WorldWideScience

Sample records for optical sensor spheres

  1. Optical fiber sensors using hollow glass spheres and CCD spectrometer interrogator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakin, John P.; Ecke, Wolfgang; Schroeder, Kerstin; Reuter, Martin

    2009-10-01

    Hollow glass micro-spheres, firstly used to make fiber optic sensors for high hydrostatic pressure, have been interrogated using a high-resolution CCD-based spectrometer, to give far better precision than conventional spectrometric read out. It is found that these simple, low-cost micro-sensors have excellent sensitivity to both static and dynamic pressure, and have the advantage of being hermetically sealed. Many other application areas are foreseen for these low-cost sensors.

  2. Magnetically remote-controlled optical sensor spheres for monitoring oxygen or pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistlberger, Günter; Koren, Klaus; Borisov, Sergey M; Klimant, Ingo

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic sensor macrospheres (MagSeMacs), i.e., stainless steel spheres coated with optical chemical sensors, are presented as an alternative to existing optical sensor patches and fiber-optical dip-probes. Such spheres can either be reversibly attached to the tip of an optical fiber (dip-probe) or trapped inside a vessel for read-out through the side wall. Moving the magnetic separator at the exterior enables measurements at varying positions with a single sensor. Moreover, the sensor's replacement is rapid and contactless. We measured dissolved oxygen or pH in stirred liquids, rotating flasks, and 24-well plates with a SensorDish-reader device for parallel cell culture monitoring. In these applications, MagSeMacs proved to be advantageous over conventional sensor patches and magnetic optical sensor particles because of their magnetism, spherical shape, reflectance, and size. These properties resulted in strong but reversible fixation, magnetic remote-controllability, short response times, high signal intensities, and simplified handling.

  3. Integrated Optical Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambeck, Paul; Hoekstra, Hugo

    2003-01-01

    The optical (tele-) communication is the main driving force for the worldwide R&D on integrated optical devices and microsystems. lO-sensors have to compete with many other sensor types both within the optical domain (fiber sensors) and outside that domain, where sensors based on measurand induced c

  4. Integrated Optical Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambeck, Paul V.; Hoekstra, Hugo

    2003-01-01

    The optical (tele-) communication is the main driving force for the worldwide R&D on integrated optical devices and microsystems. lO-sensors have to compete with many other sensor types both within the optical domain (fiber sensors) and outside that domain, where sensors based on measurand induced c

  5. MEMS optical sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an all-optical sensor utilizing effective index modulation of a waveguide and detection of a wavelength shift of reflected light and a force sensing system accommodating said optical sensor. One embodiment of the invention relates to a sensor system comprising...... at least one multimode light source, one or more optical sensors comprising a multimode sensor optical waveguide accommodating a distributed Bragg reflector, at least one transmitting optical waveguide for guiding light from said at least one light source to said one or more multimode sensor optical...... waveguides, a detector for measuring light reflected from said Bragg reflector in said one or more multimode sensor optical waveguides, and a data processor adapted for analyzing variations in the Bragg wavelength of at least one higher order mode of the reflected light....

  6. Optical waveguide sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fluitman, J.; Popma, Th.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the field of optical waveguide sensors is presented. Some emphasis is laid on the development of a single scheme under which the diversity of sensor principles can be arranged. First three types of sensors are distinguished: intrinsic, extrinsic and active. Next, two steps are disting

  7. MEMS optical sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an all-optical sensor utilizing effective index modulation of a waveguide and detection of a wavelength shift of reflected light and a force sensing system accommodating said optical sensor. One embodiment of the invention relates to a sensor system comprising...... waveguides, a detector for measuring light reflected from said Bragg reflector in said one or more multimode sensor optical waveguides, and a data processor adapted for analyzing variations in the Bragg wavelength of at least one higher order mode of the reflected light....

  8. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homuth, Emil F.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  9. Roadmap on optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Mário F. S.; Castro-Camus, Enrique; Ottaway, David J.; López-Higuera, José Miguel; Feng, Xian; Jin, Wei; Jeong, Yoonchan; Picqué, Nathalie; Tong, Limin; Reinhard, Björn M.; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Méndez, Alexis; Diem, Max; Vollmer, Frank; Quan, Qimin

    2017-08-01

    Sensors are devices or systems able to detect, measure and convert magnitudes from any domain to an electrical one. Using light as a probe for optical sensing is one of the most efficient approaches for this purpose. The history of optical sensing using some methods based on absorbance, emissive and florescence properties date back to the 16th century. The field of optical sensors evolved during the following centuries, but it did not achieve maturity until the demonstration of the first laser in 1960. The unique properties of laser light become particularly important in the case of laser-based sensors, whose operation is entirely based upon the direct detection of laser light itself, without relying on any additional mediating device. However, compared with freely propagating light beams, artificially engineered optical fields are in increasing demand for probing samples with very small sizes and/or weak light-matter interaction. Optical fiber sensors constitute a subarea of optical sensors in which fiber technologies are employed. Different types of specialty and photonic crystal fibers provide improved performance and novel sensing concepts. Actually, structurization with wavelength or subwavelength feature size appears as the most efficient way to enhance sensor sensitivity and its detection limit. This leads to the area of micro- and nano-engineered optical sensors. It is expected that the combination of better fabrication techniques and new physical effects may open new and fascinating opportunities in this area. This roadmap on optical sensors addresses different technologies and application areas of the field. Fourteen contributions authored by experts from both industry and academia provide insights into the current state-of-the-art and the challenges faced by researchers currently. Two sections of this paper provide an overview of laser-based and frequency comb-based sensors. Three sections address the area of optical fiber sensors, encompassing both

  10. Sphere-based calibration method for trinocular vision sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Rui; Shao, Mingwei

    2017-03-01

    A new method to calibrate a trinocular vision sensor is proposed and two main tasks are finished in this paper, i.e. to determine the transformation matrix between each two cameras and the trifocal tensor of the trinocular vision sensor. A flexible sphere target with several spherical circles is designed. As the isotropy of a sphere, trifocal tensor of the three cameras can be determined exactly from the feature on the sphere target. Then the fundamental matrix between each two cameras can be obtained. Easily, compatible rotation matrix and translation matrix can be deduced base on the singular value decomposition of the fundamental matrix. In our proposed calibration method, image points are not requested one-to-one correspondence. When image points locates in the same feature are obtained, the transformation matrix between each two cameras with the trifocal tensor of trinocular vision sensor can be determined. Experiment results show that the proposed calibration method can obtain precise results, including measurement and matching results. The root mean square error of distance is 0.026 mm with regard to the view field of about 200×200 mm and the feature matching of three images is strict. As a sphere projection is not concerned with its orientation, the calibration method is robust and with an easy operation. Moreover, our calibration method also provides a new approach to obtain the trifocal tensor.

  11. Wearable Optical Chemical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobnik, Aleksandra

    Wearable sensors can be used to provide valuable information about the wearer's health and/or monitor the wearer's surroundings, identify safety concerns and detect threats, during the wearer's daily routine within his or her natural environment. The "sensor on a textile", an integrated sensor capable of analyzing data, would enable early many forms of detection. Moreover, a sensor connected with a smart delivery system could simultaneously provide comfort and monitoring (for safety and/or health), non-invasive measurements, no laboratory sampling, continuous monitoring during the daily activity of the person, and possible multi-parameter analysis and monitoring. However, in order for the technology to be accessible, it must remain innocuous and impose a minimal intrusion on the daily activities of the wearer. Therefore, such wearable technologies should be soft, flexible, and washable in order to meet the expectations of normal clothing. Optical chemical sensors (OCSs) could be used as wearable technology since they can be embedded into textile structures by using conventional dyeing, printing processes and coatings, while fiber-optic chemical sensors (FOCSs) as well as nanofiber sensors (NFSs) can be incorporated by weaving, knitting or laminating. The interest in small, robust and sensitive sensors that can be embedded into textile structures is increasing and the research activity on this topic is an important issue.

  12. Sphere-Wall Impact Experiments with Piezoelectric Force Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinko, John E.; Lassiter, Jonathan S.

    2008-04-01

    Measurement of impulse imparted to a target from μs-timescale laser ablation events is often performed with piezoelectric force sensors. For pulsed laser ablation with a target resting on the force sensors, an effect can occur for a vertical thrust stand in an exhaust-up configuration that results in measurement of about twice the actual imparted impulse. A CO2 laser operating at 10.6 μm wavelength, 300 ns pulse length, and up to 20 J pulse energy single shots was used to ablate samples of PCTFE. Force sensor measurements of the imparted impulse were compared to tests with a ballistic pendulum over a variety of fluences. The theoretical impulse delivered by the impacts of 6 mm diameter spheres of aluminum, steel, POM, and PTFE on the force sensor were studied, and the coefficients of restitution were measured for the targets. Practical issues for measurement of ablation-imparted impulse with piezoelectric sensors are discussed.

  13. Wearable Optical Sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Ballard, Zachary S.

    2017-07-12

    The market for wearable sensors is predicted to grow to $5.5 billion by 2025, impacting global health in unprecedented ways. Optics and photonics will play a key role in the future of these wearable technologies, enabling highly sensitive measurements of otherwise invisible information and parameters about our health and surrounding environment. Through the implementation of optical wearable technologies, such as heart rate, blood pressure, and glucose monitors, among others, individuals are becoming more empowered to generate a wealth of rich, multifaceted physiological and environmental data, making personalized medicine a reality. Furthermore, these technologies can also be implemented in hospitals, clinics, point-of-care offices, assisted living facilities or even in patients’ homes for real-time, remote patient monitoring, creating more expeditious as well as resource-efficient systems. Several key optical technologies make such sensors possible, including e.g., optical fiber textiles, colorimetric, plasmonic, and fluorometric sensors, as well as Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) and Organic Photo-Diode (OPD) technologies. These emerging technologies and platforms show great promise as basic sensing elements in future wearable devices and will be reviewed in this chapter along-side currently existing fully integrated wearable optical sensors.

  14. Optical fiber synaptic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarchik, A. N.; Jaimes-Reátegui, R.; Sevilla-Escoboza, R.; García-Lopez, J. H.; Kazantsev, V. B.

    2011-06-01

    Understanding neuron connections is a great challenge, which is needed to solve many important problems in neurobiology and neuroengineering for recreation of brain functions and efficient biorobotics. In particular, a design of an optical synapse capable to communicate with neuron spike sequences would be crucial to improve the functionality of neuromimmetic networks. In this work we propose an optical synaptic sensor based on an erbium-doped fiber laser driven by a FitzHung-Nagumo electronic neuron, to connect with another electronic neuron. Two possible optical synaptic configurations are analyzed for optoelectronic coupling between neurons: laser cavity loss modulation and pump laser modulation. The control parameters of the proposed optical synapse provide additional degrees of flexibility to the neuron connection traditionally controlled only by coupling strengths in artificial networks.

  15. Infrared Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Successive years of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Langley Research Center to Sensiv Inc., a joint venture between Foster-Miller Inc. and Isorad, Ltd., assisted in the creation of remote fiber optic sensing systems. NASA's SBIR interest in infrared, fiber optic sensor technology was geared to monitoring the curing cycles of advanced composite materials. These funds helped in the fabrication of an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. Foster-Miller ingenuity allowed infrared transmitting optical fibers to combine with Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy to enable remote sensing. Sensiv probes operate in the mid-infrared range of the spectrum, although modifications to the instrument also permits its use in the near-infrared region. The Sensiv needle-probe is built to be placed in a liquid or powder and analyze the chemicals in the mixture. Other applications of the probe system include food processing control; combustion control in furnaces; and maintenance problem solving.

  16. From Ewald sphere to Ewald shell in nonlinear optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huang; Huang, Cheng-Ping; Zhang, Chao; Hong, Xu-Hao; Zhang, Xue-Jin; Qin, Yi-Qiang; Zhu, Yong-Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Ewald sphere is a simple vector scheme to depict the X-ray Bragg diffraction in a crystal. A similar method, known as the nonlinear Ewald sphere, was employed to illustrate optical frequency conversion processes. We extend the nonlinear Ewald sphere to the Ewald shell construction. With the Ewald shell, a variety of quasi-phase-matching (QPM) effects, such as the collective envelope effect associated with multiple QPM resonances, the enhanced second- harmonic generation due to multiple reciprocal vectors etc., are suggested theoretically and verified experimentally. By rotating the nonlinear photonic crystal sample, the dynamic evolution of these QPM effects has also been observed, which agreed well with the Ewald shell model.

  17. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, M.A.; Sanchez, R.; Dulleck, G.R.

    1996-05-01

    This report covers the development of fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensors for monitoring dissolved hydrogen gas in transformer oil. The concentration of hydrogen gas is a measure of the corona and spark discharge within the transformer and reflects the state of health of the transformer. Key features of the instrument include use of palladium alloys to enhance hydrogen sensitivity, a microprocessor controlled instrument with RS-232, liquid crystal readout, and 4-20 ma. current loop interfaces. Calibration data for both sensors can be down loaded to the instrument through the RS-232 interface. This project was supported by the Technology Transfer Initiative in collaboration with J. W. Harley, Inc. through the mechanism of a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA).

  18. Fiber-Optic Sensor Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Constructs and evaluates fiber-optic sensors for a variety of measurands. These measurands include acoustic, pressure, magnetic, and electric field as well...

  19. Interferometric Fiber Optic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Young Choi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Fiber optic interferometers to sense various physical parameters including temperature, strain, pressure, and refractive index have been widely investigated. They can be categorized into four types: Fabry-Perot, Mach-Zehnder, Michelson, and Sagnac. In this paper, each type of interferometric sensor is reviewed in terms of operating principles, fabrication methods, and application fields. Some specific examples of recently reported interferometeric sensor technologies are presented in detail to show their large potential in practical applications. Some of the simple to fabricate but exceedingly effective Fabry-Perot interferometers, implemented in both extrinsic and intrinsic structures, are discussed. Also, a wide variety of Mach-Zehnder and Michelson interferometric sensors based on photonic crystal fibers are introduced along with their remarkable sensing performances. Finally, the simultaneous multi-parameter sensing capability of a pair of long period fiber grating (LPG is presented in two types of structures; one is the Mach-Zehnder interferometer formed in a double cladding fiber and the other is the highly sensitive Sagnac interferometer cascaded with an LPG pair.

  20. Interferometric fiber optic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeong Ha; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Kwan Seob; Eom, Joo Beom; Kim, Myoung Jin; Rho, Byung Sup; Choi, Hae Young

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic interferometers to sense various physical parameters including temperature, strain, pressure, and refractive index have been widely investigated. They can be categorized into four types: Fabry-Perot, Mach-Zehnder, Michelson, and Sagnac. In this paper, each type of interferometric sensor is reviewed in terms of operating principles, fabrication methods, and application fields. Some specific examples of recently reported interferometeric sensor technologies are presented in detail to show their large potential in practical applications. Some of the simple to fabricate but exceedingly effective Fabry-Perot interferometers, implemented in both extrinsic and intrinsic structures, are discussed. Also, a wide variety of Mach-Zehnder and Michelson interferometric sensors based on photonic crystal fibers are introduced along with their remarkable sensing performances. Finally, the simultaneous multi-parameter sensing capability of a pair of long period fiber grating (LPG) is presented in two types of structures; one is the Mach-Zehnder interferometer formed in a double cladding fiber and the other is the highly sensitive Sagnac interferometer cascaded with an LPG pair.

  1. Optical technologies for space sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hu; Liu, Jie; Xue, Yaoke; Liu, Yang; Liu, Meiying; Wang, Lingguang; Yang, Shaodong; Lin, Shangmin; Chen, Su; Luo, Jianjun

    2015-10-01

    Space sensors are used in navigation sensor fields. The sun, the earth, the moon and other planets are used as frame of reference to obtain stellar position coordinates, and then to control the attitude of an aircraft. Being the "eyes" of the space sensors, Optical sensor system makes images of the infinite far stars and other celestial bodies. It directly affects measurement accuracy of the space sensor, indirectly affecting the data updating rate. Star sensor technology is the pilot for Space sensors. At present more and more attention is paid on all-day star sensor technology. By day and night measurements of the stars, the aircraft's attitude in the inertial coordinate system can be provided. Facing the requirements of ultra-high-precision, large field of view, wide spectral range, long life and high reliability, multi-functional optical system, we integration, integration optical sensors will be future space technology trends. In the meantime, optical technologies for space-sensitive research leads to the development of ultra-precision optical processing, optical and precision test machine alignment technology. It also promotes the development of long-life optical materials and applications. We have achieved such absolute distortion better than ±1um, Space life of at least 15years of space-sensitive optical system.

  2. Fiber Optic Geophysics Sensor Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grochowski, Lucjan

    1989-01-01

    The distributed optical sensor arrays are analysed in view of specific needs of 3-D seismic explorations methods. There are compared advantages and disadventages of arrays supported by the sensors which are modulated in intensity and phase. In these systems all-fiber optic structures and their compabilities with digital geophysic formats are discussed. It was shown that the arrays based on TDM systems with the intensity modulated sensors are economically and technically the best matched for geophysic systems supported by a large number of the sensors.

  3. Optical Landing Hazard Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Visidyne proposes to investigate an active optical 3D imaging LADAR as the sensor for an automated Landing Hazard Avoidance system for spacecraft landing on the Moon...

  4. Fiber Optic Magnetic Sensor Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-28

    Michelson inter- ferometric fiber optical point temperature sensor (Appendix B). The sensor has potential applicntion to non-invnsive and high...3roeniheaingUsing similar techniques, to for monolithic circuits. Lange couplers have been fabricated on alumina substrates. The: re- Fig 3 illustrates

  5. Optical simulation of the new PTB sphere interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Torsten; Nicolaus, Arnold

    2017-08-01

    For the redefinition of the SI-unit kilogram the Avogadro constant needs to be determined with lowest possible uncertainty. The approach which is followed by an international group including the PTB is the XRCD-method (Azuma et al 2015 Metrologia 52 360). Currently the uncertainty of the silicon sphere volume determination is the main contribution to the uncertainty of the Avogadro constant and therefore critical for reaching the self-set goal of underrunning a relative uncertainty of 1.5×10-8 . The volume uncertainty itself is dominated by the wave-front deformation uncertainty which occurs due to optical imperfections in the measurement system. Up to now this type of uncertainty was only roughly estimated. This paper presents results from a self developed optical raytracing software which allows the main deviations of the real optical system from the ideal optical design to be investigated. With this software a complete sphere measurement can be simulated which helps to determine the influence of the system imperfections. In result the relative uncertainty contribution of the wave-front uncertainties to the volume measurement can be reduced to 4.5 × 10-9 .

  6. Adaptive optical zoom sensor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweatt, William C.; Bagwell, Brett E.; Wick, David Victor

    2005-11-01

    In order to optically vary the magnification of an imaging system, continuous mechanical zoom lenses require multiple optical elements and use fine mechanical motion to precisely adjust the separations between individual or groups of lenses. By incorporating active elements into the optical design, we have designed and demonstrated imaging systems that are capable of variable optical magnification with no macroscopic moving parts. Changing the effective focal length and magnification of an imaging system can be accomplished by adeptly positioning two or more active optics in the optical design and appropriately adjusting the optical power of those elements. In this application, the active optics (e.g. liquid crystal spatial light modulators or deformable mirrors) serve as variable focal-length lenses. Unfortunately, the range over which currently available devices can operate (i.e. their dynamic range) is relatively small. Therefore, the key to this concept is to create large changes in the effective focal length of the system with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual elements by leveraging the optical power of conventional optical elements surrounding the active optics. By appropriately designing the optical system, these variable focal-length lenses can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length, and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses.

  7. Micro-fabricated all optical pressure sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havreland, Andreas Spandet; Petersen, Søren Dahl; Østergaard, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Optical pressure sensors can operate in certain harsh application areas where the electrical pressure sensors cannot. However, the sensitivity is often not as good for the optical sensors. This work presents an all optical pressure sensor, which is fabricated by micro fabrication techniques, wher...

  8. Full-field optical coherence tomography apply in sphere measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Li, Weiwei; li, Juncheng; Wang, Jingyu; Wang, Jianguo

    2016-10-01

    The geometry of a spherical surface, for example that of a precision optic, is completely determined by the radius -of-curvature at one point and the deviation from the perfect spherical form at all other points of the sphere. Full-field Optical Coherence Tomography (FF-OCT) is a parallel detection OCT technique that utilizes a 2D detector array. This technique avoids mechanical scanning in imaging optics, thereby speeding up the imaging process and enhancing the quality of images. The current paper presents an FF-OCT instrument that is designed to be used in sphere measurement with the principle of multiple delays (MD) OCT to evaluate the curvature and radius of curved objects in single-shot imaging. The optimum combination of the MD principle with the FF-OCT method was evaluated, and the radius of a metal ball was measured with this method. The generated 2n-1 contour lines were obtained by using an MDE with n delays in a single en-face OCT image. This method of measurement, it engaged in the measurement accuracy of spherical and enriches the means of measurement, to make a spherical scan techniques flexible application.

  9. All-optical pressure sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to an all-optical pressure sensor comprising a waveguide accommodating a distributed Bragg reflector. Pressure sensing can then be provided by utilizing effective index modulation of the waveguide and detection of a wavelength shift of light reflected from the Bragg...... reflector. Sound sensing may also be provided thereby having an all-optical microphone. One embodiment of the invention relates to an optical pressure sensor comprising at least one outer membrane and a waveguide, the waveguide comprising at least one core for confining and guiding light,at least one...... distributed Bragg reflector located in said at least one core, and at least one inner deflecting element forming at least a part of the core,wherein the pressure sensor is configured such that the geometry and/or dimension of the at least one core is changed when the at least one outer membrane is submitted...

  10. Fiber optic sensor and method for making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartuli, James Scott; Bousman, Kenneth Sherwood; Deng, Kung-Li; McEvoy, Kevin Paul; Xia, Hua

    2010-05-18

    A fiber optic sensor including a fiber having a modified surface integral with the fiber wherein the modified surface includes an open pore network with optical agents dispersed within the open pores of the open pore network. Methods for preparing the fiber optic sensor are also provided. The fiber optic sensors can withstand high temperatures and harsh environments.

  11. Fiber-Optic Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maram, Jonathan M.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed sensor measures temperatures over wide range, from cryogenic liquids to burning gases. Made in part of optical fibers, sensor lighter in weight than thermocouple and immune to electromagnetic interference. Device does not respond to temperatures elsewhere than at sensing tip. Thermal expansion and contraction of distance between fiber end and mirror alters interference between light reflected from those two surfaces, thereby giving interferometric indication of temperatures.

  12. Wearable optical sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Maurício Neves Rodrigues da Silva

    2008-01-01

    Neste trabalho foi desenvolvido um sensor para medição do ângulo de flexão do cotovelo de um indivíduo. Este sensor é uma ajuda na aferição da recuperação de uma pessoa que sofreu um acidente cardiovascular e que tenha perdido mobilidade no conjunto ombro-braço. Embora o sensor por si só não desempenhe uma função vital na recuperação de um paciente com as características referidas, espera-se que se torne uma ajuda na motivação da pessoa bem como uma maneira de quantificar o ...

  13. Optical Fiber Grating based Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susanne

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis differenct optical fiber gratings are used for sensor purposes. If a fiber with a core concentricity error (CCE) is used, a directional dependent bend sensor can be produced. The CCE direction can be determined by means of diffraction. This makes it possible to produce long......-period gratings in a fiber with a CCE direction parallel or perpendicular to the writing direction. The maximal bending sensitivity is independent on the writing direction, but the detailed bending response is different in the two cases. A temperature and strain sensor, based on a long-period grating and two...

  14. Fiber Optic Chemical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Studies Press Ltd, Book Chapter, AIS, 1-25, 1983. Saarl, Linda A. and Seltz, Rudolf W., "Immobilized Morin as Fluorescence Sensor for Determination...34Thin Films," Photonics Spectra, AVO, AIS, 113-118, 1988. Hanst, Philip L. and Stephens, Edgar R., "Infrared Analysis of Engine Exhausts: Methyl...79-84, 1988. Watson, Jr., Edgar , "On-line Analysis of Trace Contaminants 145 36 in Process Streams," Amarican Laboratory, AVO, AIS, 97-101, 1988

  15. High-Temperature Optical Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Varga, Donald J.; Floyd, Bertram M.

    2010-01-01

    A high-temperature optical sensor (see Figure 1) has been developed that can operate at temperatures up to 1,000 C. The sensor development process consists of two parts: packaging of a fiber Bragg grating into a housing that allows a more sturdy thermally stable device, and a technological process to which the device is subjected to in order to meet environmental requirements of several hundred C. This technology uses a newly discovered phenomenon of the formation of thermally stable secondary Bragg gratings in communication-grade fibers at high temperatures to construct robust, optical, high-temperature sensors. Testing and performance evaluation (see Figure 2) of packaged sensors demonstrated operability of the devices at 1,000 C for several hundred hours, and during numerous thermal cycling from 400 to 800 C with different heating rates. The technology significantly extends applicability of optical sensors to high-temperature environments including ground testing of engines, flight propulsion control, thermal protection monitoring of launch vehicles, etc. It may also find applications in such non-aerospace arenas as monitoring of nuclear reactors, furnaces, chemical processes, and other hightemperature environments where other measurement techniques are either unreliable, dangerous, undesirable, or unavailable.

  16. Distributed optical fiber surface plasmon resonance sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenxin Cao; Lenan Wu; Dayong Li

    2006-01-01

    @@ The relationships of the resonant wavelength of optical fiber surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors to the modulation layer refractive index, thickness and the refractive index of the bulk medium are obtained by using theoretical calculation model of optical fiber SPR sensors under certain conditions, which indicates that resonant wavelength of the sensors is approximately linear with modulation layer thickness. Based on the linear relationship, multiple SPR sensors with different resonant wavelengths can be fabricated in a single optical fiber named as distributed optical fiber surface plasmon resonance sensors (DOFSPRSs).Experimental results are presented, showing that it is practical to fabricate more than one SPR sensors in a single optical fiber.

  17. Structural health monitoring with fiber optic sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.ANSARI

    2009-01-01

    Optical fiber sensors have been successfully implemented in aeronautics, mechanical systems, and medical applications. Civil structures pose further challenges in monitoring mainly due to their large dimensions, diversity and heterogeneity of materials involved, and hostile construction environment. This article provides a summary of basic principles pertaining to practical health monitoring of civil engineering structures with optical fiber sensors. The issues discussed include basic sensor principles, strain transfer mechanism, sensor packaging, sensor placement in construction environment, and reliability and survivability of the sensors.

  18. High pressure fiber optic sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, Renato; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon K; Dekate, Sachin N

    2013-11-26

    The present application provides a fiber optic sensor system. The fiber optic sensor system may include a small diameter bellows, a large diameter bellows, and a fiber optic pressure sensor attached to the small diameter bellows. Contraction of the large diameter bellows under an applied pressure may cause the small diameter bellows to expand such that the fiber optic pressure sensor may measure the applied pressure.

  19. Reference Sphere Positioning Measurement Based on Line-Structured Light Vision Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The line-structured light vision sensor has been used widely in industrial vision measuring fields due to its simple structure, small volume, light weight, low cost, convenient calibration, and high accuracy of measurement. To locate the reference sphere precisely with line-structured light vision sensor, a mathematical model based on the measuring principle of line-structured light vision sensor is established in the paper. Then, the positioning measurement error is analyzed in detail. The e...

  20. Optical rotation sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotge, J. R.; Simmons, B. J.; Kroncke, G. T.; Stech, D. J.

    1986-05-01

    Research efforts were concentrated on passive ring laser rotation sensor technology. Initial efforts were performed on supportive projects, e.g., laser stabilization, followed by a 0.62 sq m passive resonant ring laser gyro (PRRLG), leading to the development of a 60 sq m system mounted on the pneumatically supported isolation test platform (Iso-Pad) at FJSRL. Numerous sub-system tasks and a feasibility 0.62 sq m PRRLG were completed, supporting projections of very high resolution performance by a large 60 sq m PRRLG. The expected performance of the large PRRLG, on the order of 10 to the minus 10th power ERU (earth rate units), would provide an accurate error model applicable to Air Force operational ring laser gyros, a new source of geophysical data, e.g., earth wobble and variations in earth rotation, a proven design concept applicable to Air Force sensor needs as reference to MX instruments tests, and relativity experiments. This report documents the many accomplishments leading to, and the status of the large PRRLG at the date of the PRRLG stop order, November 1985.

  1. Overview of Fiber-Optical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P.; Moore, Emery L.

    1987-01-01

    Design, development, and sensitivity of sensors using fiber optics reviewed. State-of-the-art and probable future developments of sensors using fiber optics described in report including references to work in field. Serves to update previously published surveys. Systems incorporating fiber-optic sensors used in medical diagnosis, navigation, robotics, sonar, power industry, and industrial controls.

  2. Optical viscosity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng-Ling; Peyroux, Juliette; Perez, Alex; Tsui, Chi-Leung; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2009-03-01

    Viscosity measurement by bend loss of fiber is presented. The sensing principle makes use of the damping characteristic of a vibrating optical fiber probe with fix-free end configuration. By measuring the displacement of the fiber probe, the viscosity can be determined by matching the probe's displacement with the displacement built in the database obtained by either experimental method or Finite element calculation. Experimental results are presented by measuring the sucrose and glycerol solutions of different concentrations with a viscosity varying from 1 to 15 cP. Stokes' flow assumption is utilized to attenuate the mass density effect and simplify the viscosity measurement.

  3. Threshold temperature optical fibre sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiewicz, K. A.; Musial, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a new approach to manufacture a threshold temperature sensor based on a biconical optical fibre taper. The presented sensor employs the influence of variable state of concentration of some isotropic materials like wax or paraffin. Application of the above- mentioned materials is an attempt to prove that there is a possibility to obtain a low-cost, repeatable and smart sensor working as an in-line element. Optical fibre taper was obtained from a standard single mode fibre (SMF28®) by using a low pressure gas burner technique. The diameter of the manufactured tapers was 6.0 ± 0.5 μm with the length of elongation equal to 30.50 ± 0.16 mm. The applied technology allowed to produce tapers with the losses of 0.183 ± 0.015 dB. Application of materials with different temperature transition points made it possible to obtain the threshold work at the temperatures connected directly with their conversion temperature. External materials at the temperatures above their melting points do not influence the propagation losses. For each of them two types of the protection area and position of the optical fibre taper were applied.

  4. Great prospects for fiber optics sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, T. E.

    1983-10-01

    Fiber optic sensors provide noise immunity and galvanic insulation at the measurement point. Interest in such sensors is increasing for these reasons. In the United States sales are expected to increase from 12 million dollars in 1981 to 180 million in 1991. Interferometric sensors based on single modus fibers deliver extremely high sensitivity, while sensors based on multi-modus fibers are more easily manufactured. The fiber optic sensors which are available today are based on point measurements. Development of fiber optic sensors in Norway is being carried out at the Central institute and has resulted in the development of medical manometers which are now undergoing clinical testing.

  5. Fiber optic sensors for smart taxiways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Douglas D.; Fuerstenau, Norbert; Goetze, Wolfgang

    1995-09-01

    Fiber-optic sensors could offer advantages in the field of airport ground traffic monitoring: immunity to electromagnetic interference, installation without costly and time consuming airfield closures, and low loss, low noise optical connection between sensors and signal processing equipment. This paper describes fiber-optic sensors developed for airport taxiway monitoring and the first steps toward their installation in an experimental surface movement guidance and control system at the Braunschweig airport. Initial results obtained with fiber- optic light barriers and vibration sensors are reported. The feasibility of employing interferometric strain gauges for this application will be discussed based on sensor characteristics obtained through measurements of strain in an aircraft structure in flight.

  6. Gold island fiber optic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriaudeau, Fabrice; Wig, A. G.; Passian, A.; Downey, Todd R.; Buncick, Milan; Ferrell, Trinidad L.

    1999-12-01

    A fiber optic chemical sensor based on gold-island surface plasmon excitation is presented. The sensing part of the fiber is the end of the fiber onto which a thin layer of gold has been deposited to form a particulate surface. Annealing the gold reshapes the particles and produces an optical absorbance near 535 nm with the fiber in air. The optical absorption resonance of the gold particles is shifted if the fiber is immersed in a medium other than air. These resonance shifts are examined by transmission spectroscopy through the fiber. Experimental results for the sensitivity and dynamic range in the measurement of liquid solutions are in agreement with a basic theoretical model which characterizes the surface plasmon using nonretarded electrodynamics.

  7. A highly sensitive, low-cost, wearable pressure sensor based on conductive hydrogel spheres

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong

    2015-01-01

    Wearable pressure sensing solutions have promising future for practical applications in health monitoring and human/machine interfaces. Here, a highly sensitive, low-cost, wearable pressure sensor based on conductive single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/alginate hydrogel spheres is reported. Conductive and piezoresistive spheres are embedded between conductive electrodes (indium tin oxide-coated polyethylene terephthalate films) and subjected to environmental pressure. The detection mechanism is based on the piezoresistivity of the SWCNT/alginate conductive spheres and on the sphere-electrode contact. Step-by-step, we optimized the design parameters to maximize the sensitivity of the sensor. The optimized hydrogel sensor exhibited a satisfactory sensitivity (0.176 ΔR/R0/kPa-1) and a low detectable limit (10 Pa). Moreover, a brief response time (a few milliseconds) and successful repeatability were also demonstrated. Finally, the efficiency of this strategy was verified through a series of practical tests such as monitoring human wrist pulse, detecting throat muscle motion or identifying the location and the distribution of an external pressure using an array sensor (4 × 4). © 2015 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  8. A highly sensitive, low-cost, wearable pressure sensor based on conductive hydrogel spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yanlong; Mulle, Matthieu; Aguilar Ventura, Isaac; Lubineau, Gilles

    2015-09-21

    Wearable pressure sensing solutions have promising future for practical applications in health monitoring and human/machine interfaces. Here, a highly sensitive, low-cost, wearable pressure sensor based on conductive single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/alginate hydrogel spheres is reported. Conductive and piezoresistive spheres are embedded between conductive electrodes (indium tin oxide-coated polyethylene terephthalate films) and subjected to environmental pressure. The detection mechanism is based on the piezoresistivity of the SWCNT/alginate conductive spheres and on the sphere-electrode contact. Step-by-step, we optimized the design parameters to maximize the sensitivity of the sensor. The optimized hydrogel sensor exhibited a satisfactory sensitivity (0.176 ΔR/R0/kPa(-1)) and a low detectable limit (10 Pa). Moreover, a brief response time (a few milliseconds) and successful repeatability were also demonstrated. Finally, the efficiency of this strategy was verified through a series of practical tests such as monitoring human wrist pulse, detecting throat muscle motion or identifying the location and the distribution of an external pressure using an array sensor (4 × 4).

  9. Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — VIP Sensors proposes to develop a Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor Array for measuring air flow pressure at multiple points on the skin of aircrafts for Flight Load Test...

  10. Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — VIP Sensors proposes to develop a Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor Array System for measuring air flow pressure at multiple points on the skin of aircrafts for Flight...

  11. Optical seismic sensor systems and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, A. Craig; Cummings, Malcolm E.; Zavriyev, Anton; Christensen, Caleb A.; Lee, Keun

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed is an optical seismic sensor system for measuring seismic events in a geological formation, including a surface unit for generating and processing an optical signal, and a sensor device optically connected to the surface unit for receiving the optical signal over an optical conduit. The sensor device includes at least one sensor head for sensing a seismic disturbance from at least one direction during a deployment of the sensor device within a borehole of the geological formation. The sensor head includes a frame and a reference mass attached to the frame via at least one flexure, such that movement of the reference mass relative to the frame is constrained to a single predetermined path.

  12. Assessment of fiber optic pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemian, H.M.; Black, C.L.; Farmer, J.P. [Analysis and Measurement Services Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    This report presents the results of a six-month Phase 1 study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing and describes the design and principle of operation of various fiber optic pressure sensors. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. In addition, current requirements for environmental and seismic qualification of sensors for nuclear power plants were reviewed to determine the extent of the qualification tests that fiber optic pressure sensors may have to meet before they can be used in nuclear power plants. This project has concluded that fiber optic pressure sensors are still in the research and development stage and only a few manufacturers exist in the US and abroad which supply suitable fiber optic pressure sensors for industrial applications. Presently, fiber optic pressure sensors are mostly used in special applications for which conventional sensors are not able to meet the requirements.

  13. Development of Whispering Gallery Mode Polymeric Micro-optical Electric Field Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioppolo, Tindaro; Ötügen, Volkan; Ayaz, Ulas

    2013-01-01

    Optical modes of dielectric micro-cavities have received significant attention in recent years for their potential in a broad range of applications. The optical modes are frequently referred to as "whispering gallery modes" (WGM) or "morphology dependent resonances" (MDR) and exhibit high optical quality factors. Some proposed applications of micro-cavity optical resonators are in spectroscopy1, micro-cavity laser technology2, optical communications3-6 as well as sensor technology. The WGM-based sensor applications include those in biology7, trace gas detection8, and impurity detection in liquids9. Mechanical sensors based on microsphere resonators have also been proposed, including those for force10,11, pressure12, acceleration13 and wall shear stress14. In the present, we demonstrate a WGM-based electric field sensor, which builds on our previous studies15,16. A candidate application of this sensor is in the detection of neuronal action potential. The electric field sensor is based on polymeric multi-layered dielectric microspheres. The external electric field induces surface and body forces on the spheres (electrostriction effect) leading to elastic deformation. This change in the morphology of the spheres, leads to shifts in the WGM. The electric field-induced WGM shifts are interrogated by exciting the optical modes of the spheres by laser light. Light from a distributed feedback (DFB) laser (nominal wavelength of ~ 1.3 μm) is side-coupled into the microspheres using a tapered section of a single mode optical fiber. The base material of the spheres is polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Three microsphere geometries are used: (1) PDMS sphere with a 60:1 volumetric ratio of base-to-curing agent mixture, (2) multi layer sphere with 60:1 PDMS core, in order to increase the dielectric constant of the sphere, a middle layer of 60:1 PDMS that is mixed with varying amounts (2% to 10% by volume) of barium titanate and an outer layer of 60:1 PDMS and (3) solid silica sphere

  14. Integrated Differential Optical Shadow Sensor for Modular Gravitational Reference Sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Zoellner, Andreas; Sun, Ke-Xun

    2013-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a proposed space mission for the detection of gravitational waves. It consists of three drag-free satellites flying in a triangular constellation. A gravitational reference sensor is used in conjunction with a laser interferometer to measure the distance between test masses inside the three satellites. Other future space mission such as DECIGO and BBO also require a gravitational reference sensor. The Modular Gravitational Reference Sensor (MGRS) is being designed for these purposes and consists of two different optical sensors and a UV LED charge management system. The Differential Optical Shadow Sensor (DOSS) is one of the optical sensors and measures the position of a spherical test mass with respect to the surrounding satellite. This measurement is used for the drag-free feedback control loop. This paper describes the most recent, third generation of the experimental setup for the DOSS that uses a fiber coupled super luminescent LED, an integrated mounting ...

  15. Reference Sphere Positioning Measurement Based on Line-Structured Light Vision Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The line-structured light vision sensor has been used widely in industrial vision measuring fields due to its simple structure, small volume, light weight, low cost, convenient calibration, and high accuracy of measurement. To locate the reference sphere precisely with line-structured light vision sensor, a mathematical model based on the measuring principle of line-structured light vision sensor is established in the paper. Then, the positioning measurement error is analyzed in detail. The experimental results show that the method is valid and correct. In addition, an accurate measurement area which is from R0 × sin 45° to R0 × sin 75° away from the center of reference sphere is delimited through the statistical analysis of the experimental data. For the robot temperature compensation and calibration of flexible vision measurement system, this method effectively solves the positioning measurement problems about reference sphere with line-structured light vision sensor and has been applied in the industrial flexible online measurement systems successfully.

  16. A versatile integrating sphere based photoacoustic sensor for trace gas monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Lassen, Mikael; Brusch, Anders; Petersen, Jan C

    2014-01-01

    A compact versatile photoacoustic (PA) sensor for trace gas detection is reported. The sensor is based on an integrating sphere as the PA absorption cell with an organ pipe tube attached to increase the sensitivity of the PA sensor. The versatility and enhancement of the sensitivity of the PA signal is investigated by monitoring specific ro-vibrational lines of CO2 in the 2 mm wavelength region and of NO2 in the 405 nm region. The measured enhancement factor of the PA signal exceeds 1200, which is due to the acoustic resonance of the tube and the absorption enhancement of the integrating sphere relatively to a non-resonant single pass cell. It is observed that the background absorption signals are highly attenuated due to the thermal conduction and diffusion effects in the polytetrafluoroethylene cell walls. This demonstrates that careful choice of cell wall materials can be highly beneficial to the sensitivity of the PA sensor. These properties makes the sensor suitable for various practical sensor applicati...

  17. Miniaturised optical sensors for industrial applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2010-01-01

    When addressing optical sensors for use in e.g. industry, compactness, robustness and performance are essentials. Adhering to these demands, we have developed a suit of compact optical sensors for the specific purposes of measuring angular velocity and linear translations of rigid objects...

  18. Digitally encoded all-optical sensor multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Anjum

    1992-01-01

    A digital, all-optical temperature sensor design concept based on optical sampling and digital encoding is presented. The proposed sensor generates 2M binary digital codewords of length M bits. The codewords are generated serially and, therefore, only a single output fiber line is required. A multiplexing scheme, which minimizes the power requirement per sensor array and facilitates a cost-effective digit regeneration for remote monitoring over long distance, is presented. The sensor arrays are used as building blocks to configure large scale sensor networks based on LAN topologies.

  19. Fibre-optic sensors in health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazia Mignani, Anna; Baldini, Francesco

    1997-05-01

    Biomedical fibre-optic sensors are attractive for the measurement of physical, chemical and biochemical parameters and for spectral measurements directly performed on the patient. An overview of fibre-optic sensors for in vivo monitoring is given, with particular attention paid to the advantages that these sensors are able to offer in different application fields such as cardiovascular and intensive care, angiology, gastroenterology, ophthalmology, oncology, neurology, dermatology and dentistry.

  20. Porous glasses for optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorosz, Dominik; Procyk, Bernadeta

    2006-03-01

    Microporous glasses from the Na II0-B II0 3-Si0 II system can be obtained by appropriate thermal and chemical treatment. During the thermal treatment the separation of the borate phase from the silicon skeleton has been occurred. The borates are in the form small drops joined to each other. In the course of chemical treatment the borates become leached in water, water solutions of acids or basis and the glass becomes porous. Microporous glasses may find application in many branches of science and engineering. The applications depend on the internal arrangement, size and shape of pores. These parameters may be in a wide range modified by a change of the chemical composition. The received porous glass was used as an element in optical fibre NO II sensor. The specific coloration reaction between organic reagents and NO II in the pores was occurred. It is possible to detection of 10-50 ppm NO II level.

  1. Structural Parameters Calibration for Binocular Stereo Vision Sensors Using a Double-Sphere Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhong Wei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Structural parameter calibration for the binocular stereo vision sensor (BSVS is an important guarantee for high-precision measurements. We propose a method to calibrate the structural parameters of BSVS based on a double-sphere target. The target, consisting of two identical spheres with a known fixed distance, is freely placed in different positions and orientations. Any three non-collinear sphere centres determine a spatial plane whose normal vector under the two camera-coordinate-frames is obtained by means of an intermediate parallel plane calculated by the image points of sphere centres and the depth-scale factors. Hence, the rotation matrix R is solved. The translation vector T is determined using a linear method derived from the epipolar geometry. Furthermore, R and T are refined by nonlinear optimization. We also provide theoretical analysis on the error propagation related to the positional deviation of the sphere image and an approach to mitigate its effect. Computer simulations are conducted to test the performance of the proposed method with respect to the image noise level, target placement times and the depth-scale factor. Experimental results on real data show that the accuracy of measurement is higher than 0.9‰, with a distance of 800 mm and a view field of 250 × 200 mm2.

  2. Photothermal determination of optical coefficients using an optical fibre sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Laufer, J

    2000-01-01

    configuration is more sensitive to the thermal coefficients than the optical coefficients of the target. Pulsed photothermal radiometry was found to have higher sensitivity to the optical coefficients than has the optical fibre sensor in its present form. However, modifications to the configuration of the sensor can produce a performance matching that of pulsed photothermal radiometry. This thesis is concerned with the development of an optical fibre sensor for the photothermal determination of the optical coefficients of tissue. The detection of differences in tissue optical properties might be used for the diagnosis of cancers and other tissue pathologies. The sensor consists of a thin transparent polymer film mounted at the distal end of an optical fibre. The film acts as a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The absorption of short, low energy laser pulses transmitted through the film and into the tissue generates thermal as well as acoustic transients, which propagate into/the film and modulate its thickness. Th...

  3. Fabrication of an Optical Fiber Micro-Sphere with a Diameter of Several Tens of Micrometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijuan Yu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A new method to fabricate an integrated optical fiber micro-sphere with a diameter within 100 µm, based on the optical fiber tapering technique and the Taguchi method is proposed. Using a 125 µm diameter single-mode (SM optical fiber, an optical fiber taper with a cone angle is formed with the tapering technique, and the fabrication optimization of a micro-sphere with a diameter of less than 100 µm is achieved using the Taguchi method. The optimum combination of process factors levels is obtained, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of three quality evaluation parameters and the significance of each process factors influencing them are selected as the two standards. Using the minimum zone method (MZM to evaluate the quality of the fabricated optical fiber micro-sphere, a three-dimensional (3D numerical fitting image of its surface profile and the true sphericity are subsequently realized. From the results, an optical fiber micro-sphere with a two-dimensional (2D diameter less than 80 µm, 2D roundness error less than 0.70 µm, 2D offset distance between the micro-sphere center and the fiber stylus central line less than 0.65 µm, and true sphericity of about 0.5 µm, is fabricated.

  4. Integrating sphere-based setup as an accurate system for optical properties measurements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abdalmonem, S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the optical properties of solid and liquid samples has great importance. Since the integrating sphere-based setup is used to measure the amount of reflected and transmitted light by the examined samples, optical properties could...

  5. Investigations on the structural and optical properties of sphere-shaped indium nitride (InN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagavath, C.; Kumar, J. [Anna University, Crystal Growth Centre, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Nasi, L. [IMEM-CNR, Parma (Italy)

    2017-04-15

    Indium nitride (InN) sphere-shaped micro crystals and nano crystals were made using sol-gel method. The crystalline size of the samples were calculated using X-ray diffraction, which were found to increase with the increase of nitridation temperature and time. High resolution-transmission electron microscopy images exhibited the distinct sphere shape of InN with different size of micro and nanometers. The calculated band gap of InN spheres using photo luminescence and UV-visible absorption spectra, was found to be 1.2 eV. Optical phonon modes of InN were determined from micro-Raman studies. (orig.)

  6. Development Of Porous Glass Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, P. B.; Barkatt, Aa.; Feng, X.; Finger, S. M.; Hojaji, H.; Laberge, N.; Mohr, R.; Penafiel, M.; Saad, E.

    A method for producing rugged, continuous porous glass fiber optic sensors was developed. pH and temperature sensors based on this technology have been successfully produced. The sensor portion of the fiber is made porous by selective leaching of a specially formulated borosilicate glass fiber. This results in a strong, monolithic structure where the sensor portion of the fiber remains integrally attached to the rest of the fiber (which acts as a light pipe), essentially eliminating losses at the sensor-light pipe interface. Pore size in the sensor can be controllably varied by modifying heat treatment conditions, making these sensors suitable for chemical concentration measurements in liquids and gases. Appropriate dyes were chemically bonded by silanization to the large interior surface area of the porous sensors to produce the pH and temperature sensors. Cresol red and phenol red were used for pH and pinacyanol chloride was used for temperature sensing. The sensitivity of these devices can be controlled by varying the concentration of the chemically bonded dye and the length of the porous region. Optical absorbance measurements were made in the visible range. The tip of the sensors was coated with a thin, porous layer of gold to reflect the incident light, resulting in a double pass across the porous sensor. Experimental measurements were made over a pH range of 3 to 8 and a temperature range of 28-70 C. These porous glass fiber optic sensors were found to be rugged and reliable due to their monolithic structure and large interior surface area for attachment of active species. A broad range of sensors based on this technology could be developed by using different active species, such as enzymes and other biochemicals, which could be bonded to the interior surface of the porous glass sensor.

  7. Miniaturised optical sensors for industrial applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2010-01-01

    When addressing optical sensors for use in e.g. industry, compactness, robustness and performance are essentials. Adhering to these demands, we have developed a suit of compact optical sensors for the specific purposes of measuring angular velocity and linear translations of rigid objects....... The technology is based on compact and low-cost laser sources such as Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs). The methods characterise the object motion by speckle translation in the near field (imaging) or far field (optical Fourier transform) by optical spatial filtering velocimetry. The volume...

  8. Optical sensor EIB/KNX gateway

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Valdivielso, Carlos; Matías Maestro, Ignacio R.; Arregui-San-Martín, Francisco Javier; Jiménez Buendía, Manuel; Vera Repullo, José Alfonso; Roca Dorda, Joaquín

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays, there are some special building like for example power or chemical plants, where convetional electronic sensors cannot be used as they are exposed to explosive enviroments or due to the presence of either electromagnetic interferences, or chemical or mechanical disturbances. Because of that, those sensors cannot operate and monitor correctly the target parameters. In these cases, the use of optical fiber sensors is a valid alternative due to their passive nature, inmunity to electr...

  9. Continuous spectrum of modes for optical micro-sphere resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooramin, Amir Saman; Shahabadi, Mahmoud

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an improved modal analysis for the spherical dielectric resonator. This is commonly carried out by assuming an outgoing spherical Hankel function for the region surrounding the dielectric sphere. It will be shown that this assumption is incomplete and cannot lead to the entire spectrum of resonance frequencies. Following an analytical formulation, we prove that, like cylindrical resonators, the only choice for the outer region of the dielectric sphere can be a proper linear combination of an inward and an outward traveling wave. Starting from this formulation, we determine the complete spectrum of the resonance frequencies and the associated mode fields. In this analysis, the continuous spectrum of resonance frequencies is introduced and the properties of radiation modes are studied in detail. The proposed analytical formulation is thereafter employed to calculate the quality factor of the resonator due to radiation and dielectric loss.

  10. Optical sensors for harsh environment applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R.; Maity, S.; Bekal, A.; Vartak, S.; Sridharan, A. K.; Mitra, C.

    2015-05-01

    The development of a harsh environment ammonia slip sensor based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy is presented. A hybrid optical sensor design, through combination of wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) and alignment control, is proposed as an approach towards reliable in-situ measurements in misalignment prone harsh environments. 1531.59 nm, 1553.4 nm and 1555.56 nm are suggested as possible absorption lines for trace ammonia measurement (system are presented in detail. Effect of misalignment related measurement degradation is investigated and significant improvement in measurement fidelity is demonstrated through the use of the hybrid optical sensor design.

  11. Dynamic temperature measurements with embedded optical sensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,; Seagle, Christopher T; Ao, Tommy

    2013-10-01

    This report summarizes LDRD project number 151365, \\Dynamic Temperature Measurements with Embedded Optical Sensors". The purpose of this project was to develop an optical sensor capable of detecting modest temperature states (<1000 K) with nanosecond time resolution, a recurring diagnostic need in dynamic compression experiments at the Sandia Z machine. Gold sensors were selected because the visible re ectance spectrum of gold varies strongly with temperature. A variety of static and dynamic measurements were performed to assess re ectance changes at di erent temperatures and pressures. Using a minimal optical model for gold, a plausible connection between static calibrations and dynamic measurements was found. With re nements to the model and diagnostic upgrades, embedded gold sensors seem capable of detecting minor (<50 K) temperature changes under dynamic compression.

  12. Optical Fibre Pressure Sensors in Medical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Poeggel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is focused on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of optical fibre pressure sensors for medical applications. Optical fibres have inherent advantages due to their small size, immunity to electromagnetic interferences and their suitability for remote monitoring and multiplexing. The small dimensions of optical fibre-based pressure sensors, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive for many medical applications and, thus, particularly suited to in vivo measurement. This means that the sensor can be placed directly inside a patient, e.g., for urodynamic and cardiovascular assessment. This paper presents an overview of the recent developments in optical fibre-based pressure measurements with particular reference to these application areas.

  13. The magneto-optical effect of cold atoms in an integrating sphere for atomic clock and optical magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Wan, Jinyin; Meng, Yanling; Xiao, Ling; Liu, Peng; Wang, Xiumei; Wang, Yaning; Liu, Liang

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the magneto-optical effect of cold atoms in an integrating sphere both experimentally and theoretically. The dependence of magneto-optical rotation angle on the biased magnetic field, the probe light intensity, and the probe light detuning are investigated. The probe light background is blocked and the shot noise is strongly suppressed. This detection scheme may provide a new approach for high contrast cold atom clock and cold atom optical magnetometer.

  14. Miniature refractive index fiber sensor based on silica micro-tube and Au micro-sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Riqing; Li, Jin; Hu, Haifeng; Yao, Chengbao

    2017-10-01

    We demonstrated the refractive index sensing characteristics of a miniature fiber sensor composited by silica-hollow-tube (SHT) and Au-micro-sphere (AmS). The high sensitivity is obtained due to the evanescent field effect existing in the SHT with the inner diameter of ∼2.3 μm and the surface plasmon resonance effect excited on the surface of AmS with the diameter of ∼2 μm. Experimental results indicate that this sensor can continuously measure the glucose concentration in range of 0-60% with a good linearity. The high detection sensitivity up to 8.33 μmol/L (47.33 mW/RIU) enables its ability in determining the glucose concentration in either blood or body fluids. Furthermore, the tiny structure is promise to be integrated into the microchip or other injectable structures, and monitor the glucose concentration in real-time.

  15. Hybrid Piezoelectric/Fiber-Optic Sensor Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mark; Qing, Xinlin

    2004-01-01

    Hybrid piezoelectric/fiber-optic (HyPFO) sensor sheets are undergoing development. They are intended for use in nondestructive evaluation and long-term monitoring of the integrity of diverse structures, including aerospace, aeronautical, automotive, and large stationary ones. It is anticipated that the further development and subsequent commercialization of the HyPFO sensor systems will lead to economic benefits in the form of increased safety, reduction of life-cycle costs through real-time structural monitoring, increased structural reliability, reduction of maintenance costs, and increased readiness for service. The concept of a HyPFO sensor sheet is a generalization of the concept of a SMART Layer(TradeMark), which is a patented device that comprises a thin dielectric film containing an embedded network of distributed piezoelectric actuator/sensors. Such a device can be mounted on the surface of a metallic structure or embedded inside a composite-material structure during fabrication of the structure. There is has been substantial interest in incorporating sensors other than piezoelectric ones into SMART Layer(TradeMark) networks: in particular, because of the popularity of the use of fiber-optic sensors for monitoring the "health" of structures in recent years, it was decided to incorporate fiber-optic sensors, giving rise to the concept of HyPFO devices.

  16. Optical networks for wideband sensor array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Lin Horng

    2011-12-01

    This thesis presents the realization of novel systems for optical sensing networks with an array of long-period grating (LPG) sensors. As a launching point of the thesis, the motivation to implement optical sensing network in precisely catering LPG sensors is presented. It highlights the flexibility of the sensing network to act as the foundation in order to boost the application of the various LPG sensor design in biological and chemical sensing. After the thorough study on the various optical sensing networks, sub-carrier multiplexing (SCM) and optical time division multiplexing (OTDM) schemes are adopted in conjunction with tunable laser source (TLS) to facilitate simultaneous interrogation of the LPG sensors array. In fact, these systems are distinct to have the capability to accommodate wideband optical sensors. Specifically, the LPG sensors which is in 20nm bandwidth are identified to operate in these systems. The working principles of the systems are comprehensively elucidated in this thesis. It highlights the mathematical approach to quantify the experimental setup of the optical sensing network. Additionally, the system components of the designs are identified and methodically characterized so that the components well operate in the designed environment. A mockup has been setup to demonstrate the application in sensing of various liquid indices and analyse the response of the LPG sensors in order to evaluate the performance of the systems. Eventually, the resemblance of the demultiplexed spectral response to the pristine spectral response are quantified to have excellent agreement. Finally, the promising result consistency of the systems is verified through repeatability test.

  17. Optical network of silicon micromachined sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark L.; Burns, David W.; Zook, J. David

    1996-03-01

    The Honeywell Technology Center, in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin and the Mobil Corporation, and under funding from this ARPA sponsored program, are developing a new type of `hybrid' micromachined silicon/fiber optic sensor that utilizes the best attributes of each technology. Fiber optics provide a noise free method to read out the sensor without electrical power required at the measurement point. Micromachined silicon sensor techniques provide a method to design many different types of sensors such as temperature, pressure, acceleration, or magnetic field strength and report the sensor data using FDM methods. Our polysilicon resonant microbeam structures have a built in Fabry-Perot interferometer that offers significant advantages over other configurations described in the literature. Because the interferometer is an integral part of the structure, the placement of the fiber becomes non- critical, and packaging issues become considerably simpler. The interferometer spacing are determined by the thin-film fabrication processes and therefore can be extremely well controlled. The main advantage, however, is the integral vacuum cavity that ensures high Q values. Testing results have demonstrated relaxed alignment tolerances in packaging these devices, with an excellent Signal to Noise Ratio. Networks of 16 or more sensors are currently being developed. STORM (Strain Transduction by Optomechanical Resonant Microbeams) sensors can also provide functionality and self calibration information which can be used to improve the overall system reliability. Details of the sensor and network design, as well as test results, are presented.

  18. Scattering of Light and Pulling Optical Forces for Hyperbolic-Metamaterial Spheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; Zhukovsky, Sergei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We discuss electromagnetic fields and optical forces acting on microspheres made of extremely anisotropic medium. We propose an energy-based criterion for choosing an appro- priate solution of Maxwell’s equations inside the sphere when two solutions are singular at the center. We investigate...

  19. All-Optical Graphene Oxide Humidity Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weng Hong Lim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The optical characteristics of graphene oxide (GO were explored to design and fabricate a GO-based optical humidity sensor. GO film was coated onto a SU8 polymer channel waveguide using the drop-casting technique. The proposed sensor shows a high TE-mode absorption at 1550 nm. Due to the dependence of the dielectric properties of the GO film on water content, this high TE-mode absorption decreases when the ambient relative humidity increases. The proposed sensor shows a rapid response (<1 s to periodically interrupted humid air flow. The transmission of the proposed sensor shows a linear response of 0.553 dB/% RH in the range of 60% to 100% RH.

  20. High-sensitivity fiber optic acoustic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Liu, Deming; Liao, Hao

    2016-11-01

    Due to the overwhelming advantages compared with traditional electronicsensors, fiber-optic acoustic sensors have arisen enormous interest in multiple disciplines. In this paper we present the recent research achievements of our group on fiber-optic acoustic sensors. The main point of our research is high sensitivity interferometric acoustic sensors, including Michelson, Sagnac, and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In addition, some advanced technologies have been proposed for acoustic or acoustic pressure sensing such as single-mode/multimode fiber coupler, dual FBGs and multi-longitudinal mode fiber laser based acoustic sensors. Moreover, our attention we have also been paid on signal demodulation schemes. The intensity-based quadrature point (Q-point) demodulation, two-wavelength quadrature demodulation and symmetric 3×3 coupler methodare discussed and compared in this paper.

  1. Optical fibre cantilever sensor for biological application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Zhou, Y. X.; Patterson, G.; Shu, W. M.; Maier, R. R. J.; Fowler, R.; Hand, D. P.; MacPherson, W. N.

    2014-05-01

    Micro-cantilever sensors have shown great promise in a wide range of application are as including chemical and biological sensing. However, many of these devices are based upon a sensor `chip' that requires careful alignment between the cantilever and the read-out system, which can be challenging. Furthermore, optical interrogation typically involves a bulky free-space system. Optical fibre addressed cantilevers have been reported previously in the literature and in this paper we propose techniques to design and fabricate polymer micro-cantilevers for attachment onto the end of standard single mode fibres using laser machining. Low-cost optical sources and a fibre coupled spectrometer are employed to monitor the cantilever deflection and therefore observe biological binding between a species of interest and an activated cantilever. Proof-of-concept experiments show that the sensor is capable of detecting pathogen concentration with down to a level of 105cfu/ml.

  2. Optical torque on a magneto-dielectric Rayleigh absorptive sphere by a vector Bessel (vortex) beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Renxian; Yang, Ruiping; Ding, Chunying; Mitri, F. G.

    2017-04-01

    The optical torque exerted on an absorptive megneto-dielectric sphere by an axicon-generated vector Bessel (vortex) beam with selected polarizations is investigated in the framework of the dipole approximation. The total optical torque is expressed as the sum of orbital and spin torques. The axial orbital torque component is calculated from the z-component of the cross-product of the vector position r and the optical force exerted on the sphere F. Depending on the beam characteristics (such as the half-cone angle and polarization type) and the physical properties of the sphere, it is shown here that the axial orbital torque vanishes before reversing sign, indicating a counter-intuitive orbital motion in opposite handedness of the angular momentum carried by the incident waves. Moreover, analytical formulas for the spin torque, which is divided into spin torques induced by electric and magnetic dipoles, are derived. The corresponding components of both the optical spin and orbital torques are numerically calculated, and the effects of polarization, the order of the beam, and half-cone angle are discussed in detail. The left-handed (i.e., negative) optical torque is discussed, and the conditions for generating optical spin and orbital torque sign reversal are numerically investigated. The transverse optical spin torque has a vortex-like character, whose direction depends on the polarization, the half-cone angle, and the order of the beam. Numerical results also show that the vortex direction depends on the radial position of the particle in the transverse plane. This means that a sphere may rotate with different directions when it moves radially. Potential applications are in particle manipulation and rotation, single beam optical tweezers, and other emergent technologies using vector Bessel beams on a small magneto-dielectric (nano) particle.

  3. Fiber-Optic Chemical Sensors and Fiber-Optic Bio-Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Pospíšilová

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes principles and current stage of development of fiber-optic chemical sensors (FOCS and biosensors (FOBS. Fiber optic sensor (FOS systems use the ability of optical fibers (OF to guide the light in the spectral range from ultraviolet (UV (180 nm up to middle infrared (IR (10 μm and modulation of guided light by the parameters of the surrounding environment of the OF core. The introduction of OF in the sensor systems has brought advantages such as measurement in flammable and explosive environments, immunity to electrical noises, miniaturization, geometrical flexibility, measurement of small sample volumes, remote sensing in inaccessible sites or harsh environments and multi-sensing. The review comprises briefly the theory of OF elaborated for sensors, techniques of fabrications and analytical results reached with fiber-optic chemical and biological sensors.

  4. Fiber optic liquid refractive index sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Vanita; Gangwar, Rahul Kumar; Singh, Vinod Kumar

    2015-08-01

    In this present work we report fabrication of fiber optic liquid refractive index (RI) measurement sensor based on Michelson Interferometer method. This sensor was assembled by using graded index multimode (MM) fiber with core diameter 50 µm and the cladding of fiber was removed by simple chemical method. To perform this experiment a 2×2 3dB coupler is used. The fiber ends are then immersed in solvent and solution to provide reference and refractive index measurements, respectively. This method was successfully used to measure refractive index of Sodium Chloride (NaCl)-Water solution at different concentrations. The fringe contrast sensitivity of device is 92.90 dB/RIU measured in the RI range from 1.34 to 1.42 which is better than Mach-Zehnder Interferometer sensor [1] and Fabry perot based sensor [2]. The fabrication of sensor is simple, low cost and highly sensitive.

  5. Thermal strain analysis of optic fiber sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Her, Shiuh-Chuan; Huang, Chih-Ying

    2013-01-31

    An optical fiber sensor surface bonded onto a host structure and subjected to a temperature change is analytically studied in this work. The analysis is developed in order to assess the thermal behavior of an optical fiber sensor designed for measuring the strain in the host structure. For a surface bonded optical fiber sensor, the measuring sensitivity is strongly dependent on the bonding characteristics which include the protective coating, adhesive layer and the bonding length. Thermal stresses can be generated due to a mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients between the optical fiber and host structure. The optical fiber thermal strain induced by the host structure is transferred via the adhesive layer and protective coating. In this investigation, an analytical expression of the thermal strain and stress in the optical fiber is presented. The theoretical predictions are validated using the finite element method. Numerical results show that the thermal strain and stress are linearly dependent on the difference in thermal expansion coefficients between the optical fiber and host structure and independent of the thermal expansion coefficients of the adhesive and coating.

  6. Optical Landing Hazard Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Visidyne's Phase I effort has established through modeling and analysis that a unique concept for an active optical 3-D Imager (or Imaging LADAR) has high potential...

  7. Miniaturized optical sensors based on lens arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Steen Grüner; Jakobsen, M.L.; Larsen, H.E.

    2005-01-01

    A suite of optical sensors based on the use of lenticular arrays for probing mechanical deflections will be displayed. The optical systems are well suited for miniaturization, and utilize speckles as the information-carriers. This implementation allows for acquiring directional information of the...... of the displacement. Systems for probing lateral displacements and in-plane vibrations (1-D and 2-D) are displayed, as will systems for probing angular velocity and torsional vibrations of rotating objects....

  8. Flexible optical chemical sensor platform for BTX

    OpenAIRE

    Arias Espinoza, Juan Diego; Sazhnikov, Viacheslav; Sabik, Sami; Ionov, Dmitriy; Smits, Edsger; Kalathimekkad, Sandeep; Van Steenberge, Geert; Alfimov, Michail; Posniak, Malgorzata; Schoo, Herman

    2012-01-01

    An in-plane flexible sensor platform for BTX detection was developed using low-cost patterning techniques and foil-based optical components. The platform was produced by a combination of laser patterning, inkjet printing and capillary filling. Key optical components such as lightguides, opticalcladding layers and metallic interconnections were realized on low cost substrates such as paper and PET. The sensing mechanism is based on the change in fluorescence spectra of a reporter dye, supporte...

  9. Free-Space Optical Communications: Capacity Bounds, Approximations, and a New Sphere-Packing Perspective

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas

    2016-02-03

    The capacity of the free-space optical channel is studied. A new recursive approach for bounding the capacity of the channel based on sphere-packing is proposed. This approach leads to new capacity upper bounds for a channel with a peak intensity constraint or an average intensity constraint. Under an average constraint only, the derived bound is tighter than an existing sphere-packing bound derived earlier by Farid and Hranilovic. The achievable rate of a truncated-Gaussian input distribution is also derived. It is shown that under both average and peak constraints, this achievable rate and the sphere-packing bounds are within a small gap at high SNR, leading to a simple high-SNR capacity approximation. Simple fitting functions that capture the best known achievable rate for the channel are provided. These functions can be of practical importance especially for the study of systems operating under atmospheric turbulence and misalignment conditions.

  10. Measuring method for optical fibre sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Fluitman, J.H.J.

    1984-01-01

    A new measuring method for the signal amplitude in intensity modulating fibre optic sensors is described. A reference signal is generated in the time domain. The method is insensitive for the sensitivity fluctuations of the light transmitter and the light receiver. The method is experimentally

  11. Integrated Optical Asymmetric Coupler Pressure Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyat, Isa; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2004-05-01

    Analysis of a novel pressure sensor based on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) asymmetric vertical coupler is presented. The integrated optical component is a coupler composed of a single mode (SM) low index waveguide and a thin silicon slab. High sensitivities of about 0.14 rad.kPa-1 should be achieved.

  12. Measuring method for optical fibre sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerink, T.S.J.; Fluitman, J.H.J.

    1984-01-01

    A new measuring method for the signal amplitude in intensity modulating fibre optic sensors is described. A reference signal is generated in the time domain. The method is insensitive for the sensitivity fluctuations of the light transmitter and the light receiver. The method is experimentally teste

  13. The development of fibre optic microbend sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsthuis, W.H.G.; Fluitman, J.H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Investigations concerning the development of a fibre optic pressure sensor are reported. The phenomenon of light power attenuation in a periodically deformed graded index fibre has been studied theoretically. It appears that available theories are not suited to describe this attenuation process in t

  14. Integrated optical sensors for the chemical domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambeck, Paul V.

    2006-01-01

    During the last decade there has been a rapidly growing interest in integrated optical (IO) sensors, expecially because many of them principally allow for sensitive, real time, label-free-on-site measurements of the concentration of (bio-)chemical species. This review aims at giving an overview of t

  15. Integrated optical sensors for the chemical domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambeck, Paul

    2006-01-01

    During the last decade there has been a rapidly growing interest in integrated optical (IO) sensors, expecially because many of them principally allow for sensitive, real time, label-free-on-site measurements of the concentration of (bio-)chemical species. This review aims at giving an overview of t

  16. Compact optical MEMS accelerometers and temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timotijevic, Branislav; Petremand, Yves; Bayat, Dara; Luetzelschwab, Markus; Aebi, Laurent; Tormen, Maurizio

    2017-02-01

    Continuous and accurate monitoring of acceleration and temperature inside large turbo- and hydro-generators is of crucial importance to prevent extremely expensive system damages and false positives. Development of optical, metalfree sensors for such systems has gained a lot of attention due to the fact that they are resistant to typically very strong electromagnetic fields and that they are non-conductive. We present miniature temperature and accelerometer optical sensors using a common silicon MEMS platform. A linear response with a deviation as small as 1% between set and measured accelerations has been obtained in an acceleration range 0-40g. Preliminary tests for temperature sensors indicate a linear response with sensitivity better than 1°C in a range of 20°C to 150°C.

  17. OPUS: an optically parallel ultrasound sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallman, Jeffrey S.; Ashby, A. E.; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Thomas, Graham H.

    2000-03-01

    Transmission ultrasound is not in widespread use, partially because of the time and expense of acquiring the data. We are addressing this problem with an optically parallel ultrasound sensor. The core of the sensor is a thin silicon nitride membrane patterned with gold to create 'acoustic pixels' over a large area. Each acoustic pixel vibrates at the frequency of the acoustic excitation. The thin membrane, supported by short walls over an optical substrate, with one side immersed in the ultrasound medium and the supported side exposed to air, flexes when an ultrasound pressure wave encounters it. This flexing causes the air gap between the optical substrate and the membrane to change. The change in the air gap modulates the reflection of an optical beam by frustrated total internal reflection. By strobing the optical beam, the deflection of the membrane can be detected and measured at any point through the acoustic period. Acquiring a sequence of images allow us to extract the relative pressure phase and amplitude. Proof of principle experiments have shown that we can build this sensor, and we are currently using a small aperture version to examine simple test objects.

  18. Fibre optic sensor with disturbance localization in one optical fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Ciurapinski, W.

    2007-05-01

    Ordinary perimeter security systems consist of many individual sensors with detection range 200-300 meters. These limitations are connected with physical phenomena that are used in microwave and infrared barriers as well as in ground and fence cable sensors. On the contrary, fiber optic perimeter sensors can be applied in the range of many kilometers and zone length 200-300 meters is degradation of their possibilities. This paper presents investigation results of a new generation of the fiber optic perimeter sensor in a two Sagnac and Sagna'c interferometers configuration. This system can detect a potential intruder and determine its position along a protected zone. We propose a method that makes use of the inherent properties of both interferometers. After demodulation of signals from both interferometers, obtained amplitude characteristic of the Sagnac interferometer depends on position of a disturbance along the both interferometer. So, quotient of both demodulated characteristics is proportional to the position of the disturbance. Arrangement of a laboratory model of the sensor and its signal processing scheme is presented. During research of a laboratory model, it was possible to detect the position of the disturbance with resolution of about 50m along a 10-km long sensor.

  19. Comparison between reflectance spectra obtained with an integrating sphere and a fiber optic collection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norvang Nilsen, Lill T.; Fiskerstrand, Elisanne J.; Koenig, Karsten; Bakken, B.; Grini, D.; Standahl, O.; Milner, Thomas E.; Berns, Michael W.; Nelson, J. Stuart; Svaasand, Lars O.

    1996-01-01

    Visible reflectance spectra of human skin might serve as a valuable tool for determining blood volume and pigmentation. They can therefore be used to evaluate the response to various skin treatments such as, e.g., port-wine stain therapy. A fiber-optic system is preferable for clinical evaluation of the therapeutic response due to its higher flexibility. Diffuse reflectance spectra obtained using a fiber system are compared with the corresponding spectra from an integrating sphere system. The results show that the most accurate reflectance spectra are obtained using the integrating sphere set-up. The aperture should then be much larger than the optical penetration depth of the skin. The system will then collect all the reflected light from superficial and deeper layers, and this enables a qualitative comparison between the wavelengths. However, the size and localization of many dermal lesions limit its use. In these cases the fiber-optic system is preferable. Light with an optical penetration depth shorter than the distance between the excitation and collecting fibers is, however, favorized. Normal dermis has typically a penetration depth of 600 micrometers and 2000 micrometers for, respectively, green/yellow and red light. Consequently, the collection efficiency of a typical fiber-optic system with a distance of 100 - 200 micrometers between the emitting and collecting fibers, will be higher in the green/yellow than in the red part of the spectrum. It is, however, important to remember that the relevant parameter is the change in reflectance at each particular wavelength, rather than comparison between the wavelengths. When such a comparison is required, the spectra collected by the fiber-optic system can be calibrated. The more accurate integrating sphere system is maybe preferable in a research laboratory environment, whereas the more flexible fiber-optic system is the most applicable for use in the clinic.

  20. NOVEL SPECTRUM ABSORPTION OPTICAL FIBER METHANE SENSOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shutao; Che Rensheng

    2005-01-01

    Based on spectrum principle and analyzing the infrared absorption spectrum of methane, a kind of optical fiber methane gas sensor and its system are developed. DFBLD(Distributed feedback laser diode) in 1 300 nm waveband is used as illuminant and phase-detecting technology is used to carry out harmonic wave detecting the concentration of methane. The sensitivity can arrive at 10-5.Experiments results show that the performance targets of the sensor such as sensitivity can basically satisfy the requests of methane detection.

  1. Absolute Measurement Fiber-optic Sensors in Large Structural Monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The security of civil engineering is an important task due to the economic, social and environmental significance. Compared with conventional sensors, the optical fiber sensors have their unique characteristics.Being durable, stable and insensitive to external perturbations,they are particular interesting for the long-term monitoring of civil structures.Focus is on absolute measurement optical fiber sensors, which are emerging from the monitoring large structural, including SOFO system, F-P optical fiber sensors, and fiber Bragg grating sensors. The principle, characteristic and application of these three kinds of optical fiber sensors are described together with their future prospects.

  2. Optical sensors of bulk refractive index using optical fiber resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eryürek, M.; Karadag, Y.; Ghafoor, M.; Bavili, N.; Cicek, K.; Kiraz, A.

    2017-05-01

    Optical fiber resonator (OFR) sensor is presented for bulk liquid refractive index (RI) sensing. The sensing mechanism relies on the spectral shifts of whispering gallery modes (WGMs) of OFRs which are excited using a tapered fiber. OFR liquid RI sensor is fully characterized using water solutions of ethanol and ethylene glycol (EG). A good agreement is achieved between the analytical calculations and experimental results for both TE and TM polarizations. The detection limit for bulk RI is calculated to be between 2.7 - 4.7 × 10-5 refractive index unit (RIU). The OFR sensor provides a robust, easy-to-fabricate and sensitive liquid refractive index sensor which can be employed in lab-on-a-chip applications.

  3. Reconstructing optical parameters from double-integrating-sphere measurements using a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böcklin, Christoph; Baumann, Dirk; Stuker, Florian; Klohs, Jan; Rudin, Markus; Fröhlich, Jürg

    2013-02-01

    For the reconstruction of physiological changes in specific tissue layers detected by optical techniques, the exact knowledge of the optical parameters μa, μs and g of different tissue types is of paramount importance. One approach to accurately determine these parameters for biological tissue or phantom material is to use a double-integrating-sphere measurement system. It offers a flexible way to measure various kinds of tissues, liquids and artificial phantom materials. Accurate measurements can be achieved by technical adjustments and calibration of the spheres using commercially available reflection and transmission standards. The determination For the reconstruction of physiological changes in specific tissue layers detected by optical techniques, the exact knowledge of the optical parameters μa, μs and g of different tissue types is of paramount importance. One approach to accurately determine these parameters for biological tissue or phantom material is to use a double-integrating-sphere measurement system. It offers a flexible way to measure various kinds of tissues, liquids and artificial phantom materials. Accurate measurements can be achieved by technical adjustments and calibration of the spheres using commercially available reflection and transmission standards. The determination of the optical parameters of a material is based on two separate steps. Firstly, the reflectance ρs, the total transmittance TsT and the unscattered transmittance TsC of the sample s are measured with the double-integrating-sphere setup. Secondly, the optical parameters μa, μs and g are reconstructed with an inverse search algorithm combined with an appropriate solver for the forward problem (calculating ρs, TsT and TsC from μa, μs and g) has to be applied. In this study a Genetic Algorithm is applied as search heuristic, since it offers the most flexible and general approach without requiring any foreknowledge of the fitness-landscape. Given the challenging

  4. A new calibration method between an optical sensor and a rotating platform in turbine blade inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Long; Wu, An; Li, Zi-Cheng; Zhang, Gang; Yu, Wen-Yong

    2017-03-01

    Thin-walled turbine blades with complex features are a critical part of an aviation engine, and a small change in their geometric shape can erode the performance of the aviation engine. Inspecting the blade with an optical device is a promising technique. One key task involved is the calibration of the optical sensor with the rotating platform. This paper presents a novel calibration method for the optical inspection of the blade. Three target spheres are measured by a high-precision laser tracker and an optical sensor. The positions of the sphere centers are used to build a coordinate system and an approximated plane. Following that, the rotation axis and the rotation center of the rotating platform are easily calculated. According to a direction vector from the measured stripe, the transformation parameters between the optical sensor and rotating platform are further calculated. This calibration method is simple to carry out, and it guarantees that all the measured points are represented in the same coordinate system for subsequent parameter extraction and profile error evaluation of the blade surface. The experiments demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method, and it found that the measurement error after calibration is within 0.02 mm.

  5. Optical Sensors Based on Plastic Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilro, Lúcia; Alberto, Nélia; Pinto, João L.; Nogueira, Rogério

    2012-01-01

    The recent advances of polymer technology allowed the introduction of plastic optical fiber in sensor design. The advantages of optical metrology with plastic optical fiber have attracted the attention of the scientific community, as they allow the development of low-cost or cost competitive systems compared with conventional technologies. In this paper, the current state of the art of plastic optical fiber technology will be reviewed, namely its main characteristics and sensing advantages. Several measurement techniques will be described, with a strong focus on interrogation approaches based on intensity variation in transmission and reflection. The potential applications involving structural health monitoring, medicine, environment and the biological and chemical area are also presented. PMID:23112707

  6. Optical Sensors Based on Plastic Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Nogueira

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The recent advances of polymer technology allowed the introduction of plastic optical fiber in sensor design. The advantages of optical metrology with plastic optical fiber have attracted the attention of the scientific community, as they allow the development of low-cost or cost competitive systems compared with conventional technologies. In this paper, the current state of the art of plastic optical fiber technology will be reviewed, namely its main characteristics and sensing advantages. Several measurement techniques will be described, with a strong focus on interrogation approaches based on intensity variation in transmission and reflection. The potential applications involving structural health monitoring, medicine, environment and the biological and chemical area are also presented.

  7. An integrating sphere radiometer as a solution for high power calibrations in fibre optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Sanz, Ana; Rodríguez-Barrios, Félix; Corredera, Pedro; Martín-López, Sonia; González-Herráez, Miguel; Hernanz, María Luisa

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes the design, characterization and calibration of a high power transfer standard for optical power measurements in optical fibres based on an integrating sphere radiometer. This radiometer, based on two detectors (Si and InGaAs), can measure powers between 100 nW and 10 W within the wavelength range of (400-1700) nm. The radiometer has been calibrated over the total spectral range of use against an electrically calibrated pyroelectric radiometer and different fibre laser diodes and ion lasers. The total uncertainty obtained is lower than ±1.5% for these wavelengths and power ranges (excluding the water absorption region).

  8. Porous Silicon Structures as Optical Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor A. Levitsky

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a short review of recent progress in the field of optical gas sensors based on porous silicon (PSi and PSi composites, which are separate from PSi optochemical and biological sensors for a liquid medium. Different periodical and nonperiodical PSi photonic structures (bares, modified by functional groups or infiltrated with sensory polymers are described for gas sensing with an emphasis on the device specificity, sensitivity and stability to the environment. Special attention is paid to multiparametric sensing and sensor array platforms as effective trends for the improvement of analyte classification and quantification. Mechanisms of gas physical and chemical sorption inside PSi mesopores and pores of PSi functional composites are discussed.

  9. Bioinspired optical sensors for unmanned aerial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahl, Javaan; Rosser, Kent; Mizutani, Akiko

    2011-04-01

    Insects are dependant on the spatial, spectral and temporal distributions of light in the environment for flight control and navigation. This paper reports on flight trials of implementations of insect inspired behaviors on unmanned aerial vehicles. Optical flow methods for maintaining a constant height above ground and a constant course have been demonstrated to provide navigation capabilities that are impossible using conventional avionics sensors. Precision control of height above ground and ground course were achieved over long distances. Other vision based techniques demonstrated include a biomimetic stabilization sensor that uses the ultraviolet and green bands of the spectrum, and a sky polarization compass. Both of these sensors were tested over long trajectories in different directions, in each case showing performance similar to low cost inertial heading and attitude systems. The behaviors demonstrate some of the core functionality found in the lower levels of the sensorimotor system of flying insects and shows promise for more integrated solutions in the future.

  10. Design of optics for compact star sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Minyi; Shi, Rongbao; Shen, Weimin

    2016-10-01

    In order to adapt to small size and low cost space platform such as mini-satellites, this paper studies the design of optics for compact star sensor. At first, the relationship between limiting magnitude and optical system specifications which includes field of view and entrance pupil diameter is analyzed, based on its Pyramid identification algorithm and signal-to-noise ratio requirement. The specifications corresponding to different limiting magnitude can be obtained after the detector is selected, and both of the complexity of optical lens and the size of baffle can be estimated. Then the range of the limiting magnitude can be determined for the miniaturization of the optical system. Taking STAR1000 CMOS detector as an example, the compact design of the optical system can be realized when the limiting magnitude is in the interval of 4.9Mv 5.5Mv. At last, the lens and baffle of a CMOS compact star sensor is optimally designed, of which length and weight is respectively 124 millimeters and 300 grams.

  11. An Optical Pressure Sensor Based on MEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong Zhang; Sheng Qiang; Frank Lewis; Yalin Wu; Xiaozhu Chi

    2006-01-01

    An optical fiber pressure sensor has been developed for the measurement in human body. The sensing element is possessed of a membrane structure, which is fabricated by micromachining. The fabrication process includes anisotropic wet etching on the silicon wafer. For the transmitting source and signal light, a multimode optical fiber 50/125 μm (core/clad) in diameter was used. The intensity of the light reflected back into the fiber varies with the membrane deflection, which is a function of pressure. The deflection of the membrane by applied pressure can be mathematically described.

  12. Enzyme-Based Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulp, Thomas J.; Camins, Irene; Angel, Stanley M.

    1988-06-01

    Fiber optic chemical sensors capable of detecting glucose and penicillin were developed. Each consists of a polymer membrane that is covalently attached to the tip of a glass optical fiber. The membrane contains the enzyme and a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye (fluorescein). A signal is produced when the enzyme catalyzes the conversion of the analyte (glucose or penicillin) into a product (gluconic or penicilloic acid, respectively) that lowers the microenvironmental pH of the membrane and, consequently, lowers the fluorescence intensity of the dye. Each sensor is capable of responding to analyte concentrations in the range of ~0.1 to 100 mM. The penicillin optrode response time is 40 to 60 s while that for glucose is ~5 to 12 min.

  13. Phase sensor for solar adaptive-optics

    CERN Document Server

    Kellerer, Aglae

    2011-01-01

    Wavefront sensing in solar adaptive-optics is currently done with correlating Shack-Hartmann sensors, although the spatial- and temporal-resolutions of the phase measurements are then limited by the extremely fast computing required to correlate the sensor signals at the frequencies of daytime atmospheric-fluctuations. To avoid this limitation, a new wavefront-sensing technique is presented, that makes use of the solar brightness and is applicable to extended sources. The wavefront is sent through a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer. A small, central part of the wavefront is used as reference and is made to interfere with the rest of the wavefront. The contrast of two simultaneously measured interference-patterns provides a direct estimate of the wavefront phase, no additional computation being required. The proposed optical layout shows precise initial alignment to be the critical point in implementing the new wavefront-sensing scheme.

  14. Optical Slot-Waveguide Based Biochemical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Angulo Barrios

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Slot-waveguides allow light to be guided and strongly confined inside a nanometer-scale region of low refractive index. Thus stronger light-analyte interaction can be obtained as compared to that achievable by a conventional waveguide, in which the propagating beam is confined to the high-refractive-index core of the waveguide. In addition, slot-waveguides can be fabricated by employing CMOS compatible materials and technology, enabling miniaturization, integration with electronic, photonic and fluidic components in a chip, and mass production. These advantages have made the use of slot-waveguides for highly sensitive biochemical optical integrated sensors an emerging field. In this paper, recent achievements in slot-waveguide based biochemical sensing will be reviewed. These include slot-waveguide ring resonator based refractometric label-free biosensors, label-based optical sensing, and nano-opto-mechanical sensors.

  15. Temperature Sensors Based on WGM Optical Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute; Itchenko, Vladimir; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2008-01-01

    A proposed technique for measuring temperature would exploit differences between the temperature dependences of the frequencies of two different electromagnetic modes of a whispering gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonator. An apparatus based on this technique was originally intended to be part of a control system for stabilizing a laser frequency in the face of temperature fluctuations. When suitably calibrated, apparatuses based on this technique could also serve as precise temperature sensors for purposes other than stabilization of lasers. A sensor according to the proposal would include (1) a transparent WGM dielectric resonator having at least two different sets of modes characterized by different thermo-optical constants and (2) optoelectronic instrumentation for measuring the difference between the temperature-dependent shifts of the resonance frequencies of the two sets of modes.

  16. Computer Modeling for Optical Waveguide Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-15

    COSATI CODES 18 SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse it necessary and cleritify by DIock numnerl FIEL GRUP SB-GOUP Optical waveguide sensors Computer...reflection. The resultant probe beam transmission may be plotted as a function of changes in the refractive index of the surrounding fluid medium. BASIC...all angles of incidence about the critical angle ecr. It should be noted that N in equation (3) is a function of e, since = sin - l sin 8 , see

  17. Fibre optic sensors for mine hazard detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, T; Wang, C; Wei, Y; Zhao, Y; Shang, Y; Wang, Z [Laser Institute of Shandong Academy of Science (China); Huo, D [Shandong Micro-Sensor Photonics Limited, 19 Keyuan Road, Jinan, Shandong province, 250014 (China); Ning, Y, E-mail: tongyuliu@hotmail.co [Intelligent Sensor Systems Limited, Rockley Manor, Rockley, Wiltshire (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    We report the development of a comprehensive safety monitoring solution for coal mines. A number of fibre optic sensors have been developed and deployed for safety monitoring of mine roof integrity and hazardous gases. The FOS-based mine hazard detection system offers unique advantages of intrinsic safety, multi-location and multi-parameter monitoring. They can be potentially used to build expert systems for mine hazard early detection and prevention.

  18. Optical microfiber coil resonator refractometric sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fei; Horak, Peter; Brambilla, Gilberto

    2007-06-11

    We present a novel refractometric sensor based on a coated all-coupling optical-fiber-nanowire microcoil resonator which is robust, compact, and comprises an intrinsic fluidic channel. We calculate the device sensitivity and find its dependence on the nanowire diameter and coating thickness. A sensitivity as high as 700 nm/RIU and a refractive index resolution as low as 10(-10) are predicted.

  19. Fiber-optically sensorized composite wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Joannes M.; Black, Richard J.; Moslehi, Behzad; Oblea, Levy; Patel, Rona; Sotoudeh, Vahid; Abouzeida, Essam; Quinones, Vladimir; Gowayed, Yasser; Soobramaney, Paul; Flowers, George

    2014-04-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) immune and light-weight, fiber-optic sensor based Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) will find increasing application in aerospace structures ranging from aircraft wings to jet engine vanes. Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) has been developing multi-functional fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor systems including parallel processing FBG interrogators combined with advanced signal processing for SHM, structural state sensing and load monitoring applications. This paper reports work with Auburn University on embedding and testing FBG sensor arrays in a quarter scale model of a T38 composite wing. The wing was designed and manufactured using fabric reinforced polymer matrix composites. FBG sensors were embedded under the top layer of the composite. Their positions were chosen based on strain maps determined by finite element analysis. Static and dynamic testing confirmed expected response from the FBGs. The demonstrated technology has the potential to be further developed into an autonomous onboard system to perform load monitoring, SHM and Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of composite aerospace structures (wings and rotorcraft blades). This platform technology could also be applied to flight testing of morphing and aero-elastic control surfaces.

  20. Optical Cutting Interruption Sensor for Fiber Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Adelmann

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on an optical sensor system attached to a 4 kW fiber laser cutting machine to detect cutting interruptions. The sensor records the thermal radiation from the process zone with a modified ring mirror and optical filter arrangement, which is placed between the cutting head and the collimator. The process radiation is sensed by a Si and InGaAs diode combination with the detected signals being digitalized with 20 kHz. To demonstrate the function of the sensor, signals arising during fusion cutting of 1 mm stainless steel and mild steel with and without cutting interruptions are evaluated and typical signatures derived. In the recorded signals the piercing process, the laser switch on and switch off point and waiting period are clearly resolved. To identify the cutting interruption, the signals of both Si and InGaAs diodes are high pass filtered and the signal fluctuation ranges being subsequently calculated. Introducing a correction factor, we identify that only in case of a cutting interruption the fluctuation range of the Si diode exceeds the InGaAs diode. This characteristic signature was successfully used to detect 80 cutting interruptions of 83 incomplete cuts (alpha error 3.6% and system recorded no cutting interruption from 110 faultless cuts (beta error of 0. This particularly high detection rate in combination with the easy integration of the sensor, highlight its potential for cutting interruption detection in industrial applications.

  1. Biomimetic optical sensor for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan A.; Gorospe, George E.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Barrett, Steven F.

    2015-05-01

    We report on a fiber optic sensor based on the physiological aspects of the eye and vision-related neural layers of the common housefly (Musca domestica) that has been developed and built for aerospace applications. The intent of the research is to reproduce select features from the fly's vision system that are desirable in image processing, including high functionality in low-light and low-contrast environments, sensitivity to motion, compact size, lightweight, and low power and computation requirements. The fly uses a combination of overlapping photoreceptor responses that are well approximated by Gaussian distributions and neural superposition to detect image features, such as object motion, to a much higher degree than just the photoreceptor density would imply. The Gaussian overlap in the biomimetic sensor comes from the front-end optical design, and the neural superposition is accomplished by subsequently combining the signals using analog electronics. The fly eye sensor is being developed to perform real-time tracking of a target on a flexible aircraft wing experiencing bending and torsion loads during flight. We report on results of laboratory experiments using the fly eye sensor to sense a target moving across its field of view.

  2. A fiber-optic powered wireless sensor module made on elastomeric substrate for wearable sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, V; Lin, H; Chuang, J; Sailor, M; Lo, Y

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate an integrated sensor module that combines a photonic nano-porous sensor and a bias-free optical powered RF transducer. The sensor signal is encoded in the RF frequency ready for transmission. The entire sensor module does not include battery and is constructed with the flexible and biocompatible elastomeric polymer, PDMS. This technology holds promise for wearable sensors.

  3. Study of fiber optic sugar sensor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Jayanth Kumar; N M Gowri; R Venkateswara Raju; G Nirmala; B S Bellubbi; T Radha Krishna

    2006-08-01

    Over the last two decades, the fiber optic technology has passed through many analytical stages. Some commercially available fiber optic sensors, though in a small way, are being used for automation in mechanical and industrial environments. They are also used for instrumentation and controls. In the present work, an intensity-modulated intrinsic fiber optic sugar sensor is presented. This type of sensor, with slight modification, can be used for on-line determination of the concentration of sugar content in sugarcane juice in sugar industry. In the present set-up, a plastic fiber made of polymethylmethacrylate is used. A portion of the cladding (1 cm, 2 cm, 3 cm) at the mid-point along the length of the fiber is removed. This portion is immersed in sugar solution of known concentration and refractive index. At one end of the fiber an 850 nm source is used and at the other end a power meter is connected. By varying the concentration of sugar solution, the output power is noted. These studies are made due to the change in refractive index of the fluid. The device was found to be very sensitive which is free from EMI and shock hazards, stable and repeatable and they can be remotely interfaced with a computer to give on-line measurements and thus become useful for application in sugar industries.

  4. ZELDA, a Zernike wavefront sensor for the fine measurement of quasi-static aberrations in coronagraphic systems: concept studies and results with VLT/SPHERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Diaye, M.; Vigan, A.; Dohlen, K.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Caillat, A.; Costille, A.; Girard, J. H. V.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Fusco, T.; Blanchard, P.; Le Merrer, J.; Le Mignant, D.; Madec, F.; Moreaux, G.; Mouillet, D.; Puget, P.; Zins, G.

    2016-07-01

    The high-contrast imaging instruments VLT/SPHERE and GPI have been routinely observing gas giant planets, brown dwarfs, and debris disks around nearby stars since 2013-2014. In these facilities, low-wind effects or differential aberrations between the extreme Adaptive Optics sensing path and the science path represent critical limitations for the observation of exoplanets orbiting their host star with a contrast ratio larger than 106 at small separations. To circumvent this problem, we proposed ZELDA, a Zernike wavefront sensor to measure these quasistatic aberrations at a nanometric level. A prototype was installed on VLT/SPHERE during its integration in Chile. We recently performed measurements on an internal source with ZELDA in the presence of Zernike or Fourier modes introduced with the deformable mirror of the instrument. In this communication, we present the results of our experiment and report on the contrast gain obtained with a first ZELDA-based wavefront correction. We finally discuss the suitability of such a solution for a possible upgrade of VLT/SPHERE and for its use with future E-ELT instruments or space missions with high-contrast capabilities (e.g. WFIRST-AFTA, HDST).

  5. Corrosion induced strain monitoring through fibre optic sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grattan, S K T [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, David Keir Building, Belfast, BT9 5AG (United Kingdom); Basheer, P A M [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, David Keir Building, Belfast, BT9 5AG (United Kingdom); Taylor, S E [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, David Keir Building, Belfast, BT9 5AG (United Kingdom); Zhao, W [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University, Northampton Square, London, EC1V 0HB (United Kingdom); Sun, T [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University, Northampton Square, London, EC1V 0HB (United Kingdom); Grattan, K T V [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University, Northampton Square, London, EC1V 0HB (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-15

    The use of strain sensors is commonplace within civil engineering. Fibre optic strain sensors offer a number of advantages over the current electrical resistance type gauges. In this paper the use of fibre optic strain sensors and electrical resistance gauges to monitor the production of corrosion by-products has been investigated and reported.

  6. Optical stimulator for vision-based sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rössler, Dirk; Pedersen, David Arge Klevang; Benn, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an optical stimulator system for vision-based sensors. The stimulator is an efficient tool for stimulating a camera during on-ground testing with scenes representative of spacecraft flights. Such scenes include starry sky, planetary objects, and other spacecraft. The optical...... precision and long-term stability. The system can be continuously used over several days. By facilitating a full camera including optics in the loop, the stimulator enables the more realistic simulation of flight maneuvers based on navigation cameras than pure computer simulations or camera stimulations...... stimulator is used as a test bench to simulate high-precision navigation by different types of camera systems that are used onboard spacecraft, planetary rovers, and for spacecraft rendezvous and proximity maneuvers. Careful hardware design and preoperational calibration of the stimulator result in high...

  7. Fiber optic sensors for military, industrial and commercial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, K. A.; Quick, W. H.; Strahan, V. H.

    1978-01-01

    Four examples of specific fiber optic sensor system designs, each of which demonstrates a different optical modulation format, are described. The birefrigent temperature transducer illustrates direct digital signal modulation. The temperature/pressure dependent semiconductor filter illustrates high-pass optical wavelength signal encoding. The coupled polarized-mode transducer shows how a solid-state sensor can produce narrow-bandpass optical wavelength signal encoding. The luminescent temperature sensor illustrates a way to construct a solid state sensor in order to produce pulse width modulation of an optical signal.

  8. Preparation of graphene oxide-wrapped carbon sphere@silver spheres for high performance chlorinated phenols sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Tian, E-mail: gantsjy@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xinyang Normal University, Xinyang 464000 (China); State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Lv, Zhen; Sun, Junyong; Shi, Zhaoxia; Liu, Yanming [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xinyang Normal University, Xinyang 464000 (China)

    2016-01-25

    Highlights: • Hierarchical CS@Ag@GO composite was obtained by a simple solution route. • Signal amplification is achieved for sensitive detection of chlorinated phenols. • The low-cost method exhibits wide concentration range and acceptable accuracy. • The method can be successfully applied to detect chlorinated phenols in waters. - Abstract: A template-activated strategy was developed to construct core/shell structured carbon sphere@silver composite based on one-pot hydrothermal treatment. The CS@Ag possessed a uniform three-dimensional interconnected microstructure with an enlarged surface area and catalytic activity, which was further mechanically protected by graphene oxide (GO) nanolayers to fabricate intriguing configuration, which was beneficial for efficiently preventing the aggregation and oxidation of AgNPs and improving the electrical conductivity through intimate contact. By immobilizing this special material on electrode surface, the CS@Ag@GO was further used for sensitive determination of chlorinated phenols including 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol. The tailored structure, fast electron transfer ability and facile preparation of CS@Ag@GO made it a promising electrode material for practical applications in phenols sensing.

  9. Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor using Multimode Interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Perez, V I; Sanchez-Mondragon, J J [INAOE, Apartado Postal 51 y 216, Puebla 72000 (Mexico); Basurto-Pensado, M A [CIICAp, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos (Mexico); LiKamWa, P [CREOL, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); May-Arrioja, D A, E-mail: iruiz@inaoep.mx, E-mail: mbasurto@uaem.mx, E-mail: delta_dirac@hotmail.com, E-mail: daniel_may_arrioja@hotmail.com [UAT Reynosa Rodhe, Universidad Autonoma de Tamaulipas (Mexico)

    2011-01-01

    Based on the theory of multimode interference (MMI) and self-image formation, we developed a novel intrinsic optical fiber pressure sensor. The sensing element consists of a section of multimode fiber (MMF) without cladding spliced between two single mode fibers (SMF). The MMI pressure sensor is based on the intensity changes that occur in the transmitted light when the effective refractive index of the MMF is changed. Basically, a thick layer of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is placed in direct contact with the MMF section, such that the contact area between the PDMS and the fiber will change proportionally with the applied pressure, which results in a variation of the transmitted light intensity. Using this configuration, a good correlation between the measured intensity variations and the applied pressure is obtained. The sensitivity of the sensor is 3 {mu}V/psi, for a range of 0-60 psi, and the maximum resolution of our system is 0.25 psi. Good repeatability is also observed with a standard deviation of 0.0019. The key feature of the proposed pressure sensor is its low fabrication cost, since the cost of the MMF is minimal.

  10. Microcontrollers and optical sensors for education in optics and photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, Paul; Wielage, Heinz; Haiss, Ulrich; Vauderwange, Oliver; Wozniak, P.; Curticapean, Dan

    2014-09-01

    The digital revolution is going full steam ahead, with a constantly growing number of new devices providing a steady increase in complexity and power. Most of the success is based on one important invention: the microprocessor/microcontroller. In this paper the authors present how to integrate microcontrollers and optical sensors in the curricula of media engineering by combining subjects of media technology, optics, information technology and media design. Hereby the aim is not to teach these topics separate from each other, but to bring them together in interdisciplinary lectures, projects and applications. Microcontrollers can be applied in various ways to teach content from the fields of optics and photonics. They can be used to control LEDs, displays, light detectors and infrared sensors, which makes it possible to build measuring instruments like e.g. a lux meter, a light barrier or an optical distance meter. The learning goals are to stimulate the student's interest in the multiplicity of subjects related to this course and to support a deeper understanding of the close connections between them. The teaching method that the authors describe in their paper turned out to be very successful, as the participants are motivated to bring in their own ideas for projects, they spend more time than requested and as many students return to the courses as tutors. It is an example for effectual knowledge transfer and exchange of ideas among students.

  11. Human psychophysiological activity monitoring methods using fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Uzieblo-Zyczkowska, B.

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents the concept of fiber optic sensor system for human psycho-physical activity detection. A fiber optic sensor that utilizes optical phase interferometry or intensity in modalmetric to monitor a patient's vital signs such as respiration cardiac activity, blood pressure and body's physical movements. The sensor, which is non-invasive, comprises an optical fiber interferometer that includes an optical fiber proximately situated to the patient so that time varying acusto-mechanical signals from the patient are coupled into the optical fiber. The system can be implemented in embodiments ranging form a low cost in-home to a high end product for in hospital use.

  12. Development of a Robust Optical Glucose Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, Gerard Laurence

    1990-01-01

    The long term objective of this research was the development of a noninvasive, optically-based, polarimetric sensor to monitor in vivo glucose concentrations. The goal of diabetes therapy is to approximate the 24-hour blood glucose profile of a normal individual. There have been major advances in the development of reliable, versatile, and accurate pumps for the delivery of insulin to diabetic patients and in the development of control algorithms for closed-loop insulin delivery, however, there remain major obstacles to the development of clinically useful, continuous glucose sensors. The development of an accurate noninvasive glucose sensor would have significant application in the diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitis both in conjunction with, and independent of, the glucose pump controller applications. The linear polarization vector of light routes when it interacts with an optically active material such as glucose. The amount of rotation of polarization is directly proportional to the glucose concentration and to the path length. The ability to quantitate blood glucose levels for the limited available path length in our primary sensing site, namely, the anterior chamber of the eye, therefore depends on the signal-to-noise ratio of the polarization detector. Our primary research focused on the development and testing of a prototype optical polarimetry system using D + glucose solution in a test cell, as well as using an enucleated human eye to assess the sensitivity of the system to measure physiologic glucose levels for the approximate one centimeter path length present in the anterior chamber of the eye. Our research has led to the development of a true phase technique in which helium neon laser light was coupled through a rotating linear polarizer along with two stationary linear polarizers and two detectors to produce reference and signal outputs whose amplitudes varied sinusoidally and whose phase was proportional to the rotation of light caused by

  13. Swings and roundabouts: optical Poincaré spheres for polarization and Gaussian beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, M. R.; Alonso, M. A.

    2017-02-01

    The connection between Poincaré spheres for polarization and Gaussian beams is explored, focusing on the interpretation of elliptic polarization in terms of the isotropic two-dimensional harmonic oscillator in Hamiltonian mechanics, its canonical quantization and semiclassical interpretation. This leads to the interpretation of structured Gaussian modes, the Hermite-Gaussian, Laguerre-Gaussian and generalized Hermite-Laguerre-Gaussian modes as eigenfunctions of operators corresponding to the classical constants of motion of the two-dimensional oscillator, which acquire an extra significance as families of classical ellipses upon semiclassical quantization. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  14. Waveguide-based optical chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Karen M.; Swanson, Basil I.; Honkanen, Seppo

    2007-03-13

    The invention provides an apparatus and method for highly selective and sensitive chemical sensing. Two modes of laser light are transmitted through a waveguide, refracted by a thin film host reagent coating on the waveguide, and analyzed in a phase sensitive detector for changes in effective refractive index. Sensor specificity is based on the particular species selective thin films of host reagents which are attached to the surface of the planar optical waveguide. The thin film of host reagents refracts laser light at different refractive indices according to what species are forming inclusion complexes with the host reagents.

  15. Fibre Optic Sensors for Selected Wastewater Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman W. Harun

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Demand for online and real-time measurements techniques to meet environmental regulation and treatment compliance are increasing. However the conventional techniques, which involve scheduled sampling and chemical analysis can be expensive and time consuming. Therefore cheaper and faster alternatives to monitor wastewater characteristics are required as alternatives to conventional methods. This paper reviews existing conventional techniques and optical and fibre optic sensors to determine selected wastewater characteristics which are colour, Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD and Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD. The review confirms that with appropriate configuration, calibration and fibre features the parameters can be determined with accuracy comparable to conventional method. With more research in this area, the potential for using FOS for online and real-time measurement of more wastewater parameters for various types of industrial effluent are promising.

  16. Fibre optic sensors for selected wastewater characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Su Sin; Aziz, A R Abdul; Harun, Sulaiman W

    2013-07-05

    Demand for online and real-time measurements techniques to meet environmental regulation and treatment compliance are increasing. However the conventional techniques, which involve scheduled sampling and chemical analysis can be expensive and time consuming. Therefore cheaper and faster alternatives to monitor wastewater characteristics are required as alternatives to conventional methods. This paper reviews existing conventional techniques and optical and fibre optic sensors to determine selected wastewater characteristics which are colour, Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) and Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD). The review confirms that with appropriate configuration, calibration and fibre features the parameters can be determined with accuracy comparable to conventional method. With more research in this area, the potential for using FOS for online and real-time measurement of more wastewater parameters for various types of industrial effluent are promising.

  17. Fiber Optic Temperature Sensors for Thermal Protection Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) proposes an innovative fiber optic-based, multiplexable, highly ruggedized, integrated sensor system for real-time...

  18. A Fibre Optic Sensor Of Physiological Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, J. P.; Forester, G. V.

    1986-11-01

    This paper presents an ultraminiature fibre optic probe capable of physiological monitoring in situ. The system has been described previously where a fibre optic reflectometer was configured as a temperature sensor and as a refractometer. For the present experiments a bare fibre tip was used as sensing element. We show that we have been able to monitor cyclic physiological parameters such as heart and respiratory rates in various animal preparations. The probe has been used to obtain signals from the oesophagus, the lower gastro-intestinal tract, the abdominal cavity and from blood vessels (arteries and veins). The probe has also measured phasic activity coincident with mechanical activity of isolated heart muscle. The small physical size of the sensor (125 µm diameter), its flexibility and the fact that it is biologically inert are all very important characteristics for medical and biological considerations. Most recently, the probe has been used to monitor cardiac and respiratory rates while obtaining NMR spectra assessing metabolic activity. This was possible only because the probe is magnetically transparent.

  19. Optical forces from evanescent Bessel beams, multiple reflections and Kerker conditions in magnetodielectric spheres and cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Auñon, J M

    2014-01-01

    In this work we address, first, the optical force on a magnetodielectric particle on a flat dielectric surface due to an evanescent Bessel beam and, second, the effects on the force of multiple scattering with the substrate. For the first question we find analytical solutions showing that due to the interference of the excited electric and magnetic particle dipoles, the vertical force unusually pushes the object out from the plane. The incident wavelength rules whether the illumination constitutes, or not, an optical trap. As for the second problem, we make a 2D study with a single evanescent plane wave, and we present the Kerker conditions, (so far established for spheres), for magnetodielectric cylinders; showing that in $p$-polarization those are practically reproduced and are associated to minima of the horizontal and vertical forces.

  20. Enhancement of anion binding in lanthanide optical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Morgan L; Kirby, James P; Gray, Harry B; Ponce, Adrian

    2013-11-19

    In the design of molecular sensors, researchers exploit binding interactions that are usually defined in terms of topology and charge complementarity. The formation of complementary arrays of highly cooperative, noncovalent bonding networks facilitates protein-ligand binding, leading to motifs such as the "lock-and-key". Synthetic molecular sensors often employ metal complexes as key design elements as a way to construct a binding site with the desired shape and charge to achieve target selectivity. In transition metal complexes, coordination number, structure and ligand dynamics are governed primarily by a combination of inner-sphere covalent and outer-sphere noncovalent interactions. These interactions provide a rich variable space that researchers can use to tune structure, stability, and dynamics. In contrast, lanthanide(III)-ligand complex formation and ligand-exchange dynamics are dominated by reversible electrostatic and steric interactions, because the unfilled f shell is shielded by the larger, filled d shell. Luminescent lanthanides such as terbium, europium, dysprosium, and samarium display many photophysical properties that make them excellent candidates for molecular sensor applications. Complexes of lanthanide ions act as receptors that exhibit a detectable change in metal-based luminescence upon binding of an anion. In our work on sensors for detection of dipicolinate, the unique biomarker of bacterial spores, we discovered that the incorporation of an ancillary ligand (AL) can enhance binding constants of target anions to lanthanide ions by as much as two orders of magnitude. In this Account, we show that selected ALs in lanthanide/anion systems greatly improve sensor performance for medical, planetary science, and biodefense applications. We suggest that the observed anion binding enhancement could result from an AL-induced increase in positive charge at the lanthanide ion binding site. This effect depends on lanthanide polarizability, which can be

  1. Fiber optic pressure sensors for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemian, H.M.; Black, C.L. [Analysis and Measurement Services Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    In the last few years, the nuclear industry has experienced some problems with the performance of pressure transmitters and has been interested in new sensors based on new technologies. Fiber optic pressure sensors offer the potential to improve on or overcome some of the limitations of existing pressure sensors. Up to now, research has been motivated towards development and refinement of fiber optic sensing technology. In most applications, reliability studies and failure mode analyses remain to be exhaustively conducted. Fiber optic sensors have currently penetrated certain cutting edge markets where they possess necessary inherent advantages over other existing technologies. In these markets (e.g. biomedical, aerospace, automotive, and petrochemical), fiber optic sensors are able to perform measurements for which no alternate sensor previously existed. Fiber optic sensing technology has not yet been fully adopted into the mainstream sensing market. This may be due to not only the current premium price of fiber optic sensors, but also the lack of characterization of their possible performance disadvantages. In other words, in conservative industries, the known disadvantages of conventional sensors are sometimes preferable to unknown or not fully characterized (but potentially fewer and less critical) disadvantages of fiber optic sensors. A six-month feasibility study has been initiated under the auspices of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assess the performance and reliability of existing fiber optic pressure sensors for use in nuclear power plants. This assessment will include establishment of the state of the art in fiber optic pressure sensing, characterization of the reliability of fiber optic pressure sensors, and determination of the strengths and limitations of these sensors for nuclear safety-related services.

  2. Bio-optical sensor for brain activity measurement based on whispering gallery modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amir R.; Massoud, Yasmin M.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a high-resolution bio-optical sensor is developed for brain activity measurement. The aim is to develop an optical sensor with enough sensitivity to detect small electric field perturbations caused by neuronal action potential. The sensing element is a polymeric dielectric micro-resonator fabricated in a spherical shape with a few hundred microns in diameter. They are made of optical quality polymers that are soft which make them mechanically compatible with tissue. The sensors are attached to or embedded in optical fibers which serve as input/output conduits for the sensors. Hundreds or even thousands of spheres can be attached to a single fiber to detect and transmit signals at different locations. The high quality factor for the optical resonator makes it significantly used in such bio-medical applications. The sensing phenomenon is based on whispering gallery modes (WGM) shifts of the optical sensor. To mimic the brain signals, the spherical resonator is immersed in a homogeneous electrical field that is created by applying potential difference across two metallic plates. One of the plates has a variable voltage while the volt on the other plate kept fixed. Any small perturbations of the potential difference (voltage) lead to change in the electric field intensity. In turn the sensor morphology will be affected due to the change in the electrostriction force acting on it causing change in its WGM. By tracking these WGM shift on the transmission spectrum, the induced potential difference (voltage change) could be measured. Results of a mathematical model simulation agree well with the preliminary experiments. Also, the results show that the brain activity could be measured using this principle.

  3. Fiber optic vibration sensor using bifurcated plastic optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, M.; Bidin, N.; Yasin, M.

    2016-11-01

    An extrinsic fiber optic vibration sensor is demonstrated for a fiber optic displacement sensor based on a bundled multimode fiber to measure a vibration frequency ranging from 100 until 3000 Hz. The front slope has a sensitivity of 0.1938mV/mm and linearity of 99.7% within a measurement range between 0.15-3.00 mm. By placing the diaphragm of the concave load-speaker within the linear range from the probe, the frequency of the vibration can be measured with error percentage of less than 1.54%. The graph of input against output frequency for low, medium and high frequency range show very high linearity up to 99%. Slope for low, medium, and high frequency range are calculated as 1.0026, 0.9934, and 1.0007 respectively. Simplicity, long term stability, low power consumption, wide dynamic and frequency ranges, noise reduction, ruggedness, linearity and light weight make it promising alternative to other well-establish methods for vibration frequency measurement.

  4. Low-cost fiber optic weigh-in-motion sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaai-Jazi, A.; Ardekani, S. A.; Mehdikhani, M.

    1990-11-01

    A design for a fiber optic weigh in motion (WIM) sensor is proposed. A prototype of the proposed sensor is designed, manufactured, and tested in the laboratory for different load frequency combinations using a material testing system (MTS) machine. Statistical analysis of data are performed to assess the response of the sensor under varying load frequencies for comparison.

  5. Wave front sensor based on holographic optical elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, M. S.; Krasin, G. K.; Malinina, P. I.; Odinokov, S. B.; Sagatelyan, H. R.

    2016-08-01

    A wavefront sensor (WFS) based on holographic optical elements, namely computer generated Fourier holograms is proposed as a perspective alternative to the Shack-Hartmann sensor. A possibility of single and multimode sensor and the dependence of their characteristics were investigated.

  6. Analytical analysis of sensitivity of optical waveguide sensor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology. Vol. ... optical sensors have attracted considerable attention, especially in the application of biochemical species ... Section 2 provides the principle and basic theory of optical sensors and the modal ... The electric and magnetic fields of a mode can be written as.

  7. Fiber-optic interferometric acoustic sensors for wind tunnel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    Progress in developing fiber-optic interferometric sensors for aeroacoustic measurements in wind tunnels, performed under the NASA program, is reported. Preliminary results show that the fiber-optic interferometer sensor array is a powerful instrument for solving complex acoustic measurement problems in wind tunnels, which cannot be resolved with the conventional transducer technique.

  8. Fiber-optic interferometric acoustic sensors for wind tunnel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    Progress in developing fiber-optic interferometric sensors for aeroacoustic measurements in wind tunnels, performed under the NASA program, is reported. Preliminary results show that the fiber-optic interferometer sensor array is a powerful instrument for solving complex acoustic measurement problems in wind tunnels, which cannot be resolved with the conventional transducer technique.

  9. Initial research of dual wavelength fibre optic perimeter sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Kondrat, M.; Ciurapinski, W.

    2005-10-01

    The dual wavelength fibre optic perimeter sensor bases on input signals measurements in an arrangement of fibre optic Michelson and Sagnac interferometers with a 3 × 3 coupler and two semiconductor lasers. For 3 km long sensor we obtained 20-50m resolution of determination of disturbance point.

  10. Advancement of Miniature Optic Gas Sensor (MOGS) Probe Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chullen, Cinda

    2015-01-01

    Advancement of Miniature Optic Gas Sensor (MOGS) Probe Technology" project will investigate newly developed optic gas sensors delivered from a Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Phase II effort. A ventilation test rig will be designed and fabricated to test the sensors while integrated with a Suited Manikin Test Apparatus (SMTA). Once the sensors are integrated, a series of test points will be completed to verify that the sensors can withstand Advanced Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) environments and associated human metabolic profiles for changes in pressure and levels of Oxygen (ppO2), carbon dioxide (ppCO2), and humidity (ppH2O).

  11. Implementation and characterization of a fibre-optic colour sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajić, Jovan S.; Stupar, Dragan Z.; Dakić, Bojan M.; Manojlović, Lazo M.; Slankamenac, Miloš P.; Živanov, Miloš B.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper the implementation of a fibre-optic sensor for colour detection based on reflective colour sensing is proposed. The sensor consists of three plastic optical fibres emitting red, green and blue components and one optical fibre collecting light reflected from the object. Red, green and blue LEDs are excited at different frequencies. In this way detection of the reflected signal is achieved with only one photodetector and three bandpass filters. Bandpass filters are implemented as digital IIR (infinite impulse response) filters on the microcontroller. Results obtained from the proposed sensor are compared with commercial available colour sensors and the results are satisfactory. Analyses of the sensor performance both in RGB and HSV colour space are done. The proposed solution shows that in specific applications by using the HSV model the sensor can be used both as a colour and distance sensor.

  12. Sensitivity of optical mass sensor enhanced by optomechanical coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yong, E-mail: hey@cczu.edu.cn [School of Mathematics and Physics, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China)

    2015-03-23

    Optical mass sensors based on cavity optomechanics employ radiation pressure force to drive mechanical resonator whose mechanical susceptibility can be described by nonlinear optical transmission spectrum. In this paper, we present an optical mass sensor based on a two-cavity optomechanical system where the mechanical damping rate can be decreased by adjusting a pump power so that the mass sensitivity which depends on the mechanical quality factor has been enhanced greatly. Compared with that of an optical mass sensor based on single-cavity optomechanics, the mass sensitivity of the optical mass sensor is improved by three orders of magnitude. This is an approach to enhance the mass sensitivity by means of optomechanical coupling, which is suitable for all mass sensor based on cavity optomechanics. Finally, we illustrate the accurate measurement for the mass of a few chromosomes, which can be achieved based on the current experimental conditions.

  13. Evaluations of fiber optic sensors for interior applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval, M.W.; Malone, T.P.

    1996-02-01

    This report addresses the testing and evaluation of commercial fiber optic intrusion detection systems in interior applications. The applications include laying optical fiber cable above suspended ceilings to detect removal of ceiling tiles, embedding optical fibers inside a tamper or item monitoring blanket that could be placed over an asset, and installing optical fibers on a door to detect movement or penetration. Detection capability of the fiber optic sensors as well as nuisance and false alarm information were focused on during the evaluation. Fiber optic sensor processing, system components, and system setup are described.

  14. Single mode variable-sensitivity fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, K. A.; Fogg, B. R.; Gunther, M. F.; Claus, R. O.

    1992-01-01

    We review spatially-weighted optical fiber sensors that filter specific vibration modes from one dimensional beams placed in clamped-free and clamped-clamped configurations. The sensitivity of the sensor is varied along the length of the fiber by tapering circular-core, dual-mode optical fibers. Selective vibration mode suppression on the order of 10 dB was obtained. We describe experimental results and propose future extensions to single mode sensor applications.

  15. Advances in fiber optic sensors for in-vivo monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, Francesco; Mignani, Anna G.

    1995-09-01

    Biomedical fiber-optic sensors are attractive for the measurement of both physical and chemical parameters as well as for spectral measurements directly performed on the patient. An overview of fiber-optic sensors for in vivo monitoring is given, with particular attention to the advantages that these sensors are able to offer in different fields of application such as cardiovascular and intensive care, angiology, gastroenterology, ophthalmology, oncology, neurology, dermatology, and dentistry.

  16. Improved Fiber-Optic-Coupled Pressure And Vibration Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Cuomo, Frank W.

    1994-01-01

    Improved fiber-optic coupler enables use of single optical fiber to carry light to and from sensor head. Eliminates problem of alignment of multiple fibers in sensor head and simplifies calibration by making performance both more predictable and more stable. Sensitivities increased, sizes reduced. Provides increased margin for design of compact sensor heads not required to contain amplifier circuits and withstand high operating temperatures.

  17. SAXO: the extreme adaptive optics system of SPHERE (I) system overview and global laboratory performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvage, Jean-Francois; Fusco, Thierry; Petit, Cyril; Costille, Anne; Mouillet, David; Beuzit, Jean-Luc; Dohlen, Kjetil; Kasper, Markus; Suarez, Marcos; Soenke, Christian; Baruffolo, Andrea; Salasnich, Bernardo; Rochat, Sylvain; Fedrigo, Enrico; Baudoz, Pierre; Hugot, Emmanuel; Sevin, Arnaud; Perret, Denis; Wildi, Francois; Downing, Mark; Feautrier, Philippe; Puget, Pascal; Vigan, Arthur; O'Neal, Jared; Girard, Julien; Mawet, Dimitri; Schmid, Hans Martin; Roelfsema, Ronald

    2016-04-01

    The direct imaging of exoplanet is a leading field of today's astronomy. The photons coming from the planet carry precious information on the chemical composition of its atmosphere. The second-generation instrument, Spectro-Polarimetric High contrast Exoplanet Research (SPHERE), dedicated to detection, photometry and spectral characterization of Jovian-like planets, is now in operation on the European very large telescope. This instrument relies on an extreme adaptive optics (XAO) system to compensate for atmospheric turbulence as well as for internal errors with an unprecedented accuracy. We demonstrate the high level of performance reached by the SPHERE XAO system (SAXO) during the assembly integration and test (AIT) period. In order to fully characterize the instrument quality, two AIT periods have been mandatory. In the first phase at Observatoire de Paris, the performance of SAXO itself was assessed. In the second phase at IPAG Grenoble Observatory, the operation of SAXO in interaction with the overall instrument has been optimized. In addition to the first two phases, a final check has been performed after the reintegration of the instrument at Paranal Observatory, in the New Integration Hall before integration at the telescope focus. The final performance aimed by the SPHERE instrument with the help of SAXO is among the highest Strehl ratio pretended for an operational instrument (90% in H band, 43% in V band in a realistic turbulence r0, and wind speed condition), a limit R magnitude for loop closure at 15, and a robustness to high wind speeds. The full-width at half-maximum reached by the instrument is 40 mas for infrared in H band and unprecedented 18.5 mas in V band.

  18. EDITORIAL: Optical Fibre Sensors 18 (OFS-18)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Julian D. C.; Tatam, Ralph P.

    2007-10-01

    The International Conference on Optical Fibre Sensors (OFS-18) was held in October 2006 in Cancún, Mexico, under the general chairmanship of Dr Alexis Mendez (MCH Engineering LLC, USA) and Dr Fernando Mendoza (Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Mexico). 'OFS', as it has become known, is firmly established as the leading international conference for the optical fibre sensor community. Since its inception, in London in 1983, and under the leadership of an international steering committee independent of any learned society or professional institution, it has been held approximately every eighteen months. The venue nominally rotates from Europe, to the Americas, and thence to Asia and the Pacific. OFS-18 demonstrated the continuing vigour of the community, with some 250 papers presented, plus two workshops, with attendance as international as ever. In recent years, it has become a tradition to publish a post-conference special issue in the journal Measurement Science and Technology, and these special issues offer a representative sample of the current status of the field. In the nearly 25 years since OFS began, many of the early ideas and laboratory-based proof-of-principle experiments have led to highly developed instrumentation systems, and to successful commercial products. Perhaps the most mature of all of these technologies is the optical fibre gyroscope, with the fibre hydrophone a close second—originally developed for defence applications for which it is now established, but with increasing relevance to the oil and gas industry; electromagnetic sensors based on the Faraday and electro-optic effects are of growing significance in the power generation and distribution industry; whilst in-fibre grating-based sensors occupy an expanding niche in structural monitoring, especially in civil engineering. It is therefore appropriate that the first day of OFS was devoted to workshops on structural health monitoring, and to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the

  19. A Passive Optical Fiber Current Sensor Based on YIG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Shao; Wen Liu; Cui-Qing Liu; Duan Xu

    2008-01-01

    A research on passive optical fiber current sensor based on magneto-optical crystal and a new design of light path of the sensor head are presented. Both methods of dual-channel optical detection of the polarization state of the output light and signal processing are proposed. Signal processing can obtain the linear output of the current measurement of the wire more conveniently. Theoretical analysis on the magneto-optical fiber current sensor is given, followed by experiments. After that, further analysis is made according to the results, which leads to clarifying the exiting problems and their placements.

  20. Multi-resolution optical 3D sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühmstedt, Peter; Heinze, Matthias; Schmidt, Ingo; Breitbarth, Martin; Notni, Gunther

    2007-06-01

    A new multi resolution self calibrating optical 3D measurement system using fringe projection technique named "kolibri FLEX multi" will be presented. It can be utilised to acquire the all around shape of small to medium objects, simultaneously. The basic measurement principle is the phasogrammetric approach /1,2,3/ in combination with the method of virtual landmarks for the merging of the 3D single views. The system consists in minimum of two fringe projection sensors. The sensors are mounted on a rotation stage illuminating the object from different directions. The measurement fields of the sensors can be chosen different, here as an example 40mm and 180mm in diameter. In the measurement the object can be scanned at the same time with these two resolutions. Using the method of virtual landmarks both point clouds are calculated within the same world coordinate system resulting in a common 3D-point cloud. The final point cloud includes the overview of the object with low point density (wide field) and a region with high point density (focussed view) at the same time. The advantage of the new method is the possibility to measure with different resolutions at the same object region without any mechanical changes in the system or data post processing. Typical parameters of the system are: the measurement time is 2min for 12 images and the measurement accuracy is below 3μm up to 10 μm. The flexibility makes the measurement system useful for a wide range of applications such as quality control, rapid prototyping, design and CAD/CAM which will be shown in the paper.

  1. Operation principle of a novel curvature plastic fiber optic sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Yili; Liu Renqiang; Wang Shuguo

    2005-01-01

    The operation principle of a new type of intensity modulate macrobend curvature optical fiber senor was presented based on surface light scattering theory. Sensor's static and dynamic performance was investigated. This type of sensor can distinguish between positive and negative bending directions. When curvature radius is larger than 50mm, the sensor will keep good linearity. Two-dimensional shape measurement experiments using curvature sensors have been implemented.

  2. Optics-less Sensors for Localization of Radiation Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Caulfield, H. J.; Yaroslavsky, L. P.; Goerzen, Ch.; Umansky, S.

    2008-01-01

    A new family of radiation sensors is introduced which do not require any optics. The sensors consist of arrays of elementary sub-sensors with natural cosine-law or similar angular sensitivity supplemented with a signal processing unit that computes optimal statistical estimations of source parameters. We show, both theoretically and by computer simulation, that such sensors are capable of accurate localization and intensity estimation of a given number of radiation sources and of imaging of a...

  3. Ultra violet sensors based on nanostructured ZnO spheres in network of nanowires: a novel approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luykx A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe ZnO nanostructures consisting of micro spheres in a network of nano wires were synthesized by direct vapor phase method. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy measurements were carried out to understand the chemical nature of the sample. ZnO nanostructures exhibited band edge luminescence at 383 nm. The nanostructure based ZnO thin films were used to fabricate UV sensors. The photoresponse measurements were carried out and the responsivity was measured to be 50 mA W−1. The rise and decay time measurements were also measured.

  4. Optical and Nonlinear Optical Response of Light Sensor Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Z. Weisz

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available For potential ultrafast optical sensor application, both VO2 thin films andnanocomposite crystal-Si enriched SiO2 thin films grown on fused quartz substrates weresuccessfully prepared using pulsed laser deposition (PLD and RF co-sputteringtechniques. In photoluminescence (PL measurement c-Si/SiO2 film containsnanoparticles of crystal Si exhibits strong red emission with the band maximum rangingfrom 580 to 750 nm. With ultrashort pulsed laser excitation all films show extremelyintense and ultrafast nonlinear optical (NLO response. The recorded holography fromall these thin films in a degenerate-four-wave-mixing configuration shows extremelylarge third-order response. For VO2 thin films, an optically induced semiconductor-tometalphase transition (PT immediately occurred upon laser excitation. it accompanied.It turns out that the fast excited state dynamics was responsible to the induced PT. For c-Si/SiO2 film, its NLO response comes from the contribution of charge carriers created bylaser excitation in conduction band of the c-Si nanoparticles. It was verified byintroducing Eu3+ which is often used as a probe sensing the environment variations. Itturns out that the entire excited state dynamical process associated with the creation,movement and trapping of the charge carriers has a characteristic 500 ps duration.

  5. Chalcogenide Fibre Displacement Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Fibre optic technology offers the possibility for developing of a variety of physical sensors for a wide range of physical parameters. The main...integrating sphere. The use of chalcogenide rather quartz fibre optic highly increases the Sensitivity of the sensor. Experimental set-up, transmission characteristics and technical parameters are presented.

  6. Carbon nanotubes as optical biomedical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruss, Sebastian; Hilmer, Andrew J; Zhang, Jingqing; Reuel, Nigel F; Mu, Bin; Strano, Michael S

    2013-12-01

    Biosensors are important tools in biomedical research. Moreover, they are becoming an essential part of modern healthcare. In the future, biosensor development will become even more crucial due to the demand for personalized-medicine, point-of care devices and cheaper diagnostic tools. Substantial advances in sensor technology are often fueled by the advent of new materials. Therefore, nanomaterials have motivated a large body of research and such materials have been implemented into biosensor devices. Among these new materials carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are especially promising building blocks for biosensors due to their unique electronic and optical properties. Carbon nanotubes are rolled-up cylinders of carbon monolayers (graphene). They can be chemically modified in such a way that biologically relevant molecules can be detected with high sensitivity and selectivity. In this review article we will discuss how carbon nanotubes can be used to create biosensors. We review the latest advancements of optical carbon nanotube based biosensors with a special focus on near-infrared (NIR)-fluorescence, Raman-scattering and fluorescence quenching.

  7. Optical sensor for rapid microbial detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Adhami, Mustafa; Tilahun, Dagmawi; Rao, Govind; Kostov, Yordan

    2016-05-01

    In biotechnology, the ability to instantly detect contaminants is key to running a reliable bioprocess. Bioprocesses are prone to be contaminated by cells that are abundant in our environment; detection and quantification of these cells would aid in the preservation of the bioprocess product. This paper discusses the design and development of a portable kinetics fluorometer which acts as a single-excitation, single-emission photometer that continuously measures fluorescence intensity of an indicator dye, and plots it. Resazurin is used as an indicator dye since the viable contaminant cells reduce Resazurin toResorufin, the latter being strongly fluorescent. A photodiode detects fluorescence change by generating current proportional to the intensity of the light that reached it, and a trans-impedance differential op-amp ensures amplification of the photodiodes' signal. A microfluidic chip was designed specifically for the device. It acts as a fully enclosed cuvette, which enhances the Resazurin reduction rate. E. coli in LB media, along with Resazurin were injected into the microfluidic chip. The optical sensor detected the presence of E. coli in the media based on the fluorescence change that occurred in the indicator dye in concentrations as low as 10 CFU/ml. A method was devised to detect and determine an approximate amount of contamination with this device. This paper discusses application of this method to detect and estimate sample contamination. This device provides fast, accurate, and inexpensive means to optically detect the presence of viable cells.

  8. Comparing the sphere anemometer to standard sensors for 2D wind measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisselmann, Hendrik; Hoelling, Michael; Peinke, Joachim

    2011-11-01

    The cup anemometers commonly used for wind energy applications are fairly robust, but suffer from several drawbacks like their limited temporal resolution, a systematic overestimation of the wind speed in turbulent flows and the inability to measure the wind direction. While sonic anemometers can measure the wind vector at a higher temporal resolution, they are more fragile and significantly more expensive. Therefore, we propose the sphere anemometer as a robust and highly-resolving alternative to standard anemometers. Designed without wearing parts, the sphere anemometer provides simultaneous wind speed and direction measurements as needed for wind turbine operation especially under challenging conditions such as offshore installation. In our contribution, we introduce the setup of the sphere anemometer which is based on the velocity-dependent deflection of a flexible tube with a sphere mounted atop. The deflection is measured in two dimensions using a light pointer, which allows for the simultaneous determination of wind speed and direction via calibration. Experimental results from wind tunnel measurements with sonic anemometer and sphere anemometer are presented, as well as first comparative measurements from the operation on the nacelle of a near-shore wind turbine.

  9. A fiber optic hybrid multifunctional AC voltage sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolovsky, A.; Zadvornov, S. [IRE, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ryabko, M. [UFD, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    Hybrid sensors have the advantages of both electronic and optical technologies. Their sensing element is based on conventional transducers and the optical fiber is used as a transmission media for the optical signal encoded with information between the local module and the remote module. The power supply for the remote module is usually provided by a built-in photoelectric converter illuminated by the optical radiation going through the same or another optical fiber. Electro-optic hybrid sensors have been widely used because of the electrical isolation provided by optical fiber. In the conventional fiber optic voltage sensor, piezoelectric or electro-optic transducers are implemented. Processing and conditioning measurement information is a complex task in these sensors. Moreover, the considerable drawback of most of these systems is that only one parameter, usually voltage value, is measured. This paper presented a novel fiber optic hybrid sensor for alternating current voltage measurements. This instrument provides the simultaneous measurement of four parameters, notably voltage value, frequency, phase angle and the external temperature. The paper described the measurement technology of the instrument including the remote module and optical powering as well as the unique modulation algorithm. The results and conclusions were also presented. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Free-Space Optical Communications: Capacity Bounds, Approximations, and a New Sphere-Packing Perspective

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas

    2015-04-01

    The capacity of the intensity-modulation direct-detection (IM-DD) free-space optical channel is studied. It is shown that for an IM-DD channel with generally input-dependent noise, the worst noise at high SNR is input-independent Gaussian with variance dependent on the input cost. Based on this result, a Gaussian IM-DD channel model is proposed where the noise variance depends on the optical intensity constraints only. A new recursive approach for bounding the capacity of the channel based on sphere-packing is proposed, which leads to a tighter bound than an existing sphere-packing bound for the channel with only an average intensity constraint. Under both average and peak constraints, it yields bounds that characterize the high SNR capacity within a negligible gap, where the achievability is proved by using a truncated Gaussian input distribution. This completes the high SNR capacity characterization of the channel, by closing the gap in the existing characterization for a small average-to-peak ratio. Simple fitting functions that capture the best known achievable rate for the channel are provided. These functions can be of significant practical importance especially for the study of systems operating under atmospheric turbulence and misalignment conditions. Finally, the capacity/SNR loss between heterodyne detection (HD) systems and IM-DD systems is bounded at high SNR, where it is shown that the loss grows as SNR increases for a complex-valued HD system, while it is bounded by 1.245 bits or 3.76 dB at most for a real-valued one.

  11. Embedded Optical Sensors for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David R. Clarke

    2005-11-09

    In the second year of this program on developing embedded optical sensors for thermal barrier coatings, our research has focused three topics: (1) Eu{sup 3+} doping for temperature sensing, (2) the effect of long-term, high-temperature aging on the characteristics of the luminescence from the Eu{sup 3+} ions of 8YSZ materials, (3) construction of a fiber-optic based luminescence detector system. It has been demonstrated that the variation in luminescence lifetime with temperature is identical for electron-beam evaporated Eu-doped YSZ coatings as for bulk ceramics of the same composition. Experiments indicate that the luminescence lifetime method of measuring temperatures is sensitive up to 1150 C for both Eu-doped YSZ coatings and Eu-doped Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Furthermore, the technique is sensitive up to 1250 C for the composition Eu{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. The luminescence spectra Eu-doped YSZ are insensitive to long-term aging at high-temperatures, even to 195 hours at 1425 C, except for a small frequency shift that is probably too small in measure except with instruments of the highest spectral resolution. The temperature of 1425 C is much higher than present engines attain or even planned in the foreseeable future. Nevertheless, experiments are on-going to explore longer term exposures. A fiber-optic based luminescence system has been constructed in which the hottest section of fiber operates to at least 1250 C.

  12. A Differential Reflective Intensity Optical Fiber Angular Displacement Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Binghui; He, Lei; Yan, Guodong; Feng, Yong

    2016-09-16

    In this paper, a novel differential reflective intensity optical fiber angular displacement sensor was proposed. This sensor can directly measure the angular and axial linear displacement of a flat surface. The structure of the sensor probe is simple and its basic principle was first analyzed according to the intensity modulation mechanisms. Secondly, in order to trim the dark output voltage to zero, the photoelectric conversion circuit was developed to adjust the signals. Then, the sensor model including the photoelectric conversion circuit has been established, and the influence of design parameters on the sensor output characteristic has been simulated. Finally, the design parameters of the sensor structure were obtained based on the simulation results; and an experimental test system was built for the sensor calibration. Experimental results show that the linear angular range and the sensitivity of the sensor were 74.4 and 0.051 V/°, respectively. Its change rules confirm the operating principle of the sensor well.

  13. A Differential Reflective Intensity Optical Fiber Angular Displacement Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Binghui; He, Lei; Yan, Guodong; Feng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel differential reflective intensity optical fiber angular displacement sensor was proposed. This sensor can directly measure the angular and axial linear displacement of a flat surface. The structure of the sensor probe is simple and its basic principle was first analyzed according to the intensity modulation mechanisms. Secondly, in order to trim the dark output voltage to zero, the photoelectric conversion circuit was developed to adjust the signals. Then, the sensor model including the photoelectric conversion circuit has been established, and the influence of design parameters on the sensor output characteristic has been simulated. Finally, the design parameters of the sensor structure were obtained based on the simulation results; and an experimental test system was built for the sensor calibration. Experimental results show that the linear angular range and the sensitivity of the sensor were 74.4 and 0.051 V/°, respectively. Its change rules confirm the operating principle of the sensor well. PMID:27649199

  14. Networking of optical fiber sensors for extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kara

    2016-04-01

    One of the major benefits of optical fiber sensors for applications to structural health monitoring and other structural measurements is their inherent multiplexing capabilities, meaning that a large number of sensing locations can be achieved with a single optical fiber. It has been well demonstrated that point wise sensors can be multiplexed to form sensor networks or optical fibers integrated with distributed sensing techniques. The spacing between sensing locations can also be tuned to match different length scales of interest. This article presents an overview of directions to adapt optical fiber sensor networking techniques into new applications where limitations such as available power or requirements for high data acquisition speeds are a driving factor. In particular, the trade-off between high fidelity sensor information vs. rapid signal processing or data acquisition is discussed.

  15. Optical Fiber Sensors Based on Nanoparticle-Embedded Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aitor Urrutia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of nanoparticles (NPs in scientific applications has attracted the attention of many researchers in the last few years. The use of NPs can help researchers to tune the physical characteristics of the sensing coating (thickness, roughness, specific area, refractive index, etc. leading to enhanced sensors with response time or sensitivity better than traditional sensing coatings. Additionally, NPs also offer other special properties that depend on their nanometric size, and this is also a source of new sensing applications. This review focuses on the current status of research in the use of NPs within coatings in optical fiber sensing. Most used sensing principles in fiber optics are briefly described and classified into several groups: absorbance-based sensors, interferometric sensors, fluorescence-based sensors, fiber grating sensors, and resonance-based sensors, among others. For each sensor group, specific examples of the utilization of NP-embedded coatings in their sensing structure are reported.

  16. Optical voltage sensors: principle, problem and research proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changsheng

    2016-10-01

    Sensing principles and main problems to be solved for optical voltage sensors are briefly reviewed. Optical effects used for voltage sensing usually include electro-optic Pockels and Kerr effects, electro-gyration effect, elasto-optical effect, and electroluminescent effects, etc. In principle, typical optical voltage sensor is based on electro-optic Pockels crystals and closed-loop signal detection scheme. Main problems to be solved for optical voltage sensors include: how to remove influence of unwanted multiple optical effects on voltage sensing performance; how to select or develop a proper voltage sensing material and element; how to keep optical phase bias to be stable under temperature fluctuation and vibration; how to achieve dc voltage sensing, etc. In order to suppress the influence of unwanted optical effects and light beam coupling-related loss on voltage sensing signals, we may pay more attention to all-fiber and waveguide voltage sensors. Voltage sensors based on electroluminescent effects are also promising in some application fields due to their compact configuration, low cost and potential long-term reliability.

  17. Optimize Etching Based Single Mode Fiber Optic Temperature Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a description of etching process for fabrication single mode optical fiber sensors. The process of fabrication demonstrates an optimized etching based method to fabricate single mode fiber (SMF optic sensors in specified constant time and temperature. We propose a single mode optical fiber based temperature sensor, where the temperature sensing region is obtained by etching its cladding diameter over small length to a critical value. It is observed that the light transmission through etched fiber at 1550 nm wavelength optical source becomes highly temperature sensitive, compared to the temperature insensitive behavior observed in un-etched fiber for the range on 30ºC to 100ºC at 1550 nm. The sensor response under temperature cycling is repeatable and, proposed to be useful for low frequency analogue signal transmission over optical fiber by means of inline thermal modulation approach.

  18. CCD polarization imaging sensor with aluminum nanowire optical filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruev, Viktor; Perkins, Rob; York, Timothy

    2010-08-30

    We report an imaging sensor capable of recording the optical properties of partially polarized light by monolithically integrating aluminum nanowire optical filters with a CCD imaging array. The imaging sensor, composed of 1000 by 1000 imaging elements with 7.4 μm pixel pitch, is covered with an array of pixel-pitch matched nanowire optical filters with four different orientations offset by 45°. The polarization imaging sensor has a signal-to-noise ratio of 45 dB and captures intensity, angle and degree of linear polarization in the visible spectrum at 40 frames per second with 300 mW of power consumption.

  19. Simple fiber optic sensor for applications in security systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Karol, M.; Markowski, P.; Napierala, M. S.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we demonstrate measurement results of the modalmetric fiber optic sensor used for the monitoring of the fiber optic link integrity to protect it against unauthorized access to classified information. The presented construction is based on the detection of changes of the modes distribution in a multimode fiber. Any mechanical stress on the multimode fiber causes changes of polarization and distribution of propagating modes, hence it changes the distribution of modes at the end of the multimode fiber. Observation of these changes using a narrow core single-mode fiber allows to use the structure as an optical fiber sensor. We used several kilometers long optical links to conduct field tests of laboratory sensor. On this basis the prototype module of modalmetric fiber optic sensor wasbuilt. The modification of optoelectronic part, the variation of sensor length and the change of the method of light reflection at the end of the fiber enable the use of the modalmetric fiber optic sensor in many applications. The sensor finds wide range of applications in security systems. It can be applied to protect the museum's collection, transmission lines and to protect objects of critical infrastructure.

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of N-Doped Porous TiO2 Hollow Spheres and Their Photocatalytic and Optical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongliang Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Three kinds of N-doped mesoporous TiO2 hollow spheres with different N-doping contents, surface area, and pore size distributions were prepared based on a sol–gel synthesis and combined with a calcination process. Melamine formaldehyde (MF microspheres have been used as sacrificial template and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB or polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP was selected as pore-directing agent. Core–shell intermediate spheres of titania-coated MF with diameters of 1.2–1.6 μm were fabricated by varying the volume concentration of TiO2 precursor from 1 to 3 vol %. By calcining the core–shell composite spheres at 500 °C for 3 h in air, an in situ N-doping process occurred upon the decomposition of the MF template and CTAB or PVP pore-directing surfactant. N-doped mesoporous TiO2 hollow spheres with sizes in the range of 0.4–1.2 μm and shell thickness from 40 to 110 nm were obtained. The composition and N-doping content, thermal stability, morphology, surface area and pore size distribution, wall thickness, photocatalytic activities, and optical properties of the mesoporous TiO2 hollow spheres derived from different conditions were investigated and compared based on Fourier-transformation infrared (FTIR, SEM, TEM, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, nitrogen adsorption–desorption, and UV–vis spectrophotoscopy techniques. The influences of particle size, N-doping, porous, and hollow characteristics of the TiO2 hollow spheres on their photocatalytic activities and optical properties have been studied and discussed based on the composition analysis, structure characterization, and optical property investigation of these hollow spherical TiO2 matrices.

  1. Experimental results of fiber optic contrast-sensitive dislocation sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Szustakowski, M.; Palka, N.

    2005-05-01

    The dislocation sensor based on the contrast phenomenon in an unbalanced fiber optic Michelson interferometer with a 3 x 3 coupler and a semiconductor multimode laser. Periodic contrast oscillations, which depend on a laser spectrum, occur if a measuring arm of the interferometer is elongated. A conception of the elongation sensor that based on linearization of contrast oscillations is shown. Next, a setup of the sensor and signal processing scheme of the sensor is presented. During measurements, for 1-m long sensor we obtained 5-mm measuring range with +/-28-μm uncertainty. Explanation of these differences and conclusion to further research are formulated.

  2. The research of optical windows used in aircraft sensor systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Feng; Li Yan; Tang Tian-Jin

    2012-01-01

    The optical windows used in aircrafts protect their imaging sensors from environmental effects.Considering the imaging performance,flat surfaces are traditionally used in the design of optical windows.For aircrafts operating at high speeds,the optical windows should be relatively aerodynamic,but a flat optical window may introduce unacceptably high drag to the airframes.The linear scanning infrared sensors used in aircrafts with,respectively,a fiat window,a spherical window and a toric window in front of the aircraft sensors are designed and compared.Simulation results show that the optical design using a toric surface has the integrated advantages of field of regard,aerodynamic drag,narcissus effect,and imaging performance,so the optical window with a toric surface is demonstrated to be suited for this application.

  3. Integrating-Sphere Measurements for Determining Optical Properties of Tissue-Engineered Oral Mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, A. M.; Cardona, J. C.; Garzón, I.; Oliveira, A. C.; Ghinea, R.; Alaminos, M.; Pérez, M. M.

    2015-02-01

    Surgical procedures carried out in the oral and maxillofacial region can result in large tissue defects. Accounting for the shortage of oral mucosa to replace the excised tissues, different models of an organotypic substitute of the oral mucosa generated by tissue engineering have recently been proposed. In this work, the propagation of light radiation through artificial human oral mucosa substitutes based on fibrin-agarose scaffolds (fibrin, fibrin-0.1% agarose, fibrin-0.2%agarose) is investigated, and their optical properties are determined using the inverse adding-doubling (IAD) method based on integrating-sphere measurements. Similar values for the absorption and scattering coefficients between the fibrin and fibrin-0.1% agarose bioengineered tissues and the native oral mucosa were found. These results suggest the adequacy of these biomaterials for potential clinical use in human oral mucosa applications. These optical properties represent useful references and data for applications requiring the knowledge of the light transport through this type of tissues, applications used in clinical practice. It also provides a new method of information analysis for the quality control of the development of the artificial nanostructured oral mucosa substitutes and its comparison with native oral mucosa tissues.

  4. Fiber Optic Strain Sensor for Planetary Gear Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiddy, Jason S.; Lewicki, David G.; LaBerge, Kelsen E.; Ehinger, Ryan T.; Fetty, Jason

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new sensing approach for helicopter damage detection in the planetary stage of a helicopter transmission based on a fiber optic strain sensor array. Complete helicopter transmission damage detection has proven itself a difficult task due to the complex geometry of the planetary reduction stage. The crowded and complex nature of the gearbox interior does not allow for attachment of sensors within the rotating frame. Hence, traditional vibration-based diagnostics are instead based on measurements from externally mounted sensors, typically accelerometers, fixed to the gearbox exterior. However, this type of sensor is susceptible to a number of external disturbances that can corrupt the data, leading to false positives or missed detection of potentially catastrophic faults. Fiber optic strain sensors represent an appealing alternative to the accelerometer. Their small size and multiplexibility allows for potentially greater sensing resolution and accuracy, as well as redundancy, when employed as an array of sensors. The work presented in this paper is focused on the detection of gear damage in the planetary stage of a helicopter transmission using a fiber optic strain sensor band. The sensor band includes an array of 13 strain sensors, and is mounted on the ring gear of a Bell Helicopter OH-58C transmission. Data collected from the sensor array is compared to accelerometer data, and the damage detection results are presented

  5. Broadband ultrasonic sensor array via optical frequency domain reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabai, Haniel; Steinberg, Idan; Eyal, Avishay

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a new approach for multiplexing fiber-based ultrasound sensors using Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR). In the present demonstration of the method, each sensor was a short section of Polyimide-coated single-mode fiber. One end of the sensing fiber was pigtailed to a mirror and the other end was connected, via a fiber optic delay line, to a 1X4 fiber coupler. The multiplexing was enabled by using a different delay to each sensor. Ultrasonic excitation was performed by a 1MHz transducer which transmitted 4μs tone-bursts above the sensor array. The ultrasound waves generated optical phase variations in the fibers which were detected using the OFDR method. The ultrasound field at the sensors was successfully reconstructed without any noticeable cross-talk.

  6. Optical Fiber Grating Sensor for Force Measurement of Anchor Cable

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Desheng; FU Jinghua; LIU Shengchun; SUI Lingfeng; FU Rong

    2006-01-01

    The development of the sensor suitable for measuring large load stress to the anchor cable becomes an important task in bridge construction and maintenance. Therefore, a new type of optical fiber sensor was developed in the laboratory - optical fiber grating sensor for force measurement of anchor cable (OFBFMAC). No similar report about this kind of sensor has been found up to now in China and other countries. This sensor is proved to be an effective way of monitoring in processes of anchor cable installation, cable cutting, cable force regulation, etc, with the accurate and repeatable measuring results. Its successful application in the tie bar cable force safety monitoring for Wuhan Qingchuan bridge is a new exploration of optical fiber grating sensing technology in bridge tie bar monitoring system.

  7. Optical fiber strain sensor with improved linearity range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egalon, Claudio Oliveira (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A strain sensor is constructed from a two mode optical fiber. When the optical fiber is surface mounted in a straight line and the object to which the optical fiber is mounted is subjected to strain within a predetermined range, the light intensity of any point at the output of the optical fiber will have a linear relationship to strain, provided the intermodal phase difference is less than 0.17 radians.

  8. Optical arc sensor using energy harvesting power source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoo Nam; Rho, Hee Hyuk

    2016-06-01

    Wireless sensors without external power supply gained considerable attention due to convenience both in installation and operation. Optical arc detecting sensor equipping with self sustaining power supply using energy harvesting method was investigated. Continuous energy harvesting method was attempted using thermoelectric generator to supply standby power in micro ampere scale and operating power in mA scale. Peltier module with heat-sink was used for high efficiency electricity generator. Optical arc detecting sensor with hybrid filter showed insensitivity to fluorescent and incandescent lamps under simulated distribution panel condition. Signal processing using integrating function showed selective arc discharge detection capability to different arc energy levels, with a resolution below 17J energy difference, unaffected by bursting arc waveform. The sensor showed possibility for application to arc discharge detecting sensor in power distribution panel. Also experiment with proposed continuous energy harvesting method using thermoelectric power showed possibility as a self sustainable power source of remote sensor.

  9. Integrated optical waveguide sensor for lighting impulse electric field measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiahong; Chen, Fushen; Sun, Bao; Chen, Kaixin

    2014-09-01

    A Lithium niobate (LiNbO3) based integrated optical E-field sensor with an optical waveguide Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) and a tapered antenna has been designed and fabricated for the measurement of the pulsed electric field. The minimum detectable E-field of the sensor was 10 kV/m. The sensor showed a good linear characteristic while the input E-fields varied from 10 kV/m to 370 kV/m. Furthermore, the maximum detectable E-field of the sensor, which could be calculated from the sensor input/output characteristic, was approximately equal to 1000 kV/m. All these results suggest that such sensor can be used for the measurement of the lighting impulse electric field.

  10. Optical fiber based slide tactile sensor for underwater robots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Ding-zhong; WANG Qi-ming; SONG Rui-han; YAO Xin; GU Yi-hua

    2008-01-01

    In the underwater environment,many visual sensors don't work,and many sensors which work well for robots working in space or on land can not be used underwater.Therefore,an optical fiber slide tactile sensor was designed based on the inner modulation mechanism of optical fibers.The principles and structure of the sensor are explained in detail.Its static and dynamic characteristics were analyzed theoretically and then simulated.A dynamic characteristic model was built and the simulation made using the GA based neural network.In order to improve sensor response,the recognition model of the sensor was designed based on the'inverse solution'principle of neural networks,increasing the control precision and the sensitivity of the manipulator.

  11. Optical arc sensor using energy harvesting power source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoo Nam, E-mail: knchoi@inu.ac.kr; Rho, Hee Hyuk, E-mail: rdoubleh0902@inu.ac.kr [Dept. of Information and Telecommunication Engineering Incheon National University Incheon 22012 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-03

    Wireless sensors without external power supply gained considerable attention due to convenience both in installation and operation. Optical arc detecting sensor equipping with self sustaining power supply using energy harvesting method was investigated. Continuous energy harvesting method was attempted using thermoelectric generator to supply standby power in micro ampere scale and operating power in mA scale. Peltier module with heat-sink was used for high efficiency electricity generator. Optical arc detecting sensor with hybrid filter showed insensitivity to fluorescent and incandescent lamps under simulated distribution panel condition. Signal processing using integrating function showed selective arc discharge detection capability to different arc energy levels, with a resolution below 17 J energy difference, unaffected by bursting arc waveform. The sensor showed possibility for application to arc discharge detecting sensor in power distribution panel. Also experiment with proposed continuous energy harvesting method using thermoelectric power showed possibility as a self sustainable power source of remote sensor.

  12. High Performance Fiber-Optic Sensor for Environmental Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research (LGR) proposes to develop a low-cost, compact, lightweight, rugged and easy-to-use environmental monitoring optical fiber sensor device based on...

  13. Fiber optic sensors current status and future possibilities

    CERN Document Server

    Ikezawa, Satoshi; Corres, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    This book describes important recent developments in fiber optic sensor technology and examines established and emerging applications in a broad range of fields and markets, including power engineering, chemical engineering, bioengineering, biomedical engineering, and environmental monitoring. Particular attention is devoted to niche applications where fiber optic sensors are or soon will be able to compete with conventional approaches. Beyond novel methods for the sensing of traditional parameters such as strain, temperature, and pressure, a variety of new ideas and concepts are proposed and explored. The significance of the advent of extended infrared sensors is discussed, and individual chapters focus on sensing at THz frequencies and optical sensing based on photonic crystal structures. Another important topic is the resonances generated when using thin films in conjunction with optical fibers, and the enormous potential of sensors based on lossy mode resonances, surface plasmon resonances, and long-range...

  14. In-Space Distributed Fiber Optic Hydrogen Leak Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Broadband Photonics Inc. proposes development of a patent-pending distributed fiber optic sensor for in-space hydrogen leak detection. Reliable and fast detection of...

  15. Fiber Optic Continuous Liquid Sensor for Cryogenic Propellant Gauging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Broadband Photonics Incorporated proposes to develop a patent-pending fiber optic continuous liquid sensor for low-thrust level settled mass gauging with measurement...

  16. Compact All Solid State Oceanic Inherent Optical Property Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This work concerns the development of a prototype of a Volume Scattering Function (VSF) sensor for measurement of this inherent optical property(IOP) of seawater....

  17. An embedded optical nanowire loop resonator refractometric sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fei; Pruneri, Valerio; Finazzi, Vittoria; Brambilla, Gilberto

    2008-01-21

    A novel refractometric sensor based on an embedded optical nanowire loop resonator is presented. The device sensitivity has been studied in two typical configurations and its dependence on the nanowire diameter and coating thickness determined.

  18. Characterization of optical strain sensors based on silicon waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerveld, W.J.; Pozo Torres, J.M.; Muilwijk, P.M.; Leinders, S.M.; Harmsma, P.J.; Tabak, E.; Dool, T.C. van den; Dongen, K.W.A. van; Yousefi, M.; Urbach, H.P.

    2013-01-01

    Strain gauges are widely employed in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) for sensing of, for example, deformation, acceleration, pressure, or sound [1]. Such gauges are typically based on electronic piezoresistivity. We propose integrated optical sensors which have particular benefits: insensitivi

  19. An Optical Fiber Displacement Sensor Using RF Interrogation Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeon-Ho; Choi, Sang-Jin; Jeon, Keum Soo; Pan, Jae-Kyung

    2016-02-24

    We propose a novel non-contact optical fiber displacement sensor. It uses a radio frequency (RF) interrogation technique which is based on bidirectional modulation of a Mach-Zehnder electro-optical modulator (MZ-EOM). The displacement is measured from the free spectral range (FSR) which is determined by the dip frequencies of the modulated MZ-EOM transfer function. In experiments, the proposed sensor showed a sensitivity of 456 kHz/mm or 1.043 kHz/V in a measurement range of 7 mm. The displacement resolution of the proposed sensor depends on the linewidth and the power of the optical source. Resolution better than 0.05 μm would be achieved if an optical source which has a linewidth narrower than 1.5 nm and a received power larger than -36 dBm is used. Also, the multiplexing characteristic of the proposed sensor was experimentally validated.

  20. In-Space Distributed Fiber Optic Hydrogen Leak Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Broadband Photonics Inc. proposes development of a patent-pending distributed fiber optic sensor for in-space hydrogen leak detection. Reliable and fast detection of...

  1. Optical hydrogen sensors based on metal-hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaman, M.; Westerwaal, R.; Schreuders, H.; Dam, B.

    2012-06-01

    For many hydrogen related applications it is preferred to use optical hydrogen sensors above electrical systems. Optical sensors reduce the risk of ignition by spark formation and are less sensitive to electrical interference. Currently palladium and palladium alloys are used for most hydrogen sensors since they are well known for their hydrogen dissociation and absorption properties at relatively low temperatures. The disadvantages of palladium in sensors are the low optical response upon hydrogen loading, the cross sensitivity for oxygen and carbon, the limited detection range and the formation of micro-cracks after some hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles. In contrast to Pd, we find that the use of magnesium or rear earth bases metal-hydrides in optical hydrogen sensors allow tuning of the detection levels over a broad pressure range, while maintaining a high optical response. We demonstrate a stable detection layer for detecting hydrogen below 10% of the lower explosion limit in an oxygen rich environment. This detection layer is deposited at the bare end of a glass fiber as a micro-mirror and is covered with a thin layer of palladium. The palladium layer promotes the hydrogen uptake at room temperature and acts as a hydrogen selective membrane. To protect the sensor for a long time in air a final layer of a hydrophobic fluorine based coating is applied. Such a sensor can be used for example as safety detector in automotive applications. We find that this type of fiber optic hydrogen sensor is also suitable for hydrogen detection in liquids. As example we demonstrate a sensor for detecting a broad range of concentrations in transformer oil. Such a sensor can signal a warning when sparks inside a high voltage power transformer decompose the transformer oil over a long period.

  2. Noninvasive blood pressure measurement scheme based on optical fiber sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianxuan; Yuan, Xueguang; Zhang, Yangan

    2016-10-01

    Optical fiber sensing has many advantages, such as volume small, light quality, low loss, strong in anti-jamming. Since the invention of the optical fiber sensing technology in 1977, optical fiber sensing technology has been applied in the military, national defense, aerospace, industrial, medical and other fields in recent years, and made a great contribution to parameter measurement in the environment under the limited condition .With the rapid development of computer, network system, the intelligent optical fiber sensing technology, the sensor technology, the combination of computer and communication technology , the detection, diagnosis and analysis can be automatically and efficiently completed. In this work, we proposed a noninvasive blood pressure detection and analysis scheme which uses optical fiber sensor. Optical fiber sensing system mainly includes the light source, optical fiber, optical detector, optical modulator, the signal processing module and so on. wavelength optical signals were led into the optical fiber sensor and the signals reflected by the human body surface were detected. By comparing actual testing data with the data got by traditional way to measure the blood pressure we can establish models for predicting the blood pressure and achieve noninvasive blood pressure measurement by using spectrum analysis technology. Blood pressure measurement method based on optical fiber sensing system is faster and more convenient than traditional way, and it can get accurate analysis results in a shorter period of time than before, so it can efficiently reduce the time cost and manpower cost.

  3. New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Coggin; Tom Flynn; Jonas Ivasauskas; Daniel Kominsky; Carrie Kozikowski; Russell May; Michael Miller; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell; Raymond Rumpf; Kelly Stinson-Bagby; Dan Thorsen; Rena Wilson

    2007-12-31

    Accomplishments of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants and solid oxide fuel cells are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring.

  4. Zeonex Microstructured Polymer Optical Fibre Bragg Grating Sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woyessa, Getinet; Fasano, Andrea; Markos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    We fabricated an endlessly single mode and humidity insensitive Zeonex microstructured polymer optical fibre (mPOF) for fibre Bragg grating (FBG) temperature and strain sensors. We inscribed and characterise FBGs in Zeonex mPOF for the first time.......We fabricated an endlessly single mode and humidity insensitive Zeonex microstructured polymer optical fibre (mPOF) for fibre Bragg grating (FBG) temperature and strain sensors. We inscribed and characterise FBGs in Zeonex mPOF for the first time....

  5. Modal Frequency Detection in Composite Beams Using Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    interference have been developed. These include the Fabry-Perot interferometer , the Mach-Zehner interferometer , and the Michelson interferometer [8]. The...widely studied. A Fabry-Perot interferometer as a fiber optic sensor was first introduced in 1982 [10]. In a later study intrinsic Fabry-Perot...Yoshino, Kiyoshi Kurosawa, Katsuji Itoh, and Teruzi Ose, " Fiber -Optic Fabry-Perot Interferometer and its Sensor Applications," IEEE Journal of Quantum

  6. Review Of Fiber-Optic Electric-Field Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paula, Ramon P.; Jarzynski, Jacek

    1989-01-01

    Tutorial paper reviews state of art in fiber-optic sensors of alternating electric fields. Because such sensors are made entirely of dielectric materials, they are relatively transparent to incident electric fields; they do not distort fields significantly. Paper presents equations that express relationships among stress, strain, and electric field in piezoactive plastic and equations for phase shift in terms of photoelastic coefficients and strains in optical fiber.

  7. Volatile organic compound optical fiber sensors: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Arregui, Francisco J.; Candido Bariain; Matias, Ignacio R; Cesar Elosua

    2006-01-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) detection is a topic of growing interest with applications in diverse fields, ranging from environmental uses to the food or chemical industries. Optical fiber VOC sensors offering new and interesting properties which overcame some of the inconveniences found on traditional gas sensors appeared over two decades ago. Thanks to its minimum invasive nature and the advantages that optical fiber offers such as light weight, passive nature, low attenuation and the...

  8. Network Integration of Distributed Optical Fiber Temperature Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-Yan Li; Hong-Lin Liu; Zai-Xuan Zhang

    2008-01-01

    The integration of distributed optical fiber temperature sensor with supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system is proposed and implemented. In the implementation of the integration, both the compatibility with traditional system and the characteristics of distributed optical fiber temperature sensor is considered before Modbus TCP/IP protocol is chosen. The protocol is implemented with open source component Indy. The Modbus TCP/IP protocol used in the system is proved to be fast and robust.

  9. Capillarity-based preparation system for optical colorimetric sensor arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao-gang; Yi, Xin; Bu, Xiang-nan; Hou, Chang-jun; Huo, Dan-qun; Yang, Mei; Fa, Huan-bao; Lei, Jin-can

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, optical colorimetric sensor arrays have demonstrated beneficial features, including rapid response, high selectivity, and high specificity; as a result, it has been extensively applied in food inspection and chemical studies, among other fields. There are instruments in the current market available for the preparation of an optical colorimetric sensor array, but it lacks the corresponding research of the preparation mechanism. Therefore, in connection with the main features of this kind of sensor array such as consistency, based on the preparation method of contact spotting, combined with a capillary fluid model, Washburn equation, Laplace equation, etc., this paper develops a diffusion model of an optical colorimetric sensor array during its preparation and sets up an optical colorimetric sensor array preparation system based on this diffusion model. Finally, this paper compares and evaluates the sensor arrays prepared by the system and prepared manually in three aspects such as the quality of array point, response of array, and response result, and the results show that the performance index of the sensor array prepared by a system under this diffusion model is better than that of the sensor array of manual spotting, which meets the needs of the experiment.

  10. Optical Sensor for Diverse Organic Vapors at ppm Concentration Ranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora M. Paolucci

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A broadly responsive optical organic vapor sensor is described that responds to low concentrations of organic vapors without significant interference from water vapor. Responses to several classes of organic vapors are highlighted, and trends within classes are presented. The relationship between molecular properties (vapor pressure, boiling point, polarizability, and refractive index and sensor response are discussed.

  11. A new remote optical wetness sensor and its applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusinkveld, B.G.; Berkowicz, S.M.; Jacobs, A.F.G.; Hillen, W.C.A.M.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    An optical wetness sensor (OWS) was developed for continuous surface wetness measurements. The sensor is an all-weather instrument that does not interfere with the surface wetting and drying process and is unaffected by solar radiation. It is equipped with its own light source with which it can scan

  12. Capillarity-based preparation system for optical colorimetric sensor arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao-Gang; Yi, Xin; Bu, Xiang-Nan; Hou, Chang-Jun; Huo, Dan-Qun; Yang, Mei; Fa, Huan-Bao; Lei, Jin-Can

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, optical colorimetric sensor arrays have demonstrated beneficial features, including rapid response, high selectivity, and high specificity; as a result, it has been extensively applied in food inspection and chemical studies, among other fields. There are instruments in the current market available for the preparation of an optical colorimetric sensor array, but it lacks the corresponding research of the preparation mechanism. Therefore, in connection with the main features of this kind of sensor array such as consistency, based on the preparation method of contact spotting, combined with a capillary fluid model, Washburn equation, Laplace equation, etc., this paper develops a diffusion model of an optical colorimetric sensor array during its preparation and sets up an optical colorimetric sensor array preparation system based on this diffusion model. Finally, this paper compares and evaluates the sensor arrays prepared by the system and prepared manually in three aspects such as the quality of array point, response of array, and response result, and the results show that the performance index of the sensor array prepared by a system under this diffusion model is better than that of the sensor array of manual spotting, which meets the needs of the experiment.

  13. Realization and characterization of fiber optic reflective sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzowski, B.; Łakomski, M.; Słapek, B.

    2016-11-01

    In almost all of non-invasive techniques, fiber optic sensors may be the most promising ones because of their inherent advantages such as very small size and hard environment tolerance. Proximity sensors based on optical fiber are highly required especially in the impact area of electromagnetic fields. In this paper three different types of fiber optic reflective sensors are presented. In all three types of the sensor four multimode optical fibers (MMF) illuminate the movable surface. The difference is in the number of collecting the reflected light MMF. In the first one, 12 MMF collect the light, in the second one 20 MMF, while in the third one the number of MMF collecting reflected light is 32. Moreover, all three types of fiber optic reflective sensors were realized in two configurations. In the first one, the cleaved MMF were used to collect reflected light, while in the second configuration - the ball-lensed optical fibers were chosen. In this paper an analysis of each type of realized sensor is presented. In the last part of this paper the obtained results and the detailed discussion are given.

  14. Fiber optic and laser sensors V; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, Aug. 17-19, 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paula, Ramon P. (Editor); Udd, Eric (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume focus on recent developments in fiber optic and laser sensors. Topics discussed include electric and magnetic field sensors, fiber optic pressure sensors, fiber optic gyros, fiber optic sensors for aerospace applications, fiber sensor multiplexing, temperature sensors, and specialized fiber optic sensors. Papers are presented on remote fiber optic sensors for angular orientation; fiber optic rotation sensor for space missions; adaptation of an electro-optic monitoring system to aerospace structures; optical fiber sensor for dust concentration measurements; and communication-sensing system using a single optical fiber.

  15. Nonlinear fiber-optic strain sensor based on four-wave mixing in microstructured optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Bobo; Yuan, Scott Wu; Frosz, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear fiber-optic strain sensor, which uses the shifts of four-wave mixing Stokes and anti-Stokes peaks caused by the strain-induced changes in the structure and refractive index of a microstructured optical fiber. The sensor thus uses the inherent nonlinearity of the fiber...

  16. Volume measurements of 28Si-enriched spheres using an improved optical interferometer for the determination of the Avogadro constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramoto, Naoki; Azuma, Yasushi; Inaba, Hajime; Fujii, Kenichi

    2017-04-01

    For the determination of the Avogadro constant by the x-ray crystal density method, an accurate volume measurement of 1 kg Si spheres is of primary importance. For this purpose, an optical interferometer was improved and used to measure the volumes of two 1 kg silicon spheres which were manufactured from a silicon crystal highly enriched in 28Si. The apparent volumes of the spheres, which do not take into account the influence of the surface layers on the volume measurement by interferometry, were determined with a relative standard uncertainty of as small as 2.0  ×  10‑8. The surface of the spheres was characterized by using an improved spectroscopic ellipsometer. By considering the influence of the surface layers, the core volumes of the spheres, which exclude the surface layers, were determined. These results were used for the determination of the Avogadro constant in 2015 as a framework organized by the International Avogadro Coordination project. This paper provides details on the measurements, the improvements made to the apparatus, the data analysis and the uncertainty evaluation.

  17. Controllable Fabrication and Optical Properties of Uniform Gadolinium Oxysulfate Hollow Spheres

    OpenAIRE

    Fashen Chen; Gen Chen; Tao Liu; Ning Zhang; Xiaohe Liu; Hongmei Luo; Junhui Li; Limiao Chen; Renzhi Ma; Guanzhou Qiu

    2015-01-01

    Uniform gadolinium oxysulfate (Gd2O2SO4) hollow spheres were successfully fabricated by calcination of corresponding Gd-organic precursor obtained via a facile hydrothermal process. The Gd2O2SO4 hollow spheres have a mean diameter of approximately 550 nm and shell thickness in the range of 30–70 nm. The sizes and morphologies of as-prepared Gd2O2SO4 hollow spheres could be deliberately controlled by adjusting the experimental parameters. Eu-doped Gd2O2SO4 hollow spheres have also been prepare...

  18. Transparent and flexible force sensor array based on optical waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngsung; Park, Suntak; Park, Seung Koo; Yun, Sungryul; Kyung, Ki-Uk; Sun, Kyung

    2012-06-18

    This paper suggests a force sensor array measuring contact force based on intensity change of light transmitted throughout optical waveguide. For transparency and flexibility of the sensor, two soft prepolymers with different refractive index have been developed. The optical waveguide consists of two cladding layers and a core layer. The top cladding layer is designed to allow light scattering at the specific area in response to finger contact. The force sensor shows a distinct tendency that output intensity decreases with input force and measurement range is from 0 to -13.2 dB.

  19. Plastic optical fibre sensor for quality control in food industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo, C.; Bilro, L.; Ferreira, R.; Alberto, N.; Antunes, P.; Leitão, C.; Nogueira, R.; Pinto, J. L.

    2013-05-01

    The present work addresses the need for new devices felt in the context of quality control, especially in the food industry. Due to the spectral dependence of the attenuation coefficient, a novel dual-parameter sensor for colour and refractive index was developed and tested. The sensor employs plastic optical fibres to measure the transmitted optical power in three measurement cells each with a different incident wavelength. The performance of the sensor was tested using several dyes at different concentrations and aqueous solutions of glycerine and ethanol. Results show that this technique allows the monitoring of refractive index and colour without cross-sensitivity.

  20. Optical Pressure-Temperature Sensor for a Combustion Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, John; Korman, Valentin; Gregory, Don

    2008-01-01

    A compact sensor for measuring temperature and pressure in a combusti on chamber has been proposed. The proposed sensor would include two optically birefringent, transmissive crystalline wedges: one of sapph ire (Al2O3) and one of magnesium oxide (MgO), the optical properties of both of which vary with temperature and pressure. The wedges wou ld be separated by a vapor-deposited thin-film transducer, which wou ld be primarily temperaturesensitive (in contradistinction to pressur e- sensitive) when attached to a crystalline substrate. The sensor w ould be housed in a rugged probe to survive the extreme temperatures and pressures in a combustion chamber.

  1. Scale Relativistic signature in the Brownian motion of micro-spheres in optical traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebohec, Stephan

    2017-09-01

    The development of mechanics of nondifferentiable paths36 suggested by Scale Relativity31,32 results in a foundation of Quantum Mechanics30,37 including Schrödinger’s equation and all the other axioms under the assumption the path nondifferentiability can be described as a Wiener process at the resolution-scale of observation. This naturally brings under question the possibility that the statistics of the dynamics of macroscopic systems fulfilling this hypothesis could fall under a quantum-like description with the Planck constant replaced with some other constant, possibly system specific, and corresponding to a diffusion coefficient. The observation of such a quantum-like dynamics would establish if the Scale Relativistic principle is implemented in macroscopic complex or chaotic systems. This would have major implications for the study of structure formation dynamics in various research fields. In this paper, I investigate the possibility for the detection of such an effect in the Brownian motion of a micro-sphere in an optical trap. I find that, if it exists, the observation of the transition to a quantum-like regime is within reach of modern experiments.

  2. Spectrophotometric determination of turbid optical parameters without using an integrating sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaohui; Li, Meihua; Lu, Jun Q; Huang, Chuanwei; Feng, Yuanming; Sa, Yu; Ding, Junhua; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2016-03-10

    Spectrophotometric quantification of turbidity by multiple optical parameters has wide-ranging applications in material analysis and life sciences. A robust system design needs to combine hardware for precise measurement of light signals with software to accurately model measurement configuration and rapidly solve a sequence of challenging inverse problems. We have developed and validated a design approach and performed system validation based on radiative transfer theory for determination of absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, and anisotropy factor without using an integrating sphere. Accurate and rapid determination of parameters and spectra is achieved for microsphere suspension samples by combining photodiode-based measurement of four signals with the Monte Carlo simulation and perturbation-based inverse calculations. The three parameters of microsphere suspension samples have been determined from the measured signals as functions of wavelength from 400 to 800 nm and agree with calculated results based on the Mie theory. It has been shown that the inverse problems in the cases of microsphere suspension samples are well posed with convex cost functions to yield unique solutions, and it takes about 1 min to obtain the three parameters per wavelength.

  3. Optical imaging polarimetry of the LkCa 15 protoplanetary disk with SPHERE ZIMPOL

    CERN Document Server

    Thalmann, Christian; Janson, Markus; Olofsson, Johan; Benisty, Myriam; Avenhaus, Henning; Quanz, Sascha P; Schmid, Hans Martin; Henning, Thomas; Buenzli, Esther; Ménard, Francois; Carson, Joseph C; Garufi, Antonio; Messina, Sergio; Dominik, Carsten; Leisenring, Jarron; Chauvin, Gael; Meyer, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    We present the first optical (590--890 nm) imaging polarimetry observations of the pre-transitional protoplanetary disk around the young solar analog LkCa 15, addressing a number of open questions raised by previous studies. We detect the previously unseen far side of the disk gap, confirm the highly eccentric scattered-light gap shape that was postulated from near-infrared imaging, at odds with the symmetric gap inferred from millimeter interferometry. Furthermore, we resolve the inner disk for the first time and trace it out to 30 AU. This new source of scattered light may contribute to the near-infrared interferometric signal attributed to the protoplanet candidate LkCa 15 b, which lies embedded in the outer regions of the inner disk. Finally, we present a new model for the system architecture of LkCa 15 that ties these new findings together. These observations were taken during science verification of SPHERE ZIMPOL and demonstrate this facility's performance for faint guide stars under adverse observing c...

  4. OPTICAL IMAGING POLARIMETRY OF THE LkCa 15 PROTOPLANETARY DISK WITH SPHERE ZIMPOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thalmann, C.; Quanz, S. P.; Schmid, H. M.; Garufi, A.; Meyer, M. R., E-mail: thalmann@phys.ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Institute for Astronomy, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); and others

    2015-08-01

    We present the first optical (590–890 nm) imaging polarimetry observations of the pre-transitional protoplanetary disk around the young solar analog LkCa 15, addressing a number of open questions raised by previous studies. We detect the previously unseen far side of the disk gap, confirming the highly off-centered scattered-light gap shape that was postulated from near-infrared imaging, at odds with the symmetric gap inferred from millimeter interferometry. Furthermore, we resolve the inner disk for the first time and trace it out to 30 AU. This new source of scattered light may contribute to the near-infrared interferometric signal attributed to the protoplanet candidate LkCa 15 b, which lies embedded in the outer regions of the inner disk. Finally, we present a new model for the system architecture of LkCa 15 that ties these new findings together. These observations were taken during science verification of SPHERE ZIMPOL and demonstrate this facility’s performance for faint guide stars under adverse observing conditions.

  5. Sub-0.1" optical imaging of the Z CMa jets with SPHERE/ZIMPOL

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniucci, S; Nisini, B; Bacciotti, F; Lagadec, E; Sissa, E; La Camera, A; Giannini, T; Schmid, H M; Gratton, R; Turatto, M; Desidera, S; Bonnefoy, M; Chauvin, G; Dougados, C; Bazzon, A; Thalmann, C; Langlois, M

    2016-01-01

    Crucial information on the mass accretion-ejection in young stars can be obtained from high spatial resolution images of jets in sources with recurrent accretion outbursts. Using the SPHERE/ZIMPOL instrument, we observed the young binary Z CMa that is composed of a Herbig Be star and a FUor object, both driving a jet. We analyse the structure of the two jets in relation with previous accretion events observed in this target. We obtained optical images in the Halpha and OI 6300A lines at the unprecedented angular resolution of ~0.03 arcsec, on which we have performed both continuum subtraction and deconvolution, thereby deriving results that are consistent with each other. Our images reveal extended emission from both sources: a fairly compact and poorly collimated emission SW of the Herbig component and an extended collimated and precessing jet from the FUor component. The compact emission from the Herbig star is compatible with a wide-angle wind and is possibly connected to the recent outburst events shown b...

  6. Convergent polishing: a simple, rapid, full aperture polishing process of high quality optical flats & spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suratwala, Tayyab; Steele, Rusty; Feit, Michael; Dylla-Spears, Rebecca; Desjardin, Richard; Mason, Dan; Wong, Lana; Geraghty, Paul; Miller, Phil; Shen, Nan

    2014-12-01

    Convergent Polishing is a novel polishing system and method for finishing flat and spherical glass optics in which a workpiece, independent of its initial shape (i.e., surface figure), will converge to final surface figure with excellent surface quality under a fixed, unchanging set of polishing parameters in a single polishing iteration. In contrast, conventional full aperture polishing methods require multiple, often long, iterative cycles involving polishing, metrology and process changes to achieve the desired surface figure. The Convergent Polishing process is based on the concept of workpiece-lap height mismatch resulting in pressure differential that decreases with removal and results in the workpiece converging to the shape of the lap. The successful implementation of the Convergent Polishing process is a result of the combination of a number of technologies to remove all sources of non-uniform spatial material removal (except for workpiece-lap mismatch) for surface figure convergence and to reduce the number of rogue particles in the system for low scratch densities and low roughness. The Convergent Polishing process has been demonstrated for the fabrication of both flats and spheres of various shapes, sizes, and aspect ratios on various glass materials. The practical impact is that high quality optical components can be fabricated more rapidly, more repeatedly, with less metrology, and with less labor, resulting in lower unit costs. In this study, the Convergent Polishing protocol is specifically described for fabricating 26.5 cm square fused silica flats from a fine ground surface to a polished ~λ/2 surface figure after polishing 4 hr per surface on a 81 cm diameter polisher.

  7. A Miniaturized Optical Sensor with Integrated Gas Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayerden, N.P.; Ghaderi, M.; De Graaf, G.; Wolffenbuttel, R.F.

    2015-01-01

    The design, fabrication and characterization of a highly integrated optical gas sensor is presented. The gas cell takes up most of the space in a microspectrometer and is the only component that has so far not been miniaturized. Using the tapered resonator cavity of a linear variable optical filter

  8. Future electro-optical sensors and processing in urban operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grönwall, C.; Schwering, P.B.; Rantakokko, J.; Benoist, K.W.; Kemp, R.A.W.; Steinvall, O.; Letalick, D.; Björkert, S.

    2013-01-01

    In the electro-optical sensors and processing in urban operations (ESUO) study we pave the way for the European Defence Agency (EDA) group of Electro-Optics experts (IAP03) for a common understanding of the optimal distribution of processing functions between the different platforms. Combinations of

  9. Distributed Fiber-Optic Sensors for Vibration Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Jin, Baoquan; Bai, Qing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-07-26

    Distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors receive extensive investigation and play a significant role in the sensor panorama. Optical parameters such as light intensity, phase, polarization state, or light frequency will change when external vibration is applied on the sensing fiber. In this paper, various technologies of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensing are reviewed, from interferometric sensing technology, such as Sagnac, Mach-Zehnder, and Michelson, to backscattering-based sensing technology, such as phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometer, polarization-optical time domain reflectometer, optical frequency domain reflectometer, as well as some combinations of interferometric and backscattering-based techniques. Their operation principles are presented and recent research efforts are also included. Finally, the applications of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors are summarized, which mainly include structural health monitoring and perimeter security, etc. Overall, distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors possess the advantages of large-scale monitoring, good concealment, excellent flexibility, and immunity to electromagnetic interference, and thus show considerable potential for a variety of practical applications.

  10. Shack-Hartmann sensor improvement using optical binning

    CERN Document Server

    Basden, Alastair; Guzman, Dani; Morris, Tim; Myers, Richard; Saunter, Chris

    2007-01-01

    We present a design improvement for a recently proposed type of Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor that uses a cylindrical (lenticular) lenslet array. The improved sensor design uses optical binning and requires significantly fewer detector pixels than the corresponding conventional or cylindrical Shack-Hartmann sensor, and so detector readout noise causes less signal degradation. Additionally, detector readout time is significantly reduced, which reduces the latency for closed loop systems, and data processing requirements. We provide simple analytical noise considerations and Monte-Carlo simulations, and show that the optically binned Shack-Hartmann sensor can offer better performance than the conventional counterpart in most practical situations, and our design is particularly suited for use with astronomical adaptive optics systems.

  11. A novel optical sensor for mirror edge sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. A. H.; Buous, S.; Gajjar, H.; Menzies, J. W.; Schindler, F.; Sändig, K.; Lév"que, S.

    2010-07-01

    The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) recently (2008) abandoned attempts at using capacitive mirror edge sensors, mainly due to poor performance at a relative humidity above ~60%, a not infrequent occurrence. Different technologies are now being explored for alternative sensors on SALT. In this paper we describe the design and development of a novel prototype optical edge sensor, based on the application of the interferential scanning principle, as used in optical encoders. These prototype sensors were subsequently tested at SAAO and ESO, for potential application on SALT and E-ELT. Environmental tests, conducted in climatic control chambers, looked at temperature and relative humidity sensitivity, long term stability and sensor noise. The temperature sensitivity for height and gap were, respectively, 10nm/°C and 44nm/°C, while for relative humidity they were 4nm/10% and 50nm/10%, respectively. These either met, or were close to, the SALT specification. While there were significant lags in response, this was due to the sensor's relatively large mass (~200 gm per sensor half), which was not optimized. This is likely to improve, should a revised design be developed in future. Impressively the sensor noise was <0.015 nm RMS, over three orders of magnitude better than the specification. Our conclusions are that optical edge sensing is a viable technique for use on segmented mirror telescopes.

  12. Intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical fiber sensors and their multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anbo

    2007-12-11

    An intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical sensor includes a thin film sandwiched between two fiber ends. When light is launched into the fiber, two reflections are generated at the two fiber/thin film interfaces due to a difference in refractive indices between the fibers and the film, giving rise to the sensor output. In another embodiment, a portion of the cladding of a fiber is removed, creating two parallel surfaces. Part of the evanescent fields of light propagating in the fiber is reflected at each of the surfaces, giving rise to the sensor output. In a third embodiment, the refractive index of a small portion of a fiber is changed through exposure to a laser beam or other radiation. Interference between reflections at the ends of the small portion give rise to the sensor output. Multiple sensors along a single fiber are multiplexed using an optical time domain reflectometry method.

  13. Fiber Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Air Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Yao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft operators are faced with increasing requirements to extend the service life of air platforms beyond their designed life cycles, resulting in heavy maintenance and inspection burdens as well as economic pressure. Structural health monitoring (SHM based on advanced sensor technology is potentially a cost-effective approach to meet operational requirements, and to reduce maintenance costs. Fiber optic sensor technology is being developed to provide existing and future aircrafts with SHM capability due to its unique superior characteristics. This review paper covers the aerospace SHM requirements and an overview of the fiber optic sensor technologies. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensor technology is evaluated as the most promising tool for load monitoring and damage detection, the two critical SHM aspects of air platforms. At last, recommendations on the implementation and integration of FBG sensors into an SHM system are provided.

  14. Comparison of active microwave and optical sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwering, P.B.W.; Theil, A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a number of projects at TNO-FEL in the field of sensor fusion of radar and electrooptical sensors. These fusion approaches consider land, air, and maritime scenarios for surveillance and autonomous detection tasks. Fusion benefits are present when uncorrelated and complementary

  15. Double-Tubing Encapsulated Fiber Optic Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juncheng; Pickrell, Gary; Huang, Zhengyu; Qi, Bing; Zhang, Po; Duan, Yuhong; Wang, Anbo

    2003-09-01

    Increasing the efficiency of oil production operations requires improved sensors to supply critical information such as mixed-phase fluid flow, pressure and temperature measurements within the down-hole oil environment. In order to provide robust and reliable fiber optic temperature sensors capable of operating in the harsh down-hole oil environment, where temperatures might exceed 250 °C and pressures might reach 20,000 psi (140 Mpa), a novel type of fiber optic temperature sensor has been developed. This temperature sensor functions as an EFPI (extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric) sensor. One unique contribution of this work is that the glass tubing used is a borosilicate glass with a relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and long gauge length, allowing a much higher sensitivity to be achieved, without hysteresis. The sensor structure utilizes a dual tubing design (tubing within a tubing) to allow pressure isolation. An LED light beam is used as the signal interrogation source to remotely interrogate the sensor which may be located tens of thousands of meters away, connected by an optical fiber. A white-light interferometer measurement system is utilized to process the returned interference signal and to precisely determine the length of the Fabry-Perot interferometric cavity. Another unique feature of this work is that the sensor has been packaged with a specially developed hermetic protection process to prevent water penetration and to improve the mechanical integrity of the sensor. This protection process has allowed the successful hydraulic deployment of fiber optic sensors through 3 mm ID stainless steel tubing into a functioning oil well. Data on the resolution, repeatability and pressure sensitivity are presented.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Integrated Optical Intensive Impulse Electric Field Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Bao; CHEN Fu-Shen

    2009-01-01

    We design and fabricate an integrated optical electric field sensor with segmented electrode for intensive im-pulse electric field measurement. The integrated optical sensor is based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with segmented electrodes. The output/input character of the sensing system is analysed and measured. The max-imal detectable electric field range (-75 kV/m to 245 kV/m) is obtained by analysing the results. As a result, the integrated optics electric field sensing system is suitable for transient intensive electric field measurement investigation.

  17. Distributed optical fiber dynamic magnetic field sensor based on magnetostriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi, Ali; Newson, Trevor P

    2014-05-01

    A distributed optical fiber sensor is introduced which is capable of quantifying multiple magnetic fields along a 1 km sensing fiber with a spatial resolution of 1 m. The operation of the proposed sensor is based on measuring the magnetorestrictive induced strain of a nickel wire attached to an optical fiber. The strain coupled to the optical fiber was detected by measuring the strain-induced phase variation between the backscattered Rayleigh light from two segments of the sensing fiber. A magnetic field intensity resolution of 0.3 G over a bandwidth of 50-5000 Hz was demonstrated.

  18. Direction reversal of the optical spin torque on a Rayleigh absorptive sphere in vector Bessel polarized beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruiping; Li, Renxian; Qin, Shitong; Ding, Chunying; Mitri, F. G.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of polarization on the optical spin torque (OST) exerted on an absorptive Rayleigh dielectric sphere by a vector Bessel beam is investigated using the dipole approximation method, with particular emphasis on the polarization of the plane wave component forming the beam. On the basis of the mathematical descriptions for the electric fields, which are derived using the angular spectrum decomposition method in plane waves, analytical formulas of the OST are established. The OSTs are numerically calculated, and the effects of polarization, beam-order, and half-cone angle are discussed in detail. Numerical results show that by choosing an appropriate polarization, order and half-cone angle, the transverse OST will manifest vortex-like behaviors, and the sphere will experience negative axial OSTs, i.e. OST sign reversal. Important applications in particle manipulation, rotation and handling using optical Bessel polarized beams would benefit from the results of the present investigation.

  19. Polymer Optical Fiber Sensor and the Prediction of Sensor Response Utilizing Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroglu, Derya

    The global market researches showed that there is a growing trend in the field of polymer optical fiber (POF) and POF sensors. Telecommunications, medicine, defense, aerospace, and automotive are the application areas of fiber optic sensors, where the automotive industry is the most promising application area for innovations in the field of POF sensors. The POF sensors in automobiles are particularly for detection of seat occupancy, and intelligent pedestrian protection systems. This dissertation investigates graded index perfluorinated polymer optical fiber as an intensity modulated intrinsic sensor for application in automotive seat occupancy sensing. Since a fiber optic sensor has a high bandwidth, is small in size, is lightweight, and is immune to electromagnetic interference (EMI) it offers higher performance than that of its electrical based counterparts such as strain gauge, elastomeric bladder, and resistive sensor systems. This makes the fiber optic sensor a potential suitable material for seat occupancy sensing. A textile-based fiber optic sensor was designed to be located in the area beneath the typical seated human's thighs. The pressure interval under which the proposed POF sensor design could perform well was found to be between 0.18 and 0.21 N/cm2, where perfluorinated (PF) graded index (GI) POF (62.5/750 mum) was used as the POF material. In addition, the effect of the automotive seat covering including face material (fabric) and foam backing to the sensor's performance was analyzed. The face fabric structure and the thickness of foam backing were not found to be significant factors to change the sensor results. A research study, survey, was conducted of which purpose was to better understand market demands in terms of sensor performance characteristics for automotive seat weight sensors, as a part of the Quality Function Deployment (QFD) House of Quality analysis. The companies joined the survey agreed on the first 5 most important sensor

  20. Synchronous phase detection for optical fiber interferometric sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, I J; Phillips, R L

    1983-08-01

    A system has been developed to accurately detect phase signals produced in optical interferometric sensors. The system employs optical heterodyning and synchronously detects optical phase by feeding back an error signal to a phase modulator in the reference leg of the interferometer. This system is seen to have properties similar to a phase-locked loop. The system is mathematically analyzed and a simple second-order model developed which accurately predicts the system response.

  1. Polymer optical fiber bragg grating sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefani, Alessio; Yuan, Scott Wu; Andresen, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings are reported. We have written fiber Bragg gratings for 1550 nm and 850 nm operations, characterized their temperature and strain response, and tested their performance in a prototype accelerometer....

  2. Direct-Dispense Polymeric Waveguides Platform for Optical Chemical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Hajj-Hassan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe an automated robotic technique called direct-dispense to fabricate a polymeric platform that supports optical sensor arrays. Direct-dispense, which is a type of the emerging direct-write microfabrication techniques, uses fugitive organic inks in combination with cross-linkable polymers to create microfluidic channels and other microstructures. Specifically, we describe an application of direct-dispensing to develop optical biochemical sensors by fabricating planar ridge waveguides that support sol-gelderived xerogel-based thin films. The xerogel-based sensor materials act as host media to house luminophore biochemical recognition elements. As a prototype implementation, we demonstrate gaseous oxygen (O2 responsive optical sensors that operate on the basis of monitoring luminescence intensity signals. The optical sensor employs a Light Emitting Diode (LED excitation source and a standard silicon photodiode as the detector. The sensor operates over the full scale (0%-100% of O2 concentrations with a response time of less than 1 second. This work has implications for the development of miniaturized multisensor platforms that can be cost-effectively and reliably mass-produced.

  3. Free space optical sensor network for fixed infrastructure sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Navik; Milner, Stuart D.; Davis, Christopher C.

    2009-08-01

    Free space optical (FSO) links for indoor sensor networks can provide data rates that can range from bits/s to hundreds of Mb/s. In addition, they offer physical security, and in contrast with omnidirectional RF networks, they avoid interference with other electronic systems. These features are advantageous for communication over short distances in fixed infrastructure sensor networks. In this paper the system architecture for a fixed infrastructure FSO sensor network is presented. The system includes a network of small, low power (mW), sensor systems, or "motes," that transmit data optically to a central "cluster head," which controls the network traffic of all the motes and can aggregate the sensor information. The cluster head is designed with multiple vertical cavity surface emitting lasers oriented in different directions and controlled to diverge at 12º in order to provide signal coverage over a wide field of view. Both the cluster head and motes form a local area network. Our system design focuses on low-power wireless motes that can maintain successful communication over distances up to a few meters without having to use stringent optical alignment techniques, and our network design focuses on controlling mote sleep cycles for energy efficiency. This paper presents the design as well as the experimental link and optical communications performance of a prototype FSO-based sensor network.

  4. NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

    2004-12-01

    Accomplishments during the Phase I of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. A matrix of potential fiber optic sensor approaches was derived, and a data set of specifications for high-temperature optical fiber was produced. Several fiber optic sensor configurations, including interferometric (extrinsic and intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer), gratings (fiber Bragg gratings and long period gratings), and microbend sensors, were evaluated in the laboratory. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers. Numerical aperture measurements of both clad and unclad sapphire fibers were obtained and used to estimate the reduction in mode volume afforded by the cladding. High-temperature sensors based on sapphire fibers were also investigated. The fabrication of an intrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity within sapphire fibers was attempted by the bulk diffusion of magnesium oxide into short localized segments of longer sapphire fibers. Fourier analysis of the fringes that resulted when the treated fiber was interrogated by a swept laser spectrometer suggested that an intrinsic cavity had been formed in the fiber. Also

  5. SMART composite high pressure vessels with integrated optical fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazejewski, Wojciech; Czulak, Andrzej; Gasior, Pawel; Kaleta, Jerzy; Mech, Rafal

    2010-04-01

    In this paper application of integrated Optical Fiber Sensors for strain state monitoring of composite high pressure vessels is presented. The composite tanks find broad application in areas such as: automotive industry, aeronautics, rescue services, etc. In automotive application they are mainly used for gaseous fuels storage (like CNG or compressed Hydrogen). In comparison with standard steel vessels, composite ones have many advantages (i.e. high mechanical strength, significant weight reduction, etc). In the present work a novel technique of vessel manufacturing, according to this construction, was applied. It is called braiding technique, and can be used as an alternative to the winding method. During braiding process, between GFRC layers, two types of optical fiber sensors were installed: point sensors in the form of FBGs as well as interferometric sensors with long measuring arms (SOFO®). Integrated optical fiber sensors create the nervous system of the pressure vessel and are used for its structural health monitoring. OFS register deformation areas and detect construction damages in their early stage (ensure a high safety level for users). Applied sensor system also ensured a possibility of strain state monitoring even during the vessel manufacturing process. However the main application of OFS based monitoring system is to detect defects in the composite structure. An idea of such a SMART vessel with integrated sensor system as well as an algorithm of defect detection was presented.

  6. Glidersonde, a Meteorological Optical Profiling Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The "Glidersonde"is a UAV-deployed environmental sensor suite that is air-deployed and glides into denied or hazardous areas including volcanoes or nuclear...

  7. OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR EFFICIENT AND ECONOMICAL OIL RECOVERY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2003-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress over the fourth year of the ''Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery'' program, funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. During the reporting period, research efforts under the program were focused on the development and evaluation of the fiber optic flow sensor system, and field testing in Tulsa, OK and the second field test of the pressure and temperature sensors in Coalinga, CA. The feasibility of a self-compensating fiber optic flow sensor based on a cantilever beam and interferometer for real-time flow rate measurements in the fluid filled pipes of oil field was clearly demonstrated. In addition, field testing of the pressure and temperature sensors deployed downhole continued. These accomplishments are summarized here: (1) Theoretical analysis and simulations were performed to ensure performance of the design. (2) The sensor fabrication and packaging techniques were investigated and improved. (3) Prototype flow sensors were fabricated based on the fabrication experience of hundreds of test sensors. (4) A lab-scale flow testing system was constructed and used for sensor evaluation. (5) Field-testing was performed in both the indoor and outdoor flow testing facility at the University of Tulsa, OK. (6) Testing of a multimode white light pressure and temperature sensor system continued at the oil site of Chevron/Texaco Company (Coalinga CA).

  8. Optically Defined Modal Sensors Incorporating Spiropyran-Doped Liquid Crystals with Piezoelectric Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Lung Kuo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We integrated a piezoelectric sensing layer lamina containing liquid crystals (LC and spiropyran (SP in a LC/SP mixture to create an optically reconfigurable modal sensor for a cantilever beam. The impedance of this LC/SP lamina was decreased by UV irradiation which constituted the underlying mechanism to modulate the voltage externally applied to the piezoelectric actuating layer. Illuminating a specific pattern onto the LC/SP lamina provided us with a way to spatially modulate the piezoelectric vibration signal. We showed that if an UV illuminated pattern matches the strain distribution of a specific mode, a piezoelectric modal sensor can be created. Since UV illumination can be changed in situ in real-time, our results confirm for the first time since the inception of smart sensors, that an optically tailored modal sensor can be created. Some potential applications of this type of sensor include energy harvesting devices, bio-chips, vibration sensing and actuating devices.

  9. Calibration of quasi-static aberrations in exoplanet direct-imaging instruments with a Zernike phase-mask sensor. II. Concept validation with ZELDA on VLT/SPHERE

    CERN Document Server

    N'Diaye, M; Dohlen, K; Sauvage, J -F; Caillat, A; Costille, A; Girard, J H V; Beuzit, J -L; Fusco, T; Blanchard, P; Merrer, J Le; Mignant, D Le; Madec, F; Moreaux, G; Mouillet, D; Puget, P; Zins, G

    2016-01-01

    Warm or massive gas giant planets, brown dwarfs, and debris disks around nearby stars are now routinely observed by dedicated high-contrast imaging instruments on large, ground-based observatories. These facilities include extreme adaptive optics (ExAO) and state-of-the-art coronagraphy to achieve unprecedented sensitivities for exoplanet detection and spectral characterization. However, differential aberrations between the ExAO sensing path and the science path represent a critical limitation for the detection of giant planets with a contrast lower than a few $10^{-6}$ at very small separations (<0.3\\as) from their host star. In our previous work, we proposed a wavefront sensor based on Zernike phase contrast methods to circumvent this issue and measure these quasi-static aberrations at a nanometric level. We present the design, manufacturing and testing of ZELDA, a prototype that was installed on VLT/SPHERE during its reintegration in Chile. Using the internal light source of the instrument, we performed...

  10. Control systems using modal domain optical fiber sensors for smart structure applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Reichard, Karl M.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, a new class of sensors has emerged for structural control which respond to environmental changes over a significant gauge length; these sensors are called distributed-effect sensors. These sensors can be fabricated with spatially varying sensitivity to the distributed measurand, and can be configured to measure a variety of structural parameters which can not be measured directly using point sensors. Examples of distributed-effect sensors include piezoelectric film, holographic sensors, and modal domain optical fiber sensors. Optical fiber sensors are particularly attractive for smart structure applications because they are flexible, have low mass, and can easily be embedded directly into materials. In this paper we describe the implementation of weighted modal domain optical fiber sensors. The mathematical model of the modal domain optical fiber sensor model is described and used to derive an expression for the sensor sensitivity. The effects of parameter variations on the sensor sensitivity are demonstrated to illustrate methods of spatially varying the sensor sensitivity.

  11. Multi-sensor control for precise assembly of optical components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Li; Rong Weibin; Sun Lining

    2014-01-01

    In order to perform an optical assembly accurately, a multi-sensor control strategy is developed which includes an attitude measurement system, a vision system, a loss measurement system and a force sensor. A 3-DOF attitude measuring method using linear variable differential transformers (LVDT) is designed to adjust the relation of position and attitude between the spher-ical mirror and the resonator. A micro vision feedback system is set up to extract the light beam and the diaphragm, which can achieve the coarse positioning of the spherical mirror in the optical assembly process. A rapid self-correlation method is presented to analyze the spectrum signal for the fine positioning. In order to prevent the damage of the optical components and realize sealing of the resonator, a hybrid force-position control is constructed to control the contact force of the optical components. The experimental results show that the proposed multi-sensor control strategy succeeds in accomplishing the precise assembly of the optical components, which consists of parallel adjustment, macro coarse adjustment, macro approach, micro fine adjustment, micro approach and optical contact. Therefore, the results validate the multi-sensor control strategy.

  12. Multi-sensor control for precise assembly of optical components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Li

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to perform an optical assembly accurately, a multi-sensor control strategy is developed which includes an attitude measurement system, a vision system, a loss measurement system and a force sensor. A 3-DOF attitude measuring method using linear variable differential transformers (LVDT is designed to adjust the relation of position and attitude between the spherical mirror and the resonator. A micro vision feedback system is set up to extract the light beam and the diaphragm, which can achieve the coarse positioning of the spherical mirror in the optical assembly process. A rapid self-correlation method is presented to analyze the spectrum signal for the fine positioning. In order to prevent the damage of the optical components and realize sealing of the resonator, a hybrid force-position control is constructed to control the contact force of the optical components. The experimental results show that the proposed multi-sensor control strategy succeeds in accomplishing the precise assembly of the optical components, which consists of parallel adjustment, macro coarse adjustment, macro approach, micro fine adjustment, micro approach and optical contact. Therefore, the results validate the multi-sensor control strategy.

  13. Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, a.; Pickrell, G.; Xiao, H.; May, r.

    2003-02-27

    The overall goal of this project was to develop reliable cost effective sensors for application in the down-hole environment. The physical parameters measured by these sensors were temperature, pressure, flow and acoustic signals. Sensor head configurations for each of the physical measurands were optimized to increase the sensitivity to the particular measurand of interest while decreasing the cross-sensitivity to the other physical measurands and to environmental influences. In addition, the optical signal demodulation electronics was designed to be insensitive to environmental influences while maintaining the required resolution, precision and accuracy of the parameter being sensed. The influence of potentially detrimental agents such as water in the down-hole environment was investigated as well as methods to protect both the optical fiber and the sensor from these detrimental effects.

  14. Two-interferometers fiber optic sensor for disturbance localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, Marek; Ciurapinski, Wieslaw; Kondrat, Marcin

    2005-09-01

    Initial researches of Two-interferometers Fibre Optic Sensor for Disturbance Localization will be presented. The sensor is typically susceptible to environmentally induced mechanical perturbation at low frequencies. The presented sensor consists of two interferometers: Sagnac and Michelson. The Sagnac transfer function is proportional to the product of two factors: firstly the rate of change, dφ/dt, of the optical signal, induced at a point by external disturbance, and secondly the distance between the disturbance point and the Sagnac coil centre. The second interferometer transfer function gives an output proportional to φ. So, if we determine a pulsation ω of the mechanical disturbance from both interferometers output signals, we will be able to localize point where the mechanical disturbance takes place along the fibre by means of simple division of these transfer function. A laboratory arrangement of the sensor and the results of numerical signal processing are also shown.

  15. Remote optical sensor system for E-field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzelmann, Robert; Stoehr, Andreas; Alder, Thomas; Kalinowski, D.; Schmidt, Manuel; Gross, Matthias; Jaeger, Dieter

    1998-12-01

    The concept of a remote optical sensor system for frequency selective electric field measurements will be presented. The system will be applicable to field measurement problems up to frequencies in the microwave regime. Additionally, it will provide minimum interference with the measured field, due to the optical fiber coupled sensor head. The electrooptic key components within the head of this sensor system are an array of photovoltaic cells and an electroabsorption waveguide modulator. Based on experimental results these components will be discussed and evaluated for the application within the sensor system. Furthermore, a novel fiber modulator coupling technique employing the monolithic integration of the device with InP V-grooves will be presented.

  16. Rugged Optical Atmospheric Humidity Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Trace species measurement on unmanned atmospheric research craft suitable for interplanetary travel is a demanding application for optical sensing techniques. Yet...

  17. Optical measurements of pore geometry and fluid velocity in a bed of irregularly packed spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Alice Y. L.; Huang, Michelle Y. F.; Capart, Hervé; Chen, Rong-Her

    2008-08-01

    Imaging methods are proposed for the characterisation of liquid flows through transparent porous media of matched refractive index. The methods are based on the analysis of laser-illuminated slices, and specialized for the case in which the porous medium is composed of irregularly packed spheres. They include algorithms for the reconstruction of the three-dimensional (3D) sphere arrangement based on a laser scan of the packed bed, particle tracking velocimetry applied to the motions of micro-tracers in a laser-illuminated plane, and techniques for the co-registration of geometry and velocity measurements acquired from different slices. The methods are applied to a cylindrical flow cell filled with mono-sized spheres and operated at Reynolds number Re = 28. The data produced include the full 3D geometry of the packed spheres assembly, the 2D fluid velocity field in the axial centre-plane of the flow cell, and the corresponding porosity and velocity distributions.

  18. Optical fiber sensors for IoT and smart devices

    CERN Document Server

    Domingues, Maria de Fátima F

    2017-01-01

    This brief provides a review of the evolution of optical fiber sensing solutions and related applications. Unique production methods are presented and discussed, highlighting their evolution and analyzing their complexity. Under this scope, this brief presents the existing silica optical fiber sensors and polymer optical fiber sensors solutions, comparing its field of action (sensitivity, accuracy), complexity of manufacture and economic cost. Special attention is given to low-cost production methods. This brief evaluates the different existing techniques, assessing the accuracy and suitability of these sensors for possible Internet of Things (IoT) integration in different considered scenarios. Critical analytical techniques, also covered in this brief, are expected to play a key role in the world of IoT and the smart city of tomorrow.

  19. Damage monitoring and impact detection using optical fiber vibration sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y. C.; Han, K. S.

    2002-06-01

    Intensity-based optical fiber vibrations sensors (OFVSs) are used in damage monitoring of fiber-reinforced plastics, in vibration sensing, and location of impacts. OFVSs were constructed by placing two cleaved fiber ends in a capillary tube. This sensor is able to monitor structural vibrations. For vibration sensing, the optical fiber sensor was mounted on the carbon fiber reinforced composite beam, and its response was investigated for free and forced vibration. For locating impact points, four OFVSs were placed at chosen positions and the different arrival times of impact-generated vibration signals were recorded. The impact location can be determined from these time delays. Indentation and tensile tests were performed with the measurement of the optical signal and acoustic emission (AE). The OFVSs accurately detected both free and forced vibration signals. Accurate locations of impact were determined on an acrylate plate. It was found that damage information, comparable in quality to AE data, could be obtained from the OFVS signals.

  20. Smart optical distance sensor for automatic welding detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Michael; Rinner, Stefan; Ettemeyer, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we describe a simple and cost-effective method and measuring device for automatic detection of welding. The sensor is to be used in automatic darkening filters (ADF) of welding helmets protecting the operator from intensive hazardous UV radiation. For reasons discussed in detail below, conventional sensor principles used in ADF are being out-dated. Here, we critically revise some alternatives and propose an approach comprising an optical distance sensor. Its underlying principle is triangulation with two pin-hole cameras. The absence of optical components such as lenses results in very low cost. At first, feasibility is tested with optical simulations. Additionally, we present measurement results that prove the practicability of our proposal.

  1. Carbon laminates with RE doped optical fibre sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miluski, Piotr; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Żmojda, Jacek; Silva, AbíLio P.; Reis, Paulo N. B.; Dorosz, Dominik

    2016-11-01

    A new type of luminescent optical fibre sensor for structural health monitoring of composite laminates (CFRP) is proposed. The Nd3+ doped multi-core doubleclad fibre incorporated in composite structure was used as a distributed temperature sensor. The change of luminescence intensity (Nd3+ ions) at the wavelength of 880 nm (4F3/2 → 4I9/2) and 1060 nm (4F3/2 → 4I11/2) was used for internal temperature monitoring. The special construction of optical fibre was used as it assures an efficient pumping mechanism and, at same time, it increases the measuring sensitivity. The linear response with relative sensitivity 0.015 K-1 was obtained for temperature range from 30 up to 75ºC. The manufacturing process of CFRP with embedded optical fibre sensor is also discussed.

  2. Fiber Optic Temperature Sensor Based on Multimode Interference Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Soto, J G; Antonio-Lopez, J E; Sanchez-Mondragon, J J [Photonics and Optical Physics Laboratory, Optics Department, INAOE Apdo. Postal 51 and 216, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72000 (Mexico); May-Arrioja, D A, E-mail: darrioja@uat.edu.mx

    2011-01-01

    A novel fiber optic temperature sensor based on multimode interference was designed, fabricated and tested. The sensor is very simple and inexpensive since we only need to splice a section of multimode fiber between two single mode fibers. Using this device a sensing range of 25 deg. C to 375 deg. C is demonstrated. We should also highlight that due to the pass-band filter response of MMI devices, multiplexing is rather simple by just changing the length of the multimode section.

  3. Optical Sensors and Methods for Underwater 3D Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miquel Massot-Campos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a survey on optical sensors and methods for 3D reconstruction in underwater environments. The techniques to obtain range data have been listed and explained, together with the different sensor hardware that makes them possible. The literature has been reviewed, and a classification has been proposed for the existing solutions. New developments, commercial solutions and previous reviews in this topic have also been gathered and considered.

  4. Optical fiber sensor for membrane submicrometer vibration measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopczuk, Krzysztof; Rozwadowski, Krzysztof; Aleksandra Starzyńska, M D; Domański, Andrzej W

    2014-09-10

    This paper presents an optical fiber sensor for membrane submicrometer vibration measurement. The sensor is designed ultimately for low-cost medical audiometric applications such as determining the mobility of the tympanic membrane stimulated by the tone. The sensing method is minimally invasive, and the sensing head does not contact the surface of the membrane. Measurements were performed on tympanic membrane phantoms. Deflections of a few nanometers were measured, and vibration maps of phantoms were taken.

  5. Integrated optical sensors for optoacoustic imaging of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmochowski, P.; Hayes-Gill, Barrie R.; Li, C.; Morgan, Stephen P.; Clark, Matt; Crowe, John A.; Somekh, Michael G.

    2004-07-01

    The design of a single integrated lock-in pixel with a logarithmic response for a modulated light camera is described. The sensor has been designed to detect low light levels and can detect modulated light with frequency well above 2 MHz. An n-well photodiode, amplifier, mixer and 150 Hz low-pass filter have been implemented to allow continuous processing of the incident light. The performance of the sensor is demonstrated using an optoacoustic imaging system and tissue phantoms. A 1 MHz ultrasound transducer is used to modulate light scattered through a tissue phantom. An absorbing sphere is scanned through the medium and the improvement in imaging performance provided by ultrasound modulation is demonstrated.

  6. Optic Fiber-Based Dynamic Pressure Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiu-Lin Gan; Hai-Wen Cai; Jian-Xin Geng; Zheng-Qing Pan; Rong-Hui Qu; Zu-Jie Fang

    2008-01-01

    Weigh-in-Motion(WIM) technique is the process of measuring the dynamic tire forces of a moving vehicle and estimating the corresponding tire loads of the static vehicle. Compared with the static weigh station, WIM station is an efficient and cost effective choice that will minimize unneccessary stops and delay for truckers. The way to turn birefringence of single-mode fiber into a prime quality for a powerful and reliable sensor is shown. Preliminary results for the development of a weigh-in-motion (WIM) technique based on sagnac-loop sensor are presented. After a brief description of the sensor and its principle of operation, the theoretical model is developed. Then, a full characterization made in static conditions is presented.

  7. EMBEDDED OPTICAL SENSORS FOR THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David R. Clarke

    2004-12-16

    In this first year of the program we have focused on the selection of rare-earth dopants for luminescent sensing in thermal barrier coating materials, the effect of dopant concentration on several of the luminescence characteristics and initial fabrication of one type of embedded sensor, the ''red-line'' sensor. We have initially focused on erbium as the lanthanide dopant for luminescence doping of yttria-stabilized zirconia and europium as the lanthanide for luminescence doping of gadolinium zirconate. The latter exhibits a temperature-dependent luminescence lifetime up to at least 1100 C. A buried layer, ''red-line'' sensor in an electron-beam deposited yttria-stabilized zirconia coating with erbium has been demonstrated and exhibits a temperature-dependent luminescence lifetime up to at least 400 C.

  8. New multiplexing structures for fiber optic sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Leandro González, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    El campo de la fibra óptica ha sufrido una rápida evolución durante las últimas décadas debido a sus buenas prestaciones en aplicaciones de telecomunicaciones. Aprovechando este avance científico y técnico en componentes fotónicos, los sensores de fibra óptica han emergido como una solución flexible para solventar algunas de las principales limitaciones sufridas por los sensores convencionales. Por ejemplo, la fibra óptica es químicamente inerte y electromagnéticamente pasiva. ...

  9. Nonlinear optical field sensors in extreme electromagnetic and acoustic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzarella, Anthony; Wu, Dong Ho

    2014-03-01

    Sensors based on electro-optic (EO) and magneto-optic (MO) crystals measure external electric and magnetic fields through changes in birefringence which the fields induce on the nonlinear crystals. Due to their small size and all-dielectric structure, EO and MO sensors are ideal in environments involving very large electromagnetic powers. Conventional antennas and metallic probes not only present safety hazards, due to their metallic structure and the presence of large currents, but they can also perturb the very fields they intend to measure. In the case of railguns, the large electromagnetic signals are also accompanied by tremendous acoustic noise, which presents a noise background that the sensors must overcome. In this presentation, we describe extensive data obtained from fiber optic EO and MO sensors used in the railgun of the Naval Research Laboratory. Along with the field measurements obtained, we will describe the interactions between the acoustic noise and the nonlinear crystals (most notably, photoelastic effects), the noise equivalent fields they produce, and methods they could be suppressed through the optical and geometrical configurations of the sensor so that the signal to noise ratio can be maximized.

  10. Optical and Electronic NOx Sensors for Applications in Mechatronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D. Wolter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Current production and emerging NOx sensors based on optical and nanomaterials technologies are reviewed. In view of their potential applications in mechatronics, we compared the performance of: i Quantum cascade lasers (QCL based photoacoustic (PA systems; ii gold nanoparticles as catalytically active materials in field-effect transistor (FET sensors, and iii functionalized III-V semiconductor based devices. QCL-based PA sensors for NOx show a detection limit in the sub part-per-million range and are characterized by high selectivity and compact set-up. Electrochemically synthesized gold-nanoparticle FET sensors are able to monitor NOx in a concentration range from 50 to 200 parts per million and are suitable for miniaturization. Porphyrin-functionalized III-V semiconductor materials can be used for the fabrication of a reliable NOx sensor platform characterized by high conductivity, corrosion resistance, and strong surface state coupling.

  11. Optical and Electronic NOx Sensors for Applications in Mechatronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Franco, Cinzia; Elia, Angela; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Lugarà, Pietro Mario; Ieva, Eliana; Cioffi, Nicola; Torsi, Luisa; Bruno, Giovanni; Losurdo, Maria; Garcia, Michael A.; Wolter, Scott D.; Brown, April; Ricco, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Current production and emerging NOx sensors based on optical and nanomaterials technologies are reviewed. In view of their potential applications in mechatronics, we compared the performance of: i) Quantum cascade lasers (QCL) based photoacoustic (PA) systems; ii) gold nanoparticles as catalytically active materials in field-effect transistor (FET) sensors, and iii) functionalized III-V semiconductor based devices. QCL-based PA sensors for NOx show a detection limit in the sub part-per-million range and are characterized by high selectivity and compact set-up. Electrochemically synthesized gold-nanoparticle FET sensors are able to monitor NOx in a concentration range from 50 to 200 parts per million and are suitable for miniaturization. Porphyrin-functionalized III-V semiconductor materials can be used for the fabrication of a reliable NOx sensor platform characterized by high conductivity, corrosion resistance, and strong surface state coupling. PMID:22412315

  12. Two-interferometer fiber optic sensor with disturbance localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrat, M.; Szustakowski, M.; Ciurapinski, W.; Zyczkowski, M.

    2006-09-01

    We present investigation results of a new generation of the fiber optic perimeter sensor in a Sagnac and Michelson interferometers configuration. This sensor can detect a potential intruder and determine its position along a protected zone. We propose a localization method that makes use of the inherent properties of both interferometers. After demodulation of signals from both interferometers, the obtained amplitude characteristic of the Sagnac interferometer depends on position of a disturbance along the interferometer, while amplitude characteristic of the Michelson interferometer do not depend on this position. So, quotient of both demodulated characteristics makes it possible to localize the disturbance. Arrangement of a laboratory model of the sensor and its signal processing scheme is also presented. During research of the laboratory model of the sensor, it was possible to detect the position of the disturbance with resolution of about 40m along the 6-km long sensor.

  13. Optical fiber sensors fabricated by the focused ion beam technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Wang, Fei; Bang, Ole

    2012-01-01

    crystal fiber (PCF). Using this technique we fabricate a highly compact fiber-optic Fabry-Pérot (FP) refractive index sensor near the tip of fiber taper, and a highly sensitive in-line temperature sensor in PCF. We also demonstrate the potential of using FIB to selectively fill functional fluid......Focused ion beam (FIB) is a highly versatile technique which helps to enable next generation of lab-on-fiber sensor technologies. In this paper, we demonstrate the use application of FIB to precisely mill the fiber taper and end facet of both conventional single mode fiber (SMF) and photonic...

  14. Fiber optic sensors for environmental applications: A brief review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossabi, J.

    1992-04-01

    Understanding the flow a groundwater quality. This understanding is achieved by measurement of the appropriate chemical and physical subsurface parameters. The ideal measurement would accurately assess a parameter without affecting the parameter or its environment. Fiber optic spectroscopy offers some of the most promising techniques for accurate, non-invasive measurements of environmental parameters. Fiber optic sensors for subsurface applications are currently being developed by several Department of Energy laboratories. Some of these sensors have been successfully deployed in the field and are attaining the goals of accurate, noninvasive, real time measurements in the subsurface.

  15. Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors Based on Polymer Optical Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-Sheng Zheng; Yong-Hua Lu; Zhi-Guo Xie; Jun Tao; Kai-Qun Lin; Hai Ming

    2008-01-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is a powerful technique for directly sensing in biological studies, chemical detection and environmental pollution monitoring. In this paper, we present polymer optical fiber application in SPR sensors, including wavelength interrogation surface enhanced Raman scattering SPR sensor and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probe.Long-period fiber gratings are fabricated on single mode polymer optical fiber (POF) with 120 μm period and 50% duty cycle. The polarization characteristic of this kind of birefringent grating is studied. Theoretical analysis shows it will be advantageous in SPR sensing applications.

  16. Fiber optic micro sensor for the measurement of tendon forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrmann Gregory P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A fiber optic sensor developed for the measurement of tendon forces was designed, numerically modeled, fabricated, and experimentally evaluated. The sensor incorporated fiber Bragg gratings and micro-fabricated stainless steel housings. A fiber Bragg grating is an optical device that is spectrally sensitive to axial strain. Stainless steel housings were designed to convert radial forces applied to the housing into axial forces that could be sensed by the fiber Bragg grating. The metal housings were fabricated by several methods including laser micromachining, swaging, and hydroforming. Designs are presented that allow for simultaneous temperature and force measurements as well as for simultaneous resolution of multi-axis forces. The sensor was experimentally evaluated by hydrostatic loading and in vitro testing. A commercial hydraulic burst tester was used to provide uniform pressures on the sensor in order to establish the linearity, repeatability, and accuracy characteristics of the sensor. The in vitro experiments were performed in excised tendon and in a dynamic gait simulator to simulate biological conditions. In both experimental conditions, the sensor was found to be a sensitive and reliable method for acquiring minimally invasive measurements of soft tissue forces. Our results suggest that this sensor will prove useful in a variety of biomechanical measurements.

  17. Fibre optic surface plasmon resonance sensor system designed for smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Kort; Roth, Bernhard

    2015-06-29

    A fibre optic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor system for smartphones is reported, for the first time. The sensor was fabricated by using an easy-to-implement silver coating technique and by polishing both ends of a 400 µm optical fibre to obtain 45° end-faces. For excitation and interrogation of the SPR sensor system the flash-light and camera at the back side of the smartphone were employed, respectively. Consequently, no external electrical components are required for the operation of the sensor system developed. In a first application example a refractive index sensor was realised. The performance of the SPR sensor system was demonstrated by using different volume concentrations of glycerol solution. A sensitivity of 5.96·10(-4) refractive index units (RIU)/pixel was obtained for a refractive index (RI) range from 1.33 to 1.36. In future implementations the reported sensor system could be integrated in a cover of a smartphone or used as a low-cost, portable point-of-care diagnostic platform. Consequently it offers the potential of monitoring a large variety of environmental or point-of-care parameters in combination with smartphones.

  18. WGM-Resonator/Tapered-Waveguide White-Light Sensor Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stekalov, Dmitry; Maleki, Lute; Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Iltchenko, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations have demonstrated the feasibility of compact white-light sensor optics consisting of unitary combinations of (1) low-profile whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonators and (2) tapered rod optical waveguides. These sensors are highly wavelength-dispersive and are expected to be especially useful in biochemical applications for measuring absorption spectra of liquids. These sensor optics exploit the properties of a special class of non-diffracting light beams that are denoted Bessel beams because their amplitudes are proportional to Bessel functions of the radii from their central axes. High-order Bessel beams can have large values of angular momentum. In a sensor optic of this type, a low-profile WGM resonator that supports modes having large angular momenta is used to generate high-order Bessel beams. As used here, "low-profile" signifies that the WGM resonator is an integral part of the rod optical waveguide but has a radius slightly different from that of the adjacent part(s).

  19. Acoustic emission monitoring using a multimode optical fiber sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Steve; Papy, Jean-Michel; Wevers, Martine; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2004-07-01

    Permanent damage in various materials and constructions often causes high-energy high-frequency acoustic waves. To detect those so called `acoustic emission (AE) events', in most cases ultrasonic transducers are embedded in the structure or attached to its surface. However, for many applications where event localization is less important, an embedded low-cost multimode optical fiber sensor configured for event counting may be a better alternative due to its corrosion resistance, immunity to electromagnetic interference and light-weight. The sensing part of this intensity-modulated sensor consists of a multimode optical fiber. The sensing principle now relies on refractive index variations, microbending and mode-mode interferences by the action of the acoustic pressure wave. A photodiode is used to monitor the intensity of the optical signal and transient signal detection techniques (filtering, frame-to-frame analysis, recursive noise estimation, power detector estimator) on the photodiode output are applied to detect the events. In this work, the acoustic emission monitoring capabilities of the multimode optical fiber sensor are demonstrated with the fiber sensor embedded in the liner of a Power Data Transmission (PDT) coil to detect damage (delamination, matrix cracking and fiber breaking) while bending the coil. With the Hankel Total Least Square (HTLS) technique, it is shown that both the acoustic emission signal and optical signal can be modeled with a sum of exponentially damped complex sinusoids with common poles.

  20. Recent Developments in Micro-Structured Fiber Optic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in fiber-optic sensing have involved booming research in the design and manufacturing of novel micro-structured optical fiber devices. From the conventional tapered fiber architectures to the novel micro-machined devices by advanced laser systems, thousands of micro-structured fiber-optic sensors have been proposed and fabricated for applications in measuring temperature, strain, refractive index (RI, electric current, displacement, bending, acceleration, force, rotation, acoustic, and magnetic field. The renowned and unparalleled merits of sensors-based micro-machined optical fibers including small footprint, light weight, immunity to electromagnetic interferences, durability to harsh environment, capability of remote control, and flexibility of directly embedding into the structured system have placed them in highly demand for practical use in diverse industries. With the rapid advancement in micro-technology, micro-structured fiber sensors have benefitted from the trends of possessing high performance, versatilities and spatial miniaturization. Here, we comprehensively review the recent progress in the micro-structured fiber-optic sensors with a variety of architectures regarding their fabrications, waveguide properties and sensing applications.

  1. Towards biochips using microstructured optical fiber sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Lars Henning; Hoiby, Poul Erik; Jensen, Jesper Bo

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present the first incorporation of a microstructured optical fiber (MOF) into biochip applications. A 16-mm-long piece of MOF is incorporated into an optic-fluidic coupler chip, which is fabricated in PMMA polymer using a CO2 laser. The developed chip configuration allows...... the continuous control of liquid flow through the MOF and simultaneous optical characterization. While integrated in the chip, the MOF is functionalized towards the capture of a specific single-stranded DNA string by immobilizing a sensing layer on the microstructured internal surfaces of the fiber. The sensing...

  2. Optical fiber sensors for damage analysis in aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Paul; May, Russell; Claus, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Under this grant, fiber optic sensors were investigated for use in the nondestructive evaluation of aging aircraft. Specifically, optical fiber sensors for detection and location of impacts on a surface, and for detection of corrosion in metals were developed. The use of neural networks was investigated for determining impact location by processing the output of a network of fiberoptic strain sensors distributed on a surface. This approach employs triangulation to determine location by comparing the arrival times at several sensors, of the acoustic signal generated by the impact. For this study, a neural network simulator running on a personal computer was used to train a network using a back-propagation algorithm. Fiber optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) strain sensors are attached to or embedded in the surface, so that stress waves emanating from an impact can be detected. The ability of the network to determine impact location by time-or-arrival of acoustic signals was assessed by comparing network outputs with actual experimental results using impacts on a panel instrumented with optical fiber sensors. Using the neural network to process the sensor outputs, the impact location can be inferred to centimeter range accuracy directly from the arrival time data. In addition, the network can be trained to determine impact location, regardless of material anisotropy. Results demonstrate that a back-propagation network identifies impact location for an anisotropic graphite/bismaleimide plate with the same accuracy as that for an isotropic aluminum plate. Two different approaches were investigated for the development of fiber optic sensors for corrosion detection in metals, both utilizing optical fiber sensors with metal coatings. In the first approach, an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric fiber optic strain sensor was placed under tensile stress, and while in the resulting strained position, a thick coating of metal was applied. Due to an increase in

  3. Optical Imaging Sensors and Systems for Homeland Security Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Javidi, Bahram

    2006-01-01

    Optical and photonic systems and devices have significant potential for homeland security. Optical Imaging Sensors and Systems for Homeland Security Applications presents original and significant technical contributions from leaders of industry, government, and academia in the field of optical and photonic sensors, systems and devices for detection, identification, prevention, sensing, security, verification and anti-counterfeiting. The chapters have recent and technically significant results, ample illustrations, figures, and key references. This book is intended for engineers and scientists in the relevant fields, graduate students, industry managers, university professors, government managers, and policy makers. Advanced Sciences and Technologies for Security Applications focuses on research monographs in the areas of -Recognition and identification (including optical imaging, biometrics, authentication, verification, and smart surveillance systems) -Biological and chemical threat detection (including bios...

  4. Polydimethylsiloxane fibers for optical fiber sensor of displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martincek, Ivan; Pudis, Dusan; Gaso, Peter

    2013-09-01

    The paper describes the preparation of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber integrated on the conventional optical fibers and their use for optical fiber displacement sensor. PDMS fiber was made of silicone elastomer Sylgard 184 (Dow Corning) by drawing from partially cured silicone. Optical fiber displacement sensor using PDMS fiber is based on the measurement of the local minimum of optical signal in visible spectral range generated by intermodal interference of circularly symmetric modes. Position of the local minimum in spectral range varies by stretching the PDMS fiber of 230 μm in the wavelength range from 688 to 477 nm. In the stretched PDMS fiber is possible to determine the longitudinal displacement with an accuracy of approximately 1 micrometer.

  5. Sensitization of an optical fiber methane sensor with graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J. Y.; Ding, E. J.; Xu, S. C.; Li, Z. H.; Wang, X. X.; Song, F.

    2017-09-01

    We analyze the mechanism by which tin oxide can be utilized for the optical sensing of methane gas via surface adsorption and electromagnetic theory. Single-mode optical fibers with core diameters of 9 μm and cladding diameters of 12 μm were used. A 15 mm-long segment of each optical fiber was polished to the core via wheel side-polishing; the exposed fiber core areas were coated with graphene-doped tin oxide such that a novel graphene-based optical fiber methane sensor was fabricated. The experimental results show that the sensor exhibits excellent linear fitting and reproducibility, making it useful for the detection of low concentrations of methane.

  6. Mathematical Model of Fiber Optic Temperature Sensor Based on Optic Absorption and Experiment Testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of analysis on the temperature monitoring methods for high voltage devices, a new type of fiber optic sensor structure with reference channel is given. And the operation principle of fiber optic sensor is analysed at large based on the absorption of semiconductor chip. The mathematical model of both devices and the whole system are also given. It is proved by the experiment that this mathematical model is reliable.

  7. Embedding of fibre optic sensors within flexible host

    OpenAIRE

    Ferraris, Eleonora; Van Gijseghem, Tim; Yan, Chunxiao; Van Hoe, Bram; Van Steenberge, Geert; Van Daele, Peter; Dubruel, Peter; Reynaerts, Dominiek

    2009-01-01

    This work deals with the establishment of a UV polymerisation procedure combined with moulding technology towards the development of a mass production technology for the fabrication of flexible polymers with optical fibres embedded. The concept is to provide an artificial sensing skin based on fibre optic sensors which can be applied to irregular or moveable surfaces for distributed pressure applications, as for instance in structural monitoring or rehabilitation. The selected polymers for su...

  8. Fiber-optic sensor applications in civil and geotechnical engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habel, Wolfgang R.; Krebber, Katerina

    2011-09-01

    Different types of fiber-optic sensors based on glass or polymeric fibers are used to evaluate material behavior or to monitor the integrity and long-term stability of load-bearing structure components. Fiber-optic sensors have been established as a new and innovative measurement technology in very different fields, such as material science, civil engineering, light-weight structures, geotechnical areas as well as chemical and high-voltage substations. Very often, mechanical quantities such as deformation, strain or vibration are requested. However, measurement of chemical quantities in materials and structure components, such as pH value in steel reinforced concrete members also provides information about the integrity of concrete structures. A special fiber-optic chemical sensor for monitoring the alkaline state (pH value) of the cementitious matrix in steel-reinforced concrete structures with the purpose of early detection of corrosion-initiating factors is described. The paper presents the use of several fiber-optic sensor technologies in engineering. One example concerns the use of highly resolving concrete-embeddable fiber Fabry-Perot acoustic emission (AE) sensors for the assessment of the bearing behaviour of large concrete piles in existing foundations or during and after its installation. Another example concerns fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors attached to anchor steels (micro piles) to measure the strain distribution in loaded soil anchors. Polymer optical fibers (POF) can be — because of their high elasticity and high ultimate strain — well integrated into textiles to monitor their deformation behaviour. Such "intelligent" textiles are capable of monitoring displacement of soil or slopes, critical mechanical deformation in geotechnical structures (dikes, dams, and embankments) as well as in masonry structures during and after earthquakes.

  9. Data Optical Networking Architecture Using Wavelength-Division Multiplexing Method for Optical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.

    2008-01-01

    Recently there has been a growth in the number of fiber optical sensors used for health monitoring in the hostile environment of commercial aircraft. Health monitoring to detect the onset of failure in structural systems from such causes as corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and fatigue is a critical factor in safety as well in aircraft maintenance costs. This report presents an assessment of an analysis model of optical data networking architectures used for monitoring data signals among these optical sensors. Our model is focused on the design concept of the wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) method since most of the optical sensors deployed in the aircraft for health monitoring typically operate in a wide spectrum of optical wavelengths from 710 to 1550 nm.

  10. Sub-0.1'' optical imaging of the Z CMa jets with SPHERE/ZIMPOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniucci, S.; Podio, L.; Nisini, B.; Bacciotti, F.; Lagadec, E.; Sissa, E.; La Camera, A.; Giannini, T.; Schmid, H. M.; Gratton, R.; Turatto, M.; Desidera, S.; Bonnefoy, M.; Chauvin, G.; Dougados, C.; Bazzon, A.; Thalmann, C.; Langlois, M.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Crucial information on the mass accretion-ejection connection in young stars can be obtained from high spatial resolution images of jets in sources with known recurrent accretion outbursts. Aims: Using the VLT/SPHERE ZIMPOL instrument, we observed the young binary Z CMa that is composed of a Herbig Be star and a FUor object, both driving a jet. We aim to analyse the structure of the two jets, their relation with the properties of the driving sources, and their connection with previous accretion events observed in this target. Methods: We obtained optical images in the Hα and [O i] 6300 Å lines at the unprecedented angular resolution of ~0.03 arcsec, on which we have performed both continuum subtraction and deconvolution, thereby deriving results that are consistent with each other. Results: Our images reveal extended emission from both sources: a fairly compact and poorly collimated emission SW of the Herbig component and an extended collimated and precessing jet from the FUor component. The compact emission from the Herbig star is compatible with a wide-angle wind and is possibly connected to the recent outburst events shown by this component. The FUor jet is traced down to 70 mas (80 AU) from the source and is highly collimated with a width of 26-48 AU at distances 100-200 AU, which is similar to the width of jets from T Tauri stars. This strongly suggests that the same magneto-centrifugal jet-launching mechanism also operates in FUors. The observed jet wiggle can be modelled as originating from an orbital motion with a period of 4.2 yr around an unseen companion with mass between 0.48 and 1 M⊙. The jet mass loss rate Ṁjet was derived from the [O i] luminosity and comprises of between 1 × 10-8 and 1 × 10-6M⊙ yr-1. This is the first direct Ṁjet measurement from a jet in a FUor. If we assume previous mass accretion rate estimates obtained through modelling of the accretion disk, the derived range of Ṁjet would imply a very low mass

  11. Wavefront sensors for adaptive optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, V. P.; Botygina, N. N.; Emaleev, O. N.; Konyaev, P. A.

    2010-10-01

    A high precision Shack-Hartmann wavefront (WF) sensor has been developed on the basis of a low-aperture off-axis diffraction lens array. The device is capable of measuring WF slopes at array sub-apertures of size 640x640 μm with an error not exceeding 4.80 arcsec (0.15 pixel), which corresponds to the standard deviation equal to 0.017λ at the reconstructed WF with wavelength λ . Also the modification of this sensor for adaptive system of solar telescope using extended scenes as tracking objects, such as sunspot, pores, solar granulation and limb, is presented. The software package developed for the proposed WF sensors includes three algorithms of local WF slopes estimation (modified centroids, normalized cross-correlation and fast Fourier-demodulation), as well as three methods of WF reconstruction (modal Zernike polynomials expansion, deformable mirror response functions expansion and phase unwrapping), that can be selected during operation with accordance to the application.

  12. Single-Crystal Sapphire Optical Fiber Sensor Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickrell, Gary [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Scott, Brian [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Wang, Anbo [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Yu, Zhihao [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    This report summarizes technical progress on the program “Single-Crystal Sapphire Optical Fiber Sensor Instrumentation,” funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. This project was completed in three phases, each with a separate focus. Phase I of the program, from October 1999 to April 2002, was devoted to development of sensing schema for use in high temperature, harsh environments. Different sensing designs were proposed and tested in the laboratory. Phase II of the program, from April 2002 to April 2009, focused on bringing the sensor technologies, which had already been successfully demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensors could be deployed in harsh industrial environments and eventually become commercially viable through a series of field tests. Also, a new sensing scheme was developed and tested with numerous advantages over all previous ones in Phase II. Phase III of the program, September 2009 to December 2013, focused on development of the new sensing scheme for field testing in conjunction with materials engineering of the improved sensor packaging lifetimes. In Phase I, three different sensing principles were studied: sapphire air-gap extrinsic Fabry-Perot sensors; intensity-based polarimetric sensors; and broadband polarimetric sensors. Black body radiation tests and corrosion tests were also performed in this phase. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. At the beginning of Phase II, in June 2004, the BPDI sensor was tested at the Wabash River coal gasifier

  13. Recent Improvement of Medical Optical Fibre Pressure and Temperature Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Poeggel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This investigation describes a detailed analysis of the fabrication and testing of optical fibre pressure and temperature sensors (OFPTS. The optical sensor of this research is based on an extrinsic Fabry–Perot interferometer (EFPI with integrated fibre Bragg grating (FBG for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurements. The sensor is fabricated exclusively in glass and with a small diameter of 0.2 mm, making it suitable for volume-restricted bio-medical applications. Diaphragm shrinking techniques based on polishing, hydrofluoric (HF acid and femtosecond (FS laser micro-machining are described and analysed. The presented sensors were examined carefully and demonstrated a pressure sensitivity in the range of \\(s_p\\ = 2–10 \\(\\frac{\\text{nm}}{\\text{kPa}}\\ and a resolution of better than \\(\\Delta P\\ = 10 Pa protect (0.1 cm H\\(_2\\O. A static pressure test in 38 cmH\\(_2\\O shows no drift of the sensor in a six-day period. Additionally, a dynamic pressure analysis demonstrated that the OFPTS never exceeded a drift of more than 130 Pa (1.3 cm H\\(_2\\O in a 12-h measurement, carried out in a cardiovascular simulator. The temperature sensitivity is given by \\(k=10.7\\ \\(\\frac{\\text{pm}}{\\text{K}}\\, which results in a temperature resolution of better than \\(\\Delta T\\ = 0.1 K. Since the temperature sensing element is placed close to the pressure sensing element, the pressure sensor is insensitive to temperature changes.

  14. A New, Adaptable, Optical High-Resolution 3-Axis Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Buchhold

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a new optical, multi-functional, high-resolution 3-axis sensor which serves to navigate and can, for example, replace standard joysticks in medical devices such as electric wheelchairs, surgical robots or medical diagnosis devices. A light source, e.g., a laser diode, is affixed to a movable axis and projects a random geometric shape on an image sensor (CMOS or CCD. The downstream microcontroller’s software identifies the geometric shape’s center, distortion and size, and then calculates x, y, and z coordinates, which can be processed in attached devices. Depending on the image sensor in use (e.g., 6.41 megapixels, the 3-axis sensor features a resolution of 1544 digits from right to left and 1038 digits up and down. Through interpolation, these values rise by a factor of 100. A unique feature is the exact reproducibility (deflection to coordinates and its precise ability to return to its neutral position. Moreover, optical signal processing provides a high level of protection against electromagnetic and radio frequency interference. The sensor is adaptive and adjustable to fit a user’s range of motion (stroke and force. This recommendation aims to optimize sensor systems such as joysticks in medical devices in terms of safety, ease of use, and adaptability.

  15. A New, Adaptable, Optical High-Resolution 3-Axis Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchhold, Niels; Baumgartner, Christian

    2017-01-27

    This article presents a new optical, multi-functional, high-resolution 3-axis sensor which serves to navigate and can, for example, replace standard joysticks in medical devices such as electric wheelchairs, surgical robots or medical diagnosis devices. A light source, e.g., a laser diode, is affixed to a movable axis and projects a random geometric shape on an image sensor (CMOS or CCD). The downstream microcontroller's software identifies the geometric shape's center, distortion and size, and then calculates x, y, and z coordinates, which can be processed in attached devices. Depending on the image sensor in use (e.g., 6.41 megapixels), the 3-axis sensor features a resolution of 1544 digits from right to left and 1038 digits up and down. Through interpolation, these values rise by a factor of 100. A unique feature is the exact reproducibility (deflection to coordinates) and its precise ability to return to its neutral position. Moreover, optical signal processing provides a high level of protection against electromagnetic and radio frequency interference. The sensor is adaptive and adjustable to fit a user's range of motion (stroke and force). This recommendation aims to optimize sensor systems such as joysticks in medical devices in terms of safety, ease of use, and adaptability.

  16. A New, Adaptable, Optical High-Resolution 3-Axis Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchhold, Niels; Baumgartner, Christian

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a new optical, multi-functional, high-resolution 3-axis sensor which serves to navigate and can, for example, replace standard joysticks in medical devices such as electric wheelchairs, surgical robots or medical diagnosis devices. A light source, e.g., a laser diode, is affixed to a movable axis and projects a random geometric shape on an image sensor (CMOS or CCD). The downstream microcontroller’s software identifies the geometric shape’s center, distortion and size, and then calculates x, y, and z coordinates, which can be processed in attached devices. Depending on the image sensor in use (e.g., 6.41 megapixels), the 3-axis sensor features a resolution of 1544 digits from right to left and 1038 digits up and down. Through interpolation, these values rise by a factor of 100. A unique feature is the exact reproducibility (deflection to coordinates) and its precise ability to return to its neutral position. Moreover, optical signal processing provides a high level of protection against electromagnetic and radio frequency interference. The sensor is adaptive and adjustable to fit a user’s range of motion (stroke and force). This recommendation aims to optimize sensor systems such as joysticks in medical devices in terms of safety, ease of use, and adaptability. PMID:28134824

  17. Lightning Current Measurement with Fiber-Optic Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.; Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.; Snyder, Gary P.

    2014-01-01

    A fiber-optic current sensor is successfully developed with many potential applications for electric current measurement. Originally developed for in-flight lightning measurement, the sensor utilizes Faraday Effect in an optical fiber. The Faraday Effect causes linear light polarization in a fiber to rotate when the fiber is exposed to a magnetic field. The polarization change is detected using a reflective polarimetric scheme. Forming fiber loops and applying Ampere's law, measuring the total light rotation results in the determination of the total current enclosed. The sensor is conformable to complex structure geometry. It is also non-conductive and immune to electromagnetic interference, saturation or hysteresis. Installation is non-intrusive, and the sensor can be safely routed through flammable areas. Two similar sensor systems are described in this paper. The first system operates at 1310nm laser wavelength and is capable of measuring approximately 300 A - 300 kA, a 60 dB range. Laboratory validation results of aircraft lighting direct and in-direct effect current amplitudes are reported for this sensor. The second system operates at 1550nm wavelength and can measure about 400 A - 400 kA. Triggered-lightning measurement data are presented for this system. Good results are achieved in all cases.

  18. Relative-Motion Sensors and Actuators for Two Optical Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursel, Yekta; McKenney, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Optoelectronic sensors and magnetic actuators have been developed as parts of a system for controlling the relative position and attitude of two massive optical tables that float on separate standard air suspensions that attenuate ground vibrations. In the specific application for which these sensors and actuators were developed, one of the optical tables holds an optical system that mimics distant stars, while the other optical table holds a test article that simulates a spaceborne stellar interferometer that would be used to observe the stars. The control system is designed to suppress relative motion of the tables or, on demand, to impose controlled relative motion between the tables. The control system includes a sensor system that detects relative motion of the tables in six independent degrees of freedom and a drive system that can apply force to the star-simulator table in the six degrees of freedom. The sensor system includes (1) a set of laser heterodyne gauges and (2) a set of four diode lasers on the star-simulator table, each aimed at one of four quadrant photodiodes at nominal corresponding positions on the test-article table. The heterodyne gauges are used to measure relative displacements along the x axis.

  19. YBCO Coated Conductor with an Integrated Optical Fiber Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan [American Superconductor Corporation, Devens, MA (United States); Rupich, Marty [American Superconductor Corporation, Devens, MA (United States); Schwartz, Justin [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The primary objectives of the Phase I Project was to develop a proof-of-principle for a concept of integrating an optical fiber sensor into the laminated 2G wire, there by producing a functionalized 2G wire with self-monitoring capabilities

  20. Monolithic integrated optic fiber Bragg grating sensor interrogator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Edgar A.; Esterkin, Yan; Kempen, Cornelia; Sun, Songjian

    2010-04-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are a mature sensing technology that has gained rapid acceptance in civil, aerospace, chemical and petrochemical, medicine, aviation and automotive industries. Fiber Bragg grating sensors can be use for a variety of measurements including strain, stress, vibration, acoustics, acceleration, pressure, temperature, moisture, and corrosion distributed at multiple locations within the structure using a single fiber element. The most prominent advantages of FBGs are: small size and light weight, multiple FBG transducers on a single fiber, and immunity to radio frequency interference. A major disadvantage of FBG technology is that conventional state-of-the-art fiber Bragg grating interrogation systems are typically bulky, heavy, and costly bench top instruments that are assembled from off-the-shelf fiber optic and optical components integrated with a signal electronics board into an instrument console. Based on the need for a compact FBG interrogation system, this paper describes recent progress towards the development of a miniature fiber Bragg grating sensor interrogator (FBG-TransceiverTM) system based on multi-channel monolithic integrated optic sensor microchip technology. The integrated optic microchip technology enables the monolithic integration of all of the functionalities, both passive and active, of conventional bench top FBG sensor interrogators systems, packaged in a miniaturized, low power operation, 2-cm x 5-cm small form factor (SFF) package suitable for the long-term structural health monitoring in applications where size, weight, and power are critical for operation.

  1. Optical fibre temperature sensor in the cryogenic range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertrand, S.; Jalocha, A.; Tribillon, G.; Bouazaoui, M.; Rouhet, J.

    1996-01-01

    The realization of an optical fibre sensor applied to cryogenic temperature measurement in harsh environments is presented. The measurement principle is based on the analysis of the decay-time of the fluorescence emitted by special doped crystals, the excited state lifetimes of which are greatly dep

  2. Demonstration of a refractometric sensor based on optical microfiber resonator

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrated a refractometric sensor based on a coated optical microfiber coil resonator. It is robust, compact, and comprises an intrinsic fluidic channel. A sensitivity of about 40 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) has been measured, in agreement with predictions.

  3. Characterization of Integrated Optical Strain Sensors Based on Silicon Waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerveld, W.J.; Leinders, S.M.; Muilwijk, P.M.; Pozo, J.

    2013-01-01

    Microscale strain gauges are widely used in micro electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) to measure strains such as those induced by force, acceleration, pressure or sound. We propose all-optical strain sensors based on micro-ring resonators to be integrated with MEMS. We characterized the strain-induced

  4. Fiber optical magnetic field sensor for power generator monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willsch, Michael; Bosselmann, Thomas; Villnow, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Inside of large electrical engines such as power generators and large drives, extreme electric and magnetic fields can occur which cannot be measured electrically. Novel fiber optical magnetic field sensors are being used to characterize the fields and recognize inner faults of large power generators.

  5. Development of a rechargeable optical hydrogen peroxide sensor - sensor design and biological application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koren, Klaus; Østrup Jensen, Peter; Kühl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    . Quantifying H2O2 within biological samples is challenging and often not possible. Here we present a quasi-reversible fiber-optic sensor capable of measuring H2O2 concentrations ranging from 1-100 μM within different biological samples. Based on a Prussian blue/white redox cycle and a simple sensor recharging...... and readout strategy, H2O2 can be measured with high spatial (∼500 μm) and temporal (∼30 s) resolution. The sensor has a broad applicability both in complex environmental and biomedical systems, as demonstrated by (i) H2O2 concentration profile measurements in natural photosynthetic biofilms under light...

  6. Optical sensor based on a single CdS nanobelt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Yang, Shuming; Han, Feng; Wang, Liangjun; Zhang, Xiaotong; Jiang, Zhuangde; Pan, Anlian

    2014-04-23

    In this paper, an optical sensor based on a cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanobelt has been developed. The CdS nanobelt was synthesized by the vapor phase transportation (VPT) method. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) results revealed that the nanobelt had a hexagonal wurtzite structure of CdS and presented good crystal quality. A single nanobelt Schottky contact optical sensor was fabricated by the electron beam lithography (EBL) technique, and the device current-voltage results showed back-to-back Schottky diode characteristics. The photosensitivity, dark current and the decay time of the sensor were 4 × 10⁴, 31 ms and 0.2 pA, respectively. The high photosensitivity and the short decay time were because of the exponential dependence of photocurrent on the number of the surface charges and the configuration of the back to back Schottky junctions.

  7. Optical Fiber Sensors for Aircraft Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iker García

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft structures require periodic and scheduled inspection and maintenance operations due to their special operating conditions and the principles of design employed to develop them. Therefore, structural health monitoring has a great potential to reduce the costs related to these operations. Optical fiber sensors applied to the monitoring of aircraft structures provide some advantages over traditional sensors. Several practical applications for structures and engines we have been working on are reported in this article. Fiber Bragg gratings have been analyzed in detail, because they have proved to constitute the most promising technology in this field, and two different alternatives for strain measurements are also described. With regard to engine condition evaluation, we present some results obtained with a reflected intensity-modulated optical fiber sensor for tip clearance and tip timing measurements in a turbine assembled in a wind tunnel.

  8. Optical Fiber Sensors for Aircraft Structural Health Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Iker; Zubia, Joseba; Durana, Gaizka; Aldabaldetreku, Gotzon; Illarramendi, María Asunción; Villatoro, Joel

    2015-06-30

    Aircraft structures require periodic and scheduled inspection and maintenance operations due to their special operating conditions and the principles of design employed to develop them. Therefore, structural health monitoring has a great potential to reduce the costs related to these operations. Optical fiber sensors applied to the monitoring of aircraft structures provide some advantages over traditional sensors. Several practical applications for structures and engines we have been working on are reported in this article. Fiber Bragg gratings have been analyzed in detail, because they have proved to constitute the most promising technology in this field, and two different alternatives for strain measurements are also described. With regard to engine condition evaluation, we present some results obtained with a reflected intensity-modulated optical fiber sensor for tip clearance and tip timing measurements in a turbine assembled in a wind tunnel.

  9. NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

    2004-04-01

    Accomplishments during the first six months of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers.

  10. Optical Sensor Based on a Single CdS Nanobelt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an optical sensor based on a cadmium sulfide (CdS nanobelt has been developed. The CdS nanobelt was synthesized by the vapor phase transportation (VPT method. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM results revealed that the nanobelt had a hexagonal wurtzite structure of CdS and presented good crystal quality. A single nanobelt Schottky contact optical sensor was fabricated by the electron beam lithography (EBL technique, and the device current-voltage results showed back-to-back Schottky diode characteristics. The photosensitivity, dark current and the decay time of the sensor were 4 × 104, 31 ms and 0.2 pA, respectively. The high photosensitivity and the short decay time were because of the exponential dependence of photocurrent on the number of the surface charges and the configuration of the back to back Schottky junctions.

  11. Utilization of Faraday Mirror in Fiber Optic Current Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Fiala

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Fiber optic sensors dispose of some advantages in the field of electrical current and magnetic field measurement, like large bandwidth, linearity, light transmission possibilities. Unfortunately, they suffer from some parasitic phenomena. The crucial issue is the presence of induced and latent linear birefringence, which is imposed by the fiber manufacture imperfections as well as mechanical stress by fiber bending. In order to the linear birefringence compensation a promising method was chosen for pulsed current sensor design. The method employs orthogonal polarization conjugation by the back direction propagation of the light wave in the fiber. The Jones calculus analysis presents its propriety. An experimental fiber optic current sensor has been designed and realized. The advantage of the proposed method was proved considering to the sensitivity improvement.

  12. Optical fiber sensors measurement system and special fibers improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinek, Michal; Hrabina, Jan; Hola, Miroslava; Hucl, Vaclav; Cizek, Martin; Rerucha, Simon; Lazar, Josef; Mikel, Bretislav

    2017-06-01

    We present method for the improvement of the measurement accuracy in the optical frequency spectra measurements based on tunable optical filters. The optical filter was used during the design and realization of the measurement system for the inspection of the fiber Bragg gratings. The system incorporates a reference block for the compensation of environmental influences, an interferometric verification subsystem and a PC - based control software implemented in LabView. The preliminary experimental verification of the measurement principle and the measurement system functionality were carried out on a testing rig with a specially prepared concrete console in the UJV Řež. The presented system is the laboratory version of the special nuclear power plant containment shape deformation measurement system which was installed in the power plant Temelin during last year. On the base of this research we started with preparation other optical fiber sensors to nuclear power plants measurement. These sensors will be based on the microstructured and polarization maintaining optical fibers. We started with development of new methods and techniques of the splicing and shaping optical fibers. We are able to made optical tapers from ultra-short called adiabatic with length around 400 um up to long tapers with length up to 6 millimeters. We developed new techniques of splicing standard Single Mode (SM) and Multimode (MM) optical fibers and splicing of optical fibers with different diameters in the wavelength range from 532 to 1550 nm. Together with development these techniques we prepared other techniques to splicing and shaping special optical fibers like as Polarization-Maintaining (PM) or hollow core Photonic Crystal Fiber (PCF) and theirs cross splicing methods with focus to minimalize backreflection and attenuation. The splicing special optical fibers especially PCF fibers with standard telecommunication and other SM fibers can be done by our developed techniques. Adjustment

  13. Structural Health Monitoring of Composite Structures Using Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Anthony

    Structural health monitoring is the process of detecting damage to a structure, where damage can be characterized as changes to material/mechanical properties including but not limited to plastically deforming the material or the modification of connections. Fiber optic cables with fiber Bragg gratings have emerged as a reliable method of locally measuring strains within a structure. During the manufacturing of composite structures, the fiber optic cables can be embedded between lamina plies, allowing the ability to measure strain at discrete locations within the structure as opposed to electrical strain gauges, which must typically be applied to the surface only. The fiber optic sensors may be used to see if the local strain at the sensor location is beyond desired limits, or the array response may be mined to determine additional information about the loading applied to the structure. The work presented in this thesis is to present novel and potential applications of FBG sensors being used to assess the health of the structure. The first application is the dual application of the FBG sensor as a method to determine the strain around a bolt connection as well as the preload of the fastener using a single fiber optic sensor. The composite material around the bolted connections experience stress concentrations and are often the location of damage to the structure from operational cyclic loading over the lifetime of the structure. The degradation can occur more quickly if the fastener is insufficiently tight to transfer load properly. The second application is the ability to locate the impact location of a projectile with damaging and non-damaging energy. By locating and quantifying the damage, the sensor array provides the basis for a structural health monitoring system that has the potential to determine if the damage is extensive enough to replace, or if the part can be salvaged and retrofitted.

  14. Adhesive bond failure monitoring with triboluminescent optical fiber sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shohag, Md Abu S.; Hammel, Emily C.; Olawale, David O.; Okoli, Okenwa O.

    2016-04-01

    One of the most severe damage modes in modern wind turbines is the failure of the adhesive joints in the trailing edge of the large composite blades. The geometrical shape of the blade and current manufacturing techniques make the trailing edge of the wind turbine blade more sensitive to damage. Failure to timely detect this damage type may result in catastrophic failures, expensive system downtime, and high repair costs. A novel sensing system called the In-situ Triboluminescent Optical Fiber (ITOF) sensor has been proposed for monitoring the initiation and propagation of disbonds in composite adhesive joints. The ITOF sensor combines the triboluminescent property of ZnS:Mn with the many desirable features of optical fiber to provide in-situ and distributed damage sensing in large composite structures like the wind blades. Unlike other sensor systems, the ITOF sensor does not require a power source at the sensing location or for transmitting damage-induced signals to the hub of the wind turbine. Composite parts will be fabricated and the ITOF integrated within the bondline to provide in-situ and real time damage sensing. Samples of the fabricated composite parts with integrated ITOF will be subjected to tensile and flexural loads, and the response from the integrated sensors will be monitored and analyzed to characterize the performance of the ITOF sensor as a debonding damage monitoring system. In addition, C-scan and optical microscopy will be employed to gain greater insights into the damage propagation behavior and the signals received from the ITOF sensors.

  15. Fiber optic and laser sensors VIII; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Jose, CA, Sept. 17-19, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P. (Editor); Udd, Eric (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    This issue presents topics on the advances in fiber-optic sensor technology, fiber-optic gyroscope, fiber-optic position and pressure sensors, fiber-optic magnetic and temperature sensors, and generic fiber-optic sensors. Papers included are on a novel analog phase tracker for interferometric fiber-optic sensor applications, recent development status of fiber-optic sensors in China, the magnetic-field sensitivity of depolarized fiber-optic gyros, a depolarized fiber-optic gyro for future tactical applications, fiber-optic position transducers for aircraft controls, and a metal embedded optical-fiber pressure sensor. Attention is also given to a fiber-optic magnetic field sensor using spectral modulation encoding, a bare-fiber temperature sensor, an interferometric fiber-optic accelerometer, improvement of specular reflection pyrometer, a theoretical analysis of two-mode elliptical-core optical fiber sensors, and a fiber probe for ring pattern.

  16. Microstructured optical fiber refractive index sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Town, Graham E.; McCosker, Ravi; Yuan, Scott Wu

    2010-01-01

    We describe a dual-core microstructured optical fiber designed for refractive index sensing of fluids. We show that by using the exponential dependence of intercore coupling on analyte refractive index, both large range and high sensitivity can be achieved in the one device. We also show...

  17. Microstructured optical fiber refractive index sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Town, Graham E.; McCosker, Ravi; Yuan, Scott Wu

    2010-01-01

    We describe a dual-core microstructured optical fiber designed for refractive index sensing of fluids. We show that by using the exponential dependence of intercore coupling on analyte refractive index, both large range and high sensitivity can be achieved in the one device. We also show that sel...

  18. Towards biochips using microstructured optical fiber sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindorf, Lars; Høiby, Poul Erik; Jensen, Jesper Bo; Pedersen, Lars Hagsholm; Bang, Ole; Geschke, Oliver

    2006-08-01

    In this paper we present the first incorporation of a microstructured optical fiber (MOF) into biochip applications. A 16-mm-long piece of MOF is incorporated into an optic-fluidic coupler chip, which is fabricated in PMMA polymer using a CO(2) laser. The developed chip configuration allows the continuous control of liquid flow through the MOF and simultaneous optical characterization. While integrated in the chip, the MOF is functionalized towards the capture of a specific single-stranded DNA string by immobilizing a sensing layer on the microstructured internal surfaces of the fiber. The sensing layer contains the DNA string complementary to the target DNA sequence and thus operates through the highly selective DNA hybridization process. Optical detection of the captured DNA was carried out using the evanescent-wave-sensing principle. Owing to the small size of the chip, the presented technique allows for analysis of sample volumes down to 300 nL and the fabrication of miniaturized portable devices.

  19. Optical Fiber Pressure Sensor with Reference channel①

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUZhijing; TIANWei

    1997-01-01

    The principle of optical fiber pressure sensing probe with common diaphragm and the method for stabilizing the laser diodes are described in this paper at first.Then we discussed the improvement in characteristics of the system by means of taking the techniques of reference light channel and ratio measurement.

  20. Real-Time Motion Tracking for Indoor Moving Sphere Objects with a LiDAR Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lvwen Huang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Object tracking is a crucial research subfield in computer vision and it has wide applications in navigation, robotics and military applications and so on. In this paper, the real-time visualization of 3D point clouds data based on the VLP-16 3D Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR sensor is achieved, and on the basis of preprocessing, fast ground segmentation, Euclidean clustering segmentation for outliers, View Feature Histogram (VFH feature extraction, establishing object models and searching matching a moving spherical target, the Kalman filter and adaptive particle filter are used to estimate in real-time the position of a moving spherical target. The experimental results show that the Kalman filter has the advantages of high efficiency while adaptive particle filter has the advantages of high robustness and high precision when tested and validated on three kinds of scenes under the condition of target partial occlusion and interference, different moving speed and different trajectories. The research can be applied in the natural environment of fruit identification and tracking, robot navigation and control and other fields.

  1. Real-Time Motion Tracking for Indoor Moving Sphere Objects with a LiDAR Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lvwen; Chen, Siyuan; Zhang, Jianfeng; Cheng, Bang; Liu, Mingqing

    2017-08-23

    Object tracking is a crucial research subfield in computer vision and it has wide applications in navigation, robotics and military applications and so on. In this paper, the real-time visualization of 3D point clouds data based on the VLP-16 3D Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) sensor is achieved, and on the basis of preprocessing, fast ground segmentation, Euclidean clustering segmentation for outliers, View Feature Histogram (VFH) feature extraction, establishing object models and searching matching a moving spherical target, the Kalman filter and adaptive particle filter are used to estimate in real-time the position of a moving spherical target. The experimental results show that the Kalman filter has the advantages of high efficiency while adaptive particle filter has the advantages of high robustness and high precision when tested and validated on three kinds of scenes under the condition of target partial occlusion and interference, different moving speed and different trajectories. The research can be applied in the natural environment of fruit identification and tracking, robot navigation and control and other fields.

  2. Optical chemical and biochemical sensors: new trends (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, F.; Giannetti, A.

    2005-06-01

    Chemical and biochemical sensing is under the extensive research all over the world and many chemical and biochemical sensors are finding increasing number of applications in industry, environmental monitoring, medicine, biomedicine and chemical analysis. This is evidenced by each-year-growing number of international scientific conferences, in which advances in the field of the sensors are reported. One of the main reason why only a few sensors reach the international market, notwithstanding the high number of laboratory prototype described in many peer reviewed papers, lies in the fact that a biochemical sensor is a highly interdisciplinary "object" the realization of which requires the team work of scientists coming from different areas such as chemistry, physics, optoelectronics, engineering, biochemistry, and medicine. And this peculiarity is not easily found in the research teams. In the present paper, the fundamental bases of chemical and biochemical optical sensing are summarised and the new trends are described.

  3. Optical cloud detection from a disposable airborne sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Keri; Harrison, R. Giles; Brus, David

    2016-04-01

    In-situ measurement of cloud droplet microphysical properties is most commonly made from manned aircraft platforms due to the size and weight of the instrumentation, which is both costly and typically limited to sampling only a few clouds. This work describes the development of a small, lightweight (DMT Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS) which measures cloud droplets in the size range from 0.5 to 50 microns. Both sensors were installed at the hill top observatory of Sammaltunturi during a field campaign in October and November 2015, which experienced long periods of immersion inside cloud. Preliminary analysis shows very good agreement between the CAPS and the disposable cloud sensor for cloud droplets >5micron effective diameter. Such data and calibration of the sensor will be discussed here, as will simultaneous balloon launches of the optical cloud sensor through the same cloud layers.

  4. Toluene optical fibre sensor based on air microcavity in PDMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacik, Daniel; Martincek, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    We prepared and demonstrated a compact, simple-to-fabricate, air microcavity in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) placed at the end of a single-mode optical fibre. This microcavity creates a Fabry-Perot interferometer sensor able to measure concentrations of toluene vapour in air. Operation of the sensor is provided by diffusion of the toluene vapour to the PDMS, and the consequent extension of length d of the air microcavity in PDMS. The sensor response for the presence of vapours is fast and occurs within a few seconds. By using the prepared sensor toluene vapour concentration in air can be measured in the range from about 0.833 g.m-3 to saturation, with better sensitivity than 0.15 nm/g.m-3 up to maximal sensitivity 1.4 nm/g.m-3 at around concentration 100 g.m-3 in time 5 s.

  5. A Novel Extrinsic Fiber-Optic Fabry-Perot Strain Sensor System Based on Optical Amplification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Jiang Rao; Jian Jiang; Zheng-Lin Ran

    2003-01-01

    A novel extrinsic fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometric strain sensor system is demonstrated based on the simultaneous use of the amplified spontaneous emission and optical amplification. The improvement of 3~4 orders of magnitude in signal level can be achieved.

  6. A Novel Extrinsic Fiber-Optic Fabry-Perot Strain Sensor System Based on Optical Amplification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A novel extrinsic fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometric strain sensor system is demonstrated based on the simultaneous use of the amplified spontaneous emission and optical amplification. The improvement of 3~4 orders of magnitude in signal level can be achieved.

  7. Growth of in-doped ZnO hollow spheres composed of nanosheets networks and nanocones: structural and optical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S H; Dar, G N; Umar, Ahmad

    2013-07-01

    This work reports the facile growth and characterizations of In-doped ZnO hollow spheres composed of nanosheets networks and nanocones. The In-doped ZnO hollow spheres composed of nanosheets networks and nanocones were grown on Si (100) substrate by simple and non-catalytic thermal evaporation process using metallic zinc and indium powders in the presence of oxygen. The prepared materials were examined in terms of their morphological, compositional, structural and optical properties. The detailed morphological studies revealed that the synthesized products are hollow spheres composed of nanosheet networks and nanocones and grown in high-density. The observed structural properties exhibited well-crystallinity and wurtzite hexagonal phase for the grown materials. The room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectrum showed a broad band in the visible region with a suppressed UV emission and hence due the enhancement in the green emission, the prepared materials exhibits a great interest in the area of ZnO phosphors, such as field emissive display technology, etc.

  8. 1st International Conference on Fiber-Optic Rotation Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Arditty, Hervé

    1982-01-01

    Currently there is considerable interest in the application of optical meth­ ods for the measurement of absolute rotation. Active approaches, so-called ring laser gyros, have been under serious development for at least 15 years. More recently, passive approaches using ring resonators or multi turn fiber interferometers have also demonstrated much pro~ise. The only previous conference devoted exclusively to optical rotation sensors, held in 1978 in San Diego, California, was organized by the Society of Photo-optical Instru­ mentation Engineers(S.P.I.E.J. Although the main emphasis at that conference was on ring laser gyros, a number of papers were also included that described the early development of fiber gyroscopes. Since then the field of fiber optic rotation sensors has grown so rapidly that a conference devoted primarily to this subject was needed. The First International Conference on Fiber-Optic Rotation Sensors was held at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, Nove~­ b...

  9. Miniature fiber optic sensor based on fluorescence energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, David L.; Schultz, Jerome S.

    1992-04-01

    Optical fiber biosensors based on fluorescence assays have several distinct advantages when measuring biological analytes such as metabolites, cofactors, toxins, etc. Not only are optical signals immune to electronic interferences, but the polychromatic nature of most fluorochemical assays provides more potentially useful data about the system being studied. One of the most common difficulties normally encountered with optical biosensors is the inability to routinely recalibrate the optical and electronic components of the system throughout the life of the sensor. With this in mind, we present an optical fiber assay system for glucose based on a homogeneous singlet/singlet energy transfer assay along with the electronic instrumentation built to support the sensor system. In the sensor probe, glucose concentrations are indirectly measured from the level of fluorescence quenching caused by the homogeneous competition assay between TRITC labeled concanavalin A (receptor) and FITC labeled Dextran (ligand). The FITC signal is used to indicate glucose concentrations and the TRITC signal is used for internal calibration. Data is also presented on a protein derivatization procedure that was used to prevent aggregation of the receptor protein in solution. Also, a molecular model is described for the singlet/singlet energy transfer interactions that can occur in a model system composed of a monovalent ligand (FITC labeled papain) and a monovalent receptor (TRITC labeled concanavalin A).

  10. Insect-Inspired Optical-Flow Navigation Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakoor, Sarita; Morookian, John M.; Chahl, Javan; Soccol, Dean; Hines, Butler; Zornetzer, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Integrated circuits that exploit optical flow to sense motions of computer mice on or near surfaces ( optical mouse chips ) are used as navigation sensors in a class of small flying robots now undergoing development for potential use in such applications as exploration, search, and surveillance. The basic principles of these robots were described briefly in Insect-Inspired Flight Control for Small Flying Robots (NPO-30545), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 1 (January 2005), page 61. To recapitulate from the cited prior article: The concept of optical flow can be defined, loosely, as the use of texture in images as a source of motion cues. The flight-control and navigation systems of these robots are inspired largely by the designs and functions of the vision systems and brains of insects, which have been demonstrated to utilize optical flow (as detected by their eyes and brains) resulting from their own motions in the environment. Optical flow has been shown to be very effective as a means of avoiding obstacles and controlling speeds and altitudes in robotic navigation. Prior systems used in experiments on navigating by means of optical flow have involved the use of panoramic optics, high-resolution image sensors, and programmable imagedata- processing computers.

  11. Fiber-Optic Vibration Sensor Based on Multimode Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Lujo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a fiberoptic vibration sensor based on the monitoring of the mode distribution in a multimode optical fiber. Detection of vibrations and their parameters is possible through observation of the output speckle pattern from the multimode optical fiber. A working experimental model has been built in which all used components are widely available and cheap: a CCD camera (a simple web-cam, a multimode laser in visible range as a light source, a length of multimode optical fiber, and a computer for signal processing. Measurements have shown good agreement with the actual frequency of vibrations, and promising results were achieved with the amplitude measurements although they require some adaptation of the experimental model. Proposed sensor is cheap and lightweight and therefore presents an interesting alternative for monitoring large smart structures.

  12. Optical sensor for measuring humidity, strain and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to an optical sensor (100) adapted to measure at least three physical parameters, said optical sensor comprising a polymer-based optical waveguide structure comprising a first Bragg grating structure (101) being adapted to provide information about a first, a second...... and a third physical parameter, a second Bragg grating structure (102) being adapted to provide information about the second and the third physical parameter only, and a third Bragg grating structure (103) being adapted to provide information about the third physical parameter only. The invention further...... relates to a method for measuring the first, the second and the third physical parameter. Preferably, the first, the second and the third physical parameter, are humidity, strain and temperature, respectively....

  13. Optical fiber temperature sensor based on wavelength-dependent detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang Li(李志刚); Zhenhui Du(杜振辉); Baoguang Wang(王宝光); Chengzhi Jiang(蒋诚志)

    2004-01-01

    Semiconductor fiber temperature sensors have been used widely in many fields, but most of them pick up temperature by measuring the optical intensity of certain fixed narrow-band in absorption spectrum.Furthermore, they are sensitive to the loss of optical intensity and the fluctuation of light source power.The novel temperature measurement system proposed in this paper is based on the semiconductor absorption theory and the spectral analysis of method. To measure temperature, the sensor model detects not the certain narrow-band spectrum but the most spectra of the optical absorption edge. Therefore the measurement accuracy and the stability can be improved greatly. Experimental results are in agreement with theoretical analysis results perfectly.

  14. Fiber optic stress-independent helical torsion sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Luís A; Grenier, Jason R; Aitchison, J Stewart; Herman, Peter R

    2015-02-15

    Femtosecond laser-fabricated waveguides have been formed into helical paths throughout the cladding of single-mode optical fibers to demonstrate a strain-independent fiber torsion sensor. A comparison between a Bragg grating sensor and a Mach-Zehnder based on helical waveguides (HWs) showed a much weaker twist sensitivity of 1.5 pm/(rad/m) for the grating in contrast with a value of 261 pm/(rad/m) for the interferometer. The HW geometry provided an unambiguous determination of the rotational direction of the twist while facilitating a convenient and efficient means for optical coupling into the single-mode core of the fiber. The flexible three-dimensional writing by the femtosecond laser fabrication method enabled the direct inscription of compact and robust optical cladding devices without the need for combining or splicing multiple-fiber segments.

  15. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila Using Fiber Optic Microchannel Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samla Gauri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on the detection of Aeromonas hydrophila using fiber optic microchannel biosensor. Microchannel was fabricated by photolithography method. The fiber optic was chosen as signal transmitting medium and light absorption characteristic of different microorganisms was investigated for possible detection. Experimental results showed that Aeromonas hydrophila can be detected at the region of UV-Vis spectra between 352 nm and 354 nm which was comparable to measurement provided by UV spectrophotometer and also theoretical calculation by Beer-Lambert Absorption Law. The entire detection can be done in less than 10 minutes using a total volume of 3 μL only. This result promises good potential of this fiber optic microchannel sensor as a reliable, portable, and disposable sensor.

  16. Pyridine Vapors Detection by an Optical Fibre Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Fernandez-Gutiérrez

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available An optical fibre sensor has been implemented towards pyridine vapors detection;to achieve this, a novel vapochromic material has been used, which, in solid state, suffers achange in colour from blue to pink-white in presence of pyridine vapours. This complex isadded to a solution of PVC (Poly Vinyl Chloride, TBP (Tributylphosphate andtetrahydrofuran (THF, forming a plasticized matrix; by dip coating technique, the sensingmaterial is fixed onto a cleaved ended optical fibre. The fabrication process was optimizedin terms of number of dips and dipping speed, evaluating the final devices by dynamicrange. Employing a reflection set up, the absorbance spectra and changes in the reflectedoptical power of the sensors were registered to determine their response. A linear relationbetween optical power versus vapor concentration was obtained, with a detection limit of 1ppm (v/v.

  17. 75 FR 34988 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... Department of the Navy Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems... Navy hereby gives notice of its intent to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation a.... Patent No. 7,149,374: Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor, Navy Case No. 84,557.//U.S. Patent No. 7,379,630...

  18. 78 FR 17187 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ... Department of the Navy Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems... to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation, a revocable, nonassignable, exclusive... its intent to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation a revocable, nonassignable...

  19. 77 FR 73456 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... Department of the Navy Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems... Navy hereby gives notice of its intent to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation a... described in U.S. Patent No. 7,020,354: Intensity Modulated Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor, Navy Case No. 83...

  20. OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR EFFICIENT AND ECONOMICAL OIL RECOVERY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anbo Wang; Kristie L. Cooper; Gary R. Pickrell

    2003-06-01

    Efficient recovery of petroleum reserves from existing oil wells has been proven to be difficult due to the lack of robust instrumentation that can accurately and reliably monitor processes in the downhole environment. Commercially available sensors for measurement of pressure, temperature, and fluid flow exhibit shortened lifetimes in the harsh downhole conditions, which are characterized by high pressures (up to 20 kpsi), temperatures up to 250 C, and exposure to chemically reactive fluids. Development of robust sensors that deliver continuous, real-time data on reservoir performance and petroleum flow pathways will facilitate application of advanced recovery technologies, including horizontal and multilateral wells. This is the final report for the four-year program ''Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery'', funded by the National Petroleum Technology Office of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech from October 1, 1999 to March 31, 2003. The main objective of this research program was to develop cost-effective, reliable optical fiber sensor instrumentation for real-time monitoring of various key parameters crucial to efficient and economical oil production. During the program, optical fiber sensors were demonstrated for the measurement of temperature, pressure, flow, and acoustic waves, including three successful field tests in the Chevron/Texaco oil fields in Coalinga, California, and at the world-class oil flow simulation facilities in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Research efforts included the design and fabrication of sensor probes, development of signal processing algorithms, construction of test systems, development and testing of strategies for the protection of optical fibers and sensors in the downhole environment, development of remote monitoring capabilities allowing real

  1. Optical coherent detection Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensor based on orthogonal polarization diversity reception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muping Song; Bin Zhao; Xianmin Zhang

    2005-01-01

    In Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensor, using optical coherent detection to detect Brillouin scattering optical signal is a good method, but there exists the polarization correlated detection problem. A novel detecting scheme is presented and demonstrated experimentally, which adopts orthogonal polarization diversity reception to resolve the polarization correlated detection problem. A laser is used as pump and reference light sources, a microwave electric-optical modulator (EOM) is adopted to produce frequency shift reference light, a polarization controller is used to control the polarization of the reference light which is changed into two orthogonal polarization for two adjacent acquisition periods. The Brillouin scattering light is coherently detected with the reference light, and the Brillouin scattering optical signal is taken out based on Brillouin frequency shift. After electronic processing, better Brillouin distributed sensing signal is obtained. A 25-km Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensor is achieved.

  2. A small sensor with matched optical antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepelev, A.V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Central Design Bureau for Unique Instrumentation

    1994-12-31

    Each device for radiation registration in the radio range contains an antenna. Mainly it is the antenna dimension that determines the sensitivity of the device. Can an antenna for the registration of more short wave radiation be constructed? The main feature of antenna action is the conversion of the incident radiation mode into the mode passing through the antenna. At this moment the radiation brightness (which is equivalent to a number of photons per mode) can increase. In accordance with the geometric optics (Shtraubel theorem) the length and mirror systems cannot raise the radiation brightness in principle and cannot be treated as an antenna. Recently it was established that definite optical processes and systems give a possibility of increasing the full radiation brightness. The device for effective registration of short wave radiation is worked out on the basis of these processes.

  3. Recovering Signals from Optical Fiber Interferometric Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    explained in numerous books on operational amplifiers (for example, see Sedra and Smith [Ref. 171) and so will not be further discussed here, except to say...618. 1 October 1982. 17. Sedra , A. S.. and Smith .- K. C.. Microelectronic CrciimHolt. Rinehart and Winston, 1982. 18. Abramowitz, M. and- Stegun. I.A...Interfcromctcrse, Applied Optics. Volume 21. Number 4. 689-693. 1982. 46. Smith , L. and Sheingold, D.H.. "Noise and Operational Amplifier Circuits’, Analog

  4. Optical Sensors based on Raman Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jernshøj, Kit Drescher

    Formålet med denne afhandling er at give en systematisk og uddybende videnskabelig diskussion af molekylær Raman spredning, som kan danne grundlag for udviklingen af molekylespecifikke optiske sensorer til on-site, ikke-destruktiv måling. Afhandlingen falder i tre dele, to teoriafsnit, hvor første...... data fra denne type eksperimenter betyde et øget informationsindhold til anvendelse i den multivariate analyse. Diskussionen er bygget op omkring tre forskellige typer klassifikationsproblemer, hvor der i den første type sker en perturbering, som resulterer i enten en nedgang i symmetri eller en...... energiopsplitning for den ene molekylære specie ud af to tilstede i en opløsning. I det andet type klassifikationsproblem bygger det øgede informationsindhold på en forskydning af den elektroniske absorption og endelig i det tredje klassifikationsproblem er det en molekylær aggregering, der finder sted. I...

  5. Programmable logic controller optical fibre sensor interface module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allwood, Gary; Wild, Graham; Hinckley, Steven

    2011-12-01

    Most automated industrial processes use Distributed Control Systems (DCSs) or Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) for automated control. PLCs tend to be more common as they have much of the functionality of DCSs, although they are generally cheaper to install and maintain. PLCs in conjunction with a human machine interface form the basis of Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, combined with communication infrastructure and Remote Terminal Units (RTUs). RTU's basically convert different sensor measurands in to digital data that is sent back to the PLC or supervisory system. Optical fibre sensors are becoming more common in industrial processes because of their many advantageous properties. Being small, lightweight, highly sensitive, and immune to electromagnetic interference, means they are an ideal solution for a variety of diverse sensing applications. Here, we have developed a PLC Optical Fibre Sensor Interface Module (OFSIM), in which an optical fibre is connected directly to the OFSIM located next to the PLC. The embedded fibre Bragg grating sensors, are highly sensitive and can detect a number of different measurands such as temperature, pressure and strain without the need for a power supply.

  6. Fiber-Optic Sensor for Aircraft Lightning Current Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George G.; Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.; Snyder, Gary P.

    2012-01-01

    An electric current sensor based on Faraday rotation effect in optical fiber was developed for measuring aircraft lightning current. Compared to traditional sensors, the design has many advantages including the ability to measure total current and to conform to structure geometries. The sensor is also small, light weight, non-conducting, safe from interference, and free of hysteresis and saturation. Potential applications include characterization of lightning current waveforms, parameters and paths, and providing environmental data for aircraft certifications. In an optical fiber as the sensing medium, light polarization rotates when exposed to a magnetic field in the direction of light propagation. By forming closed fiber loops around a conductor and applying Ampere s law, measuring the total light rotation yields the enclosed current. A reflective polarimetric scheme is used, where polarization change is measured after the polarized light travels round-trip through the sensing fiber. The sensor system was evaluated measuring rocket-triggered lightning over the 2011 summer. Early results compared very well against a reference current shunt resistor, demonstrating the sensor s accuracy and feasibility in a lightning environment. While later comparisons show gradually increasing amplitude deviations for an undetermined cause, the overall waveforms still compared very well.

  7. New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell

    2005-10-31

    Development of practical, high-temperature optical claddings for improved waveguiding in sapphire fibers continued during the reporting period. A set of designed experiments using the Taguchi method was undertaken to efficiently determine the optimal set of processing variables to yield clad fibers with good optical and mechanical properties. Eighteen samples of sapphire fibers were prepared with spinel claddings, each with a unique set of variables. Statistical analyses of the results were then used to predict the set of factors that would result in a spinel cladding with the optimal geometrical, mechanical, and optical properties. To confirm the predictions of the Taguchi analysis, sapphire fibers were clad with the magnesium aluminate spinel coating using the predicted optimal set of factors. In general, the clad fibers demonstrated high quality, exceeding the best results obtained during the Phase I effort. Tests of the high-temperature stability of the clad fibers were also conducted. The results indicated that the clad fibers were stable at temperatures up to 1300 C for the duration of the three day test. At the higher temperatures, some changes in the geometry of the fibers were observed. The design, fabrication, and testing of a sapphire sensor for measurement of temperature was undertaken. The specific sensor configuration uses a polished sapphire wafer as the temperature-sensitive element. The wafer is attached to a sapphire fiber (clad or unclad), and interrogated as a Fabry-Perot sensor. Methods for assembling the sensor were investigated. A prototype sensor was fabricated and tested at room temperature and elevated temperatures. Results were difficult to interpret, due to the presence of modal noise which was found to result from the use of a spectrometer that was not designed for use with multimode fibers. A spectrometer optimized for use of multimode fiber has been obtained, and further evaluation of the sapphire temperature sensor is continuing.

  8. Wavefront sensors and algorithms for adaptive optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, V. P.; Botygina, N. N.; Emaleev, O. N.; Konyaev, P. A.

    2010-07-01

    The results of recent works related to techniques and algorithms for wave-front (WF) measurement using Shack-Hartmann sensors show their high efficiency in solution of very different problems of applied optics. The goal of this paper was to develop a sensitive Shack-Hartmann sensor with high precision WF measurement capability on the base of modern technology of optical elements making and new efficient methods and computational algorithms of WF reconstruction. The Shack-Hartmann sensors sensitive to small WF aberrations are used for adaptive optical systems, compensating the wave distortions caused by atmospheric turbulence. A high precision Shack-Hartmann WF sensor has been developed on the basis of a low-aperture off-axis diffraction lens array. The device is capable of measuring WF slopes at array sub-apertures of size 640×640 μm with an error not exceeding 4.80 arcsec (0.15 pixel), which corresponds to the standard deviation equal to 0.017λ at the reconstructed WF with wavelength λ . Also the modification of this sensor for adaptive system of solar telescope using extended scenes as tracking objects, such as sunspot, pores, solar granulation and limb, is presented. The software package developed for the proposed WF sensors includes three algorithms of local WF slopes estimation (modified centroids, normalized cross-correlation and fast Fourierdemodulation), as well as three methods of WF reconstruction (modal Zernike polynomials expansion, deformable mirror response functions expansion and phase unwrapping), that can be selected during operation with accordance to the application.

  9. Future electro-optical sensors and processing in urban operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönwall, Christina; Schwering, Piet B.; Rantakokko, Jouni; Benoist, Koen W.; Kemp, Rob A. W.; Steinvall, Ove; Letalick, Dietmar; Björkert, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    In the electro-optical sensors and processing in urban operations (ESUO) study we pave the way for the European Defence Agency (EDA) group of Electro-Optics experts (IAP03) for a common understanding of the optimal distribution of processing functions between the different platforms. Combinations of local, distributed and centralized processing are proposed. In this way one can match processing functionality to the required power, and available communication systems data rates, to obtain the desired reaction times. In the study, three priority scenarios were defined. For these scenarios, present-day and future sensors and signal processing technologies were studied. The priority scenarios were camp protection, patrol and house search. A method for analyzing information quality in single and multi-sensor systems has been applied. A method for estimating reaction times for transmission of data through the chain of command has been proposed and used. These methods are documented and can be used to modify scenarios, or be applied to other scenarios. Present day data processing is organized mainly locally. Very limited exchange of information with other platforms is present; this is performed mainly at a high information level. Main issues that arose from the analysis of present-day systems and methodology are the slow reaction time due to the limited field of view of present-day sensors and the lack of robust automated processing. Efficient handover schemes between wide and narrow field of view sensors may however reduce the delay times. The main effort in the study was in forecasting the signal processing of EO-sensors in the next ten to twenty years. Distributed processing is proposed between hand-held and vehicle based sensors. This can be accompanied by cloud processing on board several vehicles. Additionally, to perform sensor fusion on sensor data originating from different platforms, and making full use of UAV imagery, a combination of distributed and

  10. Fiber Optic Sensors For Detection of Toxic and Biological Threats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Yuan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Protection of public and military personnel from chemical and biological warfareagents is an urgent and growing national security need. Along with this idea, we havedeveloped a novel class of fiber optic chemical sensors, for detection of toxic and biologicalmaterials. The design of these fiber optic sensors is based on a cladding modificationapproach. The original passive cladding of the fiber, in a small section, was removed and thefiber core was coated with a chemical sensitive material. Any change in the opticalproperties of the modified cladding material, due to the presence of a specific chemicalvapor, changes the transmission properties of the fiber and result in modal powerredistribution in multimode fibers. Both total intensity and modal power distribution (MPDmeasurements were used to detect the output power change through the sensing fibers. TheMPD technique measures the power changes in the far field pattern, i.e. spatial intensitymodulation in two dimensions. Conducting polymers, such as polyaniline and polypyrrole,have been reported to undergo a reversible change in conductivity upon exposure tochemical vapors. It is found that the conductivity change is accompanied by optical propertychange in the material. Therefore, polyaniline and polypyrrole were selected as the modifiedcladding material for the detection of hydrochloride (HCl, ammonia (NH3, hydrazine(H4N2, and dimethyl-methl-phosphonate (DMMP {a nerve agent, sarin stimulant},respectively. Several sensors were prepared and successfully tested. The results showeddramatic improvement in the sensor sensitivity, when the MPD method was applied. In thispaper, an overview on the developed class of fiber optic sensors is presented and supportedwith successful achieved results.

  11. Calibration of quasi-static aberrations in exoplanet direct-imaging instruments with a Zernike phase-mask sensor. II. Concept validation with ZELDA on VLT/SPHERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Diaye, M.; Vigan, A.; Dohlen, K.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Caillat, A.; Costille, A.; Girard, J. H. V.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Fusco, T.; Blanchard, P.; Le Merrer, J.; Le Mignant, D.; Madec, F.; Moreaux, G.; Mouillet, D.; Puget, P.; Zins, G.

    2016-08-01

    Warm or massive gas giant planets, brown dwarfs, and debris disks around nearby stars are now routinely observed by dedicated high-contrast imaging instruments that are mounted on large, ground-based observatories. These facilities include extreme adaptive optics (ExAO) and state-of-the-art coronagraphy to achieve unprecedented sensitivities for exoplanet detection and their spectral characterization. However, low spatial frequency differential aberrations between the ExAO sensing path and the science path represent critical limitations for the detection of giant planets with a contrast lower than a few 10-6 at very small separations (measure these quasi-static aberrations at a nanometric level. We present the design, manufacturing, and testing of ZELDA, a prototype that was installed on VLT/SPHERE during its reintegration in Chile. Using the internal light source of the instrument, we first performed measurements in the presence of Zernike or Fourier modes introduced with the deformable mirror. Our experimental results are consistent with the results in simulations, confirming the ability of our sensor to measure small aberrations (measurements and estimated a contrast gain of 10 in the coronagraphic image at 0.2'', reaching the raw contrast limit set by the coronagraph in the instrument. In addition to this encouraging result, the simplicity of the design and its phase reconstruction algorithm makes ZELDA an excellent candidate for the online measurements of quasi-static aberrations during the observations. The implementation of a ZELDA-based sensing path on the current and future facilities (ELTs, future space missions) could facilitate the observation of cold gaseous or massive rocky planets around nearby stars.

  12. Microbend fiber optic sensor for perioperative pediatric vital signs monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhihao; Hee, Hwan Ing; Ng, Soon Huat; Teo, Ju Teng; Yang, Xiufeng; Wang, Dier

    2017-02-01

    We have demonstrated a highly sensitive microbend fiber optic sensor for perioperative pediatric vital signs monitoring that is free from direct contact with skin, cableless, electromagnetic interference free and low cost. The feasibility of our device was studied on infants undergoing surgery and 10 participants ranging from one month to 12 months were enrolled. The sensor was placed under a barrier sheet on the operating table. All patients received standard intraoperative monitoring. The results showed good agreement in heart rate and respiratory rate between our device and the standard physiological monitoring when signals are clean.

  13. Ground strain measuring system using optical fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tadanobu; Honda, Riki; Shibata, Shunjiro; Takegawa, Naoki

    2001-08-01

    This paper presents a device to measure the dynamic horizontal shear strain of the ground during earthquake. The proposed device consists of a bronze plate with fiber Bragg grating sensors attached on it. The device is vertically installed in the ground, and horizontal shear strain of the ground is measured as deflection angle of the plate. Employment of optical fiber sensors makes the proposed device simple in mechanism and highly durable, which makes it easy to install our device in the ground. We conducted shaking table tests using ground model to verify applicability of the proposed device.

  14. Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Kristie L.; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary R.

    2006-11-14

    This report summarizes technical progress during the program “Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries”, performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The objective of this program was to use technology recently invented at Virginia Tech to develop and demonstrate the application of self-calibrating optical fiber temperature and pressure sensors to several key energy-intensive industries where conventional, commercially available sensors exhibit greatly abbreviated lifetimes due primarily to environmental degradation. A number of significant technologies were developed under this program, including • a laser bonded silica high temperature fiber sensor with a high temperature capability up to 700°C and a frequency response up to 150 kHz, • the world’s smallest fiber Fabry-Perot high temperature pressure sensor (125 x 20 μm) with 700°C capability, • UV-induced intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors for distributed measurement, • a single crystal sapphire fiber-based sensor with a temperature capability up to 1600°C. These technologies have been well demonstrated and laboratory tested. Our work plan included conducting major field tests of these technologies at EPRI, Corning, Pratt & Whitney, and Global Energy; field validation of the technology is critical to ensuring its usefulness to U.S. industries. Unfortunately, due to budget cuts, DOE was unable to follow through with its funding commitment to support Energy Efficiency Science Initiative projects and this final phase was eliminated.

  15. Optical design of rotationally symmetric triangulation sensors with low-cost detectors based on reflective optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Peter

    2003-05-01

    Classical triangulation sensors exhibit an orientation depend signal if the scattering properties of the work-piece are not symmetrical like at curved surface locations. This problem is avoided by rotational symmetric triangulation sensors. Due to this attractive property in a lot of applications such a sensor was introduced very recently on the market. This sensor is based on refractive optics and a special PSD detector, both custom made resulting in high costs. Additionally, the existing optical design approach does not offer an optical layout to start with, thus a good amount of trial and error is required and non-optimal solutions are probable. Therefore, there is great interest for a clear optical design strategy that results in layouts that are suitable also to use low cost commercial available detectors, such as CCD or CMOS image detectors. In this paper such a design procedure is presented for optical designs that use reflecting optical surfaces. Several solutions are depicted and discussed. The designs are not only attractive from the optical point of view and from detector considerations, but also from opto-mechanical design issues. For example designs with only one opto-mechanical part are possible. The resulting optical designs consist of aspherical surfaces which are obtained directly by using only some new relations of first order optics for off-axis objects. The designs are validated by exact ray tracing. These ray tracing results show already very good performance. Nevertheless, it was possible to further optimize the optical designs very efficiently using ray tracing software, thus yielding improved optical properties.

  16. Fourier optics analysis of grating sensors with tilt errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferhanoglu, Onur; Toy, M Fatih; Urey, Hakan

    2011-06-15

    Dynamic diffraction gratings can be microfabricated with precision and offer extremely sensitive displacement measurements and light intensity modulation. The effect of pure translation of the moving part of the grating on diffracted order intensities is well known. This study focuses on the parameters that limit the intensity and the contrast of the interference. The effects of grating duty cycle, mirror reflectivities, sensor tilt and detector size are investigated using Fourier optics theory and Gaussian beam optics. Analytical findings reveal that fringe visibility becomes <0.3 when the optical path variation exceeds half the wavelength within the grating interferometer. The fringe visibility can be compensated by monitoring the interfering portion of the diffracted order light only through detector size reduction in the expense of optical power. Experiments were conducted with a grating interferometer that resulted in an eightfold increase in fringe visibility with reduced detector size, which is in agreement with theory. Findings show that diffraction grating readout principle is not limited to translating sensors but also can be used for sensors with tilt or other deflection modes.

  17. Optical-frequency-comb based ultrasound sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Ogura, Takashi; Masuoka, Takashi; Hase, Eiji; Nakajima, Yoshiaki; Yamaoka, Yoshihisa; Minoshima, Kaoru; Yasui, Takeshi

    2017-03-01

    Photo-acoustic imaging is a promising modality for deep tissue imaging with high spatial resolution in the field of biology and medicine. High penetration depth and spatial resolution of the photo-acoustic imaging is achieved by means of the advantages of optical and ultrasound imaging, i.e. tightly focused beam confines ultrasound-generated region within micrometer scale and the ultrasound can propagate through tissues without significant energy loss. To enhance the detection sensitivity and penetration depth of the photo-acoustic imaging, highly sensitive ultrasound detector is greatly desired. In this study, we proposed a novel ultrasound detector employing optical frequency comb (OFC) cavity. Ultrasound generated by the excitation of tightly focused laser beam onto a sample was sensed with a part of an OFC cavity, being encoded into OFC. The spectrally encoded OFC was converted to radio-frequency by the frequency link nature of OFC. The ultrasound-encoded radio-frequency can therefore be directly measured with a high-speed photodetector. We constructed an OFC cavity for ultrasound sensing with a ring-cavity erbium-doped fiber laser. We provided a proof-of-principle demonstration of the detection of ultrasound that was generated by a transducer operating at 10 MHz. Our proposed approach will serve as a unique and powerful tool for detecting ultrasounds for photo-acoustic imaging in the future.

  18. Fiber optic and laser sensors VII; Proceedings of the Meeting, Boston, MA, Sept. 5-7, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udd, Eric (Editor); Depaula, Ramon P. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on fiber optic and laser sensors are presented. Individual topics addressed include: fiber optic photoelastic pressure sensor for high-temperature gases, fiber optic gyroscope using an eight-component LiNbO3 integrated optic circuit, design and performance of a fiber optic gyroscope using integrated optics, digital angular position sensor using wavelength division multiplexing, simple repeatable fiber optic intensity sensor for temperature measurement, compensation for effects of ambient temperature on rare-earth-doped fiber optic thermometer.

  19. A robust and reliable optical trace oxygen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, G. R.; Holmes-Smith, A. S.; Uttamlal, M.; Mitchell, C.; Shannon, P. H.

    2017-05-01

    In applications of nitrogen (N2) generation, industrial gas manufacturing and food packaging there is a need to ensure oxygen (O2) is absent from the environment, even at the lowest concentration levels. Therefore, there has been an increased growth in the development of trace O2 parts per million (ppm) sensors over the past decade to detect and quantify the concentration of molecular O2 in the environment whether it be dissolved or gaseous O2. The majority of commercially available trace O2 sensors are based on electrochemical, zirconia and paramagnetic technologies. Here, the development of a luminescence-based optical trace O2 sensor is presented. Luminescence-based sensing is now regarded as one of the best techniques for the detection and quantification of O2. This is due to the high detection sensitivity, no O2 is consumed and there are a vast array of luminescent indicators and sensing platforms (polymers) that can be selected to suit the desired application. The sensor will be shown to operate from -30 °C to +60 °C in the 0-1000 ppm and/or 0-1200 μbar partial pressure of oxygen (ppO2) range and is equipped with temperature and pressure compensation. The luminescence non-depleting principle, sensor specifications and miniaturized nature offers an attractive alternative to other sensing technologies and advantages over other luminescence-based O2 ppm sensors.

  20. A fibre-optic oxygen sensor for monitoring human breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rongsheng; Formenti, Federico; Obeid, Andy; Hahn, Clive E W; Farmery, Andrew D

    2013-09-01

    The development and construction of a tapered-tip fibre-optic fluorescence based oxygen sensor is described. The sensor is suitable for fast and real-time monitoring of human breathing. The sensitivity and response time of the oxygen sensor were evaluated in vitro with a gas pressure chamber system, where oxygen partial pressure was rapidly changed between 5 and 15 kPa, and then in vivo in five healthy adult participants who synchronized their breathing to a metronome set at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 breaths min(-1). A Datex Ultima medical gas analyser was used to monitor breathing rate as a comparator. The sensor's response time in vitro was less than 150 ms, which allows accurate continuous measurement of inspired and expired oxygen pressure. Measurements of breathing rate by means of our oxygen sensor and of the Datex Ultima were in strong agreement. The results demonstrate that the device can reliably resolve breathing rates up to 60 breaths min(-1), and that it is a suitable cost-effective alternative for monitoring breathing rates and end-tidal oxygen partial pressure in the clinical setting. The rapid response time of the sensor may allow its use for monitoring rapid breathing rates as occur in children and the newborn.

  1. Optical sensors for process control and emissions monitoring in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. W. Alendorf; D. K. Ottensen; D. W. Hahn; T. J. Kulp; U. B. Goers

    1999-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has a number of ongoing projects developing optical sensors for industrial environments. Laser-based sensors can be attractive for relatively harsh environments where extractive sampling is difficult, inaccurate, or impractical. Tools developed primarily for laboratory research can often be adapted for the real world and applied to problems far from their original uses. Spectroscopic techniques, appropriately selected, have the potential to impact the bottom line of a number of industries and industrial processes. In this paper the authors discuss three such applications: a laser-based instrument for process control in steelmaking, a laser-induced breakdown method for hazardous metal detection in process streams, and a laser-based imaging sensor for evaluating surface cleanliness. Each has the potential to provide critical, process-related information in a real-time, continuous manner. These sensor techniques encompass process control applications and emissions monitoring for pollution prevention. They also span the range from a field-tested pre-commercial prototype to laboratory instrumentation. Finally, these sensors employ a wide range of sophistication in both the laser source and associated analytical spectroscopy. In the ultimate applications, however, many attributes of the sensors are in common, such as the need for robust operation and hardening for harsh industrial environments.

  2. Optical Sensors based on Raman Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jernshøj, Kit Drescher

    Formålet med denne afhandling er at give en systematisk og uddybende videnskabelig diskussion af molekylær Raman spredning, som kan danne grundlag for udviklingen af molekylespecifikke optiske sensorer til on-site, ikke-destruktiv måling. Afhandlingen falder i tre dele, to teoriafsnit, hvor første...... del omhandler den tilgangelige molekylære information ved overfladeforstærket resonans Raman spredning (SERRS), samt hvordan adgangen til denne information kan optimeres. Anden del omhandler, hvordan det molekylære informationsindhold kan forøges ved at kombinere polariserede Raman og resonans Raman...... målinger på frie molekyler med multivariat analyse. I tredje og sidste del, som er et eksperimentelt afsnit, præsenteres og diskuteres overfladeforstærkede Raman målinger (SERS) på tre udvalgte pesticider. Afhandlingen indledes med en diskussion af teorien bag SERRS med speciel fokus på den molekylære...

  3. Optical fiber sensor having an active core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egalon, Claudio Oliveira (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An optical fiber is provided. The fiber is comprised of an active fiber core which produces waves of light upon excitation. A factor ka is identified and increased until a desired improvement in power efficiency is obtained. The variable a is the radius of the active fiber core and k is defined as 2 pi/lambda wherein lambda is the wavelength of the light produced by the active fiber core. In one embodiment, the factor ka is increased until the power efficiency stabilizes. In addition to a bare fiber core embodiment, a two-stage fluorescent fiber is provided wherein an active cladding surrounds a portion of the active fiber core having an improved ka factor. The power efficiency of the embodiment is further improved by increasing a difference between the respective indices of refraction of the active cladding and the active fiber core.

  4. Fiber optical Bragg grating sensors embedded in CFRP wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellen, Philipp M.; Frank, Andreas; Broennimann, Rolf; Meier, Urs; Sennhauser, Urs J.

    1999-05-01

    Based on the example application of Emmenbridge, a newly built steel-concrete-composite bridge in Switzerland with 47 m long built-in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) prestressing cables, we will present and analyze the process chain leading to a reliable surveillance of modern civil engineering structures with embedded fiber optical Bragg gratings. This consists first in the embedding of optical fibers and in-fiber Bragg gratings in long CFRP wires in an industrial environment, including fiber optical monitoring of the curing process. Then, various qualifying tests were done: annealing experiments for determining optical lifetime of the Bragg gratings used, dynamic and static tensile tests for estimating their mechanical lifetime under operation, push-out experiments to check adhesion of fiber/coating/matrix interfaces, and performance tests to determine strain and temperature sensitivity of the embedded Bragg gratings. Finally, the prestressing cables were equipped with the CFRP sensor wires and built into the bridge.

  5. Optical Fibre Sensors Using Graphene-Based Materials: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernaez, Miguel; Zamarreño, Carlos R.; Melendi-Espina, Sonia; Bird, Liam R.; Mayes, Andrew G.; Arregui, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    Graphene and its derivatives have become the most explored materials since Novoselov and Geim (Nobel Prize winners for Physics in 2010) achieved its isolation in 2004. The exceptional properties of graphene have attracted the attention of the scientific community from different research fields, generating high impact not only in scientific journals, but also in general-interest newspapers. Optical fibre sensing is one of the many fields that can benefit from the use of these new materials, combining the amazing morphological, chemical, optical and electrical features of graphene with the advantages that optical fibre offers over other sensing strategies. In this document, a review of the current state of the art for optical fibre sensors based on graphene materials is presented. PMID:28098825

  6. Optical Fibre Sensors Using Graphene-Based Materials: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Hernaez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene and its derivatives have become the most explored materials since Novoselov and Geim (Nobel Prize winners for Physics in 2010 achieved its isolation in 2004. The exceptional properties of graphene have attracted the attention of the scientific community from different research fields, generating high impact not only in scientific journals, but also in general-interest newspapers. Optical fibre sensing is one of the many fields that can benefit from the use of these new materials, combining the amazing morphological, chemical, optical and electrical features of graphene with the advantages that optical fibre offers over other sensing strategies. In this document, a review of the current state of the art for optical fibre sensors based on graphene materials is presented.

  7. Rockslide deformation monitoring with fiber optic strain sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Moore

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available With micro-strain resolution and the capability to sample at rates of 100 Hz and higher, fiber optic (FO strain sensors offer exciting new possibilities for in-situ landslide monitoring. Here we describe a new FO monitoring system based on long-gauge fiber Bragg grating sensors installed at the Randa Rockslide Laboratory in southern Switzerland. The new FO monitoring system can detect sub-micrometer scale deformations in both triggered-dynamic and continuous measurements. Two types of sensors have been installed: (1 fully embedded borehole sensors and (2 surface extensometers. Dynamic measurements are triggered by sensor deformation and recorded at 100 Hz, while continuous data are logged every 5 min. Deformation time series for all sensors show displacements consistent with previous monitoring. Accelerated shortening following installation of the borehole sensors is likely related to long-term shrinkage of the grout. A number of transient signals have been observed, which in some cases were large enough to trigger rapid sampling. The combination of short- and long-term observation offers new insight into the deformation process. Accelerated surface crack opening in spring is shown to have a diurnal trend, which we attribute to the effect of snowmelt seeping into the crack void space and freezing at night to generate pressure on the crack walls. Controlled-source tests investigated the sensor response to dynamic inputs, which compared an independent measure of ground motion against the strain measured across a surface crack. Low frequency signals were comparable but the FO record suffered from aliasing, where undersampling of higher frequency signals generated spectral peaks not related to ground motion.

  8. Optical sensor array platform based on polymer electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koetse, Marc M.; Rensing, Peter A.; Sharpe, Ruben B. A.; van Heck, Gert T.; Allard, Bart A. M.; Meulendijks, Nicole N. M. M.; Kruijt, Peter G. M.; Tijdink, Marcel W. W. J.; De Zwart, René M.; Houben, René J.; Enting, Erik; van Veen, Sjaak J. J. F.; Schoo, Herman F. M.

    2007-10-01

    Monitoring of personal wellbeing and optimizing human performance are areas where sensors have only begun to be used. One of the reasons for this is the specific demands that these application areas put on the underlying technology and system properties. In many cases these sensors will be integrated in clothing, be worn on the skin, or may even be placed inside the body. This implies that flexibility and wearability of the systems is essential for their success. Devices based on polymer semiconductors allow for these demands since they can be fabricated with thin film technology. The use of thin film device technology allows for the fabrication of very thin sensors (e.g. integrated in food product packaging), flexible or bendable sensors in wearables, large area/distributed sensors, and intrinsically low-cost applications in disposable products. With thin film device technology a high level of integration can be achieved with parts that analyze signals, process and store data, and interact over a network. Integration of all these functions will inherently lead to better cost/performance ratios, especially if printing and other standard polymer technology such as high precision moulding is applied for the fabrication. In this paper we present an optical transmission sensor array based on polymer semiconductor devices made by thin film technology. The organic devices, light emitting diodes, photodiodes and selective medium chip, are integrated with classic electronic components. Together they form a versatile sensor platform that allows for the quantitative measurement of 100 channels and communicates wireless with a computer. The emphasis is given to the sensor principle, the design, fabrication technology and integration of the thin film devices.

  9. Initial Photophysical Characterization of the Proteorhodopsin Optical Proton Sensor (PROPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay eNadeau

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence is not frequently used as a tool for investigating the photocycles of rhodopsins, largely because of the low quantum yield of the retinal chromophore. However, a new class of genetically encoded voltage sensors is based upon rhodopsins and their fluorescence. The first such sensor reported in the literature was the proteorhodopsin optical proton sensor (PROPS, which is capable of indicating membrane voltage changes in bacteria by means of changes in fluorescence. However, the properties of this fluorescence, such as its lifetime decay components and its origin in the protein photocycle, remain unknown. This paper reports steady-state and nanoscale time-resolved emission of this protein expressed in two strains of Escherichia coli, before and after membrane depolarization. The voltage-dependence of a particularly long lifetime component is established. Additional work to improve quantum yields and improve the general utility of PROPS is suggested.

  10. Ionic Liquid-Based Optical and Electrochemical Carbon Dioxide Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalakanta Behera

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to their unusual physicochemical properties (e.g., high thermal stability, low volatility, high intrinsic conductivity, wide electrochemical windows and good solvating ability, ionic liquids have shown immense application potential in many research areas. Applications of ionic liquid in developing various sensors, especially for the sensing of biomolecules, such as nucleic acids, proteins and enzymes, gas sensing and sensing of various important ions, among other chemosensing platforms, are currently being explored by researchers worldwide. The use of ionic liquids for the detection of carbon dioxide (CO2 gas is currently a major topic of research due to the associated importance of this gas with daily human life. This review focuses on the application of ionic liquids in optical and electrochemical CO2 sensors. The design, mechanism, sensitivity and detection limit of each type of sensor are highlighted in this review.

  11. Ionic Liquid-Based Optical and Electrochemical Carbon Dioxide Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Kamalakanta; Pandey, Shubha; Kadyan, Anu; Pandey, Siddharth

    2015-12-04

    Due to their unusual physicochemical properties (e.g., high thermal stability, low volatility, high intrinsic conductivity, wide electrochemical windows and good solvating ability), ionic liquids have shown immense application potential in many research areas. Applications of ionic liquid in developing various sensors, especially for the sensing of biomolecules, such as nucleic acids, proteins and enzymes, gas sensing and sensing of various important ions, among other chemosensing platforms, are currently being explored by researchers worldwide. The use of ionic liquids for the detection of carbon dioxide (CO₂) gas is currently a major topic of research due to the associated importance of this gas with daily human life. This review focuses on the application of ionic liquids in optical and electrochemical CO₂ sensors. The design, mechanism, sensitivity and detection limit of each type of sensor are highlighted in this review.

  12. Advanced optical position sensors for magnetically suspended wind tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, S.

    1985-01-01

    A major concern to aerodynamicists has been the corruption of wind tunnel test data by model support structures, such as stings or struts. A technique for magnetically suspending wind tunnel models was considered by Tournier and Laurenceau (1957) in order to overcome this problem. This technique is now implemented with the aid of a Large Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (LMSBS) and advanced position sensors for measuring model attitude and position within the test section. Two different optical position sensors are discussed, taking into account a device based on the use of linear CCD arrays, and a device utilizing area CID cameras. Current techniques in image processing have been employed to develop target tracking algorithms capable of subpixel resolution for the sensors. The algorithms are discussed in detail, and some preliminary test results are reported.

  13. DFB laser based electrical dynamic interrogation for optical fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, J. P.; Frazão, O.; Baptista, J. M.; Santos, J. L.; Barbero, A. P.

    2012-04-01

    An electrical dynamic interrogation technique previously reported by the authors for long-period grating sensors is now progressed by relying its operation exclusively on the modulation of a DFB Laser. The analysis of the detected first and second harmonic generated by the electrical modulation of the DFB Laser allows generating an optical signal proportional to the LPG spectral shift and resilient to optical power fluctuations along the system. This concept permits attenuating the effect of the 1/f noise of the photodetection, amplification and processing electronics on the sensing head resolution. This technique is employed in a multiplexing sensing scheme that measures refractive index variations.

  14. Optical fiber sensor for tracking line-focus solar collectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiczer, J J

    1982-08-01

    Currently there is a need to provide an alignment monitor feedback signal to the tracking mechanism of line-focus trough-type concentrating solar collectors. We report here on the novel use of an optical fiber as a distributed integrating sensor to generate such a signal. Experiments have shown that 3.0 m of optical fiber exposed to concentrated sunlight equal to ~40 suns in intensity will generate 1 microA of signal current in a silicon photodiode. These data were measured in an experimental line-focus solar collector using solar flux conditions common to this type of collector.

  15. An Optical Fiber Sensor for Electrification Measurement in Power Transformers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Static electrification and partial discharges caused by oil flow in power transformers lead to many accidents. In this paper, an optical fiber sensor which can be directly mounted inside high-voltage electric devices for electrification measurement in power transformers is introduced. Unlike the existing normal electrification measurement methods which only be used in static oil, the new one takes optical fiber as its probe and measures the electrification in flowing oil by detecting luminous flux, and is available for on-line monitoring.

  16. Adaptive optical design in surface plasma resonance sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Feng; ZHONG Jin-gang

    2006-01-01

    A double-prism adaptive optical design in surface plasma resonance (SPR) sensor is proposed,which consists of two identical isosceles right-triangular prisms. One prism is used as a component of Kretschmann configuration,and the other is for regulation of the optical path. When double-prism structure is angle-scanned by an immovable incident ray,the output ray will be always parallel with the incident ray and just has a small displacement with the shift of output point.The output ray can be focused on a fixed photodetector by a convex lens.Thus it can be avoided that a prism and a photodetector rotate by θ and 2θ respectively in conventional angular scanning SPR sensor.This new design reduces the number of the movable components,makes the structure simple and compact,and makes the manipulation convenient.

  17. Automatic Laser Glare Suppression in Electro-Optical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Ritt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress in laser technology has led to very compact but nevertheless powerful laser sources. In the visible and near infrared spectral region, lasers of any wavelength can be purchased. Continuous wave laser sources pose an especially serious threat to the human eye and electro-optical sensors due to their high proliferation and easy availability. The manifold of available wavelengths cannot be covered by conventional safety measures like absorption or interference filters. We present a protection concept for electro-optical sensors to suppress dazzling in the visible spectral region. The key element of the concept is the use of a digital micromirror device (DMD in combination with wavelength multiplexing. This approach allows selective spectral filtering in defined regions of interest in the scene. The system offers the possibility of automatic attenuation of dazzling laser radiation.

  18. New fiber optic sensor: application to refractive index sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriaudeau, Fabrice; Wig, A. G.; Passian, A.; Ferrell, Trinidad L.

    2000-08-01

    Optical fibers are more and more used as chemical sensors. This is, mainly due to their low cost, and their high efficiency to work in harsh and remote environments. Many devices are based on thin film plasmon excitation where a metal coating is evaporated onto the core of an etched optical fiber. In this paper, a new sensor configuration is presented. Instead of exciting surface plasmon waves on a thin film, surface plasma waves are excited on metal islands. The fiber is coated with 3 layers of gold. Each layer is annealed before the next layer is evaporated onto it. this is done to avoid any light leakage, fact which was found on a prior version with only one gold coating. Different sets of fibers were tested and sensitive and reproducible results for liquid with refraction indices varying from 1.3 to 1.7 were obtained.

  19. An Optical Fibre-Based Sensor for Respiratory Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Krehel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a textile-based respiratory sensing system is presented. Highly flexible polymeric optical fibres (POFs that react to applied pressure were integrated into a carrier fabric to form a wearable sensing system. After the evaluation of different optical fibres, different setups were compared. To demonstrate the feasibility of such a wearable sensor, the setup featuring the best performance was placed on the human torso, and thus it was possible to measure the respiratory rate. Furthermore, we show that such a wearable system enables to keep track of the way of breathing (diaphragmatic, upper costal and mixed when the sensor is placed at different positions of the torso. A comparison of the results with the output of some commercial respiratory measurements devices confirmed the utility of such a monitoring device.

  20. Optical Electronic Bragg Reflection Sensor System with Hydrodynamic Flow Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, D. R.

    2003-01-01

    This project, as described in the following report, involved design and fabrication of fiber optic sensors for the detection and measurement of dynamic fluid density variations. These devices are created using UV (ultraviolet) ablation and generally modified transverse holographic fiber grating techniques. The resulting phase gratings created on or immediately underneath the flat portion of D-shaped optical waveguides are characterized as evanescent field sensing devices. The primary applications include the sensor portion of a real-time localized or distributed measurement system for hydrodynamic flow, fluid density measurements, and phase change phenomena. Several design modifications were implemented in an attempt to accomplish the tasks specified in our original proposal. In addition, we have established key collaborative relationships with numerous people and institutions.

  1. Development of an optical fiber sensor for angular displacement measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Gu-In; Kim, Ji-Sun; Lee, Tae-Hee; Choi, Ju-Hyeon; Oh, Han-Byeol; Kim, A-Hee; Eom, Gwang-Moon; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Park, Jong-Rak; Lee, Young-Jae; Park, Hee-Jung; Jun, Jae-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    For diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, the joint angle measurement of a patient after an accident or a surgical operation is significant for monitoring and evaluating the recovering process. This paper proposed an optical fiber sensor for the measurement of angular displacement. The effect of beveled fiber angle on the detected light signal was investigated to find an appropriate mathematical model. Beveled fiber tips redirected the light over a range of angles away from the fiber axis. Inverse polynomial models were applied to directly obtain and display the joint angle change in real time with the Lab-VIEW program. The actual joint angle correlated well with the calculated LabVIEW output angle over the test range. The proposed optical sensor is simple, cost effective, small in size, and can evaluate the joint angle in real time. This method is expected to be useful in the field of rehabilitation and sport science.

  2. Smart aircraft composite structures with embedded small-diameter optical fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Nobuo; Minakuchi, Shu

    2012-02-01

    This talk describes the embedded optical fiber sensor systems for smart aircraft composite structures. First, a summary of the current Japanese national project on structural integrity diagnosis of aircraft composite structures is described with special emphasis on the use of embedded small-diameter optical fiber sensors including FBG sensors. Then, some examples of life-cycle monitoring of aircraft composite structures are presented using embedded small-diameter optical fiber sensors for low-cost and reliable manufacturing merits.

  3. Hazard monitoring in mines using fibre optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T.; Wang, C.; Wei, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Huo, D.; Shang, Y.; Wang, Z.; Ning, Y.

    2009-10-01

    We report the development of a comprehensive safety monitoring solution for coal mines. A number of fibre optic sensors have been developed and deployed for safety monitoring of mine roof integrity and hazardous gases. The FOS-based mine hazard detection system offers unique advantages of intrinsic safety, multi-location and multi-parameter monitoring. They can be potentially used to build expert systems for mine hazard early detection and prevention.

  4. Miniaturised Optical Fibre Sensor for Dew Detection Inside Organ Pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Baldini; Riccardo Falciai; Andrea Azelio Mencaglia; Folco Senesi; Dario Camuffo; Antonio della Valle; Carl Johan Bergsten

    2008-01-01

    A new optical sensor for the continuous monitoring of the dew formation inside organ pipes was designed. This aspect is particularly critical for the conservation of organs in unheated churches since the dew formation or the condensation on the pipe surfaces can contribute to many kinds of physical and chemical disruptive mechanisms. The working principle is based on the change in the reflectivity which is observed on the surface of the fibre tip, when a water layer is formed on its distal en...

  5. Research of optical rainfall sensor based on CCD linear array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Bifeng; LIU; Yuyan; LU; Ying; WU; Shangqian

    2015-01-01

    Rainfall monitoring is one of the most important meteorological observation elements for the disaster weather. The maintenance of current tipping bucket rain gauge and weighing type rain gauge is a critical issue. The optical rainfall sensor based on CCD linear array is mainly studied in this paper. Because of the maintenance-free time and good adaptability,it can be widely used in the automatic rainfall monitoring in severe environment and have a good perspective in using.

  6. Optical Oxygen Sensors for Applications in Microfluidic Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha M. Grist

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The presence and concentration of oxygen in biological systems has a large impact on the behavior and viability of many types of cells, including the differentiation of stem cells or the growth of tumor cells. As a result, the integration of oxygen sensors within cell culture environments presents a powerful tool for quantifying the effects of oxygen concentrations on cell behavior, cell viability, and drug effectiveness. Because microfluidic cell culture environments are a promising alternative to traditional cell culture platforms, there is recent interest in integrating oxygen-sensing mechanisms with microfluidics for cell culture applications. Optical, luminescence-based oxygen sensors, in particular, show great promise in their ability to be integrated with microfluidics and cell culture systems. These sensors can be highly sensitive and do not consume oxygen or generate toxic byproducts in their sensing process. This paper presents a review of previously proposed optical oxygen sensor types, materials and formats most applicable to microfluidic cell culture, and analyzes their suitability for this and other in vitro applications.

  7. Multiplexed detection of biological agents using optical microchip sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatta, D.; McDonnell, M. B.; Perkins, E.

    2010-10-01

    A multi-channel optical microchip sensor system suitable for real-time, label-free detection of a wide range of biological agents is presented. SpectroSensTM chips containing multiple high-precision planar Bragg gratings are exploited as lowcost, robust refractive index sensors. Sensitivity to biological agents is conferred by functionalising individual sensing regions with different antibodies selected against numerous targets of interest. Antigen binding to the surfaceimmobilised antibodies results in localised changes in refractive index; upon laser-induced interrogation of the sensing region via optical fibres, these antibody-antigen interactions manifest as increases in wavelength of light reflected from the sensor chip. Real-time detection of multiple biological agents including bacterial cells/spores, viruses and toxins has been demonstrated. Further improvements to sensor performance including physical and chemical methods are also investigated. This multi-analyte capability highlights the potential use of this sensing technology in applications ranging from bio-hazard detection for defence purposes to point-of-care clinical diagnostics.

  8. Interferometric and localized surface plasmon based fiber optic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muri, Harald Ian D. I.; Bano, Andon; Hjelme, Dag Roar

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a novel single point, multi-parameter, fiber optic sensor concept based on a combination of interferometric and plasmonic sensor modalities on an optical fiber end face. The sensor consists of a micro-Fabry-Perot interferometer in the form of a hemispherical stimuli-responsive hydrogel with immobilized gold nanoparticles. We present results of proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensing of refractive index (RI) in the visible range and interferometric measurements of volumetric changes of the pH stimuli-responsive hydrogel in near infrared range. The response of LSPR to RI (Δλr/ΔRI 877nm/RI) and the free spectral range (FSR) to pH (ΔpH/ΔFSR = 0.09624/nm) were measured with LSPR relatively constant for hydrogel swelling degree and FSR relatively constant for RI. We expect this novel sensor concept to be of great value for biosensors for medical applications.

  9. Improved fiber-optic chemical sensor for penicillin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Healy, B.G.; Walt, D.R. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    1995-12-15

    An optical penicillin biosensor is described, based on the enzyme penicillinase. The sensor is fabricated by selective photodeposition of analyte-sensitive polymer matrices on optical imaging fibers. The penicillin-sensitive matrices are fabricated by immobilizing the enzyme as micrometer-sized particles in a polymer hydrogel with a covalently bound pH indicator. An array of penicillin-sensitive and pH-sensitive matrices are fabricated on the same fiber. This array allows for the simultaneous, independent measurement of pH and penicillin. Independent measurement of the two analytes allows penicillin to be quantitated in the presence of a concurrent pH change. An analysis was conducted of enzyme kinetic parameters in order to model the penicillin response of the sensor at all pH values. This analysis accounts for the varying activity of the immobilized penicillinase at different pH values. The sensor detects penicillin in the range 0.25-10.0 mM in the pH range 6.2-7.5. The sensor was used to quantify penicillin concentration produced during a Penicillium chrysogenum fermentation. 27 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Optically Powered Temperature Sensor with Optical Fiber Ling①

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUZhijing; WANGYutian

    1997-01-01

    The principle of a new optical fiber temperature transducer is presented,and ingenious design scheme of this transducer is given.Because taking the special modulation and ratio measurement,this new transducer has provided with high characteristics:experimental transmitting distance is 500m;measurement error,in the measured temperature range of 0-250℃,,is less than ±0.5℃;power consumption of the probe is less than 300μW.Finally,some points of the experiment are given.

  11. Estimation of optical properties of neuroendocrine pancreas tumor with double-integrating-sphere system and inverse Monte Carlo model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccomandi, Paola; Larocca, Enza Stefania; Rendina, Veneranda; Schena, Emiliano; D'Ambrosio, Roberto; Crescenzi, Anna; Di Matteo, Francesco Maria; Silvestri, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    The investigation of laser-tissue interaction is crucial for diagnostics and therapeutics. In particular, the estimation of tissue optical properties allows developing predictive models for defining organ-specific treatment planning tool. With regard to laser ablation (LA), optical properties are among the main responsible for the therapy efficacy, as they globally affect the heating process of the tissue, due to its capability to absorb and scatter laser energy. The recent introduction of LA for pancreatic tumor treatment in clinical studies has fostered the need to assess the laser-pancreas interaction and hence to find its optical properties in the wavelength of interest. This work aims at estimating optical properties (i.e., absorption, μ a , scattering, μ s , anisotropy, g, coefficients) of neuroendocrine pancreas tumor at 1064 nm. Experiments were performed using two popular sample storage methods; the optical properties of frozen and paraffin-embedded neuroendocrine tumor of the pancreas are estimated by employing a double-integrating-sphere system and inverse Monte Carlo algorithm. Results show that paraffin-embedded tissue is characterized by absorption and scattering coefficients significantly higher than frozen samples (μ a of 56 cm(-1) vs 0.9 cm(-1), μ s of 539 cm(-1) vs 130 cm(-1), respectively). Simulations show that such different optical features strongly influence the pancreas temperature distribution during LA. This result may affect the prediction of therapeutic outcome. Therefore, the choice of the appropriate preparation technique of samples for optical property estimation is crucial for the performances of the mathematical models which predict LA thermal outcome on the tissue and lead the selection of optimal LA settings.

  12. Engineering materials for mid-infrared optical sensor applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson K. A

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Planar optical structures based on functionalized chalcogenide glasses provide a superb device platform for chemical and biological sensing applications. Chalcogenide glasses have demonstrated promise as materials for infrared sensing as they exhibit transparency over a large range of infrared wavelengths and tunable optical properties through doping and/or compositional tailoring. Waveguides, resonators and other components processed on-chip (silicon, Si can be realized such that the strong enhancement in the electromagnetic field confined within a high index contrast resonator, leads to highly sensitive photon-matter interactions in a small footprint. In this paper we discuss the development of highly sensitive chalcogenide glass based microdisk resonator sensors that measure resonant peak shifts caused by refractive index change upon exposure to a chemical analyte. The specificity of the microdisk resonator sensors is enhanced by applying specialized polymer films and nanofoams that respond in a predictable fashion when exposed to a chemical analyte of interest. Discussed are key material science challenges needed to enable highly sensitive and specific sensors based on such complex multi-material assemblies and the fabrication issues that ultimately define resulting optical performance.

  13. Distributed acoustic fibre optic sensors for condition monitoring of pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussels, Maria-Teresa; Chruscicki, Sebastian; Habib, Abdelkarim; Krebber, Katerina

    2016-05-01

    Industrial piping systems are particularly relevant to public safety and the continuous availability of infrastructure. However, condition monitoring systems based on many discrete sensors are generally not well-suited for widespread piping systems due to considerable installation effort, while use of distributed fibre-optic sensors would reduce this effort to a minimum. Specifically distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) is employed for detection of third-party threats and leaks in oil and gas pipelines in recent years and can in principle also be applied to industrial plants. Further possible detection routes amenable by DAS that could identify damage prior to emission of medium are subject of a current project at BAM, which aims at qualifying distributed fibre optic methods such as DAS as a means for spatially continuous monitoring of industrial piping systems. Here, first tests on a short pipe are presented, where optical fibres were applied directly to the surface. An artificial signal was used to define suitable parameters of the measurement system and compare different ways of applying the sensor.

  14. Curvature optical fiber sensor by using bend enhanced method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianrong ZHANG; Hairong LIU; Xinkun WU

    2009-01-01

    Deflection curvature measurement can offer a number of advantages compared with the well-established strain measurement alternative. It is able to measure thin structure; fiber has no resistance with force, which leads to a high precision. There are many kinds of curvature gauges with different operation principles. A low-cost curvature optical fiber sensor using bend enhanced method to improve its curvature measurement sensitivity was devel-oped in recent years. This sensor can distinguish between convex bending and concave bending and has a good linearity in measuring large curvature deformation. Whisper gallery ray theory and Monte Carlo simulation are new achievements by computer experiment. The operation mechanism of this curvature optical fiber sensor is presented based on light scattering theory. The attenuation is ascribed to the transmission mode changing by the curvature of the fiber, which affects the attenuation of the surface scattering. The mathematical model of relationship among light loss, bending curvature, surface roughness, and parameters of the fiber's configuration is also presented. We design different kinds of shapes of sensitive zones; each zone has different parameters. Through detecting their output optical attenuations in different curvatures and fitting the results by exponential decaying functions, the proposed model is demonstrated by experimental results. Also, we compare the experi-mental results with the theoretical analysis and discuss the sensitivity dependence on bending direction.

  15. Swings and roundabouts: Optical Poincar\\'e spheres for polarization and Gaussian beams

    CERN Document Server

    Dennis, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    The connection between Poincar\\'e spheres for polariz-ation and Gaussian beams is explored, focusing on the interpretation of elliptic polarization in terms of the isotropic 2-dimensional harmonic oscillator in Hamiltonian mechanics, its canonical quantization and semiclassical interpretation. This leads to the interpretation of structured Gaussian modes, the Hermite-Gaussian, Laguerre-Gaussian and Generalized Hermite-Laguerre Gaussian modes as eigenfunctions of operators corresponding to the classical constants of motion of the 2-dimensional oscillator, which acquire an extra significance as families of classical ellipses upon semiclassical quantization.

  16. Development of plasma bolometers using fiber-optic temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, M. L.; Han, M.; Liu, G.; van Eden, G. G.; Evenblij, R.; Haverdings, M.; Stratton, B. C.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of radiated power in magnetically confined plasmas are important for exhaust studies in present experiments and expected to be a critical diagnostic for future fusion reactors. Resistive bolometer sensors have long been utilized in tokamaks and helical devices but suffer from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Results are shown from initial testing of a new bolometer concept based on fiber-optic temperature sensor technology. A small, 80 μm diameter, 200 μm long silicon pillar attached to the end of a single mode fiber-optic cable acts as a Fabry-Pérot cavity when broadband light, λo ˜ 1550 nm, is transmitted along the fiber. Changes in temperature alter the optical path length of the cavity primarily through the thermo-optic effect, resulting in a shift of fringes reflected from the pillar detected using an I-MON 512 OEM spectrometer. While initially designed for use in liquids, this sensor has ideal properties for use as a plasma bolometer: a time constant, in air, of ˜150 ms, strong absorption in the spectral range of plasma emission, immunity to local EMI, and the ability to measure changes in temperature remotely. Its compact design offers unique opportunities for integration into the vacuum environment in places unsuitable for a resistive bolometer. Using a variable focus 5 mW, 405 nm, modulating laser, the signal to noise ratio versus power density of various bolometer technologies are directly compared, estimating the noise equivalent power density (NEPD). Present tests show the fiber-optic bolometer to have NEPD of 5-10 W/m2 when compared to those of the resistive bolometer which can achieve coatings, along with improving the spectral resolution of the interrogator.

  17. Tri-Axial MRI Compatible Fiber-optic Force Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, U-Xuan; Yang, Bo; Gullapalli, Rao; Desai, Jaydev P.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been gaining popularity over standard imaging modalities like ultrasound and CT because of its ability to provide excellent soft-tissue contrast. However, due to the working principle of MRI, a number of conventional force sensors are not compatible. One popular solution is to develop a fiber-optic force sensor. However, the measurements along the principal axes of a number of these force sensors are highly cross-coupled. One of the objectives of this paper is to minimize this coupling effect. In addition, this paper describes the design of elastic frame structures that are obtained systematically using topology optimization techniques for maximizing sensor resolution and sensor bandwidth. Through the topology optimization approach, we ensure that the frames are linked from the input to output. The elastic frame structures are then fabricated using polymers materials, such as ABS and Delrin®, as they are ideal materials for use in MRI environment. However, the hysteresis effect seen in the displacement-load graph of plastic materials is known to affect the accuracy. Hence, this paper also proposes modeling and addressing this hysteretic effect using Prandtl-Ishlinskii play operators. Finally, experiments are conducted to evaluate the sensor’s performance, as well as its compatibility in MRI under continuous imaging. PMID:21666783

  18. Evaluation on Radiometric Capability of Chinese Optical Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Aixia; Zhong, Bo; Wu, Shanlong; Liu, Qinhuo

    2017-01-01

    The radiometric capability of on-orbit sensors should be updated on time due to changes induced by space environmental factors and instrument aging. Some sensors, such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), have onboard calibrators, which enable real-time calibration. However, most Chinese remote sensing satellite sensors lack onboard calibrators. Their radiometric calibrations have been updated once a year based on a vicarious calibration procedure, which has affected the applications of the data. Therefore, a full evaluation of the sensors’ radiometric capabilities is essential before quantitative applications can be made. In this study, a comprehensive procedure for evaluating the radiometric capability of several Chinese optical satellite sensors is proposed. In this procedure, long-term radiometric stability and radiometric accuracy are the two major indicators for radiometric evaluation. The radiometric temporal stability is analyzed by the tendency of long-term top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance variation; the radiometric accuracy is determined by comparison with the TOA reflectance from MODIS after spectrally matching. Three Chinese sensors including the Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera onboard Huan Jing 1 satellite (HJ-1), as well as the Visible and Infrared Radiometer (VIRR) and Medium-Resolution Spectral Imager (MERSI) onboard the Feng Yun 3 satellite (FY-3) are evaluated in reflective bands based on this procedure. The results are reasonable, and thus can provide reliable reference for the sensors’ application, and as such will promote the development of Chinese satellite data. PMID:28117745

  19. Electro-optic architecture (EOA) for sensors and actuators in aircraft propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glomb, W. L., Jr.

    1989-06-01

    Results of a study to design an optimal architecture for electro-optical sensing and control in advanced aircraft and space systems are described. The propulsion full authority digital Electronic Engine Control (EEC) was the focus for the study. The recommended architecture is an on-engine EEC which contains electro-optic interface circuits for fiber-optic sensors on the engine. Size and weight are reduced by multiplexing arrays of functionally similar sensors on a pair of optical fibers to common electro-optical interfaces. The architecture contains common, multiplex interfaces to seven sensor groups: (1) self luminous sensors; (2) high temperatures; (3) low temperatures; (4) speeds and flows; (5) vibration; (6) pressures; and (7) mechanical positions. Nine distinct fiber-optic sensor types were found to provide these sensing functions: (1) continuous wave (CW) intensity modulators; (2) time division multiplexing (TDM) digital optic codeplates; (3) time division multiplexing (TDM) analog self-referenced sensors; (4) wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) digital optic code plates; (5) wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) analog self-referenced intensity modulators; (6) analog optical spectral shifters; (7) self-luminous bodies; (8) coherent optical interferometers; and (9) remote electrical sensors. The report includes the results of a trade study including engine sensor requirements, environment, the basic sensor types, and relevant evaluation criteria. These figures of merit for the candidate interface types were calculated from the data supplied by leading manufacturers of fiber-optic sensors.

  20. Optical sensor for precision in-situ spindle health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rui

    An optical sensor which can record in-situ measurements of the dynamic runout of a precision miniature spindle system in a simple and low-cost manner is proposed in this dissertation. Spindle error measurement technology utilizes a cylindrical or spherical target artifact attached to the miniature spindle with non-contact sensors, typically capacitive sensors which are calibrated with a flat target surface not a curved target surface. Due to the different behavior of an electric field between a flat plate and a curved surface and an electric field between two flat plates, capacitive sensors is not suitable for measuring target surfaces smaller than its effective sensing area. The proposed sensor utilizes curved-edge diffraction (CED), which uses the effect of cylindrical surface curvature on the diffraction phenomenon in the transition regions adjacent to shadow, transmission, and reflection boundaries. The laser diodes light incident on the cylindrical surface of precision spindle and photodetectors collect the total field produced by the diffraction around the target surface. Laser diode in the different two direction are incident to the spindle shaft edges along the X and Y axes, four photodetectors collect the total fields produced by interference of multiple waves due to CED around the spindle shaft edges. The X and Y displacement can be obtained from the total fields using two differential amplifier configurations, respectively. Precision miniature spindle (shaft φ5.0mm) runout was measured, and the proposed sensor can perform curve at the different speed of rotation from 1500rpm to 8000rpm in the X and Y axes, respectively. On the other hand, CED also show changes for different running time and temperature of spindle. These results indicate that the proposed sensor promises to be effective for in-situ monitoring of the miniature spindle's health with high resolution, wide bandwidth, and low-cost.

  1. Bedside arterial blood gas monitoring system using fluorescent optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartnik, Daniel J.; Rymut, Russell A.

    1995-05-01

    We describe a bedside arterial blood gas (ABG) monitoring system which uses fluorescent optical sensors in the measurement of blood pH, PCO2 and PO2. The Point-of-Care Arterial Blood Gas Monitoring System consists of the SensiCathTM optical sensor unit manufactured by Optical Sensors Incorporated and the TramTM Critical Care Monitoring System with ABG Module manufactured by Marquette Electronics Incorporated. Current blood gas measurement techniques require a blood sample to be removed from the patient and transported to an electrochemical analyzer for analysis. The ABG system does not require removal of blood from the patient or transport of the sample. The sensor is added to the patient's existing arterial line. ABG measurements are made by drawing a small blood sample from the arterial line in sufficient quantity to ensure an undiluted sample at the sensor. Measurements of pH, PCO2 and PO2 are made within 60 seconds. The blood is then returned to the patient, the line flushed and results appear on the bedside monitor. The ABG system offers several advantages over traditional electrochemical analyzers. Since the arterial line remains closed during the blood sampling procedure the patient's risk of infection is reduced and the caregiver's exposure to blood is eliminated. The single-use, disposable sensor can be measure 100 blood samples over 72 hours after a single two-point calibration. Quality Assurance checks are also available and provide the caregiver the ability to assess system performance even after the sensor is patient attached. The ABG module integrates with an existing bedside monitoring system. This allows ABG results to appear on the same display as ECG, respiration, blood pressure, cardiac output, SpO2, and other clinical information. The small module takes up little space in the crowded intensive care unit. Performance studies compare the ABG system with an electrochemical blood gas analyzer. Study results demonstrated accurate and precise blood

  2. Biochemical measurement of bilirubin with an evanescent wave optical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poscio, Patrick; Depeursinge, Christian D.; Emery, Y.; Parriaux, Olivier M.; Voirin, Guy

    1991-09-01

    Optical sensing techniques can be considered as powerful information sources on the biochemistry of tissue, blood, and physiological fluids. Various sensing modalities can be considered: spectroscopic determination of the fluorescence or optical absorption of the biological medium itself, or more generally, of a reagent in contact with the biological medium. The principle and realization of the optical sensor developed are based on the use of polished fibers: the cladding of a monomode fiber is removed on a longitudinal section. The device can then be inserted into an hypodermic needle for in-vivo measurements. Using this minute probe, local measurements of the tissue biochemistry or metabolic processes can be obtained. The sensing mechanism is based on the propagation of the evanescent wave in the tissues or reagent: the proximity of the fiber core allows the penetration of the model field tail into the sensed medium, with a uniquely defined field distribution. Single or multi-wavelength analysis of the light collected into the fiber yields the biochemical information. Here an example of this sensing technology is discussed. In-vitro measurement of bilirubin in gastric juice demonstrates that the evanescent wave optical sensor provides a sensitivity which matches the physiological concentrations. A device is proposed for in-vivo monitoring of bilirubin concentration in the gastro-oesophageal tract.

  3. Optical design of microlens array for CMOS image sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongzhu; Lai, Liping

    2016-10-01

    The optical crosstalk between the pixel units can influence the image quality of CMOS image sensor. In the meantime, the duty ratio of CMOS is low because of its pixel structure. These two factors cause the low detection sensitivity of CMOS. In order to reduce the optical crosstalk and improve the fill factor of CMOS image sensor, a microlens array has been designed and integrated with CMOS. The initial parameters of the microlens array have been calculated according to the structure of a CMOS. Then the parameters have been optimized by using ZEMAX and the microlens arrays with different substrate thicknesses have been compared. The results show that in order to obtain the best imaging quality, when the effect of optical crosstalk for CMOS is the minimum, the best distance between microlens array and CMOS is about 19.3 μm. When incident light successively passes through microlens array and the distance, obtaining the minimum facula is around 0.347 um in the active area. In addition, when the incident angle of the light is 0o 22o, the microlens array has obvious inhibitory effect on the optical crosstalk. And the anti-crosstalk distance between microlens array and CMOS is 0 μm 162 μm.

  4. Design of an optical sensor based on plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharwat, Marwa M.; AlSharif, Haya; Alshabani, Haifaa; Qadi, Eilaf; Sultan, Maha

    2016-04-01

    Plasmonic nano-structured array sensors have been highlighted by their tremendously promising applications, such as the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) optical biosensors. In this paper, within the visible spectrum region, the optical transmission properties of a metallic thin film deposited over dielectric films of various refraction indices are investigated. With finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, we investigate the optical transmission spectra of such plasmonic structures based on both nano-holes and nano-disc arrays. This investigation includes monitoring the modification in both the transmission resonance wavelengths and peak transmittance. The results of this study provide a better understanding of the interaction between light and plasmonic nano-hole and nano-disc arrays. It shows that the changing the shapes of the nano-holes can affect the resonance wavelengths and the intensity of transmitted spectra and alter its resonance peak transmittance values. We found that the interaction coupling between the localized plasmons (LSP) and the propagating surface plasmons (PSP) can be tuned to boost the performance of the optical sensor.

  5. Testing of a Fiber Optic Wear, Erosion and Regression Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Valentin; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2011-01-01

    The nature of the physical processes and harsh environments associated with erosion and wear in propulsion environments makes their measurement and real-time rate quantification difficult. A fiber optic sensor capable of determining the wear (regression, erosion, ablation) associated with these environments has been developed and tested in a number of different applications to validate the technique. The sensor consists of two fiber optics that have differing attenuation coefficients and transmit light to detectors. The ratio of the two measured intensities can be correlated to the lengths of the fiber optic lines, and if the fibers and the host parent material in which they are embedded wear at the same rate the remaining length of fiber provides a real-time measure of the wear process. Testing in several disparate situations has been performed, with the data exhibiting excellent qualitative agreement with the theoretical description of the process and when a separate calibrated regression measurement is available good quantitative agreement is obtained as well. The light collected by the fibers can also be used to optically obtain the spectra and measure the internal temperature of the wear layer.

  6. Development and Performance Evaluation of Optical Sensors for High Temperature Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, G.; Varga, D.; Floyd, B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses fiber optic sensors designed and constructed to withstand extreme temperatures of aircraft engine. The paper describes development and performance evaluation of fiber optic Bragg grating based sensors. It also describes the design and presents test results of packaged sensors subjected to temperatures up to 1000 C for prolonged periods of time.

  7. Application of Optical Flow Sensors for Dead Reckoning, Heading Reference, Obstacle Detection, and Obstacle Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    OPTICAL FLOW SENSORS FOR DEAD RECKONING, HEADING REFERENCE, OBSTACLE DETECTION, AND OBSTACLE AVOIDANCE by Tarek M. Nejah September 2015... SENSORS FOR DEAD RECKONING, HEADING REFERENCE, OBSTACLE DETECTION, AND OBSTACLE AVOIDANCE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Nejah, Tarek M. 7...avoidance using only one optical mouse sensor was presented in this thesis. Odometry, position tracking, and obstacle avoidance are important issues in

  8. Polymer Optical Fibre Sensors for Endoscopic Opto-Acoustic Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broadway, Christian; Gallego, Daniel; Woyessa, Getinet

    2015-01-01

    is the physical size of the device, allowing compatibility with current technology, while governing flexibility of the distal end of the endoscope based on the needs of the sensor. Polymer optical fibre (POF) presents a novel approach for endoscopic applications and has been positively discussed and compared...... in existing publications. A great advantage can be obtained for endoscopy due to a small size and array potential to provide discrete imaging speed improvements. Optical fibre exhibits numerous advantages over conventional piezo-electric transducers, such as immunity from electromagnetic interference...... and a higher resolution at small sizes. Furthermore, micro structured polymer optical fibres offer over 12 times the sensitivity of silica fibre. We present a polymer fibre Bragg grating ultrasound detector with a core diameter of 125 microns. We discuss the ultrasonic signals received and draw conclusions...

  9. Optical fiber temperature sensors: applications in heat treatments for foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Morales, María Elena; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; López-Malo, Aurelio

    2010-10-01

    Heat treatments are important methods to provide safe foods. Conventional heat treatments involve the application of steam and recently microwave treatments have been studied and applied as they are considered as fast, clean and efficient. Optical fiber sensing is an excellent tool to measure the temperature during microwave treatments. This paper shows the application of optical fiber temperature sensing during the heat treatment of different foods such as vegetables (jalapeño pepper and cilantro), cheese and ostrich meat. Reaching the target temperature, important bacteria were inactivated: Salmonella, Listeria and Escherichia coli. Thus, the use of optical fiber sensors has resulted be a useful way to develop protocols to inactivate microorganisms and to propose new methods for food processing.

  10. Optical spin torque induced by vector Bessel (vortex) beams with selective polarizations on a light-absorptive sphere of arbitrary size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Renxian; Ding, Chunying; Mitri, F. G.

    2017-07-01

    The optical spin torque (OST) induced by vector Bessel (vortex) beams can cause a particle to rotate around its center of mass. Previous works have considered the OST on a Rayleigh absorptive dielectric sphere by a vector Bessel (vortex) beam, however, it is of some importance to analyze the OST components for a sphere of arbitrary size. In this work, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT) is used to compute the OST induced by vector Bessel (vortex) beams on an absorptive dielectric sphere of arbitrary size, with particular emphasis on the beam order, the polarization of the plane wave component forming the beam, and the half-cone angle. The OST is expressed as the integration of the moment of the time-averaged Maxwell stress tensor, and the beam shape coefficients (BSCs) are calculated using the angular spectrum decomposition method (ASDM). Using this theory, the OST exerted on the light-absorptive dielectric sphere in the Rayleigh, Mie or the geometrical optics regimes can be considered. The axial and transverse OSTs are numerically calculated with particular emphasis on the sign reversal of the axial OST and the vortex-like character of the transverse OST, and the effects of polarization, beam order, and half-cone angle are discussed in detail. Numerical results show that by choosing an appropriate polarization, order and half-cone angle, the sign of the axial OST can be reversed, meaning that the sphere would spin in opposite handedness of the angular momentum carried by the incident beam. The vortex-like structure of the total transverse OSTs can be observed for all cases. When the sphere moves radially away from the beam axis, it may rotate around its center of mass in either the counter-clockwise or the clockwise direction. Conditions are also predicted where the absorptive sphere experiences no spinning. Potential applications in particle manipulation and rotation in optical tweezers and tractor beams would benefit from the results.

  11. Broadband micro-Michelson interferometer with multi-optical-path beating using a sphered-end hollow fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan-Kuang; Lu, Kuan-Yi; Shy, Jow-Tsong; Lin, Chinlon

    2011-06-01

    We demonstrate a high-sensitivity broadband (1250-1650 nm) fiber micro-Michelson interferometer using a single-mode fiber end-spliced with a sphered-end hollow-core fiber. The hollow core is slightly smaller than the solid core of a single-mode fiber, so the fractional power of the core mode is converted into cladding modes. The excited cladding modes propagate at distinct optical paths along the hollow-core fiber and have individual foci outside the spherical lens. The reflected core mode, generated at the solid core-air interface, and the reflected cladding modes, generated at external material, interfere with each other to produce beating in the interference signals.

  12. High-order adaptive optics requirements for direct detection of extrasolar planets: Application to the SPHERE instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, T; Rousset, G; Sauvage, J-F; Petit, C; Beuzit, J-L; Dohlen, K; Mouillet, D; Charton, J; Nicolle, M; Kasper, M; Baudoz, P; Puget, P

    2006-08-21

    The detection of extrasolar planets implies an extremely high-contrast, long-exposure imaging capability at near infrared and probably visible wavelengths. We present here the core of any Planet Finder instrument, that is, the extreme adaptive optics (XAO) subsystem. The level of AO correction directly impacts the exposure time required for planet detection. In addition, the capacity of the AO system to calibrate all the instrument static defects ultimately limits detectivity. Hence, the extreme AO system has to adjust for the perturbations induced by the atmospheric turbulence, as well as for the internal aberrations of the instrument itself. We propose a feasibility study for an extreme AO system in the frame of the SPHERE (Spectro-Polarimetry High-contrast Exoplanet Research) instrument, which is currently under design and should equip one of the four VLT 8-m telescopes in 2010.

  13. Unbalanced Michelson's interferometer as a fiber optic distributed sensor of external signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacki, M.; Szustakowski, Mieczyslaw; Zyczkowski, Marek

    2001-08-01

    The subject of this work is a novel fiber optic distributed sensor system. The system uses a technique called multiplexed reflectometric interferometry to measure dynamic strain in a network of single mode optical fiber sensors. The sensor is constructed on unbalanced fiber optic Michelson's interferometer is activated by series of double pulse. The time interval between those pulses depends on the length of the section of sensor. Acousto-optical modulator acts as an optical frequency shifter. A change in a frequency of electrical pulses exciting the modulator result in a frequency shift in each generated wave packet.

  14. Optical-Based Artificial Palpation Sensors for Lesion Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Jun Park

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Palpation techniques are widely used in medical procedures to detect the presence of lumps or tumors in the soft breast tissues. Since these procedures are very subjective and depend on the skills of the physician, it is imperative to perform detailed a scientific study in order to develop more efficient medical sensors to measure and generate palpation parameters. In this research, we propose an optical-based, artificial palpation sensor for lesion characterization. This has been developed using a multilayer polydimethylsiloxane optical waveguide. Light was generated at the critical angle to reflect totally within the flexible and transparent waveguide. When a waveguide was compressed by an external force, its contact area would deform and cause the light to scatter. The scattered light was captured by a high-resolution camera and saved as an image format. To test the performance of the proposed system, we used a realistic tissue phantom with embedded hard inclusions. The experimental results show that the proposed sensor can detect inclusions and provide the relative value of size, depth, and Young’s modulus of an inclusion.

  15. Fiber-Optic Current Sensor Validation with Triggered Lightning Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.; Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.; Snyder, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    A fiber optic current sensor based on the Faraday Effect is developed that is highly suitable for aircraft installation and can measure total current enclosed in a fiber loop down to DC. Other attributes include being small, light-weight, non-conducting, safe from electromagnetic interference, and free of hysteresis and saturation. The Faraday Effect causes light polarization to rotate when exposed to a magnetic field in the direction of light propagation. Measuring the induced light polarization rotation in fiber loops yields the total current enclosed. Two sensor systems were constructed and installed at Camp Blanding, Florida, measuring rocket-triggered lightning. The systems were similar in design but with different laser wavelengths, sensitivities and ranges. Results are compared to a shunt resistor as reference. The 850nm wavelength system tested in summer 2011 showed good result comparison early. However, later results showed gradual amplitude increase with time, attributed to corroded connections affecting the 50-ohm output termination. The 1550nm system also yielded good results in the summer 2012. The successful measurements demonstrate the fiber optic sensor's accuracies in capturing real lightning currents, and represent an important step toward future aircraft installation.

  16. SINGLE-CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Wang; G. Pickrell; R. May

    2002-09-10

    Accurate measurement of temperature is essential for the safe and efficient operation and control of a wide range of industrial processes. Appropriate techniques and instrumentation are needed depending on the temperature measurement requirements in different industrial processes and working environments. Harsh environments are common in many industrial applications. These harsh environments may involve extreme physical conditions, such as high-temperature, high-pressure, corrosive agents, toxicity, strong electromagnetic interference, and high-energy radiation exposure. Due to these severe environmental conditions, conventional temperature sensors are often difficult to apply. This situation has opened a new but challenging opportunity for the sensor society to provide robust, high-performance, and cost-effective temperature sensors capable of operating in those harsh environments. The focus of this research program has been to develop a temperature measurement system for temperature measurements in the primary and secondary stages of slagging gasifiers. For this application the temperature measurement system must be able to withstand the extremely harsh environment posed by the high temperatures and corrosive agents present in these systems. Real-time, accurate and reliable monitoring of temperature for the coal gasification process is important to realize the full economic potential of these gasification systems. Long life and stability of operation in the high temperature environment is essential for the temperature measurement system to ensure the continuous running of the coal gasification system over the long term. In this high temperature and chemically corrosive environment, rather limited high temperature measurement techniques such as high temperature thermocouples and optical/acoustic pyrometers are available, each with their own limitations. In this research program, five different temperature sensing schemes based on the single crystal sapphire

  17. Optical fiber waveguide sensor for the colorimetric detection of ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Katrin; Rist, Jonas; Peter, Carolin; Wöllenstein, Jürgen

    2011-06-01

    We present the development and characterization of a fiber-optic colorimetric gas sensor combined with the electronic circuitry for measurement control and RFID communication. The gas sensor detects ammonia using a 300 μm polyolefin fiber coated with a gas-sensitive polymer film. The spectral and time-dependent sensitivity of various polymer films was tested in transmission measurements. Light from a standard LED at λ = 590 nm was coupled into the polyolefin fiber through the front face. A prototype of the gas sensor with the direct coupling method was tested under realistic measurement conditions, i.e. battery-driven and in a completely autonomous mode. The sensor system showed good sensitivity to the ammonia concentrations and response times in the order of minutes. The achievable power consumption was below 100μW.The films contained the pH-sensitive dyes bromocresol purple or bromophenol blue embedded in either ethyl cellulose or polyvinyl butyral, and optionally tributyl phosphate as plasticizer. The bromophenol blue based films showed a strong reaction to ammonia, with saturation concentrations around 1000 ppm and response times of about 15 seconds to 100ppm. The colorimetric reaction was simulated using a simple kinetic model which was in good agreement with the experimental results.

  18. The fiber optic gyroscope - a portable rotational ground motion sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassermann, J. M.; Bernauer, F.; Guattari, F.; Igel, H.

    2016-12-01

    It was already shown that a portable broadband rotational ground motion sensor will have large impact on several fields of seismological research such as volcanology, marine geophysics, seismic tomography and planetary seismology. Here, we present results of tests and experiments with one of the first broadband rotational motion sensors available. BlueSeis-3A, is a fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) especially designed for the needs of seismology, developed by iXBlue, France, in close collaboration with researchers financed by the European Research council project ROMY (Rotational motions - a new observable for seismology). We first present the instrument characteristics which were estimated by different standard laboratory tests, e.g. self noise using operational range diagrams or Allan deviation. Next we present the results of a field experiment which was designed to demonstrate the value of a 6C measurement (3 components of translation and 3 components of rotation). This field test took place at Mt. Stromboli volcano, Italy, and is accompanied by seismic array installation to proof the FOG output against more commonly known array derived rotation. As already shown with synthetic data an additional direct measurement of three components of rotation can reduce the ambiguity in source mechanism estimation and can be taken to correct for dynamic tilt of the translational sensors (i.e. seismometers). We can therefore demonstrate that the deployment of a weak motion broadband rotational motion sensor is in fact producing superior results by a reduction of the number of deployed instruments.

  19. Evaluation of a Prototype pCO2 Optical Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanborn-Marsh, C.; Sutton, A.; Sabine, C. L.; Lawrence-Salvas, N.; Dietrich, C.

    2016-12-01

    Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise, driving climate change and altering the ocean carbonate systems. Carbonate chemistry can be characterized by any two of the four parameters: pH, total alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon, and partial pressure of dissolved carbon dioxide gas (pCO2). To fully monitor these dynamic systems, researchers must deploy a more temporally and spatially comprehensive sensor network. Logistical challenges, such as the energy consumption, size, lifetime, depth range, and cost of pCO2 sensors have limited the network's reach so far. NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory has conducted assessment tests of a pCO2 optical sensor (optode), recently developed by Atamanchuk et al (2014). We hope to deploy this optode in the summer of 2017 on high-resolution moored profiler, along with temperature, salinity, and oxygen sensors. While most pCO2 optodes have energy consumptions of 3-10 W, this 36mm-diameter by 86mm-long instrument consumes a mere 7-80 mW. Initial testing showed that its accuracy varied within an absolute range of 2-75 μatm, depending on environmental conditions, including temperature, salinity, response time, and initial calibration. Further research independently examining the effects of each variable on the accuracy of the data will also be presented.

  20. Study of the optical properties of solid tissue phantoms using single and double integrating sphere systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Monem, S

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tissue simulators, the so-called tissue phantoms, have been used to mimic human tissue for spectroscopic applications. Phantoms’ design depends on patterning the optical properties, namely absorption and scattering coefficients which characterize...

  1. A Novel Acoustic Emission Fiber Optic Sensor Based on a Single Mode Optical Fiber Coupler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Rongsheng; LIAO Yanbiao; ZHENG Gangtie; LIU Tongyu; Gerard Franklyn Fernando

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports, for the first time, on the use of a fused-taper single mode optical fiber coupler as a sensing element for the detection of acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasound. When an acoustic wave impinges on the mode-coupling region of a coupler, the coupling coefficient is modulated via the photo-elastic effect. Therefore, the transfer function of the coupler is modulated by an acoustic wave. The sensitivity of the sensor at 140 kHz was approximately 5.2 mV/Pa and the noise floor was 1 Pa. The bandwidth of the sensor was up to several hundred kHz. This AE sensor exhibits significant advantage compared with interferometer-based AE sensors.

  2. Optical microresonator based on hollow sphere with porous wall for chemical sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanzheng; Yuan, Lei; Kim, Cheol-Woon; Han, Qun; Wei, Tao; Lan, Xinwei; Xiao, Hai

    2012-01-01

    A porous-wall hollow glass microsphere (PW-HGM) was investigated as an optical resonator for chemical vapor sensing. A single mode optical fiber taper was used to interrogate the microresonator. Adsorption of chemical molecules into the nanosized pores induced a refractive index change of the thin wall and thus a shift in its resonance spectrum. The PW-HGM resonator had shown higher vapor detection sensitivity in comparison with a solid microsphere under similar test conditions.

  3. Development of Optical Fiber Sensor for Water Quality Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, A. F.; MatJafri, M. Z.

    2008-05-01

    The development of water quality fiber sensor through spectroscopy analysis utilizes the emission of incident light and detection of backscattered light through fiber optic cables as key elements of the design. The system has the capability to detect the light scattered 180° away from the incident light when there is an interaction between the light and the solids suspended in the water. The empirical analysis is conducted for the measurement of the capacity of clay suspended in water (in mg/L). The system consists of two separate light detector circuitry that is sensitive to blue (470 nm) and red (635 nm) monochromatic light. The heart of the system is the sensor, TSLB257 and TSLR257 that having a peak response at wavelength of 470 nm and 635 nm respectively. The final result of detection is submitted to Basic Stamp 2 microcontroller for processing and analysis. The level of turbidity is then defined and displayed by the microcontroller.

  4. Miniaturized fiber-optic Michelson-type interferometric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kent A.; Miller, William V., III; Tran, Tuan A.; Vengsarkar, Ashish M.; Claus, Richard O.

    1991-01-01

    A novel, miniaturized Michelson-type fiber-optic interferometric sensor that is relatively insensitive to temperature drifts is presented. A fused-biconical tapered coupler is cleaved immediately after the coupled length and polished down to the region of the fused cladding, but short of the interaction region. The end of one core is selectively coated with a reflective surface and is used as the reference arm; the other core serves as the sensing arm. The detection of surface acoustic waves, microdisplacements, and magnetic fields is reported. The sensor is shown to be highly stable in comparison to a classic homodyne, uncompensated Michelson interferometer, and signal-to-noise ratios of 65 dB have been obtained.

  5. Highly sensitive optical sensor system for blood leakage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Jie, Chen; Sanae, Mizuno; Touma, Yasunori

    A highly sensitive method for the detection of blood leakage has been developed, and a practical sensor system for blood concentration measurement has been constructed. The present method is based on the attenuation of laser light by blood cells. The effects of the fluctuations of the incident laser light power are eliminated by normalizing the attenuated light intensity by the incident light intensity. A part of the incident laser light is reflected by a beam splitter mounted at the entrance of the test cell, of which the power is measured to provide base data for normalization. The optical path is extended to enhance sensitivity by using a pair of side mirrors. This multi-reflection method is very effective to increase sensitivity; the maximum sensitivity obtained for blood concentration is about 4 X 10 -6 by volume, which is significantly higher than that of the conventional sensors.

  6. Amylin Detection with a Miniature Optical-Fiber Based Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaowen; Ann, Matsko; Hughes, Adam; Reeves, Mark

    We present results of a biosensor based on shifts in the localized surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles self-assembled on the end of an optical fiber. This system allows for detection of protein expression in low sensing volumes and for scanning in cell cultures and tissue samples. Positive and negative controls were done using biotin/avidin and the BSA/Anti-BSA system. These demonstrate that detection is specific and sensitive to nanomolar levels. Sensing of amylin, an important protein for pancreatic function, was performed with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. The measured data demonstrates the difference in sensitivity to the two types of antibodies, and titration experiments establish the sensitivity of the sensor. Further experiments demonstrate that the sensor can be regenerated and then reused.

  7. Coded access optical sensor (CAOS) imager and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riza, Nabeel A.

    2016-04-01

    Starting in 2001, we proposed and extensively demonstrated (using a DMD: Digital Micromirror Device) an agile pixel Spatial Light Modulator (SLM)-based optical imager based on single pixel photo-detection (also called a single pixel camera) that is suited for operations with both coherent and incoherent light across broad spectral bands. This imager design operates with the agile pixels programmed in a limited SNR operations starring time-multiplexed mode where acquisition of image irradiance (i.e., intensity) data is done one agile pixel at a time across the SLM plane where the incident image radiation is present. Motivated by modern day advances in RF wireless, optical wired communications and electronic signal processing technologies and using our prior-art SLM-based optical imager design, described using a surprisingly simple approach is a new imager design called Coded Access Optical Sensor (CAOS) that has the ability to alleviate some of the key prior imager fundamental limitations. The agile pixel in the CAOS imager can operate in different time-frequency coding modes like Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA), Code-Division Multiple Access (CDMA), and Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA). Data from a first CAOS camera demonstration is described along with novel designs of CAOS-based optical instruments for various applications.

  8. In-fiber integrated chemiluminiscence online optical fiber sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinghua; Yuan, Tingting; Yang, Jun; Dong, Biao; Liu, Yanxin; Zheng, Yao; Yuan, Libo

    2013-09-01

    We report an in-fiber integrated chemiluminiscence (CL) sensor based on a kind of hollow optical fiber with a suspended inner core. The path of microfluid is realized by etching microholes for inlets and outlets on the surface of the optical fiber without damaging the inner core and then constructing a melted point beside the microhole of the outlet. When samples are injected into the fiber, the liquids can be fully mixed and form steady microflows. Simultaneously, the photon emitted from the CL reaction is efficiently coupled into the core and can be detected at the end of the optical fiber. In this Letter, the concentration of H2O2 samples is analyzed through the emission intensity of the CL reaction among H2O2, luminol, K3Fe(CN)6, and NaOH in the optical fiber. The linear sensing range of 0.1-4.0 mmol/L of H2O2 concentration is obtained. The emission intensity can be determined within 400 ms at a total flow rate of 150 μL/min. Significantly, this work presents the information of developing in-fiber integrated online analyzing devices based on optical methods.

  9. Monitoring of Moisture in Transformer Oil Using Optical Fiber as Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Laskar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an optical fiber sensor and temperature sensor-based instrumentation system to measure the moisture content in transformer oil. The sensor system consists of (i Diode Laser Source, (ii a bare and bent multimode fiber as sensor probe, (iii an LDR as detector, (iv LM35-based temperature sensor, and (v microcontroller system having a trained ANN for processing and calibration. The bare and bent optical fiber sensor and the temperature sensor LM35 are used to provide the measures of refractive index (RI and temperature of a transformer oil sample. An ATmega32-microcontroller-based system with trained ANN algorithm has been developed to determine the moisture content of the transformer oil sample by sampling the readings of the bare bent optical fiber sensor and the temperature sensor.

  10. Development of plasma bolometers using fiber-optic temperature sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinke, M. L., E-mail: reinkeml@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Han, M.; Liu, G. [University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Eden, G. G. van [Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Evenblij, R.; Haverdings, M. [Technobis, Pyrietstraat 2, 1812 SC Alkmaar (Netherlands); Stratton, B. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Measurements of radiated power in magnetically confined plasmas are important for exhaust studies in present experiments and expected to be a critical diagnostic for future fusion reactors. Resistive bolometer sensors have long been utilized in tokamaks and helical devices but suffer from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Results are shown from initial testing of a new bolometer concept based on fiber-optic temperature sensor technology. A small, 80 μm diameter, 200 μm long silicon pillar attached to the end of a single mode fiber-optic cable acts as a Fabry–Pérot cavity when broadband light, λ{sub o} ∼ 1550 nm, is transmitted along the fiber. Changes in temperature alter the optical path length of the cavity primarily through the thermo-optic effect, resulting in a shift of fringes reflected from the pillar detected using an I-MON 512 OEM spectrometer. While initially designed for use in liquids, this sensor has ideal properties for use as a plasma bolometer: a time constant, in air, of ∼150 ms, strong absorption in the spectral range of plasma emission, immunity to local EMI, and the ability to measure changes in temperature remotely. Its compact design offers unique opportunities for integration into the vacuum environment in places unsuitable for a resistive bolometer. Using a variable focus 5 mW, 405 nm, modulating laser, the signal to noise ratio versus power density of various bolometer technologies are directly compared, estimating the noise equivalent power density (NEPD). Present tests show the fiber-optic bolometer to have NEPD of 5-10 W/m{sup 2} when compared to those of the resistive bolometer which can achieve <0.5 W/m{sup 2} in the laboratory, but this can degrade to 1-2 W/m{sup 2} or worse when installed on a tokamak. Concepts are discussed to improve the signal to noise ratio of this new fiber-optic bolometer by reducing the pillar height and adding thin metallic coatings, along with improving the spectral resolution of the interrogator.

  11. Application of conformal optical design in star sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Li, Lin; Huang, Yifan; Liu, Jiaguo

    2008-03-01

    Star sensor is a special high accuracy photoelectric instrument. It is often used in navigation of aircraft, cruise missiles, and ballistic missiles, so the imaging quality of the optical system in a star senor is very important. The spherical windows with a small impact to imaging performance are usually used in traditional star sensors. However, the spherical surfaces are not ideal aerodynamic surfaces and would cause problems such as high drag. In this paper the conformal window whose outer shape is neither spherical nor flat is used in a star sensor. Unfortunately, the conformal shape introduces amounts of aberration which may lead to low imaging resolution. The various correctors can be used to eliminate the aberrations, for example, the fixed corrector, the arch, Zernike wedges, and the deformable mirror. The fixed corrector method is selected to decrease aberrations from the conformal window in this paper. The surface of the conformal window in the star senor is described as the Von Karman equation. The field of view is 17.6°×13.5°, and the size of the CCD pixel is 6.45 um×6.45um. The optical design program ZEMAX is used to design this system. After the optimization, under the max frequency of 77.52lp/mm, the MFT can almost achieve 30%. The design results show that the aerodynamic requirements can be satisfied by the application of the conformal window in the star sensor, and the aberrations can be corrected by proper ways.

  12. Vibration sensing in flexible structures using a distributed-effect modal domain optical fiber sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Karl M.; Lindner, Douglas K.; Claus, Richard O.

    1991-01-01

    Modal domain optical fiber sensors have recently been employed in the implementation of system identification algorithms and the closed-loop control of vibrations in flexible structures. The mathematical model of the modal domain optical fiber sensor used in these applications, however, only accounted for the effects of strain in the direction of the fiber's longitudinal axis. In this paper, we extend this model to include the effects of arbitrary stress. Using this sensor model, we characterize the sensor's sensitivity and dynamic range.

  13. An optical water vapor sensor for unmanned aerial vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy A. Berkoff; Paul L. Kebabian; Robert A. McClatchy; Charles E. Kolb; Andrew Freedman

    1998-12-01

    The water vapor sensor developed by Aerodyne Research, based on the optical absorption of light at {approximately}935 nm, has been successfully demonstrated on board the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Gulfstream-1 research aircraft during the Department of Energy's ARM Intensive Operations Period in August 1998. Data taken during this field campaign show excellent agreement with a chilled mirror and Lyman-alpha hygrometers and measurements confirm the ability to measure rapid, absolute water vapor fluctuations with a high degree of instrument stability and accuracy, with a noise level as low 10 ppmv (1 Hz measurement bandwidth). The construction of this small, lightweight sensor contains several unique elements which result in several significant advantages when compared to other techniques. First, the low power consumption Argon discharge lamp provides an optical beam at a fixed wavelength without a need for temperature or precision current control. The multi-pass absorption cell developed for this instrument provides a compact, low cost method that can survive deployment in the field. Fiber-optic cables, which are used to convey to light between the absorption cell, light source, and detection modules enable remote placement of the absorption cell from the opto-electronics module. Finally, the sensor does not use any moving parts which removes a significant source of potential malfunction. The result is an instrument which maintained its calibration throughout the field measurement campaign, and was not affected by high vibration and large uncontrolled temperature excursions. We believe that the development of an accurate, fast response water vapor monitor described in this report will open up new avenues of aerial-vehicle-based atmospheric research which have been relatively unexplored due to the lack of suitable low-cost, light-weight instrumentation.

  14. Zinc selective ionophores for potentiometric and optical sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, E.; Horvath, M.; Toth, K.; Pungor, E.; Bitter, I.; Agai, B.; Toeke, L. (Technical Univ. of Budapest (Hungary))

    1992-03-01

    Iminodiacetamide derivatives were synthesized and studied as ionophores in plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) membranes with potentiometric and optical transduction. The N-benzyl and N-phenyl derivatives proved to have a distinct zinc selectivity preferring Zn{sup 2+} over Ca{sup 2+}, Na{sup +} by factors of 6x10{sup 5} and 3x10{sup 4}, respectively. All ionophores exhibit a serious proton interference (log K{sup pot}{sub Zn{sup ++}}, {sub H{sup +}} {approximately} 6) which suggests that all application of this type of ionophores based sensors are limited to hydrogen ion buffer solution at pH {>=} 6.

  15. Analysis of a plastic optical fiber-based displacement sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Felipe; Arrue, Jon; Aldabaldetreku, Gotzon; Durana, Gaizka; Zubia, Joseba; Ziemann, Olaf; Bunge, Christian-Alexander

    2007-09-01

    An easy-to-manufacture setup for a displacement sensor based on plastic optical fiber (POF) is analyzed, showing computational and experimental results. If the displacement is the consequence of force or pressure applied to the device, this can be used as a force or pressure transducer. Its principle of operation consists of bending a POF section around a flexible cylinder and measuring light attenuation when the whole set is subjected to side pressure. Attenuations are obtained computationally as a function of side deformation for different design parameters. Experimental results with an actually built prototype are also provided.

  16. Integrated optical electric field sensor with telescopic dipole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Sun; Fushen Chen; Yongjun Yang

    2008-01-01

    An integrated optical electric field sensor based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with the telescopic dipole is designed and fabricated, and its electrodes are segmented and connected with a telescopic dipole.The measured results show that when the frequency response is from 10kHz to 6GHz with the antenna length of 55mm, the minimum detectable electric field of 20mV/m can be obtained, and the linear dynamics range can reach 90dB at 250MHz.

  17. Design and Development of a Low-Cost Optical Current Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaizka Durana

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we demonstrate the design of a low-cost optical current sensor. The sensor principle is the Faraday rotation of a light beam through a magneto-optical material, SF2, when a magnetic field is present. The prototype has a high sensitivity and a high linearity for currents ranging from 0 up to 800 A. The error of the optical fibre sensor is smaller than 1% for electric currents over 175 A.

  18. Design and development of a low-cost optical current sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubia, Joseba; Casado, Luciano; Aldabaldetreku, Gotzon; Montero, Alfonso; Zubia, Eneko; Durana, Gaizka

    2013-10-10

    In this paper we demonstrate the design of a low-cost optical current sensor. The sensor principle is the Faraday rotation of a light beam through a magneto-optical material, SF2, when a magnetic field is present. The prototype has a high sensitivity and a high linearity for currents ranging from 0 up to 800 A. The error of the optical fibre sensor is smaller than 1% for electric currents over 175 A.

  19. Guided Wave and Damage Detection in Composite Laminates Using Different Fiber Optic Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Fucai Li; Hideaki Murayama; Kazuro Kageyama; Takehiro Shirai

    2009-01-01

    Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD) sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber r...

  20. Damage detection and characterization using fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glisic, Branko; Sigurdardottir, Dorotea; Yao, Yao; Hubbell, David

    2013-04-01

    Fiber optic sensors (FOS) have significantly evolved and have reached their market maturity during the last decade. Their widely recognized advantages are high precision, long-term stability, and durability. But in addition to these advantageous performances, FOS technologies allow for affordable instrumentation of large areas of structure enabling global large-scale monitoring based on long-gauge sensors and integrity monitoring based on distributed sensors. These two approaches are particularly suitable for damage detection and characterization, i.e., damage localization and to certain extent quantification and propagation, as illustrated by two applications presented in detail in this paper: post-tensioned concrete bridge and segmented concrete pipeline. Early age cracking was detected, localized and quantified in the concrete deck of a pedestrian bridge using embedded long-gauge FOS. Post-tensioning of deck closed the cracks; however, permanent weakening in a bridge joint occurred due to cracking and it was identified and quantified. The damage was confirmed using embedded distributed FOS and a separate load test of the bridge. Real-size concrete pipeline specimens and surrounding soil were equipped with distributed FOS and exposed to permanent ground displacement in a large-scale testing facility. Two tests were performed on different pipeline specimens. The sensors bonded on the pipeline specimens successfully detected and localized rupture of pipeline joints, while the sensors embedded in the soil were able to detect and localize the failure plane. Comparison with strain-gauges installed on the pipeline and visual inspection after the test confirmed accurate damage detection and characterization.

  1. Review of High-Speed Fiber Optic Grating Sensors Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udd, E; Benterou, J; May, C; Mihailov, S J; Lu, P

    2010-03-24

    Fiber grating sensors can be used to support a wide variety of high speed measurement applications. This includes measurements of vibrations on bridges, traffic monitoring on freeways, ultrasonic detection to support non-destructive tests on metal plates and providing details of detonation events. This paper provides a brief overview of some of the techniques that have been used to support high speed measurements using fiber grating sensors over frequency ranges from 10s of kHz, to MHZ and finally toward frequencies approaching the GHz regime. Very early in the development of fiber grating sensor systems it was realized that a high speed fiber grating sensor system could be realized by placing an optical filter that might be a fiber grating in front of a detector so that spectral changes in the reflection from a fiber grating were amplitude modulated. In principal the only limitation on this type of system involved the speed of the output detector which with the development of high speed communication links moved from the regime of 10s of MHz toward 10s of GHz. The earliest deployed systems involved civil structures including measurements of the strain fields on composite utility poles and missile bodies during break tests, bridges and freeways. This was followed by a series of developments that included high speed fiber grating sensors to support nondestructive testing via ultrasonic wave detection, high speed machining and monitoring ship hulls. Each of these applications involved monitoring mechanical motion of structures and thus interest was in speeds up to a few 10s of MHz. Most recently there has been interest in using fiber grating to monitor the very high speed events such as detonations and this has led to utilization of fiber gratings that are consumed during an event that may require detection speeds of hundreds of MHz and in the future multiple GHz.

  2. Fiber optic chemical sensors: The evolution of high- density fiber-optic DNA microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Jane A.

    2001-06-01

    Sensors were developed for multianalyte monitoring, fermentation monitoring, lactate analysis, remote oxygen detection for use in bioremediation monitoring and in a fuel spill clean-up project, heavy metal analysis, and high density DNA microarrays. The major focus of this thesis involved creating and improving high-density DNA gene arrays. Fiber optic sensors are created using fluorescent indicators, polymeric supports, and optical fiber substrates. The fluorescent indicator is entrapped in a polymer layer and attached to the tip of the optical fiber. The tip of the fiber bearing the sensing layer (the distal end) is placed in the sample of interest while the other end of the fiber (the proximal end) is connected to an analysis system. Any length of fiber can be used without compromising the integrity or sensitivity of the system. A fiber optic oxygen sensor was designed incorporating an oxygen sensitive fluorescent dye and a gas permeable polymer attached to an optical fiber. The construction simplicity and ruggedness of the sensor enabled its deployment for in situ chemical oxidation and bioremediation studies. Optical fibers were also used as the substrate to detect biomolecules in solution. To monitor bioprocesses, the production of the analyte of interest must be coupled with a species that is optically measurable. For example, oxygen is consumed in many metabolic functions. The fiber optic oxygen sensor is equipped with an additional sensing layer. Upon contact with a specific biochemical in the sample, a reaction occurs in the additional sensing layer that either consumes or produces oxygen. This dual layer system was used to monitor the presence of lactate, an important metabolite for clinical and bioprocess analysis. In many biological and environmental systems, the generation of one species occurs coincidentally with the generation or consumption of another species. A multianalyte sensor was prepared that can monitor the simultaneous activity of pH, CO2

  3. Miniaturised Optical Fibre Sensor for Dew Detection Inside Organ Pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Baldini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A new optical sensor for the continuous monitoring of the dew formation inside organ pipes was designed. This aspect is particularly critical for the conservation of organs in unheated churches since the dew formation or the condensation on the pipe surfaces can contribute to many kinds of physical and chemical disruptive mechanisms. The working principle is based on the change in the reflectivity which is observed on the surface of the fibre tip, when a water layer is formed on its distal end. Intensity changes of the order of 35% were measured, following the formation of the water layer on the distal end of a 400/430 μm optical fibre. Long-term tests carried out placing the fibre tip inside the base of an in-house-made metallic foot of an organ pipe located in an external environment revealed the consistency of the proposed system.

  4. Optical sensors and their applications for probing biological systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palanco, Marta Espina

    and mammalian cells. First, we performed Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) studies on intact plant materials via using silver plasmonic nanostructures. Our studies showed strong Raman signals which resemble to the presence of typical constituents such as carbohydrates, proteins and lipids of different......There is a great interest in exploring and developing new optical sensitive methodologies for probing complex biological systems. In this project we developed non-invasive and sensitive biosensor strategies for studying physiologically relevant chemical and physical properties of plant...... biological sample to provide a SERS-template where silver nanoparticles can grow, thus providing a new insight into SERS-based sensors for chemically sensing in-situ plant constituents. Optical manipulation techniques have been used to investigate mechanical properties of soft membrane cells, i.e. mammalian...

  5. Optical fiber sensor for low dose gamma irradiation monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrés, Ana I.; Esteban, Ã.`scar; Embid, Miguel

    2016-05-01

    An optical fiber gamma ray detector is presented in this work. It is based on a Terbium doped Gadolinium Oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) scintillating powder which cover a chemically etched polymer fiber tip. This etching improves the fluorescence gathering by the optical fiber. The final diameter has been selected to fulfill the trade-off between light gathering and mechanical strength. Powder has been encapsulated inside a microtube where the fiber tip is immersed. The sensor has been irradiated with different air Kerma doses up to 2 Gy/h with a 137Cs source, and the spectral distribution of the fluorescence intensity has been recorded in a commercial grade CCD spectrometer. The obtained signal-to-noise ratio is good enough even for low doses, which has allowed to reduce the integration time in the spectrometer. The presented results show the feasibility for using low cost equipment to detect/measure ionizing radiation as gamma rays are.

  6. Nanostructured Fiber Optic Cantilever Arrays and Hybrid MEMS Sensors for Chemical and Biological Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advancements in nano-/micro-scale sensor fabrication and molecular recognition surfaces offer promising opportunities to develop miniaturized hybrid fiber optic and...

  7. Cryogenic fiber optic temperature sensor and method of manufacturing the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochergin, Vladimir (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    This invention teaches the fiber optic sensors temperature sensors for cryogenic temperature range with improved sensitivity and resolution, and method of making said sensors. In more detail, the present invention is related to enhancement of temperature sensitivity of fiber optic temperature sensors at cryogenic temperatures by utilizing nanomaterials with a thermal expansion coefficient that is smaller than the thermal expansion coefficient of the optical fiber but larger in absolute value than the thermal expansion coefficient of the optical fiber at least over a range of temperatures.

  8. Optical Fiber Sensor Instrumentation for Slagging Coal Gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anbo Wang; Kristie Cooper

    2008-07-19

    Coal gasifier is one of the most promising solutions for clean fossil energy. Refractory thickness monitoring and online real-time temperature measurement is needed for improved reliability and advanced process control for current and future generation power plants. The objective of this program is to design and implement an optical fiber based sensing system that could potentially be used to monitor refractory wall thickness and temperature inside a coal gasifier. For the thickness monitoring, the system should be able to operate at temperatures up to 1000 C. For this temperature range, silica fiber can still work so it is chosen for the sensor design. The measurement is based on a photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. A narrow light pulse is launched into a silica fiber which could be embedded into the gasifier refractory wall, and is partially reflected by the far end of the fiber. The time of flight of the light pulse in the fiber then gives an indication of the position of the fiber end, which is a function of the wall thickness when the fiber is embedded. Results obtained show a measurement accuracy of {+-}2cm in environment of 1000 C with a saw cut fiber end. When the fiber end is corroded by sodium carbide at 900 C, the accuracy is {+-}3cm. For the temperature measurement, a single crystal sapphire fiber sensor is designed. The sapphire fiber guides the broadband light from a light emitting diode to a sapphire wafer functioning as a Fabry-Perot interferometer and the wafer optical thickness is a function of temperature. The returned optical signal is then demodulated by multimode fiber based whitelight interferometry. The system was tested up to 1500 C with a measurement accuracy of {+-}10 C for the entire measurement range.

  9. Sensores ópticos com detecção no infravermelho próximo e médio Near and mid infrared optical sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kássio M. G. Lima

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical chemical sensors with detection in the near and mid infrared region are reviewed. Fundamental concepts of infrared spectroscopy and optical chemical sensors are briefly described, before presenting some aspects on optical chemical sensors, such as synthesis of NIR and IR reagents, preparation of new materials as well as application in determinations of species of biological, industrial and environmental importance.

  10. Biomedical signals and sensors II linking acoustic and optic biosignals and biomedical sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Kaniusas, Eugenijus

    2015-01-01

    The book set develops a bridge between physiologic mechanisms and diagnostic human engineering. While the first volume is focused on the interface between physiologic mechanisms and the resultant biosignals, this second volume is devoted to the interface between biosignals and biomedical sensors. That is, in the first volume, the physiologic mechanisms determining biosignals are described from the basic cellular level up to their advanced mutual coordination level. This second volume, considers the genesis of acoustic and optic biosignals and the associated sensing technology from a strategic point of view. As a novelty, this book discusses heterogeneous biosignals within a common frame. This frame comprises both the biosignal formation path from the biosignal source at the physiological level to biosignal propagation in the body, and the biosignal sensing path from the biosignal transmission in the sensor applied on the body up to its conversion to a, usually electric, signal. Some biosignals arise in the co...

  11. Development of an optical redox chemical sensor for nitrite determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadat Rastegarzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An optical chemical sensor for the determination of nitrite based on incorporating methyltrioctylammonium chloride as an anionic exchanger on the triacetylcellulose polymer has been reported. The response of the sensor is based on the redox reaction between nitrite in aqueous solution and iodide adsorbed on sensing membrane using anion exchange phenomena. The sensing membrane reversibly responses to nitrite ion over the range of 6.52×10-6 - 8.70×10-5 mol L-1 with a detection limit of 6.05×10-7 mol L-1 (0.03 µg mL-1 and response time of 6 min. The relative standard deviation for eight replicate measurements of 8.70×10-6 and 4.34×10-5 mol L-1 of nitrite was 4.4 and 2.5 %, respectively. The sensor was successfully applied for determination of nitrite in food, saliva and water samples.

  12. Cordless hand-held optical 3D sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkelt, Christoph; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Kühmstedt, Peter; Schmidt, Ingo; Notni, Gunther

    2007-07-01

    A new mobile optical 3D measurement system using phase correlation based fringe projection technique will be presented. The sensor consist of a digital projection unit and two cameras in a stereo arrangement, whereby both are battery powered. The data transfer to a base station will be done via WLAN. This gives the possibility to use the system in complicate, remote measurement situations, which are typical in archaeology and architecture. In the measurement procedure the sensor will be hand-held by the user, illuminating the object with a sequence of less than 10 fringe patterns, within a time below 200 ms. This short sequence duration was achieved by a new approach, which combines the epipolar constraint with robust phase correlation utilizing a pre-calibrated sensor head, containing two cameras and a digital fringe projector. Furthermore, the system can be utilized to acquire the all around shape of objects by using the phasogrammetric approach with virtual land marks introduced by the authors 1, 2. This way no matching procedures or markers are necessary for the registration of multiple views, which makes the system very flexible in accomplishing different measurement tasks. The realized measurement field is approx. 100 mm up to 400 mm in diameter. The mobile character makes the measurement system useful for a wide range of applications in arts, architecture, archaeology and criminology, which will be shown in the paper.

  13. Microstructured polymer optical fibre sensors for opto-acoustic endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadway, Christian; Gallego, Daniel; Pospori, Andreas; Zubel, Michal; Webb, David J.; Sugden, Kate; Carpintero, Guillermo; Lamela, Horacio

    2016-04-01

    Opto-acoustic imaging is a growing field of research in recent years, providing functional imaging of physiological biomarkers, such as the oxygenation of haemoglobin. Piezo electric transducers are the industry standard detector for ultrasonics, but their limited bandwidth, susceptibility to electromagnetic interference and their inversely proportional sensitivity to size all affect the detector performance. Sensors based on polymer optical fibres (POF) are immune to electromagnetic interference, have lower acoustic impedance and a reduced Young's Modulus compared to silica fibres. Furthermore, POF enables the possibility of a wideband sensor and a size appropriate to endoscopy. Micro-structured POF (mPOF) used in an interferometric detector has been shown to be an order of magnitude more sensitive than silica fibre at 1 MHz and 3 times more sensitive at 10 MHz. We present the first opto-acoustic measurements obtained using a 4.7mm PMMA mPOF Bragg grating with a fibre diameter of 130 μm and present the lateral directivity pattern of a PMMA mPOF FBG ultrasound sensor over a frequency range of 1-50 MHz. We discuss the impact of the pattern with respect to the targeted application and draw conclusions on how to mitigate the problems encountered.

  14. Optical sensor for detection of supercavity-body contact location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belden, Jesse; Jandron, Michael; Truscott, Tadd

    2013-11-01

    Supercavitating vehicles have been the subject of intense research due to the potential for drag reduction and/or increased speeds. The control of such vehicles depends on accurate knowledge of planing forces generated by partial, transient wetting of afterbody surfaces. Measurement of the supercavity-body contact location, which determines the planing area, is thus critical for vehicle control. A robust sensor capable of measuring supercavity contact location along the length of a body is presented. The sensor operates on the optical principle of total internal reflection to differentiate between liquid and gas phases in contact with the body. An array of photodetectors is used to sense the presence or absence of light from a laser source to map the contact location. The theoretical operation and limitations of the sensor are discussed and several experiments are presented to validate the theory. Also, we present an elegant signal processing method to compensate for in situ changes in ambient light conditions. This work was funded by the Office of Naval Research.

  15. Optical Breath Gas Sensor for Extravehicular Activity Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, William R.; Casias, Miguel E.; Vakhtin, Andrei B.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Chullen, Cinda; Falconi, Eric A.; McMillin, Summer

    2013-01-01

    The function of the infrared gas transducer used during extravehicular activity in the current space suit is to measure and report the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ventilation loop. The next generation portable life support system (PLSS) requires next generation CO2 sensing technology with performance beyond that presently in use on the Space Shuttle/International Space Station extravehicular mobility unit (EMU). Accommodation within space suits demands that optical sensors meet stringent size, weight, and power requirements. A laser diode spectrometer based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy is being developed for this purpose by Vista Photonics, Inc. Two prototype devices were delivered to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in September 2011. The sensors incorporate a laser diode-based CO2 channel that also includes an incidental water vapor (humidity) measurement and a separate oxygen channel using a vertical cavity surface emitting laser. Both prototypes are controlled digitally with a field-programmable gate array/microcontroller architecture. The present development extends and upgrades the earlier hardware to the Advanced PLSS 2.0 test article being constructed and tested at JSC. Various improvements to the electronics and gas sampling are being advanced by this project. The combination of low power electronics with the performance of a long wavelength laser spectrometer enables multi-gas sensors with significantly increased performance over that presently offered in the EMU.

  16. A Fiber-Optic Aircraft Lightning Current Measurement Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.

    2013-01-01

    A fiber-optic current sensor based on the Faraday Effect is developed for aircraft installations. It can measure total lightning current amplitudes and waveforms, including continuing current. Additional benefits include being small, lightweight, non-conducting, safe from electromagnetic interference, and free of hysteresis and saturation. The Faraday Effect causes light polarization to rotate in presence of magnetic field in the direction of light propagation. Measuring the total induced light polarization change yields the total current enclosed. The system operates at 1310nm laser wavelength and can measure approximately 300 A - 300 kA, a 60 dB range. A reflective polarimetric scheme is used, where the light polarization change is measured after a round-trip propagation through the fiber. A two-detector setup measures the two orthogonal polarizations for noise subtraction and improved dynamic range. The current response curve is non-linear and requires a simple spline-fit correction. Effects of high current were achieved in laboratory using combinations of multiple fiber and wire loops. Good result comparisons against reference sensors were achieved up to 300 kA. Accurate measurements on a simulated aircraft fuselage and an internal structure illustrate capabilities that maybe difficult with traditional sensors. Also tested at a commercial lightning test facility from 20 kA to 200 kA, accuracy within 3-10% was achieved even with non-optimum setups.

  17. Lightweight Integrated Optical Sensor for Atmospheric Measurements on Mobile Platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parameswaran, Krishnan R. [Physical Sciences Inc.

    2013-12-02

    The goal of the Phase I program was to develop a novel open path sensor platform technology based on integration of semiconductor waveguides with efficient optoelectronic components on a monolithic platform. The successful Phase I effort resulted in demonstration of a novel optical resonator structure based on semiconductor high contrast gratings (HCGs) that will enable implementation of an ultra-compact, low-power gas sensor suitable for use on mobile platforms. Extensive numerical modeling was performed to design a device optimized for measuring CO2 at a wavelength for which a laser was available for proof of concept. Devices were fabricated and tested to match the target wavelength, angle, and operating temperature. This demonstration is the first implementation of HCGs at the wavelengths of interest and shows the flexibility of the proposed architecture for gas sensing applications. The measured cavity Q was lower than anticipated due to fabrication process challenges. The PSI and UC Berkeley team has identified solutions to these challenges and will produce optimized devices in a Phase II program where a prototype sensor will be fabricated and tested.

  18. Ultra-High Temperature Sensors Based on Optical Property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabeel Riza

    2008-09-30

    In this program, Nuonics, Inc. has studied the fundamentals of a new Silicon Carbide (SiC) materials-based optical sensor technology suited for extreme environments of coal-fired engines in power production. The program explored how SiC could be used for sensing temperature, pressure, and potential gas species in a gas turbine environment. The program successfully demonstrated the optical designs, signal processing and experimental data for enabling both temperature and pressure sensing using SiC materials. The program via its sub-contractors also explored gas species sensing using SiC, in this case, no clear commercially deployable method was proven. Extensive temperature and pressure measurement data using the proposed SiC sensors was acquired to 1000 deg-C and 40 atms, respectively. Importantly, a first time packaged all-SiC probe design was successfully operated in a Siemens industrial turbine rig facility with the probe surviving the harsh chemical, pressure, and temperature environment during 28 days of test operations. The probe also survived a 1600 deg-C thermal shock test using an industrial flame.

  19. Ultra-High Temperature Sensors Based on Optical Property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabeel Riza

    2008-09-30

    In this program, Nuonics, Inc. has studied the fundamentals of a new Silicon Carbide (SiC) materials-based optical sensor technology suited for extreme environments of coal-fired engines in power production. The program explored how SiC could be used for sensing temperature, pressure, and potential gas species in a gas turbine environment. The program successfully demonstrated the optical designs, signal processing and experimental data for enabling both temperature and pressure sensing using SiC materials. The program via its sub-contractors also explored gas species sensing using SiC, in this case, no clear commercially deployable method was proven. Extensive temperature and pressure measurement data using the proposed SiC sensors was acquired to 1000 deg-C and 40 atms, respectively. Importantly, a first time packaged all-SiC probe design was successfully operated in a Siemens industrial turbine rig facility with the probe surviving the harsh chemical, pressure, and temperature environment during 28 days of test operations. The probe also survived a 1600 deg-C thermal shock test using an industrial flame.

  20. Dual permeability FEM models for distributed fiber optic sensors development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-López, Juan Pablo; Bogaard, Thom

    2017-04-01

    Fiber optic cables are commonly known for being robust and reliable mediums for transferring information at the speed of light in glass. Billions of kilometers of cable have been installed around the world for internet connection and real time information sharing. Yet, fiber optic cable is not only a mean for information transfer but also a way to sense and measure physical properties of the medium in which is installed. For dike monitoring, it has been used in the past for detecting inner core and foundation temperature changes which allow to estimate water infiltration during high water events. The DOMINO research project, aims to develop a fiber optic based dike monitoring system which allows to directly sense and measure any pore pressure change inside the dike structure. For this purpose, questions like which location, how many sensors, which measuring frequency and which accuracy are required for the sensor development. All these questions may be initially answered with a finite element model which allows to estimate the effects of pore pressure change in different locations along the cross section while having a time dependent estimation of a stability factor. The sensor aims to monitor two main failure mechanisms at the same time; The piping erosion failure mechanism and the macro-stability failure mechanism. Both mechanisms are going to be modeled and assessed in detail with a finite element based dual permeability Darcy-Richards numerical solution. In that manner, it is possible to assess different sensing configurations with different loading scenarios (e.g. High water levels, rainfall events and initial soil moisture and permeability conditions). The results obtained for the different configurations are later evaluated based on an entropy based performance evaluation. The added value of this kind of modelling approach for the sensor development is that it allows to simultaneously model the piping erosion and macro-stability failure mechanisms in a time

  1. Guided wave and damage detection in composite laminates using different fiber optic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fucai; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Shirai, Takehiro

    2009-01-01

    Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD) sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminate and acquired by these fiber optic sensors. Characteristics of these fiber optic sensors in ultrasonic guided wave detection were systematically compared. Results demonstrated that both the FBG and FOD sensors can be applied in guided wave and damage detection for the CFRP laminates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of guided wave signal captured by an FOD sensor is relatively high in comparison with that of the FBG sensor because of their different physical principles in ultrasonic detection. Further, the FOD sensor is sensitive to the damage-induced fundamental shear horizontal (SH(0)) guided wave that, however, cannot be detected by using the FBG sensor, because the FOD sensor is omnidirectional in ultrasound detection and, in contrast, the FBG sensor is severely direction dependent.

  2. Guided Wave and Damage Detection in Composite Laminates Using Different Fiber Optic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fucai Li

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP laminate and acquired by these fiber optic sensors. Characteristics of these fiber optic sensors in ultrasonic guided wave detection were systematically compared. Results demonstrated that both the FBG and FOD sensors can be applied in guided wave and damage detection for the CFRP laminates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of guided wave signal captured by an FOD sensor is relatively high in comparison with that of the FBG sensor because of their different physical principles in ultrasonic detection. Further, the FOD sensor is sensitive to the damage-induced fundamental shear horizontal (SH0 guided wave that, however, cannot be detected by using the FBG sensor, because the FOD sensor is omnidirectional in ultrasound detection and, in contrast, the FBG sensor is severely direction dependent.

  3. Interferometric microstructured polymer optical fiber ultrasound sensor for optoacoustic endoscopic imaging in biomedical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallego, Daniel; Sáez-Rodríguez, David; Webb, David

    2014-01-01

    We report a characterization of the acoustic sensitivity of microstructured polymer optical fiber interferometric sensors at ultrasonic frequencies from 100kHz to 10MHz. The use of wide-band ultrasonic fiber optic sensors in biomedical ultrasonic and optoacoustic applications is an open alternative...... interferometric sensors depends strongly of the material which is composed of. In this work we compare experimentally the intrinsic ultrasonic sensitivities of a PMMA mPOF with other three optical fibers: a singlemode silica optical fiber, a single-mode polymer optical fiber and a multimode graded...

  4. Strain Sensor Using Optical Fiber Unsymmetrical F-P Cavity and the Characteristic Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BI Weihong

    2000-01-01

    An intrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity consisted of different reflective mirrors is used in fiber-optical sensors for measuring the strain. The character of the unsymmetrical fiber-optical Fabry-Perot cavity and fiber-optic longitudinal stress-strain effect is analysed. The general theory and measurement method of strain are presented. A low fineness Fabry-Perot cavity is used to improve the linearity of optical fiber strain sensors. The result of experiment agrees well with the theory.

  5. A Fiber-Optic Current Sensor for Lightning Measurement Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.

    2015-01-01

    An optical-fiber sensor based on Faraday Effect is developed for measuring total lightning electric current. It has many unique capabilities not possible with traditional current sensors. Designed for aircraft installation, the sensor is lightweight, non-conducting, structure-conforming, and is immune to electromagnetic interference, hysteresis and saturation. It can also be used on windmills, lightning towers, and can help validate lightning detection network measurements. Faraday Effect causes light polarization to rotate when the fiber is exposed to a magnetic field in the direction of light propagation. Thus, the magnetic field strength can be determined from the light polarization change. By forming closed fiber loops and applying Ampere's law, measuring the total light rotation yields the total current enclosed. The broadband, dual-detector, reflective polarimetric scheme allows measurement of both DC component and AC waveforms with about 60 dB dynamic range. Three sensor systems were built with different sensitivities from different laser wavelengths. Operating at 850nm, the first system uses twisted single-mode fiber and has a 150 A - 150 KA range. The second system operates at 1550nm, uses spun polarization maintaining fiber, and can measure 400 A - 400 KA. Both systems were validated with rocket-triggered lightning measurements and achieved excellent results when compared to a resistive shunt. The third system operates at 1310nm, uses spun polarization maintaining fiber, and can measure approximately 300 A - 300 KA. High current measurements up to 200 KA were demonstrated at a commercial lightning test facility. The system was recently installed on an aircraft and flown near icing weather conditions.

  6. Fiber optic and laser sensors IX; Proceedings of the Meeting, Boston, MA, Sept. 3-5, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P. (Editor); Udd, Eric (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on fiber-optic and laser sensors discusses industrial applications of fiber-optic sensors, fiber-optic temperature sensors, fiber-optic current sensors, fiber-optic pressure/displacement/vibration sensors, and generic fiber-optic systems. Attention is given to a fiber-sensor design for turbine engines, fiber-optic remote Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, near-IR fiber-optic temperature sensors, and an intensity-type fiber-optic electric current sensor. Topics addressed include fiber-optic magnetic field sensors based on the Faraday effect in new materials, diaphragm size and sensitivity for fiber-optic pressure sensors, a microbend pressure sensor for high-temperature environments, and linear position sensing by light exchange between two lossy waveguides. Also discussed are two-mode elliptical-core fiber sensors for measurement of strain and temperature, a fiber-optic interferometric X-ray dosimeter, fiber-optic interferometric sensors using multimode fibers, and optical fiber sensing of corona discharges.

  7. Fiber optic and laser sensors IX; Proceedings of the Meeting, Boston, MA, Sept. 3-5, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P. (Editor); Udd, Eric (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on fiber-optic and laser sensors discusses industrial applications of fiber-optic sensors, fiber-optic temperature sensors, fiber-optic current sensors, fiber-optic pressure/displacement/vibration sensors, and generic fiber-optic systems. Attention is given to a fiber-sensor design for turbine engines, fiber-optic remote Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, near-IR fiber-optic temperature sensors, and an intensity-type fiber-optic electric current sensor. Topics addressed include fiber-optic magnetic field sensors based on the Faraday effect in new materials, diaphragm size and sensitivity for fiber-optic pressure sensors, a microbend pressure sensor for high-temperature environments, and linear position sensing by light exchange between two lossy waveguides. Also discussed are two-mode elliptical-core fiber sensors for measurement of strain and temperature, a fiber-optic interferometric X-ray dosimeter, fiber-optic interferometric sensors using multimode fibers, and optical fiber sensing of corona discharges.

  8. Routh's sphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cushman, R.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we show that the integral map of Rouths sphere has monodromy when the sphere becomes gyroscopically unstable This uses the nonHamiltonian monodromy of Rouths sphere has center of mass not at its geometrical center and moment of inertia tensor with two equal principal moments of inerti

  9. Present status of research on space optical remote sensors at CIOMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jia-qi; HAN Chang-yuan

    2003-01-01

    This paper is to review our space optical remote sensor(SORS) technologies including opti-cal materials, optics fabrication and coating, optical testing, system assembly and final testing, andspace environment simulation experiment conducted in our institute. The primary parts of the fabrica-tion and testing facilities and results are described in detail.

  10. Fiber-Optic Surface Temperature Sensor Based on Modal Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Musin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatially-integrated surface temperature sensing is highly useful when it comes to controlling processes, detecting hazardous conditions or monitoring the health and safety of equipment and people. Fiber-optic sensing based on modal interference has shown great sensitivity to temperature variation, by means of cost-effective image-processing of few-mode interference patterns. New developments in the field of sensor configuration, as described in this paper, include an innovative cooling and heating phase discrimination functionality and more precise measurements, based entirely on the image processing of interference patterns. The proposed technique was applied to the measurement of the integrated surface temperature of a hollow cylinder and compared with a conventional measurement system, consisting of an infrared camera and precision temperature probe. As a result, the optical technique is in line with the reference system. Compared with conventional surface temperature probes, the optical technique has the following advantages: low heat capacity temperature measurement errors, easier spatial deployment, and replacement of multiple angle infrared camera shooting and the continuous monitoring of surfaces that are not visually accessible.

  11. Development of fiber optic sensor for fluid flow of astronauts’ life-support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shachneva, E. A.; Murashkina, T. I.

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a fiber optic sensor consumption (volume, speed) of liquids in life-support systems of astronauts, as well as offers a simple method and apparatus for reproducing the parameters of fluid flow needed in research, yustiovke and adjusting the optical sensor system.

  12. Polymer Optical Fibre Bragg Grating Humidity Sensor at 100ºC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woyessa, Getinet; Fasano, Andrea; Markos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    We have demonstrated a polymer optical fibre Bragg grating humidity sensor that can be operated up to 100ºC. The sensor has been fabricated from a polycarbonate (PC) microstructured polymer optical fibre Bragg grating (mPOFBG). PC mPOFBG gave a relative humidity (RH) sensitivity of 6.95±0.83 pm...

  13. Development of fiber optic sensors at TNO for explosion and shock wave measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Smorenburg, C.; Bree, J.L.M.J. van; Bouma, R.H.B.; Meer, B.J. van der; Prinse, W.C.; Scholtes, J.H.G.

    2000-01-01

    Fiber Optic sensors are found to be very suitable for explosion and shock wave measurements because they are immune to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). In the past few years, TNO has developed a number of sensor systems for explosion and shock wave measurements in which the optical fiber is a vit

  14. Basic Studies of Nonlinear Optical Materials for Eye and Sensor Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-10

    1 BASIC STUDIES OF NONLINEAR OPTICAL MATERIALS FOR EYE AND SENSOR PROTECTION I. Abstract: We have studied the spectroscopy, kinetics and...study liquid or solid materials from CW to 100x10-15 seconds. Basic Studies of Nonlinear Optical Materials for Eye and Sensor Protection

  15. Some Results from SAR and Optical Sensor Monitoring of China Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingsong; Lou, Xiulin; Chen, Peng; Wang, Juan; Ren, Lin; Chang, Junfang; Pan, Yufang

    2013-01-01

    As part of the final results of Dragon 2 Project Id. 5316 “Demonstrating SAR and optical sensor monitoring of Chinese Seas”, some results from SAR and optical sensor monitoring of China Seas including sea surface winds, ocean surface waves, typhoon and typhoon waves, ocean internal waves, red tides, and ships are given in this paper.

  16. Development of fiber optic sensors at TNO for explosion and shock wave measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Smorenburg, C.; Bree, J.L.M.J. van; Bouma, R.H.B.; Meer, B.J. van der; Prinse, W.C.; Scholtes, J.H.G.

    2000-01-01

    Fiber Optic sensors are found to be very suitable for explosion and shock wave measurements because they are immune to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). In the past few years, TNO has developed a number of sensor systems for explosion and shock wave measurements in which the optical fiber is a vit

  17. Annealing effects on strain and stress sensitivity of polymer optical fibre based sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pospori, A.; Marques, C. A. F.; Zubel, M. G.;

    2016-01-01

    The annealing effects on strain and stress sensitivity of polymer optical fibre Bragg grating sensors after their photoinscription are investigated. PMMA optical fibre based Bragg grating sensors are first photo-inscribed and then they were placed into hot water for annealing. Strain, stress and ...

  18. Experimental and theoretical analysis of an optical current sensor for high power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigida, A. C. S.; Nascimento, I. M.; Mendonça, S.; Costa, J. C. W. A.; Martinez, M. A. G.; Baptista, J. M.; Jorge, P. A. S.

    2013-03-01

    A magneto-optical sensor, using a dual quadrature polarimetric processing scheme, was evaluated for current metering and protection applications in high voltage lines. Sensor calibration and resolution were obtained in different operational conditions using illumination in the 1550-nm band. Results obtained indicated the feasibility of interrogating such sensor via the optical ground wire (OPGW) link installed in standard high power grids. The polarimetric bulk optical current sensor also was theoretically studied, and the effects of different sources of error considering practical deployment were evaluated. In particular, the interference from external magnetic fields in a tree-phase system was analyzed.

  19. Development of a rechargeable optical hydrogen peroxide sensor - sensor design and biological application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Klaus; Jensen, Peter Ø; Kühl, Michael

    2016-07-21

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an important member of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) family. Among ROS, H2O2 is considered the most long-lived and can accumulate inside and outside of cells, where it is involved in both vital (signaling) and deadly (toxic) reactions depending on its concentration. Quantifying H2O2 within biological samples is challenging and often not possible. Here we present a quasi-reversible fiber-optic sensor capable of measuring H2O2 concentrations ranging from 1-100 μM within different biological samples. Based on a Prussian blue/white redox cycle and a simple sensor recharging and readout strategy, H2O2 can be measured with high spatial (∼500 μm) and temporal (∼30 s) resolution. The sensor has a broad applicability both in complex environmental and biomedical systems, as demonstrated by (i) H2O2 concentration profile measurements in natural photosynthetic biofilms under light stress reaching H2O2 concentrations as high as 15 μM, and (ii) the quantification of the transient increase of the extracellular concentration of H2O2 during stimulation of neutrophils.

  20. A Temperature Sensor Based on a Polymer Optical Fiber Macro-Bend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraleda, Alberto Tapetado; García, Carmen Vázquez; Zaballa, Joseba Zubia; Arrue, Jon

    2013-01-01

    The design and development of a plastic optical fiber (POF) macrobend temperature sensor is presented. The sensor has a linear response versus temperature at a fixed bend radius, with a sensitivity of 1.92·10−3 (°C)−1. The sensor system used a dummy fiber-optic sensor for reference purposes having a resolution below 0.3 °C. A comprehensive experimental analysis was carried out to provide insight into the effect of different surrounding media on practical macro-bend POF sensor implementation. Experimental results are successfully compared with bend loss calculations. PMID:24077323

  1. Wind tunnel unsteady pressure measurements using a differential optical fiber Fabry-Perot pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Ricardo; Staines, Stephen E.; James, Stephen W.; Lawson, Nicholas; Garry, Kevin; Tatam, Ralph P.

    2014-05-01

    A differential extrinsic optical fiber Fabry-Perot based pressure sensor has been developed and benchmarked against a conventional piezoresistive Kulite pressure sensor. The sensors were placed on the fuselage of a 1:10/3 sub-scale model of a Scottish aviation Bulldog, which was placed in a wind-tunnel. Pressure tappings that surrounded the sensors aided the mapping of pressure distribution around this section of the fuselage. The results obtained from the fibre optic pressure sensor are in good agreement with those obtained from the Kulite and from the pressure tappings.

  2. A Temperature Sensor Based on a Polymer Optical Fiber Macro-Bend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseba Zubia Zaballa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The design and development of a plastic optical fiber (POF macrobend temperature sensor is presented. The sensor has a linear response versus temperature at a fixed bend radius, with a sensitivity of . The sensor system used a dummy fiber-optic sensor for reference purposes having a resolution below 0.3 °C. A comprehensive experimental analysis was carried out to provide insight into the effect of different surrounding media on practical macro-bend POF sensor implementation. Experimental results are successfully compared with bend loss calculations.

  3. Current Developments on Optical Feedback Interferometry as an All-Optical Sensor for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Perchoux

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Optical feedback interferometry (OFI sensors are experiencing a consistent increase in their applications to biosensing due to their contactless nature, low cost and compactness, features that fit very well with current biophotonics research and market trends. The present paper is a review of the work in progress at UPC-CD6 and LAAS-CNRS related to the application of OFI to different aspects of biosensing, both in vivo and ex vivo. This work is intended to present the variety of opportunities and potential applications related to OFI that are available in the field. The activities presented are divided into two main sensing strategies: The measurement of optical path changes and the monitoring of flows, which correspond to sensing strategies linked to the reconstruction of changes of amplitude from the interferometric signal, and to classical Doppler frequency measurements, respectively. For optical path change measurements, measurements of transient pulses, usual in biosensing, together with the measurement of large displacements applied to designing palliative care instrumentation for Parkinson disease are discussed. Regarding the Doppler-based approach, progress in flow-related signal processing and applications in real-time monitoring of non-steady flows, human blood flow monitoring and OFI pressure myograph sensing will be presented. In all cases, experimental setups are discussed and results presented, showing the versatility of the technique. The described applications show the wide capabilities in biosensing of the OFI sensor, showing it as an enabler of low-cost, all-optical, high accuracy biomedical applications.

  4. Analysis and Improvement of Reflection-type Transverse Modulation Optical Voltage Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Sunan; YE Miaoyuan; XU Yan; CUI Ying

    2001-01-01

    Reflection-type transverse modulation optical voltage sensors, which employ reflection retarders to replace quarter-wave plates, are convenient for practical use. In previous literatures, the measured voltage was all applied to Bi4Ge3O12 crystal along the (110) direction for transverse modulation optical voltage sensor, and crystals are used as sensing materials. In this paper, reflection-type transverse modulation optical voltage sensor has been analyzed theoretically and a novel configuration in which the measured voltage is applied to a Bi4C-e3O12 crystal along the (001) direction with light wave passing through the crystal in the (110) direction has been proposed. According to this theoretical analysis, a novel optical voltage sensor, which can be used in a 220 kV optical fiber voltage transformer, has been designed and assembled. Experimental results showed that the linearity and the stability of the sensor during 24 hours can reach 0.3%.

  5. Structural health monitoring system of soccer arena based on optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkin, Victor V.; Churin, Alexey E.; Kharenko, Denis S.; Zheleznova, Maria A.; Shelemba, Ivan S.

    2014-05-01

    A structural health monitoring system based on optical sensors has been developed and installed on the indoor soccer arena "Zarya" in Novosibirsk. The system integrates 119 fiber optic sensors: 85 strain, 32 temperature and 2 displacement sensors. In addition, total station is used for measuring displacement in 45 control points. All of the constituents of the supporting structure are subjects for monitoring: long-span frames with under floor ties, connections, purlins and foundation.

  6. Optical Sensors for Biomolecules Using Nanoporous Sol-Gel Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jonathan; Zhou, Jing C.; Lan, Esther H.; Dunn, Bruce; Gillman, Patricia L.; Smith, Scott M.

    2004-01-01

    An important consideration for space missions to Mars is the ability to detect biosignatures. Solid-state sensing elements for optical detection of biological entities are possible using sol-gel based biologically active materials. We have used these materials as optical sensing elements in a variety of bioassays, including immunoassays and enzyme assays. By immobilizing an appropriate biomolecule in the sol-gel sensing element, we have successfully detected analytes such as amino acids and hormones. In the case of the amino acid glutamate, the enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase was the immobilized molecule, whereas in the case of the hormone cortisol, an anti-cortisol antibody was immobilized in the sensing element. In this previous work with immobilized enzymes and antibodies, excellent sensitivity and specificity were demonstrated in a variety of formats including bulk materials, thin films and fibers. We believe that the sol-gel approach is an attractive platform for bioastronautics sensing applications because of the ability to detect a wide range of entities such as amino acids, fatty acids, hopanes, porphyrins, etc. The sol-gel approach produces an optically transparent 3D silica matrix that forms around the biomolecule of interest, thus stabilizing its structure and functionality while allowing for optical detection. This encapsulation process protects the biomolecule and leads to a more "rugged" sensor. The nanoporous structure of the sol-gel matrix allows diffusion of small target molecules but keeps larger, biomolecules immobilized in the pores. We are currently developing these biologically active sol-gel materials into small portable devices for on-orbit cortisol detection

  7. Miniature temperature sensor with germania-core optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingyi; Zheng, Yangzi; Chen, Li Han; Chan, Chi Chiu; Dong, Xinyong; Shum, Perry Ping; Su, Haibin

    2015-07-13

    A miniature all-fiber temperature sensor is demonstrated by using a Michelson interferometer formed with a short length of Germania-core, silica-cladding optical fiber (Ge-fiber) fusion-spliced to a conventional single-mode fiber (SMF). Thanks to the large differential refractive index of the Ge-fiber sensing element, a reasonably small free spectral range (FSR) of 18.6 nm is achieved even with an as short as 0.9 mm Ge-fiber that may help us increase the measurement accuracy especially in point sensing applications and, at the same time, keep large measurement temperature range without overlapping reading problem. Experimental results show that high sensitivity of 89.0 pm/°C is achieved and the highest measurement temperature is up to 500°C.

  8. Optical Sensor for Characterizing the Phase Transition in Salted Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claverie, Rémy; Fontana, Marc D.; Duričković, Ivana; Bourson, Patrice; Marchetti, Mario; Chassot, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new optical sensor to characterize the solid-liquid phase transition in salted solutions. The probe mainly consists of a Raman spectrometer that extracts the vibrational properties from the light scattered by the salty medium. The spectrum of the O – H stretching band was shown to be strongly affected by the introduction of NaCl and the temperature change as well. A parameter SD defined as the ratio of the integrated intensities of two parts of this band allows to study the temperature and concentration dependences of the phase transition. Then, an easy and efficient signal processing and the exploitation of a modified Boltzmann equation give information on the phase transition. Validations were done on solutions with varying concentration of NaCl. PMID:22319327

  9. Integrated optical sensors using micromechanical bridges and cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaodong; Frankena, Hans J.

    1993-03-01

    Micromechanical bridges and cantilevers sensitive to external forces have been fabricated upon Si substrates. They are used as optical waveguides and part of sensor circuits. The waveguides consist of sandwiched layers of an SiO2 buffer, an Al2O3 waveguide and an SiO2 cover. The bridges and cantilevers with very small dimensions such as 100 micrometers in length, 5 micrometers in width and 2.5 micrometers in thickness have been successfully produced. Such bridge- or cantilever-shaped waveguide structures have been applied in acoustic signal detection and noise monitoring. In this paper, the bridge and cantilever structures will be analyzed and experimental results on sound measurement will be presented.

  10. Market potential for optical fiber sensors in the energy sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosselmann, T.

    2007-07-01

    For a long time electric power was taken as a natural unlimited resource. With globalisation the demand for energy has risen. This has brought rising prices for fossil fuels, as well as a diversification of power generation. Besides conventional fossil, nuclear plants are coming up again. Renewable energy sources are gaining importance resulting in recent boom of wind energy plants. In the past reliability and availability and an extremely long lifetime were of paramount importance. Today this has been added by cost, due to the global competition and the high fuel costs. New designs of power components have increased efficiency using lesser material. Higher efficiency causes inevitably higher stress on the materials, of which the machines are built. As a reduction of lifetime is not acceptable and maintenance costs are expected to be at a minimum, condition monitoring systems are going to being used now. This offers potentials for fibre optic sensor application.

  11. Design Ammonia Gas Detection System by Using Optical Fiber Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Bushra. R. Mhdi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Design study and construction of Ammonia gas detection using a fiber as a sensor to based on evanescent wave sensing technique was investigated. Multi-mode fiber type (PCS with core diameter (600μm and (50cm length used where plastic clad was removed by chemical etching for effective sensing area which coated with sol-gel film to enhance its absorption characteristics to evanescent wave around the optical spectrum emitted from halogen lamp measurements through different temperature rang (25-60oc with and without air using as a carrier to ammonia molecules are investigated. Finally sensing efficiency are monitored to ammonia gas it affected to different temperature and environmental condition are studied and our result are compatible to scientific publishes

  12. Highly Sensitive Fiber-Optic Faraday-Effect Magnetic Field Sensor Based on Yttrium Iron Garnet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The principle and performance of a fiber-optic Faraday-effect magnetic-field sensor based on an yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and two flux concentrations are described. A single polarization maintaining optical fiber links the sensor head to the source and detection system, in which the technique of phase shift cancellation is used to cancel the phase shift that accumulate in the optical fiber. Flux concentrators were exploited to enhance the YIG crystal magneto optic sensitivity .The sensor system exhibited a noise-equivalent field of 8 and a 3 dB bandwidth of ~10 MHz.

  13. Oxygen saturation in free-diving whales: optical sensor development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Herrera, Enoch; Vacas-Jacques, Paulino; Anderson, Rox; Zapol, Warren; Franco, Walfre

    2013-02-01

    Mass stranding of live whales has been explained by proposing many natural or human-related causes. Recent necropsy reports suggest a link between the mass stranding of beaked whales and the use of naval mid-frequency sonar. Surprisingly, whales have experienced symptoms similar to those caused by inert gas bubbles in human divers. Our goal is to develop a compact optical sensor to monitor the consumption of the oxygen stores in the muscle of freely diving whales. To this end we have proposed the use of a near-infrared phase-modulated frequency-domain spectrophotometer, in reflectance mode, to probe tissue oxygenation. Our probe consists of three main components: radiofrequency (RF) modulated light sources, a high-bandwidth avalanche photodiode with transimpedance amplifier, and a RF gain and phase detector. In this work, we concentrate on the design and performance of the light sensor, and its corresponding amplifier unit. We compare three state-of-the-art avalanche photodiodes: one through-hole device and two surface-mount detectors. We demonstrate that the gain due to the avalanche effect differs between sensors. The avalanche gain near maximum bias of the through-hole device exceeds by a factor of 2.5 and 8.3 that of the surface-mount detectors. We present the behavior of our assembled through-hole detector plus high-bandwidth transimpedance amplifier, and compare its performance to that of a commercially available module. The assembled unit enables variable gain, its phase noise is qualitatively lower, and the form factor is significantly smaller. Having a detecting unit that is compact, flexible, and functional is a milestone in the development of our tissue oxygenation tag.

  14. Field comparison of optical and clark cell dissolved-oxygen sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulford, J.M.; Davies, W.J.; Garcia, L.

    2005-01-01

    Three multi-parameter water-quality monitors equipped with either Clark cell type or optical type dissolved-oxygen sensors were deployed for 30 days in a brackish (salinity biofouling. The dissolved-oxygen sensors compared periodically to a hand-held dissolved oxygen sensor, but were not serviced or cleaned during the deployment. One of the Clark cell sensors and the optical sensor performed similarly during the deployment. The remaining Clark cell sensor was not aged correctly prior to deployment and did not perform as well as the other sensors. All sensors experienced substantial biofouling that gradually degraded the accuracy of the dissolved-oxygen measurement during the last half of the deployment period. Copyright ASCE 2005.

  15. Monitoring Pre-Stressed Composites Using Optical Fibre Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram Krishnamurthy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Residual stresses in fibre reinforced composites can give rise to a number of undesired effects such as loss of dimensional stability and premature fracture. Hence, there is significant merit in developing processing techniques to mitigate the development of residual stresses. However, tracking and quantifying the development of these fabrication-induced stresses in real-time using conventional non-destructive techniques is not straightforward. This article reports on the design and evaluation of a technique for manufacturing pre-stressed composite panels from unidirectional E-glass/epoxy prepregs. Here, the magnitude of the applied pre-stress was monitored using an integrated load-cell. The pre-stressing rig was based on a flat-bed design which enabled autoclave-based processing. A method was developed to end-tab the laminated prepregs prior to pre-stressing. The development of process-induced residual strain was monitored in-situ using embedded optical fibre sensors. Surface-mounted electrical resistance strain gauges were used to measure the strain when the composite was unloaded from the pre-stressing rig at room temperature. Four pre-stress levels were applied prior to processing the laminated preforms in an autoclave. The results showed that the application of a pre-stress of 108 MPa to a unidirectional [0]16 E-glass/913 epoxy preform, reduced the residual strain in the composite from −600 µε (conventional processing without pre-stress to approximately zero. A good correlation was observed between the data obtained from the surface-mounted electrical resistance strain gauge and the embedded optical fibre sensors. In addition to “neutralising” the residual stresses, superior axial orientation of the reinforcement can be obtained from pre-stressed composites. A subsequent publication will highlight the consequences of pres-stressing on fibre alignment, the tensile, flexural, compressive and fatigue performance of unidirectional E

  16. Passive radiation detection using optically active CMOS sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosiek, Luke; Schalk, Patrick D.

    2013-05-01

    Recently, there have been a number of small-scale and hobbyist successes in employing commodity CMOS-based camera sensors for radiation detection. For example, several smartphone applications initially developed for use in areas near the Fukushima nuclear disaster are capable of detecting radiation using a cell phone camera, provided opaque tape is placed over the lens. In all current useful implementations, it is required that the sensor not be exposed to visible light. We seek to build a system that does not have this restriction. While building such a system would require sophisticated signal processing, it would nevertheless provide great benefits. In addition to fulfilling their primary function of image capture, cameras would also be able to detect unknown radiation sources even when the danger is considered to be low or non-existent. By experimentally profiling the image artifacts generated by gamma ray and β particle impacts, algorithms are developed to identify the unique features of radiation exposure, while discarding optical interaction and thermal noise effects. Preliminary results focus on achieving this goal in a laboratory setting, without regard to integration time or computational complexity. However, future work will seek to address these additional issues.

  17. Intensity based sensor based on single mode optical fiber patchcords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayuwati, Dwi; Waluyo, Tomi Budi; Mulyanto, Imam

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes the use of several single mode (SM) fiber patchcords available commercially in the market for intensity based sensor by taking the benefit of bending loss phenomenon. Firtsly, the full transmission spectrum of all fiber patchcords were measured and analyzed to examine its bending properties at a series of wavelength using white light source and optical spectrum analyzer. Bending spectral at various bending diameter using single wavelength light sources were then measured for demonstration.Three good candidates for the intensity based sensor are SM600 fiber patchcord with 970 nm LED, SMF28 fiber patchcord with 1050 nm LED and 780HP fiber patchcord with 1310 nm LED which have noticeable bending sensitive area. Experiments show that the combination of the SMF28with 1050 nm LED has 30 mm measurement range which is the widest; with sensitivity 0.107 dB/mm and resolution 0.5 mm compared with combination of SM600 patchcord and LED 970 nm which has the best sensitivity (0.891 dB/mm) and resolution (0.06 mm) but smaller range measurement (10 mm). Some suitable applications for each fiber patchcord - light source pair have also been discussed.

  18. A Miniature Fiber-Optic Sensor for High-Resolution and High-Speed Temperature Sensing in Ocean Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-05

    fiber-optic sensor for high-resolution and high-speed temperature sensing in ocean environment Guigen Liu1, Ming Han1,* Weilin Hou2, Silvia Matt2... sensor performance. In this paper, we present an optical fiber sensor for the high-resolution and high-speed temperature profiling. The developed sensor ...silicon, such as large thermal diffusivity, notable thermo-optic effects and thermal expansion coefficients of silicon, the proposed sensor exhibits

  19. High capacity fiber optic sensor networks using hybrid multiplexing techniques and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qizhen; Li, Xiaolei; Zhang, Manliang; Liu, Qi; Liu, Hai; Liu, Deming

    2013-12-01

    Fiber optic sensor network is the development trend of fiber senor technologies and industries. In this paper, I will discuss recent research progress on high capacity fiber sensor networks with hybrid multiplexing techniques and their applications in the fields of security monitoring, environment monitoring, Smart eHome, etc. Firstly, I will present the architecture of hybrid multiplexing sensor passive optical network (HSPON), and the key technologies for integrated access and intelligent management of massive fiber sensor units. Two typical hybrid WDM/TDM fiber sensor networks for perimeter intrusion monitor and cultural relics security are introduced. Secondly, we propose the concept of "Microstructure-Optical X Domin Refecltor (M-OXDR)" for fiber sensor network expansion. By fabricating smart micro-structures with the ability of multidimensional encoded and low insertion loss along the fiber, the fiber sensor network of simple structure and huge capacity more than one thousand could be achieved. Assisted by the WDM/TDM and WDM/FDM decoding methods respectively, we built the verification systems for long-haul and real-time temperature sensing. Finally, I will show the high capacity and flexible fiber sensor network with IPv6 protocol based hybrid fiber/wireless access. By developing the fiber optic sensor with embedded IPv6 protocol conversion module and IPv6 router, huge amounts of fiber optic sensor nodes can be uniquely addressed. Meanwhile, various sensing information could be integrated and accessed to the Next Generation Internet.

  20. Magnetic optical sensor particles: a flexible analytical tool for microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungerböck, Birgit; Fellinger, Siegfried; Sulzer, Philipp; Abel, Tobias; Mayr, Torsten

    2014-05-21

    In this study we evaluate magnetic optical sensor particles (MOSePs) with incorporated sensing functionalities regarding their applicability in microfluidic devices. MOSePs can be separated from the surrounding solution to form in situ sensor spots within microfluidic channels, while read-out is accomplished outside the chip. These magnetic sensor spots exhibit benefits of sensor layers (high brightness and convenient usage) combined with the advantages of dispersed sensor particles (ease of integration). The accumulation characteristics of MOSePs with different diameters were investigated as well as the in situ sensor spot stability at varying flow rates. Magnetic sensor spots were stable at flow rates specific to microfluidic applications. Furthermore, MOSePs were optimized regarding fiber optic and imaging read-out systems, and different referencing schemes were critically discussed on the example of oxygen sensors. While the fiber optic sensing system delivered precise and accurate results for measurement in microfluidic channels, limitations due to analyte consumption were found for microscopic oxygen imaging. A compensation strategy is provided, which utilizes simple pre-conditioning by exposure to light. Finally, new application possibilities were addressed, being enabled by the use of MOSePs. They can be used for microscopic oxygen imaging in any chip with optically transparent covers, can serve as flexible sensor spots to monitor enzymatic activity or can be applied to form fixed sensor spots inside microfluidic structures, which would be inaccessible to integration of sensor layers.