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Sample records for optical tomography imaging

  1. Imaging granulomatous lesions with optical coherence tomography

    Banzhaf, Christina; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2012-01-01

    To investigate and compare the presentation of granulomatous lesions in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images and compare this to previous studies of nonmelanoma skin tumors.......To investigate and compare the presentation of granulomatous lesions in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images and compare this to previous studies of nonmelanoma skin tumors....

  2. Diffuse Optical Tomography for Brain Imaging: Theory

    Yuan, Zhen; Jiang, Huabei

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive, nonionizing, and inexpensive imaging technique that uses near-infrared light to probe tissue optical properties. Regional variations in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations as well as blood flow and oxygen consumption can be imaged by monitoring spatiotemporal variations in the absorption spectra. For brain imaging, this provides DOT unique abilities to directly measure the hemodynamic, metabolic, and neuronal responses to cells (neurons), and tissue and organ activations with high temporal resolution and good tissue penetration. DOT can be used as a stand-alone modality or can be integrated with other imaging modalities such as fMRI/MRI, PET/CT, and EEG/MEG in studying neurophysiology and pathology. This book chapter serves as an introduction to the basic theory and principles of DOT for neuroimaging. It covers the major aspects of advances in neural optical imaging including mathematics, physics, chemistry, reconstruction algorithm, instrumentation, image-guided spectroscopy, neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling, and clinical applications.

  3. Optical coherence tomography in anterior segment imaging

    Kalev-Landoy, Maya; Day, Alexander C.; Cordeiro, M. Francesca; Migdal, Clive

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the ability of optical coherence tomography (OCT), designed primarily to image the posterior segment, to visualize the anterior chamber angle (ACA) in patients with different angle configurations. Methods In a prospective observational study, the anterior segments of 26 eyes of 26 patients were imaged using the Zeiss Stratus OCT, model 3000. Imaging of the anterior segment was achieved by adjusting the focusing control on the Stratus OCT. A total of 16 patients had abnormal angle configurations including narrow or closed angles and plateau irides, and 10 had normal angle configurations as determined by prior full ophthalmic examination, including slit-lamp biomicroscopy and gonioscopy. Results In all cases, OCT provided high-resolution information regarding iris configuration. The ACA itself was clearly visualized in patients with narrow or closed angles, but not in patients with open angles. Conclusions Stratus OCT offers a non-contact, convenient and rapid method of assessing the configuration of the anterior chamber. Despite its limitations, it may be of help during the routine clinical assessment and treatment of patients with glaucoma, particularly when gonioscopy is not possible or difficult to interpret. PMID:17355288

  4. Positron emission tomography and optical tissue imaging

    Falen, Steven W [Carmichael, CA; Hoefer, Richard A [Newport News, VA; Majewski, Stanislaw [Yorktown, VA; McKisson, John [Hampton, VA; Kross, Brian [Yorktown, VA; Proffitt, James [Newport News, VA; Stolin, Alexander [Newport News, VA; Weisenberger, Andrew G [Yorktown, VA

    2012-05-22

    A mobile compact imaging system that combines both PET imaging and optical imaging into a single system which can be located in the operating room (OR) and provides faster feedback to determine if a tumor has been fully resected and if there are adequate surgical margins. While final confirmation is obtained from the pathology lab, such a device can reduce the total time necessary for the procedure and the number of iterations required to achieve satisfactory resection of a tumor with good margins.

  5. Three-dimensional multifunctional optical coherence tomography for skin imaging

    Li, En; Makita, Shuichi; Hong, Young-Joo; Kasaragod, Deepa; Sasaoka, Tomoko; Yamanari, Masahiro; Sugiyama, Satoshi; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) visualizes cross-sectional microstructures of biological tissues. Recent developments of multifunctional OCT (MF-OCT) provides multiple optical contrasts which can reveal currently unknown tissue properties. In this contribution we demonstrate multifunctional OCT specially designed for dermatological investigation. And by utilizing it to measure four different body parts of in vivo human skin, three-dimensional scattering OCT, OCT angiography, polarization uniformity tomography, and local birefringence tomography images were obtained by a single scan. They respectively contrast the structure and morphology, vasculature, melanin content and collagen traits of the tissue.

  6. Optical computed tomography for imaging the breast: first look

    Grable, Richard J.; Ponder, Steven L.; Gkanatsios, Nikolaos A.; Dieckmann, William; Olivier, Patrick F.; Wake, Robert H.; Zeng, Yueping

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of the study is to compare computed tomography optical imaging with traditional breast imaging techniques. Images produced by computed tomography laser mammography (CTLMTM) scanner are compared with images obtained from mammography, and in some cases ultrasound and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). During the CTLM procedure, a near infrared laser irradiates the breast and an array of photodiodes detectors records light scattered through the breast tissue. The laser and detectors rotate synchronously around the breast to acquire a series of slice data along the coronal place. The procedure is performed without any breast compression or optical matching fluid. Cross-sectional slices of the breast are produced using a reconstruction algorithm. Reconstruction based on the diffusion theory is used to produce cross-sectional slices of the breast. Multiple slice images are combined to produce a three dimensional volumetric array of the imaged breast. This array is used to derive axial and sagittal images of the breast corresponding to cranio-caudal and medio-lateral images used in mammography. Over 200 women and 3 men have been scanned in clinical trials. The most obvious features seen in images produced by the optical tomography scanner are vascularization and significant lesions. Breast features caused by fibrocystic changes and cysts are less obvious. Breast density does not appear to be a significant factor in the quality of the image. We see correlation of the optical image structure with that seen with traditional breast imaging techniques. Further testing is being conducted to explore the sensitivity and specificity of optical tomography of the breast.

  7. Optical coherence tomography for imaging of skin and skin diseases

    Mogensen, Mette; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    2009-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging imaging technology based on light reflection. It provides real-time images with up to 2-mm penetration into the skin and a resolution of approximately 10 μm. It is routinely used in ophthalmology. The normal skin and its appendages have been studi...... technical solutions are being pursued to further improve the quality of the images and the data provided, and OCT is being integrated in multimodal imaging devices that would potentially be able to provide a quantum leap to the imaging of skin in vivo....

  8. Endoscopic optical coherence tomography for imaging the tympanic membrane

    Burkhardt, Anke; Walther, Julia; Cimalla, Peter; Bornitz, Matthias; Koch, Edmund

    2011-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging modality that enables micrometer-scale contactless subsurface imaging of biological tissue. Endoscopy, as another imaging method, has the potential of imaging tubular organs and cavities and therefore has opened up several application areas not accessible before. The combination of OCT and endoscopy uses the advantages of both methods and consequently allows additional imaging of structures beneath surfaces inside cavities. Currently, visual investigations on the surface of the human tympanic membrane are possible but only with expert eyes. up to now, visual imaging of the outer ear up to the tympanic membrane can be carried out by an otoscope, an operating microscope or an endoscope. In contrast to these devices, endoscopy has the advantage of imaging the whole tympanic membrane with one view. The intention of this research is the development of an endoscopic optical coherence tomography (EOCT) device for imaging the tympanic membrane depth-resolved and structures behind it. Detection of fluids in the middle ear, which function as an indicator for otitis media, could help to avoid the application of antibiotics. It is possible to detect a congeries of fluids with the otoscope but the ambition is to the early detection by OCT. The developed scanner head allows imaging in working distances in the range from zero up to 5 mm with a field of view of 2 mm. In the next step, the scanner head should be improved to increase the working distance and the field of view.

  9. Digital optical tomography system for dynamic breast imaging

    Flexman, Molly L.; Khalil, Michael A.; Al Abdi, Rabah; Kim, Hyun K.; Fong, Christopher J.; Desperito, Elise; Hershman, Dawn L.; Barbour, Randall L.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2011-07-01

    Diffuse optical tomography has shown promising results as a tool for breast cancer screening and monitoring response to chemotherapy. Dynamic imaging of the transient response of the breast to an external stimulus, such as pressure or a respiratory maneuver, can provide additional information that can be used to detect tumors. We present a new digital continuous-wave optical tomography system designed to simultaneously image both breasts at fast frame rates and with a large number of sources and detectors. The system uses a master-slave digital signal processor-based detection architecture to achieve a dynamic range of 160 dB and a frame rate of 1.7 Hz with 32 sources, 64 detectors, and 4 wavelengths per breast. Included is a preliminary study of one healthy patient and two breast cancer patients showing the ability to identify an invasive carcinoma based on the hemodynamic response to a breath hold.

  10. Dental imaging using laminar optical tomography and micro CT

    Long, Feixiao; Ozturk, Mehmet S.; Intes, Xavier; Kotha, Shiva

    2014-02-01

    Dental lesions located in the pulp are quite difficult to identify based on anatomical contrast, and, hence, to diagnose using traditional imaging methods such as dental CT. However, such lesions could lead to functional and/or molecular optical contrast. Herein, we report on the preliminary investigation of using Laminar Optical Tomography (LOT) to image the pulp and root canals in teeth. LOT is a non-contact, high resolution, molecular and functional mesoscopic optical imaging modality. To investigate the potential of LOT for dental imaging, we injected an optical dye into ex vivo teeth samples and imaged them using LOT and micro-CT simultaneously. A rigid image registration between the LOT and micro-CT reconstruction was obtained, validating the potential of LOT to image molecular optical contrast deep in the teeth with accuracy, non-invasively. We demonstrate that LOT can retrieve the 3D bio-distribution of molecular probes at depths up to 2mm with a resolution of several hundred microns in teeth.

  11. Dental calculus image based on optical coherence tomography

    Hsieh, Yao-Sheng; Ho, Yi-Ching; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Chuang, Ching-Cheng; Wang, Chun-Yang; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2011-03-01

    In this study, the dental calculus was characterized and imaged by means of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT). The refractive indices of enamel, dentin, cementum and calculus were measured as 1.625+/-0.024, 1.534+/-0.029, 1.570+/-0.021 and 1.896+/-0.085, respectively. The dental calculus lead strong scattering property and thus the region can be identified under enamel with SSOCT imaging. An extracted human tooth with calculus was covered by gingiva tissue as in vitro sample for SSOCT imaging.

  12. Optical Coherence Tomography in Cancer Imaging

    Nam, Ahhyun Stephanie; Vakoc, Benjamin; Blauvelt, David; Chico-Calero, Isabel

    Investigations into the biology of cancer and novel cancer therapies rely on preclinical mouse models and traditional histological endpoints. Drawbacks of this approach include a limit in the number of time points for evaluation and an increased number of animals per study. This has motivated the use of intravital microscopy, which can provide longitudinal imaging of critical tumor parameters. Here, the capabilities of OCT as an intravital microscopy of the tumor microenvironment are summarized, and the state of OCT adoption into cancer research is summarized.

  13. Imaging of oral pathological tissue using optical coherence tomography

    Canjau, Silvana; Todea, Carmen; Sinescu, Cosmin; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Topala, Florin I.; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) constitutes 90% of oral cancer. Early detection is a cornerstone to improve survival. Interaction of light with tissues may highlight changes in tissue structure and metabolism. We propose optical coherence tomography (OCT), as a non-invasive diagnosis method, being a new high-resolution optical technique that permits tri-dimensional (3-D), real-time imaging of near surface abnormalities in complex tissues. In this study half of the excisional biopsy was directed to the pathologist and the other half was assigned for OCT investigation. Histopathology validated the results. Areas of OSCC of the buccal mucosa were identified in the OCT images. The elements obserced included extensive epithelial down-growth, the disruption of the basement membrane, with areas of erosion, an epithelial layer that was highly variable in thickness and invasion into the sub-epithelial layers. Therefore, OCT appears to be a highly promising imaging modality.

  14. Functional imaging of small tissue volumes with diffuse optical tomography

    Klose, Alexander D.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2006-03-01

    Imaging of dynamic changes in blood parameters, functional brain imaging, and tumor imaging are the most advanced application areas of diffuse optical tomography (DOT). When dealing with the image reconstruction problem one is faced with the fact that near-infrared photons, unlike X-rays, are highly scattered when they traverse biological tissue. Image reconstruction schemes are required that model the light propagation inside biological tissue and predict measurements on the tissue surface. By iteratively changing the tissue-parameters until the predictions agree with the real measurements, a spatial distribution of optical properties inside the tissue is found. The optical properties can be related to the tissue oxygenation, inflammation, or to the fluorophore concentration of a biochemical marker. If the model of light propagation is inaccurate, the reconstruction process will lead to an inaccurate result as well. Here, we focus on difficulties that are encountered when DOT is employed for functional imaging of small tissue volumes, for example, in cancer studies involving small animals, or human finger joints for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Most of the currently employed image reconstruction methods rely on the diffusion theory that is an approximation to the equation of radiative transfer. But, in the cases of small tissue volumes and tissues that contain low scattering regions diffusion theory has been shown to be of limited applicability Therefore, we employ a light propagation model that is based on the equation of radiative transfer, which promises to overcome the limitations.

  15. Optical Coherence Tomography Technology and Quality Improvement Methods for Optical Coherence Tomography Images of Skin: A Short Review

    Adabi, Saba; Turani, Zahra; Fatemizadeh, Emad; Clayton, Anne; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2017-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) delivers 3-dimensional images of tissue microstructures. Although OCT imaging offers a promising high-resolution method, OCT images experience some artifacts that lead to misapprehension of tissue structures. Speckle, intensity decay, and blurring are 3 major artifacts in OCT images. Speckle is due to the low coherent light source used in the configuration of OCT. Intensity decay is a deterioration of light with respect to depth, and blurring is the consequence of deficiencies of optical components. In this short review, we summarize some of the image enhancement algorithms for OCT images which address the abovementioned artifacts. PMID:28638245

  16. Optical Coherence Tomography Technology and Quality Improvement Methods for Optical Coherence Tomography Images of Skin: A Short Review

    Saba Adabi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography (OCT delivers 3-dimensional images of tissue microstructures. Although OCT imaging offers a promising high-resolution method, OCT images experience some artifacts that lead to misapprehension of tissue structures. Speckle, intensity decay, and blurring are 3 major artifacts in OCT images. Speckle is due to the low coherent light source used in the configuration of OCT. Intensity decay is a deterioration of light with respect to depth, and blurring is the consequence of deficiencies of optical components. In this short review, we summarize some of the image enhancement algorithms for OCT images which address the abovementioned artifacts.

  17. Optical Coherence Tomography Technology and Quality Improvement Methods for Optical Coherence Tomography Images of Skin: A Short Review

    Adabi, Saba; Turani, Zahra; Fatemizadeh, Emad; Clayton, Anne; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2017-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) delivers 3-dimensional images of tissue microstructures. Although OCT imaging offers a promising high-resolution method, OCT images experience some artifacts that lead to misapprehension of tissue structures. Speckle, intensity decay, and blurring are 3 major artifacts in OCT images. Speckle is due to the low coherent light source used in the configuration of OCT. Intensity decay is a deterioration of light with respect to depth, and blurring is the conseque...

  18. Acute Solar Retinopathy Imaged With Adaptive Optics, Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography, and En Face Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Wu, Chris Y; Jansen, Michael E; Andrade, Jorge; Chui, Toco Y P; Do, Anna T; Rosen, Richard B; Deobhakta, Avnish

    2018-01-01

    Solar retinopathy is a rare form of retinal injury that occurs after direct sungazing. To enhance understanding of the structural changes that occur in solar retinopathy by obtaining high-resolution in vivo en face images. Case report of a young adult woman who presented to the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary with symptoms of acute solar retinopathy after viewing the solar eclipse on August 21, 2017. Results of comprehensive ophthalmic examination and images obtained by fundus photography, microperimetry, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT), adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy, OCT angiography, and en face OCT. The patient was examined after viewing the solar eclipse. Visual acuity was 20/20 OD and 20/25 OS. The patient was left-eye dominant. Spectral-domain OCT images were consistent with mild and severe acute solar retinopathy in the right and left eye, respectively. Microperimetry was normal in the right eye but showed paracentral decreased retinal sensitivity in the left eye with a central absolute scotoma. Adaptive optics images of the right eye showed a small region of nonwaveguiding photoreceptors, while images of the left eye showed a large area of abnormal and nonwaveguiding photoreceptors. Optical coherence tomography angiography images were normal in both eyes. En face OCT images of the right eye showed a small circular hyperreflective area, with central hyporeflectivity in the outer retina of the right eye. The left eye showed a hyperreflective lesion that intensified in area from inner to middle retina and became mostly hyporeflective in the outer retina. The shape of the lesion on adaptive optics and en face OCT images of the left eye corresponded to the shape of the scotoma drawn by the patient on Amsler grid. Acute solar retinopathy can present with foveal cone photoreceptor mosaic disturbances on adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy imaging. Corresponding reflectivity changes can be seen on en face OCT, especially

  19. Monte Carlo modeling of human tooth optical coherence tomography imaging

    Shi, Boya; Meng, Zhuo; Wang, Longzhi; Liu, Tiegen

    2013-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo model for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of human tooth. The model is implemented by combining the simulation of a Gaussian beam with simulation for photon propagation in a two-layer human tooth model with non-parallel surfaces through a Monte Carlo method. The geometry and the optical parameters of the human tooth model are chosen on the basis of the experimental OCT images. The results show that the simulated OCT images are qualitatively consistent with the experimental ones. Using the model, we demonstrate the following: firstly, two types of photons contribute to the information of morphological features and noise in the OCT image of a human tooth, respectively. Secondly, the critical imaging depth of the tooth model is obtained, and it is found to decrease significantly with increasing mineral loss, simulated as different enamel scattering coefficients. Finally, the best focus position is located below and close to the dental surface by analysis of the effect of focus positions on the OCT signal and critical imaging depth. We anticipate that this modeling will become a powerful and accurate tool for a preliminary numerical study of the OCT technique on diseases of dental hard tissue in human teeth. (paper)

  20. Diffuse optical tomography for breast cancer imaging guided by computed tomography: A feasibility study.

    Baikejiang, Reheman; Zhang, Wei; Li, Changqing

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has attracted attentions in the last two decades due to its intrinsic sensitivity in imaging chromophores of tissues such as hemoglobin, water, and lipid. However, DOT has not been clinically accepted yet due to its low spatial resolution caused by strong optical scattering in tissues. Structural guidance provided by an anatomical imaging modality enhances the DOT imaging substantially. Here, we propose a computed tomography (CT) guided multispectral DOT imaging system for breast cancer imaging. To validate its feasibility, we have built a prototype DOT imaging system which consists of a laser at the wavelength of 650 nm and an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera. We have validated the CT guided DOT reconstruction algorithms with numerical simulations and phantom experiments, in which different imaging setup parameters, such as projection number of measurements and width of measurement patch, have been investigated. Our results indicate that an air-cooling EMCCD camera is good enough for the transmission mode DOT imaging. We have also found that measurements at six angular projections are sufficient for DOT to reconstruct the optical targets with 2 and 4 times absorption contrast when the CT guidance is applied. Finally, we have described our future research plan on integration of a multispectral DOT imaging system into a breast CT scanner.

  1. Learnable despeckling framework for optical coherence tomography images

    Adabi, Saba; Rashedi, Elaheh; Clayton, Anne; Mohebbi-Kalkhoran, Hamed; Chen, Xue-wen; Conforto, Silvia; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2018-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a prevalent, interferometric, high-resolution imaging method with broad biomedical applications. Nonetheless, OCT images suffer from an artifact called speckle, which degrades the image quality. Digital filters offer an opportunity for image improvement in clinical OCT devices, where hardware modification to enhance images is expensive. To reduce speckle, a wide variety of digital filters have been proposed; selecting the most appropriate filter for an OCT image/image set is a challenging decision, especially in dermatology applications of OCT where a different variety of tissues are imaged. To tackle this challenge, we propose an expandable learnable despeckling framework, we call LDF. LDF decides which speckle reduction algorithm is most effective on a given image by learning a figure of merit (FOM) as a single quantitative image assessment measure. LDF is learnable, which means when implemented on an OCT machine, each given image/image set is retrained and its performance is improved. Also, LDF is expandable, meaning that any despeckling algorithm can easily be added to it. The architecture of LDF includes two main parts: (i) an autoencoder neural network and (ii) filter classifier. The autoencoder learns the FOM based on several quality assessment measures obtained from the OCT image including signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio, equivalent number of looks, edge preservation index, and mean structural similarity index. Subsequently, the filter classifier identifies the most efficient filter from the following categories: (a) sliding window filters including median, mean, and symmetric nearest neighborhood, (b) adaptive statistical-based filters including Wiener, homomorphic Lee, and Kuwahara, and (c) edge preserved patch or pixel correlation-based filters including nonlocal mean, total variation, and block matching three-dimensional filtering.

  2. Imaging Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma with Optical Coherence Tomography

    Hans Christian Ring

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate the presentation of a patch-stage cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL using optical coherence tomography (OCT. Methods: A patient with a patch caused by CTCL was photographed digitally, OCT-scanned and biopsied. A normal skin area adjacent to the patch was OCT-scanned for comparison, but not biopsied. The OCT image and the histological image were compared. Results: The OCT images illustrated a thickened and hyperreflective stratum corneum. OCT also demonstrated several elongated hyporeflective structures in the dermis. The largest structure was measured to have a width of 0.13 mm. A good immediate correlation was found between histology and OCT imaging of the sample. Conclusion: The aetiology of the elongated structures is thought to be lymphomatous infiltrates. Similar findings have been described in ocular lymphoma and may therefore be an important characteristic of cutaneous lymphoma. It may further be speculated that the differences in OCT images may reflect the biological behaviour of the infiltrate. This observation therefore suggests that OCT imaging may be a relevant tool for the in vivo investigation of mycosis fungoides and other CTCLs, but in order to verify these observed patterns in OCT imaging, further investigations will be required.

  3. Colposcopic imaging using visible-light optical coherence tomography

    Duan, Lian; McRaven, Michael D.; Liu, Wenzhong; Shu, Xiao; Hu, Jianmin; Sun, Cheng; Veazey, Ronald S.; Hope, Thomas J.; Zhang, Hao F.

    2017-05-01

    High-resolution colposcopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides key anatomical measures, such as thickness and minor traumatic injury of vaginal epithelium, of the female reproductive tract noninvasively. This information can be helpful in both fundamental investigations in animal models and disease screenings in humans. We present a fiber-based visible-light OCT and two probe designs for colposcopic application. One probe conducts circular scanning using a DC motor, and the other probe is capable of three-dimensional imaging over a 4.6×4.6-mm2 area using a pair of galvo scanners. Using this colposcopic vis-OCT with both probes, we acquired high-resolution images from whole isolated macaque vaginal samples and identified biopsy lesions.

  4. Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging in Acute Coronary Syndromes

    Takashi Kubo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography (OCT is a high-resolution imaging technique that offers microscopic visualization of coronary plaques. The clear and detailed images of OCT generate an intense interest in adopting this technique for both clinical and research purposes. Recent studies have shown that OCT is useful for the assessment of coronary atherosclerotic plaques, in particular the assessment of plaque rupture, erosion, and intracoronary thrombus in patients with acute coronary syndrome. In addition, OCT may enable identifying thin-cap fibroatheroma, the proliferation of vasa vasorum, and the distribution of macrophages surrounding vulnerable plaques. With its ability to view atherosclerotic lesions in vivo with such high resolution, OCT provides cardiologists with the tool they need to better understand the thrombosis-prone vulnerable plaques and acute coronary syndromes. This paper reviews the possibility of OCT for identification of vulnerable plaques in vivo.

  5. Three dimensional optical coherence tomography imaging: advantages and advances.

    Gabriele, Michelle L; Wollstein, Gadi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Xu, Juan; Kim, Jongsick; Kagemann, Larry; Folio, Lindsey S; Schuman, Joel S

    2010-11-01

    Three dimensional (3D) ophthalmic imaging using optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized assessment of the eye, the retina in particular. Recent technological improvements have made the acquisition of 3D-OCT datasets feasible. However, while volumetric data can improve disease diagnosis and follow-up, novel image analysis techniques are now necessary in order to process the dense 3D-OCT dataset. Fundamental software improvements include methods for correcting subject eye motion, segmenting structures or volumes of interest, extracting relevant data post hoc and signal averaging to improve delineation of retinal layers. In addition, innovative methods for image display, such as C-mode sectioning, provide a unique viewing perspective and may improve interpretation of OCT images of pathologic structures. While all of these methods are being developed, most remain in an immature state. This review describes the current status of 3D-OCT scanning and interpretation, and discusses the need for standardization of clinical protocols as well as the potential benefits of 3D-OCT scanning that could come when software methods for fully exploiting these rich datasets are available clinically. The implications of new image analysis approaches include improved reproducibility of measurements garnered from 3D-OCT, which may then help improve disease discrimination and progression detection. In addition, 3D-OCT offers the potential for preoperative surgical planning and intraoperative surgical guidance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. High-resolution retinal imaging using adaptive optics and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    Olivier, Scot S.; Werner, John S.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Laut, Sophie P.; Jones, Steven M.

    2010-09-07

    This invention permits retinal images to be acquired at high speed and with unprecedented resolution in three dimensions (4.times.4.times.6 .mu.m). The instrument achieves high lateral resolution by using adaptive optics to correct optical aberrations of the human eye in real time. High axial resolution and high speed are made possible by the use of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. Using this system, we have demonstrated the ability to image microscopic blood vessels and the cone photoreceptor mosaic.

  7. Optical coherence tomography: imaging architect for dermal microdialysis in psoriasis

    O'Connell, M.-L.; O'Connor, W.; Ramsay, B.; Guihen, E.; Ho, W. L.; Leahy, M. J.

    2011-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used as part of a ground breaking translational study to shed some light on one of the worlds most prevalent autoimmune diseases; psoriasis. The work successfully integrates the fields of optical imaging, biochemistry and dermatology in conducting a dermal microdialysis (DMD) trial for quantitative histamine assessment amongst a group of psoriasis sufferers. The DMD process involves temporary insertion of microscopic hollow tubes into a layer of skin to measure the levels of histamine and other important biological molecules in psoriasis. For comparison purposes, DMD catheters were implanted into healthy, peri-lesional and lesional skin regions. The catheters' entry and exit points and their precise locations in the epidermal layer of the skin were confirmed using OCT thus obtaining high resolution, wide-field images of the affected skin as well as catheter placement whilst local microdialysis enabled a tissue chemistry profile to be obtained from these three skin regions including histamine, a local immune system activator known to contribute towards itch and inflammation. Together these tools offer a synergistic approach in the clinical assessment of the disease. In addition, OCT delivered a non-invasive and rapid method for analyzing the affected skin architecture.

  8. Depth-resolved imaging of colon tumor using optical coherence tomography and fluorescence laminar optical tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Tang, Qinggong; Frank, Aaron; Wang, Jianting; Chen, Chao-wei; Jin, Lily; Lin, Jon; Chan, Joanne M.; Chen, Yu

    2016-03-01

    Early detection of neoplastic changes remains a critical challenge in clinical cancer diagnosis and treatment. Many cancers arise from epithelial layers such as those of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Current standard endoscopic technology is unable to detect those subsurface lesions. Since cancer development is associated with both morphological and molecular alterations, imaging technologies that can quantitative image tissue's morphological and molecular biomarkers and assess the depth extent of a lesion in real time, without the need for tissue excision, would be a major advance in GI cancer diagnostics and therapy. In this research, we investigated the feasibility of multi-modal optical imaging including high-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) and depth-resolved high-sensitivity fluorescence laminar optical tomography (FLOT) for structural and molecular imaging. APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) mice model were imaged using OCT and FLOT and the correlated histopathological diagnosis was obtained. Quantitative structural (the scattering coefficient) and molecular imaging parameters (fluorescence intensity) from OCT and FLOT images were developed for multi-parametric analysis. This multi-modal imaging method has demonstrated the feasibility for more accurate diagnosis with 87.4% (87.3%) for sensitivity (specificity) which gives the most optimal diagnosis (the largest area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve). This project results in a new non-invasive multi-modal imaging platform for improved GI cancer detection, which is expected to have a major impact on detection, diagnosis, and characterization of GI cancers, as well as a wide range of epithelial cancers.

  9. Correlation characteristics of optical coherence tomography images of turbid media with statistically inhomogeneous optical parameters

    Dolin, Lev S.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina A.; Turchin, Ilya V.

    2012-01-01

    Noisy structure of optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of turbid medium contains information about spatial variations of its optical parameters. We propose analytical model of statistical characteristics of OCT signal fluctuations from turbid medium with spatially inhomogeneous coefficients of absorption and backscattering. Analytically predicted correlation characteristics of OCT signal from spatially inhomogeneous medium are in good agreement with the results of correlation analysis of OCT images of different biological tissues. The proposed model can be efficiently applied for quantitative evaluation of statistical properties of absorption and backscattering fluctuations basing on correlation characteristics of OCT images.

  10. Retinal Imaging of Infants on Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Anand Vinekar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectral domain coherence tomography (SD OCT has become an important tool in the management of pediatric retinal diseases. It is a noncontact imaging device that provides detailed assessment of the microanatomy and pathology of the infant retina with a short acquisition time allowing office examination without the requirement of anesthesia. Our understanding of the development and maturation of the infant fovea has been enhanced by SD OCT allowing an in vivo assessment that correlates with histopathology. This has helped us understand the critical correlation of foveal development with visual potential in the first year of life and beyond. In this review, we summarize the recent literature on the clinical applications of SD OCT in studying the pathoanatomy of the infant macula, its ability to detect subclinical features, and its correlation with disease and vision. Retinopathy of prematurity and macular edema have been discussed in detail. The review also summarizes the current status of SD OCT in other infant retinal conditions, imaging the optic nerve, the choroid, and the retinal nerve fibre in infants and children, and suggests future areas of research.

  11. Quantifying Optical Microangiography Images Obtained from a Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography System

    Roberto Reif

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The blood vessel morphology is known to correlate with several diseases, such as cancer, and is important for describing several tissue physiological processes, like angiogenesis. Therefore, a quantitative method for characterizing the angiography obtained from medical images would have several clinical applications. Optical microangiography (OMAG is a method for obtaining three-dimensional images of blood vessels within a volume of tissue. In this study we propose to quantify OMAG images obtained with a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system. A technique for determining three measureable parameters (the fractal dimension, the vessel length fraction, and the vessel area density is proposed and validated. Finally, the repeatability for acquiring OMAG images is determined, and a new method for analyzing small areas from these images is proposed.

  12. Benefits of optical coherence tomography for imaging of skin diseases

    Utz S.R.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: working out the methods of visualization of information obtained during optical coherent tomography in normal skin and in series of inflammatory disorders. Materials and Methods. OCS1300SS (made in Thorlabs, USA was used in which the source of emission of radiation was a super-luminiscent diode with mean wavelength of 1325 nm. 12 patients with different skin conditions and 5 virtually healthy volunteers were examined with ОСТ procedure in OPD and IPD settings. High resolution USG numerical system DUB (TPM GmbH, Germany was used for comparative USG assessment. Results. ОСТ demonstrated considerably more detailed picture of the objects scanned compared to USG investigation. Image obtained with the help of ОСТ contains vital information about sizes of macro-morphological elements, status of vascular elements and their density in different depths of the skin. Conclusion. Additional results obtained from ОСТ of the skin lesions in plane section improves attraction for ОСТ in practical dermatology.

  13. New variational image decomposition model for simultaneously denoising and segmenting optical coherence tomography images

    Duan, Jinming; Bai, Li; Tench, Christopher; Gottlob, Irene; Proudlock, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging plays an important role in clinical diagnosis and monitoring of diseases of the human retina. Automated analysis of optical coherence tomography images is a challenging task as the images are inherently noisy. In this paper, a novel variational image decomposition model is proposed to decompose an OCT image into three components: the first component is the original image but with the noise completely removed; the second contains the set of edges representing the retinal layer boundaries present in the image; and the third is an image of noise, or in image decomposition terms, the texture, or oscillatory patterns of the original image. In addition, a fast Fourier transform based split Bregman algorithm is developed to improve computational efficiency of solving the proposed model. Extensive experiments are conducted on both synthesised and real OCT images to demonstrate that the proposed model outperforms the state-of-the-art speckle noise reduction methods and leads to accurate retinal layer segmentation. (paper)

  14. Optimization of coronary optical coherence tomography imaging using the attenuation-compensated technique: a validation study.

    Teo, Jing Chun; Foin, Nicolas; Otsuka, Fumiyuki; Bulluck, Heerajnarain; Fam, Jiang Ming; Wong, Philip; Low, Fatt Hoe; Leo, Hwa Liang; Mari, Jean-Martial; Joner, Michael; Girard, Michael J A; Virmani, Renu; Bezerra, HG.; Costa, MA.; Guagliumi, G.; Rollins, AM.; Simon, D.; Gutiérrez-Chico, JL.; Alegría-Barrero, E.; Teijeiro-Mestre, R.; Chan, PH.; Tsujioka, H.; de Silva, R.; Otsuka, F.; Joner, M.; Prati, F.; Virmani, R.; Narula, J.; Members, WC.; Levine, GN.; Bates, ER.; Blankenship, JC.; Bailey, SR.; Bittl, JA.; Prati, F.; Guagliumi, G.; Mintz, G.S.; Costa, Marco; Regar, E.; Akasaka, T.; Roleder, T.; Jąkała, J.; Kałuża, GL.; Partyka, Ł.; Proniewska, K.; Pociask, E.; Girard, MJA.; Strouthidis, NG.; Ethier, CR.; Mari, JM.; Mari, JM.; Strouthidis, NG.; Park, SC.; Girard, MJA.; van der Lee, R.; Foin, N.; Otsuka, F.; Wong, P.K.; Mari, J-M.; Joner, M.; Nakano, M.; Vorpahl, M.; Otsuka, F.; Taniwaki, M.; Yazdani, SK.; Finn, AV.; Nakano, M.; Yahagi, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Taniwaki, M.; Otsuka, F.; Ladich, ER.; Girard, MJ.; Ang, M.; Chung, CW.; Farook, M.; Strouthidis, N.; Mehta, JS.; Foin, N.; Mari, JM.; Nijjer, S.; Sen, S.; Petraco, R.; Ghione, M.; Liu, X.; Kang, JU.; Virmani, R.; Kolodgie, F.D.; Burke, AP.; Farb, A.; Schwartz, S.M.; Yahagi, K.; Kolodgie, F.D.; Otsuka, F.; Finn, AV.; Davis, HR.; Joner, M.; Kume, T.; Akasaka, T.; Kawamoto, T.; Watanabe, N.; Toyota, E.; Neishi, Y.; Rieber, J.; Meissner, O.; Babaryka, G.; Reim, S.; Oswald, M.E.; Koenig, A.S.; Tearney, G. J.; Regar, E.; Akasaka, T.; Adriaenssens, T.; Barlis, P.; Bezerra, HG.; Yabushita, H.; Bouma, BE.; Houser, S. L.; Aretz, HT.; Jang, I-K.; Schlendorf, KH.; Guo, J.; Sun, L.; Chen, Y.D.; Tian, F.; Liu, HB.; Chen, L.; Kawasaki, M.; Bouma, BE.; Bressner, J. E.; Houser, S. L.; Nadkarni, S. K.; MacNeill, BD.; Jansen, CHP.; Onthank, DC.; Cuello, F.; Botnar, RM.; Wiethoff, AJ.; Warley, A.; von Birgelen, C.; Hartmann, A. M.; Kubo, T.; Akasaka, T.; Shite, J.; Suzuki, T.; Uemura, S.; Yu, B.; Habara, M.; Nasu, K.; Terashima, M.; Kaneda, H.; Yokota, D.; Ko, E.; Virmani, R.; Burke, AP.; Kolodgie, F.D.; Farb, A.; Takarada, S.; Imanishi, T.; Kubo, T.; Tanimoto, T.; Kitabata, H.; Nakamura, N.; Hattori, K.; Ozaki, Y.; Ismail, TF.; Okumura, M.; Naruse, H.; Kan, S.; Nishio, R.; Shinke, T.; Otake, H.; Nakagawa, M.; Nagoshi, R.; Inoue, T.; Sinclair, H.D.; Bourantas, C.; Bagnall, A.; Mintz, G.S.; Kunadian, V.; Tearney, G. J.; Yabushita, H.; Houser, S. L.; Aretz, HT.; Jang, I-K.; Schlendorf, KH.; van Soest, G.; Goderie, T.; Regar, E.; Koljenović, S.; Leenders, GL. van; Gonzalo, N.; Xu, C.; Schmitt, JM.; Carlier, SG.; Virmani, R.; van der Meer, FJ; Faber, D.J.; Sassoon, DMB.; Aalders, M.C.; Pasterkamp, G.; Leeuwen, TG. van; Schmitt, JM.; Knuttel, A.; Yadlowsky, M.; Eckhaus, MA.; Karamata, B.; Laubscher, M.; Leutenegger, M.; Bourquin, S.; Lasser, T.; Lambelet, P.; Vermeer, K.A.; Mo, J.; Weda, J.J.A.; Lemij, H.G.; Boer, JF. de

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To optimize conventional coronary optical coherence tomography (OCT) images using the attenuation-compensated technique to improve identification of plaques and the external elastic lamina (EEL) contour. METHOD The attenuation-compensated technique was optimized via manipulating contrast

  15. In vivo imaging of human photoreceptor mosaic with wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography.

    Wong, Kevin S K; Jian, Yifan; Cua, Michelle; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2015-02-01

    Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (WSAO-OCT) is a novel imaging technique for in vivo high-resolution depth-resolved imaging that mitigates some of the challenges encountered with the use of sensor-based adaptive optics designs. This technique replaces the Hartmann Shack wavefront sensor used to measure aberrations with a depth-resolved image-driven optimization algorithm, with the metric based on the OCT volumes acquired in real-time. The custom-built ultrahigh-speed GPU processing platform and fast modal optimization algorithm presented in this paper was essential in enabling real-time, in vivo imaging of human retinas with wavefront sensorless AO correction. WSAO-OCT is especially advantageous for developing a clinical high-resolution retinal imaging system as it enables the use of a compact, low-cost and robust lens-based adaptive optics design. In this report, we describe our WSAO-OCT system for imaging the human photoreceptor mosaic in vivo. We validated our system performance by imaging the retina at several eccentricities, and demonstrated the improvement in photoreceptor visibility with WSAO compensation.

  16. Imaging of macrophage dynamics with optical coherence tomography in anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    Kokona, Despina; Häner, Nathanael U; Ebneter, Andreas; Zinkernagel, Martin S

    2017-01-01

    Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) is a relatively common cause of visual loss and results from hypoperfusion of the small arteries of the anterior portion of the optic nerve. AION is the leading cause of sudden optic nerve related vision loss with approximately 10 cases per 100'000 in the population over 50 years. To date there is no established treatment for AION and therefore a better understanding of the events occurring at the level of the optic nerve head (ONH) would be important to design future therapeutic strategies. The optical properties of the eye allow imaging of the optic nerve in vivo, which is a part of the CNS, during ischemia. Experimentally laser induced optic neuropathy (eLiON) displays similar anatomical features as anterior ischemic optic neuropathy in humans. After laser induced optic neuropathy we show that hyperreflective dots in optical coherence tomography correspond to mononuclear cells in histology. Using fluorescence-activated flow cytometry (FACS) we found these cells to peak one week after eLiON. These observations were translated to OCT findings in patients with AION, where similar dynamics of hyperreflective dots at the ONH were identified. Our data suggests that activated macrophages can be identified as hyperreflective dots in OCT. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Imaging of basal cell carcinoma by high-definition optical coherence tomography

    Boone, M A L M; Norrenberg, S; Jemec, G B E

    2012-01-01

    With the continued development of noninvasive therapies for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) such as photodynamic therapy and immune therapies, noninvasive diagnosis and monitoring become increasingly relevant. High-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) is a high-resolution imaging tool, wit......, with micrometre resolution in both transversal and axial directions, enabling visualization of individual cells up to a depth of around 570 μm, and filling the imaging gap between conventional optical coherence tomography (OCT) and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM)....

  18. Optical coherence tomography--a new imaging method in ophthalmology.

    Svorenova, I; Strmen, P; Olah, Z

    2010-01-01

    An improvement of examination methods in ophthalmology, technical digitalisation and knowledge of validity of examinations in various diseases contributes to early diagnostics, thereby leading to an opportunity for early treatment of eye disorders. Standard introduction of the so-called optical coherence tomography into the ophthamological clinical practice facilitated new options for a detailed analysis of pathological processes in the particular layers of the retina (Fig. 2, Ref. 5). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  19. Intracoronary optical coherence tomography

    Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Albuquerque, Felipe N; Sotomi, Yohei

    2017-01-01

    By providing valuable information about the coronary artery wall and lumen, intravascular imaging may aid in optimizing interventional procedure results and thereby could improve clinical outcomes following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT...

  20. Application of optical coherence tomography attenuation imaging for quantification of optical properties in medulloblastoma

    Vuong, Barry; Skowron, Patryk; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Kyan, Matthew; Garzia, Livia; Genis, Helen; Sun, Cuiru; Taylor, Michael D.; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2015-03-01

    The hemodynamic environment is known to play a crucial role in the progression, rupture, and treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Currently there is difficulty assessing and measuring blood flow profiles in vivo. An emerging high resolution imaging modality known as split spectrum Doppler optical coherence tomography (ssDOCT) has demonstrated the capability to quantify hemodynamic patterns as well as arterial microstructural changes. In this study, we present a novel in vitro method to acquire precise blood flow patterns within a patient- specific aneurysm silicone flow models using ssDOCT imaging. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were generated to verify ssDOCT results.

  1. Optical tomography of tissues

    Zimnyakov, D A; Tuchin, Valerii V

    2002-01-01

    Methods of optical tomography of biological tissues are considered, which include pulse-modulation and frequency-modulation tomography, diffusion tomography with the use of cw radiation sources, optical coherent tomography, speckle-correlation tomography of nonstationary media, and optoacoustic tomography. The method for controlling the optical properties of tissues is studied from the point of view of increasing a probing depth in optical coherent tomography. The modern state and prospects of the development of optical tomography are discussed. (review)

  2. Potential Measurement Errors Due to Image Enlargement in Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    Uji, Akihito; Murakami, Tomoaki; Muraoka, Yuki; Hosoda, Yoshikatsu; Yoshitake, Shin; Dodo, Yoko; Arichika, Shigeta; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2015-01-01

    The effect of interpolation and super-resolution (SR) algorithms on quantitative and qualitative assessments of enlarged optical coherence tomography (OCT) images was investigated in this report. Spectral-domain OCT images from 30 eyes in 30 consecutive patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) and 20 healthy eyes in 20 consecutive volunteers were analyzed. Original image (OR) resolution was reduced by a factor of four. Images were then magnified by a factor of four with and without application of one of the following algorithms: bilinear (BL), bicubic (BC), Lanczos3 (LA), and SR. Differences in peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, photoreceptor layer status, and parallelism (reflects the complexity of photoreceptor layer alterations) were analyzed in each image type. The order of PSNRs from highest to lowest was SR > LA > BC > BL > non-processed enlarged images (NONE). The PSNR was statistically different in all groups. The NONE, BC, and LA images resulted in significantly thicker RNFL measurements than the OR image. In eyes with DME, the photoreceptor layer, which was hardly identifiable in NONE images, became detectable with algorithm application. However, OCT photoreceptor parameters were still assessed as more undetectable than in OR images. Parallelism was not statistically different in OR and NONE images, but other image groups had significantly higher parallelism than OR images. Our results indicated that interpolation and SR algorithms increased OCT image resolution. However, qualitative and quantitative assessments were influenced by algorithm use. Additionally, each algorithm affected the assessments differently. PMID:26024236

  3. A Deep Learning Approach to Digitally Stain Optical Coherence Tomography Images of the Optic Nerve Head.

    Devalla, Sripad Krishna; Chin, Khai Sing; Mari, Jean-Martial; Tun, Tin A; Strouthidis, Nicholas G; Aung, Tin; Thiéry, Alexandre H; Girard, Michaël J A

    2018-01-01

    To develop a deep learning approach to digitally stain optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the optic nerve head (ONH). A horizontal B-scan was acquired through the center of the ONH using OCT (Spectralis) for one eye of each of 100 subjects (40 healthy and 60 glaucoma). All images were enhanced using adaptive compensation. A custom deep learning network was then designed and trained with the compensated images to digitally stain (i.e., highlight) six tissue layers of the ONH. The accuracy of our algorithm was assessed (against manual segmentations) using the dice coefficient, sensitivity, specificity, intersection over union (IU), and accuracy. We studied the effect of compensation, number of training images, and performance comparison between glaucoma and healthy subjects. For images it had not yet assessed, our algorithm was able to digitally stain the retinal nerve fiber layer + prelamina, the RPE, all other retinal layers, the choroid, and the peripapillary sclera and lamina cribrosa. For all tissues, the dice coefficient, sensitivity, specificity, IU, and accuracy (mean) were 0.84 ± 0.03, 0.92 ± 0.03, 0.99 ± 0.00, 0.89 ± 0.03, and 0.94 ± 0.02, respectively. Our algorithm performed significantly better when compensated images were used for training (P deep learning algorithm can simultaneously stain the neural and connective tissues of the ONH, offering a framework to automatically measure multiple key structural parameters of the ONH that may be critical to improve glaucoma management.

  4. Optical imaging of oral pathological tissue using optical coherence tomography and synchrotron radiation computed microtomography

    Cânjǎu, Silvana; Todea, Carmen; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda L.; Duma, Virgil; Mǎnescu, Adrian; Topalǎ, Florin I.; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2013-06-01

    The efforts aimed at early diagnosis of oral cancer should be prioritized towards developing a new screening instrument, based on optical coherence tomography (OCT), to be used directly intraorally, able to perform a fast, real time, 3D and non-invasive diagnosis of oral malignancies. The first step in this direction would be to optimize the OCT image interpretation of oral tissues. Therefore we propose plastination as a tissue preparation method that better preserves three-dimensional structure for study by new optical imaging techniques. The OCT and the synchrotron radiation computed microtomography (micro-CT) were employed for tissue sample analyze. For validating the OCT results we used the gold standard diagnostic procedure for any suspicious lesion - histopathology. This is a preliminary study of comparing features provided by OCT and Micro-CT. In the conditions of the present study, OCT proves to be a highly promising imaging modality. The use of x-ray based topographic imaging of small biological samples has been limited by the low intrinsic x-ray absorption of non-mineralized tissue and the lack of established contrast agents. Plastination can be used to enhance optical imagies of oral soft tissue samples.

  5. Histologic correlation of in vivo optical coherence tomography images of the human retina

    Chen, T.; Cense, B.; Miller, J.S.; Rubin, P. A. D.; Deschler, D. G.; Gragoudas, E. S.; de Boer, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate in vivo human retina optical coherence tomography (OCT)3 images with histology. Design: Case series. Methods: Linear OCT3 scans through the macula and optic nerve were obtained in three eyes of three patients who then underwent exenteration surgery for orbital cancers. OCT3

  6. Imaging actinic keratosis by high-definition optical coherence tomography. Histomorphologic correlation

    Boone, Marc A L M; Norrenberg, Sarah; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2013-01-01

    With the continued development of non-invasive therapies for actinic keratosis such as PDT and immune therapies, the non-invasive diagnosis and monitoring become increasingly relevant. High-definition optical coherence tomography is a high-resolution imaging tool, with micrometre resolution in both...... transversal and axial directions, enable to visualize individual cells up to a depth of around 570 μm filling the imaging gap between conventional optical coherence tomography and reflectance confocal microscopy. We sought to determine the feasibility of detecting and grading of actinic keratosis...... by this technique using criteria defined for reflectance confocal microscopy compared to histology. In this pilot study, skin lesions of 17 patients with a histologically proven actinic keratosis were imaged by high-definition optical coherence tomography just before excision and images analysed qualitatively...

  7. Optical coherence tomography imaging of psoriasis vulgaris: correlation with histology and disease severity

    Morsy, Hanan; Kamp, Søren; Thrane, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Epidermal thickness (ET) has been suggested as a surrogate measure of psoriasis severity. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a recent imaging technology that provides real-time skin images to a depth of 1.8 mm with a micrometre resolution. OCT may provide an accurate in vivo measure of ET. It ...

  8. An elegant technique for ex vivo imaging in experimental research—Optical coherence tomography (OCT)

    Tschernig, T.; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an elegant technology for imaging of tissues and organs and has been established for clinical use for around a decade. Thus, it is used in vivo but can also serve as a valuable ex vivo imaging tool in experimental research. Here, a brief overview is given...

  9. Functional imaging in bulk tissue specimens using optical emission tomography: fluorescence preservation during optical clearing

    Sakhalkar, H S; Dewhirst, M; Oliver, T; Cao, Y; Oldham, M

    2007-01-01

    Optical emission computed tomography (optical-ECT) is a technique for imaging the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of fluorescent probes in biological tissue specimens with high contrast and spatial resolution. In optical-ECT, functional information can be imaged by (i) systemic application of functional labels (e.g. fluorophore labelled proteins) and/or (ii) endogenous expression of fluorescent reporter proteins (e.g. red fluorescent protein (RFP), green fluorescent protein (GFP)) in vivo. An essential prerequisite for optical-ECT is optical clearing, a procedure where tissue specimens are made transparent to light by sequential perfusion with fixing, dehydrating and clearing agents. In this study, we investigate clearing protocols involving a selection of common fixing (4% buffered paraformaldehyde (PFA), methanol and ethanol), dehydrating (methanol and ethanol) and clearing agents (methyl salicylate and benzyl-alcohol-benzyl-benzoate (BABB)) in order to determine a 'fluorescence friendly' clearing procedure. Cell culture experiments were employed to optimize the sequence of chemical treatments that best preserve fluorescence. Texas red (TxRed), fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), RFP and GFP were tested as fluorophores and fluorescent reporter proteins of interest. Fluorescent and control cells were imaged on a microscope using a DSred2 and FITC filter set. The most promising clearing protocols of cell culture experiments were applied to whole xenograft tumour specimens, to test their effectiveness in large unsectioned samples. Fluorescence of TxRed/FITC fluorophores was not found to be significantly affected by any of the test clearing protocols. RFP and GFP fluorescence, however, was found to be significantly greater when cell fixation was in ethanol. Fixation in either PFA or methanol resulted in diminished fluorescence. After ethanol fixation, the RFP and GFP fluorescence proved remarkably robust to subsequent exposure to either methyl salicylate or BABB

  10. Functional imaging in bulk tissue specimens using optical emission tomography: fluorescence preservation during optical clearing

    Sakhalkar, H S [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Dewhirst, M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Oliver, T [Department of Cell Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Cao, Y [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Oldham, M [Department of Radiation Oncology Physics, and Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2007-04-21

    Optical emission computed tomography (optical-ECT) is a technique for imaging the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of fluorescent probes in biological tissue specimens with high contrast and spatial resolution. In optical-ECT, functional information can be imaged by (i) systemic application of functional labels (e.g. fluorophore labelled proteins) and/or (ii) endogenous expression of fluorescent reporter proteins (e.g. red fluorescent protein (RFP), green fluorescent protein (GFP)) in vivo. An essential prerequisite for optical-ECT is optical clearing, a procedure where tissue specimens are made transparent to light by sequential perfusion with fixing, dehydrating and clearing agents. In this study, we investigate clearing protocols involving a selection of common fixing (4% buffered paraformaldehyde (PFA), methanol and ethanol), dehydrating (methanol and ethanol) and clearing agents (methyl salicylate and benzyl-alcohol-benzyl-benzoate (BABB)) in order to determine a 'fluorescence friendly' clearing procedure. Cell culture experiments were employed to optimize the sequence of chemical treatments that best preserve fluorescence. Texas red (TxRed), fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), RFP and GFP were tested as fluorophores and fluorescent reporter proteins of interest. Fluorescent and control cells were imaged on a microscope using a DSred2 and FITC filter set. The most promising clearing protocols of cell culture experiments were applied to whole xenograft tumour specimens, to test their effectiveness in large unsectioned samples. Fluorescence of TxRed/FITC fluorophores was not found to be significantly affected by any of the test clearing protocols. RFP and GFP fluorescence, however, was found to be significantly greater when cell fixation was in ethanol. Fixation in either PFA or methanol resulted in diminished fluorescence. After ethanol fixation, the RFP and GFP fluorescence proved remarkably robust to subsequent exposure to either methyl salicylate

  11. Contribution of optical coherence tomography imaging in management of iatrogenic coronary dissection

    Barber-Chamoux, Nicolas, E-mail: nbarber-chamoux@chu-clermontferrand.fr [Department of Cardiology, Gabriel Montpied University Hospital, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Souteyrand, Géraud; Combaret, Nicolas [Department of Cardiology, Gabriel Montpied University Hospital, Clermont-Ferrand (France); ISIT, CaVITI, CNRS (UMR-6284), Auvergne University, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Ouedraogo, Edgar; Lusson, Jean René [Department of Cardiology, Gabriel Montpied University Hospital, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Motreff, Pascal [Department of Cardiology, Gabriel Montpied University Hospital, Clermont-Ferrand (France); ISIT, CaVITI, CNRS (UMR-6284), Auvergne University, Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2016-03-15

    Iatrogenic coronary dissection is a rare but potentially serious complication of coronary angiography and angioplasty. Treatment with angioplasty guided only by angiography is often difficult. Optical coherence tomography imaging seems to be an interesting technique to lead the management of iatrogenic coronary dissection. Diagnosis can be made by optical coherence tomography; it can also eliminate differential diagnosis. Furthermore, this technique can guide safely the endovascular treatment. - Highlights: • Iatrogenic coronary dissection remains a challenging problem in angiography. • Endocoronary imaging is helpful for the diagnosis of iatrogenic coronary dissection. • OCT is a safe option to manage the endovascular treatment of coronary dissection.

  12. Hyperspectral and multispectral bioluminescence optical tomography for small animal imaging

    Chaudhari, Abhijit J; Darvas, Felix; Bading, James R; Moats, Rex A; Conti, Peter S; Smith, Desmond J; Cherry, Simon R; Leahy, Richard M

    2005-01-01

    For bioluminescence imaging studies in small animals, it is important to be able to accurately localize the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of the underlying bioluminescent source. The spectrum of light produced by the source that escapes the subject varies with the depth of the emission source because of the wavelength-dependence of the optical properties of tissue. Consequently, multispectral or hyperspectral data acquisition should help in the 3D localization of deep sources. In this paper, we describe a framework for fully 3D bioluminescence tomographic image acquisition and reconstruction that exploits spectral information. We describe regularized tomographic reconstruction techniques that use semi-infinite slab or FEM-based diffusion approximations of photon transport through turbid media. Singular value decomposition analysis was used for data dimensionality reduction and to illustrate the advantage of using hyperspectral rather than achromatic data. Simulation studies in an atlas-mouse geometry indicated that sub-millimeter resolution may be attainable given accurate knowledge of the optical properties of the animal. A fixed arrangement of mirrors and a single CCD camera were used for simultaneous acquisition of multispectral imaging data over most of the surface of the animal. Phantom studies conducted using this system demonstrated our ability to accurately localize deep point-like sources and show that a resolution of 1.5 to 2.2 mm for depths up to 6 mm can be achieved. We also include an in vivo study of a mouse with a brain tumour expressing firefly luciferase. Co-registration of the reconstructed 3D bioluminescent image with magnetic resonance images indicated good anatomical localization of the tumour

  13. IMAGING WITH MULTIMODAL ADAPTIVE-OPTICS OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY IN MULTIPLE EVANESCENT WHITE DOT SYNDROME: THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIP.

    Labriola, Leanne T; Legarreta, Andrew D; Legarreta, John E; Nadler, Zach; Gallagher, Denise; Hammer, Daniel X; Ferguson, R Daniel; Iftimia, Nicusor; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the location of pathological changes in multiple evanescent white dot syndrome (MEWDS) with the use of multimodal adaptive optics (AO) imaging. A 5-year observational case study of a 24-year-old female with recurrent MEWDS. Full examination included history, Snellen chart visual acuity, pupil assessment, intraocular pressures, slit lamp evaluation, dilated fundoscopic exam, imaging with Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT), blue-light fundus autofluorescence (FAF), fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, and adaptive-optics optical coherence tomography. Three distinct acute episodes of MEWDS occurred during the period of follow-up. Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and adaptive-optics imaging showed disturbance in the photoreceptor outer segments (PR OS) in the posterior pole with each flare. The degree of disturbance at the photoreceptor level corresponded to size and extent of the visual field changes. All findings were transient with delineation of the photoreceptor recovery from the outer edges of the lesion inward. Hyperautofluorescence was seen during acute flares. Increase in choroidal thickness did occur with each active flare but resolved. Although changes in the choroid and RPE can be observed in MEWDS, Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography, and multimodal adaptive optics imaging localized the visually significant changes seen in this disease at the level of the photoreceptors. These transient retinal changes specifically occur at the level of the inner segment ellipsoid and OS/RPE line. En face optical coherence tomography imaging provides a detailed, yet noninvasive method for following the convalescence of MEWDS and provides insight into the structural and functional relationship of this transient inflammatory retinal disease.

  14. Imaging of collagen deposition disorders using optical coherence tomography

    Ring, H C; Mogensen, M; Hussain, A A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Collagen deposition disorders such as hypertrophic scars, keloids and scleroderma can be associated with significant stigma and embarrassment. These disorders often constitute considerable impairment to quality of life, with treatment posing to be a substantial challenge. Optical...... lesion type. Hypertrophic scars displayed an increased vascularity and signal-rich bands correlating to excessive collagen deposition. Keloids depicted a disarray of hyper-reflective areas primarily located in the upper dermis. Additionally, the dermis displayed a heterogeneous morphology without...... indications of any vascular supply or lymphatic network. In contrast to keloids, scleroderma displayed a more cohesive backscattering indicating a difference in density of collagen or other dermal structures. OCT images demonstrated no significant differences between mean density measurements in OCT images...

  15. Photons-based medical imaging - Radiology, X-ray tomography, gamma and positrons tomography, optical imaging; Imagerie medicale a base de photons - Radiologie, tomographie X, tomographie gamma et positons, imagerie optique

    Fanet, H.; Dinten, J.M.; Moy, J.P.; Rinkel, J. [CEA Leti, Grenoble (France); Buvat, I. [IMNC - CNRS, Orsay (France); Da Silva, A. [Institut Fresnel, Marseille (France); Douek, P.; Peyrin, F. [INSA Lyon, Lyon Univ. (France); Frija, G. [Hopital Europeen George Pompidou, Paris (France); Trebossen, R. [CEA-Service hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Orsay (France)

    2010-07-01

    This book describes the different principles used in medical imaging. The detection aspects, the processing electronics and algorithms are detailed for the different techniques. This first tome analyses the photons-based techniques (X-rays, gamma rays and visible light). Content: 1 - physical background: radiation-matter interaction, consequences on detection and medical imaging; 2 - detectors for medical imaging; 3 - processing of numerical radiography images for quantization; 4 - X-ray tomography; 5 - positrons emission tomography: principles and applications; 6 - mono-photonic imaging; 7 - optical imaging; Index. (J.S.)

  16. Extraction of optical scattering parameters and attenuation compensation in optical coherence tomography images of multi-layered tissue structures

    Thrane, Lars; Frosz, Michael Henoch; Tycho, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    A recently developed analytical optical coherence tomography (OCT) model [Thrane et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 17, 484 (2000)] allows the extraction of optical scattering parameters from OCT images, thereby permitting attenuation compensation in those images. By expanding this theoretical model, we...... have developed a new method for extracting optical scattering parameters from multilayered tissue structures in vivo. To verify this, we used a Monte Carlo (MC) OCT model as a numerical phantom to simulate the OCT signal for het-erogeneous multilayered tissue. Excellent agreement between the extracted......, and the results hold promise for expanding the functional imaging capabilities of OCT....

  17. Novelty detection-based internal fingerprint segmentation in optical coherence tomography images

    Khutlang, Rethabile

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available present an automatic segmentation of the papillary layer method, from images acquired using contact-less 3-D swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT). The papillary contour represents the internal fingerprint, which does not suffer from the external...

  18. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness map determined from optical coherence tomography images

    Mujat, M.; Chan, R. C.; Cense, B.; Park, B.H.; Joo, C.; Akkin, T.; Chen, TC; de Boer, JF

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a method to determine the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in OCT images based on anisotropic noise suppression and deformable splines. Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SDOCT) data was acquired at 29 kHz A-line rate with a depth resolution of 2.6 mum and a depth

  19. Novelty detection-based internal fingerprint segmentation in optical coherence tomography images

    Khutlang, R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available present an automatic segmentation of the papillary layer method, in 3-D swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) images. The papillary contour represents the internal fingerprint, which does not suffer external skin problems. The slices composing...

  20. In vivo integrated photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy, optical coherence tomography, and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for retinal imaging

    Song, Wei; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Hao F.; Wei, Qing; Cao, Wenwu

    2012-12-01

    The physiological and pathological properties of retina are closely associated with various optical contrasts. Hence, integrating different ophthalmic imaging technologies is more beneficial in both fundamental investigation and clinical diagnosis of several blinding diseases. Recently, photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM) was developed for in vivo retinal imaging in small animals, which demonstrated the capability of imaging retinal vascular networks and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) at high sensitivity. We combined PAOM with traditional imaging modalities, such as fluorescein angiography (FA), spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), and auto-fluorescence scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AF-SLO), for imaging rats and mice. The multimodal imaging system provided more comprehensive evaluation of the retina based on the complementary imaging contrast mechanisms. The high-quality retinal images show that the integrated ophthalmic imaging system has great potential in the investigation of blinding disorders.

  1. Choroidal vasculature characteristics based choroid segmentation for enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography images

    Chen, Qiang; Niu, Sijie [School of Computer Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Yuan, Songtao; Fan, Wen, E-mail: fanwen1029@163.com; Liu, Qinghuai [Department of Ophthalmology, The First Affiliated Hospital with Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: In clinical research, it is important to measure choroidal thickness when eyes are affected by various diseases. The main purpose is to automatically segment choroid for enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT) images with five B-scans averaging. Methods: The authors present an automated choroid segmentation method based on choroidal vasculature characteristics for EDI-OCT images with five B-scans averaging. By considering the large vascular of the Haller’s layer neighbor with the choroid-sclera junction (CSJ), the authors measured the intensity ascending distance and a maximum intensity image in the axial direction from a smoothed and normalized EDI-OCT image. Then, based on generated choroidal vessel image, the authors constructed the CSJ cost and constrain the CSJ search neighborhood. Finally, graph search with smooth constraints was utilized to obtain the CSJ boundary. Results: Experimental results with 49 images from 10 eyes in 8 normal persons and 270 images from 57 eyes in 44 patients with several stages of diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately segment the choroid of EDI-OCT images with five B-scans averaging. The mean choroid thickness difference and overlap ratio between the authors’ proposed method and manual segmentation drawn by experts were −11.43 μm and 86.29%, respectively. Conclusions: Good performance was achieved for normal and pathologic eyes, which proves that the authors’ method is effective for the automated choroid segmentation of the EDI-OCT images with five B-scans averaging.

  2. Choroidal vasculature characteristics based choroid segmentation for enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography images

    Chen, Qiang; Niu, Sijie; Yuan, Songtao; Fan, Wen; Liu, Qinghuai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In clinical research, it is important to measure choroidal thickness when eyes are affected by various diseases. The main purpose is to automatically segment choroid for enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT) images with five B-scans averaging. Methods: The authors present an automated choroid segmentation method based on choroidal vasculature characteristics for EDI-OCT images with five B-scans averaging. By considering the large vascular of the Haller’s layer neighbor with the choroid-sclera junction (CSJ), the authors measured the intensity ascending distance and a maximum intensity image in the axial direction from a smoothed and normalized EDI-OCT image. Then, based on generated choroidal vessel image, the authors constructed the CSJ cost and constrain the CSJ search neighborhood. Finally, graph search with smooth constraints was utilized to obtain the CSJ boundary. Results: Experimental results with 49 images from 10 eyes in 8 normal persons and 270 images from 57 eyes in 44 patients with several stages of diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately segment the choroid of EDI-OCT images with five B-scans averaging. The mean choroid thickness difference and overlap ratio between the authors’ proposed method and manual segmentation drawn by experts were −11.43 μm and 86.29%, respectively. Conclusions: Good performance was achieved for normal and pathologic eyes, which proves that the authors’ method is effective for the automated choroid segmentation of the EDI-OCT images with five B-scans averaging.

  3. Molecular Imaging Probes for Positron Emission Tomography and Optical Imaging of Sentinel Lymph Node and Tumor

    Qin, Zhengtao

    Molecular imaging is visualizations and measurements of in vivo biological processes at the molecular or cellular level using specific imaging probes. As an emerging technology, biocompatible macromolecular or nanoparticle based targeted imaging probes have gained increasing popularities. Those complexes consist of a carrier, an imaging reporter, and a targeting ligand. The active targeting ability dramatically increases the specificity. And the multivalency effect may further reduce the dose while providing a decent signal. In this thesis, sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping and cancer imaging are two research topics. The focus is to develop molecular imaging probes with high specificity and sensitivity, for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and optical imaging. The objective of this thesis is to explore dextran radiopharmaceuticals and porous silicon nanoparticles based molecular imaging agents. Dextran polymers are excellent carriers to deliver imaging reporters or therapeutic agents due to its well established safety profile and oligosaccharide conjugation chemistry. There is also a wide selection of dextran polymers with different lengths. On the other hand, Silicon nanoparticles represent another class of biodegradable materials for imaging and drug delivery. The success in fluorescence lifetime imaging and enhancements of the immune activation potency was briefly discussed. Chapter 1 begins with an overview on current molecular imaging techniques and imaging probes. Chapter 2 presents a near-IR dye conjugated probe, IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept. Fluorophore density was optimized to generate the maximum brightness. It was labeled with 68Ga and 99mTc and in vivo SLN mapping was successfully performed in different animals, such as mice, rabbits, dogs and pigs. With 99mTc labeled IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept, chapter 3 introduces a two-day imaging protocol with a hand-held imager. Chapter 4 proposed a method to dual radiolabel the IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept with both 68Ga and

  4. Automatic segmentation of the choroid in enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography images.

    Tian, Jing; Marziliano, Pina; Baskaran, Mani; Tun, Tin Aung; Aung, Tin

    2013-03-01

    Enhanced Depth Imaging (EDI) optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides high-definition cross-sectional images of the choroid in vivo, and hence is used in many clinical studies. However, the quantification of the choroid depends on the manual labelings of two boundaries, Bruch's membrane and the choroidal-scleral interface. This labeling process is tedious and subjective of inter-observer differences, hence, automatic segmentation of the choroid layer is highly desirable. In this paper, we present a fast and accurate algorithm that could segment the choroid automatically. Bruch's membrane is detected by searching the pixel with the biggest gradient value above the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the choroidal-scleral interface is delineated by finding the shortest path of the graph formed by valley pixels using Dijkstra's algorithm. The experiments comparing automatic segmentation results with the manual labelings are conducted on 45 EDI-OCT images and the average of Dice's Coefficient is 90.5%, which shows good consistency of the algorithm with the manual labelings. The processing time for each image is about 1.25 seconds.

  5. Fast in vivo bioluminescence tomography using a novel pure optical imaging technique

    Shuang Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence tomography (BLT is a novel optical molecular imaging technique that advanced the conventional planar bioluminescence imaging (BLI into a quantifiable three-dimensional (3D approach in preclinical living animal studies in oncology. In order to solve the inverse problem and reconstruct tumor lesions inside animal body accurately, the prior structural information is commonly obtained from X-ray computed tomography (CT. This strategy requires a complicated hybrid imaging system, extensive post imaging analysis and involvement of ionizing radiation. Moreover, the overall robustness highly depends on the fusion accuracy between the optical and structural information. Here, we present a pure optical bioluminescence tomographic (POBT system and a novel BLT workflow based on multi-view projection acquisition and 3D surface reconstruction. This method can reconstruct the 3D surface of an imaging subject based on a sparse set of planar white-light and bioluminescent images, so that the prior structural information can be offered for 3D tumor lesion reconstruction without the involvement of CT. The performance of this novel technique was evaluated through the comparison with a conventional dual-modality tomographic (DMT system and a commercialized optical imaging system (IVIS Spectrum using three breast cancer xenografts. The results revealed that the new technique offered comparable in vivo tomographic accuracy with the DMT system (P>0.05 in much shorter data analysis time. It also offered significantly better accuracy comparing with the IVIS system (P<0.04 without sacrificing too much time.

  6. Quantitative study of luminescence optical tomography. Application to sources localisation in molecular imaging

    Boffety, Matthieu

    2010-01-01

    Molecular imaging is a major modality in the field of preclinical research. Among the existing methods, techniques based on optical detection of visible or near infrared radiation are the most recent and are mainly represented by luminescence optical tomography techniques. These methods allow for 3D characterization of a biological medium by reconstructing maps of concentration or localisation of luminescent beacons sensitive to biological and chemical processes at the molecular or cellular scale. Luminescence optical tomography is based on a model of light propagation in tissues, a protocol for acquiring surface signal and a numerical inversion procedure used to reconstruct the parameters of interest. This thesis is structured around these three axes and provides an answer to each problem. The main objective of this study is to introduce and present the tools to evaluate the theoretical performances of optical tomography methods. One of its major outcomes is the realisation of experimental tomographic reconstructions from images acquired by an optical imager designed for 2D planar imaging and developed by the company Quidd. In a first step we develop the theory of transport in scattering medium to establish the concept on which our work will rely. We present two different propagation models as well as resolution methods and theoretical difficulties associated with them. In a second part we introduce the statistical tools used to characterise tomographic systems. We define and apply a procedure to simple situations in luminescence optical tomography. The last part of this work presents the development of an inversion procedure. After introducing the theoretical framework we validate the procedure from numerical data before successfully applying it to experimental measurements. (author) [fr

  7. Currently available methodologies for the processing of intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography images.

    Athanasiou, Lambros; Sakellarios, Antonis I; Bourantas, Christos V; Tsirka, Georgia; Siogkas, Panagiotis; Exarchos, Themis P; Naka, Katerina K; Michalis, Lampros K; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2014-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography and intravascular ultrasound are the most widely used methodologies in clinical practice as they provide high resolution cross-sectional images that allow comprehensive visualization of the lumen and plaque morphology. Several methods have been developed in recent years to process the output of these imaging modalities, which allow fast, reliable and reproducible detection of the luminal borders and characterization of plaque composition. These methods have proven useful in the study of the atherosclerotic process as they have facilitated analysis of a vast amount of data. This review presents currently available intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography processing methodologies for segmenting and characterizing the plaque area, highlighting their advantages and disadvantages, and discusses the future trends in intravascular imaging.

  8. Morphology and epidermal thickness of normal skin imaged by optical coherence tomography

    Mogensen, Mette; Morsy, Hanan A.; Thrane, Lars

    2008-01-01

    colour. Methods: OCT imaging is based on infrared light reflection/backscatter from tissue. PS-OCT detects birefringence of tissue. Imaging was performed in 12 skin regions. ET was calculated from the OCT images. Results: Normal skin has a layered structure. Layering is less pronounced in adults......Background: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an optical imaging technology with a potential in the non-invasive diagnosis of skin cancer. To identify skin pathologies using OCT, it is of prime importance to establish baseline morphological features of normal skin. Aims: The aim of this study...... is to describe normal skin morphology using OCT and polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT), which is a way of representing birefringent tissue such as collagen in OCT images. Anatomical locations in 20 healthy volunteers were imaged, and epidermal thickness (ET) was measured and compared to age, gender and skin...

  9. An intelligent despeckling method for swept source optical coherence tomography images of skin

    Adabi, Saba; Mohebbikarkhoran, Hamed; Mehregan, Darius; Conforto, Silvia; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2017-03-01

    Optical Coherence Optical coherence tomography is a powerful high-resolution imaging method with a broad biomedical application. Nonetheless, OCT images suffer from a multiplicative artefacts so-called speckle, a result of coherent imaging of system. Digital filters become ubiquitous means for speckle reduction. Addressing the fact that there still a room for despeckling in OCT, we proposed an intelligent speckle reduction framework based on OCT tissue morphological, textural and optical features that through a trained network selects the winner filter in which adaptively suppress the speckle noise while preserve structural information of OCT signal. These parameters are calculated for different steps of the procedure to be used in designed Artificial Neural Network decider that select the best denoising technique for each segment of the image. Results of training shows the dominant filter is BM3D from the last category.

  10. Imaging osteoarthritis in the knee joints using x-ray guided diffuse optical tomography

    Zhang, Qizhi; Yuan, Zhen; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2010-02-01

    In our previous studies, near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography (DOT) had been successfully applied to imaging osteoarthritis (OA) in the finger joints where significant difference in optical properties of the joint tissues was evident between healthy and OA finger joints. Here we report for the first time that large joints such as the knee can also be optically imaged especially when DOT is combined with x-ray tomosynthesis where the 3D image of the bones from x-ray is incorporated into the DOT reconstruction as spatial a priori structural information. This study demonstrates that NIR light can image large joints such as the knee in addition to finger joints, which will drastically broaden the clinical utility of our x-ray guided DOT technique for OA diagnosis.

  11. Adaptive optics parallel spectral domain optical coherence tomography for imaging the living retina

    Zhang, Yan; Rha, Jungtae; Jonnal, Ravi S.; Miller, Donald T.

    2005-06-01

    Although optical coherence tomography (OCT) can axially resolve and detect reflections from individual cells, there are no reports of imaging cells in the living human retina using OCT. To supplement the axial resolution and sensitivity of OCT with the necessary lateral resolution and speed, we developed a novel spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT) camera based on a free-space parallel illumination architecture and equipped with adaptive optics (AO). Conventional flood illumination, also with AO, was integrated into the camera and provided confirmation of the focus position in the retina with an accuracy of ±10.3 μm. Short bursts of narrow B-scans (100x560 μm) of the living retina were subsequently acquired at 500 Hz during dynamic compensation (up to 14 Hz) that successfully corrected the most significant ocular aberrations across a dilated 6 mm pupil. Camera sensitivity (up to 94 dB) was sufficient for observing reflections from essentially all neural layers of the retina. Signal-to-noise of the detected reflection from the photoreceptor layer was highly sensitive to the level of cular aberrations and defocus with changes of 11.4 and 13.1 dB (single pass) observed when the ocular aberrations (astigmatism, 3rd order and higher) were corrected and when the focus was shifted by 200 μm (0.54 diopters) in the retina, respectively. The 3D resolution of the B-scans (3.0x3.0x5.7 μm) is the highest reported to date in the living human eye and was sufficient to observe the interface between the inner and outer segments of individual photoreceptor cells, resolved in both lateral and axial dimensions. However, high contrast speckle, which is intrinsic to OCT, was present throughout the AO parallel SD-OCT B-scans and obstructed correlating retinal reflections to cell-sized retinal structures.

  12. An overview of methods to mitigate artifacts in optical coherence tomography imaging of the skin.

    Adabi, Saba; Fotouhi, Audrey; Xu, Qiuyun; Daveluy, Steve; Mehregan, Darius; Podoleanu, Adrian; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2018-05-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) of skin delivers three-dimensional images of tissue microstructures. Although OCT imaging offers a promising high-resolution modality, OCT images suffer from some artifacts that lead to misinterpretation of tissue structures. Therefore, an overview of methods to mitigate artifacts in OCT imaging of the skin is of paramount importance. Speckle, intensity decay, and blurring are three major artifacts in OCT images. Speckle is due to the low coherent light source used in the configuration of OCT. Intensity decay is a deterioration of light with respect to depth, and blurring is the consequence of deficiencies of optical components. Two speckle reduction methods (one based on artificial neural network and one based on spatial compounding), an attenuation compensation algorithm (based on Beer-Lambert law) and a deblurring procedure (using deconvolution), are described. Moreover, optical properties extraction algorithm based on extended Huygens-Fresnel (EHF) principle to obtain some additional information from OCT images are discussed. In this short overview, we summarize some of the image enhancement algorithms for OCT images which address the abovementioned artifacts. The results showed a significant improvement in the visibility of the clinically relevant features in the images. The quality improvement was evaluated using several numerical assessment measures. Clinical dermatologists benefit from using these image enhancement algorithms to improve OCT diagnosis and essentially function as a noninvasive optical biopsy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Imaging retinal nerve fiber bundles using optical coherence tomography with adaptive optics.

    Kocaoglu, Omer P; Cense, Barry; Jonnal, Ravi S; Wang, Qiang; Lee, Sangyeol; Gao, Weihua; Miller, Donald T

    2011-08-15

    Early detection of axonal tissue loss in retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) is critical for effective treatment and management of diseases such as glaucoma. This study aims to evaluate the capability of ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography with adaptive optics (UHR-AO-OCT) for imaging the RNFL axonal bundles (RNFBs) with 3×3×3μm(3) resolution in the eye. We used a research-grade UHR-AO-OCT system to acquire 3°×3° volumes in four normal subjects and one subject with an arcuate retinal nerve fiber layer defect (n=5; 29-62years). Cross section (B-scans) and en face (C-scan) slices extracted from the volumes were used to assess visibility and size distribution of individual RNFBs. In one subject, we reimaged the same RNFBs twice over a 7month interval and compared bundle width and thickness between the two imaging sessions. Lastly we compared images of an arcuate RNFL defect acquired with UHR-AO-OCT and commercial OCT (Heidelberg Spectralis). Individual RNFBs were distinguishable in all subjects at 3° retinal eccentricity in both cross-sectional and en face views (width: 30-50μm, thickness: 10-15μm). At 6° retinal eccentricity, RNFBs were distinguishable in three of the five subjects in both views (width: 30-45μm, thickness: 20-40μm). Width and thickness RNFB measurements taken 7months apart were strongly correlated (p<0.0005). Mean difference and standard deviation of the differences between the two measurement sessions were -0.1±4.0μm (width) and 0.3±1.5μm (thickness). UHR-AO-OCT outperformed commercial OCT in terms of clarity of the microscopic retina. To our knowledge, these are the first measurements of RNFB cross section reported in the living human eye. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Subgingival calculus imaging based on swept-source optical coherence tomography

    Hsieh, Yao-Sheng; Ho, Yi-Ching; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Lu, Chih-Wei; Jiang, Cho-Pei; Chuang, Ching-Cheng; Wang, Chun-Yang; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2011-07-01

    We characterized and imaged dental calculus using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT). The refractive indices of enamel, dentin, cementum, and calculus were measured as 1.625 +/- 0.024, 1.534 +/- 0.029, 1.570 +/- 0.021, and 2.097 +/- 0.094, respectively. Dental calculus leads strong scattering properties, and thus, the region can be identified from enamel with SS-OCT imaging. An extracted human tooth with calculus is covered with gingiva tissue as an in vitro sample for tomographic imaging.

  15. How histological features of basal cell carcinomas influence image quality in optical coherence tomography

    Mogensen, Mette; Nürnberg, Birgit M.; Thrane, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to diagnose and measure the depth of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in skin, but some lesions appear blurred in OCT images. The aim of this study is to identify histological characteristics of basal cell carcinomas (BCC) that correlate with good...... quality OCT images of the same lesions. A total of 34 patients with BCC were OCT scanned. The influence of histology parameters (e.g. inflammation, sun damage of skin, carcinoma cell size) on OCT image quality was studied by comparing 15 BCC lesions easily identified compared to 19 BCC lesions...

  16. Cystoscopic optical coherence tomography for urinary bladder imaging in vivo

    Wang, Z. G.; Adler, H.; Chan, D.; Jain, A.; Xie, H. K.; Wu, Z. L.; Pan, Y. T.

    2006-02-01

    This paper summarizes the development of new 2D MEMS mirrors and the pertinent modification to improve OCT endoscopic catheter packaging suitable for in vivo imaging diagnosis of bladder cancers. Comparative study of the newly developed endocopic OCT versus the bench-top OCT is presented. Results of in vivo OCT cystoscopy based on a porcine acute inflammation model are presented to compare time-domain OCT and spectral-domain OCT for in vivo imaging. In addition, results of spectral-domain Doppler OCT are presented to image blood flow in the lamina propria of the bladder. The results of our in vivo animal study using the presented OCT endoscope are discussed for potential problems in the future clinical applications.

  17. Molecular imaging needles: dual-modality optical coherence tomography and fluorescence imaging of labeled antibodies deep in tissue

    Scolaro, Loretta; Lorenser, Dirk; Madore, Wendy-Julie; Kirk, Rodney W.; Kramer, Anne S.; Yeoh, George C.; Godbout, Nicolas; Sampson, David D.; Boudoux, Caroline; McLaughlin, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging using optical techniques provides insight into disease at the cellular level. In this paper, we report on a novel dual-modality probe capable of performing molecular imaging by combining simultaneous three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (OCT) and two-dimensional fluorescence imaging in a hypodermic needle. The probe, referred to as a molecular imaging (MI) needle, may be inserted tens of millimeters into tissue. The MI needle utilizes double-clad fiber to carry both imaging modalities, and is interfaced to a 1310-nm OCT system and a fluorescence imaging subsystem using an asymmetrical double-clad fiber coupler customized to achieve high fluorescence collection efficiency. We present, to the best of our knowledge, the first dual-modality OCT and fluorescence needle probe with sufficient sensitivity to image fluorescently labeled antibodies. Such probes enable high-resolution molecular imaging deep within tissue. PMID:26137379

  18. High-definition optical coherence tomography imaging of melanocytic lesions

    Boone, Marc A L M; Norrenberg, Sarah; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2014-01-01

    and cytologic features of melanocytic lesions. All lesions were examined by one observer clinically and using dermoscopy. Cross-sectional HD-OCT images were compared with histopathology. En face HD-OCT images were compared with reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM). Twenty-six melanocytic lesions of 26 patients...... with sufficient resolution and penetration depth to discriminate architectural patterns and cytologic features of pigmented cells in epidermis and dermis. The method appears to offer the possibility of additional three-dimensional structural information complementary to that of RCM, albeit at a slightly lower...

  19. Spiking cortical model-based nonlocal means method for speckle reduction in optical coherence tomography images

    Zhang, Xuming; Li, Liu; Zhu, Fei; Hou, Wenguang; Chen, Xinjian

    2014-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images are usually degraded by significant speckle noise, which will strongly hamper their quantitative analysis. However, speckle noise reduction in OCT images is particularly challenging because of the difficulty in differentiating between noise and the information components of the speckle pattern. To address this problem, the spiking cortical model (SCM)-based nonlocal means method is presented. The proposed method explores self-similarities of OCT images based on rotation-invariant features of image patches extracted by SCM and then restores the speckled images by averaging the similar patches. This method can provide sufficient speckle reduction while preserving image details very well due to its effectiveness in finding reliable similar patches under high speckle noise contamination. When applied to the retinal OCT image, this method provides signal-to-noise ratio improvements of >16 dB with a small 5.4% loss of similarity.

  20. Investigation of optical coherence tomography as an imaging modality in tissue engineering

    Yang Ying; Dubois, Arnaud; Qin Xiangpei; Li Jian; Haj, Alicia El; Wang, Ruikang K

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring cell profiles in 3D porous scaffolds presents a major challenge in tissue engineering. In this study, we investigate optical coherence tomography (OCT) as an imaging modality to monitor non-invasively both structures and cells in engineered tissue constructs. We employ time-domain OCT to visualize macro-structural morphology, and whole-field optical coherence microscopy to delineate the morphology of cells and constructs in a developing in vitro engineered bone tissue. The results show great potential for the use of OCT in non-invasive monitoring of cellular activities in 3D developing engineered tissues

  1. Optical coherence tomography imaging of the basal ganglia: feasibility and brief review

    Lopez, W. O. Contreras; Ângelos, J. S. [Divisão de Neurocirurgia Funcional, Departamento de Neurologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Martinez, R. C. R. [Laboratório de Neuromodulação e Dor Experimental, Hospital Sírio-Libanes, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Takimura, C. K. [Instituto do Coração, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Teixeira, M. J. [Divisão de Neurocirurgia Funcional, Departamento de Neurologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lemos, P. A. Neto [Instituto do Coração, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fonoff, E. T., E-mail: fonoffet@usp.br [Divisão de Neurocirurgia Funcional, Departamento de Neurologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-09-29

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a promising medical imaging technique that uses light to capture real-time cross-sectional images from biological tissues in micrometer resolution. Commercially available optical coherence tomography systems are employed in diverse applications, including art conservation and diagnostic medicine, notably in cardiology and ophthalmology. Application of this technology in the brain may enable distinction between white matter and gray matter, and obtainment of detailed images from within the encephalon. We present, herein, the in vivo implementation of OCT imaging in the rat brain striatum. For this, two male 60-day-old rats (Rattus norvegicus, Albinus variation, Wistar) were stereotactically implanted with guide cannulas into the striatum to guide a 2.7-French diameter high-definition OCT imaging catheter (Dragonfly™, St. Jude Medical, USA). Obtained images were compared with corresponding histologically stained sections to collect imaging samples. A brief analysis of OCT technology and its current applications is also reported, as well as intra-cerebral OCT feasibility on brain mapping during neurosurgical procedures.

  2. Collagen Content Limits Optical Coherence Tomography Image Depth in Porcine Vocal Fold Tissue.

    Garcia, Jordan A; Benboujja, Fouzi; Beaudette, Kathy; Rogers, Derek; Maurer, Rie; Boudoux, Caroline; Hartnick, Christopher J

    2016-11-01

    Vocal fold scarring, a condition defined by increased collagen content, is challenging to treat without a method of noninvasively assessing vocal fold structure in vivo. The goal of this study was to observe the effects of vocal fold collagen content on optical coherence tomography imaging to develop a quantifiable marker of disease. Excised specimen study. Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. Porcine vocal folds were injected with collagenase to remove collagen from the lamina propria. Optical coherence tomography imaging was performed preinjection and at 0, 45, 90, and 180 minutes postinjection. Mean pixel intensity (or image brightness) was extracted from images of collagenase- and control-treated hemilarynges. Texture analysis of the lamina propria at each injection site was performed to extract image contrast. Two-factor repeated measure analysis of variance and t tests were used to determine statistical significance. Picrosirius red staining was performed to confirm collagenase activity. Mean pixel intensity was higher at injection sites of collagenase-treated vocal folds than control vocal folds (P Fold change in image contrast was significantly increased in collagenase-treated vocal folds than control vocal folds (P = .002). Picrosirius red staining in control specimens revealed collagen fibrils most prominent in the subepithelium and above the thyroarytenoid muscle. Specimens treated with collagenase exhibited a loss of these structures. Collagen removal from vocal fold tissue increases image brightness of underlying structures. This inverse relationship may be useful in treating vocal fold scarring in patients. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  3. Optical design of an optical coherence tomography and multispectral fluorescence imaging endoscope to detect early stage ovarian cancer

    Tate, Tyler; Keenan, Molly; Swan, Elizabeth; Black, John; Utzinger, Urs; Barton, Jennifer

    2014-12-01

    The five year survival rate for ovarian cancer is over 90% if early detection occurs, yet no effective early screening method exists. We have designed and are constructing a dual modality Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging (MFI) endoscope to optically screen the Fallopian tube and ovary for early stage cancer. The endoscope reaches the ovary via the natural pathway of the vagina, cervix, uterus and Fallopian tube. In order to navigate the Fallopian tube the endoscope must have an outer diameter of 600 μm, be highly flexible, steerable, tracking and nonperforating. The imaging systems consists of six optical subsystems, two from OCT and four from MFI. The optical subsystems have independent and interrelated design criteria. The endoscope will be tested on realistic tissue models and ex vivo tissue to prove feasibility of future human trials. Ultimately the project aims to provide women the first effective ovarian cancer screening technique.

  4. Characterization of Long Working Distance Optical Coherence Tomography for Imaging of Pediatric Retinal Pathology.

    Qian, Ruobing; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar M; Mangalesh, Shwetha; Sarin, Neeru; Vajzovic, Lejla; Farsiu, Sina; Izatt, Joseph A; Toth, Cynthia A

    2017-10-01

    We determined the feasibility of fovea and optic nerve head imaging with a long working distance (LWD) swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) prototype in adults, teenagers, and young children. A prototype swept source OCT system with a LWD (defined as distance from the last optical element of the imaging system to the eye) of 350 mm with custom fixation targets was developed to facilitate imaging of children. Imaging was performed in 49 participants from three age groups: 26 adults, 16 children 13 to 18 years old (teenagers), and seven children under 6 years old (young children) under an approved institutional review board protocol. The imaging goal was to acquire high quality scans of the fovea and optic nerve in each eye in the shortest time possible. OCT B-scans and volumes of the fovea and optic nerve head of each eligible eye were captured and graded based on four categories (lateral and axial centration, contrast, and resolution) and on ability to determine presence or absence of pathology. LWD-OCT imaging was successful in 88 of 94 eligible eyes, including seven of 10 eyes of young children. Of the successfully acquired OCT images, 83% of B-scan and volumetric images, including 86% from young children, were graded as high-quality scans. Pathology was observed in high-quality OCT images. The prototype LWD-OCT system achieved high quality retinal imaging of adults, teenagers, and some young children with and without pathology with reasonable alignment time. The LWD-OCT system can facilitate imaging in children.

  5. Benign familial fleck retina: multimodal imaging including optical coherence tomography angiography.

    Garcia, Jose Mauricio Botto de Barros; Isaac, David Leonardo Cruvinel; Sardeiro, Tainara; Aquino, Érika; Avila, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    This report presents multimodal imaging of a 27-year-old woman diagnosed with benign familial fleck retina (OMIM 228980), an uncommon disorder. Fundus photographs revealed retinal flecks that affected her post-equatorial retina but spared the macular area. Fundus autofluorescence and infrared imaging demonstrated a symmetrical pattern of yellow-white fleck lesions that affected both eyes. Her full-field electroretinogram and electrooculogram were normal. An optical coherence tomography B-scan was performed for both eyes, revealing increased thickness of the retinal pigmented epithelium leading to multiple small pigmented epithelium detachments. The outer retina remained intact in both eyes. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography angiography with split-spectrum amplitude decorrelation algorithm and 3 × 3 mm structural en face optical coherence tomography did not show macular lesions. Benign familial fleck retina belongs to a heterogenous group of so-called flecked retina syndromes, and should be considered in patients with yellowish-white retinal lesions without involvement of the macula.

  6. Benign familial fleck retina: multimodal imaging including optical coherence tomography angiography

    Jose Mauricio Botto de Barros Garcia

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This report presents multimodal imaging of a 27-year-old woman diagnosed with benign familial fleck retina (OMIM 228980, an uncommon disorder. Fundus photographs revealed retinal flecks that affected her post-equatorial retina but spared the macular area. Fundus autofluorescence and infrared imaging demonstrated a symmetrical pattern of yellow-white fleck lesions that affected both eyes. Her full-field electroretinogram and electrooculogram were normal. An optical coherence tomography B-scan was performed for both eyes, revealing increased thickness of the retinal pigmented epithelium leading to multiple small pigmented epithelium detachments. The outer retina remained intact in both eyes. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography angiography with split-spectrum amplitude decorrelation algorithm and 3 × 3 mm structural en face optical coherence tomography did not show macular lesions. Benign familial fleck retina belongs to a heterogenous group of so-called flecked retina syndromes, and should be considered in patients with yellowish-white retinal lesions without involvement of the macula.

  7. In-vivo imaging of blood flow dynamics using color Doppler optical coherence tomography

    Yazdanfar, Siavash; Rollins, Andrew M.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2000-04-01

    Noninvasive quantitation of blood flow in the retinal micro circulation may elucidate the progression and treatment of ocular disorders including diabetic retinopathy, age-related degeneration, and glaucoma. Color Doppler optical coherence tomography was recently introduced as a technique allowing simultaneous micron-scale resolution cross-sectional imaging of tissue micro structure and blood flow in the human retina. Here, time-resolved imaging of dynamics of blood flow profiles was performed to measure cardiac pulsatility within retinal vessels. Retinal pulsatility has been shown to decrease throughout the progression of diabetic retinopathy.

  8. Recent advances in Optical Computed Tomography (OCT) imaging system for three dimensional (3D) radiotherapy dosimetry

    Rahman, Ahmad Taufek Abdul; Farah Rosli, Nurul; Zain, Shafirah Mohd; Zin, Hafiz M.

    2018-01-01

    Radiotherapy delivery techniques for cancer treatment are becoming more complex and highly focused, to enable accurate radiation dose delivery to the cancerous tissue and minimum dose to the healthy tissue adjacent to tumour. Instrument to verify the complex dose delivery in radiotherapy such as optical computed tomography (OCT) measures the dose from a three-dimensional (3D) radiochromic dosimeter to ensure the accuracy of the radiotherapy beam delivery to the patient. OCT measures the optical density in radiochromic material that changes predictably upon exposure to radiotherapy beams. OCT systems have been developed using a photodiode and charged coupled device (CCD) as the detector. The existing OCT imaging systems have limitation in terms of the accuracy and the speed of the measurement. Advances in on-pixel intelligence CMOS image sensor (CIS) will be exploited in this work to replace current detector in OCT imaging systems. CIS is capable of on-pixel signal processing at a very fast imaging speed (over several hundred images per second) that will allow improvement in the 3D measurement of the optical density. The paper will review 3D radiochromic dosimeters and OCT systems developed and discuss how CMOS based OCT imaging will provide accurate and fast optical density measurements in 3D. The paper will also discuss the configuration of the CMOS based OCT developed in this work and how it may improve the existing OCT system.

  9. Imaging choroidal neovascular membrane using en face swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography

    Moussa M

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Magdy Moussa,1,2 Mahmoud Leila,3 Hagar Khalid1,2 1Ophthalmology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt; 2MEDIC Eye Center, Tanta, Egypt; 3Retina Department, Research Institute of Ophthalmology, Giza, Egypt Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography (SS-OCTA in delineating the morphology of choroidal neovascular membrane (CNV. Patients and methods: This was a retrospective observational case series reviewing clinical data and fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA, swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT, and SS-OCTA images of patients with CNV and comparing the findings. The swept-source technology enables deeper penetration and superior axial resolution. The incorporated blood flow detection algorithm, optical coherence tomography angiography ratio analysis (OCTARA, enables visualization of CNV in vivo without the need for dye injection. Results: The study included 136 eyes of 105 patients. Active lesions on SS-OCTA images showed increased capillary density, extensive arborization, vascular anastomosis and looping, and peri-lesional hollow. Inactive lesions showed decreased capillary density, presence of large linear vessels, and presence of feeder vessels supplying the CNV. We detected positive correlation between SS-OCTA, FFA, and SS-OCT images in 97% of eyes. In the remaining 3%, SS-OCTA confirmed the absence of CNV, whereas FFA and SS-OCT either were inconclusive in the diagnosis of CNV or yielded false-positive results. Conclusion: SS-OCT and SS-OCTA represent a reproducible risk-free analog for FFA in imaging CNV. SS-OCTA is particularly versatile in cases where FFA and SS-OCT are inconclusive. Keywords: swept-source OCT, OCT angiography, imaging of CNV, OCTARA algorithm

  10. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging of spectacular ecdysis in the royal python (Python regius).

    Tusler, Charlotte A; Maggs, David J; Kass, Philip H; Paul-Murphy, Joanne R; Schwab, Ivan R; Murphy, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    To describe using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), digital slit-lamp biomicroscopy, and external photography, changes in the ophidian cuticle, spectacle, and cornea during ecdysis. Four normal royal pythons (Python regius). Snakes were assessed once daily throughout a complete shed cycle using nasal, axial, and temporal SD-OCT images, digital slit-lamp biomicroscopy, and external photography. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images reliably showed the spectacular cuticle and stroma, subcuticular space (SCS), cornea, anterior chamber, iris, and Schlemm's canal. When visible, the subspectacular space (SSS) was more distended peripherally than axially. Ocular surface changes throughout ecdysis were relatively conserved among snakes at all three regions imaged. From baseline (7 days following completion of a full cycle), the spectacle gradually thickened before separating into superficial cuticular and deep, hyper-reflective stromal components, thereby creating the SCS. During spectacular separation, the stroma regained original reflectivity, and multiple hyper-reflective foci (likely fragments from the cuticular-stromal interface) were noted within the SCS. The cornea was relatively unchanged in character or thickness throughout all stages of ecdysis. Slit-lamp images did not permit observation of these changes. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) provided excellent high-resolution images of the snake anterior segment, and especially the cuticle, spectacle, and cornea of manually restrained normal snakes at all stages of ecdysis and warrants investigation in snakes with anterior segment disease. The peripheral spectacle may be the preferred entry point for diagnostic or therapeutic injections into the SSS and for initiating spectacular surgery. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  11. Nondestructive observation of teeth post core-space using optical coherence tomography: comparison with microcomputed tomography and live images

    Minamino, Takuya; Mine, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Mariko; Sugawa, Yoshihiko; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Higashi, Mami; Kawaguchi, Asuka; Ohmi, Masato; Awazu, Kunio; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2015-10-01

    No previous reports have observed inside the root canal using both optical coherence tomography (OCT) and x-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT) for the same sample. The purpose of this study was to clarify both OCT and μCT image properties from observations of the same root canal after resin core build-up treatment. As OCT allows real-time observation of samples, gap formation may be able to be shown in real time. A dual-cure, one-step, self-etch adhesive system bonding agent, and dual-cure resin composite core material were used in root canals in accordance with instructions from the manufacturer. The resulting OCT images were superior for identifying gap formation at the interface, while μCT images were better to grasp the tooth form. Continuous tomographic images from real-time OCT observation allowed successful construction of a video of the resin core build-up procedure. After 10 to 12 s of light curing, a gap with a clear new signal occurred at the root-core material interface, proceeding from the coronal side (6 mm from the cemento-enamel junction) to the apical side of the root.

  12. Three-dimensional imaging of artificial fingerprint by optical coherence tomography

    Larin, Kirill V.; Cheng, Yezeng

    2008-03-01

    Fingerprint recognition is one of the popular used methods of biometrics. However, due to the surface topography limitation, fingerprint recognition scanners are easily been spoofed, e.g. using artificial fingerprint dummies. Thus, biometric fingerprint identification devices need to be more accurate and secure to deal with different fraudulent methods including dummy fingerprints. Previously, we demonstrated that Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) images revealed the presence of the artificial fingerprints (made from different household materials, such as cement and liquid silicone rubber) at all times, while the artificial fingerprints easily spoofed the commercial fingerprint reader. Also we demonstrated that an analysis of the autocorrelation of the OCT images could be used in automatic recognition systems. Here, we exploited the three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the artificial fingerprint by OCT to generate vivid 3D image for both the artificial fingerprint layer and the real fingerprint layer beneath. With the reconstructed 3D image, it could not only point out whether there exists an artificial material, which is intended to spoof the scanner, above the real finger, but also could provide the hacker's fingerprint. The results of these studies suggested that Optical Coherence Tomography could be a powerful real-time noninvasive method for accurate identification of artificial fingerprints real fingerprints as well.

  13. In vivo sectional imaging of the retinal periphery using conventional optical coherence tomography systems

    Abhishek Kothari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography (OCT has transformed macular disease practices. This report describes the use of conventional OCT systems for peripheral retinal imaging. Thirty-six eyes with peripheral retinal pathology underwent imaging with conventional OCT systems. In vivo sectional imaging of lattice degeneration, snail-track degeneration, and paving-stone degeneration was performed. Differences were noted between phenotypes of lattice degeneration. Several findings previously unreported in histopathology studies were encountered. Certain anatomic features were seen that could conceivably explain clinical and intraoperative behavior of peripheral lesions. Peripheral OCT imaging helped elucidate clinically ambiguous situations such as retinal breaks, subclinical retinal detachment, retinoschisis, choroidal nevus, and metastasis. Limitations of such scanning included end-gaze nystagmus and far peripheral lesions. This first of its kind study demonstrates the feasibility of peripheral retinal OCT imaging and expands the spectrum of indications for which OCT scanning may be clinically useful.

  14. In vivo sectional imaging of the retinal periphery using conventional optical coherence tomography systems.

    Kothari, Abhishek; Narendran, V; Saravanan, V R

    2012-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has transformed macular disease practices. This report describes the use of conventional OCT systems for peripheral retinal imaging. Thirty-six eyes with peripheral retinal pathology underwent imaging with conventional OCT systems. In vivo sectional imaging of lattice degeneration, snail-track degeneration, and paving-stone degeneration was performed. Differences were noted between phenotypes of lattice degeneration. Several findings previously unreported in histopathology studies were encountered. Certain anatomic features were seen that could conceivably explain clinical and intraoperative behavior of peripheral lesions. Peripheral OCT imaging helped elucidate clinically ambiguous situations such as retinal breaks, subclinical retinal detachment, retinoschisis, choroidal nevus, and metastasis. Limitations of such scanning included end-gaze nystagmus and far peripheral lesions. This first of its kind study demonstrates the feasibility of peripheral retinal OCT imaging and expands the spectrum of indications for which OCT scanning may be clinically useful.

  15. Towards real-time diffuse optical tomography for imaging brain functions cooperated with Kalman estimator

    Wang, Bingyuan; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Dongyuan; Ding, Xuemei; Dan, Mai; Pan, Tiantian; Wang, Yihan; Li, Jiao; Zhou, Zhongxing; Zhang, Limin; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2018-02-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a non-invasive neuroimaging method to monitor the cerebral hemodynamic through the optical changes measured at the scalp surface. It has played a more and more important role in psychology and medical imaging communities. Real-time imaging of brain function using NIRS makes it possible to explore some sophisticated human brain functions unexplored before. Kalman estimator has been frequently used in combination with modified Beer-Lamber Law (MBLL) based optical topology (OT), for real-time brain function imaging. However, the spatial resolution of the OT is low, hampering the application of OT in exploring some complicated brain functions. In this paper, we develop a real-time imaging method combining diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and Kalman estimator, much improving the spatial resolution. Instead of only presenting one spatially distributed image indicating the changes of the absorption coefficients at each time point during the recording process, one real-time updated image using the Kalman estimator is provided. Its each voxel represents the amplitude of the hemodynamic response function (HRF) associated with this voxel. We evaluate this method using some simulation experiments, demonstrating that this method can obtain more reliable spatial resolution images. Furthermore, a statistical analysis is also conducted to help to decide whether a voxel in the field of view is activated or not.

  16. CAPILLARY NETWORK ALTERATIONS IN X-LINKED RETINOSCHISIS IMAGED ON OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY.

    Romano, Francesco; Arrigo, Alessandro; Chʼng, Soon Wai; Battaglia Parodi, Maurizio; Manitto, Maria Pia; Martina, Elisabetta; Bandello, Francesco; Stanga, Paulo E

    2018-06-05

    To assess foveal and parafoveal vasculature at the superficial capillary plexus, deep capillary plexus, and choriocapillaris of patients with X-linked retinoschisis by means of optical coherence tomography angiography. Six patients with X-linked retinoschisis (12 eyes) and seven healthy controls (14 eyes) were recruited and underwent complete ophthalmologic examination, including best-corrected visual acuity, dilated fundoscopy, and 3 × 3-mm optical coherence tomography angiography macular scans (DRI OCT Triton; Topcon Corp). After segmentation and quality review, optical coherence tomography angiography slabs were imported into ImageJ 1.50 (NIH; Bethesda) and digitally binarized. Quantification of vessel density was performed after foveal avascular zone area measurement and exclusion. Patients were additionally divided into "responders" and "nonresponders" to dorzolamide therapy. Foveal avascular zone area resulted markedly enlarged at the deep capillary plexus (P < 0.001), particularly in nonresponders. Moreover, patients disclosed a significant deep capillary plexus rarefaction, when compared with controls (P: 0.04); however, a subanalysis revealed that this damage was limited to the fovea (P: 0.006). Finally, the enlargement of foveal avascular zone area positively correlated with a decline in best-corrected visual acuity (P: 0.01). Prominent foveal vascular impairment is detectable in the deep capillary plexus of patients with X-linked retinoschisis. Our results correlate with functional outcomes, suggesting a possible vascular role in X-linked retinoschisis clinical manifestations.

  17. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography staging and autofluorescence imaging in achromatopsia.

    Greenberg, Jonathan P; Sherman, Jerome; Zweifel, Sandrine A; Chen, Royce W S; Duncker, Tobias; Kohl, Susanne; Baumann, Britta; Wissinger, Bernd; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A; Tsang, Stephen H

    2014-04-01

    IMPORTANCE Evidence is mounting that achromatopsia is a progressive retinal degeneration, and treatments for this condition are on the horizon. OBJECTIVES To categorize achromatopsia into clinically identifiable stages using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and to describe fundus autofluorescence imaging in this condition. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A prospective observational study was performed between 2010 and 2012 at the Edward S. Harkness Eye Institute, New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Participants included 17 patients (aged 10-62 years) with full-field electroretinography-confirmed achromatopsia. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography features and staging system, fundus autofluorescence and near-infrared reflectance features and their correlation to optical coherence tomography, and genetic mutations served as the outcomes and measures. RESULTS Achromatopsia was categorized into 5 stages on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography: stage 1 (2 patients [12%]), intact outer retina; stage 2 (2 patients [12%]), inner segment ellipsoid line disruption; stage 3 (5 patients [29%]), presence of an optically empty space; stage 4 (5 patients [29%]), optically empty space with partial retinal pigment epithelium disruption; and stage 5 (3 patients [18%]), complete retinal pigment epithelium disruption and/or loss of the outer nuclear layer. Stage 1 patients showed isolated hyperreflectivity of the external limiting membrane in the fovea, and the external limiting membrane was hyperreflective above each optically empty space. On near infrared reflectance imaging, the fovea was normal, hyporeflective, or showed both hyporeflective and hyperreflective features. All patients demonstrated autofluorescence abnormalities in the fovea and/or parafovea: 9 participants (53%) had reduced or absent autofluorescence surrounded by increased autofluorescence, 4 individuals (24%) showed only reduced or absent autofluorescence, 3

  18. Towards simultaneous Talbot bands based optical coherence tomography and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy imaging.

    Marques, Manuel J; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-05-01

    We report a Talbot bands-based optical coherence tomography (OCT) system capable of producing longitudinal B-scan OCT images and en-face scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) images of the human retina in-vivo. The OCT channel employs a broadband optical source and a spectrometer. A gap is created between the sample and reference beams while on their way towards the spectrometer's dispersive element to create Talbot bands. The spatial separation of the two beams facilitates collection by an SLO channel of optical power originating exclusively from the retina, deprived from any contribution from the reference beam. Three different modes of operation are presented, constrained by the minimum integration time of the camera used in the spectrometer and by the galvo-scanners' scanning rate: (i) a simultaneous acquisition mode over the two channels, useful for small size imaging, that conserves the pixel-to-pixel correspondence between them; (ii) a hybrid sequential mode, where the system switches itself between the two regimes and (iii) a sequential "on-demand" mode, where the system can be used in either OCT or SLO regimes for as long as required. The two sequential modes present varying degrees of trade-off between pixel-to-pixel correspondence and independent full control of parameters within each channel. Images of the optic nerve and fovea regions obtained in the simultaneous (i) and in the hybrid sequential mode (ii) are presented.

  19. Correction of distortions in optical coherence tomography imaging of the eye

    Podoleanu, Adrian [Applied Optics Group, University of Kent, Canterbury (United Kingdom); Charalambous, Ismini [Applied Optics Group, University of Kent, Canterbury (United Kingdom); Plesea, Lucian [Applied Optics Group, University of Kent, Canterbury (United Kingdom); Dogariu, Aristide [School of Optics, CREOL, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Rosen, Richard [Advanced Retinal Imaging Center, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, NY (United States)

    2004-04-07

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images are affected by artefacts. These artefacts are the result of different factors such as refraction, curvature of the intermediate layers up to the depth of interest and the scanning procedure. The effect of such errors is different, depending on the way the image is acquired, either en-face or longitudinal OCT. We quantify the distortions by evaluating a lateral and an axial error. These measure the lateral and axial deviations of each image point from the object point inside the tissue. We show that the axial distortion can be larger than the achievable depth resolution in modern OCT systems. We have investigated these errors in imaging different tissue: cornea and retina in vivo and an intraocular lens in vitro.

  20. Wide-field optical coherence tomography based microangiography for retinal imaging

    Zhang, Qinqin; Lee, Cecilia S.; Chao, Jennifer; Chen, Chieh-Li; Zhang, Thomas; Sharma, Utkarsh; Zhang, Anqi; Liu, Jin; Rezaei, Kasra; Pepple, Kathryn L.; Munsen, Richard; Kinyoun, James; Johnstone, Murray; van Gelder, Russell N.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) allows for the evaluation of functional retinal vascular networks without a need for contrast dyes. For sophisticated monitoring and diagnosis of retinal diseases, OCTA capable of providing wide-field and high definition images of retinal vasculature in a single image is desirable. We report OCTA with motion tracking through an auxiliary real-time line scan ophthalmoscope that is clinically feasible to image functional retinal vasculature in patients, with a coverage of more than 60 degrees of retina while still maintaining high definition and resolution. We demonstrate six illustrative cases with unprecedented details of vascular involvement in retinal diseases. In each case, OCTA yields images of the normal and diseased microvasculature at all levels of the retina, with higher resolution than observed with fluorescein angiography. Wide-field OCTA technology will be an important next step in augmenting the utility of OCT technology in clinical practice.

  1. ELHnet: a convolutional neural network for classifying cochlear endolymphatic hydrops imaged with optical coherence tomography.

    Liu, George S; Zhu, Michael H; Kim, Jinkyung; Raphael, Patrick; Applegate, Brian E; Oghalai, John S

    2017-10-01

    Detection of endolymphatic hydrops is important for diagnosing Meniere's disease, and can be performed non-invasively using optical coherence tomography (OCT) in animal models as well as potentially in the clinic. Here, we developed ELHnet, a convolutional neural network to classify endolymphatic hydrops in a mouse model using learned features from OCT images of mice cochleae. We trained ELHnet on 2159 training and validation images from 17 mice, using only the image pixels and observer-determined labels of endolymphatic hydrops as the inputs. We tested ELHnet on 37 images from 37 mice that were previously not used, and found that the neural network correctly classified 34 of the 37 mice. This demonstrates an improvement in performance from previous work on computer-aided classification of endolymphatic hydrops. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first deep CNN designed for endolymphatic hydrops classification.

  2. In vivo high resolution human corneal imaging using full-field optical coherence tomography.

    Mazlin, Viacheslav; Xiao, Peng; Dalimier, Eugénie; Grieve, Kate; Irsch, Kristina; Sahel, José-Alain; Fink, Mathias; Boccara, A Claude

    2018-02-01

    We present the first full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT) device capable of in vivo imaging of the human cornea. We obtained images of the epithelial structures, Bowman's layer, sub-basal nerve plexus (SNP), anterior and posterior stromal keratocytes, stromal nerves, Descemet's membrane and endothelial cells with visible nuclei. Images were acquired with a high lateral resolution of 1.7 µm and relatively large field-of-view of 1.26 mm x 1.26 mm - a combination, which, to the best of our knowledge, has not been possible with other in vivo human eye imaging methods. The latter together with a contactless operation, make FFOCT a promising candidate for becoming a new tool in ophthalmic diagnostics.

  3. Functional imaging and assessment of the glucose diffusion rate in epithelial tissues in optical coherence tomography

    Larin, K V; Tuchin, V V

    2008-01-01

    Functional imaging, monitoring and quantitative description of glucose diffusion in epithelial and underlying stromal tissues in vivo and controlling of the optical properties of tissues are extremely important for many biomedical applications including the development of noninvasive or minimally invasive glucose sensors as well as for therapy and diagnostics of various diseases, such as cancer, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Recent progress in the development of a noninvasive molecular diffusion biosensor based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) is described. The diffusion of glucose was studied in several epithelial tissues both in vitro and in vivo. Because OCT provides depth-resolved imaging of tissues with high in-depth resolution, the glucose diffusion is described not only as a function of time but also as a function of depth. (special issue devoted to application of laser technologies in biophotonics and biomedical studies)

  4. Speckle Noise Reduction for the Enhancement of Retinal Layers in Optical Coherence Tomography Images

    Fereydoon Nowshiravan Rahatabad

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction One of the most important pre-processing steps in optical coherence tomography (OCT is reducing speckle noise, resulting from multiple scattering of tissues, which degrades the quality of OCT images. Materials and Methods The present study focused on speckle noise reduction and edge detection techniques. Statistical filters with different masks and noise variances were applied on OCT and test images. Objective evaluation of both types of images was performed, using various image metrics such as peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR, root mean square error, correlation coefficient and elapsed time. For the purpose of recovery, Kuan filter was used as an input for edge enhancement. Also, a spatial filter was applied to improve image quality. Results The obtained results were presented as statistical tables and images. Based on statistical measures and visual quality of OCT images, Enhanced Lee filter (3×3 with a PSNR value of 43.6735 in low noise variance and Kuan filter (3×3 with a PSNR value of 37.2850 in high noise variance showed superior performance over other filters. Conclusion Based on the obtained results, by using speckle reduction filters such as Enhanced Lee and Kuan filters on OCT images, the number of compounded images, required to achieve a given image quality, could be reduced. Moreover, use of Kuan filters for promoting the edges allowed smoothing of speckle regions, while preserving image tissue texture.

  5. Quantitative Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging of the Ocular Anterior Segment

    McNabb, Ryan Palmer

    Clinical imaging within ophthalmology has had transformative effects on ocular health over the last century. Imaging has guided clinicians in their pharmaceutical and surgical treatments of macular degeneration, glaucoma, cataracts and numerous other pathologies. Many of the imaging techniques currently used are photography based and are limited to imaging the surface of ocular structures. This limitation forces clinicians to make assumptions about the underlying tissue which may reduce the efficacy of their diagnoses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive, non-ionizing imaging modality that has been widely adopted within the field of ophthalmology in the last 15 years. As an optical imaging technique, OCT utilizes low-coherence interferometry to produce micron-scale three-dimensional datasets of a tissue's structure. Much of the human body consists of tissues that significantly scatter and attenuate optical signals limiting the imaging depth of OCT in those tissues to only 1-2mm. However, the ocular anterior segment is unique among human tissue in that it is primarily transparent or translucent. This allows for relatively deep imaging of tissue structure with OCT and is no longer limited by the optical scattering properties of the tissue. This goal of this work is to develop methods utilizing OCT that offer the potential to reduce the assumptions made by clinicians in their evaluations of their patients' ocular anterior segments. We achieved this by first developing a method to reduce the effects of patient motion during OCT volume acquisitions allowing for accurate, three dimensional measurements of corneal shape. Having accurate corneal shape measurements then allowed us to determine corneal spherical and astigmatic refractive contribution in a given individual. This was then validated in a clinical study that showed OCT better measured refractive change due to surgery than other clinical devices. Additionally, a method was developed to combine

  6. Optical coherence tomography imaging of cranial meninges post brain injury in vivo

    Woo June Choi; Ruikang K.Wang

    2017-01-01

    We report a new application of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to investigate the cranial meninges in an animal model of brain injury in vivo.The injury is induced in a mouse due to skull thinning,in which the repeated and excessive drilling exerts mechanical stress on the mouse brain through the skull,resulting in acute and mild brain injury.Transcranial OCT imaging reveals an interesting virtual space between the cranial meningeal layers post skull thinning,which is gradually closed within hours.The finding suggests a promise of OCT as an effective tool to monitor the mechanical trauma in the small animal model of brain injury.

  7. Imaging of human breast tissue using polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Verma, Y.; Gautam, M.; Divakar Rao, K.; Swami, M. K.; Gupta, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    We report a study on the use of polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) for discriminating malignant (invasive ductal carcinoma), benign (fibroadenoma) and normal (adipocytes) breast tissue sites. The results show that while conventional OCT, that utilizes only the intensity of light back-scattered from tissue microstructures, is able to discriminate breast tissues as normal (adipocytes) and abnormal (malignant and benign) tissues, PS-OCT helps in discriminating between malignant and benign tissue sites also. The estimated values of birefringence obtained from the PSOCT imaging show that benign breast tissue samples have significantly higher birefringence as compared to the malignant tissue samples.

  8. Optical Coherence Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis and Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder.

    Manogaran, Praveena; Hanson, James V M; Olbert, Elisabeth D; Egger, Christine; Wicki, Carla; Gerth-Kahlert, Christina; Landau, Klara; Schippling, Sven

    2016-11-15

    Irreversible disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is largely attributed to neuronal and axonal degeneration, which, along with inflammation, is one of the major pathological hallmarks of these diseases. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging tool that has been used in MS, NMOSD, and other diseases to quantify damage to the retina, including the ganglion cells and their axons. The fact that these are the only unmyelinated axons within the central nervous system (CNS) renders the afferent visual pathway an ideal model for studying axonal and neuronal degeneration in neurodegenerative diseases. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to obtain anatomical information about the CNS and to quantify evolving pathology in MS and NMOSD, both globally and in specific regions of the visual pathway including the optic nerve, optic radiations and visual cortex. Therefore, correlations between brain or optic nerve abnormalities on MRI, and retinal pathology using OCT, may shed light on how damage to one part of the CNS can affect others. In addition, these imaging techniques can help identify important differences between MS and NMOSD such as disease-specific damage to the visual pathway, trans-synaptic degeneration, or pathological changes independent of the underlying disease process. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the role of the visual pathway using OCT and MRI in patients with MS and NMOSD. Emphasis is placed on studies that employ both MRI and OCT to investigate damage to the visual system in these diseases.

  9. A joint estimation detection of Glaucoma progression in 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography optic nerve head images

    Belghith, Akram; Bowd, Christopher; Weinreb, Robert N.; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2014-03-01

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease characterized by distinctive changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) and visual field. Glaucoma can strike without symptoms and causes blindness if it remains without treatment. Therefore, early disease detection is important so that treatment can be initiated and blindness prevented. In this context, important advances in technology for non-invasive imaging of the eye have been made providing quantitative tools to measure structural changes in ONH topography, an essential element for glaucoma detection and monitoring. 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), an optical imaging technique, has been commonly used to discriminate glaucomatous from healthy subjects. In this paper, we present a new framework for detection of glaucoma progression using 3D SD-OCT images. In contrast to previous works that the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurement provided by commercially available spectral-domain optical coherence tomograph, we consider the whole 3D volume for change detection. To integrate a priori knowledge and in particular the spatial voxel dependency in the change detection map, we propose the use of the Markov Random Field to handle a such dependency. To accommodate the presence of false positive detection, the estimated change detection map is then used to classify a 3D SDOCT image into the "non-progressing" and "progressing" glaucoma classes, based on a fuzzy logic classifier. We compared the diagnostic performance of the proposed framework to existing methods of progression detection.

  10. Simultaneous optical coherence tomography and lipofuscin autofluorescence imaging of the retina with a single broadband light source at 480nm

    Jiang, Minshan; Liu, Tan; Liu, Xiaojing; Jiao, Shuliang

    2014-01-01

    We accomplished spectral domain optical coherence tomography and auto-fluorescence microscopy for imaging the retina with a single broadband light source centered at 480 nm. This technique is able to provide simultaneous structural imaging and lipofuscin molecular contrast of the retina. Since the two imaging modalities are provided by the same group of photons, their images are intrinsically registered. To test the capabilities of the technique we periodically imaged the retinas of the same ...

  11. Perspectives on Imaging the Left Main Coronary Artery Using Intravascular Ultrasound and Optical Coherence Tomography

    Harry C Lowe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI for significant left main coronary artery (LMCA stenosis is increasingly being viewed as a viable alternative to Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG (1. This is leading to an expectation of increasing numbers of such procedures, with a consequent focus on both the ability to image both lesion severity, and assess more accurately the results of PCI. While there have been advances in physiologic assessment of left main severity using fractional flow reserve (FFR, imaging of the LMCA using Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS and more recently Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT has the specific advantage of being able to provide detailed anatomical information both pre and post PCI, such that it is timely to review briefly the current status of these two imaging technologies in the context of LMCA intervention.

  12. Impact of errors in experimental parameters on reconstructed breast images using diffuse optical tomography.

    Deng, Bin; Lundqvist, Mats; Fang, Qianqian; Carp, Stefan A

    2018-03-01

    Near-infrared diffuse optical tomography (NIR-DOT) is an emerging technology that offers hemoglobin based, functional imaging tumor biomarkers for breast cancer management. The most promising clinical translation opportunities are in the differential diagnosis of malignant vs. benign lesions, and in early response assessment and guidance for neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Accurate quantification of the tissue oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentration across the field of view, as well as repeatability during longitudinal imaging in the context of therapy guidance, are essential for the successful translation of NIR-DOT to clinical practice. The ill-posed and ill-condition nature of the DOT inverse problem makes this technique particularly susceptible to model errors that may occur, for example, when the experimental conditions do not fully match the assumptions built into the image reconstruction process. To evaluate the susceptibility of DOT images to experimental errors that might be encountered in practice for a parallel-plate NIR-DOT system, we simulated 7 different types of errors, each with a range of magnitudes. We generated simulated data by using digital breast phantoms derived from five actual mammograms of healthy female volunteers, to which we added a 1-cm tumor. After applying each of the experimental error types and magnitudes to the simulated measurements, we reconstructed optical images with and without structural prior guidance and assessed the overall error in the total hemoglobin concentrations (HbT) and in the HbT contrast between the lesion and surrounding area vs. the best-case scenarios. It is found that slight in-plane probe misalignment and plate rotation did not result in large quantification errors. However, any out-of-plane probe tilting could result in significant deterioration in lesion contrast. Among the error types investigated in this work, optical images were the least likely to be impacted by breast shape inaccuracies but suffered the

  13. Electro-optical system for the high speed reconstruction of computed tomography images

    Tresp, V.

    1989-01-01

    An electro-optical system for the high-speed reconstruction of computed tomography (CT) images has been built and studied. The system is capable of reconstructing high-contrast and high-resolution images at video rate (30 images per second), which is more than two orders of magnitude faster than the reconstruction rate achieved by special purpose digital computers used in commercial CT systems. The filtered back-projection algorithm which was implemented in the reconstruction system requires the filtering of all projections with a prescribed filter function. A space-integrating acousto-optical convolver, a surface acoustic wave filter and a digital finite-impulse response filter were used for this purpose and their performances were compared. The second part of the reconstruction, the back projection of the filtered projections, is computationally very expensive. An optical back projector has been built which maps the filtered projections onto the two-dimensional image space using an anamorphic lens system and a prism image rotator. The reconstructed image is viewed by a video camera, routed through a real-time image-enhancement system, and displayed on a TV monitor. The system reconstructs parallel-beam projection data, and in a modified version, is also capable of reconstructing fan-beam projection data. This extension is important since the latter are the kind of projection data actually acquired in high-speed X-ray CT scanners. The reconstruction system was tested by reconstructing precomputed projection data of phantom images. These were stored in a special purpose projection memory and transmitted to the reconstruction system as an electronic signal. In this way, a projection measurement system that acquires projections sequentially was simulated

  14. Solar tomography adaptive optics.

    Ren, Deqing; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhang, Xi; Dou, Jiangpei; Zhao, Gang

    2014-03-10

    Conventional solar adaptive optics uses one deformable mirror (DM) and one guide star for wave-front sensing, which seriously limits high-resolution imaging over a large field of view (FOV). Recent progress toward multiconjugate adaptive optics indicates that atmosphere turbulence induced wave-front distortion at different altitudes can be reconstructed by using multiple guide stars. To maximize the performance over a large FOV, we propose a solar tomography adaptive optics (TAO) system that uses tomographic wave-front information and uses one DM. We show that by fully taking advantage of the knowledge of three-dimensional wave-front distribution, a classical solar adaptive optics with one DM can provide an extra performance gain for high-resolution imaging over a large FOV in the near infrared. The TAO will allow existing one-deformable-mirror solar adaptive optics to deliver better performance over a large FOV for high-resolution magnetic field investigation, where solar activities occur in a two-dimensional field up to 60'', and where the near infrared is superior to the visible in terms of magnetic field sensitivity.

  15. MEMS-based handheld fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography for intraoperative microvascular anastomosis imaging.

    Yong Huang

    Full Text Available To demonstrate the feasibility of a miniature handheld optical coherence tomography (OCT imager for real time intraoperative vascular patency evaluation in the setting of super-microsurgical vessel anastomosis.A novel handheld imager Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography based on a 1.3-µm central wavelength swept source for extravascular imaging was developed. The imager was minimized through the adoption of a 2.4-mm diameter microelectromechanical systems (MEMS scanning mirror, additionally a 12.7-mm diameter lens system was designed and combined with the MEMS mirror to achieve a small form factor that optimize functionality as a handheld extravascular OCT imager. To evaluate in-vivo applicability, super-microsurgical vessel anastomosis was performed in a mouse femoral vessel cut and repair model employing conventional interrupted suture technique as well as a novel non-suture cuff technique. Vascular anastomosis patency after clinically successful repair was evaluated using the novel handheld OCT imager.With an adjustable lateral image field of view up to 1.5 mm by 1.5 mm, high-resolution simultaneous structural and flow imaging of the blood vessels were successfully acquired for BALB/C mouse after orthotopic hind limb transplantation using a non-suture cuff technique and BALB/C mouse after femoral artery anastomosis using a suture technique. We experimentally quantify the axial and lateral resolution of the OCT to be 12.6 µm in air and 17.5 µm respectively. The OCT has a sensitivity of 84 dB and sensitivity roll-off of 5.7 dB/mm over an imaging range of 5 mm. Imaging with a frame rate of 36 Hz for an image size of 1000(lateral×512(axial pixels using a 50,000 A-lines per second swept source was achieved. Quantitative vessel lumen patency, lumen narrowing and thrombosis analysis were performed based on acquired structure and Doppler images.A miniature handheld OCT imager that can be used for intraoperative evaluation of

  16. Optical Coherence Tomography

    Fercher, A.F.; Andersen, Peter E.

    2017-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a technique that is used to peer inside a body noninvasively. Tissue structure defined by tissue absorption and scattering coefficients, and the speed of blood flow, are derived from the characteristics of light remitted by the body. Singly backscattered light...... detected by partial coherence interferometry (PCI) is used to synthesize the tomographic image coded in false colors. A prerequisite of this technique is a low time-coherent but high space-coherent light source, for example, a superluminescent diode or a supercontinuum source. Alternatively, the imaging...... technique can be realized by using ultrafast wavelength scanning light sources. For tissue imaging, the light source wavelengths are restricted to the red and near-infrared (NIR) region from about 600 to 1300 nm, the so-called therapeutic window, where absorption (μa ≈ 0.01 mm−1) is small enough. Transverse...

  17. Optical coherence tomography imaging of colonic crypts in a mouse model of colorectal cancer

    Welge, Weston A.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2016-03-01

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) are abnormal epithelial lesions that precede development of colonic polyps. As the earliest morphological change in the development of colorectal cancer, ACF is a highly studied phenomenon. The most common method of imaging ACF is chromoendoscopy using methylene blue as a contrast agent. Narrow- band imaging is a contrast-agent-free modality for imaging the colonic crypts. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an attractive alternative to chromoendoscopy and narrow-band imaging because it can resolve the crypt structure at sufficiently high sampling while simultaneously providing depth-resolved data. We imaged in vivo the distal 15 mm of colon in the azoxymethane (AOM) mouse model of colorectal cancer using a commercial swept-source OCT system and a miniature endoscope designed and built in-house. We present en face images of the colonic crypts and demonstrate that different patterns in healthy and adenoma tissue can be seen. These patterns correspond to those reported in the literature. We have previously demonstrated early detection of colon adenoma using OCT by detecting minute thickening of the mucosa. By combining mucosal thickness measurement with imaging of the crypt structure, OCT can be used to correlate ACF and adenoma development in space and time. These results suggest that OCT may be a superior imaging modality for studying the connection between ACF and colorectal cancer.

  18. Circumferential optical coherence tomography angiography imaging of the swine esophagus using a micromotor balloon catheter.

    Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Ahsen, Osman Oguz; Liang, Kaicheng; Wang, Zhao; Cleveland, Cody; Booth, Lucas; Potsaid, Benjamin; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Cable, Alex E; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni; Fujimoto, James G

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a micromotor balloon imaging catheter for ultrahigh speed endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) which provides wide area, circumferential structural and angiographic imaging of the esophagus without contrast agents. Using a 1310 nm MEMS tunable wavelength swept VCSEL light source, the system has a 1.2 MHz A-scan rate and ~8.5 µm axial resolution in tissue. The micromotor balloon catheter enables circumferential imaging of the esophagus at 240 frames per second (fps) with a ~30 µm (FWHM) spot size. Volumetric imaging is achieved by proximal pullback of the micromotor assembly within the balloon at 1.5 mm/sec. Volumetric data consisting of 4200 circumferential images of 5,000 A-scans each over a 2.6 cm length, covering a ~13 cm(2) area is acquired in <18 seconds. A non-rigid image registration algorithm is used to suppress motion artifacts from non-uniform rotational distortion (NURD), cardiac motion or respiration. En face OCT images at various depths can be generated. OCT angiography (OCTA) is computed using intensity decorrelation between sequential pairs of circumferential scans and enables three-dimensional visualization of vasculature. Wide area volumetric OCT and OCTA imaging of the swine esophagus in vivo is demonstrated.

  19. Numerical correction of distorted images in full-field optical coherence tomography

    Min, Gihyeon; Kim, Ju Wan; Choi, Woo June; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2012-03-01

    We propose a numerical method which can numerically correct the distorted en face images obtained with a full field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT) system. It is shown that the FF-OCT image of the deep region of a biological sample is easily blurred or degraded because the sample has a refractive index (RI) much higher than its surrounding medium in general. It is analyzed that the focal plane of the imaging system is segregated from the imaging plane of the coherence-gated system due to the RI mismatch. This image-blurring phenomenon is experimentally confirmed by imaging the chrome pattern of a resolution test target through its glass substrate in water. Moreover, we demonstrate that the blurred image can be appreciably corrected by using the numerical correction process based on the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory. The proposed correction method is applied to enhance the image of a human hair, which permits the distinct identification of the melanin granules inside the cortex layer of the hair shaft.

  20. Evaluation of segmentation algorithms for optical coherence tomography images of ovarian tissue

    Sawyer, Travis W.; Rice, Photini F. S.; Sawyer, David M.; Koevary, Jennifer W.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2018-02-01

    Ovarian cancer has the lowest survival rate among all gynecologic cancers due to predominantly late diagnosis. Early detection of ovarian cancer can increase 5-year survival rates from 40% up to 92%, yet no reliable early detection techniques exist. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging technique that provides depthresolved, high-resolution images of biological tissue in real time and demonstrates great potential for imaging of ovarian tissue. Mouse models are crucial to quantitatively assess the diagnostic potential of OCT for ovarian cancer imaging; however, due to small organ size, the ovaries must rst be separated from the image background using the process of segmentation. Manual segmentation is time-intensive, as OCT yields three-dimensional data. Furthermore, speckle noise complicates OCT images, frustrating many processing techniques. While much work has investigated noise-reduction and automated segmentation for retinal OCT imaging, little has considered the application to the ovaries, which exhibit higher variance and inhomogeneity than the retina. To address these challenges, we evaluated a set of algorithms to segment OCT images of mouse ovaries. We examined ve preprocessing techniques and six segmentation algorithms. While all pre-processing methods improve segmentation, Gaussian filtering is most effective, showing an improvement of 32% +/- 1.2%. Of the segmentation algorithms, active contours performs best, segmenting with an accuracy of 0.948 +/- 0.012 compared with manual segmentation (1.0 being identical). Nonetheless, further optimization could lead to maximizing the performance for segmenting OCT images of the ovaries.

  1. Long working distance optical coherence tomography for pediatric imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Qian, Ruobing; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Vajzovic, Lejla; Gramatikov, Boris I.; Guyton, David L.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems have working distances of about 25 mm, and require cooperative subjects to immobilize and fixate on a target. Handheld OCT probes have also been demonstrated for successful imaging of pre-term infants and neonates up to ~1 year old. However, no technology yet exists for OCT in young children due to their lack of attention and inherent fear of large objects close to their face. In this work, we demonstrate a prototype retinal swept-source OCT system with a long working distance (from the last optical element to the subject's eye) to facilitate pediatric imaging. To reduce the footprint and weight of the system compared to the conventional 4f scheme, a novel 2f scanning configuration was implemented to achieve a working distance of 348mm with a +/- 8° scanning angle prior to cornea. Employing two custom-designed lenses, the system design resolution was nearly diffraction limited throughout a -8D to +5D refractive corrections. A fixation target displayed on a LCD monitor and an iris camera were used to facilitate alignment and imaging. Our prototype was tested in consented adult subjects and has the potential to facilitate imaging of young children. With this apparatus, young children could potentially sit comfortably in caretaker's lap while viewing entertainment on the fixation screen designed to direct their gaze into the imaging apparatus.

  2. In vivo oral imaging with integrated portable photoacoustic microscopy and optical coherence tomography

    Qin, Wei; Qi, Weizhi; Jin, Tian; Guo, Heng; Xi, Lei

    2017-12-01

    Oral diseases, especially oral cancers, are becoming serious health problems in humans. To image vasculatures and structures simultaneously in the human oral cavity which are tightly associated with various oral diseases, we develop a dual-modality portable optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ORPAM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. This system utilizes a new rotary scanning mechanism and a compact design of the imaging head, making it portable and free of translation of the imaging interface or samples. Through the phantom experiments, both modalities yield high lateral resolutions of 8.1 μm (ORPAM) and 8.56 μm (OCT), respectively. The axial resolutions are measured to be 116.5 μm for ORPAM and 6.1 μm for OCT. In vivo imaging of a mouse ear was carried out to evaluate the performance of the system in biological tissues. In addition, in vivo oral imaging of a healthy human lip and monitoring recovery progress of a lip ulcer demonstrate the clinical potential of this system.

  3. Visualization of Radial Peripapillary Capillaries Using Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography: The Effect of Image Averaging.

    Shelley Mo

    Full Text Available To assess the effect of image registration and averaging on the visualization and quantification of the radial peripapillary capillary (RPC network on optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA.Twenty-two healthy controls were imaged with a commercial OCTA system (AngioVue, Optovue, Inc.. Ten 10x10° scans of the optic disc were obtained, and the most superficial layer (50-μm slab extending from the inner limiting membrane was extracted for analysis. Rigid registration was achieved using ImageJ, and averaging of each 2 to 10 frames was performed in five ~2x2° regions of interest (ROI located 1° from the optic disc margin. The ROI were automatically skeletonized. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, number of endpoints and mean capillary length from the skeleton, capillary density, and mean intercapillary distance (ICD were measured for the reference and each averaged ROI. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to assess statistical significance. Three patients with primary open angle glaucoma were also imaged to compare RPC density to controls.Qualitatively, vessels appeared smoother and closer to histologic descriptions with increasing number of averaged frames. Quantitatively, number of endpoints decreased by 51%, and SNR, mean capillary length, capillary density, and ICD increased by 44%, 91%, 11%, and 4.5% from single frame to 10-frame averaged, respectively. The 10-frame averaged images from the glaucomatous eyes revealed decreased density correlating to visual field defects and retinal nerve fiber layer thinning.OCTA image registration and averaging is a viable and accessible method to enhance the visualization of RPCs, with significant improvements in image quality and RPC quantitative parameters. With this technique, we will be able to non-invasively and reliably study RPC involvement in diseases such as glaucoma.

  4. Semiautomated analysis of optical coherence tomography crystalline lens images under simulated accommodation.

    Kim, Eon; Ehrmann, Klaus; Uhlhorn, Stephen; Borja, David; Arrieta-Quintero, Esdras; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2011-05-01

    Presbyopia is an age related, gradual loss of accommodation, mainly due to changes in the crystalline lens. As part of research efforts to understand and cure this condition, ex vivo, cross-sectional optical coherence tomography images of crystalline lenses were obtained by using the Ex-Vivo Accommodation Simulator (EVAS II) instrument and analyzed to extract their physical and optical properties. Various filters and edge detection methods were applied to isolate the edge contour. An ellipse is fitted to the lens outline to obtain central reference point for transforming the pixel data into the analysis coordinate system. This allows for the fitting of a high order equation to obtain a mathematical description of the edge contour, which obeys constraints of continuity as well as zero to infinite surface slopes from apex to equator. Geometrical parameters of the lens were determined for the lens images captured at different accommodative states. Various curve fitting functions were developed to mathematically describe the anterior and posterior surfaces of the lens. Their differences were evaluated and their suitability for extracting optical performance of the lens was assessed. The robustness of these algorithms was tested by analyzing the same images repeated times.

  5. Scanning laser optical tomography for in toto imaging of the murine cochlea.

    Lena Nolte

    Full Text Available The mammalian cochlea is a complex macroscopic structure due to its helical shape and the microscopic arrangements of the individual layers of cells. To improve the outcomes of hearing restoration in deaf patients, it is important to understand the anatomic structure and composition of the cochlea ex vivo. Hitherto, only one histological technique based on confocal laser scanning microscopy and optical clearing has been developed for in toto optical imaging of the murine cochlea. However, with a growing size of the specimen, e.g., human cochlea, this technique reaches its limitations. Here, we demonstrate scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT as a valuable imaging technique to visualize the murine cochlea in toto without any physical slicing. This technique can also be applied in larger specimens up to cm3 such as the human cochlea. Furthermore, immunolabeling allows visualization of inner hair cells (otoferlin or spiral ganglion cells (neurofilament within the whole cochlea. After image reconstruction, the 3D dataset was used for digital segmentation of the labeled region. As a result, quantitative analysis of position, length and curvature of the labeled region was possible. This is of high interest in order to understand the interaction of cochlear implants (CI and cells in more detail.

  6. Texture analysis of speckle in optical coherence tomography images of tissue phantoms

    Gossage, Kirk W; Smith, Cynthia M; Kanter, Elizabeth M; Hariri, Lida P; Stone, Alice L; Rodriguez, Jeffrey J; Williams, Stuart K; Barton, Jennifer K

    2006-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging modality capable of acquiring cross-sectional images of tissue using back-reflected light. Conventional OCT images have a resolution of 10-15 μm, and are thus best suited for visualizing tissue layers and structures. OCT images of collagen (with and without endothelial cells) have no resolvable features and may appear to simply show an exponential decrease in intensity with depth. However, examination of these images reveals that they display a characteristic repetitive structure due to speckle.The purpose of this study is to evaluate the application of statistical and spectral texture analysis techniques for differentiating living and non-living tissue phantoms containing various sizes and distributions of scatterers based on speckle content in OCT images. Statistically significant differences between texture parameters and excellent classification rates were obtained when comparing various endothelial cell concentrations ranging from 0 cells/ml to 25 million cells/ml. Statistically significant results and excellent classification rates were also obtained using various sizes of microspheres with concentrations ranging from 0 microspheres/ml to 500 million microspheres/ml. This study has shown that texture analysis of OCT images may be capable of differentiating tissue phantoms containing various sizes and distributions of scatterers

  7. Speckle reduction in optical coherence tomography images based on wave atoms

    Du, Yongzhao; Liu, Gangjun; Feng, Guoying; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging noninvasive imaging technique, which is based on low-coherence interferometry. OCT images suffer from speckle noise, which reduces image contrast. A shrinkage filter based on wave atoms transform is proposed for speckle reduction in OCT images. Wave atoms transform is a new multiscale geometric analysis tool that offers sparser expansion and better representation for images containing oscillatory patterns and textures than other traditional transforms, such as wavelet and curvelet transforms. Cycle spinning-based technology is introduced to avoid visual artifacts, such as Gibbs-like phenomenon, and to develop a translation invariant wave atoms denoising scheme. The speckle suppression degree in the denoised images is controlled by an adjustable parameter that determines the threshold in the wave atoms domain. The experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively remove the speckle noise and improve the OCT image quality. The signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio, average equivalent number of looks, and cross-correlation (XCOR) values are obtained, and the results are also compared with the wavelet and curvelet thresholding techniques. PMID:24825507

  8. Wavelet analysis enables system-independent texture analysis of optical coherence tomography images

    Lingley-Papadopoulos, Colleen A.; Loew, Murray H.; Zara, Jason M.

    2009-07-01

    Texture analysis for tissue characterization is a current area of optical coherence tomography (OCT) research. We discuss some of the differences between OCT systems and the effects those differences have on the resulting images and subsequent image analysis. In addition, as an example, two algorithms for the automatic recognition of bladder cancer are compared: one that was developed on a single system with no consideration for system differences, and one that was developed to address the issues associated with system differences. The first algorithm had a sensitivity of 73% and specificity of 69% when tested using leave-one-out cross-validation on data taken from a single system. When tested on images from another system with a different central wavelength, however, the method classified all images as cancerous regardless of the true pathology. By contrast, with the use of wavelet analysis and the removal of system-dependent features, the second algorithm reported sensitivity and specificity values of 87 and 58%, respectively, when trained on images taken with one imaging system and tested on images taken with another.

  9. Non-invasive imaging of zebrafish with spinal deformities using optical coherence tomography: a preliminary study

    Bernstein, Liane; Beaudette, Kathy; Patten, Kessen; Beaulieu-Ouellet, Émilie; Strupler, Mathias; Moldovan, Florina; Boudoux, Caroline

    2013-03-01

    A zebrafish model has recently been introduced to study various genetic mutations that could lead to spinal deformities such as scoliosis. However, current imaging techniques make it difficult to perform longitudinal studies of this condition in zebrafish, especially in the early stages of development. The goal of this project is to determine whether optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a viable non-invasive method to image zebrafish exhibiting spinal deformities. Images of both live and fixed malformed zebrafish (5 to 21 days postfertilization) as well as wild-type fish (5 to 29 days postfertilization) were acquired non-invasively using a commercial SD-OCT system, with a laser source centered at 930nm (λ=100nm), permitting axial and lateral resolutions of 7 and 8μm respectively. Using two-dimensional images and three-dimensional reconstructions, it was possible to identify the malformed notochord as well as deformities in other major organs at different stages of formation. Visualization of the notochord was facilitated with the development of a segmentation algorithm. OCT images were compared to HE histological sections and images obtained by calcein staining. Because of the possibility of performing longitudinal studies on a same fish and reducing image processing time as compared with staining techniques and histology, the use of OCT could facilitate phenotypic characterization in studying genetic factors leading to spinal deformities in zebrafish and could eventually contribute to the identification of the genetic causes of spinal deformities such as scoliosis.

  10. Imaging of dental material by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Dichtl, Sabine; Baumgartner, Angela; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Moritz, Andreas; Wernisch, Johann; Robl, Barbara; Sattmann, Harald; Leitgeb, Rainer; Sperr, Wolfgang; Fercher, Adolf F.

    1999-05-01

    Partial coherence interferometry (PCI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are noninvasive and noncontact techniques for high precision biometry and for obtaining cross- sectional images of biologic structures. OCT was initially introduced to depict the transparent tissue of the eye. It is based on interferometry employing the partial coherence properties of a light source with high spatial coherence ut short coherence length to image structures with a resolution of the order of a few microns. Recently this technique has been modified for cross section al imaging of dental and periodontal tissues. In vitro and in vivo OCT images have been recorded, which distinguish enamel, cemento and dentin structures and provide detailed structural information on clinical abnormalities. In contrast to convention OCT, where the magnitude of backscattered light as a function of depth is imaged, polarization sensitive OCT uses backscattered light to image the magnitude of the birefringence in the sample as a function of depth. First polarization sensitive OCT recordings show, that changes in the mineralization status of enamel or dentin caused by caries or non-caries lesions can result in changes of the polarization state of the light backscattered by dental material. Therefore polarization sensitive OCT might provide a new diagnostic imaging modality in clinical and research dentistry.

  11. Limitations in imaging common conjunctival and corneal pathologies with fourier-domain optical coherence tomography.

    Demirci, Hakan; Steen, Daniel W

    2014-01-01

    To describe the limitations of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) in imaging common conjunctival and corneal pathology. Retrospective, single-center case series of 40 patients with conjunctival and cornea pathology. Fourier-domain OCT imaged laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) flaps in detail, including its relation to other corneal structures and abnormalities. Similarly, in infectious or degenerative corneal disorders, Fourier-domain OCT successfully showed the extent of infiltration or material deposition, which appeared as hyper-reflective areas. In cases with pterygium, the underlying cornea could not be imaged. All cases of common conjunctival pathologies, such as nevus or pinguecula, were successfully imaged in detail. Nevi, scleritis, pterygium, pinguecula, and subconjunctival hemorrhage were hyper-reflective lesions, while cysts and lymphangiectasia were hyporeflective. The details of the underlying sclera were not uniformly imaged in conjunctival pathologies. Fourier-domain OCT imaged the trabeculectomy bleb in detail, whereas the details of structures of the anterior chamber angle were not routinely visualized in all cases. Light scatter through vascularized, densely inflamed, or thick lesions limits the imaging capabilities of Fourier-domain anterior segment OCT.

  12. Wavelet analysis enables system-independent texture analysis of optical coherence tomography images.

    Lingley-Papadopoulos, Colleen A; Loew, Murray H; Zara, Jason M

    2009-01-01

    Texture analysis for tissue characterization is a current area of optical coherence tomography (OCT) research. We discuss some of the differences between OCT systems and the effects those differences have on the resulting images and subsequent image analysis. In addition, as an example, two algorithms for the automatic recognition of bladder cancer are compared: one that was developed on a single system with no consideration for system differences, and one that was developed to address the issues associated with system differences. The first algorithm had a sensitivity of 73% and specificity of 69% when tested using leave-one-out cross-validation on data taken from a single system. When tested on images from another system with a different central wavelength, however, the method classified all images as cancerous regardless of the true pathology. By contrast, with the use of wavelet analysis and the removal of system-dependent features, the second algorithm reported sensitivity and specificity values of 87 and 58%, respectively, when trained on images taken with one imaging system and tested on images taken with another.

  13. Intraoperative imaging of pediatric vocal fold lesions using optical coherence tomography

    Benboujja, Fouzi; Garcia, Jordan A.; Beaudette, Kathy; Strupler, Mathias; Hartnick, Christopher J.; Boudoux, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been previously identified as a promising tool for exploring laryngeal pathologies in adults. Here, we present an OCT handheld probe dedicated to imaging the unique geometry involved in pediatric laryngoscopy. A vertical cavity surface emitting laser-based wavelength-swept OCT system operating at 60 frames per second was coupled to the probe to acquire three-dimensional (3-D) volumes in vivo. In order to evaluate the performance of the proposed probe and system, we imaged pediatric vocal fold lesions of patients going under direct laryngoscopy. Through this in vivo study, we extracted OCT features characterizing each pediatric vocal fold lesion, which shows a great potential for noninvasive laryngeal lesion discrimination. We believe OCT vocal fold examination in 3-D will result in improved knowledge of the pediatric anatomy and could aid in managing pediatric laryngeal diseases.

  14. Segmentation of the geographic atrophy in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence images.

    Hu, Zhihong; Medioni, Gerard G; Hernandez, Matthias; Hariri, Amirhossein; Wu, Xiaodong; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2013-12-30

    Geographic atrophy (GA) is the atrophic late-stage manifestation of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which may result in severe vision loss and blindness. The purpose of this study was to develop a reliable, effective approach for GA segmentation in both spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and fundus autofluorescence (FAF) images using a level set-based approach and to compare the segmentation performance in the two modalities. To identify GA regions in SD-OCT images, three retinal surfaces were first segmented in volumetric SD-OCT images using a double-surface graph search scheme. A two-dimensional (2-D) partial OCT projection image was created from the segmented choroid layer. A level set approach was applied to segment the GA in the partial OCT projection image. In addition, the algorithm was applied to FAF images for the GA segmentation. Twenty randomly chosen macular SD-OCT (Zeiss Cirrus) volumes and 20 corresponding FAF (Heidelberg Spectralis) images were obtained from 20 subjects with GA. The algorithm-defined GA region was compared with consensus manual delineation performed by certified graders. The mean Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) between the algorithm- and manually defined GA regions were 0.87 ± 0.09 in partial OCT projection images and 0.89 ± 0.07 in registered FAF images. The area correlations between them were 0.93 (P segment GA regions in both SD-OCT and FAF images. This approach demonstrated good agreement between the algorithm- and manually defined GA regions within each single modality. The GA segmentation in FAF images performed better than in partial OCT projection images. Across the two modalities, the GA segmentation presented reasonable agreement.

  15. Signal Normalization Reduces Image Appearance Disparity Among Multiple Optical Coherence Tomography Devices.

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Wollstein, Gadi; Bilonick, Richard A; Kagemann, Larry; Schuman, Joel S

    2017-02-01

    To assess the effect of the previously reported optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal normalization method on reducing the discrepancies in image appearance among spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT) devices. Healthy eyes and eyes with various retinal pathologies were scanned at the macular region using similar volumetric scan patterns with at least two out of three SD-OCT devices at the same visit (Cirrus HD-OCT, Zeiss, Dublin, CA; RTVue, Optovue, Fremont, CA; and Spectralis, Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany). All the images were processed with the signal normalization. A set of images formed a questionnaire with 24 pairs of cross-sectional images from each eye with any combination of the three SD-OCT devices either both pre- or postsignal normalization. Observers were asked to evaluate the similarity of the two displayed images based on the image appearance. The effects on reducing the differences in image appearance before and after processing were analyzed. Twenty-nine researchers familiar with OCT images participated in the survey. Image similarity was significantly improved after signal normalization for all three combinations ( P ≤ 0.009) as Cirrus and RTVue combination became the most similar pair, followed by Cirrus and Spectralis, and RTVue and Spectralis. The signal normalization successfully minimized the disparities in the image appearance among multiple SD-OCT devices, allowing clinical interpretation and comparison of OCT images regardless of the device differences. The signal normalization would enable direct OCT images comparisons without concerning about device differences and broaden OCT usage by enabling long-term follow-ups and data sharing.

  16. Voxel-based plaque classification in coronary intravascular optical coherence tomography images using decision trees

    Kolluru, Chaitanya; Prabhu, David; Gharaibeh, Yazan; Wu, Hao; Wilson, David L.

    2018-02-01

    Intravascular Optical Coherence Tomography (IVOCT) is a high contrast, 3D microscopic imaging technique that can be used to assess atherosclerosis and guide stent interventions. Despite its advantages, IVOCT image interpretation is challenging and time consuming with over 500 image frames generated in a single pullback volume. We have developed a method to classify voxel plaque types in IVOCT images using machine learning. To train and test the classifier, we have used our unique database of labeled cadaver vessel IVOCT images accurately registered to gold standard cryoimages. This database currently contains 300 images and is growing. Each voxel is labeled as fibrotic, lipid-rich, calcified or other. Optical attenuation, intensity and texture features were extracted for each voxel and were used to build a decision tree classifier for multi-class classification. Five-fold cross-validation across images gave accuracies of 96 % +/- 0.01 %, 90 +/- 0.02% and 90 % +/- 0.01 % for fibrotic, lipid-rich and calcified classes respectively. To rectify performance degradation seen in left out vessel specimens as opposed to left out images, we are adding data and reducing features to limit overfitting. Following spatial noise cleaning, important vascular regions were unambiguous in display. We developed displays that enable physicians to make rapid determination of calcified and lipid regions. This will inform treatment decisions such as the need for devices (e.g., atherectomy or scoring balloon in the case of calcifications) or extended stent lengths to ensure coverage of lipid regions prone to injury at the edge of a stent.

  17. Patch-based anisotropic diffusion scheme for fluorescence diffuse optical tomography--part 2: image reconstruction.

    Correia, Teresa; Koch, Maximilian; Ale, Angelique; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Arridge, Simon

    2016-02-21

    Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (fDOT) provides 3D images of fluorescence distributions in biological tissue, which represent molecular and cellular processes. The image reconstruction problem is highly ill-posed and requires regularisation techniques to stabilise and find meaningful solutions. Quadratic regularisation tends to either oversmooth or generate very noisy reconstructions, depending on the regularisation strength. Edge preserving methods, such as anisotropic diffusion regularisation (AD), can preserve important features in the fluorescence image and smooth out noise. However, AD has limited ability to distinguish an edge from noise. We propose a patch-based anisotropic diffusion regularisation (PAD), where regularisation strength is determined by a weighted average according to the similarity between patches around voxels within a search window, instead of a simple local neighbourhood strategy. However, this method has higher computational complexity and, hence, we wavelet compress the patches (PAD-WT) to speed it up, while simultaneously taking advantage of the denoising properties of wavelet thresholding. Furthermore, structural information can be incorporated into the image reconstruction with PAD-WT to improve image quality and resolution. In this case, the weights used to average voxels in the image are calculated using the structural image, instead of the fluorescence image. The regularisation strength depends on both structural and fluorescence images, which guarantees that the method can preserve fluorescence information even when it is not structurally visible in the anatomical images. In part 1, we tested the method using a denoising problem. Here, we use simulated and in vivo mouse fDOT data to assess the algorithm performance. Our results show that the proposed PAD-WT method provides high quality and noise free images, superior to those obtained using AD.

  18. Scaled nonuniform Fourier transform for image reconstruction in swept source optical coherence tomography

    Mezgebo, Biniyam; Nagib, Karim; Fernando, Namal; Kordi, Behzad; Sherif, Sherif

    2018-02-01

    Swept Source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) is an important imaging modality for both medical and industrial diagnostic applications. A cross-sectional SS-OCT image is obtained by applying an inverse discrete Fourier transform (DFT) to axial interferograms measured in the frequency domain (k-space). This inverse DFT is typically implemented as a fast Fourier transform (FFT) that requires the data samples to be equidistant in k-space. As the frequency of light produced by a typical wavelength-swept laser is nonlinear in time, the recorded interferogram samples will not be uniformly spaced in k-space. Many image reconstruction methods have been proposed to overcome this problem. Most such methods rely on oversampling the measured interferogram then use either hardware, e.g., Mach-Zhender interferometer as a frequency clock module, or software, e.g., interpolation in k-space, to obtain equally spaced samples that are suitable for the FFT. To overcome the problem of nonuniform sampling in k-space without any need for interferogram oversampling, an earlier method demonstrated the use of the nonuniform discrete Fourier transform (NDFT) for image reconstruction in SS-OCT. In this paper, we present a more accurate method for SS-OCT image reconstruction from nonuniform samples in k-space using a scaled nonuniform Fourier transform. The result is demonstrated using SS-OCT images of Axolotl salamander eggs.

  19. Measurements of the parapapillary atrophy zones in en face optical coherence tomography images.

    Atsuya Miki

    Full Text Available To measure the parapapillary atrophy (PPA area in en face images obtained with swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT, and to evaluate its relationship to glaucoma, myopia, and age in non-highly myopic subjects.Retrospective, cross-sectional study.Fifty eyes of 30 subjects with open-angle glaucoma (G group and forty-three eyes of 26 healthy control subjects (C group. Eyes with high myopia (spherical equivalent refractive error ≤ -8 diopters or axial length ≥ 26.5 mm were excluded.Mean age ± standard deviation was 59.9 ± 12.4 years. The beta zone and the gamma zone PPA areas were measured in en face images reconstructed from three-dimensional SS-OCT images. Relationship between the PPA areas and patient characteristics such as glaucoma, axial length, and age was statistically evaluated using multivariate mixed-effects models.Areas of the beta zone and the gamma zone PPA measured on en face OCT images.Average ± standard deviation area of the beta and the gamma zone was 0.64 ± 0.79 and 0.16 ± 0.30 mm2, respectively. In multivariate models, the gamma zone significantly correlated with axial length (P = 0.001 but not with glaucoma (P = 0.944. In contrast, the beta zone significantly correlated with age (P = 0.0249 and glaucoma (P = 0.014.En face images reconstructed from 3D SS-OCT data facilitated measurements of the beta and the gamma PPA zones even in eyes with optic disc distortion. The OCT-defined beta zone is associated with glaucoma and age, whereas the gamma zone correlated with myopia but not with glaucoma. This study confirmed the clinical usefulness of OCT-based classification of the PPA zones in distinguishing glaucomatous damage of the optic nerve from myopic damage in non-highly myopic eyes.

  20. Optical Coherence Tomography

    Pier Alberto Testoni

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography (OCT is an optical imaging modality that performs high-resolution, cross-sectional, subsurface tomographic imaging of the microstructure of tissues. The physical principle of OCT is similar to that of B-mode ultrasound imaging, except that it uses infrared light waves rather than acoustic waves. The in vivo resolution is 10–25 times better (about 10 µm than with high-frequency ultrasound imaging, but the depth of penetration is limited to 1–3 mm, depending on tissue structure, depth of focus of the probe used, and pressure applied to the tissue surface. In the last decade, OCT technology has evolved from an experimental laboratory tool to a new diagnostic imaging modality with a wide spectrum of clinical applications in medical practice, including the gastrointestinal tract and pancreatico-biliary ductal system. OCT imaging from the gastrointestinal tract can be done in humans by using narrow-diameter, catheter-based probes that can be inserted through the accessory channel of either a conventional front-view endoscope, for investigating the epithelial structure of the gastrointestinal tract, or a side-view endoscope, inside a standard transparent ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography catheter, for investigating the pancreatico-biliary ductal system. The esophagus and esophagogastric junction have been the most widely investigated organs so far; more recently, duodenum, colon, and the pancreatico-biliary ductal system have also been extensively investigated. OCT imaging of the gastrointestinal wall structure is characterized by a multiple-layer architecture that permits an accurate evaluation of the mucosa, lamina propria, muscularis mucosae, and part of the submucosa. The technique may therefore be used to identify preneoplastic conditions of the gastrointestinal tract, such as Barrett's epithelium and dysplasia, and evaluate the depth of penetration of early-stage neoplastic lesions. OCT imaging

  1. Accelerated Optical Projection Tomography Applied to In Vivo Imaging of Zebrafish.

    Teresa Correia

    Full Text Available Optical projection tomography (OPT provides a non-invasive 3-D imaging modality that can be applied to longitudinal studies of live disease models, including in zebrafish. Current limitations include the requirement of a minimum number of angular projections for reconstruction of reasonable OPT images using filtered back projection (FBP, which is typically several hundred, leading to acquisition times of several minutes. It is highly desirable to decrease the number of required angular projections to decrease both the total acquisition time and the light dose to the sample. This is particularly important to enable longitudinal studies, which involve measurements of the same fish at different time points. In this work, we demonstrate that the use of an iterative algorithm to reconstruct sparsely sampled OPT data sets can provide useful 3-D images with 50 or fewer projections, thereby significantly decreasing the minimum acquisition time and light dose while maintaining image quality. A transgenic zebrafish embryo with fluorescent labelling of the vasculature was imaged to acquire densely sampled (800 projections and under-sampled data sets of transmitted and fluorescence projection images. The under-sampled OPT data sets were reconstructed using an iterative total variation-based image reconstruction algorithm and compared against FBP reconstructions of the densely sampled data sets. To illustrate the potential for quantitative analysis following rapid OPT data acquisition, a Hessian-based method was applied to automatically segment the reconstructed images to select the vasculature network. Results showed that 3-D images of the zebrafish embryo and its vasculature of sufficient visual quality for quantitative analysis can be reconstructed using the iterative algorithm from only 32 projections-achieving up to 28 times improvement in imaging speed and leading to total acquisition times of a few seconds.

  2. Low molecular weight dextran provides similar optical coherence tomography coronary imaging compared to radiographic contrast media.

    Frick, Kyle; Michael, Tesfaldet T; Alomar, Mohammed; Mohammed, Atif; Rangan, Bavana V; Abdullah, Shuaib; Grodin, Jerrold; Hastings, Jeffrey L; Banerjee, Subhash; Brilakis, Emmanouil S

    2014-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) coronary imaging requires displacement of red blood cells from the vessel lumen. This is usually accomplished using radiographic contrast. Low molecular weight dextran has low cost and is safe in low volumes. In the present study, we compared dextran with contrast for coronary OCT imaging. Fifty-one vessels in 26 patients were sequentially imaged using manual injection of radiographic contrast (iodixanol) and dextran. OCT images were analyzed at 1 mm intervals to determine the image clarity (defined as a visible lumen border > 270°) and to measure the lumen area and lumen diameter. To correct for the refractive index of dextran, the dextran area measurements were multiplied by 1.117 and the dextran length measurements were multiplied by 1.057. A total of 3,418 cross-sections (1,709 with contrast and 1,709 with dextran) were analyzed. There were no complications related to OCT imaging or to contrast or dextran administration. Clear image segments were observed in 97.0% vs. 96.7% of the cross-sections obtained with contrast and dextran, respectively (P = 0.45). The mean lumen areas were also similar: 6.69 ± 1.95 mm(2) with iodixanol vs. 7.06 ± 2.06 mm(2) with dextran (correlation coefficient 0.984). The image quality and measurements during OCT image acquisition are similar for dextran and contrast. Dextran could be used instead of contrast for OCT imaging, especially in patients in whom contrast load minimization is desired. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Macro optical projection tomography for large scale 3D imaging of plant structures and gene activity.

    Lee, Karen J I; Calder, Grant M; Hindle, Christopher R; Newman, Jacob L; Robinson, Simon N; Avondo, Jerome J H Y; Coen, Enrico S

    2017-01-01

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a well-established method for visualising gene activity in plants and animals. However, a limitation of conventional OPT is that the specimen upper size limit precludes its application to larger structures. To address this problem we constructed a macro version called Macro OPT (M-OPT). We apply M-OPT to 3D live imaging of gene activity in growing whole plants and to visualise structural morphology in large optically cleared plant and insect specimens up to 60 mm tall and 45 mm deep. We also show how M-OPT can be used to image gene expression domains in 3D within fixed tissue and to visualise gene activity in 3D in clones of growing young whole Arabidopsis plants. A further application of M-OPT is to visualise plant-insect interactions. Thus M-OPT provides an effective 3D imaging platform that allows the study of gene activity, internal plant structures and plant-insect interactions at a macroscopic scale. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  4. In Vivo Diffuse Optical Tomography and Fluorescence Molecular Tomography

    Mingze Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse optical tomography (DOT and fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT are two attractive imaging techniques for in vivo physiological and psychological research. They have distinct advantages such as non-invasiveness, non-ionizing radiation, high sensitivity and longitudinal monitoring. This paper reviews the key components of DOT and FMT. Light propagation model, mathematical reconstruction algorithm, imaging instrumentation and medical applications are included. Future challenges and perspective on optical tomography are discussed.

  5. Imaging of the iridocorneal angle with the RTVue spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    Perera, Shamira A; Ho, Ching Lin; Aung, Tin; Baskaran, Mani; Ho, Henrietta; Tun, Tin A; Lee, Tian Loon; Kumar, Rajesh S

    2012-04-02

    To determine the ability of the RTVue spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) to image the anterior chamber angle (ACA). Consecutive subjects, recruited from glaucoma clinics, prospectively underwent ophthalmic evaluation including gonioscopy by an ophthalmologist and anterior chamber imaging with SDOCT, adapted with a corneal lens adapter (cornea anterior module-low magnification [CAM-L]) and anterior segment OCT (ASOCT), both performed by a technician. Two different ophthalmologists, masked to gonioscopy findings, assessed visualization of the scleral spur (SS), Schwalbe's line (SL), and trabecular meshwork (TM) by the two modalities. The ability to detect a closed angle was compared with gonioscopy. The average age (SD) of the 81 subjects enrolled was 64.1 (11.4) years; the majority were Chinese (91.4%) and female (61.7%). SDOCT images revealed the SS in 26.9% (56/324) of quadrants and the SL in 44.1% (143/324) of quadrants; in ASOCT images, the SS could be visualized in 69.1% (224/324) of quadrants (P gonioscopy. When analyzing the horizontal quadrants only, both modalities agreed well with gonioscopy, 0.75 and 0.74, respectively (AC1 statistics). The RTVue SDOCT allowed visualization of SL, TM, and SS. However, these landmarks were not detected in a large percentage of images.

  6. Multimodal breast cancer imaging using coregistered dynamic diffuse optical tomography and digital breast tomosynthesis

    Zimmermann, Bernhard B.; Deng, Bin; Singh, Bhawana; Martino, Mark; Selb, Juliette; Fang, Qianqian; Sajjadi, Amir Y.; Cormier, Jayne; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.; Boas, David A.; Saksena, Mansi A.; Carp, Stefan A.

    2017-04-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is emerging as a noninvasive functional imaging method for breast cancer diagnosis and neoadjuvant chemotherapy monitoring. In particular, the multimodal approach of combining DOT with x-ray digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is especially synergistic as DBT prior information can be used to enhance the DOT reconstruction. DOT, in turn, provides a functional information overlay onto the mammographic images, increasing sensitivity and specificity to cancer pathology. We describe a dynamic DOT apparatus designed for tight integration with commercial DBT scanners and providing a fast (up to 1 Hz) image acquisition rate to enable tracking hemodynamic changes induced by the mammographic breast compression. The system integrates 96 continuous-wave and 24 frequency-domain source locations as well as 32 continuous wave and 20 frequency-domain detection locations into low-profile plastic plates that can easily mate to the DBT compression paddle and x-ray detector cover, respectively. We demonstrate system performance using static and dynamic tissue-like phantoms as well as in vivo images acquired from the pool of patients recalled for breast biopsies at the Massachusetts General Hospital Breast Imaging Division.

  7. Enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence findings in bilateral choroidal osteoma: a case report

    Erol, Muhammet Kazim; Coban, Deniz Turgut; Ceran, Basak Bostanci; Bulut, Mehmet, E-mail: muhammetkazimerol@gmail.com [Kazim Erol. Antalya Training and Research Hospital, Ophthalmology Department, Antalya (Turkey)

    2013-11-01

    The authors present enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI OCT) and fundus autofluorescence (FAF) characteristics of a patient with bilateral choroidal osteoma and try to make a correlation between two imaging techniques. Two eyes of a patient with choroidal osteoma underwent complete ophthalmic examination. Enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography revealed a cage-like pattern, which corresponded to the calcified region of the tumor. Fundus autofluorescence imaging of the same area showed slight hyperautofluorescence. Three different reflectivity patterns in the decalcified area were defined. In the areas of subretinal fluid, outer segment elongations similar to central serous chorioretinopathy were observed. Hyperautofluorescent spots were evident in fundus autofluorescence in the same area. Calcified and decalcified portions of choroidal osteoma as well as the atrophy of choriocapillaris demonstrated different patterns with enhanced depth imaging and fundus autofluorescence imaging. Both techniques were found to be beneficial in the diagnosis and follow-up of choroidal osteoma. (author)

  8. Enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence findings in bilateral choroidal osteoma: a case report

    Erol, Muhammet Kazim; Coban, Deniz Turgut; Ceran, Basak Bostanci; Bulut, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    The authors present enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI OCT) and fundus autofluorescence (FAF) characteristics of a patient with bilateral choroidal osteoma and try to make a correlation between two imaging techniques. Two eyes of a patient with choroidal osteoma underwent complete ophthalmic examination. Enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography revealed a cage-like pattern, which corresponded to the calcified region of the tumor. Fundus autofluorescence imaging of the same area showed slight hyperautofluorescence. Three different reflectivity patterns in the decalcified area were defined. In the areas of subretinal fluid, outer segment elongations similar to central serous chorioretinopathy were observed. Hyperautofluorescent spots were evident in fundus autofluorescence in the same area. Calcified and decalcified portions of choroidal osteoma as well as the atrophy of choriocapillaris demonstrated different patterns with enhanced depth imaging and fundus autofluorescence imaging. Both techniques were found to be beneficial in the diagnosis and follow-up of choroidal osteoma. (author)

  9. Enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence findings in bilateral choroidal osteoma: a case report

    Muhammet Kazim Erol

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors present enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI OCT and fundus autofluorescence (FAF characteristics of a patient with bilateral choroidal osteoma and try to make a correlation between two imaging techniques. Two eyes of a patient with choroidal osteoma underwent complete ophthalmic examination. Enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography revealed a cage-like pattern, which corresponded to the calcified region of the tumor. Fundus autofluorescence imaging of the same area showed slight hyperautofluorescence. Three different reflectivity patterns in the decalcified area were defined. In the areas of subretinal fluid, outer segment elongations similar to central serous chorioretinopathy were observed. Hyperautofluorescent spots were evident in fundus autofluorescence in the same area. Calcified and decalcified portions of choroidal osteoma as well as the atrophy of choriocapillaris demonstrated different patterns with enhanced depth imaging and fundus autofluorescence imaging. Both techniques were found to be beneficial in the diagnosis and follow-up of choroidal osteoma.

  10. Multimodal ophthalmic imaging using spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography

    El-Haddad, Mohamed T.; Malone, Joseph D.; Li, Jianwei D.; Bozic, Ivan; Arquitola, Amber M.; Joos, Karen M.; Patel, Shriji N.; Tao, Yuankai K.

    2017-08-01

    Ophthalmic surgery involves manipulation of delicate, layered tissue structures on milli- to micrometer scales. Traditional surgical microscopes provide an inherently two-dimensional view of the surgical field with limited depth perception which precludes accurate depth-resolved visualization of these tissue layers, and limits the development of novel surgical techniques. We demonstrate multimodal swept-source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography (SS-SESLO-OCT) to address current limitations of image-guided ophthalmic microsurgery. SS-SESLO-OCT provides inherently co-registered en face and cross-sectional field-of-views (FOVs) at a line rate of 400 kHz and >2 GPix/s throughput. We show in vivo imaging of the anterior segment and retinal fundus of a healthy volunteer, and preliminary results of multi-volumetric mosaicking for ultrawide-field retinal imaging with 90° FOV. Additionally, a scan-head was rapid-prototyped with a modular architecture which enabled integration of SS-SESLO-OCT with traditional surgical microscope and slit-lamp imaging optics. Ex vivo surgical maneuvers were simulated in cadaveric porcine eyes. The system throughput enabled volumetric acquisition at 10 volumes-per-second (vps) and allowed visualization of surgical dynamics in corneal sweeps, compressions, and dissections, and retinal sweeps, compressions, and elevations. SESLO en face images enabled simple real-time co-registration with the surgical microscope FOV, and OCT cross-sections provided depth-resolved visualization of instrument-tissue interactions. Finally, we demonstrate novel augmented-reality integration with the surgical view using segmentation overlays to aid surgical guidance. SS-SESLO-OCT may benefit clinical diagnostics by enabling aiming, registration, and mosaicking; and intraoperative imaging by allowing for real-time surgical feedback, instrument tracking, and overlays of computationally extracted biomarkers of disease.

  11. Offline fusion of co-registered intravascular ultrasound and frequency domain optical coherence tomography images for the analysis of human atherosclerotic plaques

    Räber, Lorenz; Heo, Jung Ho; Radu, Maria D

    2012-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility and potential usefulness of an offline fusion of matched optical coherence tomography (OCT) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)/virtual histology (IVUS-VH) images.......To demonstrate the feasibility and potential usefulness of an offline fusion of matched optical coherence tomography (OCT) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)/virtual histology (IVUS-VH) images....

  12. Microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography for image-aided positioning of glaucoma surgery

    Li, Xiqi; Wei, Ling; Dong, Xuechuan; Huang, Ping; Zhang, Chun; He, Yi; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2015-07-01

    Most glaucoma surgeries involve creating new aqueous outflow pathways with the use of a small surgical instrument. This article reported a microscope-integrated, real-time, high-speed, swept-source optical coherence tomography system (SS-OCT) with a 1310-nm light source for glaucoma surgery. A special mechanism was designed to produce an adjustable system suitable for use in surgery. A two-graphic processing unit architecture was used to speed up the data processing and real-time volumetric rendering. The position of the surgical instrument can be monitored and measured using the microscope and a grid-inserted image of the SS-OCT. Finally, experiments were simulated to assess the effectiveness of this integrated system. Experimental results show that this system is a suitable positioning tool for glaucoma surgery.

  13. Intraoperative Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging and Assessment of the Macula During Cataract Surgery: A Novel Technique.

    Tripathy, Koushik; Chawla, Rohan; Kumawat, Babulal; Sharma, Yog Raj

    2016-09-01

    The authors describe a technique to qualitatively analyze the posterior segment during cataract surgery using intraoperative optical coherence tomography (iOCT). Macular iOCT can be done before and after intraocular lens implantation after the media is rendered clear following phacoemulsification. A handheld irrigating planoconcave contact lens is placed over the cornea with the operating microscope in retroillumination mode. After focusing the microscope and upon getting a clear view of the posterior segment, iOCT is switched on, centered at the macula, and focused. This technique enables the surgeon to intraoperatively analyze and document the macular morphology and vitreoretinal interface. Potential uses of this technique include intraoperative decision-making regarding concurrent use of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents or steroids in cases with dense cataracts where preoperative OCT is difficult. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:846-847.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography for image-aided positioning of glaucoma surgery.

    Li, Xiqi; Wei, Ling; Dong, Xuechuan; Huang, Ping; Zhang, Chun; He, Yi; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2015-07-01

    Most glaucoma surgeries involve creating new aqueous outflow pathways with the use of a small surgical instrument. This article reported a microscope-integrated, real-time, high-speed, swept-source optical coherence tomography system (SS-OCT) with a 1310-nm light source for glaucoma surgery. A special mechanism was designed to produce an adjustable system suitable for use in surgery. A two-graphic processing unit architecture was used to speed up the data processing and real-time volumetric rendering. The position of the surgical instrument can be monitored and measured using the microscope and a grid-inserted image of the SS-OCT. Finally, experiments were simulated to assess the effectiveness of this integrated system. Experimental results show that this system is a suitable positioning tool for glaucoma surgery.

  15. MONSTIR II: A 32-channel, multispectral, time-resolved optical tomography system for neonatal brain imaging

    Cooper, Robert J., E-mail: robert.cooper@ucl.ac.uk; Magee, Elliott; Everdell, Nick; Magazov, Salavat; Varela, Marta; Airantzis, Dimitrios; Gibson, Adam P.; Hebden, Jeremy C. [Biomedical Optics Research Laboratory, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    We detail the design, construction and performance of the second generation UCL time-resolved optical tomography system, known as MONSTIR II. Intended primarily for the study of the newborn brain, the system employs 32 source fibres that sequentially transmit picosecond pulses of light at any four wavelengths between 650 and 900 nm. The 32 detector channels each contain an independent photo-multiplier tube and temporally correlated photon-counting electronics that allow the photon transit time between each source and each detector position to be measured with high temporal resolution. The system's response time, temporal stability, cross-talk, and spectral characteristics are reported. The efficacy of MONSTIR II is demonstrated by performing multi-spectral imaging of a simple phantom.

  16. Improving the quantitative accuracy of optical-emission computed tomography by incorporating an attenuation correction: application to HIF1 imaging

    Kim, E.; Bowsher, J.; Thomas, A. S.; Sakhalkar, H.; Dewhirst, M.; Oldham, M.

    2008-10-01

    Optical computed tomography (optical-CT) and optical-emission computed tomography (optical-ECT) are new techniques for imaging the 3D structure and function (including gene expression) of whole unsectioned tissue samples. This work presents a method of improving the quantitative accuracy of optical-ECT by correcting for the 'self'-attenuation of photons emitted within the sample. The correction is analogous to a method commonly applied in single-photon-emission computed tomography reconstruction. The performance of the correction method was investigated by application to a transparent cylindrical gelatin phantom, containing a known distribution of attenuation (a central ink-doped gelatine core) and a known distribution of fluorescing fibres. Attenuation corrected and uncorrected optical-ECT images were reconstructed on the phantom to enable an evaluation of the effectiveness of the correction. Significant attenuation artefacts were observed in the uncorrected images where the central fibre appeared ~24% less intense due to greater attenuation from the surrounding ink-doped gelatin. This artefact was almost completely removed in the attenuation-corrected image, where the central fibre was within ~4% of the others. The successful phantom test enabled application of attenuation correction to optical-ECT images of an unsectioned human breast xenograft tumour grown subcutaneously on the hind leg of a nude mouse. This tumour cell line had been genetically labelled (pre-implantation) with fluorescent reporter genes such that all viable tumour cells expressed constitutive red fluorescent protein and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 transcription-produced green fluorescent protein. In addition to the fluorescent reporter labelling of gene expression, the tumour microvasculature was labelled by a light-absorbing vasculature contrast agent delivered in vivo by tail-vein injection. Optical-CT transmission images yielded high-resolution 3D images of the absorbing contrast agent, and

  17. Improving the quantitative accuracy of optical-emission computed tomography by incorporating an attenuation correction: application to HIF1 imaging

    Kim, E; Bowsher, J; Thomas, A S; Sakhalkar, H; Dewhirst, M; Oldham, M

    2008-01-01

    Optical computed tomography (optical-CT) and optical-emission computed tomography (optical-ECT) are new techniques for imaging the 3D structure and function (including gene expression) of whole unsectioned tissue samples. This work presents a method of improving the quantitative accuracy of optical-ECT by correcting for the 'self'-attenuation of photons emitted within the sample. The correction is analogous to a method commonly applied in single-photon-emission computed tomography reconstruction. The performance of the correction method was investigated by application to a transparent cylindrical gelatin phantom, containing a known distribution of attenuation (a central ink-doped gelatine core) and a known distribution of fluorescing fibres. Attenuation corrected and uncorrected optical-ECT images were reconstructed on the phantom to enable an evaluation of the effectiveness of the correction. Significant attenuation artefacts were observed in the uncorrected images where the central fibre appeared ∼24% less intense due to greater attenuation from the surrounding ink-doped gelatin. This artefact was almost completely removed in the attenuation-corrected image, where the central fibre was within ∼4% of the others. The successful phantom test enabled application of attenuation correction to optical-ECT images of an unsectioned human breast xenograft tumour grown subcutaneously on the hind leg of a nude mouse. This tumour cell line had been genetically labelled (pre-implantation) with fluorescent reporter genes such that all viable tumour cells expressed constitutive red fluorescent protein and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 transcription-produced green fluorescent protein. In addition to the fluorescent reporter labelling of gene expression, the tumour microvasculature was labelled by a light-absorbing vasculature contrast agent delivered in vivo by tail-vein injection. Optical-CT transmission images yielded high-resolution 3D images of the absorbing contrast agent

  18. Histogram Matching Extends Acceptable Signal Strength Range on Optical Coherence Tomography Images

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Wollstein, Gadi; Bilonick, Richard A.; Sigal, Ian A.; Kagemann, Larry; Schuman, Joel S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We minimized the influence of image quality variability, as measured by signal strength (SS), on optical coherence tomography (OCT) thickness measurements using the histogram matching (HM) method. Methods. We scanned 12 eyes from 12 healthy subjects with the Cirrus HD-OCT device to obtain a series of OCT images with a wide range of SS (maximal range, 1–10) at the same visit. For each eye, the histogram of an image with the highest SS (best image quality) was set as the reference. We applied HM to the images with lower SS by shaping the input histogram into the reference histogram. Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness was automatically measured before and after HM processing (defined as original and HM measurements), and compared to the device output (device measurements). Nonlinear mixed effects models were used to analyze the relationship between RNFL thickness and SS. In addition, the lowest tolerable SSs, which gave the RNFL thickness within the variability margin of manufacturer recommended SS range (6–10), were determined for device, original, and HM measurements. Results. The HM measurements showed less variability across a wide range of image quality than the original and device measurements (slope = 1.17 vs. 4.89 and 1.72 μm/SS, respectively). The lowest tolerable SS was successfully reduced to 4.5 after HM processing. Conclusions. The HM method successfully extended the acceptable SS range on OCT images. This would qualify more OCT images with low SS for clinical assessment, broadening the OCT application to a wider range of subjects. PMID:26066749

  19. Automated measurement of epidermal thickness from optical coherence tomography images using line region growing

    Delacruz, Jomer; Weissman, Jesse; Gossage, Kirk

    2010-02-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging modality that acquires cross sectional images of tissue in-vivo. It accelerates skin diagnosis by eliminating invasive biopsy and laborious histology in the process. Dermatologists have widely used it for looking at morphology of skin diseases such as psoriasis, dermatitis, basal cell carcinoma etc. Skin scientists have also successfully used it for looking at differences in epidermal thickness and its underlying structure with respect to age, body sites, ethnicity, gender, and other related factors. Similar to other in-vivo imaging systems, OCT images suffer from a high degree of speckle and noise content, which hinders examination of tissue structures. Most of the previous work in OCT segmentation of skin was done manually. This compromised the quality of the results by limiting the analyses to a few frames per area. In this paper, we discuss a region growing method for automatic identification of the upper and lower boundaries of the epidermis in living human skin tissue. This image analysis method utilizes images obtained from a frequency-domain OCT. This system is high-resolution and high-speed, and thus capable of capturing volumetric images of the skin in short time. The three-dimensional (3D) data provides additional information that is used in the segmentation process to help compensate for the inherent noise in the images. This method not only provides a better estimation of the epidermal thickness, but also generates a 3D surface map of the epidermal-dermal junction, from which underlying topography can be visualized and further quantified.

  20. Automated intraretinal layer segmentation of optical coherence tomography images using graph-theoretical methods

    Roy, Priyanka; Gholami, Peyman; Kuppuswamy Parthasarathy, Mohana; Zelek, John; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2018-02-01

    Segmentation of spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) images facilitates visualization and quantification of sub-retinal layers for diagnosis of retinal pathologies. However, manual segmentation is subjective, expertise dependent, and time-consuming, which limits applicability of SD-OCT. Efforts are therefore being made to implement active-contours, artificial intelligence, and graph-search to automatically segment retinal layers with accuracy comparable to that of manual segmentation, to ease clinical decision-making. Although, low optical contrast, heavy speckle noise, and pathologies pose challenges to automated segmentation. Graph-based image segmentation approach stands out from the rest because of its ability to minimize the cost function while maximising the flow. This study has developed and implemented a shortest-path based graph-search algorithm for automated intraretinal layer segmentation of SD-OCT images. The algorithm estimates the minimal-weight path between two graph-nodes based on their gradients. Boundary position indices (BPI) are computed from the transition between pixel intensities. The mean difference between BPIs of two consecutive layers quantify individual layer thicknesses, which shows statistically insignificant differences when compared to a previous study [for overall retina: p = 0.17, for individual layers: p > 0.05 (except one layer: p = 0.04)]. These results substantiate the accurate delineation of seven intraretinal boundaries in SD-OCT images by this algorithm, with a mean computation time of 0.93 seconds (64-bit Windows10, core i5, 8GB RAM). Besides being self-reliant for denoising, the algorithm is further computationally optimized to restrict segmentation within the user defined region-of-interest. The efficiency and reliability of this algorithm, even in noisy image conditions, makes it clinically applicable.

  1. User-guided segmentation for volumetric retinal optical coherence tomography images

    Yin, Xin; Chao, Jennifer R.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Despite the existence of automatic segmentation techniques, trained graders still rely on manual segmentation to provide retinal layers and features from clinical optical coherence tomography (OCT) images for accurate measurements. To bridge the gap between this time-consuming need of manual segmentation and currently available automatic segmentation techniques, this paper proposes a user-guided segmentation method to perform the segmentation of retinal layers and features in OCT images. With this method, by interactively navigating three-dimensional (3-D) OCT images, the user first manually defines user-defined (or sketched) lines at regions where the retinal layers appear very irregular for which the automatic segmentation method often fails to provide satisfactory results. The algorithm is then guided by these sketched lines to trace the entire 3-D retinal layer and anatomical features by the use of novel layer and edge detectors that are based on robust likelihood estimation. The layer and edge boundaries are finally obtained to achieve segmentation. Segmentation of retinal layers in mouse and human OCT images demonstrates the reliability and efficiency of the proposed user-guided segmentation method. PMID:25147962

  2. Fractal analysis of en face tomographic images obtained with full field optical coherence tomography

    Gao, Wanrong; Zhu, Yue [Department of Optical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Jiangsu (China)

    2017-03-15

    The quantitative modeling of the imaging signal of pathological areas and healthy areas is necessary to improve the specificity of diagnosis with tomographic en face images obtained with full field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT). In this work, we propose to use the depth-resolved change in the fractal parameter as a quantitative specific biomarker of the stages of disease. The idea is based on the fact that tissue is a random medium and only statistical parameters that characterize tissue structure are appropriate. We successfully relate the imaging signal in FFOCT to the tissue structure in terms of the scattering function and the coherent transfer function of the system. The formula is then used to analyze the ratio of the Fourier transforms of the cancerous tissue to the normal tissue. We found that when the tissue changes from the normal to cancerous the ratio of the spectrum of the index inhomogeneities takes the form of an inverse power law and the changes in the fractal parameter can be determined by estimating slopes of the spectra of the ratio plotted on a log-log scale. The fresh normal and cancer liver tissues were imaged to demonstrate the potential diagnostic value of the method at early stages when there are no significant changes in tissue microstructures. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Improved Imaging of Magnetically Labeled Cells Using Rotational Magnetomotive Optical Coherence Tomography

    Peter Cimalla

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a reliable and robust method for magnetomotive optical coherence tomography (MM-OCT imaging of single cells labeled with iron oxide particles. This method employs modulated longitudinal and transverse magnetic fields to evoke alignment and rotation of anisotropic magnetic structures in the sample volume. Experimental evidence suggests that magnetic particles assemble themselves in elongated chains when exposed to a permanent magnetic field. Magnetomotion in the intracellular space was detected and visualized by means of 3D OCT as well as laser speckle reflectometry as a 2D reference imaging method. Our experiments on mesenchymal stem cells embedded in agar scaffolds show that the magnetomotive signal in rotational MM-OCT is significantly increased by a factor of ~3 compared to previous pulsed MM-OCT, although the solenoid’s power consumption was 16 times lower. Finally, we use our novel method to image ARPE-19 cells, a human retinal pigment epithelium cell line. Our results permit magnetomotive imaging with higher sensitivity and the use of low power magnetic fields or larger working distances for future three-dimensional cell tracking in target tissues and organs.

  4. Fast detection of vascular plaque in optical coherence tomography images using a reduced feature set

    Prakash, Ammu; Ocana Macias, Mariano; Hewko, Mark; Sowa, Michael; Sherif, Sherif

    2018-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images are capable of detecting vascular plaque by using the full set of 26 Haralick textural features and a standard K-means clustering algorithm. However, the use of the full set of 26 textural features is computationally expensive and may not be feasible for real time implementation. In this work, we identified a reduced set of 3 textural feature which characterizes vascular plaque and used a generalized Fuzzy C-means clustering algorithm. Our work involves three steps: 1) the reduction of a full set 26 textural feature to a reduced set of 3 textural features by using genetic algorithm (GA) optimization method 2) the implementation of an unsupervised generalized clustering algorithm (Fuzzy C-means) on the reduced feature space, and 3) the validation of our results using histology and actual photographic images of vascular plaque. Our results show an excellent match with histology and actual photographic images of vascular tissue. Therefore, our results could provide an efficient pre-clinical tool for the detection of vascular plaque in real time OCT imaging.

  5. Intracoronary imaging using attenuation-compensated optical coherence tomography allows better visualisation of coronary artery diseases

    Foin, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.foin@gmail.com [International Centre for Circulatory Health, Imperial College London, W2 1LA London (United Kingdom); Mari, Jean Martial [University College London, London (United Kingdom); Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Sen, Sayan; Petraco, Ricardo [International Centre for Circulatory Health, Imperial College London, W2 1LA London (United Kingdom); Ghione, Matteo; Di Mario, Carlo [Biomedical Research Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Davies, Justin E. [International Centre for Circulatory Health, Imperial College London, W2 1LA London (United Kingdom); Girard, Michaël J.A. [Department of Bioengineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Singapore Eye Research Institute (Singapore)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: To allow an accurate diagnosis of coronary artery diseases by enhancing optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of atheromatous plaques using a novel automated attenuation compensation technique. Background: One of the major drawbacks of coronary OCT imaging is the rapid attenuation of the OCT signal, limiting penetration in tissue to only few millimetres. Visualisation of deeper anatomy is however critical for accurate assessment of plaque burden in-vivo. Methods: A compensation algorithm, previously developed to correct for light attenuation in soft tissues and to enhance contrast in ophthalmic OCT images, was applied to intracoronary plaque imaging using spectral-domain OCT. Results: Application of the compensation algorithm significantly increased tissue contrast in the vessel wall and atherosclerotic plaque boundaries. Contrast enhancement allows a better differentiation of plaque morphology, which is particularly important for the identification of lipid rich fibro atheromatous plaques and to guide decision on treatment strategy. Conclusion: The analysis of arterial vessel structure clinically captured with OCT is improved when used in conjunction with automated attenuation compensation. This approach may improve the OCT-based interpretation of coronary plaque morphology in clinical practice.

  6. Validating Intravascular Imaging with Serial Optical Coherence Tomography and Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Tardif, Pier-Luc; Bertrand, Marie-Jeanne; Abran, Maxime; Castonguay, Alexandre; Lefebvre, Joël; Stähli, Barbara E; Merlet, Nolwenn; Mihalache-Avram, Teodora; Geoffroy, Pascale; Mecteau, Mélanie; Busseuil, David; Ni, Feng; Abulrob, Abedelnasser; Rhéaume, Éric; L'Allier, Philippe; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Lesage, Frédéric

    2016-12-15

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases are characterized by the formation of a plaque in the arterial wall. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) provides high-resolution images allowing delineation of atherosclerotic plaques. When combined with near infrared fluorescence (NIRF), the plaque can also be studied at a molecular level with a large variety of biomarkers. In this work, we present a system enabling automated volumetric histology imaging of excised aortas that can spatially correlate results with combined IVUS/NIRF imaging of lipid-rich atheroma in cholesterol-fed rabbits. Pullbacks in the rabbit aortas were performed with a dual modality IVUS/NIRF catheter developed by our group. Ex vivo three-dimensional (3D) histology was performed combining optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal fluorescence microscopy, providing high-resolution anatomical and molecular information, respectively, to validate in vivo findings. The microscope was combined with a serial slicer allowing for the imaging of the whole vessel automatically. Colocalization of in vivo and ex vivo results is demonstrated. Slices can then be recovered to be tested in conventional histology.

  7. Diffuse Optical Tomography for Brain Imaging: Continuous Wave Instrumentation and Linear Analysis Methods

    Giacometti, Paolo; Diamond, Solomon G.

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a functional brain imaging technique that measures cerebral blood oxygenation and blood volume changes. This technique is particularly useful in human neuroimaging measurements because of the coupling between neural and hemodynamic activity in the brain. DOT is a multichannel imaging extension of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). NIRS uses laser sources and light detectors on the scalp to obtain noninvasive hemodynamic measurements from spectroscopic analysis of the remitted light. This review explains how NIRS data analysis is performed using a combination of the modified Beer-Lambert law (MBLL) and the diffusion approximation to the radiative transport equation (RTE). Laser diodes, photodiode detectors, and optical terminals that contact the scalp are the main components in most NIRS systems. Placing multiple sources and detectors over the surface of the scalp allows for tomographic reconstructions that extend the individual measurements of NIRS into DOT. Mathematically arranging the DOT measurements into a linear system of equations that can be inverted provides a way to obtain tomographic reconstructions of hemodynamics in the brain.

  8. An algorithm for improving the quality of structural images of turbid media in endoscopic optical coherence tomography

    Potlov, A. Yu.; Frolov, S. V.; Proskurin, S. G.

    2018-04-01

    High-quality OCT structural images reconstruction algorithm for endoscopic optical coherence tomography of biological tissue is described. The key features of the presented algorithm are: (1) raster scanning and averaging of adjacent Ascans and pixels; (2) speckle level minimization. The described algorithm can be used in the gastroenterology, urology, gynecology, otorhinolaryngology for mucous membranes and skin diagnostics in vivo and in situ.

  9. Automated 3-D method for the correction of axial artifacts in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography images

    B. Antony (Bhavna); M.D. Abràmoff (Michael); L. Tang (Li); W.D. Ramdas (Wishal); J.R. Vingerling (Hans); N.M. Jansonius (Nomdo); K. Lee (Kyungmoo); Y.H. Kwon (Young); M. Sonka (Milan); M.K. Garvin (Mona)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe 3-D spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images of the retina often do not reflect the true shape of the retina and are distorted differently along the x and y axes. In this paper, we propose a novel technique that uses thin-plate splines in two stages to estimate

  10. Automated 3-D method for the correction of axial artifacts in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography images

    Antony, Bhavna; Abramoff, Michael D.; Tang, Li; Ramdas, Wishal D.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Lee, Kyungmoo; Kwon, Young H.; Sonka, Milan; Garvin, Mona K.

    2011-01-01

    The 3-D spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images of the retina often do not reflect the true shape of the retina and are distorted differently along the x and y axes. In this paper, we propose a novel technique that uses thin-plate splines in two stages to estimate and correct

  11. Intravascular atherosclerotic imaging with combined fluorescence and optical coherence tomography probe based on a double-clad fiber combiner

    Liang, Shanshan; Saidi, Arya; Jing, Joe; Liu, Gangjun; Li, Jiawen; Zhang, Jun; Sun, Changsen; Narula, Jagat; Chen, Zhongping

    2012-07-01

    We developed a multimodality fluorescence and optical coherence tomography probe based on a double-clad fiber (DCF) combiner. The probe is composed of a DCF combiner, grin lens, and micromotor in the distal end. An integrated swept-source optical coherence tomography and fluorescence intensity imaging system was developed based on the combined probe for the early diagnoses of atherosclerosis. This system is capable of real-time data acquisition and processing as well as image display. For fluorescence imaging, the inflammation of atherosclerosis and necrotic core formed with the annexin V-conjugated Cy5.5 were imaged. Ex vivo imaging of New Zealand white rabbit arteries demonstrated the capability of the combined system.

  12. Four-dimensional optical coherence tomography imaging of total liquid ventilated rats

    Kirsten, Lars; Schnabel, Christian; Gaertner, Maria; Koch, Edmund

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be utilized for the spatially and temporally resolved visualization of alveolar tissue and its dynamics in rodent models, which allows the investigation of lung dynamics on the microscopic scale of single alveoli. The findings could provide experimental input data for numerical simulations of lung tissue mechanics and could support the development of protective ventilation strategies. Real four-dimensional OCT imaging permits the acquisition of several OCT stacks within one single ventilation cycle. Thus, the entire four-dimensional information is directly obtained. Compared to conventional virtual four-dimensional OCT imaging, where the image acquisition is extended over many ventilation cycles and is triggered on pressure levels, real four-dimensional OCT is less vulnerable against motion artifacts and non-reproducible movement of the lung tissue over subsequent ventilation cycles, which widely reduces image artifacts. However, OCT imaging of alveolar tissue is affected by refraction and total internal reflection at air-tissue interfaces. Thus, only the first alveolar layer beneath the pleura is visible. To circumvent this effect, total liquid ventilation can be carried out to match the refractive indices of lung tissue and the breathing medium, which improves the visibility of the alveolar structure, the image quality and the penetration depth and provides the real structure of the alveolar tissue. In this study, a combination of four-dimensional OCT imaging with total liquid ventilation allowed the visualization of the alveolar structure in rat lung tissue benefiting from the improved depth range beneath the pleura and from the high spatial and temporal resolution.

  13. Quantitative shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography for noncontact mechanical characterization of myocardium

    Wang, Shang; Lopez, Andrew L.; Morikawa, Yuka; Tao, Ge; Li, Jiasong; Larina, Irina V.; Martin, James F.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is an emerging low-coherence imaging technique that provides noninvasive assessment of tissue biomechanics with high spatial resolution. Among various OCE methods, the capability of quantitative measurement of tissue elasticity is of great importance for tissue characterization and pathology detection across different samples. Here we report a quantitative OCE technique, termed quantitative shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography (Q-SWI-OCT), which enables noncontact measurement of tissue Young's modulus based on the ultra-fast imaging of the shear wave propagation inside the sample. A focused air-puff device is used to interrogate the tissue with a low-pressure short-duration air stream that stimulates a localized displacement with the scale at micron level. The propagation of this tissue deformation in the form of shear wave is captured by a phase-sensitive OCT system running with the scan of the M-mode imaging over the path of the wave propagation. The temporal characteristics of the shear wave is quantified based on the cross-correlation of the tissue deformation profiles at all the measurement locations, and linear regression is utilized to fit the data plotted in the domain of time delay versus wave propagation distance. The wave group velocity is thus calculated, which results in the quantitative measurement of the Young's modulus. As the feasibility demonstration, experiments are performed on tissuemimicking phantoms with different agar concentrations and the quantified elasticity values with Q-SWI-OCT agree well with the uniaxial compression tests. For functional characterization of myocardium with this OCE technique, we perform our pilot experiments on ex vivo mouse cardiac muscle tissues with two studies, including 1) elasticity difference of cardiac muscle under relaxation and contract conditions and 2) mechanical heterogeneity of the heart introduced by the muscle fiber orientation. Our results suggest the

  14. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging and computer aided diagnosis of human cervical tissue specimens

    Bazant-Hegemark, F.; Stone, N.; Read, M. D.; McCarthy, K.; Wang, R. K.

    2007-07-01

    The keyword for management of cervical cancer is prevention. The present program within the UK, the 'National Health Service (NHS) cervical screening programme' (NHSCSP), is based on cytology. Although the program has reduced the incidence of cervical cancer, this program requires patient follow ups and relies on diagnostic biopsying. There is potential for reducing costs and workload within the NHS, and relieving anxiety of patients. In this study, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) was investigated for its capability to improve this situation. Our time domain bench top system used a superluminescent diode (Superlum), centre wave length ~1.3 μm, resolution (air) ~15 μm. Tissue samples were obtained according to the ethics approval by Gloucestershire LREC, Nr. 05/Q2005/123. 1387 images of 199 participants have been compared with histopathology results and categorized accordingly. Our OCT images do not reach the clarity and resolution of histopathology. Further, establishing and recognizing features of diagnostic significance seems difficult. Automated classification would allow one to take decision-making to move from the subjective appraisal of a physician to an objective assessment. Hence we investigated a classification algorithm for its ability in recognizing pre-cancerous stages from OCT images. The initial results show promise.

  15. Dynamic studies of small animals with a four-color diffuse optical tomography imager

    Schmitz, Christoph H.; Graber, Harry L.; Pei Yaling; Farber, Mark; Stewart, Mark; Levina, Rita D.; Levin, Mikhail B.; Xu Yong; Barbour, Randall L.

    2005-01-01

    We present newly developed instrumentation for full-tomographic four-wavelength, continuous wave, diffuse optical tomography (DOT) imaging on small animals. A small-animal imaging stage was constructed, from materials compatible with in-magnet studies, which offers stereotaxic fixation of the animal and precise, stable probe positioning. Instrument performance, based on calibration and phantom studies, demonstrates excellent long-term signal stability. DOT measurements of the functional rat brain response to electric paw stimulation are presented, and these demonstrate high data quality and excellent sensitivity to hemodynamic changes. A general linear model analysis on individual trials is used to localize and quantify the occurrence of functional behavior associated with the different hemoglobin state responses. Statistical evaluation of outcomes of individual trials is employed to identify significant regional response variations for different stimulation sites. Image results reveal a diffuse cortical response and a strong reaction of the thalamus, both indicative of activation of pain pathways by the stimulation. In addition, a weaker lateralized functional component is observed in the brain response, suggesting presence of motor activation. An important outcome of the experiment is that it shows that reactions to individual provocations can be monitored, without having to resort to signal averaging. Thus the described technology may be useful for studies of long-term trends in hemodynamic response, as would occur, for example, in behavioral studies involving freely moving animals

  16. Longitudinal study of arteriogenesis with swept source optical coherence tomography and hyperspectral imaging

    Poole, Kristin M.; Patil, Chetan A.; Nelson, Christopher E.; McCormack, Devin R.; Madonna, Megan C.; Duvall, Craig L.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2014-03-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is an atherosclerotic disease of the extremities that leads to high rates of myocardial infarction and stroke, increased mortality, and reduced quality of life. PAD is especially prevalent in diabetic patients, and is commonly modeled by hind limb ischemia in mice to study collateral vessel development and test novel therapies. Current techniques used to assess recovery cannot obtain quantitative, physiological data non-invasively. Here, we have applied hyperspectral imaging and swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) to study longitudinal changes in blood oxygenation and vascular morphology, respectively, intravitally in the diabetic mouse hind limb ischemia model. Additionally, recommended ranges for controlling physiological variability in blood oxygenation with respect to respiration rate and body core temperature were determined from a control animal experiment. In the longitudinal study with diabetic mice, hyperspectral imaging data revealed the dynamics of blood oxygenation recovery distally in the ischemic footpad. In diabetic mice, there is an early increase in oxygenation that is not sustained in the long term. Quantitative analysis of vascular morphology obtained from Hessian-filtered speckle variance OCT volumes revealed temporal dynamics in vascular density, total vessel length, and vessel diameter distribution in the adductor muscle of the ischemic limb. The combination of hyperspectral imaging and speckle variance OCT enabled acquisition of novel functional and morphological endpoints from individual animals, and provides a more robust platform for future preclinical evaluations of novel therapies for PAD.

  17. Classification of optical coherence tomography images for diagnosing different ocular diseases

    Gholami, Peyman; Sheikh Hassani, Mohsen; Kuppuswamy Parthasarathy, Mohana; Zelek, John S.; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2018-03-01

    Optical Coherence tomography (OCT) images provide several indicators, e.g., the shape and the thickness of different retinal layers, which can be used for various clinical and non-clinical purposes. We propose an automated classification method to identify different ocular diseases, based on the local binary pattern features. The database consists of normal and diseased human eye SD-OCT images. We use a multiphase approach for building our classifier, including preprocessing, Meta learning, and active learning. Pre-processing is applied to the data to handle missing features from images and replace them with the mean or median of the corresponding feature. All the features are run through a Correlation-based Feature Subset Selection algorithm to detect the most informative features and omit the less informative ones. A Meta learning approach is applied to the data, in which a SVM and random forest are combined to obtain a more robust classifier. Active learning is also applied to strengthen our classifier around the decision boundary. The primary experimental results indicate that our method is able to differentiate between the normal and non-normal retina with an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 98.6% and also to diagnose the three common retina-related diseases, i.e., Age-related Macular Degeneration, Diabetic Retinopathy, and Macular Hole, with an AUC of 100%, 95% and 83.8% respectively. These results indicate a better performance of the proposed method compared to most of the previous works in the literature.

  18. Classification of coronary artery tissues using optical coherence tomography imaging in Kawasaki disease

    Abdolmanafi, Atefeh; Prasad, Arpan Suravi; Duong, Luc; Dahdah, Nagib

    2016-03-01

    Intravascular imaging modalities, such as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) allow nowadays improving diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and even prevention of coronary artery disease in the adult. OCT has been recently used in children following Kawasaki disease (KD), the most prevalent acquired coronary artery disease during childhood with devastating complications. The assessment of coronary artery layers with OCT and early detection of coronary sequelae secondary to KD is a promising tool for preventing myocardial infarction in this population. More importantly, OCT is promising for tissue quantification of the inner vessel wall, including neo intima luminal myofibroblast proliferation, calcification, and fibrous scar deposits. The goal of this study is to classify the coronary artery layers of OCT imaging obtained from a series of KD patients. Our approach is focused on developing a robust Random Forest classifier built on the idea of randomly selecting a subset of features at each node and based on second- and higher-order statistical texture analysis which estimates the gray-level spatial distribution of images by specifying the local features of each pixel and extracting the statistics from their distribution. The average classification accuracy for intima and media are 76.36% and 73.72% respectively. Random forest classifier with texture analysis promises for classification of coronary artery tissue.

  19. High-resolution optical coherence tomography, autofluorescence, and infrared reflectance imaging in Sjögren reticular dystrophy.

    Schauwvlieghe, Pieter-Paul; Torre, Kara Della; Coppieters, Frauke; Van Hoey, Anneleen; De Baere, Elfride; De Zaeytijd, Julie; Leroy, Bart P; Brodie, Scott E

    2013-01-01

    To describe the phenotype of three cases of Sjögren reticular dystrophy in detail, including high-resolution optical coherence tomography, autofluorescence imaging, and near-infrared reflectance imaging. Two unrelated teenagers were independently referred for ophthalmologic evaluation. Both underwent a full ophthalmologic workup, including electrophysiologic and extensive imaging with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, autofluorescence imaging, and near-infrared reflectance imaging. In addition, mutation screening of ABCA4, PRPH2, and the mitochondrial tRNA gene was performed in Patient 1. Subsequently, the teenage sister of Patient 2 was examined. Strikingly similar phenotypes were present in these three patients. Fundoscopy showed bilateral foveal pigment alterations, and a lobular network of deep retinal, pigmented deposits throughout the posterior pole, tapering toward the midperiphery, with relative sparing of the immediate perifoveal macula and peripapillary area. This network is mildly to moderately hyperautofluorescent on autofluorescence and bright on near-infrared reflectance imaging. Optical coherence tomography showed abnormalities of the retinal pigment epithelium-Bruch membrane complex, photoreceptor outer segments, and photoreceptor inner/outer segment interface. The results of retinal function test were entirely normal. No molecular cause was detected in Patient 1. Imaging suggested that the lobular network of deep retinal deposits in Sjögren reticular dystrophy is the result of accumulation of both pigment and lipofuscin between photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium, as well as within the retinal pigment epithelium.

  20. Enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography of the sclera in dome-shaped macula.

    Imamura, Yutaka; Iida, Tomohiro; Maruko, Ichiro; Zweifel, Sandrine A; Spaide, Richard F

    2011-02-01

    To examine the posterior anatomic structure of eyes with dome-shaped macula using enhanced depth imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT). Retrospective observational case series. Patients with dome-shaped macula, a condition defined as convex elevation of the macula as compared with the surrounding staphylomatous region in a highly myopic eye, were identified through routine examinations using optical coherence tomography (OCT). EDI-OCT was used to examine their posterior anatomic changes. The scleral thickness was measured from the outer border of the choroid to the outer scleral border under the fovea and 3000 μm temporal to the fovea. The mean age of the 15 patients (23 eyes) was 59.3 (± 12.2) years, and the mean refractive error was -13.6 (± 5.0) diopters. The best-corrected visual acuity ranged from 20/15 to 20/800 (median: 20/30). Eight patients (53%) had dome-shaped macula bilaterally. The mean subfoveal scleral thickness in 23 eyes with dome-shaped macula was 570 (± 221) μm, and that in 25 eyes of 15 myopic patients with staphyloma but without dome-shaped macula was 281 (± 85) μm (P macula is the result of a relative localized thickness variation of the sclera under the macula in highly myopic patients, and it cannot be categorized into any of the known types of staphyloma. This finding suggests the ocular expansion in myopia may be more complex than previously thought. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. En Face Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Imaging Versus Fundus Photography in the Measurement of Choroidal Nevi.

    Lee, Michele D; Kaidonis, Georgia; Kim, Alice Y; Shields, Ryan A; Leng, Theodore

    2017-09-01

    Choroidal nevi are common benign intraocular tumors with a small risk of malignant transformation. This retrospective study investigates the use of en face spectral-domain optical coherence tomography angiography (SD-OCTA) in determining the clinical features and measurement of choroidal nevi. Patients with choroidal nevi were imaged with both OCTA and a fundus photography device. Greatest longitudinal dimension (GLD), perpendicular dimension (PD), and the GLD/PD ratio were assessed on each device. Inter-device variation and intra- and inter-rater reliability analyses were performed. Fourteen patients with choroidal nevi were included. No significant difference between the GLD/PD ratio as measured by all three devices was found (Chi-square = 2.8, 2 df, P = .247). Intraclass correlation coefficients were greater than 0.7 for repeated measures on all devices, suggesting good repeatability and reproducibility. This study demonstrated inter-device consistency and high intra- and inter-rater reliability when measuring choroidal nevi. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2017;48:741-747.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Agreement between Gonioscopic Examination and Swept Source Fourier Domain Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    Mohammed Rigi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate interobserver, intervisit, and interinstrument agreements for gonioscopy and Fourier domain anterior segment optical coherence tomography (FD ASOCT for classifying open and narrow angle eyes. Methods. Eighty-six eyes with open or narrow anterior chamber angles were included. The superior angle was classified open or narrow by 2 of 5 glaucoma specialists using gonioscopy and imaged by FD ASOCT in the dark. The superior angle of each FD ASOCT image was graded as open or narrow by 2 masked readers. The same procedures were repeated within 6 months. Kappas for interobserver and intervisit agreements for each instrument and interinstrument agreements were calculated. Results. The mean age was 50.9 (±18.4 years. Interobserver agreements were moderate to good for both gonioscopy (0.57 and 0.69 and FD ASOCT (0.58 and 0.75. Intervisit agreements were moderate to excellent for both gonioscopy (0.53 to 0.86 and FD ASOCT (0.57 and 0.85. Interinstrument agreements were fair to good (0.34 to 0.63, with FD ASOCT classifying more angles as narrow than gonioscopy. Conclusions. Both gonioscopy and FD ASOCT examiners were internally consistent with similar interobserver and intervisit agreements for angle classification. Agreement between instruments was fair to good, with FD ASOCT classifying more angles as narrow than gonioscopy.

  3. Agreement between Gonioscopic Examination and Swept Source Fourier Domain Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    Nguyen, Donna; Minnal, Vandana R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate interobserver, intervisit, and interinstrument agreements for gonioscopy and Fourier domain anterior segment optical coherence tomography (FD ASOCT) for classifying open and narrow angle eyes. Methods. Eighty-six eyes with open or narrow anterior chamber angles were included. The superior angle was classified open or narrow by 2 of 5 glaucoma specialists using gonioscopy and imaged by FD ASOCT in the dark. The superior angle of each FD ASOCT image was graded as open or narrow by 2 masked readers. The same procedures were repeated within 6 months. Kappas for interobserver and intervisit agreements for each instrument and interinstrument agreements were calculated. Results. The mean age was 50.9 (±18.4) years. Interobserver agreements were moderate to good for both gonioscopy (0.57 and 0.69) and FD ASOCT (0.58 and 0.75). Intervisit agreements were moderate to excellent for both gonioscopy (0.53 to 0.86) and FD ASOCT (0.57 and 0.85). Interinstrument agreements were fair to good (0.34 to 0.63), with FD ASOCT classifying more angles as narrow than gonioscopy. Conclusions. Both gonioscopy and FD ASOCT examiners were internally consistent with similar interobserver and intervisit agreements for angle classification. Agreement between instruments was fair to good, with FD ASOCT classifying more angles as narrow than gonioscopy. PMID:27990300

  4. Ultrahigh speed endoscopic optical coherence tomography using micromotor imaging catheter and VCSEL technology.

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Potsaid, Benjamin; Tao, Yuankai K; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Jiang, James; Heim, Peter J S; Kraus, Martin F; Zhou, Chao; Hornegger, Joachim; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Cable, Alex E; Fujimoto, James G

    2013-07-01

    We developed a micromotor based miniature catheter with an outer diameter of 3.2 mm for ultrahigh speed endoscopic swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) using a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) at a 1 MHz axial scan rate. The micromotor can rotate a micro-prism at several hundred frames per second with less than 5 V drive voltage to provide fast and stable scanning, which is not sensitive to the bending of the catheter. The side-viewing probe can be pulled back to acquire a three-dimensional (3D) data set covering a large area on the specimen. The VCSEL provides a high axial scan rate to support dense sampling under high frame rate operation. Using a high speed data acquisition system, in vivo 3D-OCT imaging in the rabbit GI tract and ex vivo imaging of a human colon specimen with 8 μm axial resolution, 8 μm lateral resolution and 1.2 mm depth range in tissue at a frame rate of 400 fps was demonstrated.

  5. Automated detection of esophageal dysplasia in in vivo optical coherence tomography images of the human esophagus

    Kassinopoulos, Michalis; Dong, Jing; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Pitris, Costas

    2018-02-01

    Catheter-based Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) devices allow real-time and comprehensive imaging of the human esophagus. Hence, they provide the potential to overcome some of the limitations of endoscopy and biopsy, allowing earlier diagnosis and better prognosis for esophageal adenocarcinoma patients. However, the large number of images produced during every scan makes manual evaluation of the data exceedingly difficult. In this study, we propose a fully automated tissue characterization algorithm, capable of discriminating normal tissue from Barrett's Esophagus (BE) and dysplasia through entire three-dimensional (3D) data sets, acquired in vivo. The method is based on both the estimation of the scatterer size of the esophageal epithelial cells, using the bandwidth of the correlation of the derivative (COD) method, as well as intensity-based characteristics. The COD method can effectively estimate the scatterer size of the esophageal epithelium cells in good agreement with the literature. As expected, both the mean scatterer size and its standard deviation increase with increasing severity of disease (i.e. from normal to BE to dysplasia). The differences in the distribution of scatterer size for each tissue type are statistically significant, with a p value of < 0.0001. However, the scatterer size by itself cannot be used to accurately classify the various tissues. With the addition of intensity-based statistics the correct classification rates for all three tissue types range from 83 to 100% depending on the lesion size.

  6. Differences between time domain and Fourier domain optical coherence tomography in imaging tissues.

    Gao, W; Wu, X

    2017-11-01

    It has been numerously demonstrated that both time domain and Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) can generate high-resolution depth-resolved images of living tissues and cells. In this work, we compare the common points and differences between two methods when the continuous and random properties of live tissue are taken into account. It is found that when relationships that exist between the scattered light and tissue structures are taken into account, spectral interference measurements in Fourier domain OCT (FDOCT) is more advantageous than interference fringe envelope measurements in time domain OCT (TDOCT) in the cases where continuous property of tissue is taken into account. It is also demonstrated that when random property of tissue is taken into account FDOCT measures the Fourier transform of the spatial correlation function of the refractive index and speckle phenomena will limit the effective limiting imaging resolution in both TDOCT and FDOCT. Finally, the effective limiting resolution of both TDOCT and FDOCT are given which can be used to estimate the effective limiting resolution in various practical applications. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  7. Doppler optical coherence tomography imaging of local fluid flow and shear stress within microporous scaffolds

    Jia, Yali; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Yang, Ying; Haj, Alicia El; Hinds, Monica T.; Kirkpatrick, Sean J.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2009-05-01

    Establishing a relationship between perfusion rate and fluid shear stress in a 3D cell culture environment is an ongoing and challenging task faced by tissue engineers. We explore Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) as a potential imaging tool for in situ monitoring of local fluid flow profiles inside porous chitosan scaffolds. From the measured fluid flow profiles, the fluid shear stresses are evaluated. We examine the localized fluid flow and shear stress within low- and high-porosity chitosan scaffolds, which are subjected to a constant input flow rate of 0.5 ml.min-1. The DOCT results show that the behavior of the fluid flow and shear stress in micropores is strongly dependent on the micropore interconnectivity, porosity, and size of pores within the scaffold. For low-porosity and high-porosity chitosan scaffolds examined, the measured local fluid flow and shear stress varied from micropore to micropore, with a mean shear stress of 0.49+/-0.3 dyn.cm-2 and 0.38+/-0.2 dyn.cm-2, respectively. In addition, we show that the scaffold's porosity and interconnectivity can be quantified by combining analyses of the 3D structural and flow images obtained from DOCT.

  8. Skin surface and sub-surface strain and deformation imaging using optical coherence tomography and digital image correlation

    Hu, X.; Maiti, R.; Liu, X.; Gerhardt, L. C.; Lee, Z. S.; Byers, R.; Franklin, S. E.; Lewis, R.; Matcher, S. J.; Carré, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Bio-mechanical properties of the human skin deformed by external forces at difference skin/material interfaces attract much attention in medical research. For instance, such properties are important design factors when one designs a healthcare device, i.e., the device might be applied directly at skin/device interfaces. In this paper, we investigated the bio-mechanical properties, i.e., surface strain, morphological changes of the skin layers, etc., of the human finger-pad and forearm skin as a function of applied pressure by utilizing two non-invasive techniques, i.e., optical coherence tomography (OCT) and digital image correlation (DIC). Skin deformation results of the human finger-pad and forearm skin were obtained while pressed against a transparent optical glass plate under the action of 0.5-24 N force and stretching naturally from 90° flexion to 180° full extension respectively. The obtained OCT images showed the deformation results beneath the skin surface, however, DIC images gave overall information of strain at the surface.

  9. Infrared imaging and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography findings correlate with microperimetry in acute macular neuroretinopathy: a case report

    Grover Sandeep

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography findings in a patient with acute macular neuroretinopathy, and correlation with functional defects on microperimetry, are presented. Case presentation A 25-year old Caucasian woman presented with bitemporal field defects following an upper respiratory tract infection. Her visual acuity was 20/20 in both eyes and a dilated fundus examination revealed bilateral hyperpigmentary changes in the papillomacular bundle. Our patient underwent further evaluation with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, infrared and fundus autofluorescence imaging. Functional changes were assessed by microperimetry. Infrared imaging showed the classic wedge-shaped defects and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography exhibited changes at the inner segment-outer segment junction, with a thickened outer plexiform layer overlying these areas. Fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography did not demonstrate any perfusion defects or any other abnormality. Microperimetry demonstrated focal elevation in threshold correlating with the wedge-shaped defects in both eyes. Conclusion Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography findings provide new evidence of the involvement of the outer plexiform layer of the retina in acute macular neuroretinopathy.

  10. Development of a miniature multiple reference optical coherence tomography imaging device

    McNamara, Paul M.; O'Riordan, Colm; Collins, Seán.; O'Brien, Peter; Wilson, Carol; Hogan, Josh; Leahy, Martin J.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple reference optical coherence tomography (MR-OCT) is a new technology ideally suited to low-cost, compact OCT imaging. This modality is an extension of time-domain OCT with the addition of a partial mirror in front of the reference mirror. This enables extended, simultaneous depth scanning with the relatively short sweep of a miniature voice coil motor on which the scanning mirror is mounted. Applications of this technology include biometric security, ophthalmology, personal health monitoring and non-destructive testing. This work details early-stage development of the first iteration of a miniature MR-OCT device. This device utilizes a fiber-coupled input from an off-board superluminescent diode (SLD). Typical dimensions of the module are 40 × 57 mm, but future designs are expected to be more compact. Off-the-shelf miniature optical components, voice coil motors and photodetectors are used, with the complexity of design depending on specific applications. The photonic module can be configured as either polarized or non-polarized and can include balanced detection. The photodetectors are directly connected to a printed circuit board under the module containing a transimpedance amplifier with complimentary outputs. The results shown in this work are from the non-polarized device. Assembly of the photonic modules requires extensive planning. In choosing the optical components, Zemax simulations are performed to model the beam characteristics. The physical layout is modeled using Solidworks and each component is placed and aligned via a well-designed alignment procedure involving an active-alignment pick-and-place assembly system.

  11. Massively parallel data processing for quantitative total flow imaging with optical coherence microscopy and tomography

    Sylwestrzak, Marcin; Szlag, Daniel; Marchand, Paul J.; Kumar, Ashwin S.; Lasser, Theo

    2017-08-01

    We present an application of massively parallel processing of quantitative flow measurements data acquired using spectral optical coherence microscopy (SOCM). The need for massive signal processing of these particular datasets has been a major hurdle for many applications based on SOCM. In view of this difficulty, we implemented and adapted quantitative total flow estimation algorithms on graphics processing units (GPU) and achieved a 150 fold reduction in processing time when compared to a former CPU implementation. As SOCM constitutes the microscopy counterpart to spectral optical coherence tomography (SOCT), the developed processing procedure can be applied to both imaging modalities. We present the developed DLL library integrated in MATLAB (with an example) and have included the source code for adaptations and future improvements. Catalogue identifier: AFBT_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AFBT_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPLv3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 913552 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 270876249 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: CUDA/C, MATLAB. Computer: Intel x64 CPU, GPU supporting CUDA technology. Operating system: 64-bit Windows 7 Professional. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes, CPU code has been vectorized in MATLAB, CUDA code has been parallelized. RAM: Dependent on users parameters, typically between several gigabytes and several tens of gigabytes Classification: 6.5, 18. Nature of problem: Speed up of data processing in optical coherence microscopy Solution method: Utilization of GPU for massively parallel data processing Additional comments: Compiled DLL library with source code and documentation, example of utilization (MATLAB script with raw data) Running time: 1,8 s for one B-scan (150 × faster in comparison to the CPU

  12. Angiographic optical coherence tomography imaging of hemangiomas and port wine birthmarks.

    Waibel, Jill S; Holmes, Jon; Rudnick, Ashley; Woods, Daniel; Kelly, Kristen M

    2018-03-22

    A current therapeutic challenge of vascular lesions is that they do not always respond effectively to laser treatment. Information on targeted vessels could potentially be used to guide laser treatments. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a useful tool for the non-invasive imaging of tissues, including skin hemangiomas and port wine birthmarks. Dynamic OCT is able to rapidly characterize cutaneous blood vessels. The primary goal of this study was to demonstrate the ability of bedside OCT to image (i) overall vessel pattern; (ii) individual vessel morphology, diameter and depth; and (iii) total vessel density as a function of depth in infantile hemangiomas and port wine birthmarks (PWB). This IRB approved, observational clinical trial was performed among healthy volunteers ages 3 months-73 years old. All patients presented for laser treatment of either infantile hemangiomas or PWB with skin types ranging from Fitzpatrick I-V. OCT imaging of 49 hemangioma and PWB scans were performed pre- and post-treatment. The diameter and depth of the blood vessels making up the vascular lesions were measured. In addition, normal skin was scanned for comparison. Five datasets for infantile hemangiomas and five for PWB that were without motion artifacts were analyzed. Scanned lesions exhibited variable and highly heterogeneous blood vessel patterns with vessel diameters ranging from 20 to 160 μm, suggesting that the laser treatment with single pulse durations may not be optimal. The largest blood vessel diameter observed (160 μm) may not be adequately treated by commonly used pulsed dye laser pulse durations. OCT allowed rapid, non-invasive characterization of the diameter and depth of blood vessels in individual vascular lesions. Imaged lesions consisted of a heterogeneous population of vessel sizes, morphologies, and depth. Future studies could utilize this information to assist development of individualized treatment protocols in an effort to improve vascular birthmark

  13. Three-Dimensional Cataract Crystalline Lens Imaging With Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography.

    de Castro, Alberto; Benito, Antonio; Manzanera, Silvestre; Mompeán, Juan; Cañizares, Belén; Martínez, David; Marín, Jose María; Grulkowski, Ireneusz; Artal, Pablo

    2018-02-01

    To image, describe, and characterize different features visible in the crystalline lens of older adults with and without cataract when imaged three-dimensionally with a swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system. We used a new SS-OCT laboratory prototype designed to enhance the visualization of the crystalline lens and imaged the entire anterior segment of both eyes in two groups of participants: patients scheduled to undergo cataract surgery, n = 17, age range 36 to 91 years old, and volunteers without visual complains, n = 14, age range 20 to 81 years old. Pre-cataract surgery patients were also clinically graded according to the Lens Opacification Classification System III. The three-dimensional location and shape of the visible opacities were compared with the clinical grading. Hypo- and hyperreflective features were visible in the lens of all pre-cataract surgery patients and in some of the older adults in the volunteer group. When the clinical examination revealed cortical or subcapsular cataracts, hyperreflective features were visible either in the cortex parallel to the surfaces of the lens or in the posterior pole. Other type of opacities that appeared as hyporeflective localized features were identified in the cortex of the lens. The OCT signal in the nucleus of the crystalline lens correlated with the nuclear cataract clinical grade. A dedicated OCT is a useful tool to study in vivo the subtle opacities in the cataractous crystalline lens, revealing its position and size three-dimensionally. The use of these images allows obtaining more detailed information on the age-related changes leading to cataract.

  14. Deep learning classifier with optical coherence tomography images for early dental caries detection

    Karimian, Nima; Salehi, Hassan S.; Mahdian, Mina; Alnajjar, Hisham; Tadinada, Aditya

    2018-02-01

    Dental caries is a microbial disease that results in localized dissolution of the mineral content of dental tissue. Despite considerable decline in the incidence of dental caries, it remains a major health problem in many societies. Early detection of incipient lesions at initial stages of demineralization can result in the implementation of non-surgical preventive approaches to reverse the demineralization process. In this paper, we present a novel approach combining deep convolutional neural networks (CNN) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging modality for classification of human oral tissues to detect early dental caries. OCT images of oral tissues with various densities were input to a CNN classifier to determine variations in tissue densities resembling the demineralization process. The CNN automatically learns a hierarchy of increasingly complex features and a related classifier directly from training data sets. The initial CNN layer parameters were randomly selected. The training set is split into minibatches, with 10 OCT images per batch. Given a batch of training patches, the CNN employs two convolutional and pooling layers to extract features and then classify each patch based on the probabilities from the SoftMax classification layer (output-layer). Afterward, the CNN calculates the error between the classification result and the reference label, and then utilizes the backpropagation process to fine-tune all the layer parameters to minimize this error using batch gradient descent algorithm. We validated our proposed technique on ex-vivo OCT images of human oral tissues (enamel, cortical-bone, trabecular-bone, muscular-tissue, and fatty-tissue), which attested to effectiveness of our proposed method.

  15. Optical Coherence Tomography

    Mogensen, Mette; Themstrup, Lotte; Banzhaf, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has developed rapidly since its first realisation in medicine and is currently an emerging technology in the diagnosis of skin disease. OCT is an interferometric technique that detects reflected and backscattered light from tissue and is often described as the o......Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has developed rapidly since its first realisation in medicine and is currently an emerging technology in the diagnosis of skin disease. OCT is an interferometric technique that detects reflected and backscattered light from tissue and is often described...

  16. Extracting subsurface fingerprints using optical coherence tomography

    Akhoury, SS

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface Fingerprints using Optical Coherence Tomography Sharat Saurabh Akhoury, Luke Nicholas Darlow Modelling and Digital Science, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria, South Africa Abstract Physiologists have found... approach to extract the subsurface fingerprint representation using a high-resolution imaging technology known as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). ...

  17. Multimodal optical coherence tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging with interleaved excitation sources for simultaneous endogenous and exogenous fluorescence.

    Shrestha, Sebina; Serafino, Michael J; Rico-Jimenez, Jesus; Park, Jesung; Chen, Xi; Zhaorigetu, Siqin; Walton, Brian L; Jo, Javier A; Applegate, Brian E

    2016-09-01

    Multimodal imaging probes a variety of tissue properties in a single image acquisition by merging complimentary imaging technologies. Exploiting synergies amongst the data, algorithms can be developed that lead to better tissue characterization than could be accomplished by the constituent imaging modalities taken alone. The combination of optical coherence tomography (OCT) with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) provides access to detailed tissue morphology and local biochemistry. The optical system described here merges 1310 nm swept-source OCT with time-domain FLIM having excitation at 355 and 532 nm. The pulses from 355 and 532 nm lasers have been interleaved to enable simultaneous acquisition of endogenous and exogenous fluorescence signals, respectively. The multimodal imaging system was validated using tissue phantoms. Nonspecific tagging with Alexa Flour 532 in a Watanbe rabbit aorta and active tagging of the LOX-1 receptor in human coronary artery, demonstrate the capacity of the system for simultaneous acquisition of OCT, endogenous FLIM, and exogenous FLIM in tissues.

  18. The utility of three-dimensional optical projection tomography in nerve injection injury imaging

    Cvetko, E.; Čapek, Martin; Damjanovska, M.; Reina, M. A.; Eržen, I.; Stopar-Pintarič, T.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 8 (2015), s. 939-947 ISSN 0003-2409 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-12412S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH13028 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : optical projection tomography * 3D nerve visualization * nerve disruption Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 3.794, year: 2015

  19. A pilot study on slit lamp-adapted optical coherence tomography imaging of trabeculectomy filtering blebs.

    Theelen, T.; Wesseling, P.; Keunen, J.E.E.; Klevering, B.J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our study aims to identify anatomical characteristics of glaucoma filtering blebs by means of slit lamp-adapted optical coherence tomography (SL-OCT) and to identify new parameters for the functional prognosis of the filter in the early post-operative period. METHODS: Patients with

  20. Improved quality of optical coherence tomography imaging of basal cell carcinomas using speckle reduction

    Mogensen, Mette; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Thrane, Lars

    2010-01-01

    suggests a method for improving OCT image quality for skin cancer imaging. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: OCT is an optical imaging method analogous to ultrasound. Two basal cell carcinomas (BCC) were imaged using an OCT speckle reduction technique (SR-OCT) based on repeated scanning by altering the distance between...

  1. Image-guided modified deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) corneal transplant using intraoperative optical coherence tomography

    Tao, Yuankai K.; LaBarbera, Michael; Ehlers, Justis P.; Srivastava, Sunil K.; Dupps, William J.

    2015-03-01

    Deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) is an alternative to full-thickness corneal transplant and has advantages including the absence of allograft rejection; shortened duration of topical corticosteroid treatment and reduced associated risk of glaucoma, cataract, or infection; and enables use of grafts with poor endothelial quality. DALK begins by performing a trephination of approximately 80% stromal thickness, as measured by pachymetry. After removal of the anterior stoma, a needle is inserted into the residual stroma to inject air or viscoelastic to dissect Descemet's membrane. These procedures are inherently difficult and intraoperative rates of Descemet's membrane perforation between 4-39% have been reported. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides high-resolution images of tissue microstructures in the cornea, including Descemet's membrane, and allows quantitation of corneal layer thicknesses. Here, we use crosssectional intraoperative OCT (iOCT) measurements of corneal thickness during surgery and a novel micrometeradjustable biopsy punch to precision-cut the stroma down to Descemet's membrane. Our prototype cutting tool allows us to establish a dissection plane at the corneal endothelium interface, mitigates variability in cut-depths as a result of tremor, reduces procedure complexity, and reduces complication rates. iOCT-guided modified DALK procedures were performed on 47 cadaveric porcine eyes by non-experts and achieved a perforation rate of ~5% with a mean corneal dissection time care.

  2. Quantifying Pharmaceutical Film Coating with Optical Coherence Tomography and Terahertz Pulsed Imaging: An Evaluation

    Lin, Hungyen; Dong, Yue; Shen, Yaochun; Zeitler, J Axel

    2015-01-01

    Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) has recently attracted a lot of interest in the pharmaceutical industry as a fast and non-destructive modality for quantification of thin film coatings that cannot easily be resolved with other techniques. Because of the relative infancy of this technique, much of the research to date has focused on developing the in-line measurement technique for assessing film coating thickness. To better assess OCT for pharmaceutical coating quantification, this paper evaluates tablets with a range of film coating thickness measured using OCT and terahertz pulsed imaging (TPI) in an off-line setting. In order to facilitate automated coating quantification for film coating thickness in the range of 30–200 μm, an algorithm that uses wavelet denoising and a tailored peak finding method is proposed to analyse each of the acquired A-scan. Results obtained from running the algorithm reveal an increasing disparity between the TPI and OCT measured intra-tablet variability when film coating thickness exceeds 100 μm. The finding further confirms that OCT is a suitable modality for characterising pharmaceutical dosage forms with thin film coatings, whereas TPI is well suited for thick coatings. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 104:3377–3385, 2015 PMID:26284354

  3. Investigation of detection limits for diffuse optical tomography systems: II. Analysis of slab and cup geometry for breast imaging.

    Ziegler, Ronny; Brendel, Bernhard; Rinneberg, Herbert; Nielsen, Tim

    2009-01-21

    Using a statistical (chi-square) test on simulated data and a realistic noise model derived from the system's hardware we study the performance of diffuse optical tomography systems for fluorescence imaging. We compare the predicted smallest size of detectable lesions at various positions in slab and cup geometry and model how detection sensitivity depends on breast compression and lesion fluorescence contrast. Our investigation shows that lesion detection is limited by relative noise in slab geometry and by absolute noise in cup geometry.

  4. Optical Tomography in Combustion

    Evseev, Vadim

    spectral measurements at several line-of-sights with a view to applications for tomographic measurements on full-scale industrial combustion systems. The system was successfully applied on industrial scale for simultaneous fast exhaust gas temperature measurements in the three optical ports of the exhaust......D project, it was also important to investigate the spectral properties of major combustion species such as carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide in the infrared range at high temperatures to provide the theoretical background for the development of the optical tomography methods. The new software....... JQSRT 113 (2012) 2222, 10.1016/j.jqsrt.2012.07.015] included in the PhD thesis as an attachment. The knowledge and experience gained in the PhD project is the first important step towards introducing the advanced optical tomography methods of combustion diagnostics developed in the project to future...

  5. Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography at 1060 nm for retinal imaging

    Torzicky, T.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to develop a Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT) device for ocular imaging in the 1 µm wavelength range and to explore its capabilities to image healthy subjects and patients with various retinal disorders. PS-OCT set-ups working in the 840 nm range have been used in several clinical studies, for examining different retinal pathologies. Especially the segmentation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) based on PS-OCT data shows advantages in cases of age related macular degeneration (AMD) in comparison to segmentation based on intensity images from commercial OCT systems. OCT imaging in the 1 µm wavelength region has recently gained popularity for ophthalmic applications due to the fact that it is perfectly suitable for enhanced visualization of choroid and sclera. This is due to decreased scattering and absorption in the RPE with increasing wavelength and due to the local absorption minimum of water (the vitreous of the eye consists mainly of water) for wavelengths around 1060 nm. An additional advantage is that a higher imaging quality in patients with corneal haze or cataract can be achieved when using OCT systems working at 1 µm. In this work we combine the advantages of PS-OCT imaging with the enhanced penetration depth of the 1 µm wavelength range for acquiring intensity, retardation, axis orientation and degree of polarization uniformity (DOPU) images of choroid and sclera. As a first step different PS-OCT set-ups working at 1060 nm were developed and a comparison regarding set-up parameters and imaging performance was accomplished. The two different set-ups that were built and investigated were a spectrometer based Fourier Domain OCT set-up and a swept source Fourier Domain OCT set-up. The swept source set-up was tested with two different light sources, a commercially available swept source laser (A-Scan rate of 100 kHz) and a prototype of a Fourier Domain Mode Locked (FDML) laser (A-Scan rate of 350

  6. Simultaneous optical coherence tomography and lipofuscin autofluorescence imaging of the retina with a single broadband light source at 480nm.

    Jiang, Minshan; Liu, Tan; Liu, Xiaojing; Jiao, Shuliang

    2014-12-01

    We accomplished spectral domain optical coherence tomography and auto-fluorescence microscopy for imaging the retina with a single broadband light source centered at 480 nm. This technique is able to provide simultaneous structural imaging and lipofuscin molecular contrast of the retina. Since the two imaging modalities are provided by the same group of photons, their images are intrinsically registered. To test the capabilities of the technique we periodically imaged the retinas of the same rats for four weeks. The images successfully demonstrated lipofuscin accumulation in the retinal pigment epithelium with aging. The experimental results showed that the dual-modal imaging system can be a potentially powerful tool in the study of age-related degenerative retinal diseases.

  7. Optical coherence tomography image-guided smart laser knife for surgery.

    Katta, Nitesh; McElroy, Austin B; Estrada, Arnold D; Milner, Thomas E

    2018-03-01

    Surgical oncology can benefit from specialized tools that enhance imaging and enable precise cutting and removal of tissue without damage to adjacent structures. The combination of high-resolution, fast optical coherence tomography (OCT) co-aligned with a nanosecond pulsed thulium (Tm) laser offers advantages over conventional surgical laser systems. Tm lasers provide superior beam quality, high volumetric tissue removal rates with minimal residual thermal footprint in tissue, enabling a reduction in unwanted damage to delicate adjacent sub-surface structures such as nerves or micro-vessels. We investigated such a combined Tm/OCT system with co-aligned imaging and cutting beams-a configuration we call a "smart laser knife." A blow-off model that considers absorption coefficients and beam delivery systems was utilized to predict Tm cut depth, tissue removal rate and spatial distribution of residual thermal injury. Experiments were performed to verify the volumetric removal rate predicted by the model as a function of average power. A bench-top, combined Tm/OCT system was constructed using a 15W 1940 nm nanosecond pulsed Tm fiber laser (500 μJ pulse energy, 100 ns pulse duration, 30 kHz repetition rate) for removing tissue and a swept source laser (1310 ± 70 nm, 100 kHz sweep rate) for OCT imaging. Tissue phantoms were used to demonstrate precise surgery with blood vessel avoidance. Depth imaging informed cutting/removal of targeted tissue structures by the Tm laser was performed. Laser cutting was accomplished around and above phantom blood vessels while avoiding damage to vessel walls. A tissue removal rate of 5.5 mm 3 /sec was achieved experimentally, in comparison to the model prediction of approximately 6 mm 3 /sec. We describe a system that combines OCT and laser tissue modification with a Tm laser. Simulation results of the tissue removal rate using a simple model, as a function of average power, are in good agreement with experimental

  8. Teleophthalmology with optical coherence tomography imaging in community optometry. Evaluation of a quality improvement for macular patients

    Kelly SP

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Simon P Kelly1, Ian Wallwork2, David Haider1, Kashif Qureshi11Ophthalmology Department, Royal Bolton Hospital National Health Service Foundation Trust, Bolton, 2Wallwork Opticians, Salford, UKPurpose: To describe a quality improvement for referral of National Health Service patients with macular disorders from a community optometry setting in an urban area.Methods: Service evaluation of teleophthalmology consultation based on spectral domain optical coherence tomography images acquired by the community optometrist and transmitted to hospital eye services.Results: Fifty patients with suspected macular conditions were managed via telemedicine consultation over 1 year. Responses were provided by hospital eye service-based ophthalmologists to the community optometrist or patient within the next day in 48 cases (96% and in 34 (68% patients on the same day. In the consensus opinion of the optometrist and ophthalmologist, 33 (66% patients required further “face-to-face” medical examination and were triaged on clinical urgency. Seventeen cases (34% were managed in the community and are a potential cost improvement. Specialty trainees were supervised in telemedicine consultations.Conclusion: Innovation and quality improvement were demonstrated in both optometry to ophthalmology referrals and in primary optometric care by use of telemedicine with spectral domain optical coherence tomography images. E-referral of spectral domain optical coherence tomography images assists triage of macular patients and swifter care of urgent cases. Teleophthalmology is also, in the authors’ opinion, a tool to improve interdisciplinary professional working with community optometrists. Implications for progress are discussed.Keywords: telemedicine, teleophthalmology, innovation, community referral, optical coherence tomography, service evaluation

  9. Software for simulation of a computed tomography imaging spectrometer using optical design software

    Spuhler, Peter T.; Willer, Mark R.; Volin, Curtis E.; Descour, Michael R.; Dereniak, Eustace L.

    2000-11-01

    Our Imaging Spectrometer Simulation Software known under the name Eikon should improve and speed up the design of a Computed Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS). Eikon uses existing raytracing software to simulate a virtual instrument. Eikon enables designers to virtually run through the design, calibration and data acquisition, saving significant cost and time when designing an instrument. We anticipate that Eikon simulations will improve future designs of CTIS by allowing engineers to explore more instrument options.

  10. Automatic classification of retinal three-dimensional optical coherence tomography images using principal component analysis network with composite kernels.

    Fang, Leyuan; Wang, Chong; Li, Shutao; Yan, Jun; Chen, Xiangdong; Rabbani, Hossein

    2017-11-01

    We present an automatic method, termed as the principal component analysis network with composite kernel (PCANet-CK), for the classification of three-dimensional (3-D) retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. Specifically, the proposed PCANet-CK method first utilizes the PCANet to automatically learn features from each B-scan of the 3-D retinal OCT images. Then, multiple kernels are separately applied to a set of very important features of the B-scans and these kernels are fused together, which can jointly exploit the correlations among features of the 3-D OCT images. Finally, the fused (composite) kernel is incorporated into an extreme learning machine for the OCT image classification. We tested our proposed algorithm on two real 3-D spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT) datasets (of normal subjects and subjects with the macular edema and age-related macular degeneration), which demonstrated its effectiveness. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  11. Enhancement of the resolution of full-field optical coherence tomography by using a colour image sensor

    Kalyanov, A L; Lychagov, V V; Smirnov, I V; Ryabukho, V P [N.G. Chernyshevsky Saratov State University, Saratov (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-31

    The influence of white balance in a colour image detector on the resolution of a full-field optical coherence tomograph (FFOCT) is studied. The change in the interference pulse width depending on the white balance tuning is estimated in the cases of a thermal radiation source (incandescent lamp) and a white light emitting diode. It is shown that by tuning white balance of the detector in a certain range, the FFOCT resolution can be increased by 20 % as compared to the resolution, attained with the use of a monochrome detector. (optical coherence tomography)

  12. Enhancement of the resolution of full-field optical coherence tomography by using a colour image sensor

    Kalyanov, A L; Lychagov, V V; Smirnov, I V; Ryabukho, V P

    2013-01-01

    The influence of white balance in a colour image detector on the resolution of a full-field optical coherence tomograph (FFOCT) is studied. The change in the interference pulse width depending on the white balance tuning is estimated in the cases of a thermal radiation source (incandescent lamp) and a white light emitting diode. It is shown that by tuning white balance of the detector in a certain range, the FFOCT resolution can be increased by 20 % as compared to the resolution, attained with the use of a monochrome detector. (optical coherence tomography)

  13. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging of subretinal bands associated with chronic retinal detachments

    Kothari, Nikisha; Kuriyan, Ajay E; Flynn, Harry W

    2016-01-01

    Nikisha Kothari, Ajay E Kuriyan, Harry W Flynn JrDepartment of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USAAbstract: We report three patients with subretinal bands associated with retinal detachment in chronic retinal detachments who underwent successful retinal reattachment. Subretinal bands before and after surgery can be identified on clinical examination and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Removal of subr...

  14. Noninvasive Imaging of Retinal Morphology and Microvasculature in Obese Mice Using Optical Coherence Tomography and Optical Microangiography

    Zhi, Zhongwei; Chao, Jennifer R.; Wietecha, Tomasz; Hudkins, Kelly L.; Alpers, Charles E.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate early diabetes-induced changes in retinal thickness and microvasculature in a type 2 diabetic mouse model by using optical coherence tomography (OCT)/optical microangiography (OMAG). Methods. Twenty-two-week-old obese (OB) BTBR mice (n = 10) and wild-type (WT) control mice (n = 10) were imaged. Three-dimensional (3D) data volumes were captured with spectral domain OCT using an ultrahigh-sensitive OMAG scanning protocol for 3D volumetric angiography of the retina and dense A-scan protocol for measurement of the total retinal blood flow (RBF) rate. The thicknesses of the nerve fiber layer (NFL) and that of the NFL to the inner plexiform layer (IPL) were measured and compared between OB and WT mice. The linear capillary densities within intermediate and deep capillary layers were determined by the number of capillaries crossing a 500-μm line. The RBF rate was evaluated using an en face Doppler approach. These quantitative measurements were compared between OB and WT mice. Results. The retinal thickness of the NFL to IPL was significantly reduced in OB mice (P < 0.01) compared to that in WT mice, whereas the NFL thickness between the two was unchanged. 3D depth-resolved OMAG angiography revealed the first in vivo 3D model of mouse retinal microcirculation. Although no obvious differences in capillary vessel densities of the intermediate and deep capillary layers were detected between normal and OB mice, the total RBF rate was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in OB mice than in WT mice. Conclusions. We conclude that OB BTBR mice have significantly reduced NFL–IPL thicknesses and total RBF rates compared with those of WT mice, as imaged by OCT/OMAG. OMAG provides an unprecedented capability for high-resolution depth-resolved imaging of mouse retinal vessels and blood flow that may play a pivotal role in providing a noninvasive method for detecting early microvascular changes in patients with diabetic retinopathy. PMID:24458155

  15. Optical coherence tomography imaging of chorioretinal folds associated with hypotony maculopathy following pars plana vitrectomy

    Williams Jr BK

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Basil K Williams Jr, Jonathan S Chang, Harry W Flynn Jr Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA Abstract: Chorioretinal folds may occur as a consequence of hypotony and can be a cause of vision loss when associated with macular involvement. In this report, the spectral domain ocular coherence tomography imaging of three patients with chorioretinal folds before and after management are presented. The cases had unique presentations and each underwent different management approaches, but the results included improved visual acuities and lessened chorioretinal folds. Keywords: hypotony, chorioretinal folds, ocular coherence tomography

  16. Validation of Dynamic optical coherence tomography for non-invasive, in vivo microcirculation imaging of the skin

    Themstrup, L.; Welzel, Julia; Ciardo, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Dynamic optical coherence tomography (D-OCT) is an angiographic variation of OCT that non-invasively provides images of the in vivo microvasculature of the skin by combining conventional OCT images with flow data. The objective of this study was to investigate and report on the D.......001), and also the redness a measurements were positively correlated with the D-OCT measurements (r = 0.48; 95% CI [0.406, 0.55]). D-OCT was able to reliably image and identify morphologic changes in the vascular network consistent with the induced physiological changes of blood flow. Conclusion: This study has...... initiated validation of the use of D-OCT for imaging of skin blood flow. Our results showed that D-OCT was able to reliably image and identify changes in the skin vasculature consistent with the induced physiological blood flow changes. These basic findings support the use of D-OCT imaging for in vivo...

  17. Additive diagnostic role of imaging in glaucoma: optical coherence tomography and retinal nerve fiber layer photography.

    Kim, Ko Eun; Kim, Seok Hwan; Oh, Sohee; Jeoung, Jin Wook; Suh, Min Hee; Seo, Je Hyun; Kim, Martha; Park, Ki Ho; Kim, Dong Myung

    2014-11-20

    To investigate the additive diagnostic role of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and red-free retinal nerve fiber layer photography (RNFLP) in making clinical glaucoma diagnosis. Four diagnostic combination sets, including the most recent image from each measurement of 196 glaucoma eyes (including the 44 preperimetric glaucoma eyes) and 101 healthy eyes, were prepared: (1) stereo disc photography and Humphrey visual field (SH), (2) SH and SD-OCT (SHO), (3) SH and RNFLP (SHR), and (4) SHR and SD-OCT (SHRO). Each randomly sorted set was serially presented at 1-month intervals to five glaucoma specialists who were asked to evaluate them in a subjective and independent manner. The specialists' glaucoma-diagnostic performances based on the sets were then compared. For each specialist, adding SD-OCT to SH or SHR increased the glaucoma-diagnostic sensitivity but not to a level of statistical significance. For one specialist, adding RNFLP to SH significantly increased the sensitivity. Each specialist showed a high level of specificity regardless of the diagnostic set. The overall sensitivity of all specialists' assessments was significantly increased by adding RNFLP or the combination of SD-OCT and RNFLP to SH (P < 0.001); however, adding SD-OCT to SH or SHR did not significantly increase the sensitivity. A similar relationship was noted also for the preperimetric glaucoma subgroup. In contrast to RNFLP, SD-OCT did not significantly enhance the diagnostic accuracy of detecting glaucoma or even of preperimetric glaucoma. Our results suggest that, at least for glaucoma specialists, the additive diagnostic role of OCT is limited. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  18. Imaging neutrophil migration dynamics using micro-optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Chu, Kengyeh K.; Yonker, Lael; Som, Avira; Pazos, Michael; Kusek, Mark E.; Hurley, Bryan P.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2016-03-01

    Neutrophils are immune cells that undergo chemotaxis, detecting and migrating towards a chemical signal gradient. Neutrophils actively migrate across epithelial boundaries, interacting with the epithelium to selectively permit passage without compromising the epithelial barrier. In many inflammatory disorders, excessive neutrophil migration can cause damage to the epithelium itself. The signaling pathways and mechanisms that facilitate trans-epithelial migration are not fully characterized. Our laboratory has developed micro-optical coherence tomography (μOCT), which has 2 μm lateral resolution and 1 μm axial resolution. As a high-resolution native contrast modality, μOCT can directly visualize individual neutrophils as they interact with a cell layer cultured on a transwell filter. A chemoattractant can be applied to the apical side of inverted monolayer, and human neutrophils placed in the basolateral compartment, while μOCT captures 3D images of the chemotaxis. μOCT images can also generate quantitative metrics of migration volume to study the dependence of chemotaxis on monolayer cell type, chemoattractant type, and disease state of the neutrophils. For example, a disease known as leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) can be simulated by treating neutrophils with antibodies that interfere with the CD18 receptor, a facilitator of trans-epithelial migration. We conducted a migration study of anti-CD18 treated and control neutrophils using T84 intestinal epithelium as a barrier. After one hour, μOCT time-lapse imaging indicated a strong difference in the fraction of neutrophils that remain attached to the epithelium after migration (0.67 +/- 0.12 attached anti-CD18 neutrophils, 0.23 +/- 0.08 attached control neutrophils, n = 6, p < 0.05), as well as a modest but non-significant decrease in total migration volume for treated neutrophils. We can now integrate μOCT-derived migration metrics with simultaneously acquired measurements of transepithelial electrical

  19. Enhanced Visualization of Subtle Outer Retinal Pathology by En Face Optical Coherence Tomography and Correlation with Multi-Modal Imaging.

    Danuta M Sampson

    Full Text Available To present en face optical coherence tomography (OCT images generated by graph-search theory algorithm-based custom software and examine correlation with other imaging modalities.En face OCT images derived from high density OCT volumetric scans of 3 healthy subjects and 4 patients using a custom algorithm (graph-search theory and commercial software (Heidelberg Eye Explorer software (Heidelberg Engineering were compared and correlated with near infrared reflectance, fundus autofluorescence, adaptive optics flood-illumination ophthalmoscopy (AO-FIO and microperimetry.Commercial software was unable to generate accurate en face OCT images in eyes with retinal pigment epithelium (RPE pathology due to segmentation error at the level of Bruch's membrane (BM. Accurate segmentation of the basal RPE and BM was achieved using custom software. The en face OCT images from eyes with isolated interdigitation or ellipsoid zone pathology were of similar quality between custom software and Heidelberg Eye Explorer software in the absence of any other significant outer retinal pathology. En face OCT images demonstrated angioid streaks, lesions of acute macular neuroretinopathy, hydroxychloroquine toxicity and Bietti crystalline deposits that correlated with other imaging modalities.Graph-search theory algorithm helps to overcome the limitations of outer retinal segmentation inaccuracies in commercial software. En face OCT images can provide detailed topography of the reflectivity within a specific layer of the retina which correlates with other forms of fundus imaging. Our results highlight the need for standardization of image reflectivity to facilitate quantification of en face OCT images and longitudinal analysis.

  20. Ultra-High Resolution Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging of Unilateral Drusen in a 31 Year Old Woman.

    de Carlo, Talisa E; Adhi, Mehreen; Lu, Chen D; Duker, Jay S; Fujimoto, James G; Waheed, Nadia K

    We report a case of widespread unilateral drusen in a healthy 31 year old Caucasian woman using multi-modal imaging including ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT). Dilated fundus exam showed multiple drusen-like lesions in the posterior pole without heme or fluid. Fundus auto fluorescence demonstrated hyperautofluorescent at the deposits. Fluorescein angiography revealed mild hyperfluorescence and staining of the lesions. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) OS showed accumulations in the temporal macula at Bruch's membrane. UHR-OCT provided improved axial resolution compared to the standard 5 μm on the commercial SD-OCT and confirmed the presence of deposits in Bruch's membrane, consistent with drusen. The retinal layers were draped over the excrescences but did not show any disruption.

  1. Assessment of Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging in the Diagnosis of Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer and Benign Lesions Versus Normal Skin:

    Mogensen, Mette; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Nürnberg, Birgit Meincke

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an optical imaging technique that may be useful in diagnosis of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). OBJECTIVES To describe OCT features in NMSC such as actinic keratosis (AK) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and in benign lesions and to assess the diagn......BACKGROUND Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an optical imaging technique that may be useful in diagnosis of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). OBJECTIVES To describe OCT features in NMSC such as actinic keratosis (AK) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and in benign lesions and to assess...

  2. Real-time three-dimensional imaging of epidermal splitting and removal by high-definition optical coherence tomography

    Boone, Marc; Draye, Jean Pierre; Verween, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    While real-time 3-D evaluation of human skin constructs is needed, only 2-D non-invasive imaging techniques are available. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the potential of high-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) for real-time 3-D assessment of the epidermal splitting and decell......While real-time 3-D evaluation of human skin constructs is needed, only 2-D non-invasive imaging techniques are available. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the potential of high-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) for real-time 3-D assessment of the epidermal splitting...... before and after incubation. Real-time 3-D HD-OCT assessment was compared with 2-D en face assessment by reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM). (Immuno) histopathology was used as control. HD-OCT imaging allowed real-time 3-D visualization of the impact of selected agents on epidermal splitting, dermo......-epidermal junction, dermal architecture, vascular spaces and cellularity. RCM has a better resolution (1 μm) than HD-OCT (3 μm), permitting differentiation of different collagen fibres, but HD-OCT imaging has deeper penetration (570 μm) than RCM imaging (200 μm). Dispase II and NaCl treatments were found...

  3. Which histological characteristics of basal cell carcinomas influence the quality of optical coherence tomography imaging?

    Mogensen, M.; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    2009-01-01

    We explore how histopathology parameters influence OCT imaging of basal cell carcinomas (BCC) and address whether such parameters correlate with the quality of the recorded OCT images. Our results indicate that inflammation impairs OCT imaging and that sun-damaged skin can sometimes provide more ...... clear-cut images of skin cancer lesions using OCT imaging when compared to skin cancer surrounded by skin without sun-damage. ©2009 COPYRIGHT SPIE--The International Society for Optical Engineering. Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.......We explore how histopathology parameters influence OCT imaging of basal cell carcinomas (BCC) and address whether such parameters correlate with the quality of the recorded OCT images. Our results indicate that inflammation impairs OCT imaging and that sun-damaged skin can sometimes provide more...

  4. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT for Time-Resolved Imaging of Alveolar Dynamics in Mechanically Ventilated Rats

    Christian Schnabel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Though artificial ventilation is an essential life-saving treatment, the mechanical behavior of lung tissue at the alveolar level is still unknown. Therefore, we need to understand the tissue response during artificial ventilation at this microscale in order to develop new and more protective ventilation methods. Optical coherence tomography (OCT combined with intravital microscopy (IVM is a promising tool for visualizing lung tissue dynamics with a high spatial and temporal resolution in uninterruptedly ventilated rats. We present a measurement setup using a custom-made animal ventilator and a gating technique for data acquisition of time-resolved sequences.

  5. Scan-Less Line Field Optical Coherence Tomography, with Automatic Image Segmentation, as a Measurement Tool for Automotive Coatings

    Samuel Lawman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of the thicknesses of layers is important for the quality assurance of industrial coating systems. Current measurement techniques only provide a limited amount of information. Here, we show that spectral domain Line Field (LF Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT is able to return to the user a cross sectional B-Scan image in a single shot with no mechanical moving parts. To reliably extract layer thicknesses from such images of automotive paint systems, we present an automatic graph search image segmentation algorithm. To show that the algorithm works independently of the OCT device, the measurements are repeated with a separate time domain Full Field (FF OCT system. This gives matching mean thickness values within the standard deviations of the measured thicknesses across each B-Scan image. The combination of an LF-OCT with graph search segmentation is potentially a powerful technique for the quality assurance of non-opaque industrial coating layers.

  6. Fourier domain optical coherence tomography achieves full range complex imaging in vivo by introducing a carrier frequency during scanning

    Wang, Ruikang K

    2007-01-01

    The author describes a Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FDOCT) system that is capable of full range complex imaging in vivo. This is achieved by introducing a constant carrier frequency into the OCT spectral interferograms at the time when imaging is performed. The complex functions of the spatial interferograms formed by each single wavelength are constructed before performing the Fourier transformation to localize the scatters within a sample. Two algorithms, based on Fourier filtering and Hilbert transformation, respectively, are described to achieve the full range complex FDOCT imaging. It is shown that the Hilbert transformation approach delivers better performance than the Fourier filtering method does in terms of tolerating the sample movement in vivo. The author finally demonstrates experimentally the system and algorithms for true in vivo imaging at a rate of 20 000 axial scans per second

  7. Diagnostic potential of iris cross-sectional imaging in albinism using optical coherence tomography.

    Sheth, Viral; Gottlob, Irene; Mohammad, Sarim; McLean, Rebecca J; Maconachie, Gail D E; Kumar, Anil; Degg, Christopher; Proudlock, Frank A

    2013-10-01

    To characterize in vivo anatomic abnormalities of the iris in albinism compared with healthy controls using anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) and to explore the diagnostic potential of this technique for albinism. We also investigated the relationship between iris abnormalities and other phenotypical features of albinism. Prospective cross-sectional study. A total of 55 individuals with albinism and 45 healthy controls. We acquired 4.37×4.37-mm volumetric scans (743 A-scans, 50 B-scans) of the nasal and temporal iris in both eyes using AS-OCT (3-μm axial resolution). Iris layers were segmented and thicknesses were measured using ImageJ software. Iris transillumination grading was graded using Summers and colleagues' classification. Retinal OCT, eye movement recordings, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), visual evoked potential (VEP), and grading of skin and hair pigmentation were used to quantify other phenotypical features associated with albinism. Iris AS-OCT measurements included (1) total iris thickness, (2) stroma/anterior border (SAB) layer thickness, and (3) posterior epithelial layer (PEL) thickness. Correlation with other phenotypical measurements, including (1) iris transillumination grading, (2) retinal layer measurements at the fovea, (3) nystagmus intensity, (4) BCVA, (5) VEP asymmetry, (6) skin pigmentation, and (7) hair pigmentation (of head hair, lashes, and brows). The mean iris thickness was 10.7% thicker in controls (379.3 ± 44.0 μm) compared with the albinism group (342.5 ± 52.6 μm; P>0.001), SAB layers were 5.8% thicker in controls (315.1 ± 43.8 μm) compared with the albinism group (297.7 ± 50.0 μm; P=0.044), and PEL was 44.0% thicker in controls (64.1 ± 11.7 μm) compared with the albinism group (44.5 ± 13.9 μm; Palbinism. Phenotypic features of albinism, such as skin and hair pigmentation, BCVA, and nystagmus intensity, were significantly correlated to AS-OCT iris thickness measurements. We have

  8. Spatiotemporal closure of fractional laser-ablated channels imaged by optical coherence tomography and reflectance confocal microscopy

    Banzhaf, Christina A.; Wind, Bas S.; Mogensen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) offer high-resolution optical imaging of the skin, which may provide benefit in the context of laser-assisted drug delivery. We aimed to characterize postoperative healing of ablative fractional...... laser (AFXL)-induced channels and dynamics in their spatiotemporal closure using in vivo OCT and RCM techniques. Study design/Materials and Methods The inner forearm of healthy subjects (n = 6) was exposed to 10,600 nm fractional CO2 laser using 5 and 25% densities, 120 μm beam diameter, 5, 15, and 25 m......J/microbeam. Treatment sites were scanned with OCT to evaluate closure of AFXL-channels and RCM to evaluate subsequent re-epithelialization. Results OCT and RCM identified laser channels in epidermis and upper dermis as black, ablated tissue defects surrounded by characteristic hyper-and hyporeflective zones. OCT imaged...

  9. Functional imaging of the human brain using a modular, fibre-less, high-density diffuse optical tomography system.

    Chitnis, Danial; Cooper, Robert J; Dempsey, Laura; Powell, Samuel; Quaggia, Simone; Highton, David; Elwell, Clare; Hebden, Jeremy C; Everdell, Nicholas L

    2016-10-01

    We present the first three-dimensional, functional images of the human brain to be obtained using a fibre-less, high-density diffuse optical tomography system. Our technology consists of independent, miniaturized, silicone-encapsulated DOT modules that can be placed directly on the scalp. Four of these modules were arranged to provide up to 128, dual-wavelength measurement channels over a scalp area of approximately 60 × 65 mm 2 . Using a series of motor-cortex stimulation experiments, we demonstrate that this system can obtain high-quality, continuous-wave measurements at source-detector separations ranging from 14 to 55 mm in adults, in the presence of hair. We identify robust haemodynamic response functions in 5 out of 5 subjects, and present diffuse optical tomography images that depict functional haemodynamic responses that are well-localized in all three dimensions at both the individual and group levels. This prototype modular system paves the way for a new generation of wearable, wireless, high-density optical neuroimaging technologies.

  10. Photothermal optical coherence tomography for depth-resolved imaging of mesenchymal stem cells via single wall carbon nanotubes

    Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Connolly, Emma; Murphy, Mary; Barron, Valerie; Leahy, Martin

    2014-03-01

    The progress in stem cell research over the past decade holds promise and potential to address many unmet clinical therapeutic needs. Tracking stem cell with modern imaging modalities are critically needed for optimizing stem cell therapy, which offers insight into various underlying biological processes such as cell migration, engraftment, homing, differentiation, and functions etc. In this study we report the feasibility of photothermal optical coherence tomography (PT-OCT) to image human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) labeled with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for in vitro cell tracking in three dimensional scaffolds. PT-OCT is a functional extension of conventional OCT with extended capability of localized detection of absorbing targets from scattering background to provide depth-resolved molecular contrast imaging. A 91 kHz line rate, spectral domain PT-OCT system at 1310nm was developed to detect the photothermal signal generated by 800nm excitation laser. In general, MSCs do not have obvious optical absorption properties and cannot be directly visualized using PT-OCT imaging. However, the optical absorption properties of hMSCs can me modified by labeling with SWNTs. Using this approach, MSC were labeled with SWNT and the cell distribution imaged in a 3D polymer scaffold using PT-OCT.

  11. Analysis on the Effect of Sensor Views in Image Reconstruction Produced by Optical Tomography System Using Charge-Coupled Device.

    Jamaludin, Juliza; Rahim, Ruzairi Abdul; Fazul Rahiman, Mohd Hafiz; Mohd Rohani, Jemmy

    2018-04-01

    Optical tomography (OPT) is a method to capture a cross-sectional image based on the data obtained by sensors, distributed around the periphery of the analyzed system. This system is based on the measurement of the final light attenuation or absorption of radiation after crossing the measured objects. The number of sensor views will affect the results of image reconstruction, where the high number of sensor views per projection will give a high image quality. This research presents an application of charge-coupled device linear sensor and laser diode in an OPT system. Experiments in detecting solid and transparent objects in crystal clear water were conducted. Two numbers of sensors views, 160 and 320 views are evaluated in this research in reconstructing the images. The image reconstruction algorithms used were filtered images of linear back projection algorithms. Analysis on comparing the simulation and experiments image results shows that, with 320 image views giving less area error than 160 views. This suggests that high image view resulted in the high resolution of image reconstruction.

  12. Three-dimensional hard and soft tissue imaging of the human cochlea by scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT.

    Nadine Tinne

    Full Text Available The present study focuses on the application of scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT for visualization of anatomical structures inside the human cochlea ex vivo. SLOT is a laser-based highly efficient microscopy technique which allows for tomographic imaging of the internal structure of transparent specimens. Thus, in the field of otology this technique is best convenient for an ex vivo study of the inner ear anatomy. For this purpose, the preparation before imaging comprises decalcification, dehydration as well as optical clearing of the cochlea samples in toto. Here, we demonstrate results of SLOT imaging visualizing hard and soft tissue structures with an optical resolution of down to 15 μm using extinction and autofluorescence as contrast mechanisms. Furthermore, the internal structure can be analyzed nondestructively and quantitatively in detail by sectioning of the three-dimensional datasets. The method of X-ray Micro Computed Tomography (μCT has been previously applied to explanted cochlea and is solely based on absorption contrast. An advantage of SLOT is that it uses visible light for image formation and thus provides a variety of contrast mechanisms known from other light microscopy techniques, such as fluorescence or scattering. We show that SLOT data is consistent with μCT anatomical data and provides additional information by using fluorescence. We demonstrate that SLOT is applicable for cochlea with metallic cochlear implants (CI that would lead to significant artifacts in μCT imaging. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates the capability of SLOT for resolution visualization of cleared human cochleae ex vivo using multiple contrast mechanisms and lays the foundation for a broad variety of additional studies.

  13. Spatio-temporal imaging of the hemoglobin in the compressed breast with diffuse optical tomography

    Boverman, Gregory; Fang, Qianqian; Carp, Stefan A.; Miller, Eric L.; Brooks, Dana H.; Selb, Juliette; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.; Boas, David A.

    2007-07-01

    We develop algorithms for imaging the time-varying optical absorption within the breast given diffuse optical tomographic data collected over a time span that is long compared to the dynamics of the medium. Multispectral measurements allow for the determination of the time-varying total hemoglobin concentration and of oxygen saturation. To facilitate the image reconstruction, we decompose the hemodynamics in time into a linear combination of spatio-temporal basis functions, the coefficients of which are estimated using all of the data simultaneously, making use of a Newton-based nonlinear optimization algorithm. The solution of the extremely large least-squares problem which arises in computing the Newton update is obtained iteratively using the LSQR algorithm. A Laplacian spatial regularization operator is applied, and, in addition, we make use of temporal regularization which tends to encourage similarity between the images of the spatio-temporal coefficients. Results are shown for an extensive simulation, in which we are able to image and quantify localized changes in both total hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation. Finally, a breast compression study has been performed for a normal breast cancer screening subject, using an instrument which allows for highly accurate co-registration of multispectral diffuse optical measurements with an x-ray tomosynthesis image of the breast. We are able to quantify the global return of blood to the breast following compression, and, in addition, localized changes are observed which correspond to the glandular region of the breast.

  14. Optical Coherence Tomography of the Aging Kidney.

    Andrews, Peter M; Wang, Hsing-Wen; Guo, Hengchang; Anderson, Erik; Falola, Reuben; Chen, Yu

    2016-12-01

    The aging kidney exhibits a progressive decline in renal function with characteristic histopathologic changes and is a risk factor for renal transplant. However, the degree to which the kidney exhibits this decline depends on several factors that vary from one individual to the next. Optical coherence tomography is an evolving noninvasive imaging technology that has recently been used to evaluate acute tubular necrosis of living-human donor kidneys before their transplant. With the increasing use of kidneys from older individuals, it is important to determine whether optical coherence tomography also can distinguish the histopathology associated with aging. In this investigation, we used Munich-Wistar rats to evaluate the ability of optical coherence tomography to detect histopathologic changes associated with aging. Optical coherence tomography observations were correlated with renal function and conventional light microscopic evaluation of these same kidneys. With the onset of severe proteinuria at 10 to 12 months of age, optical coherence tomography revealed tubular necrosis/atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, tubular dilation, and glomerulosclerosis. With a further deterioration in kidney function at 16 to 18 months of age (as indicated by rising creatinine levels), optical coherence tomography revealed more extensive interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy, increased tubular dilation with cyst formation and more sclerotic glomeruli. The foregoing observations suggest that optical coherence tomography can be used to detect the histopathology of progressive nephropathy associated with aging.

  15. Spatiotemporal correlation of optical coherence tomography in-vivo images of rabbit airway for the diagnosis of edema

    Kang, DongYel; Wang, Alex; Volgger, Veronika; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2015-07-01

    Detection of an early stage of subglottic edema is vital for airway management and prevention of stenosis, a life-threatening condition in critically ill neonates. As an observer for the task of diagnosing edema in vivo, we investigated spatiotemporal correlation (STC) of full-range optical coherence tomography (OCT) images acquired in the rabbit airway with experimentally simulated edema. Operating the STC observer on OCT images generates STC coefficients as test statistics for the statistical decision task. Resulting from this, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for the diagnosis of airway edema with full-range OCT in-vivo images were extracted and areas under ROC curves were calculated. These statistically quantified results demonstrated the potential clinical feasibility of the STC method as a means to identify early airway edema.

  16. High-dynamic-range microscope imaging based on exposure bracketing in full-field optical coherence tomography.

    Leong-Hoi, Audrey; Montgomery, Paul C; Serio, Bruno; Twardowski, Patrice; Uhring, Wilfried

    2016-04-01

    By applying the proposed high-dynamic-range (HDR) technique based on exposure bracketing, we demonstrate a meaningful reduction in the spatial noise in image frames acquired with a CCD camera so as to improve the fringe contrast in full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT). This new signal processing method thus allows improved probing within transparent or semitransparent samples. The proposed method is demonstrated on 3 μm thick transparent polymer films of Mylar, which, due to their transparency, produce low contrast fringe patterns in white-light interference microscopy. High-resolution tomographic analysis is performed using the technique. After performing appropriate signal processing, resulting XZ sections are observed. Submicrometer-sized defects can be lost in the noise that is present in the CCD images. With the proposed method, we show that by increasing the signal-to-noise ratio of the images, submicrometer-sized defect structures can thus be detected.

  17. Added soft tissue contrast using signal attenuation and the fractal dimension for optical coherence tomography images of porcine arterial tissue

    Flueraru, C; Mao, Y; Chang, S; Popescu, D P; Sowa, M G

    2010-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of left-descending coronary tissues harvested from three porcine specimens were acquired with a home-build swept-source OCT setup. Despite the fact that OCT is capable of acquiring high resolution circumferential images of vessels, many distinct histological features of a vessel have comparable optical properties leading to poor contrast in OCT images. Two classification methods were tested in this report for the purpose of enhancing contrast between soft-tissue components of porcine coronary vessels. One method involved analyzing the attenuation of the OCT signal as a function of light penetration into the tissue. We demonstrated that by analyzing the signal attenuation in this manner we were able to differentiate two media sub-layers with different orientations of the smooth muscle cells. The other classification method used in our study was fractal analysis. Fractal analysis was implemented in a box-counting (fractal dimension) image-processing code and was used as a tool to differentiate and quantify variations in tissue texture at various locations in the OCT images. The calculated average fractal dimensions had different values in distinct regions of interest (ROI) within the imaged coronary samples. When compared to the results obtained by using the attenuation of the OCT signal, the method of fractal analysis demonstrated better classification potential for distinguishing amongst the tissue ROI.

  18. Optical coherence tomography of basal cell carcinoma

    Yücel, D.; Themstrup, L.; Manfredi, Maddalena

    2016-01-01

    Background: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most prevalent malignancy in Caucasians. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive optical imaging technology using the principle of interferometry. OCT has shown a great potential in diagnosing, monitoring, and follow-up of BCC. So far most...

  19. Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography as a Diagnosis Tool: Recent Progress with Multimodal Imaging

    Olivier Thouvenin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT is a variant of OCT that is able to register 2D en face views of scattering samples at a given depth. Thanks to its superior resolution, it can quickly reveal information similar to histology without the need to physically section the sample. Sensitivity and specificity levels of diagnosis performed with FF-OCT are 80% to 95% of the equivalent histological diagnosis performances and could therefore benefit from improvement. Therefore, multimodal systems have been designed to increase the diagnostic performance of FF-OCT. In this paper, we will discuss which contrasts can be measured with such multimodal systems in the context of ex vivo biological tissue examination. We will particularly emphasize three multimodal combinations to measure the tissue mechanics, dynamics, and molecular content respectively.

  20. WIDEFIELD SPECTRAL-DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY IMAGING OF PERIPHERAL ROUND RETINAL HOLES WITH OR WITHOUT RETINAL DETACHMENT.

    Casswell, Edward J; Abou Ltaif, Sleiman; Carr, Thomas; Keane, Pearse A; Charteris, David G; Wickham, Louisa

    2018-03-02

    To describe the widefield spectral-domain optical coherence tomography features of peripheral round retinal holes, with or without associated retinal detachment (RD). Retrospective, observational study of 28 eyes with peripheral round retinal holes, with and without RD. Patients underwent imaging with a widefield 50-degree spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (Heidelberg Engineering, Germany) and Optos ultra-widefield imaging systems (Optos, United Kingdom). Vitreous attachment at the site of the retinal hole was detected in 27/28 (96.4%) cases. Cases were split into three groups: RHs with RD (n = 12); RHs with subretinal fluid (n = 5), and flat RHs (n = 11), with minimal or no subretinal fluid. 91.6% retinal holes associated with subretinal fluid or RD had vitreous attachment at the site of the hole. Eighty percent had vitreous attachment at both edges of the retinal hole, in a U-shape configuration, which appeared to exert traction. By contrast, flat retinal holes had visible vitreous attachment only at one edge of the retinal hole in 45.4%. Vitreous attachment was commonly seen at the site of round retinal holes. Vitreous attachment at both edges of the retinal hole in a U-shape configuration was more commonly seen at holes associated with subretinal fluid or RD.

  1. In vivo imaging of human oral hard and soft tissues by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Walther, Julia; Golde, Jonas; Kirsten, Lars; Tetschke, Florian; Hempel, Franz; Rosenauer, Tobias; Hannig, Christian; Koch, Edmund

    2017-12-01

    Since optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides three-dimensional high-resolution images of biological tissue, the benefit of polarization contrast in the field of dentistry is highlighted in this study. Polarization-sensitive OCT (PS OCT) with phase-sensitive recording is used for imaging dental and mucosal tissues in the human oral cavity in vivo. An enhanced polarization contrast of oral structures is reached by analyzing the signals of the co- and crosspolarized channels of the swept source PS OCT system quantitatively with respect to reflectivity, retardation, optic axis orientation, and depolarization. The calculation of these polarization parameters enables a high tissue-specific contrast imaging for the detailed physical interpretation of human oral hard and soft tissues. For the proof-of-principle, imaging of composite restorations and mineralization defects at premolars as well as gingival, lingual, and labial oral mucosa was performed in vivo within the anterior oral cavity. The achieved contrast-enhanced results of the investigated human oral tissues by means of polarization-sensitive imaging are evaluated by the comparison with conventional intensity-based OCT.

  2. Long axial imaging range using conventional swept source lasers in optical coherence tomography via re-circulation loops

    Bradu, Adrian; Jackson, David A.; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2018-03-01

    Typically, swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) imaging instruments are capable of a longer axial range than their camera based (CB) counterpart. However, there are still various applications that would take advantage for an extended axial range. In this paper, we propose an interferometer configuration that can be used to extend the axial range of the OCT instruments equipped with conventional swept-source lasers up to a few cm. In this configuration, the two arms of the interferometer are equipped with adjustable optical path length rings. The use of semiconductor optical amplifiers in the two rings allows for compensating optical losses hence, multiple paths depth reflectivity profiles (Ascans) can be combined axially. In this way, extremely long overall axial ranges are possible. The use of the recirculation loops produces an effect equivalent to that of extending the coherence length of the swept source laser. Using this approach, the achievable axial imaging range in SS-OCT can reach values well beyond the limit imposed by the coherence length of the laser, to exceed in principle many centimeters. In the present work, we demonstrate axial ranges exceeding 4 cm using a commercial swept source laser and reaching 6 cm using an "in-house" swept source laser. When used in a conventional set-up alone, both these lasers can provide less than a few mm axial range.

  3. Improving lateral resolution and image quality of optical coherence tomography by the multi-frame superresolution technique for 3D tissue imaging.

    Shen, Kai; Lu, Hui; Baig, Sarfaraz; Wang, Michael R

    2017-11-01

    The multi-frame superresolution technique is introduced to significantly improve the lateral resolution and image quality of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Using several sets of low resolution C-scan 3D images with lateral sub-spot-spacing shifts on different sets, the multi-frame superresolution processing of these sets at each depth layer reconstructs a higher resolution and quality lateral image. Layer by layer processing yields an overall high lateral resolution and quality 3D image. In theory, the superresolution processing including deconvolution can solve the diffraction limit, lateral scan density and background noise problems together. In experiment, the improved lateral resolution by ~3 times reaching 7.81 µm and 2.19 µm using sample arm optics of 0.015 and 0.05 numerical aperture respectively as well as doubling the image quality has been confirmed by imaging a known resolution test target. Improved lateral resolution on in vitro skin C-scan images has been demonstrated. For in vivo 3D SD-OCT imaging of human skin, fingerprint and retina layer, we used the multi-modal volume registration method to effectively estimate the lateral image shifts among different C-scans due to random minor unintended live body motion. Further processing of these images generated high lateral resolution 3D images as well as high quality B-scan images of these in vivo tissues.

  4. In vivo optical coherence tomography imaging of dissolution of hyaluronic acid microneedles in human skin (Conference Presentation)

    Song, Seungri; Kim, Jung Dong; Bae, Jung-hyun; Chang, Sooho; Kim, Soocheol; Lee, Hyungsuk; Jeong, Dohyeon; Kim, Hong Kee; Joo, Chulmin

    2017-02-01

    Transdermal drug delivery (TDD) has been recently highlighted as an alternative to oral delivery and hypodermic injections. Among many methods, drug delivery using a microneedle (MN) is one of the promising administration strategies due to its high skin permeability, mininal invasiveness, and ease of injection. In addition, microneedle-based TDD is explored for cosmetic and therapeutic purposes, rapidly developing market of microneedle industry for general population. To date, visualization of microneedles inserted into biological tissue has primarily been performed ex vivo. MRI, CT and ultrasound imaging do not provide sufficient spatial resolution, and optical microscopy is not suitable because of their limited imaging depth; structure of microneedles located in 0.2 1mm into the skin cannot be visulalized. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive, cross-sectional optical imaging modality for biological tissue with high spatial resolution and acquisition speed. Compared with ultrasound imaging, it exhibits superior spatial resolution (1 10 um) and high sensitivity, while providing an imaging depth of biological tissue down to 1 2 mm. Here, we present in situ imaging and analysis of the penetration and dissolution characteristics of hyaluronic acid based MNs (HA-MN) with various needle heights in human skin in vivo. In contrast to other studies, we measured the actual penetration depths of the HA-MNs by considering the experimentally measured refractive index of HA in the solid state. For the dissolution dynamics of the HA-MNs, time-lapse structural alteration of the MNs could be clearly visualized, and the volumetric changes of the MNs were measured with an image analysis algorithm.

  5. Automated pharmaceutical tablet coating layer evaluation of optical coherence tomography images

    Markl, Daniel; Sacher, Stephan; Khinast, Johannes G; Hannesschläger, Günther; Leitner, Michael; Buchsbaum, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Film coating of pharmaceutical tablets is often applied to influence the drug release behaviour. The coating characteristics such as thickness and uniformity are critical quality parameters, which need to be precisely controlled. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) shows not only high potential for off-line quality control of film-coated tablets but also for in-line monitoring of coating processes. However, an in-line quality control tool must be able to determine coating thickness measurements automatically and in real-time. This study proposes an automatic thickness evaluation algorithm for bi-convex tables, which provides about 1000 thickness measurements within 1 s. Beside the segmentation of the coating layer, optical distortions due to refraction of the beam by the air/coating interface are corrected. Moreover, during in-line monitoring the tablets might be in oblique orientation, which needs to be considered in the algorithm design. Experiments were conducted where the tablet was rotated to specified angles. Manual and automatic thickness measurements were compared for varying coating thicknesses, angles of rotations, and beam displacements (i.e. lateral displacement between successive depth scans). The automatic thickness determination algorithm provides highly accurate results up to an angle of rotation of 30°. The computation time was reduced to 0.53 s for 700 thickness measurements by introducing feasibility constraints in the algorithm. (paper)

  6. Optical coherence tomography of the rat cochlea

    Wong, B. J. F.; de Boer, JF; Park, B.H.; Chen, ZP; Nelson, JS

    2000-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to image the internal structure of a rat cochlea (ex vivo). Immediately following sacrifice, the temporal bone of a Sprague-Dawley rat was harvested. Axial OCT cross sectional images lover regions of interest, 1x1 mm-2x8 mm) were obtained with a spatial

  7. Optical Coherence Tomography for Material Characterization

    Liu, P.

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive, contactless and high resolution imaging method, which allows the reconstruction of two or three dimensional depth-resolved images in turbid media. In the past 20 years, OCT has been extensively developed in the field of biomedical diagnostics,

  8. Extracting cardiac shapes and motion of the chick embryo heart outflow tract from four-dimensional optical coherence tomography images

    Yin, Xin; Liu, Aiping; Thornburg, Kent L.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2012-09-01

    Recent advances in optical coherence tomography (OCT), and the development of image reconstruction algorithms, enabled four-dimensional (4-D) (three-dimensional imaging over time) imaging of the embryonic heart. To further analyze and quantify the dynamics of cardiac beating, segmentation procedures that can extract the shape of the heart and its motion are needed. Most previous studies analyzed cardiac image sequences using manually extracted shapes and measurements. However, this is time consuming and subject to inter-operator variability. Automated or semi-automated analyses of 4-D cardiac OCT images, although very desirable, are also extremely challenging. This work proposes a robust algorithm to semi automatically detect and track cardiac tissue layers from 4-D OCT images of early (tubular) embryonic hearts. Our algorithm uses a two-dimensional (2-D) deformable double-line model (DLM) to detect target cardiac tissues. The detection algorithm uses a maximum-likelihood estimator and was successfully applied to 4-D in vivo OCT images of the heart outflow tract of day three chicken embryos. The extracted shapes captured the dynamics of the chick embryonic heart outflow tract wall, enabling further analysis of cardiac motion.

  9. Outer Retinal and Choroidal Evaluation in Multiple Evanescent White Dot Syndrome (MEWDS): An Enhanced Depth Imaging Optical Coherence Tomography Study.

    Fiore, Tito; Iaccheri, Barbara; Cerquaglia, Alessio; Lupidi, Marco; Torroni, Giovanni; Fruttini, Daniela; Cagini, Carlo

    2018-01-01

    To perform an analysis of optical coherence tomography (OCT) abnormalities in patients with MEWDS, during the acute and recovery stages, using enhanced depth imaging-OCT (EDI-OCT). A retrospective case series of five patients with MEWDS was included. EDI-OCT imaging was evaluated to detect retinal and choroidal features. In the acute phase, focal impairment of the ellipsoid zone and external limiting membrane, hyperreflective dots in the inner choroid, and full-thickness increase of the choroidal profile were observed in the affected eye; disappearance of these findings and restoration of the choroidal thickness (p = 0.046) was appreciated in the recovery phase. No OCT abnormalities were assessed in the unaffected eye. EDI-OCT revealed transient outer retinal layer changes and inner choroidal hyperreflective dots. A transient increased thickness of the whole choroid was also identified. This might confirm a short-lasting inflammatory involvement of the whole choroidal tissue in the active phase of MEWDS.

  10. In-vivo imaging of blood flow in human retinal vessels using color Doppler optical coherence tomography

    Yazdanfar, Siavash; Rollins, Andrew M.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    1999-04-01

    Quantification of retinal blood flow may lead to a better understanding of the progression and treatment of several ocular disorders, including diabetic retinopathy, age- related macular degeneration, and glaucoma. Current techniques, such as fluorescein angiography and laser Doppler velocimetry are limited, failing to provide sufficient information to the clinician. Color Doppler optical coherence tomography (CDOCT) is a novel technique using coherent heterodyne detection for simultaneous cross- sectional imaging of tissue microstructure and blood flow. This technique is capable of high spatial and velocity resolution imaging in highly scattering media. We implemented CDOCT for retinal blood flow mapping in human subjects. No dilation of the pupil was necessary. CDOCT is demonstrated for determining bidirectional flow in sub- 100micrometers diameter vessels in the retina. Additionally, we calculated Doppler broadening using the variance of depth- resolved spectra to identify regions with large velocity gradients within the Xenopus heart. This technique may be useful in quantifying local tissue perfusion in highly vascular retinal tissue.

  11. Reconstruction 3-dimensional image from 2-dimensional image of status optical coherence tomography (OCT) for analysis of changes in retinal thickness

    Arinilhaq,; Widita, Rena [Department of Physics, Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30

    Optical Coherence Tomography is often used in medical image acquisition to diagnose that change due easy to use and low price. Unfortunately, this type of examination produces a two-dimensional retinal image of the point of acquisition. Therefore, this study developed a method that combines and reconstruct 2-dimensional retinal images into three-dimensional images to display volumetric macular accurately. The system is built with three main stages: data acquisition, data extraction and 3-dimensional reconstruction. At data acquisition step, Optical Coherence Tomography produced six *.jpg images of each patient were further extracted with MATLAB 2010a software into six one-dimensional arrays. The six arrays are combined into a 3-dimensional matrix using a kriging interpolation method with SURFER9 resulting 3-dimensional graphics of macula. Finally, system provides three-dimensional color graphs based on the data distribution normal macula. The reconstruction system which has been designed produces three-dimensional images with size of 481 × 481 × h (retinal thickness) pixels.

  12. Intrasurgical Human Retinal Imaging With Manual Instrument Tracking Using a Microscope-Integrated Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Device.

    Hahn, Paul; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Cunefare, David; Migacz, Justin; Farsiu, Sina; Izatt, Joseph A; Toth, Cynthia A

    2015-07-01

    To characterize the first in-human intraoperative imaging using a custom prototype spectral-domain microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography (MIOCT) device during vitreoretinal surgery with instruments in the eye. Under institutional review board approval for a prospective intraoperative study, MIOCT images were obtained at surgical pauses with instruments held static in the vitreous cavity and then concurrently with surgical maneuvers. Postoperatively, MIOCT images obtained at surgical pauses were compared with images obtained with a high-resolution handheld spectral-domain OCT (HHOCT) system with objective endpoints, including acquisition of images acceptable for analysis and identification of predefined macular morphologic or pathologic features. Human MIOCT images were successfully obtained before incision and during pauses in surgical maneuvers. MIOCT imaging confirmed preoperative diagnoses, such as epiretinal membrane, full-thickness macular hole, and vitreomacular traction and demonstrated successful achievement of surgical goals. MIOCT and HHOCT images obtained at surgical pauses in two cohorts of five patients were comparable with greater than or equal to 80% correlation in 80% of patients. Real-time video-imaging concurrent with surgical manipulations enabled, for the first time using this device, visualization of dynamic instrument-retina interaction with targeted OCT tracking. MIOCT is successful for imaging at surgical pauses and for real-time image guidance with implementation of targeted OCT tracking. Even faster acquisition speeds are currently being developed with incorporation of a swept-source MIOCT engine. Further refinements and investigations will be directed toward continued integration for real-time volumetric imaging of surgical maneuvers. Ongoing development of seamless MIOCT systems will likely transform surgical visualization, approaches, and decision-making.

  13. Non-invasive imaging and monitoring of rodent retina using simultaneous dual-band optical coherence tomography

    Cimalla, Peter; Burkhardt, Anke; Walther, Julia; Hoefer, Aline; Wittig, Dierk; Funk, Richard; Koch, Edmund

    2011-03-01

    Spectral domain dual-band optical coherence tomography for simultaneous imaging of rodent retina in the 0.8 μm and 1.3 μm wavelength region and non-invasive monitoring of the posterior eye microstructure in the field of retinal degeneration research is demonstrated. The system is illuminated by a supercontinuum laser source and allows three-dimensional imaging with high axial resolution better than 3.8 μm and 5.3 μm in tissue at 800 nm and 1250 nm, respectively, for precise retinal thickness measurements. A fan-shaped scanning pattern with the pivot point close to the eye's pupil and a contact lens are applied to obtain optical access to the eye's fundus. First in vivo experiments in a RCS (royal college of surgeons) rat model with gene-related degeneration of the photoreceptor cells show good visibility of the retinal microstructure with sufficient contrast for thickness measurement of individual retinal layers. An enhanced penetration depth at 1250 nm is clearly identifiable revealing sub-choroidal structures that are not visible at 800 nm. Furthermore, additional simultaneous imaging at 1250 nm improves image quality by frequency compounding speckle noise reduction. These results are encouraging for time course studies of the rodent retina concerning its development related to disease progression and treatment response.

  14. Optical coherence tomography in conjunction with bronchoscopy

    Rodrigues, Ascedio Jose; Takimura, Celso Kiyochi; Lemos Neto, Pedro Alves; Figueiredo, Viviane Rossi

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of and the potential for using optical coherence tomography in conjunction with conventional bronchoscopy in the evaluation of the airways. Methods: This was a pilot study based on an ex vivo experimental model involving three animals: one adult New Zealand rabbit and two Landrace pigs. An optical coherence tomography imaging catheter was inserted through the working channel of a flexible bronchoscope in order to reach the distal trachea of the animals. Images of the walls of the trachea were systematically taken along its entire length, from the distal to the proximal portion. Results: The imaging catheter was easily adapted to the working channel of the bronchoscope. High-resolution images of cross sections of the trachea were taken in real time, precisely delineating microstructures, such as the epithelium, submucosa, and cartilage, as well as the adventitia of the anterior and lateral tracheal walls. The corresponding layers of the epithelium, mucosa, and cartilage were clearly differentiated. The mucosa, submucosa, and trachealis muscle were clearly identified in the posterior wall. Conclusions: It is feasible to use an optical coherence tomography imaging catheter in combination with a flexible bronchoscope. Optical coherence tomography produces high resolution images that reveal the microanatomy of the trachea, including structures that are typically seen only on images produced by conventional histology. (author)

  15. Optical coherence tomography in conjunction with bronchoscopy

    Rodrigues, Ascedio Jose; Takimura, Celso Kiyochi; Lemos Neto, Pedro Alves; Figueiredo, Viviane Rossi, E-mail: ascedio@gmail.com [Servico de Endoscopia Respiratoria, Hospital das Clinicas, Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of and the potential for using optical coherence tomography in conjunction with conventional bronchoscopy in the evaluation of the airways. Methods: This was a pilot study based on an ex vivo experimental model involving three animals: one adult New Zealand rabbit and two Landrace pigs. An optical coherence tomography imaging catheter was inserted through the working channel of a flexible bronchoscope in order to reach the distal trachea of the animals. Images of the walls of the trachea were systematically taken along its entire length, from the distal to the proximal portion. Results: The imaging catheter was easily adapted to the working channel of the bronchoscope. High-resolution images of cross sections of the trachea were taken in real time, precisely delineating microstructures, such as the epithelium, submucosa, and cartilage, as well as the adventitia of the anterior and lateral tracheal walls. The corresponding layers of the epithelium, mucosa, and cartilage were clearly differentiated. The mucosa, submucosa, and trachealis muscle were clearly identified in the posterior wall. Conclusions: It is feasible to use an optical coherence tomography imaging catheter in combination with a flexible bronchoscope. Optical coherence tomography produces high resolution images that reveal the microanatomy of the trachea, including structures that are typically seen only on images produced by conventional histology. (author)

  16. Optical coherence tomography in dermatology

    Sattler, Elke; Kästle, Raphaela; Welzel, Julia

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive diagnostic method that offers a view into the superficial layers of the skin in vivo in real-time. An infrared broadband light source allows the investigation of skin architecture and changes up to a depth of 1 to 2 mm with a resolution between 15 and 3 μm, depending on the system used. Thus OCT enables evaluation of skin lesions, especially nonmelanoma skin cancers and inflammatory diseases, quantification of skin changes, visualization of parasitic infestations, and examination of other indications such as the investigation of nails. OCT provides a quick and useful diagnostic imaging technique for a number of clinical questions and is a valuable addition or complement to other noninvasive imaging tools such as dermoscopy, high-frequency ultrasound, and confocal laser scan microscopy.

  17. Comparative assessments of the effects of alcohol exposure on fetal brain development using optical coherence tomography and ultrasound imaging

    Sudheendran, Narendran; Bake, Shameena; Miranda, Rajesh C.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2013-02-01

    The developing fetal brain is vulnerable to a variety of environmental agents including maternal ethanol consumption. Preclinical studies on the development and amelioration of fetal teratology would be significantly facilitated by the application of high resolution imaging technologies like optical coherence tomography (OCT) and high-frequency ultrasound (US). This study investigates the ability of these imaging technologies to measure the effects of maternal ethanol exposure on brain development, ex vivo, in fetal mice. Pregnant mice at gestational day 12.5 were administered ethanol (3 g/Kg b.wt.) or water by intragastric gavage, twice daily for three consecutive days. On gestational day 14.5, fetuses were collected and imaged. Three-dimensional images of the mice fetus brains were obtained by OCT and high-resolution US, and the volumes of the left and right ventricles of the brain were measured. Ethanol-exposed fetuses exhibited a statistically significant, 2-fold increase in average left and right ventricular volumes compared with the ventricular volume of control fetuses, with OCT-derived measures of 0.38 and 0.18 mm3, respectively, whereas the boundaries of the fetal mouse lateral ventricles were not clearly definable with US imaging. Our results indicate that OCT is a useful technology for assessing ventriculomegaly accompanying alcohol-induced developmental delay. This study clearly demonstrated advantages of using OCT for quantitative assessment of embryonic development compared with US imaging.

  18. Intraoperative handheld probe for 3D imaging of pediatric benign vocal fold lesions using optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Benboujja, Fouzi; Garcia, Jordan; Beaudette, Kathy; Strupler, Mathias; Hartnick, Christopher J.; Boudoux, Caroline

    2016-02-01

    Excessive and repetitive force applied on vocal fold tissue can induce benign vocal fold lesions. Children affected suffer from chronic hoarseness. In this instance, the vibratory ability of the folds, a complex layered microanatomy, becomes impaired. Histological findings have shown that lesions produce a remodeling of sup-epithelial vocal fold layers. However, our understanding of lesion features and development is still limited. Indeed, conventional imaging techniques do not allow a non-invasive assessment of sub-epithelial integrity of the vocal fold. Furthermore, it remains challenging to differentiate these sub-epithelial lesions (such as bilateral nodules, polyps and cysts) from a clinical perspective, as their outer surfaces are relatively similar. As treatment strategy differs for each lesion type, it is critical to efficiently differentiate sub-epithelial alterations involved in benign lesions. In this study, we developed an optical coherence tomography (OCT) based handheld probe suitable for pediatric laryngological imaging. The probe allows for rapid three-dimensional imaging of vocal fold lesions. The system is adapted to allow for high-resolution intra-operative imaging. We imaged 20 patients undergoing direct laryngoscopy during which we looked at different benign pediatric pathologies such as bilateral nodules, cysts and laryngeal papillomatosis and compared them to healthy tissue. We qualitatively and quantitatively characterized laryngeal pathologies and demonstrated the added advantage of using 3D OCT imaging for lesion discrimination and margin assessment. OCT evaluation of the integrity of the vocal cord could yield to a better pediatric management of laryngeal diseases.

  19. Comparing three-dimensional serial optical coherence tomography histology to MRI imaging in the entire mouse brain

    Castonguay, Alexandre; Lefebvre, Joël; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric

    2018-01-01

    An automated serial histology setup combining optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging with vibratome sectioning was used to image eight wild type mouse brains. The datasets resulted in thousands of volumetric tiles resolved at a voxel size of (4.9×4.9×6.5) μm3 stitched back together to give a three-dimensional map of the brain from which a template OCT brain was obtained. To assess deformation caused by tissue sectioning, reconstruction algorithms, and fixation, OCT datasets were compared to both in vivo and ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) imaging. The OCT brain template yielded a highly detailed map of the brain structure, with a high contrast in white matter fiber bundles and was highly resemblant to the in vivo MRI template. Brain labeling using the Allen brain framework showed little variation in regional brain volume among imaging modalities with no statistical differences. The high correspondence between the OCT template brain and its in vivo counterpart demonstrates the potential of whole brain histology to validate in vivo imaging.

  20. Optical coherence tomography: Technique and applications

    Thomsen, Jakob Borup; Sander, Birgit; Mogensen, Mette

    2009-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive optical imaging modality providing real-time video rate images in two and three dimensions of biological tissues with micrometer resolution. OCT fills the gap between ultrasound and confocal microscopy, since it has a higher resolution than...... of retinal diseases. The potential of OCT in many other applications is currently being explored, such as in developmental biology, skin cancer diagnostics, vulnerable plaque detection in cardiology, esophageal diagnostics and a number of other applications within oncology....

  1. Evolution of Choroidal Neovascularization due to Presumed Ocular Histoplasmosis Syndrome on Multimodal Imaging including Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography

    T. Y. Alvin Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 37-year-old Caucasian woman presented with acute decrease in central vision in her right eye and was found to have subfoveal choroidal neovascularization (CNV due to presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome (POHS. Her visual acuity improved from 20/70 to 20/20 at her 6-month follow-up, after 3 consecutive monthly intravitreal bevacizumab injections were initiated at her first visit. Although no CNV activity was seen on fluorescein angiography (FA or spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT at her 2-month, 4-month, and 6-month follow-up visits, persistent flow in the CNV lesion was detected on optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA. OCTA shows persistent vascular flow as well as changes in vascular flow in CNV lesions associated with POHS, indicating the continued presence of patent vessels and changes in these CNV lesions, even when traditional imaging of the lesion with OCT and FA indicates stability of the lesion with no disease activity. Additional cases with longitudinal follow-up are needed to assess how OCTA should be incorporated into clinical practice.

  2. Automated 3-D method for the correction of axial artifacts in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography images

    Antony, Bhavna; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Tang, Li; Ramdas, Wishal D.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Lee, Kyungmoo; Kwon, Young H.; Sonka, Milan; Garvin, Mona K.

    2011-01-01

    The 3-D spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images of the retina often do not reflect the true shape of the retina and are distorted differently along the x and y axes. In this paper, we propose a novel technique that uses thin-plate splines in two stages to estimate and correct the distinct axial artifacts in SD-OCT images. The method was quantitatively validated using nine pairs of OCT scans obtained with orthogonal fast-scanning axes, where a segmented surface was compared after both datasets had been corrected. The mean unsigned difference computed between the locations of this artifact-corrected surface after the single-spline and dual-spline correction was 23.36 ± 4.04 μm and 5.94 ± 1.09 μm, respectively, and showed a significant difference (p < 0.001 from two-tailed paired t-test). The method was also validated using depth maps constructed from stereo fundus photographs of the optic nerve head, which were compared to the flattened top surface from the OCT datasets. Significant differences (p < 0.001) were noted between the artifact-corrected datasets and the original datasets, where the mean unsigned differences computed over 30 optic-nerve-head-centered scans (in normalized units) were 0.134 ± 0.035 and 0.302 ± 0.134, respectively. PMID:21833377

  3. Examination of diagnostic features in multiphoton microscopy and optical coherence tomography images of ovarian tumorigenesis in a mouse model

    Watson, Jennifer M.

    Ovarian cancer is a deadly disease owing to the non-specific symptoms and suspected rapid progression, leading to frequent late stage detection and poor prognosis. Medical imaging methods such as CT, MRI and ultrasound as well as serum testing for cancer markers have had extremely poor performance for early disease detection. Due to the poor performance of available screening methods, and the impracticality and ineffectiveness of taking tissue biopsies from the ovary, women at high risk for developing ovarian cancer are often advised to undergo prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy. This surgery results in many side effects and is most often unnecessary since only a fraction of high risk women go on to develop ovarian cancer. Better understanding of the early development of ovarian cancer and characterization of morphological changes associated with early disease could lead to the development of an effective screening test for women at high risk. Optical imaging methods including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) are excellent tools for studying disease progression owing to the high resolution and depth sectioning capabilities. Further, these techniques are excellent for optical biopsy because they can image in situ non-destructively. In the studies described in this dissertation OCT and MPM are used to identify cellular and tissue morphological changes associated with early tumor development in a mouse model of ovarian cancer. This work is organized into three specific aims. The first aim is to use the images from the MPM phenomenon of second harmonic generation to quantitatively examine the morphological differences in collagen structure in normal mouse ovarian tissue and mouse ovarian tumors. The second aim is to examine the differences in endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence in normal mouse ovarian tissue and mouse ovarian tumors. The third and final aim is to identify changes in ovarian microstructure resulting from early

  4. A comparison of two methods to measure choroidal thickness by enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography

    Lundberg, Lars Kristian; Vestergaard, Anders Højslet; Vergmann, Anna Stage

    Introduction The choroid is believed to be involved in the pathophysiology of several vision threatening diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, central serous chorioretinopathy, inflammatory disorders and myopic macular degeneration. Enhanced depth imaging spectral-domain optical...... millimeter in each direction of fovea. Only the horizontal and vertical sections were selected for analysis. A total of 9 targets per eye that represented anatomically different choroidal locations were analysed for every subject. We used 2 different methods from the Heidelberg Explorer software to measure...

  5. Whole-head functional brain imaging of neonates at cot-side using time-resolved diffuse optical tomography

    Dempsey, Laura A.; Cooper, Robert J.; Powell, Samuel; Edwards, Andrea; Lee, Chuen-Wai; Brigadoi, Sabrina; Everdell, Nick; Arridge, Simon; Gibson, Adam P.; Austin, Topun; Hebden, Jeremy C.

    2015-07-01

    We present a method for acquiring whole-head images of changes in blood volume and oxygenation from the infant brain at cot-side using time-resolved diffuse optical tomography (TR-DOT). At UCL, we have built a portable TR-DOT device, known as MONSTIR II, which is capable of obtaining a whole-head (1024 channels) image sequence in 75 seconds. Datatypes extracted from the temporal point spread functions acquired by the system allow us to determine changes in absorption and reduced scattering coefficients within the interrogated tissue. This information can then be used to define clinically relevant measures, such as oxygen saturation, as well as to reconstruct images of relative changes in tissue chromophore concentration, notably those of oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin. Additionally, the effective temporal resolution of our system is improved with spatio-temporal regularisation implemented through a Kalman filtering approach, allowing us to image transient haemodynamic changes. By using this filtering technique with intensity and mean time-of-flight datatypes, we have reconstructed images of changes in absorption and reduced scattering coefficients in a dynamic 2D phantom. These results demonstrate that MONSTIR II is capable of resolving slow changes in tissue optical properties within volumes that are comparable to the preterm head. Following this verification study, we are progressing to imaging a 3D dynamic phantom as well as the neonatal brain at cot-side. Our current study involves scanning healthy babies to demonstrate the quality of recordings we are able to achieve in this challenging patient population, with the eventual goal of imaging functional activation and seizures.

  6. Volumetric imaging of rod and cone photoreceptor structure with a combined adaptive optics-optical coherence tomography-scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    Wells-Gray, Elaine M.; Choi, Stacey S.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Finn, Susanna C.; Greiner, Cherry; Werner, John S.; Doble, Nathan

    2018-03-01

    We have designed and implemented a dual-mode adaptive optics (AO) imaging system that combines spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) for in vivo imaging of the human retina. The system simultaneously acquires SLO frames and OCT B-scans at 60 Hz with an OCT volume acquisition time of 4.2 s. Transverse eye motion measured from the SLO is used to register the OCT B-scans to generate three-dimensional (3-D) volumes. Key optical design considerations include: minimizing system aberrations through the use of off-axis relay telescopes, conjugate pupil plane requirements, and the use of dichroic beam splitters to separate and recombine the OCT and SLO beams around the nonshared horizontal scanning mirrors. To demonstrate system performance, AO-OCT-SLO images and measurements are taken from three normal human subjects ranging in retinal eccentricity from the fovea out to 15-deg temporal and 20-deg superior. Also presented are en face OCT projections generated from the registered 3-D volumes. The ability to acquire high-resolution 3-D images of the human retina in the midperiphery and beyond has clinical importance in diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy.

  7. Microscope-Integrated Intraoperative Ultrahigh-Speed Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography for Widefield Retinal and Anterior Segment Imaging.

    Lu, Chen D; Waheed, Nadia K; Witkin, Andre; Baumal, Caroline R; Liu, Jonathan J; Potsaid, Benjamin; Joseph, Anthony; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Cable, Alex; Chan, Kinpui; Duker, Jay S; Fujimoto, James G

    2018-02-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of retinal and anterior segment intraoperative widefield imaging using an ultrahigh-speed, swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) surgical microscope attachment. A prototype post-objective SS-OCT using a 1,050-nm wavelength, 400 kHz A-scan rate, vertical cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) light source was integrated to a commercial ophthalmic surgical microscope after the objective. Each widefield OCT data set was acquired in 3 seconds (1,000 × 1,000 A-scans, 12 × 12 mm 2 for retina and 10 × 10 mm 2 for anterior segment). Intraoperative SS-OCT was performed in 20 eyes of 20 patients. In six of seven membrane peels and five of seven rhegmatogenous retinal detachment repair surgeries, widefield retinal imaging enabled evaluation pre- and postoperatively. In all seven cataract cases, anterior imaging evaluated the integrity of the posterior lens capsule. Ultrahigh-speed SS-OCT enables widefield intraoperative viewing in the posterior and anterior eye. Widefield imaging visualizes ocular structures and pathology without requiring OCT realignment. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2018;49:94-102.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Enhanced-Depth Imaging Optical Coherence Tomography of the Human Choroid In Vivo Compared With Histology After Enucleation

    Li, Xiao Qiang; Heegaard, Steffen; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study compared in vivo enhanced-depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT) with ex vivo histology of the choroid in human eyes. METHODS: Three eyes in three patients with advanced iris melanoma without posterior segment involvement underwent EDI-OCT less than 24 hours prior...... to enucleation and, in one eye, immediately after enucleation. Following fixation in 4% buffered formaldehyde and paraffin embedding, serial sections of the whole eye were cut horizontally, mounted, stained with hematoxylin-eosin and digitized. Alignment between histology and EDI-OCT was made on landmarks...... and subfoveal choroid thickness reduced to 56%, 45%, and 56%, respectively, of its in vivo thickness on EDI-OCT. CONCLUSIONS: There were no identifiable discrepancies in choroidal structural patterns between clinical EDI-OCT and histologic sections except that after enucleation and histologic fixation choroidal...

  9. Diagnostic imaging capabilities of the Ocelot -Optical Coherence Tomography System, ex-vivo evaluation and clinical relevance

    Dohad, Suhail; Shao, John; Cawich, Ian; Kankaria, Manish; Desai, Arjun

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a high-resolution sub-surface imaging modality using near-infrared light to provide accurate and high contrast intra-vascular images. This enables accurate assessment of diseased arteries before and after intravascular intervention. This study was designed to corroborate diagnostic imaging equivalence between the Ocelot and the Dragonfly OCT systems with regards to the intravascular features that are most important in clinical management of patients with atherosclerotic vascular disease. These intravascular features were then corroborated in vivo during treatment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) pathology using the Ocelot catheter. In order to compare the diagnostic information obtained by Ocelot (Avinger Inc., Redwood City, CA) and Dragonfly (St. Jude Medical, Minneapolis, MN) OCT systems, we utilized ex-vivo preparations of arterial segments. Ocelot and Dragonfly catheters were inserted into identical cadaveric femoral peripheral arteries for image acquisition and interpretation. Three independent physician interpreters assessed the images to establish accuracy and sensitivity of the diagnostic information. Histologic evaluation of the corresponding arterial segments provided the gold standard for image interpretation. In vivo clinical images were obtained during therapeutic interventions that included crossing of peripheral chronic total occlusions (CTOs) using the Ocelot catheter. Strong concordance was demonstrated when matching image characteristics between both OCT systems and histology. The Dragonfly and Ocelot system’s vessel features were interpreted with high sensitivity (91.1–100 %) and specificity (86.7–100 %). Inter-observer concordance was documented with excellent correlation across all vessel features. The clinical benefit that the Ocelot OCT system provided was demonstrated by comparable procedural images acquired at the point of therapy. The study demonstrates equivalence of image acquisition and

  10. [Plaque segmentation of intracoronary optical coherence tomography images based on K-means and improved random walk algorithm].

    Wang, Guanglei; Wang, Pengyu; Han, Yechen; Liu, Xiuling; Li, Yan; Lu, Qian

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has developed into a popular coronary imaging technology at home and abroad. The segmentation of plaque regions in coronary OCT images has great significance for vulnerable plaque recognition and research. In this paper, a new algorithm based on K -means clustering and improved random walk is proposed and Semi-automated segmentation of calcified plaque, fibrotic plaque and lipid pool was achieved. And the weight function of random walk is improved. The distance between the edges of pixels in the image and the seed points is added to the definition of the weight function. It increases the weak edge weights and prevent over-segmentation. Based on the above methods, the OCT images of 9 coronary atherosclerotic patients were selected for plaque segmentation. By contrasting the doctor's manual segmentation results with this method, it was proved that this method had good robustness and accuracy. It is hoped that this method can be helpful for the clinical diagnosis of coronary heart disease.

  11. Quantitative imaging of cerebral blood flow velocity and intracellular motility using dynamic light scattering-optical coherence tomography.

    Lee, Jonghwan; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Wu, Weicheng; Daneshmand, Ali; Climov, Mihail; Ayata, Cenk; Boas, David A

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes a novel optical method for label-free quantitative imaging of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and intracellular motility (IM) in the rodent cerebral cortex. This method is based on a technique that integrates dynamic light scattering (DLS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT), named DLS-OCT. The technique measures both the axial and transverse velocities of CBF, whereas conventional Doppler OCT measures only the axial one. In addition, the technique produces a three-dimensional map of the diffusion coefficient quantifying nontranslational motions. In the DLS-OCT diffusion map, we observed high-diffusion spots, whose locations highly correspond to neuronal cell bodies and whose diffusion coefficient agreed with that of the motion of intracellular organelles reported in vitro in the literature. Therefore, the present method has enabled, for the first time to our knowledge, label-free imaging of the diffusion-like motion of intracellular organelles in vivo. As an example application, we used the method to monitor CBF and IM during a brief ischemic stroke, where we observed an induced persistent reduction in IM despite the recovery of CBF after stroke. This result supports that the IM measured in this study represent the cellular energy metabolism-related active motion of intracellular organelles rather than free diffusion of intracellular macromolecules.

  12. En-face imaging of the ellipsoid zone in the retina from optical coherence tomography B-scans

    Holmes, T.; Larkin, S.; Downing, M.; Csaky, K.

    2015-03-01

    It is generally believed that photoreceptor integrity is related to the ellipsoid zone appearance in optical coherence tomography (OCT) B-scans. Algorithms and software were developed for viewing and analyzing the ellipsoid zone. The software performs the following: (a), automated ellipsoid zone isolation in the B-scans, (b), en-face view of the ellipsoid-zone reflectance, (c), alignment and overlay of (b) onto reflectance images of the retina, and (d), alignment and overlay of (c) with microperimetry sensitivity points. Dataset groups were compared from normal and dry age related macular degeneration (DAMD) subjects. Scalar measurements for correlation against condition included the mean and standard deviation of the ellipsoid zone's reflectance. The imageprocessing techniques for automatically finding the ellipsoid zone are based upon a calculation of optical flow which tracks the edges of laminated structures across an image. Statistical significance was shown in T-tests of these measurements with the population pools separated as normal and DAMD subjects. A display of en-face ellipsoid-zone reflectance shows a clear and recognizable difference between any of the normal and DAMD subjects in that they show generally uniform and nonuniform reflectance, respectively, over the region near the macula. Regions surrounding points of low microperimetry (μP) sensitivity have nonregular and lower levels of ellipsoid-zone reflectance nearby. These findings support the idea that the photoreceptor integrity could be affecting both the ellipsoid-zone reflectance and the sensitivity measurements.

  13. Compact akinetic swept source optical coherence tomography angiography at 1060 nm supporting a wide field of view and adaptive optics imaging modes of the posterior eye.

    Salas, Matthias; Augustin, Marco; Felberer, Franz; Wartak, Andreas; Laslandes, Marie; Ginner, Laurin; Niederleithner, Michael; Ensher, Jason; Minneman, Michael P; Leitgeb, Rainer A; Drexler, Wolfgang; Levecq, Xavier; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Pircher, Michael

    2018-04-01

    Imaging of the human retina with high resolution is an essential step towards improved diagnosis and treatment control. In this paper, we introduce a compact, clinically user-friendly instrument based on swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT). A key feature of the system is the realization of two different operation modes. The first operation mode is similar to conventional OCT imaging and provides large field of view (FoV) images (up to 45° × 30°) of the human retina and choroid with standard resolution. The second operation mode enables it to optically zoom into regions of interest with high transverse resolution using adaptive optics (AO). The FoV of this second operation mode (AO-OCT mode) is 3.0° × 2.8° and enables the visualization of individual retinal cells such as cone photoreceptors or choriocapillaris. The OCT engine is based on an akinetic swept source at 1060 nm and provides an A-scan rate of 200 kHz. Structural as well as angiographic information can be retrieved from the retina and choroid in both operational modes. The capabilities of the prototype are demonstrated in healthy and diseased eyes.

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Lens Nuclear Density Using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT with a Liquid Optics Interface: Correlation between OCT Images and LOCS III Grading

    You Na Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To quantify whole lens and nuclear lens densities using anterior-segment optical coherence tomography (OCT with a liquid optics interface and evaluate their correlation with Lens Opacities Classification System III (LOCS III lens grading and corrected distance visual acuity (BCVA. Methods. OCT images of the whole lens and lens nucleus of eyes with age-related nuclear cataract were analyzed using ImageJ software. The lens grade and nuclear density were represented in pixel intensity units (PIU and correlations between PIU, BCVA, and LOCS III were assessed. Results. Forty-seven eyes were analyzed. The mean whole lens and lens nuclear densities were 26.99 ± 5.23 and 19.43 ± 6.15 PIU, respectively. A positive linear correlation was observed between lens opacities (R2 = 0.187, p<0.01 and nuclear density (R2 = 0.316, p<0.01 obtained from OCT images and LOCS III. Preoperative BCVA and LOCS III were also positively correlated (R2 = 0.454, p<0.01. Conclusions. Whole lens and lens nuclear densities obtained from OCT correlated with LOCS III. Nuclear density showed a higher positive correlation with LOCS III than whole lens density. OCT with a liquid optics interface is a potential quantitative method for lens grading and can aid in monitoring and managing age-related cataracts.

  15. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography cross-sectional image of optic nerve head during intraocular pressure elevation

    Ji Young Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze changes of the optic nerve head (ONH and peripapillary region during intraocular pressure (IOP elevation in patients using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT.METHODS: Both an optic disc 200×200 cube scan and a high-definition 5-line raster scan were obtained from open angle glaucoma patients presented with monocular elevation of IOP (≥30 mm Hg using SD-OCT. Additional baseline characteristics included age, gender, diagnosis, best-corrected visual acuity, refractive error, findings of slit lamp biomicroscopy, findings of dilated stereoscopic examination of the ONH and fundus, IOP, pachymetry findings, and the results of visual field.RESULTS: The 24 patients were selected and divided into two groups:group 1 patients had no history of IOP elevation or glaucoma (n=14, and group 2 patients did have history of IOP elevation or glaucoma (n=10. In each patient, the study eye with elevated IOP was classified into group H (high, and the fellow eye was classified into group L (low. The mean deviation (MD differed significantly between groups H and L when all eyes were considered (P=0.047 and in group 2 (P=0.042, not in group 1 (P=0.893. Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL average thickness (P=0.050, rim area (P=0.015, vertical cup/disc ratio (P=0.011, cup volume (P=0.028, inferior quadrant RNFL thickness (P=0.017, and clock-hour (1, 5, and 6 RNFL thicknesses (P=0.050, 0.012, and 0.018, respectively, cup depth (P=0.008, central prelaminar layer thickness (P=0.023, mid-inferior prelaminar layer thickness (P=0.023, and nasal retinal slope (P=0.034 were significantly different between the eyes with groups H and L.CONCLUSION:RNFL average thickness, rim area, vertical cup/disc ratio, cup volume, inferior quadrant RNFL thickness, and clock-hour (1, 5, and 6 RNFL thicknesses significantly changed during acute IOP elevation.

  16. Fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) for dental applications

    Everett, M. J., LLNL

    1998-06-02

    We have developed a hand-held fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for scanning of the oral cavity We have produced, using this scanning device, in viva cross-sectional images of hard and soft dental tissues in human volunteers Clinically relevant anatomical structures, including the gingival margin, periodontal sulcus, and dento-enamel junction, were visible in all the images The dento-enamel junction and the alveolar bone were identifiable in approximately two thirds of the images These images represent, to our knowledge, the first in viva OCT images of human dental tissue.

  17. Real-time three-dimensional imaging of epidermal splitting and removal by high-definition optical coherence tomography.

    Boone, Marc; Draye, Jean Pierre; Verween, Gunther; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Verbeken, Gilbert; De Vos, Daniel; Rose, Thomas; Jennes, Serge; Jemec, Gregor B E; Del Marmol, Véronique

    2014-10-01

    While real-time 3-D evaluation of human skin constructs is needed, only 2-D non-invasive imaging techniques are available. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the potential of high-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) for real-time 3-D assessment of the epidermal splitting and decellularization. Human skin samples were incubated with four different agents: Dispase II, NaCl 1 M, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and Triton X-100. Epidermal splitting, dermo-epidermal junction, acellularity and 3-D architecture of dermal matrices were evaluated by High-definition optical coherence tomography before and after incubation. Real-time 3-D HD-OCT assessment was compared with 2-D en face assessment by reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM). (Immuno) histopathology was used as control. HD-OCT imaging allowed real-time 3-D visualization of the impact of selected agents on epidermal splitting, dermo-epidermal junction, dermal architecture, vascular spaces and cellularity. RCM has a better resolution (1 μm) than HD-OCT (3 μm), permitting differentiation of different collagen fibres, but HD-OCT imaging has deeper penetration (570 μm) than RCM imaging (200 μm). Dispase II and NaCl treatments were found to be equally efficient in the removal of the epidermis from human split-thickness skin allografts. However, a different epidermal splitting level at the dermo-epidermal junction could be observed and confirmed by immunolabelling of collagen type IV and type VII. Epidermal splitting occurred at the level of the lamina densa with dispase II and above the lamina densa (in the lamina lucida) with NaCl. The 3-D architecture of dermal papillae and dermis was more affected by Dispase II on HD-OCT which corresponded with histopathologic (orcein staining) fragmentation of elastic fibres. With SDS treatment, the epidermal removal was incomplete as remnants of the epidermal basal cell layer remained attached to the basement membrane on the dermis. With Triton X-100 treatment

  18. Diffusion tensor optical coherence tomography

    Marks, Daniel L.; Blackmon, Richard L.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2018-01-01

    In situ measurements of diffusive particle transport provide insight into tissue architecture, drug delivery, and cellular function. Analogous to diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI), where the anisotropic diffusion of water molecules is mapped on the millimeter scale to elucidate the fibrous structure of tissue, here we propose diffusion-tensor optical coherence tomography (DT-OCT) for measuring directional diffusivity and flow of optically scattering particles within tissue. Because DT-OCT is sensitive to the sub-resolution motion of Brownian particles as they are constrained by tissue macromolecules, it has the potential to quantify nanoporous anisotropic tissue structure at micrometer resolution as relevant to extracellular matrices, neurons, and capillaries. Here we derive the principles of DT-OCT, relating the detected optical signal from a minimum of six probe beams with the six unique diffusion tensor and three flow vector components. The optimal geometry of the probe beams is determined given a finite numerical aperture, and a high-speed hardware implementation is proposed. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations are employed to assess the ability of the proposed DT-OCT system to quantify anisotropic diffusion of nanoparticles in a collagen matrix, an extracellular constituent that is known to become highly aligned during tumor development.

  19. Dynamic Optical Coherence Tomography in Dermatology

    Ulrich, Martina; Themstrup, Lotte; De Carvalho, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) represents a non-invasive imaging technology, which may be applied to the diagnosis of non-melanoma skin cancer and which has recently been shown to improve the diagnostic accuracy of basal cell carcinoma. Technical developments of OCT continue to expand the app...

  20. Coronal in vivo forward-imaging of rat brain morphology with an ultra-small optical coherence tomography fiber probe

    Xie, Yijing; Bonin, Tim; Löffler, Susanne; Hüttmann, Gereon; Tronnier, Volker; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2013-02-01

    A well-established navigation method is one of the key conditions for successful brain surgery: it should be accurate, safe and online operable. Recent research shows that optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a potential solution for this application by providing a high resolution and small probe dimension. In this study a fiber-based spectral-domain OCT system utilizing a super-luminescent-diode with the center wavelength of 840 nm providing 14.5 μm axial resolution was used. A composite 125 μm diameter detecting probe with a gradient index (GRIN) fiber fused to a single mode fiber was employed. Signals were reconstructed into grayscale images by horizontally aligning A-scans from the same trajectory with different depths. The reconstructed images can display brain morphology along the entire trajectory. For scans of typical white matter, the signals showed a higher reflection of light intensity with lower penetration depth as well as a steeper attenuation rate compared to the scans typical for gray matter. Micro-structures such as axon bundles (70 μm) in the caudate nucleus are visible in the reconstructed images. This study explores the potential of OCT to be a navigation modality in brain surgery.

  1. Automatic detection and recognition of multiple macular lesions in retinal optical coherence tomography images with multi-instance multilabel learning

    Fang, Leyuan; Yang, Liumao; Li, Shutao; Rabbani, Hossein; Liu, Zhimin; Peng, Qinghua; Chen, Xiangdong

    2017-06-01

    Detection and recognition of macular lesions in optical coherence tomography (OCT) are very important for retinal diseases diagnosis and treatment. As one kind of retinal disease (e.g., diabetic retinopathy) may contain multiple lesions (e.g., edema, exudates, and microaneurysms) and eye patients may suffer from multiple retinal diseases, multiple lesions often coexist within one retinal image. Therefore, one single-lesion-based detector may not support the diagnosis of clinical eye diseases. To address this issue, we propose a multi-instance multilabel-based lesions recognition (MIML-LR) method for the simultaneous detection and recognition of multiple lesions. The proposed MIML-LR method consists of the following steps: (1) segment the regions of interest (ROIs) for different lesions, (2) compute descriptive instances (features) for each lesion region, (3) construct multilabel detectors, and (4) recognize each ROI with the detectors. The proposed MIML-LR method was tested on 823 clinically labeled OCT images with normal macular and macular with three common lesions: epiretinal membrane, edema, and drusen. For each input OCT image, our MIML-LR method can automatically identify the number of lesions and assign the class labels, achieving the average accuracy of 88.72% for the cases with multiple lesions, which better assists macular disease diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Correlation of collagen synthesis with polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography imaging of in vitro human atherosclerosis

    Kuo, Wen-Chuan; Shyu, Jeou-Jong; Chou, Nai-Kuan; Lai, Chih-Ming; Tien, En-Kuang; Huang, Huan-Jang; Chou, Chien; Jan, Gwo-Jen

    2005-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is unquestionably the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. In the mean time, the worldwide importance of acute vascular syndromes is increasing. Because collagen fiber is a critical component of atherosclerotic lesions; it constitutes up to 60% of the total atherosclerotic plaque protein. The uncontrolled collagen accumulation leads to arterial stenosis, whereas excessive collagen breakdown weakens plaques thereby making them prone to rupture finally. Thus, in this study, we present the first application, to our knowledge, of using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) in human atherosclerosis. We demonstrate this technique for imaging of intensity, birefringence, and fast-axis orientation simultaneously in atherosclerotic plaques. This in vitro study suggests that the birefringence change in plaque is due to the prominent deposition of collagen according to the correlation of PS-OCT images with histological counterpart. Moreover, we can acquire quantitative criteria based on the change of polarization of incident beam to estimate whether the collagen synthesized is "too much" or "not enough". Thus by combining of high resolution intensity imaging and birefringence detection makes PS-OCT could be a potentially powerful tool for early assessment of atherosclerosis appearance and the prediction of plaque rupture in clinic.

  3. Comparison of peripapillary choroidal thickness measurements via spectral domain optical coherence tomography with and without enhanced depth imaging.

    Ayyildiz, Onder; Kucukevcilioglu, Murat; Ozge, Gokhan; Koylu, Mehmet Talay; Ozgonul, Cem; Gokce, Gokcen; Mumcuoglu, Tarkan; Durukan, Ali Hakan; Mutlu, Fatih Mehmet

    2016-05-01

    To compare peripapillary choroidal thickness (PP-CT) measurements using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) device with and without enhanced depth imaging (EDI). Sixty healthy subjects aged from 18 to 40 years were included in this study. PP-CTs were measured in the right eyes by manual segmentation via SD-OCT both with and without EDI. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for each technique and comparison of PP-CT measurements between two techniques were evaluated. The correlation between retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and PP-CT was also explored on images of SD-OCT without EDI. The PP-CT measurements of 55 subjects were evaluated. The ICC was 0.999 (95% CI: 0.998-1.0, p  0.05). Additionally, there was no correlation between RNFL thickness and PP-CT (r = -0.109; p = 0.335). The PP-CT measurements via SD-OCT without EDI were consistent with the measurements via SD-OCT with EDI. Ophthalmologists who do not have access to EDI technology can use images of SD-OCT without EDI to measure the peripapillary choroid for research purposes. However, thicker peripapillary choroids cannot be measured using this technique and require further modifications or newer technologies, such as SD-OCT with EDI.

  4. Imaging of vascular dynamics within the foot using dynamic diffuse optical tomography to diagnose peripheral arterial disease

    Khalil, M. A.; Kim, H. K.; Hoi, J. W.; Kim, I.; Dayal, R.; Shrikande, G.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is the narrowing of the functional area of the artery generally due to atherosclerosis. It affects between 8-12 million people in the United States and if untreated this can lead to ulceration, gangrene and ultimately amputation. The current diagnostic method for PAD is the ankle-brachial index (ABI). The ABI is a ratio of the patient's systolic blood pressure in the foot to that of the brachial artery in the arm, a ratio below 0.9 is indicative of affected vasculature. However, this method is ineffective in patients with calcified arteries (diabetic and end-stage renal failure patients), which falsely elevates the ABI recording resulting in a false negative reading. In this paper we present our results in a pilot study to deduce optical tomography's ability to detect poor blood perfusion in the foot. We performed an IRB approved 30 patient study, where we imaged the feet of the enrolled patients during a five stage dynamic imaging sequence. The patients were split up into three groups: 10 healthy subjects, 10 PAD patients and 10 PAD patients with diabetes and they were imaged while applying a pressure cuff to their thigh. Differences in the magnitude of blood pooling in the foot and rate at which the blood pools in the foot are all indicative of arterial disease.

  5. Image-guided intraocular injection using multimodality optical coherence tomography and fluorescence confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy in rodent ophthalmological models

    Terrones, Benjamin D.; Benavides, Oscar R.; Leeburg, Kelsey C.; Mehanathan, Sankarathi B.; Levine, Edward M.; Tao, Yuankai K.

    2018-02-01

    Intraocular injections are routinely performed for delivery of anti-VEGF and anti-inflammatory therapies in humans. While these injections are also performed in mice to develop novel models of ophthalmic diseases and screen novel therapeutics, the injection location and volume are not well-controlled and reproducible. We overcome limitations of conventional injections methods by developing a multimodality, long working distance, non-contact optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) system for retinal imaging before and after injections. Our OCT+cSLO system combines a custom-built spectraldomain OCT engine (875+/-85 nm) with 125 kHz line-rate with a modified commercial cSLO with a maximum frame-rate of 30 fps (512 x 512 pix.). The system was designed for an overlapping OCT+cSLO field-of-view of 1.1 mm with a 7.76 mm working distance to the pupil. cSLO excitation light sources and filters were optimized for simultaneous GFP and tdTomato imaging. Lateral resolution was 3.02 µm for OCT and 2.74 μm for cSLO. Intravitreal injections of 5%, 10%, and 20% intralipid with Alex Fluor 488 were manually injected intraocularly in C57BL/6 mice. Post-injection imaging showed structural changes associated with retinal puncture, including the injection track, a retinal elevation, and detachment of the posterior hyaloid. OCT enables quantitative analysis of injection location and volumes whereas complementary cSLO improves specificity for identifying fluorescently labeled injected compounds and transgenic cells. The long working distance of our non-contact OCT+cSLO system is uniquely-suited for concurrent imaging with intraocular injections and may be applied for imaging of ophthalmic surgical dynamics and real-time image-guided injections.

  6. A Simplified Method to Measure Choroidal Thickness Using Adaptive Compensation in Enhanced Depth Imaging Optical Coherence Tomography

    Gupta, Preeti; Sidhartha, Elizabeth; Girard, Michael J. A.; Mari, Jean Martial; Wong, Tien-Yin; Cheng, Ching-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate a simplified method to measure choroidal thickness (CT) using commercially available enhanced depth imaging (EDI) spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods We measured CT in 31 subjects without ocular diseases using Spectralis EDI SD-OCT. The choroid-scleral interface of the acquired images was first enhanced using a post-processing compensation algorithm. The enhanced images were then analysed using Photoshop. Two graders independently graded the images to assess inter-grader reliability. One grader re-graded the images after 2 weeks to determine intra-grader reliability. Statistical analysis was performed using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plot analyses. Results Using adaptive compensation both the intra-grader reliability (ICC: 0.95 to 0.97) and inter-grader reliability (ICC: 0.93 to 0.97) were perfect for all five locations of CT. However, with the conventional technique of manual CT measurements using built-in callipers provided with the Heidelberg explorer software, the intra- (ICC: 0.87 to 0.94) and inter-grader reliability (ICC: 0.90 to 0.93) for all the measured locations is lower. Using adaptive compensation, the mean differences (95% limits of agreement) for intra- and inter-grader sub-foveal CT measurements were −1.3 (−3.33 to 30.8) µm and −1.2 (−36.6 to 34.2) µm, respectively. Conclusions The measurement of CT obtained from EDI SD-OCT using our simplified method was highly reliable and efficient. Our method is an easy and practical approach to improve the quality of choroidal images and the precision of CT measurement. PMID:24797674

  7. A simplified method to measure choroidal thickness using adaptive compensation in enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography.

    Preeti Gupta

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate a simplified method to measure choroidal thickness (CT using commercially available enhanced depth imaging (EDI spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT. METHODS: We measured CT in 31 subjects without ocular diseases using Spectralis EDI SD-OCT. The choroid-scleral interface of the acquired images was first enhanced using a post-processing compensation algorithm. The enhanced images were then analysed using Photoshop. Two graders independently graded the images to assess inter-grader reliability. One grader re-graded the images after 2 weeks to determine intra-grader reliability. Statistical analysis was performed using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC and Bland-Altman plot analyses. RESULTS: Using adaptive compensation both the intra-grader reliability (ICC: 0.95 to 0.97 and inter-grader reliability (ICC: 0.93 to 0.97 were perfect for all five locations of CT. However, with the conventional technique of manual CT measurements using built-in callipers provided with the Heidelberg explorer software, the intra- (ICC: 0.87 to 0.94 and inter-grader reliability (ICC: 0.90 to 0.93 for all the measured locations is lower. Using adaptive compensation, the mean differences (95% limits of agreement for intra- and inter-grader sub-foveal CT measurements were -1.3 (-3.33 to 30.8 µm and -1.2 (-36.6 to 34.2 µm, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The measurement of CT obtained from EDI SD-OCT using our simplified method was highly reliable and efficient. Our method is an easy and practical approach to improve the quality of choroidal images and the precision of CT measurement.

  8. Assessment of β-zone peripapillary atrophy by optical coherence tomography and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy imaging in glaucoma patients

    Seidensticker F

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Florian Seidensticker,1,* Lukas Reznicek,2,* Thomas Mann,2 Irene Hübert,2 Anselm Kampik,2 Michael Ulbig,2 Christoph Hirneiss,2 Aljoscha S Neubauer,2 Marcus Kernt2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany  *These authors have contributed equally to this work Purpose: To assess β-zone peripapillary atrophy (β-PPA using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT, scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO, and fundus autofluorescence (FAF imaging in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma with advanced glaucomatous visual field defects. Methods: A consecutive, prospective series of 82 study eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma were included in this study. All study participants underwent a full ophthalmic examination followed by SD-OCT, wide-field SLO, and FAF imaging of the optic nerve head and the peripapillary region. Results: Eighty-four glaucomatous eyes were included in our prospective study. Correlation analyses for horizontally and vertically obtained β-PPA for all three imaging modalities (color SLO, FAF, and SD-OCT revealed highest correlations between FAF and color SLO (Pearson correlation coefficient: 0.904 [P<0.001] for horizontal β-PPA and 0.786 [P<0.001] for vertical β-PPA. Bland–Altman plotting revealed highest agreements between color SLO and FAF, with −2.1 pixels ±1.96 standard deviation (SD for horizontal β-PPA, SD: 10.5 pixels and 2.4 pixels ±1.96 SD for vertical β-PPA. Conclusion: β-PPA can be assessed using en-face SLO and cross-sectional SD-OCT imaging. Correlation analyses revealed highest correlations between color SLO and FAF imaging, while correlations between SLO and SD-OCT were weak. A more precise structural definition of β-PPA is needed. Keywords: fundus autofluorescence, FAF, OCT, SD-OCT, SLO, glaucomatous optic neuropathy

  9. Localized Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Defects in Red-free Photographs Versus En Face Structural Optical Coherence Tomography Images.

    Jung, Jae Hoon; Park, Ji-Hye; Yoo, Chungkwon; Kim, Yong Yeon

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to compare the locations of localized retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) defects in red-free fundus photographs and optical coherence tomography (OCT) en face images. We performed a retrospective, comparative study on 46 eyes from 46 glaucoma patients with localized RNFL defects observed in red-free fundus photographs. En face structural images were obtained in the superficial and whole retinal layers using OCT and were overlaid on the corresponding red-free fundus photographs. The proximal/distal angular locations and angular width of each RNFL defect in red-free photos (red-free defects) and in en face structural images (en face defects) were compared. In the superficial retinal layer, there were no significant differences between red-free and en face defects on the proximal/distal angular location and angular width. In the whole retinal layer, the degree of the distal angular location of the en face defects was significantly larger than that of the red-free defects (71.85±18.26 vs. 70.87±17.90 degrees, P=0.003). The correlations of clinical variables with the differences in angular parameters between red-free and en face defects were not significant in the superficial retinal layer. The average RNFL thickness was negatively correlated with the difference in the distal angular location in the whole retinal layer (Pearson correlation coefficient=-0.401, P=0.006). Localized RNFL defects detected in OCT en face structural images of the superficial retinal layer showed high topographic correlation with defects detected in red-free photographs. OCT en face structural images in the superficial layer may be an alternative to red-free fundus photography for the identification of localized RNFL defects in glaucomatous eyes.

  10. Anti-Stokes effect CCD camera and SLD based optical coherence tomography for full-field imaging in the 1550nm region

    Kredzinski, Lukasz; Connelly, Michael J.

    2012-06-01

    Full-field Optical coherence tomography is an en-face interferometric imaging technology capable of carrying out high resolution cross-sectional imaging of the internal microstructure of an examined specimen in a non-invasive manner. The presented system is based on competitively priced optical components available at the main optical communications band located in the 1550 nm region. It consists of a superluminescent diode and an anti-stokes imaging device. The single mode fibre coupled SLD was connected to a multi-mode fibre inserted into a mode scrambler to obtain spatially incoherent illumination, suitable for OCT wide-field modality in terms of crosstalk suppression and image enhancement. This relatively inexpensive system with moderate resolution of approximately 24um x 12um (axial x lateral) was constructed to perform a 3D cross sectional imaging of a human tooth. To our knowledge this is the first 1550 nm full-field OCT system reported.

  11. Temporal comparison of functional brain imaging with diffuse optical tomography and fMRI during rat forepaw stimulation

    Siegel, Andrew M; Culver, Joseph P; Mandeville, Joseph B; Boas, David A

    2003-01-01

    The time courses of oxyhaemoglobin ([HbO 2 ]), deoxyhaemoglobin ([HbR]) and total haemoglobin ([HbT]) concentration changes following cortical activation in rats by electrical forepaw stimulation were measured using diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and compared to similar measurements performed previously with fMRI at 2.0 T and 4.7 T. We also explored the qualitative effects of varying stimulus parameters on the temporal evolution of the hemodynamic response. DOT images were reconstructed at a depth of 1.5 mm over a 1 cm square area from 2 mm anterior to bregma to 8 mm posterior to bregma. The measurement set included 9 sources and 16 detectors with an imaging frame rate of 10 Hz. Both DOT [HbR] and [HbO 2 ] time courses were compared to the fMRI BOLD time course during stimulation, and the DOT [HbT] time course was compared to the fMRI cerebral plasma volume (CPV) time course. We believe that DOT and fMRI can provide similar temporal information for both blood volume and deoxyhaemoglobin changes, which helps to cross-validate these two techniques and to demonstrate that DOT can be useful as a complementary modality to fMRI for investigating the hemodynamic response to neuronal activity

  12. Swept source optical coherence tomography for in vivo imaging and vibrometry in the apex of the mouse cochlea

    Lee, Hee Yoon [E.L. Ginzton Laboratory and Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Raphael, Patrick D.; Oghalai, John S. [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Ellerbee, Audrey K. [E.L. Ginzton Laboratory and Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Applegate, Brian E. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Cochlear amplification has been most commonly investigated by measuring the vibrations of the basilar membrane in animal models. Several different techniques have been used for measuring these vibrations such as laser Doppler vibrometry, miniature pressure sensors, low coherence interferometry, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). We have built a swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) system, which is similar to SD-OCT in that it is capable of performing both imaging and vibration measurements within the mouse cochlea in vivo without having to open the bone. In vivo 3D images of a mouse cochlea were obtained, and the basilar membrane, tectorial membrane, Reissner’s membrane, tunnel of Corti, and reticular lamina could all be resolved. We measured vibrations of multiple structures within the mouse cochlea to sound stimuli. As well, we measured the radial deflections of the reticular lamina and tectorial membrane to estimate the displacement of the outer hair cell stereocilia. These measurements have the potential to more clearly define the mechanisms underlying the linear and non-linear processes within the mammalian cochlea.

  13. Optical Coherence Tomography for Retinal Surgery: Perioperative Analysis to Real-Time Four-Dimensional Image-Guided Surgery.

    Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar M; Keller, Brenton; Viehland, Christian; Shen, Liangbo; Seider, Michael I; Izatt, Joseph A; Toth, Cynthia A

    2016-07-01

    Magnification of the surgical field using the operating microscope facilitated profound innovations in retinal surgery in the 1970s, such as pars plana vitrectomy. Although surgical instrumentation and illumination techniques are continually developing, the operating microscope for vitreoretinal procedures has remained essentially unchanged and currently limits the surgeon's depth perception and assessment of subtle microanatomy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized clinical management of retinal pathology, and its introduction into the operating suite may have a similar impact on surgical visualization and treatment. In this article, we review the evolution of OCT for retinal surgery, from perioperative analysis to live volumetric (four-dimensional, 4D) image-guided surgery. We begin by briefly addressing the benefits and limitations of the operating microscope, the progression of OCT technology, and OCT applications in clinical/perioperative retinal imaging. Next, we review intraoperative OCT (iOCT) applications using handheld probes during surgical pauses, two-dimensional (2D) microscope-integrated OCT (MIOCT) of live surgery, and volumetric MIOCT of live surgery. The iOCT discussion focuses on technological advancements, applications during human retinal surgery, translational difficulties and limitations, and future directions.

  14. Three-dimensional imaging analysis of Yersinia ruckeri infected rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gills by optical projection tomography

    Otani, Maki; Raida, Martin Kristian

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a new tool for three-dimensional (3D) imaging of small tissues or embryos, based on multi-angle recording of internal fluorescent signals using intact whole mount tissue or fish. To understand the route of infection, gills of Y. ruckeri infected rainbow trout...... were labeled with fluorescent antibody and visualized in 3D by the OPT scanner. Rainbow trout were infected with Y. ruckeri O1 biotype 1 (1 x 109 cells/ml) for 1 hour at 18 °C, and then transferred to clean water. Three fish were sampled at 12 different time points and fixed in 4% PFA. The gills were...... incubated whole with rabbit anti-Y. ruckeri polyclonal antibody and Alexa Fluor®594 conjugated goat anti-rabbit IgG. After embedding in 1% low melting point agarose, specimens were dehydrated in 100% methanol and cleared in BABB (benzyl alcohol: benzyl benzoate) for OPT scanning. 3D imaging results showed...

  15. Temporal comparison of functional brain imaging with diffuse optical tomography and fMRI during rat forepaw stimulation

    Siegel, Andrew M [Tufts University Bioengineering Center, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Culver, Joseph P [Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02129 (United States); Mandeville, Joseph B [Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02129 (United States); Boas, David A [Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02129 (United States)

    2003-05-21

    The time courses of oxyhaemoglobin ([HbO{sub 2}]), deoxyhaemoglobin ([HbR]) and total haemoglobin ([HbT]) concentration changes following cortical activation in rats by electrical forepaw stimulation were measured using diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and compared to similar measurements performed previously with fMRI at 2.0 T and 4.7 T. We also explored the qualitative effects of varying stimulus parameters on the temporal evolution of the hemodynamic response. DOT images were reconstructed at a depth of 1.5 mm over a 1 cm square area from 2 mm anterior to bregma to 8 mm posterior to bregma. The measurement set included 9 sources and 16 detectors with an imaging frame rate of 10 Hz. Both DOT [HbR] and [HbO{sub 2}] time courses were compared to the fMRI BOLD time course during stimulation, and the DOT [HbT] time course was compared to the fMRI cerebral plasma volume (CPV) time course. We believe that DOT and fMRI can provide similar temporal information for both blood volume and deoxyhaemoglobin changes, which helps to cross-validate these two techniques and to demonstrate that DOT can be useful as a complementary modality to fMRI for investigating the hemodynamic response to neuronal activity.

  16. Prevalence of Split Nerve Fiber Layer Bundles in Healthy People Imaged with Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Sirel Gür Güngör

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The presence of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL split bundles was recently described in normal eyes scanned using scanning laser polarimetry and by histologic studies. Split bundles may resemble RNFL loss in healthy eyes. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of nerve fiber layer split bundles in healthy people. Materials and Methods: We imaged 718 eyes of 359 healthy persons with the spectral domain optical coherence tomography in this cross-sectional study. All eyes had intraocular pressure of 21 mmHg or less, normal appearance of the optic nerve head, and normal visual fields (Humphrey Field Analyzer 24-2 full threshold program. In our study, a bundle was defined as ‘split’ when there is localized defect not resembling a wedge defect in the RNFL deviation map with a symmetrically divided RNFL appearance on the RNFL thickness map. The classification was performed by two independent observers who used an identical set of reference examples to standardize the classification. Results: Inter-observer consensus was reached in all cases. Bilateral superior split bundles were seen in 19 cases (5.29% and unilateral superior split was observed in 15 cases (4.16%. In 325 cases (90.52% there was no split bundle. Conclusion: Split nerve fiber layer bundles, in contrast to single nerve fiber layer bundles, are not common findings in healthy eyes. In eyes with normal optic disc appearance, especially when a superior RNFL defect is observed in RNFL deviation map, the RNLF thickness map and graphs should also be examined for split nerve fiber layer bundles.

  17. A novel technique of contrast-enhanced optical coherence tomography imaging in evaluation of clearance of lipids in human tears.

    Napoli, Pietro Emanuele; Coronella, Franco; Satta, Giovanni Maria; Fossarello, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to gather preliminary data in different conditions of healthy eyes, aqueous tear deficient dry eyes, obstructive meibomian gland disease (MGD) and non-obvious obstructive MGD (NOMGD) individuals, using a new, contrast-enhanced optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging method to evaluate the clearance of lipids in human tears. Eighty-two adult patients presenting with complaints of ocular irritation were studied for abnormalities of the ocular surface and classified as healthy (n = 21), aqueous tear deficient dry eyes (n = 20), obstructive MGD (n = 15) and NOMGD (n = 26) individuals. A lipid-based tracer, containing an oil-in-water emulsion, was used to obtain an enhanced OCT imaging of the lower tear meniscus. After instillation, a dramatic initial increase of reflectivity of the lower tear meniscus was detected by OCT, followed by a decay back to baseline values over time. Based on this finding, the clearance of lipids was measured in real-time by Fourier-domain anterior segment OCT. The differences in the clearance of lipids among the four groups as well as the correlations between symptom questionnaire score, standardized visual scale test, fluorescein break-up time, ocular surface fluorescein staining score, Schirmer I test scores were found to be statistically significant. The individual areas under the curve of the clearance of lipids calculated by the receiver operating characteristic curve technique ranged from 0.66 to 0.98, suggesting reliable sensitivity and specificity of lipid-enhanced OCT imaging. This new technique of contrast-enhanced OCT imaging of the tear film following lipid-based tracer instillation provides a measure of the clearance of lipids. The quantitative values found are in agreement with other methods of evaluation of the lacrimal system. An improvement of the clinician's ability in the diagnosis and understanding of abnormalities of the ocular surface may be achieved by this simple approach.

  18. Imaging retinal degeneration in mice by combining Fourier domain optical coherence tomography and fluorescent scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    Hossein-Javaheri, Nima; Molday, Laurie L.; Xu, Jing; Molday, Robert S.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2009-02-01

    Visualization of the internal structures of the retina is critical for clinical diagnosis and monitoring of pathology as well as for medical research investigating the root causes of retinal degeneration. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is emerging as the preferred technique for non-contact sub-surface depth-resolved imaging of the retina. The high resolution cross sectional images acquired in vivo by OCT can be compared to histology to visually delineate the retinal layers. The recent demonstration of the significant sensitivity increase obtained through use of Fourier domain (FD) detection with OCT has been used to facilitate high speed scanning for volumetric reconstruction of the retina in software. The images acquired by OCT are purely structural, relying on refractive index differences in the tissue for contrast, and do not provide information on the molecular content of the sample. We have constructed a FDOCT prototype and combined it with a fluorescent Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (fSLO) to permit real time alignment of the field of view on the retina. The alignment of the FDOCT system to the specimen is crucial for the registration of measurements taken throughout longitudinal studies. In addition, fluorescence detection has been integrated with the SLO to enable the en face localization of a molecular contrast signal, which is important for retinal angiography, and also for detection of autofluorescence associated with some forms of retinal degeneration, for example autofluorescence lipofuscin accumulations are associated with Stargardt's Macular Dystrophy. The integrated FD OCT/fSLO system was investigated for imaging the retina of the mice in vivo.

  19. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a contrast agent for imaging of animal tissue using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT)

    Mondal, Indranil; Raj, Shipra; Roy, Poulomi; Poddar, Raju

    2018-01-01

    We present noninvasive three-dimensional depth-resolved imaging of animal tissue with a swept-source optical coherence tomography system at 1064 nm center wavelength and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a potential contrast agent. A swept-source laser light source is used to enable an imaging rate of 100 kHz (100 000 A-scans s-1). Swept-source optical coherence tomography is a new variant of the optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique, offering unique advantages in terms of sensitivity, reduction of motion artifacts, etc. To enhance the contrast of an OCT image, AgNPs are utilized as an exogeneous contrast agent. AgNPs are synthesized using a modified Tollens method and characterization is done by UV-vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. In vitro imaging of chicken breast tissue, with and without the application of AgNPs, is performed. The effect of AgNPs is studied with different exposure times. A mathematical model is also built to calculate changes in the local scattering coefficient of tissue from OCT images. A quantitative estimation of scattering coefficient and contrast is performed for tissues with and without application of AgNPs. Significant improvement in contrast and increase in scattering coefficient with time is observed.

  20. Quantitative Assessment of Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging Performance with Phantom-Based Test Methods And Computational Modeling

    Agrawal, Anant

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful medical imaging modality that uniquely produces high-resolution cross-sectional images of tissue using low energy light. Its clinical applications and technological capabilities have grown substantially since its invention about twenty years ago, but efforts have been limited to develop tools to assess performance of OCT devices with respect to the quality and content of acquired images. Such tools are important to ensure information derived from OCT signals and images is accurate and consistent, in order to support further technology development, promote standardization, and benefit public health. The research in this dissertation investigates new physical and computational models which can provide unique insights into specific performance characteristics of OCT devices. Physical models, known as phantoms, are fabricated and evaluated in the interest of establishing standardized test methods to measure several important quantities relevant to image quality. (1) Spatial resolution is measured with a nanoparticle-embedded phantom and model eye which together yield the point spread function under conditions where OCT is commonly used. (2) A multi-layered phantom is constructed to measure the contrast transfer function along the axis of light propagation, relevant for cross-sectional imaging capabilities. (3) Existing and new methods to determine device sensitivity are examined and compared, to better understand the detection limits of OCT. A novel computational model based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, which simulates the physics of light behavior at the sub-microscopic level within complex, heterogeneous media, is developed to probe device and tissue characteristics influencing the information content of an OCT image. This model is first tested in simple geometric configurations to understand its accuracy and limitations, then a highly realistic representation of a biological cell, the retinal

  1. Optical biopsy of lymph node morphology using optical coherence tomography.

    Luo, Wei; Nguyen, Freddy T; Zysk, Adam M; Ralston, Tyler S; Brockenbrough, John; Marks, Daniel L; Oldenburg, Amy L; Boppart, Stephen A

    2005-10-01

    Optical diagnostic imaging techniques are increasingly being used in the clinical environment, allowing for improved screening and diagnosis while minimizing the number of invasive procedures. Diffuse optical tomography, for example, is capable of whole-breast imaging and is being developed as an alternative to traditional X-ray mammography. While this may eventually be a very effective screening method, other optical techniques are better suited for imaging on the cellular and molecular scale. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), for instance, is capable of high-resolution cross-sectional imaging of tissue morphology. In a manner analogous to ultrasound imaging except using optics, pulses of near-infrared light are sent into the tissue while coherence-gated reflections are measured interferometrically to form a cross-sectional image of tissue. In this paper we apply OCT techniques for the high-resolution three-dimensional visualization of lymph node morphology. We present the first reported OCT images showing detailed morphological structure and corresponding histological features of lymph nodes from a carcinogen-induced rat mammary tumor model, as well as from a human lymph node containing late stage metastatic disease. The results illustrate the potential for OCT to visualize detailed lymph node structures on the scale of micrometastases and the potential for the detection of metastatic nodal disease intraoperatively.

  2. In vivo microvascular imaging of cutaneous actinic keratosis, Bowen's disease and squamous cell carcinoma using dynamic optical coherence tomography

    Themstrup, L; Pellacani, G; Welzel, J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A clear distinction between actinic keratosis (AK), Bowen's disease (BD) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cannot reliably be made by clinical and dermoscopic evaluation alone. Dynamic optical coherence tomography (D-OCT) is a novel angiographic variant of OCT that allows for non...

  3. High-flow-velocity and shear-rate imaging by use of color Doppler optical coherence tomography

    van Leeuwen, T. G.; Kulkarni, M. D.; Yazdanfar, S.; Rollins, A. M.; Izatt, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Color Doppler optical coherence tomography (CDOCT) is capable of precise velocity mapping in turbid media. Previous CDOCT systems based on the short-time Fourier transform have been limited to maximum flow velocities of the order of tens of millimeters per second. We describe a technique, based on

  4. Massively parallel diffuse optical tomography

    Sandusky, John V.; Pitts, Todd A.

    2017-09-05

    Diffuse optical tomography systems and methods are described herein. In a general embodiment, the diffuse optical tomography system comprises a plurality of sensor heads, the plurality of sensor heads comprising respective optical emitter systems and respective sensor systems. A sensor head in the plurality of sensors heads is caused to act as an illuminator, such that its optical emitter system transmits a transillumination beam towards a portion of a sample. Other sensor heads in the plurality of sensor heads act as observers, detecting portions of the transillumination beam that radiate from the sample in the fields of view of the respective sensory systems of the other sensor heads. Thus, sensor heads in the plurality of sensors heads generate sensor data in parallel.

  5. UTILIZATION OF FUNDUS AUTOFLUORESCENCE, SPECTRAL DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY, AND ENHANCED DEPTH IMAGING IN THE CHARACTERIZATION OF BIETTI CRYSTALLINE DYSTROPHY IN DIFFERENT STAGES.

    Li, Qian; Li, Yang; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xu, Zhangxing; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Ma, Kai; She, Haicheng; Peng, Xiaoyan

    2015-10-01

    To characterize Bietti crystalline dystrophy (BCD) in different stages using multiple imaging modalities. Sixteen participants clinically diagnosed as BCD were included in the retrospective study and were categorized into 3 stages according to fundus photography. Eleven patients were genetically confirmed. Fundus autofluorescence, spectral domain optical coherence tomography, and enhanced depth imaging features of BCD were analyzed. On fundus autofluorescence, the abnormal autofluorescence was shown to enlarge in area and decrease in intensity with stages. Using spectral domain optical coherence tomography, the abnormalities in Stage 1 were observed to localize in outer retinal layers, whereas in Stage 2 and Stage 3, more extensive retinal atrophy was seen. In enhanced depth imaging, the subfoveal choroidal layers were delineated clearly in Stage 1; in Stage 2, destructions were primarily found in the choriocapillaris with associated alterations in the outer vessels; Stage 3 BCD displayed severe choroidal thinning. Choroidal neovascularization and macular edema were exhibited with high incidence. IVS6-8del17bp/inGC of the CYP4V2 gene was the most common mutant allele. Noninvasive fundus autofluorescence, spectral domain optical coherence tomography, and enhanced depth imaging may help to characterize the chorioretinal pathology of BCD at different degrees, and therefore, we propose staging of BCD depending on those methods. Physicians should be cautious of the vision-threatening complications of the disease.

  6. Automated framework for intraretinal cystoid macular edema segmentation in three-dimensional optical coherence tomography images with macular hole

    Zhu, Weifang; Zhang, Li; Shi, Fei; Xiang, Dehui; Wang, Lirong; Guo, Jingyun; Yang, Xiaoling; Chen, Haoyu; Chen, Xinjian

    2017-07-01

    Cystoid macular edema (CME) and macular hole (MH) are the leading causes for visual loss in retinal diseases. The volume of the CMEs can be an accurate predictor for visual prognosis. This paper presents an automatic method to segment the CMEs from the abnormal retina with coexistence of MH in three-dimensional-optical coherence tomography images. The proposed framework consists of preprocessing and CMEs segmentation. The preprocessing part includes denoising, intraretinal layers segmentation and flattening, and MH and vessel silhouettes exclusion. In the CMEs segmentation, a three-step strategy is applied. First, an AdaBoost classifier trained with 57 features is employed to generate the initialization results. Second, an automated shape-constrained graph cut algorithm is applied to obtain the refined results. Finally, cyst area information is used to remove false positives (FPs). The method was evaluated on 19 eyes with coexistence of CMEs and MH from 18 subjects. The true positive volume fraction, FP volume fraction, dice similarity coefficient, and accuracy rate for CMEs segmentation were 81.0%±7.8%, 0.80%±0.63%, 80.9%±5.7%, and 99.7%±0.1%, respectively.

  7. Latent fingerprint wavelet transform image enhancement technique for optical coherence tomography

    Makinana, S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available (FMR) and Equal Error Rate (EER) were used. The results of these two measures gives the FMR of 3% and EER of 1.9% for denoised images which is better than non-denoised images where the EER is 8.7%....

  8. Influence of light refraction on the image reconstruction in transmission optical tomography of scattering media

    Tereshchenko, Sergei A; Potapov, D A; Podgaetskii, Vitalii M; Smirnov, A V

    2002-01-01

    A distorting influence of light refraction at the boundaries of scattering media on the results of tomographic reconstruction of images of radially symmetric objects is investigated. The methods for the correction of such refraction-caused distortions are described. The results of the image reconstruction for two model cylindrical objects are presented.

  9. Bladder cancer diagnosis with fluorescence-image-guided optical coherence tomography

    Wang, Z. G.; Durand, D. B.; Adler, H.; Pan, Y. T.

    2006-02-01

    A fluorescence-image-guided OCT (FIG-OCT) system is described, and its ability to enhance the sensitivity and specificity is examined in an animal bladder cancer model. Total 97 specimens were examined by fluorescence imaging, OCT and histological microscopy. The sensitivity and specificity of FIG-OCT is 100% and 93% respectively, compared to 79% and 53% for fluorescence imaging, while the OCT examination time has been dramatically decreased by 3~4 times. In combination of endoscopic OCT, FIG-OCT is a promising technique for effective early bladder cancer diagnosis.

  10. Characterisation of optically cleared paper by optical coherence tomography

    Fabritius, T; Alarousu, E; Prykaeri, T; Hast, J; Myllylae, Risto

    2006-01-01

    Due to the highly light scattering nature of paper, the imaging depth of optical methods such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) is limited. In this work, we study the effect of refractive index matching on improving the imaging depth of OCT in paper. To this end, four different refractive index matching liquids (ethanol, 1-pentanol, glycerol and benzyl alcohol) with a refraction index between 1.359 and 1.538 were used in experiments. Low coherent light transmission was studied in commercial copy paper sheets, and the results indicate that benzyl alcohol offers the best improvement in imaging depth, while also being sufficiently stable for the intended purpose. Constructed cross-sectional images demonstrate visually that the imaging depth of OCT is considerably improved by optical clearing. Both surfaces of paper sheets can be detected along with information about the sheet's inner structure. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  11. Image Reconstruction for Diffuse Optical Tomography Based on Radiative Transfer Equation

    Bo Bi

    2015-01-01

    L2 regularization. Results also show the competitive performance of the split Bregman algorithm for the DOT image reconstruction with sparsity regularization compared with other existing L1 algorithms.

  12. Comparison of Scheimpflug imaging and spectral domain anterior segment optical coherence tomography for detection of narrow anterior chamber angles.

    Grewal, D S; Brar, G S; Jain, R; Grewal, S P S

    2011-05-01

    To compare the performance of anterior chamber volume (ACV) and anterior chamber depth (ACD) obtained using Scheimpflug imaging with angle opening distance (AOD500) and trabecular-iris space area (TISA500) obtained using spectral domain anterior segment optical coherence tomography (SD-ASOCT) in detecting narrow angles classified using gonioscopy. In this prospective, cross-sectional observational study, 265 eyes of 265 consecutive patients underwent sequential Scheimpflug imaging, SD-ASOCT imaging, and gonioscopy. Correlations between gonioscopy grading, ACV, ACD, AOD500, and TISA500 were evaluated. Area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios (LRs) were calculated to assess the performance of ACV, ACD, AOD500, and TISA500 in detecting narrow angles (defined as Shaffer grade ≤1 in all quadrants). SD-ASOCT images were obtained at the nasal and temporal quadrants only. Twenty-eight eyes (10.6%) were classified as narrow angles on gonioscopy. ACV correlated with gonioscopy grading (P<0.001) for temporal (r=0.204), superior (r=0.251), nasal (r=0.213), and inferior (r=0.236) quadrants. ACV correlated with TISA500 for nasal (r=0.135, P=0.029) and temporal (P=0.160, P=0.009) quadrants and also with AOD500 for nasal (r=0.498, P<0.001) and temporal (r=0.517, P<0.001) quadrants. For detection of narrow angles, ACV (AUC=0.935; 95% confidence interval (CI) =0.898-0.961) performed similar to ACD (AUC=0.88, P=0.06) and significantly better than AOD500 nasal (AUC=0.761, P=0.001), AOD500 temporal (AUC=0.808, P<0.001), TISA500 nasal (AUC=0.756, P<0.001), and TISA500 temporal (AUC=0.738, P<0.001). Using a cutoff of 113 mm(3), ACV had 90% sensitivity and 88% specificity for detecting narrow angles. Positive and negative LRs for ACV were 8.63 (95% CI=7.4-10.0) and 0.11 (95% CI=0.03-0.4), respectively. ACV measurements using Scheimpflug imaging outperformed AOD500 and TISA500 using SD-ASOCT for detecting narrow angles.

  13. Ultra-Widefield Steering-Based Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging of the Retinal Periphery.

    Choudhry, Netan; Golding, John; Manry, Matthew W; Rao, Rajesh C

    2016-06-01

    To describe the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) features of peripheral retinal findings using an ultra-widefield (UWF) steering technique to image the retinal periphery. Observational study. A total of 68 patients (68 eyes) with 19 peripheral retinal features. Spectral-domain OCT-based structural features. Nineteen peripheral retinal features, including vortex vein, congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium, pars plana, ora serrata pearl, typical cystoid degeneration (TCD), cystic retinal tuft, meridional fold, lattice and cobblestone degeneration, retinal hole, retinal tear, rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, typical degenerative senile retinoschisis, peripheral laser coagulation scars, ora tooth, cryopexy scars (retinal tear and treated retinoblastoma scar), bone spicules, white without pressure, and peripheral drusen, were identified by peripheral clinical examination. Near-infrared scanning laser ophthalmoscopy images and SD OCT of these entities were registered to UWF color photographs. Spectral-domain OCT resolved structural features of all peripheral findings. Dilated hyporeflective tubular structures within the choroid were observed in the vortex vein. Loss of retinal lamination, neural retinal attenuation, retinal pigment epithelium loss, or hypertrophy was seen in several entities, including congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium, ora serrata pearl, TCD, cystic retinal tuft, meridional fold, lattice, and cobblestone degenerations. Hyporeflective intraretinal spaces, indicating cystoid or schitic fluid, were seen in ora serrata pearl, ora tooth, TCD, cystic retinal tuft, meridional fold, retinal hole, and typical degenerative senile retinoschisis. The vitreoretinal interface, which often consisted of lamellae-like structures of the condensed cortical vitreous near or adherent to the neural retina, appeared clearly in most peripheral findings, confirming its association with many low-risk and vision

  14. Advances in Retinal Optical Imaging

    Yanxiu Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Retinal imaging has undergone a revolution in the past 50 years to allow for better understanding of the eye in health and disease. Significant improvements have occurred both in hardware such as lasers and optics in addition to software image analysis. Optical imaging modalities include optical coherence tomography (OCT, OCT angiography (OCTA, photoacoustic microscopy (PAM, scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO, adaptive optics (AO, fundus autofluorescence (FAF, and molecular imaging (MI. These imaging modalities have enabled improved visualization of retinal pathophysiology and have had a substantial impact on basic and translational medical research. These improvements in technology have translated into early disease detection, more accurate diagnosis, and improved management of numerous chorioretinal diseases. This article summarizes recent advances and applications of retinal optical imaging techniques, discusses current clinical challenges, and predicts future directions in retinal optical imaging.

  15. Utility of bleb imaging with anterior segment optical coherence tomography in clinical decision-making after trabeculectomy.

    Singh, Mandeep; Aung, Tin; Aquino, Maria C; Chew, Paul T K

    2009-08-01

    To determine if imaging of blebs with anterior segment optical coherence tomography (ASOCT) affects clinical decision-making with regard to laser suture lysis (LSL) after trabeculectomy. In this prospective observational case series, we included patients with poorly controlled intraocular pressure (IOP) after standardized trabeculectomy from May to November 2006. One observer assessed IOP, anterior chamber depth and bleb formation, and recorded a decision of whether or not to undertake LSL based on clinical grounds. A second observer masked to clinical data recorded a decision of whether or not to perform LSL based on ASOCT assessment of scleral flap position, presence of a sub-flap space, patency of the internal ostium, and bleb wall thickening. We compared the 2 observers' decisions to determine how ASOCT influenced decision-making. Seven eyes of 7 patients were included. On the basis of clinical examination, LSL was recommended in all 7 (100.0%) cases due to presence of elevated IOP, deep anterior chambers and poorly formed blebs. Using ASOCT, LSL was recommended in 5/7 (71.4%) cases with apposed scleral flaps, absent sub-flap spaces, and absent bleb wall thickening. In 2/7 (28.7%) cases, LSL was not recommended based on ASOCT findings of an elevated scleral flap, a patent sub-flap space, and bleb wall thickening. All 7 patients had good IOP control and formed blebs at a mean of 8.4+/-2.6 months after trabeculectomy, with a mean IOP of 14.3+/-3.2 mm Hg with no medications. This small study suggests that ASOCT imaging may affect decision-making with regard to LSL by providing information not apparent on clinical examination.

  16. High-definition optical coherence tomography

    Boone, Marc; Norrenberg, Sarah; Jemec, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    to those described for reflectance confocal microscopy but with the advantages not only to visualize individual cells up to a depth of 570 μm but also in both slice and en face mode. An adapted algorithmic method for pattern analysis of common inflammatory skin diseases could be proposed. This new......High-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) is a non-invasive technique for morphological investigation of tissue with cellular resolution filling the imaging gap between reflectance confocal microscopy and conventional optical coherence tomography. The aim of this study is first...... dermatitis. Additional studies to test the sensitivity and specificity of the proposed algorithm for pattern analysis are essential. The other categories of Ackerman's pattern recognition need to be evaluated. This study provides a set of morphological features generated by HD-OCT imaging very similar...

  17. High resolution in-vivo imaging of skin with full field optical coherence tomography

    Dalimier, E.; Bruhat, Alexis; Grieve, K.; Harms, F.; Martins, F.; Boccara, C.

    2014-03-01

    Full-field OCT (FFOCT) has the ability to provide en-face images with a very good axial sectioning as well as a very high transverse resolution (about 1 microns in all directions). Therefore it offers the possibility to visualize biological tissues with very high resolution both on the axial native view, and on vertical reconstructed sections. Here we investigated the potential dermatological applications of in-vivo skin imaging with FFOCT. A commercial FFOCT device was adapted for the in-vivo acquisition of stacks of images on the arm, hand and finger. Several subjects of different benign and pathological skin conditions were tested. The images allowed measurement of the stratum corneum and epidermis thicknesses, measurement of the stratum corneum refractive index, size measurement and count of the keratinocytes, visualization of the dermal-epidermal junction, and visualization of the melanin granules and of the melanocytes. Skins with different pigmentations could be discriminated and skin pathologies such as eczema could be identified. The very high resolution offered by FFOCT both on axial native images and vertical reconstructed sections allows for the visualization and measurement of a set of parameters useful for cosmetology and dermatology. In particular, FFOCT is a potential tool for the understanding and monitoring of skin hydration and pigmentation, as well as skin inflammation.

  18. Optical coherence tomography of the newborn airway.

    Ridgway, James M; Su, Jianping; Wright, Ryan; Guo, Shuguang; Kim, David C; Barretto, Roberto; Ahuja, Gurpreet; Sepehr, Ali; Perez, Jorge; Sills, Jack H; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J F

    2008-05-01

    Acquired subglottic stenosis in a newborn is often associated with prolonged endotracheal intubation. This condition is generally diagnosed during operative endoscopy after airway injury has occurred. Unfortunately, endoscopy is unable to characterize the submucosal changes observed in such airway injuries. Other modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and ultrasound, do not possess the necessary level of resolution to differentiate scar, neocartilage, and edema. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging modality that produces high-resolution, cross-sectional images of living tissue (8 to 20 microm). We examined the ability of this noninvasive technique to characterize the newborn airway in a prospective clinical trial. Twelve newborn patients who required ventilatory support underwent OCT airway imaging. Comparative analysis of intubated and non-intubated states was performed. Imaging of the supraglottis, glottis, subglottis, and trachea was performed in 12 patients, revealing unique tissue characteristics as related to turbidity, signal backscattering, and architecture. Multiple structures were identified, including the vocal folds, cricoid cartilage, tracheal rings, ducts, glands, and vessels. Optical coherence tomography clearly identifies in vivo tissue layers and regional architecture while offering detailed information concerning tissue microstructures. The diagnostic potential of this technology makes OCT a promising modality in the study and surveillance of the neonatal airway.

  19. 3D diagnostic imaging of retinoblastoma with a novel optical coherence tomography clinical system

    Nadyarnykh, O.; Moll, Annette C; De Boer, Johannes F.

    Purpose : Reliable in-vivo differentiation between the vital tumor / benign masses, and side effects is the main challenge for retinoblastoma, a retinal malignancy occurring in infancy. We have started an observational clinical study using our novel swept source OCT imaging system operating at

  20. Dental image replacement on cone beam computed tomography with three-dimensional optical scanning of a dental cast, occlusal bite, or bite tray impression.

    Kang, S-H; Lee, J-W; Lim, S-H; Kim, Y-H; Kim, M-K

    2014-10-01

    The goal of the present study was to compare the accuracy of dental image replacement on a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image using digital image data from three-dimensional (3D) optical scanning of a dental cast, occlusal bite, and bite tray impression. A Bracket Typodont dental model was used. CBCT of the dental model was performed and the data were converted to stereolithography (STL) format. Three experimental materials, a dental cast, occlusal bite, and bite tray impression, were optically scanned in 3D. STL files converted from the CBCT of the Typodont model and the 3D optical-scanned STL files of the study materials were image-registered. The error range of each methodology was measured and compared with a 3D optical scan of the Typodont. For the three materials, the smallest error observed was 0.099±0.114mm (mean error±standard deviation) for registering the 3D optical scan image of the dental cast onto the CBCT dental image. Although producing a dental cast can be laborious, the study results indicate that it is the preferred method. In addition, an occlusal bite is recommended when bite impression materials are used. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Motion tracking to enable pre-surgical margin mapping in basal cell carcinoma using optical imaging modalities: initial feasibility study using optical coherence tomography

    Duffy, M.; Richardson, T. J.; Craythorne, E.; Mallipeddi, R.; Coleman, A. J.

    2014-02-01

    A system has been developed to assess the feasibility of using motion tracking to enable pre-surgical margin mapping of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in the clinic using optical coherence tomography (OCT). This system consists of a commercial OCT imaging system (the VivoSight 1500, MDL Ltd., Orpington, UK), which has been adapted to incorporate a webcam and a single-sensor electromagnetic positional tracking module (the Flock of Birds, Ascension Technology Corp, Vermont, USA). A supporting software interface has also been developed which allows positional data to be captured and projected onto a 2D dermoscopic image in real-time. Initial results using a stationary test phantom are encouraging, with maximum errors in the projected map in the order of 1-2mm. Initial clinical results were poor due to motion artefact, despite attempts to stabilise the patient. However, the authors present several suggested modifications that are expected to reduce the effects of motion artefact and improve the overall accuracy and clinical usability of the system.

  2. Near-Infrared Diffuse Optical Tomography

    A. H. Hielscher

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse optical tomography (DOT is emerging as a viable new biomedical imaging modality. Using near-infrared (NIR light, this technique probes absorption as well as scattering properties of biological tissues. First commercial instruments are now available that allow users to obtain cross-sectional and volumetric views of various body parts. Currently, the main applications are brain, breast, limb, joint, and fluorescence/bioluminescence imaging. Although the spatial resolution is limited when compared with other imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI or X-ray computerized tomography (CT, DOT provides access to a variety of physiological parameters that otherwise are not accessible, including sub-second imaging of hemodynamics and other fast-changing processes. Furthermore, DOT can be realized in compact, portable instrumentation that allows for bedside monitoring at relatively low cost. In this paper, we present an overview of current state-of-the -art technology, including hardware and image-reconstruction algorithms, and focus on applications in brain and joint imaging. In addition, we present recent results of work on optical tomographic imaging in small animals.

  3. Cost-effectiveness analysis of 3-D computerized tomography colonography versus optical colonoscopy for imaging symptomatic gastroenterology patients.

    Gomes, Manuel; Aldridge, Robert W; Wylie, Peter; Bell, James; Epstein, Owen

    2013-04-01

    When symptomatic gastroenterology patients have an indication for colonic imaging, clinicians have a choice between optical colonoscopy (OC) and computerized tomography colonography with three-dimensional reconstruction (3-D CTC). 3-D CTC provides a minimally invasive and rapid evaluation of the entire colon, and it can be an efficient modality for diagnosing symptoms. It allows for a more targeted use of OC, which is associated with a higher risk of major adverse events and higher procedural costs. A case can be made for 3-D CTC as a primary test for colonic imaging followed if necessary by targeted therapeutic OC; however, the relative long-term costs and benefits of introducing 3-D CTC as a first-line investigation are unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the cost effectiveness of 3-D CTC versus OC for colonic imaging of symptomatic gastroenterology patients in the UK NHS. We used a Markov model to follow a cohort of 100,000 symptomatic gastroenterology patients, aged 50 years or older, and estimate the expected lifetime outcomes, life years (LYs) and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and costs (£, 2010-2011) associated with 3-D CTC and OC. Sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the robustness of the base-case cost-effectiveness results to variation in input parameters and methodological assumptions. 3D-CTC provided a similar number of LYs (7.737 vs 7.739) and QALYs (7.013 vs 7.018) per individual compared with OC, and it was associated with substantially lower mean costs per patient (£467 vs £583), leading to a positive incremental net benefit. After accounting for the overall uncertainty, the probability of 3-D CTC being cost effective was around 60 %, at typical willingness-to-pay values of £20,000-£30,000 per QALY gained. 3-D CTC is a cost-saving and cost-effective option for colonic imaging of symptomatic gastroenterology patients compared with OC.

  4. Lesion size detection in geographic atrophy by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography and correlation to conventional imaging techniques.

    Schütze, Christopher; Bolz, Matthias; Sayegh, Ramzi; Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Götzinger, Erich; Hitzenberger, Christoph K; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2013-01-28

    To investigate the reproducibility of automated lesion size detection in patients with geographic atrophy (GA) using polarization-sensitive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) and to compare findings with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and intensity-based spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT). Twenty-nine eyes of 22 patients with GA were examined by PS-OCT, selectively identifying the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). A novel segmentation algorithm was applied, automatically detecting and quantifying areas of RPE atrophy. The reproducibility of the algorithm was assessed, and lesion sizes were correlated with manually delineated SLO, FAF, and intensity-based SD-OCT images to validate the clinical applicability of PS-OCT in GA evaluation. Mean GA lesion size of all patients was 5.28 mm(2) (SD: 4.92) in PS-OCT. Mean variability of individual repeatability measurements was 0.83 mm(2) (minimum: 0.05; maximum: 3.65). Mean coefficient of variation was 0.07 (min: 0.01; max: 0.19). Mean GA area in SLO (Spectralis OCT) was 5.15 mm(2) (SD: 4.72) and 2.5% smaller than in PS-OCT (P = 0.9, Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.98, P < 0.01). Mean GA area in intensity-based SD-OCT pseudo-SLO images (Cirrus OCT) was 5.14 mm(2) (SD: 4.67) and 2.7% smaller than in PS-OCT (P = 0.9, Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.98, P < 0.01). Mean GA area of all eyes measured 5.41 mm(2) (SD: 4.75) in FAF, deviating by 2.4% from PS-OCT results (P = 0.89, Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.99, P < 0.01). PS-OCT demonstrated high reproducibility of GA lesion size determination. Results correlated well with SLO, FAF, and intensity-based SD-OCT fundus imaging. PS-OCT may therefore be a valuable and specific imaging modality for automated GA lesion size determination in scientific studies and clinical practice.

  5. Optical coherence tomography imaging of telangiectasias during intense pulsed light treatment

    Ring, Hans Christian; Mogensen, Mette; Banzhaf, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Vascular malformations commonly occur in the facial region, and can be associated with significant stigma and embarrassment. Studies have shown that even recommended light-based treatments do not always result in complete clearance. This indicates the need for more accurate pre-treatment assessment...... the vessels, which may indicate edema or insufficient coagulation. (2) Hyperreflective signals within the lumen of the vessels, compatible with the expected irreversible microthrombus formation in the vessels. OCT imaging is capable of real-time assessment of tissue damage during light and laser treatment...

  6. Optical Coherence Tomography

    Andersen, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    , functional properties such as birefringence or blood flow may be detected and used for improved diagnosis. In ophthalmology, OCT is accepted as a clinical standard for diagnosing and monitoring the treatment of a wide range of retinal diseases. With increased image acquisition speed, real-time or video...

  7. Imaging of noncarious cervical lesions by means of a fast swept source optical coherence tomography system

    Stoica, Eniko T.; Marcauteanu, Corina; Bradu, Adrian; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin Ionel; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2014-01-01

    Non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL) are defined as the loss of tooth substance at the cemento-enamel junction and are caused by abrasion, erosion and/or occlusal overload. In this paper we proved that our fast swept source OCT system is a valuable tool to track the evolution of NCCL lesions in time. On several extracted bicuspids, four levels of NCCL were artificially created. After every level of induced lesion, OCT scanning was performed. B scans were acquired and 3D reconstructions were generated. The swept source OCT instrument used in this study has a central wavelength of 1050 nm, a sweeping range of 106 nm (measured at 10 dB), an average output power of 16 mW and a sweeping rate of 100 kHz. A depth resolution determined by the swept source of 12 μm in air was experimentally obtained. NCCL were measured on the B-scans as 2D images and 3D reconstructions (volumes). For quantitative evaluations of volumes, the Image J software was used. By calculating the areas of the amount of lost tissue corresponding to each difference of Bscans, the final volumes of NCCL were obtained. This swept source OCT method allows the dynamic diagnosis of NCCL in time.

  8. Anterior chamber angle imaging with swept-source optical coherence tomography: measuring peripheral anterior synechia in glaucoma.

    Lai, Isabel; Mak, Heather; Lai, Gilda; Yu, Marco; Lam, Dennis S C; Leung, Christopher K S

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the use of swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) for measuring the area and degree of peripheral anterior synechia (PAS) involvement in patients with angle-closure glaucoma. Cross-sectional study. Twenty-three eyes with PAS (detected by indentation gonioscopy) from 20 patients with angle-closure glaucoma (20 eyes had primary angle-closure glaucoma and 3 eyes had angle-closure glaucoma secondary to chronic anterior uveitis [n = 2] and Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome [n = 1]). The anterior chamber angles were evaluated with indentation gonioscopy and imaged by swept-source OCT (Casia OCT, Tomey, Nagoya, Japan) in room light and in the dark using the "angle analysis" protocol, which was composed of 128 radial B-scans each with 512 A-scans (16-mm scan length). The area and degree of PAS involvement were measured in each eye after manual detection of the scleral spur and the anterior irido-angle adhesion by 2 masked observers. The interobserver variability of the PAS measurements was calculated. The agreement of PAS assessment by gonioscopy and OCT, the area and the degree of PAS involvement, and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of interobserver PAS measurements. The area of PAS (mean ± standard deviation) was 20.8 ± 16.9 mm(2) (range, 3.9-74.9 mm(2)), and the degree of PAS involvement was 186.5 ± 79.9 degrees (range, 42-314 degrees). There was no difference in the area of PAS (P = 0.90) and the degree of PAS involvement (P = 0.95) between images obtained in room light and in the dark. The interobserver ICCs were 0.99 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98-1.00) for the area of PAS and 0.99 (95% CI, 0.97-1.00) for the degree of PAS involvement. There was good agreement of PAS assessment between gonioscopy and OCT images (kappa = 0.79; 95% CI, 0.67-0.91). Swept-source OCT allows visualization and reproducible measurements of the area and degree of PAS involvement, providing a new paradigm for evaluation of PAS progression and risk assessment

  9. Autofluorescence Imaging and Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Incomplete Congenital Stationary Night Blindness and Comparison with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    CHEN, ROYCE W. S.; GREENBERG, JONATHAN P.; LAZOW, MARGOT A.; RAMACHANDRAN, RITHU; LIMA, LUIZ H.; HWANG, JOHN C.; SCHUBERT, CARL; BRAUNSTEIN, ALEXANDRA; ALLIKMETS, RANDO; TSANG, STEPHEN H.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To test the hypothesis that the evaluation of retinal structure can have diagnostic value in differentiating between incomplete congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB2) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). To compare retinal thickness differences between patients with CSNB2 and myopic controls. DESIGN Prospective cross-sectional study. METHODS Ten eyes of 5 patients diagnosed with CSNB2 (4 X-linked recessive, 1 autosomal recessive) and 6 eyes of 3 patients with RP (2 autosomal dominant, 1 autosomal recessive) were evaluated with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) and fundus autofluorescence (FAF). Diagnoses of CSNB2 and RP were confirmed by full-field electroretinography (ERG). Manual segmentation of retinal layers, aided by a computer program, was performed by 2 professional segmenters on SD OCT images of all CSNB2 patients and 4 age-similar, normal myopic controls. Seven patients were screened for mutations with congenital stationary night blindness and RP genotyping arrays. RESULTS Patients with CSNB2 had specific findings on SD OCT and FAF that were distinct from those found in RP. CSNB2 patients showed qualitatively normal SD OCT results with preserved photoreceptor inner segment/outer segment junction, whereas this junction was lost in RP patients. In addition, CSNB2 patients had normal FAF images, whereas patients with RP demonstrated a ring of increased autofluorescence around the macula. On SD OCT segmentation, the inner and outer retinal layers of both X-linked recessive and autosomal recessive CSNB2 patients were thinner compared with those of normal myopic controls, with means generally outside of normal 95% confidence intervals. The only layers that demonstrated similar thickness between CSNB2 patients and the controls were the retinal nerve fiber layer and, temporal to the fovea, the combined outer segment layer and retinal pigment epithelium. A proband and his 2 affected brothers from a family segregating X-linked recessive

  10. Towards optical computed tomography

    Bones, P.J.; Packer, K.; Dainty, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    Advances in laser technology have sparked interest in the possibility of imaging within tissue with light. Acknowledging the self evident fact that most tissue is at best translucent and at worst relatively opaque, such 'imaging' is unlikely to be straightforward. Attention has therefore centred on exploiting some specific characteristics of last light. Simulations were performed (at Imperial College) to study the propagation of light from continuous and pulsed sources through very simple one- and two-dimensional piecewise homogeneous regions. A finite element method (FEM) package (developed for studying shielding from neutron penetration in nuclear energy systems) was employed along with Monte Carlo (MC) programs. A range of different scattering and absorption properties were modelled in the regions. Some simulation results were verified by statistical reasoning and/or analytical derivation based on transport theory. Poster 174. (author)

  11. Quantitatively Measured Anatomic Location and Volume of Optic Disc Drusen: An Enhanced Depth Imaging Optical Coherence Tomography Study

    Malmqvist, Lasse; Lindberg, Anne-Sofie Wessel; Dahl, Vedrana Andersen

    2017-01-01

    function using automated perimetric mean deviation (MD) and multifocal visual evoked potentials. Increased age (P = 0.015); larger ODD volume (P = 0.002); and more superficial anatomic ODD location (P = 0.007) were found in patients with ODD visible by ophthalmoscopy compared to patients with buried ODD.......025) and had a higher effect on MD when compared to retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. Large ODD volume is associated with optic nerve dysfunction. The worse visual field defects associated with visible ODD should only be ascribed to larger ODD volume and not to a more superficial anatomic ODD location....

  12. A fast and accurate imaging algorithm in optical/diffusion tomography

    Klibanov, M. V.; Lucas, T. R.; Frank, R. M.

    1997-10-01

    An n-dimensional (n = 2,3) inverse problem for the parabolic/diffusion equation 0266-5611/13/5/015/img1, 0266-5611/13/5/015/img2, 0266-5611/13/5/015/img3, 0266-5611/13/5/015/img4 is considered. The problem consists of determining the function a(x) inside of a bounded domain 0266-5611/13/5/015/img5 given the values of the solution u(x,t) for a single source location 0266-5611/13/5/015/img6 on a set of detectors 0266-5611/13/5/015/img7, where 0266-5611/13/5/015/img8 is the boundary of 0266-5611/13/5/015/img9. A novel numerical method is derived and tested. Numerical tests are conducted for n = 2 and for ranges of parameters which are realistic for applications to early breast cancer diagnosis and the search for mines in murky shallow water using ultrafast laser pulses. The main innovation of this method lies in a new approach for a novel linearized problem (LP). Such a LP is derived and reduced to a well-posed boundary-value problem for a coupled system of elliptic partial differential equations. A principal advantage of this technique is in its speed and accuracy, since it leads to the factorization of well conditioned, sparse matrices with non-zero entries clustered in a narrow band near the diagonal. The authors call this approach the elliptic systems method (ESM). The ESM can be extended to other imaging modalities.

  13. Fiber optic based optical tomography sensor for monitoring plasma uniformity

    Benck, Eric C.; Etemadi, Kasra

    2001-01-01

    A new type of fiber optic based optical tomography sensor has been developed for in situ monitoring of plasma uniformity. Optical tomography inverts optical emission measurements into the actual plasma distribution without assuming radial symmetry. The new sensor is designed to operate with only two small windows and acquire the necessary data in less than a second. Optical tomography is being tested on an ICP-GEC RF plasma source. Variations in plasma uniformity are measured as a function of different plasma conditions

  14. Review of optical coherence tomography in oncology

    Wang, Jianfeng; Xu, Yang; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2017-12-01

    The application of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in the field of oncology has been prospering over the past decade. OCT imaging has been used to image a broad spectrum of malignancies, including those arising in the breast, brain, bladder, the gastrointestinal, respiratory, and reproductive tracts, the skin, and oral cavity, among others. OCT imaging has initially been applied for guiding biopsies, for intraoperatively evaluating tumor margins and lymph nodes, and for the early detection of small lesions that would often not be visible on gross examination, tasks that align well with the clinical emphasis on early detection and intervention. Recently, OCT imaging has been explored for imaging tumor cells and their dynamics, and for the monitoring of tumor responses to treatments. This paper reviews the evolution of OCT technologies for the clinical application of OCT in surgical and noninvasive interventional oncology procedures and concludes with a discussion of the future directions for OCT technologies, with particular emphasis on their applications in oncology.

  15. Optical coherence tomography technology and applications

    Fujimoto, James

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is the optical analog of ultrasound imaging and is a powerful imaging technique that enables non-invasive, in vivo, high resolution, cross-sectional imaging in biological tissue.  Between 30 to 40 Million OCT imaging procedures are performed per year in ophthalmology.  The overall market is estimated at more than 0.5 Billion USD.  A new generation OCT technology was developed, dramatically increasing resolution and speed, achieving in vivo optical biopsy, i.e. the visualization of tissue architectural morphology in situ and in real time.  Functional extensions of OCT technology enable non-invasive, depth resolved functional assessment and imaging of tissue.  The book introduces OCT technology and applications not only from an optical and technological viewpoint, but also from the biomedical and clinical perspective. This second edition is widely extended and covers significantly more topics then the first edition of this book. The chapters are written leading intern...

  16. Imaging vibration of the cochlear partition of an excised guinea pig cochlea using phase-sensitive Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    Choudhury, Niloy; Zeng, Yaguang; Fridberger, Anders; Chen, Fangyi; Zha, Dingjun; Nuttall, Alfred L.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2011-03-01

    Studying the sound stimulated vibrations of various membranes that form the complex structure of the organ of Corti in the cochlea of the inner ear is essential for understanding how the travelling sound wave of the basilar membrane couples its energy to the organ structures. In this paper we report the feasibility of using phase-sensitive Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) to image the vibration of various micro-structures of the cochlea at the same time. An excised cochlea of a guinea pig was stimulated using sounds at various frequencies and vibration image was obtained. When measuring the apex area, vibration signal from different turns, which have different best response frequencies are obtained in the same image. The method has the potential to measure the response from a much wider region of the cochlea than any other currently used method. The noise floor for vibration image for the system at 200 Hz was ~0.3nm.

  17. An investigation of the potential of optical computed tomography for imaging of synchrotron-generated x-rays at high spatial resolution

    Doran, Simon J; Brochard, Thierry; Braeuer-Krisch, Elke; Adamovics, John; Krstajic, Nikola

    2010-01-01

    X-ray microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a novel form of treatment, currently in its preclinical stage, which uses microplanar x-ray beams from a synchrotron radiation source. It is important to perform accurate dosimetry on these microbeams, but, to date, there has been no accurate enough method available for making 3D dose measurements with isotropic, high spatial resolution to verify the results of Monte Carlo dose simulations. Here, we investigate the potential of optical computed tomography for satisfying these requirements. The construction of a simple optical CT microscopy (optical projection tomography) system from standard commercially available hardware is described. The measurement of optical densities in projection data is shown to be highly linear (r 2 = 0.999). The depth-of-field (DOF) of the imaging system is calculated based on the previous literature and measured experimentally using a commercial DOF target. It is shown that high quality images can be acquired despite the evident lack of telecentricity and despite DOF of the system being much lower than the sample diameter. Possible reasons for this are discussed. Results are presented for a complex irradiation of a 22 mm diameter cylinder of the radiochromic polymer PRESAGE(TM), demonstrating the exquisite 'dose-painting' abilities available in the MRT hutch of beamline ID-17 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Dose distributions in this initial experiment are equally well resolved on both an optical CT scan and a corresponding transmission image of radiochromic film, down to a line width of 83 μm (6 lp mm -1 ) with an MTF value of 0.40. A group of 33 μm wide lines was poorly resolved on both the optical CT and film images, and this is attributed to an incorrect exposure time calculation, leading to under-delivery of dose. Image artefacts in the optical CT scan are discussed. PRESAGE(TM) irradiated using the microbeam facility is proposed as a suitable material for producing

  18. Optical coherence tomography of dental structures

    Baumgartner, Angela; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Dichtl, Sabine; Sattmann, Harald; Moritz, Andreas; Sperr, Wolfgang; Fercher, Adolf F.

    1998-04-01

    In the past ten years Partial Coherence Interferometry (PCI) and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) have been successfully developed for high precision biometry and tomography of biological tissues. OCT employs the partial coherence properties of a superluminescent diode and the Doppler principle yielding resolution and precision figures of the order of a few microns. Presently, the main application fields of this technique are biometry and imaging of ocular structures in vivo, as well as its clinical use in dermatology and endoscopic applications. This well established length measuring and imaging technique has now been applied to dentistry. First in vitro OCT images of the cemento (dentine) enamel junction of extracted sound and decayed human teeth have been recorded. These images distinguish dentine and enamel structures that are important for assessing enamel thickness and diagnosing caries. Individual optical A-Scans show that the penetration depth into enamel is considerably larger than into dentine. First polarization sensitive OCT recordings show localized changes of the polarization state of the light backscattered by dental material. Two-dimensional maps of the magnitude of the interference intensity and of the total phase difference between two orthogonal polarization states as a function of depth can reveal important structural information.

  19. Thermo-elastic optical coherence tomography.

    Wang, Tianshi; Pfeiffer, Tom; Wu, Min; Wieser, Wolfgang; Amenta, Gaetano; Draxinger, Wolfgang; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Huber, Robert; Soest, Gijs van

    2017-09-01

    The absorption of nanosecond laser pulses induces rapid thermo-elastic deformation in tissue. A sub-micrometer scale displacement occurs within a few microseconds after the pulse arrival. In this Letter, we investigate the laser-induced thermo-elastic deformation using a 1.5 MHz phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. A displacement image can be reconstructed, which enables a new modality of phase-sensitive OCT, called thermo-elastic OCT. An analysis of the results shows that the optical absorption is a dominating factor for the displacement. Thermo-elastic OCT is capable of visualizing inclusions that do not appear on the structural OCT image, providing additional tissue type information.

  20. Quantitative depth resolved microcirculation imaging with optical coherence tomography angiography (Part ΙΙ): Microvascular network imaging.

    Gao, Wanrong

    2017-04-17

    In this work, we review the main phenomena that have been explored in OCT angiography to image the vessels of the microcirculation within living tissues with the emphasis on how the different processing algorithms were derived to circumvent specific limitations. Parameters are then discussed that can quantitatively describe the depth-resolved microvascular network for possible clinic diagnosis applications. Finally,future directions in continuing OCT development are discussed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Normative data of outer photoreceptor layer thickness obtained by software image enhancing based on Stratus optical coherence tomography images

    Christensen, U.C.; Krøyer, K.; Thomadsen, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    backscattered light within the outer nuclear layer (ONL) in the fovea was registered and compared with backscattered light within the ONL in the peripheral part of the macula (I-ratio-ONL). Results: The mean RPE-OScomplex thickness in the foveal centre was 77.2 mu m (SD = 3.95). The RPE-OScomplex thickness...... in the superior macula 0.5-3 mm of the centre was significantly increased as compared with the corresponding inferior retina. In healthy subjects, the I-ratio-ONL was 1.06. Conclusions: Contrast-enhanced OCT images enable quantification of outer photoreceptor layer thickness, and normative values may help...

  2. WE-H-206-01: Photoacoustic Tomography: Multiscale Imaging From Organelles to Patients by Ultrasonically Beating the Optical Diffusion Limit

    Wang, L.

    2016-01-01

    Lihong V. Wang: Photoacoustic tomography (PAT), combining non-ionizing optical and ultrasonic waves via the photoacoustic effect, provides in vivo multiscale functional, metabolic, and molecular imaging. Broad applications include imaging of the breast, brain, skin, esophagus, colon, vascular system, and lymphatic system in humans or animals. Light offers rich contrast but does not penetrate biological tissue in straight paths as x-rays do. Consequently, high-resolution pure optical imaging (e.g., confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, and optical coherence tomography) is limited to penetration within the optical diffusion limit (∼1 mm in the skin). Ultrasonic imaging, on the contrary, provides fine spatial resolution but suffers from both poor contrast in early-stage tumors and strong speckle artifacts. In PAT, pulsed laser light penetrates tissue and generates a small but rapid temperature rise, which induces emission of ultrasonic waves due to thermoelastic expansion. The ultrasonic waves, orders of magnitude less scattering than optical waves, are then detected to form high-resolution images of optical absorption at depths up to 7 cm, conquering the optical diffusion limit. PAT is the only modality capable of imaging across the length scales of organelles, cells, tissues, and organs (up to whole-body small animals) with consistent contrast. This rapidly growing technology promises to enable multiscale biological research and accelerate translation from microscopic laboratory discoveries to macroscopic clinical practice. PAT may also hold the key to label-free early detection of cancer by in vivo quantification of hypermetabolism, the quintessential hallmark of malignancy. Learning Objectives: To understand the contrast mechanism of PAT To understand the multiscale applications of PAT Benjamin M. W. Tsui: Multi-modality molecular imaging instrumentation and techniques have been major developments in small animal imaging that has contributed significantly

  3. WE-H-206-01: Photoacoustic Tomography: Multiscale Imaging From Organelles to Patients by Ultrasonically Beating the Optical Diffusion Limit

    Wang, L. [Washington University (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Lihong V. Wang: Photoacoustic tomography (PAT), combining non-ionizing optical and ultrasonic waves via the photoacoustic effect, provides in vivo multiscale functional, metabolic, and molecular imaging. Broad applications include imaging of the breast, brain, skin, esophagus, colon, vascular system, and lymphatic system in humans or animals. Light offers rich contrast but does not penetrate biological tissue in straight paths as x-rays do. Consequently, high-resolution pure optical imaging (e.g., confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, and optical coherence tomography) is limited to penetration within the optical diffusion limit (∼1 mm in the skin). Ultrasonic imaging, on the contrary, provides fine spatial resolution but suffers from both poor contrast in early-stage tumors and strong speckle artifacts. In PAT, pulsed laser light penetrates tissue and generates a small but rapid temperature rise, which induces emission of ultrasonic waves due to thermoelastic expansion. The ultrasonic waves, orders of magnitude less scattering than optical waves, are then detected to form high-resolution images of optical absorption at depths up to 7 cm, conquering the optical diffusion limit. PAT is the only modality capable of imaging across the length scales of organelles, cells, tissues, and organs (up to whole-body small animals) with consistent contrast. This rapidly growing technology promises to enable multiscale biological research and accelerate translation from microscopic laboratory discoveries to macroscopic clinical practice. PAT may also hold the key to label-free early detection of cancer by in vivo quantification of hypermetabolism, the quintessential hallmark of malignancy. Learning Objectives: To understand the contrast mechanism of PAT To understand the multiscale applications of PAT Benjamin M. W. Tsui: Multi-modality molecular imaging instrumentation and techniques have been major developments in small animal imaging that has contributed significantly

  4. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography on a silicon chip

    Akça, B.I.

    2012-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive optical technique for high-resolution cross-sectional imaging of specimens, with many applications in clinical medicine and industry (e.g. materials testing, quality assurance, and process control). Current state-of-the-art OCT systems operate in

  5. Dispersion free full range spectral intensity optical coherence tomography

    Jensen, Mikkel; Israelsen, Niels Møller; Maria, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging technique with many applications and widespread use in ophthalmology [1]. The axial resolution in OCT is inversely proportional to the bandwidth of the optical source used, but the improved axial resolution comes at the price of more...

  6. Optical coherence tomography for diagnosing periodontal disease

    Colston, Bill W., Jr.; Everett, Matthew J.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Otis, Linda L.; Nathel, Howard

    1997-05-01

    We have, in this preliminary study, investigated the use of optical coherence tomography for diagnosis of periodontal disease. We took in vitro OCT images of the dental and periodontal tissues from a young pig and compared them to histological sections. These images distinguish tooth and soft tissue relationships that are important in diagnosing and assessing periodontal disease. We have imaged the attachment of gingiva to the tooth surface and located the cemento-enamel junction. This junction is an important reference point for defining attachment level in the diagnosis of periodontal disease. the boundary between enamel and dentin is also visible for most of the length of the anatomical crown, allowing quantitation of enamel thickness and character.

  7. Advanced modelling of optical coherence tomography systems

    Andersen, Peter E; Thrane, Lars; Yura, Harold T; Tycho, Andreas; Joergensen, Thomas M; Frosz, Michael H

    2004-01-01

    Analytical and numerical models for describing and understanding the light propagation in samples imaged by optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems are presented. An analytical model for calculating the OCT signal based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle valid both for the single and multiple scattering regimes is reviewed. An advanced Monte Carlo model for calculating the OCT signal is also reviewed, and the validity of this model is shown through a mathematical proof based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. Moreover, for the first time the model is verified experimentally. From the analytical model, an algorithm for enhancing OCT images is developed; the so-called true-reflection algorithm in which the OCT signal may be corrected for the attenuation caused by scattering. For the first time, the algorithm is demonstrated by using the Monte Carlo model as a numerical tissue phantom. Such algorithm holds promise for improving OCT imagery and to extend the possibility for functional imaging

  8. Optical coherence tomography findings of quinine poisoning

    John Christoforidis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available John Christoforidis, Robert Ricketts, Theodore Loizos, Susie ChangThe Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USAPurpose: To report a case of acute quinine poisoning, document acute and chronic macular changes with optical coherence tomography imaging and fluorescein angiography (FA, and to review the literature on ocular toxicity of quinine.Methods: A 32-year-old white female presented to our Emergency Department after ingesting over 7.5 g of quinine. She underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination, fluorescein angiography, Stratus time-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT, and electroretinography at 72 hours and 15 months postingestion. Stratus time-domain and Cirrus spectral-domain OCT, fundus autofluorescence, and FA were obtained at 28 months postingestion.Results: Fluorescein angiography at 72 hours postingestion revealed normal filling times and vasculature. OCT showed marked thickening of the inner retina bilaterally. At 15 and 28 months follow-up, fundus photography and fluorescein angiography demonstrated optic nerve pallor, severely attenuated retinal vessels while OCT showed inner retinal atrophy. Fundus autofluorescence did not reveal any retinal pigmentary abnormalities.Conclusions: Quinine toxicity as seen by OCT reveals increased thickness with inner retinal hyperreflectivity acutely with development of significant retinal atrophy in the long-term. Fundus autofluorescence reveals an intact retinal pigment epithelial layer at 28 months. These findings suggest that quinine poisoning may produce a direct toxic effect on the inner retina in the acute phase resulting in long-term retinal atrophy.Keywords: retinal, optical coherence tomography, quinine toxicity 

  9. 64Cu radiolabeled nano-materials as bimodal contrast agent for optical imaging and Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Nonat, A.M.; Roux, A.; Yahia-Ammar, A.; Charbonniere, L.J.; Platas-Iglesias, C.; Camerle, F.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent nano-crystals made of semiconductor material, also called Quantum Dots, are ideal agents for long-term or real-time optical imaging. They have been found to outperform traditional organic fluorescent dyes in many ways (size-tunable optical properties, high quantum yields, high extinction coefficients, resistance to photo bleaching). We have developed a microwave method for the synthesis of highly luminescent water soluble CdTe x S 1-x nano-crystals (Φ= 53% at 600 nm). Their surface functionalization has been developed and controlled using a Nile-Red derivative as a fluorescent marker. The same coupling strategy will be used to incorporate 64 Cu-radiotracers for PET imaging at the surface of the Quantum Dots. A large variety of poly-aza-macrocyclic ligands, have been studied in order to optimize the in vivo stability of the 64 Cu-radiolabeled complexes and their efficiency as radiopharmaceuticals

  10. Noise-immune complex correlation for vasculature imaging based on standard and Jones-matrix optical coherence tomography

    Makita, Shuichi; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Hong, Young-Joo; Li, En; Miura, Masahiro; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2016-03-01

    A new optical coherence angiography (OCA) method, called correlation mapping OCA (cmOCA), is presented by using the SNR-corrected complex correlation. An SNR-correction theory for the complex correlation calculation is presented. The method also integrates a motion-artifact-removal method for the sample motion induced decorrelation artifact. The theory is further extended to compute more reliable correlation by using multi- channel OCT systems, such as Jones-matrix OCT. The high contrast vasculature imaging of in vivo human posterior eye has been obtained. Composite imaging of cmOCA and degree of polarization uniformity indicates abnormalities of vasculature and pigmented tissues simultaneously.

  11. On the possibility of producing true real-time retinal cross-sectional images using a graphics processing unit enhanced master-slave optical coherence tomography system.

    Bradu, Adrian; Kapinchev, Konstantin; Barnes, Frederick; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2015-07-01

    In a previous report, we demonstrated master-slave optical coherence tomography (MS-OCT), an OCT method that does not need resampling of data and can be used to deliver en face images from several depths simultaneously. In a separate report, we have also demonstrated MS-OCT's capability of producing cross-sectional images of a quality similar to those provided by the traditional Fourier domain (FD) OCT technique, but at a much slower rate. Here, we demonstrate that by taking advantage of the parallel processing capabilities offered by the MS-OCT method, cross-sectional OCT images of the human retina can be produced in real time. We analyze the conditions that ensure a true real-time B-scan imaging operation and demonstrate in vivo real-time images from human fovea and the optic nerve, with resolution and sensitivity comparable to those produced using the traditional FD-based method, however, without the need of data resampling.

  12. Optical coherence tomography. A new high-resolution imaging technology to study cardiac development in chick embryos

    Yelbuz, T.M.; Choma, M.A.; Thrane, L.

    2002-01-01

    volumetric reconstructions and short video clips. The OCT-scanned embryos (2 in each group) were photographed after histological sectioning in comparable planes to those visualized by OCT. The optical and histological results showing cardiovascular microstructures such as myocardium, the cardiac jelly......, and endocardium are presented. Conclusions-OCT is a powerful imaging modality which can provide new insight in assessing and understanding normal and abnormal cardiac development in a variety of animal models....

  13. Motion contrast using optical coherence tomography

    Fingler, Jeffrey Paul

    Diagnosis of ophthalmic diseases like age-related macular degeneration is very important for treatment of the disease as well as the development of future treatments. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an optical interference technique which can measure the three-dimensional structural information of the reflecting layers within a sample. In retinal imaging, OCT is used as the primary diagnostic tool for structural abnormalities such as retinal holes and detachments. The contrast within the images of this technique is based upon reflectivity changes from different regions of the retina. This thesis demonstrates the developments of methods used to produce additional contrast to the structural OCT images based on the tiny fluctuations of motion experienced by the mobile scatterers within a sample. Motion contrast was observed for motions smaller than 50 nm in images of a variety of samples. Initial contrast method demonstrations used Brownian motion differences to separate regions of a mobile Intralipid solution from a static agarose gel, chosen in concentration to minimize reflectivity contrast. Zebrafish embryos in the range of 3-4 days post fertilization were imaged using several motion contrast methods to determine the capabilities of identifying regions of vascular flow. Vasculature identification was demonstrated in zebrafish for blood vessels of all orientations as small as 10 microns in diameter. Mouse retinal imaging utilized the same motion contrast methods to determine the contrast capabilities for motions associated with vasculature within the retina. Improved contrast imaging techniques demonstrated comparable images to fluorescein angiography, the gold standard of retinal vascular imaging. Future studies can improve the demonstrated contrast analysis techniques and apply them towards human retinal motion contrast imaging for ophthalmic diagnostic purposes.

  14. Dual-modality optical and positron emission tomography imaging of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor on tumor vasculature using quantum dots

    Chen, Kai; Li, Zi-Bo; Wang, Hui; Cai, Weibo; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2008-01-01

    To date, the in vivo imaging of quantum dots (QDs) has been mostly qualitative or semiquantitative. The development of a dual-function positron emission tomography (PET)/near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) probe might allow the accurate assessment of the tumor-targeting efficacy of QDs. An amine-functionalized QD was conjugated with VEGF protein and DOTA chelator for VEGFR-targeted PET/NIRF imaging after 64 Cu-labeling. The targeting efficacy of this dual functional probe was evaluated in vitro and in vivo through cell-binding assay, cell staining, in vivo optical/PET imaging, ex vivo optical/PET imaging, and histology. The DOTA-QD-VEGF exhibited VEGFR-specific binding in both cell-binding assay and cell staining experiment. Both NIR fluorescence imaging and microPET showed VEGFR-specific delivery of conjugated DOTA-QD-VEGF nanoparticle and prominent reticuloendothelial system uptake. The U87MG tumor uptake of 64 Cu-labeled DOTA-QD was less than one percentage injected dose per gram (%ID/g), significantly lower than that of 64 Cu-labeled DOTA-QD-VEGF (1.52±0.6%ID/g, 2.81±0.3%ID/g, 3.84± 0.4%ID/g, and 4.16±0.5%ID/g at 1,4,16, and 24 h post injection, respectively; n=3). Good correlation was also observed between the results measured by ex vivo PET and NIRF organ imaging. Histologic examination revealed that DOTA-QD-VEGF primarily targets the tumor vasculature through a VEGF-VEGFR interaction. We have successfully developed a QD-based nanoprobe for dual PET and NIRF imaging of tumor VEGFR expression. The success of this bifunctional imaging approach may render higher degree of accuracy for the quantitative targeted NIRF imaging in deep tissue. (orig.)

  15. Heartbeat OCT: In vivo intravascular megahertz-optical coherence tomography

    T. Wang (Tianshi); A.F.H. Pfeiffer (Andreas); E.S. Regar (Eveline); W. Wieser (Wolfgang); H.M.M. van Beusekom (Heleen); C.T. Lancée (Charles); T. Springeling (Tirza); I. Krabbendam (Ilona); A.F.W. van der Steen (Ton); R. Huber (Roman); G. van Soest (Gijs)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCardiac motion artifacts, non-uniform rotational distortion and undersampling affect the image quality and the diagnostic impact of intravascular optical coherence tomography (IV-OCT). In this study we demonstrate how these limitations of IV-OCT can be addressed by using an imaging

  16. Nanoparticles displacement analysis using optical coherence tomography

    StrÄ kowski, Marcin R.; Kraszewski, Maciej; StrÄ kowska, Paulina

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a versatile optical method for cross-sectional and 3D imaging of biological and non-biological objects. Here we are going to present the application of polarization sensitive spectroscopic OCT system (PS-SOCT) for quantitative measurements of materials containing nanoparticles. The PS-SOCT combines the polarization sensitive analysis with time-frequency analysis. In this contribution the benefits of using the combination of timefrequency and polarization sensitive analysis are being expressed. The usefulness of PS-SOCT for nanoparticles evaluation is going to be tested on nanocomposite materials with TiO2 nanoparticles. The OCT measurements results have been compared with SEM examination of the PMMA matrix with nanoparticles. The experiment has proven that by the use of polarization sensitive and spectroscopic OCT the nanoparticles dispersion and size can be evaluated.

  17. Challenges and advantages in wide-field optical coherence tomography angiography imaging of the human retinal and choroidal vasculature at 1.7-MHz A-scan rate

    Poddar, Raju; Migacz, Justin V.; Schwartz, Daniel M.; Werner, John S.; Gorczynska, Iwona

    2017-10-01

    We present noninvasive, three-dimensional, depth-resolved imaging of human retinal and choroidal blood circulation with a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system at 1065-nm center wavelength. Motion contrast OCT imaging was performed with the phase-variance OCT angiography method. A Fourier-domain mode-locked light source was used to enable an imaging rate of 1.7 MHz. We experimentally demonstrate the challenges and advantages of wide-field OCT angiography (OCTA). In the discussion, we consider acquisition time, scanning area, scanning density, and their influence on visualization of selected features of the retinal and choroidal vascular networks. The OCTA imaging was performed with a field of view of 16 deg (5 mm×5 mm) and 30 deg (9 mm×9 mm). Data were presented in en face projections generated from single volumes and in en face projection mosaics generated from up to 4 datasets. OCTA imaging at 1.7 MHz A-scan rate was compared with results obtained from a commercial OCTA instrument and with conventional ophthalmic diagnostic methods: fundus photography, fluorescein, and indocyanine green angiography. Comparison of images obtained from all methods is demonstrated using the same eye of a healthy volunteer. For example, imaging of retinal pathology is presented in three cases of advanced age-related macular degeneration.

  18. Viscous optical clearing agent for in vivo optical imaging

    Deng, Zijian; Jing, Lijia; Wu, Ning; lv, Pengyu; Jiang, Xiaoyun; Ren, Qiushi; Li, Changhui

    2014-07-01

    By allowing more photons to reach deeper tissue, the optical clearing agent (OCA) has gained increasing attention in various optical imaging modalities. However, commonly used OCAs have high fluidity, limiting their applications in in vivo studies with oblique, uneven, or moving surfaces. In this work, we reported an OCA with high viscosity. We measured the properties of this viscous OCA, and tested its successful performances in the imaging of a living animal's skin with two optical imaging modalities: photoacoustic microscopy and optical coherence tomography. Our results demonstrated that the viscous OCA has a great potential in the study of different turbid tissues using various optical imaging modalities.

  19. Dynamic analysis of mental sweating of eccrine sweat gland of human fingertip by time-sequential piled-up en face optical coherence tomography images.

    Ohmi, Masato; Wada, Yuki

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate dynamic analysis of mental sweating for sound stimulus of a few tens of eccrine sweat glands by the time-sequential piled-up en face optical coherence tomography (OCT) images with the frame spacing of 3.3 sec. In the experiment, the amount of excess sweat can be evaluated simultaneously for a few tens of sweat glands by piling up of all the en face OCT images. Non-uniformity was observed in mental sweating where the amount of sweat in response to sound stimulus is different for each sweat gland. Furthermore, the amount of sweat is significantly increased in proportion to the strength of the stimulus.

  20. Integration of an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system into an examination incubator to facilitate in vivo imaging of cardiovascular development in higher vertebrate embryos under stable physiological conditions

    Happel, Christoph M.; Thrane, Lars; Thommes, Jan

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution in vivo imaging of higher vertebrate embryos over short or long time periods under constant physiological conditions is a technically challenging task for researchers working on cardiovascular development. In chick embryos, for example, various studies have shown that without...... significance, should be documented under physiological conditions. However, previous studies were mostly carried out outside of an incubator or under suboptimal environmental conditions. Here we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first detailed description of an optical coherence tomography (OCT......) system integrated into an examination incubator to facilitate real-time in vivo imaging of cardiovascular development under physiological environmental conditions. We demonstrate the suitability of this OCT examination incubator unit for use in cardiovascular development studies by examples of proof...

  1. Intra-operative application of optical coherence tomography with an operating microscope.

    Just, T; Lankenau, E; Hüttmann, G; Pau, H W

    2009-09-01

    To introduce the use of optical coherence tomography with an operating microscope for intra-operative evaluation of the human larynx. A specially equipped operating microscope with integrated spectral domain optical coherence tomography apparatus was used during microlaryngoscopy. Technical improvements in optical coherence tomography equipment (e.g. pilot beam, variable focal distance, improved image quality and integration into an operating microscope) have enabled greater sensitivity and imaging speed and a non-contact approach. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography now enables a better correlation between optical coherence tomography images and histological findings. With this new technology, the precision of biopsy can be improved during microlaryngoscopy. Use of this new optical coherence tomography technology, integrated into an operating microscope, enables the surgeon to define the biopsy site location and resection plane precisely, while the optical zoom of the operating microscope can be used over the complete range.

  2. A case of unilateral circumscribed posterior keratoconus evaluated by three different imaging tools: optical coherence tomography, videokeratography, and Scheimpflug corneal tomography.

    Spadea, Leopoldo; Maraone, Giorgia; Cagini, Carlo

    2017-02-01

    Posterior keratoconus is a rare corneal anomaly which is part of the ectatic corneal disorders. We report a clinical presentation of a unilateral posterior keratoconus in a 42-year-old man. At the time of presentation, corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) was 20/20 with a correction of +2.50 +2.50 × 90° in the right eye and 20/40 with +1 +3.00 × 105° in the left eye. Slit lamp microscopy showed in the left eye an evidence of corneal thinning with a mild anterior protrusion and a remarkable posterior excavation. The intraocular pressure was 19 mmHg in right eye and 16 mmHg in left eye. Ultrasound pachymetry showed a minimum corneal thickness of 556 μ in right eye and 289 μ in left eye. The anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) revealed central corneal thinning and showed a reduced epithelial thickness. Videokeratography showed an increase of the corneal curvature in a defined area with central steepening in the area of the posterior corneal depression with gradual paracentral flattening. The description of this case underlines the importance of this instruments such us AS-OCT and corneal topography in diagnosis of posterior keratoconus. It can also be observed that in the contralateral eye there are no signs of ectasia as in the rare condition of unilateral keratoconus.

  3. Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography in dentistry

    Dichtl, S.

    1998-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive and noncontact technique for obtaining cross-sectional images of biologic structure, which was initially introduced to depict the transparent tissue of the eye. It employs the partial coherence properties of a light source to image structures with high resolution (< 20 (m). Recently, this technique has also been applied in turbid media. This tomographic imaging is analogous to conventional ultrasound B mode imaging, except that OCT measures the intensity of backreflected infrared light rather than acoustical waves. First applications, of OCT in dentistry for diagnosing periodontal disease have been reported by Colston et al. presenting in vitro OCT images of the dental and periodontal tissues of porcine premolar teeth. In this work, the feasibility of polarisation sensitive OCT for dental material is suggested. In contrast with conventional OCT, where the magnitude of backscattered light as a function of depth is imaged, backscattered light is used to image the magnitude of the birefringence in the sample as a function of depth. Partial loss of birefringence is known to be an early indication of incipient caries or tissue thermal damage. Applying this technique for caries diagnosis or guidance regarding optimal dosimetry for thermally mediated laser therapeutic procedures, polarisation sensitive OCT would represent a promising new technology for dentistry. (author)

  4. Visibility of solid and liquid fiducial markers used for image-guided radiation therapy on optical coherence tomography: an esophageal phantom study (Conference Presentation)

    Jelvehgaran, Pouya; Alderliesten, Tanja; Weda, Jelmer J. A.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; Faber, Dirk J.; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; van Herk, Marcel B.; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is used in operable and inoperable esophageal cancer patients. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fiducial marker placement allows improved translation of the disease extent on endoscopy to computed tomography (CT) images used for RT planning and enables image-guided RT. However, microscopic tumor extent at the time of RT planning is unknown. Endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a high-resolution (10-30µm) imaging modality with the potential for accurately determining the longitudinal disease extent. Visibility of fiducial markers on OCT is crucial for integrating OCT findings with the RT planning CT. We investigated the visibility on OCT (NinePoint Medical, Inc.) of 13 commercially available solid (Visicoil, Gold Anchor, Flexicoil, Polymark, and QLRAD) and liquid (BioXmark, Lipiodol, and Hydrogel) fiducial markers of different diameter. We designed and manufactured a set of dedicated Silicone-based esophageal phantoms to perform imaging in a controlled environment. The esophageal phantoms consist of several layers with different TiO2 concentrations to simulate the scattering properties of a typical healthy human esophagus. Markers were placed at various depths (0.5, 1.1, 2.0, and 3.0mm). OCT imaging allowed detection of all fiducial markers and phantom layers. The signal to background ratio was 6-fold higher for the solid fiducial markers than the liquid fiducial markers, yet OCT was capable of visualizing all 13 fiducial markers at all investigated depths. We conclude that RT fiducial markers can be visualized with OCT. This allows integration of OCT findings with CT for image-guided RT.

  5. In vivo microvascular imaging of human oral and nasal cavities using swept-source optical coherence tomography with a single forward/side viewing probe

    Choi, Woo June; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-03-01

    We report three-dimensional (3D) imaging of microcirculation within human cavity tissues in vivo using a high-speed swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) at 1.3 μm with a modified probe interface. Volumetric structural OCT images of the inner tissues of oral and nasal cavities are acquired with a field of view of 2 mm x 2 mm. Two types of disposable and detachable probe attachments are devised and applied to the port of the imaging probe of OCT system, enabling forward and side imaging scans for selective and easy access to specific cavity tissue sites. Blood perfusion is mapped with OCT-based microangiography from 3D structural OCT images, in which a novel vessel extraction algorithm is used to decouple dynamic light scattering signals, due to moving blood cells, from the background scattering signals due to static tissue elements. Characteristic tissue anatomy and microvessel architectures of various cavity tissue regions of a healthy human volunteer are identified with the 3D OCT images and the corresponding 3D vascular perfusion maps at a level approaching capillary resolution. The initial finding suggests that the proposed method may be engineered into a promising tool for evaluating and monitoring tissue microcirculation and its alteration within a wide-range of cavity tissues in the patients with various pathological conditions.

  6. Functional optical coherence tomography: principles and progress

    Kim, Jina; Levinson, Howard; Brown, William; Maher, Jason R.; Wax, Adam

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, several functional extensions of optical coherence tomography (OCT) have emerged, and this review highlights key advances in instrumentation, theoretical analysis, signal processing and clinical application of these extensions. We review five principal extensions: Doppler OCT (DOCT), polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT), optical coherence elastography (OCE), spectroscopic OCT (SOCT), and molecular imaging OCT. The former three have been further developed with studies in both ex vivo and in vivo human tissues. This review emphasizes the newer techniques of SOCT and molecular imaging OCT, which show excellent potential for clinical application but have yet to be well reviewed in the literature. SOCT elucidates tissue characteristics, such as oxygenation and carcinogenesis, by detecting wavelength-dependent absorption and scattering of light in tissues. While SOCT measures endogenous biochemical distributions, molecular imaging OCT detects exogenous molecular contrast agents. These newer advances in functional OCT broaden the potential clinical application of OCT by providing novel ways to understand tissue activity that cannot be accomplished by other current imaging methodologies. (topical review)

  7. Optical coherence tomography in the diagnosis of actinic keratosis

    Friis, K B E; Themstrup, L; Jemec, G B E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a real-time non-invasive imaging tool, introduced in dermatology in the late 1990s. OCT uses near-infrared light impulses to produce images which can be displayed in cross-sectional and en-face mode. The technique has been used to image skin...... of layers consistent with absence of normal layered architecture in the skin. Thickened epidermis was found in 14/16 studies and white (hyperreflective) streaks and dots were described in 11/16 studies. In High-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) images disarranged epidermis (cross......-sectional images) along with an atypical honeycomb pattern (en-face images) was found in 5/5 studies and well-demarcated dermo-epithelial junction (DEJ) (cross-sectional images) was described in 3/5 studies. CONCLUSION: Several morphological characteristics of AKs were identified using Conventional OCT and HD...

  8. EDITORIAL: Optical tomography and digital holography

    Coupland, Jeremy; Lobera, Julia

    2008-07-01

    the resolution now places a limit on the size of the object that can be recorded. Some 60 years after the pioneering work of Gabor, digital imaging and associated computer technology offers a step change in capability with which to further exploit holography. Modern image sensors are now available with almost 30 million photosensitive elements, which corresponds to a staggering 100-fold increase compared to standard television images. At the same time personal computers have been optimized for imaging and graphics applications and this allows more sophisticated algorithms to be used in the reconstruction process. Although resolution still falls short of the materials used for optical holography, the ability to process data numerically generally outweighs this drawback and presents us with a host of new opportunities. Faced with the ability to record and process holograms numerically, it is natural to ask the question 'what information is present within recordings of scattered light?'. In fact this question could be posed by anyone using light, or indeed any other wave disturbance, for measurement purposes. For the case of optical holography, Wolf published his answer in 1969 [6], showing that for the case of weak scattering (small perturbations) and plane wave illumination, the amplitude and phase of each plane wave within the scattered field are proportional to those of a periodic variation in the refractive index contrast (i.e. a Bragg grating). This Fourier decomposition of the object was published almost simultaneously by Dandliker and Weiss [7], who also provided a graphical illustration of the technique. These works are the basis of optical tomography and provide us with the link between holographic data and 3D form. Digital holographic reconstruction and optical tomography was the theme of an international workshop [8] held in Loughborough in 2007, and many of the topics debated at the workshop have become the subject of the papers in this issue. In general

  9. Multimodality optical coherence tomography and fluorescence confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for image-guided feedback of intraocular injections in mouse models

    Benavides, Oscar R.; Terrones, Benjamin D.; Leeburg, Kelsey C.; Mehanathan, Sankarathi B.; Levine, Edward M.; Tao, Yuankai K.

    2018-02-01

    Rodent models are robust tools for understanding human retinal disease and function because of their similarities with human physiology and anatomy and availability of genetic mutants. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been well-established for ophthalmic imaging in rodents and enables depth-resolved visualization of structures and image-based surrogate biomarkers of disease. Similarly, fluorescence confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) has demonstrated utility for imaging endogenous and exogenous fluorescence and scattering contrast in the mouse retina. Complementary volumetric scattering and en face fluorescence contrast from OCT and cSLO, respectively, enables cellular-resolution longitudinal imaging of changes in ophthalmic structure and function. We present a non-contact multimodal OCT+cSLO small animal imaging system with extended working distance to the pupil, which enables imaging during and after intraocular injection. While injections are routinely performed in mice to develop novel models of ophthalmic diseases and screen novel therapeutics, the location and volume delivered is not precisely controlled and difficult to reproduce. Animals were imaged using a custom-built OCT engine and scan-head combined with a modified commercial cSLO scan-head. Post-injection imaging showed structural changes associated with retinal puncture, including the injection track, a retinal elevation, and detachment of the posterior hyaloid. When combined with imagesegmentation, we believe OCT can be used to precisely identify injection locations and quantify injection volumes. Fluorescence cSLO can provide complementary contrast for either fluorescently labeled compounds or transgenic cells for improved specificity. Our non-contact OCT+cSLO system is uniquely-suited for concurrent imaging with intraocular injections, which may be used for real-time image-guided injections.

  10. A pilot study to image the vascular network of small melanocytic choroidal tumors with speckle noise-free 1050-nm swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT choroidal angiography).

    Maloca, Peter; Gyger, Cyrill; Hasler, Pascal W

    2016-06-01

    To visualize and measure the vascular network of melanocytic choroidal tumors with speckle noise-free swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT choroidal angiography). Melanocytic choroidal tumors from 24 eyes were imaged with 1050-nm optical coherence tomography (Topcon DRI OCT-1 Atlantis). A semi-automated algorithm was developed to remove speckle noise and to extract and measure the volume of the choroidal vessels from the obtained OCT data. In all cases, analysis of the choroidal vessels could be performed with SS-OCT without the need for pupillary dilation. The proposed method allows speckle noise-free, structure-guided visualization and measurement of the larger choroidal vessels in three dimensions. The obtained data suggest that speckle noise-free OCT may be more effective at identifying choroidal structures than traditional OCT methods. The measured volume of the extracted choroidal vessels of Haller's layer and Sattler's layer in the examined tumorous eyes was on average 0.982463955 mm(3) /982463956 μm(3) (range of 0.209764406 mm(3) /209764405.9 μm(3)to 1.78105544 mm(3) /1781055440 μm(3)). Full thickness obstruction of the choroidal vasculature by the tumor was found in 18 cases (72 %). In seven cases (18 %), choroidal vessel architecture did not show pronounced morphological abnormalities (18 %). Speckle noise-free OCT may serve as a new illustrative imaging technology and enhance visualization of the choroidal vessels without the need for dye injection. OCT can be used to identify and evaluate the choroidal vessels of melanocytic choroidal tumors, and may represent a potentially useful tool for imaging and monitoring of choroidal nevi and melanoma.

  11. Optical coherence tomography in gastroenterology: a review and future outlook

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Leggett, Cadman L.; Trindade, Arvind J.; Sethi, Amrita; Swager, Anne-Fré; Joshi, Virendra; Bergman, Jacques J.; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Nishioka, Norman S.; Namati, Eman

    2017-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging technique optically analogous to ultrasound that can generate depth-resolved images with micrometer-scale resolution. Advances in fiber optics and miniaturized actuation technologies allow OCT imaging of the human body and further expand OCT utilization in applications including but not limited to cardiology and gastroenterology. This review article provides an overview of current OCT development and its clinical utility in the gastrointestinal tract, including disease detection/differentiation and endoscopic therapy guidance, as well as a discussion of its future applications.

  12. In-vivo segmentation and quantification of coronary lesions by optical coherence tomography images for a lesion type definition and stenosis grading.

    Celi, Simona; Berti, Sergio

    2014-10-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a catheter-based medical imaging technique that produces cross-sectional images of blood vessels. This technique is particularly useful for studying coronary atherosclerosis. In this paper, we present a new framework that allows a segmentation and quantification of OCT images of coronary arteries to define the plaque type and stenosis grading. These analyses are usually carried out on-line on the OCT-workstation where measuring is mainly operator-dependent and mouse-based. The aim of this program is to simplify and improve the processing of OCT images for morphometric investigations and to present a fast procedure to obtain 3D geometrical models that can also be used for external purposes such as for finite element simulations. The main phases of our toolbox are the lumen segmentation and the identification of the main tissues in the artery wall. We validated the proposed method with identification and segmentation manually performed by expert OCT readers. The method was evaluated on ten datasets from clinical routine and the validation was performed on 210 images randomly extracted from the pullbacks. Our results show that automated segmentation of the vessel and of the tissue components are possible off-line with a precision that is comparable to manual segmentation for the tissue component and to the proprietary-OCT-console for the lumen segmentation. Several OCT sections have been processed to provide clinical outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Long ranging swept-source optical coherence tomography-based angiography outperforms its spectral-domain counterpart in imaging human skin microcirculations

    Xu, Jingjiang; Song, Shaozhen; Men, Shaojie; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2017-11-01

    There is an increasing demand for imaging tools in clinical dermatology that can perform in vivo wide-field morphological and functional examination from surface to deep tissue regions at various skin sites of the human body. The conventional spectral-domain optical coherence tomography-based angiography (SD-OCTA) system is difficult to meet these requirements due to its fundamental limitations of the sensitivity roll-off, imaging range as well as imaging speed. To mitigate these issues, we demonstrate a swept-source OCTA (SS-OCTA) system by employing a swept source based on a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser. A series of comparisons between SS-OCTA and SD-OCTA are conducted. Benefiting from the high system sensitivity, long imaging range, and superior roll-off performance, the SS-OCTA system is demonstrated with better performance in imaging human skin than the SD-OCTA system. We show that the SS-OCTA permits remarkable deep visualization of both structure and vasculature (up to ˜2 mm penetration) with wide field of view capability (up to 18×18 mm2), enabling a more comprehensive assessment of the morphological features as well as functional blood vessel networks from the superficial epidermal to deep dermal layers. It is expected that the advantages of the SS-OCTA system will provide a ground for clinical translation, benefiting the existing dermatological practice.

  14. Advances in optical imaging

    Bremer, C.; Ntziachristos, V.; Mahmood, U.; Tung, C.H.; Weissleder, R.

    2001-01-01

    Different optical imaging technologies have significantly progressed over the last years. Besides advances in imaging techniques and image reconstruction, new 'smart' optical contrast agents have been developed which can be used to detect molecular targets (such as endogenous enzymes) in vivo. The combination of novel imaging technologies coupled with smart agents bears great diagnostic potential both clinically and experimentally. This overview outlines the basic principles of optical imaging and summarizes the current state of the art. (orig.) [de

  15. Real-time calibration-free C-scan images of the eye fundus using Master Slave swept source optical coherence tomography

    Bradu, Adrian; Kapinchev, Konstantin; Barnes, Fred; Garway-Heath, David F.; Rajendram, Ranjan; Keane, Pearce; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2015-03-01

    Recently, we introduced a novel Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) method, termed as Master Slave OCT (MS-OCT), specialized for delivering en-face images. This method uses principles of spectral domain interfereometry in two stages. MS-OCT operates like a time domain OCT, selecting only signals from a chosen depth only while scanning the laser beam across the eye. Time domain OCT allows real time production of an en-face image, although relatively slowly. As a major advance, the Master Slave method allows collection of signals from any number of depths, as required by the user. The tremendous advantage in terms of parallel provision of data from numerous depths could not be fully employed by using multi core processors only. The data processing required to generate images at multiple depths simultaneously is not achievable with commodity multicore processors only. We compare here the major improvement in processing and display, brought about by using graphic cards. We demonstrate images obtained with a swept source at 100 kHz (which determines an acquisition time [Ta] for a frame of 200×200 pixels2 of Ta =1.6 s). By the end of the acquired frame being scanned, using our computing capacity, 4 simultaneous en-face images could be created in T = 0.8 s. We demonstrate that by using graphic cards, 32 en-face images can be displayed in Td 0.3 s. Other faster swept source engines can be used with no difference in terms of Td. With 32 images (or more), volumes can be created for 3D display, using en-face images, as opposed to the current technology where volumes are created using cross section OCT images.

  16. Dynamic Assessment of the Endothelialization of Tissue-Engineered Blood Vessels Using an Optical Coherence Tomography Catheter-Based Fluorescence Imaging System.

    Gurjarpadhye, Abhijit Achyut; DeWitt, Matthew R; Xu, Yong; Wang, Ge; Rylander, Marissa Nichole; Rylander, Christopher G

    2015-07-01

    Lumen endothelialization of bioengineered vascular scaffolds is essential to maintain small-diameter graft patency and prevent thrombosis postimplantation. Unfortunately, nondestructive imaging methods to visualize this dynamic process are lacking, thus slowing development and clinical translation of these potential tissue-engineering approaches. To meet this need, a fluorescence imaging system utilizing a commercial optical coherence tomography (OCT) catheter was designed to visualize graft endothelialization. C7 DragonFly™ intravascular OCT catheter was used as a channel for delivery and collection of excitation and emission spectra. Poly-dl-lactide (PDLLA) electrospun scaffolds were seeded with endothelial cells (ECs). Seeded cells were exposed to Calcein AM before imaging, causing the living cells to emit green fluorescence in response to blue laser. By positioning the catheter tip precisely over a specimen using high-fidelity electromechanical components, small regions of the specimen were excited selectively. The resulting fluorescence intensities were mapped on a two-dimensional digital grid to generate spatial distribution of fluorophores at single-cell-level resolution. Fluorescence imaging of endothelialization on glass and PDLLA scaffolds was performed using the OCT catheter-based imaging system as well as with a commercial fluorescence microscope. Cell coverage area was calculated for both image sets for quantitative comparison of imaging techniques. Tubular PDLLA scaffolds were maintained in a bioreactor on seeding with ECs, and endothelialization was monitored over 5 days using the OCT catheter-based imaging system. No significant difference was observed in images obtained using our imaging system to those acquired with the fluorescence microscope. Cell area coverage calculated using the images yielded similar values. Nondestructive imaging of endothelialization on tubular scaffolds showed cell proliferation with cell coverage area increasing from

  17. Conical wavefronts in optics and tomography

    Soroko, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    A wide range of techniques in which the information is transferred by conical (nonspherical and nonplanar) wave fronts is considered. This is the first summary of papers published in the field of mesooptics and optical tomography. After the introduction into the new branch of modern optics - mesooptics -the properties of conical wavefronts are treated in detail. Some possible applications of mesooptics in science and technology are considered. The long history of mesooptics treated in the last chapter of this review lecture goes from the early stage of our Universe, gravitational lens, first publications in the last century and up-to-date innovations in optics, mesooptics and optical tomography. 3 refs

  18. Optical imaging and spectroscopy

    Brady, David J

    2009-01-01

    An essential reference for optical sensor system design This is the first text to present an integrated view of the optical and mathematical analysis tools necessary to understand computational optical system design. It presents the foundations of computational optical sensor design with a focus entirely on digital imaging and spectroscopy. It systematically covers: Coded aperture and tomographic imaging Sampling and transformations in optical systems, including wavelets and generalized sampling techniques essential to digital system analysis Geometric, wave, and statis

  19. Preclinical evaluation and intraoperative human retinal imaging with a high-resolution microscope-integrated spectral domain optical coherence tomography device.

    Hahn, Paul; Migacz, Justin; O'Donnell, Rachelle; Day, Shelley; Lee, Annie; Lin, Phoebe; Vann, Robin; Kuo, Anthony; Fekrat, Sharon; Mruthyunjaya, Prithvi; Postel, Eric A; Izatt, Joseph A; Toth, Cynthia A

    2013-01-01

    The authors have recently developed a high-resolution microscope-integrated spectral domain optical coherence tomography (MIOCT) device designed to enable OCT acquisition simultaneous with surgical maneuvers. The purpose of this report is to describe translation of this device from preclinical testing into human intraoperative imaging. Before human imaging, surgical conditions were fully simulated for extensive preclinical MIOCT evaluation in a custom model eye system. Microscope-integrated spectral domain OCT images were then acquired in normal human volunteers and during vitreoretinal surgery in patients who consented to participate in a prospective institutional review board-approved study. Microscope-integrated spectral domain OCT images were obtained before and at pauses in surgical maneuvers and were compared based on predetermined diagnostic criteria to images obtained with a high-resolution spectral domain research handheld OCT system (HHOCT; Bioptigen, Inc) at the same time point. Cohorts of five consecutive patients were imaged. Successful end points were predefined, including ≥80% correlation in identification of pathology between MIOCT and HHOCT in ≥80% of the patients. Microscope-integrated spectral domain OCT was favorably evaluated by study surgeons and scrub nurses, all of whom responded that they would consider participating in human intraoperative imaging trials. The preclinical evaluation identified significant improvements that were made before MIOCT use during human surgery. The MIOCT transition into clinical human research was smooth. Microscope-integrated spectral domain OCT imaging in normal human volunteers demonstrated high resolution comparable to tabletop scanners. In the operating room, after an initial learning curve, surgeons successfully acquired human macular MIOCT images before and after surgical maneuvers. Microscope-integrated spectral domain OCT imaging confirmed preoperative diagnoses, such as full-thickness macular hole

  20. In-depth imaging and quantification of degenerative changes associated with Achilles ruptured tendons by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Bagnaninchi, P O; Yang, Y; Maffulli, G; El Haj, A; Maffulli, N; Bonesi, M; Meglinski, I; Phelan, C

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a method based on polarization-sensitive optical coherent tomography (PSOCT) for the imaging and quantification of degenerative changes associated with Achilles tendon rupture. Ex vivo PSOCT examinations were performed in 24 patients. The study involved samples from 14 ruptured Achilles tendons, 4 tendinopathic Achilles tendons and 6 patellar tendons (collected during total knee replacement) as non-ruptured controls. The samples were imaged in both intensity and phase retardation modes within 24 h after surgery, and birefringence was quantified. The samples were fixed and processed for histology immediately after imaging. Slides were assessed twice in a blind manner to provide a semi-quantitative histological score of degeneration. In-depth micro structural imaging was demonstrated. Collagen disorganization and high cellularity were observable by PSOCT as the main markers associated with pathological features. Quantitative assessment of birefringence and penetration depth found significant differences between non-ruptured and ruptured tendons. Microstructure abnormalities were observed in the microstructure of two out of four tendinopathic samples. PSOCT has the potential to explore in situ and in-depth pathological change associated with Achilles tendon rupture, and could help to delineate abnormalities in tendinopathic samples in vivo.

  1. Towards spectral-domain optical coherence tomography on a silicon chip

    Akça, B.I.; Worhoff, Kerstin; Nguyen, V.D.; Kalkman, J.; van Leeuwen, Ton; de Ridder, R.M.; Pollnau, Markus

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a widely used optical imaging technology, particularly in the medical field, since it can provide non-invasive, sub-micrometer resolution diagnostic images of tissue. Current OCT systems contain optical fibers and free-space optical components which make these

  2. Optical tomography of the aurora and EISCAT

    H. U. Frey

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Tomographic reconstruction of the three-dimensional auroral arc emission is used to obtain vertical and horizontal distributions of the optical auroral emission. Under the given experimental conditions with a very limited angular range and a small number of observers, algebraic reconstruction methods generally yield better results than transform techniques. Different algebraic reconstruction methods are tested with an auroral arc model and the best results are obtained with an iterative least-square method adapted from emission-computed tomography. The observation geometry used during a campaign in Norway in 1995 is tested with the arc model and root-mean-square errors, to be expected under the given geometrical conditions, are calculated. Although optimum geometry was not used, root-mean-square errors of less than 2% for the images and of the order of 30% for the distribution could be obtained. The method is applied to images from real observations. The correspondence of original pictures and projections of the reconstructed volume is discussed, and emission profiles along magnetic field lines through the three-dimensionally reconstructed arc are calibrated into electron density profiles with additional EISCAT measurements. Including a background profile and the temporal changes of the electron density due to recombination, good agreement can be obtained between measured profiles and the time-sequence of calculated profiles. These profiles are used to estimate the conductivity distribution in the vicinity of the EISCAT site. While the radar can only probe the ionosphere along the radar beam, the three-dimensional tomography enables conductivity estimates in a large area around the radar site.Key words. Tomography · Aurora · EISCAT · Ionosphere · Conductivity

  3. Optical tomography of the aurora and EISCAT

    H. U. Frey

    Full Text Available Tomographic reconstruction of the three-dimensional auroral arc emission is used to obtain vertical and horizontal distributions of the optical auroral emission. Under the given experimental conditions with a very limited angular range and a small number of observers, algebraic reconstruction methods generally yield better results than transform techniques. Different algebraic reconstruction methods are tested with an auroral arc model and the best results are obtained with an iterative least-square method adapted from emission-computed tomography. The observation geometry used during a campaign in Norway in 1995 is tested with the arc model and root-mean-square errors, to be expected under the given geometrical conditions, are calculated. Although optimum geometry was not used, root-mean-square errors of less than 2% for the images and of the order of 30% for the distribution could be obtained. The method is applied to images from real observations. The correspondence of original pictures and projections of the reconstructed volume is discussed, and emission profiles along magnetic field lines through the three-dimensionally reconstructed arc are calibrated into electron density profiles with additional EISCAT measurements. Including a background profile and the temporal changes of the electron density due to recombination, good agreement can be obtained between measured profiles and the time-sequence of calculated profiles. These profiles are used to estimate the conductivity distribution in the vicinity of the EISCAT site. While the radar can only probe the ionosphere along the radar beam, the three-dimensional tomography enables conductivity estimates in a large area around the radar site.

    Key words. Tomography · Aurora · EISCAT · Ionosphere · Conductivity

  4. Dynamic gonioscopy using optical coherence tomography.

    Matonti, Frederic; Chazalon, Elodie; Trichet, Elodie; Khaled, El Samak; Denis, Danièle; Hoffart, Louis

    2012-01-01

    To describe the use of anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) in studying the dynamic changes of the anterior chamber angle by corneal indentation. In a prospective observational study, the anterior segments of 21 eyes were imaged using AS-OCT. After the initial scan, a second scan was executed on the same areas with a central corneal indentation. An evaluation of the reopening of the angle and its measurement were performed. With AS-OCT, the indirect signs were accurate enough to guide the diagnosis in all plateau iris confirmed by ultrabiomicroscopy. The angle widths were significantly increased after indentation. This method would appear to offer a convenient and rapid method of assessing the configuration of the anterior chamber; it may help during the routine clinical assessment and treatment of patients with narrow or closed angles, particularly when gonioscopy is difficult to interpret. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. An All-Fiber-Optic Combined System of Noncontact Photoacoustic Tomography and Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Eom, Jonghyun; Shin, Jun Geun; Park, Soongho; Rim, Sunghwan; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2016-05-20

    We propose an all-fiber-based dual-modal imaging system that combines noncontact photoacoustic tomography (PAT) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). The PAT remotely measures photoacoustic (PA) signals with a 1550-nm laser on the surface of a sample by utilizing a fiber interferometer as an ultrasound detector. The fiber-based OCT, employing a swept-source laser centered at 1310 nm, shares the sample arm of the PAT system. The fiber-optic probe for the combined system was homemade with a lensed single-mode fiber (SMF) and a large-core multimode fiber (MMF). The compact and robust common probe is capable of obtaining both the PA and the OCT signals at the same position without any physical contact. Additionally, the MMF of the probe delivers the short pulses of a Nd:YAG laser to efficiently excite the PA signals. We experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed dual-modal system with a phantom made of a fishing line and a black polyethylene terephthalate fiber in a tissue mimicking solution. The all-fiber-optic system, capable of providing complementary information about absorption and scattering, has a promising potential in minimally invasive and endoscopic imaging.

  6. An All-Fiber-Optic Combined System of Noncontact Photoacoustic Tomography and Optical Coherence Tomography

    Eom, Jonghyun; Shin, Jun Geun; Park, Soongho; Rim, Sunghwan; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2016-01-01

    We propose an all-fiber-based dual-modal imaging system that combines noncontact photoacoustic tomography (PAT) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). The PAT remotely measures photoacoustic (PA) signals with a 1550-nm laser on the surface of a sample by utilizing a fiber interferometer as an ultrasound detector. The fiber-based OCT, employing a swept-source laser centered at 1310 nm, shares the sample arm of the PAT system. The fiber-optic probe for the combined system was homemade with a lensed single-mode fiber (SMF) and a large-core multimode fiber (MMF). The compact and robust common probe is capable of obtaining both the PA and the OCT signals at the same position without any physical contact. Additionally, the MMF of the probe delivers the short pulses of a Nd:YAG laser to efficiently excite the PA signals. We experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed dual-modal system with a phantom made of a fishing line and a black polyethylene terephthalate fiber in a tissue mimicking solution. The all-fiber-optic system, capable of providing complementary information about absorption and scattering, has a promising potential in minimally invasive and endoscopic imaging. PMID:27213392

  7. An All-Fiber-Optic Combined System of Noncontact Photoacoustic Tomography and Optical Coherence Tomography

    Jonghyun Eom

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose an all-fiber-based dual-modal imaging system that combines noncontact photoacoustic tomography (PAT and optical coherence tomography (OCT. The PAT remotely measures photoacoustic (PA signals with a 1550-nm laser on the surface of a sample by utilizing a fiber interferometer as an ultrasound detector. The fiber-based OCT, employing a swept-source laser centered at 1310 nm, shares the sample arm of the PAT system. The fiber-optic probe for the combined system was homemade with a lensed single-mode fiber (SMF and a large-core multimode fiber (MMF. The compact and robust common probe is capable of obtaining both the PA and the OCT signals at the same position without any physical contact. Additionally, the MMF of the probe delivers the short pulses of a Nd:YAG laser to efficiently excite the PA signals. We experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed dual-modal system with a phantom made of a fishing line and a black polyethylene terephthalate fiber in a tissue mimicking solution. The all-fiber-optic system, capable of providing complementary information about absorption and scattering, has a promising potential in minimally invasive and endoscopic imaging.

  8. Actinic keratosis in the en-face and slice imaging mode of high-definition optical coherence tomography and comparison with histology.

    Maier, T; Braun-Falco, M; Laubender, R P; Ruzicka, T; Berking, C

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows real-time, in vivo examination of nonmelanoma skin cancer. An innovative high-definition (HD)-OCT with a horizontal (en-face) and vertical (slice) imaging mode offers additional information in the diagnosis of actinic keratosis (AK) and may potentially replace invasive diagnostic biopsies.  To define the characteristic morphological features of AK by using HD-OCT in the two imaging modes compared with histopathology as gold standard.  In total, 20 AKs were examined by HD-OCT in the en-face and slice imaging modes and characteristic features were described and evaluated in comparison with the histopathological findings. Furthermore, the HD-OCT images of a subgroup of AKs were compared with those of the clinically normal adjacent skin.  The preoperative in vivo diagnostics showed the following features in the en-face imaging mode of HD-OCT: disruption of stratum corneum, architectural disarray, cellular/nuclear polymorphism in the stratum granulosum/stratum spinosum, and bright irregular bundles in the superficial dermis. In the vertical slice imaging mode the following characteristics were found: irregular entrance signal, destruction of layering, white streaks and dots, and grey areas. In contrast, the clinically healthy adjacent skin showed mainly a regular epidermal 'honeycomb' pattern in the en-face mode and distinct layering of the skin in the slice mode.  HD-OCT with both the en-face and slice imaging modes offers additional information in the diagnosis of AK compared with conventional OCT and might enhance the possibility of the noninvasive diagnosis of AK prior to treatment procedures and possibly in the monitoring of noninvasive treatment strategies. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  9. Dynamic light scattering optical coherence tomography.

    Lee, Jonghwan; Wu, Weicheng; Jiang, James Y; Zhu, Bo; Boas, David A

    2012-09-24

    We introduce an integration of dynamic light scattering (DLS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) for high-resolution 3D imaging of heterogeneous diffusion and flow. DLS analyzes fluctuations in light scattered by particles to measure diffusion or flow of the particles, and OCT uses coherence gating to collect light only scattered from a small volume for high-resolution structural imaging. Therefore, the integration of DLS and OCT enables high-resolution 3D imaging of diffusion and flow. We derived a theory under the assumption that static and moving particles are mixed within the OCT resolution volume and the moving particles can exhibit either diffusive or translational motion. Based on this theory, we developed a fitting algorithm to estimate dynamic parameters including the axial and transverse velocities and the diffusion coefficient. We validated DLS-OCT measurements of diffusion and flow through numerical simulations and phantom experiments. As an example application, we performed DLS-OCT imaging of the living animal brain, resulting in 3D maps of the absolute and axial velocities, the diffusion coefficient, and the coefficient of determination.

  10. Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography detection method

    Colston, B W; DaSilva, L B; Everett, M J; Featherstone, J D B; Fried, D; Ragadio, J N; Sathyam, U S.

    1999-01-01

    This study demonstrates the potential of polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) for non-invasive in vivo detection and characterization of early, incipient caries lesions. PS-OCT generates cross-sectional images of biological tissue while measuring the effect of the tissue on the polarization state of incident light. Clear discrimination between regions of normal and demineralized enamel is first shown in PS-OCT images of bovine enamel blocks containing well-characterized artificial lesions. High-resolution, cross-sectional images of extracted human teeth are then generated that clearly discriminate between the normal and carious regions on both the smooth and occlusal surfaces. Regions of the teeth that appeared to be demineralized in the PS-OCT images were verified using histological thin sections examined under polarized light microscopy. The PS-OCT system discriminates between normal and carious regions by measuring the polarization state of the back-scattered 1310 nm light, which is affected by the state of demineralization of the enamel. Demineralization of enamel increases the scattering coefficient, thus depolarizing the incident light. This study shows that PS-OCT has great potential for the detection, characterization, and monitoring of incipient caries lesions

  11. 3D optical tomography in the presence of void regions

    Riley, J.; Dehghani, Hamid; Schweiger, Martin; Arridge, Simon R.; Ripoll, Jorge; Nieto-Vesperinas, Manuel

    2000-12-01

    We present an investigation of the effect of a 3D non-scattering gap region on image reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography. The void gap is modelled by the Radiosity-Diffusion method and the inverse problem is solved using the adjoint field method. The case of a sphere with concentric spherical gap is used as an example.

  12. Modeling light–tissue interaction in optical coherence tomography systems

    Andersen, Peter E.; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Thrane, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) performs high-resolution, cross-sectional tomographic imaging of the internal tissue microstructure by measuring backscattered or backreflected light. The scope of this chapter is to present analytical and numerical models that are able to describe light-tissue ...

  13. Optical coherence tomography used for internal biometrics

    Chang, Shoude; Sherif, Sherif; Mao, Youxin; Flueraru, Costel

    2007-06-01

    Traditional biometric technologies used for security and person identification essentially deal with fingerprints, hand geometry and face images. However, because all these technologies use external features of human body, they can be easily fooled and tampered with by distorting, modifying or counterfeiting these features. Nowadays, internal biometrics which detects the internal ID features of an object is becoming increasingly important. Being capable of exploring under-skin structure, optical coherence tomography (OCT) system can be used as a powerful tool for internal biometrics. We have applied fiber-optic and full-field OCT systems to detect the multiple-layer 2D images and 3D profile of the fingerprints, which eventually result in a higher discrimination than the traditional 2D recognition methods. More importantly, the OCT based fingerprint recognition has the ability to easily distinguish artificial fingerprint dummies by analyzing the extracted layered surfaces. Experiments show that our OCT systems successfully detected the dummy, which was made of plasticene and was used to bypass the commercially available fingerprint scanning system with a false accept rate (FAR) of 100%.

  14. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography of Retinal Cavernous Hemangioma.

    Pierro, Luisa; Marchese, Alessandro; Gagliardi, Marco; Bandello, Francesco

    2017-08-01

    Retinal cavernous hemangioma is a rare, benign, retinal tumor characterized by angiomatous proliferation of vessels within the inner retina or the optic disc.1 Here we report a case of retinal cavernous hemangioma on the margin of the optic disc in the right eye of a 61-year-old asymptomatic female. The lesion was studied with multimodal imaging which included structural optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography, blue fundus auto-fluorescence, optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) (DRI OCT Triton; Topcon, Tokyo, Japan) and visual field examination. Blood circulation inside retinal cavernous hemangioma lesion is typically low-stagnant.2 However, OCTA demonstrated blood flow inside the lesion, illustrating its vascular circulation.3 Visual field was within the normal limits, except from a slight enlargement of the blind spot. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2017;48:684-685.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Objective assessment of multimodality optical coherence tomography and second-harmonic generation image quality of ex vivo mouse ovaries using human observers

    Welge, Weston A.; DeMarco, Andrew T.; Watson, Jennifer M.; Rice, Photini S.; Barton, Jennifer K.; Kupinski, Matthew A.

    2014-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is particularly deadly because it is usually diagnosed after it has begun to spread. Transvaginal sonography (TVS) is the most common imaging screening technique. However, routine use of TVS has not reduced ovarian cancer mortality. The superior resolution of optical imaging techniques may make them attractive alternatives to TVS. We have previously identified features of ovarian cancer using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and secondharmonic generation (SHG) microscopy (with collagen as the targeted fluorophore). OCT provides a gross anatomical image of the ovary while SHG provides a closer look at a particular region. Knowing these anatomical features, we sought to investigate the diagnostic potential of OCT and SHG. We conducted a fully crossed, multi-reader, multi-case study using seven human observers. Each observer classified 44 ex vivo mouse ovaries as normal or abnormal from OCT, SHG, and simultaneous, co-registered OCT and SHG images and provided a confidence rating on a three-point ordinal scale. We determined the average receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, area under the ROC curves (AUC), and other quantitative figures of merit. The results show that OCT has diagnostic potential with an average AUC of 0.91 +/- 0.03. The average AUC for SHG was less promising at 0.71 +/- 0.06. Interestingly, the average AUC for simultaneous, co-registered OCT and SHG was not significantly different from OCT alone. This suggests that collagen may not be a useful fluorophore for ovarian cancer screening. The high performance of OCT warrants further investigation.

  16. Optical Biopsy Using Tissue Spectroscopy and Optical Coherence Tomography

    Norman S Nishioka

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available ‘Optical biopsy’ or ‘optical diagnostics’ is a technique whereby light energy is used to obtain information about the structure and function of tissues without disrupting them. In fluorescence spectroscopy, light energy (usually provided by a laser is used to excite tissues and the resulting fluorescence provides information about the target tissue. Its major gastrointestinal application has been in the evaluation of colonic polyps, in which it can reliably distinguish malignant from benign lesions. Optical coherence tomography (OCT has been used in the investigation of Barrett’s epithelium (and dysplasia, although a variety of other applications are feasible. For example, OCT could assist in the identification and staging of mucosal and submucosal neoplasms, the grading of inflammation in the stomach and intestine, the diagnosis of biliary tumours and the assessment of villous architecture. OCT differs from endoscopic ultrasound, a complementary modality, in that it has a much higher resolution but lesser depth of penetration. The images correlate with the histopathological appearance of tissues, and the addition of Doppler methods may enable it to evaluate the vascularity of tumours and the amount of blood flow in varices. Refinements in these new optical techniques will likely make them valuable in clinical practice, although their specific roles have yet to be determined.

  17. Analysis of multiple scattering effects in optical Doppler tomography

    Yura, H.T.; Thrane, L.; Andersen, Peter E.

    2005-01-01

    Optical Doppler tomography (ODT) combines Doppler velocimetry and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to obtain high-resolution cross-sectional imaging of particle flow velocity in scattering media such as the human retina and skin. Here, we present the results of a theoretical analysis of ODT where...... multiple scattering effects are included. The purpose of this analysis is to determine how multiple scattering affects the estimation of the depth-resolved localized flow velocity. Depth-resolved velocity estimates are obtained directly from the corresponding mean or standard deviation of the observed...

  18. Semiautomated segmentation and analysis of retinal layers in three-dimensional spectral-domain optical coherence tomography images of patients with atrophic age-related macular degeneration.

    Hu, Zhihong; Shi, Yue; Nandanan, Kiran; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2017-01-01

    Historically, regular drusen and geographic atrophy (GA) have been recognized as the hallmarks of nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Recent imaging developments have revealed another distinct nonneovascular AMD phenotype, reticular pseudodrusen (RPD). We develop an approach to semiautomatically quantify retinal surfaces associated with various AMD lesions (i.e., regular drusen, RPD, and GA) in spectral domain (SD) optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. More specifically, a graph-based algorithm was used to segment multiple retinal layers in SD-OCT volumes. Varying surface feasibility constraints based on the presegmentation were applied on the double-surface graph search to refine the surface segmentation. The thicknesses of these layers and their correlation with retinal functional measurements, including microperimetry (MP) sensitivity and visual acuity (VA), were investigated. The photoreceptor outer segment layer demonstrated significant thinning with a reduction in MP sensitivity and VA score when atrophic AMD lesions were present. Regular drusen and RPD were separately segmented on SD-OCT images to allow their characteristics and distribution to be studied separately. The mean thickness of regular drusen was found to significantly correlate with the VA score. RPD appeared to be distributed evenly throughout the macula and regular drusen appeared to be more concentrated centrally.

  19. Fully Automated Robust System to Detect Retinal Edema, Central Serous Chorioretinopathy, and Age Related Macular Degeneration from Optical Coherence Tomography Images

    Samina Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Maculopathy is the excessive damage to macula that leads to blindness. It mostly occurs due to retinal edema (RE, central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR, or age related macular degeneration (ARMD. Optical coherence tomography (OCT imaging is the latest eye testing technique that can detect these syndromes in early stages. Many researchers have used OCT images to detect retinal abnormalities. However, to the best of our knowledge, no research that presents a fully automated system to detect all of these macular syndromes is reported. This paper presents the world’s first ever decision support system to automatically detect RE, CSCR, and ARMD retinal pathologies and healthy retina from OCT images. The automated disease diagnosis in our proposed system is based on multilayered support vector machines (SVM classifier trained on 40 labeled OCT scans (10 healthy, 10 RE, 10 CSCR, and 10 ARMD. After training, SVM forms an accurate decision about the type of retinal pathology using 9 extracted features. We have tested our proposed system on 2819 OCT scans (1437 healthy, 640 RE, and 742 CSCR of 502 patients from two different datasets and our proposed system correctly diagnosed 2817/2819 subjects with the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity ratings of 99.92%, 100%, and 99.86%, respectively.

  20. Greedy algorithms for diffuse optical tomography reconstruction

    Dileep, B. P. V.; Das, Tapan; Dutta, Pranab K.

    2018-03-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive imaging modality that reconstructs the optical parameters of a highly scattering medium. However, the inverse problem of DOT is ill-posed and highly nonlinear due to the zig-zag propagation of photons that diffuses through the cross section of tissue. The conventional DOT imaging methods iteratively compute the solution of forward diffusion equation solver which makes the problem computationally expensive. Also, these methods fail when the geometry is complex. Recently, the theory of compressive sensing (CS) has received considerable attention because of its efficient use in biomedical imaging applications. The objective of this paper is to solve a given DOT inverse problem by using compressive sensing framework and various Greedy algorithms such as orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP), compressive sampling matching pursuit (CoSaMP), and stagewise orthogonal matching pursuit (StOMP), regularized orthogonal matching pursuit (ROMP) and simultaneous orthogonal matching pursuit (S-OMP) have been studied to reconstruct the change in the absorption parameter i.e, Δα from the boundary data. Also, the Greedy algorithms have been validated experimentally on a paraffin wax rectangular phantom through a well designed experimental set up. We also have studied the conventional DOT methods like least square method and truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) for comparison. One of the main features of this work is the usage of less number of source-detector pairs, which can facilitate the use of DOT in routine applications of screening. The performance metrics such as mean square error (MSE), normalized mean square error (NMSE), structural similarity index (SSIM), and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) have been used to evaluate the performance of the algorithms mentioned in this paper. Extensive simulation results confirm that CS based DOT reconstruction outperforms the conventional DOT imaging methods in terms of

  1. All-optically integrated photoacoustic and optical coherence tomography: A review

    Wei Qiao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available All-optically integrated photoacoustic (PA and optical coherence tomography (OCT dual-mode imaging technology that could offer comprehensive pathological information for accurate diagnosis in clinic has gradually become a promising imaging technology in the aspect of biomedical imaging during the recent years. This review refers to the technology aspects of all-optical PA detection and system evolution of optically integrated PA and OCT, including Michelson interferometer dual-mode imaging system, Fabry–Perot (FP interferometer dual-mode imaging system and Mach–Zehnder interferometer dual-mode imaging system. It is believed that the optically integrated PA and OCT has great potential applications in biomedical imaging.

  2. In vivo endoscopic multi-beam optical coherence tomography

    Standish, Beau A; Mariampillai, Adrian; Munce, Nigel R; Leung, Michael K K; Vitkin, I Alex [Deptartment of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Lee, Kenneth K C; Yang, Victor X D [Ontario Cancer Institute/University Health Network, Toronto (Canada)], E-mail: standish@ee.ryerson.ca

    2010-02-07

    A multichannel optical coherence tomography (multi-beam OCT) system and an in vivo endoscopic imaging probe were developed using a swept-source OCT system. The distal optics were micro-machined to produce a high numerical aperture, multi-focus fibre optic array. This combination resulted in a transverse design resolution of <10 {mu}m full width half maximum (FWHM) throughout the entire imaging range, while also increasing the signal intensity within the focus of the individual channels. The system was used in a pre-clinical rabbit study to acquire in vivo structural images of the colon and ex vivo images of the oesophagus and trachea. A good correlation between the structural multi-beam OCT images and H and E histology was achieved, demonstrating the feasibility of this high-resolution system and its potential for in vivo human endoscopic imaging.

  3. In vivo endoscopic multi-beam optical coherence tomography

    Standish, Beau A; Mariampillai, Adrian; Munce, Nigel R; Leung, Michael K K; Vitkin, I Alex; Lee, Kenneth K C; Yang, Victor X D

    2010-01-01

    A multichannel optical coherence tomography (multi-beam OCT) system and an in vivo endoscopic imaging probe were developed using a swept-source OCT system. The distal optics were micro-machined to produce a high numerical aperture, multi-focus fibre optic array. This combination resulted in a transverse design resolution of <10 μm full width half maximum (FWHM) throughout the entire imaging range, while also increasing the signal intensity within the focus of the individual channels. The system was used in a pre-clinical rabbit study to acquire in vivo structural images of the colon and ex vivo images of the oesophagus and trachea. A good correlation between the structural multi-beam OCT images and H and E histology was achieved, demonstrating the feasibility of this high-resolution system and its potential for in vivo human endoscopic imaging.

  4. Autofluorescence and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography of optic disk melanocytoma.

    Guerra, Ricardo Luz Leitão; Marback, Eduardo Ferrari; Silva, Igor Sandes Pessoa da; Maia Junior, Otacílio de Oliveira; Marback, Roberto Lorens

    2014-01-01

    The authors report fundus autofluorescence (FAF) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) findings of two consecutive patients who presented with optic disk melanocytoma (ODM). A retrospective study was performed by reviewing medical records and ophthalmic imaging examinations. Optical coherence tomography findings were sloped and brightly reflective anterior tumor surface, adjacent retinal desorganization and abrupt posterior optical shadowing. Vitreous seeds were found in one patient. Fundus autofluorescence revealed outstanding hypoautofluorescence at the tumor area and isoautofluorescence at the remaining retina. Optical coherence tomography findings of the reported cases are consistent with those reported in the reviewed literature. Fundus autofluorescence has been used in the assessment of choroidal melanocytic tumors, but not yet in melanocytomas. We assume that this is the first report of these findings and believe that when its pattern has become clearly defined, fundus autofluorescence will be a useful tool to avoid misdiagnosis in suspicious cases and for follow-up.

  5. Autofluorescence and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography of optic disk melanocytoma

    Ricardo Luz Leitão Guerra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors report fundus autofluorescence (FAF and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT findings of two consecutive patients who presented with optic disk melanocytoma (ODM. A retrospective study was performed by reviewing medical records and ophthalmic imaging examinations. Optical coherence tomography findings were sloped and brightly reflective anterior tumor surface, adjacent retinal desorganization and abrupt posterior optical shadowing. Vitreous seeds were found in one patient. Fundus autofluorescence revealed outstanding hypoautofluorescence at the tumor area and isoautofluorescence at the remaining retina. Optical coherence tomography findings of the reported cases are consistent with those reported in the reviewed literature. Fundus autofluorescence has been used in the assessment of choroidal melanocytic tumors, but not yet in melanocytomas. We assume that this is the first report of these findings and believe that when its pattern has become clearly defined, fundus autofluorescence will be a useful tool to avoid misdiagnosis in suspicious cases and for follow-up.

  6. Emission tomography for adrenal imaging

    Britton, K.E.; Shapiro, B.; Hawkins, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    Single photon emission tomography (SPET) of the adrenals was compared to convential gamma camera images. Depths of 19 adrenals were assessed by both the lateral skin-upper kidney pole method and by SPET. Eleven patients with adrenal disorders were also studied. An advantage of using SPET was that the analogue transverse section image showed improvement over the conventional posterior view because the liver activity was well separated from the adrenal. Furthermore, non-adrenal tissue background was virtually eliminated and adrenal depth determination facilitated. (U.K.)

  7. Field programmable gate array-based real-time optical Doppler tomography system for in vivo imaging of cardiac dynamics in the chick embryo

    Thrane, Lars; Larsen, Henning Engelbrecht; Norozi, Kambiz

    2009-01-01

    efficient and compact implementation by combining the conversion to an analytic signal with a pulse shaping function without the need for extra resources as compared to the Hilbert transform method. The conversion of the analytic signal to amplitude and phase is done by use of the coordinate rotation......We demonstrate a field programmable gate-array-based real-time optical Doppler tomography system. A complex-valued bandpass filter is used for the first time in optical coherence tomography signal processing to create the analytic signal. This method simplifies the filter design, and allows...

  8. Spatially-resolved in-situ quantification of biofouling using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and 3D image analysis in a spacer filled channel

    Fortunato, Luca

    2016-11-21

    The use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to investigate biomass in membrane systems has increased with time. OCT is able to characterize the biomass in-situ and non-destructively. In this study, a novel approach to process three-dimensional (3D) OCT scans is proposed. The approach allows obtaining spatially-resolved detailed structural biomass information. The 3D biomass reconstruction enables analysis of the biomass only, obtained by subtracting the time zero scan to all images. A 3D time series analysis of biomass development in a spacer filled channel under representative conditions (cross flow velocity) for a spiral wound membrane element was performed. The flow cell was operated for five days with monitoring of ultrafiltration membrane performance: feed channel pressure drop and permeate flux. The biomass development in the flow cell was detected by OCT before a performance decline was observed. Feed channel pressure drop continuously increased with increasing biomass volume, while flux decline was mainly affected in the initial phase of biomass accumulation. The novel OCT imaging approach enabled the assessment of spatial biomass distribution in the flow cell, discriminating the total biomass volume between the membrane, feed spacer and glass window. Biomass accumulation was stronger on the feed spacer during the early stage of biofouling, impacting the feed channel pressure drop stronger than permeate flux.

  9. Functional swept source optical coherence tomography

    Blatter, C.

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging modality capable of providing information about a sample structure along the three spatial dimensions with micrometer scale resolution. A new chapter opened with the development of functional OCT that provides additional information to the standard structural imaging. Among those extensions is Doppler OCT (D-OCT) that yields knowledge about the motion of the sample and/or its substructure. Its main application in biomedical imaging is the assessment of blood flow. D-OCT is therefore often associated with blood velocity measurement and recently with the visualization of the vascular network. Blood flow and vasculature are important markers of tissue health. Their assessment provides crucial information for diagnostics, treatment planning and monitoring. OCT is in a good position, as a non-invasive technique, to become an alternative to current fluorescence based techniques, allowing thereby also more frequent examination and broader screenings and, as a high resolution modality, to give insight into potential changes at the capillary level. An important challenge of in vivo imaging is patient motion that decreases the quality of acquisitions. One solution to that issue is high-speed imaging. Recently swept source OCT (SSOCT) revealed to be an efficient technology to achieve high-speed. This thesis investigates the use of swept sources for qualitative and quantitative vasculature imaging. It is presented via five journal papers that form its backbone. Prior to that, main concepts of FDOCT, D-OCT and SS systems are presented. The first paper reports a SSOCT system for skin imaging. In standard OCT systems, improving the lateral resolution comes at a cost of reduced depth of focus. This should be avoided in order to be able to assess different vascular beds in depth while keeping the speed advantage of FDOCT. Employing a Bessel beam for illumination of the sample allows circumventing this issue. The image

  10. In-line optical fiber metallic mirror reflector for monolithic common path optical coherence tomography probes.

    Singh, Kanwarpal; Reddy, Rohith; Sharma, Gargi; Verma, Yogesh; Gardecki, Joseph A; Tearney, Guillermo

    2018-03-01

    Endoscopic optical coherence tomography probes suffer from various artifacts due to dispersion imbalance and polarization mismatch between reference and sample arm light. Such artifacts can be minimized using a common path approach. In this work, we demonstrate a miniaturized common path probe for optical coherence tomography using an inline fiber mirror. A common path optical fiber probe suitable for performing high-resolution endoscopic optical coherence tomography imaging was developed. To achieve common path functionality, an inline fiber mirror was fabricated using a thin gold layer. A commercially available swept source engine was used to test the designed probe in a cadaver human coronary artery ex vivo. We achieved a sensitivity of 104 dB for this probe using a swept source optical coherence tomography system. To test the probe, images of a cadaver human coronary artery were obtained, demonstrating the quality that is comparable to those obtained by OCT systems with separate reference arms. Additionally, we demonstrate recovery of ranging depth by use of a Michelson interferometer in the detection path. We developed a miniaturized monolithic inline fiber mirror-based common path probe for optical coherence tomography. Owing to its simplicity, our design will be helpful in endoscopic applications that require high-resolution probes in a compact form factor while reducing system complexity. Lasers Surg. Med. 50:230-235, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. In vivo imaging of palisades of Vogt in dry eye versus normal subjects using en-face spectral-domain optical coherence tomography.

    Wajdene Ghouali

    Full Text Available To evaluate a possible clinical application of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT using en-face module for the imaging of the corneoscleral limbus in normal subjects and dry eye patients.Seventy-six subjects were included in this study. Seventy eyes of 35 consecutive patients with dry eye disease and 82 eyes of 41 healthy control subjects were investigated. All subjects were examined with the Avanti RTVue® anterior segment OCT. En-face OCT images of the corneoscleral limbus were acquired in four quadrants (inferior, superior, nasal and temporal and then were analyzed semi-quantitatively according to whether or not palisades of Vogt (POV were visible. En-face OCT images were then compared to in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM in eleven eyes of 7 healthy and dry eye patients.En-face SD-OCT showed POV as a radially oriented network, located in superficial corneoscleral limbus, with a good correlation with IVCM features. It provided an easy and reproducible identification of POV without any special preparation or any direct contact, with a grading scale from 0 (no visualization to 3 (high visualization. The POV were found predominantly in superior (P<0.001 and inferior (P<0.001 quadrants when compared to the nasal and temporal quadrants for all subjects examined. The visibility score decreased with age (P<0.001 and was lower in dry eye patients (P<0.01. In addition, the score decreased in accordance with the severity of dry eye disease (P<0.001.En-face SD-OCT is a non-contact imaging technique that can be used to evaluate the POV, thus providing valuable information about differences in the limbal anatomy of dry eye patients as compared to healthy patients.

  12. Fiber optic-based optical coherence tomography (OCT) for dental applications

    Everett, Matthew J.; Colston, Bill W., Jr.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Otis, Linda L.

    1998-09-01

    We have developed a hand-held fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for scanning of the oral cavity. We have produced, using this scanning device, in vivo cross-sectional images of hard and soft dental tissues in human volunteers. Clinically relevant anatomical structures, including the gingival margin, periodontal sulcus, and dento- enamel junction, were visible in all the images. The cemento- enamel junction and the alveolar bone were identified in approximately two thirds of the images. These images represent, or our knowledge, the first in vivo OCT images of human dental tissue.

  13. Dynamic Optically Multiplexed Imaging

    2015-07-29

    Dynamic Optically Multiplexed Imaging Yaron Rachlin, Vinay Shah, R. Hamilton Shepard, and Tina Shih Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of...V. Shah, and T. Shih “Design Architectures for Optically Multiplexed Imaging,” in submission 9 R. Gupta , P. Indyk, E. Price, and Y. Rachlin

  14. Visibility of fiducial markers used for image-guided radiation therapy on optical coherence tomography for registration with CT: An esophageal phantom study.

    Jelvehgaran, Pouya; Alderliesten, Tanja; Weda, Jelmer J A; de Bruin, Martijn; Faber, Dirk J; Hulshof, Maarten C C M; van Leeuwen, Ton G; van Herk, Marcel; de Boer, Johannes F

    2017-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is of interest to visualize microscopic esophageal tumor extensions to improve tumor delineation for radiation therapy (RT) planning. Fiducial marker placement is a common method to ensure target localization during planning and treatment. Visualization of these fiducial markers on OCT permits integrating OCT and computed tomography (CT) images used for RT planning via image registration. We studied the visibility of 13 (eight types) commercially available solid and liquid fiducial markers in OCT images at different depths using dedicated esophageal phantoms and evaluated marker placement depth in clinical practice. We designed and fabricated dedicated esophageal phantoms, in which three layers mimic the anatomical wall structures of a healthy human esophagus. We successfully implanted 13 commercially available fiducial markers that varied in diameter and material property at depths between 0.5 and 3.0 mm. The resulting esophageal phantoms were imaged with OCT, and marker visibility was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively using the contrast-to-background-noise ratio (CNR). The CNR was defined as the difference between the mean intensity of the fiducial markers and the mean intensity of the background divided by the standard deviation of the background intensity. To determine whether, in current clinical practice, the implanted fiducial markers are within the OCT visualization range (up to 3.0 mm depth), we retrospectively measured the distance of 19 fiducial markers to the esophageal lumen on CT scans of 16 esophageal cancer patients. In the esophageal phantoms, all the included fiducial markers were visible on OCT at all investigated depths. Solid fiducial markers were better visible on OCT than liquid fiducial markers with a 1.74-fold higher CNR. Although fiducial marker identification per type and size was slightly easier for superficially implanted fiducial markers, we observed no difference in the ability of OCT to

  15. Complex regression Doppler optical coherence tomography

    Elahi, Sahar; Gu, Shi; Thrane, Lars; Rollins, Andrew M.; Jenkins, Michael W.

    2018-04-01

    We introduce a new method to measure Doppler shifts more accurately and extend the dynamic range of Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT). The two-point estimate of the conventional Doppler method is replaced with a regression that is applied to high-density B-scans in polar coordinates. We built a high-speed OCT system using a 1.68-MHz Fourier domain mode locked laser to acquire high-density B-scans (16,000 A-lines) at high enough frame rates (˜100 fps) to accurately capture the dynamics of the beating embryonic heart. Flow phantom experiments confirm that the complex regression lowers the minimum detectable velocity from 12.25 mm / s to 374 μm / s, whereas the maximum velocity of 400 mm / s is measured without phase wrapping. Complex regression Doppler OCT also demonstrates higher accuracy and precision compared with the conventional method, particularly when signal-to-noise ratio is low. The extended dynamic range allows monitoring of blood flow over several stages of development in embryos without adjusting the imaging parameters. In addition, applying complex averaging recovers hidden features in structural images.

  16. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Retinal Diseases.

    Chalam, K V; Sambhav, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a new, non-invasive imaging system that generates volumetric data of retinal and choroidal layers. It has the ability to show both structural and blood flow information. Split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm (a vital component of OCTA software) helps to decrease the signal to noise ratio of flow detection thus enhancing visualization of retinal vasculature using motion contrast. Published studies describe potential efficacy for OCTA in the evaluation of common ophthalmologic diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vascular occlusions and sickle cell disease. OCTA provides a detailed view of the retinal vasculature, which allows accurate delineation of microvascular abnormalities in diabetic eyes and vascular occlusions. It helps quantify vascular compromise depending upon the severity of diabetic retinopathy. OCTA can also elucidate the presence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in wet AMD. In this paper, we review the knowledge, available in English language publications regarding OCTA, and compare it with the conventional angiographic standard, fluorescein angiography (FA). Finally, we summarize its potential applications to retinal vascular diseases. Its current limitations include a relatively small field of view, inability to show leakage, and tendency for image artifacts. Further larger studies will define OCTA's utility in clinical settings and establish if the technology may offer a non-invasive option of visualizing the retinal vasculature, enabling us to decrease morbidity through early detection and intervention in retinal diseases.

  17. Engineering of Nanoscale Contrast Agents for Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Gordon, Andrew Y; Jayagopal, Ashwath

    2014-01-30

    Optical coherence tomography has emerged as valuable imaging modalityin ophthalmology and other fields by enabling high-resolution three-dimensional imaging of tissue. In this paper, we review recent progress in the field of contrast-enhanced optical coherence tomography (OCT). We discuss exogenous and endogenous sources of OCT contrast, focusing on their use with standard OCT systems as well as emerging OCT-based imaging modalities. We include advances in the processing of OCT data that generate improved tissue contrast, including spectroscopic OCT (SOCT), as well as work utilizing secondary light sources and/or detection mechanisms to create and detect enhanced contrast, including photothermal OCT (PTOCT) and photoacoustic OCT (PAOCT). Finally, we conclude with a discussion of the translational potential of these developments as well as barriers to their clinical use.

  18. Simultaneous measurement of group refractive index and thickness of optical samples using optical coherence tomography

    Cheng, Hsu-Chih; Liu, Yi-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT), based on a Michelson interferometer and utilizing low coherence light as the optical source, is a novel technique for the noninvasive imaging of optical scattering media. A simple OCT scheme based on a 3x3 fiber coupler is presented for the simultaneous measurement of the refractive index and thickness of optical samples. The proposed system enables the refractive index and thickness to be determined without any prior knowledge of the sample parameters and is characterized by a simple and compact configuration, a straightforward measurement procedure, and a low cost. The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated experimentally using BK7 and B270 optical glass samples.

  19. Spatially-resolved in-situ quantification of biofouling using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and 3D image analysis in a spacer filled channel

    Fortunato, Luca; Bucs, Szilard; Valladares Linares, Rodrigo; Cali, Corrado; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.; Leiknes, TorOve

    2016-01-01

    The use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to investigate biomass in membrane systems has increased with time. OCT is able to characterize the biomass in-situ and non-destructively. In this study, a novel approach to process three-dimensional (3D

  20. Reconstructions in ultrasound modulated optical tomography

    Allmaras, Moritz; Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a mathematical model for ultrasound modulated optical tomography and present a simple reconstruction scheme for recovering the spatially varying optical absorption coefficient from scanning measurements with narrowly focused ultrasound signals. Computational results for this model show that the reconstruction of sharp features of the absorption coefficient is possible. A formal linearization of the model leads to an equation with a Fredholm operator, which explains the stability observed in our numerical experiments. © de Gruyter 2011.

  1. Fully Automated Segmentation of Fluid/Cyst Regions in Optical Coherence Tomography Images With Diabetic Macular Edema Using Neutrosophic Sets and Graph Algorithms.

    Rashno, Abdolreza; Koozekanani, Dara D; Drayna, Paul M; Nazari, Behzad; Sadri, Saeed; Rabbani, Hossein; Parhi, Keshab K

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a fully automated algorithm to segment fluid-associated (fluid-filled) and cyst regions in optical coherence tomography (OCT) retina images of subjects with diabetic macular edema. The OCT image is segmented using a novel neutrosophic transformation and a graph-based shortest path method. In neutrosophic domain, an image is transformed into three sets: (true), (indeterminate) that represents noise, and (false). This paper makes four key contributions. First, a new method is introduced to compute the indeterminacy set , and a new -correction operation is introduced to compute the set in neutrosophic domain. Second, a graph shortest-path method is applied in neutrosophic domain to segment the inner limiting membrane and the retinal pigment epithelium as regions of interest (ROI) and outer plexiform layer and inner segment myeloid as middle layers using a novel definition of the edge weights . Third, a new cost function for cluster-based fluid/cyst segmentation in ROI is presented which also includes a novel approach in estimating the number of clusters in an automated manner. Fourth, the final fluid regions are achieved by ignoring very small regions and the regions between middle layers. The proposed method is evaluated using two publicly available datasets: Duke, Optima, and a third local dataset from the UMN clinic which is available online. The proposed algorithm outperforms the previously proposed Duke algorithm by 8% with respect to the dice coefficient and by 5% with respect to precision on the Duke dataset, while achieving about the same sensitivity. Also, the proposed algorithm outperforms a prior method for Optima dataset by 6%, 22%, and 23% with respect to the dice coefficient, sensitivity, and precision, respectively. Finally, the proposed algorithm also achieves sensitivity of 67.3%, 88.8%, and 76.7%, for the Duke, Optima, and the university of minnesota (UMN) datasets, respectively.

  2. Computed tomography in optic neuritis

    Fujitani, Ken; Hakuba, Akira; Tsujimoto, Takeshi; Yasui, Toshihiro; Sakamoto, Hiroaki

    1979-01-01

    In two patients with optic neuritis, CT scans showed common features which were helpful in diagnosis. These consisted of an enlargement of the optic nerve and an increased density of the optic nerve after contrast infusion. A 49-year-old man was admitted with a two-week duration of pain and a progressive visual loss in his right eye. On admission, an enlarged central scotoma was noted, and only a flashlight was perceived at the periphery in the right eye. The right optic disc was swollen with perivascular bleeding. Plain skull radiographs and orbital tomographs were normal. An orbital CT scan, however, revealed an enlargement of the right optic nerve, the density of which was increased after the infusion of a contrast medium. After steroid therapy, the CT scan showed a normal optic nerve following improvement in the vision of the right eye. A 44-year-old man was referred to this hospital because of a visual loss in his right eye which had been noted one month before. The right eye, with a central scotoma, had only visual acuity enough to perceive hand motion. The right pupil responded poorly to light. The right optic disc was hyperemic. Plain skull radiographs were normal. The orbital CT scan, however, showed an enlargement of the right optic nerve and exhibited contrast enhancement. Steroid therapy resulted in an improvement of the visual disturbance, and a follow-up CT scan showed normal. Two months later, though, the visual acuity had decreased and a visual field defect was noted in his left eye. The orbital CT scan revealed an enlargement of the left optic nerve. The administration of steroid again improved the visual field defect in the left eye, and the CT scan again showed normal. (author)

  3. Speckle reduction in optical coherence tomography images of human skin by a spatial diversity method - art. no. 66270P

    Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Thrane, Lars; Mogensen, M.

    2007-01-01

    the scheme with a mobile fiber-based time-domain real-time OCT system. Essential enhancement was obtained in image contrast when performing in vivo imaging of normal skin and lesions. Resulting images show improved delineation of structure in correspondence with the observed improvements in contrast...... system. Here, we consider a method that in principle can be fitted to most OCT systems without major modifications. Specifically, we address a spatial diversity technique for suppressing speckle noise in OCT images of human skin. The method is a variant of changing the position of the sample relative...

  4. In vivo imaging through the entire thickness of human cornea by full-field optical coherence tomography

    Mazlin, Viacheslav; Xiao, Peng; Dalimier, Eugénie; Grieve, Kate; Irsch, Kristina; Sahel, José; Fink, Mathias; Boccara, Claude

    2018-02-01

    Despite obvious improvements in visualization of the in vivo cornea through the faster imaging speeds and higher axial resolutions, cellular imaging stays unresolvable task for OCT, as en face viewing with a high lateral resolution is required. The latter is possible with FFOCT, a method that relies on a camera, moderate numerical aperture (NA) objectives and an incoherent light source to provide en face images with a micrometer-level resolution. Recently, we for the first time demonstrated the ability of FFOCT to capture images from the in vivo human cornea1. In the current paper we present an extensive study of appearance of healthy in vivo human corneas under FFOCT examination. En face corneal images with a micrometer-level resolution were obtained from the three healthy subjects. For each subject it was possible to acquire images through the entire corneal depth and visualize the epithelium structures, Bowman's layer, sub-basal nerve plexus (SNP) fibers, anterior, middle and posterior stroma, endothelial cells with nuclei. Dimensions and densities of the structures visible with FFOCT, are in agreement with those seen by other cornea imaging methods. Cellular-level details in the images obtained together with the relatively large field-of-view (FOV) and contactless way of imaging make this device a promising candidate for becoming a new tool in ophthalmological diagnostics.

  5. Clinical optical coherence tomography combined with multiphoton tomography for evaluation of several skin disorders

    König, Karsten; Speicher, Marco; Bückle, Rainer; Reckfort, Julia; McKenzie, Gordon; Welzel, Julia; Koehler, Martin J.; Elsner, Peter; Kaatz, Martin

    2010-02-01

    The first clinical trial of optical coherence tomography (OCT) combined with multiphoton tomography (MPT) and dermoscopy is reported. State-of-the-art (i) OCT systems for dermatology (e.g. multibeam swept source OCT), (ii) the femtosecond laser multiphoton tomograph DermaInspectTM, and (iii) digital dermoscopes were applied to 47 patients with a diversity of skin diseases and disorders such as skin cancer, psoriasis, hemangioma, connective tissue diseases, pigmented lesions, and autoimmune bullous skin diseases. Dermoscopy, also called 'epiluminescent microscopy', provides two-dimensional color images of the skin surface. OCT imaging is based on the detection of optical reflections within the tissue measured interferometrically whereas nonlinear excitation of endogenous fluorophores and the second harmonic generation are the bases of MPT images. OCT cross sectional "wide field" image provides a typical field of view of 5 x 2 mm2 and offers fast information on the depth and the volume of the investigated lesion. In comparison, multiphoton tomography presents 0.36 x 0.36 mm2 horizontal or diagonal sections of the region of interest within seconds with submicron resolution and down to a tissue depth of 200 μm. The combination of OCT and MPT provides a synergistic optical imaging modality for early detection of skin cancer and other skin diseases.

  6. Optical coherence tomography as a diagnostic tool

    Singh, A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has been used in biomedical applications as a method to non-invasively detect changes occurring in tissue such as the detection of skin cancer. The effect of skin tone on detection of skin cancer has however...

  7. Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography imaging of spectacular ecdysis in the corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus) and the California king snake (Lampropeltis getulus californiae).

    Cazalot, Guillaume; Rival, Franck; Linsart, Adeline; Isard, Pierre-François; Tissier, Marion; Peiffer, Robert Louis; Dulaurent, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    One of the singularities of the eyes of snakes is the presence of the spectacle, a transparent and vascularized integument covering the cornea. The spectacle is completely renewed during ecdysis. Combined scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and conventional macrophotography were used to image this phenomenon. A spectral OCT/SLO examination and macrophotography were performed in four healthy adult corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus) and one healthy adult California king snake (Lampropeltis getulus californiae) the day before the start of ecdysis and then daily during ecdysis. In all animals, ecdysis lasted 5 days. The spectacle was hardly visible at baseline, but became obvious at day one, while the subspectacular space became larger and the superficial cornea presented a hyperechoic band. At day two, eye surface became translucent, and at the same time, vascularization of the spectacle was visible using SLO. At day 3, the vascularization was no longer visible, while the subspectacular space increased and the eye surface remained translucent. At day 4, the eye surface was transparent and the superficial hyperechoic band started to become less bright. At day 5, the old spectacle was shed and all the parameters returned to baseline. We hypothesize that the echogenicity modifications of the anterior cornea correspond to major metabolic activity associated with new spectacle formation. This increased metabolic activity may contribute to the neovascularization and play an important role in the accumulation of fluid in the subspectacular space, facilitating the shedding of the old spectacle. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  8. Optical coherence tomography of the prostate nerves

    Chitchian, Shahab

    Preservation of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery is critical in preserving a man's ability to have spontaneous erections following surgery. These microscopic nerves course along the surface of the prostate within a few millimeters of the prostate capsule, and they vary in size and location from one patient to another, making preservation of the nerves difficult during dissection and removal of a cancerous prostate gland. These observations may explain in part the wide variability in reported sexual potency rates (9--86%) following prostate cancer surgery. Any technology capable of providing improved identification, imaging, and visualization of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery would be of great assistance in improving sexual function after surgery, and result in direct patient benefit. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive optical imaging technique capable of performing high-resolution cross-sectional in vivo and in situ imaging of microstructures in biological tissues. OCT imaging of the cavernous nerves in the rat and human prostate has recently been demonstrated. However, improvements in the OCT system and the quality of the images for identification of the cavernous nerves is necessary before clinical use. The following chapters describe complementary approaches to improving identification and imaging of the cavernous nerves during OCT of the prostate gland. After the introduction to OCT imaging of the prostate gland, the optimal wavelength for deep imaging of the prostate is studied in Chapter 2. An oblique-incidence single point measurement technique using a normal-detector scanning system was implemented to determine the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients, mua and m's , of fresh canine prostate tissue, ex vivo, from the diffuse reflectance profile of near-IR light as a function of source-detector distance. The effective attenuation coefficient, mueff, and the Optical Penetration Depth (OPD) were

  9. Three-dimensional image reconstruction of macula from stratus optical coherence tomography (OCT) for diagnosis of macular degeneration

    Arinilhaq; Widita, R

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of macular degeneration using a Stratus OCT with a fast macular thickness map (FMTM) method produced six B-scan images of macula from different angles. The images were converted into a retinal thickness chart to be evaluated by normal distribution percentile of data so that it can be classified as normal thickness of macula or as experiencing abnormality (e.g. thickening and thinning). Unfortunately, the diagnostic images only represent the retinal thickness in several areas of the macular region. Thus, this study is aims to obtain the entire retinal thickness in the macula area from Status OCT's output images. Basically, the volumetric image is obtained by combining each of the six images. Reconstruction consists of a series of processes such as pre-processing, segmentation, and interpolation. Linear interpolation techniques are used to fill the empty pixels in reconstruction matrix. Based on the results, this method is able to provide retinal thickness maps on the macula surface and the macula 3D image. Retinal thickness map can display the macula area which experienced abnormalities. The macula 3D image can show the layers of tissue in the macula that is abnormal. The system built cannot replace ophthalmologist in decision making in term of diagnosis. (paper)

  10. Three-dimensional image reconstruction of macula from stratus optical coherence tomography (OCT) for diagnosis of macular degeneration

    Arinilhaq; Widita, R.

    2016-03-01

    Diagnosis of macular degeneration using a Stratus OCT with a fast macular thickness map (FMTM) method produced six B-scan images of macula from different angles. The images were converted into a retinal thickness chart to be evaluated by normal distribution percentile of data so that it can be classified as normal thickness of macula or as experiencing abnormality (e.g. thickening and thinning). Unfortunately, the diagnostic images only represent the retinal thickness in several areas of the macular region. Thus, this study is aims to obtain the entire retinal thickness in the macula area from Status OCT's output images. Basically, the volumetric image is obtained by combining each of the six images. Reconstruction consists of a series of processes such as pre-processing, segmentation, and interpolation. Linear interpolation techniques are used to fill the empty pixels in reconstruction matrix. Based on the results, this method is able to provide retinal thickness maps on the macula surface and the macula 3D image. Retinal thickness map can display the macula area which experienced abnormalities. The macula 3D image can show the layers of tissue in the macula that is abnormal. The system built cannot replace ophthalmologist in decision making in term of diagnosis.

  11. Quantification by optical coherence tomography imaging of the ablation volume obtained with the Orbital Atherectomy System in calcified coronary lesions

    Sotomi, Yohei; Cavalcante, Rafael; Shlofmitz, Richard A.; Suwannasom, Pannipa; Tateishi, Hiroki; Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Zheng, Yaping; Abdelghani, Mohammad; de Winter, Robbert J.; Wykrzykowska, Joanna J.; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Serruys, Patrick W.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, favourable procedural 30-day and one-year outcomes with the Diamondback 360 Orbital Atherectomy System (OAS) in the treatment of severely calcified lesions have been reported. The purpose of this study was to assess the therapeutic mechanism and efficacy of the OAS with optical coherence

  12. Automatic diagnosis of abnormal macula in retinal optical coherence tomography images using wavelet-based convolutional neural network features and random forests classifier.

    Rasti, Reza; Mehridehnavi, Alireza; Rabbani, Hossein; Hajizadeh, Fedra

    2018-03-01

    The present research intends to propose a fully automatic algorithm for the classification of three-dimensional (3-D) optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans of patients suffering from abnormal macula from normal candidates. The method proposed does not require any denoising, segmentation, retinal alignment processes to assess the intraretinal layers, as well as abnormalities or lesion structures. To classify abnormal cases from the control group, a two-stage scheme was utilized, which consists of automatic subsystems for adaptive feature learning and diagnostic scoring. In the first stage, a wavelet-based convolutional neural network (CNN) model was introduced and exploited to generate B-scan representative CNN codes in the spatial-frequency domain, and the cumulative features of 3-D volumes were extracted. In the second stage, the presence of abnormalities in 3-D OCTs was scored over the extracted features. Two different retinal SD-OCT datasets are used for evaluation of the algorithm based on the unbiased fivefold cross-validation (CV) approach. The first set constitutes 3-D OCT images of 30 normal subjects and 30 diabetic macular edema (DME) patients captured from the Topcon device. The second publicly available set consists of 45 subjects with a distribution of 15 patients in age-related macular degeneration, DME, and normal classes from the Heidelberg device. With the application of the algorithm on overall OCT volumes and 10 repetitions of the fivefold CV, the proposed scheme obtained an average precision of 99.33% on dataset1 as a two-class classification problem and 98.67% on dataset2 as a three-class classification task. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  13. Dynamic Optical Coherence Tomography in Dermatology.

    Ulrich, Martina; Themstrup, Lotte; de Carvalho, Nathalie; Manfredi, Marco; Grana, Costantino; Ciardo, Silvana; Kästle, Raphaela; Holmes, Jon; Whitehead, Richard; Jemec, Gregor B E; Pellacani, Giovanni; Welzel, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) represents a non-invasive imaging technology, which may be applied to the diagnosis of non-melanoma skin cancer and which has recently been shown to improve the diagnostic accuracy of basal cell carcinoma. Technical developments of OCT continue to expand the applicability of OCT for different neoplastic and inflammatory skin diseases. Of these, dynamic OCT (D-OCT) based on speckle variance OCT is of special interest as it allows the in vivo evaluation of blood vessels and their distribution within specific lesions, providing additional functional information and consequently greater density of data. In an effort to assess the potential of D-OCT for future scientific and clinical studies, we have therefore reviewed the literature and preliminary unpublished data on the visualization of the microvasculature using D-OCT. Information on D-OCT in skin cancers including melanoma, as well as in a variety of other skin diseases, is presented in an atlas. Possible diagnostic features are suggested, although these require additional validation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Quantitative contrast-enhanced optical coherence tomography

    Winetraub, Yonatan; SoRelle, Elliott D. [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Bio-X Program, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Biophysics Program, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Structural Biology, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Liba, Orly [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Bio-X Program, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Structural Biology, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Zerda, Adam de la [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Bio-X Program, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Biophysics Program, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Structural Biology, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-01-11

    We have developed a model to accurately quantify the signals produced by exogenous scattering agents used for contrast-enhanced Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). This model predicts distinct concentration-dependent signal trends that arise from the underlying physics of OCT detection. Accordingly, we show that real scattering particles can be described as simplified ideal scatterers with modified scattering intensity and concentration. The relation between OCT signal and particle concentration is approximately linear at concentrations lower than 0.8 particle per imaging voxel. However, at higher concentrations, interference effects cause signal to increase with a square root dependence on the number of particles within a voxel. Finally, high particle concentrations cause enough light attenuation to saturate the detected signal. Predictions were validated by comparison with measured OCT signals from gold nanorods (GNRs) prepared in water at concentrations ranging over five orders of magnitude (50 fM to 5 nM). In addition, we validated that our model accurately predicts the signal responses of GNRs in highly heterogeneous scattering environments including whole blood and living animals. By enabling particle quantification, this work provides a valuable tool for current and future contrast-enhanced in vivo OCT studies. More generally, the model described herein may inform the interpretation of detected signals in modalities that rely on coherence-based detection or are susceptible to interference effects.

  15. [Evaluation of diabetic microangiopathy using optical coherence tomography angiography].

    Czakó, Cecília; Sándor, Gábor László; Ecsedy, Mónika; Szepessy, Zsuzsanna; Borbándy, Ágnes; Resch, Miklós; Papp, András; Récsán, Zsuzsa; Horváth, Hajnalka; Nagy, Zoltán Zsolt; Kovács, Illés

    2018-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography is a non-invasive imaging technique that is able to visualize the different retinal vascular layers using motion contrast to detect blood flow without intravenous dye injection. This method might help to assess microangiopathy in diabetic retinopathy during screening and follow-up. To quantify retinal microvasculature alterations in both eyes of diabetic patients in relation to systemic risk factors using optical coherence tomography angiography. Both eyes of 36 diabetic patients and 45 individuals without diabetes were examined. Duration of diabetes, insulin therapy, blood pressure, HbA 1c , dyslipidemia, axial length and the presence of diabetic retinopathy were recorded. Retinal vessel density was measured by optical coherence tomography angiography. The effect of risk factors on vessel density and between-eye asymmetry was assessed using multivariable regression analysis. Vessel density was significantly lower and between-eye difference was significantly higher in diabetic patients compared to controls (pdiabetes duration (pdiabetic retinopathy compared to control subjects (pdiabetes compared to healthy subjects. By using optical coherence tomography angiography, the detection of these microvascular alterations is possible before clinically detectable diabetic retinopathy and might serve as a useful tool in both screening and timing of treatment. Orv Hetil. 2018; 159(8): 320-326.

  16. Optic Nerve Imaging

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Optic Nerve Imaging email Send this article to a friend ... measurements of nerve fiber damage (or loss). The Nerve Fiber Analyzer (GDx) uses laser light to measure ...

  17. Posterior Lattice Degeneration Characterized by Spectral Domain Optical Tomography

    Manjunath, Varsha; Taha, Mohammed; Fujimoto, James G.; Duker, Jay S.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To utilize high-resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in the characterization of retinal and vitreal morphological changes overlying posterior lattice degeneration. METHODS: A cross-sectional, retrospective analysis was performed on 13 eyes of 13 nonconsecutive subjects with posterior lattice degeneration seen at the New England Eye Center, Tufts Medical Center between October 2009 and January 2010. SD-OCT images taken through the region of latti...

  18. Advanced Technologies for Ultrahigh Resolution and Functional Optical Coherence Tomography

    2008-04-15

    Gorczynska, "Frequency domain optical coherence tomography techniques in eye imaging," Acta Physica Polonica A , vol. 102, pp. 739-46, 2002/12/ 2002. [57] S...other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a ...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a . REPORT b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

  19. Multiple projection optical diffusion tomography with plane wave illumination

    Markel, Vadim A; Schotland, John C

    2005-01-01

    We describe a new data collection scheme for optical diffusion tomography in which plane wave illumination is combined with multiple projections in the slab imaging geometry. Multiple projection measurements are performed by rotating the slab around the sample. The advantage of the proposed method is that the measured data are more compatible with the dynamic range of most commonly used detectors. At the same time, multiple projections improve image quality by mutually interchanging the depth and transverse directions, and the scanned (detection) and integrated (illumination) surfaces. Inversion methods are derived for image reconstructions with extremely large data sets. Numerical simulations are performed for fixed and rotated slabs

  20. Segmentation of forensic latent fingerprint images lifted contact-less from planar surfaces with optical cohererence tomography

    Khutlang, R

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available the substrate surface plus the latent fingerprint impression left on it. They are concatenated together to form a 2-D segmented image of the lifted fingerprint. After enhancement using contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization, minutiae were extracted...

  1. Whole brain imaging with Serial Two-Photon Tomography

    Stephen P Amato

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Imaging entire mouse brains at submicron resolution has historically been a challenging undertaking and largely confined to the province of dedicated atlasing initiatives. The has limited systematic investigations into important areas of neuroscience, such as neural circuits, brain mapping and neurodegeneration. In this paper, we describe in detail Serial Two-Photon (STP tomography, a robust, reliable method for imaging entire brains with histological detail. We provide examples of how the basic methodology can be extended to other imaging modalities, such as optical coherence tomography, in order to provide unique contrast mechanisms. Furthermore we provide a survey of the research that STP tomography has enabled in the field of neuroscience, provide examples of how this technology enables quantitative whole brain studies, and discuss the current limitations of STP tomography-based approaches

  2. Computed tomography and three-dimensional imaging

    Harris, L.D.; Ritman, E.L.; Robb, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Presented here is a brief introduction to two-, three-, and four-dimensional computed tomography. More detailed descriptions of the mathematics of reconstruction and of CT scanner operation are presented elsewhere. The complementary tomographic imaging methods of single-photon-emission tomography (SPECT) positron-emission tomography (PET), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, ulltrasound sector scanning, and ulltrasound computer-assisted tomography [UCAT] are only named here. Each imaging modality ''probes'' the body with a different energy form, yielding unique and useful information about tomographic sections through the body

  3. Three-Dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography (3D OCT), Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Applied Science Innovations, Inc. proposes a new tool of 3D optical coherence tomography (OCT) for cellular level imaging at video frame rates and dramatically...

  4. Non-invasive retinal imaging in mice with fluorescent Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy and Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Hossein-Javaheri, Nima

    2010-01-01

    Visualization of the internal structures of the retina is critical for clinical diagnosis and monitoring of pathology as well as for medical research investigating the root causes of retinal degeneration. The aim of this thesis is to develop multi-modal non-invasive imaging technology for studying retinal degeneration and gene therapy in mice. We have constructed a FD-OCT prototype and combined it with a Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (SLO) to permit real time alignment of the retinal field of...

  5. Agreement of angle closure assessments between gonioscopy, anterior segment optical coherence tomography and spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    Tay, Elton Lik Tong; Yong, Vernon Khet Yau; Lim, Boon Ang; Sia, Stelson; Wong, Elizabeth Poh Ying; Yip, Leonard Wei Leon

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine angle closure agreements between gonioscopy and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT), as well as gonioscopy and spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT). A secondary objective was to quantify inter-observer agreements of AS-OCT and SD-OCT assessments. METHODS: Seventeen consecutive subjects (33 eyes) were recruited from the study hospital’s Glaucoma clinic. Gonioscopy was performed by a glaucomatologist masked to OCT results. OCT images were read independently by 2 ...

  6. Fast automatic segmentation of anatomical structures in x-ray computed tomography images to improve fluorescence molecular tomography reconstruction.

    Freyer, Marcus; Ale, Angelique; Schulz, Ralf B; Zientkowska, Marta; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Englmeier, Karl-Hans

    2010-01-01

    The recent development of hybrid imaging scanners that integrate fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and x-ray computed tomography (XCT) allows the utilization of x-ray information as image priors for improving optical tomography reconstruction. To fully capitalize on this capacity, we consider a framework for the automatic and fast detection of different anatomic structures in murine XCT images. To accurately differentiate between different structures such as bone, lung, and heart, a combination of image processing steps including thresholding, seed growing, and signal detection are found to offer optimal segmentation performance. The algorithm and its utilization in an inverse FMT scheme that uses priors is demonstrated on mouse images.

  7. Optical coherence tomography in otolaryngology: original results and review of the literature

    Bibas, Athanasios G.; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.; Cucu, Radu G.; Dobre, George M.; Odell, Edward; Boxer, Aaron B.; O'Connors, Alec F.; Gleeson, Michael J.

    2004-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography is a diagnostic imaging technique allowing two dimensional tomographic imaging of tissue architecture. This is a review article on the use of optical coherence tomography in Otolaryngology including original images from human laryngeal tissue and temporal bones (cochlea) in our laboratory. Tissue specimens from normal larynges were imaged with an 850 nm OCT system. Our results showed good correlation between OCT image s and the corresponding haematoxylin-eosin stained histology sections in the normal larynx. Human temporal bones were also imaged using an 1300 nm OCT system. Limited morphological details were obtained due to the high scattering properties of the bony labyrinth.

  8. Local inversions in ultrasound-modulated optical tomography

    Bal, Guillaume; Moskow, Shari

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography is a hybrid imaging modality that aims to combine the high contrast of optical waves with the high resolution of ultrasound. We follow the model of the influence of ultrasound modulation on the light intensity measurements developed in Bal and Schotland (2010 Phys. Rev. Lett. 104 043902). We present sufficient conditions ensuring that the absorption and diffusion coefficients modeling light propagation can locally be uniquely and stably reconstructed from the corresponding available information. We present an iterative procedure to solve such a problem based on the analysis of linear elliptic systems of redundant partial differential equations. (paper)

  9. Optical Coherence Tomography: Advanced Modeling

    Andersen, Peter E.; Thrane, Lars; Yura, Harold T.

    2013-01-01

    - and multiple-scattering regimes is derived. An advanced Monte Carlo model for calculating the OCT signal is also derived, and the validity of this model is shown through a mathematical proof based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. From the analytical model, an algorithm for enhancing OCT images...... are discussed. Finally, the Wigner phase-space distribution function is derived in a closed-form solution, which may have applications in OCT....

  10. Automatic diagnosis of abnormal macula in retinal optical coherence tomography images using wavelet-based convolutional neural network features and random forests classifier

    Rasti, Reza; Mehridehnavi, Alireza; Rabbani, Hossein; Hajizadeh, Fedra

    2018-03-01

    The present research intends to propose a fully automatic algorithm for the classification of three-dimensional (3-D) optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans of patients suffering from abnormal macula from normal candidates. The method proposed does not require any denoising, segmentation, retinal alignment processes to assess the intraretinal layers, as well as abnormalities or lesion structures. To classify abnormal cases from the control group, a two-stage scheme was utilized, which consists of automatic subsystems for adaptive feature learning and diagnostic scoring. In the first stage, a wavelet-based convolutional neural network (CNN) model was introduced and exploited to generate B-scan representative CNN codes in the spatial-frequency domain, and the cumulative features of 3-D volumes were extracted. In the second stage, the presence of abnormalities in 3-D OCTs was scored over the extracted features. Two different retinal SD-OCT datasets are used for evaluation of the algorithm based on the unbiased fivefold cross-validation (CV) approach. The first set constitutes 3-D OCT images of 30 normal subjects and 30 diabetic macular edema (DME) patients captured from the Topcon device. The second publicly available set consists of 45 subjects with a distribution of 15 patients in age-related macular degeneration, DME, and normal classes from the Heidelberg device. With the application of the algorithm on overall OCT volumes and 10 repetitions of the fivefold CV, the proposed scheme obtained an average precision of 99.33% on dataset1 as a two-class classification problem and 98.67% on dataset2 as a three-class classification task.

  11. Prediction of the filter no-reflow phenomenon in patients with angina pectoris by using multimodality: Magnetic resonance imaging, optical coherence tomography, and serum biomarkers.

    Matsumoto, Kenji; Ehara, Shoichi; Hasegawa, Takao; Otsuka, Kenichiro; Yoshikawa, Junichi; Shimada, Kenei

    2016-05-01

    Although the occurrence of no-reflow during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has been shown to be associated with worse short- and long-term clinical outcomes, the clinical relevance of preventing flow deterioration by using the filter-based distal protection devices (DPDs) is controversial. We investigated predictors of the filter no-reflow (FNR) phenomenon during PCI by using multimodality, such as hyperintense plaques (HIPs) in the coronary artery on T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) non-contrast magnetic resonance, plaque composition by using optical coherence tomography (OCT), and serum biomarkers, in patients with angina pectoris. Fifty lesions from 50 patients with angina were examined. All patients underwent T1WI within 24 h before invasive coronary angiography was performed, and preinterventional OCT was performed on a native atherosclerotic culprit lesion. The signal intensity of coronary plaque to cardiac muscle ratio (PMR) was calculated on a standard console of the magnetic resonance system. Of the 50 lesions, 20 lesions showed FNR during PCI, while non-FNR was observed in 30 lesions. A cut-off value >1.85 of PMR had a sensitivity of 65%, a specificity of 93%, a positive predictive value of 87%, and a negative predictive value of 80% for identifying lesions with FNR. Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of HIPs with PMR >1.85 (p=0.008) was the only independent predictor of the FNR phenomenon during PCI. This study shows that the presence of HIPs with PMR >1.85 on T1WI was a novel independent predictor of the FNR phenomenon during PCI in angina patients. This result may help in identifying high-risk lesions for no-reflow to deploy filter-based DPDs. Copyright © 2015 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Optical theorem, depolarization and vector tomography

    Toperverg, B.P.

    2003-01-01

    A law of the total flux conservation is formulated in the form of the optical theorem. It is employed to explicitly derive equations for the description of the neutron polarization within the range of the direct beam defined by its angular divergence. General considerations are illustrated by calculations using the Born and Eikonal approximations. Results are briefly discussed as applied to Larmor-Fourier tomography

  13. A photoacoustic tomography system for imaging of biological tissues

    Su Yixiong; Zhang Fan; Xu Kexin; Yao Jianquan; Wang, Ruikang K

    2005-01-01

    Non-invasive laser-induced photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a promising imaging modality in the biomedical optical imaging field. This technology, based on the intrinsic optical properties of tissue and ultrasonic detection, overcomes the resolution disadvantage of pure-optical imaging caused by strong light scattering and the contrast and speckle disadvantages of pure ultrasonic imaging. Here, we report a PAT experimental system constructed in our laboratory. In our system, a Q-switched Nd : YAG pulse laser operated at 532 nm with a 8 ns pulse width is used to generate a photoacoustic signal. By using this system, the two-dimensional distribution of optical absorption in the tissue-mimicking phantom is reconstructed and has an excellent agreement with the original ones. The spatial resolution of the imaging system approaches 100 μm through about 4 cm of highly scattering medium

  14. Tomografia de coerência óptica na commotio retinae: relato de caso Optical coherence tomography imaging in commotio retinae: case report

    Celso Morita

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste relato é correlacionar achados à tomografia de coerência óptica e prognóstico visual de pacientes com commotio retina e de gravidades diferentes. Dois pacientes do sexo masculino, de 20 e 23 anos com baixa visual unilateral após trauma ocular contuso atribuível a edema de Berlin foram avaliados pela retinografia e tomografia de coerência óptica. A acuidade visual no olho afetado era de 20/25 no primeiro paciente e conta dedos a 2 metros no segundo. O exame oftalmológico revelou uveíte traumática e, na fundoscopia, evidenciaram-se opacificação retiniana moderada no primeiro caso e grave no segundo. A tomografia de coerência óptica confirmou discreta diminuição da depressão foveal no primeiro caso e desorganização das camadas retinianas no segundo. Houve resolução anatômica e funcional completa a tomografia de coerência óptica no primeiro paciente, enquanto o segundo evoluiu com baixa visual permanente e desorganização da arquitetura retiniana. A tomografia de coerência óptica é um exame complementar útil na avaliação do trauma retiniano, ajudando a entender sua fisiopatologia e predizer prognóstico a partir da análise anatômica da região acometida.The purpose of this case report was to correlate optical coherence tomography findings and visual outcomes of patients with different degrees of commotio retinae. A 20-year-old male and a 23-year-old male that presented with decreased vision due to Berlin's edema after blunt ocular trauma were evaluated by optical coherence tomography and retinography. The visual acuity in the affected eye was 20/25 in the first patient and counting fingers in the second one. The ophthalmic examination showed traumatic uveitis and fundoscopy revealed mild retinal opacification in the first case and severe opacification in the latter. The optical coherence tomography confirmed the reduction of foveal depression on the first case and the disarrangement of all retinal

  15. Assessing carotid atherosclerosis by fiber-optic multispectral photoacoustic tomography

    Hui, Jie; Li, Rui; Wang, Pu; Phillips, Evan; Bruning, Rebecca; Liao, Chien-Sheng; Sturek, Michael; Goergen, Craig J.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2015-03-01

    Atherosclerotic plaque at the carotid bifurcation is the underlying cause of the majority of ischemic strokes. Noninvasive imaging and quantification of the compositional changes preceding gross anatomic changes within the arterial wall is essential for diagnosis of disease. Current imaging modalities such as duplex ultrasound, computed tomography, positron emission tomography are limited by the lack of compositional contrast and the detection of flow-limiting lesions. Although high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging has been developed to characterize atherosclerotic plaque composition, its accessibility for wide clinical use is limited. Here, we demonstrate a fiber-based multispectral photoacoustic tomography system for excitation of lipids and external acoustic detection of the generated ultrasound. Using sequential ultrasound imaging of ex vivo preparations we achieved ~2 cm imaging depth and chemical selectivity for assessment of human arterial plaques. A multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares analysis method was applied to resolve the major chemical components, including intravascular lipid, intramuscular fat, and blood. These results show the promise of detecting carotid plaque in vivo through esophageal fiber-optic excitation of lipids and external acoustic detection of the generated ultrasound. This imaging system has great potential for serving as a point-ofcare device for early diagnosis of carotid artery disease in the clinic.

  16. Computational adaptive optics for broadband optical interferometric tomography of biological tissue.

    Adie, Steven G; Graf, Benedikt W; Ahmad, Adeel; Carney, P Scott; Boppart, Stephen A

    2012-05-08

    Aberrations in optical microscopy reduce image resolution and contrast, and can limit imaging depth when focusing into biological samples. Static correction of aberrations may be achieved through appropriate lens design, but this approach does not offer the flexibility of simultaneously correcting aberrations for all imaging depths, nor the adaptability to correct for sample-specific aberrations for high-quality tomographic optical imaging. Incorporation of adaptive optics (AO) methods have demonstrated considerable improvement in optical image contrast and resolution in noninterferometric microscopy techniques, as well as in optical coherence tomography. Here we present a method to correct aberrations in a tomogram rather than the beam of a broadband optical interferometry system. Based on Fourier optics principles, we correct aberrations of a virtual pupil using Zernike polynomials. When used in conjunction with the computed imaging method interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy, this computational AO enables object reconstruction (within the single scattering limit) with ideal focal-plane resolution at all depths. Tomographic reconstructions of tissue phantoms containing subresolution titanium-dioxide particles and of ex vivo rat lung tissue demonstrate aberration correction in datasets acquired with a highly astigmatic illumination beam. These results also demonstrate that imaging with an aberrated astigmatic beam provides the advantage of a more uniform depth-dependent signal compared to imaging with a standard gaussian beam. With further work, computational AO could enable the replacement of complicated and expensive optical hardware components with algorithms implemented on a standard desktop computer, making high-resolution 3D interferometric tomography accessible to a wider group of users and nonspecialists.

  17. Posterior lattice degeneration characterized by spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    Manjunath, Varsha; Taha, Mohammed; Fujimoto, James G; Duker, Jay S

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to use high-resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography in the characterization of retinal and vitreal morphological changes overlying posterior lattice degeneration. A cross-sectional retrospective analysis was performed on 13 eyes of 13 nonconsecutive subjects with posterior lattice degeneration seen at the New England Eye Center, Tufts Medical Center between October 2009 and January 2010. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography images taken through the region of lattice degeneration were qualitatively analyzed. Four characteristic changes of the retina and vitreous were seen in the 13 eyes with lattice degeneration: 1) anterior/posterior U-shaped vitreous traction; 2) retinal breaks; 3) focal retinal thinning; and 4) vitreous membrane formation. The morphologic appearance of vitreous traction and retinal breaks were found to be consistent with previous histologic reports. It is possible to image posterior lattice degeneration in many eyes using spectral domain optical coherence tomography and to visualize the spectrum of retinal and vitreous changes throughout the area of lattice degeneration.

  18. Optical coherence tomography: technology and applications (biological and medical physics, biomedical engineering)

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is the optical analog of ultrasound imaging and is emerging as a powerful imaging technique that enables non-invasive, in vivo, high resolution, cross-sectional imaging in biological tissue. This book introduces OCT technology and applications not only from an optical and technological viewpoint, but also from biomedical and clinical perspectives. The chapters are written by leading research groups, in a style comprehensible to a broad audience.

  19. New imaging algorithm in diffusion tomography

    Klibanov, Michael V.; Lucas, Thomas R.; Frank, Robert M.

    1997-08-01

    A novel imaging algorithm for diffusion/optical tomography is presented for the case of the time dependent diffusion equation. Numerical tests are conducted for ranges of parameters realistic for applications to an early breast cancer diagnosis using ultrafast laser pulses. This is a perturbation-like method which works for both homogeneous a heterogeneous background media. Its main innovation lies in a new approach for a novel linearized problem (LP). Such an LP is derived and reduced to a boundary value problem for a coupled system of elliptic partial differential equations. As is well known, the solution of such a system amounts to the factorization of well conditioned, sparse matrices with few non-zero entries clustered along the diagonal, which can be done very rapidly. Thus, the main advantages of this technique are that it is fast and accurate. The authors call this approach the elliptic systems method (ESM). The ESM can be extended for other data collection schemes.

  20. Application of optical coherence tomography angiography for diabetic retinopathy

    Qing Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography angiography(OCTAis a new emerging technology of the optical coherence tomography(OCTin recent years. It's a noninvasive and fast retinal vascular imaging technology with high resolution, and has been gradually applied to make diagnosis, gives treatment and follow-up for various types of retinal vascular diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy, choroid neovascularization, etc. OCTA has the unique advantages of layered observing the structure and shape of the chorioretinal vascular at different levels, and quantifying the blood flow index of designated scope and the flow area of lesions. However, OCTA requires high solid vision and good cooperation of patients, even has the limitations to observe the retinal scope and retinal vascular barrier function. With overcoming these limitations, it's helpful for us to improve the understanding of retinal vascular diseases, consummate the diagnosis and treatment and observation of retinal vascular diseases.

  1. Swept-source optical coherence tomography powered by a 1.3-μm vertical cavity surface emitting laser enables 2.3-mm-deep brain imaging in mice in vivo

    Choi, Woo June; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-10-01

    We report noninvasive, in vivo optical imaging deep within a mouse brain by swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT), enabled by a 1.3-μm vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL). VCSEL SS-OCT offers a constant signal sensitivity of 105 dB throughout an entire depth of 4.25 mm in air, ensuring an extended usable imaging depth range of more than 2 mm in turbid biological tissue. Using this approach, we show deep brain imaging in mice with an open-skull cranial window preparation, revealing intact mouse brain anatomy from the superficial cerebral cortex to the deep hippocampus. VCSEL SS-OCT would be applicable to small animal studies for the investigation of deep tissue compartments in living brains where diseases such as dementia and tumor can take their toll.

  2. Reflectance diffuse optical tomography. Its application to human brain mapping

    Ueda, Yukio; Yamanaka, Takeshi; Yamashita, Daisuke; Suzuki, Toshihiko; Ohmae, Etsuko; Oda, Motoki; Yamashita, Yutaka

    2005-01-01

    We report the successful application of reflectance diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using near-infrared light with the new reconstruction algorithm that we developed to the observation of regional hemodynamic changes in the brain under specific mental tasks. Our results reveal the heterogeneous distribution of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin in the brain, showing complementary images of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin changes in certain regions. We conclude that our reflectance DOT has practical potential for human brain mapping, as well as in the diagnostic imaging of brain diseases. (author)

  3. Visible-light optical coherence tomography: a review

    Shu, Xiao; Beckmann, Lisa; Zhang, Hao F.

    2017-12-01

    Visible-light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT) is an emerging imaging modality, providing new capabilities in both anatomical and functional imaging of biological tissue. It relies on visible light illumination, whereas most commercial and investigational OCTs use near-infrared light. As a result, vis-OCT requires different considerations in engineering design and implementation but brings unique potential benefits to both fundamental research and clinical care of several diseases. Here, we intend to provide a summary of the development of vis-OCT and its demonstrated applications. We also provide perspectives on future technology improvement and applications.

  4. Detection of bladder tumors using optical coherence tomography

    Pan, Yingtian; Xie, Tuqiang; Wang, Zhenguo

    2004-07-01

    This paper summarizes the engineering development of our lab for endoscopic optical coherence tomography toward the ultimate goal to image bladder micro architecture and to diagnose bladder cancers. To test the utility and potential limitations of OCT setups for bladder tumor diagnosis, we used a rat bladder cancer model to track the morphological changes following tumor growth. Image results are presented, suggesting that OCT is able to differentiate cancerous lesions from inflammatory lesions based on OCT characterizations of epithelial thickness and backscattering changes of bladder tissue.

  5. Tomography

    Barrett, H.H.; Gordon, S.; Swindell, W.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus is described for generating a two-dimensional back-projected image of a slice of an object in tomography. The apparatus uses optical techniques to perform the functions of filtering and back projection. Central to the technique is a cylindrical drum which rotates at a fast rate and whose rotational axis tilts at a slower rate. The novel method overcomes the problem of image blurring due to motion which occurs in many tomographic techniques. It also has the advantages of being less expensive and simpler compared to tomography using digital processing techniques which require fast computers. (UK)

  6. Positron emission tomography imaging of gene expression

    Tang Ganghua

    2001-01-01

    The merging of molecular biology and nuclear medicine is developed into molecular nuclear medicine. Positron emission tomography (PET) of gene expression in molecular nuclear medicine has become an attractive area. Positron emission tomography imaging gene expression includes the antisense PET imaging and the reporter gene PET imaging. It is likely that the antisense PET imaging will lag behind the reporter gene PET imaging because of the numerous issues that have not yet to be resolved with this approach. The reporter gene PET imaging has wide application into animal experimental research and human applications of this approach will likely be reported soon

  7. Low-cost diffuse optical tomography for the classroom

    Minagawa, Taisuke; Zirak, Peyman; Weigel, Udo M.; Kristoffersen, Anna K.; Mateos, Nicolas; Valencia, Alejandra; Durduran, Turgut

    2012-10-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is an emerging imaging modality with potential applications in oncology, neurology, and other clinical areas. It allows the non-invasive probing of the tissue function using relatively inexpensive and safe instrumentation. An educational laboratory setup of a DOT system could be used to demonstrate how photons propagate through tissues, basics of medical tomography, and the concepts of multiple scattering and absorption. Here, we report a DOT setup that could be introduced to the advanced undergraduate or early graduate curriculum using inexpensive and readily available tools. The basis of the system is the LEGO Mindstorms NXT platform which controls the light sources, the detectors (photo-diodes), a mechanical 2D scanning platform, and the data acquisition. A basic tomographic reconstruction is implemented in standard numerical software, and 3D images are reconstructed. The concept was tested and developed in an educational environment that involved a high-school student and a group of post-doctoral fellows.

  8. Adaptive optics imaging of the retina

    Rajani Battu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive optics is a relatively new tool that is available to ophthalmologists for study of cellular level details. In addition to the axial resolution provided by the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, adaptive optics provides an excellent lateral resolution, enabling visualization of the photoreceptors, blood vessels and details of the optic nerve head. We attempt a mini review of the current role of adaptive optics in retinal imaging. PubMed search was performed with key words Adaptive optics OR Retina OR Retinal imaging. Conference abstracts were searched from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO and American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO meetings. In total, 261 relevant publications and 389 conference abstracts were identified.

  9. Extended depth of focus adaptive optics spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    Sasaki, Kazuhiro; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Makita, Shuichi; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2012-01-01

    We present an adaptive optics spectral domain optical coherence tomography (AO-SDOCT) with a long focal range by active phase modulation of the pupil. A long focal range is achieved by introducing AO-controlled third-order spherical aberration (SA). The property of SA and its effects on focal range are investigated in detail using the Huygens-Fresnel principle, beam profile measurement and OCT imaging of a phantom. The results indicate that the focal range is extended by applying SA, and the direction of extension can be controlled by the sign of applied SA. Finally, we demonstrated in vivo human retinal imaging by altering the applied SA. PMID:23082278

  10. Computational optical tomography using 3-D deep convolutional neural networks

    Nguyen, Thanh; Bui, Vy; Nehmetallah, George

    2018-04-01

    Deep convolutional neural networks (DCNNs) offer a promising performance for many image processing areas, such as super-resolution, deconvolution, image classification, denoising, and segmentation, with outstanding results. Here, we develop for the first time, to our knowledge, a method to perform 3-D computational optical tomography using 3-D DCNN. A simulated 3-D phantom dataset was first constructed and converted to a dataset of phase objects imaged on a spatial light modulator. For each phase image in the dataset, the corresponding diffracted intensity image was experimentally recorded on a CCD. We then experimentally demonstrate the ability of the developed 3-D DCNN algorithm to solve the inverse problem by reconstructing the 3-D index of refraction distributions of test phantoms from the dataset from their corresponding diffraction patterns.

  11. Advances in optical coherence tomography in dermatology-a review

    Olsen, Jonas; Holmes, Jon; Jemec, Gregor B. E.

    2018-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was introduced as an imaging system, but like ultrasonography, other measures, such as blood perfusion and polarization of light, have enabled the technology to approach clinical utility. This review aims at providing an overview of the advances in clinical research based on the improving technical aspects. OCT provides cross-sectional and en face images down to skin depths of 0.4 to 2.00 mm with optical resolution of 3 to 15 μm. Dynamic optical coherence tomography (D-OCT) enables the visualization of cutaneous microvasculature via detection of rapid changes in the interferometric signal of blood flow. Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most comprehensively investigated topic, resulting in improved descriptions of morphological features and diagnostic criteria. A refined scoring system for diagnosing NMSC, taking findings from conventional and D-OCT into account, is warranted. OCT diagnosis of melanoma is hampered by the resolution and the optical properties of melanin. D-OCT may be of value in diseases characterized with dynamic changes in the vasculature of the skin and the addition of functional measures is strongly encouraged. In conclusion, OCT in dermatology is still an emerging technology that has great potential for improving further in the future.

  12. High-speed optical coherence tomography by circular interferometric ranging

    Siddiqui, Meena; Nam, Ahhyun S.; Tozburun, Serhat; Lippok, Norman; Blatter, Cedric; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2018-02-01

    Existing three-dimensional optical imaging methods excel in controlled environments, but are difficult to deploy over large, irregular and dynamic fields. This means that they can be ill-suited for use in areas such as material inspection and medicine. To better address these applications, we developed methods in optical coherence tomography to efficiently interrogate sparse scattering fields, that is, those in which most locations (voxels) do not generate meaningful signal. Frequency comb sources are used to superimpose reflected signals from equispaced locations through optical subsampling. This results in circular ranging, and reduces the number of measurements required to interrogate large volumetric fields. As a result, signal acquisition barriers that have limited speed and field in optical coherence tomography are avoided. With a new ultrafast, time-stretched frequency comb laser design operating with 7.6 MHz to 18.9 MHz repetition rates, we achieved imaging of multi-cm3 fields at up to 7.5 volumes per second.

  13. Diffuse optical tomography using semiautomated coregistered ultrasound measurements

    Mostafa, Atahar; Vavadi, Hamed; Uddin, K. M. Shihab; Zhu, Quing

    2017-12-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has demonstrated huge potential in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment monitoring. DOT image reconstruction guided by ultrasound (US) improves the diffused light localization and lesion reconstruction accuracy. However, DOT reconstruction depends on tumor geometry provided by coregistered US. Experienced operators can manually measure these lesion parameters; however, training and measurement time are needed. The wide clinical use of this technique depends on its robustness and faster imaging reconstruction capability. This article introduces a semiautomated procedure that automatically extracts lesion information from US images and incorporates it into the optical reconstruction. An adaptive threshold-based image segmentation is used to obtain tumor boundaries. For some US images, posterior shadow can extend to the chest wall and make the detection of deeper lesion boundary difficult. This problem can be solved using a Hough transform. The proposed procedure was validated from data of 20 patients. Optical reconstruction results using the proposed procedure were compared with those reconstructed using extracted tumor information from an experienced user. Mean optical absorption obtained from manual measurement was 0.21±0.06 cm-1 for malignant and 0.12±0.06 cm-1 for benign cases, whereas for the proposed method it was 0.24±0.08 cm-1 and 0.12±0.05 cm-1, respectively.

  14. Optical Imaging of Mammaglobin Expression of Breast Cancer

    Achilefu, Samuel I

    2003-01-01

    .... TO accomplish this goal, we labeled polyclonal and monoclonal anti-MMG antibodies with a near infrared fluorescent probe for optical imaging and 64Cu-DOTA for positron emission tomography (mPET...

  15. Miniature endoscopic optical coherence tomography for calculus detection.

    Kao, Meng-Chun; Lin, Chun-Li; Kung, Che-Yen; Huang, Yi-Fung; Kuo, Wen-Chuan

    2015-08-20

    The effective treatment of periodontitis involves the detection and removal of subgingival dental calculus. However, subgingival calculus is more difficult to detect than supragingival calculus because it is firmly attached to root surfaces within periodontal pockets. To achieve a smooth root surface, clinicians often remove excessive amounts of root structure because of decreased visibility. In addition, enamel pearl, a rare type of ectopic enamel formation on the root surface, can easily be confused with dental calculus in the subgingival environment. In this study, we developed a fiber-probe swept-source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) technique and combined it with the quantitative measurement of an optical parameter [standard deviation (SD) of the optical coherence tomography (OCT) intensity] to differentiate subgingival calculus from sound enamel, including enamel pearl. Two-dimensional circumferential images were constructed by rotating the miniprobe (0.9 mm diameter) while acquiring image lines, and the adjacent lines in each rotation were stacked to generate a three-dimensional volume. In OCT images, compared to sound enamel and enamel pearls, dental calculus showed significant differences (Pdental calculus.

  16. Applications of optical imaging

    Schellenberger, E.

    2005-01-01

    Optical imaging in the form of near infrared fluorescence and bioluminescence has proven useful for a wide range of applications in the field of molecular imaging. Both techniques provide a high sensitivity (in the nanomolar range), which is of particular importance for molecular imaging. Imaging with near infrared fluorescence is especially cost-effective and can be performed, in contrast to radioactivity-based methods, with fluorescence dyes that remain stable for months. The most important advantage of bioluminescence, in turn, is the lack of background signal. Although molecular imaging with these techniques is still in the experimental phase, an application of near infrared fluorescence is already foreseeable for the imaging of superficial structures. (orig.)

  17. Imaging of the Macula Indicates Early Completion of Structural Deficit in Autosomal-Dominant Optic Atrophy

    Rönnbäck, Cecilia; Milea, Dan; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables 3-dimensional imaging of the retina, including the layer of ganglion cells that supplies the optic nerve with its axons. We tested OCT as means of diagnosing and phenotyping autosomal-dominant optic atrophy (ADOA)....

  18. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography findings in tamoxifen retinopathy--a case report.

    Nair, Sandhya Narayanan; Anantharaman, Giridhar; Gopalakrishnan, Mahesh; Vyas, Jyothiprakash

    2013-01-01

    To report spectral domain optical coherence tomography findings in a case of typical tamoxifen retinopathy. In this observational case report, a patient with tamoxifen retinopathy was imaged with spectral domain optical coherence tomography and fundus auto fluorescence. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography showed numerous hyperreflective spots within the retina, mainly in the inner retinal layers in both the eyes. The external limiting membrane, the Inner Segment-Outer Segment junction, and the photoreceptors were not discernable at the fovea in the right eye. In the left eye, there was foveal atrophy with total loss of photoreceptors. The autofluorescent images showed macular hypofluorescence with foveal hyperfluorescence. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography demonstrated abnormalities in the outer retinal layers in tamoxifen retinopathy. There were also characteristic alterations in the autofluorescence pattern at the macula in tamoxifen retinopathy.

  19. Characterization of dynamic physiology of the bladder by optical coherence tomography

    Yuan, Zhijia; Keng, Kerri; Pan, Rubin; Ren, Hugang; Du, Congwu; Kim, Jason; Pan, Yingtian

    2012-03-01

    Because of its high spatial resolution and noninvasive imaging capabilities, optical coherence tomography has been used to characterize the morphological details of various biological tissues including urinary bladder and to diagnose their alternations (e.g., cancers). In addition to static morphology, the dynamic features of tissue morphology can provide important information that can be used to diagnose the physiological and functional characteristics of biological tissues. Here, we present the imaging studies based on optical coherence tomography to characterize motion related physiology and functions of rat bladder detrusor muscles and compared the results with traditional biomechanical measurements. Our results suggest that optical coherence tomography is capable of providing quantitative evaluation of contractile functions of intact bladder (without removing bladder epithelium and connective tissue), which is potentially of more clinical relevance for future clinical diagnosis - if incorporated with cystoscopic optical coherence tomography.

  20. Electrical Resistance Tomography imaging of concrete

    Karhunen, Kimmo; Seppä nen, Aku; Lehikoinen, Anssi; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.; Kaipio, Jari P.

    2010-01-01

    We apply Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) for three dimensional imaging of concrete. In ERT, alternating currents are injected into the target using an array of electrodes attached to the target surface, and the resulting voltages are measured

  1. Image quality in coronary computed tomography angiography

    Precht, Helle; Gerke, Oke; Thygesen, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT) technology is rapidly evolving and software solution developed to optimize image quality and/or lower radiation dose. Purpose To investigate the influence of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) at different radiation doses in coronary CT...

  2. Computational adaptive optics for broadband interferometric tomography of tissues and cells

    Adie, Steven G.; Mulligan, Jeffrey A.

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) can shape aberrated optical wavefronts to physically restore the constructive interference needed for high-resolution imaging. With access to the complex optical field, however, many functions of optical hardware can be achieved computationally, including focusing and the compensation of optical aberrations to restore the constructive interference required for diffraction-limited imaging performance. Holography, which employs interferometric detection of the complex optical field, was developed based on this connection between hardware and computational image formation, although this link has only recently been exploited for 3D tomographic imaging in scattering biological tissues. This talk will present the underlying imaging science behind computational image formation with optical coherence tomography (OCT) -- a beam-scanned version of broadband digital holography. Analogous to hardware AO (HAO), we demonstrate computational adaptive optics (CAO) and optimization of the computed pupil correction in 'sensorless mode' (Zernike polynomial corrections with feedback from image metrics) or with the use of 'guide-stars' in the sample. We discuss the concept of an 'isotomic volume' as the volumetric extension of the 'isoplanatic patch' introduced in astronomical AO. Recent CAO results and ongoing work is highlighted to point to the potential biomedical impact of computed broadband interferometric tomography. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of HAO vs. CAO for the effective shaping of optical wavefronts, and highlight opportunities for hybrid approaches that synergistically combine the unique advantages of hardware and computational methods for rapid volumetric tomography with cellular resolution.

  3. Strategies to improve phase-stability of ultrafast swept source optical coherence tomography for single shot imaging of transient mechanical waves at 16 kHz frame rate

    Song, Shaozhen; Wei, Wei; Hsieh, Bao-Yu; Pelivanov, Ivan; O' Donnell, Matthew [Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Shen, Tueng T.; Wang, Ruikang K., E-mail: wangrk@uw.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98104 (United States)

    2016-05-09

    We present single-shot phase-sensitive imaging of propagating mechanical waves within tissue, enabled by an ultrafast optical coherence tomography (OCT) system powered by a 1.628 MHz Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) swept laser source. We propose a practical strategy for phase-sensitive measurement by comparing the phases between adjacent OCT B-scans, where the B-scan contains a number of A-scans equaling an integer number of FDML buffers. With this approach, we show that micro-strain fields can be mapped with ∼3.0 nm sensitivity at ∼16 000 fps. The system's capabilities are demonstrated on porcine cornea by imaging mechanical wave propagation launched by a pulsed UV laser beam, promising non-contact, real-time, and high-resolution optical coherence elastography.

  4. On uniqueness in diffuse optical tomography

    Harrach, Bastian

    2009-01-01

    A prominent result of Arridge and Lionheart (1998 Opt. Lett. 23 882–4) demonstrates that it is in general not possible to simultaneously recover both the diffusion (aka scattering) and the absorption coefficient in steady-state (dc) diffusion-based optical tomography. In this work we show that it suffices to restrict ourselves to piecewise constant diffusion and piecewise analytic absorption coefficients to regain uniqueness. Under this condition both parameters can simultaneously be determined from complete measurement data on an arbitrarily small part of the boundary

  5. Gabor fusion master slave optical coherence tomography

    Cernat, Ramona; Bradu, Adrian; Israelsen, Niels Møller

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the Gabor filtering protocol to a Master/Slave (MS) swept source optical coherence tomography (SS)-OCT system at 1300 nm. The MS-OCT system delivers information from selected depths, a property that allows operation similar to that of a time domain OCT system......, where dynamic focusing is possible. The Gabor filtering processing following collection of multiple data from different focus positions is different from that utilized by a conventional swept source OCT system using a Fast Fourier transform (FFT) to produce an A-scan. Instead of selecting the bright...

  6. Holography Experiments on Optical Imaging.

    Bonczak, B.; Dabrowski, J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes experiments intended to produce a better understanding of the holographic method of producing images and optical imaging by other optical systems. Application of holography to teaching physics courses is considered. (Author/SA)

  7. Potential applications of optical coherence tomography angiography in glaucoma.

    Dastiridou, Anna; Chopra, Vikas

    2018-05-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a novel, noninvasive imaging modality that allows assessment of the retinal and choroidal vasculature. The scope of this review is to summarize recent studies using OCTA in glaucoma and highlight potential applications of this new technology in the field of glaucoma. OCTA studies have shown that retinal vascular changes may not develop solely as a result of advanced glaucoma damage. OCTA-derived measurements have provided evidence for lower retinal vascular densities at the optic nerve head, peripapillary and macula in preperimetric-glaucoma and early-glaucoma, as well as, in more advanced glaucoma, in comparison to with normal eyes. OCTA is a novel imaging modality that has already started to expand our knowledge base regarding the role of ocular blood flow in glaucoma. Future studies will better elucidate the role of OCTA-derived measurements in clinical practice, research, and clinical trials in glaucoma.

  8. Ultrahigh speed endoscopic optical coherence tomography for gastroenterology.

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Ahsen, Osman O; Liang, Kaicheng; Giacomelli, Michael G; Potsaid, Benjamin M; Tao, Yuankai K; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Figueiredo, Marisa; Huang, Qin; Cable, Alex E; Fujimoto, James; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    We describe an ultrahigh speed endoscopic swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for clinical gastroenterology using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and micromotor imaging catheter. The system had a 600 kHz axial scan rate and 8 µm axial resolution in tissue. Imaging was performed with a 3.2 mm diameter imaging catheter at 400 frames per second with a 12 µm spot size. Three-dimensional OCT (3D-OCT) imaging was performed in patients with a cross section of pathologies undergoing upper and lower endoscopy. The use of distally actuated imaging catheters enabled OCT imaging with more flexibility, such as volumetric imaging in the small intestine and the assessment of hiatal hernia using retroflex imaging. The high rotational scanning stability of the micromotor enabled 3D volumetric imaging with micron scale volumetric accuracy for both en face OCT and cross-sectional imaging, as well as OCT angiography (OCTA) for 3D visualization of subsurface microvasculature. The ability to perform both structural and functional 3D OCT imaging in the GI tract with microscopic accuracy should enable a wide range of studies and enhance the sensitivity and specificity of OCT for detecting pathology.

  9. Fiber-optic polarization diversity detection for rotary probe optical coherence tomography.

    Lee, Anthony M D; Pahlevaninezhad, Hamid; Yang, Victor X D; Lam, Stephen; MacAulay, Calum; Lane, Pierre

    2014-06-15

    We report a polarization diversity detection scheme for optical coherence tomography with a new, custom, miniaturized fiber coupler with single mode (SM) fiber inputs and polarization maintaining (PM) fiber outputs. The SM fiber inputs obviate matching the optical lengths of the X and Y OCT polarization channels prior to interference and the PM fiber outputs ensure defined X and Y axes after interference. Advantages for this scheme include easier alignment, lower cost, and easier miniaturization compared to designs with free-space bulk optical components. We demonstrate the utility of the detection system to mitigate the effects of rapidly changing polarization states when imaging with rotating fiber optic probes in Intralipid suspension and during in vivo imaging of human airways.

  10. Fourier phase in Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    Uttam, Shikhar; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Phase of an electromagnetic wave propagating through a sample-of-interest is well understood in the context of quantitative phase imaging in transmission-mode microscopy. In the past decade, Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography has been used to extend quantitative phase imaging to the reflection-mode. Unlike transmission-mode electromagnetic phase, however, the origin and characteristics of reflection-mode Fourier phase are poorly understood, especially in samples with a slowly varying refractive index. In this paper, the general theory of Fourier phase from first principles is presented, and it is shown that Fourier phase is a joint estimate of subresolution offset and mean spatial frequency of the coherence-gated sample refractive index. It is also shown that both spectral-domain phase microscopy and depth-resolved spatial-domain low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy are special cases of this general theory. Analytical expressions are provided for both, and simulations are presented to explain and support the theoretical results. These results are further used to show how Fourier phase allows the estimation of an axial mean spatial frequency profile of the sample, along with depth-resolved characterization of localized optical density change and sample heterogeneity. Finally, a Fourier phase-based explanation of Doppler optical coherence tomography is also provided. PMID:26831383

  11. Fourier phase in Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography.

    Uttam, Shikhar; Liu, Yang

    2015-12-01

    Phase of an electromagnetic wave propagating through a sample-of-interest is well understood in the context of quantitative phase imaging in transmission-mode microscopy. In the past decade, Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography has been used to extend quantitative phase imaging to the reflection-mode. Unlike transmission-mode electromagnetic phase, however, the origin and characteristics of reflection-mode Fourier phase are poorly understood, especially in samples with a slowly varying refractive index. In this paper, the general theory of Fourier phase from first principles is presented, and it is shown that Fourier phase is a joint estimate of subresolution offset and mean spatial frequency of the coherence-gated sample refractive index. It is also shown that both spectral-domain phase microscopy and depth-resolved spatial-domain low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy are special cases of this general theory. Analytical expressions are provided for both, and simulations are presented to explain and support the theoretical results. These results are further used to show how Fourier phase allows the estimation of an axial mean spatial frequency profile of the sample, along with depth-resolved characterization of localized optical density change and sample heterogeneity. Finally, a Fourier phase-based explanation of Doppler optical coherence tomography is also provided.<