part of the nonlinear signal spectrum. We propose the lossless path-averaged (LPA) model for fiber links with non-ideal Raman gain profile by taking into account the average effect of the Raman gain. We show that the NIS scheme employing the LPA model can offer a performance gain of 3 dB regard...

  9. Freely designable optical frequency conversion in Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jian; Katsuragawa, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear optical processes are governed by the relative-phase relationships among the relevant electromagnetic fields in these processes. In this Report, we describe the physics of arbitrary manipulation of Raman-resonant four-wave-mixing process by artificial control of relative phases. As a typical example, we show freely designable optical-frequency conversions to extreme spectral regions, mid-infrared and vacuum-ultraviolet, with near-unity quantum efficiencies. Furthermore, we show that such optical-frequency conversions can be realized by using a surprisingly simple technology where transparent plates are placed in a nonlinear optical medium and their positions and thicknesses are adjusted precisely. In a numerical simulation assuming practically applicable parameters in detail, we demonstrate a single-frequency tunable laser that covers the whole vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range of 120 to 200 nm. PMID:25748023

  10. Long Working-Distance Optical Trap for in Situ Analysis of Contact-Induced Phase Transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ryan D; Lance, Sara; Gordon, Joshua A; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2015-06-16

    A novel optical trapping technique is described that combines an upward propagating Gaussian beam and a downward propagating Bessel beam. Using this optical arrangement and an on-demand droplet generator makes it possible to rapidly and reliably trap particles with a wide range of particle diameters (∼1.5-25 μm), in addition to crystalline particles, without the need to adjust the optical configuration. Additionally, a new image analysis technique is described to detect particle phase transitions using a template-based autocorrelation of imaged far-field elastically scattered laser light. The image analysis allows subtle changes in particle characteristics to be quantified. The instrumental capabilities are validated with observations of deliquescence and homogeneous efflorescence of well-studied inorganic salts. Then, a novel collision-based approach to seeded crystal growth is described in which seed crystals are delivered to levitated aqueous droplets via a nitrogen gas flow. To our knowledge, this is the first account of contact-induced phase changes being studied in an optical trap. This instrument offers a novel and simple analytical technique for in situ measurements and observations of phase changes and crystal growth processes relevant to atmospheric science, industrial crystallization, pharmaceuticals, and many other fields.

  11. Optical probing of Eu ions confined in an RF trap

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pushpa M Rao; Anita Gupta

    2012-01-01

    The Eu ions confined in an RF quadrupole trap, has been optically detected. Using a tunable dye laser which is pumped by a Nd-YAG pulsed laser system, the resonance ${}^9S_4–6 p_{3/2}$, = 5 transition of the Eu ions have been excited and the resulting fluorescence to the metastable ${}^9 D_{4−6}$ state has been detected. In preparation to determine the ground-state hyperfine splitting of the odd isotopes we found the optimum trapping operating point. We have also observed a number of instabilities inside the region of the stability for an ideal trap. These non-linear resonances arise from higher-order contributions to the ideal quadrupole potential.

  12. On the Properties of a Bundle of Flexible Actin Filaments in an Optical Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Perilli, Alessia; Ciccotti, Giovanni; Ryckaert, Jean Paul

    2016-01-01

    We establish the Statistical Mechanics framework for a bundle of Nf living and uncrosslinked actin filaments in a supercritical solution of free monomers pressing against a mobile wall. The filaments are anchored normally to a fixed planar surface at one of their ends and, because of their limited flexibility, they grow almost parallel to each other. Their growing ends hit a moving obstacle, depicted as a second planar wall, parallel to the previous one and subjected to a harmonic compressive force. The force constant is denoted as trap strength while the distance between the two walls as trap length to make contact with the experimental optical trap apparatus. For an ideal solution of reactive filaments and free monomers at fixed free monomers chemical potential, we obtain the general expression for the grand potential from which we derive averages and distributions of relevant physical quantities, namely the obstacle position, the bundle polymerization force and the number of filaments in direct contact wit...

  13. Wave optical simulation of the light trapping properties of black silicon surface textures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bett, Alexander Jürgen; Eisenlohr, Johannes; Höhn, Oliver; Repo, Päivikki; Savin, Hele; Bläsi, Benedikt; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph

    2016-03-21

    Due to their low reflectivity and effective light trapping properties black silicon nanostructured surfaces are promising front side structures for thin crystalline silicon solar cells. For further optimization of the light trapping effect, particularly in combination with rear side structures, it is necessary to simulate the optical properties of black silicon. Especially, the angular distribution of light in the silicon bulk after passage through the front side structure is relevant. In this paper, a rigorous coupled wave analysis of black silicon is presented, where the black silicon needle shaped structure is approximated by a randomized cone structure. The simulated absorptance agrees well with measurement data. Furthermore, the simulated angular light distribution within the silicon bulk shows that about 70% of the light can be subjected to internal reflection, highlighting the good light trapping properties.

  14. Quantum phases and dynamics of bosonic atoms trapped in a single-mode optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Bhuvanesh; Mueller, Erich

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by experiments performed by R. Landig et al. (arXiv:1511.00007), we theoretically explore the behavior of bosonic atoms trapped in a single-mode cavity in the presence of a two-dimensional optical lattice. As explained by arXiv:1511.00007, Rayleigh scattering of light from the lattice-inducing beams into the cavity produces infinite-range cavity-mediated interactions between the atoms, leading to competition between superfluid, supersolid, Mott insulating and charge density wave phases. We calculate the phase diagram for a uniform trap using a variation of the Gutzwiller Ansatz. We also calculate the spatial distribution of the different phases in the gas in the presence of a harmonic trap. We explore hysteretic behavior when parameters of the system are changed.

  15. Calibration of trapping force and response function of optical tweezers in viscoelastic media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Mario; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2007-01-01

    , 594) is not possible as the viscoelastic properties of the bio-active medium are a priori unknown. Here, we present an approach that neither requires explicit assumptions about the size of the trapped particle nor about the viscoelastic properties of the medium. Instead, the interaction between...... the medium and the trapped particle is described in a general manner, through velocity and acceleration memory. Our method is applicable to general, at least locally homogeneous, viscoelastic media. The procedure combines active and passive approaches by the application of Onsager's regression hypothesis....... It allows extraction of the trapping stiffness kappa of the optical tweezers and of the response function chi(omega), which is the frequency-dependent effective inverse spring constant of the system. Finally, information about the viscoelastic properties of the medium may also be found. To test the method...

  16. Breakdown of Atomic Hyperfine Coupling in a Deep Optical-Dipole Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Neuzner, Andreas; Dürr, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally study the breakdown of hyperfine coupling for an atom in a deep optical-dipole trap. One-color laser spectroscopy is performed at the resonance lines of a single $^{87}$Rb atom for a trap wavelength of 1064 nm. Evidence of hyperfine breakdown comes from three observations, namely a nonlinear dependence of the transition frequencies on the trap intensity, a splitting of lines which are degenerate for small intensities, and the ability to drive transitions which would be forbidden by selection rules in the absence of hyperfine breakdown. From the data, we infer the hyperfine interval of the $5P_{1/2}$ state and the scalar and tensor polarizabilities for the $5P_{3/2}$ state.

  17. Buffer-gas loaded magneto-optical traps for Yb, Tm, Er and Ho

    CERN Document Server

    Hemmerling, Boerge; Chae, Eunmi; Ravi, Aakash; Doyle, John M

    2013-01-01

    Direct loading of magneto-optical traps from a very slow cryogenic buffer-gas beam of lanthanides is achieved and studied, without the need for laser slowing. A collisionally cooled cryogenic atomic source with average forward velocity of 60-70 m/s and a width of ~70 m/s allows for loading without additional dissipation, unlike oven or supersonic sources. The lanthanides Yb, Tm, Er, and Ho are trapped. Despite the He buffer-gas background, we observe a maximum lifetime of about 80 ms (with Yb). We further show that the addition of a single-frequency slowing laser increases the number of trapped Yb atoms by an order of magnitude, yielding a total of 4.0(2) x 10^8. We study decay to metastable states in all species and report decay rates. Extension of this approach to MOTs of molecules is discussed.

  18. Light-induced evaporative cooling in a magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Hong-Yu; Cheng Hua-Dong; Wang Yu-Zhu; Liu Liang

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental demonstration of light-induced evaporative cooling in a magneto-optical trap.An additional laser is used to interact with atoms at the edge of the atomic cloud in the trap.These atoms get an additional force and evaporated away from the trap by both the magnetic field and laser fields.The remaining atoms have lower kinetic energy and thus are cooled.It reports the measurements on the temperature and atomic number after the evaporative cooling with different parameters including the distance between the laser and the centre of the atomic cloud,the detuning,the intensity.The results show that the light-induced evaporative cooling is a way to generate an ultra-cold atom source.

  19. Characterization of fluorescence collection optics integrated with a micro-fabricated surface electrode ion trap

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Craig R; Ellis, A R; Hunker, Jeff; Kemme, Shanalyn A; Maunz, Peter; Tabakov, Boyan; Tigges, Chris; Stick, Daniel L

    2013-01-01

    One of the outstanding challenges for ion trap quantum information processing is to accurately detect the states of many ions in a scalable fashion. In the particular case of surface traps, geometric constraints make imaging perpendicular to the surface appealing for light collection at multiple locations with minimal cross-talk. In this report we describe an experiment integrating Diffractive Optic Elements (DOE's) with surface electrode traps, connected through in-vacuum multi-mode fibers. The square DOE's reported here were all designed with solid angle collection efficiencies of 3.58%; with all losses included a detection efficiency of 0.388% (1.02% excluding the PMT loss) was measured with a single Ca+ ion. The presence of the DOE had minimal effect on the stability of the ion, both in temporal variation of stray electric fields and in motional heating rates.

  20. Preliminary research on monitoring the durability of concrete subjected to sulfate attack with optical fibre Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yanfei; Bai, Yun; Basheer, P. A. Muhammed; Boland, John J.; Wang, Jing Jing

    2013-04-01

    Formation of ettringite and gypsum from sulfate attack together with carbonation and chloride ingress have been considered as the most serious deterioration mechanisms of concrete structures. Although Electrical Resistance Sensors and Fibre Optic Chemical Sensors could be used to monitoring the latter two mechanisms in situ, currently there is no system for monitoring the deterioration mechanisms of sulfate attack and hence still needs to be developed. In this paper, a preliminary study was carried out to investigate the feasibility of monitoring the sulfate attack with optical fibre Raman spectroscopy through characterizing the ettringite and gypsum formed in deteriorated cementitious materials under an `optical fibre excitation + spectroscopy objective collection' configuration. Bench-mounted Raman spectroscopy analysis was also used to validate the spectrum obtained from the fibre-objective configuration. The results showed that the expected Raman bands of ettringite and gypsum in the sulfate attacked cement paste have been clearly identified by the optical fibre Raman spectroscopy and are in good agreement with those identified from bench-mounted Raman spectroscopy. Therefore, based on these preliminary results, there is a good potential of developing an optical fibre Raman spectroscopy-based system for monitoring the deterioration mechanisms of concrete subjected to the sulfate attack in the future.

  1. Quantum logic operations on two distant atoms trapped in two optical-fibre-connected cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Ying-Qiao; Zhang Shou; Yeon Kyu-Hwang; Yu Seong-Cho

    2011-01-01

    Based on the coupling of two distant three-level atoms in two separate optical cavities connected with two optical fibres,schemes on the generation of several two-qubit logic gates are discussed under the conditions of △ =δ -2v cos πk/2 (》) g/2 and (v~ g).Discussion and analysis of the fidelity,gate time and experimental setups show that our schemes are feasible with current optical cavity,atomic trap and optical fibre techniques.Moreover,the atom-cavityfibre coupling can be used to generate an N-qubit nonlocal entanglement and transfer quantum information among N distant atoms by arranging N atom-cavity assemblages in a line and connecting each two adjacent cavities with two optical fibres.

  2. Multisectional linear ion trap and novel loading method for optical spectroscopy of electron and nuclear transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysoev, Alexey A; Troyan, Victor I; Borisyuk, Peter V; Krasavin, Andrey V; Vasiliev, Oleg S; Palchikov, Vitaly G; Avdeev, Ivan A; Chernyshev, Denis M; Poteshin, Sergey S

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing need for the development of atomic and nuclear frequency standards because of the important contribution of methods for precision time and frequency measurements to the development of fundamental science, technology, and the economy. It is also conditioned by their potential use in optical clocks and quantum logic applications. It is especially important to develop a universal method that could allow one to use ions of most elements effectively (including ones that are not easily evaporated) proposed for the above-mentioned applications. A linear quadrupole ion trap for the optical spectroscopy of electron and nuclear transitions has been developed and evaluated experimentally. An ion source construction is based on an ultra-high vacuum evaporator in which a metal sample is subjected to an electron beam of energy up to 1 keV, resulting in the appearance of gaseous atoms and ions of various charge state. The linear ion trap consists of five successive quadrupole sections including an entrance quadrupole section, quadrupole mass filter, quadrupole ion guide, ion-trap section, and exit quadrupole section. The same radiofrequency but a different direct current voltage feeds the quadrupole sections. The instrument allows the mass and energy selected trapping of ions from ion beams of various intensities and their localization in the area of laser irradiation. The preliminary results presented show that the proposed instrument and methods allow one to produce effectively up to triply charged thorium ions as well as to trap ions for future spectroscopic study. The instrument is proposed for future use in optical clocks and quantum logic application development.

  3. Development of an in situ fiber optic Raman system to monitor hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Tina M; Dunn, Eileen E; Lilley, Marvin D; Holloway, John; Dable, Brian K; Marquardt, Brian J; Booksh, Karl S

    2004-07-01

    The development of a field portable fiber optic Raman system modified from commercially available components that can operate remotely on battery power and withstand the corrosive environment of the hydrothermal vents is discussed. The Raman system is designed for continuous monitoring in the deep-sea environment. A 785 nm diode laser was used in conjunction with a sapphire ball fiber optic Raman probe, single board computer, and a CCD detector. Using the system at ambient conditions the detection limits of SO(4)(2-), CO(3)(2-) and NO(3)(-) were determined to be approximately 0.11, 0.36 and 0.12 g l(-1) respectively. Mimicking the cold conditions of the sea floor by placing the equipment in a refrigerator yielded slightly worse detection limits of approximately 0.16 g l(-1) for SO(4)(-2) and 0.20 g l(-1) for NO(3)(-). Addition of minerals commonly found in vent fluid plumes also decreased the detection limits to approximately 0.33 and 0.34 g l(-1) respectively for SO(4)(-2) and NO(3)(-).

  4. Simulating surface-enhanced Raman optical activity using atomistic electrodynamics-quantum mechanical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulhai, Dhabih V; Jensen, Lasse

    2014-10-01

    Raman optical activity has proven to be a powerful tool for probing the geometry of small organic and biomolecules. It has therefore been expected that the same mechanisms responsible for surface-enhanced Raman scattering may allow for similar enhancements in surface-enhanced Raman optical activity (SEROA). However, SEROA has proved to be an experimental challenge and mirror-image SEROA spectra of enantiomers have so far not been measured. There exists a handful of theories to simulate SEROA, all of which treat the perturbed molecule as a point-dipole object. To go beyond these approximations, we present two new methods to simulate SEROA: the first is a dressed-tensors model that treats the molecule as a point-dipole and point-quadrupole object; the second method is the discrete interaction model/quantum mechanical (DIM/QM) model, which considers the entire charge density of the molecule. We show that although the first method is acceptable for small molecules, it fails for a medium-sized one such as 2-bromohexahelicene. We also show that the SEROA mode intensities and signs are highly sensitive to the nature of the local electric field and gradient, the orientation of the molecule, and the surface plasmon frequency width. Our findings give some insight into why experimental SEROA, and in particular observing mirror-image SEROA for enantiomers, has been difficult.

  5. Tapered Optical Fiber Probe Assembled with Plasmonic Nanostructures for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhulin; Lei, Xing; Liu, Ye; Wang, Zhiwei; Wang, Xiujuan; Wang, Zhaoming; Mao, Qinghe; Meng, Guowen

    2015-08-12

    Optical fiber-Raman devices integrated with plasmonic nanostructures have promising potentials for in situ probing remote liquid samples and biological samples. In this system, the fiber probe is required to simultaneously demonstrate stable surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals and high sensitivity toward the target species. Here we demonstrate a generic approach to integrate presynthesized plasmonic nanostructures with tapered fiber probes that are prepared by a dipping-etching method, through reversed electrostatic attraction between the silane couple agent modified silica fiber probe and the nanostructures. Using this approach, both negatively and positively charged plasmonic nanostructures with various morphologies (such as Au nanosphere, Ag nanocube, Au nanorod, Au@Ag core-shell nanorod) can be stably assembled on the tapered silica fiber probes. Attributed to the electrostatic force between the plasmonic units and the fiber surface, the nanostructures do not disperse in liquid samples easily, making the relative standard deviation of SERS signals as low as 2% in analyte solution. Importantly, the detection sensitivity of the system can be optimized by adjusting the cone angle (from 3.6° to 22°) and the morphology of nanostructures assembled on the fiber. Thus, the nanostructures-sensitized optical fiber-Raman probes show great potentials in the applications of SERS-based environmental detection of liquid samples.

  6. Near real-time measurement of forces applied by an optical trap to a rigid cylindrical object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Joseph; Hoeprich, David; Resnick, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    An automated data acquisition and processing system is established to measure the force applied by an optical trap to an object of unknown composition in real time. Optical traps have been in use for the past 40 years to manipulate microscopic particles, but the magnitude of applied force is often unknown and requires extensive instrument characterization. Measuring or calculating the force applied by an optical trap to nonspherical particles presents additional difficulties which are also overcome with our system. Extensive experiments and measurements using well-characterized objects were performed to verify the system performance.

  7. Analysis of thermal radiation in ion traps for optical frequency standards

    CERN Document Server

    Doležal, Miroslav; Nisbet-Jones, Peter B R; King, Steven A; Jones, Jonathan M; Klein, Hugh A; Gill, Patrick; Lindvall, Thomas; Wallin, Anders E; Merimaa, Mikko; Tamm, Christian; Sanner, Christian; Huntemann, Nils; Scharnhorst, Nils; Leroux, Ian D; Schmidt, Piet O; Burgermeister, Tobias; Mehlstäubler, Tanja E; Peik, Ekkehard

    2015-01-01

    In many of the high-precision optical frequency standards with trapped atoms or ions that are under development to date, the AC Stark shift induced by thermal radiation leads to a major contribution to the systematic uncertainty. We present an analysis of the inhomogeneous thermal environment experienced by ions in various types of ion traps. Finite element models which allow the determination of the temperature of the trap structure and the temperature of the radiation were developed for 5 ion trap designs, including operational traps at PTB and NPL and further optimized designs. Models were refined based on comparison with infrared camera measurement until an agreement of better than 10% of the measured temperature rise at critical test points was reached. The effective temperature rises of the radiation seen by the ion range from 0.8 K to 2.1 K at standard working conditions. The corresponding fractional frequency shift uncertainties resulting from the uncertainty in temperature are in the 10-18 range for ...

  8. Confocal Raman microscopy supported by optical clearing treatment of the skin—influence on collagen hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sdobnov, Anton Yu; Tuchin, Valery V.; Lademann, Juergen; E Darvin, Maxim

    2017-07-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) is employed to study the skin physiology, drug permeation and skin disease monitoring. In order to increase the depth of investigations, the effect of optical clearing was observed on porcine ear skin ex vivo. The optical clearing agents (OCAs) glycerol and iohexol (Omnipaque™) were applied to the porcine ear skin and investigated by CRM after 30 and 60 min of treatment. The extent of optical clearing by utilizing concentrations of 70% glycerol and 100% Omnipaque™ was evaluated. The intensity of the skin-related Raman peaks significantly increased starting from the depth 160 µm for Omnipaque™ and 40 µm for glycerol (p  ⩽  0.05) after 60 min of treatment. The OCAs’ influence on the collagen hydration in the deep-located dermis was investigated. Both OCAs induce skin dehydration, but the effect of glycerol treatment (30 min and 60 min) is stronger. The obtained results demonstrate that with increasing the treatment time, both glycerol and Omnipaque™ solutions improve the optical clearing of porcine skin making the deep-located dermal regions able for investigations. At the used concentrations and time intervals, glycerol is more effective than Omnipaque™. However, Omnipaque™ is more promising than glycerol for future in vivo applications as it is an already approved pharmaceutic substance without any known impact on the skin structure.

  9. Optical characteristics of biomass burning aerosols over Southeastern Europe determined from UV-Raman lidar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Amiridis

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of smoke on the aerosol loading in the free troposphere over Thessaloniki, Greece is examined in this paper. Ten cases during 2001–2005 were identified when very high aerosol optical depth values in the free troposphere were observed with a UV-Raman lidar. Particle dispersion modeling (FLEXPART and satellite hot spot fire detection (ATSR showed that these high free tropospheric aerosol optical depths are mainly attributed to the advection of smoke plumes from biomass burning regions over Thessaloniki. The biomass burning regions were found to extend across Russia in the latitudinal belt between 45° N–55° N, as well as in Eastern Europe (Baltic countries, Western Russia, Belarus, and the Ukraine. The highest frequency of agricultural fires occurred during the summer season (mainly in August. The data collected allowed the optical characterization of the smoke aerosols that arrived over Greece, where limited information has so far been available. Two-wavelength backscatter lidar measurements showed that the backscatter-related Ångström exponent ranged between 0.5 and 2.4 indicating a variety of particle sizes. UV-Raman lidar measurements showed that for smoke particles the extinction to backscatter ratios varied between 40 sr for small particles to 100 sr for large particles. Dispersion model estimations of the carbon monoxide tracer concentration profiles for smoke particles indicate that the variability of the optical parameters is a function of the age of the smoke plumes.

  10. Quantum optics including noise reduction, trapped ions, quantum trajectories, and decoherence

    CERN Document Server

    Orszag, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This new edition gives a unique and broad coverage of basic laser-related phenomena that allow graduate students, scientists and engineers to carry out research in quantum optics and laser physics. It covers quantization of the electromagnetic field, quantum theory of coherence, atom-field interaction models, resonance fluorescence, quantum theory of damping, laser theory using both the master equation and the Langevin theory, the correlated emission laser, input-output theory with applications to non-linear optics, quantum trajectories, quantum non-demolition measurements and generation of non-classical vibrational states of ions in a Paul trap. In this third edition, there is an enlarged chapter on trapped ions, as well as new sections on quantum computing and quantum bits with applications. There is also additional material included for quantum processing and entanglement. These topics are presented in a unified and didactic manner, each chapter is accompanied by specific problems and hints to solutions to...

  11. Quasi-optical theory of microwave plasma heating in open magnetic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalashov, A. G.; Balakin, A. A.; Gospodchikov, E. D.; Khusainov, T. A.

    2016-11-01

    Microwave heating of a high-temperature plasma confined in a large-scale open magnetic trap, including all important wave effects like diffraction, absorption, dispersion, and wave beam aberrations, is described for the first time within the first-principle technique based on consistent Maxwell's equations. With this purpose, the quasi-optical approach is generalized over weakly inhomogeneous gyrotrotropic media with resonant absorption and spatial dispersion, and a new form of the integral quasi-optical equation is proposed. An effective numerical technique for this equation's solution is developed and realized in a new code QOOT, which is verified with the simulations of realistic electron cyclotron heating scenarios at the Gas Dynamic Trap at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk, Russia).

  12. Enhanced topological phase and spin Hall shifts in an optical trap

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Basudev; Gupta, Subhasish Dutta; Roy, Soumyajit; Banerjee, Ayan

    2013-01-01

    The spin orbit interaction (SOI) of light has been in the focus in recent times because of fundamental consequences and potential applications in diverse systems ranging from inhomogeneous anisotropic media to engineered plasmonics and metamaterial strutures. Here we demonstrate perhaps one of the simplest means to realize SOI and the Spin Hall Shift (SHS) using a standard Gaussian TEM$_{00}$ beam in an optical trap. Our system exploits the versatility and interference generated in a stratified medium to control and manipulate SOI and transfer the resulting angular momentum to optically trapped micro-particles. We show that even such a simple setup can lead to an order of magnitude enhancement in the SHS compared to the sub-wavelength shifts typically obtained. Importantly, this leads to controlled rotation of mesoscopic particles using a fundamental Gaussian beam lacking any intrinsic angular momentum.

  13. Simultaneous magneto-optical trapping of lithium and ytterbium atoms towards production of ultracold polar molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Okano, M; Muramatsu, M; Doi, K; Uetake, S; Takasu, Y; Takahashi, Y

    2009-01-01

    We have successfully implemented the first simultaneous magneto-optical trapping (MOT) of lithium ($^6$Li) and ytterbium ($^{174}$Yb) atoms, towards production of ultracold polar molecules of LiYb. For this purpose, we developed the dual atomic oven which contains both atomic species as an atom source and successfully observed the spectra of the Li and Yb atoms in the atomic beams from the dual atomic oven. We constructed the vacuum chamber including the glass cell with the windows made of zinc selenium (ZnSe) for the CO$_2$ lasers, which are the useful light sources of optical trapping for evaporative and sympathetic cooling. Typical atom numbers and temperatures in the compressed MOT are 7$\\times10^3$ atoms, 640 $\\mu$K for $^6$Li, 7$\\times10^4$ atoms and 60 $\\mu$K for $^{174}$Yb, respectively.

  14. Quasi-optical theory of microwave plasma heating in open magnetic trap

    CERN Document Server

    Shalashov, A G; Gospodchikov, E D; Khusainov, T A

    2016-01-01

    Microwave heating of a high-temperature plasma confined in a large-scale open magnetic trap, including all important wave effects like diffraction, absorption, dispersion and wave beam aberrations, is described for the first time within the first-principle technique based on consistent Maxwell's equations. With this purpose, the quasi-optical approach is generalized over weakly inhomogeneous gyrotrotropic media with resonant absorption and spatial dispersion, and a new form of the integral quasi-optical equation is proposed. An effective numerical technique for this equation's solution is developed and realized in a new code QOOT, which is verified with the simulations of realistic electron cyclotron heating scenarios at the Gas Dynamic Trap at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk, Russia).

  15. Raman Studies Of Laser Damaged Single- And Multi-Layer Optical Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exarhos, G. J.; Morse, P. L.

    1985-11-01

    Structural changes in dielectric optical coatings induced thermally or by high energy pulsed laser irradiation have been studied by the non-destructive technique of Raman Spectroscopy. A two laser (damage, probe) arrangement was used to characterize the damage process in crystalline and amorphous TiO2 and Zr02 coatings on silica during irradiation and at longer times following the onset of damage. Raman measurements were also undertaken to assess the effects of coating phase and microcrystalline grain orientation on laser induced damage in Ti02. Results suggest that certain phases have higher damage thresholds for comparable coating thicknesses and that thermal and electronic excitation effects are important considerations for modeling the damage process.

  16. Four-Wave Optical Parametric Amplification in a Raman-Active Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichiro Kida

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Four-wave optical parametric amplification (FWOPA in a Raman-active medium is experimentally investigated by use of an air-filled hollow fiber. A femtosecond pump pulse shorter than the period of molecular motion excites the coherent molecular motion of the Raman-active molecules during the parametric amplification of a signal pulse. The excited coherent motion modulates the frequency of the signal pulse during the parametric amplification, and shifts it to lower frequencies. The magnitude of the frequency redshift depends on the pump intensity, resulting in intensity-dependent spectral characteristics that are different from those in the FWOPA induced in a noble-gas-filled hollow fiber.

  17. Interactive optical trapping shows that confinement is a determinant of growth in a mixed yeast culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arneborg, N.; Siegumfeldt, H.; Andersen, G.H.;

    2005-01-01

    Applying a newly developed user-interactive optical trapping system, we controllably surrounded individual cells of one yeast species, Hanseniaspora uvarum, with viable cells of another yeast species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, thus creating a confinement of the former. Growth of surrounded and no...... of the latter. This study is the first to demonstrate that confinement is a determinant of growth in a microbial ecosystem. (c) 2005 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  18. Physical and chemical study of single aerosol particles using optical trapping cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-30

    benefits from the stable ringdown baseline stability of this pulsed UV -CRDS system that offers a laser beam in a wide wavelength range from visible to...measure wavelength-dependent single particle extinction for different types of particles and in different wavelength regions ( Visible - UV ). We found: (1...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We report a new single-aerosol particle scope using an optical trapping-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OT-CRDS) technique

  19. Bessel beams in tunable acoustic gradient index lenses and optical trap assisted nanolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Euan

    2009-12-01

    Bessel beams are laser beams whose shape gives them nondiffracting and self-healing properties. They find use in applications requiring a narrow laser beam with a high depth of field. The first part of this thesis presents the study of a new adaptive optical element capable of generating rapidly tunable Bessel beams: the tunable acoustic gradient index (TAG) lens. This device uses piezoelectrically-generated acoustic waves to modulate a fluid's density and refractive index, leading to electrically controllable lensing behavior. Both modeling and experiment are used to explain the observed multiscale Bessel beams. Because the TAG lens operates at frequencies of hundreds of kilohertz, the effective Bessel beam cone angle continuously varies at timescales on the order of microseconds or smaller-orders of magnitude faster than other existing technologies. In addition, the TAG lens may be driven with a Fourier superposition of multiple frequencies, which could enable the generation of arbitrary patterns. The second part of this thesis presents the application of Bessel beams in a new probe-based direct-write optical nanolithography method called optical trap assisted nanolithography (OTAN). When compared to alternative techniques, OTAN makes probe placement and parallelization easier. The method uses Bessel beam optical tweezers to trap dielectric microspheres in close proximity to a surface. These microspheres are then illuminated with pulses from a second laser beam, whose fluence is enhanced directly below the microsphere by focusing and near-field effects to a level great enough to modify the substrate. This technique is used to produce 100 nm features, which are less than lambda/3, and whose sizes agree well with finite-difference time-domain models of the experiment. A demonstration is given of how the technique can be parallelized by trapping multiple microspheres with multiple beams and exposing all spheres in unison with a single pulsed beam. Finally, modeling

  20. Fused Silica Ion Trap Chip with Efficient Optical Collection System for Timekeeping, Sensing, and Emulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-22

    sourcing, or in some ion trap applications, RF resonant detection. The walls of the high aspect slots and undercuts used to establish electrode...voltage test of these prototypes under vacuum did not result in any trace of breakdown (i.e. no observation of sparks or resonance jumps) even after...holes are characteristically conical . This geometry provides two benefits: it minimizes any limitation to the numerical aperture of the optics, and it

  1. Enhanced trapping of colding lithium by using the multiple-sideband cooling in a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Kai; Gao, Tianyou; Peng, Shi-Guo; Jiang, Kaijun

    2015-01-01

    Trapping lithium with a big number in a simplified experimental setup has difficulties and challenges today. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate the enhancement of \\textsuperscript{6}Li trapping efficiency in a three-dimensional magneto-optical trap (3D MOT) by using the multiple-sideband cooling in a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap (2D MOT). To improve the number of trapped atoms, we broaden the cooling light spectrum to 102 MHz composed of seven frequency components and then trap atoms with a number of $6.0\\times10^8$ which is about 4 times compared to that in the single-frequency cooling. The capture velocity and dependence of atomic number on the laser detuning have been analyzed, where the experimental result has a good agreement with the theoretical prediction based on a simple two-level model. We also analyze the loss rate of alkali metals due to fine-structure exchanging collisions and find that the multiple-sideband cooling is special valid for lithium.

  2. Probing DNA-DNA Interactions with a Combination of Quadruple-Trap Optical Tweezers and Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Ineke; King, Graeme A; Heller, Iddo; Biebricher, Andreas S; Peterman, Erwin J G; Wuite, Gijs J L

    2017-01-01

    DNA metabolism and DNA compaction in vivo involve frequent interactions of remote DNA segments, mediated by proteins. In order to gain insight into such interactions, quadruple-trap optical tweezers have been developed. This technique provides an unprecedented degree of control through the ability to independently manipulate two DNA molecules in three dimensions. In this way, discrete regions of different DNA molecules can be brought into contact with one another, with a well-defined spatial configuration. At the same time, the tension and extension of the DNA molecules can be monitored. Furthermore, combining quadruple-trap optical tweezers with microfluidics makes fast buffer exchange possible, which is important for in situ generation of the dual DNA-protein constructs needed for these kinds of experiments. In this way, processes such as protein-mediated inter-DNA bridging can be studied with unprecedented control. This chapter provides a step-by-step description of how to perform a dual DNA manipulation experiment using combined quadruple-trap optical tweezers and microfluidics.

  3. Statics characteristics of two Bose-Einstein condensate dark solitons trapped in an optical lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Yong-shan; GONG Rong-zhou; LI Hong

    2006-01-01

    The statics characteristics of two coupled Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) dark solitons trapped in an optical lattice are investigated with the variational approach.It is found that the interaction between a ‘kink’ and an ‘anti-kink’ with opposite phase gradients is effectively repulsive, and the optical lattice can be controllably used to produce a pair of static BEC dark solitons.Its effect depends on the initial location of the BEC dark solitons, the lattice amplitude and wave number.

  4. Purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus gamete manipulation using optical trapping and microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Shi, Linda Z.; Zhu, Qingyuan; Berns, Michael W.

    2013-04-01

    A system has been developed that allows for optical and fluidic manipulation of gametes. The optical manipulation is performed by using a single-point gradient trap with a 40× oil immersion PH3 1.3 NA objective on a Zeiss inverted microscope. The fluidic manipulation is performed by using a custom microfluidic chamber designed to fit into the short working distance between the condenser and objective. The system is validated using purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus gametes and has the potential to be used for mammalian in vitro fertilization and animal husbandry.

  5. Trapping and rotating microparticles and bacteria with moiré-based optical propelling beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Hernandez, Daniel; Cannan, Drake; Hu, Yi; Fardad, Shima; Huang, Simon; Chen, Joseph C; Christodoulides, Demetrios N; Chen, Zhigang

    2012-08-01

    We propose and demonstrate trapping and rotation of microparticles and biological samples with a moiré-based rotating optical tweezers. We show that polystyrene beads, as well as Escherichia coli cells, can be rotated with ease, while the speed and direction of rotation are fully controllable by a computer, obviating mechanical movement or phase-sensitive interference. Furthermore, we demonstrate experimentally the generation of white-light propelling beams and arrays, and discuss the possibility of optical tweezing and particle micro-manipulation based on incoherent white-light rotating patterns.

  6. Vibrational analysis of various irotopes of L-alanyl-L-alanine in aqueous solution: Vibrational Absorption (VA), Vibrational Circular Dichroism (VCD), Raman and Raman Optical Activity (ROA) Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalkanen, Karl J.; Nieminen, R.M.; Knapp-Mohammady, M.

    2003-01-01

    In a recent work (Knapp-Mohammady, M.; Jalkanen, K. J.; Nardi, F.; Wade, R. C.; Suhai, S. Chem Phys 1999, 240, 63-77) the structures of the zwitterionic species Of L-alanyI-L-alanine (LALA) in aqueous solution using a combination of molecular mechanics (MM) and density functional theory (DFT) have...... been reported. Subsequently, the vibrational absorption (VA) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and the Raman and Raman Optical Activity (ROA) spectra have been reported. In this work an analysis of the aqueous solution VA, VCD, Raman, and ROA spectra for various isotopomers of LALA are reported...... pattern could be reproduced with the DIFT atomic axial tensors calculated for the LALA plus explicit water molecules. The continuum treatment of the solvent for the calculation of these tensors appeirs to be a secondary effect. The ROA spectra are not well reproduced due to the failure to take...

  7. Raman Based Dispersive Systems for Short Pulse Generation and Optical Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyoncu, Salih Kagan

    Spatiotemporal dispersive systems have been widely utilized for nonlinear optics and optical signal processing applications. This thesis is dedicated to the investigation of dispersive and nonlinear properties of optical fibers, temporal dispersion for real time operation and spatially dispersed pulse shaping systems. In particular, this thesis is focused on Raman based dispersive systems based on such promising techniques as dispersion management, photonic time stretching and space-to-wavelength mapping for synchronous pulse generation and all-optical RF arbitrary waveform generation incorporated with mature MEMS technology. The first part of this thesis discusses a novel technique of using dispersion managed system for synchronous first and second order pulsed Raman lasers that can achieve frequency spacing of up to 1000 cm-1, which are widely utilized for CARS microscopy applications. In particular, I focus on analytical and numerical analysis of pulsed stability derived for Raman lasers by using dispersion-managed telecom fibers and pumping at near 1530 nm telecom wavelengths. I show the evolution of the first and second order Stokes signals at the output for different peak pump power and the net anomalous dispersion combinations. I determine the stability condition for dispersion-managed synchronous Raman lasers up to second order. In the second part of the thesis, the noise performance of the amplified time stretched systems is investigated. Amplified time stretched systems enabling real time applications such as high-speed analog-to-digital converters, RF arbitrary waveform generation and dispersive imaging are performance limited by the noise cumulated in the system. In particular, I analyze the noise performance and hence the effective number of bits (ENOB) performance of time stretch ADCs with distributed and lumped amplifications. I estimate that distributed amplification in time stretch system with >10GHz analog bandwidth exhibit up to 16dB higher SNR

  8. Divalent Rydberg atoms in optical lattices: intensity landscape and magic trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Topcu, Turker

    2013-01-01

    We develop a theoretical understanding of trapping divalent Rydberg atoms in optical lattices. Because the size of the Rydberg electron cloud can be comparable to the scale of spatial variations of laser intensity, we pay special attention to averaging optical fields over the atomic wavefunctions. Optical potential is proportional to the ac Stark polarizability. We find that in the independent particle approximation for the valence electrons, this polarizability breaks into two contributions: the singly ionized core polarizability and the contribution from the Rydberg electron. Unlike the usually employed free electron polarizability, the Rydberg contribution depends both on laser intensity profile and the rotational symmetry of the total electronic wavefunction. We focus on the $J=0$ Rydberg states of Sr and evaluate the dynamic polarizabilities of the 5s$n$s($^1S_0$) and 5s$n$p($^3P_0$) Rydberg states. We specifically choose Sr atom for its optical lattice clock applications. We find that there are several ...

  9. Optical storage studies on the trapping states of BaFCl:Eu sup 2 sup +

    CERN Document Server

    Meng Xian Guo; Sun Li; Jin Hui; Zhang Li

    2003-01-01

    The optical absorption spectra of BaF sub 2 sub - sub x Cl sub x :Eu in different states of optical storage were measured to clarify the electron trapping mechanism for its optical storage and photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL). Based on the absorption spectra and difference absorption spectra, the electron transfer processes after ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation were investigated. This demonstrates that (1) Eu sup 3 sup + ions are formed upon UV light irradiation at room temperature; (2) the two absorption bands in the visible region (400-600 nm) should be assigned to two different F centres, both of which contribute to the optical storage and PSL, and (3) a third broad difference absorption band around approx 650 nm, which matches the common laser better, was observed.

  10. Optical Gaussian beam interaction with one-dimensional thermal wave in the Raman-Nath configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Roman J

    2009-03-01

    Optical Gaussian beam interaction with a one-dimensional temperature field in the form of a thermal wave in the Raman-Nath configuration is analyzed. For the description of the Gaussian beam propagation through the nonstationary temperature field the complex geometric optics method was used. The influence of the refractive coefficient modulation by thermal wave on the complex ray phase, path, and amplitude was taken into account. It was assumed that for detection of the modulated Gaussian beam parameters two types of detector can be used: quadrant photodiodes or centroidal photodiodes. The influence of such parameters as the size and position of the Gaussian beam waist, the laser-screen (detector) distance, the thermal wave beam position and width, as well as thermal wave frequency and the distance between the probing optical beam axis and source of thermal waves on the so-called normal signal was taken into account.

  11. Non-Gaussian statistics and optical rogue waves in stimulated Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfared, Yashar E; Ponomarenko, Sergey A

    2017-03-20

    We explore theoretically and numerically optical rogue wave formation in stimulated Raman scattering inside a hydrogen filled hollow core photonic crystal fiber. We assume a weak noisy Stokes pulse input and explicitly construct the input Stokes pulse ensemble using the coherent mode representation of optical coherence theory, thereby providing a link between optical coherence and rogue wave theories. We show that the Stokes pulse peak power probability distribution function (PDF) acquires a long tail in the limit of nearly incoherent input Stokes pulses. We demonstrate a clear link between the PDF tail magnitude and the source coherence time. Thus, the latter can serve as a convenient parameter to control the former. We explain our findings qualitatively using the concepts of statistical granularity and global degree of coherence.

  12. Research on WDM optical fiber transmission system based on fiber Raman amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Xue(薛飞); Kun Qiu(邱昆); Yue Chen(陈玥)

    2003-01-01

    After wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) optical fiber transmission system based on fiber Raman amplifier (FRA) is investigated in detail, the influence of the collocation of dispersion compensation fiber (DCF), the dispersion coefficient, dispersion slope (DS), effective core area, nonlinear index, length of FRA, launch power and the bandwidth of Bessel filter on bit error rate (BER) is deduced. The influence of Rayleigh backscattering noise on optical signal noise ratio (OSNR) is also investigated, which affects the performance of long haul transmission badly. The result indicates that the broadband long haul transmission can be realized through the reasonable design of the fiber. The result is useful to the optimal design of the WDM optical fiber transmission system based on FRA.

  13. A Model for the Force Exerted on a Primary Cilium by an Optical Trap and the Resulting Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Lofgren

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cilia are slender flexible structures extending from the cell body; genetically similar to flagella. Although their existence has been long known, the mechanical and functional properties of non-motile (“primary” cilia are largely unknown. Optical traps are a non-contact method of applying a localized force to microscopic objects and an ideal tool for the study of ciliary mechanics. We present a method to measure the mechanical properties of a cilium using an analytic model of a flexible, anchored cylinder held within an optical trap. The force density is found using the discrete-dipole approximation. Utilizing Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, we then integrate this force density and numerically obtain the equilibrium deformation of the cilium in response to an optical trap. The presented results demonstrate that optical trapping can provide a great deal of information and insight about the properties and functions of the primary cilium.

  14. Molecular dynamics in an optical trap of glutamate receptors labeled with quantum-dots on living neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Tatsunori; Maezawa, Yasuyo; Kudoh, Suguru N.; Taguchi, Takahisa; Hosokawa, Chie

    2017-04-01

    Molecular dynamics of glutamate receptor, which is major neurotransmitter receptor at excitatory synapse located on neuron, is essential for synaptic plasticity in the complex neuronal networks. Here we studied molecular dynamics in an optical trap of AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR) labeled with quantum-dot (QD) on living neuronal cells with fluorescence imaging and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). When a 1064-nm laser beam for optical trapping was focused on QD-AMPARs located on neuronal cells, the fluorescence intensity of QD-AMPARs gradually increased at the focal spot. Using single-particle tracking of QD-AMPARs on neurons, the average diffusion coefficient decreased in an optical trap. Moreover, the decay time obtained from FCS analysis increased with the laser power and the initial assembling state of AMPARs depended on culturing day, suggesting that the motion of QD-AMPAR was constrained in an optical trap.

  15. Optical trap steering system%光阱位置操纵系统的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚新程; 李兆霖; 郭红莲; 程丙英; 张道中

    2001-01-01

    An optical tweezers, which can be used to mainipulate biological sample in three dimensions, was incorporated into a LEICA DMIRBE inverted microscope with bottom port. During setting up this system, transverse position mainpulating system of an optical trap was studied especially. Theoretical analysis and experimental results indicate that the transvers position of an optical trap can be changed by laterally moving or rotating a mirror. The mechanisms of optical trap steering systems by moving and rotating mirrors were explained in detail, resp ectively. In addition, comparing with moving mirror system the rotating mirror system is of benefit to increase the mainipulating speed of an optical trap, simp lify the mechanism of an optical tweezers, reduce its cost, and shorten the cycle of completing an optical tweezers.%利用He-Ne激光器,在LEICA DMIRBE倒置显微镜上建立了可对生物样品进行三维操纵的光镊系统。在光镊的研制过程中,我们重点对光阱的横向位置操纵系统进行了研究。理论分析及 实验表明,利用平移反射镜及转动反射镜的方案均可实现光阱位置的横向操纵。本文对平移 反射镜及转动反射镜实现光阱位置操纵的机理进行了详细的论述,并对操纵过程中保证光阱 质量不发生变化的条件进行了理论分析和说明。此外,比较分析表明,与平移反射镜系统相比 ,转镜系统在光镊技术中的应用可加快光镊操纵速度、简化光阱位置操纵系统的复杂程度、 有利于系统开发成本的减少及开发周期的缩短。

  16. Selective trapping or rotation of isotropic dielectric microparticles by optical near field in a plasmonic archimedes spiral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wei-Yi; Huang, Jer-Shing; Huang, Chen-Bin

    2014-02-12

    We demonstrate selective trapping or rotation of optically isotropic dielectric microparticles by plasmonic near field in a single gold plasmonic Archimedes spiral. Depending on the handedness of circularly polarized excitation, plasmonic near fields can be selectively engineered into either a focusing spot for particle trapping or a plasmonic vortex for particle rotation. Our design provides a simple solution for subwavelength optical manipulation and may find applications in micromechanical and microfluidic systems.

  17. All-optical production and transport of a large $^6$Li quantum gas in a crossed optical dipole trap

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, Ch; Dieckmann, K

    2016-01-01

    We report on an efficient production scheme for a large quantum degenerate sample of fermionic lithium. The approach is based on our previous work on narrow-line $ 2S_{1/2}\\rightarrow 3P_{3/2} $ laser cooling resulting in a high phase-space density of up to $3\\times10^{-4}$. This allows utilizing a large volume crossed optical dipole trap with a total power of $45\\,\\textrm{W}$, leading to high loading efficiency and $8\\times10^6$ trapped atoms. The same optical trapping configuration is used for rapid adiabatic transport over a distance of $25\\,\\textrm{cm}$ in $0.9\\,\\textrm{s}$, and subsequent evaporative cooling. With optimized evaporation we achieve a degenerate Fermi gas with $1.7\\times 10^{6}$ atoms at a temperature of $60 \\, \\textrm{nK}$, corresponding to $T/T_{\\text{F}}=0.16\\left(2 \\right)$. Furthermore, the performance is demonstrated by evaporation near a broad Feshbach resonance creating a molecular Bose-Einstein condensate of $3\\times10^5$ lithium dimers.

  18. Enhanced optical precursors by Doppler effect via active Raman gain process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yandong; Niu, Yueping; Zhang, Lida; Yang, Aihong; Jiang, Lin; Gong, Shangqing

    2012-08-15

    A scheme for enhancing precursor pulse by Doppler effect is proposed in a room-temperature active-Raman-gain medium. Due to abnormal dispersion between two gain peaks, main fields are advanced and constructively interfere with optical precursors, which leads to enhancement of the transient pulse at the rise edge of the input. Moreover, after Doppler averaging, the abnormal dispersion intensifies and the constructive interference between precursors and main fields is much strengthened, which boosts the transient spike. Simulation results demonstrate that the peak intensity of precursors could be enhanced nearly 20 times larger than that of the input.

  19. Transmission stability and Raman-induced amplitude dynamics in multichannel soliton-based optical waveguide systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Avner; Nguyen, Quan M.; Tran, Thinh P.

    2016-12-01

    We study transmission stability and dynamics of pulse amplitudes in N-channel soliton-based optical waveguide systems, taking into account second-order dispersion, Kerr nonlinearity, delayed Raman response, and frequency dependent linear gain-loss. We carry out numerical simulations with systems of N coupled nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equations and compare the results with the predictions of a simplified predator-prey model for Raman-induced amplitude dynamics. Coupled-NLS simulations for single-fiber transmission with 2 ≤ N ≤ 4 frequency channels show stable oscillatory dynamics of soliton amplitudes at short-to-intermediate distances, in excellent agreement with the predator-prey model's predictions. However, at larger distances, we observe transmission destabilization due to resonant formation of radiative sidebands, which is caused by Kerr nonlinearity. The presence of linear gain-loss in a single fiber leads to a limited increase in transmission stability. Significantly stronger enhancement of transmission stability is achieved in a nonlinear N-waveguide coupler due to efficient suppression of radiative sideband generation by the linear gain-loss. As a result, the distances along which stable Raman-induced dynamics of soliton amplitudes is observed are significantly larger in the waveguide coupler system compared with the single-fiber system.

  20. Thermometry of levitated nanoparticles in a hybrid electro-optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranas, E. B.; Fonseca, P. Z. G.; Barker, P. F.; Monteiro, T. S.

    2017-03-01

    There have been recent rapid developments in stable trapping of levitated nanoparticles in high vacuum. Cooling of nanoparticles, from phonon occupancies of 107 down to ≃ 100{--}1000 phonons, have already been achieved by several groups. Prospects for quantum ground-state cooling seem extremely promising. Cavity-cooling without added stabilisation by feedback cooling remains challenging, but trapping at high vacuum in a cavity is now possible through the addition of a Paul trap. However, the Paul trap has been found to qualitatively modify the cavity output spectrum, with the latter acquiring an atypical ‘split-sideband’ structure, of different form from the displacement spectrum, and which depends on N, the optical well at which the particle localises. In the present work we investigate the N-dependence of the dynamics, in particular with respect to thermometry: we show that in strong cooling regions N≳ 100, the temperature may still be reliably inferred from the cavity output spectra. We also explain the N-dependence of the mechanical frequencies and optomechanical coupling showing that these may be accurately estimated. We present a simple ‘fast-cavity’ model for the cavity output and test all our findings against full numerical solutions of the nonlinear stochastic equations of motion for the system.

  1. Buffer gas loaded magneto-optical traps for Yb, Tm, Er and Ho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmerling, Boerge; Drayna, Garrett K.; Chae, Eunmi; Ravi, Aakash; Doyle, John M.

    2014-06-01

    Direct loading of lanthanide atoms into magneto-optical traps (MOTs) from a very slow cryogenic buffer gas beam source is achieved, without the need for laser slowing. The beam source has an average forward velocity of 60-70\\;m\\;{{s}^{-1}} and a velocity half-width of \\sim 35\\;m\\;{{s}^{-1}}, which allows for direct MOT loading of Yb, Tm, Er and Ho. Residual helium background gas originating from the beam results in a maximum trap lifetime of about 80 ms (with Yb). The addition of a single-frequency slowing laser applied to the Yb in the buffer gas beam increases the number of trapped Yb atoms to 1.3\\left( 0.7 \\right)\\times {{10}^{8}} with a loading rate of 2.0\\left( 1.0 \\right)\\times {{10}^{10}}\\;atoms\\;{{s}^{-1}}. Decay to metastable states is observed for all trapped species and decay rates are measured. Extension of this approach to the loading of molecules into a MOT is discussed.

  2. Controlled transportation of mesoscopic particles by enhanced spin orbit interaction of light in an optical trap

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Basudev; Panigrahi, Prasanta K; Roy, Soumyajit; Banerjee, Ayan

    2012-01-01

    Optical spin orbit interaction (SOI) causes an intrinsic coupling between the polarization and position of light and is manifested as a sub-wavelength effect in isotropic and inhomogeneous (stratified) media. We investigate the effects of SOI in an optical trap and demonstrate that the SOI for a tightly focused polarized laser beam in stratified media (as is found in an optical trap) depends on the thickness of the media, and can be magnified significantly by choosing slightly thicker cover slips than that used conventionally. A polarization analysis of the stratified media in the sample chamber shows the presence of spatially varying linear diattenuation terms in the Mueller matrix that result in a polarization dependent intensity profile. It is thus possible to controllably transport asymmetric particles having a well-defined optic axis by simply changing the polarization angle of a linearly polarized input beam. Pea-pod shaped single soft oxometalate (SOM) particles of dimension around 1 $\\mu$m have been m...

  3. Optical interface created by laser-cooled atoms trapped in the evanescent field surrounding an optical nanofiber

    CERN Document Server

    Vetsch, E; Sagué, G; Schmidt, R; Dawkins, S T; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2009-01-01

    Trapping and optically interfacing laser-cooled neutral atoms is an essential requirement for their use in advanced quantum technologies. Here we simultaneously realize both of these tasks with cesium atoms interacting with a multi-color evanescent field surrounding an optical nanofiber. The atoms are localized in a one-dimensional optical lattice about 200 nm above the nanofiber surface and can be efficiently interrogated with a resonant light field sent through the nanofiber. Our technique opens the route towards the direct integration of laser-cooled atomic ensembles within fiber networks, an important prerequisite for large scale quantum communication schemes. Moreover, it is ideally suited to the realization of hybrid quantum systems that combine atoms with, e.g., solid state quantum devices.

  4. Interspecies Feshbach resonances in an ultracold, optically trapped Bose-Fermi mixture of cesium and lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repp, Marc

    2013-05-08

    This thesis reports on the tunability of interactions in ultracold Bose-Fermi mixtures of Cesium and Lithium. The first realization of an optically trapped {sup 6}Li - {sup 133}Cs mixture enabled to perform trap loss spectroscopy measurements to identify magnetic Feshbach resonances. A total of 19 interspecies Feshbach resonances, all in the magnetic field range between 650 G and 950 G, were observed for the two energetically lowest spin states of each species. Two 5 G broad and especially two 60 G broad s-wave resonances give perspectives to produce a dipolar quantum gas of LiCs ground state molecules as well as to study the Efimov effect in highly mass imbalanced systems. In addition, a unique relative tunability of intra- and interspecies scattering lengths was found which makes the {sup 6}Li - {sup 133}Cs system also well suited for the investigation of polarons. Evaporative cooling was performed on optically trapped samples which contained only one of the species. In this way, Bose-Einstein condensates of {sup 6}Li molecules as well as {sup 133}Cs samples at a phase-space density of ρ = 4 . 10{sup -2} were prepared. All experiments were performed in a new apparatus, which has been designed and set up during this thesis.

  5. All-optical atom trap trace analysis for rare krypton isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woelk, Pablo; Kohler, Markus; Sieveke, Carsten; Hebel, Simon; Sahling, Peter [Carl Friedrich von Weizsaecker Centre for Science and Peace Research, University of Hamburg (Germany); Becker, Christoph; Sengstock, Klaus [Institut fuer Laser-Physik, University of Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The isotope Krypton-85 is an excellent indicator for the detection of nuclear reprocessing activities. However, for the analysis of atmospheric air samples, sensitive measuring methods down to the single atom level are required because of the small concentrations. Furthermore, for a practical and effective detection of clandestine reprocessing, small sample sizes and a high sample throughput rate are desirable. Established methods using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) allow high sensitivity but have a limited throughput of about 200 samples per year, since the vacuum chambers have to be flushed for several hours after each measurement to avoid cross contamination due to the RF-driven excitation of metastable states. Here we present an enhanced ATTA apparatus, which in contrast to the established methods, produces metastable Kr all-optically. This avoids cross contamination, therefore allowing a much higher throughput rate. The apparatus is based on a self-made VUV-lamp and a 2D-3D magneto-optical trap setup. In the 2D trap metastable krypton is produced and a beam of atoms is formed by Doppler-cooling simultaneously.

  6. Orientational dynamics of human red blood cells in an optical trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathi, Praveen; Nagesh, Belavadi V; Lakkegowda, Yogesha; Iyengar, Shruthi S; Ananthamurthy, Sharath; Bhattacharya, Sarbari

    2013-02-01

    We report here on studies of reorientation of human red blood cells (RBCs) in an optical trap. We have measured the time required, tre, for the plane of the RBC entering the optical trap to undergo a 90-deg rotation to acquire an edge on orientation with respect to the beam direction. This has been studied as a function of laser power, P, at the trap center. The variation of tre with increasing P shows an initial sharp decrease followed by a much smaller rate of further decrease. We find that this experimentally measured variation is not in complete agreement with the variation predicted by a theoretical model where the RBC is treated as a perfectly rigid circular disk-like body. We argue that this deviation arises due to deformation of the RBC. We further reason that this feature is dominated by the elastic behavior of the RBC membrane. We compare the studies carried out on normal RBCs with RBCs where varying conditions of membrane stiffness are expected. We propose that the value of energy used for maximum deformation possible during a reorientation process is an indicator of the membrane elasticity of the system under study.

  7. Non-destructive analysis of the nuclei of transgenic living cells using laser tweezers and near-infrared raman spectroscopic technique

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tang, Wei; Newton, Ronald J; Xie, Chang An; Li, Yong Qing; Whitley, Nicki

    2005-01-01

    ...) system in this investigation. A low power diode laser at 785 nm was used for both laser optical trapping of single transgenic cells and excitation for near-infrared Raman spectroscopy of the nuclei of synchronized cells, which...

  8. Quantum Optics Including Noise Reduction, Trapped Ions, Quantum Trajectories, and Decoherence

    CERN Document Server

    Orszag, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    Quantum Optics gives a very broad coverage of basic laser-related phenomena that allow scientist and engineers to carry out research in quantum optics and laser physics. It covers quantization of the electromagnetic field, quantum theory of coherence, atom-field interaction models, resonance fluorescence, quantum theory of damping, laser theory using both the master equation and the Langevin theory, the correlated emission laser, input-output theory with applications to non-linear optics, quantum trajectories, quantum non-demolition measurements and generation of non-classical vibrational states of ions in a Paul trap. In this second edition, there is an enlarged chapter on decoherence, as well as additional material dealing with elements of quantum computation, entanglement of pure and mixed states as well as a chapter on quantum copying and processors. These topics are presented in a unified and didactic manner. The presentation of the book is clear and pedagogical; it balances the theoretical aspect of qua...

  9. Self assembly of microparticles in stable ring structures in an optical trap

    CERN Document Server

    Haldar, Arijit; Roy, Basudev; Gupta, S Dutta; Banerjee, Ayan

    2011-01-01

    Micro-particle self assembly under the influence of optical forces produced by higher order optical beams or by projection of a hologram into the trapping volume is well known. In this paper, we report the spontaneous formation of a ring of identical microspheres (each with diameter 1.1 um in conventional single beam optical tweezers having standing wave geometry with the sample chamber consisting of a cover slip and glass slide, and a usual TEM00 Gaussian beam. The effects of different experimental parameters on the ring formation are studied extensively. The experimental observations are backed by theoretical simulations based on a plane wave decomposition of the forward and backward propagating Gaussian beams. The ring patterns are shown to be caused due to geomterical aberrations produced by focusing the Gaussian beam using a high numerical aperture microscope objective into stratified media. It is found that the thickness of the stratified media and the standing wave geometry itself play a critical role ...

  10. Integral localized approximation description of ordinary Bessel beams and application to optical trapping forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Leonardo A.; Hernández-Figueroa, Hugo E.

    2011-01-01

    Ordinary Bessel beams are described in terms of the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT) by adopting, for what is to our knowledge the first time in the literature, the integral localized approximation for computing their beam shape coefficients (BSCs) in the expansion of the electromagnetic fields. Numerical results reveal that the beam shape coefficients calculated in this way can adequately describe a zero-order Bessel beam with insignificant difference when compared to other relative time-consuming methods involving numerical integration over the spherical coordinates of the GLMT coordinate system, or quadratures. We show that this fast and efficient new numerical description of zero-order Bessel beams can be used with advantage, for example, in the analysis of optical forces in optical trapping systems for arbitrary optical regimes. PMID:21750767

  11. The Feasibility of a Fully Miniaturized Magneto-Optical Trap for Portable Ultracold Quantum Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Rushton, Joseph; Himsworth, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Experiments using laser cooled atoms and ions show real promise for practical applications in quantum- enhanced metrology, timing, navigation, and sensing as well as exotic roles in quantum computing, networking and simulation. The heart of many of these experiments has been translated to microfabricated platforms known as atom chips whose construction readily lend themselves to integration with larger systems and future mass production. To truly make the jump from laboratory demonstrations to practical, rugged devices, the complex surrounding infrastructure (including vacuum systems, optics, and lasers) also needs to be miniatur- ized and integrated. In this paper we explore the feasibility of applying this approach to the Magneto-Optical Trap; incorporating the vacuum system, atom source and optical geometry into a permanently sealed micro- litre system capable of maintaining $10^{-10}$ mbar for more than 1000 days of operation with passive pumping alone. We demonstrate such an engineering challenge is achi...

  12. Self-trapping Characteristics of Partially Coherent Optical Beam in Photonic Crystal Fiber under Compton Scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Dong-shan; LI Ji-zhou

    2007-01-01

    Using the mutually coherent function, the self-trapping of the circle partially coherent optical beam in the total internal reflective photonic crystal fiber(TIRPCF) under Compton scattering is studied.The study shows that the composition of the non-coherent optical beam in the optical spectrum and the diffraction effect are decreased by Compton scattering,and the probability of forming the soliton is greatly increased.The vibration peak value in the propagation,compressed degree,changed cycle,and radius of the soliton are all smaller than those before the scattering,but its coherent radius is larger than that before the scattering.In this propagation,the self-focusing plays a key role.

  13. High-Resolution "Fleezers": Dual-Trap Optical Tweezers Combined with Single-Molecule Fluorescence Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Kevin D; Comstock, Matthew J; Chemla, Yann R

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in optical tweezers have greatly expanded their measurement capabilities. A new generation of hybrid instrument that combines nanomechanical manipulation with fluorescence detection-fluorescence optical tweezers, or "fleezers"-is providing a powerful approach to study complex macromolecular dynamics. Here, we describe a combined high-resolution optical trap/confocal fluorescence microscope that can simultaneously detect sub-nanometer displacements, sub-piconewton forces, and single-molecule fluorescence signals. The primary technical challenge to these hybrid instruments is how to combine both measurement modalities without sacrificing the sensitivity of either one. We present general design principles to overcome this challenge and provide detailed, step-by-step instructions to implement them in the construction and alignment of the instrument. Lastly, we present a set of protocols to perform a simple, proof-of-principle experiment that highlights the instrument capabilities.

  14. Optical and magnetic measurements of gyroscopically stabilized graphene nanoplatelets levitated in an ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagornykh, Pavel; Coppock, Joyce E.; Murphy, Jacob P. J.; Kane, B. E.

    2017-07-01

    Using optical measurements, we demonstrate that the rotation of micron-scale graphene nanoplatelets levitated in a quadrupole ion trap in high vacuum can be frequency-locked to an applied radiofrequency electric field Erf. Over time, frequency-locking stabilizes the nanoplatelet so that its axis of rotation is normal to the nanoplatelet and perpendicular to Erf. We observe that residual slow dynamics of the direction of the axis of rotation in the plane normal to Erf is determined by an applied magnetic field. We present a simple model that accurately describes our observations. From our data and model, we can infer both a diamagnetic polarizability and a magnetic moment proportional to the frequency of rotation, which we compare to theoretical values. Our results establish that trapping technologies have applications for materials measurements at the nanoscale.

  15. Work distribution for a particle moving in an optical trap and non-Markovian bath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alok Samanta; K Srinivasu; Swapan K Ghosh

    2009-09-01

    We propose a simple approach to derive an exact analytical expression of work distribution for a system consisting of a colloidal particle trapped in an optical harmonic potential well, which is being pulled at a constant velocity through a solution represented by a non-Markovian bath. The thermal environment is represented by a bath composed of an infinite set of harmonic oscillators, and a model Hamiltonian for the trapped colloidal particle is constructed by representing the interaction with the bathvia linear dissipative mechanism. We have studied the effects of pulling time, pulling speed, and the adiabatic limit. It is also observed that only at long time the total work is completely converted into dissipative work.

  16. Macro-optical trapping for sample confinement in light sheet microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhengyi; Piksarv, Peeter; Ferrier, David E K; Gunn-Moore, Frank J; Dholakia, Kishan

    2015-08-01

    Light sheet microscopy is a powerful approach to construct three-dimensional images of large specimens with minimal photo-damage and photo-bleaching. To date, the specimens are usually mounted in agents such as agarose, potentially restricting the development of live samples, and also highly mobile specimens need to be anaesthetized before imaging. To overcome these problems, here we demonstrate an integrated light sheet microscope which solely uses optical forces to trap and hold the sample using a counter-propagating laser beam geometry. Specifically, tobacco plant cells and living Spirobranchus lamarcki larvae were successfully trapped and sectional images acquired. This novel approach has the potential to significantly expand the range of applications for light sheet imaging.

  17. Optical dipole-force cooling of anions in a Penning trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesel, Julian; Gerber, Sebastian; Doser, Michael; Comparat, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    We discuss the possibility of using optical dipole forces for Sisyphus cooling of ions stored in a Penning trap by addressing the specific case of the molecular cooling candidate C2 -. Using a GPU accelerated code for Penning trap simulations, which we extended to include the molecule-light interaction, we show that this scheme can decrease the time required for cooling by an order of magnitude with respect to Doppler cooling. In our simulation we found that a reduction of the axial anion temperature from 10 K to 50 mK in around 10 s is possible. The temperature of the radial degrees of freedom was seen to thermalize to 150 mK . Based on the laser-cooled C2 -, a study on the sympathetic cooling of anions with masses 1-50 nucleon was performed, covering relevant candidates for investigations of chemical anion reactions at ultracold temperatures as well as for antimatter studies.

  18. Narrow-line magneto-optical trap for erbium: Simple approach for a complex atom

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, A; Mark, M; Rietzler, A; Schindler, J; Zupanic, E; Grimm, R; Ferlaino, F

    2012-01-01

    We report on the experimental realization of a robust and efficient magneto-optical trap for erbium atoms, based on a narrow cooling transition at 583nm. We observe up to $N=2 \\times 10^{8}$ atoms at a temperature of about $T=15 \\mu K$. This simple scheme provides better starting conditions for direct loading of dipole traps as compared to approaches based on the strong cooling transition alone, or on a combination of a strong and a narrow kHz transition. Our results on Er point to a general, simple and efficient approach to laser cool samples of other lanthanide atoms (Ho, Dy, and Tm) for the production of quantum-degenerate samples.

  19. Dependence of loading time on control parameters in a standard vapour-loaded magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yi-Chi; Wu Ji-Zhou; Li Yu-Qing; Ma Jie; Wang Li-Rong; Zhao Yan-Ting; Xiao Lian-Tuan; Jia Suo-Tang

    2011-01-01

    Loading time is one of the most important dynamic characteristics of a magneto-optical trap.In this paper,we primarily report on a detailed experimental study of the effects of some magneto-optical trap control parameters on loading time,including the background vacuum pressure,the magnetic field gradient,and the intensities of trapping and repumping lasers.We compare the results with previous theoretical and experimental results,and give qualitative analysis.These experimental investigations offer some useful guidelines to control the loading time of magneto-optical traps.The controllable loading time achieved is helpful to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of photoassociation spectroscopy,which is remarkably improved from 7 to 28.6.

  20. Raman fiber-optical method for colon cancer detection: Cross-validation and outlier identification approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, D.; Naveed, P.; Ragheb, A.; Niedieker, D.; El-Mashtoly, S. F.; Brechmann, T.; Kötting, C.; Schmiegel, W. H.; Freier, E.; Pox, C.; Gerwert, K.

    2017-06-01

    Endoscopy plays a major role in early recognition of cancer which is not externally accessible and therewith in increasing the survival rate. Raman spectroscopic fiber-optical approaches can help to decrease the impact on the patient, increase objectivity in tissue characterization, reduce expenses and provide a significant time advantage in endoscopy. In gastroenterology an early recognition of malign and precursor lesions is relevant. Instantaneous and precise differentiation between adenomas as precursor lesions for cancer and hyperplastic polyps on the one hand and between high and low-risk alterations on the other hand is important. Raman fiber-optical measurements of colon biopsy samples taken during colonoscopy were carried out during a clinical study, and samples of adenocarcinoma (22), tubular adenomas (141), hyperplastic polyps (79) and normal tissue (101) from 151 patients were analyzed. This allows us to focus on the bioinformatic analysis and to set stage for Raman endoscopic measurements. Since spectral differences between normal and cancerous biopsy samples are small, special care has to be taken in data analysis. Using a leave-one-patient-out cross-validation scheme, three different outlier identification methods were investigated to decrease the influence of systematic errors, like a residual risk in misplacement of the sample and spectral dilution of marker bands (esp. cancerous tissue) and therewith optimize the experimental design. Furthermore other validations methods like leave-one-sample-out and leave-one-spectrum-out cross-validation schemes were compared with leave-one-patient-out cross-validation. High-risk lesions were differentiated from low-risk lesions with a sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 74% and an accuracy of 77%, cancer and normal tissue with a sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 83% and an accuracy of 81%. Additionally applied outlier identification enabled us to improve the recognition of neoplastic biopsy samples.

  1. Raman fiber-optical method for colon cancer detection: Cross-validation and outlier identification approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, D; Naveed, P; Ragheb, A; Niedieker, D; El-Mashtoly, S F; Brechmann, T; Kötting, C; Schmiegel, W H; Freier, E; Pox, C; Gerwert, K

    2017-06-15

    Endoscopy plays a major role in early recognition of cancer which is not externally accessible and therewith in increasing the survival rate. Raman spectroscopic fiber-optical approaches can help to decrease the impact on the patient, increase objectivity in tissue characterization, reduce expenses and provide a significant time advantage in endoscopy. In gastroenterology an early recognition of malign and precursor lesions is relevant. Instantaneous and precise differentiation between adenomas as precursor lesions for cancer and hyperplastic polyps on the one hand and between high and low-risk alterations on the other hand is important. Raman fiber-optical measurements of colon biopsy samples taken during colonoscopy were carried out during a clinical study, and samples of adenocarcinoma (22), tubular adenomas (141), hyperplastic polyps (79) and normal tissue (101) from 151 patients were analyzed. This allows us to focus on the bioinformatic analysis and to set stage for Raman endoscopic measurements. Since spectral differences between normal and cancerous biopsy samples are small, special care has to be taken in data analysis. Using a leave-one-patient-out cross-validation scheme, three different outlier identification methods were investigated to decrease the influence of systematic errors, like a residual risk in misplacement of the sample and spectral dilution of marker bands (esp. cancerous tissue) and therewith optimize the experimental design. Furthermore other validations methods like leave-one-sample-out and leave-one-spectrum-out cross-validation schemes were compared with leave-one-patient-out cross-validation. High-risk lesions were differentiated from low-risk lesions with a sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 74% and an accuracy of 77%, cancer and normal tissue with a sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 83% and an accuracy of 81%. Additionally applied outlier identification enabled us to improve the recognition of neoplastic biopsy samples. Copyright

  2. Solution structures of potato virus X and narcissus mosaic virus from Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanch, Ewan W.; Robinson, David J.; Hecht, Lutz;

    2002-01-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) and narcissus mosaic virus (NMV) were studied using vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) in order to obtain new information on the structures of their coat protein subunits. The ROA spectra of the two intact virions are very similar to each other and similar to that of to......Potato virus X (PVX) and narcissus mosaic virus (NMV) were studied using vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) in order to obtain new information on the structures of their coat protein subunits. The ROA spectra of the two intact virions are very similar to each other and similar...... that the coat protein subunit folds of PVX and NMV may be very similar to each other and similar to that of TMV. These results suggest that PVX and NMV may have coat protein subunit structures based on folds similar to the TMV helix bundle and hence that the helical architecture of the PVX and NMV particles may...... be similar to that of TMV but with different structural parameters....

  3. High temperature measurements in irradiated environment using Raman fiber optics distributed temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, Pierre; Blairon, Sylvain; Boldo, Didier; Taillade, Frédéric; Caussanel, Matthieu; Beauvois, Gwendal; Duval, Hervé; Grieu, Stéphane; Laffont, Guillaume; Lainé, Frédéric; Carrel, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Optical fiber temperature sensors using Raman effect are a promising technology for temperature mapping of nuclear power plant pipes. These pipes are exposed to high temperature (350 °C) and gamma radiations, which is a harsh environment for standard telecom fibers. Therefore metal coated fibers are to be used to perform measurement over 300 °C. Temperature variations can affect the attenuation of the metallic coated fiber before irradiation. The latter induces an extra attenuation, due to light absorption along the fiber by radiation-induced defects. The recombination of these defects can be strongly accelerated by the high temperature value. As backscattered Raman signal is weak it is important to test optical fibers under irradiation to observe how it gets attenuated. Different experiments are described in this conference paper: two in situ irradiation campaigns with different dose rates at, both ambient and high temperature. We observe that the tested off-the-shelf metallic coated fibers have a high attenuation under irradiation. We also noticed the fact that thermal annealing plays a massive role in the +300 °C temperature range.

  4. Importance of backbone angles versus amino acid configurations in peptide vibrational Raman optical activity spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Carmen; Ruud, Kenneth; Reiher, Markus

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we investigate whether the differential scattering of right- and left-circularly polarized light in peptide Raman optical activity spectra are uniquely dominated by the backbone conformation, or whether the configurations of the individual amino acid also play a significant role. This is achieved by calculating Raman optical activity spectra using density functional theory for four structurally related peptides with a common backbone conformation, but with different sequences of amino acid configurations. Furthermore, the ROA signals of the amide normal modes are decomposed into contributions from groups of individual atoms. It is found that the amino acid configuration has a considerable influence on the ROA peaks in the amide I, II, and III regions, although the local decomposition reveals that the side-chain atoms only contribute to those peaks directly in the case of the amide II vibrations. Furthermore, small changes in the amide normal modes may lead to large and irregular modifications in the ROA intensity differences, making it difficult to establish transferable ROA intensity differences even for structurally similar vibrations.

  5. Improvement of tissue analysis and classification using optical coherence tomography combined with Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Qi, Ji; Lu, Jing; Wang, Shang; Wu, Chen; Shih, Wei-Chuan; Larin, Kirill V.

    2014-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an optical imaging technique that is capable of performing high-resolution (approaching the histopathology level) and real-time imaging of tissues without use of contrast agents. Based on these advantages, the pathological features of tumors (in micro scale) can be identified during resection surgery. However, the accuracy of tumor margin prediction still needs to be enhanced for assisting the judgment of surgeons. In this regard, we present a two-dimensional computational method for advanced tissue analysis and characterization based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) and Raman spectroscopy (RS). The method combines the slope of OCT intensity signal and the Principal component (PC) of RS, and relies on the tissue optical attenuation and chemical ingredients for the classification of tissue types. Our pilot experiments were performed on mouse kidney, liver and small intestine. Results demonstrate the improvement of the tissue differentiation compared with the analysis only based on the OCT detection. This combined OCT/RS method is potentially useful as a novel optical biopsy technique for cancer detection.

  6. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering: effective optical constants for electric field modelling of nanostructured Ag films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, M. Nilusha M. N.; Schmidt, Daniel; Gibbs, W. E. Keith; Juodkazis, Saulius; Stoddart, Paul R.

    2016-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is drawing increasing interest in fields such as chemical and biomolecular sensing, nanoscale plasmonic engineering and surface science. In addition to the electromagnetic and chemical enhancements in SERS, several studies have reported a "back-side" enhancement when nanostructures are excited through a transparent base rather than directly through air. This additional enhancement has been attributed to a local increase in the electric field for propagation from high to low refractive index media. In this study, Mueller matrix ellipsometry was used to derive the effective optical constants of Ag nanostructures fabricated by thermal evaporation at oblique angles. The results confirm that the effective optical constants of the nanostructured Ag film depart substantially from the bulk properties. Detailed analysis suggests that the optical constants of the nano-island Ag structures exhibit uniaxial optical properties with the optical axis inclined from the substrate normal towards the deposition direction of the vapour flux. The substrates were functionalized with thiophenol and used to measure the wavelength dependence of the additional SERS signal. Further, a model based on the Fresnel equations was developed, using the Ag film optical constants and thickness as determined by ellipsometry. Both experimental data and the model show a significant additional enhancement in the back-side SERS, blue shifted from the plasmon resonance of the nanostructures. This information will be useful for a range of applications where it is necessary to understand the effective optical behaviour of thin films and in designing miniaturized optical fibre sensors for remote sensing applications.

  7. Optical fiber loops and helices: tools for integrated photonic device characterization and microfluidic trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yundong; Zhang, Rui; Ti, Chaoyang; Liu, Yuxiang

    2016-09-01

    Tapered optical fibers can deliver guided light into and carry light out of micro/nanoscale systems with low loss and high spatial resolution, which makes them ideal tools in integrated photonics and microfluidics. Special geometries of tapered fibers are desired for probing monolithic devices in plane as well as optical manipulation of micro particles in fluids. However, for many specially shaped tapered fibers, it remains a challenge to fabricate them in a straightforward, controllable, and repeatable way. In this work, we fabricated and characterized two special geometries of tapered optical fibers, namely fiber loops and helices, that could be switched between one and the other. The fiber loops in this work are distinct from previous ones in terms of their superior mechanical stability and high optical quality factors in air, thanks to a post-annealing process. We experimentally measured an intrinsic optical quality factor of 32,500 and a finesse of 137 from a fiber loop. A fiber helix was used to characterize a monolithic cavity optomechanical device. Moreover, a microfluidic "roller coaster" was demonstrated, where microscale particles in water were optically trapped and transported by a fiber helix. Tapered fiber loops and helices can find various applications ranging from on-the-fly characterization of integrated photonic devices to particle manipulation and sorting in microfluidics.

  8. Selective particle trapping and optical binding in the evanescent field of an optical nanofiber

    CERN Document Server

    Frawley, Mary C; Truong, Viet Giang; Sergides, Marios; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2014-01-01

    The evanescent field of an optical nanofiber presents a versatile interface for the manipulation of micron-scale particles in dispersion. Here, we present a detailed study of the optical binding interactions of a pair of 3.13 $\\mu$m SiO$_2$ particles in the nanofiber evanescent field. Preferred equilibrium positions for the spheres as a function of nanofiber diameter and sphere size are discussed. We demonstrated optical propulsion and self-arrangement of chains of one to seven 3.13 $\\mu$m SiO$_2$ particles; this effect is associated with optical binding via simulated trends of multiple scattering effects. Incorporating an optical nanofiber into an optical tweezers setup facilitated the individual and collective introduction of selected particles to the nanofiber evanescent field for experiments. Computational simulations provide insight into the dynamics behind the observed behavior.

  9. Monolayer optical memory cells based on artificial trap-mediated charge storage and release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juwon; Pak, Sangyeon; Lee, Young-Woo; Cho, Yuljae; Hong, John; Giraud, Paul; Shin, Hyeon Suk; Morris, Stephen M.; Sohn, Jung Inn; Cha, Seungnam; Kim, Jong Min

    2017-03-01

    Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides are considered to be promising candidates for flexible and transparent optoelectronics applications due to their direct bandgap and strong light-matter interactions. Although several monolayer-based photodetectors have been demonstrated, single-layered optical memory devices suitable for high-quality image sensing have received little attention. Here we report a concept for monolayer MoS2 optoelectronic memory devices using artificially-structured charge trap layers through the functionalization of the monolayer/dielectric interfaces, leading to localized electronic states that serve as a basis for electrically-induced charge trapping and optically-mediated charge release. Our devices exhibit excellent photo-responsive memory characteristics with a large linear dynamic range of ~4,700 (73.4 dB) coupled with a low OFF-state current (<4 pA), and a long storage lifetime of over 104 s. In addition, the multi-level detection of up to 8 optical states is successfully demonstrated. These results represent a significant step toward the development of future monolayer optoelectronic memory devices.

  10. Long persistent and optically stimulated luminescence behaviors of calcium aluminates with different trap filling processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Buhao; Xu, Xuhui; Li, Qianyue; Wu, Yumei; Qiu, Jianbei; Yu, Xue, E-mail: yuyu6593@126.com

    2014-09-15

    Properties of long persistent luminescence (LPL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+}, R{sup 3+} (R=Nd, Dy, Tm) materials were investigated. The observed phenomenon indicates that R{sup 3+} ions (R=Nd, Dy, Tm) have different effects on trap properties of CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+}. The greatly improved LPL performance was observed in Nd{sup 3+} co-doped samples, which indicates that the incorporation of Nd{sup 3+} creates suitable traps for LPL. While co-doping Tm{sup 3+} ions, the intensity of high temperature of thermoluminescence band in CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphors is enhanced for the formation of the most suitable traps which benefits the intense and stable OSL. These results suggest that the effective traps contributed to the LPL/OSL are complex, of which could be an aggregation formation with shallow and deep traps other than simple traps from co-doped R{sup 3+} ions. The mechanism presented in the end potentially provides explanations of why the OSL of CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+}, R{sup 3+} exhibits different read-in/read-out performance as well. - Graphical abstract: OSL emission spectra of Ca{sub 0.995}Al{sub 2}O{sub 4}:0.0025Eu{sup 2+}, 0.0025R{sup 3+} (R=Nd, Dy, Tm) taken under varying stimulation time (0, 25, 50, 75, 100 s). Inset: Blue emission pictures under varying stimulation time. - Highlights: • The LPL and OSL properties of CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+}, R{sup 3+} were investigated. • An alternative approach to control the trap depth of CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphor was proposed. • A new oxide ETM phosphor exhibiting intense and stable OSL was explored.

  11. Special diffractive elements for optical trapping fabricated on optical fiber tips using the focused ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues Ribeiro, R. S.; Guerreiro, A.; Viegas, J.; Jorge, P. A. S.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, spiral phase lenses and Fresnel zone lenses for beam tailoring, fabricated on the tip of optical fibers, are reported. The spiral phase lenses allow tailoring the fundamental guided mode, a Gaussian beam, into a Laguerre - Gaussian profile without using additional optical elements. Whereas, the Fresnel lenses are used as focusing systems. The lenses are fabricated using Focused Ion Beam milling, enabling high resolution in the manufacturing process. The output optical intensity profiles matching the numerical simulations are presented and analyzed.

  12. Cell visco-elasticity measured with AFM and optical trapping at sub-micrometer deformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schanila Nawaz

    Full Text Available The measurement of the elastic properties of cells is widely used as an indicator for cellular changes during differentiation, upon drug treatment, or resulting from the interaction with the supporting matrix. Elasticity is routinely quantified by indenting the cell with a probe of an AFM while applying nano-Newton forces. Because the resulting deformations are in the micrometer range, the measurements will be affected by the finite thickness of the cell, viscous effects and even cell damage induced by the experiment itself. Here, we have analyzed the response of single 3T3 fibroblasts that were indented with a micrometer-sized bead attached to an AFM cantilever at forces from 30-600 pN, resulting in indentations ranging from 0.2 to 1.2 micrometer. To investigate the cellular response at lower forces up to 10 pN, we developed an optical trap to indent the cell in vertical direction, normal to the plane of the coverslip. Deformations of up to two hundred nanometers achieved at forces of up to 30 pN showed a reversible, thus truly elastic response that was independent on the rate of deformation. We found that at such small deformations, the elastic modulus of 100 Pa is largely determined by the presence of the actin cortex. At higher indentations, viscous effects led to an increase of the apparent elastic modulus. This viscous contribution that followed a weak power law, increased at larger cell indentations. Both AFM and optical trapping indentation experiments give consistent results for the cell elasticity. Optical trapping has the benefit of a lower force noise, which allows a more accurate determination of the absolute indentation. The combination of both techniques allows the investigation of single cells at small and large indentations and enables the separation of their viscous and elastic components.

  13. Optical studies of self-trapped excitons in SiO/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Chihiro; Tanimura, Katsumi; Itoh, Noriaki

    1988-09-20

    Linear polarisation, with respect to the z axis, and the effect of the subsequent laser-induced excitation on the luminescence and transient optical absorption induced by irradiation of crystalline SiO/sub 2/ with an electron pulse have been studied. It is found that the luminescence spectrum consists of two bands peaked at 2.8 eV and at 2.5 eV and that the transition dipole moment of the former, which has been shown to be intrinsic, is nearly parallel to the z axis, while that of the latter is parallel to the x axis. In addition to the 5.2 eV transient optical absorption band, a satellite band at 4.2 eV is found to be induced by irradiation with an electron pulse. For both of these bands, the transition dipoles are found not to be parallel to any of the crystalline axes. Subsequent irradiation with a 4.0 or 5.6 eV laser pulse of a specimen irradiated with an electron pulse is found to eliminate both of these transient optical absorption bands and the 2.8 eV luminescence band. In view of previous work on optically detected magnetic resonance and volume changes induced by electron pulse irradiation, it is concluded that the 5.2 and 4.2 eV transient optical absorption bands and the 2.8 eV luminescence band are associated with self-trapped excitons. The existing models of self-trapped excitons are discussed on the basis of the present experimental results.

  14. Microstructuring of polymer films by femtosecond pulses through optically trapped polystyrene microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astaf' ev, A A; Shakhov, A M; Sarkisov, Oleg M; Nadtochenko, V A

    2013-04-30

    We report the laser ablation of polymers by femtosecond (18 and 54 fs) pulses focused by 1 and 3.8 {mu}m diameter spherical microlenses, which are held by optical traps. It is shown that this technique allows one to produce surface structures with lateral dimensions up to {lambda}/6 (125 nm). It is found that the size of the structures depends on the diameter of the microlens; the highest spatial resolution is achieved by using 1 {mu}m diameter microlenses. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  15. One single trapped and laser cooled radium ion: Towards an all-optical atomic clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Versolato, Oscar; Wansbeek, Lotje; Willmann, Lorenz; Timmermans, Rob; Jungmann, Klaus [KVI, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    One single trapped radium ion is an ideal candidate for an all-optical frequency standard (*clock*). This system provides a long coherence time and tractable systematics. If the ion is laser cooled to the Lamb-Dicke regime, first order Doppler shifts are eliminated. Ultra-narrow transitions in radium ions provide an excellent basis for such a high stability clock, using commercially available semiconductor lasers in the visible regime. In certain odd isotopes of radium, the nuclear electric quadrupole shift is absent. Further, the radium ion is an excellent candidate for a high sensitivity experiment to search for a time variation of the finestructure constant.

  16. Stability of trapped Bose-Einstein condensates in one-dimensional tilted optical lattice potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Jian-Shu; Liao Xiang-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Using the direct perturbation technique, this paper obtains a general perturbed solution of the Bose-Einstein condensates trapped in one-dimensional tilted optical lattice potential. We also gave out two necessary and sufficient conditions for boundedness of the perturbed solution. Theoretical analytical results and the corresponding numerical results show that the perturbed solution of the Bose-Einstein condensate system is unbounded in general and indicate that the Bose-Einstein condensates are Lyapunov-unstable. However, when the conditions for boundedness of the perturbed solution are satisfied, then the Bose-Einstein condensates are Lyapunov-stable.

  17. Investigation of ultracold atoms and molecules in a dark magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Li-Rong; Ji Zhong-Hua; Yuan Jin-Peng; Yang Yan; Zhao Yan-Ting; Ma Jie; Xiao Lian-Tuan; Jia Suo-Tang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,ultracold atoms and molecules in a dark magneto-optical trap (MOT) are studied via depumping the cesium cold atoms into the dark hyperfine ground state.The collision rate is reduced to 0.45 s-1 and the density of the atoms is increased to 5.6 × 1011 cm-3 when the fractional population of the atoms in the bright hyperfine ground state is as low as 0.15.The vibrational spectra of the ultracold cesium molecules are also studied in a standard MOT and in a dark MOT separately.The experimental results are analyzed by using the perturbative quantum approach.

  18. Sympathetic cooling in an optically trapped mixture of alkali and spin-singlet atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Vladyslav V; Khramov, Alexander; Hansen, Anders H; Dowd, William H; Münchow, Frank; Jamison, Alan O; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2011-04-15

    We report on the realization of a stable mixture of ultracold lithium and ytterbium atoms confined in a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap. We observe sympathetic cooling of 6Li by 174Yb and extract the s-wave scattering length magnitude |a(6Li-174Yb)|=(13±3)a0 from the rate of interspecies thermalization. Using forced evaporative cooling of 174Yb, we achieve reduction of the 6Li temperature to below the Fermi temperature, purely through interspecies sympathetic cooling.

  19. Investigation of HIV-1 infected and uninfected cells using the optical trapping technique

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ombinda-Lemboumba, Saturnin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available (NLC) Biophotonics group sombindalemboumba@csir.co.za Slide 2 Outline • Introduction • Aim • Background • Optical trapping of living cell • Transmission spectroscopy • Experimental setup • Results • Conclusions © CSIR 2017 www....csir.co.za Slide 3 Introduction • Current HIV diagnostics tests are: • Too expensive (CD4 count, PCR) • Require laboratory facilities and high skilled personnel • Long testing time (ELISA, P24 test, Reverse transcriptase test) • New point-of-care diagnostics...

  20. Anisotropic pair superfluidity of trapped two-component Bose gases in an optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongqiang; He, Liang; Hofstetter, Walter

    2013-09-01

    We theoretically investigate the pair-superfluid phase of two-component ultracold gases with attractive inter-species interactions in an optical lattice. We establish the phase diagram for filling n = 1 at zero and finite temperatures, by applying bosonic dynamical mean-field theory, and observe stable pair-superfluid and charge-density wave quantum phases for asymmetric hopping of the two species. While the pair superfluid is found to be robust in the presence of a harmonic trap, we observe that it is destroyed already by a small population imbalance of the two species.