WorldWideScience

Sample records for optical spectroscopy study

  1. Optical Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrhaug, Erling

    The work presented in this thesis is broadly concerned with how complexation reactions and molecular motion can be characterized with the standard techniques in optical spectroscopy. The thesis aims to show a relatively broad range of methods for probing physico-chemical properties in fluorophore...... containing systems and are characterized using techniques in optical spectroscopy. Of the standard techniques in optical spectroscopy, particular attention has been paid to those based on time-resolved measurements and polarization, which is reflected in the experiment design in the projects. Not all...... reactions by optical spectroscopy. In project 1 simple steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy is used to determine the stoichiometries and equilibrium constants in the inclusion complex formation between cyclodextrins and derivatives of the water-insoluble oligo(phenylene vinylene) in aqueous...

  2. Non-linear optical studies of adsorbates: Spectroscopy and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiangdong.

    1989-08-01

    In the first part of this thesis, we have established a systematic procedure to apply the surface optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) technique to study surface dynamics of adsorbates. In particular, we have developed a novel technique for studies of molecular surface diffusions. In this technique, the laser-induced desorption with two interfering laser beams is used to produce a monolayer grating of adsorbates. The monolayer grating is detected with diffractions of optical SHG. By monitoring the first-order second-harmonic diffraction, we can follow the time evolution of the grating modulation from which we are able to deduce the diffusion constant of the adsorbates on the surface. We have successfully applied this technique to investigate the surface diffusion of CO on Ni(111). The unique advantages of this novel technique will enable us to readily study anisotropy of a surface diffusion with variable grating orientation, and to investigate diffusion processes of a large dynamic range with variable grating spacings. In the second part of this work, we demonstrate that optical infrared-visible sum-frequency generation (SFG) from surfaces can be used as a viable surface vibrational spectroscopic technique. We have successfully recorded the first vibrational spectrum of a monolayer of adsorbates using optical infrared-visible SFG. The qualitative and quantitative correlation of optical SFG with infrared absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopies are examined and experimentally demonstrated. We have further investigated the possibility to use transient infrared-visible SFG to probe vibrational transients and ultrafast relaxations on surfaces. 146 refs.

  3. Optical imaging and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brady, David J

    2009-01-01

    An essential reference for optical sensor system design This is the first text to present an integrated view of the optical and mathematical analysis tools necessary to understand computational optical system design. It presents the foundations of computational optical sensor design with a focus entirely on digital imaging and spectroscopy. It systematically covers: Coded aperture and tomographic imaging Sampling and transformations in optical systems, including wavelets and generalized sampling techniques essential to digital system analysis Geometric, wave, and statis

  4. Optical emission spectroscopy study on deposition process of microcrystalline silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Zhi-Meng; Lei Qing-Song; Geng Xin-Hua; Zhao Ying; Sun Jian; Xi Jian-Ping

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports that the optical emission spectroscopy (OES) is used to monitor the plasma during the deposition process of hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon films in a very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system. The OES intensities (SiH*, H*α and H*β) are investigated by varying the deposition parameters. The result shows that the discharge power, silane concentrations and substrate temperature affect the OES intensities. When the discharge power at silane concentration of 4% increases, the OES intensities increase first and then are constant, the intensities increase with the discharge power monotonously at silane concentration of 6%. The SiH* intensity increases with silane concentration, while the intensities of H*α and H*β increase first and then decrease. When the substrate temperature increases, the SiH* intensity decreases and the intensities of H*α and H*β are constant. The correlation between the intensity ratio of IH*α/ISiH* and the crystalline volume fraction (Xc) of films is confirmed.

  5. Nanocrystalline zinc ferrite films studied by magneto-optical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lišková-Jakubisová, E., E-mail: liskova@karlov.mff.cuni.cz; Višňovský, Š. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 5, Prague (Czech Republic); Široký, P.; Hrabovský, D.; Pištora, J. [Nanotechnology Center, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15, 708 33 Ostrava-Poruba (Czech Republic); Sahoo, Subasa C. [Department of Physics, Central University of Kerala, Kasaragod, Kerala 671314 (India); Prasad, Shiva [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Venkataramani, N. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Bohra, Murtaza [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), Okinawa (Japan); Krishnan, R. [Groupe d' Etude de la Matière Condensée (GEMaC), CNRS-UVSQ, 45 Avenue des Etats-Unis, 78935 Versailles (France)

    2015-05-07

    Ferrimagnetic Zn-ferrite (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) films can be grown with the ferromagnetic resonance linewidth of 40 Oe at 9.5 GHz without going through a high temperature processing. This presents interest for applications. The work deals with laser ablated ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} films deposited at O{sub 2} pressure of 0.16 mbar onto fused quartz substrates. The films about 120 nm thick are nanocrystalline and their spontaneous magnetization, 4πM{sub s}, depends on the nanograin size, which is controlled by the substrate temperature (T{sub s}). At T{sub s} ≈ 350 °C, where the grain distribution peaks around ∼20–30 nm, the room temperature 4πM{sub s} reaches a maximum of ∼2.3 kG. The films were studied by magnetooptical polar Kerr effect (MOKE) spectroscopy at photon energies between 1 and 5 eV. The complementary characteristics were provided by spectral ellipsometry (SE). Both the SE and MOKE spectra confirmed ferrimagnetic ordering. The structural details correspond to those observed in MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Li{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2.5}O{sub 4} spinels. SE experiments confirm the insulator behavior. The films display MOKE amplitudes somewhat reduced with respect to those in Li{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2.5}O{sub 4} and MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} due to a lower degree of spinel inversion and nanocrystalline structure. The results indicate that the films are free of oxygen vacancies and Fe{sup 3+}-Fe{sup 2+} exchange.

  6. Optical property and spectroscopy studies on the selected lubricating oil in the terahertz range

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Lu; ZHOU QingLi; JIN Bin; ZHAO Kun; ZHAO SongQing; SHI YuLei; ZHANG CunLin

    2009-01-01

    The optical property and spectroscopy of selected kinds of lubricating oil are studied based on the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) in the spectral range of 0.3-1.6 THz. The samples are classified by their characteristics via the near-infrared spectrum. The experimental results reveal that lubricating oil is more sensitive in the range of terahertz than in the near-infrared, and the specific kinds of lubricating oil can be identified according to their different spectral features in the terahertz range. The THz-TDS technology applied to lubricating oil analysis has potentially significant impact on the petroleum field.

  7. Optical property and spectroscopy studies on the selected lubricating oil in the terahertz range

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The optical property and spectroscopy of selected kinds of lubricating oil are studied based on the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) in the spectral range of 0.3-1.6 THz. The samples are classified by their characteristics via the near-infrared spectrum. The experimental results reveal that lubricating oil is more sensitive in the range of terahertz than in the near-infrared,and the specific kinds of lubricating oil can be identified according to their different spectral features in the terahertz range. The THz-TDS technology applied to lubricating oil analysis has potentially significant impact on the petroleum field.

  8. Optical spectroscopy for differentiation of liver tissue under distinct stages of fibrosis: an ex vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabila, D. A.; Hernández, L. F.; de la Rosa, J.; Stolik, S.; Arroyo-Camarena, U. D.; López-Vancell, M. D.; Escobedo, G.

    2013-11-01

    Liver fibrosis is the decisive step towards the development of cirrhosis; its early detection affects crucially the diagnosis of liver disease, its prognosis and therapeutic decision making. Nowadays, several techniques are employed to this task. However, they have the limitation in estimating different stages of the pathology. In this paper we present a preliminary study to evaluate if optical spectroscopy can be employed as an auxiliary tool of diagnosis of biopsies of human liver tissue to differentiate the fibrosis stages. Ex vivo fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectra were acquired from biopsies using a portable fiber-optic system. Empirical discrimination algorithms based on fluorescence intensity ratio at 500 nm and 680 nm as well as diffuse reflectance intensity at 650 nm were developed. Sensitivity and specificity of around 80% and 85% were respectively achieved. The obtained results show that combined use of fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy could represent a novel and useful tool in the early evaluation of liver fibrosis.

  9. Optical fiber Raman-based spectroscopy for oral lesions characterization: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Luis Felipe C. S.; Neto, Lázaro P. M.; Oliveira, Inajara P.; Rangel, João. Lucas; Ferreira, Isabelle; Kitakawa, Dárcio; Martin, Airton A.

    2016-03-01

    In the clinical daily life various lesions of the oral cavity have shown different aspects, generating an inconclusive or doubtful diagnosis. In general, oral injuries are diagnosed by histopathological analysis from biopsy, which is an invasive procedure and does not gives immediate results. In the other hand, Raman spectroscopy technique it is a real time and minimal invasive analytical tool, with notable diagnostic capability. This study aims to characterize, by optical fiber Raman-based spectroscopy (OFRS), normal, inflammatory, potentially malignant, benign and malign oral lesions. Raman data were collected by a Holospec f / 1.8 spectrograph (Kayser Optical Systems) coupled to an optical fiber, with a 785nm laser line source and a CCD Detector. The data were pre-processed and vector normalized. The average analysis and standard deviation was performed associated with cluster analysis and compared to the histopalogical results. Samples of described oral pathological processes were used in the study. The OFRS was efficient to characterized oral lesions and normal mucosa, in which biochemical information related to vibrational modes of proteins, lipids, nucleic acids and carbohydrates were observed. The technique (OFRS) is able to demonstrate biochemical information concern different types of oral lesions showing that Raman spectroscopy could be useful for an early and minimal invasive diagnosis.

  10. Optical spectroscopy study of nc-Si-based p-i-n solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sancho-Parramon, Jordi; Gracin, Davor; Gajovic, Andreja [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Modreanu, Mircea [Tyndall Institute, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland)

    2009-10-15

    In the present study we analyzed nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si)-based p-i-n thin film structures (SiC/nc-Si/n-doped amorphous Si) on glass produced by radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The crystallinity of the nc-Si layer was modified by varying the deposition conditions ([SiH{sub 4}]/[H{sub 2}] ratio in the plasma and radio-frequency power). Structural properties of the samples (crystalline fraction and crystal size distribution) were inferred by Raman spectroscopy. Different optical spectroscopy methods were combined for the determination of the optical constants in different spectral ranges: spectrophotometry, ellipsometry and photothermal deflection spectroscopy. Characterization results evidence that the optical properties of the nc-Si layers are strongly connected with the layer structural properties. Thus, the correlation between density of defects, Urbach energy, band-gap and line-shape of dielectric function critical points with the crystalline properties of the films is established. (author)

  11. Feasibility Study of Optical Spectroscopy as a Medical Tool for Diagnosis of Skin Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asad Saf

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Skin cancer is one of the most frequently en-countered types of cancer in the Western world. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation Statistics, one in every five Americans develops skin cancer during his/her lifetime. Today, the incurability of advanced cutaneous melanoma raises the importance of its early detection. Since the differentiation of early melanoma from other pigmented skin lesions is not a trivial task, even for experienced dermatologists, computer aided diagnosis could become an important tool for reducing the mortality rate of this highly malignant cancer type. In this paper, a computer aided diagnosis system based on machine learning is proposed in order to support the clinical use of optical spectroscopy for skin lesions quantification and classification. The focuses is on a feasibility study of optical spectroscopy as a medical tool for diagnosis. To this end, data acquisition protocols for optical spectroscopy are defined and detailed analysis of feature vectors is performed. Different tech-niques for supervised and unsupervised learning are explored on clinical data, collected from patients with malignant and benign skin lesions.

  12. Two-dimensional optical spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Minhaeng

    2009-01-01

    Discusses the principles and applications of two-dimensional vibrational and optical spectroscopy techniques. This book provides an account of basic theory required for an understanding of two-dimensional vibrational and electronic spectroscopy.

  13. Studies of thin films and surfaces with optical harmonic generation and electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilk, Dieter Emre [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Optical second harmonic generation (SHG) and sum frequency generation (SFG) were used to study C60 thin solid films (low energy ED forbidden electronic excitations), and electron spectroscopy was used to study organic overlayers (xylenes) on Pt(111). Theory of SHG from a thin film is described in terms of surface and bulk contributions as well as local and nonlocal contributions to the optical nonlinearities. (1)In situ SHG data on C60 films during UHV film growth can be described in terms of only nonlocal contributions to both surface and bulk nonlinear susceptibilities. Microscopic origin of SHG response is discussed in terms of electric quadrupole and ED transitions of C60. (2)Adsorption and thermal decomposition of ortho- and para-xylene on Pt(111) is studied using HREELS, LEED, AES, and thermal desorption spectroscopy. We have observed preferential decomposition of the methyl groups which leads to distinct decomposition pathways for ortho- and para-xylene on Pt(111).

  14. Optical Spectroscopy at the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xiaoping

    Recent advances in material science and fabrication techniques enabled development of nanoscale applications and devices with superior performances and high degree of integration. Exotic physics also emerges at nanoscale where confinement of electrons and phonons leads to drastically different behavior from those in the bulk materials. It is therefore rewarding and interesting to investigate and understand material properties at the nanoscale. Optical spectroscopy, one of the most versatile techniques for studying material properties and light-matter interactions, can provide new insights into the nanomaterials. In this thesis, I explore advanced laser spectroscopic techniques to probe a variety of different nanoscale phenomena. A powerful tool in nanoscience and engineering is scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Its capability in atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy unveiled the mystical quantum world of atoms and molecules. However identification of molecular species under investigation is one of the limiting functionalities of the STM. To address this need, we take advantage of the molecular `fingerprints' - vibrational spectroscopy, by combining an infrared light sources with scanning tunneling microscopy. In order to map out sharp molecular resonances, an infrared continuous wave broadly tunable optical parametric oscillator was developed with mode-hop free fine tuning capabilities. We then combine this laser with STM by shooting the beam onto the STM substrate with sub-monolayer diamondoids deposition. Thermal expansion of the substrate is detected by the ultrasensitive tunneling current when infrared frequency is tuned across the molecular vibrational range. Molecular vibrational spectroscopy could be obtained by recording the thermal expansion as a function of the excitation wavelength. Another interesting field of the nanoscience is carbon nanotube, an ideal model of one dimensional physics and applications. Due to the small light absorption with

  15. Study of optical phonon modes of CdS nanoparticles using Raman spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajeev R Prabhu; M Abdul Khadar

    2008-06-01

    The reduction in the grain size to nanometer range can bring about radical changes in almost all of the properties of semiconductors. CdS nanoparticles have attracted considerable scientific interest because they exhibit strongly size-dependent optical and electrical properties. In the case of nanostructured materials, confinement of optical phonons can produce noticeable changes in their vibrational spectra compared to those of bulk crystals. In this paper we report the study of optical phonon modes of nanoparticles of CdS using Raman spectroscopy. Nanoparticle sample for the present study was synthesized through chemical precipitation technique. The CdS nanoparticles were then subjected to heat treatment at low temperature (150°C) for extended time intervals. The crystal structure and grain size of the samples were determined using X-ray diffraction and HRTEM. The Raman spectra of the as-prepared and heat treated samples were recorded using conventional Raman and micro-Raman techniques. The spectrum of as prepared sample exhibited an intense, broad peak at 301 cm-1 corresponding to the LO phonon mode. Higher order phonon modes were also observed in the spectra. A noticeable asymmetry in the Raman line shape indicated the effect of phonon confinement. Other features in the spectra are discussed in detail.

  16. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang-Hwan Kim

    2003-12-12

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms.

  17. Comparison endpoint study of process plasma and secondary electron beam exciter optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan Thamban, P. L.; Yun, Stuart; Padron-Wells, Gabriel; Hosch, Jimmy W.; Goeckner, Matthew J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, 800W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, 800W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Verity Instruments, Inc., 2901 Eisenhower Street, Carrollton, Texas 75007 (United States); Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Traditionally process plasmas are often studied and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. Here, the authors compare experimental measurements from a secondary electron beam excitation and direct process plasma excitation to discuss and illustrate its distinctiveness in the study of process plasmas. They present results that show excitations of etch process effluents in a SF{sub 6} discharge and endpoint detection capabilities in dark plasma process conditions. In SF{sub 6} discharges, a band around 300 nm, not visible in process emission, is observed and it can serve as a good indicator of etch product emission during polysilicon etches. Based on prior work reported in literature the authors believe this band is due to SiF{sub 4} gas phase species.

  18. Optical Fiber Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report of work done on NASA Grant NAG-1-443. The work covers the period from July 1, 1992 to December 1, 1998. During this period several distinct but related research studies and work tasks were undertaken. These different subjects are enumerated below with a description of the work done on each of them. The focus of the research was the development of optical fibers for use as distributed temperature and stress sensors. The initial concept was to utilize the utilize the temperature and stress dependence of emission from rare earth and transition metal ions substitutionally doped into crystalline or glass fibers. During the course of investigating this it became clear that fiber Bragg gratings provided a alternative for making the desired measurements and there was a shift of research focus on to include the photo-refractive properties of germano-silicate glasses used for most gratings and to the possibility of developing fiber laser sources for an integrated optical sensor in the research effort. During the course of this work several students from Christopher Newport University and other universities participated in this effort. Their names are listed below. Their participation was an important part of their education.

  19. Structure and dynamics in protic ionic liquids: a combined optical Kerr-effect and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, David A; Sonnleitner, Thomas; Ortner, Alex; Walther, Markus; Hefter, Glenn; Seddon, Kenneth R; Stana, Simona; Plechkova, Natalia V; Buchner, Richard; Wynne, Klaas

    2012-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of ionic liquids (ILs) are unusual due to the strong interactions between the ions and counter ions. These microscopic properties determine the bulk transport properties critical to applications of ILs such as advanced fuel cells. The terahertz dynamics and slower relaxations of simple alkylammonium nitrate protic ionic liquids (PILs) are here studied using femtosecond optical Kerr-effect spectroscopy, dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, and terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The observed dynamics give insight into more general liquid behaviour while comparison with glass-forming liquids reveals an underlying power-law decay and relaxation rates suggest supramolecular structure and nanoscale segregation.

  20. Dynamics of Methyl Methacrylate Nanoconfined in Silica Sol Glasses Studied by Optical Kerr Effect Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Dujuan; Xue, Lianjie; Tamas, George; Quitevis, Edward; Simon, Sindee

    2014-03-01

    Nanoconfinement has been found to have an effect on polymerization processes [1,2] and on the glass transition temperature Tg [3]. Here we report studies of the nanoconfinement effect on the dynamics of monomers in the pores of silica sol-gel glass. The samples were prepared under a vacuum and studied by using optical Kerr effect (OKE) spectroscopy. The reorientational dynamics of methyl methacrylate (MMA) confined in silica sol-gel glasses with pore diameters of 32, 41, and 82 Å was studied. The decays of the reorientational correlation function C(t) became longer as the pore size decreased. Based on the analysis of the reorientational correlation functions using a two-state model [4], the nanoconfinement effect is due to the interaction of molecules with the surface of the silica-gel glass. In a study of the effect of nanoconfinement in modified silica sol-gel glasses, which were obtained by refluxing the sol-gel glasses in methanol to give hydrophobic pore surfaces, the decay is faster in the modified silica gel glass than in the unmodified sol-gel glass. This work is supported by NSF Grant CMMI-1235346.

  1. Physical and chemical study of single aerosol particles using optical trapping cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-30

    benefits from the stable ringdown baseline stability of this pulsed UV -CRDS system that offers a laser beam in a wide wavelength range from visible to...measure wavelength-dependent single particle extinction for different types of particles and in different wavelength regions ( Visible - UV ). We found: (1...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We report a new single-aerosol particle scope using an optical trapping-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OT-CRDS) technique

  2. Optical spectroscopy and tooth decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, P.; De, T.; Singh, R.

    2005-11-01

    Optical spectroscopy in the ultraviolet, visible and mid-infrared spectral regions has been used to discriminate between healthy and diseased teeth of patients in the age range 15-75 years. Spectral scans of absorbance versus wavenumber and fluorescence intensity versus wavelength have been recorded and investigated for caries and periodontal disease. Such optical diagnostics can prove very useful in the early detection and treatment of tooth decay.

  3. Electronic and optical properties of Fe, Pd, and Ti studied by reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, Dahlang [Department of Physics, Hasanuddin University, Makassar 90245 (Indonesia); Kraaer, Jens; Tougaard, Sven [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark)

    2014-06-28

    We have studied the electronic and optical properties of Fe, Pd, and Ti by reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS). REELS spectra recorded for primary energies in the range from 300 eV to 10 keV were corrected for multiple inelastically scattered electrons to determine the effective inelastic-scattering cross section. The dielectric functions and optical properties were determined by comparing the experimental inelastic-electron scattering cross section with a simulated cross section calculated within the semi-classical dielectric response model in which the only input is Im(−1/ε) by using the QUEELS-ε(k,ω)-REELS software package. The complex dielectric functions ε(k,ω), in the 0–100 eV energy range, for Fe, Pd, and Ti were determined from the derived Im(−1/ε) by Kramers-Kronig transformation and then the refractive index n and extinction coefficient k. The validity of the applied model was previously tested and found to give consistent results when applied to REELS spectra at energies between 300 and 1000 eV taken at widely different experimental geometries. In the present paper, we provide, for the first time, a further test on its validity and find that the model also gives consistent results when applied to REELS spectra in the full range of primary electron energies from 300 eV to 10000 eV. This gives confidence in the validity of the applied method.

  4. Optical pathology study of human abdominal aorta tissues using confocal micro resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng-hui; Boydston-White, Susie; Wang, Wubao; Sordillo, Laura A.; Shi, Lingyan; Weisberg, Arel; Tomaselli, Vincent P.; Sordillo, Peter P.; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopic technique has a high potential for label-free and in-situ detection of biomedical lesions in vivo. This study evaluates the ability of RR spectroscopy method as an optical histopathology tool to detect the atherosclerotic plaque states of abdominal aorta in vitro. This part demonstrates the RR spectral molecular fingerprint features from different sites of the atherosclerotic abdominal aortic wall tissues. Total 57 sites of five pieces aortic samples in intimal and adventitial wall from an autopsy specimen were examined using confocal micro Raman system of WITec 300R with excitation wavelength of 532nm. The preliminary RR spectral biomarkers of molecular fingerprints indicated that typical calcified atherosclerotic plaque (RR peak at 964cm-1) tissue; fibrolipid plaque (RR peaks at 1007, 1161, 1517 and 2888cm-1) tissue, lipid pool with the fatty precipitation cholesterol) with collagen type I (RR peaks at 864, 1452, 1658, 2888 and 2948cm-1) in the soft tissue were observed and investigated.

  5. Prediction of post-operative necrosis after mastectomy: A pilot study utilizing optical diffusion imaging spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Xian-Jin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Flap necrosis and epidermolysis occurs in 18-30% of all mastectomies. Complications may be prevented by intra-operative detection of ischemia. Currently, no technique enables quantitative valuation of mastectomy skin perfusion. Optical Diffusion Imaging Spectroscopy (ViOptix T.Ox Tissue Oximeter measures the ratio of oxyhemoglobin to deoxyhemoglobin over a 1 × 1 cm area to obtain a non-invasive measurement of perfusion (StO2. Methods This study evaluates the ability of ViOptix T.Ox Tissue Oximeter to predict mastectomy flap necrosis. StO2 measurements were taken at five points before and at completion of dissection in 10 patients. Data collected included: demographics, tumor size, flap length/thickness, co-morbidities, procedure length, and wound complications. Results One patient experienced mastectomy skin flap necrosis. Five patients underwent immediate reconstruction, including the patient with necrosis. Statistically significant factors contributing to necrosis included reduction in medial flap StO2 (p = 0.0189, reduction in inferior flap StO2 (p = 0.003, and flap length (p = 0.009. Conclusion StO2 reductions may be utilized to identify impaired perfusion in mastectomy skin flaps.

  6. Optical spectroscopy and decoherence studies of Y b3 + :YAG at 968 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, Thomas; Thiel, C. W.; Cone, R. L.; Sun, Y.; Faraon, A.

    2016-07-01

    The 7/2 2F ↔ 5/2 2F optical transitions of Y b3 + doped into Y3A l5O12 (YAG) were studied for potential quantum information and photonic signal processing applications. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy located the energy levels of the ground >7/2 2F and excited 5/2 2F manifolds, allowing inconsistencies between previous assignments of crystal field splittings in the literature to be resolved. These measurements reveal an unusually large splitting between the first and second levels in both the ground and excited multiplets, potentially providing for reduced sensitivity to thermally induced decoherence and spin-lattice relaxation. Spectral hole burning through two-level saturation was observed, determining the excited state lifetime to be 860 μs and resolving ambiguities in previous fluorescence measurements that were caused by the large radiation trapping effects in this material. Optical decoherence measurements using two-pulse photon echoes gave a homogeneous linewidth of 18 kHz for an applied magnetic field of 1 T, narrowing to 5 kHz at 2.5 T. The observed decoherence was described by spectral diffusion attributed to Y b3 +- Y b3 + magnetic dipole interactions. Laser absorption determined an inhomogeneous linewidth of 3.6 GHz for this transition in this 0.05%-doped crystal, which is narrower than for any other rare-earth-ion transition previously studied in the YAG host. The temperature dependence of the transition energy and linewidth of the lowest 7/2 2F to lowest 5/2 2F transition centered at 968.571 nm measured from 4 K to 300 K was well described by phonon scattering at higher temperatures, with an additional anomalous linear temperature-dependent broadening at temperatures below 80 K. Two magnetically inequivalent subgroups of Y b3 + ions were identified when a magnetic field was applied along the axis, as expected for the D2 sites in the cubic symmetry crystal, with ground and excited state effective g -values of gg=3.40 (3.34) and ge=1.04 (2

  7. Using optical nanofibers for spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Fernandez, R; Bruse, F; Dan, C; Karapetyan, K; Rehband, O; Stiebeiner, A; Wiedemann, U; Meschede, D; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2011-01-01

    We review our recent progress in the production and characterization of tapered optical fibers with a sub-wavelength diameter waist. Such fibers exhibit a pronounced evanescent field and are therefore a useful tool for highly sensitive evanescent wave spectroscopy of adsorbates on the fiber waist or of the medium surrounding. We use a carefully designed flame pulling process that allows us to realize preset fiber diameter profiles. In order to determine the waist diameter and to verify the fiber profile, we employ scanning electron microscope measurements and a novel accurate in situ optical method based on harmonic generation. We use our fibers for linear and non-linear absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy of surface-adsorbed organic molecules and investigate their agglomeration dynamics. Furthermore, we apply our spectroscopic method to quantum dots on the surface of the fiber waist and to caesium vapor surrounding the fiber. Finally, towards dispersive measurements, we present our first results on buil...

  8. Characteristics of solid aerosols produced by optical catapulting studied by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, F. J.; Laserna, J. J.

    2010-08-01

    Optical catapulting (OC) constitutes an effective method to transport small amounts of different materials in the form of a solid aerosol. In this report, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used for the analysis of those aerosols produced by OC. For this purpose, materials were catapulted using a Q-switch Nd:YAG laser. A second Q-switch Nd:YAG laser was used for LIBS analysis of the ejected particles. Data processing of aerosols was conducted using conditional data analysis. Also, the standard deviation method was used for the qualitative identification of the ejected particles. Two modes of interaction in OC (OC with focused or defocused pulses) have been evaluated and discussed. LIBS demonstrates that the distribution (spreading) of the ejected particles along the propagation axis increased as a function of the interpulse delay time. The mass density and the thickness of the target also play an important role in OC-LIBS.

  9. Consistency-dependent optical properties of lubricating grease studied by terahertz spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Lu; Miao Qing; Zhang Cun-Lin; Zhou Qing-Li; Zhao Kun; Shi Yu-Lei; Zhao Dong-Mei; Zhao Song-Qing; Zhao Hui; Bao Ri-Ma; Zhu Shou-Ming

    2011-01-01

    The optical properties of four kinds of lubricating greases (urea, lithium, extreme pressure lithium, molybdenum disulfide lithium greases) with different NLGL (National Lubricant Grease Institute of America) numbers were investigated using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. Greases with different NLGL grades have unique spectral features in the terahertz range. Comparison of the experimental data with predictions based on Lorentz-Lorenz theory exhibited that the refractive indices of each kind of lubricating grease were dependent on the their consistency. In addition,molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) as a libricant additive shows strong absorption from 0.2 to 1.4 THz, leading to higher absorption of MoS2-1ithium grease than that of lithium grease.

  10. Optical spectroscopy to study confined and semi-closed explosions of homogeneous and composite charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiz, Lotfi; Trzciński, Waldemar A.; Paszula, Józef

    2017-01-01

    Confined and semi-closed explosions of new class of energetic composites as well as TNT and RDX charges were investigated using optical spectroscopy. These composites are considered as thermobarics when used in layered charges or enhanced blast explosives when pressed. Two methods to estimate fireball temperature histories of both homogeneous and metallized explosives from the spectroscopic data are also presented, compared and analyzed. Fireball temperature results of the charges detonated in a small explosion chamber under air and argon atmospheres, and detonated in a semi-closed bunker are presented and compared with theoretical ones calculated by a thermochemical code. Important conclusions about the fireball temperatures and the physical and chemical phenomena occurring after the detonation of homogeneous explosives and composite formulations are deduced.

  11. Self-Powered Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-27

    publications, 1 more in preparation, 1 archival conference paper, and 2 invention disclosures . 15. SUBJECT TERMS spectroscopy, nanoparticles, medical...name and address of the organization(s) financially responsible for and monitoring the work. 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S). Enter, if...analyzing  the  chemical  composition  of  many   materials :  the  interaction  of  optical  photons   with  the  underlying

  12. Optical and structural properties of plasma-treated Cordyceps bassiana spores as studied by circular dichroism, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Geon Joon; Sim, Geon Bo; Choi, Eun Ha; Kwon, Young-Wan; Kim, Jun Young; Jang, Siun; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2015-01-01

    To understand the killing mechanism of fungal spores by plasma treatment, the optical, structural, and biological properties of the insect pathogenic fungus Cordyceps bassiana spores were studied. A nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to treat the spores in aqueous solution. Optical emission spectra of the APPJ acquired in air indicated emission peaks corresponding to hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. When the APPJ entered the aqueous solution, additional reactive species were derived from the interaction of plasma radicals with the aqueous solution. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy confirmed the generation of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide in the plasma-activated water (PAW). Spore counting showed that plasma treatment significantly reduced spore viability. Absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the DNA extracted from plasma-treated spores showed a reduction in spore DNA content. The magnitude of the dip in the CD spectrum was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, indicating that plasma treatment causes structural modifications and/or damage to cellular components. Tryptophan fluorescence intensity was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, suggesting that plasma treatment modified cell wall proteins. Changes in spore viability and DNA content were attributed to structural modification of the cell wall by reactive species coming from the APPJ and the PAW. Our results provided evidence that the plasma radicals and the derived reactive species play critical roles in fungal spore inactivation.

  13. Optical and structural properties of plasma-treated Cordyceps bassiana spores as studied by circular dichroism, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Geon Joon, E-mail: gjlee@kw.ac.kr; Sim, Geon Bo; Choi, Eun Ha [Plasma Bioscience Research Center/Department of Electrical and Biological Physics, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Young-Wan [KU-KIST Graduate School of Converging Science and Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun Young; Jang, Siun; Kim, Seong Hwan, E-mail: piceae@naver.com [Department of Microbiology and Institute of Basic Sciences, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-14

    To understand the killing mechanism of fungal spores by plasma treatment, the optical, structural, and biological properties of the insect pathogenic fungus Cordyceps bassiana spores were studied. A nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to treat the spores in aqueous solution. Optical emission spectra of the APPJ acquired in air indicated emission peaks corresponding to hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. When the APPJ entered the aqueous solution, additional reactive species were derived from the interaction of plasma radicals with the aqueous solution. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy confirmed the generation of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide in the plasma-activated water (PAW). Spore counting showed that plasma treatment significantly reduced spore viability. Absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the DNA extracted from plasma-treated spores showed a reduction in spore DNA content. The magnitude of the dip in the CD spectrum was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, indicating that plasma treatment causes structural modifications and/or damage to cellular components. Tryptophan fluorescence intensity was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, suggesting that plasma treatment modified cell wall proteins. Changes in spore viability and DNA content were attributed to structural modification of the cell wall by reactive species coming from the APPJ and the PAW. Our results provided evidence that the plasma radicals and the derived reactive species play critical roles in fungal spore inactivation.

  14. Plasma-water systems studied with optical diagnostics including sum-frequency generation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tsuyohito

    2016-09-01

    Recently, various applications of plasma-water systems have been reported, such as materials synthesis, agricultural applications, and medical treatments. As one of basic studies of such systems, we are investigating water surface structure influenced by a plasma via vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy. Vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy is known to be an interfacially active diagnostic technique, as such process occurs in noncentrosymmetric medium. Visible and wavenumber-tunable infrared beams are simultaneously irradiated to the interface. The interfacial water has ice-like ( 3200 cm-1), liquid-like ( 3400 cm-1), and free OH (3700 cm-1) structures (assignment of the ice-like structure still remains contentious), and the intensity of the signal becomes stronger when the tunable infrared beam resonates with a vibration of the structures. The results indicate that with generating air dielectric barrier discharges for supplying reactive species to the water surface, all investigated signals originating from the above-mentioned three structures decrease. Furthermore, the signal strengths are recovered after terminating the plasma generation. We currently believe that the surface density of the reactive species should be high when they are found at the water surface. Details on the experimental results of the sum-frequency generation spectroscopy, as well as other spectroscopic results of plasma-water systems, will be presented at the conference.

  15. Band gap states in nanocrystalline WO3 thin films studied by soft x-ray spectroscopy and optical spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, M. B.; Kristiansen, P. T.; Duda, L.; Niklasson, G. A.; Österlund, L.

    2016-11-01

    Nanocrystalline tungsten trioxide (WO3) thin films prepared by DC magnetron sputtering have been studied using soft x-ray spectroscopy and optical spectrophotometry. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements reveal band gap states in sub-stoichiometric γ-WO3-x with x  =  0.001-0.005. The energy positions of these states are in good agreement with recently reported density functional calculations. The results were compared with optical absorption measurements in the near infrared spectral region. An optical absorption peak at 0.74 eV is assigned to intervalence transfer of polarons between W sites. A less prominent peak at energies between 0.96 and 1.16 eV is assigned to electron excitation of oxygen vacancies. The latter results are supported by RIXS measurements, where an energy loss in this energy range was observed, and this suggests that electron transfer processes involving transitions from oxygen vacancy states can be observed in RIXS. Our results have implications for the interpretation of optical properties of WO3, and the optical transitions close to the band gap, which are important in photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical applications.

  16. Band gap states in nanocrystalline WO3 thin films studied by soft x-ray spectroscopy and optical spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, M B; Kristiansen, P T; Duda, L; Niklasson, G A; Österlund, L

    2016-11-30

    Nanocrystalline tungsten trioxide (WO3) thin films prepared by DC magnetron sputtering have been studied using soft x-ray spectroscopy and optical spectrophotometry. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements reveal band gap states in sub-stoichiometric γ-WO3-x with x  =  0.001-0.005. The energy positions of these states are in good agreement with recently reported density functional calculations. The results were compared with optical absorption measurements in the near infrared spectral region. An optical absorption peak at 0.74 eV is assigned to intervalence transfer of polarons between W sites. A less prominent peak at energies between 0.96 and 1.16 eV is assigned to electron excitation of oxygen vacancies. The latter results are supported by RIXS measurements, where an energy loss in this energy range was observed, and this suggests that electron transfer processes involving transitions from oxygen vacancy states can be observed in RIXS. Our results have implications for the interpretation of optical properties of WO3, and the optical transitions close to the band gap, which are important in photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical applications.

  17. Normal-appearing white matter in optic neuritis and multiple sclerosis: a comparative proton spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tourbah, A. [Service de Neuroradiologie, Centre Hospitalier National d' Ophtalmologie, Paris (France); Faculte de Medecine Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Federation de Neurologie, Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris (France); Pathologie de la Myeline, Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris (France); Stievenart, J.L.; Abanou, A.; Iba-Zizen, M.T.; Cabanis, E.A. [Service de Neuroradiologie, Centre Hospitalier National d' Ophtalmologie, Paris (France); Faculte de Medecine Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Hamard, H. [Service d' Ophtalmologie II, Centre Hospitalier National d' Ophtalmologie, Paris (France); Lyon-Caen, O. [Faculte de Medecine Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Federation de Neurologie, Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris (France); Stievenart, L. [Service de Biophysique et Medecine Nucleaire, Hopital Beaujon, Clichy (France)

    1999-10-01

    We investigated neurochemical abnormalities in the normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) on MRI of patients with optic neuritis (ON) and compared them to those of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Patients with ON (42) were classified into three groups according to abnormalities on brain MRI. Patients with MS (55) were devided in two groups: relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) and secondary progressive MS (SPMS). All patients underwent MRI of the brain and localised proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of NAWM. The results were compared to those of 15 controls. Patients with MS had significant abnormalities compared with controls and with patients with ON. Patients with RRMS and those with ON had comparable MRS parameters, while patients with SPMS had significant spectroscopic abnormalities in comparison with controls, but also with patients with RRMS. These changes consisted of a decrease in N -acetylaspartate, a neuronal marker, which may reflect axonal dysfunction and/or loss. MRS abnormalities were detected in 14 patients with ON (27 %). The main abnormalities consisted of a decrease in N -acetylaspartate, an increase in choline-containing compounds at long echo times, and the presence of free lipid peaks at short echo times. MRS of the NAWM on MRI may prove useful for detecting neurochemical brain abnormalities in ON not visible on MRI. (orig.)

  18. Excitation spectroscopy in multispectral optical fluorescence tomography: methodology, feasibility and computer simulation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Ahn, Sangtae; Levenson, Richard; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Cherry, Simon R.; Leahy, Richard M.

    2009-08-01

    Molecular probes used for in vivo optical fluorescence tomography (OFT) studies in small animals are typically chosen such that their emission spectra lie in the 680-850 nm wavelength range. This is because tissue attenuation in this spectral band is relatively low, allowing optical photons even from deep sites in tissue to reach the animal surface and consequently be detected by a CCD camera. The wavelength dependence of tissue optical properties within the 680-850 nm band can be exploited for emitted light by measuring fluorescent data via multispectral approaches and incorporating the spectral dependence of these optical properties into the OFT inverse problem—that of reconstructing underlying 3D fluorescent probe distributions from optical data collected on the animal surface. However, in the aforementioned spectral band, due to only small variations in the tissue optical properties, multispectral emission data, though superior for image reconstruction compared to achromatic data, tend to be somewhat redundant. A different spectral approach for OFT is to capitalize on the larger variations in the optical properties of tissue for excitation photons than for the emission photons by using excitation at multiple wavelengths as a means of decoding source depth in tissue. The full potential of spectral approaches in OFT can be realized by a synergistic combination of these two approaches, that is, exciting the underlying fluorescent probe at multiple wavelengths and measuring emission data multispectrally. In this paper, we describe a method that incorporates both excitation and emission spectral information into the OFT inverse problem. We describe a linear algebraic formulation of the multiple wavelength illumination-multispectral detection forward model for OFT and compare it to models that use only excitation at multiple wavelengths or those that use only multispectral detection techniques. This study is carried out in a realistic inhomogeneous mouse atlas

  19. Applications of Optical Spectroscopy in Studies on Energy & Electron Transfer and Solvation Effects in Nanoscale and Molecular Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Megan H. J.

    This thesis describes three investigations, ranging in subject matters, all of which relating to systems capable of photoinduced reactions involving energy or electron transfer. The phenomenon and the effects of environment in the various systems are explored using different methodologies of optical spectroscopy. As the chapters progress, different investigations introduce and build on fundamental concepts encountered and in complexity of the methodologies used to explore the systems. The first chapter introduces the preparation of water-soluble CdSe nanocrystal clusters. The clusters, created using a protein, are 3-D close-packed self-assemblies of nanocrystals. Due to this close-packed nature, electronic interactions between the nanocrystals allow for energy migration within the cluster. The structural and optical properties of the clusters were described. Then using steady-state spectroscopy, properties of the original nanocrystals were compared to that of the cluster to determine the consequence of nanocrystal coupling interactions and their potential use toward the development of artificial light-harvesting systems. In the second chapter, CdSe nanocrystals are functionalized with a unique electro-active polymer, and the electron transfer between the nanocrystal and the electro-active polymer adsorbate is investigated. Using fluorescence decay measurements, the electron transfer reaction inherent to the system with respect to a comprehensive range of dielectric solvents was explored. The study illustrates the high complexity of seemingly typical nanocrystal-based systems and provides general awareness of what factors need to be considered when dealing with such systems. The final chapter starts with an informal review of ultrafast nonlinear spectroscopy, focusing on two methods, three-pulse photon echo peak shift (3PEPS) and two-dimensional photon echo (2DPE) electronic spectroscopy, and how they are related. A straightforward approach for extracting 3PEPS data

  20. Optical Spectroscopy Study of Transparent Non-Carious Human Dentin and Dentin-Enamel Junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, G.W.; Marshall, S.J.; Gallagher, R.R.; Demos, S.

    1999-12-14

    Improving our knowledge of the morphology, composition and properties of the dentin, enamel, and the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) is vital for the development of improved restorative materials and clinical placement techniques. Most studies of dental tissues have used light microscopy for characterization. In our investigation, the spectroscopic properties of normal and non-carious transparent human root dentin, and the dentin-enamel junction were investigated using emission imaging microscopy, and micro-spectroscopy. Experimental results reveal new information on the structural and biochemical characteristics of these dental tissues.

  1. Physician attitudes toward dissemination of optical spectroscopy devices for cervical cancer control: An Industrial-Academic collaborative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Eileen; Qazi, Usman; Gera, Shalini; Brodovsky, Joan; Simpson, Jessica; Follen, Michele; Basen-Engquist, Karen; MacAulay, Calum

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Optical Spectroscopy has been studied for biologic plausisbility, technical efficacy, clinical effectiveness, patient satisfaction and cost-effectiveness. We sought to identify healthcare provider attitudes or practices that might act as barriers or to the dissemination of this new technology. Methods Through an academic-industrial partnership, we conducted a series of focus groups to examine physician barriers to optical diagnosis. The study was conducted in two stages. First, a pilot group of ten physicians (8 obstetrician gynecologists and two family practitioners) was randomly selected from 8 regions of the US and interviewed individually. They were presented with the results of a large trial (N=980) testing the accuracy of a spectroscopy based device in the detection of cervical neoplasia. They were also shown a prototype of the device and were given a period of time to ask questions and receive answers regarding the device. They were also asked to provide feedback of a questionnaire (provided in Appendix A) which was then revised and presented to three larger focus groups (n=13, 15, 17 for a total n=45). The larger focus groups were conducted during national scientific meetings with 20 obstetrician gynecologists and 25 primary care physicians (family practitioners and internists). Results When asked about the dissemination potential of the new cervical screening technology, all study groups tended to rely on established clinical guidelines from their respective professional societies with regard to the screening and diagnosis of cervical cancer. In addition, study participants consistently agreed that real-time spectroscopy would be viewed positively by their patients. Participants were positive about the new technology's potential as an adjunct to colposcopy and agreed that the improved accuracy would result in reduced healthcare costs (due to decreased biopsies and decreased visits). However, while all saw the potential of real-time diagnosis

  2. Study the efficacy of neuroprotective drugs on brain physiological properties during focal head injury using optical spectroscopy data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abookasis, David; Shochat, Ariel

    2016-03-01

    We present a comparative evaluation of five different neuroprotective drugs in the early phase following focal traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mouse intact head. The effectiveness of these drugs in terms of changes in brain tissue morphology and hemodynamic properties was experimentally evaluated through analysis of the optical absorption coefficient and spectral reduced scattering parameters in the range of 650-1000 nm. Anesthetized male mice (n=50 and n=10 control) were subjected to weight drop model mimics real life focal head trauma. Monitoring the effect of injury and neuroprotective drugs was obtained by using a diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system utilizing independent source-detector separation and location. Result indicates that administration of minocycline improve hemodynamic and reduced the level of tissue injury at an early phase post-injury while hypertonic saline treatment decrease brain water content. These findings highlight the heterogeneity between neuroprotective drugs and the ongoing controversy among researchers regarding which drug therapy is preferred for treatment of TBI. On the other hand, our results show the capability of optical spectroscopy technique to noninvasively study brain function following injury and drug therapy.

  3. Application of electrochemical optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy for studying the effect of different stress factors on lactic acid bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adanyi, Nora [Central Food Research Institute, H-1537 Budapest, P.O. Box 393 (Hungary)]. E-mail: n.adanyi@cfri.hu; Nemeth, Edina [Central Food Research Institute, H-1537 Budapest, P.O. Box 393 (Hungary); Halasz, Anna [Central Food Research Institute, H-1537 Budapest, P.O. Box 393 (Hungary); Szendro, Istvan [MicroVacuum Ltd., H-1147 Budapest, Kerekgyarto u. 10 (Hungary); Varadi, Maria [Central Food Research Institute, H-1537 Budapest, P.O. Box 393 (Hungary)

    2006-07-28

    Electrochemical optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (EC-OWLS) has been developed to combine evanescent-field optical sensing with electrochemical control of surface adsorption processes. For bioanalytical sensing, a layer of indium tin oxide (ITO) served as both a high-refractive index waveguide and a conductive electrode. In addition, an electrochemical flow-through fluid cuvette was applied, which incorporated working, reference, and counter electrodes, and was compatible with the constraints of optical sensing. The subject of our study was to monitor how the different stress factors (lactic acid, acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide) influence the survival of lactic acid bacteria. The advantage of EC-OWLS technique is that we could carry out kinetic studies on the behaviour of bacteria under stress conditions, and after exposure of lactobacilli to acid and oxidative stress we get faster results about the status of bacteria compared to the traditional quantitative methods. After optimization of the polarization potential used, calibration curve was determined and the sensor response of different rate of living and damaged cells was studied. The bacterial cells were adsorbed in native form on the surface of the sensor by ensuring polarizing potential (1 V) and were exposed to different concentration of acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide solution to 1 h, respectively and the behaviour of bacteria was monitored. Results were compared to traditional micro-assay method.

  4. Cellular biosensing using optical spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, Adam

    2016-03-01

    The interaction of light with biological cells can provide a unique tool for studying their biophysical properties. Optical spectroscopy of biological cells can reveal detailed information on their structure and dynamics in a way that is not possible with traditional microscopy techniques. Histological evaluation can only obtain a snapshot of the activity of individual cells, relying instead on large ensembles to develop a picture of their temporal evolution. On the other hand optical spectroscopy can be applied to cells with little to no preparation and can enable studies of the same live cells at extended time intervals. Our research group has developed a suite of optical spectroscopic tools to assess the structure and function of biological cells and modulation due to the onset of disease. The wavelength dependence of the interaction of cells with light provides information of cell features through elastic scattering across the visible and near infrared spectrum. Alternatively, the angular dependence of scattered light can also be used to reveal cell properties. We will discuss how both modes of elastic scattering can be used to evaluate cell status. Finally, the recent advances in the use of optical phase imaging to create contrast in nearly transparent biological cells will also be discussed as related to the role of this modality in biosensing.

  5. Studying the distribution of deep Raman spectroscopy signals using liquid tissue phantoms with varying optical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardaki, Martha Z; Gardner, Benjamin; Stone, Nicholas; Matousek, Pavel

    2015-08-01

    In this study we employed large volume liquid tissue phantoms, consisting of a scattering agent (Intralipid), an absorption agent (Indian ink) and a synthesized calcification powder (calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP)) similar to that found in cancerous tissues (e.g. breast and prostate), to simulate human tissues. We studied experimentally the magnitude and origin of Raman signals in a transmission Raman geometry as a function of optical properties of the medium and the location of calcifications within the phantom. The goal was to inform the development of future noninvasive cancer screening applications in vivo. The results provide insight into light propagation and Raman scattering distribution in deep Raman measurements, exploring also the effect of the variation of relative absorbance of laser and Raman photons within the phantoms. Most notably when modeling breast and prostate tissues it follows that maximum signals is obtained from the front and back faces of the tissue with the central region contributing less to the measured spectrum.

  6. Spectral studies of ocean water with space-borne sensor SCIAMACHY using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vountas

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Methods enabling the retrieval of oceanic parameter from the space borne instrumentation Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric ChartographY (SCIAMACHY using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS are presented. SCIAMACHY onboard ENVISAT measures back scattered solar radiation at a spectral resolution (0.2 to 1.5 nm. The DOAS method was used for the first time to fit modelled Vibrational Raman Scattering (VRS in liquid water and in situ measured phytoplankton absorption reference spectra to optical depths measured by SCIAMACHY. Spectral structures of VRS and phytoplankton absorption were clearly found in these optical depths. Both fitting approaches lead to consistent results. DOAS fits correlate with estimates of chlorophyll concentrations: low fit factors for VRS retrievals correspond to large chlorophyll concentrations and vice versa; large fit factors for phytoplankton absorption correspond with high chlorophyll concentrations and vice versa. From these results a simple retrieval technique taking advantage of both measurements is shown. First maps of global chlorophyll concentrations were compared to the corresponding MODIS measurements with very promising results. In addition, results from this study will be used to improve atmospheric trace gas DOAS-retrievals from visible wavelengths by including these oceanographic signatures.

  7. A study of internal oxidation in carburized steels by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    An, X; Rainforth, W M; Chen, L

    2003-01-01

    The internal oxidation of Cr-Mn carburizing steel was studied. Internal oxidation was induced using a commercial carburizing process. Sputter erosion coupled with glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) was used to determine the depth profile elemental distribution within the internal oxidation layer (<10 mu m). In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) studies were carried out on selected sputter eroded surfaces. Oxide type was identified primarily by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The carburized surface was found to consist of a continuous oxide layer, followed by a complex internal oxidation layer, where Cr and Mn oxides were found to populate grain boundaries in a globular form in the near surface region. At greater depths (5-10 mu m), Si oxides formed as a grain boundary network. The internal oxides (mainly complex oxides) grew quickly during the initial stages of the carburizing process (2 h, 800 deg. C+3 h, 930 deg. C). G...

  8. Optical Emission Spectroscopy Study of Competing Phases of Electrons in the Second Landau Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, A L; Wurstbauer, U; Kuznetsova, Y Y; Pinczuk, A; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W; Manfra, M J; Gardner, G C; Watson, J D

    2016-01-01

    Quantum phases of electrons in the filling factor range 2≤ν≤3 are probed by the weak optical emission from the partially populated second Landau level and spin wave measurements. Observations of optical emission include a multiplet of sharp peaks that exhibit a strong filling factor dependence. Spin wave measurements by resonant inelastic light scattering probe breaking of spin rotational invariance and are used to link this optical emission with collective phases of electrons. A remarkably rapid interplay between emission peak intensities manifests phase competition in the second Landau level.

  9. Structural relaxation in the hydrogen-bonding liquids N-methylacetamide and water studied by optical Kerr-effect spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Turton, David A; 10.1063/1.2897432

    2009-01-01

    Structural relaxation in the peptide model N-methylacetamide (NMA) is studied experimentally by ultrafast optical Kerr-effect spectroscopy over the normal-liquid temperature range and compared to the relaxation measured in water at room temperature. It is seen that in both hydrogen-bonding liquids, beta relaxation is present and in each case it is found that this can be described by the Cole-Cole function. For NMA in this temperature range, the alpha and beta relaxations are each found to have an Arrhenius temperature dependence with indistinguishable activation energies. It is known that the variations on the Debye function, including the Cole-Cole function, are unphysical, and we introduce two general modifications: one allows for the initial rise of the function, determined by the librational frequencies, and the second allows the function to be terminated in the alpha relaxation.

  10. Structural relaxation in the hydrogen-bonding liquids N-methylacetamide and water studied by optical Kerr effect spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, David A; Wynne, Klaas

    2008-04-21

    Structural relaxation in the peptide model N-methylacetamide (NMA) is studied experimentally by ultrafast optical Kerr effect spectroscopy over the normal-liquid temperature range and compared to the relaxation measured in water at room temperature. It is seen that in both hydrogen-bonding liquids, beta relaxation is present, and in each case, it is found that this can be described by the Cole-Cole function. For NMA in this temperature range, the alpha and beta relaxations are each found to have an Arrhenius temperature dependence with indistinguishable activation energies. It is known that the variations on the Debye function, including the Cole-Cole function, are unphysical, and we introduce two general modifications: One allows for the initial rise of the function, determined by the librational frequencies, and the second allows the function to be terminated in the alpha relaxation.

  11. Plasma spectroscopy using optical vortex laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Toda, Yasunori; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Shikano, Yutaka

    2014-10-01

    Laser spectroscopy is a useful tool for nonintrusive plasma diagnostics; it can provide many important quantities in a plasma such as temperature, density, and flow velocity of ions and neutrals from the spectrum obtained by scanning the frequency of narrow bandwidth laser. Obtainable information is, however, limited in principle to the direction parallel to the laser path. The aim of this study is to introduce a Laguerre-Gaussian beam, which is called as optical vortex, in place of a widely used Hermite-Gaussian beam. One of the remarkable properties of the Laguerre-Gaussian beam is that it carries an angular momentum in contrast to the Hermite-Gaussian beam. It follows that particles in the laser beam feel the Doppler effect even in the transverse direction of the laser path. Therefore it is expected that the limitation imposed by the laser path can be overcome by using an optical vortex laser. The concept of optical vortex spectroscopy, the development of the laser system, and some preliminary results of a proof-of-principle experiment will be presented. This work is performed with the support and under the auspices of NINS young scientists collaboration program for cross-disciplinary study, NIFS collaboration research program (NIFS13KOAP026), and JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25287152.

  12. Role of trimer-trimer interaction of bacteriorhodopsin studied by optical spectroscopy and high-speed atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hayato; Inoue, Keiichi; Shibata, Mikihiro; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Sasaki, Jun; Kandori, Hideki; Ando, Toshio

    2013-10-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) trimers form a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice in the purple membrane of Halobacterium salinarum. However, the physiological significance of forming the lattice has long been elusive. Here, we study this issue by comparing properties of assembled and non-assembled bR trimers using directed mutagenesis, high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM), optical spectroscopy, and a proton pumping assay. First, we show that the bonds formed between W12 and F135 amino acid residues are responsible for trimer-trimer association that leads to lattice assembly; the lattice is completely disrupted in both W12I and F135I mutants. HS-AFM imaging reveals that both crystallized D96N and non-crystallized D96N/W12I mutants undergo a large conformational change (i.e., outward E-F loop displacement) upon light-activation. However, lattice disruption significantly reduces the rate of conformational change under continuous light illumination. Nevertheless, the quantum yield of M-state formation, measured by low-temperature UV-visible spectroscopy, and proton pumping efficiency are unaffected by lattice disruption. From these results, we conclude that trimer-trimer association plays essential roles in providing bound retinal with an appropriate environment to maintain its full photo-reactivity and in maintaining the natural photo-reaction pathway.

  13. Spectroscopy and optical diagnostics for gases

    CERN Document Server

    Hanson, Ronald K; Goldenstein, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    This text provides an introduction to the science that governs the interaction of light and matter (in the gas phase). It provides readers with the basic knowledge to exploit the light-matter interaction to develop quantitative tools for gas analysis (i.e. optical diagnostics) and understand and interpret the results of spectroscopic measurements. The authors pair the basics of gas‐phase spectroscopy with coverage of key optical diagnostic techniques utilized by practicing engineers and scientists to measure fundamental flow‐field properties. The text is organized to cover three sub‐topics of gas‐phase spectroscopy: (1) spectral line positions, (2) spectral line strengths, and (3) spectral lineshapes by way of absorption, emission, and scattering interactions. The latter part of the book describes optical measurement techniques and equipment. Key subspecialties include laser induced fluorescence, tunable laser absorption spectroscopy, and wavelength modulation spectroscopy. It is ideal for students an...

  14. Optically stimulated differential impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxey, Lonnie C; Parks, II, James E; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A; Partridge, Jr., William P

    2014-02-18

    Methods and apparatuses for evaluating a material are described. Embodiments typically involve use of an impedance measurement sensor to measure the impedance of a sample of the material under at least two different states of illumination. The states of illumination may include (a) substantially no optical stimulation, (b) substantial optical stimulation, (c) optical stimulation at a first wavelength of light, (d) optical stimulation at a second wavelength of light, (e) a first level of light intensity, and (f) a second level of light intensity. Typically a difference in impedance between the impedance of the sample at the two states of illumination is measured to determine a characteristic of the material.

  15. Two-Photon Polarization Dependent Spectroscopy in Chirality: A Novel Experimental-Theoretical Approach to Study Optically Active Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencio E. Hernández

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Many phenomena, including life itself and its biochemical foundations are fundamentally rooted in chirality. Combinatorial methodologies for catalyst discovery and optimization remain an invaluable tool for gaining access to enantiomerically pure compounds in the development of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and flavors. Some exotic metamaterials exhibiting negative refractive index at optical frequencies are based on chiral structures. Chiroptical activity is commonly quantified in terms of circular dichroism (CD and optical rotatory dispersion (ORD. However, the linear nature of these effects limits their application in the far and near-UV region in highly absorbing and scattering biological systems. In order to surmount this barrier, in recent years we made important advancements on a novel non linear, low-scatter, long-wavelength CD approach called two-photon absorption circular dichroism (TPACD. Herein we present a descriptive analysis of the optics principles behind the experimental measurement of TPACD, i.e., the double L-scan technique, and its significance using pulsed lasers. We also make an instructive examination and discuss the reliability of our theoretical-computational approach, which uses modern analytical response theory, within a Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT approach. In order to illustrate the potential of this novel spectroscopic tool, we first present the experimental and theoretical results obtained in C2-symmetric, axially chiral R-(+-1,1'-bi(2-naphthol, R-BINOL, a molecule studied at the beginning of our investigation in this field. Next, we reveal some preliminary results obtained for (R-3,3′-diphenyl-2,2′-bi-1-naphthol, R-VANOL, and (R-2,2′-diphenyl-3,3′-(4-biphenanthrol, R-VAPOL. This family of optically active compounds has been proven to be a suitable model for the structure-property relationship study of TPACD, because its members are highly conjugated yet photo-stable, and easily

  16. Two-photon polarization dependent spectroscopy in chirality: a novel experimental-theoretical approach to study optically active systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Florencio E; Rizzo, Antonio

    2011-04-18

    Many phenomena, including life itself and its biochemical foundations are fundamentally rooted in chirality. Combinatorial methodologies for catalyst discovery and optimization remain an invaluable tool for gaining access to enantiomerically pure compounds in the development of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and flavors. Some exotic metamaterials exhibiting negative refractive index at optical frequencies are based on chiral structures. Chiroptical activity is commonly quantified in terms of circular dichroism (CD) and optical rotatory dispersion (ORD). However, the linear nature of these effects limits their application in the far and near-UV region in highly absorbing and scattering biological systems. In order to surmount this barrier, in recent years we made important advancements on a novel non linear, low-scatter, long-wavelength CD approach called two-photon absorption circular dichroism (TPACD). Herein we present a descriptive analysis of the optics principles behind the experimental measurement of TPACD, i.e., the double L-scan technique, and its significance using pulsed lasers. We also make an instructive examination and discuss the reliability of our theoretical-computational approach, which uses modern analytical response theory, within a Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) approach. In order to illustrate the potential of this novel spectroscopic tool, we first present the experimental and theoretical results obtained in C(2)-symmetric, axially chiral R-(+)-1,1'-bi(2-naphthol), R-BINOL, a molecule studied at the beginning of our investigation in this field. Next, we reveal some preliminary results obtained for (R)-3,3'-diphenyl-2,2'-bi-1-naphthol, R-VANOL, and (R)-2,2'-diphenyl-3,3'-(4-biphenanthrol), R-VAPOL. This family of optically active compounds has been proven to be a suitable model for the structure-property relationship study of TPACD, because its members are highly conjugated yet photo-stable, and easily derivatized at the 5

  17. Spectroscopy of Optical Excitations in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingzhong

    2006-03-01

    Understanding the optical spectra and electronic excited state dynamics of carbon naotubes is important both for fundamental research and a wide variety of potential applications. In this presentation, we will report the results of a systematic study on semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) obtained by utilizing complementary femtosecond spectroscopic techniques, including fluorescence up-conversion, frequency-resolved transient absorption, and three-pulse photon echo peakshift (3PEPS) spectroscopy. Our efforts have focused on optically selective detection of the spectra and dynamics associated with structurally distinct semiconducting SWNT species. Using individual nanotube enriched micelle-dispersed SWNT preparations, in combination with resonant excitation and detection, has enabled us to independently access selected species, such as the (8,3), (6,5), (7,5), (11,0), (7,6) and (9,5) nanotubes. We will discuss the following topics: (1) the excitonic nature of the elementary excitation and its unambiguous identification from direct determination of the exciton binding energy for a selected semiconducting nanotube, the (8,3) tube; (2) the spectroscopic and dynamical signatures of exciton-exciton annihilation and its predominant role in governing ultrafast excited state relaxation; (3) the annihilation-concomitant exciton dissociation and the spectroscopic and dynamic features of the resulting electron-hole continuum; (4) timescales characterizing the ultrafast thermalization processes. In addition, we will demonstrate the power of 3PEPS spectroscopy to elucidate the spectral properties and dynamics of SWNTs. This work was supported by the NSF.

  18. Synthesis and Study of Optical Properties of Graphene/TiO2 Composites Using UV-VIS Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, P. B.; Waghuley, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    Graphene and TiO2 were synthesized using electrochemical exfoliation and co-precipitation methods, respectively. An ex situ approach was adopted for the graphene/TiO2 composites. The conformation of graphene in the TiO2 samples was examined through X-ray diffraction. Optical properties of the as-synthesised composites such as optical absorption, extinction coefficient, refractive index, real dielectric constant, imaginary dielectric constant, dissipation factor, and optical conductivity were measured using UV-Vis spectroscopy. The varying concentration of graphene in TiO2 affects the optical properties which appear different for 10 wt.% as compared to 5 wt.% graphene/ TiO2 composite. The composites exhibit an absorption peak at 300 nm with a decrease in band gap for 10 wt.% as compared to 5 wt.% graphene/TiO2 composite. The maximum optical conductivity for the graphene/TiO2 composite of 10 wt.% was found to be 1.86·10-2 Ω-1·m-1 at 300 nm.

  19. Review of optical breast imaging and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosenick, Dirk; Rinneberg, Herbert; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Taroni, Paola

    2016-09-01

    Diffuse optical imaging and spectroscopy of the female breast is an area of active research. We review the present status of this field and discuss the broad range of methodologies and applications. Starting with a brief overview on breast physiology, the remodeling of vasculature and extracellular matrix caused by solid tumors is highlighted that is relevant for contrast in optical imaging. Then, the various instrumental techniques and the related methods of data analysis and image generation are described and compared including multimodality instrumentation, fluorescence mammography, broadband spectroscopy, and diffuse correlation spectroscopy. We review the clinical results on functional properties of malignant and benign breast lesions compared to host tissue and discuss the various methods to improve contrast between healthy and diseased tissue, such as enhanced spectroscopic information, dynamic variations of functional properties, pharmacokinetics of extrinsic contrast agents, including the enhanced permeability and retention effect. We discuss research on monitoring neoadjuvant chemotherapy and on breast cancer risk assessment as potential clinical applications of optical breast imaging and spectroscopy. Moreover, we consider new experimental approaches, such as photoacoustic imaging and long-wavelength tissue spectroscopy.

  20. Laser-assisted decay and optical spectroscopy studies of neutron-deficient thallium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Van Beveren, Céline; Huyse, Mark

    The neutron-deficient thallium isotopes with one proton less than the Z = 82 shell closure, are situated in an interesting region of the nuclear chart, notorious for intruder states and shape coexistence. Shape coexistence is the remarkable phenomenon in which two or more distinct types of deformation occur at low energy in the same atomic nucleus. Shape coexistence has been studied intensively, experimentally as well as theoretically in different nuclei in the light-lead region and the isomerism in the thallium isotopes was among the first indications of this phenomenon. Different shapes, whose structure has been linked to specific proton orbitals above and below the Z = 82 shell closure, are present at low energy in the neutron-deficient odd-mass thallium nuclei. In the odd-odd nuclei, the coupling of an unpaired proton and unpaired neutron gives rise to multiplets of low-lying states from which some can be isomeric. Since thallium has one proton missing in the major proton shell, and when approaching neutr...

  1. Metal-insulator transition in Si(111)-(4 x 1)/(8 x 2)-In studied by optical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speiser, E.; Hinrichs, K.; Cobet, C.; Esser, N. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften - ISAS - e.V., Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Chandola, S. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften - ISAS - e.V., Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany); School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin 2 (Ireland); Gensch, M. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (Germany); Wippermann, S.; Schmidt, W.G. [Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Paderborn (Germany); Bechstedt, F. [Institut fuer Festkoerpertheorie und -Optik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, Jena (Germany); Richter, W. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Fleischer, K.; McGilp, J.F. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-08-15

    Measurements of the surface vibrational modes and optical response of Si(111)-(4 x 1)/(8 x 2)-In are compiled and a comparison to ab initio calculations performed within DFT-LDA formalism is given. Surface resonant Raman spectroscopy allows identifying a number of surface phonons with high spectral precision. The phase transition of the (4 x 1)-(8 x 2) surface structure is found to be accompanied by characteristic changes of the surface phonons, which are discussed with respect to various structural models suggested. The optical anisotropy of the (8 x 2) phase shows that the anisotropic Drude tail of the (4 x 1) phase is replaced by two peaks at 0.50 and 0.72 eV. The spectroscopic signatures of the (4 x 1) and (8 x 2) phases agree with a metal-insulator transition. The mid-IR-anisotropic optical response of the insulating (8 x 2) phase is interpreted in terms of electronic single particle excitations between surface electronic bands related to the In-nanowire surface. Comparison of the measured optical transitions with DFT ab initio calculations for the hexagon model and the trimer model of the (8 x 2) structure shows evidence for the existence of the hexagon structure. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. Nonlinear Optical Spectroscopy of Excited States in Polyfluorene

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, M; Vardeny, Z V

    2006-01-01

    We used a variety of nonlinear optical (NLO) spectroscopies to study the singlet excited states order, and primary photoexcitations in polyfluorene; an important blue emitting p-conjugated polymer. The polarized NLO spectroscopies include ultrafast pump-probe photomodulation, two-photon absorption, and electroabsorption. For completeness we also measured the linear absorption and photoluminescence spectra. We found that the primary photoexcitations in polyfluorene are singlet excitons.

  3. Study of laser-induced removal of co-deposits from tokamak plasma-facing components using ion diagnostics and optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolowski, J.; Gasior, P.; Hoffman, J.; Kubkowska, M.; Rosinski, M.; Szymanski, Z.

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents studies of the application of ion diagnostics and optical spectroscopy for on-line measurement of the amount and characteristics of co-deposits from the laser-ablated surface of the plasma-facing components (e.g. graphite tiles). For removal of the co-deposit layer a repetitive Nd:YAG laser was used. Determination of the characteristics of ions emitted from the laser-illuminated targets was performed using ion collectors (on the basis of a time-of-flight method) and an optical spectrometer. The main ion stream parameters and spectral lines of deuterium and carbon or tungsten ions were measured depending on laser pulse parameters. The research proved that optical spectroscopy could be a convenient method for on-line observation of the co-deposited layer removal by means of laser ablation. In combination with the investigation of collected co-deposit dust, the performed study made it possible to state that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy can be useful as a diagnostic method for the ablative co-deposited layer removal and the wall conditioning. The properties of modified surfaces of samples and collected dust (evaporated co-deposit) were determined using different measuring methods.

  4. Multivariate optical computation for predictive spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M P; Aust, J F; Dobrowolski, J A; Verly, P G; Myrick, M L

    1998-01-01

    A novel optical approach to predicting chemical and physical properties based on principal component analysis (PCA) is proposed and evaluated using a data set from earlier work. In our approach, a regression vector produced by PCA is designed into the structure of a set of paired optical filters. Light passing through the paired filters produces an analog detector signal that is directly proportional to the chemical/physical property for which the regression vector was designed. This simple optical computational method for predictive spectroscopy is evaluated in several ways, using the example data for numeric simulation. First, we evaluate the sensitivity of the method to various types of spectroscopic errors commonly encountered and find the method to have the same susceptibilities toward error as standard methods. Second, we use propagation of errors to determine the effects of detector noise on the predictive power of the method, finding the optical computation approach to have a large multiplex advantage over conventional methods. Third, we use two different design approaches to the construction of the paired filter set for the example measurement to evaluate manufacturability, finding that adequate methods exist to design appropriate optical devices. Fourth, we numerically simulate the predictive errors introduced by design errors in the paired filters, finding that predictive errors are not increased over conventional methods. Fifth, we consider how the performance of the method is affected by light intensities that are not linearly related to chemical composition (as in transmission spectroscopy) and find that the method is only marginally affected. In summary, we conclude that many types of predictive measurements based on use of regression (or other) vectors and linear mathematics can be performed more rapidly, more effectly, and at considerably lower cost by the proposed optical computation method than by traditional dispersive or interferometric

  5. Optical Spectroscopy of Nano Materials and Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenhao

    In this thesis, nanostructures and nanomaterials ranging from 3D to OD will be studied compresively, by using optical methods. Firstly, for 3D and 2D nanomaterials, nanoporous zeolite crystals, such as AFI and AEL are introduced as host materials to accommodate diatomic iodine molecules. Polarized Raman spectroscopy is utilized to identify the two configurations of iodine molecules to stay in the channels of AEL: the lying mode (the bond of the two atoms is parallel to the direction of the channels) and the standing mode (the bond is perpendicular to the direction of the channels). The lying mode and standing mode are switchable and can be well controlled by the amount of water molecules inside the crystal, revealed by both molecule dynamics simulation and experiment observation. With more water molecules inside, iodine molecules choose to stay in the standing mode, while with less water molecules, iodine molecules prefer to lie along the channel. Therefore, the configurations of molecules could be precisely controlled, globally by the surrounding pressure and temperature, and locally by the laser light. Ii is believed that this easy and reversible control of single molecule will be valuable in nanostructured devices, such as molecular sieving or molecular detection. Secondly, for 1D case, the PL spectrum of ZnO nanowire under uniaxial strain is studied. When a ZnO nanowire is bent, besides the lattice constant induced bandgap change on the tensile and compressive sides, there is a piezoelectric field generated along the cross section. This piezoelectric potential, together with the bandgap changes induced by the deformation, will redistribute the electrons excited by incident photons from valence band to conduction band. As a result, the electrons occupying the states at the tensile side will largely outnumbered the ones at the compressive side. Therefore, the PL spectrum we collected at the whole cross section will manifest a redshift, other than the peak

  6. Azimuthal Doppler Effect in Optical Vortex Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Yoshimura, Shinji; Toda, Yasunori; Morisaki, Tomohiro; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Masayoshi

    2015-11-01

    Optical vortices (OV) are a set of solutions of the paraxial Helmholtz equation in the cylindrical coordinates, and its wave front has a spiral shape. Since the Doppler shift is caused by the phase change by the movement in a wave field, the observer in the OV, which has the three-dimensional structured wave front, feels a three-dimensional Doppler effect. Since the multi-dimensional Doppler components are mixed into a single Doppler spectrum, development of a decomposition method is required. We performed a modified saturated absorption spectroscopy to separate the components. The OV and plane wave are used as a probe beam and pump beam, respectively. Although the plane-wave pump laser cancels the z-direction Doppler shift, the azimuthal Doppler shift remains in the saturated dip. The spatial variation of the dip width gives the information of the azimuthal Doppler shift. The some results of optical vortex spectroscopy will be presented.

  7. Force spectroscopy in studying infection

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Zhaokun

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical force spectroscopy tools - for example optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy, - have been used to study elastic, mechanical, conformational and dynamic properties of single biological specimens from single proteins to whole cells to reveal information not accessible by ensemble average methods such as X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and so on. Here we review the application of these tools on a range of infection-related questions from antibody-inhibited protein processivity to virus-cell adhesion. In each case we focus on how the instrumental design tailored to the biological system in question translates into the functionality suitable for that particular study. The unique insights that force spectroscopy has gained to complement knowledge learned through population averaging techniques in interrogating biomolecular details prove to be instrumental in therapeutic innovations such as those in structure-based drug design.

  8. Ultrafast chiroptical spectroscopy: Monitoring optical activity in quick time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanju Rhee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical activity spectroscopy provides rich structural information of biologically important molecules in condensed phases. However, a few intrinsic problems of conventional method based on electric field intensity measurement scheme prohibited its extension to time domain technique. We have recently developed new types of optical activity spectroscopic methods capable of measuring chiroptical signals with femtosecond pulses. It is believed that these novel approaches will be applied to a variety of ultrafast chiroptical studies.

  9. Collimating slicer for optical integral field spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Florence; Hénault, François

    2016-07-01

    Integral Field Spectroscopy (IFS) is a technique that gives simultaneously the spectrum of each spatial sampling element of a given field. It is a powerful tool which rearranges the data cube represented by two spatial dimensions defining the field and the spectral decomposition (x, y, λ) in a detector plane. In IFS, the "spatial" unit reorganizes the field, the "spectral" unit is being composed of a classical spectrograph. For the spatial unit, three main techniques - microlens array, microlens array associated with fibres and image slicer - are used in astronomical instrumentations. The development of a Collimating Slicer is to propose a new type of optical integral field spectroscopy which should be more compact. The main idea is to combine the image slicer with the collimator of the spectrograph mixing the "spatial" and "spectral" units. The traditional combination of slicer, pupil and slit elements and spectrograph collimator is replaced by a new one composed of a slicer and spectrograph collimator only. After testing few configurations, this new system looks very promising for low resolution spectrographs. In this paper, the state of art of integral field spectroscopy using image slicers will be described. The new system based onto the development of a Collimating Slicer for optical integral field spectroscopy will be depicted. First system analysis results and future improvements will be discussed.

  10. Near- and far field spectroscopy of semi-continuous gold films with optically induced anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydendahl, Christian; Repän, Taavi; Geisler, Mathias

    Using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), optical spectroscopy, and finite element method simulations, we investigate the distributions of plasmonic modes present in fractal semi-continuous gold films, as well as studying anisotropy introduced into these films from photothermal melting...

  11. Real-time study of the effect of different stress factors on lactic acid bacteria by electrochemical optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Edina; Adányi, Nóra; Halász, Anna; Váradi, Mária; Szendro, István

    2007-12-01

    Lactic acid bacteria play an important role in the fermentation of different food products. During the fermentation processes, lactobacilli are confronted with many inhibitor factors. These factors by themselves or in combination can influence the growth of lactic acid bacteria and their acidification capacity. The subject of our study was to monitor with a newly developed biosensing technique how the different chemical stress factors influence the survival of lactic acid bacteria. Electrochemical optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy combines evanescent-field optical sensing with electrochemical control of surface adsorption processes. For optical sensing, a layer of indium tin oxide served as a high refractive index waveguide and as a conductive electrode, as well. Lactobacillus plantarum 2142 suspended in Jerusalem artichoke syrup was used in the experiments. Electrochemical optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy measurements were undertaken by using OW 2,400c indium tin oxide coated waveguide sensors (MicroVacuum, Budapest, Hungary) and were performed in a flow-injection analyzer system. The bacterial cells were adsorbed in native form without any chemical binding on the surface of the sensor by ensuring polarizing potential (1V) and were exposed to different concentration of acetic acid/Jerusalem artichoke syrup, lactic acid/Jerusalem artichoke syrup and hydrogen peroxide/Jerusalem artichoke syrup solution for 1h, respectively, and the effect on bacteria cells was monitored. Results were compared to the traditional micro-assay method, and it can be assumed that after further investigations this new technique could be used in real-time application.

  12. Adaptive Optics for Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Leroux, Charles Edouard; Derouard, Jacques; Delon, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) yields measurement parameters (number of molecules, diffusion time) that characterize the concentration and kinetics of fluorescent molecules within a supposedly known observation volume. Absolute derivation of concentrations and diffusion constants therefore requires preliminary calibrations of the confocal Point Spread Function with phantom solutions under perfectly controlled environmental conditions. In this paper, we quantify the influence of optical aberrations on single photon FCS and demonstrate a simple Adaptive Optics system for aberration correction. Optical aberrations are gradually introduced by focussing the excitation laser beam at increasing depths in fluorescent solutions with various refractive indices, which leads to drastic depth-dependent bias in the estimated FCS parameters. Aberration correction with a Deformable Mirror stabilizes these parameters within a range of several tens of \\mum into the solution. We also demonstrate, both theoretically...

  13. PREFACE: XVIII International Youth Scientific School "Coherent Optics and Optical Spectroscopy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salakhov, M. Kh; Samartsev, V. V.; Gainutdinov, R. Kh

    2015-05-01

    Kazan Federal University has held the annual International Youth School "Coherent Optics and Optical Spectroscopy" since 1997. The choice of the topic is not accidental. Kazan is the home of photon echo which was predicted at Kazan Physical-Technical Institute in 1963 by Prof. U.G. Kopvil'em and V.R. Nagibarov and observed in Columbia University by N.A. Kurnit, I.D. Abella, and S.R. Hartmann in 1964. Since then, photon echo has become a powerful tool of coherent optical spectroscopy and optical information processing, which have been developed here in Kazan in close collaboration between Kazan Physical-Technical Institute and Kazan Federal University. The main subjects of the XVIII International Youth School are: Nonlinear and coherent optics; Atomic and molecular spectroscopy; Coherent laser spectroscopy; Problems of quantum optics; Quantum theory of radiation; and Nanophotonics and Scanning Probe Microscopy. The unchallenged organizers of that school are Kazan Federal University and Kazan E.K. Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute. The rector of the School is Professor Myakzyum Salakhov, and the vice-rector is Professor Vitaly Samartsev. The International Youth Scientific School "Coherent Optics and Optical Spectroscopy" follows the global pattern of comprehensive studies of matter properties and their interaction with electromagnetic fields. Since 1997 more than 100 famous scientists from the USA, Germany, Ukraine, Belarus and Russia have given plenary lecture presentations. Here over 1000 young scientists had an opportunity to participate in lively discussions about the latest scientific news. Many young people have submitted interesting reports on photonics, quantum electronics, laser physics, quantum optics, traditional optical and laser spectroscopy, non-linear optics, material science and nanotechnology. Here we are publishing the fullsize papers prepared from the most interesting lectures and reports selected by the Program Committee of the School. The

  14. Study of the 5p3/2 -> 6p3/2 electric dipole forbidden transition in atomic rubidium using optical-optical double resonance spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ponciano-Ojeda, Francisco; López-Hernández, Oscar; Mojica-Casique, Cristian; Colín-Rodríguez, Ricardo; Ramírez-Martínez, Fernando; Flores-Mijangos, Jesús; Sahagún, Daniel; Jáuregui, Rocío; Jiménez-Mier, José

    2015-01-01

    Direct evidence of excitation of the 5p3/2 -> 6p3/2 electric dipole forbidden transition in atomic rubidium is presented. The experiments were performed in a room temperature rubidium cell with continuous wave extended cavity diode lasers. Optical-optical double resonance spectroscopy with counterpropagating beams allows the detection of the non-dipole transition free of Doppler broadening. The 5p3/2 state is prepared by excitation with a laser locked to the maximum F cyclic transition of the D2 line, and the forbidden transition is produced by excitation with a 911 nm laser. Production of the forbidden transition is monitored by detection of the 420 nm fluorescence that results from decay of the 6p3/2 state. Spectra with three narrow lines (~ 13 MHz FWHM) with the characteristic F - 1, F and F + 1 splitting of the 6p3/2 hyperfine structure in both rubidium isotopes were obtained. The results are in very good agreement with a direct calculation that takes into account the 5s -> 5p3/2 preparation dynamics, the...

  15. Complexation of lactate with neodymium(III) and europium(III) at variable temperatures: studies by potentiometry, microcalorimetry, optical absorption, and luminescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Guoxin; Martin, Leigh R; Rao, Linfeng

    2010-11-15

    The complexation of neodymium(III) and europium(III) with lactate was studied at variable temperatures by potentiometry, absorption spectrophotometry, luminescence spectroscopy, and microcalorimetry. The stability constants of three successive lactate complexes (ML(2+), ML(2)(+), and ML(3)(aq), where M stands for Nd and Eu and L stands for lactate) at 10, 25, 40, 55, and 70 °C were determined. The enthalpies of complexation at 25 °C were determined by microcalorimetry. Thermodynamic data show that the complexation of trivalent lanthanides (Nd(3+) and Eu(3+)) with lactate is exothermic and the complexation becomes weaker at higher temperatures. Results from optical absorption and luminescence spectroscopy suggest that the complexes are inner-sphere chelate complexes in which the protonated α-hydroxyl group of lactate participates in the complexation.

  16. Polarized light in optics and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kliger, David S

    1990-01-01

    This comprehensive introduction to polarized light provides students and researchers with the background and the specialized knowledge needed to fully utilize polarized light. It provides a basic introduction to the interaction of light with matter for those unfamiliar with photochemistry and photophysics. An in-depth discussion of polarizing optics is also given. Different analytical techniques are introduced and compared and introductions to the use of polarized light in various forms of spectroscopy are provided.Key Features* Starts at a basic level and develops tools for resear

  17. Optical studies of the X-ray transient XTE J2123-058 - II. Phase-resolved spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, R. I.; Charles, P. A.; Haswell, C. A.; Casares, J.; Zurita, C.; Serra-Ricart, M.

    2001-06-01

    We present time-resolved spectroscopy of the soft X-ray transient XTEJ2123-058 in outburst. A useful spectral coverage of 3700-6700Å was achieved spanning two orbits of the binary, with single-epoch coverage extending to ~9000Å. The optical spectrum approximates a steep blue power law, consistent with emission on the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of a hot blackbody spectrum. The strongest spectral lines are Heii 4686Å and Ciii/Niii 4640Å (Bowen blend) in emission. Their relative strengths suggest that XTEJ2123-058 was formed in the Galactic plane, not in the halo. Other weak emission lines of Heii and Civ are present, and Balmer lines show a complex structure, blended with Heii. Heii 4686-Å profiles show a complex multiple S-wave structure, with the strongest component appearing at low velocities in the lower-left quadrant of a Doppler tomogram. Hα shows transient absorption between phases 0.35 and 0.55. Both of these effects appear to be analogous to similar behaviour in SW Sex type cataclysmic variables. We therefore consider whether the spectral line behaviour of XTEJ2123-058 can be explained by the same models invoked for those systems.

  18. Study on the interaction between tabersonine and human serum albumin by optical spectroscopy and molecular modeling methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Hua; Chen, Rongrong [Department of Biology, College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Pu Hanlin, E-mail: tphl@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Biology, College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2012-03-15

    The mechanism of interaction between tabersonine (TAB) and human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated by the methods of fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and molecular modeling under simulative physiological conditions. Results obtained from analysis of fluorescence spectrum and fluorescence intensity indicated that TAB has a strong ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA through a static quenching procedure. The binding site number n and apparent binding constant K{sub a}, corresponding thermodynamic parameters {Delta}G, {Delta}H and {Delta}S at different temperatures were calculated. The distance r between donor (human serum albumin) and acceptor (tabersonine) was obtained according to the Foerster theory of non-radiation energy transfer. The effect of common ions on binding constant was also investigated. The synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra were used to investigate the structural change of HSA molecules with addition of TAB. Furthermore, the study of molecular modeling indicated that TAB could bind to the site I of HSA and hydrophobic interaction was the major acting force, which was in agreement with the binding mode study. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence study of the mechanism of interaction between tabersonine and HSA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The binding parameters and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The distance r was obtained and common ions effects was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conformation of HSA and its molecular modeling was analyzed.

  19. HOMES - Holographic Optical Method for Exoplanet Spectroscopy Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — HOMES (Holographic Optical Method for Exoplanet Spectroscopy) is a space telescope designed for exoplanet discovery. Its double dispersion architecture employs a...

  20. A new Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy instrument to study atmospheric chemistry from a high-altitude unmanned aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutz, Jochen; Werner, Bodo; Spolaor, Max; Scalone, Lisa; Festa, James; Tsai, Catalina; Cheung, Ross; Colosimo, Santo F.; Tricoli, Ugo; Raecke, Rasmus; Hossaini, Ryan; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Feng, Wuhu; Gao, Ru-Shan; Hintsa, Eric J.; Elkins, James W.; Moore, Fred L.; Daube, Bruce; Pittman, Jasna; Wofsy, Steven; Pfeilsticker, Klaus

    2017-03-01

    Observations of atmospheric trace gases in the tropical upper troposphere (UT), tropical tropopause layer (TTL), and lower stratosphere (LS) require dedicated measurement platforms and instrumentation. Here we present a new limb-scanning Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument developed for NASA's Global Hawk (GH) unmanned aerial system and deployed during the Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX). The mini-DOAS system is designed for automatic operation under unpressurized and unheated conditions at 14-18 km altitude, collecting scattered sunlight in three wavelength windows: UV (301-387 nm), visible (410-525 nm), and near infrared (900-1700 nm). A telescope scanning unit allows selection of a viewing angle around the limb, as well as real-time correction of the aircraft pitch. Due to the high altitude, solar reference spectra are measured using diffusors and direct sunlight. The DOAS approach allows retrieval of slant column densities (SCDs) of O3, O4, NO2, and BrO with relative errors similar to other aircraft DOAS systems. Radiative transfer considerations show that the retrieval of trace gas mixing ratios from the observed SCD based on O4 observations, the most common approach for DOAS measurements, is inadequate for high-altitude observations. This is due to the frequent presence of low-altitude clouds, which shift the sensitivity of the O4 SCD into the lower atmosphere and make it highly dependent on cloud coverage. A newly developed technique that constrains the radiative transfer by comparing in situ and DOAS O3 observations overcomes this issue. Extensive sensitivity calculations show that the novel O3-scaling technique allows the retrieval of BrO and NO2 mixing ratios at high accuracies of 0.5 and 15 ppt, respectively. The BrO and NO2 mixing ratios and vertical profiles observed during ATTREX thus provide new insights into ozone and halogen chemistry in the UT, TTL, and LS.

  1. Optical Biopsy Using Tissue Spectroscopy and Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman S Nishioka

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available ‘Optical biopsy’ or ‘optical diagnostics’ is a technique whereby light energy is used to obtain information about the structure and function of tissues without disrupting them. In fluorescence spectroscopy, light energy (usually provided by a laser is used to excite tissues and the resulting fluorescence provides information about the target tissue. Its major gastrointestinal application has been in the evaluation of colonic polyps, in which it can reliably distinguish malignant from benign lesions. Optical coherence tomography (OCT has been used in the investigation of Barrett’s epithelium (and dysplasia, although a variety of other applications are feasible. For example, OCT could assist in the identification and staging of mucosal and submucosal neoplasms, the grading of inflammation in the stomach and intestine, the diagnosis of biliary tumours and the assessment of villous architecture. OCT differs from endoscopic ultrasound, a complementary modality, in that it has a much higher resolution but lesser depth of penetration. The images correlate with the histopathological appearance of tissues, and the addition of Doppler methods may enable it to evaluate the vascularity of tumours and the amount of blood flow in varices. Refinements in these new optical techniques will likely make them valuable in clinical practice, although their specific roles have yet to be determined.

  2. Fe3S4 and Fe3O4 magnetic nanocrystals: magneto-optical and Mössbauer spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C.-R.; Tseng, Y.-T.; Ovchinnikov, S. G.; Ivantsov, R. D.; Edelman, I. S.; Fedorov, A. S.; Kuzubov, A. A.; Fedorov, D. A.; Starchikov, S. S.; Lyubutin, I. S.

    2014-04-01

    Iron oxide magnetite (Fe3O4) should be a reasonable analog for conception and understanding of the magnetic properties of iron sulfide greigite (Fe3S4)—one of the most required magnetic materials having numerous applications but being far from the complete understanding now. We present here a comparative study of the Mössbauer effect (ME) and the magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy of Fe3O4 and Fe3S4 nanoparticles. The ME spectrum parameters of Fe3S4 are shown to distinguish strongly from that of Fe3O4, and the MCD spectrum shapes are shown to be absolutely different for two compounds. To clarify the origin of the Fe3S4 MCD spectrum we have performed ab initio band structure calculations and identified the MCD spectrum features with the transitions between calculated energy states.

  3. Tissue optics, light distribution, and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchin, Valery V.; Utz, Sergei R.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya V.

    1994-10-01

    A model of multilayered tissue is considered. The Monte Carlo simulation technique is used to study laser beam transport through tissues with varying optical properties for each layer (absorption, scattering, scattering anisotropy factor, and refractive index). Calculations are performed for some models of the human skin and adjacent tissues for visible and UV wavelength ranges. New technology for human epidermis optical parameters determination is presented. This technology includes epidermis upper layers glue stripping; in vitro measurements of total transmission, diffuse reflection, and angular scattering of stripping samples; and using an inverse calculation technique based on four-flux approximation of radiation transport theory. The technology was successfully used for depth dependence monitoring of epidermis optical parameters. An inverse Monte Carlo technique for determining the optical properties of tissues based on spectrophotometric measurements is developed. This technique takes into accounts the 2-D geometry of the experiment, finite sizes of incident beam and integrating sphere ports, boundary conditions, and sideways losses of light.

  4. Optical Reflection Spectroscopy of GEO Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Cardona, Tammaso; Lederer, Susan M.; Cowardin, Heather; Abercromby, Kira J.; Barker, Edwin S.; Bedard, Donald

    2013-01-01

    We report on optical reflection spectroscopy of geosynchronous (GEO) objects in the US Space Surveillance Network (SSN) catalog. These observations were obtained using imaging spectrographs on the 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our goal is to determine the composition of these objects by comparing these spectral observations with ground-based laboratory measurements of spacecraft materials. The observations are all low resolution (1 nm after smoothing) obtained through a 5 arcsecond wide slit and using a grism as the dispersing element. The spectral range covered was from 450 nm to 800 nm. All spectra were flux calibrated using observations of standard stars with the exact same instrumental setup. An effort was made to obtain all observations within a limited range of topocentric phase angle, although the solar incident angle is unknown due to the lack of any knowledge of the attitude of the observed surface at the time of observation.

  5. Optical spectroscopy of four young radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xu-Liang; Bai, Jin-Ming; Hu, Chen; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2017-01-01

    We report the optical spectroscopy of four young radio sources which are observed with the Lijiang 2.4 m telescope. The Eddington ratios of these sources are similar with those of narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s). Their Fe II emission is strong while [O III] strength is weak. These results confirm the NLS1 features of young radio sources, except that the width of broad Hβ of young radio sources is larger than that of NLS1s. We thus suggest that the young radio sources are the high black hole mass counterparts of steep-spectrum radio-loud NLS1s. In addition, the broad Hβ component of 4C 12.50 is the blue wing of the narrow component, but not from the broad line region.

  6. Optical Spectroscopy of Four Young Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Xu-Liang; Hu, Chen; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    We report the optical spectroscopy of four young radio sources which are observed with the Lijiang 2.4m telescope. The Eddington ratios of these sources are similar with those of narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s). Their Fe {\\sc ii} emission is strong while [O {\\sc iii}] strength is weak. These results confirm the NLS1 features of young radio sources, except that the width of broad H$\\beta$ of young radio sources is larger than that of NLS1s. We thus suggest that the young radio sources are the high black hole mass counterparts of steep-spectrum radio-loud NLS1s. In addition, the broad H$\\beta$ component of \\astrobj{4C 12.50} is the blue wing of the narrow component, but not from the broad line region.

  7. Feasibility of interstitial near-infrared radiance spectroscopy platform for ex vivo canine prostate studies: optical properties extraction, hemoglobin and water concentration, and gold nanoparticles detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabtchak, Serge; Montgomery, Logan G.; Whelan, William M.

    2014-05-01

    The canine prostate is a close match for the human prostate and is used in research of prostate cancers. Determining accurately optical absorption and scattering properties of the gland in a wide spectral range (preferably in a minimally invasive way), linking optical properties to concentrations of major endogenous chromophores, and detecting the presence of localized optical inhomogeneities like inclusions of gold nanoparticles for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes, are among the major challenges for researchers. The goal of the article is to demonstrate a feasibility of the multifunctional radiance spectroscopy platform in providing the required information. For ex vivo canine prostate, extraction of the effective attenuation and diffusion coefficients using relative cw radiance measurements was demonstrated in the 650- to 900-nm range. The derived absorption coefficient was decomposed to contributions from 9.0 μM HbO2, 29.6 μM Hb, and 0.47 fractional volume of H2O. Detection of a localized inclusion containing ˜1.5.1010 gold nanorods (0.8 μg Au) at 10 mm distance from the urethra was achieved with the detector in the urethra and the light source in a virtual rectum position. The platform offers the framework for a systematic study of various chromophores in the prostate that can be used as comprehensive diagnostic markers.

  8. [Review on Application of Optical Scattering Spectroscopy for Elastic Wave Velocity Study on Materials in Earth's Interior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jian-jun; Li, He-ping; Dai, Li-dong; Hu, Hai-ying; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Chao-shuai

    2015-09-01

    In-situ experimental results on the elastic wave velocity of Earth materials at high pressure and high temperature in combination with data from seismic observation can help to inverse the chemical composition, state and migration of materials in Earth's interior, providing an important approach to explore information of deep earth. Applying the Brillouin scattering into the Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) to obtain the in situ elastic wave velocities of minerals, is the important approach to investigate elastic properties of Earth's Interior. With the development of DAC technology, on the one hand, the high temperature and high pressure experimental environment to simulate different layers of the earth can be achieved; on the other hand, the optical properties of DAC made many kinds of optical analysis and test methods have been widely applied in this research field. In order to gain the elastic wave velocity under high temperature and high pressure, the accurate experimental pressure and heating temperature of the sample in the cavity should be measured and calibrated first, then the scattering signal needs to dealt with, using the Brillouin frequency shift to calculate the velocity in the sample. Combined with the lattice constants obtained from X ray technique, by a solid elastic theory, all the elastic parameters of minerals can be solved. In this paper, firstly, application of methods based on optical spectrum such as Brillouin and Raman scattering in elasticity study on materials in Earth's interior, and the basic principle and research progress of them in the velocity measurement, pressure and temperature calibration are described in detail. Secondly, principle and scope of application of two common methods of spectral pressure calibration (fluorescence and Raman spectral pressure standard) are analyzed, in addition with introduce of the application of two conventional means of temperature calibration (blackbody radiation and Raman temperature scale) in

  9. Development and biological applications of optical tweezers and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chang'an

    Optical tweezers is a three-dimensional manipulation tool that employs a gradient force that originates from the single highly focused laser beam. Raman spectroscopy is a molecular analytical tool that can give a highly unique "fingerprint" for each substance by measuring the unique vibrations of its molecules. The combination of these two optical techniques offers a new tool for the manipulation and identification of single biological cells and microscopic particles. In this thesis, we designed and implemented a Laser-Tweezers-Raman-Spectroscopy (LTRS) system, also called the Raman-tweezers, for the simultaneous capture and analysis of both biological particles and non-biological particles. We show that microparticles can be conveniently captured at the focus of a laser beam and the Raman spectra of trapped particles can be acquired with high quality. The LTRS system overcomes the intrinsic Brownian motion and cell motility of microparticles in solution and provides a promising tool for in situ identifying suspicious agents. In order to increase the signal to noise ratio, several schemes were employed in LTRS system to reduce the blank noise and the fluorescence signal coming from analytes and the surrounding background. These techniques include near-infrared excitation, optical levitation, confocal microscopy, and frequency-shifted Raman difference. The LTRS system has been applied for the study in cell biology at the single cell level. With the built Raman-tweezers system, we studied the dynamic physiological processes of single living cells, including cell cycle, the transcription and translation of recombinant protein in transgenic yeast cells and the T cell activation. We also studied cell damage and associated biochemical processes in optical traps, UV radiations, and evaluated heating by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. These studies show that the Raman-tweezers system is feasible to provide rapid and reliable diagnosis of cellular disorders and can be

  10. Fiber-optic fourier transform mid-infrared reflectance spectroscopy: a suitable technique for in situ studies of mural paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miliani, C; Rosi, F; Borgia, I; Benedetti, P; Brunetti, B G; Sgamellotti, A

    2007-03-01

    A prototypical in situ noninvasive study of ancient mural painting materials has been carried out using an easily manageable fiber-optic Fourier transform mid-infrared (mid-FT-IR) reflectance spectrophotometer. The reported object of the study is the Renaissance fresco by Pietro Vannucci, called il Perugino, located in the church of Santa Maria delle Lacrime (1521, Trevi, Perugia Italy). For the first classification and interpretation of infrared spectra, principal components analysis was used. Spectral artifacts due to lacunas, restoration materials, or alteration products have been identified, as well as two different secco refinements bound in a tempera medium. For the characterization of inorganic pigments, mid-FT-IR spectra have been integrated with other data obtained through in situ X-ray fluorescence (XRF) elemental analysis. This complementary noninvasive approach led to the characterization of Perugino's pigments, even in the presence of complex mixtures. The mid-FT-IR noninvasive technique, in combination with XRF, is thus recommended as a valuable first approach for the examination of mural paintings, permitting the assessment of the execution technique as well as contributing to the evaluation of the conservation state.

  11. Optical multichannel analyzer techniques for high resolution optical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, J.L.

    1980-06-01

    The development of optical multichannel analyzer techniques for UV/VIS spectroscopy is presented. The research focuses on the development of spectroscopic techniques for measuring high resolution spectral lineshape functions from the exciton phosphorescence in H/sub 2/-1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene. It is found that the temperature dependent frequency shifts and widths confirm a theoretical model based on an exchange theory. The exchange of low energy phonon modes which couple with excited state exciton transitions is shown to display the proper temperature dependent behavior. In addition to the techniques for using the optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) to perform low light level target integration, the use of the OMA for capturing spectral information in transient pulsed laser applications is discussed. An OMP data acquisition system developed for real-time signal processng is described. Both hardware and software interfacing considerations for control and data acquisition by a microcomputer are described. The OMA detector is described in terms of the principles behind its photoelectron detection capabilities and its design is compared with other optoelectronic devices.

  12. Study of NaCl:Mn{sup 2+} nanostructures in the Suzuki phase by optical spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejía-Uriarte, E.V., E-mail: elsi.mejia@ccadet.unam.mx [Laboratorio de Fotónica de Microondas, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 70-186, C.P. 04510, D.F. México (Mexico); Kolokoltsev, O. [Laboratorio de Fotónica de Microondas, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 70-186, C.P. 04510, D.F. México (Mexico); Navarrete Montesinos, M. [Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, D.F. México (Mexico); Camarillo, E.; Hernández A, J.; Murrieta S, H. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 20-364, C.P. 01000, D.F. México (Mexico)

    2015-04-15

    NaCl:Mn{sup 2+} nanostructures in the Suzuki phase have been studied by fluorescence (emission and excitation) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as a function of temperature. The “as-grown” samples give rise to two broad emission bands that peak at 508 (green emission) and 610 nm (red emission). The excitation spectrum shows peaks at 227 nm and 232 nm for emission wavelengths at 508 nm and 610 nm, respectively. When the samples are heated continuously from room temperature up to 220 °C, the green emission (associated to the excitation peak at 227 nm) disappears at a temperature close to 120 °C, whilst only the red emission remains, which is characteristic of manganese ions. AFM images on the (0 0 1) surface (freshly cleaved) show several conformations of nanostructures, such as disks of 20–50 nm in diameter. Particularly, the images also reveal nanostructures with rectangular shape of ~280×160 nm{sup 2} and ~6 nm height; these are present only in samples with green emission associated to the Suzuki phase. Then, the evidence suggests that this topographic configuration might be related to the interaction with the first neighbors and the next neighbors, according to the configuration that has been suggested for the Suzuki phase. - Highlights: • NaCl:Mn{sup 2+} single crystals in the Suzuki phase contain rectangular nanostructures. • Double emission of manganese ions: green (508 nm) and red (610 nm) bands. • The excitation peak at 227 nm is attributed to rectangular nanostructures. • The green emission band associated to Suzuki phase is extinguished at 120 °C.

  13. Understanding Multiferroic Hexagonal Manganites by Static and Ultrafast Optical Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ting Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiferroic hexagonal manganites ReMnO3 studied by optics are reviewed. Their electronic structures were revealed by static linear and nonlinear spectra. Two transitions located at ~1.7 eV and ~2.3 eV have been observed and attributed to the interband transitions from the lower-lying Mn3+dxy/dx2-y2 and dxz/dyz states to the Mn3+d3z2-r2 state, respectively. These so-called d-d transitions exhibit a blueshift as decreasing temperatures and an extra blueshift near TN. This dramatic change indicates that the magnetic ordering seriously influences the electronic structure. On the other hand, the ultrafast optical pump-probe spectroscopy has provided the important information on spin-charge coupling and spin-lattice coupling. Because of the strongly correlation between electronic structure and magnetic ordering, the amplitude of the initial rising component in ΔR/R shows striking changes at the vicinity of TN. Moreover, the coherent optical and acoustic phonons were observed on optical pump-probe spectroscopy. Both the amplitude and dephasing time of coherent phonons also exhibit significant changes at TN, which provide the evidence for spin-lattice interaction in these intriguing materials.

  14. Optical Spectroscopy of Two Dimensional Graphene and Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Long

    This dissertation describes the use of optical spectroscopy in studying the physical properties of two dimensional nano materials like graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. Compared to bulk materials, atomically thin two dimensional materials have a unique character that is the strong dependence of physical properties on external control. Both electronic band structure and chemical potential can be tuned in situ by electric field-which is a powerful knob in experiment. Therefore the optical study at atomic thickness scale can greatly benefit from modern micro-fabrication technique and electric control of the material properties. As will be shown in this dissertation, such control of both gemometric and physical properties enables new possibilities of optical spectroscopic measurement as well as opto-electronic studies. Other experimental techniques like electric transport and scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy are also combined with optical spectroscopy to reveal the physics that is beyond the reach of each individual technique. There are three major themes in the dissertation. The first one is focused on the study of plasmon excitation of Dirac electrons in monolayer graphene. Unlike plasmons in ordinary two dimensional electron gas, plasmons of 2D electrons as in graphene obey unusual scaling laws. We fabricate graphene micro-ribbon arrays with photolithography technique and use optical absorption spectroscopy to study its absorption spectrum. The experimental result demonstrates the extraordinarily strong light-plasmon coupling and its novel dependence on both charge doping and geometric dimensions. This work provides a first glance at the fundamental properties of graphene plasmons and forms the basis of an emerging subfield of graphene research and applications such as graphene terahertz metamaterials. The second part describes the opto-electronic response of heterostructures composed of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. We found that there is

  15. Optical emission spectroscopy study of the expansion dynamics of a laser generated plasma during the deposition of thin films by laser ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazio, Enza

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the expanding plasma produced by excimer laser ablation of different materials such as silicon, silicon carbide, graphite and tin powder were studied by means of time integrated, spatially resolved emission spectroscopy and fast photography imaging of the expanding plasma. Experiments were performed both in vacuum and in different pure background atmosphere (i.e. oxygen or nitrogen and, finally, in gaseous mixtures (i.e. in O2/Ar and N2/Ar mixtures. These investigations were performed to gather information on the nature of the chemical species present in the plasma and on the occurrence of chemical reactions during the interaction between the plasma and the background gas. Then, we tried to correlate the plasma expansion dynamics to the structural and physical properties of the deposited materials. Experimental results clearly indicate that there is a strong correlation between the plasma expansion dynamics and the structural properties of the deposited thin films. In this respect, the investigations performed by means of fast photography and of optical emission spectroscopy revealed themselves as powerful tools for an efficient control of the deposition process itself.

  16. Optical spectroscopy study of the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2(As0.935P0.065)2 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X. B.; Wang, H. P.; Dong, T.; Chen, R. Y.; Wang, N. L.

    2014-10-01

    We present an optical spectroscopy study on P-doped CaFe2As2 which experiences a structural phase transition from tetragonal to collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase near 75 K. The measurement reveals a sudden reduction of low-frequency spectral weight and the emergence of a feature near 3200 cm -1 (0.4 eV) in optical conductivity across the transition, indicating an abrupt reconstruction of band structure. The appearance of the feature is related to the interband transition arising from the sinking of hole bands near the Γ point below Fermi level in the cT phase, as expected from the density function theory calculations in combination with the dynamical mean field theory. However, the reduction of Drude spectral weight is at variance with those calculations. The measurement also indicates an absence of the abnormal spectral weight transfer at high energy (near 0.5-0.7 eV) in the cT phase, suggesting a suppression of the electron correlation effect.

  17. Off-axis phonon and photon propagation in porous silicon superlattices studied by Brillouin spectroscopy and optical reflectance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, L. C., E-mail: lcparsons@mun.ca; Andrews, G. T., E-mail: tandrews@mun.ca [Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, Newfoundland A1B 3X7 (Canada)

    2014-07-21

    Brillouin light scattering experiments and optical reflectance measurements were performed on a pair of porous silicon-based optical Bragg mirrors which had constituent layer porosity ratios close to unity. For off-axis propagation, the phononic and photonic band structures of the samples were modeled as a series of intersecting linear dispersion curves. Zone-folding was observed for the longitudinal bulk acoustic phonon and the frequency of the probed zone-folded longitudinal phonon was shown to be dependent on the propagation direction as well as the folding order of the mode branch. There was no conclusive evidence of coupling between the transverse and the folded longitudinal modes. Two additional observed Brillouin peaks were attributed to the Rayleigh surface mode and a possible pseudo-surface mode. Both of these modes were dispersive, with the velocity increasing as the wavevector decreased.

  18. Extreme Spectroscopy: In situ nuclear materials behavior from optical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimbretiere, G.; Canizares, A.; Raimboux, N.; Omnee, R.; Duval, F.; Ammar, M.R.; Simon, P. [CNRS - UPR3079 CEMHTI, Universite d' Orleans, 45071Orleans cedex 2 (France); Desgranges, L.; Mohun, R. [CEA, DEN, DEC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Jegou, C.; Magnin, M. [CEA/DTCD/SECM/LMPA, Marcoule 30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France); Clavier, N.; Dacheux, N. [ICSM-UMR5257 CEA/CNRS/UM2/ENSCM, Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2015-07-01

    In the nuclear industry, materials are regularly exposed to high temperature or/and irradiation and a better knowledge and understanding of their behavior under such extreme conditions is a key-point for improvements and further developments. Nowadays, Raman spectroscopy begins to be well known as a promising technique in the post mortem and remote characterization of nuclear materials exposed to extreme conditions. On this topic, at ANIMMA 2013 conference, we have presented some results about its implementation in the study of model or real nuclear fuel. However, the strength of Raman spectroscopy as in situ characterization tool is mainly its ability to be implemented remotely through optical fibers. Aware of this, implementation of other optical techniques can be considered in order to gain information not only on the structural dynamics of materials but also on the electronic charge carrier populations. In this paper, we propose to present our last advances in Raman characterization of nuclear materials and enlarge to the in situ use of complementary optical spectroscopies. Emphasis will be made on the information that can be gained to the behavior of the model fuel depleted UO{sub 2} under extreme conditions of high temperature and ionic irradiation: - In Situ Raman identification of the radiolysis alteration products of UO{sub 2} in contact with water under ionic irradiation. - In Situ Raman recording of the damaged dynamic of UO{sub 2} under inert atmosphere. - In Situ Raman and photo-luminescence study of virgin and damaged UO2 at high temperature. - In Situ study of electronic charge carriers' behavior in U{sub x}Th{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} solid solutions by mean of Iono- and Thermo- luminescence under and post- ionic irradiation. (authors)

  19. Optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy of Rare Earth Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiatlowski, Jerlyn; Palm, Christopher; Joshi, Trinity; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Jackson Kimball, Derek

    2013-05-01

    We discuss progress in our experimental program to employ optical-frequency-comb-based spectroscopy to understand the complex spectra of rare-earth atoms. We plan to carry out systematic measurements of atomic transitions in rare-earth atoms to elucidate the energy level structure and term assignment and determine presently unknown atomic state parameters. This spectroscopic information is important in view of the increasing interest in rare-earth atoms for atomic frequency standards, in astrophysical investigations of chemically peculiar stars, and in tests of fundamental physics (tests of parity and time-reversal invariance, searches for time variation of fundamental constants, etc.). We are presently studying the use of hollow cathode lamps as atomic sources for two-photon frequency comb spectroscopy. Supported by the National Science Foundation under grant PHY-0958749.

  20. Measuring spatiotemporal variation in snow optical grain size under a subalpine forest canopy using contact spectroscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Molotch, Noah P; Barnard, David M; Burns, Sean P; Painter, Thomas H

    2016-01-01

    .... In this study, we address one of many measurement gaps by using contact spectroscopy to measure snow optical grain size at high spatial resolution in trenches dug between tree boles in a subalpine forest...

  1. 3D OPTICAL AND IR SPECTROSCOPY OF EXCEPTIONAL HII GALAXIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Telles

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution I will very brie y summarize some recent results obtained applying 3D spectroscopy to observations of the well known HII galaxy II Zw 40, both in the optical and near-IR. I have studied the distribution of the dust in the starburst region, the velocity and velocity dispersion, and the geometry of the molecular hydrogen and ionized gas. I found a clear correlation between the component of the ISM and the velocity eld suggesting that the latter has a fundamental role in de ning the modes of the star formation process.

  2. Spectroscopy of intraband optical transitions in anisotropic semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkov, Vadim K.; Baimuratov, Anvar S.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a new type of optical spectroscopy of anisotropic semiconductor nanocrystals, which is based on the welldeveloped stationary pump-probe technique, where the pump and probe fields are absorbed upon, respectively, interband and intraband transitions of the nanocrystals' electronic subsystem. We develop a general theory of intraband absorption based on the density matrix formalism. This theory can be applied to study degenerate eigenstates of electrons in semiconductor nanocrystals of different shapes and dimentions. We demonstrate that the angular dependence of intraband absorption by nonspherical nanocrystals enables investigating their shape and orientation, as well as the symmetry of quantum states excited by the probe field and selection rules of electronic transitions.

  3. Rotational spectroscopy with an optical centrifuge

    CERN Document Server

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Hepburn, John W; Milner, Valery

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a new spectroscopic method for studying electronic transitions in molecules with extremely broad range of angular momentum. We employ an optical centrifuge to create narrow rotational wave packets in the ground electronic state of $^{16}$O$_2$. Using the technique of resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization, we record the spectrum of multiple ro-vibrational transitions between $X^3\\Sigma_{g}^{-}$ and $C^3\\Pi_{g}$ electronic manifolds of oxygen. Direct control of rotational excitation, extending to rotational quantum numbers as high as $N\\gtrsim 120$, enables us to interpret the complex structure of rotational spectra of $C^3\\Pi_{g}$ beyond thermally accessible levels.

  4. Theoretical optical spectroscopy of complex systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conte, A. Mosca, E-mail: adriano.mosca.conte@roma2.infn.it [MIFP, NAST, ETSF,CNR INFM-SMC, Universitá di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, Roma (Italy); Violante, C., E-mail: claudia.violante@roma2.infn.it [MIFP, NAST, ETSF,CNR INFM-SMC, Universitá di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, Roma (Italy); Missori, M., E-mail: mauro.missori@isc.cnr.it [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Salaria Km 29.300, 00016 Monterotondo Scalo (Rome) (Italy); Bechstedt, F., E-mail: bech@ifto.physik.uni-jena.de [Institut fur Festkorpertheorie und -optik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitat, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Teodonio, L. [MIFP, NAST, ETSF,CNR INFM-SMC, Universitá di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, Roma (Italy); Istituto centrale per il restauro e la conservazione del patrimonio archivistico e librario (IC-RCPAL), Italian Minister for Cultural Heritage, Via Milano 76, 00184 Rome (Italy); Ippoliti, E.; Carloni, P. [German Research School for Simulation Sciences, Julich (Germany); Guidoni, L., E-mail: leonardo.guidoni@univaq.it [Università degli Studi di L’Aquila, Dipartimento di Chimica e Materiali, Via Campo di Pile, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); Pulci, O., E-mail: olivia.pulci@roma2.infn.it [MIFP, NAST, ETSF,CNR INFM-SMC, Universitá di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, Roma (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: ► We review some theoretical condensed matter ab initio spectroscopic computational techniques. ► We show several applications ranging from 0 to 3 dimensional systems. ► For each system studied, we show which kind of information it is possible to obtain by performing these calculations. -- Abstract: We review here some of the most reliable and efficient computational theoretical ab initio techniques for the prediction of optical and electronic spectroscopic properties and show some important applications to molecules, surfaces, and solids. We investigate the role of the solvent in the optical absorption spectrum of indole molecule. We study the excited-state properties of a photo-active minimal model molecule for the retinal of rhodopsin, responsible for vision mechanism in animals. We then show a study about spectroscopic properties of Si(1 1 1) surface. Finally we simulate a bulk system: paper, that is mainly made of cellulose, a pseudo-crystalline material representing 40% of annual biomass production in the Earth.

  5. A Fundamental Study of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Using Fiber Optics for Remote Measurements Of Trace Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Goode; S. Michael Angel

    2004-01-20

    Develop a fiber-optic imaging probe for microanalysis of solid samples; Design a time-resolved plasma imaging system to measure the development of the LIBS signal; Setup a laboratory system capable of timing two lasers independently, for optimizing and characterizing dual-pulse LIBS; Compare the development of laser-induced plasmas generated with a single laser pulse to the development of laser-induced plasmas generated with a pre-ablation spark prior to sample ablation; Examine the effect of sample matrix on the LIBS signals of elements in different sample matrices; Investigate the effect of excitation wavelength of the ablation beam in pre-ablation spark dual-pulse LIBS experiments; Determine the effect of the physical properties of the sample on the mass of materials ablated.

  6. Assessment of Renal Ischemia By Optical Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, J T; Demos, S; Michalopoulou, A; Pierce, J L; Troppmann, C

    2004-01-07

    Introduction: No reliable method currently exists for quantifying the degree of warm ischemia in kidney grafts prior to transplantation. We describe a method for evaluating pretransplant warm ischemia time using optical spectroscopic methods. Methods: Lewis rat kidney vascular pedicles were clamped unilaterally in vivo for 0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 60, 90 or 120 minutes; 8 animals were studied at each time point. Injured and contra-lateral control kidneys were then flushed with Euro-Collins solution, resected and placed on ice. 335 nm excitation autofluorescence as well as cross polarized light scattering images were taken of each injured and control kidney using filters of various wavelengths. The intensity ratio of the injured to normal kidneys was compared to ischemia time. Results: Autofluorescence intensity ratios through a 450 nm filter and light scattering intensity ratios through an 800 nm filter both decreased significantly with increasing ischemia time (p < 0.0001 for each method, one-way ANOVA). All adjacent and non-adjacent time points between 0 and 90 minutes were distinguishable using one of these two modalities by Fisher's PLSD. Conclusions: Optical spectroscopic methods can accurately quantify warm ischemia time in kidneys that have been subsequently hypothermically preserved. Further studies are needed to correlate results with physiological damage and posttransplant performance.

  7. Mössbauer spectroscopy of europium-containing glasses: optical activator study for x-ray image plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. E.; Vu, M.; Johnson, J. A.; Brown, D. E.; Weber, J. K. R.; Paßlick, C.; Schweizer, S.

    2014-04-01

    A fluorozirconate glass (ZBLAN) containing BaCl 2 nanocrystals doped with divalent Eu is a promising material for x-ray image plates for medical diagnosis. Since it is known that Eu 2+ readily oxidizes to Eu 3+, which reduces fluorescence efficiency of the image plates, 151Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy was used in this work to monitor the Eu oxidation state of the samples during degradation over time in the presence of ambient humidity. In addition, Mössbauer spectroscopic experiments show that the oxidation state has already changed during the glass melt: The sample made from 5 mol% EuCl 2 contained 78 % EuCl 2 + 22 % EuCl 3 deduced from the relative areas of the absorption lines. The sample made from 2.5 mol% EuCl2 + 2.5 mol% EuCl2 contained 37 % EuCl2 + 63 % EuCl3, i.e. 26 % of the original EuCl 2 was oxidized to EuCl 3.

  8. Fabrication and Cathodoluminescence Spectroscopy of Optical Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redinbo, Gregory Finley

    1995-01-01

    This thesis presents the fabrication of buried optical nanostructures in III-V materials by modifying semiconductor quantum wells using an implantation enhanced interdiffusion (IEI) technique. An investigation of the effect of fabrication parameters on the resulting nanostructures is carried out, and the characteristics of the fabricated structures are measured using room temperature and low temperature cathodoluminescence (CL). IEI using protons is reported for the first time in this work and is found to increase the diffusion length of Al in GaAs/AlGaAs single quantum wells. The enhanced diffusion lengths compare favorably to Ga^ {+} IEI studies and the enhanced interdiffusion mechanism is determined to be due to implantation generated point defects. The use of H^{+} IEI for laterally patterning 100-nm optical nanostructures is demonstrated and is found to be limited by the lateral straggle of the light ions during implantation. Optical quantum wires with widths down to 40 nm are fabricated using low energy Ga^{+ } and electron beam lithography generated metal masks on GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells. Single nanostructures are measured with low temperature CL, and an increasing blue shift of wire emission with decreasing mask size is measured. The lateral extent of intermixing is found to be 30 nm, independent of Ga^{+} implantation energy. Based on a model of emission energy shift, a lateral quantization energy of ~3 meV for carriers is achieved in these structures. Optical nanostructures are also fabricated with direct write IEI using a Ga^{+ } focused ion beam (FIB) and are compared to the quantum wires. A larger effective lateral extent of intermixing of 200 nm is found with the FIB. IEI patterning of strained InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells is demonstrated and a model of the resulting lateral bandgap profile leads to a lateral defect diffusion length of ~1 mum. Strain enhanced lateral diffusion of defects during IEI cause this length to be substantially larger than that

  9. Photothermal deflection spectroscopy for the study of thin films and optical coatings: measurements of absorption losses and detection of photoinduced changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commandre, Mireille; Roche, Pierre J.; Albrand, Gerard; Pelletier, Emile P.

    1990-08-01

    Photothermal deflection has been used to map the absorption characteristics of thin film optical coatings. Our experimental set-up can give low level absorption coefficient down to 1 ppm, with a spatial resolution limited by the excitating laser beam diameter (100 tim). On single layer films, we can calculate extinction coefficient of the deposited material with a detectivity of a few i07. We present a study of absorption losses in single layer titania films and in TiOWSiO2 Fabry-Perot filters prepared in our laboratory by electron beam evaporation, ion assisted deposition and ion plating. Local variations of absorption on the sample surface can be very large especially in lowly absorbing samples; high absorption sites may be related to local defects responsible for laser damage. Furthermore, we show that some titania films can present photoinduced instabilities. Photothermal deflection spectroscopy is a good way to study absorption evolution under illumination. In Ti02/Si02 Fabry-Perot filters, we have observed that these absorption changes are associated with important drifts of transmission curves. So these instabilities can be explained by a change of the value of the complex index Ii = n - ik. Results lead to the conclusion that stability under illumination is strongly correlated to the deposition technique and also to the deposition conditions: unstable samples are mostly prepared by electron beam evaporation.

  10. X-ray excited optical luminescence, photoluminescence, photostimulated luminescence and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy studies on BaFBr:Eu

    CERN Document Server

    Subramanian, N; Govinda-Rajan, K; Mohammad-Yousuf; Santanu-Bera; Narasimhan, S V

    1997-01-01

    The results of x-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL), photoluminescence (PL), photostimulated luminescence (PSL) and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) studies on the x-ray storage phosphor BaFBr:Eu are presented in this paper. Analyses of XEOL, PL and PSL spectra reveal features corresponding to the transitions from 4f sup 6 td sup 1 to 4f sup 7 configurations in different site symmetries of Eu sup 2 sup +. Increasing x-ray dose is seen to lead to a red shift in the maximum of the PL excitation spectrum for the 391 nm emission. The XEOL and XPS spectra do not show any signature of Eu sup 3 sup + in the samples studied by us, directly raising doubts about the model of Takahashi et al in which Eu sup 2 sup + is expected to ionize to Eu sup 3 sup + upon x-ray irradiation and remain stable until photostimulation. XEOL and PSL experiments with simultaneous x-ray irradiation and He - Ne laser excitation as well as those with sequential x-ray irradiation and laser stimulation bring out the competition betwe...

  11. Ultrafast terahertz conductivity and transient optical absorption spectroscopy of silicon nanocrystal thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Titova, Lyubov V.; Harthy, Rahma Al; Cooke, David

    We use time-resolved THz spectroscopy and transient optical absorption spectroscopy as two complementary techniques to study ultrafast carrier dynamics in silicon nanocrystal thin films. We find that the photoconductive dynamics in these materials is dominated by interface trapping, and we observe...... several different relaxation mechanisms for photoexcited carriers...

  12. Effects of probe geometry on transscleral diffuse optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenmarker, Pontus; Xu, Can T; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Krohn, Jørgen

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how the geometry of a fiber optic probe affects the transmission and reflection of light through the scleral eye wall. Two geometrical parameters of the fiber probe were investigated: the source-detector distance and the fiber protrusion, i.e. the length of the fiber extending from the flat surface of the fiber probe. For optimization of the fiber optic probe geometry, fluorescence stained choroidal tumor phantoms in ex vivo porcine eyes were measured with both diffuse reflectance- and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The strength of the fluorescence signal compared to the excitation signal was used as a measure for optimization. Intraocular pressure (IOP) and temperature were monitored to assess the impact of the probe on the eye. For visualizing any possible damage caused by the probe, the scleral surface was imaged with scanning electron microscopy after completion of the spectroscopic measurements. A source-detector distance of 5 mm with zero fiber protrusion was considered optimal in terms of spectroscopic contrast, however, a slight fiber protrusion of 0.5 mm is argued to be advantageous for clinical measurements. The study further indicates that transscleral spectroscopy can be safely performed in human eyes under in vivo conditions, without leading to an unacceptable IOP elevation, a significant rise in tissue temperature, or any visible damage to the scleral surface.

  13. Optical and Microwave Spectroscopy of Transient Metal-Containing Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steimle, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Small metal containing molecules are ideal venues for testing Fundamental Physics, investigating relativistic effects, and modelling spin-orbit induced unimolecular dynamics. Electronic spectroscopy is an effective method for probing these phenomena because such spectra are readily recorded at the natural linewidth limited resolution and accuracy of 0.0001 wn. The information garnered includes fine and hyperfine interactions, magnetic and electric dipoles, and dynamics. With this in mind, three examples from our recent (unpublished) studies will be highlighted. SiHD: Long ago Duxbury et al. developed a semi-quantitative model invoking Renner-Teller and spin-orbit coupling of the tilde{a}3B{1}, tilde{X}1A1, and tilde{A}1B1, states to explain the observed local perturbations and anomalous radiative lifetimes in the visible spectrum. More recently, the tilde{a}3B1 to tilde{A}1B1 intersystem crossing has been modeled using both semi-classical transition state theory and quantum trajectory surface hopping dynamics. Here we investigate the effects of the reduced symmetry of SiHD on the spectroscopy and dynamics using 2D spectroscopy. Rotationally resolved lines in the origin tilde{X}1A'→ tilde{A}1A" band are assigned to both c-type transitions and additional axis-switching induced transitions. AuO and AuS: The observed markedly different bonding of thiols and alcohols to gold clusters should be traceable to the difference in Au-O and Au-S bonding. To investigate this difference we have used optical Stark and Zeeman spectroscopy to determine the permanent electric dipole moments and magnetic g-factors. The results are rationalized using simple m.o. correlation diagrams and compared to ab initio predictions. TaN: TaN is the best candidate to search for a T,P- violating nuclear magnetic quadrupole moment. Here we report on the optical 2D, Stark, and Zeeman spectra, and our efforts to record the pure rotational spectrum using the separated field pump/probe microwave-optical

  14. Nonlinear optical spectroscopy of diamond surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, R.P.

    1995-04-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) and infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopies have been shown to be powerful and versatile for studying surfaces with submonolayer sensitivity. They have been used in this work to study bare diamond surfaces and molecular adsorption on them. In particular, infrared-visible SFG as a surface vibrational spectroscopic technique has been employed to identify and monitor in-situ surface bonds and species on the diamond (111) surface. The CH stretch spectra allow us to investigate hydrogen adsorption, desorption, abstraction, and the nature of the hydrogen termination. The C(111) surface dosed with atomic hydrogen was found to be in a monohydride configuration with the hydrogen atoms situated at top-sites. The ratio of the abstraction rate to the adsorption rate was appreciable during atomic hydrogen dosing. Kinetic parameters for thermal desorption of H on C(111) were determined showing a near first-order kinetics. For the fully H-terminated (111) surface, a large (110 cm{sup {minus}1}) anharmonicity and {approximately}19 psec lifetime were measured for the first-excited CH stretch mode. The bare reconstructed C(111)-(2 {times} l) surface showed the presence of CC stretch modes which were consistent with the Pandey {pi}-bonded chain structure. When exposed to the methyl radical, the SFG spectra of the C(111) surface showed features suggesting the presence of adsorbed methyl species. After heating to sufficiently high temperatures, they were converted into the monohydride species. Preliminary results on the hydrogen-terminated diamond (100) surface are also presented.

  15. High-pressure optical spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies on synthetic cobalt aluminum silicate garnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    N. Taran, Michail; Nestola, Fabrizio; Ohashi, Haruo

    2007-01-01

    The pressure-induced behavior of spin-allowed dd-bands of VIIICo2+ in the absorption spectra of synthetic Co3Al2Si3O12 garnet was studied from 10-4 to 13 GPa. The plots of the peak energy vs. pressure for the three sharpest well resolved bands at ca. 5160, 17 680, and 18 740 cm-1 display small bu...

  16. Study of dynamical process of heat denaturation in optically trapped single microorganisms by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Changan; Li, Yong-qing; Tang, Wei; Newton, Ronald J.

    2003-11-01

    The development of laser traps has made it possible to investigate single cells and record real-time Raman spectra during a heat-denaturation process when the temperature of the surrounding medium is increased. Large changes in the phenylalanine band (1004 cm-1) of near-infrared spectra between living and heat-treated cells were observed in yeast and Escerichia coli and Enterobacter aerogenes bacteria. This change appears to reflect the change in environment of phenylalanine as proteins within the cells unfold as a result of increasing temperatures. As a comparison, we measured Raman spectra of native and heat-denatured solutions of bovine serum albumin proteins, and a similar change in the phenylalanine band of spectra was observed. In addition, we measured Raman spectra of native and heat-treated solutions of pure phenylalanine molecules; no observable difference in vibrational spectra was observed. These findings may make it possible to study conformational changes in proteins within single cells.

  17. Properties of Type-II ZnTe/ZnSe Submonolayer Quantum Dots Studied via Excitonic Aharonov- Bohm Effect and Polarized Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Haojie

    In this thesis I develop understanding of the fundamental physical and material properties of type-II ZnTe/ZnSe submonolayer quantum dots (QDs), grown via combination of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and migration enhanced epitaxy (MEE). I use magneto-photoluminescence, including excitonic Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect and polarized optical spectroscopy as the primary tools in this work. I present previous studies as well as the background of optical and magneto-optical processes in semiconductor nanostructures and introduce the experimental methods in Chapters 1 - 3. In Chapter 4 I focus on the excitonic AB effect in the type-II QDs. I develop a lateral tightly-bound exciton model for ZnTe/ZnSe type-II QDs, using analytical methods and numerical calculations. This explained the magneto-PL observation and allowed for establishing the size and density of the QDs in each sample based on the results of PL and magneto-PL measurements. For samples with larger QDs, I observe behaviors that fall between properties of quantum-dot and quantum-well-like systems due to increased QD densities and their type-II nature. Finally, the decoherence mechanisms of the AB excitons are investigated via the temperature dependent studies of the magneto-PL. It is determined that the AB exciton decoherence is due to transport-like (acoustic phonon) scattering of the electrons moving in the ZnSe barriers, but with substantially smaller magnitude of electron-phonon coupling constant due to relatively strong electron-hole coupling within these type-II QDs. In Chapter 5 I discuss the results of circularly polarized magneto-PL measurements. A model with ultra-long spin-flip time of holes confined to submonolayer QDs is proposed. The g-factor of type-II excitons was extracted from the Zeeman splitting and the g-factor of electrons was obtained by fitting the temperature dependence of the degree of circular polarization (DCP), from which g-factor of holes confined within ZnTe QDs was found. It is shown

  18. Vibrational and optical spectroscopies integrated with environmental transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picher, Matthieu; Mazzucco, Stefano [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6203 (United States); Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); Blankenship, Steve [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6203 (United States); Sharma, Renu, E-mail: renu.sharma@nist.gov [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6203 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Here, we present a measurement platform for collecting multiple types of spectroscopy data during high-resolution environmental transmission electron microscopy observations of dynamic processes. Such coupled measurements are made possible by a broadband, high-efficiency, free-space optical system. The critical element of the system is a parabolic mirror, inserted using an independent hollow rod and placed below the sample holder which can focus a light on the sample and/or collect the optical response. We demonstrate the versatility of this optical setup by using it to combine in situ atomic-scale electron microscopy observations with Raman spectroscopy. The Raman data is also used to measure the local temperature of the observed sample area. Other applications include, but are not limited to: cathodo- and photoluminescence spectroscopy, and use of the laser as a local, high-rate heating source. - Highlights: • Broadband, high-efficiency design adaptable to other electron microscopes. • Raman spectroscopy integrated with environmental transmission electron microscopy. • Raman spectra peak frequency shifts enable measurement of local sample temperature. • Multiple types of optical spectroscopy enabled, e.g. cathodoluminescence.

  19. Optical fiber sensing based on reflection laser spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Gianluca; Salza, Mario; Ferraro, Pietro; Chehura, Edmond; Tatam, Ralph P; Gangopadhyay, Tarun K; Ballard, Nicholas; Paz-Soldan, Daniel; Barnes, Jack A; Loock, Hans-Peter; Lam, Timothy T-Y; Chow, Jong H; De Natale, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    An overview on high-resolution and fast interrogation of optical-fiber sensors relying on laser reflection spectroscopy is given. Fiber Bragg-gratings (FBGs) and FBG resonators built in fibers of different types are used for strain, temperature and acceleration measurements using heterodyne-detection and optical frequency-locking techniques. Silica fiber-ring cavities are used for chemical sensing based on evanescent-wave spectroscopy. Various arrangements for signal recovery and noise reduction, as an extension of most typical spectroscopic techniques, are illustrated and results on detection performances are presented.

  20. Optical Fiber Sensing Based on Reflection Laser Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Gagliardi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available An overview on high-resolution and fast interrogation of optical-fiber sensors relying on laser reflection spectroscopy is given. Fiber Bragg-gratings (FBGs and FBG resonators built in fibers of different types are used for strain, temperature and acceleration measurements using heterodyne-detection and optical frequency-locking techniques. Silica fiber-ring cavities are used for chemical sensing based on evanescent-wave spectroscopy. Various arrangements for signal recovery and noise reduction, as an extension of most typical spectroscopic techniques, are illustrated and results on detection performances are presented.

  1. Optimal Extraction of Fibre Optic Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sharp, R

    2009-01-01

    We report an optimal extraction methodology, for the reduction of multi-object fibre spectroscopy data, operating in the regime of tightly packed (and hence significantly overlapping) fibre profiles. The routine minimises crosstalk between adjacent fibres and statistically weights the extraction to reduce noise. As an example of the process we use simulations of the numerous modes of operation of the AAOmega fibre spectrograph and observational data from the SPIRAL Integral Field Unit at the Anglo-Australian Telescope.

  2. Multiplexed sub-Doppler spectroscopy with an optical frequency comb

    CERN Document Server

    Long, David A; Plusquellic, David F; Hodges, Joseph T

    2016-01-01

    An optical frequency comb generated with an electro-optic phase modulator and a chirped radiofrequency waveform is used to perform saturation and pump-probe spectroscopy on the $D_1$ and $D_2$ transitions of atomic potassium. With a comb tooth spacing of 200 kHz and an optical bandwidth of 2 GHz the hyperfine transitions can be simultaneously observed. Interferograms are recorded in as little as 5 $\\mu$s (a timescale corresponding to the inverse of the comb tooth spacing). Importantly, the sub-Doppler features can be measured as long as the laser carrier frequency lies within the Doppler profile, thus removing the need for slow scanning or a priori knowledge of the frequencies of the sub-Doppler features. Sub-Doppler optical frequency comb spectroscopy has the potential to dramatically reduce acquisition times and allow for rapid and accurate assignment of complex molecular and atomic spectra which are presently intractable.

  3. Advances in Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging of Breast Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, S; Vogel, A J; Gandjbakhche, A H

    2006-01-03

    A review is presented of recent advances in optical imaging and spectroscopy and the use of light for addressing breast cancer issues. Spectroscopic techniques offer the means to characterize tissue components and obtain functional information in real time. Three-dimensional optical imaging of the breast using various illumination and signal collection schemes in combination with image reconstruction algorithms may provide a new tool for cancer detection and monitoring of treatment.

  4. Optical absorption and scattering spectroscopies of single nano-objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crut, Aurélien; Maioli, Paolo; Del Fatti, Natalia; Vallée, Fabrice

    2014-06-07

    Developments of optical detection and spectroscopy methods for single nano-objects are key advances for applications and fundamental understanding of the novel properties exhibited by nanosize systems. These methods are reviewed, focusing on far-field optical approaches based on light absorption and elastic scattering. The principles of the main linear and nonlinear methods are described and experimental results are illustrated in the case of metal nanoparticles, stressing the key role played by the object environment, such as the presence of a substrate, bound surface molecules or other nano-objects. Special attention is devoted to quantitative methods and correlation of the measured optical spectra of a nano-object with its morphology, characterized either optically or by electron microscopy, as this permits precise comparison with theoretical models. Application of these methods to optical detection and spectroscopy for single semiconductor nanowires and carbon nanotubes is also presented. Extension to ultrafast nonlinear extinction or scattering spectroscopies of single nano-objects is finally discussed in the context of investigation of their nonlinear optical response and their electronic, acoustic and thermal properties.

  5. Transmission electron microscopy and time resolved optical spectroscopy study of the electronic and structural interactions of ZnO nanorods with bovine serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaumünzer, M; Weichsel, U; Mačković, M; Spiecker, E; Peukert, W; Kryschi, C

    2013-08-22

    The adsorption behavior and electronic interactions of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with ZnO nanorod surfaces were investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy as well as stationary and time-resolved optical spectroscopy techniques. Transmission electron microscopy shows that ZnO nanorod surfaces are surrounded by a homogeneous amorphous BSA film with thicknesses between ~2.5 and 5.0 nm. The electronic structure and adsorption geometry of BSA were examined using high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy. The adsorption process was observed to result into an unfolded conformation of BSA becoming predominantly bound in the side-on orientation at the ZnO surface. This adsorption mode of the BSA molecules allows for a strong interaction with surface states of the ZnO nanorods. This is obvious from its efficient quenching of the defect-center photoluminescence of ZnO. Complementary information of electronic interactions across the ZnO nanorod interface was obtained from femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy experiments. The rise dynamics of the measured transients revealed altered hole trapping dynamics and, thus, indicated to heterogeneous charge transfer as emerging from adsorbed BSA molecules to defect centers of the ZnO interface.

  6. Atomic and Molecular Data for Optical Stellar Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Heiter, U; Asplund, M; Barklem, P S; Bergemann, M; Magrini, L; Masseron, T; Mikolaitis, Š; Pickering, J C; Ruffoni, M P

    2015-01-01

    High-precision spectroscopy of large stellar samples plays a crucial role for several topical issues in astrophysics. Examples include studying the chemical structure and evolution of the Milky Way galaxy, tracing the origin of chemical elements, and characterizing planetary host stars. Data are accumulating from instruments that obtain high-quality spectra of stars in the ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelength regions on a routine basis. These instruments are located at ground-based 2- to 10-m class telescopes around the world, in addition to the spectrographs with unique capabilities available at the Hubble Space Telescope. The interpretation of these spectra requires high-quality transition data for numerous species, in particular neutral and singly ionized atoms, and di- or triatomic molecules. We rely heavily on the continuous efforts of laboratory astrophysics groups that produce and improve the relevant experimental and theoretical atomic and molecular data. The compilation of the best available ...

  7. Raman correlation spectroscopy: A feasibility study of a new optical correlation technique and development of multi-component nanoparticles using the reprecipitation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Maki

    The feasibility of Raman correlation spectroscopy (RCS) is investigated as a new temporal optical fluctuation spectroscopy in this dissertation. RCS analyzes the correlations of the intensity fluctuations of Raman scattering from particles in a suspension that undergo Brownian motion. Because each Raman emission line arises from a specific molecular bond, the RCS method could yield diffusion behavior of specific chemical species within a dispersion. Due to the nature of Raman scattering as a coherent process, RCS could provide similar information as acquired in dynamic light scattering (DLS) and be practical for various applications that requires the chemical specificity in dynamical information. The theoretical development is discussed, and four experimental implementations of this technique are explained. The autocorrelation of the intensity fluctuations from a beta-carotene solution is obtained using the some configurations; however, the difficulty in precise alignment and weak nature of Raman scattering prevented the achievement of high sensitivity and resolution. Possible fluctuations of the phase of Raman scattering could also be affecting the results. A possible explanation of the observed autocorrelation in terms of number fluctuations of particles is also examined to test the feasibility of RCS as a new optical characterization method. In order to investigate the complex systems for which RCS would be useful, strategies for the creation of a multicomponent nanoparticle system are also explored. Using regular solution theory along with the concept of Hansen solubility parameters, an analytical model is developed to predict whether two or more components will form single nanoparticles, and what effect various processing conditions would have. The reprecipitation method was used to demonstrate the formation of the multi-component system of the charge transfer complex perylene:TCNQ (tetracyanoquinodimethane) and the active pharmaceutical ingredient cocrystal

  8. Optical spectroscopy of ancient paper and textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missori, M.

    2016-03-01

    Ancient paper and textiles represent a striking example of optically inhomogenous materials whose optical responses are strongly governed by scattering effects. In order to recover the absorption coefficient from non-invasive and non-destructive reflectance measurements a specific approach based on Kubelka-Munk two-flux theory must be applied. In this way quantitative chemical information, such as chromophores concentration, can be obtained, as well as quantitative spectra of additional substances such as pigments or dyes. Results on a folio of the Codex on the Flight of Birds by Leonardo da Vinci and a linen cloth dated back to 1653 and called the Shroud of Arquata, a copy of the Shroud of Turin, will be presented.

  9. HOMES Holographic Optical Method for Exoplanet Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditto, Thomas D.; McGrew, Stephen P.

    2013-09-01

    A novel telescope architecture is proposed specifically for the purpose of taking spectra of exoplanets orbiting stars within 10 pc ("the neighborhood"). The primary objective and the secondary spectrograph are holographic optical elements (HOEs) formed on flat membrane substrates of low areal mass that can be transported on cylinder rolls that are compatible with the payload geometry of delivery vehicles. Ribbon-shaped HOEs of up to 100 x 10 meters are contemplated. Computer models are presented with these dimensions. The models predict resolving power better than 10 mas. Because the primary separates wavelengths, we consider coronagraphs that use the divide and conquer strategy of one wavelength at a time. After delivery at the second Lagrange point, the stowed membranes are unfurled into flat holographic optics positioned in a four part formation spanning 1 km of open space.

  10. Optical & Infrared Spectroscopy of Transiting Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, C. A.; Tinetti, G.

    2010-10-01

    Two types of spectra can be measured from transiting extrasolar planets. The primary eclipse provides a transmission spectra of the exoplanet's limb as the planet passes in front of the star. These data probe the gas and particle composition of the atmosphere, as well as the atmospheric scale height. The secondary eclipse measures the emission of mainly the planet's dayside atmosphere from the planet plus star's emission minus the emission of star alone, when it eclipses the planet. These data probe the temperature and composition structure of the exoplanet. Only in the past 3 years, have infrared transmission and emission spectroscopy revealed the presence of the primary carbon and oxygen species (CH4, CO2, CO, and H2O). Efforts to constrain the abundances of these molecules are hindered by degenerate effects of the temperature and composition in the emission spectra. Transmission spectra, while less sensitive to the atmospheric temperatures, are difficult to interpret because the composition derived depends delicately on the assumed radius at a specified pressure level. This talk will discuss the correlations in the degenerate solutions that result from the radiative transfer analyses of both emission and transmission spectroscopy. The physical implications of these correlations are assessed in order to determine the temperature and composition structure of extrasolar planets, and their significance with respect to the exoplanet's chemistry and dynamics.

  11. Collimating Slicer for Optical Integral Field Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Integral Field Spectroscopy (IFS) is a technique that gives simultaneously the spectrum of each spatial sampling element in a given object field. It is a powerful tool which rearranges the data cube (x, y, lambda) represented by two spatial dimensions defining the field and the spectral decomposition in a detector plane. In IFS, the spatial unit reorganizes the field and the spectral unit is being composed of a classical spectrograph.The development of a Collimating Slicer aims at proposing a new type of integral field spectrograph which should be more compact. The main idea is to combine the image slicer with the collimator of the spectrograph, thus mixing the spatial and spectral units. The traditional combination of slicer, pupil and slit elements and the spectrograph collimator is replaced by a new one composed of a slicer and collimator only. In this paper, the state of the art of integral field spectroscopy using image slicers is described. The new system based onto the development of a Collimating Slic...

  12. Optical heterodyne detected velocity modulation molecular ionic spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Guanglong; YANG Xiaohua; YING Xuping; LIU Gang; HUANG Yunxia; CHEN Yangqin

    2004-01-01

    Optical heterodyne detected velocity modulation molecular ionic spectroscopy is presented and employed to observe the rovibrantional spectra of and That the lineshape of OH-VMS is of the second derivative of Gaussian profile and its sensitivity is 3.5×10-8 are theoretically analyzed, and they are both in good agreement with our experimental results.

  13. Focusing adaptive-optics for neutron spectroscopy at extreme conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeoni, G. G., E-mail: ggsimeoni@outlook.com [Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), FRM II, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Physics Department E13, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Valicu, R. G. [Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), FRM II, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Physics Department E13, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Physics Department E21, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Borchert, G. [Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), FRM II, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Böni, P. [Physics Department E21, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Rasmussen, N. G. [Nanoscience Center, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Yang, F.; Kordel, T.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Kargl, F.; Meyer, A. [Institut für Materialphysik im Weltraum, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, D-51170 Köln (Germany)

    2015-12-14

    Neutron Spectroscopy employing extreme-conditions sample environments is nowadays a crucial tool for the understanding of fundamental scientific questions as well as for the investigation of materials and chemical-physical properties. For all these kinds of studies, an increased neutron flux over a small sample area is needed. The prototype of a focusing neutron guide component, developed and produced completely at the neutron source FRM II in Garching (Germany), has been installed at the time-of-flight (TOF) disc-chopper neutron spectrometer TOFTOF and came into routine-operation. The design is based on the compressed Archimedes' mirror concept for finite-size divergent sources. It represents a unique device combining the supermirror technology with Adaptive Optics, suitable for broad-bandwidth thermal-cold TOF neutron spectroscopy (here optimized for 1.4–10 Å). It is able to squeeze the beam cross section down to a square centimeter, with a more than doubled signal-to-background ratio, increased efficiency at high scattering angles, and improved symmetry of the elastic resolution function. We present a comparison between the simulated and measured beam cross sections, as well as the performance of the instrument within real experiments. This work intends to show the unprecedented opportunities achievable at already existing instruments, along with useful guidelines for the design and construction of next-generation neutron spectrometers.

  14. Optical Stark Spectroscopy of Chloro-Methylene HCCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiujuan; Steimle, Timothy C.; Wang, Zhong

    2011-06-01

    The optical spectrum of chloro-methylene, HCCl, has been studied for more than 40 years by both conventional and laser-based spectroscopy. Surprisingly, numerous visible bands have yet to be characterized, due in part to known perturbations. Furthermore, the permanent electric dipole moment, μEl, for any state has yet to be determined. Here we report on the field-free and optical Stark spectrum of the tilde{A}1A'' (060)- tilde{X}1A '(000) band system. A cold molecular beam sample was produced by skimming the output of a pulsed discharge source and the spectrum recorded at a resolution of approximately 30 MHz via LIF detection. The field-free spectrum was analyzed to produce an improved set of spectroscopic parameters for the tilde{A}1A''(060)state. The Stark induced shifts were analyzed to determine the values of the a-component of μEl for the tilde{X}1A^ {'}(000)state of 0.498(8)D. Small perturbations in the tilde{A}1A''(060)state will be described. A. J. Merer and D.N. Travis Can. J. Phys., 44, 525 1966. M.Kakimoto, S.Saito and E. Hirota J.Mol.Spectrosc., 97, 194 1983. B.-C.Chang and T. Sears J.Mol.Spectrosc., 173, 391 1995. H. Fan, I. Ionescu, C. Annesley, J. Cummins, M. Bowers and S. A. Reid J.Mol.Spectrosc., 225, 43 2004.

  15. Authenticity screening of stained glass windows using optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulebroeck, Wendy; Wouters, Hilde; Nys, Karin; Thienpont, Hugo

    2016-11-01

    Civilized societies should safeguard their heritage as it plays an important role in community building. Moreover, past technologies often inspire new technology. Authenticity is besides conservation and restoration a key aspect in preserving our past, for example in museums when exposing showpieces. The classification of being authentic relies on an interdisciplinary approach integrating art historical and archaeological research complemented with applied research. In recent decades analytical dating tools are based on determining the raw materials used. However, the traditional applied non-portable, chemical techniques are destructive and time-consuming. Since museums oftentimes only consent to research actions which are completely non-destructive, optical spectroscopy might offer a solution. As a case-study we apply this technique on two stained glass panels for which the 14th century dating is nowadays questioned. With this research we were able to identify how simultaneous mapping of spectral signatures measured with a low cost optical spectrum analyser unveils information regarding the production period. The significance of this research extends beyond the re-dating of these panels to the 19th century as it provides an instant tool enabling immediate answering authenticity questions during the conservation process of stained glass, thereby providing the necessary data for solving deontological questions about heritage preservation.

  16. Monitoring of Tumor Response to Cisplatin Using Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spliethoff, Jarich W.; Evers, Daniel J.; Jaspers, Janneke E.; Hendriks, Benno H.W.; Rottenberg, Sven; Ruers, Theo J.M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Anatomic imaging alone is often inadequate for tuning systemic treatment for individual tumor response. Optically based techniques could potentially contribute to fast and objective response monitoring in personalized cancer therapy. In the present study, we evaluated the feasibility of dual-modality diffuse reflectance spectroscopy–autofluorescence spectroscopy (DRS-AFS) to monitor the effects of systemic treatment in a mouse model for hereditary breast cancer. METHODS: Brca1−/−; p53−/− mammary tumors were grown in 36 mice, half of which were treated with a single dose of cisplatin. Changes in the tumor physiology and morphology were measured for a period of 1 week using dual-modality DRS-AFS. Liver and muscle tissues were also measured to distinguish tumor-specific alterations from systemic changes. Model-based analyses were used to derive different optical parameters like the scattering and absorption coefficients, as well as sources of intrinsic fluorescence. Histopathologic analysis was performed for cross-validation with trends in optically based parameters. RESULTS: Treated tumors showed a significant decrease in Mie-scattering slope and Mie-to-total scattering fraction and an increase in both fat volume fraction and tissue oxygenation after 2 days of follow-up. Additionally, significant tumor-specific changes in the fluorescence spectra were seen. These longitudinal trends were consistent with changes observed in the histopathologic analysis, such as vital tumor content and formation of fibrosis. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that dual-modality DRS-AFS provides quantitative functional information that corresponds well with the degree of pathologic response. DRS-AFS, in conjunction with other imaging modalities, could be used to optimize systemic cancer treatment on the basis of early individual tumor response. PMID:24726234

  17. Optical Spectroscopy of IRAS 02091+6333

    CERN Document Server

    Kimeswenger, S; Emprechtinger, M; Groemer, G E; Kapferer, W; Kausch, W; Kitzbichler, M G; Lechner, M F M; Lederle, C; Uytterhoeven, K; Zijlstra, A A

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed spectroscopic investigation, spanning four winters, of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star IRAS 02091+6333. Zijlstra & Weinberger (2002) found a giant wall of dust around this star and modelled this unique phenomenon. However their work suffered from the quality of the optical investigations of the central object. Our spectroscopic investigation allowed us to define the spectral type and the interstellar foreground extinction more precisely. Accurate multi band photometry was carried out. This provides us with the possibility to derive the physical parameters of the system. The measurements presented here suggest a weak irregular photometric variability of the target, while there is no evidence of a spectroscopic variability over the last four years.

  18. Study of effect of H2 addition on the production of fluorocarbon radicals in H2/C4F8 inductively coupled plasma via optical emission spectroscopy actinometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Song; Xin Yu; Ning Zhao-Yuan

    2005-01-01

    C4F8 plasma with the addition of H2 is generated by the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) method. The relative densities of CF, CF2, H and F radicals are determined by actinometric optical emission spectroscopy (AOES) as a function of the gas flow rate ratio R=H2/(H2+C4F8) at a pressure of 0.8 Pa and an input r.f. power of 400W, while that of HF is measured by quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS). The results show that plasma activity increases firstly and then decreases with increasing R. As the gas flow rate ratio R changes from 0 to 0.625, relative densities of both CF and CF2 decrease, and the relative [CF] has a similar tendency as the calculated [CF], indicating that CF radicals are generated mainly by the electron impact dissociation of CF2 radicals. Production of HF is also discussed.

  19. Optical Stark Spectroscopy of Gold Chrolride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruohan; Steimle, Timothy

    2014-06-01

    The bonding and electrostatic properties of gold containing molecules are highly influenced by relativistic effects and electron correlation. Hence it is difficult to predict those properties via electron structure calculation, and such calculation are guided by experimental observations. Here we report on the A(Ω=1)-X1Σ+ and B(Ω=0)-X1Σ+ bands of AuCl, which have been previously recorded at Doppler limited resolution. A cold molecular beam sample was generated and the bands were recorded at high resolution (FWHM =35 MHz) using laser excitation spectroscopy, both field-free and in the presence of a static electric field. An improved set of spectroscopic parameters for the A(Ω=1) and B(Ω=0) states were obtained. The Stark induced shifts were analyzed to determine the permanent electric dipole moments for the X, A, and B states. A comparison with AuF and theory will be made. P. Pyykko; Angew Chem. Int {43} 4412, 2004. L. C. O'Brien, A. L. Elliott, and M. Dulick; J. Mol. Spectrosc, 194, 124, 1999.

  20. Optical Absorption Spectroscopy for Gas Analysis in Biomass Gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosch, Helge

    the concentration of the mentioned compounds. However, continuous measurements of different species directly in the gas (in-situ) and at the same time are scarce. In this work, the basis of optical in-situ analysis with ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopy was build to determine the concentration of the most...... important gas species of the low-temperature circulating fluidized bed gasifier. At first, a special gas cell,the hot gas flow cell (HGC), was build up and veried. In this custom-made gas cell, the optical properties, the so-called absorption cross-sections, of the most important sulfur and aromatic...

  1. Nonlinear optical signals and spectroscopy with quantum light

    CERN Document Server

    Dorfman, Konstantin E; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-01-01

    Conventional nonlinear spectroscopy uses classical light to detect matter properties through the variation of its response with frequencies or time delays. Quantum light opens up new avenues for spectroscopy by utilizing parameters of the quantum state of light as novel control knobs and through the variation of photon statistics by coupling to matter. We present an intuitive diagrammatic approach for calculating ultrafast spectroscopy signals induced by quantum light, focusing on applications involving entangled photons with nonclassical bandwidth properties - known as "time-energy entanglement". Nonlinear optical signals induced by quantized light fields are expressed using time ordered multipoint correlation functions of superoperators. These are different from Glauber's g- functions for photon counting which use normally ordered products of ordinary operators. Entangled photon pairs are not subjected to the classical Fourier limitations on the joint temporal and spectral resolution. After a brief survey o...

  2. Optical spectroscopy by 5-aminolevulinic acid hexylester induced photodynamic treatment in rat bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Eivind L. P.; Randeberg, Lise L.; Gederaas, Odrun A.; Arum, Carl-Jørgen; Krokan, Hans E.; Hjelme, Dag R.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality which has been shown to be effective for both malignant and non-malignant diseases. New photosensitizers such as 5-aminolevulinic acid hexylester (hALA) may increase the efficiency of PDT. Monitoring of the tissue response provides important information for optimizing factors such as drug and light dose for this treatment modality. Optical spectroscopy may be suited for this task. To test the efficacy of hALA induced PDT, a study on rats with a superficial bladder cancer model, in which a bladder cancer cell line (AY-27) is instilled, will be performed. Preliminary studies have included a PDT feasibility study on rats, fluorescence spectroscopy on AY-27 cell suspensions, and optical reflection and fluorescence spectroscopy in rat bladders in vivo. The results from the preliminary studies are promising, and the study on hALA induced PDT treatment of bladder cancer will be continued.

  3. Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy and optical characterization of a-C-H and BN films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouch, J. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Warner, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The amorphous dielectrics a-C:H and BN were deposited on III-V semiconductors. Optical band gaps as high as 3 eV were measured for a-C:H generated by C4H10 plasmas; a comparison was made with bad gaps obtained from films prepared by CH4 glow discharges. The ion beam deposited BN films exhibited amorphous behavior with band gaps on the order of 5 eV. Film compositions were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The optical properties were characterized by ellipsometry, UV/VIS absorption, and IR reflection and transmission. Etching rates of a-C:H subjected to O2 dicharges were determined.

  4. Computational optical biomedical spectroscopy and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Musa, Sarhan M

    2015-01-01

    Applications of Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging in Personal Care Studies; Guojin Zhang, Roger L. McMullen, Richard Mendelsohn, and Osama M. MusaFluorescence Bioimaging with Applications to Chemistry; Ufana Riaz and S.M. AshrafNew Trends in Immunohistochemical, Genome, and Metabolomics Imaging; G. Livanos, Aditi Deshpande, C. Narayan, Ying Na, T. Quang, T. Farrahi, R. Koglin, Suman Shrestha, M. Zervakis, and George C. GiakosDeveloping a Comprehensive Taxonomy for Human Cell Types; Richard Conroy and Vinay PaiFunctional Near-Infrared S

  5. Photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical study of M(IO3)2(-) (M = H, Li, Na, K): structural evolution, optical isomers, and hyperhalogen behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Gao-Lei; Wu, Miao Miao; Wen, Hui; Sun, Qiang; Wang, Xue-Bin; Zheng, Wei-Jun

    2013-07-28

    H(IO3)2(-) and M(IO3)2(-) (M = Li, Na, K) anions were successfully produced via electrospray ionization of their corresponding bulk salt solutions, and were characterized by combining negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The experimental vertical detachment energies (VDEs) of M(IO3)2(-) (M = H, Li, Na, K) are 6.25, 6.57, 6.60, and 6.51 eV, respectively, and they are much higher than that of IO3(-) (4.77 eV). The theoretical calculations show that each of these anions has two energetically degenerate optical isomers. It is found that the structure of H(IO3)2(-) can be written as IO3(-)(HIO3), in which the H atom is tightly bound to one of the IO3(-) groups and forms an iodic acid (HIO3) molecule; while the structures of M(IO3)2(-) can be written as (IO3(-))M(+)(IO3(-)), in which the alkali metal atoms interact with the two IO3(-) groups almost equally and bridge the two IO3(-) groups via two O atoms of each IO3(-) with the two MOOI planes nearly perpendicular to each other. In addition, the high VDEs of M(IO3)2(-) (M = Li, Na, K) can be explained by the hyperhalogen behavior of their neutral counterparts.

  6. Photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical study of M(IO3)2- (M = H, Li, Na, K): Structural evolution, optical isomers, and hyperhalogen behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Gao-Lei; Wu, Miao Miao; Wen, Hui; Sun, Qiang; Wang, Xue-Bin; Zheng, Wei-Jun

    2013-07-01

    H(IO3)2- and M(IO3)2- (M = Li, Na, K) anions were successfully produced via electrospray ionization of their corresponding bulk salt solutions, and were characterized by combining negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The experimental vertical detachment energies (VDEs) of M(IO3)2- (M = H, Li, Na, K) are 6.25, 6.57, 6.60, and 6.51 eV, respectively, and they are much higher than that of IO3- (4.77 eV). The theoretical calculations show that each of these anions has two energetically degenerate optical isomers. It is found that the structure of H(IO3)2- can be written as IO3-(HIO3), in which the H atom is tightly bound to one of the IO3- groups and forms an iodic acid (HIO3) molecule; while the structures of M(IO3)2- can be written as (IO3-)M+(IO3-), in which the alkali metal atoms interact with the two IO3- groups almost equally and bridge the two IO3- groups via two O atoms of each IO3- with the two MOOI planes nearly perpendicular to each other. In addition, the high VDEs of M(IO3)2- (M = Li, Na, K) can be explained by the hyperhalogen behavior of their neutral counterparts.

  7. Two-dimensional optical correlation spectroscopy applied to liquid/glass dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazonder, Kees; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Wiersma, Douwe A.; Corkum, Paul; Jonas, David M.; Miller, R.J. Dwayne.; Weiner, Andrew M.

    2007-01-01

    Correlation spectroscopy was used to study the effects of temperature and phase changes on liquid and glass solvent dynamics. By assessing the eccentricity of the elliptic shape of a 2D optical correlation spectrum the value of the underlying frequency-frequency correlation function can be retrieved

  8. Two-dimensional optical correlation spectroscopy applied to liquid/glass dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazonder, Kees; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    2006-01-01

    Correlation spectroscopy was used to study the effects of temperature and phase changes on liquid and glass solvent dynamics. This method yielded both intuitive clues and a quantitative measure of the dynamics of the system. © 2006 Optical Society of America.

  9. Magneto-optical spectroscopy of (Ga,Mn)N epilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcet, S.; Ferrand, D.; Halley, D.; Kuroda, S.; Mariette, H.; Gheeraert, E.; Teran, F. J.; Sadowski, M. L.; Galera, R. M.; Cibert, J.

    2006-09-01

    We report on the magneto-optical spectroscopy and cathodoluminescence of a set of wurtzite (Ga,Mn)N epilayers with a low Mn content, grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The sharpness of the absorption lines associated with the Mn3+ internal transitions allows a precise study of its Zeeman effect in both Faraday and Voigt configurations. We obtain a good agreement if we assume a dynamical Jahn-Teller effect in the 3d4 configuration of Mn, and we determine the parameters of the effective Hamiltonians describing the T25 and E5 levels, and those of the spin Hamiltonian in the ground spin multiplet, from which the magnetization of the isolated ion can be calculated. On layers grown on transparent substrates, transmission close to the band gap, and the associated magnetic circular dichroism, reveal the presence of the giant Zeeman effect resulting from exchange interactions between the Mn3+ ions and the carriers. The spin-hole interaction is found to be ferromagnetic.

  10. Novel microfluidic devices for Raman spectroscopy and optical trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottevaere, Heidi; Liu, Qing; de Coster, Diane; Van Erps, Jürgen; Vervaeke, Michael; Thienpont, Hugo

    2016-09-01

    Traditionally, Raman spectroscopy is done in a specialized lab, with considerable requirements in terms of equipment, time and manual sampling of substances of interest. We present the modeling, the design and the fabrication process of a microfluidic device incorporation Raman spectroscopy, from which one enables confocal Raman measurements on-chip. The latter is fabricated using ultra precision diamond tooling and is tested in a proof-of-concept setup, by for example measuring Raman spectra of urea solutions with various concentrations. If one wants to analyze single cells instead of a sample solution, precautions need to be taken. Since Raman scattering is a weak process, the molecular fingerprint of flowing particles would be hard to measure. One method is to stably position the cell under test in the detection area during acquisition of the Raman scattering such that the acquisition time can be increased. Positioning of cells can be done through optical trapping and leads to an enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and thus a more reliable cell identification. Like Raman spectroscopy, optical trapping can also be miniaturized. We present the modeling, design process and fabrication of a mass-manufacturable polymer microfluidic device for dual fiber optical trapping using two counterpropagating singlemode beams. We use a novel fabrication process that consists of a premilling step and ultraprecision diamond tooling for the manufacturing of the molds and double-sided hot embossing for replication, resulting in a robust microfluidic chip for optical trapping. In a proof-of-concept demonstration, we characterize the trapping capabilities of the hot embossed chip.

  11. In-plane spectroscopy with optical fibers and liquid-filled APEX™ glass microcuvettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, William R.; Hasan Tantawi, Khalid; Waddell, Emanuel; Fedorov, Vladimir; Williams, John D.

    2013-10-01

    Chemical etching and laser drilling of microstructural glass results in opaque or translucent sidewalls, limiting the optical analysis of glass microfluidic devices to top down or non-planar topologies. These non-planar observation topologies prevent each layer of a multilayered device from being independently optically addressed. However, novel photosensitive glass processing techniques in APEX™ have resulted in microfabricated glass structures with transparent sidewalls. Toward the goal of a transparent multilayered glass microfluidic device, this study demonstrates the ability to perform spectroscopy with optical fibers and microcuvettes fabricated in photosensitive APEX™ glass.

  12. Developing fibre optic Raman probes for applications in clinical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Oliver; Iping Petterson, Ingeborg E; Day, John C C; Stone, Nick

    2016-04-07

    Raman spectroscopy has been shown by various groups over the last two decades to have significant capability in discriminating disease states in bodily fluids, cells and tissues. Recent development in instrumentation, optics and manufacturing approaches has facilitated the design and demonstration of various novel in vivo probes, which have applicability for myriad of applications. This review focusses on key considerations and recommendations for application specific clinical Raman probe design and construction. Raman probes can be utilised as clinical tools able to provide rapid, non-invasive, real-time molecular analysis of disease specific changes in tissues. Clearly the target tissue location, the significance of spectral changes with disease and the possible access routes to the region of interest will vary for each clinical application considered. This review provides insight into design and construction considerations, including suitable probe designs and manufacturing materials compatible with Raman spectroscopy.

  13. Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Theoretical Study of M(IO3)2– (M = H, Li, Na, K): Structural Evolution, Optical Isomers and Hyperhalogen Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Gao-Lei; Wu, Miao Miao; Wen, Hui; Sun, Qiang N.; Wang, Xue B.; Zheng, Weijun

    2013-07-31

    H(IO3)2- and M(IO3)2- (M = Li, Na, K) anions were successfully produced via electrospray ionization of their corresponding bulk salt solutions, and were characterized by combining negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The photoelectron spectra reveal that all these M(IO3)2- species possess very high vertical detachment energies (VDEs), to be 6.25, 6.57, 6.60 and 6.51 eV for H(IO3)2-, Li(IO3)2-, Na(IO3)2- and K(IO3)2-, respectively, which are much higher than that of IO3- (4.77 eV). The theoretical calculations show that each of these anions has two energetically degenerated optical isomers. It is found that the structure of H(IO3)2- can be written as IO3-(HIO3), in which the H atom is tightly bound to one of the IO3- groups and forms an iodic acid (HIO3) molecule; while the structures of M(IO3)2- can be written as (IO3-)M+(IO3-), in which the alkali metal atoms interact with the two IO3- groups almost equally and bridge the two IO3- groups via two O atoms of each IO3- with the two MOOI planes nearly perpendicular to each other. In addition, the high VDEs of M(IO3)2- (M = Li, Na, K) can be explained by the hyperhalogen behavior of their neutral counterparts.

  14. Optical Characterization of Commercial Lithiated Graphite Battery Electrodes and in Situ Fiber Optic Evanescent Wave Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannoum, AbdulRahman; Norris, Ryan C; Iyer, Krishna; Zdravkova, Liliana; Yu, Aiping; Nieva, Patricia

    2016-07-27

    Optical characterization of graphite anodes in lithium ion batteries (LIB) is presented here for potential use in estimating their state of charge (SOC). The characterization is based on reflectance spectroscopy of the anode of commercial LIB cells and in situ optical measurements using an embedded optical fiber sensor. The optical characterization of the anode using wavelengths ranging from 500 to 900 nm supports the dominance of graphite over the solid electrolyte interface in governing the anode's reflectance properties. It is demonstrated that lithiated graphite's reflectance has a significant change in the near-infrared band, 750-900 nm, compared with the visible spectrum as a function of SOC. An embedded optical sensor is used to measure the transmittance of graphite anode in the near-infrared band, and the results suggest that a unique inexpensive method may be developed to estimate the SOC of a LIB.

  15. Optical and ultraviolet spectroscopy of three F + B binary stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, Bernard W.; Dempsey, Robert C.; Parsons, Sidney B.

    1991-01-01

    Optical and ultraviolet spectroscopy is presented for three F + B objects that are members of the first group of strongly interacting, F II + B systems. The data obtained confirm that HD 59771, HD 242257, and CoD -30 5135 are all binary star systems consisting of a luminous F-type component and a B star. Strong, variable H-alpha emission is seen in all the stars. It is found that the UV spectrum of HD 59771 resembles the spectrum of HD 207739. CoD -30 5135 has the most dramatic mid-UV spectrum seen among the scores of observed cool + hot star systems.

  16. Optical amplification in disordered electrooptic Tm3+ and Ho3+ codoped lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate ceramics and study of spectroscopy and communication between cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Long; Sun, Fankui; Chen, Xuesheng; Li, Kewen K.; Zhang, Jingwen

    2014-02-01

    Rare earth doped electro-optic (EO) ceramics of lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate (PLZT) are promising in building multifunctional optical devices, by taking advantage of both EO effect and optical activity. In this work, the combination of the measured spectra of absorption and photoluminescence, the fluorescent decay, the calculated Judd-Ofelt parameters, and measured single pass gain in Tm3+, Ho3+ codoped PLZT ceramics have marked them out as promising gain media in building electrically controllable lasers/optical amplifiers and other multifunctional devices. Optical energy storage was also observed in the optical amplification dynamics.

  17. Anisotropic optical response of optically opaque elastomers with conductive fillers as revealed by terahertz polarization spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Makoto; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2016-12-01

    Elastomers are one of the most important materials in modern society because of the inherent viscoelastic properties due to their cross-linked polymer chains. Their vibration-absorbing and adhesive properties are especially useful and thus utilized in various applications, for example, tires in automobiles and bicycles, seismic dampers in buildings, and seals in a space shuttle. Thus, the nondestructive inspection of their internal states such as the internal deformation is essential in safety. Generally, industrial elastomers include various kinds of additives, such as carbon blacks for reinforcing them. The additives make most of them opaque in a wide spectral range from visible to mid-infrared, resulting in that the nondestructive inspection of the internal deformation is quite difficult. Here, we demonstrate transmission terahertz polarization spectroscopy as a powerful technique for investigating the internal optical anisotropy in optically opaque elastomers with conductive additives, which are transparent only in the terahertz frequency region. The internal deformation can be probed through the polarization changes inside the material due to the anisotropic dielectric response of the conductive additives. Our study about the polarization-dependent terahertz response of elastomers with conductive additives provides novel knowledge for in situ, nondestructive evaluation of their internal deformation.

  18. Design of differential optical absorption spectroscopy long-path telescopes based on fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merten, André; Tschritter, Jens; Platt, Ulrich

    2011-02-10

    We present a new design principle of telescopes for use in the spectral investigation of the atmosphere and the detection of atmospheric trace gases with the long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. A combination of emitting and receiving fibers in a single bundle replaces the commonly used coaxial-Newton-type combination of receiving and transmitting telescope. This very simplified setup offers a higher light throughput and simpler adjustment and allows smaller instruments, which are easier to handle and more portable. The higher transmittance was verified by ray-tracing calculations, which result in a theoretical factor threefold improvement in signal intensity compared with the old setup. In practice, due to the easier alignment and higher stability, up to factor of 10 higher signal intensities were found. In addition, the use of a fiber optic light source provides a better spectral characterization of the light source, which results in a lower detection limit for trace gases studied with this instrument. This new design will greatly enhance the usability and the range of applications of active DOAS instruments.

  19. Electromagnon excitation in the field-induced noncollinear ferrimagnetic phase of Ba2Mg2Fe12O22 studied by polarized inelastic neutron scattering and terahertz time-domain optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Taro; Takahashi, Youtarou; Kibayashi, Shunsuke; Matsuda, Masaaki; Kakurai, Kazuhisa; Ishiwata, Shintaro; Taguchi, Yasujiro; Tokura, Yoshinori; Arima, Taka-hisa

    2016-01-01

    We have studied magnetic excitations in a field-induced noncollinear commensurate ferrimagnetic phase of Ba2Mg2Fe12O22 by means of polarized inelastic neutron scattering (PINS) and terahertz (THz) time-domain optical spectroscopy under magnetic field. A previous THz spectroscopy study reported that the field-induced phase exhibits electric-dipole-active excitations with energies of around 5 meV [Kida et al., Phys. Rev. B 83, 064422 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevB.83.064422]. In the present PINS measurements, we observed inelastic scattering signals around 5 meV at the zone center in the spin-flip channel. This directly shows that the electric-dipole-active excitations are indeed of magnetic origin, that is, electromagnons. In addition, the present THz spectroscopy confirms that the excitations have oscillating electric polarization parallel to the c axis. In terms of the spin-current model (Katsura-Nagaosa-Balatsky model), the noncollinear magnetic order in the field-induced phase can induce static electric polarization perpendicular to the c axis, but not dynamic electric polarization along the c axis. We suggest that the electromagnon excitations can be explained by applying the magnetostriction model to the out-of-phase oscillations of the magnetic moments, which is deduced from the present experimental results.

  20. Ultrafast Third-Order Nonlinear Optical Spectroscopy of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napoleon Thantu; Robert S. Schley

    2003-09-01

    Time-resolved Raman induced Kerr effect spectroscopy in the optical heterodyne detection configuration has been employed to investigate intermolecular, intramolecular, and reorientational dynamics in neat trichloroethylene (TCE). The reorientation time constant is directly measured from the time-resolved data, while Fourier transformation of the time-resolved data yields the intermolecular and intramolecular vibrational spectrum. Use of ultrashort, femtosecond pulses enables excitation of depolarized Raman-active transitions between 1 and 500 cm-1. The intramolecular vibrations have been identified using a previous assignment. The limitations imposed by the laser and detector noise, and other nonlinear optical processes that are manifest at high pulse intensities, on the use of this time-domain technique for performing chemical species detection are discussed using carbon tetrachloride as an example.

  1. Recipes to make organic phantoms for diffusive optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarto, Giovanna; Pifferi, Antonio; Bargigia, Ilaria; Farina, Andrea; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Taroni, Paola

    2013-04-10

    Three recipes are presented to make tissue constituent-equivalent phantoms of water and lipids. Different approaches to prepare the emulsion are proposed. Nature phantoms are made using no emulsifying agent, but just a professional disperser; instead Agar and Triton phantoms are made using agar or Triton X-100, respectively, as agents to emulsify water and lipids. Different water-to-lipid ratios ranging from 30% to 70% by mass were tested. A broadband time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy system was used to characterize the phantoms in terms of optical properties and composition. For some water/lipid ratios the emulsion fails or the phantom has limited lifetime, but in most cases the recipes provide phantoms with a high degree of homogeneity [coefficient of variation (CV) of 4.6% and 1.5% for the absorption and reduced scattering coefficient, respectively] and good reproducibility (CV of 8.3% and 12.4% for absorption and reduced scattering coefficient, respectively).

  2. Band (5, 0) in the Red System A2ПI - X2Σ+ of CN Studied by Optical Heterodyne Magnetic Rotation Enhanced Concentration Modulation Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许朝雄; 吴玲; 刘进军; 吴升海; 段传喜; 陈扬骎; 刘煜炎

    2002-01-01

    We study the CN radical using optical heterodyne magnetic rotation enhanced concentration modulation spec troscopy in the visible region. The radical has been produced in the ac glow discharge of acetonitrile with helium as the carrier gas. The (5, 0) band of the red system A2П - X2∑+ in the range 17450-17830cm-1 has been observed and rotationally analysed. We determine a set of precise molecular constants for the v = 5 vibrational level of CN in the A2ПI state.

  3. Measurement of aerosol optical properties by cw cavity enhanced spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Guo; Ye, Shan-Shan; Yang, Xiao; Han, Ye-Xing; Tang, Huai-Wu; Yu, Zhi-Wei

    2016-10-01

    The CAPS (Cavity Attenuated Phase shift Spectroscopy) system, which detects the extinction coefficients within a 10 nm bandpass centered at 532 nm, comprises a green LED with center wavelength in 532nm, a resonant optical cavity (36 cm length), a Photo Multiplier Tube detector, and a lock in amplifier. The square wave modulated light from the LED passes through the optical cavity and is detected as a distorted waveform which is characterized by a phase shift with respect to the initial modulation. Extinction coefficients are determined from changes in the phase shift of the distorted waveform of the square wave modulated LED light that is transmitted through the optical cavity. The performance of the CAPS system was evaluated by using measurements of the stability and response of the system. The minima ( 0.1 Mm-1) in the Allan plots show the optimum average time ( 100s) for optimum detection performance of the CAPS system. In the paper, it illustrates that extinction coefficient was correlated with PM2.5 mass (0.91). These figures indicate that this method has the potential to become one of the most sensitive on-line analytical techniques for extinction coefficient detection. This work aims to provide an initial validation of the CAPS extinction monitor in laboratory and field environments. Our initial results presented in this paper show that the CAPS extinction monitor is capable of providing state-of-the-art performance while dramatically reducing the complexity of optical instrumentation for directly measuring the extinction coefficients.

  4. Localization Spectroscopy of a Single Ion in an Optical Lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legrand, Olivier Philippe Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The work reported in this thesis primarily focuses on studies of the dynamics of a single laser-cooled ion, simultaneously confined in the harmonic potential of a linear Paul trap and a rapidly varying periodic potential – a so-called optical lattice – generated from an optical standing-wave. Bes......The work reported in this thesis primarily focuses on studies of the dynamics of a single laser-cooled ion, simultaneously confined in the harmonic potential of a linear Paul trap and a rapidly varying periodic potential – a so-called optical lattice – generated from an optical standing...... calibration and analysis of the detection system, several theoretical simulations of the expected dynamics and associated optical response of the ion were undertaken. Finally, a new laser source based on second harmonic generation was developed in order to perform laser-cooling of Ca+ ions, and to serve...

  5. Compositional and Optical Properties of Titan Haze Analogs Using Aerosol Mass Spectrometry, Photoacoustic Spectroscopy and Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugelow, M.; Zarzana, K. J.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The organic haze that surrounds Saturn's moon Titan is formed through the photolysis and electron initiated dissociation of methane and nitrogen. The chemical pathways leading to haze formation and the resulting haze optical properties are still highly uncertain. Here we examine the compositional and optical properties of Titan haze aerosol analogs. By studying these properties together, the impact of haze on Titan's radiative balance can be better understood. The aerosol analogs studied are produced from different initial methane concentrations (0.1, 2 and 10% CH4) using spark discharge excitation. To determine the complex refractive index of the aerosol, we combine two spectroscopic techniques, one that measures absorption and one that measures extinction: photoacoustic spectroscopy coupled with cavity ring-down spectroscopy (PASCaRD). This technique provides the benefit of a high precision determination of the imaginary component of the refractive index (k), along with the highly sensitive determination of the real component of the refractive index (n). The refractive indices are retrieved at two wavelengths, 405 and 532 nm, using the PASCaRD system. To yield aerosol composition, quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometry is used. Compositional information is obtained from a technique that uses isotopically labeled and unlabeled methane gas. I will present preliminary data on the complex refractive indices of Titan aerosol analogs at both wavelengths, in conjunction with the aerosol composition as a percent by weight of carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen. The correlation of optical and chemical properties should be useful for remote sensing instruments probing Titan haze.

  6. An extensive investigation on nucleation, growth parameters, crystalline perfection, spectroscopy, thermal, optical, microhardness, dielectric and SHG studies on potential NLO crystal - Ammonium Hydrogen L-tartarte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanumantharao, Redrothu; Kalainathan, S.; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Madhusoodanan, U.

    2013-02-01

    Ammonium Hydrogen L-tartarte (AMT), an organic nonlinear optical crystal was grown by slow evaporation method at ambient temperature. Solubility, metastable zone width and induction period of Ammonium Hydrogen L-tartarte in aqueous solution were determined. Good quality crystals were selected and characterized by Single crystal XRD, HR-XRD, FT-IR, 1H NMR, Mass, TGA-DTA, SEM, EDAX, optical and NLO studies. Single crystal XRD analysis revealed that the crystal system belongs to orthorhombic with cell parameters a = 7.65 Å, b = 7.85 Å and c = 11.07 Å. High-resolution-X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD) analysis was carried out to study the crystalline perfection of the grown crystal. 1H NMR and FTIR spectrum thus confirmed the presence of functional groups of the grown crystal. Molecular mass of AMT was measured accurately by mass spectroscopic analysis. Surface features of the grown crystal were analyzed by SEM, AFM, chemical etching and the presence of elements in the compound was identified by EDAX analysis. Thermal behavior of the grown crystal has been studied by TG/DTA analysis. The recorded UV-Vis-NIR spectrum shows excellent transmission in the region of 190-1100 nm. The Vickers and Knoop's microhardness studies have been carried out on AMT crystals over a range of 10-50 g. Hardness anisotropy has been observed in accordance with the orientation of the crystal. Fluorescence spectral studies were carried in the range of 280-500 nm for the grown crystal. The SHG conversion efficiency and laser damage threshold were measured using an Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm).

  7. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leen, J Brian; O'Keefe, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10(-10) cm(-1)/√Hz; an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features.

  8. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leen, J. Brian, E-mail: b.leen@lgrinc.com; O’Keefe, Anthony [Los Gatos Research, 67 E. Evelyn Avenue, Suite 3, Mountain View, California 94041 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10{sup −10} cm{sup −1}/√(Hz;) an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features.

  9. An Optical Tweezers Platform for Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy in Organic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jacob; Kamenetska, Maria; Ganim, Ziad

    2017-10-03

    Observation at the single molecule level has been a revolutionary tool for molecular biophysics and materials science, but single molecule studies of solution-phase chemistry are less widespread. In this work we develop an experimental platform for solution-phase single molecule force spectroscopy in organic solvents. This optical-tweezer-based platform was designed for broad chemical applicability and utilizes optically trapped core-shell microspheres, synthetic polymer tethers, and click chemistry linkages formed in situ. We have observed stable optical trapping of the core-shell microspheres in ten different solvents, and single molecule link formation in four different solvents. These experiments demonstrate how to use optical tweezers for single molecule force application in the study of solution-phase chemistry.

  10. Optical signatures of molecular particles via mass-selected cluster spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    A new molecular beam apparatus was developed to study optical absorption in cold (less than 100 K) atomic clusters and complexes produced by their condensation with simple molecular gases. In this instrument, ionized clusters produced in a laser vaporization nozzle source are mass selected and studied with photodissociation spectroscopy at visible and ultraviolet wavelengths. This new approach can be applied to synthesize and characterize numerous particulates and weakly bound complexes expected in planetary atmospheres and in comets.

  11. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of single living cells: principle and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jianliao; Wei, Qing; Wang, Yuzhu; Li, Yong Qing

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the principle and applications of the combination technique of optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy for real-time analysis of single living cells. We demonstrate that the information of each substance inside a captured cell can be retrieved by the Raman spectrum of the cell. The effect of alcohol solution on single human Red Blood Cell (RBC) is investigated using near-infrared laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS). The significant difference between the spectrum of fresh RBC and the spectrum of RBC exposed to alcohol is observed due to the degradation of RBC. We also present the preliminary study result on the diagnosis of colorectal cancer using LTRS system.

  12. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Michael J.; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications. PMID:23945738

  13. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    CERN Document Server

    Morrissey, Michael J; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining ground in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension on this work to molecules will be introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for particular applications.

  14. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Síle Nic Chormaic

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications.

  15. Fast optical in situ spectroscopy in III-V MOVPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaspari, C.

    2007-09-29

    This work describes the application of optical in situ measurement techniques (reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy, RAS, and spectroscopic ellipsometry, SE) to processes that are important for the growth of III-V semiconductors like GaAs, InP, InAs and GaP in metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Special emphasis is placed on the determination of the free carrier concentration (doping level) and the study of the thermal desorption properties of III-V oxides. A large part of this work is concerned with the development and the construction of a multichannel RAS setup that allows the recording of RAS spectra within fractions of a second. On the basis of benchmark measurements it was shown that the spectral resolution is sufficiently accurate for application in epitaxy. To demonstrate the recording of spectra with high temporal resolution, RAS monolayer oscillations during growth of GaAs were studied and it was shown that the surface changes periodically between a relatively smooth morphology with adsorbed methyl groups (type III) and a stepped, gallium-rich surface (type II). Furthermore the non-reversible process of growing InAs quantum dots on GaAs was studied. It was shown that the multichannel RAS is capable of detecting the 2D-3D transition as well as the following morphological change of the surface at high temporal resolution. For the measurement of the doping level, the relationship between the doping-induced internal electric field and the anisotropy of the sample was studied. To understand the effect of the so-called doping oscillations, a theoretical model was developed. For the investigation of the thermal desorption of the III-V oxides in MOVPE, a number of test series were realised. It was also found that the formation of the reconstructed surface is finished a considerable time after the SE transient indicates stable conditions (no further reduction of the oxide layer). The activation energy for oxide desorption from InAs, GaAs and InP was

  16. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  17. Optical spectroscopy of low-dimensional rare-earth iron borates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, M. N.

    2009-04-01

    The family of RFe 3(BO 3) 4 borates (R=Pr, Nd, Eu-Er, Y) was studied by high-resolution optical absorption and Raman spectroscopies. Structural and magnetic phase transitions were detected and the types of magnetic structure were determined. Energy of crystal-field (CF) levels and exchange splitting of the ground state of the R 3+ ion were obtained from the analysis of optical spectra. CF calculations were carried out. Effective magnetic field at the R 3+ site was found, using the calculated value of the magnetic g-factor. Some peculiarities of modeling the paramagnetic susceptibility of NdFe 3(BO 3) 4 are discussed.

  18. Enhancing stellar spectroscopy with extreme adaptive optics and photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Jovanovic, Nemanja; Cvetojevic, Nick; Guyon, Olivier; Martinache, Frantz

    2016-01-01

    Extreme adaptive optics systems are now in operation across the globe. These systems, capable of high order wavefront correction, deliver Strehl ratios of 90% in the near-infrared. Originally intended for the direct imaging of exoplanets, these systems are often equipped with advanced coronagraphs that suppress the on-axis-star, interferometers to calibrate wavefront errors, and low order wavefront sensors to stabilize any tip/tilt residuals to a degree never seen before. Such systems are well positioned to facilitate the detailed spectroscopic characterization of faint substellar companions at small angular separations from the host star. Additionally, the increased light concentration of the point-spread function and the unprecedented stability create opportunities in other fields of astronomy as well, including spectroscopy. With such Strehl ratios, efficient injection into single-mode fibers or photonic lanterns becomes possible. With diffraction-limited components feeding the instrument, calibrating a sp...

  19. Optical Coherence Tomography and Raman Spectroscopy of the retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J W; Zawadzki, R J; Liu, R; Chan, J; Lane, S; Werner, J S

    2009-01-16

    Imaging the structure and correlating it with the biochemical content of the retina holds promise for fundamental research and for clinical applications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is commonly used to image the 3D structure of the retina and while the added functionality of biochemical analysis afforded by Raman scattering could provide critical molecular signatures for clinicians and researchers, there are many technical challenges to combining these imaging modalities. We present an ex vivo OCT microscope combined with Raman spectroscopy capable of collecting morphological and molecular information about a sample simultaneously. The combined instrument will be used to investigate remaining technical challenges to combine these imaging modalities, such as the laser power levels needed to achieve a Raman signal above the noise level without damaging the sample.

  20. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 1. Atoms and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter

    2015-09-01

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  1. Diffractive optics based four-wave, six-wave, ..., nu-wave nonlinear spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R J Dwayne; Paarmann, Alexander; Prokhorenko, Valentyn I

    2009-09-15

    A detailed understanding of chemical processes requires information about both structure and dynamics. By definition, a reaction involves nonstationary states and is a dynamic process. Structure describes the atomic positions at global minima in the nuclear potential energy surface. Dynamics are related to the anharmonicities in this potential that couple different minima and lead to changes in atomic positions (reactions) and correlations. Studies of molecular dynamics can be configured to directly access information on the anharmonic interactions that lead to chemical reactions and are as central to chemistry as structural information. In this regard, nonlinear spectroscopies have distinct advantages over more conventional linear spectroscopies. Because of this potential, nonlinear spectroscopies could eventually attain a comparable level of importance for studying dynamics on the relevant time scales to barrier crossings and reactive processes as NMR has for determining structure. Despite this potential, nonlinear spectroscopy has not attained the same degree of utility as linear spectroscopy largely because nonlinear studies are more technically challenging. For example, unlike the linear spectrometers that exist in almost all chemistry departments, there are no "black box" four-wave mixing spectrometers. This Account describes recent advances in the application of diffractive optics (DOs) to nonlinear spectroscopy, which reduces the complexity level of this technology to be closer to that of linear spectroscopy. The combination of recent advances in femtosecond laser technology and this single optic approach could bring this form of spectroscopy out of the exclusive realm of specialists and into the general user community. However, the real driving force for this research is the pursuit of higher sensitivity limits, which would enable new forms of nonlinear spectroscopy. This Account chronicles the research that has now extended nonlinear spectroscopy to six

  2. Self-absorption influence on the optical spectroscopy of zinc oxide laser produced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Posada, E; Arronte, M A; Ponce, L; Rodriguez, E; Flores, T [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y TecnologIa Avanzada-Unidad Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Lunney, J G, E-mail: edeposada@ipn.mx [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland)

    2011-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy is used to study the laser ablation process of ZnO targets. It is demonstrated that even if Partial Local Thermal Equilibrium is present, self absorption process leads to a decrease of recorded lines emission intensities and have to be taken into account to obtain correct values of such parameters. It is presented a method that combines results of both Langmuir probe technique and Anisimov model to obtain correct values of plasma parameters.

  3. Optical characterization of gaps in directly bonded Si compound optics using infrared spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gully-Santiago, Michael; White, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Silicon direct bonding offers flexibility in the design and development of Si optics by allowing manufacturers to combine subcomponents with a potentially lossless and mechanically stable interface. The bonding process presents challenges in meeting the requirements for optical performance because air gaps at the Si interface cause large Fresnel reflections. Even small (35 nm) gaps reduce transmission through a direct bonded Si compound optic by 4% at $\\lambda = 1.25 \\; \\mu$m at normal incidence. We describe a bond inspection method that makes use of precision slit spectroscopy to detect and measure gaps as small as 14 nm. Our method compares low finesse Fabry-P\\'{e}rot models to high precision measurements of transmission as a function of wavelength. We demonstrate the validity of the approach by measuring bond gaps of known depths produced by microlithography.

  4. Preliminary research on monitoring the durability of concrete subjected to sulfate attack with optical fibre Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yanfei; Bai, Yun; Basheer, P. A. Muhammed; Boland, John J.; Wang, Jing Jing

    2013-04-01

    Formation of ettringite and gypsum from sulfate attack together with carbonation and chloride ingress have been considered as the most serious deterioration mechanisms of concrete structures. Although Electrical Resistance Sensors and Fibre Optic Chemical Sensors could be used to monitoring the latter two mechanisms in situ, currently there is no system for monitoring the deterioration mechanisms of sulfate attack and hence still needs to be developed. In this paper, a preliminary study was carried out to investigate the feasibility of monitoring the sulfate attack with optical fibre Raman spectroscopy through characterizing the ettringite and gypsum formed in deteriorated cementitious materials under an `optical fibre excitation + spectroscopy objective collection' configuration. Bench-mounted Raman spectroscopy analysis was also used to validate the spectrum obtained from the fibre-objective configuration. The results showed that the expected Raman bands of ettringite and gypsum in the sulfate attacked cement paste have been clearly identified by the optical fibre Raman spectroscopy and are in good agreement with those identified from bench-mounted Raman spectroscopy. Therefore, based on these preliminary results, there is a good potential of developing an optical fibre Raman spectroscopy-based system for monitoring the deterioration mechanisms of concrete subjected to the sulfate attack in the future.

  5. High-resolution optical spectroscopy of Plaskett's star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, N.; Rauw, G.; Martins, F.; Sana, H.; De Becker, M.; Gosset, E.

    2008-10-01

    Context: Plaskett's star (HD 47 129) is a very massive O + O binary that belongs to the Mon OB2 association. Previous work suggests that this system displays the Struve-Sahade effect although the measurements of the secondary radial velocities are very difficult and give controversial results. Both components have powerful stellar winds that collide and produce a strong X-ray emission. Aims: Our aim is to study the physical parameters of this system in detail and to investigate the relation between its spectral properties and its evolutionary status. Methods: We present here analysis of an extensive set of high-resolution optical spectra of HD 47 129. We used a disentangling method to separate the individual spectra of each star. We derived a new orbital solution and discuss the spectral classification of both components. A Doppler tomography technique applied to the emission lines Hα and He II λ 4686 yields a Doppler map that illustrates the wind interactions in the system. Finally, an atmosphere code is used to determine the different chemical abundances of the system components and the wind parameters. Results: HD 47 129 appears to be an O8 III/I + O7.5 III binary system in a post RLOF evolutionary stage, where matter has been transferred from the primary to the secondary star. The He overabundance of the secondary supports this scenario. In addition, the N overabundance and C underabundance of the primary component confirm previous results based on X-ray spectroscopy and indicate that the primary is an evolved massive star. We also determined a new orbital solution, with MP sin^3i = 45.4 ± 2.4 M⊙ and MS sin^3i = 47.3 ± 0.3 M⊙. Furthermore, the secondary star has a high rotational velocity (v sin i ˜ 300 km s-1) that deforms its surface, leading to a non-uniform distribution in effective temperature. This could explain the variations in the equivalent widths of the secondary lines with phase. We suggest that the wind of the secondary star is confined

  6. Crystal optics for precision x-ray spectroscopy on highly charged ions—conception and proof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, H. F.; Gassner, T.; Trassinelli, M.; Heß, R.; Spillmann, U.; Banaś, D.; Blumenhagen, K.-H.; Bosch, F.; Brandau, C.; Chen, W.; Dimopoulou, Chr; Förster, E.; Grisenti, R. E.; Gumberidze, A.; Hagmann, S.; Hillenbrand, P.-M.; Indelicato, P.; Jagodzinski, P.; Kämpfer, T.; Kozhuharov, Chr; Lestinsky, M.; Liesen, D.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Loetzsch, R.; Manil, B.; Märtin, R.; Nolden, F.; Petridis, N.; Sanjari, M. S.; Schulze, K. S.; Schwemlein, M.; Simionovici, A.; Steck, M.; Stöhlker, Th; Szabo, C. I.; Trotsenko, S.; Uschmann, I.; Weber, G.; Wehrhan, O.; Winckler, N.; Winters, D. F. A.; Winters, N.; Ziegler, E.

    2015-07-01

    The experimental investigation of quantum-electrodydamic contributions to the binding energies of inner shells of highly charged heavy ions requires an accurate spectroscopy in the region of hard x-rays suitable at a limited source strength. For this purpose the focusing compensated asymmetric Laue crystal optics has been developed and a twin-spectrometer assembly has been built and commissioned at the experimental storage ring of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum Darmstadt. We characterize the crystal optics and demonstrate the usefulness of the instrumentation for accurate spectroscopy of both stationary and fast moving x-ray sources. The experimental procedures discussed here may also be applied for other spectroscopic studies where a transition from conventional germanium x-ray detectors to crystal spectrometers seems too demanding because of low source intensity.

  7. Monitoring the cementitious materials subjected to sulfate attack with optical fiber excitation Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yanfei; Bai, Yun; Muhammed Basheer, P. A.; Boland, John J.; Wang, Jing Jing

    2013-10-01

    Formation of ettringite and gypsum from sulfate attack together with carbonation and chloride ingress have been considered as the most serious deterioration mechanisms of concrete structures. Although electrical resistance sensors and fiber optic chemical sensors could be used to monitor the latter two mechanisms on site, currently there is no system for monitoring the deterioration mechanisms of sulfate attack. In this paper, a preliminary study was carried out to investigate the feasibility of monitoring sulfate attack with optical fiber excitation Raman spectroscopy through characterizing the ettringite and gypsum formed in deteriorated cementitious materials under an optical fiber excitation + objective collection configuration. Bench-mounted Raman spectroscopy analysis was also conducted to validate the spectrum obtained from the fiber-objective configuration. The results showed that the expected Raman bands of ettringite and gypsum in the sulfate-attacked cement paste can be clearly identified by the optical fiber excitation Raman spectrometer and are in good agreement with those identified from bench-mounted Raman spectrometer. Therefore, based on these preliminary results, it is considered that there is a good potential for developing an optical fiber-based Raman system to monitor the deterioration mechanisms of concrete subjected to sulfate attack in the future.

  8. The Optical Absorption Coefficient of Bean Seeds Investigated Using Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Hernandez, G.; Hernandez-Aguilar, C.; Dominguez-Pacheco, A.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Perez-Reyes, M. C. J.; Martinez, E. Moreno

    2015-06-01

    A knowledge about seed optical parameters is of great relevance in seed technology practice. Such parameters provide information about its absorption and reflectance, which could be useful for biostimulation processes, by light sources, in early stages of seed germination. In the present research photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) and the Rosencwaig and Gersho model were used to determine the optical absorption coefficient () of five varieties of bean seeds ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.), of different productive cycles; the seeds were biostimulated by laser treatment to evaluate the effects of biostimulation pre-sowing. It was found that the bean varieties V1, V2, V4, and V5 were optically opaque in the visible spectrum; in the case of the V3 variety, this sample was optically transparent from 680 nm. The varieties of the studied bean seeds showed significant statistical differences in sizes and also in their optical absorption spectra. The biostimulation effects showed that the seed samples with a higher optical penetration length had a positive biostimulation, in the percentage of germination, obtaining an enhancement of 47 % compared to the control sample. The utility of PAS for the optical characterization of seeds has been demonstrated in this study of the laser biostimulation process of this kind of samples.

  9. Optical Zeeman Spectroscopy of Calcium Fluoride, CaF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steimle, Timothy; Kokkin, Damian L.; Delvin, Jack; Tarbutt, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Recently laser cooling has been demonstrated for the diatomic radical calcium fluoride, CaF. The mechanism of magneto-optical trapping for diatomic molecules has been elucidated recently by Tarbutt where a rate model was used to model the interaction of molecules with multiple frequencies of laser light. It was shown that the correct choice of laser polarization depends on the sign of the upper state magnetic g-factor. The magnetic tuning of the low rotational levels in the X^2σ^+, A^2Π and B^2σ^+ electronic states of CaF, have been experimentally investigated using high resolution optical Zeeman spectroscopy of a cold molecular beam sample. The observed Zeeman-induced shifts and splittings were successfully modeled using a traditional effective Hamiltonian approach to account for the interaction between the (ν=0) A^2Π and (ν=0) B^2σ^+ states. The determined magnetic g-factors for the X^2σ^+, A^2Π and B^2σ^+ states are compared to those predicted by perturbation theory. V. Zhelyazkova, A. Cournol, T.E. Wall, A. Matsushima, J.J. Hudson, E.A. Hinds, M.R. Tarbutt and B.E. Sauer, Phys. Rev. A 89, 053416 (2014) M. R. Tarbutt, New J. Phys 17, 015007 (2015)

  10. X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF YB3+-DOPED OPTICAL FIBERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Citron, Robert; Kropf, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Optical fibers doped with Ytterbium-3+ have become increasingly common in fiber lasers and amplifiers. Yb-doped fibers provide the capability to produce high power and short pulses at specific wavelengths, resulting in highly effective gain media. However, little is known about the local structure, distribution, and chemical coordination of Yb3+ in the fibers. This information is necessary to improve the manufacturing process and optical qualities of the fibers. Five fibers doped with Yb3+ were studied using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES), in addition to Yb3+ mapping. The Yb3+ distribution in each fiber core was mapped with 2D and 1D intensity scans, which measured X-ray fluorescence over the scan areas. Two of the five fibers examined showed highly irregular Yb3+ distributions in the core center. In four of the five fibers Yb3+ was detected outside of the given fiber core dimensions, suggesting possible Yb3+ diffusion from the core, manufacturing error, or both. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis has so far proven inconclusive, but did show that the fibers had differing EXAFS spectra. The Yb3+ distribution mapping proved highly useful, but additional modeling and examination of fiber preforms must be conducted to improve XAS analysis, which has been shown to have great potential for the study of similar optical fi bers.

  11. In situ orientation studies of a poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(epsilon-caprolactone) blend by rheo-optical fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation spectroscopic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Miriam; Siesler, Heinz W

    2009-12-01

    In the present study, the orientation of a poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB)/poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) blend was monitored during uniaxial elongation by rheo-optical Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and analyzed by generalized two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS). The dichroism of the delta(CH(2)) absorption bands of PHB and PCL was employed to determine the polymer chain orientation in the PHB/PCL blend during the elongation up to 267% strain. From the PHB and PCL specific orientation functions it was derived that the PCL chains orient into the drawing direction while the PHB chains orient predominantly perpendicular to the applied strain. To extract more detailed information about the polymer orientation during uniaxial elongation, 2D-COS analysis was employed for the dichroic difference of the polarization spectra recorded during the drawing process. In the corresponding synchronous and asynchronous 2D correlation plots, absorption bands characteristic of the crystalline and amorphous regions of PHB and PCL were separated. Furthermore, the 2D-COS analysis revealed that during the mechanical treatment the PCL domains orient before the PHB domains.

  12. Optical Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy of Disordered Semiconductor Quantum Wells and Quantum Dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cundiff, Steven T. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-05-03

    This final report describes the activities undertaken under grant "Optical Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy of Disordered Semiconductor Quantum Wells and Quantum Dots". The goal of this program was to implement optical 2-dimensional Fourier transform spectroscopy and apply it to electronic excitations, including excitons, in semiconductors. Specifically of interest are quantum wells that exhibit disorder due to well width fluctuations and quantum dots. In both cases, 2-D spectroscopy will provide information regarding coupling among excitonic localization sites.

  13. Frank Isakson Prize for Optical Effects in Solids: Optical spectroscopy and mechanisms of superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Marel, Dirk

    By its very nature the phenomenon of superconductivity is intimately connected to the electrodynamics properties of a material, both in the normal and in the superconducting state. Optical spectroscopy and electrical transport -corresponding to the zero-frequency limit of the optical response- provide for this reason sensitive tools probing the collective response of a superconducting material. Optical spectroscopy can provide the real and imaginary parts of the optical conductivity of an electron liquid for all frequencies from radiowaves through infrared and visible up to the ultraviolet and even X-ray frequencies. Theory of the optical response is particularly well developed, leading among others to a number of sumrules, providing powerful tools for confronting experiment and theoretical models of superconducting pairing. In this talk examples of sumrules will be discussed relating to the kinetic energy and the Coulomb energy of the paired electrons, and experimental data of addressing these two energies will be presented. The basic understanding of pair formation in the conventional (i.e. BCS) model of superconductivity is, that electrons form pairs as a result of an attractive interaction. On general grounds one than expects the interaction energy to become reduced when the electrons form pairs, while at the same their kinetic energy increases. Superconductivity is a stable state of matter provided that all contributions together result in a lowering of the total (interaction, kinetic plus other terms if relevant) lowering of energy. In this talk I will demonstrate that these two effects can be observed in the cuprate superconductors, that behave according to aforementioned trends for strongly overdoped cuprates, but that the observed effects have the opposite sign for underdoped and optimally doped cuprates. These observations compare favorably with published numerical calculations based on models of strong electron-electron correlation, not involving the

  14. Optical clearing of melanoma in vivo: characterization by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Layla; Demidov, Valentin; Vitkin, I. Alex; Bagnato, Vanderlei; Kurachi, Cristina; Wilson, Brian C.

    2016-08-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive type of skin cancer, with significant risk of fatality. Due to its pigmentation, light-based imaging and treatment techniques are limited to near the tumor surface, which is inadequate, for example, to evaluate the microvascular density that is associated with prognosis. White-light diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and near-infrared optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used to evaluate the effect of a topically applied optical clearing agent (OCA) in melanoma in vivo and to image the microvascular network. DRS was performed using a contact fiber optic probe in the range from 450 to 650 nm. OCT imaging was performed using a swept-source system at 1310 nm. The OCT image data were processed using speckle variance and depth-encoded algorithms. Diffuse reflectance signals decreased with clearing, dropping by ˜90% after 45 min. OCT was able to image the microvasculature in the pigmented melanoma tissue with good spatial resolution up to a depth of ˜300 μm without the use of OCA; improved contrast resolution was achieved with optical clearing to a depth of ˜750 μm in tumor. These findings are relevant to potential clinical applications in melanoma, such as assessing prognosis and treatment responses. Optical clearing may also facilitate the use of light-based treatments such as photodynamic therapy.

  15. Optical Gratings Coated with Thin Si3N4 Layer for Efficient Immunosensing by Optical Waveguide Lightmode Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Diéguez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available New silicon nitride coated optical gratings were tested by means of Optical Waveguide Lightmode Spectroscopy (OWLS. A thin layer of 10 nm of transparent silicon nitride was deposited on commercial optical gratings by means of sputtering. The quality of the layer was tested by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. As a proof of concept, the sensors were successfully tested with OWLS by monitoring the concentration dependence on the detection of an antibody-protein pair. The potential of the Si3N4 as functional layer in a real-time biosensor opens new ways for the integration of optical waveguides with microelectronics.

  16. Enhancing Stellar Spectroscopy with Extreme Adaptive Optics and Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, N.; Schwab, C.; Cvetojevic, N.; Guyon, O.; Martinache, F.

    2016-12-01

    Extreme adaptive optics (AO) systems are now in operation across the globe. These systems, capable of high order wavefront correction, deliver Strehl ratios of ∼ 90 % in the near-infrared. Originally intended for the direct imaging of exoplanets, these systems are often equipped with advanced coronagraphs that suppress the on-axis-star, interferometers to calibrate wavefront errors, and low order wavefront sensors to stabilize any tip/tilt residuals to a degree never seen before. Such systems are well positioned to facilitate the detailed spectroscopic characterization of faint substellar companions at small angular separations from the host star. Additionally, the increased light concentration of the point-spread function and the unprecedented stability create opportunities in other fields of astronomy as well, including spectroscopy. With such Strehl ratios, efficient injection into single-mode fibers (SMFs) or photonic lanterns becomes possible. With diffraction-limited components feeding the instrument, calibrating a spectrograph’s line profile becomes considerably easier, as modal noise or imperfect scrambling of the fiber output are no longer an issue. It also opens up the possibility of exploiting photonic technologies for their advanced functionalities, inherent replicability, and small, lightweight footprint to design and build future instrumentation. In this work, we outline how extreme AO systems will enable advanced photonic and diffraction-limited technologies to be exploited in spectrograph design and the impact it will have on spectroscopy. We illustrate that the precision of an instrument based on these technologies, with light injected from an efficient SMF feed would be entirely limited by the spectral content and stellar noise alone on cool stars and would be capable of achieving a radial velocity precision of several m/s; the level required for detecting an exo-Earth in the habitable zone of a nearby M-dwarf.

  17. Simultaneous X-ray and optical spectroscopy of the Oef supergiant lambda Cep

    CERN Document Server

    Rauw, G; Naze, Y; Gonzalez-Perez, J N; Hempelmann, A; Mittag, M; Schmitt, J H M M; Schroeder, K -P; Gosset, E; Eenens, P; Uuh-Sonda, J M

    2015-01-01

    Probing the structures of stellar winds is of prime importance for the understanding of massive stars. Based on their optical spectral morphology and variability, the stars of the Oef class have been suggested to feature large-scale structures in their wind. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and time-series of X-ray observations of presumably-single O-type stars can help us understand the physics of their stellar winds. We have collected XMM-Newton observations and coordinated optical spectroscopy of the O6Ief star lambda Cep to study its X-ray and optical variability and to analyse its high-resolution X-ray spectrum. We investigate the line profile variability of the He II 4686 and H-alpha emission lines in our time series of optical spectra, including a search for periodicities. We further discuss the variability of the broadband X-ray flux and analyse the high-resolution spectrum of lambda Cep using line-by-line fits as well as a code designed to fit the full high-resolution X-ray spectrum consistently. D...

  18. Magneto-optical spectroscopy of Co{sub 2}FeSi Heusler compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veis, M., E-mail: veis@karlov.mff.cuni.cz; Beran, L.; Antos, R. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Ke Karlovu 5, 12116 Prague (Czech Republic); Legut, D.; Hamrle, J.; Pistora, J. [Nanotechnology Centre, VSB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15, 70833 Ostrava (Czech Republic); Sterwerf, Ch.; Meinert, M.; Schmalhorst, J.-M.; Kuschel, T.; Reiss, G. [Faculty of Physics, Bielefeld University, Postfach 100131, 33501 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2014-05-07

    Magneto-optical and electronic properties of the Co{sub 2}FeSi Heusler compound were studied by polar Kerr magneto-optical spectroscopy and ab-initio calculations. The thin-film samples were grown by dc/rf magnetron co-sputtering on MgO(100) substrates. A Cr seed layer was deposited prior to the Co{sub 2}FeSi layer to achieve its epitaxial growth. The magneto-optical spectroscopy was carried out using generalized magneto-optical ellipsometry with rotating analyzer in the photon energy range from 1.4 to 5.5 eV with an applied magnetic field of up to 1.2 T. The polar Kerr spectra showed a smooth spectral behavior up to 5.5 eV indicating nearly free charge carriers. Experimental data were compared with ab-initio calculations based on density functional theory employing the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method.

  19. Raman spectroscopy and immunohistochemistry for schwannoma characterization: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Lazaro P. M.; das Chagas, Maurilio J.; Carvalho, Luis Felipe C. S.; Ferreira, Isabelle; dos Santos, Laurita; Haddad, Marcelo; Loddi, Vinicius; Martin, Airton A.

    2016-03-01

    The schwannomas is a tumour of the tissue that covers nerves, called the nerve sheath. Schwannomas are often benign tumors of the Schwan cells, which are the principal glia of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Preoperative diagnosis of this lesion usually is difficult, therefore, new techniques are being studied as pre surgical evaluation. Among these, Raman spectroscopy, that enables the biochemical identification of the tissue analyzed by their optical properties, may be used as a tool for schwannomas diagnosis. The aim of this study was to discriminate between normal nervous tissue and schwannoma through the confocal Raman spectroscopy and Raman optical fiber-based techniques combined with immunohistochemical analysis. Twenty spectra were analyzed from a normal nerve tissue sample (10) and schwannoma (10) by Holospec f / 1.8 (Kayser Optical Systems) coupled to an optical fiber with a 785nm laser line source. The data were pre-processed and vector normalized. The average analysis and standard deviation was performed associated with cluster analysis. AML, 1A4, CD34, Desmin and S-100 protein markers were used for immunohistochemical analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis was positive only for protein S-100 marker which confirmed the neural schwanomma originality. The immunohistochemistry analysis were important to determine the source of the injury, whereas Raman spectroscopy were able to differentiated tissues types indicating important biochemical changes between normal and benign neoplasia.

  20. Optical humidity detection based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Keke; Liu, Shixuan; Chen, Shizhe; Zhao, Qiang; Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Xuanqun; Wang, Wenyan; Wu, Yushang

    2017-02-01

    Humidity is an important environmental parameter, which is difficult to be measured accurately and quickly using traditional measurement methods. Under the environment of low temperature or high humidity, traditional humidity and temperature sensor has shortages in humidity measurement accuracy, corresponding time and wet fade speed. To solve these problems, this paper proposes a method to measure the environmental humidity with wavelength modulation technology and harmonic detection technology based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. H2O molecular absorption line near 1392 nm is selected as the characteristic spectra. The effects of temperature, pressure and water concentration on the absorption spectrum width, the wavelength modulation coefficient and the amplitude of the harmonic signal are analyzed. Humidity and temperature sensor is modified using temperature and pressure compensation model, and the influence of the water concentration variation is eliminated by the iterative algorithm. The new humidity and temperature sensor prototype is developed, and the structure of the optical system is simple, which is easy to be adjusted. The response frequency of the humidity detection is 40 Hz. The experiment was carried out for 3 months at Qingdao national basic weather station. Experimental results show that the consistency of the humidity and temperature data is very good, which can proves the validity of the humidity measurement technology.

  1. Optical emission spectroscopy of argon and hydrogen-containing plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepa, Sarah; Danko, Stephan; Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) on neutral argon is applied to investigate argon, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas. The spectra are analyzed using an extensive collisional-radiative model (CRM), from which the electron density and the electron temperature (or mean energy) can be calculated. The CRM also yields insight into the importance of different excited species and kinetic processes. The OES measurements are performed on pure argon plasmas at intermediate pressure. Besides, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas are investigated using argon as a trace gas. Especially for the gas mixture discharges, CRMs for low and high pressure differ substantially. The commonly used line-ratio technique is found to lose its sensitivity for gas mixture discharges at higher pressure. A solution using absolutely calibrated line intensities is proposed. The effect of radiation trapping and the shape of the electron energy distribution function on the results are discussed in detail, as they have been found to significantly influence the results. This work was supported by the Ruhr University Research School PLUS, funded by Germany's Excellence Initiative [DFG GSC 98/3].

  2. Optical Spectroscopy of 2MASS Color-Selected Ultracool Subdwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Burgasser, A J; Kirkpatrick, J D; Burgasser, Adam J.; Cruz, Kelle L.

    2006-01-01

    We present Gemini GMOS and Magellan LDSS-3 optical spectroscopy for seven ultracool subdwarf candidates color-selected from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Five are identified as late-type subdwarfs, including the previously reported sdM9.5 SSSPM 1013-1356 and L subdwarf 2MASS 1626+3925, and a new sdM8.5 2MASS 0142+0523. 2MASS 1640+1231 exhibits spectral features intermediate between a late-type M dwarf and subdwarf, similar to the previously identified high proper motion star SSSPM 1444-2019, and we classify both sources as mild subdwarfs, d/sdM9. 2MASS 1227-0447 is a new ultracool extreme subdwarf, spectral type esdM7.5. Spectral model fits yield metallicities that are consistent with these metallicity classifications. Effective temperatures track with numerical subtype within a metallicity class, although they are not equivalent across metallicity classes. As a first attempt to delineate subtypes in the L subdwarf regime we classify 2MASS 1626+3925 and the previously identified 2MASS 0532+8246 as sdL4 and s...

  3. UV-Vis spectroscopy of tyrosine side-groups in studies of protein structure. Part 1: basic principles and properties of tyrosine chromophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Jan M; Shugar, David

    2016-06-01

    Spectroscopic properties of tyrosine residues may be employed in structural studies of proteins. Here we discuss several different types of UV-Vis spectroscopy, like normal, difference and second-derivative UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, linear and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, and corresponding optical properties of the tyrosine chromophore, phenol, which are used to study protein structure.

  4. UV–Vis spectroscopy of tyrosine side-groups in studies of protein structure. Part 1: basic principles and properties of tyrosine chromophore

    OpenAIRE

    Antosiewicz, Jan M.; Shugar, David

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic properties of tyrosine residues may be employed in structural studies of proteins. Here we discuss several different types of UV–Vis spectroscopy, like normal, difference and second-derivative UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, linear and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, and corresponding optical properties of the tyrosine chromophore, phenol, which are used to study protein structure.

  5. UV-Vis spectroscopy of tyrosine side-groups in studies of protein structure. Part 1: basic principles and properties of tyrosine chromophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Jan M; Shugar, David

    Spectroscopic properties of tyrosine residues may be employed in structural studies of proteins. Here we discuss several different types of UV-Vis spectroscopy, like normal, difference and second-derivative UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, linear and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, and corresponding optical properties of the tyrosine chromophore, phenol, which are used to study protein structure.

  6. Electronic structure of antiferromagnetic UN and UPtGe single crystals from optical and magneto-optical spectroscopy; Elektronische Struktur von antiferromagnetischen UN- und UPtGe-Einkristallen aus optischer und magnetooptischer Spektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marutzky, M.

    2006-10-12

    In this thesis the study of the magneto-optical Kerr effect and the determination of the optical constants by means of ellipsometry and Fourier-transformation infrared spectroscopy of UN and UPtGe is described. In UPtGe an optical anisotropy was detected over a spectral range from 6 meV to 32 eV. (HSI)

  7. Glow Discharge Optical Spectroscopy of Ion Implanted Gallium Arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    PECVD processes are silane (SiH4 ) plus either 47 t - Im ammonia (NH 3 ) or nitrogen (N2 ) or both. The chemical reactions are, 3SiH4+2N 2-Si3N 4+6H 2...Physics, 44:5183-5184 (Nov 1973). 68 I i . 13. Sawyer, R., Experimental Spectroscopy, New York: Dover Publication, Inc. (1963) 14. Kerm , W., R. Rosler...composition as functions of the follow- ing parameters: flow, pressure, substrate temperature, and RF power. Kerm , et al., (Ref 14) studied films grown

  8. THz Acoustic Spectroscopy by using Double Quantum Wells and Ultrafast Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fan Jun; Yeh, Yu-Hsiang; Sheu, Jinn-Kong; Lin, Kung-Hsuan

    2016-06-01

    GaN is a pivotal material for acoustic transducers and acoustic spectroscopy in the THz regime, but its THz phonon properties have not been experimentally and comprehensively studied. In this report, we demonstrate how to use double quantum wells as a THz acoustic transducer for measuring generated acoustic phonons and deriving a broadband acoustic spectrum with continuous frequencies. We experimentally investigated the sub-THz frequency dependence of acoustic attenuation (i.e., phonon mean-free paths) in GaN, in addition to its physical origins such as anharmonic scattering, defect scattering, and boundary scattering. A new upper limit of attenuation caused by anharmonic scattering, which is lower than previously reported values, was obtained. Our results should be noteworthy for THz acoustic spectroscopy and for gaining a fundamental understanding of heat conduction.

  9. Probing focal cortical dysplasia in formalin fixed samples using tissue optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Suresh; Cicchi, Riccardo; Giordano, Flavio; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Conti, Valerio; Guerrini, Renzo; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2016-03-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is one of most common causes of intractable epilepsy in pediatric population and these are often insensitive to anti-epileptic drugs. FCD is characterized by a disarray in localized regions of the cerebral cortex and abnormal neurons which results them to misfire with incorrect signals. Resective neurosurgery to remove or disconnect the affected parts from the rest of the brain seems to be a viable option to treat FCD. Before neurosurgery the subject could undergo imaging studies including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) scans. On the downside FCD could be elusive in MRI images and may be practically invisible in CT scans. Furthermore, unnecessary removal of normal tissues is to be taken into consideration as this could lead to neurological defects. In this context, optical spectroscopy have been widely investigated as an alternative technique for the detection of abnormal tissues in different organ sites. Disease progression is accompanied by a number of architectural, biochemical and morphological changes. These variations are reflected in the spectral intensity and line shape. Here, in this proof of concept study we propose to investigate the application of tissue optical spectroscopy based on fluorescence excitation at two wavelength 378 and 445 nm coupled along with Raman spectroscopy for the detection of FCD on formalin fixed tissue specimens from pediatric subjects. For fluorescence at both the excitation wavelengths FCD showed a decreased intensity at longer wavelength when compared to normal tissues. Also, differences exist in the Raman spectral profiles of normal and FCD.

  10. Study of vibrational spectroscopy, linear and non-linear optical properties of Sm3+ ions doped BaO-ZnO-B2O3 glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Kirti; Kundu, R. S.; Sharma, Sarita; Mohan, Devendra; Punia, R.; Kishore, N.

    2015-07-01

    Samarium oxide doped Barium-Zinc-Borate glasses with compositions xSm2O3-(100-x)[0.1BaO-0.4ZnO-0.5B2O3]; x = 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 have been prepared by melt quench technique. The amorphous nature of as-prepared glasses has been ascertained by X-ray diffraction patterns. The observed values of density and molar volume of the glass samples are found to increase with the increase in concentration of Sm2O3. Fourier Transform Infrared spectra of the prepared glasses indicate that Sm2O3 acts as glass modifier. With the increase in Sm2O3 content, BO4 structural units start converting into BO3 structural units. The values of optical energy band gap (Eg), estimated from Tauc's plots, are observed to decrease with the increase in Sm2O3 content. The nonlinear optical properties of glass samples have been investigated by Z-scan method with nanosecond pulsed laser at ˜532 nm in both open and close aperture geometries. The values of two photon absorption coefficient (β) and nonlinear refractive index (n2) have been estimated by fitting of experimentally observed data with theoretical models and both are found to increase with the increase in Sm3+ ions concentration in the glass matrix. The total third order nonlinear susceptibility (χ(3)) have been calculated and observed to increase with the increase in Sm3+ ions concentration.

  11. Soret Effect Study on High-Pressure CO2-Water Solutions Using UV-Raman Spectroscopy and a Concentric-Tube Optical Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windisch, Charles F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Maupin, Gary D.

    2012-01-01

    Spatially resolved deep-UV Raman spectroscopy was applied to solutions of CO2 and H2O (or D2O), which were subject to a temperature gradient in a thermally regulated high-pressure concentric-tube Raman cell in an attempt to measure a Soret effect in the vicinity of the critical point of CO2. Although Raman spectra of solutions of CO2 dissolved in D2O at 10 MPa and temperatures near the critical point of CO2 had adequate signal-to-noise and spatial resolution to observe a Soret effect with a Soret coefficient with magnitude of |ST| > 0.03, no evidence for an effect of this size was obtained for applied temperature gradients up to 19oC. The presence of 1 M NaCl did not make a difference. In contrast, the concentration of CO2 dissolved in H2O was shown to vary significantly across the temperature gradient when excess CO2 was present, but the results could be explained simply by the variation in CO2 solubility over the temperature range and not to kinetic factors. For mixtures of D2O dissolved in scCO2 at 10 MPa and temperatures close to the critical point of CO2, the Raman peaks for H2O were too weak to measure with confidence even at the limit of D2O solubility.

  12. Micro-Raman Spectroscopy of Silver Nanoparticle Induced Stress on Optically-Trapped Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankapur, Aseefhali; Krishnamurthy, R. Sagar; Zachariah, Elsa; Santhosh, Chidangil; Chougule, Basavaraj; Praveen, Bhavishna; Valiathan, Manna; Mathur, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    We report here results of a single-cell Raman spectroscopy study of stress effects induced by silver nanoparticles in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). A high-sensitivity, high-resolution Raman Tweezers set-up has been used to monitor nanoparticle-induced biochemical changes in optically-trapped single cells. Our micro-Raman spectroscopic study reveals that hMSCs treated with silver nanoparticles undergo oxidative stress at doping levels in excess of 2 µg/ml, with results of a statistical analysis of Raman spectra suggesting that the induced stress becomes more dominant at nanoparticle concentration levels above 3 µg/ml. PMID:22514708

  13. Collinear laser spectroscopy of manganese isotopes using optical pumping in ISCOOL

    CERN Multimedia

    Marsh, B A; Neyens, G; Flanagan, K; Rajabali, M M; Reponen, M; Campbell, P; Procter, T J

    Recently, optical pumping of ions has been achieved inside an ion beam cooler-buncher. By illuminating the central axis of the cooler with laser light, subsequent decay populates selected ionic metastable states. This population enhancement is retained as the ion beam is delivered to an experimental station. In the case of collinear laser spectroscopy, transitions can then be excited from a preferred metastable level, rather than the ground-state. This proposal seeks to establish and develop the technique for ISCOOL. As a test of efficiency, this will be applied to the study of $^{55-66}$Mn isotopes using collinear laser spectroscopy-expanding an earlier study where the benefit of the technique was demonstrated. This will provide nuclear spins, magnetic-dipole and electric-quadrupole moments and changes in mean-square charge radii across N = 40 shell closure candidate and into a region where an onset of deformation, and a new "island of inversion" is predicted.

  14. Optical Spectroscopy of Strongly Correlated (MOTT-HUBBARD, Heavy-Fermion, Unconventional Superconductor) Materials Tuned Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, A; Struzhkin, V V

    2003-11-12

    During the past years, the Co-PI's have been responsible for the development and operation of optical techniques (Raman, IR, fluorescence, absorption and reflectance spectroscopy at ultrahigh pressures and high and low temperatures) which have proven to be extremely powerful for studying low-Z, molecular solids including hydrogen, ice, etc. (see results below). Meanwhile, it has become increasingly clear that optical spectroscopy has an equally extraordinary potential for studying metals and superconductors at ultrahigh pressures, thus the result will have a major impact on material research. However, because of the extreme difference in optical properties of opaque metals and transparent insulating molecular solids, successful accomplishment of the present project will require substantial effort in improving the present equipment and developing new techniques, and funds for this are requested here. Below we provide a short description of the work done and techniques developed during the last years. We also propose to explore new frontiers in compressed materials close to the insulator-metal boundaries, spin-crossover, and other quantum critical points.

  15. From Selenium- to Tellurium-Based Glass Optical Fibers for Infrared Spectroscopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Lucas

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chalcogenide glasses are based on sulfur, selenium and tellurium elements, and have been studied for several decades regarding different applications. Among them, selenide glasses exhibit excellent infrared transmission in the 1 to 15 µm region. Due to their good thermo-mechanical properties, these glasses could be easily shaped into optical devices such as lenses and optical fibers. During the past decade of research, selenide glass fibers have been proved to be suitable for infrared sensing in an original spectroscopic method named Fiber Evanescent Wave Spectroscopy (FEWS. FEWS has provided very nice and promising results, for example for medical diagnosis. Then, some sophisticated fibers, also based on selenide glasses, were developed: rare-earth doped fibers and microstructured fibers. In parallel, the study of telluride glasses, which can have transmission up to 28 µm due to its atom heaviness, has been intensified thanks to the DARWIN mission led by the European Space Agency (ESA. The development of telluride glass fiber enables a successful observation of CO2 absorption band located around 15 µm. In this paper we review recent results obtained in the Glass and Ceramics Laboratory at Rennes on the development of selenide to telluride glass optical fibers, and their use for spectroscopy from the mid to the far infrared ranges.

  16. From selenium- to tellurium-based glass optical fibers for infrared spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shuo; Chahal, Radwan; Boussard-Plédel, Catherine; Nazabal, Virginie; Doualan, Jean-Louis; Troles, Johann; Lucas, Jacques; Bureau, Bruno

    2013-05-10

    Chalcogenide glasses are based on sulfur, selenium and tellurium elements, and have been studied for several decades regarding different applications. Among them, selenide glasses exhibit excellent infrared transmission in the 1 to 15 µm region. Due to their good thermo-mechanical properties, these glasses could be easily shaped into optical devices such as lenses and optical fibers. During the past decade of research, selenide glass fibers have been proved to be suitable for infrared sensing in an original spectroscopic method named Fiber Evanescent Wave Spectroscopy (FEWS). FEWS has provided very nice and promising results, for example for medical diagnosis. Then, some sophisticated fibers, also based on selenide glasses, were developed: rare-earth doped fibers and microstructured fibers. In parallel, the study of telluride glasses, which can have transmission up to 28 µm due to its atom heaviness, has been intensified thanks to the DARWIN mission led by the European Space Agency (ESA). The development of telluride glass fiber enables a successful observation of CO₂ absorption band located around 15 µm. In this paper we review recent results obtained in the Glass and Ceramics Laboratory at Rennes on the development of selenide to telluride glass optical fibers, and their use for spectroscopy from the mid to the far infrared ranges.

  17. Report on neptunium speciation by NMR and optical spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tait, C.D.; Palmer, P.D.; Ekberg, S.A.; Clark, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    Hydrolysis and carbonate complexation reactions were examined for NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and NpO{sub 2}{sup +} ions by a variety of techniques including potentiometric titration, UV-Vis-NIR and NMR spectroscopy. The equilibrium constant for the reaction 3NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} + 3H{sup +} {rightleftharpoons} (NpO{sub 2}){sub 3}(CO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 6{minus}} + 3HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} was determined to be logK = 19.7 ({plus_minus} 0.8) (I = 2.5 m). {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy of NpO{sub 2}{sup n+} ions (n = 1,2) reveals a readily observable {sup 17}O resonance for n = 2, but not for n = 1. The first hydrolysis constant for NpO{sub 2}{sup +} was studied as a function of temperature, and the functional form for the temperature-dependent equilibrium constant for the reaction written as NpO{sub 2}{sup +} + H{sub 2}O {rightleftharpoons} NpO{sub 2}OH + H{sup +} was found to be logK = 2.28 {minus} 3780/T, where T is in {degree}K. Finally, the temperature dependence of neptunium(V) carbonate complexation constants was studied. For the first carbonate complexation constant, the appropriate functional form was found to be log{beta}{sub 01} = 1.47 + 786/T.

  18. Time-resolved optical spectroscopy measurements of shocked liquid deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J. E.; Knudson, M. D.; Carlson, A. L.; Dunham, G. S.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Hanson, D. L.; Asay, J. R.

    2008-10-01

    Time-resolved optical spectroscopy has been used to measure the shock pressure steadiness, emissivity, and temperature of liquid deuterium shocked to 22-90 GPa. The shock was produced using magnetically accelerated flyer plate impact, and spectra were acquired with a suite of four fiber-optic-coupled spectrometers with streak camera detectors. The shock pressure changes by an average of -1.2% over the 10-30 ns cell transit time, determined from the relative changes in the shock front self-emission with time. The shock front reflectivity was measured from 5140Å and 5320Å laser light reflected from the D2 shock. The emissivity inferred from the reflectivity measurements was in reasonably good agreement with quantum molecular dynamics simulation predictions. The spectral radiance wavelength dependence was found to agree well (average normalized χ2=1.6 ) with a Planckian multiplied by the emissivity. The shock front temperature was determined from the emissivity and the wavelength-dependent shock self-emission. Thirty-seven temperature measurements spanning the 22-90 GPa range were accumulated. The large number of temperature measurements enables a comparison of the scatter in the data with expectations for a Gaussian distribution. This facilitates determination of uncertainties that incorporate both apparatus contributions and otherwise unquantified systematic effects that cause self-emission variations from one experiment to another. Agreement between temperatures determined from the absolute spectral radiance and from the relative shape of the spectrum further substantiates the absence of systematic biases. The weighted mean temperature uncertainties were as low as ±3-4% , enabling the discrimination between competing models for the D2 equation of state (EOS). The temperature results agree well with models that predict a maximum compression of ˜4.4 . Softer models that predict approximately sixfold compression are inconsistent with the data to a very high

  19. Study of carrier energetics in ITO/P(VDF-TrFE)/pentacene/Au diode by using electric-field-induced optical second harmonic generation measurement and charge modulation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Takako; Taguchi, Dai; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2017-02-01

    By using electric-field-induced optical second harmonic generation (EFISHG) measurement and charge modulation spectroscopy (CMS), we studied carrier behavior and polarization reversal in ITO/ poly(vinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE))/pentacene/Au diodes with a ferroelectric P(VDF-TrFE) layer in terms of carrier energetics. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the diodes showed three-step polarization reversal in the dark. However, the I-V was totally different under illumination and exhibited two-step behavior. EFISHG probed the internal electric field in the pentacene layer and accounted for the polarization reversal change due to charge accumulation at the pentacene/P(VDF-TrFE) interface. CMS probed the related carrier energetics and indicated that exciton dissociation in pentacene molecular states governed carrier accumulation at the pentacene/ferroelectric interface, leading to different polarization reversal processes in the dark and under light illumination. Combining EFISHG measurement and CMS provides us a way to study carrier energetics that govern polarization reversal in ferroelectric P(VDF-TrFE)/pentacene diodes.

  20. Non-Complexing Anions for Quantitative Speciation Studies Using Raman Spectroscopy in Fused Silica High-Pressure Optical Cells Under Hydrothermal Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegarth, Lucas M S G A; Alcorn, Christopher; Bissonette, Katherine; Noël, John; Tremaine, Peter R

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports methods for obtaining time-dependent reduced isotropic Raman spectra of aqueous species in quartz capillary high-pressure optical cells under hydrothermal conditions, as a means of determining quantitative speciation in hydrothermal fluids. The methods have been used to determine relative Raman scattering coefficients and to examine the thermal decomposition kinetics of the non-complexing anions bisulfate (HSO4(-)), perchlorate (CIO4(-)), perrhenate (ReO4(-)), and trifluoromethanesulfonate, or "triflate" (CF3SO3(-)) in acidic and neutral solutions at temperatures up to 400°C and 30 MPa. Arrhenius expressions for calculating the thermal decomposition rate constants are also reported. Thermal stabilities in the acidic solutions followed the order HSO4(-) (stable) > ReO4(-) > CIO4(-) > CF3SO3(-), with half-lives (t1/2) > 7 h at 300°C. In neutral solutions, the order was HSO4(-) (stable) > CF3SO3(-) > ReO4(-) > CIO4(-), with t1/2 > 8 h at 350°C. CF3SO3(-) was extremely stable in neutral solutions, with t1/2 > 11 h at 400°C.

  1. Spectroscopy and photophysics of self-organized zinc porphyrin nanolayers. 1. Optical spectroscopy of excitonic interactions involving the soret band

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, H.; Koehorst, R.B.M.; Schaafsma, T.J.

    2005-01-01

    The photophysical properties of excited singlet states of zinc tetra-(p-octylphenyl)-porphyrin in 5-25-nm-thick films spin-coated onto quartz slides have been investigated by optical spectroscopy. Analysis of the polarized absorption spectra using a dipole-dipole exciton model with two mutually perp

  2. Effect of mechanical optical clearing on near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idelson, Christopher R; Vogt, William C; King-Casas, Brooks; LaConte, Stephen M; Rylander, Christopher G

    2015-08-01

    Near-infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) is a broadly utilized technology with many emerging applications including clinical diagnostics, sports medicine, and functional neuroimaging, to name a few. For functional brain imaging NIR light is delivered at multiple wavelengths through the scalp and skull to the brain to enable spatial oximetry measurements. Dynamic changes in brain oxygenation are highly correlated with neural stimulation, activation, and function. Unfortunately, NIRS is currently limited by its low spatial resolution, shallow penetration depth, and, perhaps most importantly, signal corruption due to light interactions with superficial non-target tissues such as scalp and skull. In response to these issues, we have combined the non-invasive and rapidly reversible method of mechanical tissue optical clearing (MOC) with a commercially available NIRS system. MOC utilizes a compressive loading force on tissue, causing the lateral displacement of blood and water, while simultaneously thinning the tissue. A MOC-NIRS Breath Hold Test displayed a ∼3.5-fold decrease in the time-averaged standard deviation between channels, consequentially promoting greater channel agreement. A Skin Pinch Test was implemented to negate brain and muscle activity from affecting the recorded signal. These results displayed a 2.5-3.0 fold increase in raw signal amplitude. Existing NIRS instrumentation has been further integrated within a custom helmet device to provide a uniform force distribution across the NIRS sensor array. These results showed a gradual decrease in time-averaged standard deviation among channels with an increase in applied pressure. Through these experiments, and the development of the MOC-NIRS helmet device, MOC appears to provide enhancement of NIRS technology beyond its current limitations.

  3. A Linear Ion Trap with an Expanded Inscribed Diameter to Improve Optical Access for Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Vaishnavi; Stokes, Chris; Ferzoco, Alessandra

    2017-08-01

    We report a custom-geometry linear ion trap designed for fluorescence spectroscopy of gas-phase ions at ambient to cryogenic temperatures. Laser-induced fluorescence from trapped ions is collected from between the trapping rods, orthogonal to the excitation laser that runs along the axis of the linear ion trap. To increase optical access to the ion cloud, the diameter of the round trapping rods is 80% of the inscribed diameter, rather than the roughly 110% used to approximate purely quadrupolar electric fields. To encompass as much of the ion cloud as possible, the first collection optic has a 25.4 mm diameter and a numerical aperture of 0.6. The choice of geometry and collection optics yields 107 detected photons/s from trapped rhodamine 6G ions. The trap is coupled to a closed-cycle helium refrigerator, which in combination with two 50 Ohm heaters enables temperature control to below 25 K on the rod electrodes. The purpose of the instrument is to broaden the applicability of fluorescence spectroscopy of gas-phase ions to cases where photon emission is a minority relaxation pathway. Such studies are important to understand how the microenvironment of a chromophore influences excited state charge transfer processes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Investigation of the structure of alpha-lactalbumin protein nanotubes using optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhan, Ozgür; Tarhan, Enver; Harsa, Sebnem

    2014-02-01

    Alpha-lactalbumin (α-la) is one of the major proteins in whey. When partially hydrolysed with Bacillus licheniformis protease, it produces nanotubular structures in the presence of calcium ions by a self-assembly process. This study presents investigation of α-la protein structure during hydrolysis and nanotube formation using optical spectroscopy. Before spectroscopic measurements, nanotubes were examined with microscopy. The observed α-la nanotubes (α-LaNTs) were in the form of regular hollow strands with a diameter of about 20 nm and the average length of 1 μm. Amide and backbone vibration bands of the Raman spectra displayed remarkable conformational changes in α and β domains in the protein structure during nanotube growth. This was confirmed by the Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy data. Also, FTIR analysis revealed certain bands at calcium (Ca++) binding sites of COO- groups in hydrolysed protein. These sites might be critical in nanotube elongation.

  5. Fiber-optic based in situ atomic spectroscopy for manufacturing of x-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasoff, George; Metting, Christopher J.; von Bredow, Hasso

    2016-09-01

    The manufacturing of multilayer Laue (MLL) components for X-ray optics by physical vapor deposition (PVD) requires high precision and accuracy that presents a significant process control challenge. Currently, no process control system provides the accuracy, long-term stability and broad capability for adoption in the manufacturing of X-ray optics. In situ atomic absorption spectroscopy is a promising process control solution, capable of monitoring the deposition rate and chemical composition of extremely thin metal silicide films during deposition and overcoming many limitations of the traditional methods. A novel in situ PVD process control system for the manufacturing of high-precision thin films, based on combined atomic absorption/emission spectrometry in the vicinity of the deposited substrate, is described. By monitoring the atomic concentration in the plasma region independently from the film growth on the deposited substrate, the method allows deposition control of extremely thin films, compound thin films and complex multilayer structures. It provides deposition rate and film composition measurements that can be further utilized for dynamic feedback process control. The system comprises a reconfigurable hardware module located outside the deposition chamber with hollow cathode light sources and a fiber-optic-based frame installed inside the deposition chamber. Recent experimental results from in situ monitoring of Al and Si thin films deposited by DC and RF magnetron sputtering at a variety of plasma conditions and monitoring configurations are presented. The results validate the operation of the system in the deposition of compound thin films and provide a path forward for use in manufacturing of X-Ray optics.

  6. Mid-infrared dual-comb spectroscopy with electro-optic modulators

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Ming; Iwakuni, Kana; Millot, Guy; Hänsch, Theodor W; Picqué, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate dual-comb spectroscopy based on difference frequency generation of frequency-agile near-infrared frequency combs, produced with the help of electro-optic modulators. The combs have a remarkably flat intensity distribution and their positions and line spacings can be selected freely by simply dialing a knob. We record, in the 3-micron region, Doppler-limited absorption spectra with resolved comb lines within milliseconds. Precise molecular line parameters are retrieved. Our technique holds promise for fast and sensitive time-resolved studies e.g. of trace gases.

  7. Observation of SERS effect in Raman optical activity, a new tool for chiral vibrational spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim

    2006-01-01

    A new tool for chiral vibrational spectroscopy is here reported. A Surface Enhanced effect was observed using Raman Optical Activity (ROA). This observation opens new possibilities for ROA as a tool for vibrational spectroscopy. The combination of surface enhanced effect SE and ROA into SEROA...

  8. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  9. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2008-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations.

  10. Continuous wave terahertz spectroscopy system with stably tunable beat source using optical switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Joo Beom; Kim, Chihoon; Ahn, Jaesung

    2017-01-01

    A tunable beat source has been made using an optical switch module. A stably-tunable beat source for continuous wave terahertz spectroscopy system was implemented by simply connecting 16 coaxial distributed feedback laser diodes to an optical switch. The terahertz frequency was rapidly changed without frequency drifts by changing the optical path. The continuous wave terahertz frequency was tuned from 0.05 to 0.8 THz in steps of 50 GHz or 0.4 nm. We measured continuous wave terahertz waveforms emitted from the photomixers using the switched optical beat source. We also calculated the terahertz frequency peaks by taking fast Fourier transforms of the measured terahertz waveforms. By equipping the implemented tunable beat source with an optical switch, a continuous wave terahertz spectroscopy system was constructed and used to demonstrate the feasibility of continuous wave terahertz spectroscopy for nondestructive tests using the spectra of two type of Si wafers with different resistivity.

  11. Near-Field Optical Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Pointed Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    metal nanostructure can be viewed as an optical antenna . Of course, the efficiency depends on the material composition and the geometry of the...nanostructure. A simple form of optical antenna is a single ellipsoidal particle. This particle ex- hibits a distinct resonance for which the field...Grober RD, Schoelkopf RJ, Prober DE. 1997. Optical antenna : towards a unity efficiency near-field optical probe. Appl. Phys. Lett. 70:1354 54. Farahani

  12. Flexo-dielectro-optical spectroscopy of PDLC films modified by nano-rubbed PTFE layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Lidia T.

    2016-02-01

    The electro-optical (EO) response of planar single layers of polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) composites of relatively large nematic microdroplets modified by layers of teflon (PTFE), was studied. The PDLC films were prepared from liquid crystal E7 and photopolymer NOA-65 in cells assembled with parallel or orthogonal PTFE-covered glass plates. The influence of nanostructured PTFE polymer nanolayers on both the polarized and depolarized component of laser light transmitted through PDLC cells of both geometry of layer rubbing directions was determined. Flexo-dielectro-optical spectroscopy in the range of 10 Hz - 1 kHz was applied to examine the amplitude-frequency EO modulation by PTFE-modified PDLCs in dependence on the applied alternating-current electric field. Specific fall-downs in the frequency spectra of the first and second harmonic EO modulation by PTFE-modified PDLCs were observed, that could be tuned by the driving electric field.

  13. Towards optical fibre based Raman spectroscopy for the detection of surgical site infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alex J.; Koziej, Lukasz; Williams, Huw D.; Elson, Daniel S.; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2016-03-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are common post-surgical complications that remain significant clinical problems, as they are associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. As such, there is significant interest in the development of minimally invasive techniques that permit early detection of SSIs. To this end, we are applying a compact, clinically deployable Raman spectrometer coupled to an optical fibre probe to the study of bacteria, with the long term goal of using Raman spectroscopy to detect infection in vivo. Our system comprises a 785 nm laser diode for excitation and a commercial (Ocean Optics, Inc.) Raman spectrometer for detection. Here we discuss the design, optimisation and validation of this system, and describe our first experiences interrogating bacterial cells (Escherichia coli) in vitro.

  14. Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study of Quinonimides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Ekram; Deng, Shihu; Gozem, Samer; Krylov, Anna; Wang, Xue-Bin; Wenthold, Paul G.

    2017-08-16

    Structures and energetics of o-, m- and p-quinonimide anions (OC6H4N) and quinoniminyl radicals have been investigated by using negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy. Modeling of the photoelectron spectrum of the ortho isomer shows that the ground state of the anion is a triplet, while the quinoniminyl radical has a doublet ground state with a doublet-quartet splitting of 35.5 kcal/mol. The para radical has doublet ground state, but a band for a quartet state is missing from the photoelectron spectrum indicating that the anion has a singlet ground state, in contrast to previously reported calculations. The theoretical modeling is revisited here, and it is shown that accurate predictions for the electronic structure of the para quinonimide anion require both an accurate account of electron correlation and a sufficiently diffuse basis set. Electron affinities of o- and p-quinoniminyl radicals are measured to be 1.715 ± 0.010 and 1.675 ± 0.010 eV, respectively. The photoelectron spectrum of the m-quinonimide anion shows that the ion undergoes several different rearrangements, including a rearrangement to the energetically favorable para isomer. Such rearrangements preclude a meaningful analysis of the experimental spectrum.

  15. Study on binding and fluorescence energy transfer efficiency of Rhodamine B with Pluronic F127-gold nanohybrid using optical spectroscopy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonisamy, Jenif Dsouza; Swain, Jitendriya; Dash, Sasmita

    2017-02-01

    This work focuses on the binding efficiency and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) of fluorescent dye Rhodamine B (Rh B) to Pluronic F127-gold nanohybrid. The formation of gold nanoparticles inside Rh B doped Pluronic F127 copolymer have been characterized using dynamic light scattering study, HR-TEM images, UV-visible spectra and fluorescence studies. Fluorescence quenching and the constant fluorescence lifetime of the Rhodamine B present in the cavity of Pluronic F127-gold nanohybrid suggested a strong binding ability (3.5 × 103 L mol- 1), static nature of quenching and better energy transfer efficiency of fluorescent dye towards Pluronic F127-gold (Au) nanohybrids.

  16. Conformation of the RNA-binding N-terminus of the coat protein of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus : a nuclear magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, van der M.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the study described in this thesis was to obtain information about protein-RNA interactions in cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV). CCMV consists of RNA and a protective protein coat, composed of 180 identical coat proteins. The positively charged N-terminal arm of the

  17. Ultrafast optical spectroscopy of quasi one dimensional Ta{sub 2}NiSe{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mor, Selene; Herzog, Marc; Monney, Claude; Staehler, Julia; Wolf, Martin [Fritz-Haber-Institut der MPG, Dept. of Phys. Chem., Berlin (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Ta2NiSe5 is a layered compound in which atomic chains are aligned in the layers, forming a quasi one dimensional crystal structure. At 328 K, the system shows a structural change, which is accompanied by an electronic phase transition from a semiconductor to an excitonic insulator, with an estimated energy gap of about few hundreds millielectronvolts. Our aim is to unveil the microscopic mechanisms underlying the phase transition in Ta{sub 2}NiSe{sub 5}. The system is excited with a femtosecond Ti:sapphire fundamental laser pulse and the mid-infrared (MIR) transient optical response is monitored by ultrafast optical spectroscopy. We observe a fast rise of transient reflectivity, which decays exponentially. This incoherent response is superimposed by a coherent phonon oscillation. A preliminary study with white light (WL) probe beam shows that low repetition rate is mandatory to study the response of the photoexcited system. The analysis unveils the presence of two phonons at 3 and 4 THz, that dominate at high (HT) and low (LT) temperature, respectively. We study the time evolution of the two phonons in the LT phase. We reveal a finite lifetime for the LT phase phonon, whose amplitude decays within few picoseconds, while the HT phase phonon amplitude remains almost constant. The picture is supported by temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy.

  18. Defects in a mixed-habit Yakutian diamond: Studies by optical and cathodoluminescence microscopy, infrared absorption, Raman scattering and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, A. R.; Bulanova, G. P.; Fisher, D.; Furkert, S.; Sarua, A.

    2007-12-01

    Widespread occurrences in the crystallisation history of natural diamonds are epochs of mixed-habit growth in which normal {1 1 1}-faceted growth is accompanied by non-faceted growth on curved surfaces of mean orientation ˜{1 0 0}, termed 'cuboid'. This paper analyses mixed-habit-related phenomena in a near-central, (1 1 0)-polished slice of an octahedron from the Mir pipe, previously studied principally by SIMS probes analysing N impurity content and C and N isotope composition. In the present work, newly studied features include dislocation content, fine structure in cathodoluminescence (CL) patterns, refined IR absorption data, Raman and photoluminescence (PL) microspectroscopy and microscopy of internal non-diamond bodies. Topographic imaging and spectroscopic techniques traced the specimen's morphological evolution from a cubo-octahedral core containing complex relative development of {1 1 1} and cuboid sectors, both populated by graphite crystallites, diameters up to ˜5 μm, lying on all diamond host {1 1 1}. Coherently overgrowing the core was a zone of widely but smoothly varying relative development of {1 1 1} and cuboid sectors, both on birefringence evidence dislocation-free, emitting strongly from cuboid sectors the PL spectra associated with Ni-N-vacancy complexes. An enclosing octahedral shell of solely {1 1 1} lamellae terminated mixed-habit growth. High-resolution FTIR absorption measurements of I( B'), the integrated absorption due to {1 0 0}-platelet defects, showed from its absence or weakness that total or substantial platelet degradation had taken place in the mixed-habit zones, indicating that these had undergone conditions close to the diamond-graphite phase boundary in their history.

  19. Multiphoton microscopy, fluorescence lifetime imaging and optical spectroscopy for the diagnosis of neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skala, Melissa Caroline

    2007-12-01

    the ultraviolet to visible wavelength range indicated that the most diagnostic optical signals originate from sub-surface tissue layers. Optical properties extracted from these spectroscopy measurements showed a significant decrease in the hemoglobin saturation, absorption coefficient, reduced scattering coefficient and fluorescence intensity (at 400 nm excitation) in neoplastic compared to normal tissues. The results from these studies indicate that multiphoton microscopy and optical spectroscopy can non-invasively provide information on tissue structure and function in vivo that is related to tissue pathology.

  20. Interaction Study of 2,6-Bis[4-(4-amino-2-trifluoromethyl phenoxy)benzoyl] Pyridine with Human Immunoglobulin by Optical Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Wenying; ZHANG Qiongmei; GAO Wenhua; DONG Yuming; YAO Xiaojun

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between human immunoglobulin (HIgG) and BAFP (2,6-bis[4-(4-amino-2-trifluoromethyl phenoxy)benzoyl] pyridine was studied by fluorescence quenching, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra and molecule modeling. The synchronous fluorescence spectra indicated the information on qualitative changes of the pro-tein secondary structure in the presence of BAFP in aqueous solution. The quantitative alterations of the protein sec-ondary structure were estimated by the evidences from FT-IR spectra with increases of α helices by about 2.6%-10.2%, increases of β-sheet structure by about 13.6%-27.7%, and reductions of β-turn structure by about 23.8%-30.3%. Molecular docking suggests that BAFP can strongly bind to HIgG. There are four hydrogen bond interac-tions between the drug and the residues Trp 170, Val 105, Met 139 and Asn 52. It was also considered that BAFP bound to HIgG mainly by a hydrophobic interaction, which is in good agreement with the results from the experi-mental thermodynamic parameters (the enthalpy change △Hθ and the entropy change △Sθ were calculated to be-6.70 kJ·mol-1 and 71.93 J·mol-1·K-1,respectively, according to the Van't Holf equation).

  1. Effect of β-cyclodextrin on the molecular properties of myricetin upon nano-encapsulation: insight from optical spectroscopy and quantum chemical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sandipan; Basu, Soumalee; Basak, Soumen

    2014-01-01

    Myricetin, a bioactive plant flavonol, readily forms inclusion complex with the drug delivery vehicle beta-cyclodextrin (β-CD). Appearance of typical "dual emission", consisting of normal (470 nm) and ESIPT tautomer (530 nm) bands, with concomitant rise in fluorescence intensity and dramatically blue shifted normal fluorescence of myricetin with increasing β-CD concentration, indicates facile entry of myricetin into the cavity of β-CD. The stoichiometry of the inclusion complex has been established to be equimolar (1:1), with an equilibrium constant of 439 ± 18 M(-1) at 25 °C. The driving force of inclusion is attributed to strong van der Waals interaction and formation of hydrogen bond between host (β-CD) and guest (myricetin). Both experimental and theoretical studies indicate that myricetin possibly incorporates within β-CD through its benzoyl moiety. Inclusion in β-CD increases the antioxidant potency of myricetin which has been attributed to the less delocalised HOMO and reduced HOMO-LUMO energy gap in the confined state.

  2. Thermodynamic Insight into the Solvation and Complexation Behavior of U(VI) in Ionic Liquid: Binding of CMPO with U(VI) Studied by Optical Spectroscopy and Calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi; Sun, Taoxiang; Meng, Xianghai; Chen, Jing; Xu, Chao

    2017-03-06

    The complexation of U(VI) with octylphenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO, denoted as L) in ionic liquid (IL) C4mimNTf2 was investigated by UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry and isothermal titration calorimetry. Spectro-photometric titration suggests that three successive complexes, UO2Lj(2+) (j = 1-3), formed both in "dry" (water content U(VI) is much stronger, with stability constants of the respective complexes more than 1 order of magnitude higher than that in wet IL. Energetically, the complexation of U(VI) with CMPO in dry IL is mainly driven by negative enthalpies. In contrast, the complexation in wet IL is overwhelmingly driven by highly positive entropies as a result of the release of a large amount of water molecules from the solvation sphere of U(VI). Moreover, comparisons between the fitted absorption spectra of complexes in wet IL and that of extractive samples from solvent extraction have identified the speciation involved in the extraction of U(VI) by CMPO in ionic liquid. The results from this study not only offer a thermodynamic insight into the complexation behavior of U(VI) with CMPO in IL but also provide valuable information for understanding the extraction behavior in the corresponding solvent extraction system.

  3. Optical spectroscopy for tissue diagnostics and treatment control

    OpenAIRE

    Yavari, Nazila

    2006-01-01

    Biomedical Optics as an interdisciplinary field of science has been developed during many years and is experiencing tremendous growth, to cover a wide range of optical techniques and methods, utilized for medical therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. Biomedical optics contributes by introducing methods and creation of devices used in healthcare of various specialties, such as ophthalmology, cardiology, surgery, dermatology, oncology, radiology, etc. Each of these specialities mi...

  4. Optical spectroscopy study of charge density wave order in Sr3Rh4Sn13 and (Sr0.5Ca0.5)3Rh4Sn13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, W. J.; Wang, H. P.; Tseng, C. W.; Kuo, C. N.; Lue, C. S.; Wang, N. L.

    2017-04-01

    We perform optical spectroscopy measurement on single-crystal samples of Sr3Rh4Sn13 and (Sr0.5Ca0.5)3Rh4Sn13. Formation of CDW energy gap was clearly observed for both single-crystal samples when they undergo the phase transitions. The existence of residual Drude components in σ 1( ω) below T CDW indicates that the Fermi surface is only partially gapped in the CDW state. The obtained value of 2Δ/ k B T CDW is roughly 13 for both Sr3Rh4Sn13 and (Sr0.5Ca0.5)3Rh4Sn13 compounds, which is considerably larger than the mean-field value based on the weak-coupling BCS theory. The measurements provide optical evidence for the strong coupling characteristics of the CDW phase transition.

  5. Synthesis, crystal structure, vibrational spectroscopy, optical properties and theoretical studies of a new organic-inorganic hybrid material: [((CH3)2NH2)(+)]6·[(BiBr6)(3-)]2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ahmed, A; Feki, H; Abid, Y

    2014-12-10

    A new organic-inorganic hybrid material, [((CH3)2NH2)(+)]6·[(BiBr6)(3-)]2, has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy and UV-Visible absorption. The studied compound crystallizes in the triclinic system, space group P1¯ with the following parameters: a=8.4749(6)(Å), b=17.1392(12)(Å), c=17.1392(12)(Å), α=117.339(0)°, β=99.487(0)°, γ=99.487(0)° and Z=2. The crystal lattice is composed of a two discrete (BiBr6)(3-) anions surrounded by six ((CH3)2NH2)(+) cations. Complex hydrogen bonding interactions between (BiBr6)(3-) and organic cations from a three-dimensional network. Theoretical calculations were performed using density functional theory (DFT) for studying the molecular structure, vibrational spectra and optical properties of the investigated molecule in the ground state. The full geometry optimization of designed system is performed using DFT method at B3LYP/LanL2DZ level of theory using the Gaussian03. The optimized geometrical parameters obtained by DFT calculations are in good agreement with single crystal XRD data. The vibrational spectral data obtained from FT-IR and Raman spectra are assigned based on the results of the theoretical calculations. The energy and oscillator strength calculated by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) results complements with the experimental findings. The simulated spectra satisfactorily coincide with the experimental UV-Visible spectrum. The results show good consistent with the experiment and confirm the contribution of metal orbital to the HOMO-LUMO boundary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Probing the Active Galactic Nuclei using optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivek, M.

    Variability studies offer one of the best tools for understanding the physical conditions present in regions close to the central engine in an AGN. We probed the various properties of AGN through time variability studies of spectral lines in the optical wavelengths using the 2m telescope in IUCAA Girawali observatory. The absorption line variability studies are mainly concentrated in understanding the nature of outflows in quasars. Quasar outflows have a huge impact on the evolution of central supermassive blackholes, their host galaxies and the surrounding intergalactic medium. Studying the variability in these Broad Absorption Lines (BALs) can help us understand the structure, evolution, and basic physical properties of these outflows. We conducted a repeated Low ionization BAL monitoring program with 27 LoBALs (Low Ionization BALs) at z 0.3-2.1 covering timescales from 3.22 to 7.69 years in the quasar rest frame. We see a variety of phenomena, including some BALs that either appeared or disappeared completely and some BALs which do not vary over the observation period. In one case, the excited fine structure lines have changed dramatically. One source shows signatures of radiative acceleration. Here, we present the results from this program. Emission line studies are concentrated in understanding the peculiar characteristics of a dual-AGN source SDSS J092712.64+294344.0.

  7. Acousto-optic multiphoton laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton photon counting spectroscopy: Applications and implications for optical neurobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Vijay

    Multiphoton excitation of molecular probes has become an important tool in experimental neurobiology owing to the intrinsic optical sectioning and low light scattering it affords. Using molecular functional indicators, multiphoton excitation allows physiological signals within single neurons to be observed from within living brain tissue. Ideally, it would be possible to record from multiple sites located throughout the elaborately branching dendritic arbors, in order to study the correlations of structure and function both within and across experiments. However, existing multiphoton microscope systems based on scanning mirrors do not allow optical recordings to be obtained from more than a handful of sites simultaneously at the high rates required to capture the fast physiological signals of interest (>100Hz for Ca2+ signals, >1kHz for membrane potential transients). In order to overcome this limitation, two-dimensional acousto-optic deflection was employed, to allow an ultrafast laser beam suited for multiphoton excitation to be rapidly repositioned with low latency (˜15mus). This supports a random-access scanning mode in which the beam can repeatedly visit a succession of user-selected sites of interest within the microscope's field-of-view at high rates, with minimal sacrifice of pixel dwell time. This technique of acousto-optic multiphoton laser scanning microscope (AO-MPLSM) was demonstrated to allow the spatial profile of signals arising in response to physiological stimulation to be rapidly mapped. Means to compensate or avoid problems of dispersion which have hampered AO-MPLSM in the past are presented, with the latter being implemented. Separately, the combination of photon counting detection with multiphoton excitation, termed generally multiphoton photon counting spectroscopy (MP-PCS), was also considered, with particular emphasis on the technique of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). MP-PCS was shown to allow information about molecular

  8. From Protein Structure to Function via Single Crystal Optical Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca eRonda

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The more than 100.000 protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography provide a wealth of information for the characterization of biological processes at the molecular level. However, several crystallographic artifacts, including conformational selection, crystallization conditions and radiation damages, may affect the quality and the interpretation of the electron density map, thus limiting the relevance of structure determinations. Moreover, for most of these structures no functional data have been obtained in the crystalline state, thus posing serious questions on their validity in the inference for protein mechanisms. In order to solve these issues, spectroscopic methods have been applied for the determination of equilibrium and kinetic properties of proteins in the crystalline state. These methods are UV-vis spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, IR, EPR, Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Some of these approaches have been implemented with on-line instruments at X-ray synchrotron beamlines. Here, we provide an overview of investigations predominantly carried out in our laboratory by single crystal polarized absorption UV-vis microspectrophotometry, the most applied technique for the functional characterization of proteins in the crystalline state. Studies on hemoglobins, pyridoxal 5’-phosphate dependent enzymes and green fluorescent protein in the crystalline state have addressed key biological issues, leading to either straightforward structure-function correlations or limitations to structure-based mechanisms.

  9. Biophysical Characterisation of Globins and Multi-Heme Cytochromes Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmet, Filip

    Heme proteins of different families were investigated in this work, using a combination of pulsed and continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, resonance Raman spectroscopy and laser flash photolysis. The first class of proteins that were investigated, were the globins. The globin-domain of the globin-coupled sensor of the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens was studied in detail using different pulsed EPR techniques (HYSCORE and Mims ENDOR). The results of this pulsed EPR study are compared with the results of the optical investigation and the crystal structure of the protein. The second globin, which was studied, is the Protoglobin of Methanosarcina acetivorans, various mutants of this protein were studied using laser flash photolysis and Raman spectroscopy to unravel the link between this protein's unusual structure and its ligand-binding kinetics. In addition to this, the CN -bound form of this protein was investigated using EPR and the influence of the strong deformation of the heme on the unusual low gz values is discussed. Finally, the neuroglobins of three species of fishes, Danio rerio, Dissostichus mawsoni and Chaenocephalus aceratus are studied. The influence of the presence or absence of two cysteine residues in the C-D and D-region of the protein on the EPR spectrum, and the possible formation of a disulfide bond is studied. The second group of proteins that were studied in this thesis belong to the family of the cytochromes. First the Mouse tumor suppressor cytochrome b561 was studied, the results of a Raman and EPR investigation are compared to the Human orthologue of the protein. Secondly, the tonoplast cytochrome b561 of Arabidopsis was investigated in its natural form and in two double-mutant forms, in which the heme at the extravesicular side was removed. The results of this investigation are then compared with two models in literature that predict the localisation of the hemes in this

  10. Toward contrast-enhanced, optically-detected NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriles, Carlos; Pagliero, Daniela

    2011-03-01

    Optical detection of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) takes place via a two-step process that relies on the interaction between optical photons and electrons on the one hand, and the hyperfine coupling between electrons and nuclear spins on the other. The latter depends on the material system under consideration while the former is dominated by the difference between the illumination and optical transition wavelengths. Here we use optical Faraday rotation to monitor nuclear spins in real time after resonant radio-frequency excitation at high-magnetic field. Comparison between inductively and optically detected NMR spectra in model sample fluids indicates that each of these mechanisms can lead to alternate forms of spectral contrast. Extension of these findings may find application in solvent suppression protocols, sensitivity-enhanced NMR of metalloproteins, or the characterization of molecular orbitals in diamagnetic systems. We acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation.

  11. Lattice Studies of Hyperon Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, David G. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    I describe recent progress at studying the spectrum of hadrons containing the strange quark through lattice QCD calculations. I emphasise in particular the richness of the spectrum revealed by lattice studies, with a spectrum of states at least as rich as that of the quark model. I conclude by prospects for future calculations, including in particular the determination of the decay amplitudes for the excited states.

  12. Interference-free optical detection for Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet (Inventor); Fischer, David G (Inventor); Kojima, Jun (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An architecture for spontaneous Raman scattering (SRS) that utilizes a frame-transfer charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor operating in a subframe burst gating mode to realize time-resolved combustion diagnostics is disclosed. The technique permits all-electronic optical gating with microsecond shutter speeds (<5 .mu.s), without compromising optical throughput or image fidelity. When used in conjunction with a pair of orthogonally-polarized excitation lasers, the technique measures time-resolved vibrational Raman scattering that is minimally contaminated by problematic optical background noise.

  13. Radioracemization and radiation-induced chiral amplification of chiral terpenes measured by optical rotatory dispersion (ORD) spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cataldo, Franco [Lupi Chemical Research Institute, Via Casilina 1626/A, 00133 Rome (Italy); INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, 95123 Catania (Italy)], E-mail: franco.cataldo@fastwebnet.it; Ursini, Ornella; Angelini, Giancarlo [Institute of Chemical Methodologies, CNR Via Salaria Km. 29300 00016 Monterotondo Stazione, Rome (Italy)

    2008-08-15

    For the first time the radioracemization of {alpha}(+)pinene and {alpha}(-)pinene, of turpentine and of R(-)-{alpha}-phellandrene has been studied by optical rotatory dispersion (ORD) spectroscopy. For all these compounds, the radioracemization implies a shift of the ORD curves toward lower levels of specific optical rotation. The radioracemization degree (R{sub R}) has been defined and calculated for all the compounds studied. It has been found that for radiation dose of 1 MGy the radioracemization degree is about 4.5% for the compound with the highest optical purity and reaches 7-8% for the less optically pure compounds, demonstrating that impurities can affect greatly the radioracemization. In contrast with the general radioracemization effect exerted by high-energy radiation on chiral molecules, {beta}(-)pinene, {beta}(+)pinene when irradiated show an increment of their specific optical rotation. This fact has been measured for the first time by ORD spectroscopy and the amplification degree of chirality can reach 1000% in the near UV. This phenomenon is due to the formation of a chiral polymer, poly-{beta}-pinene, which forms a solution with the monomer enhancing its optical activity. The implications for the theories of the origin of life of such unexpected phenomenon are discussed briefly.

  14. Nonlinear optical spectroscopy of isotropic and anisotropic metallic nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Hernandez, R C; Gleason-Villagran, R; Cheang-Wong, J C; Crespo-Sosa, A; Rodriguez-Fernandez, L; Lopez-Suarez, A; Oliver, A; Reyes-Esqueda, J A [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D. F. 04510 (Mexico); Torres-Torres, C [Seccion de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigacion, ESIME-Zacatenco, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D. F. 07338 (Mexico); Rangel-Rojo, R, E-mail: reyes@fisica.unam.mx [CICESE/Depto. de Optica, A.P. 360, Ensenada, B. C. 22860 (Mexico)

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we studied the nonlinear absorption and refraction of isotropic and anisotropic metallic nanocomposites, which consist of Au and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in matrices of SiO{sub 2}. We performed this study at different wavelengths using the Z-scan technique in the picosecond regime. The wavelengths were selected accordingly to the absorption spectra of the nanocomposites, choosing wavelengths into the inter- and intra-band transitions regions, including the surface plasmon (SP) resonance, as well as in the transparent region. For the anisotropic nanocomposites, the polarization and the incident angle were varied in order to evaluate the different components of the third order susceptibility tensor, {chi}{sup (3)}. We observed dramatic changes of sign for both, nonlinear refraction and absorption, when passing from Au to Ag and/or varying the wave length. The results accentuate the importance of the hot-electrons contribution to the nonlinear optical response at this temporal regime, when compared to inter-band and intra-band transitions contributions.

  15. Fluorescence-detected two-dimensional electronic coherence spectroscopy by acousto-optic phase modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekavec, Patrick F; Lott, Geoffrey A; Marcus, Andrew H

    2007-12-07

    Two-dimensional electronic coherence spectroscopy (ECS) is an important method to study the coupling between distinct optical modes of a material system. Such studies often involve excitation using a sequence of phased ultrashort laser pulses. In conventional approaches, the delays between pulse temporal envelopes must be precisely monitored or maintained. Here, we introduce a new experimental scheme for phase-selective nonlinear ECS, which combines acousto-optic phase modulation with ultrashort laser excitation to produce intensity modulated nonlinear fluorescence signals. We isolate specific nonlinear signal contributions by synchronous detection, with respect to appropriately constructed references. Our method effectively decouples the relative temporal phases from the pulse envelopes of a collinear train of four sequential pulses. We thus achieve a robust and high signal-to-noise scheme for phase-selective ECS to investigate the resonant nonlinear optical response of photoluminescent systems. We demonstrate the validity of our method using a model quantum three-level system-atomic Rb vapor. Moreover, we show how our measurements determine the resonant complex-valued third-order susceptibility.

  16. Initial Results of Optical Vortex Laser Absorption Spectroscopy in the HYPER-I Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Asai, Shoma; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Ozawa, Naoya; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Morisaki, Tomohiro

    2015-11-01

    Optical vortex beams have a potential to make a new Doppler measurement, because not only parallel but perpendicular movement of atoms against the beam axis causes the Doppler shift of their resonant absorption frequency. As the first step of a proof-of-principle experiment, we have performed the optical vortex laser absorption spectroscopy for metastable argon neutrals in an ECR plasma produced in the HYPER-I device at the National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan. An external cavity diode laser (TOPTICA, DL100) of which center wavelength was 696.735 nm in vacuum was used for the light source. The Hermite-Gaussian (HG) beam was converted into the Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam (optical vortex) by a computer-generated hologram displayed on the spatial light modulator (Hamamatsu, LCOS-SLM X10468-07). In order to make fast neutral flow across the LG beam, a high speed solenoid valve system was installed on the HYPER-I device. Initial results including the comparison of absorption spectra for HG and LG beams will be presented. This study was supported by NINS young scientists collaboration program for cross-disciplinary study, NIFS collaboration research program (NIFS13KOAP026), and JSPS KAKENHI grant number 15K05365.

  17. Atmospheric studies by optical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Åke

    The 19th Annual European Meeting on Atmospheric Studies by Optical Methods was held in Kiruna, Sweden, from August 10 to 14. About 120 scientists from thirteen countries contributed talks and posters to eight topical sessions.The annual optical meeting, which was first held in Stockholm in 1972, provides a platform for the exchange of ideas, scientific results, and instrumental information on atmospheric studies collected by optical methods. Although the primary objective is to stimulate high-level scientific discussions, social activities are included in the conference program to expose participants to the host city's local culture, industry, and sights. Participants from all parts of the world are welcome to attend.

  18. Noninvasive optical cytochrome c oxidase redox state measurements using diffuse optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jangwoen; Kim, Jae G.; Mahon, Sari B.; Mukai, David; Yoon, David; Boss, Gerry R.; Patterson, Steven E.; Rockwood, Gary; Isom, Gary; Brenner, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    A major need exists for methods to assess organ oxidative metabolic states in vivo. By contrasting the responses to cyanide (CN) poisoning versus hemorrhage in animal models, we demonstrate that diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) can detect cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) redox states. Intermittent decreases in inspired O2 from 100% to 21% were applied before, during, and after CN poisoning, hemorrhage, and resuscitation in rabbits. Continuous DOS measurements of total hemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and oxidized and reduced CcO from muscle were obtained. Rabbit hemorrhage was accomplished with stepwise removal of blood, followed by blood resuscitation. CN treated rabbits received 0.166 mg/min NaCN infusion. During hemorrhage, CcO redox state became reduced concurrently with decreases in oxyhemoglobin, resulting from reduced tissue oxygen delivery and hypoxia. In contrast, during CN infusion, CcO redox state decreased while oxyhemoglobin concentration increased due to CN binding and reduction of CcO with resultant inhibition of the electron transport chain. Spectral absorption similarities between hemoglobin and CcO make noninvasive spectroscopic distinction of CcO redox states difficult. By contrasting physiological perturbations of CN poisoning versus hemorrhage, we demonstrate that DOS measured CcO redox state changes are decoupled from hemoglobin concentration measurement changes.

  19. Integrated optical measurement system for fluorescence spectroscopy in microfluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hübner, Jörg; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Jørgensen, Anders Michael

    2001-01-01

    A transportable miniaturized fiber-pigtailed measurement system is presented which allows quantitative fluorescence detection in microliquid handling systems. The microliquid handling chips are made in silica on silicon technology and the optical functionality is monolithically integrated...... with the microfluidic channel system. This results in inherent stability and photolithographic alignment precision. Permanently attached optical fibers provide a rugged connection to the light source, detection, and data processing unit, which potentially allows field use of such systems. Fluorescence measurements...

  20. Time domain terahertz electro- and magneto-optic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, G P

    2001-01-01

    sub i sub c sub u sub l sub a sub r = 0 centre dot 19m sub e and m sub p sub a sub r sub a sub l sub l sub e sub l = 0 centre dot 90m sub e. The temperature dependence of the cyclotron resonance was measured over the range 5K to 80 K, and a peak is found at approx 30 K which can be explained in terms of ionised and neutral impurity scattering at temperatures below 30 K and by phonon scattering above 30 K. The measurement of small amplitude ferromagnetic resonance oscillations in the time domain in thin films of permalloy (78), iron and cobalt has been achieved by using the time resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect. A stripline device was fabricated to provide an out of plane broadband magnetic pulse with a peak strength of approx 5 Oe. The observed frequencies are shown to agree well with the established theory. A time domain terahertz spectrometer and a bolometer have been used to study the coherent THz radiation emitted from n- and p-type InAs surfaces illuminated by femtosecond near infrared pulses. The magn...

  1. Molecular Beam Optical Zeeman Spectroscopy of Vanadium Monoxide, VO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung; Zhang, Ruohan; Steimle, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Like almost all astronomical studies, exoplanet investigations are observational endeavors that rely primarily on remote spectroscopic sensing to infer the physical properties of planets. Most exoplanet related information is inferred from to temporal variation of luminosity of the parent star. An effective method of monitoring this variation is via Magnetic Doppler Imaging (MDI), which uses optical polarimetry of paramagnetic molecules or atoms. One promising paramagnetic stellar absorption is the near infrared spectrum of VO. With this in mind, we have begun a project to record and analyze the field-free and Zeeman spectrum of the band. A cold (approx. 20 K) beam of VO was probed with a single frequency laser and detected using laser induced fluorescence. The determined spectral parameters will be discussed and compared to those extracted from the analysis of a hot spectrum. Supported by the National Science Foundation under the Grant No. CHE-1265885. O. Kochukhov, N. Rusomarov, J. A. Valenti, H. C. Stempels, F. Snik, M. Rodenhuis, N. Piskunov, V. Makaganiuk, C. U. Keller and C. M. Johns-Krull, Astron. Astrophys. 574 (Pt. 2), A79/71-A79/12 (2015). S. V. Berdyugina, Astron. Soc. Pac. Conf. Ser. 437 (Solar Polarization 6), 219-235 (2011). S. V. Berdyugina, P. A. Braun, D. M. Fluri and S. K. Solanki, Astron. Astrophys. 444 (3), 947-960 (2005). A. S. C. Cheung, P. G. Hajigeorgiou, G. Huang, S. Z. Huang and A. J. Merer, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 163 (2), 443-458 (1994)

  2. Rapid evaluation of ion thruster lifetime using optical emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, B. A.; Parsons, M. L.; Mantenieks, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    A major life-limiting phenomenon of electric thrusters is the sputter erosion of discharge chamber components. Thrusters for space propulsion are required to operate for extended periods of time, usually in excess of 10,000 hr. Lengthy and very costly life-tests in high-vacuum facilities have been required in the past to determine the erosion rates of thruster components. Alternative methods for determining erosion rates which can be performed in relatively short periods of time at considerably lower costs are studied. An attempt to relate optical emission intensity from an ion bombarded surface (screen grid) to the sputtering rate of that surface is made. The model used a kinetic steady-state (KSS) approach, balancing the rates of population and depopulation of ten low-lying excited states of the sputtered molybdenum atom (MoI) with those of the ground state to relate the spectral intensities of the various transitions of the MoI to the population densities. Once this is accomplished, the population density can be related to the sputting rate of the target. Radiative and collisional modes of excitation and decay are considered. Since actual data has not been published for MoI excitation rate and decay constants, semiempirical equations are used. The calculated sputtering rate and intensity is compared to the measured intensity and sputtering rates of the 8 and 30 cm ion thrusters.

  3. Optical emission enhancement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using micro-torches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Huang, X.; Li, S.; Lu, Yao; Chen, K.; Lu, Y. F.

    2016-03-01

    A cost effective method for optical emission enhancement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been proposed in this research. The pulsed Nd:YAG laser with a wavelength of 532 nm was used for sample ablation and plasma generation. A cost effective commercial butane micro-torch was put parallel to the sample surface to generate a small flame above the surface. The laser-induced plasma expanded in the flame environment. The time-resolved optical emission intensity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) have been observed with and without micro torch. For laser with pulse energy of 20 mJ, the relationship between optical emission intensity and delay time indicates that signal intensities have been greatly enhanced in the initial several microseconds when using micro torch. The time-resolved study of signal-to-noise ratio shows that the maximum SNR occurs at the delay time of 2 μs. The laser energy effects on the enhancements of optical emission intensity and SNR have also been analyzed, which indicates that the enhancement factors are both delay time and laser energy dependent. The maximum enhancement factors for both optical emission intensity and SNR gradually decreases with the laser energy increase. The limits of detection (LODs) for aluminum (Al) and molybdenum (Mo) in steel have been estimated, which shows that the detection sensitivity has been improved by around 4 times. The LODs of Al and Mo have been reduced from 18 to 6 ppm and from 110 to 36 ppm in LIBS, respectively. The method of LIBS by a micro torch has been demonstrated to be a cost effective method for detection sensitivity improvement, especially in the situation of low laser pulse energy.

  4. Engine Throat/Nozzle Optics for Plume Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    which describes the percentage of chrome atoms existing in an atomic state. This value from Handbook of Flame Spectroscopy by Parsons[I] is approximate...with a modified SMA connector. The bundle extends through the SMA connector and is encased in a flexible sheathing . A metal band at the fiber bundle

  5. [Techniques of on-line monitoring volatile organic compounds in ambient air with optical spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhen-Hui; Zhai, Ya-Qiong; Li, Jin-Yi; Hu, Bo

    2009-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are harmful gaseous pollutants in the ambient air. The techniques of on-line monitoring VOCs are very significant for environment protection. Until now, there is no single technology that can meet all the needs of monitoring various VOCs. The characteristics and present situation of several optical methods, which can be applied to on-line monitoring VOCs, including non dispersive infrared (NDIR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), and laser spectroscopy were reviewed. Comparison was completed between the national standard methods and spectroscopic method for measuring VOCs. The main analysis was focused on the status and trends of tuning diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology.

  6. Lattice Studies for hadron spectroscopy and interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Aoki, Sinya

    2014-01-01

    Recent progresses of lattice QCD studies for hadron spectroscopy and interactions are briefly reviewed. Some emphasis are given on a new proposal for a method, which enable us to calculate potentials between hadrons. As an example of the method, the extraction of nuclear potential in lattice QCD is discussed in detail.

  7. Cooperative photo-induced effects: from photo-magnetism under continuous irradiation to ultra-fast phenomena - study through optical spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction; Effets photo-induits cooperatifs: du photomagnetisme sous irradiation continue aux phenomenes ultrarapides - etude par spectroscopie optique et diffraction X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glijer, D

    2006-12-15

    The control with ultra-short laser pulses of the collective and concerted transformation of molecules driving a macroscopic state switching on an ultra-fast time scale in solid state opens new prospects in materials science. The goal is to realize at the material level what happens at the molecular level in femto-chemistry. These processes are highly cooperative and highly non-linear, leading to self-amplification and self-organization within the material, a so-called photo-induced phase transition with a new long range order (structural, magnetic, ferroelectric,...). Two families of molecular compounds have been studied here: first of all, spin transition materials changing from a diamagnetic state over to a paramagnetic state under the effect of temperature or under continuous laser excitation. It concerns photo-active molecular bi-stability prototype materials in solid state, whose switching has been studied during X-ray diffraction, optical reflectivity and magnetism experiments. Then we have studied charge-transfer molecular systems, prototype compounds for ultrafast photo-induced phase transitions: insulator-metal, neutral-ionic....As well as ultrafast optical experiments, time-resolved X ray crystallography is a key technique in order to follow at the atomic level the different steps of the photo-induced transformation and thus to observe the involved mechanisms. We have underlined a process of photo-formation of one-dimensional nano-domains of lattice-relaxed charge-transfer excitations, governing the photo-induced phase transition of the molecular charge-transfer complex TTF-CA by the first time-resolved diffuse scattering measurements. Moreover, a new femtosecond laser-plasma source and a optical pump-probe spectroscopy set-up with a highly sensitive detecting system have been developed in this work. The results presented here will be an illustration of the present scientific challenges existing on the one hand with the development of projects of major

  8. Vibrational Spectroscopy in Studies of Atmospheric Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saman Hosseinpour

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational spectroscopy has been successfully used for decades in studies of the atmospheric corrosion processes, mainly to identify the nature of corrosion products but also to quantify their amounts. In this review article, a summary of the main achievements is presented with focus on how the techniques infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy can be used in the field. Several different studies have been discussed where these instruments have been used to assess both the nature of corrosion products as well as the properties of corrosion inhibitors. Some of these techniques offer the valuable possibility to perform in-situ measurements in real time on ongoing corrosion processes, which allows the kinetics of formation of corrosion products to be studied, and also minimizes the risk of changing the surface properties which may occur during ex-situ experiments. Since corrosion processes often occur heterogeneously over a surface, it is of great importance to obtain a deeper knowledge about atmospheric corrosion phenomena on the nano scale, and this review also discusses novel vibrational microscopy techniques allowing spectra to be acquired with a spatial resolution of 20 nm.

  9. Vibrational Spectroscopy in Studies of Atmospheric Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinpour, Saman; Johnson, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy has been successfully used for decades in studies of the atmospheric corrosion processes, mainly to identify the nature of corrosion products but also to quantify their amounts. In this review article, a summary of the main achievements is presented with focus on how the techniques infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy can be used in the field. Several different studies have been discussed where these instruments have been used to assess both the nature of corrosion products as well as the properties of corrosion inhibitors. Some of these techniques offer the valuable possibility to perform in-situ measurements in real time on ongoing corrosion processes, which allows the kinetics of formation of corrosion products to be studied, and also minimizes the risk of changing the surface properties which may occur during ex-situ experiments. Since corrosion processes often occur heterogeneously over a surface, it is of great importance to obtain a deeper knowledge about atmospheric corrosion phenomena on the nano scale, and this review also discusses novel vibrational microscopy techniques allowing spectra to be acquired with a spatial resolution of 20 nm. PMID:28772781

  10. Estimation of optical parameters of highly scattering materials by time-of-flight spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plucinski, Jerzy

    2004-07-01

    Optical measurement methods are indispensable tool in biomedical research, providing invaluable information on optical properties of biological tissues. However, the application of these techniques is a big challenge, as most tissues are highly scattering materials whose optical properties cannot be measured in a straightforward way, due to multiple scattering of photons. Therefore, new optical measurement techniques and methods for highly scattering media are being developed to address this problem. One of the very promising techniques is time-of-flight spectroscopy. The paper presents problems encountered in reconstruction of basic optical parameters of tissues or other highly scattering materials from optical time-of-flight spectroscopy measurement data. To estimate the reconstruction accuracy of optical parameters (i.e. absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, anisotropy factor and refractive index) the test data were generated by a computer program simulating light propagation in highly scattering material by Monte Carlo method. Following, a set of computer programs based on diffusion equation and optimization algorithms such as simplex method and genetic method were used to reconstruct optical parameters from the test data. Finally, by comparing reconstructed optical parameters with those used for generation of the test data, the accuracy of reconstructing algorithms it was estimated.

  11. Raman spectroscopy of optical properties in CdS thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trajić J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of CdS thin films were investigated applying atomic force microscopy (AFM and Raman spectroscopy. CdS thin films were prepared by using thermal evaporation technique under base pressure 2 x 10-5 torr. The quality of these films was investigated by AFM spectroscopy. We apply Raman scattering to investigate optical properties of CdS thin films, and reveal existence of surface optical phonon (SOP mode at 297 cm-1. Effective permittivity of mixture were modeled by Maxwell - Garnet approximation. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 45003

  12. Hollow Core Fiber Optics for Mid-Wave and Long-Wave Infrared Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriesel, J.M.; Gat, N.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Erikson, Rebecca L.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bledt, Carlos M.; Harrington, J. A.

    2011-06-01

    The development and testing of hollow core glass waveguides (i.e., fiber optics) for use in Long-Wave Infrared (LWIR) spectroscopy systems is described. LWIR fiber optics are a key enabling technology needed to improve the utility and effectiveness of trace chemical detection systems based in the 8 to 12 micron region. This paper focuses on recent developments in hollow waveguide technology geared specifically for LWIR spectroscopy, including a reduction in both the length dependent loss and the bending loss while maintaining relatively high beam quality. Results will be presented from tests conducted with a Quantum Cascade Laser.

  13. Probing the Spin-Polarized Electronic Band Structure in Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides by Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zefang; Zhao, Liang; Mak, Kin Fai; Shan, Jie

    2017-02-01

    We study the electronic band structure in the K/K' valleys of the Brillouin zone of monolayer WSe2 and MoSe2 by optical reflection and photoluminescence spectroscopy on dual-gated field-effect devices. Our experiment reveals the distinct spin polarization in the conduction bands of these compounds by a systematic study of the doping dependence of the A and B excitonic resonances. Electrons in the highest-energy valence band and the lowest-energy conduction band have antiparallel spins in monolayer WSe2, and parallel spins in monolayer MoSe2. The spin splitting is determined to be hundreds of meV for the valence bands and tens of meV for the conduction bands, which are in good agreement with first principles calculations. These values also suggest that both n- and p-type WSe2 and MoSe2 can be relevant for spin- and valley-based applications

  14. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy determination of trace element composition of argan oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzálvez, A; Ghanjaoui, M E; El Rhazi, M; de la Guardia, M

    2010-02-01

    A methodology based on inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) after microwave assisted acid digestion has been developed to determine the trace element content of Moroccan argan oil. Limit of detection values equal or lower than few mg/kg were obtained for all elements under study. To assure the accuracy of the whole procedure, recovery studies were carried out on argan oil samples spiked at different concentration levels from 10 to 200 µg/L. Quantitative average recovery values were obtained for all elements evaluated, demonstrating the suitability of this methodology for the determination of trace elements in argan oil samples. Aluminum, calcium, chromium, iron, potassium, lithium, magnesium, sodium, vanadium and zinc were quantitatively determined in Moroccan argan oils being found that their concentration is different of that found in other edible oils thus offering a way for authentication and for the evaluation of possible adulterations.

  15. Spectral characterization of acousto-optic filters used in imaging spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Georgi; Glenar, David A; Hillman, John J

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to improve the study of the characteristics of noncollinear acoustooptic tunable filters (AOTFs) used in imaging spectroscopy. Three filters were characterized and the results compared with tuning models to verify that device operation can be reliably predicted in advance. All these devices use tellurium dioxide as the interaction medium and have large geometric apertures for spectroscopic imaging applications in the spectral range 0.5-3.5 microm. The device characteristics that we studied were compared with the results of AOTF models, and the spectral and angular dependence of acoustic frequency and bandpass width for both output polarization states were confirmed by measurements. One of the AOTFs was used as a dispersive element coupled to external imaging optics. We summarize measurements of the basic spectral and imaging characteristics in this configuration.

  16. Terahertz magneto-optical spectroscopy of a two-dimensional hole gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamaraju, N., E-mail: nkamaraju@lanl.gov; Taylor, A. J.; Prasankumar, R. P., E-mail: rpprasan@lanl.gov [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Pan, W.; Reno, J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Ekenberg, U. [Semiconsultants, Brunnsgrnd 12, SE-18773 Täby (Sweden); Gvozdić, D. M. [School of Electrical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Belgrade 11120 (Serbia); Boubanga-Tombet, S. [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-Ku, Sendai (Japan); Upadhya, P. C. [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Laboratory for Electro-Optics Systems, Indian Space Research Organization, Bangalore 560058 (India)

    2015-01-19

    Two-dimensional hole gases (2DHGs) have attracted recent attention for their unique quantum physics and potential applications in areas including spintronics and quantum computing. However, their properties remain relatively unexplored, motivating the use of different techniques to study them. We used terahertz magneto-optical spectroscopy to investigate the cyclotron resonance frequency in a high mobility 2DHG, revealing a nonlinear dependence on the applied magnetic field. This is shown to be due to the complex non-parabolic valence band structure of the 2DHG, as verified by multiband Landau level calculations. We also find that impurity scattering dominates cyclotron resonance decay in the 2DHG, in contrast with the dominance of superradiant damping in two-dimensional electron gases. Our results shed light on the properties of 2DHGs, motivating further studies of these unique 2D nanosystems.

  17. Calibration of effective optical path length for hollow-waveguide based gas cell using absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Du, Zhenhui; Li, Jinyi

    2016-10-01

    The Hollow Waveguide (HWG) has emerged as a novel tool to transmit laser power. Owing to its long Effective Optical Path Length (EOPL) within a relatively small volume, it is suitable for the application as a gas cell in concentration measurement by using laser spectroscopy. The measurement of effective optical path length for a hollow waveguide, which possesses the physical length of 284.0 cm, by using Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) was demonstrated. Carbon dioxide was used as a sample gas for a hollow waveguide calibration. A 2004 nm Distributed Feed-Back (DFB) laser was used as the light source to cover a CO2 line near 2003 nm, which was selected as the target line in the measurement. The reference direct absorption spectroscopy signal was obtained by delivering CO2 into a reference cell possessing a length of 29.4 cm. Then the effective optical path length of HWG was calculated by least-squares fitting the measured absorption signal to the reference absorption signal. The measured EOPL of HWG was 282.8 cm and the repeatability error of effective optical path length was calculated as 0.08 cm. A detection limit of 0.057 cm (with integral time 5 s) characterized by the Allan variance, was derived. The effective optical path length is obtained as the significant parameter to calculate the concentration of gases and it is of great importance to precise measurement of absorption spectroscopy.

  18. Local Optical Spectroscopies for Subnanometer Spatial Resolution Chemical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Paul

    2014-01-20

    The evanescently coupled photon scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs) have special requirements in terms of stability and optical access. We have made substantial improvements to the stability, resolution, and noise floor of our custom-built visible-photon STM, and will translate these advances to our infrared instrument. Double vibration isolation of the STM base with a damping system achieved increased rigidity, giving high tunneling junction stability for long-duration and high-power illumination. Light frequency modulation with an optical chopper and phase-sensitive detection now enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the tunneling junction during irradiation.

  19. Optical spectroscopy for the detection of ischemic tissue injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, Stavros [Livermore, CA; Fitzgerald, Jason [Sacramento, CA; Troppmann, Christoph [Sacramento, CA; Michalopoulou, Andromachi [Athens, GR

    2009-09-08

    An optical method and apparatus is utilized to quantify ischemic tissue and/or organ injury. Such a method and apparatus is non-invasive, non-traumatic, portable, and can make measurements in a matter of seconds. Moreover, such a method and apparatus can be realized through optical fiber probes, making it possible to take measurements of target organs deep within a patient's body. Such a technology provides a means of detecting and quantifying tissue injury in its early stages, before it is clinically apparent and before irreversible damage has occurred.

  20. Ultrafast and Nonlinear Optical Spectroscopy of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Junichiro

    2011-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) provide a variety of unique opportunities for studying the dynamics and interactions of one-dimensional (1-D) electrons and phonons. We have carried out a series of ultrafast and nonlinear optical experiments on SWNTs, revealing novel properties of high- density 1-D excitons as well as coherent lattice vibrations. We have shown that there exists an upper limit on the density of 1-D excitons in SWNTs, which results in photoluminescence saturation. Using a model based on diffusion-limited exciton- exciton annihilation, we provided realistic estimates for the exciton densities in the saturation regime. We also predicted and demonstrated that there is an optimum temperature at which the exciton density can be maximized, due to the existence of a dark exciton state. Using ultrashort pulses, we have also investigated the dynamics of coherent phonons (CPs) in SWNTs, including both the low frequency radial breathing mode and high frequency G-mode phonons. Pulse shaping techniques allowed us to generate and detect CPs in SWNTs in a chirality-selective manner, which provided insight into the chirality dependence of light absorption, phonon generation, and phonon-induced band- structure modulations. Finally, we observed novel large- amplitude CPs through near-band-edge excitations as well as strongly polarization-dependent CP signals in highly-aligned SWNTs. This work was performed in collaboration with Y. Murakami, A. Srivastava, T. A. Searles, L. G. Booshehri, E. H. Hároz, D. T. Morris, J.-H. Kim, K.-J. Yee, Y.-S. Lim, G. D. Sanders, C. J. Stanton, and R. Saito.

  1. NONLINEAR OPTICS: Coherent laser spectroscopy of matter utilizing waveguide structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaus, A. I.; Yashkir, Yu N.

    1990-07-01

    Some features of CARS spectroscopy in waveguide structures are investigated theoretically taking into account stimulated Raman amplification of a weak pump wave in the field of a strong wave and allowing for the phase matching. A four-photon intermode coupling which occurs under amplification conditions results in energy diffusion between different modes. General expressions for the intensities of the pump waves undergoing stimulated amplification and for the anti-Stokes signal are derived and analyzed.

  2. Radiation-induced defects in chalcogenide glasses characterized by combined optical spectroscopy, XPS and PALS methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O. [Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15 al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa 42201 (Poland); Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' ' Carat' ' , 202, Stryjska str., 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Kovalskiy, A.; Jain, H. [Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Golovchak, R. [Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' ' Carat' ' , 202, Stryjska str., 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Zurawska, A. [Opole University of Technology, 75, Ozimska str., Opole 45370 (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    Temperature-dependent optical absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetimes spectroscopy are utilized to understand radiation-induced changes in Ge-Sb-S chalcogenide glasses. Theoretically predicted topological scheme of {gamma}-induced coordination defect formation in stoichiometric Ge{sub 23.5}Sb{sub 11.8}S{sub 64.7} glass composition is supported by these measurements. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Mid-infrared dual-comb spectroscopy with an optical parametric oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaowei; Gardiner, Tom; Reid, Derryck T

    2013-08-15

    We present the first implementation of mid-infrared dual-comb spectroscopy with an optical parametric oscillator. Methane absorption spectroscopy was demonstrated with a resolution of 0.2 cm(-1) (5 GHz) at an acquisition time of ~10.4 ms over a spectral coverage at 2900-3050 cm(-1). The average power from each individual mid-infrared comb line was ~1 μW, representing a power level much greater than typical difference-frequency-generation sources. Mid-infrared dual-comb spectroscopy opens up unique opportunities to perform broadband spectroscopic measurements with high resolution, high requisition rate, and high detection sensitivity.

  4. The clinical effectiveness of reflectance optical spectroscopy for the in vivo diagnosis of oral lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Diana VMessadi; Fariba SYounai; Hong-Hu Liu; Gao Guo; Cun-Yu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy devices are being developed and tested for the screening and diagnosis of oral precancer and cancer lesions. This study reports a device that uses white light for detection of suspicious lesions and green-amber light at 545 nm that detect tissue vascularity on patients with several suspicious oral lesions. The clinical grading of vascularity was compared to the histological grading of the biopsied lesions using specific biomarkers. Such a device, in the hands of dentists and other health professionals, could greatly increase the number of oral cancerous lesions detected in early phase. The purpose of this study is to correlate the clinical grading of tissue vascularity in several oral suspicious lesions using the IdentafiH system with the histological grading of the biopsied lesions using specific vascular markers. Twenty-one patients with various oral lesions were enrolled in the study. The lesions were visualized using IdentafiH device with white light illumination, followed by visualization of tissue autofluorescence and tissue reflectance. Tissue biopsied was obtained from the all lesions and both histopathological and immunohistochemical studies using a vascular endothelial biomarker (CD34) were performed on these tissue samples. The clinical vascular grading using the green-amber light at 545 nm and the expression pattern and intensity of staining for CD34 in the different biopsies varied depending on lesions, grading ranged from 1 to 3. The increase in vascularity was observed in abnormal tissues when compared to normal mucosa, but this increase was not limited to carcinoma only as hyperkeratosis and other oral diseases, such as lichen planus, also showed increase in vascularity. Optical spectroscopy is a promising technology for the detection of oral mucosal abnormalities;however, further investigations with a larger population group is required to evaluate the usefulness of these devices in differentiating benign lesions from

  5. Experimental, computational, and analytical techniques for diagnosing breast cancer using optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Gregory M.

    This dissertation presents the results of an investigation into experimental, computational, and analytical methodologies for diagnosing breast cancer using fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. First, the optimal experimental methodology for tissue biopsy studies was determined using an animal study. It was found that the use of freshly excised tissue samples preserved the original spectral line shape and magnitude of the fluorescence and diffuse reflectance. Having established the optimal experimental methodology, a clinical study investigating the use of fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for the diagnosis of breast cancer was undertaken. In addition, Monte Carlo-based models of diffuse reflectance and fluorescence were developed and validated to interpret these data. These models enable the extraction of physically meaningful information from the measured spectra, including absorber concentrations, and scattering and intrinsic fluorescence properties. The model was applied to the measured spectra, and using a support vector machine classification algorithm based on physical features extracted from the diffuse reflectance spectra, it was found that breast cancer could be diagnosed with a cross-validated sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 92%, respectively, which are substantially better than that obtained using a conventional, empirical algorithm. It was found that malignant tissues had lower hemoglobin oxygen saturation, were more scattering, and had lower beta-carotene concentration, relative to the non-malignant tissues. It was also found that the fluorescence model could successfully extract the intrinsic fluorescence line shape from tissue samples. One limitation of the previous study is that a priori knowledge of the tissue's absorbers and scatterers is required. To address this limitation, and to improve upon the method with which fiber optic probes are designed, an alternate approach was developed. This method used a

  6. Real-time tissue differentiation based on optical emission spectroscopy for guided electrosurgical tumor resection

    OpenAIRE

    Spether, Dominik; Scharpf, Marcus; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Schwentner, Christian; Neugebauer, Alexander; Nüßle, Daniela; Fischer, Klaus; Zappe, Hans; Stenzl, Arnulf; Fend, Falko; Seifert, Andreas; Enderle, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Complete surgical removal of cancer tissue with effective preservation of healthy tissue is one of the most important challenges in modern oncology. We present a method for real-time, in situ differentiation of tissue based on optical emission spectroscopy (OES) performed during electrosurgery not requiring any biomarkers, additional light sources or other excitation processes. The analysis of the optical emission spectra, enables the differentiation of healthy and tumorous tissue. By using m...

  7. Crystal optics for hard-X-ray spectroscopy of highly charged ions

    OpenAIRE

    Beyer, H. F.; Attia, D.; Banas, D; Bigot, E. -O. Le; Bosch, F.; Dousse, Jean-Claude; Förster, E.; Gumberidze, A.; Hagmann, S.; Heß, S.; J. Hoszowska; Indelicato, P.; Jagodzinski, P.; Kozhuharov, Chr.; Krings, Th.

    2009-01-01

    A twin crystal-spectrometer assembly, operated in the focusing compensated asymmetric Laue geometry has been developed for accurate spectroscopy of fast highly charged heavy ions in the hard-X-ray region. Coupled to the focusing crystal optics is a specially developed two-dimensional position-sensitive X-ray detector which is necessary for retaining spectral resolution also for fast moving sources. We summarize the crystal optics and demonstrate the usefulness of the instrument for spectrosco...

  8. Emission Spectroscopy of the Interior of Optically Dense Post-Detonation Fireballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    TP-2013-011 Emission Spectroscopy of the Interior of Optically Dense Post-Detonation Fireballs Distribution A: Approved for public release...Detonation Fireballs 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F 6. AUTHOR(S) W.K. Lewis1, C.G. Rumchik2, M.J...detonation fireballs that form as under- oxidized detonation products burn in the surrounding air are optically dense and the corresponding emission

  9. Development of a gated optical multichannel analyser for laser-plasma spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Corcoran, Richard

    1990-01-01

    An Optical Multichannel Analyser (OMA) has been developed for the detection of radiation from laser-produced plasmas (LPPs). The system is based on a gated image - intensified photodiode array (PDA) Software for the control of, and data acquisition from, the OMA system has been developed. A high resolution (10ns) delay generator was also designed and constructed to permit timeresolved. optical spectroscopy. The system has been tested and operated with a laser plasma source m...

  10. Optical spectroscopy of erbium and thulium doped SnO glass ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The advantages of multifunctional integrated optical components in planar devices are well known. For these devices to be small, a planar amplifier with high rare-earth solubility and photosensitivity would be highly desirable. Tin-doped silica has been found to have high negative photosensitivity, with excellent thermal stability. Optical spectroscopy has been carried out on a range of erbium- and thulium-doped tin-silicates, with rare earth doping levels from 200-10,000ppm and tin concentra...

  11. Optical properties and extinction spectroscopy to characterize the synthesis of amine capped silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roldan, Maria Virginia [Laboratorio de Materiales Ceramicos, FCEIyA, IFIR, UNR, Rosario (Argentina)], E-mail: vroldan@fceia.unr.edu.ar; Scaffardi, Lucia B. [CIOp - CONICET, CIC, c.c. 124, 1900 La Plata (Argentina) and Area Departamental de Ciencias Basicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata (Argentina); Sanctis, Oscar de [Laboratorio de Materiales Ceramicos, FCEIyA, IFIR, UNR, Rosario (Argentina); Pellegri, Nora [Laboratorio de Materiales Ceramicos, FCEIyA, IFIR, UNR, Rosario (Argentina)], E-mail: pellegri@fceia.unr.edu.ar

    2008-12-20

    The present work describes a method for preparation of Ag nanoparticles from chemical reduction of AgNO{sub 3} in ethanol with ATS [N-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl] diethylenetriamine] as surface modifier. We study the influence of different parameters such as concentration, time, temperature and reductor agents on the size and shape of the nanoparticles. We present the morphologic and structural characterization of samples by UV-vis extinction spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Particularly, using optical extinction spectroscopy, the present work shows the analysis of size evolution in the fabrication process of spherical silver nanoparticles. This evolution is studied as a function of the time elapsed between the beginning of the reaction and the extraction of the sample (temporal delayed synthesis), and as a function of the temperature during the chemical reaction. In both the cases, we propose the study of the plasmon width as a useful, simple and inexpensive method for analysis of the mean radius, specially, for values below 6 nm.

  12. Optical spectroscopy of the dwarf nova U Geminorum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unda-Sanzana, E.; Marsh, T.R.; Morales-Rueda, L.

    2006-01-01

    The dwarf nova U Gem is unique in having a direct measurement of the K velocity of its white dwarf from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectra (K1 = 107 +/- 2kms-1 from Long et al.). We present high-resolution optical spectra of U Gem in quiescence taken to test the accuracy to w

  13. Photometry and spectroscopy of the GRB 970508 optical counterpart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Gorosabel, J.; Benitez, N.;

    1998-01-01

    were observed for 1 hour during the decline phase. According to the fireball and afterglow models, the intensity should rise monotonically before the observed optical maximum, but the data indicate that another physical mechanism may be responsible for the constant phase seen during the first hours...

  14. Single metal nanoparticle absorption spectroscopy and optical characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muskens, O. L.; Del Fatti, N.; Vallée, F.; Huntzinger, J. R.; Billaud, P.; Broyer, M.

    2006-02-01

    Optical absorption spectra of small single metal nanoparticles are measured using a far-field technique combining a spatial modulation microscope with a broadband light source. Quantitative determination of the spectral and polarization dependencies of the absorption cross section of individual gold nanoparticles permits precise determination of their geometrical properties in excellent agreement with transmission electron microscopy measurements.

  15. Retrieving the optical parameters of biological tissues using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and Fourier series expansions. I. theory and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Morales, Aarón A; Vázquez Y Montiel, Sergio

    2012-10-01

    The determination of optical parameters of biological tissues is essential for the application of optical techniques in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Diffuse Reflection Spectroscopy is a widely used technique to analyze the optical characteristics of biological tissues. In this paper we show that by using diffuse reflectance spectra and a new mathematical model we can retrieve the optical parameters by applying an adjustment of the data with nonlinear least squares. In our model we represent the spectra using a Fourier series expansion finding mathematical relations between the polynomial coefficients and the optical parameters. In this first paper we use spectra generated by the Monte Carlo Multilayered Technique to simulate the propagation of photons in turbid media. Using these spectra we determine the behavior of Fourier series coefficients when varying the optical parameters of the medium under study. With this procedure we find mathematical relations between Fourier series coefficients and optical parameters. Finally, the results show that our method can retrieve the optical parameters of biological tissues with accuracy that is adequate for medical applications.

  16. New approach to imaging spectroscopy using diffractive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnrichs, Michele; Massie, Mark A.

    1997-10-01

    Over the past several years, Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) has developed several hyperspectral imagers using diffractive optics as the dispersive media. This new approach has been patented and demonstrated in numerous field tests. PAT has developed hyperspectral cameras in the visible, mid-wave IR and is currently under contrast to the Air Force to develop a dual band hyperspectral lens for simultaneous spectral imaging in both the mid-wave and long- wave IR. The development of these cameras over the years have been sponsored by internal research and development, contracts from the Air Force Phillips Lab., Air Force Wright Labs Armament Division, BMDO and by the Office of Naval Research. Numerous papers have been presented in the past describing the performance of these various hyperspectral cameras. The purpose of this paper is to describe the theory behind the image multi-spectral sensing (IMSS) used in these hyperspectral cameras. IMSS utilizes a very simple optical design that enables a robust and low cost hyper-spectral imaging instrument. The IMSS is a dispersive spectrometer using a single diffractive optical element for both imaging and dispersion. The lens is tuned for a single wavelength giving maximum diffraction efficiency at that wavelength and high efficiency throughout the spectral band-pass of the camera. The diffractive optics disperse the light along the optical axis as opposed to perpendicular to the axis in conventional dispersive spectrometers. A detector array is used as the sensing medium and the spectral images are rad out electronically. POst processing is used to reduce spectral cross talk and to spatially sharpen the spectral images.

  17. Optical spectroscopy and photometry of main-belt asteroids with a high orbital inclination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Aya; Itoh, Yoichi; Terai, Tsuyoshi; Gupta, Ranjan; Sen, Asoke; Takahashi, Jun

    2017-02-01

    We carried out low-resolution optical spectroscopy of 51 main-belt asteroids, most of which have highly-inclined orbits. They are selected from D-type candidates in the SDSS-MOC 4 catalog. Using the University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescope and the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics 2 m telescope in India, we determined the spectral types of 38 asteroids. Among them, eight asteroids were classified as D-type asteroids. Fractions of D-type asteroids are 3.0+/-1.1 for low orbital inclination main-belt asteroids and 7.3+/-2.0 for high orbital inclination main-belt asteroids. The results of our study indicate that some D-type asteroids were formed within the ecliptic region between the main belt and Jupiter, and were then perturbed by Jupiter.

  18. Inexpensive diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system for measuring changes in tissue optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennie, Diana L.; Hayward, Joseph E.; McKee, Daniel E.; Farrell, Thomas J.

    2014-10-01

    The measurement of changes in blood volume in tissue is important for monitoring the effects of a wide range of therapeutic interventions, from radiation therapy to skin-flap transplants. Many systems available for purchase are either expensive or difficult to use, limiting their utility in the clinical setting. A low-cost system, capable of measuring changes in tissue blood volume via diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is presented. The system consists of an integrating sphere coupled via optical fibers to a broadband light source and a spectrometer. Validation data are presented to illustrate the accuracy and reproducibility of the system. The validity and utility of this in vivo system were demonstrated in a skin blanching/reddening experiment using epinephrine and lidocaine, and in a study measuring the severity of radiation-induced erythema during radiation therapy.

  19. Applying of the optical time-of-flight spectroscopy for the paper and pulp characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluciński, Jerzy

    2006-02-01

    The paper presents benefits of optical time-of-flight spectroscopy for the pulp and paper characterization. A semiconductor pulse laser and a streak camera as the photodetector were utilized in experimental part of research described in this paper. Distribution of the time of flight of photons through various kinds of wood pulp (e.g. pulp after mechanical treatment coming both fi-om tree species giving hard and soft wood and pulp after thermo-mechanical treatment) was measured. The pulp samples used in the measurements had consistency ranging from 0 to 5% of dry mass in the suspension. The influence of additives (kaolin, talc and calcium carbonate) present in the suspension on the time of flight distribution of photons was studied as well. Finally, dependence of the time of flight of photons through various kinds of the paper (i.e. newspaper, copy paper, and tissue) on the thickness of the sample was investigated.

  20. Plasma diagnostics in gas metal arc welding by optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valensi, F; Pellerin, S; Zielinska, S [GREMI, Universite d' Orleans (Site de Bourges)/CNRS, BP 4043, 18028 Bourges cedex (France); Boutaghane, A [Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, Alger (Algeria); Dzierzega, K [Marian Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Pellerin, N [CNRS, UPR3079 CEMHTI, 1D av. de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Briand, F, E-mail: flavien.valensi@laplace.univ-tsle.f, E-mail: stephane.pellerin@univ-orleans.f, E-mail: aboutaghane@yahoo.f, E-mail: krzycho@netmail.if.uj.edu.p, E-mail: sylwia.zielinska@airliquide.co, E-mail: nadia.pellerin@univ-orleans.f, E-mail: francis.briand@airliquide.co [CTAS-Air Liquide Welding, Saint Ouen l' Aumone, 95315 Cergy-Pontoise cedex (France)

    2010-11-03

    The plasma column in a metal inert gas welding process is investigated by optical emission spectroscopy and high-speed imaging. The concentration and repartition of iron vapours are measured and correlated with the plasma and electrode geometric configuration. Plasma temperatures and electron densities are also measured for each studied position in the plasma. The temperatures are calculated using two different methods, allowing validation of the local thermodynamic equilibrium state of the plasma. The results show a maximum temperature of 12 500 K in the upper part of the arc, away from the arc axis. The iron concentration reaches a maximum of 0.3% close to the anode and strongly decreases along both the vertical and radial directions. The plasma thermophysical properties, calculated from this plasma composition, are then discussed regarding the metal transfer mode.

  1. The Optical Absorption Coefficient of Maize Grains Investigated by Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Páez, C. L.; Carballo-Carballo, A.; Rico-Molina, R.; Hernández-Aguilar, C.; Domínguez-Pacheco, A.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Moreno-Martínez, E.

    2017-01-01

    In the maize and tortilla industry, it is important to characterize the color of maize ( Zea mays L.) grain, as it is one of the attributes that directly affect the quality of the tortillas consumed by the population. For this reason, the availability of alternative techniques for assessing and improving the quality of grain is valued. Photoacoustic spectroscopy has proven to be a useful tool for characterizing maize grain. So, the objective of the present study was to determine the optical absorption coefficient β of the maize grain used to make tortillas from two regions of Mexico: (a) Valles Altos, 2012-2013 production cycle and (b) Guasave, Sinaloa, 2013-2014 production cycle. Traditional reflectance measurements, physical characteristics of the grain and nutrient content were also calculated. The experimental results show different characteristics for maize grains.

  2. Assessing the role of moment of inertia in optical Kerr effect spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfred, Katherine; He, XiaoXiao; Fourkas, John T

    2010-09-23

    Optical Kerr effect (OKE) spectroscopy allows for the acquisition of high-quality, Bose-Einstein-corrected, low-frequency Raman spectra in liquids. However, the assignment of a molecular interpretation to these spectra remains an open problem. To address this issue, here we present an OKE study of benzene and four of its isotopologues. Our results indicate that hindered rotations are the major contributor to the OKE reduced spectral density (RSD) over the entire intermolecular spectral region (0-250 cm(-1)). We also have found that isotopologues with six (13)C atoms have RSDs that are enhanced at frequencies below 30 cm(-1). We further demonstrate that the collective orientational correlation time of these liquids scales with the inverse square root of the tumbling moment of inertia, indicating that there is strong translation-rotation coupling in benzene.

  3. Optical monitoring of testicular torsion using a miniaturized near infrared spectroscopy sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadgan, Babak; Kajbafzadeh, Majid; Nigro, Mark; Kajbafzadeh, A. M.; Macnab, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    Background: Testicular torsion is an acute urological emergency occurring in children and adolescents. Accurate and fast diagnosis is important as the resulting ischemia can destroy the testis. Currently, Doppler ultrasound is the preferred diagnostic method. Ultrasound is not readily available in all centers which may delay surgical treatment. In this study, a rat model was used to examine the feasibility and sensitivity of using spatially-resolved near infrared spectroscopy (SR-NIRS) with a custom-made miniaturized optical sensor probe to detect and study changes in testicular hemodynamics and oxygenation during three degrees of induced testicular torsion, and after detorsion. Methods: Eight anesthetized rats (16 testes) were studied using SR-NIRS with the miniaturized optical probe applied directly onto the surface of the surgically exposed testis during 360, 720 and 1080 degrees of torsion followed by detorsion. Oxygenated, deoxygenated and total hemoglobin and TOI% were studied pre-and post-manipulations. Results: NIRS monitoring reflected acute testicular ischemia and hypoxia on induction of torsion, and tissue reperfusionreoxygenation after detorsion. Testicular torsion at 720 degrees induced the maximum observed degree of hypoxic changes. In all cases, rhythmic changes were observed in the NIRS signals before inducing torsion; these disappeared after applying 360 degrees of torsion and did not reappear after detorsion. Conclusion: This animal study indicates that SR-NIRS monitoring of the testes using a directly applied miniature sensor is a feasible and sensitive method to detect testicular ischemia and hypoxia immediately after torsion occurs, and testicular reperfusion upon detorsion. This study offers the potential for a SR-NIRS system with a miniaturized sensor to be explored further as a rapid, noninvasive, optical method for detecting testicular torsion in children.

  4. Coherent, multi-heterodyne spectroscopy using stabilized optical frequency combs

    CERN Document Server

    Coddington, Ian; Newbury, Nathan R

    2007-01-01

    The broadband, coherent nature of narrow-linewidth fiber frequency combs is exploited to measure the full complex spectrum of a molecular gas through multi-heterodyne spectroscopy. We measure the absorption and phase shift experienced by each of 155,000 individual frequency comb lines, spaced by 100 MHz and spanning from 1495 nm to 1620 nm, after passing through a hydrogen cyanide gas. The measured phase spectrum agrees with Kramers-Kronig transformation of the absorption spectrum. This technique can provide a full complex spectrum rapidly, over wide bandwidths, and with hertz-level accuracy.

  5. Strong electronic correlation effects in coherent multidimensional nonlinear optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadimitriou, M E; Kavousanaki, E G; Dani, K M; Fromer, N A; Perakis, I E

    2011-05-12

    We discuss a many-body theory of the coherent ultrafast nonlinear optical response of systems with a strongly correlated electronic ground state that responds unadiabatically to photoexcitation. We introduce a truncation of quantum kinetic density matrix equations of motion that does not rely on an expansion in terms of the interactions and thus applies to strongly correlated systems. For this we expand in terms of the optical field, separate out contributions to the time-evolved many-body state due to correlated and uncorrelated multiple optical transitions, and use "Hubbard operator" density matrices to describe the exact dynamics of the individual contributions within a subspace of strongly coupled states, including "pure dephasing". Our purpose is to develop a quantum mechanical tool capable of exploring how, by coherently photoexciting selected modes, one can trigger nonlinear dynamics of strongly coupled degrees of freedom. Such dynamics could lead to photoinduced phase transitions. We apply our theory to the nonlinear response of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in a magnetic field. We coherently photoexcite the two lowest Landau level (LL) excitations using three time-delayed optical pulses. We identify some striking temporal and spectral features due to dynamical coupling of the two LLs facilitated by inter-Landau-level magnetoplasmon and magnetoroton excitations and compare to three-pulse four-wave-mixing (FWM) experiments. We show that these features depend sensitively on the dynamics of four-particle correlations between an electron-hole pair and a magnetoplasmon/magnetoroton, reminiscent of exciton-exciton correlations in undoped semiconductors. Our results shed light into unexplored coherent dynamics and relaxation of the quantum Hall system (QHS) and can provide new insight into non-equilibrium co-operative phenomena in strongly correlated systems.

  6. Far Infrared Optical Spectroscopy of Alkali Halide-Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, J. T.; Broderick, S. D.; Rodriguez, G. A.

    1998-03-01

    Composite samples of small (dimension polytetrafluoroethylene) have been prepared. The far infrared optical spectra of these samples are presented, spanning a temperature range of 300 to thermal expansion, using published values for the mode Gruneisen parameter and the temperature dependence of the lattice thermal coefficient. In contrast, the linewidth (phonon lifetime) of the composite samples is roughly twice as large as that observed for thin film and bulk crystals, and has a much stronger temperature dependence as well.

  7. Moessbauer spectroscopy study of interfaces for spintronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantovan, R., E-mail: roberto.mantovan@mdm.infm.it; Wiemer, C.; Lamperti, A.; Georgieva, M.; Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio Nazionale MDM CNR-INFM (Italy); Goikhman, A.; Barantsev, N.; Lebedinskii, Yu.; Zenkevich, A. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    The submonolayer sensitivity and element-specificity of conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy, combined with the use of {sup 57}Fe enriched tracer layers, enable to carefully investigate thin films and interfaces at the atomic-scale. This paper reports on the main achievements we obtained so far in the study of structural, chemical, and magnetic properties of a variety of interfaces between oxides and Fe-based films having potential interest in the field of spintronics.

  8. Electro-Optical Multichannel Spectrometer for Transient Resonance Raman and Absorption Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karina Benthin; Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn

    1979-01-01

    An optical multichannel system is described, used for time‐dependent absorption measurements in the gas phase and the liquid phase and for resonance Raman spectroscopy of short‐lived transient species in the liquid phase in pulse radiolysis. It consists of either an image converter streak unit or...

  9. Playing with Light: Adventures in Optics and Spectroscopy for Honors and Majors General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Staveren, Marie N.; Edwards, Kimberly D.; Apkarian, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    A lab was developed for use in an undergraduate honors and majors general chemistry laboratory to introduce students to optics, spectroscopy, and the underlying principles of quantum mechanics. This lab includes four mini-experiments exploring total internal reflection, the tunneling of light, spectra of sparklers and colored candles, and emission…

  10. Diameter grouping in bulk samples of single-walled carbon nanotubes from optical absorption spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golden, M.S.; Fink, J.; Dunsch, L.; Bauer, H.-D.; Reibold, M.; Knupfer, M.; Friedlein, R.; Pichler, T.; Jost, O.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of the synthesis parameters on the mean characteristics of single-wall carbon nanotubes in soot produced by the laser vaporization of graphite has been analyzed using optical absorption spectroscopy. The abundance and mean diameter of the nanotubes were found to be most influenced by

  11. Playing with Light: Adventures in Optics and Spectroscopy for Honors and Majors General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Staveren, Marie N.; Edwards, Kimberly D.; Apkarian, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    A lab was developed for use in an undergraduate honors and majors general chemistry laboratory to introduce students to optics, spectroscopy, and the underlying principles of quantum mechanics. This lab includes four mini-experiments exploring total internal reflection, the tunneling of light, spectra of sparklers and colored candles, and emission…

  12. Communication: atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ((3))) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ((2))).

  13. Image-guided optical spectroscopy in diagnosis of osteoarthritis by combining spectral and spatial a-priori information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhen; Zhang, Qizhi; Jiang, Huizhu; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2009-02-01

    A multi-modality imaging approach and instrument that integrate optical imaging system and near-infrared spectroscopy into an x-ray tomosynthesis setup have been employed to perform a clinical study of image-guided spectroscopy on osteoarthritis (OA) in the finger joints. The multiwavelength spectroscopy of the joints using x-ray-guided spatial constraints provides 3D images of oxygen saturation and water content with high resolution and improved quantitative capability. Based on the recovered quantitative results from 18 healthy volunteers and 22 patients, we observed that oxygen saturation and water content were significant discriminators for differentiation of healthy joints from diseased ones. The recovered images appear to show that the OA joints have high water values and decreased oxygen saturation.

  14. J-aggregates on metal nanoparticles characterized through ultrafast spectroscopy and near-field optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederrecht, Gary P; Wurtz, Gregory A; Im, Jin Seo; Hranisavljevic, Jasmina

    2004-01-01

    Illumination of metal nanoparticles at the plasmon resonance produces enhanced evanescent fields on the nanoparticles' surfaces. The unusual strength of the field makes it a target for exploring photoinduced phenomena at the nanoscale, if efficient functionalization or coating of the nanoparticle surface with appropriate chromophores is possible. One direction is to use cyanine dyes that form monolayers of J-aggregates on the surface of noble metal nanoparticle colloids. The unique, collective electronic properties of J-aggregates produce excitons with enormous extinction coefficients that are of interest for their efficient energy transfer, electron transfer, and nonlinear optical properties. In that vein, we report our results on time-resolved spectroscopy and near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) of J-aggregate exciton dynamics on Ag and Au nanoparticle colloids. Ultrafast transient absorption studies show that J-aggregate exciton lifetimes on Ag nanoparticles are much longer than on Au nanoparticles, with a 300 ps lifetime that is two orders of magnitude longer than the electronic processes in the nanoparticles themselves. Complementary NSOM studies of the colloids show that fluorescence from the J-aggregates on the Ag nanoparticles is induced by the scanning probe. These results may be significant for improving the nanophotonic performance of hybrid materials for nanoscale applications.

  15. Non-linear Spectroscopy of Sr Atoms in an Optical Cavity for Laser Stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Bjarke T R; Schäffer, Stefan A; Westergaard, Philip G; Ye, Jun; Holland, Murray; Thomsen, Jan W

    2015-01-01

    We study the non-linear interaction of a cold sample of strontium-88 atoms coupled to a single mode of a low finesse optical cavity in the so-called bad cavity limit and investigate the implications for applications to laser stabilization. The atoms are probed on the weak inter-combination line $\\lvert 5s^{2} \\, ^1 \\textrm{S}_0 \\rangle \\,-\\, \\lvert 5s5p \\, ^3 \\textrm{P}_1 \\rangle$ at 689 nm in a strongly saturated regime. Our measured observables include the atomic induced phase shift and absorption of the light field transmitted through the cavity represented by the complex cavity transmission coefficient. We demonstrate high signal-to-noise-ratio measurements of both quadratures - the cavity transmitted phase and absorption - by employing FM spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS). We also show that when FM spectroscopy is employed in connection with a cavity locked to the probe light, observables are substantially modified compared to the free space situation where no cavity is present. Furthermore, the non-linear dynami...

  16. Theoretical study on single-molecule spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAN Guang-cun; HUANG Wei

    2006-01-01

    The photon-by-photon approach for single molecule spectroscopy experiments utilizes the information carried by each detected photon and allows the measurements of conformational fluctuation with time resolution on a vast range of time scales,where each photon represents a data point.Here,we theoretically simulate the photon emission dynamics of a single molecule spectroscopy using the kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm to understand the underlying complex photon dynamic process of a single molecule.In addition,by following the molecular process in real time,the mechanism of complex biochemical reactions can be revealed.We hope that this theoretical study will serve as an introduction and a guideline into this exciting new field.

  17. Coherent optical spectroscopy in a biological semiconductor quantum dot-DNA hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigate coherent optical spectroscopy of a biological semiconductor quantum dot (QD) coupled to DNA molecules. Coupling with DNAs, the linear optical responses of the peptide QDs will be enhanced significantly in the simultaneous presence of two optical fields. Based on this technique, we propose a scheme to measure the vibrational frequency of DNA and the coupling strength between peptide QD and DNA in all-optical domain. Distinct with metallic quantum dot, biological QD is non-toxic and pollution-free to environment, which will contribute to clinical medicine experiments. This article leads people to know more about the optical behaviors of DNAs-quantum dot system, with the currently popular pump-probe technique. PMID:22340277

  18. Coherent optical spectroscopy in a biological semiconductor quantum dot-DNA hybrid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Jin; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2012-02-16

    We theoretically investigate coherent optical spectroscopy of a biological semiconductor quantum dot (QD) coupled to DNA molecules. Coupling with DNAs, the linear optical responses of the peptide QDs will be enhanced significantly in the simultaneous presence of two optical fields. Based on this technique, we propose a scheme to measure the vibrational frequency of DNA and the coupling strength between peptide QD and DNA in all-optical domain. Distinct with metallic quantum dot, biological QD is non-toxic and pollution-free to environment, which will contribute to clinical medicine experiments. This article leads people to know more about the optical behaviors of DNAs-quantum dot system, with the currently popular pump-probe technique.

  19. Low-power Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy with optimized electro-optical detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorenflo, Stefan; Hinkov, Iliyana; Lambrecht, Armin

    2005-01-01

    A Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system with electro-optical detector based on a ZnTe crystal is presented. The pump laser is a Ti:Sa laser with pulse duration of approx. 10 fs at a central wavelength of 800 nm. Using an optimized detection configuration, a signal-to-noise ratio bet...... better than 103 is achieved, applying an optical laser power of only 25mW. Several substances can be clearly distinguished on the basis of their specific THz absorption spectra.......A Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system with electro-optical detector based on a ZnTe crystal is presented. The pump laser is a Ti:Sa laser with pulse duration of approx. 10 fs at a central wavelength of 800 nm. Using an optimized detection configuration, a signal-to-noise ratio...

  20. An overview on applications of optical spectroscopy in cervical cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chilakapati Murali

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in the treatment modalities, cervical cancers are one of the leading causes of cancer death among women. Pap smear and colposcopy are the existing screening methods and histopathology is the gold standard for diagnosis. However, these methods have been shown to be prone to reporting errors, which could be due to their subjective interpretation. Radiotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for the locally advanced stages of cervical cancers. The typical treatment regimen spans over 4 months, from the first fraction of radiation to clinical assessment of tumor response to radiotherapy. It is often noticed that due to intrinsic properties of tumors, patients with the same clinical stage and histological type respond differently to radiotherapy. Hence, there exists a need for the development of new methods for early diagnosis as well as for early prediction of tumor radioresponse. Optical spectroscopic methods have been shown to be potential alternatives for use in cancer diagnosis. In this review, we provide a brief background on the anatomy and histology of the uterine cervix and the etiology of cervical cancers; we briefly discuss the optical spectroscopic approach to cervical cancer diagnosis. A very brief discussion on radiation therapy and radiation resistance is also provided. We also share our experiences with the Raman spectroscopic methodologies in cervical cancer diagnosis as well as in the prediction of tumor radioresponse.

  1. Optical spectroscopy of the dwarf nova U Geminorum

    CERN Document Server

    Morales-Rueda, T R

    2006-01-01

    U Gem is unique in having a direct measurement of K1 = 107 +- 2 km/s, Long et al. 1999). We present high-resolution optical spectra of the dwarf nova U Gem in quiescence taken to test the accuracy to which the HST value can be recovered from optical data. We find that, even with data of very high S/N we cannot recover Long et al.'s value to better than about 20% by any method. Contamination by neighbouring emission lines seems a likely culprit. Our data reveal a number of new features: Doppler tomograms show emission at low velocity, close to the centre of mass, and a transient, narrow absorption feature is seen in the Balmer lines near the line centres at the time of eclipse. We suggest that stellar prominences, as previously invoked for the dwarf novae IP Peg and SS Cyg in outburst, may explain both of these features. The He II 4686.75 A line emission is dominated by the gas stream/disc impact region. Two distinct spots are seen in Doppler maps, the first being very narrow and showing a velocity close to th...

  2. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBartolo, Baldassare; Barnes, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This booklet presents an account of the course 'Spectroscopy of Systems with Spatially Confined Structures' held in Erice-Sicily, Italy, from June 15 to June 30, 2001. This meeting was organized by the International School of Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy of the 'Ettore Majorana' Centre for Scientific Culture. The purpose of this course was to present and discuss nanometer-scale physics, a rapidly progressing field. The top-down approach of semiconductor technology will soon meet the scales of the bottom-up approaches of supramolecular chemistry and of spatially localized excitations in ionic crystals. This course dealt with the fabrication, measurement and understanding of the relevant structures and brought together the scientific communities responsible for these development. The advances in this area of physics have already let to applications in optoelectronics and will likely lead to many more. The subjects of the course included spatially resolved structures such as quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots, single atoms and molecules, clusters, fractal systems, and the development of related techniques like near-field spectroscopy and confocal microscopy to study such systems.

  3. X-ray and optical spectroscopy of the massive young open cluster IC1805

    CERN Document Server

    Rauw, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Very young open clusters are ideal places to study the X-ray properties of a homogeneous population of early-type stars. In this respect, the IC1805 open cluster is very interesting as it hosts the O4If$^+$ star HD15570 thought to be in an evolutionary stage intermediate between a normal O-star and a Wolf-Rayet star. Such a star could provide a test for theoretical models aiming at explaining the empirical scaling relation between the X-ray and bolometric luminosities of O-type stars. We have observed IC1805 with XMM-Newton and further collected optical spectroscopy of some of the O-star members of the cluster. The optical spectra allow us to revisit the orbital solutions of BD+60$^{\\circ}$ 497 and HD15558, and provide the first evidence of binarity for BD+60$^{\\circ}$ 498. X-ray emission from colliding winds does not appear to play an important role among the O-stars of IC1805. Notably, the X-ray fluxes do not vary significantly between archival X-ray observations and our XMM-Newton pointing. The very fast r...

  4. Optical spectroscopy of the microquasar GRS 1758-258: a possible intermediate mass system?

    CERN Document Server

    Martí, Josep; Muñoz-Arjonilla, Álvaro J

    2016-01-01

    Context. GRS 1758-258 is one of two prototypical microquasars towards the Galactic Center direction discovered almost a quarter of a century ago. The system remains poorly studied in the optical domain due to its counterpart being a very faint and absorbed target in a crowded region of the sky. Aims. Our aim is to investigate GRS 1758-258 in order to shed light on the nature of the stellar binary components. In particular, the main physical parameters of the donor star, such as the mass or the spectral type, are not yet well constrained. Methods. GRS 1758-258 has remained so far elusive to optical spectroscopy owing to its observational difficulties. Here, we use this traditional tool of stellar astronomy at low spectral resolution with a 10 m class telescope and a long slit spectrograph. Results. An improved spectrum is obtained as compared to previous work. The quality of the data does not allow the detection of emission or absorption features but, nevertheless, we manage to partially achieve our aims compa...

  5. Optical properties of xenon implanted CuInSe{sub 2} by photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satour, F.Z. [Laboratoire: Croissance et Caracterisation de Nouveaux Semiconducteurs, Departement d' Electronique, Faculte de Technologie, Universite Ferhat Abbas-Setif, 19000 Setif (Algeria); Zegadi, A., E-mail: ameur_zegadi@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire: Croissance et Caracterisation de Nouveaux Semiconducteurs, Departement d' Electronique, Faculte de Technologie, Universite Ferhat Abbas-Setif, 19000 Setif (Algeria)

    2012-07-15

    A theoretical relation is derived for the normalized photoacoustic amplitude signal of a gas-coupled cell for the case of double-layer solid samples with particular application given to ion implanted semiconductors. Numerical estimates for a solar cell of the type CdS/CuInSe{sub 2} based on experimental measured data of these compounds are given to illustrate the photoacoustic effect originating from double-layer samples. In application to ion implanted semiconductors, we show that the absorption coefficient of the implanted layer can be very easily extracted by photoacoustic spectroscopy if the absorption coefficient of the untreated substrate is known. We also present the optical properties results obtained from the analysis of the effect of xenon implantation into CuInSe{sub 2} single crystals with the energy of 40 keV and a dose of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A derived theoretical relation for photoacoustic study of implanted solids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical analysis of the effect of xenon implantation into CuInSe{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impurity defect states analysis following the introduction of Xe into CuInSe{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison between results obtained and existing literature.

  6. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Allam, Srinivasa Rao, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M., E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Sharan, Alok, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, Puducherry-605014 (India)

    2014-10-15

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  7. Chemical characterization of single micro- and nano-particles by optical catapulting-optical trapping-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, Francisco J.; Fernández-Bravo, Angel; Javier Laserna, J.

    2014-10-01

    Spectral identification of individual micro- and nano-sized particles by the sequential intervention of optical catapulting, optical trapping and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is presented. The three techniques are used for different purposes. Optical catapulting (OC) serves to put the particulate material under inspection in aerosol form. Optical trapping (OT) permits the isolation and manipulation of individual particles from the aerosol, which are subsequently analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Once catapulted, the dynamics of particle trapping depends both on the laser beam characteristics (power and intensity gradient) and on the particle properties (size, mass and shape). Particles are stably trapped in air at atmospheric pressure and can be conveniently manipulated for a precise positioning for LIBS analysis. The spectra acquired from the individually trapped particles permit a straightforward identification of the material inspected. Variability of LIBS signal for the inspection of Ni microspheres was 30% relative standard deviation. OC-OT-LIBS permits the separation of particles in a heterogeneous mixture and the subsequent analysis of the isolated particle of interest. In order to evaluate the sensitivity of the approach, the number of absolute photons emitted by a single trapped particle was calculated. The limit of detection (LOD) for Al2O3 particles was calculated to be 200 attograms aluminium.

  8. Magnetic field-induced spectroscopy of forbidden optical transitions with application to lattice-based optical atomic clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I; Oates, C W; Hoyt, C W; Barber, Z W; Hollberg, L

    2006-03-01

    We develop a method of spectroscopy that uses a weak static magnetic field to enable direct optical excitation of forbidden electric-dipole transitions that are otherwise prohibitively weak. The power of this scheme is demonstrated using the important application of optical atomic clocks based on neutral atoms confined to an optical lattice. The simple experimental implementation of this method--a single clock laser combined with a dc magnetic field--relaxes stringent requirements in current lattice-based clocks (e.g., magnetic field shielding and light polarization), and could therefore expedite the realization of the extraordinary performance level predicted for these clocks. We estimate that a clock using alkaline-earth-like atoms such as Yb could achieve a fractional frequency uncertainty of well below 10(-17) for the metrologically preferred even isotopes.

  9. Revealing hidden optical transitions with tuneable optical-pump THz-probe spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Novelli, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    While a vast amount of theoretical and experimental approaches can be used to study the band structure of simple solids, the investigation of the electronic properties of high-temperature superconductors and other strongly correlated systems is far less simple. Limitations to both theory and experiments arise from e.g. the many-body nature of the mathematical problem and from the non-trivial surface reconstructions, respectively. Here we propose a novel approach able to reveal energy gaps between band extrema that cannot be identified from the equilibrium optical properties. By combining finely-tunable visible pump pulses with terahertz probe fields, we identify changes to the transient conductivity as the pump wavelength is changed and the density of carriers in different parts of the band structure varies. This approach is demonstrated on a typical semiconductor, undoped silicon, where we identify the band minimum at the $L$ point of the conduction band, corresponding to the second lowest energy indirect ga...

  10. Multisectional linear ion trap and novel loading method for optical spectroscopy of electron and nuclear transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysoev, Alexey A; Troyan, Victor I; Borisyuk, Peter V; Krasavin, Andrey V; Vasiliev, Oleg S; Palchikov, Vitaly G; Avdeev, Ivan A; Chernyshev, Denis M; Poteshin, Sergey S

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing need for the development of atomic and nuclear frequency standards because of the important contribution of methods for precision time and frequency measurements to the development of fundamental science, technology, and the economy. It is also conditioned by their potential use in optical clocks and quantum logic applications. It is especially important to develop a universal method that could allow one to use ions of most elements effectively (including ones that are not easily evaporated) proposed for the above-mentioned applications. A linear quadrupole ion trap for the optical spectroscopy of electron and nuclear transitions has been developed and evaluated experimentally. An ion source construction is based on an ultra-high vacuum evaporator in which a metal sample is subjected to an electron beam of energy up to 1 keV, resulting in the appearance of gaseous atoms and ions of various charge state. The linear ion trap consists of five successive quadrupole sections including an entrance quadrupole section, quadrupole mass filter, quadrupole ion guide, ion-trap section, and exit quadrupole section. The same radiofrequency but a different direct current voltage feeds the quadrupole sections. The instrument allows the mass and energy selected trapping of ions from ion beams of various intensities and their localization in the area of laser irradiation. The preliminary results presented show that the proposed instrument and methods allow one to produce effectively up to triply charged thorium ions as well as to trap ions for future spectroscopic study. The instrument is proposed for future use in optical clocks and quantum logic application development.

  11. Adaptive optics near infrared integral field spectroscopy of NGC 2992

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, S; Hicks, E K S; Engel, H; Müller-Sánchez, F; Genzel, R; Tacconi, L J

    2010-01-01

    NGC 2992 is an intermediate Seyfert 1 galaxy showing outflows on kilo parsec scales which might be due either to AGN or starburst activity. We therefore aim at investigating its central region for a putative starburst in the past and its connection to the AGN and the outflows. Observations were performed with the adaptive optics near infrared integral field spectrograph SINFONI on the VLT, complemented by longslit observations with ISAAC on the VLT, as well as N- and Q-band data from the Spitzer archive. The spatial and spectral resolutions of the SINFONI data are 50 pc and 83 km/s, respectively. The field of view of 3" x 3" corresponds to 450 pc x 450 pc. Br_gamma equivalent width and line fluxes from PAHs were compared to stellar population models to constrain the age of the putative recent star formation. A simple geometric model of two mutually inclined disks and an additional cone to describe an outflow was developed to explain the observed complex velocity field in H_2 1-0S(1). The morphologies of the B...

  12. Optical spectroscopy of Be/gamma-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Zamanov, R K; Marti, J; Latev, G Y; Nikolov, Y M; Bode, M F; Luque-Escamilla, P L

    2016-01-01

    We report optical spectroscopic observations of the gamma-ray binaries LSI+61303, MWC 656, MWC 148. The peak separation and equivalent widths of prominent emission lines (H-alpha, H-beta, H-gamma, HeI and FeII) are measured. We estimate the circumstellar disc size, compare it with separation between the components and discuss the disc truncation. We find that in LSI+61303 the compact object comes into contact with the outer parts of the circumstellar disc at periastron; in MWC 148 the compact object goes deeply into the disc during the periastron passage, and in MWC 656 the black hole is accreting from the outer parts of the circumstellar disc along the entire orbit. The interstellar extinction is estimated using interstellar lines and hydrogen column density. The rotation of the mass donors appears to be similar to the rotation of the mass donors in Be/X-ray binaries. We suggest that X-ray periodicity ~1 day deserves to be searched for.

  13. Echelle long-slit optical spectroscopy of evolved stars

    CERN Document Server

    Contreras, C Sanchez; de Paz, A Gil; Goodrich, R

    2008-01-01

    We present echelle long-slit optical spectra of a sample of objects evolving off the AGB, most of them in the pre-planetary nebula (pPN) phase, obtained with the ESI and MIKE spectrographs at Keck-II and Magellan-I, respectively. The total wavelength range covered with ESI (MIKE) is ~3900 to 10900 A (~3600 to 7200A). In this paper, we focus our analysis mainly on the Halpha profiles. Prominent Halpha emission is detected in half of the objects, most of which show broad Halpha wings (up to ~4000 km/s). In the majority of the Halpha-emission sources, fast, post-AGB winds are revealed by P-Cygni profiles. In ~37% of the objects Halpha is observed in absorption. In almost all cases, the absorption profile is partially filled with emission, leading to complex, structured profiles that are interpreted as an indication of incipient post-AGB mass-loss. All sources in which Halpha is seen mainly in absorption have F-G type central stars, whereas sources with intense Halpha emission span a larger range of spectral type...

  14. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagna, P.; Cortelli, P.; Barbiroli, B. (Inst. of Medical Pathology, Univ. of Bologna (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe the method of [sup 31]phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and review the results when it is applied to the study of brain and muscle energy metabolism in migraine subjects. Brain energy metabolism appears to be abnormal in all major subtypes of migraine when measured both during and between attacks. Impaired energy metabolism is also documented in skeletal muscle. It is suggested that migraine is associated with a generalized disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and that this may constitute a threshold for the triggering of migraine attacks. 47 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Optical luminescence spectroscopy as a probe of the surface mineralogy of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, A. H.

    1992-01-01

    Optical luminescence (OpL) spectroscopy is an attractive use of a visible-near-IR spectrometer on a Mars lander because mineral products of atmosphere-surface interactions on Mars will probably have characteristic OpL spectra. Optical luminescence spectra would be taken at night, when a spectrometer might otherwise sit idle. Also needed would be a source of exciting radiation, which could be shared with other experiments. Optical luminescence is emission of nonthermal optical photons (near-UV through near-IR) as a response to energy input. On absorption of energy, an atom (or ion) will enter an excited state. The favored decay of many such excited states involving valence-band electrons is emission of an optical photon. Optical luminescence spectra can be useful in determining mineralogy and mineral composition. Optical luminescence in crystals can arise from essential elements (or ions), trace-element substituents (activators), or defects. Common activators in salts of alkali and alkaline earth elements include Mn(2+)(VI), other transition metals, the rare earths, and the actinides. Trace substituents of other species can enhance or quench OpL (e.g., Pb(2+) vs. Fe(3+)). Optical luminescence can also arise from defects in crystal structures, including those caused by radiation and shock.

  16. Optical fiber strain sensor using fiber resonator based on frequency comb Vernier spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Liang; Lu, Ping; Chen, Li;

    2012-01-01

    A novel (to our best knowledge) optical fiber strain sensor using a fiber ring resonator based on frequency comb Vernier spectroscopy is proposed and demonstrated. A passively mode-locked optical fiber laser is employed to generate a phased-locked frequency comb. Strain applied to the optical fiber...... be proportionally improved by increasing the length of the optical fiber ring resonator....... of the fiber ring resonator can be measured with the transmission spectrum. A good linearity is obtained between displacement and the inverse of wavelength spacing with an R2 of 0.9989, and high sensitivities better than 40  pm/με within the range of 0 to 10  με are achieved. The sensitivity can...

  17. Basic Studies of Nonlinear Optical Materials for Eye and Sensor Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-10

    1 BASIC STUDIES OF NONLINEAR OPTICAL MATERIALS FOR EYE AND SENSOR PROTECTION I. Abstract: We have studied the spectroscopy, kinetics and...study liquid or solid materials from CW to 100x10-15 seconds. Basic Studies of Nonlinear Optical Materials for Eye and Sensor Protection

  18. Optical Autler-Townes spectroscopy in a heteronuclear mixture of laser-cooled atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, C.; Münchow, F.; Görlitz, A.

    2017-01-01

    We report on optical Autler-Townes spectroscopy in a heteronuclear mixture of {}^{87}Rb and {}^{176}Yb in a continuously loaded double-species magneto-optical trap. An excited vibrational level of Rb*Yb which is energetically close to the 5^2P_{1/2} state of Rb is coupled by a strong laser field to a vibrational level in the ground state of RbYb and probed by a weak probe laser field. The induced Autler-Townes splittings in the photoassociation spectra allow us to determine relative Franck-Condon factors of molecular transitions in RbYb.

  19. Comparison of organic phantom recipes and characterization by time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarto, G.; Pifferi, A.; Bargigia, I.; Farina, A.; Cubeddu, R.; Taroni, P.

    2013-06-01

    Three recipes for tissue constituent-equivalent phantoms of water and lipids are presented. Nature phantoms are made using no emulsifying agent, but just a professional disperser, instead Agar and Triton phantoms are made using agar or Triton X-100, respectively, as agents to emulsify water and lipids. Different water-to-lipid ratios ranging from 30 to 70 percent by mass are proposed and tested. Optical characterization by time-resolved spectroscopy was performed in terms of optical properties, homogeneity, reproducibility and composition retrieval.

  20. Comparative study of optical fiber cure-monitoring methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Peter A.; Powell, Graham R.; Fernando, Gerard F.; Waters, David N.; France, Chris M.; Spooncer, Ronald C.

    1997-06-01

    This paper reports on a comparative study undertaken for different types of optical fiber sensor developed to monitor the cure of an epoxy resin system. The optical fiber sensors used to monitor the cure process were based on transmission spectroscopy, evanescent wave spectroscopy and refractive index monitoring. The transmission sensor was prepared by aligning two optical fibers within a specially prepared sleeve with a gap between the optical fiber end-faces. During cure, resin from the specimen flowed into the gap between the optical fibers allowing transmission spectra of the resin to be obtained. The evanescent wave sensor was prepared by stripping the cladding from a high refractive index core optical fiber. The prepared sensor was embedded in the sample and attenuated total reflectance spectra recorded from the resin/core boundary. Refractive index monitoring was undertaken using a high refractive index core optical fiber which had a small portion of its cladding removed. The prepared sensor was embedded in the resin specimen and light from a single wavelength source was launched into the fiber. Changes in the guiding characteristics of the sensor due to refractive index changes at the resin/core boundary were used to monitor the progress of the cure reaction. The transmission and evanescent wave spectroscopy sensors were used to follow changes in characteristic near-infrared absorption bands of the resin over the range 1450 - 1700 nm during the cure reaction. Consequently these techniques required tunable wavelength sources covering specific wavelength ranges. However, the refractive index based sensor used a single wavelength source. Therefore the equipment costs for this type of sensor were considerably less. Additionally, the refractive index sensor did not require a single wavelength source at any particular wavelength and could be applied to any spectral region in which the optical fiber would transmit light. The advantages and disadvantages of these

  1. K- band integral field spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy of massive young stellar objects in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, J. L.; Oliveira, J. M.; van Loon, J. Th.; Sewiło, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present K-band integral field spectroscopic observations towards 17 massive young stellar objects (YSOs) in the low-metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and two YSO candidates in the compact H II regions N81 and N88 A (also in the SMC). These sources, originally identified using Spitzer photometry and/or spectroscopy, have been resolved into 29 K-band continuum sources. By comparing Brγ emission luminosities with those presented for a Galactic sample of massive YSOs, we find tentative evidence for increased accretion rates in the SMC. Around half of our targets exhibit emission-line (Brγ, He I and H2) morphologies that extend significantly beyond the continuum source and we have mapped both the emission morphologies and the radial velocity fields. This analysis also reveals evidence for the existence of ionized low-density regions in the centre outflows from massive YSOs. Additionally, we present an analysis of optical spectra towards a similar sample of massive YSOs in the SMC, revealing that the optical emission is photoexcited and originates near the outer edges of molecular clouds, and is therefore consistent with a high mean-free path of UV photons in the interstellar medium (ISM) of the SMC. Finally, we discuss the sample of YSOs in an evolutionary context incorporating the results of previous infrared and radio observations, as well as the near-infrared and optical observations presented in this work. Our spectroscopic analysis in both the K band and the optical regimes, combined with previously obtained infrared and radio data, exposes differences between properties of massive YSOs in our own Galaxy and the SMC, including tracers of accretion, discs and YSO-ISM interactions.

  2. Excitation and Imaging of Resonant Optical Modes of Au Triangular Nano-Antennas Using Cathodoluminescence Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Anil; Mabon, James C; Chow, Edmond; Fang, Nicholas X

    2010-01-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging spectroscopy is an important technique to understand resonant behavior of optical nanoantennas. We report high-resolution CL spectroscopy of triangular gold nanoantennas designed with near-vacuum effective index and very small metal-substrate interface. This design helped in addressing issues related to background luminescence and shifting of dipole modes beyond visible spectrum. Spatial and spectral investigations of various plasmonic modes are reported. Out-of-plane dipole modes excited with vertically illuminated electron beam showed high-contrast tip illumination in panchromatic imaging. By tilting the nanostructures during fabrication, in-plane dipole modes of antennas were excited. Finite-difference time-domain simulations for electron and optical excitations of different modes showed excellent agreement with experimental results. Our approach of efficiently exciting antenna modes by using low index substrates is confirmed both with experiments and numerical simulations....

  3. Optical properties of 3d-ions in crystals spectroscopy and crystal field analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Brik, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    "Optical Properties of 3d-Ions in Crystals: Spectroscopy and Crystal Field Analysis" discusses spectral, vibronic and magnetic properties of 3d-ions in a wide range of crystals, used as active media for solid state lasers and potential candidates for this role. Crystal field calculations (including first-principles calculations of energy levels and absorption spectra) and their comparison with experimental spectra, the Jahn-Teller effect, analysis of vibronic spectra, materials science applications are systematically presented. The book is intended for researchers and graduate students in crystal spectroscopy, materials science and optical applications. Dr. N.M. Avram is an Emeritus Professor at the Physics Department, West University of Timisoara, Romania; Dr. M.G. Brik is a Professor at the Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Estonia.

  4. Investigation of microplasma discharge in sea water for optical emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamaleev, Vladislav; Okamura, Yo; Kitamura, Kensuke; Hashimoto, Yusuke; Oh, Jun-Seok; Furuta, Hiroshi; Hatta, Akimitsu

    2016-07-01

    Microplasma discharge in sea water for optical emission spectroscopy was investigated using a needle-to-plane electrode system. The electrodes of a Pd needle and a Pt plate were placed with a gap of 25 µm in typical artificial sea water or locally sampled natural deep sea water. A pulse current source, consisting of a MOSFET switch, a capacitor, an inductor and the resistance of the sea water between the electrodes, was used. The circuit parameters were optimized to decrease the breakdown voltage and the spark duration to suppress erosion of the electrodes. Using a microgap configuration, spark discharges were reproducibly ignited in the highly conductive sea water at low breakdown voltages. The ignition of spark discharges required not only a critical voltage sufficient for breakdown, but also a critical energy for preheating of the sea water, sufficient for bubble formation. The possibility of using optical emission spectroscopy of microplasma in water is shown for identifying elemental composition of sea water.

  5. Extending differential optical absorption spectroscopy for limb measurements in the UV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Puķīte

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Methods of UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy to determine the constituents in the Earth's atmosphere from measurements of scattered light are often based on the Beer-Lambert law, like e.g. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS. While the Beer-Lambert law is strictly valid for a single light path only, the relation between the optical depth and the concentration of any absorber can be approximated as linear also for scattered light observations at a single wavelength if the absorption is weak. If the light path distribution is approximated not to vary with wavelength, also linearity between the optical depth and the product of the cross-section and the concentration of an absorber can be assumed. These assumptions are widely made for DOAS applications for scattered light observations.

    For medium and strong absorption of scattered light (e.g. along very long light-paths like in limb geometry the relation between the optical depth and the concentration of an absorber is no longer linear. In addition, for broad wavelength intervals the differences in the travelled light-paths at different wavelengths become important, especially in the UV, where the probability for scattering increases strongly with decreasing wavelength.

    However, the DOAS method can be extended to cases with medium to strong absorptions and for broader wavelength intervals by the so called air mass factor modified (or extended DOAS and the weighting function modified DOAS. These approaches take into account the wavelength dependency of the slant column densities (SCDs, but also require a priori knowledge for the air mass factor or the weighting function from radiative transfer modelling.

    We describe an approach that considers the fitting results obtained from DOAS, the SCDs, as a function of wavelength and vertical optical depth and expands this function into a Taylor series of both quantities. The Taylor coefficients are then applied as

  6. Extending differential optical absorption spectroscopy for limb measurements in the UV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puä·Ä«Te, J.; Kühl, S.; Deutschmann, T.; Platt, U.; Wagner, T.

    2010-05-01

    Methods of UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy to determine the constituents in the Earth's atmosphere from measurements of scattered light are often based on the Beer-Lambert law, like e.g. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). While the Beer-Lambert law is strictly valid for a single light path only, the relation between the optical depth and the concentration of any absorber can be approximated as linear also for scattered light observations at a single wavelength if the absorption is weak. If the light path distribution is approximated not to vary with wavelength, also linearity between the optical depth and the product of the cross-section and the concentration of an absorber can be assumed. These assumptions are widely made for DOAS applications for scattered light observations. For medium and strong absorption of scattered light (e.g. along very long light-paths like in limb geometry) the relation between the optical depth and the concentration of an absorber is no longer linear. In addition, for broad wavelength intervals the differences in the travelled light-paths at different wavelengths become important, especially in the UV, where the probability for scattering increases strongly with decreasing wavelength. However, the DOAS method can be extended to cases with medium to strong absorptions and for broader wavelength intervals by the so called air mass factor modified (or extended) DOAS and the weighting function modified DOAS. These approaches take into account the wavelength dependency of the slant column densities (SCDs), but also require a priori knowledge for the air mass factor or the weighting function from radiative transfer modelling. We describe an approach that considers the fitting results obtained from DOAS, the SCDs, as a function of wavelength and vertical optical depth and expands this function into a Taylor series of both quantities. The Taylor coefficients are then applied as additional fitting parameters in the DOAS analysis

  7. Studies on metabolic regulation using NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, H; Badar-Goffer, R; Ben-Yoseph, O; Morris, P; Thatcher, N

    1993-01-01

    The effects of hypoxia and hypoglycaemia on cerebral metabolism and calcium have been studied using multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. 13C MRS showed that severe hypoxia did not cause any further increase in metabolic flux into lactate seen in mild hypoxia, but there was a further increase in 13C labelling of alanine and glycerol 3-phosphate. These results are discussed in terms of the ability of lactate dehydrogenase to maintain normal levels of NADH in mild hypoxia, but not in severe hypoxia. We conclude that glycerol 3-phosphate and alanine may provide novel means of monitoring severe hypoxia whereas lactate is a reliable indicator only of mild hypoxia. 19F- and 31P NMR spectroscopy showed that neither hypoxia nor hypoglycaemia alone caused any significant change in [Ca2+]i. Combined sequential insults (hypoxia, followed by hypoxia plus hypoglycaemia), or vice versa, produced a 100% increase in [Ca2+]i, whereas immediate exposure to the combined insult (hypoxia plus hypoglycaemia) resulted in a large 5-fold increase in [Ca2+]i, with severe irreversible effects on the energy state. These results are discussed in terms of metabolic adaptation to the single type of insult, which renders the tissue less vulnerable to the combined insult. The effects of this combined insult are far more severe than those caused by glutamate or NMDA, which throws doubt on the current excitoxic hypothesis of cell damage.

  8. Diode-Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of an Optically Thick Plasma in Combination with Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nomura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Distortion of laser-induced fluorescence profiles attributable to optical absorption and saturation broadening was corrected in combination with laser absorption spectroscopy in argon plasma flow. At high probe-laser intensity, saturated absorption profiles were measured to correct probe-laser absorption. At low laser intensity, nonsaturated absorption profiles were measured to correct fluorescence reabsorption. Saturation broadening at the measurement point was corrected using a ratio of saturated to non-saturated broadening. Observed LIF broadening and corresponding translational temperature without correction were, respectively, 2.20±0.05 GHz and 2510±100 K and corrected broadening and temperature were, respectively, 1.96±0.07 GHz and 1990±150 K. Although this correction is applicable only at the center of symmetry, the deduced temperature agreed well with that obtained by LAS with Abel inversion.

  9. Development and use of compact instruments for tropospheric investigations based on optical spectroscopy from mobile platforms

    OpenAIRE

    Merlaud, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents the development of four different remote-sensing instruments dedicated to atmospheric research and their use in field campaigns between 2008 and 2012. The instruments are based on uv-visible spectrometers and installed respectively on a scientific aircraft (Safire ATR-42), ultralight aircraft, and cars. One of the instruments is targeted to operate from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique is used to quantify ...

  10. Vibrational spectroscopy studies of formalin-fixed cervix tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, C M; Sockalingum, G D; Vadhiraja, B M; Maheedhar, K; Rao, A C K; Rao, L; Venteo, L; Pluot, M; Fernandes, D J; Vidyasagar, M S; Kartha, V B; Manfait, M

    2007-02-15

    Optical histopathology is fast emerging as a potential tool in cancer diagnosis. Fresh tissues in saline are ideal samples for optical histopathology. However, evaluation of suitability of ex vivo handled tissues is necessitated because of severe constraints in sample procurement, handling, and other associated problems with fresh tissues. Among these methods, formalin-fixed samples are shown to be suitable for optical histopathology. However, it is necessary to further evaluate this method from the point of view discriminating tissues with minute biochemical variations. A pilot Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopic studies of formalin-fixed tissues normal, malignant, and after-2-fractions of radiotherapy from the same malignant cervix subjects were carried out, with an aim to explore the feasibility of discriminating these tissues, especially the tissues after-2-fractions of radiotherapy from other two groups. Raman and FTIR spectra exhibit large differences for normal and malignant tissues and subtle differences are seen between malignant and after-2-fractions of radiotherapy tissues. Spectral data were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) and it provided good discrimination of normal and malignant tissues. PCA of data of three tissues, normal, malignant, and 2-fractions after radiotherapy, gave two clusters corresponding to normal and malignant + after-2-fractions of radiotherapy tissues. A second step of PCA was required to achieve discrimination between malignant and after-2-fractions of radiotherapy tissues. Hence, this study not only further supports the use of formalin-fixed tissues in optical histopathology, especially from Raman spectroscopy point of view, it also indicates feasibility of discriminating tissues with minute biochemical differences such as malignant and after-2-fractions of radiotherapy.

  11. Study of normal colorectal tissue by FT-Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, P O; Bitar, R A; Yassoyama, K; Martinho, H; Santo, A M E; Bruno, P M; Martin, A A

    2007-03-01

    FT-Raman spectroscopy was employed to study normal human colorectal tissues in vitro with the aim of evaluating the spectral differences of the complex colon mucous in order to establish a characteristic Raman spectrum. The samples were collected from 39 patients, providing 144 spectra for the statistical analysis. The results enable one to establish three well-defined spectroscopic groups of non-altered colorectal tissues that were consistently checked by statistical (clustering) and biological (histopathology) analyses: group 1 is represented by samples with the presence of epithelial layer, connective tissue papillae, and smooth muscle tissue; group 2 comprises tissues with epithelial layer and connective tissue papillae; group 3 presented mostly fatty and slack conjunctive tissue. The study reveals the existence of an intrinsic spectral variability for each patient that must be considered when sampling tissues fragments to build a spectral database. This is the first step for future studies and applications of Raman spectroscopy to optical biopsy and diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  12. Detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques by Raman probe spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthäus, Christian; Dochow, Sebastian; Egodage, Kokila D.; Schie, Iwan; Romeike, Bernd F.; Brehm, Bernhard R.; Popp, Jürgen

    2017-02-01

    Visualization and characterization of inner arterial plaque depositions is of vital diagnostic interest. Established intravascular imaging techniques provide valuable morphological information, but cannot deliver information about the chemical composition of individual plaques. Probe based Raman spectroscopy offers the possibility for a biochemical characterization of atherosclerotic plaque formations during an intravascular intervention. From post mortem studies it is well known that the severity of a plaque and its stability are strongly correlated with its biochemical composition. Especially the identification of vulnerable plaques remains one of the most important and challenging aspects in cardiology. Thus, specific information about the composition of a plaque would greatly improve the risk assessment and management. Furthermore, knowledge about the composition can offer new therapeutic and medication strategies. Plaque calcifications as well as major lipid components such as cholesterol, cholesterol esters and triglycerides can be spectroscopically easily differentiated. Intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) is currently a prominent catheter based imaging technique for the localization and visualization of atherosclerotic plaque depositions. The high resolution of OCT with 10 to 15 µm allows for very detailed characterization of morphological features such as different plaque formations, thin fibrous caps and accurate measurements of lesion lengths. In combination with OCT imaging the obtained spectral information can provide substantial information supporting on on-site diagnosis of various plaque types and therefor an improved risk assessment. The potential and feasibility of combining OCT with Raman spectroscopy is demonstrated on excised plaque samples, as well as under in vivo conditions. Acknowledgements: Financial support from the Carl Zeiss Foundation is greatly acknowledged.

  13. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of CdSe/ZnS quantum dot optical bioimaging probes with ultra-thin biocompatible coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcia, Michael J; Shaw, David L; Long, Eric C; Naumann, Christoph A

    2008-04-01

    The current study reports on the colloidal stabilities and emission properties of CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (QD) optical probes capped with a variety of thin, hydrophilic surface coatings as studied using confocal fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. These coatings are based on mercaptoethanol, mercaptopropionic acid (with and without conjugated aminoethoxyethanol), lipopolymers (DSPE-PEG2000), cysteine (Cys), and a variety of Xaa-Cys dipeptides. The study shows that several types of QDs with thin hydrophilic coatings can be designed that combine good colloidal stability and excellent emission properties (brightness). Furthermore, there is a general correlation between colloidal stability and brightness. The experiments reported herein illustrate that QDs with multiple types of thin coatings can be created for optical imaging applications in a biological environment while also maintaining a size below 10 nm.

  14. Surface enhanced raman spectroscopy studies on triglycine sulphate single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameswari, A.; Mohamed Asath, R.; Premkumar, R.; Milton Franklin Benial, A.

    2017-01-01

    Adsorption characteristics of triglycine sulphate (TGS) on silver (Ag) surface were investigated based on density functional theory calculations and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique. The single crystals of TGS were grown by slow evaporation method. Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were prepared by solution combustion method and characterized. The calculated and observed structural parameters of TGS molecule were compared. Raman and SERS spectra for TGS single crystal were studied experimentally and validated theoretically. Frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) analysis was carried out for TGS and TGS adsorbed on Ag surface. The second harmonic generation measurements confirm the nonlinear optical (NLO) activity of the TGS molecule. SERS spectral analysis reveals that the TGS adsorbed as tilted orientation on the silver surface. The theoretical and experimental results evidence the suitability of the grown TGS single crystal for optoelectronic applications.

  15. Using Terahertz Spectroscopy to Study Systems with Solar Energy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milot, Rebecca L.; Moore, Gary F.; Martini, Lauren A.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Crabtree, Robert H.; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A.

    2013-06-01

    Biomimetic solar water oxidation systems are being developed as renewable alternatives to fossil fuels. One possible design incorporates thin-film dye-sensitized nanoparticle photoanades to capture and convert visible light to charge carriers and catalysts to facilitate water oxidation. The physical properties of the dye are important due to its position as the light absorber and electron transfer initiator. Given the role that porphyrins play in photosynthesis and their synthetic tunability, they are promising components for these photoanodes. Time-Resolved THz Spectroscopy (TRTS), an optical pump/THz probe technique, is a non-contact electrical probe with proven usefulness for studying electron transfer and conductivity on a sub-picosecond timescale. Using TRTS, the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from porphyrin dyes into metal oxide surfaces was found to be strongly influenced by the structure and photophysical properties of the dye.

  16. Optical properties of single semiconductor nanowires and nanowire ensembles. Probing surface physics by photoluminescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfueller, Carsten

    2011-06-27

    This thesis presents a detailed investigation of the optical properties of semiconductor nanowires (NWs) in general and single GaN NWs and GaN NW ensembles in particular by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. NWs are often considered as potential building blocks for future nanometer-scaled devices. This vision is based on several attractive features that are generally ascribed to NWs. For instance, they are expected to grow virtually free of strain and defects even on substrates with a large structural mismatch. In the first part of the thesis, some of these expectations are examined using semiconductor NWs of different materials. On the basis of the temperature-dependent PL of Au- and selfassisted GaAs/(Al,Ga)As core-shell NWs, the influence of foreign catalyst particles on the optical properties of NWs is investigated. For the Au-assisted NWs, we find a thermally activated, nonradiative recombination channel, possibly related to Auatoms incorporated from the catalyst. These results indicate the limited suitability of catalyst-assisted NWs for optoelectronic applications. The effect of the substrate choice is studied by comparing the PL of ZnO NWs grown on Si, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and ZnO substrates. Their virtually identical optical characteristics indicate that the synthesis of NWs may indeed overcome the constraints that limit the heteroepitaxial deposition of thin films. The major part of this thesis discusses the optical properties of GaN NWs grown on Si substrates. The investigation of the PL of single GaN NWs and GaN NW ensembles reveals the significance of their large surface-to-volume ratio. Differences in the recombination behavior of GaNNW ensembles and GaN layers are observed. First, the large surface-to-volume ratio is discussed to be responsible for the different recombination mechanisms apparent in NWs. Second, certain optical features are only found in the PL of GaN NWs, but not in that of GaN layers. An unexpected broadening of the donor

  17. Identification of natural red and purple dyes on textiles by Fiber-optics Reflectance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynez-Rojas, M. A.; Casanova-González, E.; Ruvalcaba-Sil, J. L.

    2017-05-01

    Understanding dye chemistry and dye processes is an important issue for studies of cultural heritage collections and science conservation. Fiber Optics Reflectance Spectroscopy (FORS) is a powerful technique, which allows preliminary dye identification, causing no damage or mechanical stress on the artworks subjected to analysis. Some information related to specific light scattering and absorption can be obtained in the UV-visible and infrared range (300-1400 nm) and it is possible to discriminate the kind of support fiber in the near infrared region (1000-2500 nm). The main spectral features of natural dye fibers samples, such as reflection maxima, inflection points and reflection minima, can be used in the differentiation of various red natural dyes. In this work, a set of dyed references were manufactured following Mexican recipes with red dyes (cochineal and brazilwood) in order to determine the characteristic FORS spectral features of fresh and aged dyed fibers for their identification in historical pieces. Based on these results, twenty-nine indigenous textiles belonging to the National Commission for the Development of Indigenous People of Mexico were studied. Cochineal and brazilwood were successfully identified by FORS in several pieces, as well as the mixture of cochineal and indigo for purple color.

  18. Identification of natural red and purple dyes on textiles by Fiber-optics Reflectance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynez-Rojas, M A; Casanova-González, E; Ruvalcaba-Sil, J L

    2017-02-09

    Understanding dye chemistry and dye processes is an important issue for studies of cultural heritage collections and science conservation. Fiber Optics Reflectance Spectroscopy (FORS) is a powerful technique, which allows preliminary dye identification, causing no damage or mechanical stress on the artworks subjected to analysis. Some information related to specific light scattering and absorption can be obtained in the UV-visible and infrared range (300-1400nm) and it is possible to discriminate the kind of support fiber in the near infrared region (1000-2500nm). The main spectral features of natural dye fibers samples, such as reflection maxima, inflection points and reflection minima, can be used in the differentiation of various red natural dyes. In this work, a set of dyed references were manufactured following Mexican recipes with red dyes (cochineal and brazilwood) in order to determine the characteristic FORS spectral features of fresh and aged dyed fibers for their identification in historical pieces. Based on these results, twenty-nine indigenous textiles belonging to the National Commission for the Development of Indigenous People of Mexico were studied. Cochineal and brazilwood were successfully identified by FORS in several pieces, as well as the mixture of cochineal and indigo for purple color.

  19. The GTC exoplanet transit spectroscopy survey . VII. An optical transmission spectrum of WASP-48b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgas, F.; Pallé, E.; Parviainen, H.; Chen, G.; Nortmann, L.; Nowak, G.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.; Iro, N.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Transiting planets offer an excellent opportunity for characterizing the atmospheres of extrasolar planets under very different conditions from those found in our solar system. Aims: We are currently carrying out a ground-based survey to obtain the transmission spectra of several extrasolar planets using the 10 m Gran Telescopio Canarias. In this paper we investigate the extrasolar planet WASP-48b, a hot Jupiter orbiting around an F-type star with a period of 2.14 days. Methods: We obtained long-slit optical spectroscopy of one transit of WASP-48b with the Optical System for Imaging and low-Intermediate-Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy (OSIRIS) spectrograph. We integrated the spectrum of WASP-48 and one reference star in several channels with different wavelength ranges, creating numerous color light curves of the transit. We fit analytic transit curves to the data taking into account the systematic effects present in the time series in an effort to measure the change of the planet-to-star radius ratio (Rp/Rs) across wavelength. The change in transit depth can be compared with atmosphere models to infer the presence of particular atomic or molecular compounds in the atmosphere of WASP-48b. Results: After removing the transit model and systematic trends to the curves we reached precisions between 261 ppm and 455-755 ppm for the white and spectroscopic light curves, respectively. We obtained Rp/Rs uncertainty values between 0.8 × 10-3 and 1.5 × 10-3 for all the curves analyzed in this work. The measured transit depth for the curves made by integrating the wavelength range between 530 nm and 905 nm is in agreement with previous studies. We report a relatively flat transmission spectrum for WASP-48b with no statistical significant detection of atmospheric species, although the theoretical models that fit the data more closely include TiO and VO. The transit light curves are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http

  20. Neutrino beam line optics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ming-Jen

    1996-09-01

    A study was done to understand the beam line optics from the beginning of Switchyard all the way to the end of Neutrino beam line. All available SWIC data were taken to get the beam centroid and width to be used in the analysis. The beam emittance and lattice function at the beginning of beam line can also be inferred from the study. The result indicated that the normalized 95% emittance to be around 15 {pi}-mm-mr for the vertical plane and about 28 {pi}-mm-mr for the horizontal plane.

  1. Optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics of an atmospheric pressure direct current microplasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sismanoglu, B.N., E-mail: bogos@ita.b [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Comando-Geral de Tecnologia Aeroespacial, Pca Marechal Eduardo Gomes 50, 12 228-900, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Amorim, J., E-mail: jayr.amorim@bioetanol.org.b [Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Bioetanol - CTBE, Caixa Postal 6170, 13083-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Souza-Correa, J.A., E-mail: jorge.correa@bioetanol.org.b [Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Bioetanol - CTBE, Caixa Postal 6170, 13083-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira, C., E-mail: carlosf@ita.b [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Comando-Geral de Tecnologia Aeroespacial, Pca Marechal Eduardo Gomes 50, 12 228-900, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Gomes, M.P., E-mail: gomesmp@ita.b [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Comando-Geral de Tecnologia Aeroespacial, Pca Marechal Eduardo Gomes 50, 12 228-900, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2009-11-15

    This paper is about the use of optical emission spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool to determine the gas discharge parameters of a direct current (98% Ar-2% H{sub 2}) non-thermal microplasma jet, operated at atmospheric pressure. The electrical and optical behaviors were studied to characterize this glow discharge. The microplasma jet was investigated in the normal and abnormal glow regimes, for current ranging from 10 to 130 mA, at approx 220 V of applied voltage for copper cathode. OH (A {sup 2}SIGMA{sup +}, nu = 0 -> X {sup 2}PI, nu' = 0) rotational bands at 306.357 nm and also the 603.213 nm Ar I line, which is sensitive to van der Waals broadening, were used to determine the gas temperature, which ranges from 550 to 800 K. The electron number densities, ranging from 6.0 x 10{sup 14} to 1.4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}, were determined through a careful analysis of the main broadening mechanisms of the H{sub beta} line. From both 603.213 nm and 565.070 nm Ar I line broadenings, it was possible to obtain simultaneously electron number density and temperature (approx 8000 K). Excitation temperatures were also measured from two methods: from two Cu I lines and from Boltzmann-plot of 4p-4s and 5p-4s Ar I transitions. By employing H{sub alpha} line, the hydrogen atoms' H temperature was estimated (approx 18,000 K) and found to be surprisingly hotter than the excitation temperature.

  2. Sedimentation field flow fractionation and optical absorption spectroscopy for a quantitative size characterization of silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contado, Catia; Argazzi, Roberto; Amendola, Vincenzo

    2016-11-04

    Many advanced industrial and biomedical applications that use silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), require that particles are not only nano-sized, but also well dispersed, not aggregated and not agglomerated. This study presents two methods able to give rapidly sizes of monodispersed AgNPs suspensions in the dimensional range of 20-100nm. The first method, based on the application of Mie's theory, determines the particle sizes from the values of the surface plasmon resonance wavelength (SPRMAX), read from the optical absorption spectra, recorded between 190nm and 800nm. The computed sizes were compared with those determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) and resulted in agreement with the nominal values in a range between 13% (for 20nm NPs) and 1% (for 100nm NPs), The second method is based on the masterly combination of the Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation (SdFFF - now sold as Centrifugal FFF-CFFF) and the Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (OAS) techniques to accomplish sizes and quantitative particle size distributions for monodispersed, non-aggregated AgNPs suspensions. The SdFFF separation abilities, well exploited to size NPs, greatly benefits from the application of Mie's theory to the UV-vis signal elaboration, producing quantitative mass-based particle size distributions, from which trusted number-sized particle size distributions can be derived. The silver mass distributions were verified and supported by detecting off-line the Ag concentration with the graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Optical spectroscopy of the microquasar GRS 1758-258: a possible intermediate mass system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, Josep; Luque-Escamilla, Pedro L.; Muñoz-Arjonilla, Álvaro J.

    2016-11-01

    Context. GRS 1758-258 is one of two prototypical microquasars towards the Galactic center direction discovered almost a quarter of a century ago. The system remains poorly studied in the optical domain due to its counterpart being a very faint and absorbed target in a crowded region of the sky. Aims: Our aim is to investigate GRS 1758-258 in order to shed light on the nature of the stellar binary components. In particular, the main physical parameters of the donor star, such as the mass or the spectral type, are not yet well constrained. Methods: GRS 1758-258 has remained so far elusive to optical spectroscopy owing to its observational difficulties. Here, we use this traditional tool of stellar astronomy at low spectral resolution with a 10 m class telescope and a long slit spectrograph. Results: An improved spectrum is obtained as compared to previous work. The quality of the data does not allow the detection of emission or absorption features but, nevertheless, we manage to partially achieve our aims comparing the de-reddened continuum with the spectral energy distribution expected from an irradiated disc model and different donor star templates. Conclusions: We tentatively propose that GRS 1758-258 does not host a giant star companion. Instead, a main sequence star with mid-A spectral type appears to better agree with our data. The main impacts of this finding are the possibility that we are dealing with an intermediate mass system and, in this case, the prediction of an orbital period significantly shorter than previously proposed.

  4. [Research on the blood components detecting by multi-optical path length spectroscopy technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Zhao, Zhe; Liu, Rui; Wang, Hui-quan; Wu, Hong-jie; Lin, Ling

    2010-09-01

    To discuss the feasibility of using the serum's multi-optical path length spectroscopy information for measuring the concentration of the human blood components, the automatic micro-displacement measuring device was designed, which can obtain the near-infrared multi-optical path length from 0 to 4.0 mm (interval is 0.2 mm) spectra of 200 serum samples with multioptical path length spectrum of serum participated in building the quantitative analysis model of four components of the human blood: glucose (GLU), total cholesterol (TC), total protein (TP) and albumin (ALB), by mean of the significant non-linear spectral characteristic of blood. Partial least square (PLS) was used to set up the calibration models of the multi-optical path length near-infrared absorption spectrum of 160 experimental samples against the biochemical analysis results of them. The blood components of another 40 samples were predicted according to the model. The prediction effect of four blood components was favorable, and the correlation coefficient (r) of predictive value and biochemical analysis value were 0.9320, 0.9712, 0.9462 and 0.9483, respectively. All of the results proved the feasibility of the multi-optical path length spectroscopy technique for blood components analysis. And this technique established the foundation of detecting the components of blood and other liquid conveniently and rapidly.

  5. FORS, Fiber Optics Reflectance Spectroscopy con gli spettrometri miniaturizzati per l’identificazione dei pigmenti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Cosentino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractQuesto articolo riporta i risultati del test di un sistema FORS (Fiber Optics Reflectance Spectroscopy assemblato con componenti Ocean Optics. Questa ditta ha sviluppato una linea di spettrometri miniaturizzati e dal costo estremamente contenuto. Le trascurabili dimensioni e peso di questo sistema FORS lo rendono uno strumento assolutamente adatto alle indagini dell’arte in cantiere. Sono stati testati 54 pigmenti storici in polvere e stesi con gomma arabica, tempera all’uovo, olio e affresco. Il sistema è stato provato su un quadro dell’800 e su opere murali del barocco siciliano.   This paper shows the results of the testing of a FORS (Fiber Optics Reflectance Spectroscopy system assembled with Ocean Optics components and featuring a USB4000 miniaturized and low cost spectrometer. The small dimensions and little weight of this FORS system make it adapt for the specific needs of art examination in the field. 54 historical pigments have been tested both in powder and laid with gum Arabic, egg tempera, linseed oil and fresco. The FORS system was also tested on a 1800s oil painting and on 1700s Sicilian baroque murals and the results compared with multispectral imaging analysis.   

  6. High-Resolution Two-Dimensional Optical Spectroscopy of Electron Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salewski, M.; Poltavtsev, S. V.; Yugova, I. A.; Karczewski, G.; Wiater, M.; Wojtowicz, T.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Akimov, I. A.; Meier, T.; Bayer, M.

    2017-07-01

    Multidimensional coherent optical spectroscopy is one of the most powerful tools for investigating complex quantum mechanical systems. While it was conceived decades ago in magnetic resonance spectroscopy using microwaves and radio waves, it has recently been extended into the visible and UV spectral range. However, resolving MHz energy splittings with ultrashort laser pulses still remains a challenge. Here, we analyze two-dimensional Fourier spectra for resonant optical excitation of resident electrons to localized trions or donor-bound excitons in semiconductor nanostructures subject to a transverse magnetic field. Particular attention is devoted to Raman coherence spectra, which allow one to accurately evaluate tiny splittings of the electron ground state and to determine the relaxation times in the electron spin ensemble. A stimulated steplike Raman process induced by a sequence of two laser pulses creates a coherent superposition of the ground-state doublet which can be retrieved only optically because of selective excitation of the same subensemble with a third pulse. This provides the unique opportunity to distinguish between different complexes that are closely spaced in energy in an ensemble. The related experimental demonstration is based on photon-echo measurements in an n -type CdTe /(Cd ,Mg )Te quantum-well structure detected by a heterodyne technique. The difference in the sub-μ eV range between the Zeeman splittings of donor-bound electrons and electrons localized at potential fluctuations can be resolved even though the homogeneous linewidth of the optical transitions is larger by 2 orders of magnitude.

  7. ACADEMIC TRAINING: Probing nature with high precision; particle traps, laser spectroscopy and optical combs

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    17, 18, 19 June LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Probing nature with high precision; particle traps, laser spectroscopy and optical combs by G. GABRIELSE / Harvard University, USA Experiments with atomic energy scales probe nature and its symmetries with exquisite precision. Particle traps allow the manipulation of single charged particles for months at a time, allow the most accurate comparison of theory and experiment, and promise to allow better measurement of fundamental quantities like the fine structure constant. Ions and atoms can be probed with lasers that are phase locked to microwave frequency standards via optical combs, thus calibrating optical sources in terms of the official cesium second. A series of three lectures will illustrate what can be measured and discuss key techniques.  ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  8. Optical Spectroscopy and Nebular Oxygen Abundances of the Spitzer/SINGS Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Moustakas, John; Jr.,; Tremonti, Christy A; Dale, Daniel A; Smith, John-David T; Calzetti, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    We present intermediate-resolution optical spectrophotometry of 65 galaxies obtained in support of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS). For each galaxy we obtain a nuclear, circumnuclear, and semi-integrated optical spectrum designed to coincide spatially with mid- and far-infrared spectroscopy from the Spitzer Space Telescope. We make the reduced, spectrophotometrically calibrated one-dimensional spectra, as well as measurements of the fluxes and equivalent widths of the strong nebular emission lines, publically available. We use optical emission-line ratios measured on all three spatial scales to classify the sample into star-forming, active galactic nuclei (AGN), and galaxies with a mixture of star formation and nuclear activity. We find that the relative fraction of the sample classified as star-forming versus AGN is a strong function of the integrated light enclosed by the spectroscopic aperture. We supplement our observations with a large database of nebular emission-line measurements of...

  9. Atomization efficiency and photon yield in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of single nanoparticles in an optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Pablo; Fortes, Francisco J.; Laserna, J. Javier

    2017-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was employed for investigating the influence of particle size on the dissociation efficiency and the absolute production of photons per mass unit of airborne solid graphite spheres under single-particle regime. Particles of average diameter of 400 nm were probed and compared with 2 μm particles. Samples were first catapulted into aerosol form and then secluded in an optical trap set by a 532 nm laser. Trap stability was quantified before subjecting particles to LIBS analysis. Fine alignment of the different lines comprising the optical catapulting-optical trapping-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument and tuning of excitation parameters conditioning the LIBS signal such as fluence and acquisition delay are described in detail with the ultimate goal of acquiring clear spectroscopic data on masses as low as 75 fg. The atomization efficiency and the photon yield increase as the particle size becomes smaller. Time-resolved plasma imaging studies were conducted to elucidate the mechanisms leading to particle disintegration and excitation.

  10. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  11. Camera, handlens, and microscope optical system for imaging and coupled optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor); Boynton, John (Inventor); Sepulveda, Cesar A. (Inventor); Nunes de Sepulveda, legal representative, Alicia (Inventor); Gursel, Yekta (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An optical system comprising two lens cells, each lens cell comprising multiple lens elements, to provide imaging over a very wide image distance and within a wide range of magnification by changing the distance between the two lens cells. An embodiment also provides scannable laser spectroscopic measurements within the field-of-view of the instrument.

  12. Measurements of Nighttime Nitrate Radical Concentrations in the Atmosphere by Long-Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Suwen; LIU Wenqing; XIE Pinhua; LI Ang; QIN Min; DOU Ke

    2007-01-01

    The long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) technique was developed to measure nighttime atmospheric nitrate radical (NO3) concentrations. An optimized retrieval method, resulting in a small residual structure and low detection limits, was developed to retrieve NOs. The time series of the NO3 concentration were collected from 17 to 24 March, 2006, where a nighttime average value of 15.8 ppt was observed. The interfering factors and errors are also discussed. These results indicate that the DOAS technique provides an essential tool for the quantification of NO3 concentration and in the study of its effects upon nighttime chemistry.

  13. Estimation of optical constants of a bio-thin layer (onion epidermis), using SPR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Saif-ur-; Mumtaz, Huma; Hayashi, Shinji; Shaukat, S. F.; Sekkat, Zouheir

    2014-12-01

    We estimate the optical constants of a biological thin layer (Allium cepa) by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. For this study, the fresh inner thin epidermis of an onion bulb was used and stacked directly on gold (Au) and silver (Ag) film surfaces in order to identify the shift in SPR mode of each metal film at an operating wavelength of 632.8 nm. The thickness and dielectric constants of the biological thin layer were determined by matching the experimental SPR curves to theoretical ones. The thickness and roughness of bare Au and Ag thin films were also measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM); the results of which are in good agreement with those obtained through experiment. Due to the high surface roughness of the natural onion epidermis layer, AFM could not measure the exact thickness of an onion epidermis. It is estimated that the value of the real part of the dielectric constant of an onion epidermis is between the dielectric constants of water and air.

  14. Optical Waveguide Lightmode Spectroscopy (OWLS as a Sensor for Thin Film and Quantum Dot Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinke Tang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS is usually applied as a biosensor system to the sorption-desorption of proteins to waveguide surfaces. Here, we show that OWLS can be used to monitor the quality of oxide thin film materials and of coatings of pulsed laser deposition synthesized CdSe quantum dots (QDs intended for solar energy applications. In addition to changes in data treatment and experimental procedure, oxide- or QD-coated waveguide sensors must be synthesized. We synthesized zinc stannate (Zn2SnO4 coated (Si,TiO2 waveguide sensors, and used OWLS to monitor the relative mass of the film over time. Films lost mass over time, though at different rates due to variation in fluid flow and its physical effect on removal of film material. The Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD technique was used to deposit CdSe QD coatings on waveguides. Sensors exposed to pH 2 solution lost mass over time in an expected, roughly exponential manner. Sensors at pH 10, in contrast, were stable over time. Results were confirmed with atomic force microscopy imaging. Limiting factors in the use of OWLS in this manner include limitations on the annealing temperature that maybe used to synthesize the oxide film, and limitations on the thickness of the film to be studied. Nevertheless, the technique overcomes a number of difficulties in monitoring the quality of thin films in-situ in liquid environments.

  15. Non-invasive tissue temperature measurements based on quantitative diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, S H [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Cerussi, A E; Tromberg, B J [Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, 1002 Health Sciences Road, Irvine 92612, CA (United States); Merritt, S I [Masimo Corporation, 40 Parker, Irvine, CA 92618 (United States); Ruth, J, E-mail: bjtrombe@uci.ed [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, 210 S. 33rd Street, Room 240, Skirkanich Hall, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2010-07-07

    We describe the development of a non-invasive method for quantitative tissue temperature measurements using Broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS). Our approach is based on well-characterized opposing shifts in near-infrared (NIR) water absorption spectra that appear with temperature and macromolecular binding state. Unlike conventional reflectance methods, DOS is used to generate scattering-corrected tissue water absorption spectra. This allows us to separate the macromolecular bound water contribution from the thermally induced spectral shift using the temperature isosbestic point at 996 nm. The method was validated in intralipid tissue phantoms by correlating DOS with thermistor measurements (R = 0.96) with a difference of 1.1 {+-} 0.91 {sup 0}C over a range of 28-48 {sup 0}C. Once validated, thermal and hemodynamic (i.e. oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentration) changes were measured simultaneously and continuously in human subjects (forearm) during mild cold stress. DOS-measured arm temperatures were consistent with previously reported invasive deep tissue temperature studies. These results suggest that DOS can be used for non-invasive, co-registered measurements of absolute temperature and hemoglobin parameters in thick tissues, a potentially important approach for optimizing thermal diagnostics and therapeutics.

  16. Optical spectroscopy of GaAs/AlGaAs V-groove quantum wires Quantum wells

    CERN Document Server

    Roshan, R

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis we report on optical spectroscopy of GaAs/AIGaAs quantum wires (QWRs), grown on pre-patterned semi-insulating GaAs (100) substrates by low-pressure metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (LP-MOVPE). Crescent-shaped quantum wires develop at the bottom of the grooves by self-organisation when a GaAs quantum well embedded in Al sub 0 sub . sub 3 Ga sub 0 sub . sub 7 As barriers was overgrown on the patterned surface. The overgrowth also resulted in the formation of vertical quantum wells (VQWs) in the AIGaAs barriers and sidewall quantum wells (SQWs) on the (111) surfaces that define the grooves. A narrow constriction (pinch-off) separates the QWRs from the side walls and provides two-dimensional confinement in them. Several types of wire arrangements are investigated in detail which includes single QWR, vertical stacked QWRs, lateral arrays of wires with sub-mu m pitch and gated QWRs. Both conventional far-field and near-field spectroscopic techniques are used to study these wires. A low-temperature ...

  17. Cerebral monitoring during carotid endarterectomy using near-infrared diffuse optical spectroscopies and electroencephalogram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang Yu; Cheng Ran; Dong Lixin; Yu Guoqiang [Center for Biomedical Engineering, University of Kentucky, KY (United States); Ryan, Stephen J [Department of Neurology, University of Kentucky, KY (United States); Saha, Sibu P, E-mail: guoqiang.yu@uky.edu [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Kentucky, KY (United States)

    2011-05-21

    Intraoperative monitoring of cerebral hemodynamics during carotid endarterectomy (CEA) provides essential information for detecting cerebral hypoperfusion induced by temporary internal carotid artery (ICA) clamping and post-CEA hyperperfusion syndrome. This study tests the feasibility and sensitivity of a novel dual-wavelength near-infrared diffuse correlation spectroscopy technique in detecting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral oxygenation in patients undergoing CEA. Two fiber-optic probes were taped on both sides of the forehead for cerebral hemodynamic measurements, and the instantaneous decreases in CBF and electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha-band power during ICA clamping were compared to test the measurement sensitivities of the two techniques. The ICA clamps resulted in significant CBF decreases (-24.7 {+-} 7.3%) accompanied with cerebral deoxygenation at the surgical sides (n = 12). The post-CEA CBF were significantly higher (+43.2 {+-} 16.9%) than the pre-CEA CBF. The CBF responses to ICA clamping were significantly faster, larger and more sensitive than EEG responses. Simultaneous monitoring of CBF, cerebral oxygenation and EEG power provides a comprehensive evaluation of cerebral physiological status, thus showing potential for the adoption of acute interventions (e.g., shunting, medications) during CEA to reduce the risks of severe cerebral ischemia and cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome.

  18. Combining scanning haptic microscopy and fibre optic Raman spectroscopy for tissue characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candefjord, S; Murayama, Y; Nyberg, M; Hallberg, J; Ramser, K; Ljungberg, B; Bergh, A; Lindahl, O A

    2012-08-01

    The tactile resonance method (TRM) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) are promising for tissue characterization in vivo. Our goal is to combine these techniques into one instrument, to use TRM for swift scanning, and RS for increasing the diagnostic power. The aim of this study was to determine the classification accuracy, using support vector machines, for measurements on porcine tissue and also produce preliminary data on human prostate tissue. This was done by developing a new experimental set-up combining micro-scale TRM-scanning haptic microscopy (SHM)-for assessing stiffness on a micro-scale, with fibre optic RS measurements for assessing biochemical content. We compared the accuracy using SHM alone versus SHM combined with RS, for different degrees of tissue homogeneity. The cross-validation classification accuracy for healthy porcine tissue types using SHM alone was 65-81%, and when RS was added it increased to 81-87%. The accuracy for healthy and cancerous human tissue was 67-70% when only SHM was used, and increased to 72-77% for the combined measurements. This shows that the potential for swift and accurate classification of healthy and cancerous prostate tissue is high. This is promising for developing a tool for probing the surgical margins during prostate cancer surgery.

  19. Investigation of proton damage in III-V semiconductors by optical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaccuzzi, E.; Giudici, P. [Departamento Energía Solar, Centro Atómico Constituyentes, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín (Argentina); CONICET, Godoy Cruz 2290 (C1425FQB), CABA (Argentina); Khachadorian, S.; Strittmatter, A.; Hoffmann, A. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Suárez, S. [Laboratorio de Colisiones Atómicas, Centro Atómico Bariloche, E. Bustillo 9500, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); CONICET, Godoy Cruz 2290 (C1425FQB), CABA (Argentina); Reinoso, M. [Departamento Física Experimental, Centro Atómico Constituyentes, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín (Argentina); CONICET, Godoy Cruz 2290 (C1425FQB), CABA (Argentina); Goñi, A. R. [ICREA, Passeig Lluís Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2016-06-21

    We studied the damage produced by 2 MeV proton radiation on epitaxially grown InGaP/GaAs structure by means of spatially resolved Raman and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The irradiation was performed parallel to the sample surface in order to determine the proton penetration range in both compounds. An increase in the intensity of longitudinal optical phonons and a decrease in the luminescence were observed. We associate these changes with the creation of defects in the damaged region, also responsible for the observed change of the carrier concentration in the GaAs layer, determined by the shift of the phonon-plasmon coupled mode frequency. From the spatially resolved profile of the PL and phonon intensities, we obtained the proton range in both materials and we compared them with stopping and range of ions in matter simulations. The comparison between the experimentally obtained proton range and simulations shows a very good agreement for GaAs but a discrepancy of 20% for InGaP. This discrepancy can be explained in terms of limitations of the model to simulate the electronic orbitals and bonding structure of the simulated compound. In order to overcome this limitation, we propose an increase in 40% in the electronic stopping power for InGaP.

  20. The Application of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and Optical Microscopy to the Characterization of Sized Airborne Particulate in Dayton, Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    PERIOD COVERED " AneT Appication of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy ’ and Optical Microscopy to the Characterization of THESIS/DISSERTATION 4 Sized...1978 U I HEREBY REC04MEND THAT THE THESIS PREPARED ’NDER MY SUPERVISION BY Lorelei Ann Krebs ENTITLED The Application of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and...acid and diluted with distilled water in a 25 milliliter volumetric flask. Atomic absorption . spectroscopy was used to analyze the solutions for

  1. Optical Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrhaug, Erling

    solution. In project 2 the intramolecular excited state association reaction between aniline and anthracene is characterized by both steady-state and time-resolved techniques, where the time resolved fluorescence measurements in particular allowed for the determination of the reaction rate constants...

  2. Exploiting Optical Contrasts for Cervical Precancer Diagnosis via Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Vivide Tuan-Chyan

    collagen without altering the amount of collagen present. Further work would be required to elucidate the exact sources of scattering contrast observed. Common confounding variables that limit the accuracy and clinical acceptability of optical spectroscopic systems are calibration requirements and variable probe-tissue contact pressures. Our results suggest that using a real-time self-calibration channel, as opposed to conventional post-experiment diffuse reflectance standard calibration measurements, significantly improved data integrity for the extraction of scattering contrast. Extracted [total Hb] and scattering were also significantly associated with applied contact probe pressure in colposcopically normal sites. Hence, future contact probe spectroscopy or imaging systems should incorporate a self-calibration channel and ensure spectral acquisition at a consistent contact pressure to collect reliable data with enhanced absorption and scattering contrasts. Another method to enhance optical contrast is to selectively interrogate different depths in the dysplastic cervix. For instance, scattering has been shown to increase in the epithelium (increase in nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio) while decrease in the stroma (re-organization of the extra-cellular matrix and changes in of collagen fiber cross-links). A fiber-optic probe with 45° illumination and collection fibers with a separation distance of 330 μm was designed and constructed to selectively interrogate the cervical epithelium. Mean extraction errors from liquid phantoms with optical properties mimicking the cervical epithelium for μa and μs' were 11.3 % and 12.7 %, respectively. Diffuse reflectance spectra from 9 sites in four loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) patients were analyzed. Preliminary data demonstrate the utility of the oblique fiber geometry in extracting scattering contrast in the cervical epithelium. Further work is needed to study the systematic error in optical property extraction and

  3. [Efficient method of analysis of optical spectra from kinetic studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvortsov, A N

    2009-01-01

    The application of principal components for the analysis of kinetic data obtained by optical spectroscopy is described. The use of singular value decomposition (SVD) for stable and reproducible generation of principal components, details of realization, advantages and drawbacks of the method are discussed. The described method with minor modifications may be used in a wide variety of UV-spectroscopy applications in molecular biology and biophysics. The developed method was applied to study the reaction of platinum anticancer drug, cisplatin, with DNA and methionine. Use of sensitive UV-spectroscopy allowed to study low platinum concentrations, typical for biological systems. It has been shown, that reactions of cisplatin with DNA and L-methionine generally follow the same pathway both at high and low concentrations.

  4. p-Hertz excitation spectroscopy of an optical antenna, optical transmitter-receiver mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrakçeken, Fuat; Unlügedik, Asli; Hayvali, Mustafa; Yaman, Ali

    2005-07-01

    o-Xylene sensitized biacetyl fluorescence and phosphorescence have been investigated and photosensitized fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetimes of biacetyl in the vapor phase have been determined. Attempts to detect the triplet of biacetyl by its absorption spectrum were unsuccessful, primarily due to, it is believed, the low extinction coefficients of the triplet, and the low triplet concentrations produced by the optical pumping device at room temperature.

  5. p-Hertz excitation spectroscopy of an optical antenna, optical transmitter-receiver mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrakçeken, Fuat; Ünlügedik, Aslı; Hayvalı, Mustafa; Yaman, Ali

    2005-07-01

    o-Xylene sensitized biacetyl fluorescence and phosphorescence have been investigated and photosensitized fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetimes of biacetyl in the vapor phase have been determined. Attempts to detect the triplet of biacetyl by its absorption spectrum were unsuccessful, primarily due to, it is believed, the low extinction coefficients of the triplet, and the low triplet concentrations produced by the optical pumping device at room temperature.

  6. Characterization of bacterial spore germination using integrated phase contrast microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingbo; Zhang, Pengfei; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-Qing

    2010-05-01

    We present a methodology that combines external phase contrast microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and optical tweezers to monitor a variety of changes during the germination of single Bacillus cereus spores in both nutrient (l-alanine) and non-nutrient (Ca-dipicolinic acid (DPA)) germinants with a temporal resolution of approximately 2 s. Phase contrast microscopy assesses changes in refractility of individual spores during germination, while Raman spectroscopy gives information on changes in spore-specific molecules. The results obtained include (1) the brightness of the phase contrast image of an individual dormant spore is proportional to the level of CaDPA in that spore; (2) the end of the first Stage of germination, revealed as the end of the rapid drop in spore refractility by phase contrast microscopy, precisely corresponds to the completion of the release of CaDPA as revealed by Raman spectroscopy; and (3) the correspondence between the rapid drop in spore refractility and complete CaDPA release was observed not only for spores germinating in the well-controlled environment of an optical trap but also for spores germinating when adhered on a microscope coverslip. Using this latter method, we also simultaneously characterized the distribution of the time-to-complete-CaDPA release (T(release)) of hundreds of individual B. cereus spores germinating with both saturating and subsaturating concentrations of l-alanine and with CaDPA.

  7. Hollow core fiber optics for mid-wave and long-wave infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriesel, Jason M.; Gat, Nahum; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Erikson, Rebecca L.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bledt, Carlos M.; Harrington, James A.

    2011-05-01

    We describe the development and testing of hollow core glass waveguides (i.e., fiber optics) for use in Mid-Wave Infrared (MWIR) and Long-Wave Infrared (LWIR) spectroscopy systems. Spectroscopy measurements in these wavelength regions (i.e., from 3 to 14 μm) are useful for detecting trace chemical compounds for a variety of security and defense related applications, and fiber optics are a key enabling technology needed to improve the utility and effectiveness of detection and calibration systems. Hollow glass fibers have the advantage over solid-core fibers (e.g., chalcogenide) in that they are less fragile, do not produce cladding modes, do not require angle cleaving or antireflection coatings to minimize laser feedback effects, and effectively transmit deeper into the infrared. This paper focuses on recent developments in hollow fiber technology geared specifically for infrared spectroscopy, including single mode beam delivery with relatively low bending loss. Results are presented from tests conducted using both Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCL) and CO2 lasers operating in the LWIR wavelength regime. Single-mode waveguides are shown to effectively deliver beams with relatively low loss (~ 1 dB/m) and relatively high beam quality. The fibers are also shown to effectively mode-filter the "raw" multi-mode output from a QCL, in effect damping out the higher order modes to produce a circularly symmetric Gaussian-like beam profile.

  8. Multi-fibre optical spectroscopy of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in Upper Sco

    CERN Document Server

    Lodieu, N; Hambly, N C

    2011-01-01

    We have obtained multi-fibre intermediate-resolution optical spectroscopy of 94 photometric and proper motion selected low-mass star and brown dwarf candidates in Upper Sco with AAT/AAOmega. We have estimated the spectral types and measured the equivalent widths of youth and gravity diagnostic features to confirm the spectroscopic membership of about 95% of the candidates extracted from 6.5 square degrees in Upper Sco. We also detect lithium in the spectra with the highest signal-to-noise, consolidating our conclusions about their youth. Furthermore, we derive an estimate of our selections using spectroscopic data obtained for a large number of stars falling into the instrument's field-of-view. We have estimated the effective temperatures and masses for each new spectroscopic member using the latest evolutionary models available for low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. Combining the current optical spectroscopy presented here with near-infrared spectroscopy obtained for the faintest photometric candidates, we con...

  9. In-vivo optical detection of cancer using chlorin e6 – polyvinylpyrrolidone induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Khee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photosensitizer based fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy is fast becoming a promising approach for cancer detection. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of the photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6 formulated in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP as a potential exogenous fluorophore for fluorescence imaging and spectroscopic detection of human cancer tissue xenografted in preclinical models as well as in a patient. Methods Fluorescence imaging was performed on MGH human bladder tumor xenografted on both the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM and the murine model using a fluorescence endoscopy imaging system. In addition, fiber optic based fluorescence spectroscopy was performed on tumors and various normal organs in the same mice to validate the macroscopic images. In one patient, fluorescence imaging was performed on angiosarcoma lesions and normal skin in conjunction with fluorescence spectroscopy to validate Ce6-PVP induced fluorescence visual assessment of the lesions. Results Margins of tumor xenografts in the CAM model were clearly outlined under fluorescence imaging. Ce6-PVP-induced fluorescence imaging yielded a specificity of 83% on the CAM model. In mice, fluorescence intensity of Ce6-PVP was higher in bladder tumor compared to adjacent muscle and normal bladder. Clinical results confirmed that fluorescence imaging clearly captured the fluorescence of Ce6-PVP in angiosarcoma lesions and good correlation was found between fluorescence imaging and spectral measurement in the patient. Conclusion Combination of Ce6-PVP induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy could allow for optical detection and discrimination between cancer and the surrounding normal tissues. Ce6-PVP seems to be a promising fluorophore for fluorescence diagnosis of cancer.

  10. Diagnosis of breast cancer using diffuse optical spectroscopy from 500 to 1600 nm: a comparison of classification methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nachabe, R.; Evers, D.; Hendriks, B.H.W.; Lucassen, G.W.; Van der Voort, M.; Wesseling, J.; Rutgers, E. J.; Vrancken Peeters, M.J.; Hage, J.A.van der; Oldenbeng, H.S.; Ruers, T.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the use of diffuse optical spectroscopy analysis of breast spectra acquired in the wavelength range from 500 to 1600 nm with a fiber optic probe. A total of 102 ex vivo samples of five different breast tissue types, namely adipose, glandular, fibroadenoma, invasive carcinoma and ductal

  11. Physical structure of the proto-planetary nebula CRL618.I. optical long split spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, C. S.; Sahai, R.; Gil de Paz, A.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present optical long-slit spectroscopy and imaging of the protoplanetary nebula CRL 618. The optical lobes of CRL 618 consist of shock-excited gas, which emits many recombination and forbidden lines, and dust, which scatters light from the innermost regions.

  12. Diagnosis of breast cancer using diffuse optical spectroscopy from 500 to 1600 nm: comparison of classification methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nachabé, Rami; Evers, Daniel J.; Hendriks, Benno H.W.; Lucassen, Gerald W.; Voort, van der Marjolein; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Vrancken Peeters, Marie-Jeanne; Hage, van der Jos A.; Oldenburg, Hester S.; Wesseling, Jelle; Ruers, Theo J.M.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the use of diffuse optical spectroscopy analysis of breast spectra acquired in the wavelength range from 500 to 1600 nm with a fiber optic probe. A total of 102 ex vivo samples of five different breast tissue types, namely adipose, glandular, fibroadenoma, invasive carcinoma, and ductal

  13. Diagnosis of breast cancer using diffuse optical spectroscopy from 500 to 1600 nm: a comparison of classification methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nachabe, R.; Evers, D.; Hendriks, B.H.W.; Lucassen, G.W.; Van der Voort, M.; Wesseling, J.; Rutgers, E. J.; Vrancken Peeters, M.J.; Hage, J.A.van der; Oldenbeng, H.S.; Ruers, T.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the use of diffuse optical spectroscopy analysis of breast spectra acquired in the wavelength range from 500 to 1600 nm with a fiber optic probe. A total of 102 ex vivo samples of five different breast tissue types, namely adipose, glandular, fibroadenoma, invasive carcinoma and ductal

  14. Ultrafast wavelength multiplexed broad bandwidth digital diffuse optical spectroscopy for in vivo extraction of tissue optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torjesen, Alyssa; Istfan, Raeef; Roblyer, Darren

    2017-03-01

    Frequency-domain diffuse optical spectroscopy (FD-DOS) utilizes intensity-modulated light to characterize optical scattering and absorption in thick tissue. Previous FD-DOS systems have been limited by large device footprints, complex electronics, high costs, and limited acquisition speeds, all of which complicate access to patients in the clinical setting. We have developed a new digital DOS (dDOS) system, which is relatively compact and inexpensive, allowing for simplified clinical use, while providing unprecedented measurement speeds. The dDOS system utilizes hardware-integrated custom board-level direct digital synthesizers and an analog-to-digital converter to generate frequency sweeps and directly measure signals utilizing undersampling at six wavelengths modulated at discrete frequencies from 50 to 400 MHz. Wavelength multiplexing is utilized to achieve broadband frequency sweep measurements acquired at over 97 Hz. When compared to a gold-standard DOS system, the accuracy of optical properties recovered with the dDOS system was within 5.3% and 5.5% for absorption and reduced scattering coefficient extractions, respectively. When tested in vivo, the dDOS system was able to detect physiological changes throughout the cardiac cycle. The new FD-dDOS system is fast, inexpensive, and compact without compromising measurement quality.

  15. Improvement of tissue analysis and classification using optical coherence tomography combined with Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Qi, Ji; Lu, Jing; Wang, Shang; Wu, Chen; Shih, Wei-Chuan; Larin, Kirill V.

    2014-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an optical imaging technique that is capable of performing high-resolution (approaching the histopathology level) and real-time imaging of tissues without use of contrast agents. Based on these advantages, the pathological features of tumors (in micro scale) can be identified during resection surgery. However, the accuracy of tumor margin prediction still needs to be enhanced for assisting the judgment of surgeons. In this regard, we present a two-dimensional computational method for advanced tissue analysis and characterization based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) and Raman spectroscopy (RS). The method combines the slope of OCT intensity signal and the Principal component (PC) of RS, and relies on the tissue optical attenuation and chemical ingredients for the classification of tissue types. Our pilot experiments were performed on mouse kidney, liver and small intestine. Results demonstrate the improvement of the tissue differentiation compared with the analysis only based on the OCT detection. This combined OCT/RS method is potentially useful as a novel optical biopsy technique for cancer detection.

  16. Modulation index optimization for optical fringe suppression in wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Bo; Du, Zhenhui; Li, Jinyi

    2015-11-01

    Optical fringes constitute one of the major obstacles in the gas detection based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). In order to suppress optical fringes, a convenient method of modulation index optimization was presented, using the signal-fringe ratio as a criterion. In addition to suppressing optical fringes, the optimized modulation index enables the detection of gas absorption. This method was demonstrated in a WMS based oxygen sensor. By comparing the sensor performances with and without the use of the optimized modulation index, we showed that the optical fringes are reduced by using the optimized modulation index; furthermore, the system stability and detection limit are improved. More specifically, the long-term fluctuation of the sensor measurement is dramatically reduced by a factor of 8, and a detection limit of as low as 120 ppm (with effective optical path length of 32 cm and integral time of 2.6 s), characterized by the Allan variance, was derived. This method can be applied in other existing WMS systems without the need for additional devices or complex algorithms and has the potential to be used in both laboratory and industrial settings.

  17. Field enhancement at silicon surfaces by gold ellipsoids probed by optical second-harmonic generation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulriksen, Hans Ulrik; Pedersen, Kjeld

    2016-12-01

    Optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) spectroscopy has been used to determine the field enhancements from Au nanoparticles on a silicon substrate. Au particles with diameters from 30 to 250 nm have been deposited on a Si substrate passivated by a 1 nm thick surface oxide. The linear optical spectra are dominated by a horizontal plasmon resonance near 1.0 eV, and the experimental spectra are modelled by the island film model in order to extract the linear properties of the metal particles. SHG spectroscopy from this system shows resonances from the metal particles and from the silicon/oxide substrate. By following the evolution of these Si resonances with the size of the Au particles, the field enhancement in the Si surface has been modelled. The effect of the Au particles on SHG at the Si E1 resonance is a combination of charge transfer through the thin oxide that changes the space charge region and an enhancement of the optical field in a thin surface layer of the Si substrate.

  18. High-throughput optical imaging and spectroscopy of individual carbon nanotubes in devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kaihui; Hong, Xiaoping; Zhou, Qin; Jin, Chenhao; Li, Jinghua; Zhou, Weiwei; Liu, Jie; Wang, Enge; Zettl, Alex; Wang, Feng

    2013-12-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes are uniquely identified by a pair of chirality indices (n,m), which dictate the physical structures and electronic properties of each species. Carbon nanotube research is currently facing two outstanding challenges: achieving chirality-controlled growth and understanding chirality-dependent device physics. Addressing these challenges requires, respectively, high-throughput determination of the nanotube chirality distribution on growth substrates and in situ characterization of the nanotube electronic structure in operating devices. Direct optical imaging and spectroscopy techniques are well suited for both goals, but their implementation at the single nanotube level has remained a challenge due to the small nanotube signal and unavoidable environment background. Here, we report high-throughput real-time optical imaging and broadband in situ spectroscopy of individual carbon nanotubes on various substrates and in field-effect transistor devices using polarization-based microscopy combined with supercontinuum laser illumination. Our technique enables the complete chirality profiling of hundreds of individual carbon nanotubes, both semiconducting and metallic, on a growth substrate. In devices, we observe that high-order nanotube optical resonances are dramatically broadened by electrostatic doping, an unexpected behaviour that points to strong interband electron-electron scattering processes that could dominate ultrafast dynamics of excited states in carbon nanotubes.

  19. Development of micro-optics for high-resolution IL spectroscopy with a proton microbeam probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kada, Wataru, E-mail: kada.wataru@gunma-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-machi, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Satoh, Takahiro; Yokoyama, Akihito; Koka, Masashi; Kamiya, Tomihiro [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-01-01

    Confocal optics for ion luminescence (IL) was developed for the precise analysis of the chemical composition of microscopic targets with an external proton microbeam probe. Anti-reflection-coated confocal micro-lens optics with an effective focus area of approximately 800 × 800 μm was installed on the microbeam line of a single-ended accelerator. Chromatic aberrations of the confocal optics were examined at wavelengths of 300–900 nm. An electrically-cooled back-thinned charge coupled device spectrometer with a wavelength resolution of 0.5 nm was used for the microscopic spectroscopy and IL imaging of microscopic mineral targets. Simultaneous microscopic IL and micro-PIXE analysis were performed using an external 3 MeV H{sup +} microbeam with a current of less than 100 pA. A spectral resolution of 3 nm was achieved for a single IL peak which corresponded to Cr{sup 3+} impurities in a single-crystal of aluminum oxide. The use of IL spectroscopy and imaging for aerosol targets revealed microscopic distributions of the chemical and elemental composition in the atmosphere.

  20. Investigations of the cathode region of an argon arc plasma by degenerate four-wave mixing laser spectroscopy and optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzierzega, K [Marian Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Reymonta 4, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Pokrzywka, B [Mt. Suhora Observatory, Cracow Pedagogical University, ul. Podchorazych 2, 30-083 Cracow (Poland); Pellerin, S [LASEP, Universite d' Orleans-Centre Universitaire de Bourges, Rue Gaston Berger BP 4043, 18028 Bourges (France)

    2004-07-07

    Degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) laser spectroscopy was used in local studies of atmospheric pressure argon plasma generated in a free-burning arc. The results of plasma diagnostics using the DFWM method were compared to the results obtained with optical emission measurements. In the cathode region of the arc the maxima of both the DFWM signal and the emission coefficient for the 696.5 nm Ar I line depend on the distance from the cathode tip. This effect proves the departure of the plasma state from local thermal equilibrium (LTE) as it has been reported by many authors. On the other hand the Stark shifts of the 696.5 nm Ar I line determined by the DFWM method in relation to plasma diagnostic results show no deviations from LTE on the arc axis down to 1.0 mm from the cathode tip.

  1. Extending differential optical absorption spectroscopy for limb measurements in the UV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Puķīte

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Methods of UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy to determine the constituents in the Earth's atmosphere from measurements of scattered light are often based on the Beer-Lambert law, like e.g. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS. Therefore they are strictly valid for weak absorptions and narrow wavelength intervals (strictly only for monochromatic radiation. For medium and strong absorption (e.g. along very long light-paths like in limb geometry the relation between the optical depth and the concentration of an absorber is not linear anymore. As well, for large wavelength intervals the wavelength dependent differences in the travelled light-paths become important, especially in the UV, where the probability for scattering increases strongly with decreasing wavelength.

    However, by taking into account these dependencies, the applicability of the DOAS method can be extended also to cases with medium to strong absorptions and for broader wavelength intervals.

    Common approaches for this correction are the so called air mass factor modified (or extended DOAS and the weighting function modified DOAS. These approaches take into account the wavelength dependency of the slant column densities (SCDs, but also require a-priori knowledge for the air mass factor or the weighting function calculation by radiative transfer modelling.

    We describe an approach that considers the fitting results obtained from DOAS, the SCDs, as a function of wavelength and vertical optical depth and expands this function into a Taylor series of both quantities. The Taylor coefficients are then applied as additional fitting parameters in the DOAS analysis. Thus the variability of the SCD in the fit window is determined by the retrieval itself.

    This new approach gives a description of the SCD that is as close to reality as desired (depending on the order of the Taylor expansion, and is independent from any assumptions or a-priori knowledge

  2. Study of clusters using negative ion photodetachment spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuexing

    1995-12-01

    The weak van der Waals interaction between an open-shell halogen atom and a closed-shell atom or molecule has been investigated using zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy. This technique is also applied to study the low-lying electronic states in GaAs and GaAs{sup {minus}}. In addition, the spectroscopy and electron detachment dynamics of several small carbon cluster anions are studied using resonant multiphoton detachment spectroscopy.

  3. Study of clusters using negative ion photodetachment spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuexing [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The weak van der Waals interaction between an open-shell halogen atom and a closed-shell atom or molecule has been investigated using zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy. This technique is also applied to study the low-lying electronic states in GaAs and GaAs-. In addition, the spectroscopy and electron detachment dynamics of several small carbon cluster anions are studied using resonant multiphoton detachment spectroscopy.

  4. Development and Optical Testing of the Camera, Hand Lens, and Microscope Probe with Scannable Laser Spectroscopy (CHAMP-SLS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Greg S.; Gursel, Yekta; Sepulveda, Cesar A.; Anderson, Mark; La Baw, Clayton; Johnson, Kenneth R.; Deans, Matthew; Beegle, Luther; Boynton, John

    2008-01-01

    Conducting high resolution field microscopy with coupled laser spectroscopy that can be used to selectively analyze the surface chemistry of individual pixels in a scene is an enabling capability for next generation robotic and manned spaceflight missions, civil, and military applications. In the laboratory, we use a range of imaging and surface preparation tools that provide us with in-focus images, context imaging for identifying features that we want to investigate at high magnification, and surface-optical coupling that allows us to apply optical spectroscopic analysis techniques for analyzing surface chemistry particularly at high magnifications. The camera, hand lens, and microscope probe with scannable laser spectroscopy (CHAMP-SLS) is an imaging/spectroscopy instrument capable of imaging continuously from infinity down to high resolution microscopy (resolution of approx. 1 micron/pixel in a final camera format), the closer CHAMP-SLS is placed to a feature, the higher the resultant magnification. At hand lens to microscopic magnifications, the imaged scene can be selectively interrogated with point spectroscopic techniques such as Raman spectroscopy, microscopic Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (micro-LIBS), laser ablation mass-spectrometry, Fluorescence spectroscopy, and/or Reflectance spectroscopy. This paper summarizes the optical design, development, and testing of the CHAMP-SLS optics.

  5. Development and Optical Testing of the Camera, Hand Lens, and Microscope Probe with Scannable Laser Spectroscopy (CHAMP-SLS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Greg S.; Gursel, Yekta; Sepulveda, Cesar A.; Anderson, Mark; La Baw, Clayton; Johnson, Kenneth R.; Deans, Matthew; Beegle, Luther; Boynton, John

    2008-01-01

    Conducting high resolution field microscopy with coupled laser spectroscopy that can be used to selectively analyze the surface chemistry of individual pixels in a scene is an enabling capability for next generation robotic and manned spaceflight missions, civil, and military applications. In the laboratory, we use a range of imaging and surface preparation tools that provide us with in-focus images, context imaging for identifying features that we want to investigate at high magnification, and surface-optical coupling that allows us to apply optical spectroscopic analysis techniques for analyzing surface chemistry particularly at high magnifications. The camera, hand lens, and microscope probe with scannable laser spectroscopy (CHAMP-SLS) is an imaging/spectroscopy instrument capable of imaging continuously from infinity down to high resolution microscopy (resolution of approx. 1 micron/pixel in a final camera format), the closer CHAMP-SLS is placed to a feature, the higher the resultant magnification. At hand lens to microscopic magnifications, the imaged scene can be selectively interrogated with point spectroscopic techniques such as Raman spectroscopy, microscopic Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (micro-LIBS), laser ablation mass-spectrometry, Fluorescence spectroscopy, and/or Reflectance spectroscopy. This paper summarizes the optical design, development, and testing of the CHAMP-SLS optics.

  6. Isotopic hydrogen analysis via conventional and surface-enhanced fiber optic Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LASCOLA, ROBERT

    2004-09-23

    This report describes laboratory development and process plant applications of Raman spectroscopy for detection of hydrogen isotopes in the Tritium Facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a U.S. Department of Energy complex. Raman spectroscopy provides a lower-cost, in situ alternative to mass spectrometry techniques currently employed at SRS. Using conventional Raman and fiber optics, we have measured, in the production facility glove boxes, process mixtures of protium and deuterium at various compositions and total pressures ranging from 1000-4000 torr, with detection limits ranging from 1-2 percent for as low as 3-second integration times. We are currently investigating fabrication techniques for SERS surfaces in order to measure trace (0.01-0.1 percent) amounts of one isotope in the presence of the other. These efforts have concentrated on surfaces containing palladium, which promotes hydrogen dissociation and forms metal hydride bonds, essentially providing a chemical enhancement mechanism.

  7. Dynamics of double-pulse laser produced titanium plasma inferred from thin film morphology and optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krstulović, N., E-mail: niksak@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, Bijenička 46, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Salamon, K., E-mail: ksalamon@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, Bijenička 46, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Modic, M., E-mail: martina.modic@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Bišćan, M., E-mail: mbiscan@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, Bijenička 46, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Milat, O., E-mail: milat@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, Bijenička 46, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Milošević, S., E-mail: slobodan@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, Bijenička 46, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, dynamics of double-pulse laser produced titanium plasma was studied both directly using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and indirectly from morphological properties of deposited thin films. Both approaches yield consistent results. Ablated material was deposited in a form of thin film on the Si substrate. During deposition, plasma dynamics was monitored using optical emission spectroscopy with spatial and temporal resolutions. The influence of ablation mode (single and double) and delay time τ (delay between first and second pulses in double-pulse mode) on plasma dynamics and consequently on morphology of deposited Ti-films was studied using X-ray reflectivity and atomic force microscopy. Delay time τ was varied from 170 ns to 4 μs. The results show strong dependence of both emission signal and Ti-film properties, such as thickness, density and roughness, on τ. In addition, correlation of average density and thickness of film is observed. These results are discussed in terms of dependency of angular distribution and kinetic energy of plasma plume particles on τ. Advantages of using double-pulse laser deposition for possible application in thin film production are shown. - Highlights: • Ti-thin films produced by single and double pulse laser ablation mode. • Ablation mode and delay time influenced plasma plume and film characteristics. • Films are most compact for optimized delay time (thinnest, smoothest and most dense). • Plasma dynamics can be inferred from film characteristics.

  8. $K$-band integral field spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy of massive young stellar objects in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, J L; van Loon, J Th; Sewiło, M

    2016-01-01

    We present $K$-band integral field spectroscopic observations towards 17 massive young stellar objects (YSOs) in the low metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and two YSO candidates in the compact H ii regions N81 and N88 A (also in the SMC). These sources, originally identified using $Spitzer$ photometry and/or spectroscopy, have been resolved into 29 $K$-band continuum sources. By comparing Br$\\gamma$ emission luminosities with those presented for a Galactic sample of massive YSOs, we find tentative evidence for increased accretion rates in the SMC. Around half of our targets exhibit emission line (Br$\\gamma$, He i and H$_2$) morphologies which extend significantly beyond the continuum source and we have mapped both the emission morphologies and the radial velocity fields. This analysis also reveals evidence for the existence of ionized low density regions in the centre outflows from massive YSOs. Additionally we present an analysis of optical spectra towards a similar sample of massive YSOs in the SMC, ...

  9. Transformation optics: a time- and frequency-domain analysis of electron-energy loss spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kraft, Matthias; Pendry, J B

    2016-01-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and Cathodoluminescence (CL) play a pivotal role in many of the cutting edge experiments in plasmonics. EELS and CL experiments are usually supported by numerical simulations, which, whilst accurate, may not provide as much physical insight as analytical calculations do. Fully analytical solutions to EELS and CL systems in plasmonics are rare and difficult to obtain. This paper aims to narrow this gap by introducing a new method based on Transformation optics that allows to calculate the quasi-static frequency and time-domain response of plasmonic particles under electron beam excitation.

  10. Optical feedback in dfb quantum cascade laser for mid-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terabayashi, Ryohei, E-mail: terabayashi.ryouhei@h.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Sonnenschein, Volker, E-mail: volker@nagoya-u.jp; Tomita, Hideki, E-mail: tomita@nagoya-u.jp; Hayashi, Noriyoshi, E-mail: hayashi.noriyoshi@h.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Kato, Shusuke, E-mail: katou.shuusuke@f.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Jin, Lei, E-mail: kin@nuee.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Yamanaka, Masahito, E-mail: yamanaka@nuee.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Nishizawa, Norihiko, E-mail: nishizawa@nuee.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Nagoya University, Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering (Japan); Sato, Atsushi, E-mail: atsushi.sato@sekisui.com; Nozawa, Kohei, E-mail: kohei.nozawa@sekisui.com; Hashizume, Kenta, E-mail: kenta.hashizume@sekisui.com; Oh-hara, Toshinari, E-mail: toshinari.ohara@sekisui.com [Sekisui Medical Co., Ltd., Drug Development Solutions Center (Japan); Iguchi, Tetsuo, E-mail: t-iguchi@nucl.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Nagoya University, Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering (Japan)

    2017-11-15

    A simple external optical feedback system has been applied to a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB QCL) for cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and a clear effect of feedback was observed. A long external feedback path length of up to 4m can decrease the QCL linewidth to around 50kHz, which is of the order of the transmission linewidth of our high finesse ring-down cavity. The power spectral density of the transmission signal from high finesse cavity reveals that the noise at frequencies above 20kHz is reduced dramatically.

  11. Real time assessment of RF cardiac tissue ablation with optical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, S G; Sharareh, S

    2008-03-20

    An optical spectroscopy approach is demonstrated allowing for critical parameters during RF ablation of cardiac tissue to be evaluated in real time. The method is based on incorporating in a typical ablation catheter transmitting and receiving fibers that terminate at the tip of the catheter. By analyzing the spectral characteristics of the NIR diffusely reflected light, information is obtained on such parameters as, catheter-tissue proximity, lesion formation, depth of penetration of the lesion, formation of char during the ablation, formation of coagulum around the ablation site, differentiation of ablated from healthy tissue, and recognition of micro-bubble formation in the tissue.

  12. Optical-fiber-based laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for detection of early caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system targeting for the in vivo analysis of tooth enamel is described. The system is planned to enable real-time analysis of teeth during laser dental treatment by utilizing a hollow optical fiber that transmits both Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light for LIBS and infrared Er:YAG laser light for tooth ablation. The sensitivity of caries detection was substantially improved by expanding the spectral region under analysis to ultraviolet (UV) light and by focusing on emission peaks of Zn in the UV region. Subsequently, early caries were distinguished from healthy teeth with accuracy rates above 80% in vitro.

  13. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy Diagnostic of Laser-Induced Optical Breakdown

    OpenAIRE

    Parigger, Christian G.; Hornkohl, James O.; László Nemes

    2010-01-01

    Transient laser plasma is generated in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB). Here we report experiments conducted with 10.6-micron CO2 laser radiation, and with 1.064-micron fundamental, 0.532-micron frequency-doubled, 0.355-micron frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser radiation. Characterization of laser induced plasma utilizes laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) techniques. Atomic hydrogen Balmer series emissions show electron number density of 1017 cm−3 measured approximately 10 μs and ...

  14. Optical-fiber-based laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for detection of early caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system targeting for the in vivo analysis of tooth enamel is described. The system is planned to enable real-time analysis of teeth during laser dental treatment by utilizing a hollow optical fiber that transmits both Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light for LIBS and infrared Er:YAG laser light for tooth ablation. The sensitivity of caries detection was substantially improved by expanding the spectral region under analysis to ultraviolet (UV) light and by focusing on emission peaks of Zn in the UV region. Subsequently, early caries were distinguished from healthy teeth with accuracy rates above 80% in vitro.

  15. Optical Emission Spectroscopy Investigation of a Surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Aerodynamic Actuator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ying-Hong; WU Yun; JIA Min; ZHOU Zhang-Wen; GUO Zhi-Gang; PU Yi-Kang

    2008-01-01

    The optical emission spectroscopy of a surface dielectric barrier discharge plasma aerodynamic actuator is investigated with different electrode configurations, applied voltages and driving frequencies. The rotational temperature of N2 (C3IIu) molecule is calculated according to its rotational emission band near 380.5 nm. The average electron energy of the discharge is evaluated by emission intensity ratio of first negative system to second positive system of N2. The rotational temperature is sensitive to the inner space of an electrode pair. The average electron energy shows insensitivity to the applied voltage, the driving frequency and the electrode configuration.

  16. Absorption spectroscopy measurements in optically dense explosive fireballs using a modeless broadband dye laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glumac, Nick

    2009-09-01

    A modeless broadband dye laser is applied to probe inside optically dense fireballs generated by high explosives using single-shot, high resolution absorption spectroscopy. Despite attenuation of the main beam by 98%, high signal-to-noise ratio absorption spectra of Al, Ti, and AlO are readily obtained at resolutions of 0.007 nm, and luminosity from the fireball is strongly rejected. Detection limits for atomic species are less than 200 ppb. The method offers good time resolution of chemistry within the fireball, and scaling laws suggest that this technique should be valid in explosives tests at least up to the gram scale.

  17. Mid-Infrared Optical Frequency Combs based on Difference Frequency Generation for Molecular Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz, Flavio C; Johnson, Todd; Ycas, Gabriel; Klose, Andrew; Giorgetta, Fabrizio R; Coddington, Ian; Diddams, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    Mid-infrared femtosecond optical frequency combs were produced by difference frequency generation of the spectral components of a near-infrared comb in a 3-mm-long MgO:PPLN crystal. We observe strong pump depletion and 9.3 dB parametric gain in the 1.5 \\mu m signal, which yields powers above 500 mW (3 \\mu W/mode) in the idler with spectra covering 2.8 \\mu m to 3.5 \\mu m. Potential for broadband, high-resolution molecular spectroscopy is demonstrated by absorption spectra and interferograms obtained by heterodyning two combs.

  18. Near-infrared spectroscopy for monitoring water permeability of optical coatings on plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, U; Kaiser, N

    1997-02-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy has been applied to determine the water content of plastic lenses. An analytical method is presented for monitoring the water permeability of thin layers on plastic optics by utilizing the reversible moisture absorption of organic polymers. As an example, scratch-resistant and antireflective layers on poly[diethylenglycol-bis(allylcarbonate)] lenses are investigated. The measurements demonstrate the relatively high water barrier of coatings deposited by plasma-ion-assisted deposition compared with classical physical vapor deposition coatings and polysiloxane dip coatings.

  19. Optical characterization of two-dimensional array of 2,048 tilting micromirrors for astronomical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canonica, Michael D; Zamkotsian, Frédéric; Lanzoni, Patrick; Noell, Wilfried; De Rooij, Nico

    2013-09-23

    A micromirror array composed of 2048 silicon micromirrors measuring 200 × 100 μm² and tilting by 25° was developed as a reconfigurable slit mask for multi-object spectroscopy (MOS) in astronomy. The fill factor, contrast, and mirror deformation at both room and cryogenic temperatures were investigated. Contrast was measured using an optical setup that mimics a MOS instrument, and mirror deformation was characterized using a Twyman-Green interferometer. The results indicate that the array exhibited a fill factor of 82%, a contrast ratio of 1000:1, and surface mirror deformations of 8 nm and 27 nm for mirrors tilted at 298 K and 162 K, respectively.

  20. Optical diagnosis of dengue virus infection in human blood serum using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, M.; Bilal, M.; Anwar, S.; Rehman, A.; Ahmed, M.

    2013-03-01

    We present the optical diagnosis of dengue virus infection in human blood serum using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra were acquired from 18 blood serum samples using a laser at 532 nm as the excitation source. A multivariate regression model based on partial least-squares regression is developed that uses Raman spectra to predict dengue infection with leave-one-sample-out cross validation. The prediction of dengue infection by our model yields correlation coefficient r2 values of 0.9998 between the predicted and reference clinical results. The model was tested for six unknown human blood sera and found to be 100% accurate in accordance with the clinical results.

  1. Detection and aggregation of the antitumoral drug parietin in ethanol/water mixture and on plasmonic metal nanoparticles studied by surface-enhanced optical spectroscopy: Effect of pH and ethanol concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Tobar, Eduardo; Verebova, Valeria; Blascakova, Ludmila; Jancura, Daniel; Fabriciova, Gabriela; Sanchez-Cortes, Santiago

    2016-04-15

    In the present paper, we have investigated the effect of ethanol in aqueous media, the pH and the presence of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) on the aggregation processes of the antitumoral anthraquinone parietin in aqueous media and on the metal surface. UV-visible absorption, fluorescence and Raman spectra of parietin were used for such purpose. The present study provides information about the deprotonation and molecular aggregation processes occurring in parietin under different environments: ethanol/water mixture and when adsorbed onto Ag nanoparticles. The effect of ethanol on the optical properties of parietin in alcohol-water mixtures was also investigated at different ethanol concentrations with the time. For the case of the adsorption and organization of parietin molecules on the surface of Ag NPs, special attention was paid to the use of surface-enhanced optical techniques, SEF (surface-enhanced fluorescence) and SERS (surface-enhanced Raman scattering), for the characterization of the parietin aggregates and the ionization of the molecule on the surface. In particular, we have studied the variation of the SEF signal with the pH, which depends on the molecular organization of the molecule on the surface. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of the SERS spectra at different pH was accomplished and the main Raman bands of the protonated, mono-deprotonated and di-deprotonated parietin were identified. Finally, the second ionization pK of parietin on metal NPs was deduced from the SERS spectra. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Combining elastic and resonant inelastic optical spectroscopies for multiscale probing of embedded nanoparticle architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farcau, Cosmin; Bonafos, Caroline; Benzo, Patrizio; Benassayag, Gerard; Carles, Robert

    2010-11-01

    Composite materials consisting of metal nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a dielectric matrix have a great potential for photonic and plasmonic applications. A set of expensive, time-consuming, and destructive methods (like electron microscopy, electron energy loss, or secondary ion mass spectroscopy) are extensively being used for the structural characterization of such buried NP assemblies. Here, we show the power of combining complementary, noninvasive optical techniques to characterize planar arrays of Ag NPs embedded in a silica film. We use UV-Vis optical reflectivity and resonant Brillouin-Raman scattering, sustained by simulations, to show the sensitivity of these methods to the presence, density, size distribution, and spatial localization of NPs. The accuracy of the results is validated by transmission electron microscopy investigations. Finally the method is applied to obtain images of embedded plasmonic structures from reflectivity and Raman scanning microscopy.

  3. Note: A simple broad bandwidth undersampling frequency-domain digital diffuse optical spectroscopy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Justin; Istfan, Raeef; Roblyer, Darren

    2014-07-01

    Near-Infrared frequency-domain technologies, such as Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy (DOS), have demonstrated growing potential in a number of clinical applications. The broader dissemination of this technology is limited by the complexity and cost of instrumentation. We present here a simple system constructed with off-the-shelf components that utilizes undersampling for digital frequency-domain dDOS measurements. Broadband RF sweeps (50-300 MHz) were digitally sampled at 25 MSPS; amplitude, phase, and optical property extractions were within 5% of network analyzer derived values. The use of undersampling for broad bandwidth dDOS provides a significant reduction in complexity, power consumption, and cost compared with high-speed ADCs and analog techniques.

  4. Noninvasive assessment of breast cancer risk using time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taroni, Paola; Pifferi, Antonio; Quarto, Giovanna; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Torricelli, Alessandro; Abbate, Francesca; Villa, Anna; Balestreri, Nicola; Menna, Simona; Cassano, Enrico; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2010-11-01

    Breast density is a recognized strong and independent risk factor for breast cancer. We propose the use of time-resolved transmittance spectroscopy to estimate breast tissue density and potentially provide even more direct information on breast cancer risk. Time-resolved optical mammography at seven wavelengths (635 to 1060 nm) is performed on 49 subjects. Average information on breast tissue of each subject is obtained on oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin, water, lipids, and collagen content, as well as scattering amplitude and power. All parameters, except for blood volume and oxygenation, correlate with mammographic breast density, even if not to the same extent. A synthetic optical index proves to be quite effective in separating different breast density categories. Finally, the estimate of collagen content as a more direct means for the assessment of breast cancer risk is discussed.

  5. Photonic crystal waveguides intersection for resonant quantum dot optical spectroscopy detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaohong; Declair, Stefan; Meier, Torsten; Zrenner, Artur; Förstner, Jens

    2012-06-18

    Using a finite-difference time-domain method, we theoretically investigate the optical spectra of crossing perpendicular photonic crystal waveguides with quantum dots embedded in the central rod. The waveguides are designed so that the light mainly propagates along one direction and the cross talk is greatly reduced in the transverse direction. It is shown that when a quantum dot (QD) is resonant with the cavity, strong coupling can be observed via both the transmission and crosstalk spectrum. If the cavity is far off-resonant from the QD, both the cavity mode and the QD signal can be detected in the transverse direction since the laser field is greatly suppressed in this direction. This structure could have strong implications for resonant excitation and in-plane detection of QD optical spectroscopy.

  6. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 2. Molecules and photons - Spectroscopy and collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    This is the second volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 2 introduces lasers and quantum optics, while the main focus is on the structure of molecules and their spectroscopy, as well as on collision physics as the continuum counterpart to bound molecular states. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  7. Intrinsic carrier multiplication efficiency in bulk Si crystals evaluated by optical-pump/terahertz-probe spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, G.; Nagai, M., E-mail: mnagai@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: ashida@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp; Ashida, M., E-mail: mnagai@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: ashida@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Matsubara, E. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Department of Physics, Osaka Dental University, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1121 (Japan); Kanemitsu, Y. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2014-12-08

    We estimated the carrier multiplication efficiency in the most common solar-cell material, Si, by using optical-pump/terahertz-probe spectroscopy. Through close analysis of time-resolved data, we extracted the exact number of photoexcited carriers from the sheet carrier density 10 ps after photoexcitation, excluding the influences of spatial diffusion and surface recombination in the time domain. For incident photon energies greater than 4.0 eV, we observed enhanced internal quantum efficiency due to carrier multiplication. The evaluated value of internal quantum efficiency agrees well with the results of photocurrent measurements. This optical method allows us to estimate the carrier multiplication and surface recombination of carriers quantitatively, which are crucial for the design of the solar cells.

  8. Unfolding features of bovine testicular hyaluronidase studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Nina; Cai, Xiaoqiang; Tang, Kai; Zou, Guolin

    2005-11-01

    Chemical unfolding of bovine testicular hyaluronidase (HAase) has been studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Thermodynamic parameters were determined for unfolding HAase from changes in the intrinsic fluorescence emission intensity and the formations of several possible unfolding intermediates have been identified. This was further confirmed by representation of fluorescence data in terms of 'phase diagram'. The secondary structures of HAase have been assigned and semiquantitatively estimated from the FTIR. The occurrence of conformational change during chemical unfolding as judged by fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy indicated that the unfolding of HAase may not follow the typical two-state model.

  9. High-Resolution Two-Dimensional Optical Spectroscopy of Electron Spins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Salewski

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Multidimensional coherent optical spectroscopy is one of the most powerful tools for investigating complex quantum mechanical systems. While it was conceived decades ago in magnetic resonance spectroscopy using microwaves and radio waves, it has recently been extended into the visible and UV spectral range. However, resolving MHz energy splittings with ultrashort laser pulses still remains a challenge. Here, we analyze two-dimensional Fourier spectra for resonant optical excitation of resident electrons to localized trions or donor-bound excitons in semiconductor nanostructures subject to a transverse magnetic field. Particular attention is devoted to Raman coherence spectra, which allow one to accurately evaluate tiny splittings of the electron ground state and to determine the relaxation times in the electron spin ensemble. A stimulated steplike Raman process induced by a sequence of two laser pulses creates a coherent superposition of the ground-state doublet which can be retrieved only optically because of selective excitation of the same subensemble with a third pulse. This provides the unique opportunity to distinguish between different complexes that are closely spaced in energy in an ensemble. The related experimental demonstration is based on photon-echo measurements in an n-type CdTe/(Cd,MgTe quantum-well structure detected by a heterodyne technique. The difference in the sub-μeV range between the Zeeman splittings of donor-bound electrons and electrons localized at potential fluctuations can be resolved even though the homogeneous linewidth of the optical transitions is larger by 2 orders of magnitude.

  10. Optical frequency comb spectroscopy at 3-5.4 {\\mu}m with a doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Khodabakhsh, Amir; Rutkowski, Lucile; Johansson, Alexandra C; Lee, Kevin F; Jiang, Jie; Mohr, Christian; Fermann, Martin E; Foltynowicz, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    We present a versatile mid-infrared frequency comb spectroscopy system based on a doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator tunable in the 3-5.4 {\\mu}m range and two detection methods, a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) and a Vernier spectrometer. Using the FTS with a multipass cell we measure high-precision broadband absorption spectra of CH$_4$ and NO at ~3.3 {\\mu}m and ~5.2 {\\mu}m, respectively, and of atmospheric species (CH$_4$, CO, CO$_2$ and H$_2$O) in air in the signal and idler wavelength range. The figure of merit of the system is on the order of 10$^{-8}$ cm$^{-1}$ Hz$^{-1/2}$ per spectral element, and multiline fitting yields minimum detectable concentrations of 10-20 ppb Hz$^{-1/2}$ for CH$_4$, NO and CO. For the first time in the mid-infrared, we perform continuous-filtering Vernier spectroscopy using a low finesse enhancement cavity, a grating and a single detector, and measure the absorption spectrum of CH$_4$ and H$_2$O in ambient air at ~3.3 {\\mu}m.

  11. Tunable plasmonic nanostructures: From fundamental nanoscale optics to surface-enhanced spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui

    In this thesis, I demonstrate the rational design and controllable fabrication of a series of novel plasmonic nanostructures with judiciously tailored optical properties including perfect nanoshells, roughened subwavelength particles, prolate nanoshells known as nanorice, and non-concentric nanoshells known as nanoeggs. All of these nanostructures are very important subwavelength nanoscale optical components that can be utilized to manipulate light in unique ways. The most striking feature of these nanoparticles is their geometrically tunable plasmon resonances, which can be harnessed for widespread applications. I have also utilized these nanostructures as the building blocks to construct self-assembled multinanoparticle systems, such as nanoshell heterodimers, nanosphere arrays and nanoshell arrays. I have further developed multifunctional molecular sensing platforms using these nanoengineered plasmonic structures as substrates for surface-enhanced spectroscopies, realizing integrated analytical chemistry lab-on-a-chip. Applying the Plasmon Hybridization model as design principles to experimentally realizable nanostructures results in a thorough understanding of the origin of the geometry-dependent optical properties observed in these nanosystems. Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method also provides a powerful platform for the numerical simulation of local- and far-field optical properties of these nanostructures.

  12. Synthetic diagnostic for the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic using a full optical integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausammann, L.; Churchill, R. M.; Shi, L.

    2017-02-01

    The beam emission spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic is used to measure fluctuations of electron density in the edge and core of fusion plasmas, and is a key in understanding turbulence in a plasma reactor. A synthetic BES diagnostic for the turbulence simulation code XGC1 has been developed using a realistic neutral beam model and an optical system easily adaptable to different kinds of tokamaks. The beam is modeled using multiple beam energy components, each one with a fraction of the total energy and their own mass and energy (mono-energetic components). The optical system consists of a lens focusing a bundle of optical fibers and resulting in a 2D measurement. The synthetic diagnostic gives similar correlation functions and behaviour of the turbulences than the usual methods that do not take into account the full 3D optical effects. The results, based on a simulation of XGC1, contain an analysis of the correlation (in space and time), a comparison of different approximations possible and their importance in accurately modeling the BES diagnostic.

  13. The Sedentary Survey of Extreme High Energy Peaked BL Lacs III. Results from Optical Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Piranomonte, S; Giommi, P; Landt, H; Padovani, P

    2007-01-01

    The multi-frequency Sedentary Survey is a flux limited, statistically well-defined sample of highly X-ray dominated BL Lacertae objects (HBLs) which includes 150 sources. In this paper, the third of the series, we report the results of a dedicated optical spectroscopy campaign that, together with results from other independent optical follow up programs, led to the spectroscopic identification of all sources in the sample. We carried out a systematic spectroscopic campaign for the observation of all unidentified objects of the sample using the ESO 3.6m, the KPNO 4m, and the TNG optical telescopes. We present new identifications and optical spectra for 76 sources, 50 of which are new BL Lac objects, 18 are sources previously referred as BL Lacs but for which no redshift information was available, and 8 are broad emission lines AGNs. We find that the multi-frequency selection technique used to build the survey is highly efficient (about 90%) in selecting BL Lacs objects. We present positional and spectroscopic ...

  14. Clinical research device for ovarian cancer detection by optical spectroscopy in the ultraviolet C-visible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Ronie; Chandrasekaran, Archana; Brewer, Molly A; Hatch, Kenneth D; Utzinger, Urs

    2010-01-01

    Early detection of ovarian cancer could greatly increase the likelihood of successful treatment. However, present detection techniques are not very effective, and symptoms are more commonly seen in later stage disease. Amino acids, structural proteins, and enzymatic cofactors have endogenous optical properties influenced by precancerous changes and tumor growth. We present the technical details of an optical spectroscopy system used to quantify these properties. A fiber optic probe excites the surface epithelium (origin of 90% of cases) over 270 to 580 nm and collects fluorescence and reflectance at 300 to 800 nm with four or greater orders of magnitude instrument to background suppression. Up to four sites per ovary are investigated on patients giving consent to oophorectomy and the system's in vivo optical evaluation. Data acquisition is completed within 20 s per site. We illustrate design, selection, and development of the components used in the system. Concerns relating to clinical use, performance, calibration, and quality control are addressed. In the future, spectroscopic data will be compared with histological biopsies from the corresponding tissue sites. If proven effective, this technique can be useful in screening women at high risk of developing ovarian cancer to determine whether oophorectomy is necessary.

  15. A guiding light: spectroscopy on digital microfluidic devices using in-plane optical fibre waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kihwan; Mudrik, Jared M; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel method for in-plane digital microfluidic spectroscopy. In this technique, a custom manifold (.stl file available online as ESM) aligns optical fibres with a digital microfluidic device, allowing optical measurements to be made in the plane of the device. Because of the greater width vs thickness of a droplet on-device, the in-plane alignment of this technique allows it to outperform the sensitivity of vertical absorbance measurements on digital microfluidic (DMF) devices by ∼14×. The new system also has greater calibration sensitivity for thymol blue measurements than the popular NanoDrop system by ∼2.5×. The improvements in absorbance sensitivity result from increased path length, as well as from additional effects likely caused by liquid lensing, in which the presence of a water droplet between optical fibres increases fibre-to-fibre transmission of light by ∼2× through refraction and internal reflection. For interrogation of dilute samples, stretching of droplets using digital microfluidic electrodes and adjustment of fibre-to-fibre gap width allows absorbance path length to be changed on-demand. We anticipate this new digital microfluidic optical fibre absorbance and fluorescence measurement system will be useful for a wide variety of analytical applications involving microvolume samples with digital microfluidics.

  16. Fluorescence spectroscopy incorporated in an Optical Biopsy System for the detection of early neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerwinkel, D F; Holz, J A; Hawkins, D M; Curvers, W L; Aalders, M C; Weusten, B L; Visser, M; Meijer, S L; Bergman, J J

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic surveillance is recommended for patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) to detect high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGIN) or early cancer (EC). Early neoplasia is difficult to detect with white light endoscopy and random biopsies are associated with sampling error. Fluorescence spectroscopy has been studied to distinguish non-dysplastic Barrett's epithelium (NDBE) from early neoplasia. The Optical Biopsy System (OBS) uses an optical fiber integrated in a regular biopsy forceps. This allows real-time spectroscopy and ensures spot-on correlation between the spectral signature and corresponding physical biopsy. The OBS may provide an easy-to-use endoscopic tool during BE surveillance. We aimed to develop a tissue-differentiating algorithm and correlate the discriminating properties of the OBS with the constructed algorithm to the endoscopist's assessment of the Barrett's esophagus. In BE patients undergoing endoscopy, areas suspicious for neoplasia and endoscopically non-suspicious areas were investigated with the OBS, followed by a correlating physical biopsy with the optical biopsy forceps. Spectra were correlated to histology and an algorithm was constructed to discriminate between HGIN/EC and NDBE using smoothed linear dicriminant analysis. The constructed classifier was internally cross-validated and correlated to the endoscopist's assessment of the BE segment. A total of 47 patients were included (39 males, age 66 years): 35 BE patients were referred with early neoplasia and 12 patients with NDBE. A total of 245 areas were investigated with following histology: 43 HGIN/EC, 66 low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, 108 NDBE, 28 gastric or squamous mucosa. Areas with low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and gastric/squamous mucosa were excluded. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the constructed classifier was 0.78. Sensitivity and specificity for the discrimination between NDBE and HGIN/EC of OBS alone were 81% and 58

  17. Measurement of axial neutral density profiles in a microwave discharge ion thruster by laser absorption spectroscopy with optical fiber probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukizaki, Ryudo; Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Kazutaka; Kuninaka, Hitoshi

    2011-12-01

    In order to reveal the physical processes taking place within the "μ10" microwave discharge ion thruster, internal plasma diagnosis is indispensable. However, the ability of metallic probes to access microwave plasmas biased at a high voltage is limited from the standpoints of the disturbance created in the electric field and electrical isolation. In this study, the axial density profiles of excited neutral xenon were successfully measured under ion beam acceleration by using a novel laser absorption spectroscopy system. The target of the measurement was metastable Xe I 5p(5)((2)P(0) (3/2))6s[3/2](0) (2) which absorbed a wavelength of 823.16 nm. Signals from laser absorption spectroscopy that swept a single-mode optical fiber probe along the line of sight were differentiated and converted into axial number densities of the metastable neutral particles in the plasma source. These measurements revealed a 10(18) m(-3) order of metastable neutral particles situated in the waveguide, which caused two different modes during the operation of the μ10 thruster. This paper reports a novel spectroscopic measurement system with axial resolution for microwave plasma sources utilizing optical fiber probes.

  18. Absorption spectroscopy of single red blood cells in the presence of mechanical deformations induced by optical traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojdyla, Michal; Raj, Saurabh; Petrov, Dmitri

    2012-09-01

    The electronic properties of single human red blood cells under mechanical deformations were investigated using a combination of dual beam optical tweezers and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The mechanical deformations were induced by two near-infrared optical traps with different trapping powers and trap configurations. The deformations were applied in two ways: locally, due to the mechanical forces around the traps, and by stretching the cell by moving the traps in opposite directions. In the presence of local deformations, the single cell undergoes a transition from an oxygenated state to a partially deoxygenated state. This process was found to be reversible and strongly power-dependent. Stretching the cell caused an opposite effect, indicating that the electronic response of the whole cell is dominated by the local interaction with the trapping beams. Results are discussed considering light-induced local heating, the Stark effect, and biochemical alterations due to mechanical forces, and are compared with reports of previous Raman spectroscopy studies. The information gained by the analysis of a single red blood cell's electronic response facilitates the understanding of fundamental physiological processes and sheds further light on the cell's mechanochemistry. This information may offer new opportunities for the diagnosis and treatment of blood diseases.

  19. X-ray and optical spectroscopy of the massive young open cluster IC 1805

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauw, G.; Nazé, Y.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Very young open clusters are ideal places to study the X-ray properties of a homogeneous population of early-type stars. In this respect, the IC 1805 open cluster is very interesting as it hosts the O4 If+ star HD 15570 thought to be in an evolutionary stage intermediate between a normal O-star and a Wolf-Rayet star. Aims: Such a star could provide a test for theoretical models aiming at explaining the empirical scaling relation between the X-ray and bolometric luminosities of O-type stars. Methods: We have observed IC 1805 with XMM-Newton and further collected optical spectroscopy of some of the O-star members of the cluster. Results: The optical spectra allow us to revisit the orbital solutions of BD+60° 497 and HD 15558, and provide the first evidence of binarity for BD+60° 498. X-ray emission from colliding winds does not appear to play an important role among the O-stars of IC 1805. Notably, the X-ray fluxes do not vary significantly between archival X-ray observations and our XMM-Newton pointing. The very fast rotator BD+60° 513, and to a lesser extent the O4 If+ star HD 15570 appear somewhat underluminous. Whilst the underluminosity of HD 15570 is only marginally significant, its amplitude is found to be compatible with theoretical expectations based on its stellar and wind properties. A number of other X-ray sources are detected in the field, and the brightest objects, many of which are likely low-mass pre-main sequence stars, are analyzed in detail. Based on observations collected with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA member states and the USA (NASA), and with the TIGRE telescope (La Luz, Mexico).Table A.1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/594/A82

  20. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy study of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, N.A.; Fisher, R.F.; Asher, S.E.; Kazmerski, L.L.

    1987-07-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy is used to study hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). Core-level and plasma excitations were examined as a function of hydrogen content. This technique and its interpretation reveals a consistent picture of the electron excitations within this important material. The a-Si:H thin films were fabricated by rf sputtering. Their hydrogen concentrations ranged from 0% to 15%. Hydrogen content was determined by infrared spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and inspection of the silicon Auger-KLL peak confirmed the silicon core levels.

  1. The clusters-in-a-liquid approach for solvation: New insights from the conformer specific gas phase spectroscopy and vibrational optical activity spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjie eXu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational optical activity spectroscopies, namely vibrational circular dichroism (VCD and Raman optical activity (ROA, have been emerged in the past decade as a powerful spectroscopic tool for stereochemical information of a wide range of chiral compounds in solution directly. More recently, their applications in unveiling solvent effects, especially those associated with water solvent, have been explored. In this review article, we first select a few examples to demonstrate the unique sensitivity of VCD spectral signatures to both bulk solvent effects and explicit hydrogen-bonding interactions in solution. Second, we discuss the induced solvent chirality, or chiral transfer, VCD spectral features observed at the water bending band region in detail. From these chirality transfer spectral data, the related conformer specific gas phase spectroscopic studies of small chiral hydration clusters, and the associated matrix isolation VCD experiments of hydrogen-bonded complexes in cold rare gas matrices, a general picture of solvation in aqueous solution emerges. In such an aqueous solution, some small chiral hydration clusters, rather than the chiral solutes themselves, are the dominant species and are the ones who contribute mainly to the experimentally observed VCD features. We then review a series of VCD studies of amino acids and their derivatives in aqueous solution under different pHs to emphasize the importance of the inclusion of the bulk solvent effects. These experimental data and the associated theoretical analyses are the foundation for the proposed clusters-in-a-liquid approach to account for solvent effects effectively. We present several approaches to identify and build such representative chiral hydration clusters. Recent studies which applied molecular dynamics simulations and the subsequent snapshot averaging approach to generate the ROA, electronic CD, and optical rotatory dispersion spectra are also reviewed. Challenges associated

  2. Optical tweezers for single molecule force spectroscopy on bacterial adhesion organelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Magnus; Axner, Ove; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Fällman, Erik

    2006-08-01

    Instrumentation and methodologies for single molecule force spectroscopy on bacterial adhesion organelles by the use of force measuring optical tweezers have been developed. A thorough study of the biomechanical properties of fimbrial adhesion organelles expressed by uropathogenic E. coli, so-called pili, is presented. Steady-state as well as dynamic force measurements on P pili, expressed by E. coli causing pyelonephritis, have revealed, among other things, various unfolding and refolding properties of the helical structure of P pili, the PapA rod. Based on these properties an energy landscape model has been constructed by which specific biophysical properties of the PapA rod have been extracted, e.g. the number of subunits, the length of a single pilus, bond lengths and activation energies for bond opening and closure. Moreover, long time repetitive measurements have shown that the rod can be unfolded and refolded repetitive times without losing its intrinsic properties. These properties are believed to be of importance for the bacteria's ability to maintain close contact with host cells during initial infections. The results presented are considered to be of importance for the field of biopolymers in general and the development of new pharmaceuticals towards urinary tract infections in particular. The results show furthermore that the methodology can be used to gain knowledge of the intrinsic biomechanical function of adhesion organelles. The instrumentation is currently used for characterization of type 1 pili, expressed by E. coli causing cystitis, i.e. infections in the bladder. The first force spectrometry investigations of these pili will be presented.

  3. About the use of photoacoustic spectroscopy for the optical characterization of semiconductor thin films: CdTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin, E.; Calderon, A. [CICATA-IPN, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Vigil G, O.; Sastre, J.; Contreras P, G.; Aguilar H, J. [ESFM-IPN, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Saucedo, E.; Ruiz, C.M. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    CdTe has been used satisfactorily in multiple and diverse technological applications such as detectors of X and gamma rays that operate at room temperature, for digital imagenology of X rays with medical and industrial applications and as active part in CdTe/CdS solar cells. In form of films, CdTe is generally grown with thicknesses ranging between 3 and 15 {mu}m, for which it is difficult to measure, by means of optical techniques, absorption coefficients greater than 10{sup 3} cm{sup -1} because nearly full absorption of light should occur below 800 nm. The exact determination of the optical absorption coefficient in detectors on the basis of CdTe is very important since this parameter determines the absorption length at which 90% of the photons with energies over the forbidden zone of the CdTe will be absorbed by this. In CdS/CdTe polycrystalline solar cells the greater efficiency of conversion have been reported for film thicknesses of 10 mm, however, the optimal value of this parameter depends strongly on the method and the variables of growth. The optical absorption coefficient spectrum can be determined by several methods, often involving several approximations and the knowledge of some minority carrier related electronic parameters that reduce their application in general way. In this work we propose to determine the absorption coefficient in CdTe thin films by photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), because this technique allow us to obtain the optical absorption spectra in thicker layers and therefore the study of the influence of the several growth and post-growth processes in the optical properties of this thin films. We measure by PAS the optical-absorption coefficients of CdTe thin films in the spectral region near the fundamental absorption edge ranging from 1.0 to 2.4 eV using an open cell in the transmission configuration. The films were deposited on different substrates by the CSVT-HW (hot wall) technique. In order to study the influence of several

  4. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  5. In vivo water state measurements in breast cancer using broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, S. H.; Cerussi, A. E.; Klifa, C.; Baek, H. M.; Birgul, O.; Gulsen, G.; Merritt, S. I.; Hsiang, D.; Tromberg, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    Structural changes in water molecules are related to physiological, anatomical and pathological properties of tissues. Near infrared (NIR) optical absorption methods are sensitive to water; however, detailed characterization of water in thick tissues is difficult to achieve because subtle spectral shifts can be obscured by multiple light scattering. In the NIR, a water absorption peak is observed around 975 nm. The precise NIR peak's shape and position are highly sensitive to water molecular disposition. We introduce a bound water index (BWI) that quantifies shifts observed in tissue water absorption spectra measured by broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS). DOS quantitatively measures light absorption and scattering spectra and therefore reveals bound water spectral shifts. BWI as a water state index was validated by comparing broadband DOS to magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion-weighted MRI and conductivity in bound water tissue phantoms. Non-invasive DOS measurements of malignant and normal breast tissues performed in 18 subjects showed a significantly higher fraction of free water in malignant tissues (p breast cancer tissues inversely correlated with Nottingham-Bloom-Richardson histopathology scores. These results highlight broadband DOS sensitivity to molecular disposition of water and demonstrate the potential of BWI as a non-invasive in vivo index that correlates with tissue pathology.

  6. In vivo water state measurements in breast cancer using broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, S H; Cerussi, A E; Tromberg, B J [Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, Irvine, 1002 Health Sciences Road, Irvine 92612, CA (United States); Klifa, C [Magnetic Resonance Science Center, Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, 505 Parnassus Avenue, Box 0628, San Francisco, CA 94143-0628 (United States); Baek, H M; Birgul, O; Gulsen, G [Tu and Yuen Center for Functional Onco Imaging, Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, 108 Irvine Hall, Irvine, CA, 92697-5020 (United States); Merritt, S I [Masimo Corporation, 40 Parker, Irvine, CA 92618 (United States); Hsiang, D [Department of Surgery, Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Irvine, Healthcare, 101 The City Drive South, Orange, CA 92868 (United States)], E-mail: bjtrombe@uci.edu

    2008-12-07

    Structural changes in water molecules are related to physiological, anatomical and pathological properties of tissues. Near infrared (NIR) optical absorption methods are sensitive to water; however, detailed characterization of water in thick tissues is difficult to achieve because subtle spectral shifts can be obscured by multiple light scattering. In the NIR, a water absorption peak is observed around 975 nm. The precise NIR peak's shape and position are highly sensitive to water molecular disposition. We introduce a bound water index (BWI) that quantifies shifts observed in tissue water absorption spectra measured by broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS). DOS quantitatively measures light absorption and scattering spectra and therefore reveals bound water spectral shifts. BWI as a water state index was validated by comparing broadband DOS to magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion-weighted MRI and conductivity in bound water tissue phantoms. Non-invasive DOS measurements of malignant and normal breast tissues performed in 18 subjects showed a significantly higher fraction of free water in malignant tissues (p < 0.0001) compared to normal tissues. BWI of breast cancer tissues inversely correlated with Nottingham-Bloom-Richardson histopathology scores. These results highlight broadband DOS sensitivity to molecular disposition of water and demonstrate the potential of BWI as a non-invasive in vivo index that correlates with tissue pathology.

  7. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy to detect hepatic necrosis after normothermic ischemia: animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Renan A.; Vollet-Filho, Jose D.; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Fernandez, Jorge L.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Castro-e-Silva, Orlando; Sankarankutty, Ajith K.

    2015-06-01

    Liver transplantation is a well-established treatment for liver failure. However, the success of the transplantation procedure depends on liver graft conditions. The tissue function evaluation during the several transplantation stages is relevant, in particular during the organ harvesting, when a decision is made concerning the viability of the graft. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy is a good option because it is a noninvasive and fast technique. A partial normothermic hepatic ischemia was performed in rat livers, with a vascular occlusion of both median and left lateral lobes, allowing circulation only for the right lateral lobe and the caudate lobe. Fluorescence spectra under excitation at 532 nm (doubled frequency Nd:YAG laser) were collected using a portable spectrometer (USB2000, Ocean Optics, USA). The fluorescence emission was collected before vascular occlusion, after ischemia, and 24 hours after reperfusion. A morphometric histology analysis was performed as the gold standard evaluation - liver samples were analyzed, and the percentage of necrotic tissue was obtained. The results showed that changes in the fluorescence emission after ischemia can be correlated with the amount of necrosis evaluated by a morphometric analysis, the Pearson correlation coefficient of the generated model was 0.90 and the root mean square error was around 20%. In this context, the laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique after normothermic ischemia showed to be a fast and efficient method to differentiate ischemic injury from viable tissues.

  8. Optical and microstructural characterization of porous silicon using photoluminescence, SEM and positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, C K [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Nahid, F [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Cheng, C C [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Beling, C D [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Fung, S [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Ling, C C [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Djurisic, A B [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Pramanik, C [Department of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Saha, H [Department of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Sarkar, C K [Department of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2007-12-05

    We have studied the dependence of porous silicon morphology and porosity on fabrication conditions. N-type (100) silicon wafers with resistivity of 2-5 {omega} cm were electrochemically etched at various current densities and anodization times. Surface morphology and the thickness of the samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Detailed information of the porous silicon layer morphology with variation of preparation conditions was obtained by positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS): the depth-defect profile and open pore interconnectivity on the sample surface has been studied using a slow positron beam. Coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy (CDBS) was used to study the chemical environment of the samples. The presence of silicon micropores with diameter varying from 1.37 to 1.51 nm was determined by positron lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). Visible luminescence from the samples was observed, which is considered to be a combination effect of quantum confinement and the effect of Si = O double bond formation near the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface according to the results from photoluminescence (PL) and positron annihilation spectroscopy measurements. The work shows that the study of the positronium formed when a positron is implanted into the porous surface provides valuable information on the pore distribution and open pore interconnectivity, which suggests that positron annihilation spectroscopy is a useful tool in the porous silicon micropores' characterization.

  9. Diagnosis of colorectal cancer by near-infrared optical fiber spectroscopy and random forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Lin, Zan; Wu, Hegang; Wang, Li; Wu, Tong; Tan, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has such advantages as being noninvasive, fast, relatively inexpensive, and no risk of ionizing radiation. Differences in the NIR signals can reflect many physiological changes, which are in turn associated with such factors as vascularization, cellularity, oxygen consumption, or remodeling. NIR spectral differences between colorectal cancer and healthy tissues were investigated. A Fourier transform NIR spectroscopy instrument equipped with a fiber-optic probe was used to mimic in situ clinical measurements. A total of 186 spectra were collected and then underwent the preprocessing of standard normalize variate (SNV) for removing unwanted background variances. All the specimen and spots used for spectral collection were confirmed staining and examination by an experienced pathologist so as to ensure the representative of the pathology. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to uncover the possible clustering. Several methods including random forest (RF), partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLSDA), K-nearest neighbor and classification and regression tree (CART) were used to extract spectral features and to construct the diagnostic models. By comparison, it reveals that, even if no obvious difference of misclassified ratio (MCR) was observed between these models, RF is preferable since it is quicker, more convenient and insensitive to over-fitting. The results indicate that NIR spectroscopy coupled with RF model can serve as a potential tool for discriminating the colorectal cancer tissues from normal ones.

  10. Diagnosis of colorectal cancer by near-infrared optical fiber spectroscopy and random forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Lin, Zan; Wu, Hegang; Wang, Li; Wu, Tong; Tan, Chao

    2015-01-25

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has such advantages as being noninvasive, fast, relatively inexpensive, and no risk of ionizing radiation. Differences in the NIR signals can reflect many physiological changes, which are in turn associated with such factors as vascularization, cellularity, oxygen consumption, or remodeling. NIR spectral differences between colorectal cancer and healthy tissues were investigated. A Fourier transform NIR spectroscopy instrument equipped with a fiber-optic probe was used to mimic in situ clinical measurements. A total of 186 spectra were collected and then underwent the preprocessing of standard normalize variate (SNV) for removing unwanted background variances. All the specimen and spots used for spectral collection were confirmed staining and examination by an experienced pathologist so as to ensure the representative of the pathology. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to uncover the possible clustering. Several methods including random forest (RF), partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLSDA), K-nearest neighbor and classification and regression tree (CART) were used to extract spectral features and to construct the diagnostic models. By comparison, it reveals that, even if no obvious difference of misclassified ratio (MCR) was observed between these models, RF is preferable since it is quicker, more convenient and insensitive to over-fitting. The results indicate that NIR spectroscopy coupled with RF model can serve as a potential tool for discriminating the colorectal cancer tissues from normal ones.

  11. Optical Frequency Comb Fourier Transform Spectroscopy with Resolution Exceeding the Limit Set by the Optical Path Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltynowicz, Aleksandra; Rutkowski, Lucile; Johanssson, Alexandra C.; Khodabakhsh, Amir; Maslowski, Piotr; Kowzan, Grzegorz; Lee, Kevin; Fermann, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS) based on optical frequency combs (OFC) allow detection of broadband molecular spectra with high signal-to-noise ratios within acquisition times orders of magnitude shorter than traditional FTIRs based on thermal sources. Due to the pulsed nature of OFCs the interferogram consists of a series of bursts rather than a single burst at zero optical path difference (OPD). The comb mode structure can be resolved by acquiring multiple bursts, in both mechanical FTS systems and dual-comb spectroscopy. However, in all existing demonstrations the resolution was ultimately limited either by the maximum available OPD between the interferometer arms or by the total acquisition time enabled by the storage memory. We present a method that provides spectral resolution exceeding the limit set by the maximum OPD using an interferogram containing only a single burst. The method allows measurements of absorption lines narrower than the OPD-limited resolution without any influence of the instrumental lineshape function. We demonstrate this by measuring undistorted CO2 and CO absorption lines with linewidth narrower than the OPD-limited resolution using OFC-based mechanical FTS in the near- and mid-infrared wavelength ranges. The near-infrared system is based on an Er:fiber femtosecond laser locked to a high finesse cavity, while the mid-infrared system is based on a Tm:fiber-laser-pumped optical parametric oscillator coupled to a multi-pass cell. We show that the method allows acquisition of high-resolution molecular spectra with interferometer length orders of magnitude shorter than traditional FTIR. Mandon, J., G. Guelachvili, and N. Picque, Nat. Phot., 2009. 3(2): p. 99-102. Zeitouny, M., et al., Ann. Phys., 2013. 525(6): p. 437-442. Zolot, A.M., et al., Opt. Lett., 2012. 37(4): p. 638-640.

  12. The design of circuit for THz time domain spectroscopy system based on asynchronous optical sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruike; Zhang, Mile; Li, Yihan; He, Jingsuo; Zhang, Cunlin; Cui, Hailin

    2016-11-01

    Terahertz time domain spectroscopy system (THz-TDS) is the most commonly means of measuring terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The time delay between the pump and probe laser is an important technology to realize THz time domain spectrum measurement. The translation platform with two mirrors and the mechanical structure is the popular means to adjust the optical path difference between the pump and probe laser to get the time delay of femtosecond pulse. Because of the limit of the mechanical structure and the phase-locked amplifier, this technique can't scan spectrum fast. In order to obtain high quality signal, a long time will be taken to scan spectrum. So a more rapid and convenient time delay technology is required to Instead of the machine translation platform and accomplish the Rapid spectral measurement. Asynchronous optical sampling technique is a way to get the time delay by producing a very small frequency difference between the repetition frequency of two femtosecond lasers. The scanner time will be reduced, because of there is no waste of time, due to mechanical inertia, not only by using the asynchronous optical sampling method to replace the mechanical structure without the influence of vibration. It will greatly increase the degree of integration by using the fiber femtosecond laser and highly integrated circuit to realize optical asynchronous sampling. To solve the problem above, a terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system based on asynchronous sampling is designed in this thesis. The system is based of two femtosecond laser whose repetition frequency is 100MHz.In order to realize asynchronous sampling, the control circuit of the two lasers is the most important. This thesis focuses on the researching, designing and experiment of this circuit. Firstly, the circuit is designed overall. Then the selection of the key device and the designing of the circuit principle is done by myself. Secondly, the test of the circuit to phase locked the master and

  13. Mid-IR fiber-optic reflectance spectroscopy for identifying the finish on wooden furniture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, T; Chiantore, O; Nervo, M; Piccirillo, A

    2011-05-01

    Mid-IR fiber-optic reflectance spectroscopy (FORS) is a totally noninvasive infrared analytical technique allowing the investigation of artworks without the need for any sampling. The development and optimization of this analytical methodology can provide a tool that is capable of supporting conservators during the first steps of their interventions, yielding fast results and dramatically reducing the number of samples needed to identify the materials involved. Furthermore, since reflection IR spectra suffer from important spectral anomalies that complicate accurate spectral interpretation, it is important to characterize known reference materials and substrates in advance. This work aims to verify the possibility of investigating and identifying the most widely used wood finishes by means of fiber-optic (chalcogenide and metal halides) mid-infrared spectroscopy. Two historically widely employed wood finishes (beeswax, shellac) and two modern ones (a hydrogenated hydrocarbon resin and a microcrystalline wax) were investigated in an extended IR range (from 1000 to 6000 cm(-1)) with reflectance spectroscopy and with FORS. The broad spectral response of the MCT detector was exploited in order to include overtones and combination bands from the NIR spectral range in the investigation. The reflectance spectra were compared with those collected in transmission mode in order to highlight modifications to shapes and intensities, to assign absorptions, and finally to select "marker" bands indicating the presence of certain finishing materials, even when applied onto a substrate such as wood, which shows many absorptions in the mid-infrared region. After the characterization, the different products were applied to samples of aged pear wood and investigated with the same techniques in order to check the ability of mid-IR FORS to reveal the presence and composition of the product on the wooden substrate.

  14. Glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy: a complementary technique to analyze thin electrodeposited polyaniline films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moutarlier, V. [Institut UTINAM, CNRS-UMR 6213, Université de Franche-Comté, 16 route de Gray, 25030 Besançon (France); Lakard, S., E-mail: sophie.lakard@univ-fcomte.fr [Institut UTINAM, CNRS-UMR 6213, Université de Franche-Comté, 16 route de Gray, 25030 Besançon (France); Patois, T. [Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Université Catholique de Louvain, Croix du Sud, 1/4, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Lakard, B. [Institut UTINAM, CNRS-UMR 6213, Université de Franche-Comté, 16 route de Gray, 25030 Besançon (France)

    2014-01-01

    Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy (GDOES) has been developed to perform depth profiles of thick metallic films, in tens of microns range. GDOES spectroscopy can also be used to analyze thin organic polymer films since this technique has a great potential thanks to its high depth resolution, multi-element capability, sensitivity, and adaptability to solids or films and to conducting or non-conducting samples. In particular thin electrodeposited conducting polymer films remain an unexplored field of investigation for GDOES technique. However GDOES was used in this work to analyze electrodeposited polyaniline films, in addition to other techniques such as profilometry, electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). More precisely polyaniline thin films were electrodeposited from HCl solutions and the presence of an anilinium chloride excess at the top surface of the polymer film was demonstrated using GDOES and XRD. Rinsing of these films with water led to the removal of this excess and to the partial dedoping of the polymer film due to the porous structure of polymer films. Polyaniline thin films were also electrodeposited from H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions and an anilinium hydrogen sulfate was similarly observed at the top surface of the polymer. This excess was removed by rinsing, contrary to hydrogen sulfate anions incorporated into the polymer film during the electrochemical polymerization that were not completely expulsed from the polyaniline films as proved using GDOES. - Highlights: • Polyaniline films were electrodeposited from HCl and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions • Polymer films were analyzed by Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy (GDOES) • The incorporation of anions in the films was proved using GDOES depth profiles • The crystalline structure of polyaniline films was modified by water rinsing.

  15. Optical Studies on Antimonide Superlattice Infrared Detector Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoglund, Linda; Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Ting, David Z.; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Liao, Anna; Keo, Sam; Lee, Michael C.; Nguyen, Jean; Mumolo, Jason M.; hide

    2010-01-01

    In this study the material quality and optical properties of type II InAs/GaSb superlattices are investigated using transmission and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The influence of the material quality on the intensity of the luminescence and on the electrical properties of the detectors is studied and a good correlation between the photodetector current-voltage (IV) characteristics and the PL intensity is observed. Studies of the temperature dependence of the PL reveal that Shockley-Read-Hall processes are limiting the minority carrier lifetime in both the mid-IR wavelength and the long-IR wavelength detector material studied. These results demonstrate that PL spectroscopy is a valuable tool for optimization of infrared detectors.

  16. FTIR Spectroscopy for Carbon Family Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ţucureanu, Vasilica; Matei, Alina; Avram, Andrei Marius

    2016-11-01

    Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is a versatile technique for the characterization of materials belonging to the carbon family. Based on the interaction of the IR radiation with matter this technique may be used for the identification and characterization of chemical structures. Most important features of this method are: non-destructive, real-time measurement and relatively easy to use. Carbon basis for all living systems has found numerous industrial applications from carbon coatings (i.e. amorphous and nanocrystalline carbon films: diamond-like carbon (DLC) films) to nanostructured materials (fullerenes, nanotubes, graphene) and carbon materials at nanoscale or carbon dots (CDots). In this paper, we present the FTIR vibrational spectroscopy for the characterization of diamond, amorphous carbon, graphite, graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), fullerene and carbon quantum dots (CQDs), without claiming to cover entire field.

  17. Nonlinear Laser Spectroscopy Studies of Semiconductor Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-14

    2301/Al 11. SUWPUENOTARY NOTES II& W.TNUUUIO/AVALAWISJT STATEMINT 12 3~.g7"miy Coal UNLIMITED 3 1I& AUSTRAC ? (AMaiium 200 wv* JN1419930 SEE ATTACH PAGE...IIth> 35). Optical feedback may also play a role , though replacing the polarizer with an optical isolator (isolation >40 dB) did not increase the...angle between the polarization directions of d, play a role , although replacing the polarizer with an and b.. Assigning d. to the primary polarization

  18. Optical spectroscopy of single Si nanocylinders with magnetic and electric resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evlyukhin, A. B.; Eriksen, R. L.; Cheng, W.

    2014-01-01

    Resonant electromagnetic properties of nanoparticles fabricated from high-index semiconductor or dielectric materials are very promising for the realization of novel nanoantennas and metamaterials. In this paper we study optical resonances of Si nanocylinders located on a silica substrate...

  19. [Measurement of Trace C2H6 Based on Optical-Feedback Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Fu; Chen, Wei-gen; Gu, Zhao-liang; Zou, Jing-xin; DU, Ling-Ling; Qi, Wei; Zhou, Qu

    2015-10-01

    Ethane is one of major fault characteristic gases dissolved in power transformer, the detection of Ethane with high accuracy and sensitivity is the key of dissolved gas analysis. In this paper, based on optical feedback theory and cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy, combined with quantum cascade laser, a detection system for dissolved gas C2 H6 in transformer oil was built up. Based on the symmetry of the individual cavity modes, the phase matching of returning light in resonance with the cavity was achieved through LabVIEW codes. The optical feedback effect that the emitted light return to the laser cavity after a small delay time and lock to the resonance frequency of cavity, even and odd modes effect that the higher modes and lower modes structure will build up alternatively, and threshold current lowering effect of about 1.2 mA were studied and achieved. By cavity ring-down spectroscopy, the effective reflectivity of 99.978% and cavity finesse of 7 138.4 is obtained respectively. The frequency selectivity is 0.005 2 cm(-1). With an acquisition time of 1s, this optical system allows detection for the PQ3 band of C2 H6 with high accuracy of 95.72% ± 0.17% and detection limit of (1.97 ± 0.06) x 10(-3) μL x L(-1) at atmospheric pressure and temperature of 20 degrees C, which lays a foundation for fault diagnose from dissolved gas analysis.

  20. FT-Raman spectroscopy study of human breast tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar Carter, Renata A.; Martin, Airton A.; Netto, Mario M.; Soares, Fernando A.

    2004-07-01

    Optical spectroscopy has been extensively studied as a potential in vivo diagnostic tool to provide information about the chemical and morphologic structure of tissue. Raman Spectroscpy is an inelastic scattering process that can provide a wealth of spectral features that can be related to the specific molecular structure of the sample. This article reports results of an in vitro study of the FT-Raman human breast tissue spectra. An Nd:YAG laser at 1064nm was used as the excitation source in the FT-Raman Spectrometer. The neoplastic human breast samples, both Fibroadenoma and ICD, were obtained during therapeutical routine medical procedures required by the primary disease, and the non-diseased human tissue was obtained in plastic surgery. No sample preparation was needed for the FT-Raman spectra collection. The FT-Raman spectra were recorded from normal, benign (Fibroadenomas) and malignant (IDC-Intraductal Carcinoma) samples, adding up 51 different areas. The main spectral differences of a typical FT-Raman spectra of a Normal (Non-diseased), Fibroadenoma, and Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) breast tissue at the interval of 600 to 1800cm-1, which may differentiate diagnostically the sample, were found in the bands of 1230 to 1295cm-1, 1440 to 1460 cm-1 and 1650 to 1680 cm-1, assigned to the vibrational bands of the carbohydrate-amide III, proteins and lipids, and carbohydrate-amide I, respectively.

  1. The application of near infrared spectroscopy in nutritional intervention studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippa A Jackson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Functional near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS is a non-invasive optical imaging technique used to monitor cerebral blood flow (CBF and by proxy neuronal activation. The use of NIRS in nutritional intervention studies is a relatively novel application of this technique, with only a small, but growing, number of trials published to date. These trials—in which the effects on CBF following administration of dietary components such as caffeine, polyphenols and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are assessed—have successfully demonstrated NIRS as a sensitive measure of change in haemodynamic response during cognitive tasks in both acute and chronic treatment intervention paradigms. The existent research in this area has been limited by the constraints of the technique itself however advancements in the measurement technology, paired with studies endeavouring increased sophistication in number and locations of channels over the head should render the use of NIRS in nutritional interventions particularly valuable in advancing our understanding of the effects of nutrients and dietary components on the brain.

  2. Metastable argon atom density in complex argon/acetylene plasmas determined by means of optical absorption and emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushkov, Vladimir; Herrendorf, Ann-Pierra; Hippler, Rainer

    2016-10-01

    Optical emission and absorption spectroscopy has been utilized to investigate the instability of acetylene-containing dusty plasmas induced by growing nano-particles. The density of Ar(1s5) metastable atoms was derived by two methods: tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and with the help of the branching ratio method of emitted spectral lines. Results of the two techniques agree well with each other. The density of Ar(1s3) metastable atoms was also measured by means of optical emission spectroscopy. The observed growth instability leads to pronounced temporal variations of the metastable and other excited state densities. An analysis of optical line ratios provides evidence for a depletion of free electrons during the growth cycle but no indication for electron temperature variations.

  3. Hyperfine Interactions in Iron Meteorites: Comparative Study by Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshtrakh, M. I., E-mail: oshtrakh@mail.utnet.ru [Ural State Technical University - UPI, Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control (Russian Federation); Milder, O. B. [Ural State Technical University - UPI, Faculty of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Grokhovsky, V. I. [Ural State Technical University - UPI, Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control (Russian Federation); Semionkin, V. A. [Ural State Technical University - UPI, Faculty of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2004-11-15

    The iron meteorites Sikhote-Alin, Bilibino, Chinga and Dronino with different Ni concentration and terrestrial age were studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Different Moessbauer hyperfine parameters were determined for studied meteorites and possible Fe-Ni phases were supposed.

  4. The use of high resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy for refining the infrared optical constants of GaS, GaSe, and InSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li-Ming; Thiry, P. A.; Degiovanni, A.; Conard, Th.; Leclerc, G.; Caudano, R.; Lambin, Ph.; Debever, J.-M.

    1994-06-01

    Cleaved surfaces of III-VI lamellar semiconducting compounds GaS, GaSe, and InSe have been studied by high resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS). The infrared optical constants of the materials were retrieved by using the dielectric theory taking account of the resonance frequencies published from infrared reflectivity (IRS) data. The limitations of the HREELS and IRS measurements in the case of these materials are discussed in detail. However, it is shown that, by combining the informations from both spectroscopies, it is possible to refine some of the oscillator strengths of these materials.

  5. Protein dynamics in an intermediate state of myoglobin: optical absorption, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray structure analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    N. Engler; Ostermann, A; Gassmann, A.; Lamb, D C; Prusakov, V E; J. Schott; Schweitzer-Stenner, R; Parak, F. G.

    2000-01-01

    A metastable state of myoglobin is produced by reduction of metmyoglobin at low temperatures. This is done either by irradiation with x-rays at 80 K or by electron transfer from photoexcited tris(2, 2'-bipyridine)-ruthenium(II) at 20 K. At temperatures above 150 K, the conformational transition toward the equilibrium deoxymyoglobin is observed. X-ray crystallography, Raman spectroscopy, and temperature-dependent optical absorption spectroscopy show that the metastable state has a six-ligated ...

  6. Elastic scattering spectroscopy in vivo: optical biopsies of cancers of the breast and GI tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, David C. O.; Briggs, Gavin M.; Saunders, Christobel; Lakhani, Sunil; Ripley, Paul M.; Bigio, Irving J.; Bown, Stephen G.

    2000-04-01

    Elastic scattering or diffuse reflectance spectroscopy offers the possibility of distinguishing between normal and neoplastic tissue with a relatively simple optical measurement. The measurement of the reflection of light has previously been shown to be sensitive to the size and distribution of both intra and inter-cellular structures as well as absorption from chromatophores which are present in the tissue. By coupling a white light source and spectrometer to optic fibers it is possible to construct probes which can be inserted precutaneously or intra- operatively into breast tissue or which can pass down the channel of an endoscope and take in-vivo spectra of diseased and normal tissue in the Gastro-Intestinal tract. Spectra are reported from a large number of patients with a variety of benign, metaplastic, dysplastic and cancerous conditions. Some differences that have been observed in these spectra are discussed and the merits and disadvantages of 'optical biopsy' as an in-vivo diagnostic tool are examined. It is shown that to a relatively high degree of sensitivity and specificity it is possible to distinguish cancerous from normal tissue in a number of cases. The methods of distinguishing spectra and some possible modalities for their improvement are discussed.

  7. Photons and (artificial) atoms: an overview of optical spectroscopy techniques on quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamivakas, A. N.; Atatüre, M.

    2010-01-01

    In most branches within experimental physics technical prowess lies at the heart of many seminal works. From the observation of the photoelectric effect and the ultraviolet catastrophe that led to the development of quantum mechanics to the first transistor that shaped the modern age of electronics, significant physical insight has been achieved on the shoulders of technical advances and progress. Research on self-assembled quantum dots may be a drop in the sea of physics, but it still is no exception to this trend, and more physical insight continues to be revealed as the tools of the trade get increasingly more complex and advanced. This article is written primarily for senior undergraduate students and first year graduate students of experimental physics involving optically active quantum dots. More often than not, we have seen students shuffling through journal articles trying to relate the reported physics to the used experimental techniques. What we want to cover here is not in any way the history or the recent progress in quantum dot research - there are an ample number of topical books and review articles for that - but rather to highlight a selection of optics-based measurement techniques that have led to significant progress in our understanding of quantum dot physics as well as their applications in the last two decades. We hope a basic survey of the relevant optical spectroscopy techniques will help the newcomers in connecting the dots between measurements and physics.

  8. A circumzenithal arc to study optics concepts with geometrical optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Hakan

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes the formation of a circumzenithal arc for the purpose of teaching light and optics. A circumzenithal arc, an optic formation rarely witnessed by people, is formed in this study using a water-filled cylindrical glass illuminated by sunlight. Sunlight refracted at the top and side surfaces of the glass of water is dispersed into its constituent colours. First, multi-colour arcs are observed on paper at the bottom of the glass. Then, a single arc for each colour is observed on the floor when the rays are allowed to propagate to the furthest points from the glass. The change in observations is explained by formulating an equation for the geometry of the situation. The formula relates each point on the first refracting surface for an incoming light ray to a point further from the second refracting surface. Then, a parallel graph is drawn to visualize the superposition of colours to the formation of a single arc. The geometrical optics studies in this paper exemplify the concept of Snell’s law, total internal reflection and dispersion. The duration of the observation on a circumzenithal arc is limited by the altitude of the Sun in the sky. This study depends on the use of astronomy software to track solar altitude. Pedagogical aspects of the study are discussed for inquiry-based teaching and learning of light and optics concepts.

  9. Accuracy of optical spectroscopy for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia without colposcopic tissue information; a step toward automation for low resource settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamal, Jose-Miguel; Zewdie, Getie A.; Cox, Dennis D.; Neely Atkinson, E.; Cantor, Scott B.; MacAulay, Calum; Davies, Kalatu; Adewole, Isaac; Buys, Timon P. H.; Follen, Michele

    2012-04-01

    Optical spectroscopy has been proposed as an accurate and low-cost alternative for detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. We previously published an algorithm using optical spectroscopy as an adjunct to colposcopy and found good accuracy (sensitivity=1.00 [95% confidence interval (CI)=0.92 to 1.00], specificity=0.71 [95% CI=0.62 to 0.79]). Those results used measurements taken by expert colposcopists as well as the colposcopy diagnosis. In this study, we trained and tested an algorithm for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (i.e., identifying those patients who had histology reading CIN 2 or worse) that did not include the colposcopic diagnosis. Furthermore, we explored the interaction between spectroscopy and colposcopy, examining the importance of probe placement expertise. The colposcopic diagnosis-independent spectroscopy algorithm had a sensitivity of 0.98 (95% CI=0.89 to 1.00) and a specificity of 0.62 (95% CI=0.52 to 0.71). The difference in the partial area under the ROC curves between spectroscopy with and without the colposcopic diagnosis was statistically significant at the patient level (p=0.05) but not the site level (p=0.13). The results suggest that the device has high accuracy over a wide range of provider accuracy and hence could plausibly be implemented by providers with limited training.

  10. An integrated instrumental setup for the combination of atomic force microscopy with optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, R J; Heyes, C D; Knebel, D; Röcker, C; Nienhaus, G U

    2006-07-01

    In recent years, the study of single biomolecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques has resulted in a plethora of new information regarding the physics underlying these complex biological systems. It is especially advantageous to be able to measure the optical, topographical, and mechanical properties of single molecules simultaneously. Here an AFM is used that is especially designed for integration with an inverted optical microscope and that has a near-infrared light source (850 nm) to eliminate interference between the optical experiment and the AFM operation. The Tip Assisted Optics (TAO) system consists of an additional 100 x 100-microm(2) X-Y scanner for the sample, which can be independently and simultaneously used with the AFM scanner. This allows the offset to be removed between the confocal optical image obtained with the sample scanner and the simultaneously acquired AFM topography image. The tip can be positioned exactly into the optical focus while the user can still navigate within the AFM image for imaging or manipulation of the sample. Thus the tip-enhancement effect can be maximized and it becomes possible to perform single molecule manipulation experiments within the focus of a confocal optical image. Here this is applied to simultaneous measurement of single quantum dot fluorescence and topography with high spatial resolution.

  11. Optical Nanofiber Integrated into Optical Tweezers for In Situ Fiber Probing and Optical Binding Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Gusachenko

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Precise control of particle positioning is desirable in many optical propulsion and sorting applications. Here, we develop an integrated platform for particle manipulation consisting of a combined optical nanofiber and optical tweezers system. We show that consistent and reversible transmission modulations arise when individual silica microspheres are introduced to the nanofiber surface using the optical tweezers. The observed transmission changes depend on both particle and fiber diameter and can be used as a reference point for in situ nanofiber or particle size measurement. Thence, we combine scanning electron microscope (SEM size measurements with nanofiber transmission data to provide calibration for particle-based fiber assessment. This integrated optical platform provides a method for selective evanescent field manipulation of micron-sized particles and facilitates studies of optical binding and light-particle interaction dynamics.

  12. Depth probing of the hydride formation process in thin Pd films by combined electrochemistry and fiber optics-based in situ UV/vis spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickman, Björn; Fredriksson, Mattias; Feng, Ligang; Lindahl, Niklas; Hagberg, Johan; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-07-15

    We demonstrate a flexible combined electrochemistry and fiber optics-based in situ UV/vis spectroscopy setup to gain insight into the depth evolution of electrochemical hydride and oxide formation in Pd films with thicknesses of 20 and 100 nm. The thicknesses of our model systems are chosen such that the films are thinner or significantly thicker than the optical skin depth of Pd to create two distinctly different situations. Low power white light is irradiated on the sample and analyzed in three different configurations; transmittance through, and, reflectance from the front and the back side of the film. The obtained optical sensitivities correspond to fractions of a monolayer of adsorbed or absorbed hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) on Pd. Moreover, a combined simultaneous readout obtained from the different optical measurement configurations provides mechanistic insights into the depth-evolution of the studied hydrogenation and oxidation processes.

  13. Studies of Bistable Optical Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-15

    Alternate Switching, and Subharmonic Generation in Bistable Optical Devices" (J. A. Goldstone, P.-T. Ho, E. Garmire) Appl. Phys. Lett. 37, 126 (1980). 7...demonstrated with modulators which are inherently slow, but have useful features. This includes driving a thin Fabry-Perot with a piezo -electric (McCall, Appl

  14. Reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy as efficient technique for the determination of optical properties of polystyrene intermixed with gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deris, Jamileh; Hajati, Shaaker

    2017-01-01

    The electronic properties (electron inelastic cross section, energy loss function) of a nano-metalized polystyrene obtained by reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) in a previous study [J. Deris, S. Hajati, S. Tougaard, V. Zaporojtchenko, Appl. Surf. Sci. 377 (2016) 44-47], which relies on the Yubero-Tougaard method, were used in the complementary application of Kramers-Kronig transformation to determine its optical properties such as the real part (ε1) and imaginary part (ε2) of the dielectric function (ε), refractive index (n), coefficients of extinction (k), reflection (R) and absorption (μ). The degree of intermixing of polystyrene thin film and gold nanoparticles of sizes 5.5 nm was controlled by annealing the sample to achieve a morphology in which the nanoparticles were homogeneously distributed within polystyrene. It is worth noting that no data are available on the optical properties of metalized polymers such as gold nanoparticles intermixed with polystyrene. Therefore, this work is of high importance in terms of both the sample studied here and the method applied. The advantage of the method applied here is that no information on the lateral distribution of the nanocomposite sample is required. This means that the REELS technique has been presented here to suitably, efficiently and easily obtain the optical properties of such nano-metalized polymer in which the metal nanoparticles have been vertically well distributed (homogeneous in depth). Therefore, for vertically homogeneous and laterally inhomogeneous samples, it is possible to make REELS imaging by scanning the sample and thus to make an image of their optical properties.

  15. Valence band gaps and plasma energies for galena, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite natural minerals using differential optical reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todoran, R.; Todoran, D.; Szakacs, Zs.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the determinations of the valence band gaps and plasma energies of the galena, sphalerite and chalcopyrite natural minerals. The work was carried out using differential optical reflectance spectroscopy of the clean mineral surfaces. The determination of the optical properties such as refractive index, real part of the complex dielectric constant and the location of certain van Hove singularities, was carried out using the Kramers-Kronig formalism.

  16. Multivariate reference technique for quantitative analysis of fiber-optic tissue Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergholt, Mads Sylvest; Duraipandian, Shiyamala; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-12-03

    We report a novel method making use of multivariate reference signals of fused silica and sapphire Raman signals generated from a ball-lens fiber-optic Raman probe for quantitative analysis of in vivo tissue Raman measurements in real time. Partial least-squares (PLS) regression modeling is applied to extract the characteristic internal reference Raman signals (e.g., shoulder of the prominent fused silica boson peak (~130 cm(-1)); distinct sapphire ball-lens peaks (380, 417, 646, and 751 cm(-1))) from the ball-lens fiber-optic Raman probe for quantitative analysis of fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy. To evaluate the analytical value of this novel multivariate reference technique, a rapid Raman spectroscopy system coupled with a ball-lens fiber-optic Raman probe is used for in vivo oral tissue Raman measurements (n = 25 subjects) under 785 nm laser excitation powers ranging from 5 to 65 mW. An accurate linear relationship (R(2) = 0.981) with a root-mean-square error of cross validation (RMSECV) of 2.5 mW can be obtained for predicting the laser excitation power changes based on a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation, which is superior to the normal univariate reference method (RMSE = 6.2 mW). A root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 2.4 mW (R(2) = 0.985) can also be achieved for laser power prediction in real time when we applied the multivariate method independently on the five new subjects (n = 166 spectra). We further apply the multivariate reference technique for quantitative analysis of gelatin tissue phantoms that gives rise to an RMSEP of ~2.0% (R(2) = 0.998) independent of laser excitation power variations. This work demonstrates that multivariate reference technique can be advantageously used to monitor and correct the variations of laser excitation power and fiber coupling efficiency in situ for standardizing the tissue Raman intensity to realize quantitative analysis of tissue Raman measurements in vivo, which is particularly appealing in

  17. Optical spectroscopy and band gap analysis of hybrid improper ferroelectric Ca3Ti2O7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Judy G.; Birol, Turan; Harms, Nathan C.; Gao, Bin; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Vanderbilt, David; Musfeldt, Janice L.

    2016-06-01

    We bring together optical absorption spectroscopy, photoconductivity, and first principles calculations to reveal the electronic structure of the room temperature ferroelectric Ca3Ti2O7. The 3.94 eV direct gap in Ca3Ti2O7 is charge transfer in nature and noticeably higher than that in CaTiO3 (3.4 eV), a finding that we attribute to dimensional confinement in the n = 2 member of the Ruddlesden-Popper series. While Sr substitution introduces disorder and broadens the gap edge slightly, oxygen deficiency reduces the gap to 3.7 eV and gives rise to a broad tail that persists to much lower energies.

  18. Temperature Effect on the Optical Emission Intensity in Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Super Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbani, S. M. R.; Ghezelbash, M.; Majd, A. E.; Soltanolkotabi, M.; Saghafifar, H.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the influence of heating and cooling samples on the optical emission spectra and plasma parameters of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for Titanium 64, Inconel 718 super alloys, and Aluminum 6061 alloy is investigated. Samples are uniformly heated up to approximately 200°C and cooled down to -78°C by an external heater and liquid nitrogen, respectively. Variations of plasma parameters like electron temperature and electron density with sample temperature are determined by using Boltzmann plot and Stark broadening methods, respectively. Heating the samples improves LIBS signal strength and broadens the width of the spectrum. On the other hand, cooling alloys causes fluctuations in the LIBS signal and decrease it to some extent, and some of the spectral peaks diminish. In addition, our results show that electron temperature and electron density depend on the sample temperature variations.

  19. Optical Spectroscopy and Velocity Dispersions of Galaxy Clusters from the SPT-SZ Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Ruel, J; Bayliss, M; Brodwin, M; Foley, R J; Stalder, B; Aird, K A; Armstrong, R; Ashby, M L N; Bautz, M; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Bocquet, S; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Chapman, S C; Cho, H M; Clocchiatti, A; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; de Haan, T; Desai, S; Dobbs, M A; Dudley, J P; Forman, W R; George, E M; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; Halverson, N W; Harrington, N L; High, F W; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hrubes, J D; Jones, C; Joy, M; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Liu, J; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; Mantz, A; Marrone, D P; McDonald, M; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Mocanu, L; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Murray, S S; Natoli, T; Nurgaliev, D; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Saro, A; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Shaw, L; Shirokoff, E; Song, J; Šuhada, R; Spieler, H G; Stanford, S A; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; Stubbs, C W; van Engelen, A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vikhlinin, A; Williamson, R; Zahn, O; Zenteno, A

    2013-01-01

    We present optical spectroscopy of galaxies in clusters detected through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect with the South Pole Telescope (SPT). We report our own measurements of $61$ spectroscopic cluster redshifts, and $48$ velocity dispersions each calculated with more than $15$ member galaxies. This catalog also includes $19$ dispersions of SPT-observed clusters previously reported in the literature. The majority of the clusters in this paper are SPT-discovered; of these, most have been previously reported in other SPT cluster catalogs, and five are reported here as SPT discoveries for the first time. By performing a resampling analysis of galaxy velocities, we find that unbiased velocity dispersions can be obtained from a relatively small number of member galaxies ($\\lesssim 30$), but with increased systematic scatter. We use this analysis to determine statistical confidence intervals that include the effect of membership selection. We fit scaling relations between the observed cluster velocity dispersio...

  20. Characterization of polymer composites by fiber optic Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Bhat, Sanmitra A.; Osbaldiston, Richard; DiTaranto, Marie B.; Smith, Wayne W.; Rose, Jennifer; Liu, Yong-Ming; Shaw, Montgomery

    1999-01-01

    The in-use performance of polymer composites is highly dependent on the polymeric structure, which in turn, is highly dependent on the processing conditions. We have been developing a Fourier transform Raman system capable of high temperature measurements within curing devices through the use of fiber optic probes. The goal is to use real-time spectral data to control heat schedules and ultimately, composite properties. This presentation will describe the development of cure models based on reaction mechanisms for an epoxy resin and a polyimide using IR and Raman spectroscopy. It will also describe correlations between molecular structure and mechanical properties obtained by simultaneous Raman and rheology measurements. In addition, new spectral methods to determine cure kinetics will be presented.

  1. Optical coherence tomography – near infrared spectroscopy system and catheter for intravascular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fard, Ali M.; Vacas-Jacques, Paulino; Hamidi, Ehsan; Wang, Hao; Carruth, Robert W.; Gardecki, Joseph A.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2013-01-01

    Owing to its superior resolution, intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) is a promising tool for imaging the microstructure of coronary artery walls. However, IVOCT does not identify chemicals and molecules in the tissue, which is required for a more complete understanding and accurate diagnosis of coronary disease. Here we present a dual-modality imaging system and catheter that uniquely combines IVOCT with diffuse near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in a single dual-modality imaging device for simultaneous acquisition of microstructural and compositional information. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, the device has been used to visualize co-incident microstructural and spectroscopic information obtained from a diseased cadaver human coronary artery. PMID:24514658

  2. Spatially resolved optical-emission spectroscopy of a radio-frequency driven iodine plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedrick, James; Doyle, Scott; Grondein, Pascaline; Aanesland, Ane

    2016-09-01

    Iodine is of interest for potential use as a propellant for spacecraft propulsion, and has become attractive as a replacement to xenon due to its similar mass and ionisation potential. Optical emission spectroscopy has been undertaken to characterise the emission from a low-pressure, radio-frequency driven inductively coupled plasma source operating in iodine with respect to axial distance across its transverse magnetic filter. The results are compared with axial profiles of the electron temperature and density for identical source conditions, and the spatial distribution of the emission intensity is observed to be closely correlated with the electron temperature. This work has been done within the LABEX Plas@Par project, and received financial state aid managed by the ``Agence Nationale de la Recherche'', as part of the ``Programme d'Investissements d'Avenir'' under the reference ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02.

  3. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet During Tooth Bleaching Gel Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šantak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Tarle, Zrinka; Milošević, Slobodan

    2015-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was performed during atmospheric pressure plasma needle helium jet treatment of various tooth-bleaching gels. When the gel sample was inserted under the plasma plume, the intensity of all the spectral features increased approximately two times near the plasma needle tip and up to two orders of magnitude near the sample surface. The color change of the hydroxylapatite pastille treated with bleaching gels in conjunction with the atmospheric pressure plasma jet was found to be in correlation with the intensity of OH emission band (309 nm). Using argon as an additive to helium flow (2 L/min), a linear increase (up to four times) of OH intensity and, consequently, whitening (up to 10%) of the pastilles was achieved. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet activates bleaching gel, accelerates OH production, and accelerates tooth bleaching (up to six times faster).

  4. High precision measurement of formaldehyde in air with differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The formaldehyde (HCHO) measurement is described by differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique and the data processing method is discussed in detail, including the selection of retrieval wavelength band, the removing of interfering structures, the steps of data processing and the spectrum dealing with nonlinear method. The HCHO concentration retrieved in different wavelength bands were compared, including relative error, repeatability and detection limit. As a result, the band from 314 to 332 nm was most suitable for the retrieval of HCHO. With these methods, high measurement precision of 1.9% was obtained and the detection limit of HCHO is less than 1.5 ppb. In addition, high linear relativity 0.9999 is achieved by measuring five different concentrations of HCHO with this system.

  5. Concurrent multiaxis differential optical absorption spectroscopy system for the measurement of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Roland J.; Corlett, Gary K.; Friess, Udo; Monks, Paul S.

    2006-10-01

    The development of a new concurrent multiaxis (CMAX) sky viewing spectrometer to monitor rapidly changing urban concentrations of nitrogen dioxide is detailed. The CMAX differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique involves simultaneous spectral imaging of the zenith and off-axis measurements of spatially resolved scattered sunlight. Trace-gas amounts are retrieved from the measured spectra using the established DOAS technique. The potential of the CMAX DOAS technique to derive information on rapidly changing concentrations and the spatial distribution of NO2 in an urban environment is demonstrated. Three example data sets are presented from measurements during 2004 of tropospheric NO2 over Leicester, UK (52.62°N, 1.12°W). The data demonstrate the current capabilities and future potential of the CMAX DOAS method in terms of the ability to measure real-time spatially disaggregated urban NO2.

  6. Signal line shapes of Fourier transform cavity-enhanced frequency modulation spectroscopy with optical frequency combs

    CERN Document Server

    Johansson, Alexandra C; Khodabakhsh, Amir; Foltynowicz, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    We present a thorough analysis of the signal line shapes of Fourier transform-based noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical frequency comb spectroscopy (NICE-OFCS). We discuss the signal dependence on the ratio of the modulation frequency, f${_m}$, to the molecular line width, {\\Gamma}. We compare a full model of the signals and a simplified absorption-like analytical model that has high accuracy for low f${_m}$/{\\Gamma} ratios and is much faster to compute. We verify the theory experimentally by measuring and fitting NICE-OFCS spectra of CO${_2}$ at 1575 nm using a system based on an Er:fiber femtosecond laser and a cavity with a finesse of ~11000.

  7. Ellipsometric spectroscopy study of cobalt oxide thin films deposited by sol-gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera-Calva, E.; Martinez-Flores, J.C. [Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica, UAM ? Iztapalapa, Av. Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, Mexico DF 09340 (Mexico); Huerta, L. [Instituto de Investigacion en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico DF (Mexico); Avila, A.; Ortega-Lopez, M. [Depto. Ingenieria Electrica, SEES, CINVESTAV- IPN, Mexico DF 07360 (Mexico)

    2006-09-22

    Due to their unique optical properties, solar selective coatings enhance the thermal efficiency of solar photothermal converters. Hence it seems to be interesting to study the optical properties of promising materials as solar selective coatings. In an earlier work, it was demonstrated that sol-gel deposited cobalt oxide thin films possess suitable optical properties as selective coatings. In this work, cobalt oxide thin films were prepared by same technique and their optical properties were analyzed as a function of the dipping time of the substrate in the sol, using the spectroscopy ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. The optical constants (n and k) for these films, in the 200-800nm range, are reported as a function of the dipping time. The fitting of ellipsometric data, I{sub s} and I{sub c}, for the glass substrate and the cobalt oxide thin film, as modeled with the Lorentz and Tauc-Lorentz dispersion relations, indicated that the film microstructure resembles a multilayer stack with voids. From these results, the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and void percentages in the film were estimated. Both, thin film thickness and void/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} percentage ratio, were determined to be strongly dependent on the immersion time. Furthermore, the total thickness of a multilayered film was found to be the sum of thickness of each individual layer. (author)

  8. Using geometric algebra to study optical aberrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanlon, J.; Ziock, H.

    1997-05-01

    This paper uses Geometric Algebra (GA) to study vector aberrations in optical systems with square and round pupils. GA is a new way to produce the classical optical aberration spot diagrams on the Gaussian image plane and surfaces near the Gaussian image plane. Spot diagrams of the third, fifth and seventh order aberrations for square and round pupils are developed to illustrate the theory.

  9. Hobby-Eberly Telescope Optical Transmission Spectroscopy of the Hot Jupiter WASP-12b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Adam G.; Redfield, Seth; Cauley, Paul W.; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.

    2017-01-01

    Transmission spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres is an extremely useful tool that can be used for understanding exoplanetary composition as well as potentially revealing star-planet interactions from radiation, magnetic fields, and more. The hot Jupiter planet WASP-12b is interesting in that it is very close to its star (0.02 AU), has a large calculated scale height, has had water and metals detected in its atmosphere, and has had varying observational and theoretical constraints placed on its C/O ratio. Here we present a preliminary analysis of the optical transmission spectrum of WASP-12b taken with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET). Our data covers the optical wavelength range from approximately 4800 to 6850 Angstroms. Most notably this includes two Balmer lines of hydrogen (H-alpha at 6563 Angstroms and H-beta at 4861 Angstroms) and the sodium D doublet (at 5890 and 5896 Angstroms). Due to the relative faintness of the system's central star and different instrumental settings, the analysis involves several challenges that are not present in previous transmission spectroscopy observations with the HET.This work is supported by NASA Exoplanet Research Program grant 14-XRP14_2-0090 to the University of Nebraska-Kearney. The Hobby-Eberly Telescope is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat Munchen, and Georg-August-Universitat Gottingen and is named in honor of its principal benefactors, William P. Hobby and Robert E. Eberly.

  10. Nonlinear optical studies of relaxation in semiconductor microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remillard, Jeffrey Thomas

    1990-11-01

    Exposing a semiconductor to optical radiation near the fundamental band gap results in the creation of populations or elementary excitations including electrons, holes, and excitons, and also results in the creation of a superposition state between the ground and excited state of the solid. The relaxation of optically generated excitons and carriers in semiconductor microstructures was studied using four wave mixing (FWM) spectroscopy. The systems studied include CdSSe microcrystallite doped glasses and GaA/AlGaAs multiple quantum well structures (MQWS). First, the nonlinear optical response of simple two level systems is examined in order to provide insight into the types of line shapes expected from semiconductors. It is shown that the line shape is strongly dependent on how the system is coupled to the reservoir and the consequences of coupling to a reservoir are examined in a FWM measurement made in atomic sodium. The first semiconductor system studied is CdSSe microcrystallite doped glass. This system is shown to have a very slow component to the nonlinear response which has an optical intensity dependence and temperature dependence which suggests that the FWM response in these materials is trap mediated. Room temperature FWM measurements in GaAs MQWS enables the measurement of the carrier recombination time and the ambipolar diffusion coefficient. Using the technique of correlated optical fields, a slow component to the nonlinear response was measured showing an interference profile which suggests a possible shift of the exciton resonance due to the optically generated carriers. At low temperatures, measurements of the exciton line shape and relaxation time were made and evidence for exciton spectral diffusion was found. The low temperature line shapes can be qualitatively reproduced using Modified Optical Bloch equations which include the effects of spectral diffusion.

  11. Quantitating membrane bleb stiffness using AFM force spectroscopy and an optical sideview setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnermann, Carina; Huang, Chaolie; Becker, Sarah F; Stamov, Dimitar R; Wedlich, Doris; Kashef, Jubin; Franz, Clemens M

    2015-03-01

    AFM-based force spectroscopy in combination with optical microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating cell mechanics and adhesion on the single cell level. However, standard setups featuring an AFM mounted on an inverted light microscope only provide a bottom view of cell and AFM cantilever but cannot visualize vertical cell shape changes, for instance occurring during motile membrane blebbing. Here, we have integrated a mirror-based sideview system to monitor cell shape changes resulting from motile bleb behavior of Xenopus cranial neural crest (CNC) cells during AFM elasticity and adhesion measurements. Using the sideview setup, we quantitatively investigate mechanical changes associated with bleb formation and compared cell elasticity values recorded during membrane bleb and non-bleb events. Bleb protrusions displayed significantly lower stiffness compared to the non-blebbing membrane in the same cell. Bleb stiffness values were comparable to values obtained from blebbistatin-treated cells, consistent with the absence of a functional actomyosin network in bleb protrusions. Furthermore, we show that membrane blebs forming within the cell-cell contact zone have a detrimental effect on cell-cell adhesion forces, suggesting that mechanical changes associated with bleb protrusions promote cell-cell detachment or prevent adhesion reinforcement. Incorporating a sideview setup into an AFM platform therefore provides a new tool to correlate changes in cell morphology with results from force spectroscopy experiments.

  12. Total internal reflection spectroscopy for studying soft matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, David A; Bain, Colin D

    2014-02-28

    Total internal reflection (TIR) spectroscopy is a widely used technique to study soft matter at interfaces. This tutorial review aims to provide researchers with an overview of the principles, experimental design and applications of TIR spectroscopy to enable them to understand how this class of techniques might be used in their research. It also highlights limitations and pitfalls of TIR techniques, which will assist readers in critically analysing the literature. Techniques covered include attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), TIR fluorescence, TIR Raman scattering and cavity-enhanced techniques. Other related techniques are briefly described.

  13. Study of Nonlocal Optical Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN; Yuan

    2013-01-01

    It is generally known that nuclear optical potentials are theoretically expected to be non-local.The non-locality arises from the exchange of particles between the projectile and target and from coupling tonon-elastic channels.This non-locality was first introduced by Frahn and Lemmer,and developed further by Perey and Buck(PB).The kernel is of the form

  14. Diagnosis of breast cancer using diffuse optical spectroscopy from 500 to 1600 nm: comparison of classification methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachabé, Rami; Evers, Daniel J.; Hendriks, Benno H. W.; Lucassen, Gerald W.; van der Voort, Marjolein; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Peeters, Marie-Jeanne Vrancken; van der Hage, Jos A.; Oldenburg, Hester S.; Wesseling, Jelle; Ruers, Theo J. M.

    2011-08-01

    We report on the use of diffuse optical spectroscopy analysis of breast spectra acquired in the wavelength range from 500 to 1600 nm with a fiber optic probe. A total of 102 ex vivo samples of five different breast tissue types, namely adipose, glandular, fibroadenoma, invasive carcinoma, and ductal carcinoma in situ from 52 patients were measured. A model deriving from the diffusion theory was applied to the measured spectra in order to extract clinically relevant parameters such as blood, water, lipid, and collagen volume fractions, β-carotene concentration, average vessels radius, reduced scattering amplitude, Mie slope, and Mie-to-total scattering fraction. Based on a classification and regression tree algorithm applied to the derived parameters, a sensitivity-specificity of 98%-99%, 84%-95%, 81%-98%, 91%-95%, and 83%-99% were obtained for discrimination of adipose, glandular, fibroadenoma, invasive carcinoma, and ductal carcinoma in situ, respectively; and a multiple classes overall diagnostic performance of 94%. Sensitivity-specificity values obtained for discriminating malignant from nonmalignant tissue were compared to existing reported studies by applying the different classification methods that were used in each of these studies. Furthermore, in these reported studies, either lipid or β-carotene was considered as adipose tissue precursors. We estimate both chromophore concentrations and demonstrate that lipid is a better discriminator for adipose tissue than β-carotene.

  15. Photoacoustic detection and optical spectroscopy of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in biologic tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alhamami, Mosa; Kolios, Michael C.; Tavakkoli, Jahan, E-mail: jtavakkoli@ryerson.ca [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The aims of this study are: (a) to investigate the capability of photoacoustic (PA) method in detecting high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments in muscle tissuesin vitro; and (b) to determine the optical properties of HIFU-treated and native tissues in order to assist in the interpretation of the observed contrast in PA detection of HIFU treatments. Methods: A single-element, spherically concaved HIFU transducer with a centre frequency of 1 MHz was utilized to create thermal lesions in chicken breast tissuesin vitro. To investigate the detectability of HIFU treatments photoacoustically, PA detection was performed at 720 and 845 nm on seven HIFU-treated tissue samples. Within each tissue sample, PA signals were acquired from 22 locations equally divided between two regions of interest within two volumes in tissue – a HIFU-treated volume and an untreated volume. Optical spectroscopy was then carried out on 10 HIFU-treated chicken breast specimens in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm, in 1-nm increments, using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment. The authors’ optical spectroscopy raw data (total transmittance and diffuse reflectance) were used to obtain the optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of HIFU-induced thermal lesions and native tissues by employing the inverse adding-doubling method. The aforementioned interaction coefficients were subsequently used to calculate the effective attenuation coefficient and light penetration depth of HIFU-treated and native tissues in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm. Results: HIFU-treated tissues produced greater PA signals than native tissues at 720 and 845 nm. At 720 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.68 ± 0.25 (mean ± standard error of the mean). At 845 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.75

  16. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and optical polarization imaging of in-vivo biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Núñez, A.; Castillejos, Y.; García-Torales, G.; Martínez-Ponce, G.

    2013-11-01

    A number of optical techniques have been reported in the scientific literature as accomplishable methodologies to diagnose diseases in biological tissue, for instance, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and optical polarization imaging (OPI). The skin is the largest organ in the body and consists of three primary layers, namely, the epidermis (the outermost layer exposed to the world), the dermis, and the hypodermis. The epidermis changes from to site to site, mainly because of difference in hydration. A lower water content increase light scattering and reduce the penetration depth of radiation. In this work, two hairless mice have been selected to evaluate their skin features by using DRS and OPI. Four areas of the specimen body were chosen to realize the comparison: back, abdomen, tail, and head. From DRS, it was possible to distinguish the skin nature because of different blood irrigation at dermis. In the other hand, OPI shows pseudo-depolarizing regions in the measured Mueller images related to a spatially varying propagation of the scattered light. This provides information about the cell size in the irradiated skin.

  17. Boosting persistence time of laser-induced plasma by electric arc discharge for optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eschlböck-Fuchs, S., E-mail: simon.eschlboeck-fuchs@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Kolmhofer, P.J.; Bodea, M.A.; Hechenberger, J.G.; Huber, N. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Rössler, R. [voestalpine Stahl GmbH, A-4031 Linz (Austria); Pedarnig, J.D., E-mail: johannes.pedarnig@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2015-07-01

    Plasma induced by nanosecond laser ablation is re-excited by a pulsed electric discharge and the parameters and optical emission of the plasma are measured. The discharge is a low-voltage and high-current electric arc that is triggered by the laser-induced plasma and slowly decaying with time. The optical emission of such combined plasma lasts up to several milliseconds which is much longer than without re-excitation (μs range). The emission spectra of re-excited plasma measured on different sample materials show higher line intensities than spectra measured by conventional laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Moreover, emission lines of fluorine (spectral range 683–691 nm) and sulfur (range 520–550 nm) not detected by conventional LIBS become easily detectable with the combined plasma. The concentration of major components in metallurgical slags, as determined by calibration-free LIBS, agrees very well to the reference data evaluating the spectra taken from re-excited plasma. - Highlights: • Persistence time of laser-induced plasma in air is increased from ~ 10 μs to ~ 1 ms. • Laser-induced plasma triggers an electric arc discharge that boosts the plasma. • The combined laser-arc plasma is in LTE state over very long time (ms range). • CF-LIBS method delivers accurate results evaluating spectra of combined plasma. • Emission from S and F, not detected by LIBS, is detected with combined plasma.

  18. Diffuse optical spectroscopy monitoring of oxygen state and hemoglobin concentration during SKBR-3 tumor model growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, A. G.; Kirillin, M. Yu; Volovetsky, A. B.; Shilyagina, N. Yu; Sergeeva, E. A.; Golubiatnikov, G. Yu; Turchin, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    Tumor oxygenation and hemoglobin content are the key indicators of the tumor status which can be efficiently employed for prognosis of tumor development and choice of treatment strategy. We report on monitoring of these parameters in SKBR-3 (human breast adenocarcinoma) tumors established as subcutaneous tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice by diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS). A simple continuous wave fiber probe DOS system is employed. Optical properties extraction approach is based on diffusion approximation. Statistically significant difference between measured values of normal tissue and tumor are demonstrated. Hemoglobin content in tumor increases from 7.0  ±  4.2 μM to 30.1  ±  16.1 μM with tumor growth from 150  ±  80 mm3 to 1300  ±  650 mm3 which is determined by gradual increase of deoxyhemoglobin content while measured oxyhemoglobin content does not demonstrate any statistically significant variations. Oxygenation in tumor falls quickly from 52.8  ±  24.7% to 20.2  ±  4.8% preceding acceleration of tumor growth. Statistical analysis indicated dependence of oxy-, deoxy- and total hemoglobin on tumor volume (p  Pearson’s correlation coefficient equals 0.8).

  19. Spectral areas and ratios classifier algorithm for pancreatic tissue classification using optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Malavika; Scheiman, James; Simeone, Diane; McKenna, Barbara; Purdy, Julianne; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer death, in part because of the inability of current diagnostic methods to reliably detect early-stage disease. We present the first assessment of the diagnostic accuracy of algorithms developed for pancreatic tissue classification using data from fiber optic probe-based bimodal optical spectroscopy, a real-time approach that would be compatible with minimally invasive diagnostic procedures for early cancer detection in the pancreas. A total of 96 fluorescence and 96 reflectance spectra are considered from 50 freshly excised tissue sites-including human pancreatic adenocarcinoma, chronic pancreatitis (inflammation), and normal tissues-on nine patients. Classification algorithms using linear discriminant analysis are developed to distinguish among tissues, and leave-one-out cross-validation is employed to assess the classifiers' performance. The spectral areas and ratios classifier (SpARC) algorithm employs a combination of reflectance and fluorescence data and has the best performance, with sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value for correctly identifying adenocarcinoma being 85, 89, 92, and 80%, respectively.

  20. Optical Kerr Effect Spectroscopy of a Nonpolar Solute in Dicationic versus Monocationic Ionic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Eshan; Xue, Lianjie; Tamas, George; Quitevis, Edward

    2014-03-01

    A comparison of the intermolecular dynamics of small nonpolar solute molecules in monocationic and dicationic ionic liquids (ILs) was performed using optical heterodyne-detected Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy (OHD-RIKES). The optical Kerr effect (OKE) spectrum of CS2 in 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane-sulfonyl)amide [C3mim][NTf2] and 1,6-bis(3-methylimidazolium-1-yl) hexane bis(trifluoromethane-sulfonyl)amide [C6(mim)2][NTf2]2 was investigated as a function of concentration at 295 K. An additivity model with components from the subpicosecond dynamics of IL and CS2 was used to interpret the OKE spectra of the mixtures. The spectrum of CS2 in the two ILs is lower in frequency and narrower than that of neat CS2. The spectrum of CS2 in the dicationic IL is higher in frequency than in the monocationic IL. This result shows that CS2 molecule experiences a stiffer potential in dicationic ILs as compared to monocationic ILs. Higher stiffness in C6(mim)2][NTf2]2 might be due to a more ordered arrangement and lower mobility of the alkyl chains linking the imidazolium rings. This work was supported by NSF Grant CHE-1153077.