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Sample records for optical oxygen sensors

  1. Optical Oxygen Sensors for Applications in Microfluidic Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha M. Grist

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The presence and concentration of oxygen in biological systems has a large impact on the behavior and viability of many types of cells, including the differentiation of stem cells or the growth of tumor cells. As a result, the integration of oxygen sensors within cell culture environments presents a powerful tool for quantifying the effects of oxygen concentrations on cell behavior, cell viability, and drug effectiveness. Because microfluidic cell culture environments are a promising alternative to traditional cell culture platforms, there is recent interest in integrating oxygen-sensing mechanisms with microfluidics for cell culture applications. Optical, luminescence-based oxygen sensors, in particular, show great promise in their ability to be integrated with microfluidics and cell culture systems. These sensors can be highly sensitive and do not consume oxygen or generate toxic byproducts in their sensing process. This paper presents a review of previously proposed optical oxygen sensor types, materials and formats most applicable to microfluidic cell culture, and analyzes their suitability for this and other in vitro applications.

  2. A fibre-optic oxygen sensor for monitoring human breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rongsheng; Formenti, Federico; Obeid, Andy; Hahn, Clive E W; Farmery, Andrew D

    2013-09-01

    The development and construction of a tapered-tip fibre-optic fluorescence based oxygen sensor is described. The sensor is suitable for fast and real-time monitoring of human breathing. The sensitivity and response time of the oxygen sensor were evaluated in vitro with a gas pressure chamber system, where oxygen partial pressure was rapidly changed between 5 and 15 kPa, and then in vivo in five healthy adult participants who synchronized their breathing to a metronome set at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 breaths min(-1). A Datex Ultima medical gas analyser was used to monitor breathing rate as a comparator. The sensor's response time in vitro was less than 150 ms, which allows accurate continuous measurement of inspired and expired oxygen pressure. Measurements of breathing rate by means of our oxygen sensor and of the Datex Ultima were in strong agreement. The results demonstrate that the device can reliably resolve breathing rates up to 60 breaths min(-1), and that it is a suitable cost-effective alternative for monitoring breathing rates and end-tidal oxygen partial pressure in the clinical setting. The rapid response time of the sensor may allow its use for monitoring rapid breathing rates as occur in children and the newborn.

  3. A robust and reliable optical trace oxygen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, G. R.; Holmes-Smith, A. S.; Uttamlal, M.; Mitchell, C.; Shannon, P. H.

    2017-05-01

    In applications of nitrogen (N2) generation, industrial gas manufacturing and food packaging there is a need to ensure oxygen (O2) is absent from the environment, even at the lowest concentration levels. Therefore, there has been an increased growth in the development of trace O2 parts per million (ppm) sensors over the past decade to detect and quantify the concentration of molecular O2 in the environment whether it be dissolved or gaseous O2. The majority of commercially available trace O2 sensors are based on electrochemical, zirconia and paramagnetic technologies. Here, the development of a luminescence-based optical trace O2 sensor is presented. Luminescence-based sensing is now regarded as one of the best techniques for the detection and quantification of O2. This is due to the high detection sensitivity, no O2 is consumed and there are a vast array of luminescent indicators and sensing platforms (polymers) that can be selected to suit the desired application. The sensor will be shown to operate from -30 °C to +60 °C in the 0-1000 ppm and/or 0-1200 μbar partial pressure of oxygen (ppO2) range and is equipped with temperature and pressure compensation. The luminescence non-depleting principle, sensor specifications and miniaturized nature offers an attractive alternative to other sensing technologies and advantages over other luminescence-based O2 ppm sensors.

  4. Oxygen saturation in free-diving whales: optical sensor development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Herrera, Enoch; Vacas-Jacques, Paulino; Anderson, Rox; Zapol, Warren; Franco, Walfre

    2013-02-01

    Mass stranding of live whales has been explained by proposing many natural or human-related causes. Recent necropsy reports suggest a link between the mass stranding of beaked whales and the use of naval mid-frequency sonar. Surprisingly, whales have experienced symptoms similar to those caused by inert gas bubbles in human divers. Our goal is to develop a compact optical sensor to monitor the consumption of the oxygen stores in the muscle of freely diving whales. To this end we have proposed the use of a near-infrared phase-modulated frequency-domain spectrophotometer, in reflectance mode, to probe tissue oxygenation. Our probe consists of three main components: radiofrequency (RF) modulated light sources, a high-bandwidth avalanche photodiode with transimpedance amplifier, and a RF gain and phase detector. In this work, we concentrate on the design and performance of the light sensor, and its corresponding amplifier unit. We compare three state-of-the-art avalanche photodiodes: one through-hole device and two surface-mount detectors. We demonstrate that the gain due to the avalanche effect differs between sensors. The avalanche gain near maximum bias of the through-hole device exceeds by a factor of 2.5 and 8.3 that of the surface-mount detectors. We present the behavior of our assembled through-hole detector plus high-bandwidth transimpedance amplifier, and compare its performance to that of a commercially available module. The assembled unit enables variable gain, its phase noise is qualitatively lower, and the form factor is significantly smaller. Having a detecting unit that is compact, flexible, and functional is a milestone in the development of our tissue oxygenation tag.

  5. Intrinsic artefacts in optical oxygen sensors--how reliable are our measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Philipp; Staudinger, Christoph; Borisov, Sergey M; Regensburger, Johannes; Klimant, Ingo

    2015-03-01

    Optical oxygen sensing is of broad interest in many areas of research, such as medicine, food processing, and micro- and marine biology. The operation principle of optical oxygen sensors is well established and these sensors are routinely employed in lab and field experiments. Ultratrace oxygen sensors, which enable measurements in the sub-nanomolar region (dissolved oxygen), are becoming increasingly important. Such sensors prominently exhibit phenomena that complicate calibration and measurements. However, these phenomena are not constrained to ultratrace sensors; rather, these effects are inherent to the way optical oxygen sensors work and may influence any optical oxygen measurement when certain conditions are met. This scenario is especially true for applications that deal with high-excitation light intensities, such as microscopy and microfluidic applications. Herein, we present various effects that we could observe in our studies with ultratrace oxygen sensors and discuss the reasons for their appearance, the mechanism by which they influence measurements, and how to best reduce their impact. The phenomena discussed are oxygen photoconsumption in the sensor material; depletion of the dye ground state by high-excitation photon-flux values, which can compromise both intensity and ratiometric-based measurements; triplet-triplet annihilation; and singlet-oxygen accumulation, which affects measurements at very low oxygen concentrations.

  6. Field comparison of optical and clark cell dissolved-oxygen sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulford, J.M.; Davies, W.J.; Garcia, L.

    2005-01-01

    Three multi-parameter water-quality monitors equipped with either Clark cell type or optical type dissolved-oxygen sensors were deployed for 30 days in a brackish (salinity biofouling. The dissolved-oxygen sensors compared periodically to a hand-held dissolved oxygen sensor, but were not serviced or cleaned during the deployment. One of the Clark cell sensors and the optical sensor performed similarly during the deployment. The remaining Clark cell sensor was not aged correctly prior to deployment and did not perform as well as the other sensors. All sensors experienced substantial biofouling that gradually degraded the accuracy of the dissolved-oxygen measurement during the last half of the deployment period. Copyright ASCE 2005.

  7. An Optical Oxygen Sensor for Long-Term Continuous Monitoring of Dissolved Oxygen in Perfused Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, F. G.; Jeevarajan, A. S.; Anderson, M. M.

    2002-01-01

    For long-term growth of man1ITlalian cells in perfused bioreactors, it is essential to monitor the concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO) present in the culture medium to quantitate and control level of DO. Continuous measurement of the amount of DO in the cell culture medium in-line under sterile conditions in NASA's perfused bioreactor requires that the oxygen sensor provide increased sensitivity and be sterilizable and nontoxic. Additionally, long-term cell culture experiments require that the calibration be maintained several weeks or months. Although there are a number of sensors for dissolved oxygen on the market and under development elsewhere, very few meet these stringent conditions. An optical oxygen sensor (BOXY) based on dynamic fluorescent quenching and a pulsed blue LED light source was developed in our laboratory to address these requirements. Tris( 4,7 -diphenyl-l, 1 O-phenanthroline )ruthenium(II) chloride is employed as the fluorescent dye indicator. The sensing element consists of a glass capillary (OD 4.0 mm; ID 2.0 mm) coated internally with a thin layer of the fluorescent dye in silicone matrix and overlayed with a black shielding layer. Irradiation of the sensing element with blue light (blue LED with emission maximum at 475 nm) generates a red fluorescence centered at 626 nm. The fluorescence intensity is correlated to the concentration of DO present in the culture medium, following the modified non-linear Stern-Volmer equation. By using a pulsed irradiating light source, the problem of dye-bleaching, which is often encountered in long-term continuous measurements of tIns type, 'is minimized. To date we achieved sensor resolution of 0.3 mmHg at 50 mmHg p02, and 0.6 mmHg at 100 mmHg p02, with a response time of about one minute. Calibration was accomplished in sterile phosphate-buffered saline with a blood-gas analyzer (BGA) measurement as reference. Stand-alone software was also developed to control the sensor and bioreactor as well as to

  8. In vitro performance of a perfusion and oxygenation optical sensor using a unique liver phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Tony J.; King, Travis J.; Long, Ruiqi; Ericson, M. N.; Wilson, Mark A.; McShane, Michael J.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2012-03-01

    Between the years 1999 and 2008, on average 2,052 people died per year on the waiting list for liver transplants. Monitoring perfusion and oxygenation in transplanted organs in the 7 to 14 days period post-transplant can enhance graft and patient survival rates, and resultantly increase the availability of organs. In this work, we present in vitro results using a unique liver phantom that support the ability of our sensor to detect perfusion changes in the portal vein at low levels (50 mL/min . 4.5% of normal level). Our sensor measures diffuse reflection from three wavelengths (735, 805 and 940 nm) around the hemoglobin isobestic point (805 nm) to determine perfusion and oxygenation separately. To assess the sensitivity of our sensor to flow changes in the low range, we used two peristaltic pumps to pump a dye solution mimicking the optical properties of oxygenated blood, at various rates, through a PDMS based phantom mimicking the optical properties of liver tissue. The collected pulsatile signal increased by 120% (2.2X) for every 100 mL/min flow rise for all three wavelengths in the range 50 to 500 mL/min. In addition, we used different dye mixtures to mimic oxygenation changes at constant perfusion/flow levels. The optical properties of the dye mixtures mimic oxygen saturations ranging between 0 and 100%. The sensor was shown to be sensitive to changes in oxygen saturations above 50%.

  9. Magnetically remote-controlled optical sensor spheres for monitoring oxygen or pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistlberger, Günter; Koren, Klaus; Borisov, Sergey M; Klimant, Ingo

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic sensor macrospheres (MagSeMacs), i.e., stainless steel spheres coated with optical chemical sensors, are presented as an alternative to existing optical sensor patches and fiber-optical dip-probes. Such spheres can either be reversibly attached to the tip of an optical fiber (dip-probe) or trapped inside a vessel for read-out through the side wall. Moving the magnetic separator at the exterior enables measurements at varying positions with a single sensor. Moreover, the sensor's replacement is rapid and contactless. We measured dissolved oxygen or pH in stirred liquids, rotating flasks, and 24-well plates with a SensorDish-reader device for parallel cell culture monitoring. In these applications, MagSeMacs proved to be advantageous over conventional sensor patches and magnetic optical sensor particles because of their magnetism, spherical shape, reflectance, and size. These properties resulted in strong but reversible fixation, magnetic remote-controllability, short response times, high signal intensities, and simplified handling.

  10. Miniature dissolved oxygen and turbulence optical sensor for river and coastal environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapezza, Edward M.; Lombardi, Gabrial; Butman, Jerry; Babb, Ivar

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes an innovative miniature optical sensor for predicting dissolved oxygen concentrations and measuring turbulence in river and littoral water columns. The dissolved oxygen and turbulence sensor consists of a single-frequency laser transmitter and a photodetector on which the scattered light from the turbulent water at the base of a dam or spillway is coherently mixed with a sample of the transmitted beam. This miniature sensor could be used both upstream and downsteam of dams and weirs to predict the amount of dissolved oxygen and turbulence in these waters. It could also be used on mobile platforms, such as unmanned underwater vehicles (UUV's), to monitor the edges of biological or chemical plumes or for wake follow platforms, schools of fish or marine mammals or on stationary unattended underwater sensors to monitor natural aeration and turbulence in littoral and riverine waters. Arrays of fixed unattended sensors could be used to detect the wake of transiting submerged vehicles, scuba divers, marine mammals or large schools of fish. A mobile platform equipped with a miniature sensor could to be cued to the general location and depth of an underwater target and then the platform could use this small aperture sensor to acquire and follow the wake. This dissolved oxygen and turbulence sensor system could be miniaturized and packaged into a very small volume; approximately the size of a wristwatch.

  11. A Fiber Optic Catalytic Sensor for Neutral Atom Measurements in Oxygen Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Vesel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The presented sensor for neutral oxygen atom measurement in oxygen plasma is a catalytic probe which uses fiber optics and infrared detection system to measure the gray body radiation of the catalyst. The density of neutral atoms can be determined from the temperature curve of the probe, because the catalyst is heated predominantly by the dissipation of energy caused by the heterogeneous surface recombination of neutral atoms. The advantages of this sensor are that it is simple, reliable, easy to use, noninvasive, quantitative and can be used in plasma discharge regions. By using different catalyst materials the sensor can also be applied for detection of neutral atoms in other plasmas. Sensor design, operation, example measurements and new measurement procedure for systematic characterization are presented.

  12. Robust optical oxygen sensors based on polymer-bound NIR-emitting platinum(II)-benzoporphyrins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutter, L.H.; Müller, B.J.; Koren, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Several advanced optical oxygen sensor materials are presented. They are based on bright NIR-emitting platinum(II)-benzoporphyrins covalently incorporated into a variety of polymeric matrices. The dye-polymer conjugates are prepared either via Suzuki coupling of the brominated porphyrins to the s......Several advanced optical oxygen sensor materials are presented. They are based on bright NIR-emitting platinum(II)-benzoporphyrins covalently incorporated into a variety of polymeric matrices. The dye-polymer conjugates are prepared either via Suzuki coupling of the brominated porphyrins...... dyes showed significant drift of their calibration. Additionally, we present a new synthetic method for preparation of analytically pure benzoporphyrins via simple 1-step template condensation which a promising alternative to the commonly used Lindsey method. © the Partner Organisations 2014....

  13. Fiber-optic fluorescence-quenching oxygen partial pressure sensor using platinum octaethylporphyrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, John J; Hickey, Michelle; Phillips, Justin P; Kyriacou, Panayiotis A

    2016-07-20

    The development and bench testing of a fiber-optic oxygen sensor is described. The sensor is designed for measurement of tissue oxygen levels in the mucosa of the digestive tract. The materials and construction are optimized for insertion through the mouth for measurement in the lower esophagus. An oxygen-sensitive fluorescence-quenching film was applied as a solution of platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP) poly(ethyl methacrylate) (PEMA) and dichloromethane and dip coated onto the distal tip of the fiber. The sensor was tested by comparing relative fluorescence when immersed in liquid water at 37°C, at a range of partial pressures (0-101 kPa). Maximum relative fluorescence at most oxygen concentrations was seen when the PtOEP concentration was 0.1  g.L-1, four layers of coating solution were applied, and a fiber core radius of 600 μm was selected, giving a Stern-Volmer constant of 0.129  kPa-1. The performance of the sensor is suitable for many in vivo applications, particularly mucosal measurements. It has sufficient sensitivity, is sterilizable, and is sufficiently flexible and robust for insertion via the mouth without damage to the probe or risk of harm to the patient.

  14. A New Optical Oxygen Sensor Reveals Spatial and Temporal Variations of Dissolved Oxygen at Ecohydrological Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, T.; Schmidt, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Vieweg, M.; Harjung, A.

    2015-12-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of dissolved oxygen (DO) at highly reactive aquatic interfaces, e.g. in the hyporheic zone (HZ), is a primary indicator of redox and interlinked biogeochemical zonations. However, continuous measuring of DO over time and depths is challenging due to the dynamic and potentially heterogenic nature of the HZ. We further developed a novel technology for spatially continuous in situ vertical oxygen profiling based on optical sensing (Vieweg et al, 2013). Continuous vertical measurements to a depth of 50 cm are obtained by the motor-controlled insertion of a side-firing Polymer Optical Fiber (POF) into tubular DO probes. Our technology allows minimally invasive DO measurements without DO consumption at high spatial resolution in the mm range. The reduced size of the tubular probe (diameter 5 mm) substantially minimizes disturbance of flow conditions. We tested our technology in situ in the HZ of an intermittent stream during the drying period. Repeated DO measurements were taken over a total duration of six weeks at two locations up- and downstream of a pool-cascade sequence. We were able to precisely map the spatial DO distribution which exhibited sharp gradients and rapid temporal changes as a function of changing hydrologic conditions. Our new vertical oxygen sensing technology will help to provide new insights to the coupling of transport of DO and biogeochemical reactions at aquatic interfaces. Vieweg, M., Trauth, N., Fleckenstein, J. H., Schmidt, C. (2013): Robust Optode-Based Method for Measuring in Situ Oxygen Profiles in Gravelly Streambeds. Environmental Science & Technology. doi:10.1021/es401040w

  15. Real-time frequency-domain fiber optic sensor for intra-arterial blood oxygen measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcala, J. R.; Scott, Ian L.; Parker, Jennifer W.; Atwater, Beauford W.; Yu, Clement; Fischer, Russell; Bellingrath, K.

    1993-05-01

    A real time frequency domain phosphorimeter capable of measuring precise and accurate excited state lifetimes for determining oxygen is described. This frequency domain instrument does not make use of cross correlation techniques traditionally used in frequency domain fluorometers. Instead, the electrical signal from the detector is filtered to contain only the first several harmonics. This filtered signal is then sampled and averaged over a few thousand cycles. The absolute phase and absolute modulation of each sampled harmonic of the excitation and of the luminescence is computed by employing fast Fourier transform algorithms. The phase delay and the modulation ratio is then calculated at each harmonic frequency. A least squares fit is performed in the frequency domain to obtain the lifetimes of discrete exponentials. Oxygen concentrations are computed from these lifetimes. Prototypes based on these techniques were built employing commercially available components. Results from measurements in saline solution and in the arterial blood of dogs show that oxygen concentrations can be determined reproducibly. The system drift is less than 1% in over 100 hours of continuous operation. The performance of fiber optic sensors was evaluated in dogs over a period of 10 hours. The sensors tracked changes in arterial oxygen tension over the course of the experiment without instabilities. The overall response of the system was about 90 seconds. The update time was 3 seconds.

  16. Real-time frequency domain temperature and oxygen sensor with a single optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, S C; Xu, Z; Izatt, J A; Alcala, J R

    1997-11-01

    The combined excited-state phosphorescence life-times of an alexandrite crystal and platinum tetraphenylporphyrin Pt(TPP) in a single-fiber sensor are used to monitor temperature and oxygen concentration in the physiological range from 15-45 degrees C and 0-50% O2 with precision of 0.24 degree C and 0.15% O2 and accuracy of 0.28 degree C and 0.2% O2. A 500-micron cubic alexandrite crystal bound to the distal end of a 750-micron-diameter optical fiber core and the Pt(TPP) coated circumferentially with a length of 1 cm from the end of the same fiber are excited with pulsed super-bright blue LED light. This apparatus uses a 125-kHz sampler for data acquisition and frequency domain methods for signal processing. The instrument amplifies both the dc and ac components of the photomultiplier output and band limits the signal to 20 kHz. The fundamental frequency of the excitation is set to 488.3 Hz and the highest harmonic used is the 35th. This bandlimited signal is sampled and averaged over a few hundred cycles in the time domain. The frequency domain representation of the data is obtained by employing fast Fourier transform algorithms. The phase delay and the modulation ratio of each sampled harmonic are then computed. At least four log-spaced harmonic phases or modulations are averaged before decoding the two lifetimes of temperature and oxygen phosphorescent sensors. A component of zero lifetime is introduced to account for the excitation backscatter leakage through optical interference filters seen by the photodetector. Linear and second-order empirical polynomials are employed to compute the temperatures and oxygen concentrations from the inverse lifetimes. In the situation of constant oxygen concentration, the lifetime of Pt(TPP) changes with temperature but can be compensated using the measured temperature lifetime. The system drift is 0.24 degree C for the temperature measurement and 0.59% for the oxygen concentration measurement over 30 h of continuous operation

  17. Optical monitoring of kidney oxygenation and hemodynamics using a miniaturized near-infrared sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadgan, Babak; Macnab, Andrew; Nigro, Mark; Nguan, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    Background: Following human renal allograft transplant primary graft dysfunction can occur early in the postoperative period as a result of acute tubular necrosis, acute rejection, drug toxicity, and vascular complications. Successful treatment of graft dysfunction requires early detection and accurate diagnosis so that disease-specific medical and/or surgical intervention can be provided promptly. However, current diagnostic methods are not sensitive or specific enough, so that identifying the cause of graft dysfunction is problematic and often delayed. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is an established optical method that monitors changes in tissue hemodynamics and oxygenation in real time. We report the feasibility of directly monitoring kidney the kidney in an animal model using NIRS to detect renal ischemia and hypoxia. Methods: In an anesthetized pig, a customized continuous wave spatially resolved (SR) NIRS sensor was fixed directly to the surface of the surgically exposed kidney. Changes in the concentration of oxygenated (O2Hb) deoxygenated (HHb) and total hemoglobin (THb) were monitored before, during and after renal artery clamping and reperfusion, and the resulting fluctuations in chromophore concentration from baseline used to measure variations in renal perfusion and oxygenation. Results: On clamping the renal artery THb and O2Hb concentrations declined progressively while HHb rose. With reperfusion after releasing the artery clamp O2Hb and THb rose while HHb fell with all parameters returning to its baseline. This pattern was similar in all three trials. Conclusion: This pilot study indicates that a miniaturized NIRS sensor applied directly to the surface of a kidney in an animal model can detect the onset of renal ischemia and tissue hypoxia. With modification, our NIRS-based method may contribute to early detection of renal vascular complications and graft dysfunction following renal transplant.

  18. Optical Sensors for Hydrogen and Oxygen for Unambiguous Detection in Their Mutual Presence Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Phase I SBIR project is to develop sensors that can discriminate the presence of combustible gases like oxygen (O2) in hydrogen (H2) or H2 in O2...

  19. A flowing liquid test system for assessing the linearity and time-response of rapid fibre optic oxygen partial pressure sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R; Hahn, C E W; Farmery, A D

    2012-08-15

    The development of a methodology for testing the time response, linearity and performance characteristics of ultra fast fibre optic oxygen sensors in the liquid phase is presented. Two standard medical paediatric oxygenators are arranged to provide two independent extracorporeal circuits. Flow from either circuit can be diverted over the sensor under test by means of a system of rapid cross-over solenoid valves exposing the sensor to an abrupt change in oxygen partial pressure, P O2. The system is also capable of testing the oxygen sensor responses to changes in temperature, carbon dioxide partial pressure P CO2 and pH in situ. Results are presented for a miniature fibre optic oxygen sensor constructed in-house with a response time ≈ 50 ms and a commercial fibre optic sensor (Ocean Optics Foxy), when tested in flowing saline and stored blood.

  20. Tuning the dynamic range and sensitivity of optical oxygen-sensors by employing differently substituted polystyrene-derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Klaus; Hutter, Lukas; Enko, Barbara; Pein, Andreas; Borisov, Sergey M.; Klimant, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Ten different polystyrene-derivatives were tested with respect to their potential use as matrix materials for optical oxygen sensors in combination with the platinum(II) meso-tetra(4-fluorophenyl)tetrabenzoporphyrin as indicator dye. Either halogen atoms or bulky residues were introduced as substituents on the phenyl ring. A fine-tuning of the sensor sensitivity was achieved, without compromising solubility of the indicator in the matrix by providing a chemical environment very similar to polystyrene (PS), a standard matrix in optical oxygen sensors. To put the results into perspective, the studied materials were compared to PS regarding sensitivity of the sensor, molecular weight and glass-transition temperature. The materials promise to be viable alternatives to PS with respect to the requirements posed in various sensor application fields. Some of the polymers (e.g. poly(2,6-dichlorostyrene)) promise to be of use in applications requiring measurements from 0 to 100% oxygen due to linearity across this range. Poly(4-tert-butylstyrene) and poly(2,6-fluorostyrene), on the other hand, yield sensors with increased sensitivity. Sensor stability was evaluated as a function of the matrix, a topic which has not received a lot of interest so far. PMID:23576846

  1. Oxygen sensing with an absolute optical sensor based on biluminescence (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas Redondo, Caterin; Reineke, Sebastian

    2017-06-01

    exciton dynamic range extended up to nine orders of magnitude between nanosecond-lifetime fluorescence and millisecond-lifetime phosphorescence. In this presentation, we will report on the oxygen sensing characteristics of this luminescent system compared to a benchmarked single state optical sensor. Such properties can be evaluated because of the sensitivity of the triplet state to oxygen and therefore, we investigate the dependence of the persistent phosphorescence on the oxygen content. Furthermore, we will address our efforts towards the potential integration of novel optical biluminescent sensing into organic electronics.

  2. Online analysis of oxygen inside silicon-glass microreactors with integrated optical sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehgartner, Josef; Sulzer, Philipp; Burger, Tobias;

    2016-01-01

    a resolution of 0.2-0.6 hPa at low oxygen concentrations (ambient air oxygen concentrations. The sensors were integrated into different silicon-glass microreactors which were manufactured using mass production compatible processes. The obtained microreactors were applied for online...... monitoring of enzyme transformations, including d-alanine or d-phenylalanine oxidation by d-amino acid oxidase, and glucose oxidation by glucose oxidase....

  3. Solid state oxygen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzon, F.H.; Brosha, E.L.

    1997-12-09

    A potentiometric oxygen sensor is formed having a logarithmic response to a differential oxygen concentration while operating as a Nernstian-type sensor. Very thin films of mixed conducting oxide materials form electrode services while permitting diffusional oxygen access to the interface between the zirconia electrolyte and the electrode. Diffusion of oxygen through the mixed oxide is not rate-limiting. Metal electrodes are not used so that morphological changes in the electrode structure do not occur during extended operation at elevated temperatures. 6 figs.

  4. Fast pesticide detection inside microfluidic device with integrated optical pH, oxygen sensors and algal fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahirbegi, Islam Bogachan; Ehgartner, Josef; Sulzer, Philipp; Zieger, Silvia; Kasjanow, Alice; Paradiso, Mirco; Strobl, Martin; Bouwes, Dominique; Mayr, Torsten

    2017-02-15

    The necessities of developing fast, portable, cheap and easy to handle pesticide detection platforms are getting attention of scientific and industrial communities. Although there are some approaches to develop microchip based pesticide detection platforms, there is no compact microfluidic device for the complementary, fast, cheap, reusable and reliable analysis of different pesticides. In this work, a microfluidic device is developed for in-situ analysis of pesticide concentration detected via metabolism/photosynthesis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algal cells (algae) in tap water. Algae are grown in glass based microfluidic chip, which contains integrated optical pH and oxygen sensors in a portable system for on-site detection. In addition, intrinsic algal fluorescence is detected to analyze the pesticide concentration in parallel to pH and oxygen sensors with integrated fluorescence detectors. The response of the algae under the effect of different concentrations of pesticides is evaluated and complementary inhibition effects depending on the pesticide concentration are demonstrated. The three different sensors allow the determination of various pesticide concentrations in the nanomolar concentration range. The miniaturized system provides the fast quantification of pesticides in less than 10min and enables the study of toxic effects of different pesticides on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii green algae. Consequently, the microfluidic device described here provides fast and complementary detection of different pesticides with algae in a novel glass based microfluidic device with integrated optical pH, oxygen sensors and algal fluorescence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A fibre optic oxygen sensor that detects rapid PO2 changes under simulated conditions of cyclical atelectasis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formenti, Federico; Chen, Rongsheng; McPeak, Hanne; Matejovic, Martin; Farmery, Andrew D; Hahn, Clive E W

    2014-01-15

    Two challenges in the management of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome are the difficulty in diagnosing cyclical atelectasis, and in individualising mechanical ventilation therapy in real-time. Commercial optical oxygen sensors can detect [Formula: see text] oscillations associated with cyclical atelectasis, but are not accurate at saturation levels below 90%, and contain a toxic fluorophore. We present a computer-controlled test rig, together with an in-house constructed ultra-rapid sensor to test the limitations of these sensors when exposed to rapidly changing [Formula: see text] in blood in vitro. We tested the sensors' responses to simulated respiratory rates between 10 and 60 breaths per minute. Our sensor was able to detect the whole amplitude of the imposed [Formula: see text] oscillations, even at the highest respiratory rate. We also examined our sensor's resistance to clot formation by continuous in vivo deployment in non-heparinised flowing animal blood for 24h, after which no adsorption of organic material on the sensor's surface was detectable by scanning electron microscopy.

  6. Enzyme-based online monitoring and measurement of antioxidant activity using an optical oxygen sensor coupled to an HPLC system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Michela; Nugroho Prasetyo, Endry; Koren, Klaus; Nyanhongo, Gibson S; Murkovic, Michael; Klimant, Ingo; Guebitz, Georg M

    2013-03-01

    It is estimated that up to 50% of the adult population take antioxidant products on a daily basis to promote their health status. Strangely, despite the well-recognized importance of antioxidants, currently there is no international standard index for labeling owing to the lack of standardized methods for antioxidant measurement in complex products. Here, an online high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based method to detect and measure the total antioxidant capacity of antioxidant samples is presented. In this approach, complex samples containing antioxidants are separated by the HPLC system, which is further coupled to an antioxidant measuring system consisting of an optical oxygen sensor, laccase, and tetramethoxy azobismethylene quinone (TMAMQ). The antioxidants, separated via HPLC, reduce TMAMQ to syringaldazine, which is then reoxidized by laccase while simultaneously consuming O(2). The amount of consumed oxygen is directly proportional to the concentration of antioxidants and is measured by the optical oxygen sensor. The sensor is fabricated by coating a glass capillary with an oxygen-sensitive thin layer made of platinum(II) meso-tetra(4-fluorophenyl)tetrabenzoporphyrin and polystyrene, which makes real-time analysis possible (t(90) = 1.1 s in solution). Four selected antioxidants (3 mM), namely, catechin, ferulic acid, naringenin (used as a control), and Trolox, representing flavonol, hydrocinnamic acid, flavanone, and vitamin E, respectively, were injected into the online antioxidant monitoring system, separated, and then mixed with the TMAMQ/laccase solution, which resulted in oxygen consumption. This study shows that, with the use of such a system, the antioxidant activity of individual antioxidant molecules in a sample and their contribution to the total antioxidant activity of the sample can be correctly assigned.

  7. Definition and use of the experimental sensible parameters to characterize sensitivity and precision of a generic oxygen optical sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badocco, Denis; Pastore, Paolo

    2008-03-15

    Experimental data, obtained with an oxygen optical sensor constituted by a polysulfone layer embedding ruthenium(II)(4,7-diphenyl-l,l0-phenanthroline)octylsulfate (Ru(dpp)OS), were rationalized by using the digital simulation technique and generalized for different sensors. The experimental, asymmetric, emission shape was used to define two sensible parameters, ASY (asymmetry factor) and DeltaI(%) (percent variation of emission intensity), to characterize the sensitivity of a generic oxygen optical sensor (represented by the Stern-Volmer constant, K'(sv)). Correlations between ASY and K'(sv) and between DeltaI(%) and K'(sv) were established, and a double working curve was proposed to evaluate with a single light emission measurement the K'(sv) value with the best precision. Sensitive membranes (-log K'(sv) = pK'(sv) 2.5) had constant but scarce precisions in a large %O(2) interval. For %O(2) up to 21% (air) good values are pK'(sv)= 0.5-1.0. In order to monitor a wider %O(2) range, pK'(sv) = 1.5-2.0 are good choices. A simple mathematical model allowed one to estimate the oxygen diffusion coefficient inside the layer, D(O2), and its solubility in the polymer matrix, s(O2), from the simple measurement of the membrane thickness, response time, t(90), and luminescence lifetime. D(O2) = 2 x 10(-8) cm2 s(-1) and s(O2) = 2.2 x 10(-3) mol atm(-1) dm(-3) [corrected] were estimated for our membranes. The proposed working curves gave very good results even with literature data.

  8. Fabrication and laser patterning of polystyrene optical oxygen sensor films for lab-on-a-chip applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grist, S M; Oyunerdene, N; Flueckiger, J; Kim, J; Wong, P C; Chrostowski, L; Cheung, K C

    2014-11-21

    We present a novel and simple method for patterning oxygen-sensitive polystyrene thin films and demonstrate its potential for integration with microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices. Optical oxygen sensing films composed of polystyrene with an embedded luminescent oxygen-sensitive dye present a convenient option for the measurement of oxygen levels in microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip devices; however, patterning and integrating the films with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices has proven difficult due to a residue after dry etch patterning that inhibits subsequent PDMS bonding. Our new method uses mask-less laser ablation by a commercial laser ablation system to define the outline of the structures and subsequent bulk film removal by aqueous lift-off. Because the bulk film is peeled or lifted off of the substrate rather than etched, the process is compatible with standard PDMS plasma bonding. We used ToF-SIMS analysis to investigate how laser ablation facilitates this fabrication process as well as why dry etching polystyrene inhibits PDMS plasma bonding. The results of this analysis showed evidence of chemical species formed during the laser ablation and dry etching processes that can produce these effects. Our new method's mask-less nature, simplicity, speed, and compatibility with PDMS bonding make it ideally suited for single-use lab-on-a-chip applications. To demonstrate the method's compatibility with PDMS microfluidics, we also present a demonstration of the sensors' integration into a microfluidic oxygen gradient generator device.

  9. Integrated Optical Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambeck, Paul; Hoekstra, Hugo

    2003-01-01

    The optical (tele-) communication is the main driving force for the worldwide R&D on integrated optical devices and microsystems. lO-sensors have to compete with many other sensor types both within the optical domain (fiber sensors) and outside that domain, where sensors based on measurand induced c

  10. Integrated Optical Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambeck, Paul V.; Hoekstra, Hugo

    2003-01-01

    The optical (tele-) communication is the main driving force for the worldwide R&D on integrated optical devices and microsystems. lO-sensors have to compete with many other sensor types both within the optical domain (fiber sensors) and outside that domain, where sensors based on measurand induced c

  11. Optical sensor based on fluorescent quenching and pulsed blue LED excitation for long-term monitoring of dissolved oxygen in NASA space bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Frank G; Fay, James M; Mathew, Grace; Jeevarajan, Antony S; Anderson, Melody M

    2005-01-01

    There is a need to monitor the concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO) present in the culture medium for NASA's space cell biology experiments, as well as in earth-based cell cultures. Continuous measurement of DO concentration in the cell culture medium in perfused bioreactors requires that the oxygen sensor provide adequate sensitivity and low toxicity to the cells, as well as maintain calibration over several weeks. Although there are a number of sensors for dissolved oxygen on the market and under development elsewhere, very few meet these stringent conditions. An in-house optical oxygen sensor (HOXY) based on dynamic fluorescent quenching of Tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline)ruthenium(II) chloride and a pulsed blue LED light source was developed in our laboratory to address these requirements. The sensing element consisted of the fluorescent dye embedded in a silicone matrix and coated onto a glass capillary. Photobleaching was minimized by a pulsed LED light source. The total noise in the sensor output is 2% and the sensor dynamic range is 0 to 200 mm Hg. The resolution of the sensor is 0.1 mm Hg at 50 mm Hg, and 0.25 mm Hg at 130 mm Hg, while the accuracy is 5%. The LED-based oxygen sensor exhibited stable performance and low drift, making it compatible for space-flight bioreactor systems.

  12. A Fiber Optic Sensor for Determination of 2,4-Dichlorophenol Based on Oxygen Oxidation Catalyzed by Iron(III) Tetrasulfophthalocyanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Yilin; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Cong; Li, Kun; Ding, Liyun [Wuhan Univ. of Technology, Wuhan (China); Li, Dapeng [Xuchang Univ., Henan (China)

    2013-11-15

    A new fiber optical sensor was developed for the determination of 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP). The sensor was based on DCP oxidation by oxygen with the catalysis of iron(III) tetrasulfophthalocyanine (Fe(III)PcTs). The optical oxygen sensing film with Ru(bpy){sub 3}Cl{sub 2} as the fluorescence indicator was used to determine the consumption of oxygen in solution. A lock-in amplifier was used for detecting the lifetime of the oxygen sensing film by measuring the phase delay change of the sensor head. The different variables affecting the sensor performance were evaluated and optimized. Under the optimal conditions (i. e. pH 6.0, 25 .deg. C, Fe(III)PcTs concentration of 0.62 mg/mL), the linear detection range and response time of the sensor are 1.0 Χ 10{sup -6}-9.0 Χ 10{sup -6} mol/L and 250 s, respectively. The sensor displays high selectivity, good repeatability and stability, and can be used as an effective tool in analyzing DCP concentration in practical samples.

  13. MEMS optical sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an all-optical sensor utilizing effective index modulation of a waveguide and detection of a wavelength shift of reflected light and a force sensing system accommodating said optical sensor. One embodiment of the invention relates to a sensor system comprising...... at least one multimode light source, one or more optical sensors comprising a multimode sensor optical waveguide accommodating a distributed Bragg reflector, at least one transmitting optical waveguide for guiding light from said at least one light source to said one or more multimode sensor optical...... waveguides, a detector for measuring light reflected from said Bragg reflector in said one or more multimode sensor optical waveguides, and a data processor adapted for analyzing variations in the Bragg wavelength of at least one higher order mode of the reflected light....

  14. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  15. EVALUATING AN INNOVATIVE OXYGEN SENSOR FOR REMOTE SUBSURFACE OXYGEN MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millings, M; Brian Riha, B; Warren Hyde, W; Karen Vangelas, K; Brian02 Looney, B

    2006-10-12

    Oxygen is a primary indicator of whether anaerobic reductive dechlorination and similar redox based processes contribute to natural attenuation remedies at chlorinated solvent contaminated sites. Thus, oxygen is a viable indicator parameter for documenting that a system is being sustained in an anaerobic condition. A team of researchers investigated the adaptation of an optical sensor that was developed for oceanographic applications. The optical sensor, because of its design and operating principle, has potential for extended deployment and sensitivity at the low oxygen levels relevant to natural attenuation. The results of the research indicate this tool will be useful for in situ long-term monitoring applications, but that the traditional characterization tools continue to be appropriate for characterization activities.

  16. Optical waveguide sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fluitman, J.; Popma, Th.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the field of optical waveguide sensors is presented. Some emphasis is laid on the development of a single scheme under which the diversity of sensor principles can be arranged. First three types of sensors are distinguished: intrinsic, extrinsic and active. Next, two steps are disting

  17. MEMS optical sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an all-optical sensor utilizing effective index modulation of a waveguide and detection of a wavelength shift of reflected light and a force sensing system accommodating said optical sensor. One embodiment of the invention relates to a sensor system comprising...... waveguides, a detector for measuring light reflected from said Bragg reflector in said one or more multimode sensor optical waveguides, and a data processor adapted for analyzing variations in the Bragg wavelength of at least one higher order mode of the reflected light....

  18. New hybrid reflectance optical pulse oximetry sensor for lower oxygen saturation measurement and for broader clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogawa, Masamichi; Ching, Chong Thong; Ida, Takeyuki; Itakura, Keiko; Takatani, Setsuo

    1997-06-01

    A new reflectance pulse oximeter sensor for lower arterial oxygen saturation (Sa)2) measurement has been designed and evaluated in animals prior to clinical trials. The new sensor incorporates ten light emitting diode chips for each wavelength of 730 and 880 nm mounted symmetrically and at the radial separation distance of 7 mm around a photodiode chip. The separation distance of 7 mm was chosen to maximize the ratio of the pulsatile to the average plethysmographic signal level at each wavelength. The 730 and 880 wavelength combination was determined to obtain a linear relationship between the reflectance ratio of the 730 and 880 nm wavelengths and Sa)2. In addition to these features of the sensor, the Fast Fourier Transform method was employed to compute the pulsatile and average signal level at each wavelength. The performance of the new reflectance pulse oximeter sensor was evaluated in dogs in comparison to the 665/910 nm sensor. As predicted by the theoretical simulation based on a 3D photon diffusion theory, the 730/880 nm sensor demonstrated an excellent linearity over the SaO2 range from 100 to 30 percent. For the SaO2 range between 100 and 70 percent, the 665/910 and 730/880 sensors showed the standard error of around 3.5 percent and 2.1 percent, respectively, in comparison to the blood samples. For the range between 70 and 30 percent, the standard error of the 730/880 nm sensor was only 2.7 percent, while that of the 665/910 nm sensor was 9.5 percent. The 730/880 sensor showed improved accuracy for a wide range of SaO2 particularly over the range between 70 and 30 percent. This new reflectance sensor can provide noninvasive measurement of SaO2 accurately over the wide saturation range from 100 to 30 percent.

  19. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...... glaucoma patients is six times higher at a perfusion pressure of 30 mmHg, which corresponds to a level where the optic nerve is hypoxic in experimental animals, as compared to perfusion pressure levels above 50 mmHg where the optic nerve is normoxic. Medical intervention can affect optic nerve oxygen......-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, which indicates that prostaglandin metabolism plays a role. Laboratory studies suggest that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors might be useful for medical treatment of optic nerve and retinal ischemia, potentially in diseases such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. However, clinical...

  20. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch;

    2005-01-01

    at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...... glaucoma patients is six times higher at a perfusion pressure of 30 mmHg, which corresponds to a level where the optic nerve is hypoxic in experimental animals, as compared to perfusion pressure levels above 50 mmHg where the optic nerve is normoxic. Medical intervention can affect optic nerve oxygen......-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, which indicates that prostaglandin metabolism plays a role. Laboratory studies suggest that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors might be useful for medical treatment of optic nerve and retinal ischemia, potentially in diseases such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. However, clinical...

  1. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homuth, Emil F.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  2. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta...

  3. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta block...

  4. Roadmap on optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Mário F. S.; Castro-Camus, Enrique; Ottaway, David J.; López-Higuera, José Miguel; Feng, Xian; Jin, Wei; Jeong, Yoonchan; Picqué, Nathalie; Tong, Limin; Reinhard, Björn M.; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Méndez, Alexis; Diem, Max; Vollmer, Frank; Quan, Qimin

    2017-08-01

    Sensors are devices or systems able to detect, measure and convert magnitudes from any domain to an electrical one. Using light as a probe for optical sensing is one of the most efficient approaches for this purpose. The history of optical sensing using some methods based on absorbance, emissive and florescence properties date back to the 16th century. The field of optical sensors evolved during the following centuries, but it did not achieve maturity until the demonstration of the first laser in 1960. The unique properties of laser light become particularly important in the case of laser-based sensors, whose operation is entirely based upon the direct detection of laser light itself, without relying on any additional mediating device. However, compared with freely propagating light beams, artificially engineered optical fields are in increasing demand for probing samples with very small sizes and/or weak light-matter interaction. Optical fiber sensors constitute a subarea of optical sensors in which fiber technologies are employed. Different types of specialty and photonic crystal fibers provide improved performance and novel sensing concepts. Actually, structurization with wavelength or subwavelength feature size appears as the most efficient way to enhance sensor sensitivity and its detection limit. This leads to the area of micro- and nano-engineered optical sensors. It is expected that the combination of better fabrication techniques and new physical effects may open new and fascinating opportunities in this area. This roadmap on optical sensors addresses different technologies and application areas of the field. Fourteen contributions authored by experts from both industry and academia provide insights into the current state-of-the-art and the challenges faced by researchers currently. Two sections of this paper provide an overview of laser-based and frequency comb-based sensors. Three sections address the area of optical fiber sensors, encompassing both

  5. Precision remote sensor for oxygen and carbon dioxide Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mesa Photonics proposes development of a passive optical sensor for simultaneous high-precision measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide profiles within the full...

  6. Wearable Optical Chemical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobnik, Aleksandra

    Wearable sensors can be used to provide valuable information about the wearer's health and/or monitor the wearer's surroundings, identify safety concerns and detect threats, during the wearer's daily routine within his or her natural environment. The "sensor on a textile", an integrated sensor capable of analyzing data, would enable early many forms of detection. Moreover, a sensor connected with a smart delivery system could simultaneously provide comfort and monitoring (for safety and/or health), non-invasive measurements, no laboratory sampling, continuous monitoring during the daily activity of the person, and possible multi-parameter analysis and monitoring. However, in order for the technology to be accessible, it must remain innocuous and impose a minimal intrusion on the daily activities of the wearer. Therefore, such wearable technologies should be soft, flexible, and washable in order to meet the expectations of normal clothing. Optical chemical sensors (OCSs) could be used as wearable technology since they can be embedded into textile structures by using conventional dyeing, printing processes and coatings, while fiber-optic chemical sensors (FOCSs) as well as nanofiber sensors (NFSs) can be incorporated by weaving, knitting or laminating. The interest in small, robust and sensitive sensors that can be embedded into textile structures is increasing and the research activity on this topic is an important issue.

  7. Wearable Optical Sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Ballard, Zachary S.

    2017-07-12

    The market for wearable sensors is predicted to grow to $5.5 billion by 2025, impacting global health in unprecedented ways. Optics and photonics will play a key role in the future of these wearable technologies, enabling highly sensitive measurements of otherwise invisible information and parameters about our health and surrounding environment. Through the implementation of optical wearable technologies, such as heart rate, blood pressure, and glucose monitors, among others, individuals are becoming more empowered to generate a wealth of rich, multifaceted physiological and environmental data, making personalized medicine a reality. Furthermore, these technologies can also be implemented in hospitals, clinics, point-of-care offices, assisted living facilities or even in patients’ homes for real-time, remote patient monitoring, creating more expeditious as well as resource-efficient systems. Several key optical technologies make such sensors possible, including e.g., optical fiber textiles, colorimetric, plasmonic, and fluorometric sensors, as well as Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) and Organic Photo-Diode (OPD) technologies. These emerging technologies and platforms show great promise as basic sensing elements in future wearable devices and will be reviewed in this chapter along-side currently existing fully integrated wearable optical sensors.

  8. Limitations of potentiometric oxygen sensors operating at low oxygen levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders; Jacobsen, Torben; Hansen, Karin Vels

    2011-01-01

    The electrochemical processes that limit the range of oxygen partial pressures in which potentiometric oxygen sensors can be used, were analysed using a theoretical and an experimental approach. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was performed on porous Pt/yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ......) electrodes between 10−6 and 0.2 bar and at temperatures between 500 and 950 °C. The flow of oxide ions and electron holes through a sensor cell, with a YSZ electrolyte, were calculated under similar conditions. The oxygen permeation of the sensor cell was insignificant at an oxygen partial pressure of 10...... sensors can be used....

  9. Optical fiber synaptic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarchik, A. N.; Jaimes-Reátegui, R.; Sevilla-Escoboza, R.; García-Lopez, J. H.; Kazantsev, V. B.

    2011-06-01

    Understanding neuron connections is a great challenge, which is needed to solve many important problems in neurobiology and neuroengineering for recreation of brain functions and efficient biorobotics. In particular, a design of an optical synapse capable to communicate with neuron spike sequences would be crucial to improve the functionality of neuromimmetic networks. In this work we propose an optical synaptic sensor based on an erbium-doped fiber laser driven by a FitzHung-Nagumo electronic neuron, to connect with another electronic neuron. Two possible optical synaptic configurations are analyzed for optoelectronic coupling between neurons: laser cavity loss modulation and pump laser modulation. The control parameters of the proposed optical synapse provide additional degrees of flexibility to the neuron connection traditionally controlled only by coupling strengths in artificial networks.

  10. Infrared Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Successive years of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Langley Research Center to Sensiv Inc., a joint venture between Foster-Miller Inc. and Isorad, Ltd., assisted in the creation of remote fiber optic sensing systems. NASA's SBIR interest in infrared, fiber optic sensor technology was geared to monitoring the curing cycles of advanced composite materials. These funds helped in the fabrication of an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. Foster-Miller ingenuity allowed infrared transmitting optical fibers to combine with Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy to enable remote sensing. Sensiv probes operate in the mid-infrared range of the spectrum, although modifications to the instrument also permits its use in the near-infrared region. The Sensiv needle-probe is built to be placed in a liquid or powder and analyze the chemicals in the mixture. Other applications of the probe system include food processing control; combustion control in furnaces; and maintenance problem solving.

  11. Nanomaterial-based robust oxygen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Kisholoy; Sampathkumaran, Uma; Alam, Maksudul; Tseng, Derek; Majumdar, Arun K.; Kazemi, Alex A.

    2007-09-01

    Since the TWA flight 800 accident in July 1996, significant emphasis has been placed on fuel tank safety. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has focused research to support two primary methods of fuel tank protection - ground-based and on-board - both involving fuel tank inerting. Ground-based fuel tank inerting involves some combination of fuel scrubbing and ullage washing with Nitrogen Enriched Air (NEA) while the airplane is on the ground (applicable to all or most operating transport airplanes). On-board fuel tank inerting involves ullage washing with OBIGGS (on-board inert gas generating system), a system that generates NEA during aircraft operations. An OBIGGS generally encompasses an air separation module (ASM) to generate NEA, a compressor, storage tanks, and a distribution system. Essential to the utilization of OBIGGS is an oxygen sensor that can operate inside the aircraft's ullage and assess the effectiveness of the inerting systems. OBIGGS can function economically by precisely knowing when to start and when to stop. Toward achieving these goals, InnoSense LLC is developing an all-optical fuel tank ullage sensor (FTUS) prototype for detecting oxygen in the ullage of an aircraft fuel tank in flight conditions. Data would be presented to show response time and wide dynamic range of the sensor in simulated flight conditions and fuel tank environment.

  12. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, M.A.; Sanchez, R.; Dulleck, G.R.

    1996-05-01

    This report covers the development of fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensors for monitoring dissolved hydrogen gas in transformer oil. The concentration of hydrogen gas is a measure of the corona and spark discharge within the transformer and reflects the state of health of the transformer. Key features of the instrument include use of palladium alloys to enhance hydrogen sensitivity, a microprocessor controlled instrument with RS-232, liquid crystal readout, and 4-20 ma. current loop interfaces. Calibration data for both sensors can be down loaded to the instrument through the RS-232 interface. This project was supported by the Technology Transfer Initiative in collaboration with J. W. Harley, Inc. through the mechanism of a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA).

  13. Electrochemical Oxygen Sensor Development for Liquid Sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nollet, Billy K.

    Safe operation of a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) requires in-depth understanding of the corrosion implications of liquid sodium coolant on reactor materials. Dissolved oxygen concentration is of particular importance in characterizing sodium attack, so an accurate means of measuring and controlling oxygen is crucial. There is significant room for improvement in current oxygen sensing technology, so extensive research has been conducted at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to address this issue. Experimental facilities and electrochemical oxygen sensors have been developed, tested, and analyzed. This research is discussed in detail in this report. The oxygen sensors tested in this research were developed using a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte whereas many of the past research in this field was conducted with yttria doped thoria (YDT or YST) electrolytes. Thorium, an alpha emitter, is expensive and increasingly difficult to acquire, so motivation to switch to a new material exists. YSZ is commonly used as the electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cells, and ample data is available for high temperature ionic conduction of this material. While some work has been done with YSZ in oxygen sensors (the automotive field, for example, uses YSZ O2 sensors), research on YSZ sensors in sodium is limited. A thorough study of YSZ-based electrochemical oxygen sensors must include detailed corrosion testing and analysis of YSZ in liquid sodium, careful oxygen sensor development and testing, and finally, a comprehensive analysis of the acquired sensor data. The research presented in this report describes the design and development of an electrochemical oxygen sensor for use in sodium using a YSZ electrolyte through the previously-mentioned steps. The designed sensors were subjected to a series of hypotheses which advance common understanding of oxygen sensor signal. These results were used in conjunction with past research to form reliable conclusions.

  14. Fiber-Optic Sensor Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Constructs and evaluates fiber-optic sensors for a variety of measurands. These measurands include acoustic, pressure, magnetic, and electric field as well...

  15. Interferometric Fiber Optic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Young Choi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Fiber optic interferometers to sense various physical parameters including temperature, strain, pressure, and refractive index have been widely investigated. They can be categorized into four types: Fabry-Perot, Mach-Zehnder, Michelson, and Sagnac. In this paper, each type of interferometric sensor is reviewed in terms of operating principles, fabrication methods, and application fields. Some specific examples of recently reported interferometeric sensor technologies are presented in detail to show their large potential in practical applications. Some of the simple to fabricate but exceedingly effective Fabry-Perot interferometers, implemented in both extrinsic and intrinsic structures, are discussed. Also, a wide variety of Mach-Zehnder and Michelson interferometric sensors based on photonic crystal fibers are introduced along with their remarkable sensing performances. Finally, the simultaneous multi-parameter sensing capability of a pair of long period fiber grating (LPG is presented in two types of structures; one is the Mach-Zehnder interferometer formed in a double cladding fiber and the other is the highly sensitive Sagnac interferometer cascaded with an LPG pair.

  16. Interferometric fiber optic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeong Ha; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Kwan Seob; Eom, Joo Beom; Kim, Myoung Jin; Rho, Byung Sup; Choi, Hae Young

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic interferometers to sense various physical parameters including temperature, strain, pressure, and refractive index have been widely investigated. They can be categorized into four types: Fabry-Perot, Mach-Zehnder, Michelson, and Sagnac. In this paper, each type of interferometric sensor is reviewed in terms of operating principles, fabrication methods, and application fields. Some specific examples of recently reported interferometeric sensor technologies are presented in detail to show their large potential in practical applications. Some of the simple to fabricate but exceedingly effective Fabry-Perot interferometers, implemented in both extrinsic and intrinsic structures, are discussed. Also, a wide variety of Mach-Zehnder and Michelson interferometric sensors based on photonic crystal fibers are introduced along with their remarkable sensing performances. Finally, the simultaneous multi-parameter sensing capability of a pair of long period fiber grating (LPG) is presented in two types of structures; one is the Mach-Zehnder interferometer formed in a double cladding fiber and the other is the highly sensitive Sagnac interferometer cascaded with an LPG pair.

  17. Optical technologies for space sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hu; Liu, Jie; Xue, Yaoke; Liu, Yang; Liu, Meiying; Wang, Lingguang; Yang, Shaodong; Lin, Shangmin; Chen, Su; Luo, Jianjun

    2015-10-01

    Space sensors are used in navigation sensor fields. The sun, the earth, the moon and other planets are used as frame of reference to obtain stellar position coordinates, and then to control the attitude of an aircraft. Being the "eyes" of the space sensors, Optical sensor system makes images of the infinite far stars and other celestial bodies. It directly affects measurement accuracy of the space sensor, indirectly affecting the data updating rate. Star sensor technology is the pilot for Space sensors. At present more and more attention is paid on all-day star sensor technology. By day and night measurements of the stars, the aircraft's attitude in the inertial coordinate system can be provided. Facing the requirements of ultra-high-precision, large field of view, wide spectral range, long life and high reliability, multi-functional optical system, we integration, integration optical sensors will be future space technology trends. In the meantime, optical technologies for space-sensitive research leads to the development of ultra-precision optical processing, optical and precision test machine alignment technology. It also promotes the development of long-life optical materials and applications. We have achieved such absolute distortion better than ±1um, Space life of at least 15years of space-sensitive optical system.

  18. Preparation and analysis of zirconia oxygen sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Zhi-an; XIAO Jian-zhong; XIA Feng

    2006-01-01

    Thimble zirconia oxygen sensors were prepared with yttria stabilized zirconia(YSZ). The surfaces of the electrode,electrolyte and their interface were observed by scanning electron microscope(SEM). The sensor was examined with engine bench test to evaluate the essential performance. The results show that the oxygen sensor has good performance,which can meet the demand of practical applications. Chemical equilibrium theory was introduced to explain electromotive force of the sensors and the influence of temperature on the signals. The educed theoretical model of electromotive force agrees well with testing results.

  19. Fiber Optic Geophysics Sensor Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grochowski, Lucjan

    1989-01-01

    The distributed optical sensor arrays are analysed in view of specific needs of 3-D seismic explorations methods. There are compared advantages and disadventages of arrays supported by the sensors which are modulated in intensity and phase. In these systems all-fiber optic structures and their compabilities with digital geophysic formats are discussed. It was shown that the arrays based on TDM systems with the intensity modulated sensors are economically and technically the best matched for geophysic systems supported by a large number of the sensors.

  20. Determining Performance Acceptability of Electrochemical Oxygen Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    A method has been developed to screen commercial electrochemical oxygen sensors to reduce the failure rate. There are three aspects to the method: First, the sensitivity over time (several days) can be measured and the rate of change of the sensitivity can be used to predict sensor failure. Second, an improvement to this method would be to store the sensors in an oxygen-free (e.g., nitrogen) environment and intermittently measure the sensitivity over time (several days) to accomplish the same result while preserving the sensor lifetime by limiting consumption of the electrode. Third, the second time derivative of the sensor response over time can be used to determine the point in time at which the sensors are sufficiently stable for use.

  1. High-temperature langasite SAW oxygen sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peng; Chin, Tao-Lun; Greve, David; Oppenheim, Irving; Malone, Vanessa; Cao, Limin

    2011-08-01

    High-temperature langasite SAW oxygen sensors using sputtered ZnO as a resistive gas-sensing layer were fabricated and tested. Sensitivity to oxygen gas was observed between 500°C to 700°C, with a sensitivity peak at about 625°C, consistent with the theoretical predictions of the acoustoelectric effect.

  2. Optical Landing Hazard Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Visidyne proposes to investigate an active optical 3D imaging LADAR as the sensor for an automated Landing Hazard Avoidance system for spacecraft landing on the Moon...

  3. Fiber Optic Magnetic Sensor Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-28

    Michelson inter- ferometric fiber optical point temperature sensor (Appendix B). The sensor has potential applicntion to non-invnsive and high...3roeniheaingUsing similar techniques, to for monolithic circuits. Lange couplers have been fabricated on alumina substrates. The: re- Fig 3 illustrates

  4. Advancement of Miniature Optic Gas Sensor (MOGS) Probe Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chullen, Cinda

    2015-01-01

    Advancement of Miniature Optic Gas Sensor (MOGS) Probe Technology" project will investigate newly developed optic gas sensors delivered from a Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Phase II effort. A ventilation test rig will be designed and fabricated to test the sensors while integrated with a Suited Manikin Test Apparatus (SMTA). Once the sensors are integrated, a series of test points will be completed to verify that the sensors can withstand Advanced Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) environments and associated human metabolic profiles for changes in pressure and levels of Oxygen (ppO2), carbon dioxide (ppCO2), and humidity (ppH2O).

  5. Adaptive optical zoom sensor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweatt, William C.; Bagwell, Brett E.; Wick, David Victor

    2005-11-01

    In order to optically vary the magnification of an imaging system, continuous mechanical zoom lenses require multiple optical elements and use fine mechanical motion to precisely adjust the separations between individual or groups of lenses. By incorporating active elements into the optical design, we have designed and demonstrated imaging systems that are capable of variable optical magnification with no macroscopic moving parts. Changing the effective focal length and magnification of an imaging system can be accomplished by adeptly positioning two or more active optics in the optical design and appropriately adjusting the optical power of those elements. In this application, the active optics (e.g. liquid crystal spatial light modulators or deformable mirrors) serve as variable focal-length lenses. Unfortunately, the range over which currently available devices can operate (i.e. their dynamic range) is relatively small. Therefore, the key to this concept is to create large changes in the effective focal length of the system with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual elements by leveraging the optical power of conventional optical elements surrounding the active optics. By appropriately designing the optical system, these variable focal-length lenses can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length, and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses.

  6. Robust high temperature oxygen sensor electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders

    Platinum is the most widely used material in high temperature oxygen sensor electrodes. However, platinum is expensive and the platinum electrode may, under certain conditions, suffer from poisoning, which is detrimental for an oxygen sensor. The objective of this thesis is to evaluate electrode ......-based electrodes and one porous electrode based on the perovskite-structured strontium and vanadiumdoped lanthanum chromium oxide (LSCV) were investigated. The porous electrodes were applied on yttrium-stabilised zirconium oxide (YSZ) substrates in a collaboration with the company PBI...

  7. Micro-fabricated all optical pressure sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havreland, Andreas Spandet; Petersen, Søren Dahl; Østergaard, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Optical pressure sensors can operate in certain harsh application areas where the electrical pressure sensors cannot. However, the sensitivity is often not as good for the optical sensors. This work presents an all optical pressure sensor, which is fabricated by micro fabrication techniques, wher...

  8. Contact CMOS imaging of gaseous oxygen sensor array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daivasagaya, Daisy S; Yao, Lei; Yi Yung, Ka; Hajj-Hassan, Mohamad; Cheung, Maurice C; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P; Bright, Frank V

    2011-10-01

    We describe a compact luminescent gaseous oxygen (O2) sensor microsystem based on the direct integration of sensor elements with a polymeric optical filter and placed on a low power complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imager integrated circuit (IC). The sensor operates on the measurement of excited-state emission intensity of O2-sensitive luminophore molecules tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium(II) ([Ru(dpp)3](2+)) encapsulated within sol-gel derived xerogel thin films. The polymeric optical filter is made with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) that is mixed with a dye (Sudan-II). The PDMS membrane surface is molded to incorporate arrays of trapezoidal microstructures that serve to focus the optical sensor signals on to the imager pixels. The molded PDMS membrane is then attached with the PDMS color filter. The xerogel sensor arrays are contact printed on top of the PDMS trapezoidal lens-like microstructures. The CMOS imager uses a 32 × 32 (1024 elements) array of active pixel sensors and each pixel includes a high-gain phototransistor to convert the detected optical signals into electrical currents. Correlated double sampling circuit, pixel address, digital control and signal integration circuits are also implemented on-chip. The CMOS imager data is read out as a serial coded signal. The CMOS imager consumes a static power of 320 µW and an average dynamic power of 625 µW when operating at 100 Hz sampling frequency and 1.8 V DC. This CMOS sensor system provides a useful platform for the development of miniaturized optical chemical gas sensors.

  9. A Novel Electrochemical Oxygen Sensor for Determination of Ultra-low Oxygen Contents in Molten Metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A novel electrochemical oxygen sensor has been developed by using La-Al2O3 as solid electrolyte and Cr+Cr2O3 as reference electrode. The sensor not only can be used as normal oxygen sensor but also as an ultra-low oxygen sensor. Especially, it is very sensitive to measure ultra-low oxygen in molten metal. For estimating the accuracy of La-Al2O3 oxygen sensor, two series of oxygen activities in molten iron at different oxygen contents and different temperature were measured by both La-Al2O3 oxygen sensor and ZrO2 oxygen sensor. The theoretical values of oxygen activities in molten iron (3.30%C, in mass fraction) at 1723K and 1745K were also evaluated for comparing the measuring results of two sensors. At last, the error of measurement for La-Al2O3 oxygen sensor was discussed too.

  10. All-optical pressure sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to an all-optical pressure sensor comprising a waveguide accommodating a distributed Bragg reflector. Pressure sensing can then be provided by utilizing effective index modulation of the waveguide and detection of a wavelength shift of light reflected from the Bragg...... reflector. Sound sensing may also be provided thereby having an all-optical microphone. One embodiment of the invention relates to an optical pressure sensor comprising at least one outer membrane and a waveguide, the waveguide comprising at least one core for confining and guiding light,at least one...... distributed Bragg reflector located in said at least one core, and at least one inner deflecting element forming at least a part of the core,wherein the pressure sensor is configured such that the geometry and/or dimension of the at least one core is changed when the at least one outer membrane is submitted...

  11. Fiber optic sensor and method for making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartuli, James Scott; Bousman, Kenneth Sherwood; Deng, Kung-Li; McEvoy, Kevin Paul; Xia, Hua

    2010-05-18

    A fiber optic sensor including a fiber having a modified surface integral with the fiber wherein the modified surface includes an open pore network with optical agents dispersed within the open pores of the open pore network. Methods for preparing the fiber optic sensor are also provided. The fiber optic sensors can withstand high temperatures and harsh environments.

  12. Fiber-Optic Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maram, Jonathan M.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed sensor measures temperatures over wide range, from cryogenic liquids to burning gases. Made in part of optical fibers, sensor lighter in weight than thermocouple and immune to electromagnetic interference. Device does not respond to temperatures elsewhere than at sensing tip. Thermal expansion and contraction of distance between fiber end and mirror alters interference between light reflected from those two surfaces, thereby giving interferometric indication of temperatures.

  13. Wearable optical sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Maurício Neves Rodrigues da Silva

    2008-01-01

    Neste trabalho foi desenvolvido um sensor para medição do ângulo de flexão do cotovelo de um indivíduo. Este sensor é uma ajuda na aferição da recuperação de uma pessoa que sofreu um acidente cardiovascular e que tenha perdido mobilidade no conjunto ombro-braço. Embora o sensor por si só não desempenhe uma função vital na recuperação de um paciente com as características referidas, espera-se que se torne uma ajuda na motivação da pessoa bem como uma maneira de quantificar o ...

  14. Lifetime of the internal reference oxygen sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Qiang; Jacobsen, Torben; Hansen, Karin Vels

    2013-01-01

    The internal reference oxygen sensor (IROS) based on a binary mixture of metal and its stoichiometric oxide is subject to leaks that result in consumption of the binary mixture. An IROS loses the functionality when the binary mixture is exhausted. Among the possible leak sources the electronic leak...

  15. Optical Fiber Grating based Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susanne

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis differenct optical fiber gratings are used for sensor purposes. If a fiber with a core concentricity error (CCE) is used, a directional dependent bend sensor can be produced. The CCE direction can be determined by means of diffraction. This makes it possible to produce long......-period gratings in a fiber with a CCE direction parallel or perpendicular to the writing direction. The maximal bending sensitivity is independent on the writing direction, but the detailed bending response is different in the two cases. A temperature and strain sensor, based on a long-period grating and two...

  16. Research on Oxygen Sensor for Metallurgical Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new technique for manufacture of the oxygen sensor used formetallurgical process has been developed. The powder of MgO-PSZ was prepared by coprecipitation. The MgO-PSZ tube was prepared by powder injection molding (PIM). The final sintered tube was assembled into oxygen cell, then tested in laboratory and on RH vessel. The results showed that the thermal shock resistance of MgO-PSZ matrix is strong enough for determining the active oxygen concentration in steel melt. The reproducibility of the EMF measurement is very good. The structure of the tube has been analysed by means of SEM and XRD. In addition, the characteristics such as the density and phase ratio in the product were compared with that of Shijiazhuang Maple Wood Sensor Company′s product.

  17. Fibre Optic Sensors for Selected Wastewater Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman W. Harun

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Demand for online and real-time measurements techniques to meet environmental regulation and treatment compliance are increasing. However the conventional techniques, which involve scheduled sampling and chemical analysis can be expensive and time consuming. Therefore cheaper and faster alternatives to monitor wastewater characteristics are required as alternatives to conventional methods. This paper reviews existing conventional techniques and optical and fibre optic sensors to determine selected wastewater characteristics which are colour, Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD and Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD. The review confirms that with appropriate configuration, calibration and fibre features the parameters can be determined with accuracy comparable to conventional method. With more research in this area, the potential for using FOS for online and real-time measurement of more wastewater parameters for various types of industrial effluent are promising.

  18. Fibre optic sensors for selected wastewater characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Su Sin; Aziz, A R Abdul; Harun, Sulaiman W

    2013-07-05

    Demand for online and real-time measurements techniques to meet environmental regulation and treatment compliance are increasing. However the conventional techniques, which involve scheduled sampling and chemical analysis can be expensive and time consuming. Therefore cheaper and faster alternatives to monitor wastewater characteristics are required as alternatives to conventional methods. This paper reviews existing conventional techniques and optical and fibre optic sensors to determine selected wastewater characteristics which are colour, Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) and Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD). The review confirms that with appropriate configuration, calibration and fibre features the parameters can be determined with accuracy comparable to conventional method. With more research in this area, the potential for using FOS for online and real-time measurement of more wastewater parameters for various types of industrial effluent are promising.

  19. Fiber Optic Chemical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Studies Press Ltd, Book Chapter, AIS, 1-25, 1983. Saarl, Linda A. and Seltz, Rudolf W., "Immobilized Morin as Fluorescence Sensor for Determination...34Thin Films," Photonics Spectra, AVO, AIS, 113-118, 1988. Hanst, Philip L. and Stephens, Edgar R., "Infrared Analysis of Engine Exhausts: Methyl...79-84, 1988. Watson, Jr., Edgar , "On-line Analysis of Trace Contaminants 145 36 in Process Streams," Amarican Laboratory, AVO, AIS, 97-101, 1988

  20. High-Temperature Optical Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Varga, Donald J.; Floyd, Bertram M.

    2010-01-01

    A high-temperature optical sensor (see Figure 1) has been developed that can operate at temperatures up to 1,000 C. The sensor development process consists of two parts: packaging of a fiber Bragg grating into a housing that allows a more sturdy thermally stable device, and a technological process to which the device is subjected to in order to meet environmental requirements of several hundred C. This technology uses a newly discovered phenomenon of the formation of thermally stable secondary Bragg gratings in communication-grade fibers at high temperatures to construct robust, optical, high-temperature sensors. Testing and performance evaluation (see Figure 2) of packaged sensors demonstrated operability of the devices at 1,000 C for several hundred hours, and during numerous thermal cycling from 400 to 800 C with different heating rates. The technology significantly extends applicability of optical sensors to high-temperature environments including ground testing of engines, flight propulsion control, thermal protection monitoring of launch vehicles, etc. It may also find applications in such non-aerospace arenas as monitoring of nuclear reactors, furnaces, chemical processes, and other hightemperature environments where other measurement techniques are either unreliable, dangerous, undesirable, or unavailable.

  1. Distributed optical fiber surface plasmon resonance sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenxin Cao; Lenan Wu; Dayong Li

    2006-01-01

    @@ The relationships of the resonant wavelength of optical fiber surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors to the modulation layer refractive index, thickness and the refractive index of the bulk medium are obtained by using theoretical calculation model of optical fiber SPR sensors under certain conditions, which indicates that resonant wavelength of the sensors is approximately linear with modulation layer thickness. Based on the linear relationship, multiple SPR sensors with different resonant wavelengths can be fabricated in a single optical fiber named as distributed optical fiber surface plasmon resonance sensors (DOFSPRSs).Experimental results are presented, showing that it is practical to fabricate more than one SPR sensors in a single optical fiber.

  2. Structural health monitoring with fiber optic sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.ANSARI

    2009-01-01

    Optical fiber sensors have been successfully implemented in aeronautics, mechanical systems, and medical applications. Civil structures pose further challenges in monitoring mainly due to their large dimensions, diversity and heterogeneity of materials involved, and hostile construction environment. This article provides a summary of basic principles pertaining to practical health monitoring of civil engineering structures with optical fiber sensors. The issues discussed include basic sensor principles, strain transfer mechanism, sensor packaging, sensor placement in construction environment, and reliability and survivability of the sensors.

  3. High pressure fiber optic sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, Renato; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon K; Dekate, Sachin N

    2013-11-26

    The present application provides a fiber optic sensor system. The fiber optic sensor system may include a small diameter bellows, a large diameter bellows, and a fiber optic pressure sensor attached to the small diameter bellows. Contraction of the large diameter bellows under an applied pressure may cause the small diameter bellows to expand such that the fiber optic pressure sensor may measure the applied pressure.

  4. Oxygen-Partial-Pressure Sensor for Aircraft Oxygen Mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Mark; Pettit, Donald

    2003-01-01

    A device that generates an alarm when the partial pressure of oxygen decreases to less than a preset level has been developed to help prevent hypoxia in a pilot or other crewmember of a military or other high-performance aircraft. Loss of oxygen partial pressure can be caused by poor fit of the mask or failure of a hose or other component of an oxygen distribution system. The deleterious physical and mental effects of hypoxia cause the loss of a military aircraft and crew every few years. The device is installed in the crewmember s oxygen mask and is powered via communication wiring already present in all such oxygen masks. The device (see figure) includes an electrochemical sensor, the output potential of which is proportional to the partial pressure of oxygen. The output of the sensor is amplified and fed to the input of a comparator circuit. A reference potential that corresponds to the amplified sensor output at the alarm oxygen-partial-pressure level is fed to the second input of the comparator. When the sensed partial pressure of oxygen falls below the minimum acceptable level, the output of the comparator goes from the low state (a few millivolts) to the high state (near the supply potential, which is typically 6.8 V for microphone power). The switching of the comparator output to the high state triggers a tactile alarm in the form of a vibration in the mask, generated by a small 1.3-Vdc pager motor spinning an eccentric mass at a rate between 8,000 and 10,000 rpm. The sensation of the mask vibrating against the crewmember s nose is very effective at alerting the crewmember, who may already be groggy from hypoxia and is immersed in an environment that is saturated with visual cues and sounds. Indeed, the sensation is one of rudeness, but such rudeness could be what is needed to stimulate the crewmember to take corrective action in a life-threatening situation.

  5. Optical rotation sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotge, J. R.; Simmons, B. J.; Kroncke, G. T.; Stech, D. J.

    1986-05-01

    Research efforts were concentrated on passive ring laser rotation sensor technology. Initial efforts were performed on supportive projects, e.g., laser stabilization, followed by a 0.62 sq m passive resonant ring laser gyro (PRRLG), leading to the development of a 60 sq m system mounted on the pneumatically supported isolation test platform (Iso-Pad) at FJSRL. Numerous sub-system tasks and a feasibility 0.62 sq m PRRLG were completed, supporting projections of very high resolution performance by a large 60 sq m PRRLG. The expected performance of the large PRRLG, on the order of 10 to the minus 10th power ERU (earth rate units), would provide an accurate error model applicable to Air Force operational ring laser gyros, a new source of geophysical data, e.g., earth wobble and variations in earth rotation, a proven design concept applicable to Air Force sensor needs as reference to MX instruments tests, and relativity experiments. This report documents the many accomplishments leading to, and the status of the large PRRLG at the date of the PRRLG stop order, November 1985.

  6. Overview of Fiber-Optical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P.; Moore, Emery L.

    1987-01-01

    Design, development, and sensitivity of sensors using fiber optics reviewed. State-of-the-art and probable future developments of sensors using fiber optics described in report including references to work in field. Serves to update previously published surveys. Systems incorporating fiber-optic sensors used in medical diagnosis, navigation, robotics, sonar, power industry, and industrial controls.

  7. Optical viscosity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng-Ling; Peyroux, Juliette; Perez, Alex; Tsui, Chi-Leung; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2009-03-01

    Viscosity measurement by bend loss of fiber is presented. The sensing principle makes use of the damping characteristic of a vibrating optical fiber probe with fix-free end configuration. By measuring the displacement of the fiber probe, the viscosity can be determined by matching the probe's displacement with the displacement built in the database obtained by either experimental method or Finite element calculation. Experimental results are presented by measuring the sucrose and glycerol solutions of different concentrations with a viscosity varying from 1 to 15 cP. Stokes' flow assumption is utilized to attenuate the mass density effect and simplify the viscosity measurement.

  8. Solid Reference Electrode of Metallurgical Oxygen Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LOU Tian-jun; KONG Xiang-hua; HUANG Ke-qin; LIU Qing-guo

    2006-01-01

    The thermal equilibrium state of the reference electrode was investigated. The results show that the temperature difference between the inside and the outside of zirconia tube was very small and the Seebeck effect can be ignored after the sensor was dipped into liquid steel for more than 2 s. A special sensor was designed to test the relation between the EMF (electromotive force) of sensor and the thermal equilibrium state of the reference electrode. Based on these results, it is suggested that the peak in EMF curve was caused by the change of oxygen potential in reference electrode before the thermal equilibrium was reached. If NiO was added by 2%-5% to the Cr/Cr2O3 reference electrode, the peak in EMF curve could be eliminated.

  9. Threshold temperature optical fibre sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiewicz, K. A.; Musial, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a new approach to manufacture a threshold temperature sensor based on a biconical optical fibre taper. The presented sensor employs the influence of variable state of concentration of some isotropic materials like wax or paraffin. Application of the above- mentioned materials is an attempt to prove that there is a possibility to obtain a low-cost, repeatable and smart sensor working as an in-line element. Optical fibre taper was obtained from a standard single mode fibre (SMF28®) by using a low pressure gas burner technique. The diameter of the manufactured tapers was 6.0 ± 0.5 μm with the length of elongation equal to 30.50 ± 0.16 mm. The applied technology allowed to produce tapers with the losses of 0.183 ± 0.015 dB. Application of materials with different temperature transition points made it possible to obtain the threshold work at the temperatures connected directly with their conversion temperature. External materials at the temperatures above their melting points do not influence the propagation losses. For each of them two types of the protection area and position of the optical fibre taper were applied.

  10. Great prospects for fiber optics sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, T. E.

    1983-10-01

    Fiber optic sensors provide noise immunity and galvanic insulation at the measurement point. Interest in such sensors is increasing for these reasons. In the United States sales are expected to increase from 12 million dollars in 1981 to 180 million in 1991. Interferometric sensors based on single modus fibers deliver extremely high sensitivity, while sensors based on multi-modus fibers are more easily manufactured. The fiber optic sensors which are available today are based on point measurements. Development of fiber optic sensors in Norway is being carried out at the Central institute and has resulted in the development of medical manometers which are now undergoing clinical testing.

  11. Fiber optic sensors for smart taxiways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Douglas D.; Fuerstenau, Norbert; Goetze, Wolfgang

    1995-09-01

    Fiber-optic sensors could offer advantages in the field of airport ground traffic monitoring: immunity to electromagnetic interference, installation without costly and time consuming airfield closures, and low loss, low noise optical connection between sensors and signal processing equipment. This paper describes fiber-optic sensors developed for airport taxiway monitoring and the first steps toward their installation in an experimental surface movement guidance and control system at the Braunschweig airport. Initial results obtained with fiber- optic light barriers and vibration sensors are reported. The feasibility of employing interferometric strain gauges for this application will be discussed based on sensor characteristics obtained through measurements of strain in an aircraft structure in flight.

  12. Gold island fiber optic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriaudeau, Fabrice; Wig, A. G.; Passian, A.; Downey, Todd R.; Buncick, Milan; Ferrell, Trinidad L.

    1999-12-01

    A fiber optic chemical sensor based on gold-island surface plasmon excitation is presented. The sensing part of the fiber is the end of the fiber onto which a thin layer of gold has been deposited to form a particulate surface. Annealing the gold reshapes the particles and produces an optical absorbance near 535 nm with the fiber in air. The optical absorption resonance of the gold particles is shifted if the fiber is immersed in a medium other than air. These resonance shifts are examined by transmission spectroscopy through the fiber. Experimental results for the sensitivity and dynamic range in the measurement of liquid solutions are in agreement with a basic theoretical model which characterizes the surface plasmon using nonretarded electrodynamics.

  13. Optical hydrogen sensors based on metal-hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaman, M.; Westerwaal, R.; Schreuders, H.; Dam, B.

    2012-06-01

    For many hydrogen related applications it is preferred to use optical hydrogen sensors above electrical systems. Optical sensors reduce the risk of ignition by spark formation and are less sensitive to electrical interference. Currently palladium and palladium alloys are used for most hydrogen sensors since they are well known for their hydrogen dissociation and absorption properties at relatively low temperatures. The disadvantages of palladium in sensors are the low optical response upon hydrogen loading, the cross sensitivity for oxygen and carbon, the limited detection range and the formation of micro-cracks after some hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles. In contrast to Pd, we find that the use of magnesium or rear earth bases metal-hydrides in optical hydrogen sensors allow tuning of the detection levels over a broad pressure range, while maintaining a high optical response. We demonstrate a stable detection layer for detecting hydrogen below 10% of the lower explosion limit in an oxygen rich environment. This detection layer is deposited at the bare end of a glass fiber as a micro-mirror and is covered with a thin layer of palladium. The palladium layer promotes the hydrogen uptake at room temperature and acts as a hydrogen selective membrane. To protect the sensor for a long time in air a final layer of a hydrophobic fluorine based coating is applied. Such a sensor can be used for example as safety detector in automotive applications. We find that this type of fiber optic hydrogen sensor is also suitable for hydrogen detection in liquids. As example we demonstrate a sensor for detecting a broad range of concentrations in transformer oil. Such a sensor can signal a warning when sparks inside a high voltage power transformer decompose the transformer oil over a long period.

  14. Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — VIP Sensors proposes to develop a Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor Array for measuring air flow pressure at multiple points on the skin of aircrafts for Flight Load Test...

  15. Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — VIP Sensors proposes to develop a Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor Array System for measuring air flow pressure at multiple points on the skin of aircrafts for Flight...

  16. Distributed Fiber Optical Sensing of Oxygen with Optical Time Domain Reflectometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmar Schmälzlin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In many biological and environmental applications spatially resolved sensing of molecular oxygen is desirable. A powerful tool for distributed measurements is optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR which is often used in the field of telecommunications. We combine this technique with a novel optical oxygen sensor dye, triangular-[4] phenylene (TP, immobilized in a polymer matrix. The TP luminescence decay time is 86 ns. The short decay time of the sensor dye is suitable to achieve a spatial resolution of some meters. In this paper we present the development and characterization of a reflectometer in the UV range of the electromagnetic spectrum as well as optical oxygen sensing with different fiber arrangements.

  17. Optical seismic sensor systems and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, A. Craig; Cummings, Malcolm E.; Zavriyev, Anton; Christensen, Caleb A.; Lee, Keun

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed is an optical seismic sensor system for measuring seismic events in a geological formation, including a surface unit for generating and processing an optical signal, and a sensor device optically connected to the surface unit for receiving the optical signal over an optical conduit. The sensor device includes at least one sensor head for sensing a seismic disturbance from at least one direction during a deployment of the sensor device within a borehole of the geological formation. The sensor head includes a frame and a reference mass attached to the frame via at least one flexure, such that movement of the reference mass relative to the frame is constrained to a single predetermined path.

  18. Assessment of fiber optic pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemian, H.M.; Black, C.L.; Farmer, J.P. [Analysis and Measurement Services Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    This report presents the results of a six-month Phase 1 study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing and describes the design and principle of operation of various fiber optic pressure sensors. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. In addition, current requirements for environmental and seismic qualification of sensors for nuclear power plants were reviewed to determine the extent of the qualification tests that fiber optic pressure sensors may have to meet before they can be used in nuclear power plants. This project has concluded that fiber optic pressure sensors are still in the research and development stage and only a few manufacturers exist in the US and abroad which supply suitable fiber optic pressure sensors for industrial applications. Presently, fiber optic pressure sensors are mostly used in special applications for which conventional sensors are not able to meet the requirements.

  19. Integrated Differential Optical Shadow Sensor for Modular Gravitational Reference Sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Zoellner, Andreas; Sun, Ke-Xun

    2013-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a proposed space mission for the detection of gravitational waves. It consists of three drag-free satellites flying in a triangular constellation. A gravitational reference sensor is used in conjunction with a laser interferometer to measure the distance between test masses inside the three satellites. Other future space mission such as DECIGO and BBO also require a gravitational reference sensor. The Modular Gravitational Reference Sensor (MGRS) is being designed for these purposes and consists of two different optical sensors and a UV LED charge management system. The Differential Optical Shadow Sensor (DOSS) is one of the optical sensors and measures the position of a spherical test mass with respect to the surrounding satellite. This measurement is used for the drag-free feedback control loop. This paper describes the most recent, third generation of the experimental setup for the DOSS that uses a fiber coupled super luminescent LED, an integrated mounting ...

  20. Miniaturised optical sensors for industrial applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2010-01-01

    When addressing optical sensors for use in e.g. industry, compactness, robustness and performance are essentials. Adhering to these demands, we have developed a suit of compact optical sensors for the specific purposes of measuring angular velocity and linear translations of rigid objects...

  1. Digitally encoded all-optical sensor multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Anjum

    1992-01-01

    A digital, all-optical temperature sensor design concept based on optical sampling and digital encoding is presented. The proposed sensor generates 2M binary digital codewords of length M bits. The codewords are generated serially and, therefore, only a single output fiber line is required. A multiplexing scheme, which minimizes the power requirement per sensor array and facilitates a cost-effective digit regeneration for remote monitoring over long distance, is presented. The sensor arrays are used as building blocks to configure large scale sensor networks based on LAN topologies.

  2. Fibre-optic sensors in health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazia Mignani, Anna; Baldini, Francesco

    1997-05-01

    Biomedical fibre-optic sensors are attractive for the measurement of physical, chemical and biochemical parameters and for spectral measurements directly performed on the patient. An overview of fibre-optic sensors for in vivo monitoring is given, with particular attention paid to the advantages that these sensors are able to offer in different application fields such as cardiovascular and intensive care, angiology, gastroenterology, ophthalmology, oncology, neurology, dermatology and dentistry.

  3. Porous glasses for optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorosz, Dominik; Procyk, Bernadeta

    2006-03-01

    Microporous glasses from the Na II0-B II0 3-Si0 II system can be obtained by appropriate thermal and chemical treatment. During the thermal treatment the separation of the borate phase from the silicon skeleton has been occurred. The borates are in the form small drops joined to each other. In the course of chemical treatment the borates become leached in water, water solutions of acids or basis and the glass becomes porous. Microporous glasses may find application in many branches of science and engineering. The applications depend on the internal arrangement, size and shape of pores. These parameters may be in a wide range modified by a change of the chemical composition. The received porous glass was used as an element in optical fibre NO II sensor. The specific coloration reaction between organic reagents and NO II in the pores was occurred. It is possible to detection of 10-50 ppm NO II level.

  4. The EMOSFET as an oxygen sensor: constant current potentiometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrikse, J.; Olthuis, W.; Bergveld, P.

    1999-01-01

    In a previous paper, a novel type of potentiometric dissolved oxygen sensor was introduced. The transduction principle of the sensor is based on the modulation of the work function of an iridium oxide film by the ratio of IrIII/IrIV oxide in the film. This ratio depends on the oxygen concentration i

  5. Photothermal determination of optical coefficients using an optical fibre sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Laufer, J

    2000-01-01

    configuration is more sensitive to the thermal coefficients than the optical coefficients of the target. Pulsed photothermal radiometry was found to have higher sensitivity to the optical coefficients than has the optical fibre sensor in its present form. However, modifications to the configuration of the sensor can produce a performance matching that of pulsed photothermal radiometry. This thesis is concerned with the development of an optical fibre sensor for the photothermal determination of the optical coefficients of tissue. The detection of differences in tissue optical properties might be used for the diagnosis of cancers and other tissue pathologies. The sensor consists of a thin transparent polymer film mounted at the distal end of an optical fibre. The film acts as a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The absorption of short, low energy laser pulses transmitted through the film and into the tissue generates thermal as well as acoustic transients, which propagate into/the film and modulate its thickness. Th...

  6. Oxygen Sensors Monitor Bioreactors and Ensure Health and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In order to cultivate healthy bacteria in bioreactors, Kennedy Space Center awarded SBIR funding to Needham Heights, Massachusetts-based Polestar Technologies Inc. to develop sensors that could monitor oxygen levels. The result is a sensor now widely used by pharmaceutical companies and medical research universities. Other sensors have also been developed, and in 2013 alone the company increased its workforce by 50 percent.

  7. Direct-Dispense Polymeric Waveguides Platform for Optical Chemical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Hajj-Hassan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe an automated robotic technique called direct-dispense to fabricate a polymeric platform that supports optical sensor arrays. Direct-dispense, which is a type of the emerging direct-write microfabrication techniques, uses fugitive organic inks in combination with cross-linkable polymers to create microfluidic channels and other microstructures. Specifically, we describe an application of direct-dispensing to develop optical biochemical sensors by fabricating planar ridge waveguides that support sol-gelderived xerogel-based thin films. The xerogel-based sensor materials act as host media to house luminophore biochemical recognition elements. As a prototype implementation, we demonstrate gaseous oxygen (O2 responsive optical sensors that operate on the basis of monitoring luminescence intensity signals. The optical sensor employs a Light Emitting Diode (LED excitation source and a standard silicon photodiode as the detector. The sensor operates over the full scale (0%-100% of O2 concentrations with a response time of less than 1 second. This work has implications for the development of miniaturized multisensor platforms that can be cost-effectively and reliably mass-produced.

  8. Development Of Porous Glass Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, P. B.; Barkatt, Aa.; Feng, X.; Finger, S. M.; Hojaji, H.; Laberge, N.; Mohr, R.; Penafiel, M.; Saad, E.

    A method for producing rugged, continuous porous glass fiber optic sensors was developed. pH and temperature sensors based on this technology have been successfully produced. The sensor portion of the fiber is made porous by selective leaching of a specially formulated borosilicate glass fiber. This results in a strong, monolithic structure where the sensor portion of the fiber remains integrally attached to the rest of the fiber (which acts as a light pipe), essentially eliminating losses at the sensor-light pipe interface. Pore size in the sensor can be controllably varied by modifying heat treatment conditions, making these sensors suitable for chemical concentration measurements in liquids and gases. Appropriate dyes were chemically bonded by silanization to the large interior surface area of the porous sensors to produce the pH and temperature sensors. Cresol red and phenol red were used for pH and pinacyanol chloride was used for temperature sensing. The sensitivity of these devices can be controlled by varying the concentration of the chemically bonded dye and the length of the porous region. Optical absorbance measurements were made in the visible range. The tip of the sensors was coated with a thin, porous layer of gold to reflect the incident light, resulting in a double pass across the porous sensor. Experimental measurements were made over a pH range of 3 to 8 and a temperature range of 28-70 C. These porous glass fiber optic sensors were found to be rugged and reliable due to their monolithic structure and large interior surface area for attachment of active species. A broad range of sensors based on this technology could be developed by using different active species, such as enzymes and other biochemicals, which could be bonded to the interior surface of the porous glass sensor.

  9. Miniaturised optical sensors for industrial applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2010-01-01

    When addressing optical sensors for use in e.g. industry, compactness, robustness and performance are essentials. Adhering to these demands, we have developed a suit of compact optical sensors for the specific purposes of measuring angular velocity and linear translations of rigid objects....... The technology is based on compact and low-cost laser sources such as Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs). The methods characterise the object motion by speckle translation in the near field (imaging) or far field (optical Fourier transform) by optical spatial filtering velocimetry. The volume...

  10. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn; Po Zhang

    2006-06-30

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Our approach towards immobilizing the potassium salt of the molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, at the far end of an optical fiber is to embed the cluster in a thermally cured sol-gel matrix particle. This particle-in-binder approach affords fibers with greatly improved mechanical properties, as compared to previous approaches. The sensor was characterized in 2-21% gas phase oxygen at 40, 70 and 100 C. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  11. Optical sensor EIB/KNX gateway

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Valdivielso, Carlos; Matías Maestro, Ignacio R.; Arregui-San-Martín, Francisco Javier; Jiménez Buendía, Manuel; Vera Repullo, José Alfonso; Roca Dorda, Joaquín

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays, there are some special building like for example power or chemical plants, where convetional electronic sensors cannot be used as they are exposed to explosive enviroments or due to the presence of either electromagnetic interferences, or chemical or mechanical disturbances. Because of that, those sensors cannot operate and monitor correctly the target parameters. In these cases, the use of optical fiber sensors is a valid alternative due to their passive nature, inmunity to electr...

  12. Differential Diode Laser Sensor for High-Purity Oxygen Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A compact portable sensor for determining the purity of oxygen concentrations near 100 percent is proposed based on differential absorption of two beams from a diode...

  13. Highly Accurate Sensor for High-Purity Oxygen Determination Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this STTR effort, Los Gatos Research (LGR) and the University of Wisconsin (UW) propose to develop a highly-accurate sensor for high-purity oxygen determination....

  14. Development of solid state thick film zirconia oxygen gas sensors.

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannou, Andreas Stylianou

    1992-01-01

    Aspects relating to and including the development of thick film amperometric zirconia oxygen sensors were investigated. These devices, which were operated in the range 550-950°C, had a laminated structure in which a cathode, an electrolyte and an anode were printed, in that order, onto a planar alumina substrate. The anode and electrolyte were porous and during sensor Operation also acted as a diffusion barrier, restricting the rate of oxygen diffusion to the cathode. A thick film platinum he...

  15. Magnetic optical sensor particles: a flexible analytical tool for microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungerböck, Birgit; Fellinger, Siegfried; Sulzer, Philipp; Abel, Tobias; Mayr, Torsten

    2014-05-21

    In this study we evaluate magnetic optical sensor particles (MOSePs) with incorporated sensing functionalities regarding their applicability in microfluidic devices. MOSePs can be separated from the surrounding solution to form in situ sensor spots within microfluidic channels, while read-out is accomplished outside the chip. These magnetic sensor spots exhibit benefits of sensor layers (high brightness and convenient usage) combined with the advantages of dispersed sensor particles (ease of integration). The accumulation characteristics of MOSePs with different diameters were investigated as well as the in situ sensor spot stability at varying flow rates. Magnetic sensor spots were stable at flow rates specific to microfluidic applications. Furthermore, MOSePs were optimized regarding fiber optic and imaging read-out systems, and different referencing schemes were critically discussed on the example of oxygen sensors. While the fiber optic sensing system delivered precise and accurate results for measurement in microfluidic channels, limitations due to analyte consumption were found for microscopic oxygen imaging. A compensation strategy is provided, which utilizes simple pre-conditioning by exposure to light. Finally, new application possibilities were addressed, being enabled by the use of MOSePs. They can be used for microscopic oxygen imaging in any chip with optically transparent covers, can serve as flexible sensor spots to monitor enzymatic activity or can be applied to form fixed sensor spots inside microfluidic structures, which would be inaccessible to integration of sensor layers.

  16. Optical sensors for harsh environment applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R.; Maity, S.; Bekal, A.; Vartak, S.; Sridharan, A. K.; Mitra, C.

    2015-05-01

    The development of a harsh environment ammonia slip sensor based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy is presented. A hybrid optical sensor design, through combination of wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) and alignment control, is proposed as an approach towards reliable in-situ measurements in misalignment prone harsh environments. 1531.59 nm, 1553.4 nm and 1555.56 nm are suggested as possible absorption lines for trace ammonia measurement (system are presented in detail. Effect of misalignment related measurement degradation is investigated and significant improvement in measurement fidelity is demonstrated through the use of the hybrid optical sensor design.

  17. Dynamic temperature measurements with embedded optical sensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,; Seagle, Christopher T; Ao, Tommy

    2013-10-01

    This report summarizes LDRD project number 151365, \\Dynamic Temperature Measurements with Embedded Optical Sensors". The purpose of this project was to develop an optical sensor capable of detecting modest temperature states (<1000 K) with nanosecond time resolution, a recurring diagnostic need in dynamic compression experiments at the Sandia Z machine. Gold sensors were selected because the visible re ectance spectrum of gold varies strongly with temperature. A variety of static and dynamic measurements were performed to assess re ectance changes at di erent temperatures and pressures. Using a minimal optical model for gold, a plausible connection between static calibrations and dynamic measurements was found. With re nements to the model and diagnostic upgrades, embedded gold sensors seem capable of detecting minor (<50 K) temperature changes under dynamic compression.

  18. Optical fiber head for monitoring of heart rate and blood oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Kacper; Baranowska, Agata; Zmojda, Jacek; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Dorosz, Dominik

    2016-09-01

    In this article we presented possibility of heart rate and blood oxygenation measurements by classic displacement optical fiber sensor in reflection mode. Based on numerical analysis of sensor head characteristics the optimal construction was developed. Three LED diodes at the wavelengths of 530nm (green), 650nm (red) and 850nm (infrared) were used for determine heart rate and saturation of blood during "in vivo" measurements. Developed sensor head allows noninvasive and continuously monitoring of blood parameters.

  19. Conical Tapered Tip Fiber Optical Oxygen Sensor Probe Based on Fluorescence Quenching%基于荧光猝灭的锥尖型光纤氧传感探头

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓辉; 王晓英; 肖吉群; 柏云

    2015-01-01

    利用动态化学腐蚀法制备锥尖型光纤端面,以提拉法镀溶胶凝胶敏感膜,组装了基于荧光猝灭的直径仅1.5 mm的光纤氧传感探头。探头锥面的长径比可通过调控腐蚀参数(温度、腐蚀液面下降速度)调控。构建相移测量系统,优化参数后进行0~21%范围内的氧含量测定,工作曲线呈现良好的线性特征(R2=0.9996),偏差小于测量值的5%。%Conical tapered tip was prepared by dynamic chemical etching method,on which sensitive membrane was plated through sol-dipping coating.Then,fiber optical oxygen sensor probe of 1.5 millimeters based on fluorescence quenching was fabrica-ted.The geometrical parameters could be regulated etch parameters,such as temperature and descent velocity.Phase shift measuring system was set to evaluate the performance of the probe.After parameters optimized,the oxygen content was tested within the scope of 0% ~21%.The working curve shows favorable linearity (R2 = 0.999 6),and the deviation is less than 5% of measured value.

  20. Optical Fibre Pressure Sensors in Medical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Poeggel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is focused on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of optical fibre pressure sensors for medical applications. Optical fibres have inherent advantages due to their small size, immunity to electromagnetic interferences and their suitability for remote monitoring and multiplexing. The small dimensions of optical fibre-based pressure sensors, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive for many medical applications and, thus, particularly suited to in vivo measurement. This means that the sensor can be placed directly inside a patient, e.g., for urodynamic and cardiovascular assessment. This paper presents an overview of the recent developments in optical fibre-based pressure measurements with particular reference to these application areas.

  1. Development of oxygen sensors for use in liquid metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Nieuwenhove, Rudi [Institutt for Energiteknikk, Halden, (Norway); Ejenstam, Jesper; Szakalos, Peter [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, Stockholm, (Sweden)

    2015-07-01

    For generation IV reactor concepts, based on liquid metal cooling, there is a need for robust oxygen sensors which can be used in the core of the reactor since corrosion can only be kept sufficiently low by controlling the dissolved oxygen content in the liquid metal. A robust, ceramic membrane type sensor has been developed at IFE/Halden (Norway) and tested in an autoclave system at KTH (Sweden). The sensor has been tested in lead-bismuth at 550 deg. C and performed well. (authors)

  2. Development of a highly sensitive galvanic cell oxygen sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, H; Asakura, K

    1995-02-01

    A highly sensitive galvanic cell oxygen sensor was successfully developed for determining parts per billion of oxygen in high purity gases such as nitrogen, argon, etc. The response of this improved sensor was proportional in the range of oxygen concentrations from 10.0 ppm to the detection limit. The response speed in this study was improved to within 90 sec for a 90% response. The detection limit was tentatively found to be less than 0.4 ppb corresponding to S N = 2 .

  3. Hybrid Piezoelectric/Fiber-Optic Sensor Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mark; Qing, Xinlin

    2004-01-01

    Hybrid piezoelectric/fiber-optic (HyPFO) sensor sheets are undergoing development. They are intended for use in nondestructive evaluation and long-term monitoring of the integrity of diverse structures, including aerospace, aeronautical, automotive, and large stationary ones. It is anticipated that the further development and subsequent commercialization of the HyPFO sensor systems will lead to economic benefits in the form of increased safety, reduction of life-cycle costs through real-time structural monitoring, increased structural reliability, reduction of maintenance costs, and increased readiness for service. The concept of a HyPFO sensor sheet is a generalization of the concept of a SMART Layer(TradeMark), which is a patented device that comprises a thin dielectric film containing an embedded network of distributed piezoelectric actuator/sensors. Such a device can be mounted on the surface of a metallic structure or embedded inside a composite-material structure during fabrication of the structure. There is has been substantial interest in incorporating sensors other than piezoelectric ones into SMART Layer(TradeMark) networks: in particular, because of the popularity of the use of fiber-optic sensors for monitoring the "health" of structures in recent years, it was decided to incorporate fiber-optic sensors, giving rise to the concept of HyPFO devices.

  4. Optical networks for wideband sensor array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Lin Horng

    2011-12-01

    This thesis presents the realization of novel systems for optical sensing networks with an array of long-period grating (LPG) sensors. As a launching point of the thesis, the motivation to implement optical sensing network in precisely catering LPG sensors is presented. It highlights the flexibility of the sensing network to act as the foundation in order to boost the application of the various LPG sensor design in biological and chemical sensing. After the thorough study on the various optical sensing networks, sub-carrier multiplexing (SCM) and optical time division multiplexing (OTDM) schemes are adopted in conjunction with tunable laser source (TLS) to facilitate simultaneous interrogation of the LPG sensors array. In fact, these systems are distinct to have the capability to accommodate wideband optical sensors. Specifically, the LPG sensors which is in 20nm bandwidth are identified to operate in these systems. The working principles of the systems are comprehensively elucidated in this thesis. It highlights the mathematical approach to quantify the experimental setup of the optical sensing network. Additionally, the system components of the designs are identified and methodically characterized so that the components well operate in the designed environment. A mockup has been setup to demonstrate the application in sensing of various liquid indices and analyse the response of the LPG sensors in order to evaluate the performance of the systems. Eventually, the resemblance of the demultiplexed spectral response to the pristine spectral response are quantified to have excellent agreement. Finally, the promising result consistency of the systems is verified through repeatability test.

  5. Optical network of silicon micromachined sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark L.; Burns, David W.; Zook, J. David

    1996-03-01

    The Honeywell Technology Center, in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin and the Mobil Corporation, and under funding from this ARPA sponsored program, are developing a new type of `hybrid' micromachined silicon/fiber optic sensor that utilizes the best attributes of each technology. Fiber optics provide a noise free method to read out the sensor without electrical power required at the measurement point. Micromachined silicon sensor techniques provide a method to design many different types of sensors such as temperature, pressure, acceleration, or magnetic field strength and report the sensor data using FDM methods. Our polysilicon resonant microbeam structures have a built in Fabry-Perot interferometer that offers significant advantages over other configurations described in the literature. Because the interferometer is an integral part of the structure, the placement of the fiber becomes non- critical, and packaging issues become considerably simpler. The interferometer spacing are determined by the thin-film fabrication processes and therefore can be extremely well controlled. The main advantage, however, is the integral vacuum cavity that ensures high Q values. Testing results have demonstrated relaxed alignment tolerances in packaging these devices, with an excellent Signal to Noise Ratio. Networks of 16 or more sensors are currently being developed. STORM (Strain Transduction by Optomechanical Resonant Microbeams) sensors can also provide functionality and self calibration information which can be used to improve the overall system reliability. Details of the sensor and network design, as well as test results, are presented.

  6. All-Optical Graphene Oxide Humidity Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weng Hong Lim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The optical characteristics of graphene oxide (GO were explored to design and fabricate a GO-based optical humidity sensor. GO film was coated onto a SU8 polymer channel waveguide using the drop-casting technique. The proposed sensor shows a high TE-mode absorption at 1550 nm. Due to the dependence of the dielectric properties of the GO film on water content, this high TE-mode absorption decreases when the ambient relative humidity increases. The proposed sensor shows a rapid response (<1 s to periodically interrupted humid air flow. The transmission of the proposed sensor shows a linear response of 0.553 dB/% RH in the range of 60% to 100% RH.

  7. High-sensitivity fiber optic acoustic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Liu, Deming; Liao, Hao

    2016-11-01

    Due to the overwhelming advantages compared with traditional electronicsensors, fiber-optic acoustic sensors have arisen enormous interest in multiple disciplines. In this paper we present the recent research achievements of our group on fiber-optic acoustic sensors. The main point of our research is high sensitivity interferometric acoustic sensors, including Michelson, Sagnac, and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In addition, some advanced technologies have been proposed for acoustic or acoustic pressure sensing such as single-mode/multimode fiber coupler, dual FBGs and multi-longitudinal mode fiber laser based acoustic sensors. Moreover, our attention we have also been paid on signal demodulation schemes. The intensity-based quadrature point (Q-point) demodulation, two-wavelength quadrature demodulation and symmetric 3×3 coupler methodare discussed and compared in this paper.

  8. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D. J. Osborn; Po Zhang

    2006-09-30

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Our approach towards immobilizing the potassium salt of the molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, at the far end of an optical fiber is to embed the cluster in a thermally cured sol-gel matrix particle. Due to the improved mechanical properties of this approach high temperature sensor measurements were performed up to 100 C. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  9. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2005-04-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. One of the critical materials issues is to demonstrate that the luminescent cluster immobilized in the sol-gel porous support can withstand high temperature. At the same time the sol-gel matrix must have a high permeability to oxygen. Using a potassium salt of the molybdenum clusters, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, we have established the conditions necessary for deposition of optical quality sol-gel films. From spectroscopic measurements of the film we have shown that the cluster luminescence is stable following heat cycling of 54 hours at 200 C. Quenching of a factor of 1.5X between pure nitrogen and 21% oxygen was observed from in-situ measurements of films heated directly at 200 C. An automated system for characterizing fiber optic oxygen sensors up to 220 C with a temporal resolution better than 10 s is under construction. We estimate a signal of 6 x 10{sup 8} photons/s after complete quenching in 21% oxygen. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  10. Optical fibre cantilever sensor for biological application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Zhou, Y. X.; Patterson, G.; Shu, W. M.; Maier, R. R. J.; Fowler, R.; Hand, D. P.; MacPherson, W. N.

    2014-05-01

    Micro-cantilever sensors have shown great promise in a wide range of application are as including chemical and biological sensing. However, many of these devices are based upon a sensor `chip' that requires careful alignment between the cantilever and the read-out system, which can be challenging. Furthermore, optical interrogation typically involves a bulky free-space system. Optical fibre addressed cantilevers have been reported previously in the literature and in this paper we propose techniques to design and fabricate polymer micro-cantilevers for attachment onto the end of standard single mode fibres using laser machining. Low-cost optical sources and a fibre coupled spectrometer are employed to monitor the cantilever deflection and therefore observe biological binding between a species of interest and an activated cantilever. Proof-of-concept experiments show that the sensor is capable of detecting pathogen concentration with down to a level of 105cfu/ml.

  11. Oxygen Sensor Based on the Principle of Electrochemical Pump

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗瑞贤; 刘恩辉; 任凤彩; 陈霭璠

    1994-01-01

    A high-temperature oxygen sensor of limiting.current with a porous layer on the cathode te limit the diffusion rate of oxygen is investigated and fabricated.The solid electrolyte is made of Yttria-doped stabilized zirooma (YSZ) and the porous platinum film electrode is deposited on the surface of YSZ.The relation between temperature and oxygen concentration is tested at 629°-780℃ in a mixture of N2 and O2 with the oxygen concentration being 0-37%.Experimental results show a linear output with the oxygen concentration.The temperature-dependence of its output can be explained by taking into account a mixed diffusion control mechanism of the ordinary and Knudsen diffusion.The operating principle,structure and performance of the sensor are discussed.

  12. Fiber-Optic Chemical Sensors and Fiber-Optic Bio-Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Pospíšilová

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes principles and current stage of development of fiber-optic chemical sensors (FOCS and biosensors (FOBS. Fiber optic sensor (FOS systems use the ability of optical fibers (OF to guide the light in the spectral range from ultraviolet (UV (180 nm up to middle infrared (IR (10 μm and modulation of guided light by the parameters of the surrounding environment of the OF core. The introduction of OF in the sensor systems has brought advantages such as measurement in flammable and explosive environments, immunity to electrical noises, miniaturization, geometrical flexibility, measurement of small sample volumes, remote sensing in inaccessible sites or harsh environments and multi-sensing. The review comprises briefly the theory of OF elaborated for sensors, techniques of fabrications and analytical results reached with fiber-optic chemical and biological sensors.

  13. Fiber optic liquid refractive index sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Vanita; Gangwar, Rahul Kumar; Singh, Vinod Kumar

    2015-08-01

    In this present work we report fabrication of fiber optic liquid refractive index (RI) measurement sensor based on Michelson Interferometer method. This sensor was assembled by using graded index multimode (MM) fiber with core diameter 50 µm and the cladding of fiber was removed by simple chemical method. To perform this experiment a 2×2 3dB coupler is used. The fiber ends are then immersed in solvent and solution to provide reference and refractive index measurements, respectively. This method was successfully used to measure refractive index of Sodium Chloride (NaCl)-Water solution at different concentrations. The fringe contrast sensitivity of device is 92.90 dB/RIU measured in the RI range from 1.34 to 1.42 which is better than Mach-Zehnder Interferometer sensor [1] and Fabry perot based sensor [2]. The fabrication of sensor is simple, low cost and highly sensitive.

  14. Thermal strain analysis of optic fiber sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Her, Shiuh-Chuan; Huang, Chih-Ying

    2013-01-31

    An optical fiber sensor surface bonded onto a host structure and subjected to a temperature change is analytically studied in this work. The analysis is developed in order to assess the thermal behavior of an optical fiber sensor designed for measuring the strain in the host structure. For a surface bonded optical fiber sensor, the measuring sensitivity is strongly dependent on the bonding characteristics which include the protective coating, adhesive layer and the bonding length. Thermal stresses can be generated due to a mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients between the optical fiber and host structure. The optical fiber thermal strain induced by the host structure is transferred via the adhesive layer and protective coating. In this investigation, an analytical expression of the thermal strain and stress in the optical fiber is presented. The theoretical predictions are validated using the finite element method. Numerical results show that the thermal strain and stress are linearly dependent on the difference in thermal expansion coefficients between the optical fiber and host structure and independent of the thermal expansion coefficients of the adhesive and coating.

  15. Optical Landing Hazard Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Visidyne's Phase I effort has established through modeling and analysis that a unique concept for an active optical 3-D Imager (or Imaging LADAR) has high potential...

  16. Miniaturized optical sensors based on lens arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Steen Grüner; Jakobsen, M.L.; Larsen, H.E.

    2005-01-01

    A suite of optical sensors based on the use of lenticular arrays for probing mechanical deflections will be displayed. The optical systems are well suited for miniaturization, and utilize speckles as the information-carriers. This implementation allows for acquiring directional information of the...... of the displacement. Systems for probing lateral displacements and in-plane vibrations (1-D and 2-D) are displayed, as will systems for probing angular velocity and torsional vibrations of rotating objects....

  17. Flexible optical chemical sensor platform for BTX

    OpenAIRE

    Arias Espinoza, Juan Diego; Sazhnikov, Viacheslav; Sabik, Sami; Ionov, Dmitriy; Smits, Edsger; Kalathimekkad, Sandeep; Van Steenberge, Geert; Alfimov, Michail; Posniak, Malgorzata; Schoo, Herman

    2012-01-01

    An in-plane flexible sensor platform for BTX detection was developed using low-cost patterning techniques and foil-based optical components. The platform was produced by a combination of laser patterning, inkjet printing and capillary filling. Key optical components such as lightguides, opticalcladding layers and metallic interconnections were realized on low cost substrates such as paper and PET. The sensing mechanism is based on the change in fluorescence spectra of a reporter dye, supporte...

  18. Fiber optic chemical sensors: The evolution of high- density fiber-optic DNA microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Jane A.

    2001-06-01

    Sensors were developed for multianalyte monitoring, fermentation monitoring, lactate analysis, remote oxygen detection for use in bioremediation monitoring and in a fuel spill clean-up project, heavy metal analysis, and high density DNA microarrays. The major focus of this thesis involved creating and improving high-density DNA gene arrays. Fiber optic sensors are created using fluorescent indicators, polymeric supports, and optical fiber substrates. The fluorescent indicator is entrapped in a polymer layer and attached to the tip of the optical fiber. The tip of the fiber bearing the sensing layer (the distal end) is placed in the sample of interest while the other end of the fiber (the proximal end) is connected to an analysis system. Any length of fiber can be used without compromising the integrity or sensitivity of the system. A fiber optic oxygen sensor was designed incorporating an oxygen sensitive fluorescent dye and a gas permeable polymer attached to an optical fiber. The construction simplicity and ruggedness of the sensor enabled its deployment for in situ chemical oxidation and bioremediation studies. Optical fibers were also used as the substrate to detect biomolecules in solution. To monitor bioprocesses, the production of the analyte of interest must be coupled with a species that is optically measurable. For example, oxygen is consumed in many metabolic functions. The fiber optic oxygen sensor is equipped with an additional sensing layer. Upon contact with a specific biochemical in the sample, a reaction occurs in the additional sensing layer that either consumes or produces oxygen. This dual layer system was used to monitor the presence of lactate, an important metabolite for clinical and bioprocess analysis. In many biological and environmental systems, the generation of one species occurs coincidentally with the generation or consumption of another species. A multianalyte sensor was prepared that can monitor the simultaneous activity of pH, CO2

  19. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2006-05-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Previously we described a particle-in-binder approach to immobilizing the potassium salt of the molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, at the tips of optical fibers. Compared to previous methods, the particle-in-binder approach affords fibers with greatly improved mechanical properties. The response of the sensor to oxygen at 40, 70 and 100 C was measured in 2-21% gas phase oxygen. The normalized sensor signal is linear with molar oxygen concentration and fits the theoretical Stern-Volmer relationship. Although the sensitivity decreases with temperature, at 100 C the sensitivity is 160 [O{sub 2}]{sup -1}. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  20. Measuring method for optical fibre sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Fluitman, J.H.J.

    1984-01-01

    A new measuring method for the signal amplitude in intensity modulating fibre optic sensors is described. A reference signal is generated in the time domain. The method is insensitive for the sensitivity fluctuations of the light transmitter and the light receiver. The method is experimentally

  1. Integrated Optical Asymmetric Coupler Pressure Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyat, Isa; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2004-05-01

    Analysis of a novel pressure sensor based on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) asymmetric vertical coupler is presented. The integrated optical component is a coupler composed of a single mode (SM) low index waveguide and a thin silicon slab. High sensitivities of about 0.14 rad.kPa-1 should be achieved.

  2. Measuring method for optical fibre sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerink, T.S.J.; Fluitman, J.H.J.

    1984-01-01

    A new measuring method for the signal amplitude in intensity modulating fibre optic sensors is described. A reference signal is generated in the time domain. The method is insensitive for the sensitivity fluctuations of the light transmitter and the light receiver. The method is experimentally teste

  3. The development of fibre optic microbend sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsthuis, W.H.G.; Fluitman, J.H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Investigations concerning the development of a fibre optic pressure sensor are reported. The phenomenon of light power attenuation in a periodically deformed graded index fibre has been studied theoretically. It appears that available theories are not suited to describe this attenuation process in t

  4. Integrated optical sensors for the chemical domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambeck, Paul V.

    2006-01-01

    During the last decade there has been a rapidly growing interest in integrated optical (IO) sensors, expecially because many of them principally allow for sensitive, real time, label-free-on-site measurements of the concentration of (bio-)chemical species. This review aims at giving an overview of t

  5. Integrated optical sensors for the chemical domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambeck, Paul

    2006-01-01

    During the last decade there has been a rapidly growing interest in integrated optical (IO) sensors, expecially because many of them principally allow for sensitive, real time, label-free-on-site measurements of the concentration of (bio-)chemical species. This review aims at giving an overview of t

  6. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2005-07-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor is being developed that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Two critical materials issues are the cluster's ability to withstand high temperatures when immobilized in a porous the sol-gel support, and whether after heating to high temperatures, the sol-gel matrix maintains a high and constant permeability to oxygen to support rapid quenching of luminescence. We used a composite materials approach to prepare stable sensing layers on optical fibers. We dispersed 60 w/w% of a pre-cured sol-gel composite containing the potassium salt of molybdenum clusters (K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}) into a sol-gel binder solution, and established the conditions necessary for deposition of sol-gel films on optical fibers and planar substrates. The fiber sensor has an output signal of 5 nW when pumped with an inexpensive commercial 365 nm ultraviolet light emitting diode (LED). Quenching of the sensor signal by oxygen was observed up to a gas temperature of 175 C with no degradation of the oxygen permeability of the composite after high temperature cycling. On planar substrates the cluster containing composite responds within <1 second to a gas exchange from nitrogen to oxygen, indicating the feasibility of real-time oxygen detection.

  7. Compact optical MEMS accelerometers and temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timotijevic, Branislav; Petremand, Yves; Bayat, Dara; Luetzelschwab, Markus; Aebi, Laurent; Tormen, Maurizio

    2017-02-01

    Continuous and accurate monitoring of acceleration and temperature inside large turbo- and hydro-generators is of crucial importance to prevent extremely expensive system damages and false positives. Development of optical, metalfree sensors for such systems has gained a lot of attention due to the fact that they are resistant to typically very strong electromagnetic fields and that they are non-conductive. We present miniature temperature and accelerometer optical sensors using a common silicon MEMS platform. A linear response with a deviation as small as 1% between set and measured accelerations has been obtained in an acceleration range 0-40g. Preliminary tests for temperature sensors indicate a linear response with sensitivity better than 1°C in a range of 20°C to 150°C.

  8. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2006-01-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Previously we described a particle-in-binder approach to immobilizing the potassium salt of a molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, at the tips of optical fibers. Compared to previous methods, the particle-in-binder approach affords fibers with greatly improved mechanical properties. We have extensively characterized two fiber sensors at high temperature. We obtain quenching ratios between pure nitrogen and 21% oxygen as high as 3.9 x at 70 C. For the first sensor at 60 C we obtained a {+-} 1% variation in the quenching ratio over 6 cycles of measurement, and monitored the device performance over 23 days. We were able to operate the second sensor continuously for 14 hours at 70 C, and the sensor quenching ratio was stable to 5% over that time period. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  9. OPUS: an optically parallel ultrasound sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallman, Jeffrey S.; Ashby, A. E.; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Thomas, Graham H.

    2000-03-01

    Transmission ultrasound is not in widespread use, partially because of the time and expense of acquiring the data. We are addressing this problem with an optically parallel ultrasound sensor. The core of the sensor is a thin silicon nitride membrane patterned with gold to create 'acoustic pixels' over a large area. Each acoustic pixel vibrates at the frequency of the acoustic excitation. The thin membrane, supported by short walls over an optical substrate, with one side immersed in the ultrasound medium and the supported side exposed to air, flexes when an ultrasound pressure wave encounters it. This flexing causes the air gap between the optical substrate and the membrane to change. The change in the air gap modulates the reflection of an optical beam by frustrated total internal reflection. By strobing the optical beam, the deflection of the membrane can be detected and measured at any point through the acoustic period. Acquiring a sequence of images allow us to extract the relative pressure phase and amplitude. Proof of principle experiments have shown that we can build this sensor, and we are currently using a small aperture version to examine simple test objects.

  10. Fibre optic sensor with disturbance localization in one optical fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Ciurapinski, W.

    2007-05-01

    Ordinary perimeter security systems consist of many individual sensors with detection range 200-300 meters. These limitations are connected with physical phenomena that are used in microwave and infrared barriers as well as in ground and fence cable sensors. On the contrary, fiber optic perimeter sensors can be applied in the range of many kilometers and zone length 200-300 meters is degradation of their possibilities. This paper presents investigation results of a new generation of the fiber optic perimeter sensor in a two Sagnac and Sagna'c interferometers configuration. This system can detect a potential intruder and determine its position along a protected zone. We propose a method that makes use of the inherent properties of both interferometers. After demodulation of signals from both interferometers, obtained amplitude characteristic of the Sagnac interferometer depends on position of a disturbance along the both interferometer. So, quotient of both demodulated characteristics is proportional to the position of the disturbance. Arrangement of a laboratory model of the sensor and its signal processing scheme is presented. During research of a laboratory model, it was possible to detect the position of the disturbance with resolution of about 50m along a 10-km long sensor.

  11. NOVEL SPECTRUM ABSORPTION OPTICAL FIBER METHANE SENSOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shutao; Che Rensheng

    2005-01-01

    Based on spectrum principle and analyzing the infrared absorption spectrum of methane, a kind of optical fiber methane gas sensor and its system are developed. DFBLD(Distributed feedback laser diode) in 1 300 nm waveband is used as illuminant and phase-detecting technology is used to carry out harmonic wave detecting the concentration of methane. The sensitivity can arrive at 10-5.Experiments results show that the performance targets of the sensor such as sensitivity can basically satisfy the requests of methane detection.

  12. Absolute Measurement Fiber-optic Sensors in Large Structural Monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The security of civil engineering is an important task due to the economic, social and environmental significance. Compared with conventional sensors, the optical fiber sensors have their unique characteristics.Being durable, stable and insensitive to external perturbations,they are particular interesting for the long-term monitoring of civil structures.Focus is on absolute measurement optical fiber sensors, which are emerging from the monitoring large structural, including SOFO system, F-P optical fiber sensors, and fiber Bragg grating sensors. The principle, characteristic and application of these three kinds of optical fiber sensors are described together with their future prospects.

  13. Optical sensors of bulk refractive index using optical fiber resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eryürek, M.; Karadag, Y.; Ghafoor, M.; Bavili, N.; Cicek, K.; Kiraz, A.

    2017-05-01

    Optical fiber resonator (OFR) sensor is presented for bulk liquid refractive index (RI) sensing. The sensing mechanism relies on the spectral shifts of whispering gallery modes (WGMs) of OFRs which are excited using a tapered fiber. OFR liquid RI sensor is fully characterized using water solutions of ethanol and ethylene glycol (EG). A good agreement is achieved between the analytical calculations and experimental results for both TE and TM polarizations. The detection limit for bulk RI is calculated to be between 2.7 - 4.7 × 10-5 refractive index unit (RIU). The OFR sensor provides a robust, easy-to-fabricate and sensitive liquid refractive index sensor which can be employed in lab-on-a-chip applications.

  14. Optical Sensors Based on Plastic Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilro, Lúcia; Alberto, Nélia; Pinto, João L.; Nogueira, Rogério

    2012-01-01

    The recent advances of polymer technology allowed the introduction of plastic optical fiber in sensor design. The advantages of optical metrology with plastic optical fiber have attracted the attention of the scientific community, as they allow the development of low-cost or cost competitive systems compared with conventional technologies. In this paper, the current state of the art of plastic optical fiber technology will be reviewed, namely its main characteristics and sensing advantages. Several measurement techniques will be described, with a strong focus on interrogation approaches based on intensity variation in transmission and reflection. The potential applications involving structural health monitoring, medicine, environment and the biological and chemical area are also presented. PMID:23112707

  15. Optical Sensors Based on Plastic Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Nogueira

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The recent advances of polymer technology allowed the introduction of plastic optical fiber in sensor design. The advantages of optical metrology with plastic optical fiber have attracted the attention of the scientific community, as they allow the development of low-cost or cost competitive systems compared with conventional technologies. In this paper, the current state of the art of plastic optical fiber technology will be reviewed, namely its main characteristics and sensing advantages. Several measurement techniques will be described, with a strong focus on interrogation approaches based on intensity variation in transmission and reflection. The potential applications involving structural health monitoring, medicine, environment and the biological and chemical area are also presented.

  16. Porous Silicon Structures as Optical Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor A. Levitsky

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a short review of recent progress in the field of optical gas sensors based on porous silicon (PSi and PSi composites, which are separate from PSi optochemical and biological sensors for a liquid medium. Different periodical and nonperiodical PSi photonic structures (bares, modified by functional groups or infiltrated with sensory polymers are described for gas sensing with an emphasis on the device specificity, sensitivity and stability to the environment. Special attention is paid to multiparametric sensing and sensor array platforms as effective trends for the improvement of analyte classification and quantification. Mechanisms of gas physical and chemical sorption inside PSi mesopores and pores of PSi functional composites are discussed.

  17. Bioinspired optical sensors for unmanned aerial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahl, Javaan; Rosser, Kent; Mizutani, Akiko

    2011-04-01

    Insects are dependant on the spatial, spectral and temporal distributions of light in the environment for flight control and navigation. This paper reports on flight trials of implementations of insect inspired behaviors on unmanned aerial vehicles. Optical flow methods for maintaining a constant height above ground and a constant course have been demonstrated to provide navigation capabilities that are impossible using conventional avionics sensors. Precision control of height above ground and ground course were achieved over long distances. Other vision based techniques demonstrated include a biomimetic stabilization sensor that uses the ultraviolet and green bands of the spectrum, and a sky polarization compass. Both of these sensors were tested over long trajectories in different directions, in each case showing performance similar to low cost inertial heading and attitude systems. The behaviors demonstrate some of the core functionality found in the lower levels of the sensorimotor system of flying insects and shows promise for more integrated solutions in the future.

  18. Design of optics for compact star sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Minyi; Shi, Rongbao; Shen, Weimin

    2016-10-01

    In order to adapt to small size and low cost space platform such as mini-satellites, this paper studies the design of optics for compact star sensor. At first, the relationship between limiting magnitude and optical system specifications which includes field of view and entrance pupil diameter is analyzed, based on its Pyramid identification algorithm and signal-to-noise ratio requirement. The specifications corresponding to different limiting magnitude can be obtained after the detector is selected, and both of the complexity of optical lens and the size of baffle can be estimated. Then the range of the limiting magnitude can be determined for the miniaturization of the optical system. Taking STAR1000 CMOS detector as an example, the compact design of the optical system can be realized when the limiting magnitude is in the interval of 4.9Mv 5.5Mv. At last, the lens and baffle of a CMOS compact star sensor is optimally designed, of which length and weight is respectively 124 millimeters and 300 grams.

  19. An Optical Pressure Sensor Based on MEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong Zhang; Sheng Qiang; Frank Lewis; Yalin Wu; Xiaozhu Chi

    2006-01-01

    An optical fiber pressure sensor has been developed for the measurement in human body. The sensing element is possessed of a membrane structure, which is fabricated by micromachining. The fabrication process includes anisotropic wet etching on the silicon wafer. For the transmitting source and signal light, a multimode optical fiber 50/125 μm (core/clad) in diameter was used. The intensity of the light reflected back into the fiber varies with the membrane deflection, which is a function of pressure. The deflection of the membrane by applied pressure can be mathematically described.

  20. Enzyme-Based Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulp, Thomas J.; Camins, Irene; Angel, Stanley M.

    1988-06-01

    Fiber optic chemical sensors capable of detecting glucose and penicillin were developed. Each consists of a polymer membrane that is covalently attached to the tip of a glass optical fiber. The membrane contains the enzyme and a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye (fluorescein). A signal is produced when the enzyme catalyzes the conversion of the analyte (glucose or penicillin) into a product (gluconic or penicilloic acid, respectively) that lowers the microenvironmental pH of the membrane and, consequently, lowers the fluorescence intensity of the dye. Each sensor is capable of responding to analyte concentrations in the range of ~0.1 to 100 mM. The penicillin optrode response time is 40 to 60 s while that for glucose is ~5 to 12 min.

  1. Phase sensor for solar adaptive-optics

    CERN Document Server

    Kellerer, Aglae

    2011-01-01

    Wavefront sensing in solar adaptive-optics is currently done with correlating Shack-Hartmann sensors, although the spatial- and temporal-resolutions of the phase measurements are then limited by the extremely fast computing required to correlate the sensor signals at the frequencies of daytime atmospheric-fluctuations. To avoid this limitation, a new wavefront-sensing technique is presented, that makes use of the solar brightness and is applicable to extended sources. The wavefront is sent through a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer. A small, central part of the wavefront is used as reference and is made to interfere with the rest of the wavefront. The contrast of two simultaneously measured interference-patterns provides a direct estimate of the wavefront phase, no additional computation being required. The proposed optical layout shows precise initial alignment to be the critical point in implementing the new wavefront-sensing scheme.

  2. Optical Slot-Waveguide Based Biochemical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Angulo Barrios

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Slot-waveguides allow light to be guided and strongly confined inside a nanometer-scale region of low refractive index. Thus stronger light-analyte interaction can be obtained as compared to that achievable by a conventional waveguide, in which the propagating beam is confined to the high-refractive-index core of the waveguide. In addition, slot-waveguides can be fabricated by employing CMOS compatible materials and technology, enabling miniaturization, integration with electronic, photonic and fluidic components in a chip, and mass production. These advantages have made the use of slot-waveguides for highly sensitive biochemical optical integrated sensors an emerging field. In this paper, recent achievements in slot-waveguide based biochemical sensing will be reviewed. These include slot-waveguide ring resonator based refractometric label-free biosensors, label-based optical sensing, and nano-opto-mechanical sensors.

  3. Temperature Sensors Based on WGM Optical Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute; Itchenko, Vladimir; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2008-01-01

    A proposed technique for measuring temperature would exploit differences between the temperature dependences of the frequencies of two different electromagnetic modes of a whispering gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonator. An apparatus based on this technique was originally intended to be part of a control system for stabilizing a laser frequency in the face of temperature fluctuations. When suitably calibrated, apparatuses based on this technique could also serve as precise temperature sensors for purposes other than stabilization of lasers. A sensor according to the proposal would include (1) a transparent WGM dielectric resonator having at least two different sets of modes characterized by different thermo-optical constants and (2) optoelectronic instrumentation for measuring the difference between the temperature-dependent shifts of the resonance frequencies of the two sets of modes.

  4. Computer Modeling for Optical Waveguide Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-15

    COSATI CODES 18 SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse it necessary and cleritify by DIock numnerl FIEL GRUP SB-GOUP Optical waveguide sensors Computer...reflection. The resultant probe beam transmission may be plotted as a function of changes in the refractive index of the surrounding fluid medium. BASIC...all angles of incidence about the critical angle ecr. It should be noted that N in equation (3) is a function of e, since = sin - l sin 8 , see

  5. Fibre optic sensors for mine hazard detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, T; Wang, C; Wei, Y; Zhao, Y; Shang, Y; Wang, Z [Laser Institute of Shandong Academy of Science (China); Huo, D [Shandong Micro-Sensor Photonics Limited, 19 Keyuan Road, Jinan, Shandong province, 250014 (China); Ning, Y, E-mail: tongyuliu@hotmail.co [Intelligent Sensor Systems Limited, Rockley Manor, Rockley, Wiltshire (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    We report the development of a comprehensive safety monitoring solution for coal mines. A number of fibre optic sensors have been developed and deployed for safety monitoring of mine roof integrity and hazardous gases. The FOS-based mine hazard detection system offers unique advantages of intrinsic safety, multi-location and multi-parameter monitoring. They can be potentially used to build expert systems for mine hazard early detection and prevention.

  6. Optical microfiber coil resonator refractometric sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fei; Horak, Peter; Brambilla, Gilberto

    2007-06-11

    We present a novel refractometric sensor based on a coated all-coupling optical-fiber-nanowire microcoil resonator which is robust, compact, and comprises an intrinsic fluidic channel. We calculate the device sensitivity and find its dependence on the nanowire diameter and coating thickness. A sensitivity as high as 700 nm/RIU and a refractive index resolution as low as 10(-10) are predicted.

  7. Fiber-optically sensorized composite wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Joannes M.; Black, Richard J.; Moslehi, Behzad; Oblea, Levy; Patel, Rona; Sotoudeh, Vahid; Abouzeida, Essam; Quinones, Vladimir; Gowayed, Yasser; Soobramaney, Paul; Flowers, George

    2014-04-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) immune and light-weight, fiber-optic sensor based Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) will find increasing application in aerospace structures ranging from aircraft wings to jet engine vanes. Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) has been developing multi-functional fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor systems including parallel processing FBG interrogators combined with advanced signal processing for SHM, structural state sensing and load monitoring applications. This paper reports work with Auburn University on embedding and testing FBG sensor arrays in a quarter scale model of a T38 composite wing. The wing was designed and manufactured using fabric reinforced polymer matrix composites. FBG sensors were embedded under the top layer of the composite. Their positions were chosen based on strain maps determined by finite element analysis. Static and dynamic testing confirmed expected response from the FBGs. The demonstrated technology has the potential to be further developed into an autonomous onboard system to perform load monitoring, SHM and Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of composite aerospace structures (wings and rotorcraft blades). This platform technology could also be applied to flight testing of morphing and aero-elastic control surfaces.

  8. Optical Cutting Interruption Sensor for Fiber Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Adelmann

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on an optical sensor system attached to a 4 kW fiber laser cutting machine to detect cutting interruptions. The sensor records the thermal radiation from the process zone with a modified ring mirror and optical filter arrangement, which is placed between the cutting head and the collimator. The process radiation is sensed by a Si and InGaAs diode combination with the detected signals being digitalized with 20 kHz. To demonstrate the function of the sensor, signals arising during fusion cutting of 1 mm stainless steel and mild steel with and without cutting interruptions are evaluated and typical signatures derived. In the recorded signals the piercing process, the laser switch on and switch off point and waiting period are clearly resolved. To identify the cutting interruption, the signals of both Si and InGaAs diodes are high pass filtered and the signal fluctuation ranges being subsequently calculated. Introducing a correction factor, we identify that only in case of a cutting interruption the fluctuation range of the Si diode exceeds the InGaAs diode. This characteristic signature was successfully used to detect 80 cutting interruptions of 83 incomplete cuts (alpha error 3.6% and system recorded no cutting interruption from 110 faultless cuts (beta error of 0. This particularly high detection rate in combination with the easy integration of the sensor, highlight its potential for cutting interruption detection in industrial applications.

  9. Biomimetic optical sensor for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan A.; Gorospe, George E.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Barrett, Steven F.

    2015-05-01

    We report on a fiber optic sensor based on the physiological aspects of the eye and vision-related neural layers of the common housefly (Musca domestica) that has been developed and built for aerospace applications. The intent of the research is to reproduce select features from the fly's vision system that are desirable in image processing, including high functionality in low-light and low-contrast environments, sensitivity to motion, compact size, lightweight, and low power and computation requirements. The fly uses a combination of overlapping photoreceptor responses that are well approximated by Gaussian distributions and neural superposition to detect image features, such as object motion, to a much higher degree than just the photoreceptor density would imply. The Gaussian overlap in the biomimetic sensor comes from the front-end optical design, and the neural superposition is accomplished by subsequently combining the signals using analog electronics. The fly eye sensor is being developed to perform real-time tracking of a target on a flexible aircraft wing experiencing bending and torsion loads during flight. We report on results of laboratory experiments using the fly eye sensor to sense a target moving across its field of view.

  10. A fiber-optic powered wireless sensor module made on elastomeric substrate for wearable sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, V; Lin, H; Chuang, J; Sailor, M; Lo, Y

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate an integrated sensor module that combines a photonic nano-porous sensor and a bias-free optical powered RF transducer. The sensor signal is encoded in the RF frequency ready for transmission. The entire sensor module does not include battery and is constructed with the flexible and biocompatible elastomeric polymer, PDMS. This technology holds promise for wearable sensors.

  11. Study of fiber optic sugar sensor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Jayanth Kumar; N M Gowri; R Venkateswara Raju; G Nirmala; B S Bellubbi; T Radha Krishna

    2006-08-01

    Over the last two decades, the fiber optic technology has passed through many analytical stages. Some commercially available fiber optic sensors, though in a small way, are being used for automation in mechanical and industrial environments. They are also used for instrumentation and controls. In the present work, an intensity-modulated intrinsic fiber optic sugar sensor is presented. This type of sensor, with slight modification, can be used for on-line determination of the concentration of sugar content in sugarcane juice in sugar industry. In the present set-up, a plastic fiber made of polymethylmethacrylate is used. A portion of the cladding (1 cm, 2 cm, 3 cm) at the mid-point along the length of the fiber is removed. This portion is immersed in sugar solution of known concentration and refractive index. At one end of the fiber an 850 nm source is used and at the other end a power meter is connected. By varying the concentration of sugar solution, the output power is noted. These studies are made due to the change in refractive index of the fluid. The device was found to be very sensitive which is free from EMI and shock hazards, stable and repeatable and they can be remotely interfaced with a computer to give on-line measurements and thus become useful for application in sugar industries.

  12. Corrosion induced strain monitoring through fibre optic sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grattan, S K T [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, David Keir Building, Belfast, BT9 5AG (United Kingdom); Basheer, P A M [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, David Keir Building, Belfast, BT9 5AG (United Kingdom); Taylor, S E [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, David Keir Building, Belfast, BT9 5AG (United Kingdom); Zhao, W [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University, Northampton Square, London, EC1V 0HB (United Kingdom); Sun, T [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University, Northampton Square, London, EC1V 0HB (United Kingdom); Grattan, K T V [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University, Northampton Square, London, EC1V 0HB (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-15

    The use of strain sensors is commonplace within civil engineering. Fibre optic strain sensors offer a number of advantages over the current electrical resistance type gauges. In this paper the use of fibre optic strain sensors and electrical resistance gauges to monitor the production of corrosion by-products has been investigated and reported.

  13. Optical stimulator for vision-based sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rössler, Dirk; Pedersen, David Arge Klevang; Benn, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an optical stimulator system for vision-based sensors. The stimulator is an efficient tool for stimulating a camera during on-ground testing with scenes representative of spacecraft flights. Such scenes include starry sky, planetary objects, and other spacecraft. The optical...... precision and long-term stability. The system can be continuously used over several days. By facilitating a full camera including optics in the loop, the stimulator enables the more realistic simulation of flight maneuvers based on navigation cameras than pure computer simulations or camera stimulations...... stimulator is used as a test bench to simulate high-precision navigation by different types of camera systems that are used onboard spacecraft, planetary rovers, and for spacecraft rendezvous and proximity maneuvers. Careful hardware design and preoperational calibration of the stimulator result in high...

  14. Fiber optic sensors for military, industrial and commercial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, K. A.; Quick, W. H.; Strahan, V. H.

    1978-01-01

    Four examples of specific fiber optic sensor system designs, each of which demonstrates a different optical modulation format, are described. The birefrigent temperature transducer illustrates direct digital signal modulation. The temperature/pressure dependent semiconductor filter illustrates high-pass optical wavelength signal encoding. The coupled polarized-mode transducer shows how a solid-state sensor can produce narrow-bandpass optical wavelength signal encoding. The luminescent temperature sensor illustrates a way to construct a solid state sensor in order to produce pulse width modulation of an optical signal.

  15. Improved Internal Reference Oxygen Sensors with Composite Ceramic Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Qiang; Jacobsen, Torben; Hansen, Karin Vels

    2012-01-01

    Potentiometric oxygen sensors with an internal reference electrode, which uses the equilibrium pO2 of the binary mixture of Ni/NiO as the reference, are demonstrated. The cells employ Pt or composite ceramics as the sensing electrode. The cells are fabricated by a flexible and potentially low cost...... and performance are highly reproducible. The composite ceramics, based on strontium doped manganite and yttria doped zirconia, are proven superior over Pt to serve as the electrode material....

  16. Evaluation of a Prototype pCO2 Optical Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanborn-Marsh, C.; Sutton, A.; Sabine, C. L.; Lawrence-Salvas, N.; Dietrich, C.

    2016-12-01

    Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise, driving climate change and altering the ocean carbonate systems. Carbonate chemistry can be characterized by any two of the four parameters: pH, total alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon, and partial pressure of dissolved carbon dioxide gas (pCO2). To fully monitor these dynamic systems, researchers must deploy a more temporally and spatially comprehensive sensor network. Logistical challenges, such as the energy consumption, size, lifetime, depth range, and cost of pCO2 sensors have limited the network's reach so far. NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory has conducted assessment tests of a pCO2 optical sensor (optode), recently developed by Atamanchuk et al (2014). We hope to deploy this optode in the summer of 2017 on high-resolution moored profiler, along with temperature, salinity, and oxygen sensors. While most pCO2 optodes have energy consumptions of 3-10 W, this 36mm-diameter by 86mm-long instrument consumes a mere 7-80 mW. Initial testing showed that its accuracy varied within an absolute range of 2-75 μatm, depending on environmental conditions, including temperature, salinity, response time, and initial calibration. Further research independently examining the effects of each variable on the accuracy of the data will also be presented.

  17. Versatile common instrumentation for optical detection of pH and dissolved oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardesai, Neha [Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Rao, Govind [Center for Advanced Sensor Technology and Department of Chemical, Biochemical, and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Kostov, Yordan, E-mail: kostov@umbc.edu [Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Center for Advanced Sensor Technology and Department of Chemical, Biochemical, and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The recent trend toward use of disposable and miniature bioreactors requires the use of appropriate sensors. pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) are often measured using optical chemical sensors due to their small form factor and convenience in use. These sensors are often interrogated using a specialized opto-electronic transducer that is designed around the optical sensor. In this contribution, we are presenting a new class of opto-electronic transducers that are usable with several different chemical sensors without the need to switch the optics or hardware when changing the type of the chemical sensor. This allows flexibility closer to the lab-grade devices while the size is closer to a dedicated sensor. This versatile instrumentation is capable of seamlessly switching between the pH and DO measurement modes and is capable of auto recognition of the sensor type. The principle of ratiometric fluorescence is used for pH measurements, and that of fluorescence lifetime for DO measurements. An approach to obtain identical calibrations between several devices is also presented. The described hardware constitutes common instrumentation for measuring either pH or DO and has been tested in actual bioprocesses. It has been found adequate for continuous bioprocess monitoring.

  18. Versatile common instrumentation for optical detection of pH and dissolved oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardesai, Neha; Rao, Govind; Kostov, Yordan

    2015-07-01

    The recent trend toward use of disposable and miniature bioreactors requires the use of appropriate sensors. pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) are often measured using optical chemical sensors due to their small form factor and convenience in use. These sensors are often interrogated using a specialized opto-electronic transducer that is designed around the optical sensor. In this contribution, we are presenting a new class of opto-electronic transducers that are usable with several different chemical sensors without the need to switch the optics or hardware when changing the type of the chemical sensor. This allows flexibility closer to the lab-grade devices while the size is closer to a dedicated sensor. This versatile instrumentation is capable of seamlessly switching between the pH and DO measurement modes and is capable of auto recognition of the sensor type. The principle of ratiometric fluorescence is used for pH measurements, and that of fluorescence lifetime for DO measurements. An approach to obtain identical calibrations between several devices is also presented. The described hardware constitutes common instrumentation for measuring either pH or DO and has been tested in actual bioprocesses. It has been found adequate for continuous bioprocess monitoring.

  19. Flexible Sheet-Type Sensor for Noninvasive Measurement of Cellular Oxygen Metabolism on a Culture Dish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Kojima

    Full Text Available A novel flexible sensor was developed for the noninvasive oxygen metabolism measurement of cultivated cells and tissues. This device is composed of a transparent double-layered polymer sheet of ethylene-vinyl alcohol (EVOH and poly(dimethylsiloxane (PDMS having an array of microhole structures of 90 μm diameter and 50 μm depth on its surface. All the microhole structures were equipped with a 1-μm-thick optical chemical sensing layer of platinum porphyrin-fluoropolymer on their bottom. The three-dimensional microstructures of the sensor were fabricated by a newly developed simple and low-cost production method named self-aligned hot embossing. The device was designed to be attached slightly above the cells cultivated on a dish to form a temporarily closed microspace over the target cells during measurement. Since the change in oxygen concentration is relatively fast in the microcompartmentalized culture medium, a rapid evaluation of the oxygen consumption rate is possible by measuring the phosphorescence lifetime of the platinum porphyrin-fluoropolymer. The combined use of the device and an automated optical measurement system enabled the high-throughput sensing of cellular oxygen consumption (100 points/min. We monitored the oxygen metabolism of the human breast cancer cell line MCF7 on a Petri dish and evaluated the oxygen consumption rate to be 0.72 ± 0.12 fmol/min/cell. Furthermore, to demonstrate the utility of the developed sensing system, we demonstrated the mapping of the oxygen consumption rate of rat brain slices and succeeded in visualizing a clear difference among the layer structures of the hippocampus, i.e., the cornu ammonis (CA1 and CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG.

  20. Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor using Multimode Interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Perez, V I; Sanchez-Mondragon, J J [INAOE, Apartado Postal 51 y 216, Puebla 72000 (Mexico); Basurto-Pensado, M A [CIICAp, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos (Mexico); LiKamWa, P [CREOL, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); May-Arrioja, D A, E-mail: iruiz@inaoep.mx, E-mail: mbasurto@uaem.mx, E-mail: delta_dirac@hotmail.com, E-mail: daniel_may_arrioja@hotmail.com [UAT Reynosa Rodhe, Universidad Autonoma de Tamaulipas (Mexico)

    2011-01-01

    Based on the theory of multimode interference (MMI) and self-image formation, we developed a novel intrinsic optical fiber pressure sensor. The sensing element consists of a section of multimode fiber (MMF) without cladding spliced between two single mode fibers (SMF). The MMI pressure sensor is based on the intensity changes that occur in the transmitted light when the effective refractive index of the MMF is changed. Basically, a thick layer of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is placed in direct contact with the MMF section, such that the contact area between the PDMS and the fiber will change proportionally with the applied pressure, which results in a variation of the transmitted light intensity. Using this configuration, a good correlation between the measured intensity variations and the applied pressure is obtained. The sensitivity of the sensor is 3 {mu}V/psi, for a range of 0-60 psi, and the maximum resolution of our system is 0.25 psi. Good repeatability is also observed with a standard deviation of 0.0019. The key feature of the proposed pressure sensor is its low fabrication cost, since the cost of the MMF is minimal.

  1. Microcontrollers and optical sensors for education in optics and photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, Paul; Wielage, Heinz; Haiss, Ulrich; Vauderwange, Oliver; Wozniak, P.; Curticapean, Dan

    2014-09-01

    The digital revolution is going full steam ahead, with a constantly growing number of new devices providing a steady increase in complexity and power. Most of the success is based on one important invention: the microprocessor/microcontroller. In this paper the authors present how to integrate microcontrollers and optical sensors in the curricula of media engineering by combining subjects of media technology, optics, information technology and media design. Hereby the aim is not to teach these topics separate from each other, but to bring them together in interdisciplinary lectures, projects and applications. Microcontrollers can be applied in various ways to teach content from the fields of optics and photonics. They can be used to control LEDs, displays, light detectors and infrared sensors, which makes it possible to build measuring instruments like e.g. a lux meter, a light barrier or an optical distance meter. The learning goals are to stimulate the student's interest in the multiplicity of subjects related to this course and to support a deeper understanding of the close connections between them. The teaching method that the authors describe in their paper turned out to be very successful, as the participants are motivated to bring in their own ideas for projects, they spend more time than requested and as many students return to the courses as tutors. It is an example for effectual knowledge transfer and exchange of ideas among students.

  2. High-temperature potentiometric oxygen sensor with internal reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Routbort, Jules L. (Hinsdale, IL); Singh, Dileep (Naperville, IL); Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Ramasamy, Ramamoorthy (North Royalton, OH); Spirig, John V. (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh (Hilliard, OH)

    2011-11-15

    A compact oxygen sensor is provided, comprising a mixture of metal and metal oxide an enclosure containing said mixture, said enclosure capable of isolating said mixture from an environment external of said enclosure, and a first wire having a first end residing within the enclosure and having a second end exposed to the environment. Also provided is a method for the fabrication of an oxygen sensor, the method comprising confining a metal-metal oxide solid mixture to a container which consists of a single material permeable to oxygen ions, supplying an electrical conductor having a first end and a second end, whereby the first end resides inside the container as a reference (PO.sub.2).sup.ref, and the second end resides outside the container in the atmosphere where oxygen partial pressure (PO.sub.2).sup.ext is to be measured, and sealing the container with additional single material such that grain boundary sliding occurs between grains of the single material and grains of the additional single material.

  3. Human psychophysiological activity monitoring methods using fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Uzieblo-Zyczkowska, B.

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents the concept of fiber optic sensor system for human psycho-physical activity detection. A fiber optic sensor that utilizes optical phase interferometry or intensity in modalmetric to monitor a patient's vital signs such as respiration cardiac activity, blood pressure and body's physical movements. The sensor, which is non-invasive, comprises an optical fiber interferometer that includes an optical fiber proximately situated to the patient so that time varying acusto-mechanical signals from the patient are coupled into the optical fiber. The system can be implemented in embodiments ranging form a low cost in-home to a high end product for in hospital use.

  4. Development of a Robust Optical Glucose Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, Gerard Laurence

    1990-01-01

    The long term objective of this research was the development of a noninvasive, optically-based, polarimetric sensor to monitor in vivo glucose concentrations. The goal of diabetes therapy is to approximate the 24-hour blood glucose profile of a normal individual. There have been major advances in the development of reliable, versatile, and accurate pumps for the delivery of insulin to diabetic patients and in the development of control algorithms for closed-loop insulin delivery, however, there remain major obstacles to the development of clinically useful, continuous glucose sensors. The development of an accurate noninvasive glucose sensor would have significant application in the diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitis both in conjunction with, and independent of, the glucose pump controller applications. The linear polarization vector of light routes when it interacts with an optically active material such as glucose. The amount of rotation of polarization is directly proportional to the glucose concentration and to the path length. The ability to quantitate blood glucose levels for the limited available path length in our primary sensing site, namely, the anterior chamber of the eye, therefore depends on the signal-to-noise ratio of the polarization detector. Our primary research focused on the development and testing of a prototype optical polarimetry system using D + glucose solution in a test cell, as well as using an enucleated human eye to assess the sensitivity of the system to measure physiologic glucose levels for the approximate one centimeter path length present in the anterior chamber of the eye. Our research has led to the development of a true phase technique in which helium neon laser light was coupled through a rotating linear polarizer along with two stationary linear polarizers and two detectors to produce reference and signal outputs whose amplitudes varied sinusoidally and whose phase was proportional to the rotation of light caused by

  5. Waveguide-based optical chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Karen M.; Swanson, Basil I.; Honkanen, Seppo

    2007-03-13

    The invention provides an apparatus and method for highly selective and sensitive chemical sensing. Two modes of laser light are transmitted through a waveguide, refracted by a thin film host reagent coating on the waveguide, and analyzed in a phase sensitive detector for changes in effective refractive index. Sensor specificity is based on the particular species selective thin films of host reagents which are attached to the surface of the planar optical waveguide. The thin film of host reagents refracts laser light at different refractive indices according to what species are forming inclusion complexes with the host reagents.

  6. Fiber Optic Temperature Sensors for Thermal Protection Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) proposes an innovative fiber optic-based, multiplexable, highly ruggedized, integrated sensor system for real-time...

  7. A Fibre Optic Sensor Of Physiological Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, J. P.; Forester, G. V.

    1986-11-01

    This paper presents an ultraminiature fibre optic probe capable of physiological monitoring in situ. The system has been described previously where a fibre optic reflectometer was configured as a temperature sensor and as a refractometer. For the present experiments a bare fibre tip was used as sensing element. We show that we have been able to monitor cyclic physiological parameters such as heart and respiratory rates in various animal preparations. The probe has been used to obtain signals from the oesophagus, the lower gastro-intestinal tract, the abdominal cavity and from blood vessels (arteries and veins). The probe has also measured phasic activity coincident with mechanical activity of isolated heart muscle. The small physical size of the sensor (125 µm diameter), its flexibility and the fact that it is biologically inert are all very important characteristics for medical and biological considerations. Most recently, the probe has been used to monitor cardiac and respiratory rates while obtaining NMR spectra assessing metabolic activity. This was possible only because the probe is magnetically transparent.

  8. Quality assessment of packaged foods by optical oxygen sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papkovsky, Dmitri B.; O'Mahony, Fiach C.; Kerry, Joe P.; Ogurtsov, Vladimir I.

    2005-11-01

    A phase-fluorometric oxygen sensor system has been developed, which allows non-destructive measurement of residual oxygen levels in sealed containers such as packaged foods. It operates with disposable solid-state sensors incorporated in each pack, and a portable detector which interrogates with the sensors through a (semi)transparent packaging material. The system has been optimized for packaging applications and validated in small and medium scale trials with different types of food, including MAP hams, cheese, convenience foods, smoked fish, bakery. It has demonstrated high efficiency in monitoring package integrity, oxygen profiles in packs, performance of packaging process and many other research and quality control tasks, allowing control of 100% of packs. The low-cost batch-calibrated sensors have demonstrated reliability, safety, stability including direct contact with food, high efficiency in the low oxygen range. Another system, which also employs the fluorescence-based oxygen sensing approach, provides rapid assessment of microbial contamination (total viable counts) in complex samples such as food homogenates, industrial waste, environmental samples, etc. It uses soluble oxygen-sensitive probes, standard microtitter plates and fluorescence measurements on conventional plate reader to monitor growth of aerobic bacteria in small test samples (e.g. food homogenates) via their oxygen respiration. The assay provides high sample through put, miniaturization, speed, and can serve as alternative to the established methods such as agar plate colony counts and turbidimetry.

  9. Fiber optic pressure sensors for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemian, H.M.; Black, C.L. [Analysis and Measurement Services Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    In the last few years, the nuclear industry has experienced some problems with the performance of pressure transmitters and has been interested in new sensors based on new technologies. Fiber optic pressure sensors offer the potential to improve on or overcome some of the limitations of existing pressure sensors. Up to now, research has been motivated towards development and refinement of fiber optic sensing technology. In most applications, reliability studies and failure mode analyses remain to be exhaustively conducted. Fiber optic sensors have currently penetrated certain cutting edge markets where they possess necessary inherent advantages over other existing technologies. In these markets (e.g. biomedical, aerospace, automotive, and petrochemical), fiber optic sensors are able to perform measurements for which no alternate sensor previously existed. Fiber optic sensing technology has not yet been fully adopted into the mainstream sensing market. This may be due to not only the current premium price of fiber optic sensors, but also the lack of characterization of their possible performance disadvantages. In other words, in conservative industries, the known disadvantages of conventional sensors are sometimes preferable to unknown or not fully characterized (but potentially fewer and less critical) disadvantages of fiber optic sensors. A six-month feasibility study has been initiated under the auspices of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assess the performance and reliability of existing fiber optic pressure sensors for use in nuclear power plants. This assessment will include establishment of the state of the art in fiber optic pressure sensing, characterization of the reliability of fiber optic pressure sensors, and determination of the strengths and limitations of these sensors for nuclear safety-related services.

  10. Microstructured polymer optical fibre sensors for opto-acoustic endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadway, Christian; Gallego, Daniel; Pospori, Andreas; Zubel, Michal; Webb, David J.; Sugden, Kate; Carpintero, Guillermo; Lamela, Horacio

    2016-04-01

    Opto-acoustic imaging is a growing field of research in recent years, providing functional imaging of physiological biomarkers, such as the oxygenation of haemoglobin. Piezo electric transducers are the industry standard detector for ultrasonics, but their limited bandwidth, susceptibility to electromagnetic interference and their inversely proportional sensitivity to size all affect the detector performance. Sensors based on polymer optical fibres (POF) are immune to electromagnetic interference, have lower acoustic impedance and a reduced Young's Modulus compared to silica fibres. Furthermore, POF enables the possibility of a wideband sensor and a size appropriate to endoscopy. Micro-structured POF (mPOF) used in an interferometric detector has been shown to be an order of magnitude more sensitive than silica fibre at 1 MHz and 3 times more sensitive at 10 MHz. We present the first opto-acoustic measurements obtained using a 4.7mm PMMA mPOF Bragg grating with a fibre diameter of 130 μm and present the lateral directivity pattern of a PMMA mPOF FBG ultrasound sensor over a frequency range of 1-50 MHz. We discuss the impact of the pattern with respect to the targeted application and draw conclusions on how to mitigate the problems encountered.

  11. Optical Breath Gas Sensor for Extravehicular Activity Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, William R.; Casias, Miguel E.; Vakhtin, Andrei B.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Chullen, Cinda; Falconi, Eric A.; McMillin, Summer

    2013-01-01

    The function of the infrared gas transducer used during extravehicular activity in the current space suit is to measure and report the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ventilation loop. The next generation portable life support system (PLSS) requires next generation CO2 sensing technology with performance beyond that presently in use on the Space Shuttle/International Space Station extravehicular mobility unit (EMU). Accommodation within space suits demands that optical sensors meet stringent size, weight, and power requirements. A laser diode spectrometer based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy is being developed for this purpose by Vista Photonics, Inc. Two prototype devices were delivered to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in September 2011. The sensors incorporate a laser diode-based CO2 channel that also includes an incidental water vapor (humidity) measurement and a separate oxygen channel using a vertical cavity surface emitting laser. Both prototypes are controlled digitally with a field-programmable gate array/microcontroller architecture. The present development extends and upgrades the earlier hardware to the Advanced PLSS 2.0 test article being constructed and tested at JSC. Various improvements to the electronics and gas sampling are being advanced by this project. The combination of low power electronics with the performance of a long wavelength laser spectrometer enables multi-gas sensors with significantly increased performance over that presently offered in the EMU.

  12. Intravascular oxygen sensors with novel applications for bedside respiratory monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formenti, F; Farmery, A D

    2017-01-01

    Measurement allows us to quantify various parameters and variables in natural systems. In addition, by measuring the effect by which a perturbation of one part of the system influences the system as a whole, insights into the functional mechanisms of the system can be inferred. Clinical monitoring has a different role to that of scientific measurement. Monitoring describes measurements whose prime purpose is not to give insights into underlying mechanisms, but to provide information to 'warn' of imminent events. What is often more important is the description of trends in measured variables. In this article, we give some examples - focussed around oxygen sensors - of how new sensors can make important measurements and might in the future contribute to improved clinical management.

  13. Improved Internal Reference Oxygen Sensors Using Composite Oxides as Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Qiang

    The thesis describes the research on and development of an internal reference oxygen sensor (IROS). The IROS is potentiometric and uses the equilibrium pO2of the binary mixture of Ni/NiO as the reference pO2. The sensing electrode of the IROS are made from metallic Pt or the composite of (La0.75Sr0...... comprehensively and the evaluation is targeted to the performance indicators that relate closely to the practical application. IROSes show high accuracy, good stability, fast response, good tolerance to thermal and pO2cycling and easy recoverability when Ni is depleted. Both cell fabrication and performance show...

  14. An Assessment of the Influence of the Industry Distribution Chain on the Oxygen Levels in Commercial Modified Atmosphere Packaged Cheddar Cheese Using Non-Destructive Oxygen Sensor Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A.M. O’ Callaghan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The establishment and control of oxygen levels in packs of oxygen-sensitive food products such as cheese is imperative in order to maintain product quality over a determined shelf life. Oxygen sensors quantify oxygen concentrations within packaging using a reversible optical measurement process, and this non-destructive nature ensures the entire supply chain can be monitored and can assist in pinpointing negative issues pertaining to product packaging. This study was carried out in a commercial cheese packaging plant and involved the insertion of 768 sensors into 384 flow-wrapped cheese packs (two sensors per pack that were flushed with 100% carbon dioxide prior to sealing. The cheese blocks were randomly assigned to two different storage groups to assess the effects of package quality, packaging process efficiency, and handling and distribution on package containment. Results demonstrated that oxygen levels increased in both experimental groups examined over the 30-day assessment period. The group subjected to a simulated industrial distribution route and handling procedures of commercial retailed cheese exhibited the highest level of oxygen detected on every day examined and experienced the highest rate of package failure. The study concluded that fluctuating storage conditions, product movement associated with distribution activities, and the possible presence of cheese-derived contaminants such as calcium lactate crystals were chief contributors to package failure.

  15. An Assessment of the Influence of the Industry Distribution Chain on the Oxygen Levels in Commercial Modified Atmosphere Packaged Cheddar Cheese Using Non-Destructive Oxygen Sensor Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O' Callaghan, Karen A M; Papkovsky, Dmitri B; Kerry, Joseph P

    2016-06-20

    The establishment and control of oxygen levels in packs of oxygen-sensitive food products such as cheese is imperative in order to maintain product quality over a determined shelf life. Oxygen sensors quantify oxygen concentrations within packaging using a reversible optical measurement process, and this non-destructive nature ensures the entire supply chain can be monitored and can assist in pinpointing negative issues pertaining to product packaging. This study was carried out in a commercial cheese packaging plant and involved the insertion of 768 sensors into 384 flow-wrapped cheese packs (two sensors per pack) that were flushed with 100% carbon dioxide prior to sealing. The cheese blocks were randomly assigned to two different storage groups to assess the effects of package quality, packaging process efficiency, and handling and distribution on package containment. Results demonstrated that oxygen levels increased in both experimental groups examined over the 30-day assessment period. The group subjected to a simulated industrial distribution route and handling procedures of commercial retailed cheese exhibited the highest level of oxygen detected on every day examined and experienced the highest rate of package failure. The study concluded that fluctuating storage conditions, product movement associated with distribution activities, and the possible presence of cheese-derived contaminants such as calcium lactate crystals were chief contributors to package failure.

  16. Fiber optic vibration sensor using bifurcated plastic optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, M.; Bidin, N.; Yasin, M.

    2016-11-01

    An extrinsic fiber optic vibration sensor is demonstrated for a fiber optic displacement sensor based on a bundled multimode fiber to measure a vibration frequency ranging from 100 until 3000 Hz. The front slope has a sensitivity of 0.1938mV/mm and linearity of 99.7% within a measurement range between 0.15-3.00 mm. By placing the diaphragm of the concave load-speaker within the linear range from the probe, the frequency of the vibration can be measured with error percentage of less than 1.54%. The graph of input against output frequency for low, medium and high frequency range show very high linearity up to 99%. Slope for low, medium, and high frequency range are calculated as 1.0026, 0.9934, and 1.0007 respectively. Simplicity, long term stability, low power consumption, wide dynamic and frequency ranges, noise reduction, ruggedness, linearity and light weight make it promising alternative to other well-establish methods for vibration frequency measurement.

  17. Low-cost fiber optic weigh-in-motion sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaai-Jazi, A.; Ardekani, S. A.; Mehdikhani, M.

    1990-11-01

    A design for a fiber optic weigh in motion (WIM) sensor is proposed. A prototype of the proposed sensor is designed, manufactured, and tested in the laboratory for different load frequency combinations using a material testing system (MTS) machine. Statistical analysis of data are performed to assess the response of the sensor under varying load frequencies for comparison.

  18. Wave front sensor based on holographic optical elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, M. S.; Krasin, G. K.; Malinina, P. I.; Odinokov, S. B.; Sagatelyan, H. R.

    2016-08-01

    A wavefront sensor (WFS) based on holographic optical elements, namely computer generated Fourier holograms is proposed as a perspective alternative to the Shack-Hartmann sensor. A possibility of single and multimode sensor and the dependence of their characteristics were investigated.

  19. Analytical analysis of sensitivity of optical waveguide sensor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology. Vol. ... optical sensors have attracted considerable attention, especially in the application of biochemical species ... Section 2 provides the principle and basic theory of optical sensors and the modal ... The electric and magnetic fields of a mode can be written as.

  20. Fiber-optic interferometric acoustic sensors for wind tunnel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    Progress in developing fiber-optic interferometric sensors for aeroacoustic measurements in wind tunnels, performed under the NASA program, is reported. Preliminary results show that the fiber-optic interferometer sensor array is a powerful instrument for solving complex acoustic measurement problems in wind tunnels, which cannot be resolved with the conventional transducer technique.

  1. Fiber-optic interferometric acoustic sensors for wind tunnel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    Progress in developing fiber-optic interferometric sensors for aeroacoustic measurements in wind tunnels, performed under the NASA program, is reported. Preliminary results show that the fiber-optic interferometer sensor array is a powerful instrument for solving complex acoustic measurement problems in wind tunnels, which cannot be resolved with the conventional transducer technique.

  2. Initial research of dual wavelength fibre optic perimeter sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Kondrat, M.; Ciurapinski, W.

    2005-10-01

    The dual wavelength fibre optic perimeter sensor bases on input signals measurements in an arrangement of fibre optic Michelson and Sagnac interferometers with a 3 × 3 coupler and two semiconductor lasers. For 3 km long sensor we obtained 20-50m resolution of determination of disturbance point.

  3. Implementation and characterization of a fibre-optic colour sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajić, Jovan S.; Stupar, Dragan Z.; Dakić, Bojan M.; Manojlović, Lazo M.; Slankamenac, Miloš P.; Živanov, Miloš B.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper the implementation of a fibre-optic sensor for colour detection based on reflective colour sensing is proposed. The sensor consists of three plastic optical fibres emitting red, green and blue components and one optical fibre collecting light reflected from the object. Red, green and blue LEDs are excited at different frequencies. In this way detection of the reflected signal is achieved with only one photodetector and three bandpass filters. Bandpass filters are implemented as digital IIR (infinite impulse response) filters on the microcontroller. Results obtained from the proposed sensor are compared with commercial available colour sensors and the results are satisfactory. Analyses of the sensor performance both in RGB and HSV colour space are done. The proposed solution shows that in specific applications by using the HSV model the sensor can be used both as a colour and distance sensor.

  4. Sensitivity of optical mass sensor enhanced by optomechanical coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yong, E-mail: hey@cczu.edu.cn [School of Mathematics and Physics, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China)

    2015-03-23

    Optical mass sensors based on cavity optomechanics employ radiation pressure force to drive mechanical resonator whose mechanical susceptibility can be described by nonlinear optical transmission spectrum. In this paper, we present an optical mass sensor based on a two-cavity optomechanical system where the mechanical damping rate can be decreased by adjusting a pump power so that the mass sensitivity which depends on the mechanical quality factor has been enhanced greatly. Compared with that of an optical mass sensor based on single-cavity optomechanics, the mass sensitivity of the optical mass sensor is improved by three orders of magnitude. This is an approach to enhance the mass sensitivity by means of optomechanical coupling, which is suitable for all mass sensor based on cavity optomechanics. Finally, we illustrate the accurate measurement for the mass of a few chromosomes, which can be achieved based on the current experimental conditions.

  5. Evaluations of fiber optic sensors for interior applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval, M.W.; Malone, T.P.

    1996-02-01

    This report addresses the testing and evaluation of commercial fiber optic intrusion detection systems in interior applications. The applications include laying optical fiber cable above suspended ceilings to detect removal of ceiling tiles, embedding optical fibers inside a tamper or item monitoring blanket that could be placed over an asset, and installing optical fibers on a door to detect movement or penetration. Detection capability of the fiber optic sensors as well as nuisance and false alarm information were focused on during the evaluation. Fiber optic sensor processing, system components, and system setup are described.

  6. Single mode variable-sensitivity fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, K. A.; Fogg, B. R.; Gunther, M. F.; Claus, R. O.

    1992-01-01

    We review spatially-weighted optical fiber sensors that filter specific vibration modes from one dimensional beams placed in clamped-free and clamped-clamped configurations. The sensitivity of the sensor is varied along the length of the fiber by tapering circular-core, dual-mode optical fibers. Selective vibration mode suppression on the order of 10 dB was obtained. We describe experimental results and propose future extensions to single mode sensor applications.

  7. Advances in fiber optic sensors for in-vivo monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, Francesco; Mignani, Anna G.

    1995-09-01

    Biomedical fiber-optic sensors are attractive for the measurement of both physical and chemical parameters as well as for spectral measurements directly performed on the patient. An overview of fiber-optic sensors for in vivo monitoring is given, with particular attention to the advantages that these sensors are able to offer in different fields of application such as cardiovascular and intensive care, angiology, gastroenterology, ophthalmology, oncology, neurology, dermatology, and dentistry.

  8. Improved Fiber-Optic-Coupled Pressure And Vibration Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Cuomo, Frank W.

    1994-01-01

    Improved fiber-optic coupler enables use of single optical fiber to carry light to and from sensor head. Eliminates problem of alignment of multiple fibers in sensor head and simplifies calibration by making performance both more predictable and more stable. Sensitivities increased, sizes reduced. Provides increased margin for design of compact sensor heads not required to contain amplifier circuits and withstand high operating temperatures.

  9. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D. J. Osborn; Po Zhang

    2006-09-30

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications has been developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. We report on a fiber optic technique for detection of gas phase oxygen up to 100 C based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the luminescence from molybdenum chloride clusters, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}. The inorganic sensing film is a composite of sol-gel particles embedded in a thin, oxygen permeable sol-gel binder. The particles are comprised of thermally stable, luminescent K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14} clusters dispersed in a fully equilibrated sol-gel matrix. From 40 to 100 C, the fiber sensor switches {approx}6x in intensity in response to alternating pulses of <0.001% O2 and 21% O{sub 2} between two well defined levels with a response time of 10 s. The sensor signal is a few nW for an input pump power of 250 {micro}W. The normalized sensor signal is linear with molar oxygen concentration and fits the theoretical Stern-Volmer relationship. Although the sensitivity decreases with temperature, sensitivity at 100 C is 160 [O{sub 2}]{sup -1}. These parameters are well suited for in-situ, real-time monitoring of oxygen for industrial process control applications.

  10. EDITORIAL: Optical Fibre Sensors 18 (OFS-18)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Julian D. C.; Tatam, Ralph P.

    2007-10-01

    The International Conference on Optical Fibre Sensors (OFS-18) was held in October 2006 in Cancún, Mexico, under the general chairmanship of Dr Alexis Mendez (MCH Engineering LLC, USA) and Dr Fernando Mendoza (Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Mexico). 'OFS', as it has become known, is firmly established as the leading international conference for the optical fibre sensor community. Since its inception, in London in 1983, and under the leadership of an international steering committee independent of any learned society or professional institution, it has been held approximately every eighteen months. The venue nominally rotates from Europe, to the Americas, and thence to Asia and the Pacific. OFS-18 demonstrated the continuing vigour of the community, with some 250 papers presented, plus two workshops, with attendance as international as ever. In recent years, it has become a tradition to publish a post-conference special issue in the journal Measurement Science and Technology, and these special issues offer a representative sample of the current status of the field. In the nearly 25 years since OFS began, many of the early ideas and laboratory-based proof-of-principle experiments have led to highly developed instrumentation systems, and to successful commercial products. Perhaps the most mature of all of these technologies is the optical fibre gyroscope, with the fibre hydrophone a close second—originally developed for defence applications for which it is now established, but with increasing relevance to the oil and gas industry; electromagnetic sensors based on the Faraday and electro-optic effects are of growing significance in the power generation and distribution industry; whilst in-fibre grating-based sensors occupy an expanding niche in structural monitoring, especially in civil engineering. It is therefore appropriate that the first day of OFS was devoted to workshops on structural health monitoring, and to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the

  11. A Passive Optical Fiber Current Sensor Based on YIG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Shao; Wen Liu; Cui-Qing Liu; Duan Xu

    2008-01-01

    A research on passive optical fiber current sensor based on magneto-optical crystal and a new design of light path of the sensor head are presented. Both methods of dual-channel optical detection of the polarization state of the output light and signal processing are proposed. Signal processing can obtain the linear output of the current measurement of the wire more conveniently. Theoretical analysis on the magneto-optical fiber current sensor is given, followed by experiments. After that, further analysis is made according to the results, which leads to clarifying the exiting problems and their placements.

  12. Multi-resolution optical 3D sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühmstedt, Peter; Heinze, Matthias; Schmidt, Ingo; Breitbarth, Martin; Notni, Gunther

    2007-06-01

    A new multi resolution self calibrating optical 3D measurement system using fringe projection technique named "kolibri FLEX multi" will be presented. It can be utilised to acquire the all around shape of small to medium objects, simultaneously. The basic measurement principle is the phasogrammetric approach /1,2,3/ in combination with the method of virtual landmarks for the merging of the 3D single views. The system consists in minimum of two fringe projection sensors. The sensors are mounted on a rotation stage illuminating the object from different directions. The measurement fields of the sensors can be chosen different, here as an example 40mm and 180mm in diameter. In the measurement the object can be scanned at the same time with these two resolutions. Using the method of virtual landmarks both point clouds are calculated within the same world coordinate system resulting in a common 3D-point cloud. The final point cloud includes the overview of the object with low point density (wide field) and a region with high point density (focussed view) at the same time. The advantage of the new method is the possibility to measure with different resolutions at the same object region without any mechanical changes in the system or data post processing. Typical parameters of the system are: the measurement time is 2min for 12 images and the measurement accuracy is below 3μm up to 10 μm. The flexibility makes the measurement system useful for a wide range of applications such as quality control, rapid prototyping, design and CAD/CAM which will be shown in the paper.

  13. Development of a rechargeable optical hydrogen peroxide sensor - sensor design and biological application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Klaus; Jensen, Peter Ø; Kühl, Michael

    2016-07-21

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an important member of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) family. Among ROS, H2O2 is considered the most long-lived and can accumulate inside and outside of cells, where it is involved in both vital (signaling) and deadly (toxic) reactions depending on its concentration. Quantifying H2O2 within biological samples is challenging and often not possible. Here we present a quasi-reversible fiber-optic sensor capable of measuring H2O2 concentrations ranging from 1-100 μM within different biological samples. Based on a Prussian blue/white redox cycle and a simple sensor recharging and readout strategy, H2O2 can be measured with high spatial (∼500 μm) and temporal (∼30 s) resolution. The sensor has a broad applicability both in complex environmental and biomedical systems, as demonstrated by (i) H2O2 concentration profile measurements in natural photosynthetic biofilms under light stress reaching H2O2 concentrations as high as 15 μM, and (ii) the quantification of the transient increase of the extracellular concentration of H2O2 during stimulation of neutrophils.

  14. Optical detection of singlet oxygen from single cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snyder, John; Skovsen, Esben; Lambert, John D. C.;

    2006-01-01

    The lowest excited electronic state of molecular oxygen, singlet molecular oxygen, O2(a 1g), is a reactive species involved in many chemical and biological processes. To better understand the roles played by singlet oxygen in biological systems, particularly at the sub-cellular level, optical too...... for mechanistic studies of intra- and inter-cellular signaling and events that ultimately lead to photo-induced cell death....

  15. Operation principle of a novel curvature plastic fiber optic sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Yili; Liu Renqiang; Wang Shuguo

    2005-01-01

    The operation principle of a new type of intensity modulate macrobend curvature optical fiber senor was presented based on surface light scattering theory. Sensor's static and dynamic performance was investigated. This type of sensor can distinguish between positive and negative bending directions. When curvature radius is larger than 50mm, the sensor will keep good linearity. Two-dimensional shape measurement experiments using curvature sensors have been implemented.

  16. Optics-less Sensors for Localization of Radiation Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Caulfield, H. J.; Yaroslavsky, L. P.; Goerzen, Ch.; Umansky, S.

    2008-01-01

    A new family of radiation sensors is introduced which do not require any optics. The sensors consist of arrays of elementary sub-sensors with natural cosine-law or similar angular sensitivity supplemented with a signal processing unit that computes optimal statistical estimations of source parameters. We show, both theoretically and by computer simulation, that such sensors are capable of accurate localization and intensity estimation of a given number of radiation sources and of imaging of a...

  17. Optical and Nonlinear Optical Response of Light Sensor Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Z. Weisz

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available For potential ultrafast optical sensor application, both VO2 thin films andnanocomposite crystal-Si enriched SiO2 thin films grown on fused quartz substrates weresuccessfully prepared using pulsed laser deposition (PLD and RF co-sputteringtechniques. In photoluminescence (PL measurement c-Si/SiO2 film containsnanoparticles of crystal Si exhibits strong red emission with the band maximum rangingfrom 580 to 750 nm. With ultrashort pulsed laser excitation all films show extremelyintense and ultrafast nonlinear optical (NLO response. The recorded holography fromall these thin films in a degenerate-four-wave-mixing configuration shows extremelylarge third-order response. For VO2 thin films, an optically induced semiconductor-tometalphase transition (PT immediately occurred upon laser excitation. it accompanied.It turns out that the fast excited state dynamics was responsible to the induced PT. For c-Si/SiO2 film, its NLO response comes from the contribution of charge carriers created bylaser excitation in conduction band of the c-Si nanoparticles. It was verified byintroducing Eu3+ which is often used as a probe sensing the environment variations. Itturns out that the entire excited state dynamical process associated with the creation,movement and trapping of the charge carriers has a characteristic 500 ps duration.

  18. Carbon nanotubes as optical biomedical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruss, Sebastian; Hilmer, Andrew J; Zhang, Jingqing; Reuel, Nigel F; Mu, Bin; Strano, Michael S

    2013-12-01

    Biosensors are important tools in biomedical research. Moreover, they are becoming an essential part of modern healthcare. In the future, biosensor development will become even more crucial due to the demand for personalized-medicine, point-of care devices and cheaper diagnostic tools. Substantial advances in sensor technology are often fueled by the advent of new materials. Therefore, nanomaterials have motivated a large body of research and such materials have been implemented into biosensor devices. Among these new materials carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are especially promising building blocks for biosensors due to their unique electronic and optical properties. Carbon nanotubes are rolled-up cylinders of carbon monolayers (graphene). They can be chemically modified in such a way that biologically relevant molecules can be detected with high sensitivity and selectivity. In this review article we will discuss how carbon nanotubes can be used to create biosensors. We review the latest advancements of optical carbon nanotube based biosensors with a special focus on near-infrared (NIR)-fluorescence, Raman-scattering and fluorescence quenching.

  19. Optical sensor for rapid microbial detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Adhami, Mustafa; Tilahun, Dagmawi; Rao, Govind; Kostov, Yordan

    2016-05-01

    In biotechnology, the ability to instantly detect contaminants is key to running a reliable bioprocess. Bioprocesses are prone to be contaminated by cells that are abundant in our environment; detection and quantification of these cells would aid in the preservation of the bioprocess product. This paper discusses the design and development of a portable kinetics fluorometer which acts as a single-excitation, single-emission photometer that continuously measures fluorescence intensity of an indicator dye, and plots it. Resazurin is used as an indicator dye since the viable contaminant cells reduce Resazurin toResorufin, the latter being strongly fluorescent. A photodiode detects fluorescence change by generating current proportional to the intensity of the light that reached it, and a trans-impedance differential op-amp ensures amplification of the photodiodes' signal. A microfluidic chip was designed specifically for the device. It acts as a fully enclosed cuvette, which enhances the Resazurin reduction rate. E. coli in LB media, along with Resazurin were injected into the microfluidic chip. The optical sensor detected the presence of E. coli in the media based on the fluorescence change that occurred in the indicator dye in concentrations as low as 10 CFU/ml. A method was devised to detect and determine an approximate amount of contamination with this device. This paper discusses application of this method to detect and estimate sample contamination. This device provides fast, accurate, and inexpensive means to optically detect the presence of viable cells.

  20. Design and testing of electrochemical oxygen sensors for service in liquid lead alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.schroer@kit.edu [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Institut fuer Angewandte Materialien - Werkstoffprozesstechnik (IAM-WPT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Konys, Juergen [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Institut fuer Angewandte Materialien - Werkstoffprozesstechnik (IAM-WPT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Verdaguer, Ariadna; Abella, Jordi [Universitat Ramon Llull, Institut Quimic de Sarria (IQS), Via Augusta, 390, 08017 Barcelona (Spain); Gessi, Alessandro [Agenzia nazionale per le nuove tecnologie, l' energia e lo sviluppo economico sostenibile (ENEA), Centro ricercho Brasimone, FISING, 40032 Camugnano (Bologna) (Italy); Kobzova, Alena; Babayan, Stella [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (NRI), Division of Integrity and Technical Engineering, Husinec-Rez 130, 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Courouau, Jean-Louis [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, Laboratoire d' Etude de la Corrosion Non Aqueuse, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-08-31

    Electrochemical oxygen sensors currently used for measuring the chemical potential of oxygen in liquid lead alloys were investigated by five European laboratories, focussing on factors influencing the accuracy of the sensor output, the long-term performance in experimental facilities and methods of testing the sensors before installation and during operation in a plant. The design of different electrochemical oxygen sensors is introduced, along with the experimentally determined sensor reliability and appropriate testing methods. The reported results summarize the results of Task 4.2.4 within Domain 4 (DEMETRA) of the integrated project (IP) EUROTRANS that was funded by the EURATOM 6th Framework Programme.

  1. Mitochondrial reprogramming through cardiac oxygen sensors in ischaemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadenas, Susana; Aragonés, Julián; Landázuri, Manuel O

    2010-11-01

    Under hypoxic conditions, mitochondria can represent a threat to the cell because of their capacity to generate toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, cardiomyocytes are equipped with an oxygen-sensing pathway that involves prolyl hydroxylase oxygen sensors and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), which induces a tightly regulated programme to keep ischaemic mitochondrial activity under control. The aim of this review is to provide an update on the pathways leading to mitochondrial reprogramming, which occurs in the myocardium during ischaemia, with particular emphasis on those induced by HIF activation. We start by studying the mechanisms of mitochondrial damage during ischaemia and upon reperfusion, highlighting the importance of the formation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore during reperfusion and its consequences for cardiomyocyte survival. Next, we analyse hypoxia-induced metabolic reprogramming through HIF and its important consequences for mitochondrial bioenergetics, as well as the phenomenon known as the hibernating myocardium. Subsequently, we examine the mechanisms underlying ischaemic preconditioning, focusing, in particular, on those that involve the HIF pathway, such as adenosine signalling, sub-lethal ROS generation, and nitric oxide production. Finally, the role of the mitochondrial uncoupling proteins in ischaemia tolerance is discussed.

  2. A fiber optic hybrid multifunctional AC voltage sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolovsky, A.; Zadvornov, S. [IRE, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ryabko, M. [UFD, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    Hybrid sensors have the advantages of both electronic and optical technologies. Their sensing element is based on conventional transducers and the optical fiber is used as a transmission media for the optical signal encoded with information between the local module and the remote module. The power supply for the remote module is usually provided by a built-in photoelectric converter illuminated by the optical radiation going through the same or another optical fiber. Electro-optic hybrid sensors have been widely used because of the electrical isolation provided by optical fiber. In the conventional fiber optic voltage sensor, piezoelectric or electro-optic transducers are implemented. Processing and conditioning measurement information is a complex task in these sensors. Moreover, the considerable drawback of most of these systems is that only one parameter, usually voltage value, is measured. This paper presented a novel fiber optic hybrid sensor for alternating current voltage measurements. This instrument provides the simultaneous measurement of four parameters, notably voltage value, frequency, phase angle and the external temperature. The paper described the measurement technology of the instrument including the remote module and optical powering as well as the unique modulation algorithm. The results and conclusions were also presented. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Embedded Optical Sensors for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David R. Clarke

    2005-11-09

    In the second year of this program on developing embedded optical sensors for thermal barrier coatings, our research has focused three topics: (1) Eu{sup 3+} doping for temperature sensing, (2) the effect of long-term, high-temperature aging on the characteristics of the luminescence from the Eu{sup 3+} ions of 8YSZ materials, (3) construction of a fiber-optic based luminescence detector system. It has been demonstrated that the variation in luminescence lifetime with temperature is identical for electron-beam evaporated Eu-doped YSZ coatings as for bulk ceramics of the same composition. Experiments indicate that the luminescence lifetime method of measuring temperatures is sensitive up to 1150 C for both Eu-doped YSZ coatings and Eu-doped Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Furthermore, the technique is sensitive up to 1250 C for the composition Eu{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. The luminescence spectra Eu-doped YSZ are insensitive to long-term aging at high-temperatures, even to 195 hours at 1425 C, except for a small frequency shift that is probably too small in measure except with instruments of the highest spectral resolution. The temperature of 1425 C is much higher than present engines attain or even planned in the foreseeable future. Nevertheless, experiments are on-going to explore longer term exposures. A fiber-optic based luminescence system has been constructed in which the hottest section of fiber operates to at least 1250 C.

  4. Optimizing source detector separation for an implantable perfusion and oxygenation sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, T. J.; King, T. J.; Long, R.; Baba, J. S.; McShane, M. J.; Ericson, M. N.; Wilson, M. A.; Coté, G. L.

    2011-03-01

    Each year thousands of patients are added to the waiting list for liver transplants. The first 7-10 days after transplant have proven to be the most critical in patient recovery and it is hypothesized that monitoring organ vital signals in this period can increase patient and graft survival rates. An implantable sensor to monitor the organ perfusion and oxygenation signals following surgery is being developed by our group. The sensor operates based on measuring diffuse reflection from three light emitting diodes (735, 805 and 940 nm). In this work the optimal source detector spacing to maximize oxygenation signal level is investigated for a portal vein model. Monte Carlo simulations provided signal levels and corresponding penetration depths as a function of separation between a point optical source and detector. The modeling results indicated a rapid decay in the optical signal with increasing distance. Through further analysis, it was found that there exists an optimal range of point source to detector spacing, between roughly 1 and 2 mm, in which the blood signal from the simulated portal vein was maximized. Overall, these results are being used to guide the placement and configuration of our probe for in vivo animal studies.

  5. A Differential Reflective Intensity Optical Fiber Angular Displacement Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Binghui; He, Lei; Yan, Guodong; Feng, Yong

    2016-09-16

    In this paper, a novel differential reflective intensity optical fiber angular displacement sensor was proposed. This sensor can directly measure the angular and axial linear displacement of a flat surface. The structure of the sensor probe is simple and its basic principle was first analyzed according to the intensity modulation mechanisms. Secondly, in order to trim the dark output voltage to zero, the photoelectric conversion circuit was developed to adjust the signals. Then, the sensor model including the photoelectric conversion circuit has been established, and the influence of design parameters on the sensor output characteristic has been simulated. Finally, the design parameters of the sensor structure were obtained based on the simulation results; and an experimental test system was built for the sensor calibration. Experimental results show that the linear angular range and the sensitivity of the sensor were 74.4 and 0.051 V/°, respectively. Its change rules confirm the operating principle of the sensor well.

  6. A Differential Reflective Intensity Optical Fiber Angular Displacement Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Binghui; He, Lei; Yan, Guodong; Feng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel differential reflective intensity optical fiber angular displacement sensor was proposed. This sensor can directly measure the angular and axial linear displacement of a flat surface. The structure of the sensor probe is simple and its basic principle was first analyzed according to the intensity modulation mechanisms. Secondly, in order to trim the dark output voltage to zero, the photoelectric conversion circuit was developed to adjust the signals. Then, the sensor model including the photoelectric conversion circuit has been established, and the influence of design parameters on the sensor output characteristic has been simulated. Finally, the design parameters of the sensor structure were obtained based on the simulation results; and an experimental test system was built for the sensor calibration. Experimental results show that the linear angular range and the sensitivity of the sensor were 74.4 and 0.051 V/°, respectively. Its change rules confirm the operating principle of the sensor well. PMID:27649199

  7. Networking of optical fiber sensors for extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kara

    2016-04-01

    One of the major benefits of optical fiber sensors for applications to structural health monitoring and other structural measurements is their inherent multiplexing capabilities, meaning that a large number of sensing locations can be achieved with a single optical fiber. It has been well demonstrated that point wise sensors can be multiplexed to form sensor networks or optical fibers integrated with distributed sensing techniques. The spacing between sensing locations can also be tuned to match different length scales of interest. This article presents an overview of directions to adapt optical fiber sensor networking techniques into new applications where limitations such as available power or requirements for high data acquisition speeds are a driving factor. In particular, the trade-off between high fidelity sensor information vs. rapid signal processing or data acquisition is discussed.

  8. Optical Fiber Sensors Based on Nanoparticle-Embedded Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aitor Urrutia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of nanoparticles (NPs in scientific applications has attracted the attention of many researchers in the last few years. The use of NPs can help researchers to tune the physical characteristics of the sensing coating (thickness, roughness, specific area, refractive index, etc. leading to enhanced sensors with response time or sensitivity better than traditional sensing coatings. Additionally, NPs also offer other special properties that depend on their nanometric size, and this is also a source of new sensing applications. This review focuses on the current status of research in the use of NPs within coatings in optical fiber sensing. Most used sensing principles in fiber optics are briefly described and classified into several groups: absorbance-based sensors, interferometric sensors, fluorescence-based sensors, fiber grating sensors, and resonance-based sensors, among others. For each sensor group, specific examples of the utilization of NP-embedded coatings in their sensing structure are reported.

  9. Optical voltage sensors: principle, problem and research proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changsheng

    2016-10-01

    Sensing principles and main problems to be solved for optical voltage sensors are briefly reviewed. Optical effects used for voltage sensing usually include electro-optic Pockels and Kerr effects, electro-gyration effect, elasto-optical effect, and electroluminescent effects, etc. In principle, typical optical voltage sensor is based on electro-optic Pockels crystals and closed-loop signal detection scheme. Main problems to be solved for optical voltage sensors include: how to remove influence of unwanted multiple optical effects on voltage sensing performance; how to select or develop a proper voltage sensing material and element; how to keep optical phase bias to be stable under temperature fluctuation and vibration; how to achieve dc voltage sensing, etc. In order to suppress the influence of unwanted optical effects and light beam coupling-related loss on voltage sensing signals, we may pay more attention to all-fiber and waveguide voltage sensors. Voltage sensors based on electroluminescent effects are also promising in some application fields due to their compact configuration, low cost and potential long-term reliability.

  10. Optimize Etching Based Single Mode Fiber Optic Temperature Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a description of etching process for fabrication single mode optical fiber sensors. The process of fabrication demonstrates an optimized etching based method to fabricate single mode fiber (SMF optic sensors in specified constant time and temperature. We propose a single mode optical fiber based temperature sensor, where the temperature sensing region is obtained by etching its cladding diameter over small length to a critical value. It is observed that the light transmission through etched fiber at 1550 nm wavelength optical source becomes highly temperature sensitive, compared to the temperature insensitive behavior observed in un-etched fiber for the range on 30ºC to 100ºC at 1550 nm. The sensor response under temperature cycling is repeatable and, proposed to be useful for low frequency analogue signal transmission over optical fiber by means of inline thermal modulation approach.

  11. CCD polarization imaging sensor with aluminum nanowire optical filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruev, Viktor; Perkins, Rob; York, Timothy

    2010-08-30

    We report an imaging sensor capable of recording the optical properties of partially polarized light by monolithically integrating aluminum nanowire optical filters with a CCD imaging array. The imaging sensor, composed of 1000 by 1000 imaging elements with 7.4 μm pixel pitch, is covered with an array of pixel-pitch matched nanowire optical filters with four different orientations offset by 45°. The polarization imaging sensor has a signal-to-noise ratio of 45 dB and captures intensity, angle and degree of linear polarization in the visible spectrum at 40 frames per second with 300 mW of power consumption.

  12. Simple fiber optic sensor for applications in security systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Karol, M.; Markowski, P.; Napierala, M. S.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we demonstrate measurement results of the modalmetric fiber optic sensor used for the monitoring of the fiber optic link integrity to protect it against unauthorized access to classified information. The presented construction is based on the detection of changes of the modes distribution in a multimode fiber. Any mechanical stress on the multimode fiber causes changes of polarization and distribution of propagating modes, hence it changes the distribution of modes at the end of the multimode fiber. Observation of these changes using a narrow core single-mode fiber allows to use the structure as an optical fiber sensor. We used several kilometers long optical links to conduct field tests of laboratory sensor. On this basis the prototype module of modalmetric fiber optic sensor wasbuilt. The modification of optoelectronic part, the variation of sensor length and the change of the method of light reflection at the end of the fiber enable the use of the modalmetric fiber optic sensor in many applications. The sensor finds wide range of applications in security systems. It can be applied to protect the museum's collection, transmission lines and to protect objects of critical infrastructure.

  13. Experimental results of fiber optic contrast-sensitive dislocation sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Szustakowski, M.; Palka, N.

    2005-05-01

    The dislocation sensor based on the contrast phenomenon in an unbalanced fiber optic Michelson interferometer with a 3 x 3 coupler and a semiconductor multimode laser. Periodic contrast oscillations, which depend on a laser spectrum, occur if a measuring arm of the interferometer is elongated. A conception of the elongation sensor that based on linearization of contrast oscillations is shown. Next, a setup of the sensor and signal processing scheme of the sensor is presented. During measurements, for 1-m long sensor we obtained 5-mm measuring range with +/-28-μm uncertainty. Explanation of these differences and conclusion to further research are formulated.

  14. The research of optical windows used in aircraft sensor systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Feng; Li Yan; Tang Tian-Jin

    2012-01-01

    The optical windows used in aircrafts protect their imaging sensors from environmental effects.Considering the imaging performance,flat surfaces are traditionally used in the design of optical windows.For aircrafts operating at high speeds,the optical windows should be relatively aerodynamic,but a flat optical window may introduce unacceptably high drag to the airframes.The linear scanning infrared sensors used in aircrafts with,respectively,a fiat window,a spherical window and a toric window in front of the aircraft sensors are designed and compared.Simulation results show that the optical design using a toric surface has the integrated advantages of field of regard,aerodynamic drag,narcissus effect,and imaging performance,so the optical window with a toric surface is demonstrated to be suited for this application.

  15. Fiber Optic Strain Sensor for Planetary Gear Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiddy, Jason S.; Lewicki, David G.; LaBerge, Kelsen E.; Ehinger, Ryan T.; Fetty, Jason

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new sensing approach for helicopter damage detection in the planetary stage of a helicopter transmission based on a fiber optic strain sensor array. Complete helicopter transmission damage detection has proven itself a difficult task due to the complex geometry of the planetary reduction stage. The crowded and complex nature of the gearbox interior does not allow for attachment of sensors within the rotating frame. Hence, traditional vibration-based diagnostics are instead based on measurements from externally mounted sensors, typically accelerometers, fixed to the gearbox exterior. However, this type of sensor is susceptible to a number of external disturbances that can corrupt the data, leading to false positives or missed detection of potentially catastrophic faults. Fiber optic strain sensors represent an appealing alternative to the accelerometer. Their small size and multiplexibility allows for potentially greater sensing resolution and accuracy, as well as redundancy, when employed as an array of sensors. The work presented in this paper is focused on the detection of gear damage in the planetary stage of a helicopter transmission using a fiber optic strain sensor band. The sensor band includes an array of 13 strain sensors, and is mounted on the ring gear of a Bell Helicopter OH-58C transmission. Data collected from the sensor array is compared to accelerometer data, and the damage detection results are presented

  16. Broadband ultrasonic sensor array via optical frequency domain reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabai, Haniel; Steinberg, Idan; Eyal, Avishay

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a new approach for multiplexing fiber-based ultrasound sensors using Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR). In the present demonstration of the method, each sensor was a short section of Polyimide-coated single-mode fiber. One end of the sensing fiber was pigtailed to a mirror and the other end was connected, via a fiber optic delay line, to a 1X4 fiber coupler. The multiplexing was enabled by using a different delay to each sensor. Ultrasonic excitation was performed by a 1MHz transducer which transmitted 4μs tone-bursts above the sensor array. The ultrasound waves generated optical phase variations in the fibers which were detected using the OFDR method. The ultrasound field at the sensors was successfully reconstructed without any noticeable cross-talk.

  17. Optical Fiber Grating Sensor for Force Measurement of Anchor Cable

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Desheng; FU Jinghua; LIU Shengchun; SUI Lingfeng; FU Rong

    2006-01-01

    The development of the sensor suitable for measuring large load stress to the anchor cable becomes an important task in bridge construction and maintenance. Therefore, a new type of optical fiber sensor was developed in the laboratory - optical fiber grating sensor for force measurement of anchor cable (OFBFMAC). No similar report about this kind of sensor has been found up to now in China and other countries. This sensor is proved to be an effective way of monitoring in processes of anchor cable installation, cable cutting, cable force regulation, etc, with the accurate and repeatable measuring results. Its successful application in the tie bar cable force safety monitoring for Wuhan Qingchuan bridge is a new exploration of optical fiber grating sensing technology in bridge tie bar monitoring system.

  18. Optical fiber strain sensor with improved linearity range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egalon, Claudio Oliveira (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A strain sensor is constructed from a two mode optical fiber. When the optical fiber is surface mounted in a straight line and the object to which the optical fiber is mounted is subjected to strain within a predetermined range, the light intensity of any point at the output of the optical fiber will have a linear relationship to strain, provided the intermodal phase difference is less than 0.17 radians.

  19. Optical arc sensor using energy harvesting power source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoo Nam; Rho, Hee Hyuk

    2016-06-01

    Wireless sensors without external power supply gained considerable attention due to convenience both in installation and operation. Optical arc detecting sensor equipping with self sustaining power supply using energy harvesting method was investigated. Continuous energy harvesting method was attempted using thermoelectric generator to supply standby power in micro ampere scale and operating power in mA scale. Peltier module with heat-sink was used for high efficiency electricity generator. Optical arc detecting sensor with hybrid filter showed insensitivity to fluorescent and incandescent lamps under simulated distribution panel condition. Signal processing using integrating function showed selective arc discharge detection capability to different arc energy levels, with a resolution below 17J energy difference, unaffected by bursting arc waveform. The sensor showed possibility for application to arc discharge detecting sensor in power distribution panel. Also experiment with proposed continuous energy harvesting method using thermoelectric power showed possibility as a self sustainable power source of remote sensor.

  20. Integrated optical waveguide sensor for lighting impulse electric field measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiahong; Chen, Fushen; Sun, Bao; Chen, Kaixin

    2014-09-01

    A Lithium niobate (LiNbO3) based integrated optical E-field sensor with an optical waveguide Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) and a tapered antenna has been designed and fabricated for the measurement of the pulsed electric field. The minimum detectable E-field of the sensor was 10 kV/m. The sensor showed a good linear characteristic while the input E-fields varied from 10 kV/m to 370 kV/m. Furthermore, the maximum detectable E-field of the sensor, which could be calculated from the sensor input/output characteristic, was approximately equal to 1000 kV/m. All these results suggest that such sensor can be used for the measurement of the lighting impulse electric field.

  1. Optical fiber based slide tactile sensor for underwater robots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Ding-zhong; WANG Qi-ming; SONG Rui-han; YAO Xin; GU Yi-hua

    2008-01-01

    In the underwater environment,many visual sensors don't work,and many sensors which work well for robots working in space or on land can not be used underwater.Therefore,an optical fiber slide tactile sensor was designed based on the inner modulation mechanism of optical fibers.The principles and structure of the sensor are explained in detail.Its static and dynamic characteristics were analyzed theoretically and then simulated.A dynamic characteristic model was built and the simulation made using the GA based neural network.In order to improve sensor response,the recognition model of the sensor was designed based on the'inverse solution'principle of neural networks,increasing the control precision and the sensitivity of the manipulator.

  2. Optical arc sensor using energy harvesting power source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoo Nam, E-mail: knchoi@inu.ac.kr; Rho, Hee Hyuk, E-mail: rdoubleh0902@inu.ac.kr [Dept. of Information and Telecommunication Engineering Incheon National University Incheon 22012 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-03

    Wireless sensors without external power supply gained considerable attention due to convenience both in installation and operation. Optical arc detecting sensor equipping with self sustaining power supply using energy harvesting method was investigated. Continuous energy harvesting method was attempted using thermoelectric generator to supply standby power in micro ampere scale and operating power in mA scale. Peltier module with heat-sink was used for high efficiency electricity generator. Optical arc detecting sensor with hybrid filter showed insensitivity to fluorescent and incandescent lamps under simulated distribution panel condition. Signal processing using integrating function showed selective arc discharge detection capability to different arc energy levels, with a resolution below 17 J energy difference, unaffected by bursting arc waveform. The sensor showed possibility for application to arc discharge detecting sensor in power distribution panel. Also experiment with proposed continuous energy harvesting method using thermoelectric power showed possibility as a self sustainable power source of remote sensor.

  3. High Performance Fiber-Optic Sensor for Environmental Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research (LGR) proposes to develop a low-cost, compact, lightweight, rugged and easy-to-use environmental monitoring optical fiber sensor device based on...

  4. Fiber optic sensors current status and future possibilities

    CERN Document Server

    Ikezawa, Satoshi; Corres, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    This book describes important recent developments in fiber optic sensor technology and examines established and emerging applications in a broad range of fields and markets, including power engineering, chemical engineering, bioengineering, biomedical engineering, and environmental monitoring. Particular attention is devoted to niche applications where fiber optic sensors are or soon will be able to compete with conventional approaches. Beyond novel methods for the sensing of traditional parameters such as strain, temperature, and pressure, a variety of new ideas and concepts are proposed and explored. The significance of the advent of extended infrared sensors is discussed, and individual chapters focus on sensing at THz frequencies and optical sensing based on photonic crystal structures. Another important topic is the resonances generated when using thin films in conjunction with optical fibers, and the enormous potential of sensors based on lossy mode resonances, surface plasmon resonances, and long-range...

  5. In-Space Distributed Fiber Optic Hydrogen Leak Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Broadband Photonics Inc. proposes development of a patent-pending distributed fiber optic sensor for in-space hydrogen leak detection. Reliable and fast detection of...

  6. Fiber Optic Continuous Liquid Sensor for Cryogenic Propellant Gauging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Broadband Photonics Incorporated proposes to develop a patent-pending fiber optic continuous liquid sensor for low-thrust level settled mass gauging with measurement...

  7. Compact All Solid State Oceanic Inherent Optical Property Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This work concerns the development of a prototype of a Volume Scattering Function (VSF) sensor for measurement of this inherent optical property(IOP) of seawater....

  8. An embedded optical nanowire loop resonator refractometric sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fei; Pruneri, Valerio; Finazzi, Vittoria; Brambilla, Gilberto

    2008-01-21

    A novel refractometric sensor based on an embedded optical nanowire loop resonator is presented. The device sensitivity has been studied in two typical configurations and its dependence on the nanowire diameter and coating thickness determined.

  9. Characterization of optical strain sensors based on silicon waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerveld, W.J.; Pozo Torres, J.M.; Muilwijk, P.M.; Leinders, S.M.; Harmsma, P.J.; Tabak, E.; Dool, T.C. van den; Dongen, K.W.A. van; Yousefi, M.; Urbach, H.P.

    2013-01-01

    Strain gauges are widely employed in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) for sensing of, for example, deformation, acceleration, pressure, or sound [1]. Such gauges are typically based on electronic piezoresistivity. We propose integrated optical sensors which have particular benefits: insensitivi

  10. An Optical Fiber Displacement Sensor Using RF Interrogation Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeon-Ho; Choi, Sang-Jin; Jeon, Keum Soo; Pan, Jae-Kyung

    2016-02-24

    We propose a novel non-contact optical fiber displacement sensor. It uses a radio frequency (RF) interrogation technique which is based on bidirectional modulation of a Mach-Zehnder electro-optical modulator (MZ-EOM). The displacement is measured from the free spectral range (FSR) which is determined by the dip frequencies of the modulated MZ-EOM transfer function. In experiments, the proposed sensor showed a sensitivity of 456 kHz/mm or 1.043 kHz/V in a measurement range of 7 mm. The displacement resolution of the proposed sensor depends on the linewidth and the power of the optical source. Resolution better than 0.05 μm would be achieved if an optical source which has a linewidth narrower than 1.5 nm and a received power larger than -36 dBm is used. Also, the multiplexing characteristic of the proposed sensor was experimentally validated.

  11. In-Space Distributed Fiber Optic Hydrogen Leak Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Broadband Photonics Inc. proposes development of a patent-pending distributed fiber optic sensor for in-space hydrogen leak detection. Reliable and fast detection of...

  12. Noninvasive blood pressure measurement scheme based on optical fiber sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianxuan; Yuan, Xueguang; Zhang, Yangan

    2016-10-01

    Optical fiber sensing has many advantages, such as volume small, light quality, low loss, strong in anti-jamming. Since the invention of the optical fiber sensing technology in 1977, optical fiber sensing technology has been applied in the military, national defense, aerospace, industrial, medical and other fields in recent years, and made a great contribution to parameter measurement in the environment under the limited condition .With the rapid development of computer, network system, the intelligent optical fiber sensing technology, the sensor technology, the combination of computer and communication technology , the detection, diagnosis and analysis can be automatically and efficiently completed. In this work, we proposed a noninvasive blood pressure detection and analysis scheme which uses optical fiber sensor. Optical fiber sensing system mainly includes the light source, optical fiber, optical detector, optical modulator, the signal processing module and so on. wavelength optical signals were led into the optical fiber sensor and the signals reflected by the human body surface were detected. By comparing actual testing data with the data got by traditional way to measure the blood pressure we can establish models for predicting the blood pressure and achieve noninvasive blood pressure measurement by using spectrum analysis technology. Blood pressure measurement method based on optical fiber sensing system is faster and more convenient than traditional way, and it can get accurate analysis results in a shorter period of time than before, so it can efficiently reduce the time cost and manpower cost.

  13. New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Coggin; Tom Flynn; Jonas Ivasauskas; Daniel Kominsky; Carrie Kozikowski; Russell May; Michael Miller; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell; Raymond Rumpf; Kelly Stinson-Bagby; Dan Thorsen; Rena Wilson

    2007-12-31

    Accomplishments of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants and solid oxide fuel cells are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring.

  14. A simple optical fiber interferometer based breathing sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xixi; Liu, Dejun; Kumar, Rahul; Ng, Wai Pang; Fu, Yong-qing; Yuan, Jinhui; Yu, Chongxiu; Wu, Yufeng; Zhou, Guorui; Farrell, Gerald; Semenova, Yuliya; Wu, Qiang

    2017-03-01

    A breathing sensor has been experimentally demonstrated based on a singlemode-multimode-singlemode (SMS) fiber structure which is attached to a thin plastic film in an oxygen mask. By detecting power variations due to the macro bending applied to the SMS section by each inhalation and exhalation process, the breath state can be monitored. The proposed sensor is capable of distinguishing different types of breathing conditions including regular and irregular breath state. The sensor can be used in a strong electric/magnetic field and radioactive testing systems such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and computed tomography (CT) examinations where electrical sensors are restricted.

  15. Zeonex Microstructured Polymer Optical Fibre Bragg Grating Sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woyessa, Getinet; Fasano, Andrea; Markos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    We fabricated an endlessly single mode and humidity insensitive Zeonex microstructured polymer optical fibre (mPOF) for fibre Bragg grating (FBG) temperature and strain sensors. We inscribed and characterise FBGs in Zeonex mPOF for the first time.......We fabricated an endlessly single mode and humidity insensitive Zeonex microstructured polymer optical fibre (mPOF) for fibre Bragg grating (FBG) temperature and strain sensors. We inscribed and characterise FBGs in Zeonex mPOF for the first time....

  16. Modal Frequency Detection in Composite Beams Using Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    interference have been developed. These include the Fabry-Perot interferometer , the Mach-Zehner interferometer , and the Michelson interferometer [8]. The...widely studied. A Fabry-Perot interferometer as a fiber optic sensor was first introduced in 1982 [10]. In a later study intrinsic Fabry-Perot...Yoshino, Kiyoshi Kurosawa, Katsuji Itoh, and Teruzi Ose, " Fiber -Optic Fabry-Perot Interferometer and its Sensor Applications," IEEE Journal of Quantum

  17. Review Of Fiber-Optic Electric-Field Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paula, Ramon P.; Jarzynski, Jacek

    1989-01-01

    Tutorial paper reviews state of art in fiber-optic sensors of alternating electric fields. Because such sensors are made entirely of dielectric materials, they are relatively transparent to incident electric fields; they do not distort fields significantly. Paper presents equations that express relationships among stress, strain, and electric field in piezoactive plastic and equations for phase shift in terms of photoelastic coefficients and strains in optical fiber.

  18. Volatile organic compound optical fiber sensors: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Arregui, Francisco J.; Candido Bariain; Matias, Ignacio R; Cesar Elosua

    2006-01-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) detection is a topic of growing interest with applications in diverse fields, ranging from environmental uses to the food or chemical industries. Optical fiber VOC sensors offering new and interesting properties which overcame some of the inconveniences found on traditional gas sensors appeared over two decades ago. Thanks to its minimum invasive nature and the advantages that optical fiber offers such as light weight, passive nature, low attenuation and the...

  19. Network Integration of Distributed Optical Fiber Temperature Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-Yan Li; Hong-Lin Liu; Zai-Xuan Zhang

    2008-01-01

    The integration of distributed optical fiber temperature sensor with supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system is proposed and implemented. In the implementation of the integration, both the compatibility with traditional system and the characteristics of distributed optical fiber temperature sensor is considered before Modbus TCP/IP protocol is chosen. The protocol is implemented with open source component Indy. The Modbus TCP/IP protocol used in the system is proved to be fast and robust.

  20. Oxygen-dependent ATF-4 stability is mediated by the PHD3 oxygen sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köditz, Jens; Nesper, Jutta; Wottawa, Marieke; Stiehl, Daniel P; Camenisch, Gieri; Franke, Corinna; Myllyharju, Johanna; Wenger, Roland H; Katschinski, Dörthe M

    2007-11-15

    The activating transcription factor-4 (ATF-4) is translationally induced under anoxic conditions, mediates part of the unfolded protein response following endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and is a critical regulator of cell fate. Here, we identified the zipper II domain of ATF-4 to interact with the oxygen sensor prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain 3 (PHD3). The PHD inhibitors dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) and hypoxia, or proteasomal inhibition, all induced ATF-4 protein levels. Hypoxic induction of ATF-4 was due to increased protein stability, but was independent of the ubiquitin ligase von Hippel-Lindau protein (pVHL). A novel oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain was identified adjacent to the zipper II domain. Mutations of 5 prolyl residues within this ODD domain or siRNA-mediated down-regulation of PHD3, but not of PHD2, was sufficient to stabilize ATF-4 under normoxic conditions. These data demonstrate that PHD-dependent oxygen-sensing recruits both the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and ATF-4 systems, and hence not only confers adaptive responses but also cell fate decisions.

  1. Capillarity-based preparation system for optical colorimetric sensor arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao-gang; Yi, Xin; Bu, Xiang-nan; Hou, Chang-jun; Huo, Dan-qun; Yang, Mei; Fa, Huan-bao; Lei, Jin-can

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, optical colorimetric sensor arrays have demonstrated beneficial features, including rapid response, high selectivity, and high specificity; as a result, it has been extensively applied in food inspection and chemical studies, among other fields. There are instruments in the current market available for the preparation of an optical colorimetric sensor array, but it lacks the corresponding research of the preparation mechanism. Therefore, in connection with the main features of this kind of sensor array such as consistency, based on the preparation method of contact spotting, combined with a capillary fluid model, Washburn equation, Laplace equation, etc., this paper develops a diffusion model of an optical colorimetric sensor array during its preparation and sets up an optical colorimetric sensor array preparation system based on this diffusion model. Finally, this paper compares and evaluates the sensor arrays prepared by the system and prepared manually in three aspects such as the quality of array point, response of array, and response result, and the results show that the performance index of the sensor array prepared by a system under this diffusion model is better than that of the sensor array of manual spotting, which meets the needs of the experiment.

  2. Optical Sensor for Diverse Organic Vapors at ppm Concentration Ranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora M. Paolucci

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A broadly responsive optical organic vapor sensor is described that responds to low concentrations of organic vapors without significant interference from water vapor. Responses to several classes of organic vapors are highlighted, and trends within classes are presented. The relationship between molecular properties (vapor pressure, boiling point, polarizability, and refractive index and sensor response are discussed.

  3. A new remote optical wetness sensor and its applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusinkveld, B.G.; Berkowicz, S.M.; Jacobs, A.F.G.; Hillen, W.C.A.M.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    An optical wetness sensor (OWS) was developed for continuous surface wetness measurements. The sensor is an all-weather instrument that does not interfere with the surface wetting and drying process and is unaffected by solar radiation. It is equipped with its own light source with which it can scan

  4. Capillarity-based preparation system for optical colorimetric sensor arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao-Gang; Yi, Xin; Bu, Xiang-Nan; Hou, Chang-Jun; Huo, Dan-Qun; Yang, Mei; Fa, Huan-Bao; Lei, Jin-Can

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, optical colorimetric sensor arrays have demonstrated beneficial features, including rapid response, high selectivity, and high specificity; as a result, it has been extensively applied in food inspection and chemical studies, among other fields. There are instruments in the current market available for the preparation of an optical colorimetric sensor array, but it lacks the corresponding research of the preparation mechanism. Therefore, in connection with the main features of this kind of sensor array such as consistency, based on the preparation method of contact spotting, combined with a capillary fluid model, Washburn equation, Laplace equation, etc., this paper develops a diffusion model of an optical colorimetric sensor array during its preparation and sets up an optical colorimetric sensor array preparation system based on this diffusion model. Finally, this paper compares and evaluates the sensor arrays prepared by the system and prepared manually in three aspects such as the quality of array point, response of array, and response result, and the results show that the performance index of the sensor array prepared by a system under this diffusion model is better than that of the sensor array of manual spotting, which meets the needs of the experiment.

  5. Realization and characterization of fiber optic reflective sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzowski, B.; Łakomski, M.; Słapek, B.

    2016-11-01

    In almost all of non-invasive techniques, fiber optic sensors may be the most promising ones because of their inherent advantages such as very small size and hard environment tolerance. Proximity sensors based on optical fiber are highly required especially in the impact area of electromagnetic fields. In this paper three different types of fiber optic reflective sensors are presented. In all three types of the sensor four multimode optical fibers (MMF) illuminate the movable surface. The difference is in the number of collecting the reflected light MMF. In the first one, 12 MMF collect the light, in the second one 20 MMF, while in the third one the number of MMF collecting reflected light is 32. Moreover, all three types of fiber optic reflective sensors were realized in two configurations. In the first one, the cleaved MMF were used to collect reflected light, while in the second configuration - the ball-lensed optical fibers were chosen. In this paper an analysis of each type of realized sensor is presented. In the last part of this paper the obtained results and the detailed discussion are given.

  6. Fiber optic and laser sensors V; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, Aug. 17-19, 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paula, Ramon P. (Editor); Udd, Eric (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume focus on recent developments in fiber optic and laser sensors. Topics discussed include electric and magnetic field sensors, fiber optic pressure sensors, fiber optic gyros, fiber optic sensors for aerospace applications, fiber sensor multiplexing, temperature sensors, and specialized fiber optic sensors. Papers are presented on remote fiber optic sensors for angular orientation; fiber optic rotation sensor for space missions; adaptation of an electro-optic monitoring system to aerospace structures; optical fiber sensor for dust concentration measurements; and communication-sensing system using a single optical fiber.

  7. Nonlinear fiber-optic strain sensor based on four-wave mixing in microstructured optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Bobo; Yuan, Scott Wu; Frosz, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear fiber-optic strain sensor, which uses the shifts of four-wave mixing Stokes and anti-Stokes peaks caused by the strain-induced changes in the structure and refractive index of a microstructured optical fiber. The sensor thus uses the inherent nonlinearity of the fiber...

  8. Transparent and flexible force sensor array based on optical waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngsung; Park, Suntak; Park, Seung Koo; Yun, Sungryul; Kyung, Ki-Uk; Sun, Kyung

    2012-06-18

    This paper suggests a force sensor array measuring contact force based on intensity change of light transmitted throughout optical waveguide. For transparency and flexibility of the sensor, two soft prepolymers with different refractive index have been developed. The optical waveguide consists of two cladding layers and a core layer. The top cladding layer is designed to allow light scattering at the specific area in response to finger contact. The force sensor shows a distinct tendency that output intensity decreases with input force and measurement range is from 0 to -13.2 dB.

  9. Plastic optical fibre sensor for quality control in food industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo, C.; Bilro, L.; Ferreira, R.; Alberto, N.; Antunes, P.; Leitão, C.; Nogueira, R.; Pinto, J. L.

    2013-05-01

    The present work addresses the need for new devices felt in the context of quality control, especially in the food industry. Due to the spectral dependence of the attenuation coefficient, a novel dual-parameter sensor for colour and refractive index was developed and tested. The sensor employs plastic optical fibres to measure the transmitted optical power in three measurement cells each with a different incident wavelength. The performance of the sensor was tested using several dyes at different concentrations and aqueous solutions of glycerine and ethanol. Results show that this technique allows the monitoring of refractive index and colour without cross-sensitivity.

  10. Optical Pressure-Temperature Sensor for a Combustion Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, John; Korman, Valentin; Gregory, Don

    2008-01-01

    A compact sensor for measuring temperature and pressure in a combusti on chamber has been proposed. The proposed sensor would include two optically birefringent, transmissive crystalline wedges: one of sapph ire (Al2O3) and one of magnesium oxide (MgO), the optical properties of both of which vary with temperature and pressure. The wedges wou ld be separated by a vapor-deposited thin-film transducer, which wou ld be primarily temperaturesensitive (in contradistinction to pressur e- sensitive) when attached to a crystalline substrate. The sensor w ould be housed in a rugged probe to survive the extreme temperatures and pressures in a combustion chamber.

  11. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2005-10-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Previously we immobilized the potassium salt of a molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}M{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, in a sol-gel matrix and showed that the luminescence is stable after 54 hours at 200 C, but the quenching ratios were low and the films delaminated after thermal cycling due to densification of the matrix. Three new approaches to solve decreased quenching over time and delamination of films off fiber tips were investigated. In the first approach K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14} embedded in cured sol-gel particles were incorporated into a TEOS based sol-gel. These gave enhanced quenching (6x), but delaminated. Our second approach was to use a commercial cyanoacrylate glue to immobilize the particles onto the tip of an optical fiber. This gave better adhesion and good quenching initially, but eventually the glue degraded upon heating. Our third approach was to use a 55% OtMOS/ TEOS sol-gel binder. Films based on this new sol-gel binder show high quenching ({approx}6x) and superior mechanical stability even after thermal cycling. Sensor measurements on an optical fiber containing K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14} embedded in cured sol-gel particles were obtained from 100 to 25 C. The signal intensity in nitrogen was stable at 2.8 {+-} 0.2 nW, and the quenching ratio (ratio of signal in N{sub 2} vs. 21 % O{sub 2}) varied from 4.4 to 6.9X. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  12. Visible light optical coherence tomography measure retinal oxygen metabolic response to systemic oxygenation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ji; Liu, Wenzhong; Chen, Siyu; Backman, Vadim; Sheibani, Nader; Sorenson, Christine M.; Fawzi, Amani A.; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-03-01

    The lack of capability to quantify oxygen metabolism noninvasively impedes both fundamental investigation and clinical diagnosis of a wide spectrum of diseases including all the major blinding diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Using visible light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT), we demonstrated accurate and robust measurement of retinal oxygen metabolic rate (rMRO2) noninvasively in rat eyes. The rMRO2 was calculated by concurrent measurement of blood flow and blood oxygen saturation (sO2). Blood flow was calculated by the principle of Doppler optical coherence tomography, where the phase shift between two closely spaced A-lines measures the axial velocity. The distinct optical absorption spectra of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin provided the contrast for sO2 measurement, combined with the spectroscopic analysis of vis-OCT signal within the blood vessels. We continuously monitored the regulatory response of oxygen consumption to a progressive hypoxic challenge. We found that both oxygen delivery, and rMRO2 increased from the highly regulated retinal circulation (RC) under hypoxia, by 0.28+/-0.08 μL/min (pcompensated for the deficient oxygen supply from the poorly regulated choroidal circulation (CC).

  13. A Miniaturized Optical Sensor with Integrated Gas Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayerden, N.P.; Ghaderi, M.; De Graaf, G.; Wolffenbuttel, R.F.

    2015-01-01

    The design, fabrication and characterization of a highly integrated optical gas sensor is presented. The gas cell takes up most of the space in a microspectrometer and is the only component that has so far not been miniaturized. Using the tapered resonator cavity of a linear variable optical filter

  14. Future electro-optical sensors and processing in urban operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grönwall, C.; Schwering, P.B.; Rantakokko, J.; Benoist, K.W.; Kemp, R.A.W.; Steinvall, O.; Letalick, D.; Björkert, S.

    2013-01-01

    In the electro-optical sensors and processing in urban operations (ESUO) study we pave the way for the European Defence Agency (EDA) group of Electro-Optics experts (IAP03) for a common understanding of the optimal distribution of processing functions between the different platforms. Combinations of

  15. Distributed Fiber-Optic Sensors for Vibration Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Jin, Baoquan; Bai, Qing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-07-26

    Distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors receive extensive investigation and play a significant role in the sensor panorama. Optical parameters such as light intensity, phase, polarization state, or light frequency will change when external vibration is applied on the sensing fiber. In this paper, various technologies of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensing are reviewed, from interferometric sensing technology, such as Sagnac, Mach-Zehnder, and Michelson, to backscattering-based sensing technology, such as phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometer, polarization-optical time domain reflectometer, optical frequency domain reflectometer, as well as some combinations of interferometric and backscattering-based techniques. Their operation principles are presented and recent research efforts are also included. Finally, the applications of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors are summarized, which mainly include structural health monitoring and perimeter security, etc. Overall, distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors possess the advantages of large-scale monitoring, good concealment, excellent flexibility, and immunity to electromagnetic interference, and thus show considerable potential for a variety of practical applications.

  16. Shack-Hartmann sensor improvement using optical binning

    CERN Document Server

    Basden, Alastair; Guzman, Dani; Morris, Tim; Myers, Richard; Saunter, Chris

    2007-01-01

    We present a design improvement for a recently proposed type of Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor that uses a cylindrical (lenticular) lenslet array. The improved sensor design uses optical binning and requires significantly fewer detector pixels than the corresponding conventional or cylindrical Shack-Hartmann sensor, and so detector readout noise causes less signal degradation. Additionally, detector readout time is significantly reduced, which reduces the latency for closed loop systems, and data processing requirements. We provide simple analytical noise considerations and Monte-Carlo simulations, and show that the optically binned Shack-Hartmann sensor can offer better performance than the conventional counterpart in most practical situations, and our design is particularly suited for use with astronomical adaptive optics systems.

  17. A novel optical sensor for mirror edge sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. A. H.; Buous, S.; Gajjar, H.; Menzies, J. W.; Schindler, F.; Sändig, K.; Lév"que, S.

    2010-07-01

    The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) recently (2008) abandoned attempts at using capacitive mirror edge sensors, mainly due to poor performance at a relative humidity above ~60%, a not infrequent occurrence. Different technologies are now being explored for alternative sensors on SALT. In this paper we describe the design and development of a novel prototype optical edge sensor, based on the application of the interferential scanning principle, as used in optical encoders. These prototype sensors were subsequently tested at SAAO and ESO, for potential application on SALT and E-ELT. Environmental tests, conducted in climatic control chambers, looked at temperature and relative humidity sensitivity, long term stability and sensor noise. The temperature sensitivity for height and gap were, respectively, 10nm/°C and 44nm/°C, while for relative humidity they were 4nm/10% and 50nm/10%, respectively. These either met, or were close to, the SALT specification. While there were significant lags in response, this was due to the sensor's relatively large mass (~200 gm per sensor half), which was not optimized. This is likely to improve, should a revised design be developed in future. Impressively the sensor noise was <0.015 nm RMS, over three orders of magnitude better than the specification. Our conclusions are that optical edge sensing is a viable technique for use on segmented mirror telescopes.

  18. Intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical fiber sensors and their multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anbo

    2007-12-11

    An intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical sensor includes a thin film sandwiched between two fiber ends. When light is launched into the fiber, two reflections are generated at the two fiber/thin film interfaces due to a difference in refractive indices between the fibers and the film, giving rise to the sensor output. In another embodiment, a portion of the cladding of a fiber is removed, creating two parallel surfaces. Part of the evanescent fields of light propagating in the fiber is reflected at each of the surfaces, giving rise to the sensor output. In a third embodiment, the refractive index of a small portion of a fiber is changed through exposure to a laser beam or other radiation. Interference between reflections at the ends of the small portion give rise to the sensor output. Multiple sensors along a single fiber are multiplexed using an optical time domain reflectometry method.

  19. Fiber Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Air Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Yao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft operators are faced with increasing requirements to extend the service life of air platforms beyond their designed life cycles, resulting in heavy maintenance and inspection burdens as well as economic pressure. Structural health monitoring (SHM based on advanced sensor technology is potentially a cost-effective approach to meet operational requirements, and to reduce maintenance costs. Fiber optic sensor technology is being developed to provide existing and future aircrafts with SHM capability due to its unique superior characteristics. This review paper covers the aerospace SHM requirements and an overview of the fiber optic sensor technologies. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensor technology is evaluated as the most promising tool for load monitoring and damage detection, the two critical SHM aspects of air platforms. At last, recommendations on the implementation and integration of FBG sensors into an SHM system are provided.

  20. Comparison of active microwave and optical sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwering, P.B.W.; Theil, A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a number of projects at TNO-FEL in the field of sensor fusion of radar and electrooptical sensors. These fusion approaches consider land, air, and maritime scenarios for surveillance and autonomous detection tasks. Fusion benefits are present when uncorrelated and complementary

  1. Double-Tubing Encapsulated Fiber Optic Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juncheng; Pickrell, Gary; Huang, Zhengyu; Qi, Bing; Zhang, Po; Duan, Yuhong; Wang, Anbo

    2003-09-01

    Increasing the efficiency of oil production operations requires improved sensors to supply critical information such as mixed-phase fluid flow, pressure and temperature measurements within the down-hole oil environment. In order to provide robust and reliable fiber optic temperature sensors capable of operating in the harsh down-hole oil environment, where temperatures might exceed 250 °C and pressures might reach 20,000 psi (140 Mpa), a novel type of fiber optic temperature sensor has been developed. This temperature sensor functions as an EFPI (extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric) sensor. One unique contribution of this work is that the glass tubing used is a borosilicate glass with a relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and long gauge length, allowing a much higher sensitivity to be achieved, without hysteresis. The sensor structure utilizes a dual tubing design (tubing within a tubing) to allow pressure isolation. An LED light beam is used as the signal interrogation source to remotely interrogate the sensor which may be located tens of thousands of meters away, connected by an optical fiber. A white-light interferometer measurement system is utilized to process the returned interference signal and to precisely determine the length of the Fabry-Perot interferometric cavity. Another unique feature of this work is that the sensor has been packaged with a specially developed hermetic protection process to prevent water penetration and to improve the mechanical integrity of the sensor. This protection process has allowed the successful hydraulic deployment of fiber optic sensors through 3 mm ID stainless steel tubing into a functioning oil well. Data on the resolution, repeatability and pressure sensitivity are presented.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Integrated Optical Intensive Impulse Electric Field Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Bao; CHEN Fu-Shen

    2009-01-01

    We design and fabricate an integrated optical electric field sensor with segmented electrode for intensive im-pulse electric field measurement. The integrated optical sensor is based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with segmented electrodes. The output/input character of the sensing system is analysed and measured. The max-imal detectable electric field range (-75 kV/m to 245 kV/m) is obtained by analysing the results. As a result, the integrated optics electric field sensing system is suitable for transient intensive electric field measurement investigation.

  3. Distributed optical fiber dynamic magnetic field sensor based on magnetostriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi, Ali; Newson, Trevor P

    2014-05-01

    A distributed optical fiber sensor is introduced which is capable of quantifying multiple magnetic fields along a 1 km sensing fiber with a spatial resolution of 1 m. The operation of the proposed sensor is based on measuring the magnetorestrictive induced strain of a nickel wire attached to an optical fiber. The strain coupled to the optical fiber was detected by measuring the strain-induced phase variation between the backscattered Rayleigh light from two segments of the sensing fiber. A magnetic field intensity resolution of 0.3 G over a bandwidth of 50-5000 Hz was demonstrated.

  4. Polymer Optical Fiber Sensor and the Prediction of Sensor Response Utilizing Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroglu, Derya

    The global market researches showed that there is a growing trend in the field of polymer optical fiber (POF) and POF sensors. Telecommunications, medicine, defense, aerospace, and automotive are the application areas of fiber optic sensors, where the automotive industry is the most promising application area for innovations in the field of POF sensors. The POF sensors in automobiles are particularly for detection of seat occupancy, and intelligent pedestrian protection systems. This dissertation investigates graded index perfluorinated polymer optical fiber as an intensity modulated intrinsic sensor for application in automotive seat occupancy sensing. Since a fiber optic sensor has a high bandwidth, is small in size, is lightweight, and is immune to electromagnetic interference (EMI) it offers higher performance than that of its electrical based counterparts such as strain gauge, elastomeric bladder, and resistive sensor systems. This makes the fiber optic sensor a potential suitable material for seat occupancy sensing. A textile-based fiber optic sensor was designed to be located in the area beneath the typical seated human's thighs. The pressure interval under which the proposed POF sensor design could perform well was found to be between 0.18 and 0.21 N/cm2, where perfluorinated (PF) graded index (GI) POF (62.5/750 mum) was used as the POF material. In addition, the effect of the automotive seat covering including face material (fabric) and foam backing to the sensor's performance was analyzed. The face fabric structure and the thickness of foam backing were not found to be significant factors to change the sensor results. A research study, survey, was conducted of which purpose was to better understand market demands in terms of sensor performance characteristics for automotive seat weight sensors, as a part of the Quality Function Deployment (QFD) House of Quality analysis. The companies joined the survey agreed on the first 5 most important sensor

  5. Synchronous phase detection for optical fiber interferometric sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, I J; Phillips, R L

    1983-08-01

    A system has been developed to accurately detect phase signals produced in optical interferometric sensors. The system employs optical heterodyning and synchronously detects optical phase by feeding back an error signal to a phase modulator in the reference leg of the interferometer. This system is seen to have properties similar to a phase-locked loop. The system is mathematically analyzed and a simple second-order model developed which accurately predicts the system response.

  6. Polymer optical fiber bragg grating sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefani, Alessio; Yuan, Scott Wu; Andresen, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings are reported. We have written fiber Bragg gratings for 1550 nm and 850 nm operations, characterized their temperature and strain response, and tested their performance in a prototype accelerometer....

  7. Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, H. [PBI-Dansensor A/S (Denmark); Toft Soerensen, O. [Risoe National Lab., Materials Research Dept. (Denmark)

    1999-10-01

    A new type of ceramic oxygen sensors based on semiconducting oxides was developed in this project. The advantage of these sensors compared to standard ZrO{sub 2} sensors is that they do not require a reference gas and that they can be produced in small sizes. The sensor design and the techniques developed for production of these sensors are judged suitable by the participating industry for a niche production of a new generation of oxygen sensors. Materials research on new oxygen ion conducting conductors both for applications in oxygen sensors and in fuel was also performed in this project and finally a new process was developed for fabrication of ceramic tubes by dip-coating. (EHS)

  8. Free space optical sensor network for fixed infrastructure sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Navik; Milner, Stuart D.; Davis, Christopher C.

    2009-08-01

    Free space optical (FSO) links for indoor sensor networks can provide data rates that can range from bits/s to hundreds of Mb/s. In addition, they offer physical security, and in contrast with omnidirectional RF networks, they avoid interference with other electronic systems. These features are advantageous for communication over short distances in fixed infrastructure sensor networks. In this paper the system architecture for a fixed infrastructure FSO sensor network is presented. The system includes a network of small, low power (mW), sensor systems, or "motes," that transmit data optically to a central "cluster head," which controls the network traffic of all the motes and can aggregate the sensor information. The cluster head is designed with multiple vertical cavity surface emitting lasers oriented in different directions and controlled to diverge at 12º in order to provide signal coverage over a wide field of view. Both the cluster head and motes form a local area network. Our system design focuses on low-power wireless motes that can maintain successful communication over distances up to a few meters without having to use stringent optical alignment techniques, and our network design focuses on controlling mote sleep cycles for energy efficiency. This paper presents the design as well as the experimental link and optical communications performance of a prototype FSO-based sensor network.

  9. NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

    2004-12-01

    Accomplishments during the Phase I of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. A matrix of potential fiber optic sensor approaches was derived, and a data set of specifications for high-temperature optical fiber was produced. Several fiber optic sensor configurations, including interferometric (extrinsic and intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer), gratings (fiber Bragg gratings and long period gratings), and microbend sensors, were evaluated in the laboratory. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers. Numerical aperture measurements of both clad and unclad sapphire fibers were obtained and used to estimate the reduction in mode volume afforded by the cladding. High-temperature sensors based on sapphire fibers were also investigated. The fabrication of an intrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity within sapphire fibers was attempted by the bulk diffusion of magnesium oxide into short localized segments of longer sapphire fibers. Fourier analysis of the fringes that resulted when the treated fiber was interrogated by a swept laser spectrometer suggested that an intrinsic cavity had been formed in the fiber. Also

  10. SMART composite high pressure vessels with integrated optical fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazejewski, Wojciech; Czulak, Andrzej; Gasior, Pawel; Kaleta, Jerzy; Mech, Rafal

    2010-04-01

    In this paper application of integrated Optical Fiber Sensors for strain state monitoring of composite high pressure vessels is presented. The composite tanks find broad application in areas such as: automotive industry, aeronautics, rescue services, etc. In automotive application they are mainly used for gaseous fuels storage (like CNG or compressed Hydrogen). In comparison with standard steel vessels, composite ones have many advantages (i.e. high mechanical strength, significant weight reduction, etc). In the present work a novel technique of vessel manufacturing, according to this construction, was applied. It is called braiding technique, and can be used as an alternative to the winding method. During braiding process, between GFRC layers, two types of optical fiber sensors were installed: point sensors in the form of FBGs as well as interferometric sensors with long measuring arms (SOFO®). Integrated optical fiber sensors create the nervous system of the pressure vessel and are used for its structural health monitoring. OFS register deformation areas and detect construction damages in their early stage (ensure a high safety level for users). Applied sensor system also ensured a possibility of strain state monitoring even during the vessel manufacturing process. However the main application of OFS based monitoring system is to detect defects in the composite structure. An idea of such a SMART vessel with integrated sensor system as well as an algorithm of defect detection was presented.

  11. Glidersonde, a Meteorological Optical Profiling Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The "Glidersonde"is a UAV-deployed environmental sensor suite that is air-deployed and glides into denied or hazardous areas including volcanoes or nuclear...

  12. OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR EFFICIENT AND ECONOMICAL OIL RECOVERY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2003-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress over the fourth year of the ''Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery'' program, funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. During the reporting period, research efforts under the program were focused on the development and evaluation of the fiber optic flow sensor system, and field testing in Tulsa, OK and the second field test of the pressure and temperature sensors in Coalinga, CA. The feasibility of a self-compensating fiber optic flow sensor based on a cantilever beam and interferometer for real-time flow rate measurements in the fluid filled pipes of oil field was clearly demonstrated. In addition, field testing of the pressure and temperature sensors deployed downhole continued. These accomplishments are summarized here: (1) Theoretical analysis and simulations were performed to ensure performance of the design. (2) The sensor fabrication and packaging techniques were investigated and improved. (3) Prototype flow sensors were fabricated based on the fabrication experience of hundreds of test sensors. (4) A lab-scale flow testing system was constructed and used for sensor evaluation. (5) Field-testing was performed in both the indoor and outdoor flow testing facility at the University of Tulsa, OK. (6) Testing of a multimode white light pressure and temperature sensor system continued at the oil site of Chevron/Texaco Company (Coalinga CA).

  13. Optically Defined Modal Sensors Incorporating Spiropyran-Doped Liquid Crystals with Piezoelectric Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Lung Kuo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We integrated a piezoelectric sensing layer lamina containing liquid crystals (LC and spiropyran (SP in a LC/SP mixture to create an optically reconfigurable modal sensor for a cantilever beam. The impedance of this LC/SP lamina was decreased by UV irradiation which constituted the underlying mechanism to modulate the voltage externally applied to the piezoelectric actuating layer. Illuminating a specific pattern onto the LC/SP lamina provided us with a way to spatially modulate the piezoelectric vibration signal. We showed that if an UV illuminated pattern matches the strain distribution of a specific mode, a piezoelectric modal sensor can be created. Since UV illumination can be changed in situ in real-time, our results confirm for the first time since the inception of smart sensors, that an optically tailored modal sensor can be created. Some potential applications of this type of sensor include energy harvesting devices, bio-chips, vibration sensing and actuating devices.

  14. Control systems using modal domain optical fiber sensors for smart structure applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Reichard, Karl M.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, a new class of sensors has emerged for structural control which respond to environmental changes over a significant gauge length; these sensors are called distributed-effect sensors. These sensors can be fabricated with spatially varying sensitivity to the distributed measurand, and can be configured to measure a variety of structural parameters which can not be measured directly using point sensors. Examples of distributed-effect sensors include piezoelectric film, holographic sensors, and modal domain optical fiber sensors. Optical fiber sensors are particularly attractive for smart structure applications because they are flexible, have low mass, and can easily be embedded directly into materials. In this paper we describe the implementation of weighted modal domain optical fiber sensors. The mathematical model of the modal domain optical fiber sensor model is described and used to derive an expression for the sensor sensitivity. The effects of parameter variations on the sensor sensitivity are demonstrated to illustrate methods of spatially varying the sensor sensitivity.

  15. Multi-sensor control for precise assembly of optical components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Li; Rong Weibin; Sun Lining

    2014-01-01

    In order to perform an optical assembly accurately, a multi-sensor control strategy is developed which includes an attitude measurement system, a vision system, a loss measurement system and a force sensor. A 3-DOF attitude measuring method using linear variable differential transformers (LVDT) is designed to adjust the relation of position and attitude between the spher-ical mirror and the resonator. A micro vision feedback system is set up to extract the light beam and the diaphragm, which can achieve the coarse positioning of the spherical mirror in the optical assembly process. A rapid self-correlation method is presented to analyze the spectrum signal for the fine positioning. In order to prevent the damage of the optical components and realize sealing of the resonator, a hybrid force-position control is constructed to control the contact force of the optical components. The experimental results show that the proposed multi-sensor control strategy succeeds in accomplishing the precise assembly of the optical components, which consists of parallel adjustment, macro coarse adjustment, macro approach, micro fine adjustment, micro approach and optical contact. Therefore, the results validate the multi-sensor control strategy.

  16. Multi-sensor control for precise assembly of optical components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Li

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to perform an optical assembly accurately, a multi-sensor control strategy is developed which includes an attitude measurement system, a vision system, a loss measurement system and a force sensor. A 3-DOF attitude measuring method using linear variable differential transformers (LVDT is designed to adjust the relation of position and attitude between the spherical mirror and the resonator. A micro vision feedback system is set up to extract the light beam and the diaphragm, which can achieve the coarse positioning of the spherical mirror in the optical assembly process. A rapid self-correlation method is presented to analyze the spectrum signal for the fine positioning. In order to prevent the damage of the optical components and realize sealing of the resonator, a hybrid force-position control is constructed to control the contact force of the optical components. The experimental results show that the proposed multi-sensor control strategy succeeds in accomplishing the precise assembly of the optical components, which consists of parallel adjustment, macro coarse adjustment, macro approach, micro fine adjustment, micro approach and optical contact. Therefore, the results validate the multi-sensor control strategy.

  17. Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, a.; Pickrell, G.; Xiao, H.; May, r.

    2003-02-27

    The overall goal of this project was to develop reliable cost effective sensors for application in the down-hole environment. The physical parameters measured by these sensors were temperature, pressure, flow and acoustic signals. Sensor head configurations for each of the physical measurands were optimized to increase the sensitivity to the particular measurand of interest while decreasing the cross-sensitivity to the other physical measurands and to environmental influences. In addition, the optical signal demodulation electronics was designed to be insensitive to environmental influences while maintaining the required resolution, precision and accuracy of the parameter being sensed. The influence of potentially detrimental agents such as water in the down-hole environment was investigated as well as methods to protect both the optical fiber and the sensor from these detrimental effects.

  18. Two-interferometers fiber optic sensor for disturbance localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, Marek; Ciurapinski, Wieslaw; Kondrat, Marcin

    2005-09-01

    Initial researches of Two-interferometers Fibre Optic Sensor for Disturbance Localization will be presented. The sensor is typically susceptible to environmentally induced mechanical perturbation at low frequencies. The presented sensor consists of two interferometers: Sagnac and Michelson. The Sagnac transfer function is proportional to the product of two factors: firstly the rate of change, dφ/dt, of the optical signal, induced at a point by external disturbance, and secondly the distance between the disturbance point and the Sagnac coil centre. The second interferometer transfer function gives an output proportional to φ. So, if we determine a pulsation ω of the mechanical disturbance from both interferometers output signals, we will be able to localize point where the mechanical disturbance takes place along the fibre by means of simple division of these transfer function. A laboratory arrangement of the sensor and the results of numerical signal processing are also shown.

  19. Remote optical sensor system for E-field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzelmann, Robert; Stoehr, Andreas; Alder, Thomas; Kalinowski, D.; Schmidt, Manuel; Gross, Matthias; Jaeger, Dieter

    1998-12-01

    The concept of a remote optical sensor system for frequency selective electric field measurements will be presented. The system will be applicable to field measurement problems up to frequencies in the microwave regime. Additionally, it will provide minimum interference with the measured field, due to the optical fiber coupled sensor head. The electrooptic key components within the head of this sensor system are an array of photovoltaic cells and an electroabsorption waveguide modulator. Based on experimental results these components will be discussed and evaluated for the application within the sensor system. Furthermore, a novel fiber modulator coupling technique employing the monolithic integration of the device with InP V-grooves will be presented.

  20. Rugged Optical Atmospheric Humidity Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Trace species measurement on unmanned atmospheric research craft suitable for interplanetary travel is a demanding application for optical sensing techniques. Yet...

  1. Portable High Sensitivity and High Resolution Sensor to Determine Oxygen Purity Levels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this Phase I STTR project is to develop a highly sensitive oxygen (O2) sensor, with high accuracy and precision, to determine purity levels of high...

  2. Optical fiber sensors for IoT and smart devices

    CERN Document Server

    Domingues, Maria de Fátima F

    2017-01-01

    This brief provides a review of the evolution of optical fiber sensing solutions and related applications. Unique production methods are presented and discussed, highlighting their evolution and analyzing their complexity. Under this scope, this brief presents the existing silica optical fiber sensors and polymer optical fiber sensors solutions, comparing its field of action (sensitivity, accuracy), complexity of manufacture and economic cost. Special attention is given to low-cost production methods. This brief evaluates the different existing techniques, assessing the accuracy and suitability of these sensors for possible Internet of Things (IoT) integration in different considered scenarios. Critical analytical techniques, also covered in this brief, are expected to play a key role in the world of IoT and the smart city of tomorrow.

  3. Damage monitoring and impact detection using optical fiber vibration sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y. C.; Han, K. S.

    2002-06-01

    Intensity-based optical fiber vibrations sensors (OFVSs) are used in damage monitoring of fiber-reinforced plastics, in vibration sensing, and location of impacts. OFVSs were constructed by placing two cleaved fiber ends in a capillary tube. This sensor is able to monitor structural vibrations. For vibration sensing, the optical fiber sensor was mounted on the carbon fiber reinforced composite beam, and its response was investigated for free and forced vibration. For locating impact points, four OFVSs were placed at chosen positions and the different arrival times of impact-generated vibration signals were recorded. The impact location can be determined from these time delays. Indentation and tensile tests were performed with the measurement of the optical signal and acoustic emission (AE). The OFVSs accurately detected both free and forced vibration signals. Accurate locations of impact were determined on an acrylate plate. It was found that damage information, comparable in quality to AE data, could be obtained from the OFVS signals.

  4. Smart optical distance sensor for automatic welding detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Michael; Rinner, Stefan; Ettemeyer, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we describe a simple and cost-effective method and measuring device for automatic detection of welding. The sensor is to be used in automatic darkening filters (ADF) of welding helmets protecting the operator from intensive hazardous UV radiation. For reasons discussed in detail below, conventional sensor principles used in ADF are being out-dated. Here, we critically revise some alternatives and propose an approach comprising an optical distance sensor. Its underlying principle is triangulation with two pin-hole cameras. The absence of optical components such as lenses results in very low cost. At first, feasibility is tested with optical simulations. Additionally, we present measurement results that prove the practicability of our proposal.

  5. Carbon laminates with RE doped optical fibre sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miluski, Piotr; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Żmojda, Jacek; Silva, AbíLio P.; Reis, Paulo N. B.; Dorosz, Dominik

    2016-11-01

    A new type of luminescent optical fibre sensor for structural health monitoring of composite laminates (CFRP) is proposed. The Nd3+ doped multi-core doubleclad fibre incorporated in composite structure was used as a distributed temperature sensor. The change of luminescence intensity (Nd3+ ions) at the wavelength of 880 nm (4F3/2 → 4I9/2) and 1060 nm (4F3/2 → 4I11/2) was used for internal temperature monitoring. The special construction of optical fibre was used as it assures an efficient pumping mechanism and, at same time, it increases the measuring sensitivity. The linear response with relative sensitivity 0.015 K-1 was obtained for temperature range from 30 up to 75ºC. The manufacturing process of CFRP with embedded optical fibre sensor is also discussed.

  6. Fiber Optic Temperature Sensor Based on Multimode Interference Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Soto, J G; Antonio-Lopez, J E; Sanchez-Mondragon, J J [Photonics and Optical Physics Laboratory, Optics Department, INAOE Apdo. Postal 51 and 216, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72000 (Mexico); May-Arrioja, D A, E-mail: darrioja@uat.edu.mx

    2011-01-01

    A novel fiber optic temperature sensor based on multimode interference was designed, fabricated and tested. The sensor is very simple and inexpensive since we only need to splice a section of multimode fiber between two single mode fibers. Using this device a sensing range of 25 deg. C to 375 deg. C is demonstrated. We should also highlight that due to the pass-band filter response of MMI devices, multiplexing is rather simple by just changing the length of the multimode section.

  7. Optical Sensors and Methods for Underwater 3D Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miquel Massot-Campos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a survey on optical sensors and methods for 3D reconstruction in underwater environments. The techniques to obtain range data have been listed and explained, together with the different sensor hardware that makes them possible. The literature has been reviewed, and a classification has been proposed for the existing solutions. New developments, commercial solutions and previous reviews in this topic have also been gathered and considered.

  8. Optical fiber sensor for membrane submicrometer vibration measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopczuk, Krzysztof; Rozwadowski, Krzysztof; Aleksandra Starzyńska, M D; Domański, Andrzej W

    2014-09-10

    This paper presents an optical fiber sensor for membrane submicrometer vibration measurement. The sensor is designed ultimately for low-cost medical audiometric applications such as determining the mobility of the tympanic membrane stimulated by the tone. The sensing method is minimally invasive, and the sensing head does not contact the surface of the membrane. Measurements were performed on tympanic membrane phantoms. Deflections of a few nanometers were measured, and vibration maps of phantoms were taken.

  9. Optic Fiber-Based Dynamic Pressure Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiu-Lin Gan; Hai-Wen Cai; Jian-Xin Geng; Zheng-Qing Pan; Rong-Hui Qu; Zu-Jie Fang

    2008-01-01

    Weigh-in-Motion(WIM) technique is the process of measuring the dynamic tire forces of a moving vehicle and estimating the corresponding tire loads of the static vehicle. Compared with the static weigh station, WIM station is an efficient and cost effective choice that will minimize unneccessary stops and delay for truckers. The way to turn birefringence of single-mode fiber into a prime quality for a powerful and reliable sensor is shown. Preliminary results for the development of a weigh-in-motion (WIM) technique based on sagnac-loop sensor are presented. After a brief description of the sensor and its principle of operation, the theoretical model is developed. Then, a full characterization made in static conditions is presented.

  10. EMBEDDED OPTICAL SENSORS FOR THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David R. Clarke

    2004-12-16

    In this first year of the program we have focused on the selection of rare-earth dopants for luminescent sensing in thermal barrier coating materials, the effect of dopant concentration on several of the luminescence characteristics and initial fabrication of one type of embedded sensor, the ''red-line'' sensor. We have initially focused on erbium as the lanthanide dopant for luminescence doping of yttria-stabilized zirconia and europium as the lanthanide for luminescence doping of gadolinium zirconate. The latter exhibits a temperature-dependent luminescence lifetime up to at least 1100 C. A buried layer, ''red-line'' sensor in an electron-beam deposited yttria-stabilized zirconia coating with erbium has been demonstrated and exhibits a temperature-dependent luminescence lifetime up to at least 400 C.

  11. New multiplexing structures for fiber optic sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Leandro González, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    El campo de la fibra óptica ha sufrido una rápida evolución durante las últimas décadas debido a sus buenas prestaciones en aplicaciones de telecomunicaciones. Aprovechando este avance científico y técnico en componentes fotónicos, los sensores de fibra óptica han emergido como una solución flexible para solventar algunas de las principales limitaciones sufridas por los sensores convencionales. Por ejemplo, la fibra óptica es químicamente inerte y electromagnéticamente pasiva. ...

  12. Trace detection of oxygen--ionic liquids in gas sensor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, N; Beyle, F; Freiner, S; Geier, F; Joos, M; Pinkwart, K; Rabenecker, P

    2013-11-15

    This paper presents a novel electrochemical membrane sensor on basis of ionic liquids for trace analysis of oxygen in gaseous atmospheres. The faradaic response currents for the reduction of oxygen which were obtained by multiple-potential-step-chronoamperometry could be used for real time detection of oxygen down to concentrations of 30 ppm. The theoretical limit of detection was 5 ppm. The simple, non-expensive sensors varied in electrolyte composition and demonstrated a high sensitivity, a rapid response time and an excellent reproducibility at room temperature. Some of them were continuously used for at least one week and first results promise good long term stability. Voltammetric, impedance and oxygen detection studies at temperatures up to 200 °C (in the presence and absence of humidity and CO2) revealed also the limitations of certain ionic liquids for some electrochemical high temperature applications. Application areas of the developed sensors are control and analysis processes of non oxidative and oxygen free atmospheres.

  13. Nonlinear optical field sensors in extreme electromagnetic and acoustic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzarella, Anthony; Wu, Dong Ho

    2014-03-01

    Sensors based on electro-optic (EO) and magneto-optic (MO) crystals measure external electric and magnetic fields through changes in birefringence which the fields induce on the nonlinear crystals. Due to their small size and all-dielectric structure, EO and MO sensors are ideal in environments involving very large electromagnetic powers. Conventional antennas and metallic probes not only present safety hazards, due to their metallic structure and the presence of large currents, but they can also perturb the very fields they intend to measure. In the case of railguns, the large electromagnetic signals are also accompanied by tremendous acoustic noise, which presents a noise background that the sensors must overcome. In this presentation, we describe extensive data obtained from fiber optic EO and MO sensors used in the railgun of the Naval Research Laboratory. Along with the field measurements obtained, we will describe the interactions between the acoustic noise and the nonlinear crystals (most notably, photoelastic effects), the noise equivalent fields they produce, and methods they could be suppressed through the optical and geometrical configurations of the sensor so that the signal to noise ratio can be maximized.

  14. Optical and Electronic NOx Sensors for Applications in Mechatronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D. Wolter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Current production and emerging NOx sensors based on optical and nanomaterials technologies are reviewed. In view of their potential applications in mechatronics, we compared the performance of: i Quantum cascade lasers (QCL based photoacoustic (PA systems; ii gold nanoparticles as catalytically active materials in field-effect transistor (FET sensors, and iii functionalized III-V semiconductor based devices. QCL-based PA sensors for NOx show a detection limit in the sub part-per-million range and are characterized by high selectivity and compact set-up. Electrochemically synthesized gold-nanoparticle FET sensors are able to monitor NOx in a concentration range from 50 to 200 parts per million and are suitable for miniaturization. Porphyrin-functionalized III-V semiconductor materials can be used for the fabrication of a reliable NOx sensor platform characterized by high conductivity, corrosion resistance, and strong surface state coupling.

  15. Optical and Electronic NOx Sensors for Applications in Mechatronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Franco, Cinzia; Elia, Angela; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Lugarà, Pietro Mario; Ieva, Eliana; Cioffi, Nicola; Torsi, Luisa; Bruno, Giovanni; Losurdo, Maria; Garcia, Michael A.; Wolter, Scott D.; Brown, April; Ricco, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Current production and emerging NOx sensors based on optical and nanomaterials technologies are reviewed. In view of their potential applications in mechatronics, we compared the performance of: i) Quantum cascade lasers (QCL) based photoacoustic (PA) systems; ii) gold nanoparticles as catalytically active materials in field-effect transistor (FET) sensors, and iii) functionalized III-V semiconductor based devices. QCL-based PA sensors for NOx show a detection limit in the sub part-per-million range and are characterized by high selectivity and compact set-up. Electrochemically synthesized gold-nanoparticle FET sensors are able to monitor NOx in a concentration range from 50 to 200 parts per million and are suitable for miniaturization. Porphyrin-functionalized III-V semiconductor materials can be used for the fabrication of a reliable NOx sensor platform characterized by high conductivity, corrosion resistance, and strong surface state coupling. PMID:22412315

  16. Two-interferometer fiber optic sensor with disturbance localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrat, M.; Szustakowski, M.; Ciurapinski, W.; Zyczkowski, M.

    2006-09-01

    We present investigation results of a new generation of the fiber optic perimeter sensor in a Sagnac and Michelson interferometers configuration. This sensor can detect a potential intruder and determine its position along a protected zone. We propose a localization method that makes use of the inherent properties of both interferometers. After demodulation of signals from both interferometers, the obtained amplitude characteristic of the Sagnac interferometer depends on position of a disturbance along the interferometer, while amplitude characteristic of the Michelson interferometer do not depend on this position. So, quotient of both demodulated characteristics makes it possible to localize the disturbance. Arrangement of a laboratory model of the sensor and its signal processing scheme is also presented. During research of the laboratory model of the sensor, it was possible to detect the position of the disturbance with resolution of about 40m along the 6-km long sensor.

  17. Optical fiber sensors fabricated by the focused ion beam technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Wang, Fei; Bang, Ole

    2012-01-01

    crystal fiber (PCF). Using this technique we fabricate a highly compact fiber-optic Fabry-Pérot (FP) refractive index sensor near the tip of fiber taper, and a highly sensitive in-line temperature sensor in PCF. We also demonstrate the potential of using FIB to selectively fill functional fluid......Focused ion beam (FIB) is a highly versatile technique which helps to enable next generation of lab-on-fiber sensor technologies. In this paper, we demonstrate the use application of FIB to precisely mill the fiber taper and end facet of both conventional single mode fiber (SMF) and photonic...

  18. Fiber optic sensors for environmental applications: A brief review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossabi, J.

    1992-04-01

    Understanding the flow a groundwater quality. This understanding is achieved by measurement of the appropriate chemical and physical subsurface parameters. The ideal measurement would accurately assess a parameter without affecting the parameter or its environment. Fiber optic spectroscopy offers some of the most promising techniques for accurate, non-invasive measurements of environmental parameters. Fiber optic sensors for subsurface applications are currently being developed by several Department of Energy laboratories. Some of these sensors have been successfully deployed in the field and are attaining the goals of accurate, noninvasive, real time measurements in the subsurface.

  19. Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors Based on Polymer Optical Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-Sheng Zheng; Yong-Hua Lu; Zhi-Guo Xie; Jun Tao; Kai-Qun Lin; Hai Ming

    2008-01-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is a powerful technique for directly sensing in biological studies, chemical detection and environmental pollution monitoring. In this paper, we present polymer optical fiber application in SPR sensors, including wavelength interrogation surface enhanced Raman scattering SPR sensor and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probe.Long-period fiber gratings are fabricated on single mode polymer optical fiber (POF) with 120 μm period and 50% duty cycle. The polarization characteristic of this kind of birefringent grating is studied. Theoretical analysis shows it will be advantageous in SPR sensing applications.

  20. Fiber optic micro sensor for the measurement of tendon forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrmann Gregory P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A fiber optic sensor developed for the measurement of tendon forces was designed, numerically modeled, fabricated, and experimentally evaluated. The sensor incorporated fiber Bragg gratings and micro-fabricated stainless steel housings. A fiber Bragg grating is an optical device that is spectrally sensitive to axial strain. Stainless steel housings were designed to convert radial forces applied to the housing into axial forces that could be sensed by the fiber Bragg grating. The metal housings were fabricated by several methods including laser micromachining, swaging, and hydroforming. Designs are presented that allow for simultaneous temperature and force measurements as well as for simultaneous resolution of multi-axis forces. The sensor was experimentally evaluated by hydrostatic loading and in vitro testing. A commercial hydraulic burst tester was used to provide uniform pressures on the sensor in order to establish the linearity, repeatability, and accuracy characteristics of the sensor. The in vitro experiments were performed in excised tendon and in a dynamic gait simulator to simulate biological conditions. In both experimental conditions, the sensor was found to be a sensitive and reliable method for acquiring minimally invasive measurements of soft tissue forces. Our results suggest that this sensor will prove useful in a variety of biomechanical measurements.

  1. Fibre optic surface plasmon resonance sensor system designed for smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Kort; Roth, Bernhard

    2015-06-29

    A fibre optic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor system for smartphones is reported, for the first time. The sensor was fabricated by using an easy-to-implement silver coating technique and by polishing both ends of a 400 µm optical fibre to obtain 45° end-faces. For excitation and interrogation of the SPR sensor system the flash-light and camera at the back side of the smartphone were employed, respectively. Consequently, no external electrical components are required for the operation of the sensor system developed. In a first application example a refractive index sensor was realised. The performance of the SPR sensor system was demonstrated by using different volume concentrations of glycerol solution. A sensitivity of 5.96·10(-4) refractive index units (RIU)/pixel was obtained for a refractive index (RI) range from 1.33 to 1.36. In future implementations the reported sensor system could be integrated in a cover of a smartphone or used as a low-cost, portable point-of-care diagnostic platform. Consequently it offers the potential of monitoring a large variety of environmental or point-of-care parameters in combination with smartphones.

  2. WGM-Resonator/Tapered-Waveguide White-Light Sensor Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stekalov, Dmitry; Maleki, Lute; Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Iltchenko, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations have demonstrated the feasibility of compact white-light sensor optics consisting of unitary combinations of (1) low-profile whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonators and (2) tapered rod optical waveguides. These sensors are highly wavelength-dispersive and are expected to be especially useful in biochemical applications for measuring absorption spectra of liquids. These sensor optics exploit the properties of a special class of non-diffracting light beams that are denoted Bessel beams because their amplitudes are proportional to Bessel functions of the radii from their central axes. High-order Bessel beams can have large values of angular momentum. In a sensor optic of this type, a low-profile WGM resonator that supports modes having large angular momenta is used to generate high-order Bessel beams. As used here, "low-profile" signifies that the WGM resonator is an integral part of the rod optical waveguide but has a radius slightly different from that of the adjacent part(s).

  3. Acoustic emission monitoring using a multimode optical fiber sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Steve; Papy, Jean-Michel; Wevers, Martine; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2004-07-01

    Permanent damage in various materials and constructions often causes high-energy high-frequency acoustic waves. To detect those so called `acoustic emission (AE) events', in most cases ultrasonic transducers are embedded in the structure or attached to its surface. However, for many applications where event localization is less important, an embedded low-cost multimode optical fiber sensor configured for event counting may be a better alternative due to its corrosion resistance, immunity to electromagnetic interference and light-weight. The sensing part of this intensity-modulated sensor consists of a multimode optical fiber. The sensing principle now relies on refractive index variations, microbending and mode-mode interferences by the action of the acoustic pressure wave. A photodiode is used to monitor the intensity of the optical signal and transient signal detection techniques (filtering, frame-to-frame analysis, recursive noise estimation, power detector estimator) on the photodiode output are applied to detect the events. In this work, the acoustic emission monitoring capabilities of the multimode optical fiber sensor are demonstrated with the fiber sensor embedded in the liner of a Power Data Transmission (PDT) coil to detect damage (delamination, matrix cracking and fiber breaking) while bending the coil. With the Hankel Total Least Square (HTLS) technique, it is shown that both the acoustic emission signal and optical signal can be modeled with a sum of exponentially damped complex sinusoids with common poles.

  4. Recent Developments in Micro-Structured Fiber Optic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in fiber-optic sensing have involved booming research in the design and manufacturing of novel micro-structured optical fiber devices. From the conventional tapered fiber architectures to the novel micro-machined devices by advanced laser systems, thousands of micro-structured fiber-optic sensors have been proposed and fabricated for applications in measuring temperature, strain, refractive index (RI, electric current, displacement, bending, acceleration, force, rotation, acoustic, and magnetic field. The renowned and unparalleled merits of sensors-based micro-machined optical fibers including small footprint, light weight, immunity to electromagnetic interferences, durability to harsh environment, capability of remote control, and flexibility of directly embedding into the structured system have placed them in highly demand for practical use in diverse industries. With the rapid advancement in micro-technology, micro-structured fiber sensors have benefitted from the trends of possessing high performance, versatilities and spatial miniaturization. Here, we comprehensively review the recent progress in the micro-structured fiber-optic sensors with a variety of architectures regarding their fabrications, waveguide properties and sensing applications.

  5. Towards biochips using microstructured optical fiber sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Lars Henning; Hoiby, Poul Erik; Jensen, Jesper Bo

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present the first incorporation of a microstructured optical fiber (MOF) into biochip applications. A 16-mm-long piece of MOF is incorporated into an optic-fluidic coupler chip, which is fabricated in PMMA polymer using a CO2 laser. The developed chip configuration allows...... the continuous control of liquid flow through the MOF and simultaneous optical characterization. While integrated in the chip, the MOF is functionalized towards the capture of a specific single-stranded DNA string by immobilizing a sensing layer on the microstructured internal surfaces of the fiber. The sensing...

  6. Optical fiber sensors for damage analysis in aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Paul; May, Russell; Claus, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Under this grant, fiber optic sensors were investigated for use in the nondestructive evaluation of aging aircraft. Specifically, optical fiber sensors for detection and location of impacts on a surface, and for detection of corrosion in metals were developed. The use of neural networks was investigated for determining impact location by processing the output of a network of fiberoptic strain sensors distributed on a surface. This approach employs triangulation to determine location by comparing the arrival times at several sensors, of the acoustic signal generated by the impact. For this study, a neural network simulator running on a personal computer was used to train a network using a back-propagation algorithm. Fiber optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) strain sensors are attached to or embedded in the surface, so that stress waves emanating from an impact can be detected. The ability of the network to determine impact location by time-or-arrival of acoustic signals was assessed by comparing network outputs with actual experimental results using impacts on a panel instrumented with optical fiber sensors. Using the neural network to process the sensor outputs, the impact location can be inferred to centimeter range accuracy directly from the arrival time data. In addition, the network can be trained to determine impact location, regardless of material anisotropy. Results demonstrate that a back-propagation network identifies impact location for an anisotropic graphite/bismaleimide plate with the same accuracy as that for an isotropic aluminum plate. Two different approaches were investigated for the development of fiber optic sensors for corrosion detection in metals, both utilizing optical fiber sensors with metal coatings. In the first approach, an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric fiber optic strain sensor was placed under tensile stress, and while in the resulting strained position, a thick coating of metal was applied. Due to an increase in

  7. Optical Imaging Sensors and Systems for Homeland Security Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Javidi, Bahram

    2006-01-01

    Optical and photonic systems and devices have significant potential for homeland security. Optical Imaging Sensors and Systems for Homeland Security Applications presents original and significant technical contributions from leaders of industry, government, and academia in the field of optical and photonic sensors, systems and devices for detection, identification, prevention, sensing, security, verification and anti-counterfeiting. The chapters have recent and technically significant results, ample illustrations, figures, and key references. This book is intended for engineers and scientists in the relevant fields, graduate students, industry managers, university professors, government managers, and policy makers. Advanced Sciences and Technologies for Security Applications focuses on research monographs in the areas of -Recognition and identification (including optical imaging, biometrics, authentication, verification, and smart surveillance systems) -Biological and chemical threat detection (including bios...

  8. Polydimethylsiloxane fibers for optical fiber sensor of displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martincek, Ivan; Pudis, Dusan; Gaso, Peter

    2013-09-01

    The paper describes the preparation of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber integrated on the conventional optical fibers and their use for optical fiber displacement sensor. PDMS fiber was made of silicone elastomer Sylgard 184 (Dow Corning) by drawing from partially cured silicone. Optical fiber displacement sensor using PDMS fiber is based on the measurement of the local minimum of optical signal in visible spectral range generated by intermodal interference of circularly symmetric modes. Position of the local minimum in spectral range varies by stretching the PDMS fiber of 230 μm in the wavelength range from 688 to 477 nm. In the stretched PDMS fiber is possible to determine the longitudinal displacement with an accuracy of approximately 1 micrometer.

  9. Sensitization of an optical fiber methane sensor with graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J. Y.; Ding, E. J.; Xu, S. C.; Li, Z. H.; Wang, X. X.; Song, F.

    2017-09-01

    We analyze the mechanism by which tin oxide can be utilized for the optical sensing of methane gas via surface adsorption and electromagnetic theory. Single-mode optical fibers with core diameters of 9 μm and cladding diameters of 12 μm were used. A 15 mm-long segment of each optical fiber was polished to the core via wheel side-polishing; the exposed fiber core areas were coated with graphene-doped tin oxide such that a novel graphene-based optical fiber methane sensor was fabricated. The experimental results show that the sensor exhibits excellent linear fitting and reproducibility, making it useful for the detection of low concentrations of methane.

  10. Mathematical Model of Fiber Optic Temperature Sensor Based on Optic Absorption and Experiment Testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of analysis on the temperature monitoring methods for high voltage devices, a new type of fiber optic sensor structure with reference channel is given. And the operation principle of fiber optic sensor is analysed at large based on the absorption of semiconductor chip. The mathematical model of both devices and the whole system are also given. It is proved by the experiment that this mathematical model is reliable.

  11. Embedding of fibre optic sensors within flexible host

    OpenAIRE

    Ferraris, Eleonora; Van Gijseghem, Tim; Yan, Chunxiao; Van Hoe, Bram; Van Steenberge, Geert; Van Daele, Peter; Dubruel, Peter; Reynaerts, Dominiek

    2009-01-01

    This work deals with the establishment of a UV polymerisation procedure combined with moulding technology towards the development of a mass production technology for the fabrication of flexible polymers with optical fibres embedded. The concept is to provide an artificial sensing skin based on fibre optic sensors which can be applied to irregular or moveable surfaces for distributed pressure applications, as for instance in structural monitoring or rehabilitation. The selected polymers for su...

  12. Fiber-optic sensor applications in civil and geotechnical engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habel, Wolfgang R.; Krebber, Katerina

    2011-09-01

    Different types of fiber-optic sensors based on glass or polymeric fibers are used to evaluate material behavior or to monitor the integrity and long-term stability of load-bearing structure components. Fiber-optic sensors have been established as a new and innovative measurement technology in very different fields, such as material science, civil engineering, light-weight structures, geotechnical areas as well as chemical and high-voltage substations. Very often, mechanical quantities such as deformation, strain or vibration are requested. However, measurement of chemical quantities in materials and structure components, such as pH value in steel reinforced concrete members also provides information about the integrity of concrete structures. A special fiber-optic chemical sensor for monitoring the alkaline state (pH value) of the cementitious matrix in steel-reinforced concrete structures with the purpose of early detection of corrosion-initiating factors is described. The paper presents the use of several fiber-optic sensor technologies in engineering. One example concerns the use of highly resolving concrete-embeddable fiber Fabry-Perot acoustic emission (AE) sensors for the assessment of the bearing behaviour of large concrete piles in existing foundations or during and after its installation. Another example concerns fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors attached to anchor steels (micro piles) to measure the strain distribution in loaded soil anchors. Polymer optical fibers (POF) can be — because of their high elasticity and high ultimate strain — well integrated into textiles to monitor their deformation behaviour. Such "intelligent" textiles are capable of monitoring displacement of soil or slopes, critical mechanical deformation in geotechnical structures (dikes, dams, and embankments) as well as in masonry structures during and after earthquakes.

  13. Oxygen optodes as fast sensors for eddy correlation measurements in aquatic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chipman, Lindsay; Huettel, Markus; Berg, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The aquatic eddy-correlation technique can be used to noninvasively determine the oxygen exchange across the sediment-water interface by analyzing the covariance of vertical flow velocity and oxygen concentration in a small measuring volume above the sea bed. The method requires fast sensors that...

  14. Atomic Oxygen (AO) and Nitrogen (AN) In-situ Flux Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-10

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0126 DURIP 09) AN ATOMIC OXYGEN FLUX MONITOR FOR USE IN THE SEARCH FOR NEW AND BETT Malcolm Beasley LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIV ...Grant # FA9550-01-1-0433 M. R. Beasley, PI Stanford University Project Title: Atomic Oxygen (AO) and Nitrogen (AN) In-situ Flux Sensor

  15. Data Optical Networking Architecture Using Wavelength-Division Multiplexing Method for Optical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.

    2008-01-01

    Recently there has been a growth in the number of fiber optical sensors used for health monitoring in the hostile environment of commercial aircraft. Health monitoring to detect the onset of failure in structural systems from such causes as corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and fatigue is a critical factor in safety as well in aircraft maintenance costs. This report presents an assessment of an analysis model of optical data networking architectures used for monitoring data signals among these optical sensors. Our model is focused on the design concept of the wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) method since most of the optical sensors deployed in the aircraft for health monitoring typically operate in a wide spectrum of optical wavelengths from 710 to 1550 nm.

  16. Wavefront sensors for adaptive optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, V. P.; Botygina, N. N.; Emaleev, O. N.; Konyaev, P. A.

    2010-10-01

    A high precision Shack-Hartmann wavefront (WF) sensor has been developed on the basis of a low-aperture off-axis diffraction lens array. The device is capable of measuring WF slopes at array sub-apertures of size 640x640 μm with an error not exceeding 4.80 arcsec (0.15 pixel), which corresponds to the standard deviation equal to 0.017λ at the reconstructed WF with wavelength λ . Also the modification of this sensor for adaptive system of solar telescope using extended scenes as tracking objects, such as sunspot, pores, solar granulation and limb, is presented. The software package developed for the proposed WF sensors includes three algorithms of local WF slopes estimation (modified centroids, normalized cross-correlation and fast Fourier-demodulation), as well as three methods of WF reconstruction (modal Zernike polynomials expansion, deformable mirror response functions expansion and phase unwrapping), that can be selected during operation with accordance to the application.

  17. Feasibility Study on Advanced Solid-State Oxygen Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    CaO-ZrO2) structure.. 6..............6 3 A typical galvanic cell using a zirconia oxygen ion electrolyte . 8 4 The closed-loop concept of engine...0.645 90.4 6 Sm203 0.869 97.2 Zirconia Electrolyte Cell A typical galvanic cell using a zirconia solid electrolyte is shown in Figure 3 (18, 23, 25-28...oxygen determined by oxygen partial electrolyte oxygen partial pressure P p pressure Po0 0? 0---- Figure 3. A typical galvanic cell using a zirconia V

  18. Single-Crystal Sapphire Optical Fiber Sensor Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickrell, Gary [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Scott, Brian [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Wang, Anbo [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Yu, Zhihao [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. & State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    This report summarizes technical progress on the program “Single-Crystal Sapphire Optical Fiber Sensor Instrumentation,” funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. This project was completed in three phases, each with a separate focus. Phase I of the program, from October 1999 to April 2002, was devoted to development of sensing schema for use in high temperature, harsh environments. Different sensing designs were proposed and tested in the laboratory. Phase II of the program, from April 2002 to April 2009, focused on bringing the sensor technologies, which had already been successfully demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensors could be deployed in harsh industrial environments and eventually become commercially viable through a series of field tests. Also, a new sensing scheme was developed and tested with numerous advantages over all previous ones in Phase II. Phase III of the program, September 2009 to December 2013, focused on development of the new sensing scheme for field testing in conjunction with materials engineering of the improved sensor packaging lifetimes. In Phase I, three different sensing principles were studied: sapphire air-gap extrinsic Fabry-Perot sensors; intensity-based polarimetric sensors; and broadband polarimetric sensors. Black body radiation tests and corrosion tests were also performed in this phase. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. At the beginning of Phase II, in June 2004, the BPDI sensor was tested at the Wabash River coal gasifier

  19. Recent Improvement of Medical Optical Fibre Pressure and Temperature Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Poeggel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This investigation describes a detailed analysis of the fabrication and testing of optical fibre pressure and temperature sensors (OFPTS. The optical sensor of this research is based on an extrinsic Fabry–Perot interferometer (EFPI with integrated fibre Bragg grating (FBG for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurements. The sensor is fabricated exclusively in glass and with a small diameter of 0.2 mm, making it suitable for volume-restricted bio-medical applications. Diaphragm shrinking techniques based on polishing, hydrofluoric (HF acid and femtosecond (FS laser micro-machining are described and analysed. The presented sensors were examined carefully and demonstrated a pressure sensitivity in the range of \\(s_p\\ = 2–10 \\(\\frac{\\text{nm}}{\\text{kPa}}\\ and a resolution of better than \\(\\Delta P\\ = 10 Pa protect (0.1 cm H\\(_2\\O. A static pressure test in 38 cmH\\(_2\\O shows no drift of the sensor in a six-day period. Additionally, a dynamic pressure analysis demonstrated that the OFPTS never exceeded a drift of more than 130 Pa (1.3 cm H\\(_2\\O in a 12-h measurement, carried out in a cardiovascular simulator. The temperature sensitivity is given by \\(k=10.7\\ \\(\\frac{\\text{pm}}{\\text{K}}\\, which results in a temperature resolution of better than \\(\\Delta T\\ = 0.1 K. Since the temperature sensing element is placed close to the pressure sensing element, the pressure sensor is insensitive to temperature changes.

  20. A New, Adaptable, Optical High-Resolution 3-Axis Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Buchhold

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a new optical, multi-functional, high-resolution 3-axis sensor which serves to navigate and can, for example, replace standard joysticks in medical devices such as electric wheelchairs, surgical robots or medical diagnosis devices. A light source, e.g., a laser diode, is affixed to a movable axis and projects a random geometric shape on an image sensor (CMOS or CCD. The downstream microcontroller’s software identifies the geometric shape’s center, distortion and size, and then calculates x, y, and z coordinates, which can be processed in attached devices. Depending on the image sensor in use (e.g., 6.41 megapixels, the 3-axis sensor features a resolution of 1544 digits from right to left and 1038 digits up and down. Through interpolation, these values rise by a factor of 100. A unique feature is the exact reproducibility (deflection to coordinates and its precise ability to return to its neutral position. Moreover, optical signal processing provides a high level of protection against electromagnetic and radio frequency interference. The sensor is adaptive and adjustable to fit a user’s range of motion (stroke and force. This recommendation aims to optimize sensor systems such as joysticks in medical devices in terms of safety, ease of use, and adaptability.

  1. A New, Adaptable, Optical High-Resolution 3-Axis Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchhold, Niels; Baumgartner, Christian

    2017-01-27

    This article presents a new optical, multi-functional, high-resolution 3-axis sensor which serves to navigate and can, for example, replace standard joysticks in medical devices such as electric wheelchairs, surgical robots or medical diagnosis devices. A light source, e.g., a laser diode, is affixed to a movable axis and projects a random geometric shape on an image sensor (CMOS or CCD). The downstream microcontroller's software identifies the geometric shape's center, distortion and size, and then calculates x, y, and z coordinates, which can be processed in attached devices. Depending on the image sensor in use (e.g., 6.41 megapixels), the 3-axis sensor features a resolution of 1544 digits from right to left and 1038 digits up and down. Through interpolation, these values rise by a factor of 100. A unique feature is the exact reproducibility (deflection to coordinates) and its precise ability to return to its neutral position. Moreover, optical signal processing provides a high level of protection against electromagnetic and radio frequency interference. The sensor is adaptive and adjustable to fit a user's range of motion (stroke and force). This recommendation aims to optimize sensor systems such as joysticks in medical devices in terms of safety, ease of use, and adaptability.

  2. A New, Adaptable, Optical High-Resolution 3-Axis Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchhold, Niels; Baumgartner, Christian

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a new optical, multi-functional, high-resolution 3-axis sensor which serves to navigate and can, for example, replace standard joysticks in medical devices such as electric wheelchairs, surgical robots or medical diagnosis devices. A light source, e.g., a laser diode, is affixed to a movable axis and projects a random geometric shape on an image sensor (CMOS or CCD). The downstream microcontroller’s software identifies the geometric shape’s center, distortion and size, and then calculates x, y, and z coordinates, which can be processed in attached devices. Depending on the image sensor in use (e.g., 6.41 megapixels), the 3-axis sensor features a resolution of 1544 digits from right to left and 1038 digits up and down. Through interpolation, these values rise by a factor of 100. A unique feature is the exact reproducibility (deflection to coordinates) and its precise ability to return to its neutral position. Moreover, optical signal processing provides a high level of protection against electromagnetic and radio frequency interference. The sensor is adaptive and adjustable to fit a user’s range of motion (stroke and force). This recommendation aims to optimize sensor systems such as joysticks in medical devices in terms of safety, ease of use, and adaptability. PMID:28134824

  3. Lightning Current Measurement with Fiber-Optic Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.; Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.; Snyder, Gary P.

    2014-01-01

    A fiber-optic current sensor is successfully developed with many potential applications for electric current measurement. Originally developed for in-flight lightning measurement, the sensor utilizes Faraday Effect in an optical fiber. The Faraday Effect causes linear light polarization in a fiber to rotate when the fiber is exposed to a magnetic field. The polarization change is detected using a reflective polarimetric scheme. Forming fiber loops and applying Ampere's law, measuring the total light rotation results in the determination of the total current enclosed. The sensor is conformable to complex structure geometry. It is also non-conductive and immune to electromagnetic interference, saturation or hysteresis. Installation is non-intrusive, and the sensor can be safely routed through flammable areas. Two similar sensor systems are described in this paper. The first system operates at 1310nm laser wavelength and is capable of measuring approximately 300 A - 300 kA, a 60 dB range. Laboratory validation results of aircraft lighting direct and in-direct effect current amplitudes are reported for this sensor. The second system operates at 1550nm wavelength and can measure about 400 A - 400 kA. Triggered-lightning measurement data are presented for this system. Good results are achieved in all cases.

  4. Relative-Motion Sensors and Actuators for Two Optical Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursel, Yekta; McKenney, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Optoelectronic sensors and magnetic actuators have been developed as parts of a system for controlling the relative position and attitude of two massive optical tables that float on separate standard air suspensions that attenuate ground vibrations. In the specific application for which these sensors and actuators were developed, one of the optical tables holds an optical system that mimics distant stars, while the other optical table holds a test article that simulates a spaceborne stellar interferometer that would be used to observe the stars. The control system is designed to suppress relative motion of the tables or, on demand, to impose controlled relative motion between the tables. The control system includes a sensor system that detects relative motion of the tables in six independent degrees of freedom and a drive system that can apply force to the star-simulator table in the six degrees of freedom. The sensor system includes (1) a set of laser heterodyne gauges and (2) a set of four diode lasers on the star-simulator table, each aimed at one of four quadrant photodiodes at nominal corresponding positions on the test-article table. The heterodyne gauges are used to measure relative displacements along the x axis.

  5. YBCO Coated Conductor with an Integrated Optical Fiber Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan [American Superconductor Corporation, Devens, MA (United States); Rupich, Marty [American Superconductor Corporation, Devens, MA (United States); Schwartz, Justin [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The primary objectives of the Phase I Project was to develop a proof-of-principle for a concept of integrating an optical fiber sensor into the laminated 2G wire, there by producing a functionalized 2G wire with self-monitoring capabilities

  6. Monolithic integrated optic fiber Bragg grating sensor interrogator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Edgar A.; Esterkin, Yan; Kempen, Cornelia; Sun, Songjian

    2010-04-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are a mature sensing technology that has gained rapid acceptance in civil, aerospace, chemical and petrochemical, medicine, aviation and automotive industries. Fiber Bragg grating sensors can be use for a variety of measurements including strain, stress, vibration, acoustics, acceleration, pressure, temperature, moisture, and corrosion distributed at multiple locations within the structure using a single fiber element. The most prominent advantages of FBGs are: small size and light weight, multiple FBG transducers on a single fiber, and immunity to radio frequency interference. A major disadvantage of FBG technology is that conventional state-of-the-art fiber Bragg grating interrogation systems are typically bulky, heavy, and costly bench top instruments that are assembled from off-the-shelf fiber optic and optical components integrated with a signal electronics board into an instrument console. Based on the need for a compact FBG interrogation system, this paper describes recent progress towards the development of a miniature fiber Bragg grating sensor interrogator (FBG-TransceiverTM) system based on multi-channel monolithic integrated optic sensor microchip technology. The integrated optic microchip technology enables the monolithic integration of all of the functionalities, both passive and active, of conventional bench top FBG sensor interrogators systems, packaged in a miniaturized, low power operation, 2-cm x 5-cm small form factor (SFF) package suitable for the long-term structural health monitoring in applications where size, weight, and power are critical for operation.

  7. Optical fibre temperature sensor in the cryogenic range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertrand, S.; Jalocha, A.; Tribillon, G.; Bouazaoui, M.; Rouhet, J.

    1996-01-01

    The realization of an optical fibre sensor applied to cryogenic temperature measurement in harsh environments is presented. The measurement principle is based on the analysis of the decay-time of the fluorescence emitted by special doped crystals, the excited state lifetimes of which are greatly dep

  8. Demonstration of a refractometric sensor based on optical microfiber resonator

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrated a refractometric sensor based on a coated optical microfiber coil resonator. It is robust, compact, and comprises an intrinsic fluidic channel. A sensitivity of about 40 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) has been measured, in agreement with predictions.

  9. Characterization of Integrated Optical Strain Sensors Based on Silicon Waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerveld, W.J.; Leinders, S.M.; Muilwijk, P.M.; Pozo, J.

    2013-01-01

    Microscale strain gauges are widely used in micro electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) to measure strains such as those induced by force, acceleration, pressure or sound. We propose all-optical strain sensors based on micro-ring resonators to be integrated with MEMS. We characterized the strain-induced

  10. Fiber optical magnetic field sensor for power generator monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willsch, Michael; Bosselmann, Thomas; Villnow, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Inside of large electrical engines such as power generators and large drives, extreme electric and magnetic fields can occur which cannot be measured electrically. Novel fiber optical magnetic field sensors are being used to characterize the fields and recognize inner faults of large power generators.

  11. Development of a rechargeable optical hydrogen peroxide sensor - sensor design and biological application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koren, Klaus; Østrup Jensen, Peter; Kühl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    . Quantifying H2O2 within biological samples is challenging and often not possible. Here we present a quasi-reversible fiber-optic sensor capable of measuring H2O2 concentrations ranging from 1-100 μM within different biological samples. Based on a Prussian blue/white redox cycle and a simple sensor recharging...... and readout strategy, H2O2 can be measured with high spatial (∼500 μm) and temporal (∼30 s) resolution. The sensor has a broad applicability both in complex environmental and biomedical systems, as demonstrated by (i) H2O2 concentration profile measurements in natural photosynthetic biofilms under light...

  12. Optical sensor based on a single CdS nanobelt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Yang, Shuming; Han, Feng; Wang, Liangjun; Zhang, Xiaotong; Jiang, Zhuangde; Pan, Anlian

    2014-04-23

    In this paper, an optical sensor based on a cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanobelt has been developed. The CdS nanobelt was synthesized by the vapor phase transportation (VPT) method. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) results revealed that the nanobelt had a hexagonal wurtzite structure of CdS and presented good crystal quality. A single nanobelt Schottky contact optical sensor was fabricated by the electron beam lithography (EBL) technique, and the device current-voltage results showed back-to-back Schottky diode characteristics. The photosensitivity, dark current and the decay time of the sensor were 4 × 10⁴, 31 ms and 0.2 pA, respectively. The high photosensitivity and the short decay time were because of the exponential dependence of photocurrent on the number of the surface charges and the configuration of the back to back Schottky junctions.

  13. Optical Fiber Sensors for Aircraft Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iker García

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft structures require periodic and scheduled inspection and maintenance operations due to their special operating conditions and the principles of design employed to develop them. Therefore, structural health monitoring has a great potential to reduce the costs related to these operations. Optical fiber sensors applied to the monitoring of aircraft structures provide some advantages over traditional sensors. Several practical applications for structures and engines we have been working on are reported in this article. Fiber Bragg gratings have been analyzed in detail, because they have proved to constitute the most promising technology in this field, and two different alternatives for strain measurements are also described. With regard to engine condition evaluation, we present some results obtained with a reflected intensity-modulated optical fiber sensor for tip clearance and tip timing measurements in a turbine assembled in a wind tunnel.

  14. Optical Fiber Sensors for Aircraft Structural Health Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Iker; Zubia, Joseba; Durana, Gaizka; Aldabaldetreku, Gotzon; Illarramendi, María Asunción; Villatoro, Joel

    2015-06-30

    Aircraft structures require periodic and scheduled inspection and maintenance operations due to their special operating conditions and the principles of design employed to develop them. Therefore, structural health monitoring has a great potential to reduce the costs related to these operations. Optical fiber sensors applied to the monitoring of aircraft structures provide some advantages over traditional sensors. Several practical applications for structures and engines we have been working on are reported in this article. Fiber Bragg gratings have been analyzed in detail, because they have proved to constitute the most promising technology in this field, and two different alternatives for strain measurements are also described. With regard to engine condition evaluation, we present some results obtained with a reflected intensity-modulated optical fiber sensor for tip clearance and tip timing measurements in a turbine assembled in a wind tunnel.

  15. NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

    2004-04-01

    Accomplishments during the first six months of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers.

  16. Optical Sensor Based on a Single CdS Nanobelt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an optical sensor based on a cadmium sulfide (CdS nanobelt has been developed. The CdS nanobelt was synthesized by the vapor phase transportation (VPT method. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM results revealed that the nanobelt had a hexagonal wurtzite structure of CdS and presented good crystal quality. A single nanobelt Schottky contact optical sensor was fabricated by the electron beam lithography (EBL technique, and the device current-voltage results showed back-to-back Schottky diode characteristics. The photosensitivity, dark current and the decay time of the sensor were 4 × 104, 31 ms and 0.2 pA, respectively. The high photosensitivity and the short decay time were because of the exponential dependence of photocurrent on the number of the surface charges and the configuration of the back to back Schottky junctions.

  17. Utilization of Faraday Mirror in Fiber Optic Current Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Fiala

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Fiber optic sensors dispose of some advantages in the field of electrical current and magnetic field measurement, like large bandwidth, linearity, light transmission possibilities. Unfortunately, they suffer from some parasitic phenomena. The crucial issue is the presence of induced and latent linear birefringence, which is imposed by the fiber manufacture imperfections as well as mechanical stress by fiber bending. In order to the linear birefringence compensation a promising method was chosen for pulsed current sensor design. The method employs orthogonal polarization conjugation by the back direction propagation of the light wave in the fiber. The Jones calculus analysis presents its propriety. An experimental fiber optic current sensor has been designed and realized. The advantage of the proposed method was proved considering to the sensitivity improvement.

  18. Optical fiber sensors measurement system and special fibers improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinek, Michal; Hrabina, Jan; Hola, Miroslava; Hucl, Vaclav; Cizek, Martin; Rerucha, Simon; Lazar, Josef; Mikel, Bretislav

    2017-06-01

    We present method for the improvement of the measurement accuracy in the optical frequency spectra measurements based on tunable optical filters. The optical filter was used during the design and realization of the measurement system for the inspection of the fiber Bragg gratings. The system incorporates a reference block for the compensation of environmental influences, an interferometric verification subsystem and a PC - based control software implemented in LabView. The preliminary experimental verification of the measurement principle and the measurement system functionality were carried out on a testing rig with a specially prepared concrete console in the UJV Řež. The presented system is the laboratory version of the special nuclear power plant containment shape deformation measurement system which was installed in the power plant Temelin during last year. On the base of this research we started with preparation other optical fiber sensors to nuclear power plants measurement. These sensors will be based on the microstructured and polarization maintaining optical fibers. We started with development of new methods and techniques of the splicing and shaping optical fibers. We are able to made optical tapers from ultra-short called adiabatic with length around 400 um up to long tapers with length up to 6 millimeters. We developed new techniques of splicing standard Single Mode (SM) and Multimode (MM) optical fibers and splicing of optical fibers with different diameters in the wavelength range from 532 to 1550 nm. Together with development these techniques we prepared other techniques to splicing and shaping special optical fibers like as Polarization-Maintaining (PM) or hollow core Photonic Crystal Fiber (PCF) and theirs cross splicing methods with focus to minimalize backreflection and attenuation. The splicing special optical fibers especially PCF fibers with standard telecommunication and other SM fibers can be done by our developed techniques. Adjustment

  19. Structural Health Monitoring of Composite Structures Using Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Anthony

    Structural health monitoring is the process of detecting damage to a structure, where damage can be characterized as changes to material/mechanical properties including but not limited to plastically deforming the material or the modification of connections. Fiber optic cables with fiber Bragg gratings have emerged as a reliable method of locally measuring strains within a structure. During the manufacturing of composite structures, the fiber optic cables can be embedded between lamina plies, allowing the ability to measure strain at discrete locations within the structure as opposed to electrical strain gauges, which must typically be applied to the surface only. The fiber optic sensors may be used to see if the local strain at the sensor location is beyond desired limits, or the array response may be mined to determine additional information about the loading applied to the structure. The work presented in this thesis is to present novel and potential applications of FBG sensors being used to assess the health of the structure. The first application is the dual application of the FBG sensor as a method to determine the strain around a bolt connection as well as the preload of the fastener using a single fiber optic sensor. The composite material around the bolted connections experience stress concentrations and are often the location of damage to the structure from operational cyclic loading over the lifetime of the structure. The degradation can occur more quickly if the fastener is insufficiently tight to transfer load properly. The second application is the ability to locate the impact location of a projectile with damaging and non-damaging energy. By locating and quantifying the damage, the sensor array provides the basis for a structural health monitoring system that has the potential to determine if the damage is extensive enough to replace, or if the part can be salvaged and retrofitted.

  20. Adhesive bond failure monitoring with triboluminescent optical fiber sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shohag, Md Abu S.; Hammel, Emily C.; Olawale, David O.; Okoli, Okenwa O.

    2016-04-01

    One of the most severe damage modes in modern wind turbines is the failure of the adhesive joints in the trailing edge of the large composite blades. The geometrical shape of the blade and current manufacturing techniques make the trailing edge of the wind turbine blade more sensitive to damage. Failure to timely detect this damage type may result in catastrophic failures, expensive system downtime, and high repair costs. A novel sensing system called the In-situ Triboluminescent Optical Fiber (ITOF) sensor has been proposed for monitoring the initiation and propagation of disbonds in composite adhesive joints. The ITOF sensor combines the triboluminescent property of ZnS:Mn with the many desirable features of optical fiber to provide in-situ and distributed damage sensing in large composite structures like the wind blades. Unlike other sensor systems, the ITOF sensor does not require a power source at the sensing location or for transmitting damage-induced signals to the hub of the wind turbine. Composite parts will be fabricated and the ITOF integrated within the bondline to provide in-situ and real time damage sensing. Samples of the fabricated composite parts with integrated ITOF will be subjected to tensile and flexural loads, and the response from the integrated sensors will be monitored and analyzed to characterize the performance of the ITOF sensor as a debonding damage monitoring system. In addition, C-scan and optical microscopy will be employed to gain greater insights into the damage propagation behavior and the signals received from the ITOF sensors.

  1. Fiber optic and laser sensors VIII; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Jose, CA, Sept. 17-19, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P. (Editor); Udd, Eric (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    This issue presents topics on the advances in fiber-optic sensor technology, fiber-optic gyroscope, fiber-optic position and pressure sensors, fiber-optic magnetic and temperature sensors, and generic fiber-optic sensors. Papers included are on a novel analog phase tracker for interferometric fiber-optic sensor applications, recent development status of fiber-optic sensors in China, the magnetic-field sensitivity of depolarized fiber-optic gyros, a depolarized fiber-optic gyro for future tactical applications, fiber-optic position transducers for aircraft controls, and a metal embedded optical-fiber pressure sensor. Attention is also given to a fiber-optic magnetic field sensor using spectral modulation encoding, a bare-fiber temperature sensor, an interferometric fiber-optic accelerometer, improvement of specular reflection pyrometer, a theoretical analysis of two-mode elliptical-core optical fiber sensors, and a fiber probe for ring pattern.

  2. Microstructured optical fiber refractive index sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Town, Graham E.; McCosker, Ravi; Yuan, Scott Wu

    2010-01-01

    We describe a dual-core microstructured optical fiber designed for refractive index sensing of fluids. We show that by using the exponential dependence of intercore coupling on analyte refractive index, both large range and high sensitivity can be achieved in the one device. We also show...

  3. Microstructured optical fiber refractive index sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Town, Graham E.; McCosker, Ravi; Yuan, Scott Wu

    2010-01-01

    We describe a dual-core microstructured optical fiber designed for refractive index sensing of fluids. We show that by using the exponential dependence of intercore coupling on analyte refractive index, both large range and high sensitivity can be achieved in the one device. We also show that sel...

  4. Towards biochips using microstructured optical fiber sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindorf, Lars; Høiby, Poul Erik; Jensen, Jesper Bo; Pedersen, Lars Hagsholm; Bang, Ole; Geschke, Oliver

    2006-08-01

    In this paper we present the first incorporation of a microstructured optical fiber (MOF) into biochip applications. A 16-mm-long piece of MOF is incorporated into an optic-fluidic coupler chip, which is fabricated in PMMA polymer using a CO(2) laser. The developed chip configuration allows the continuous control of liquid flow through the MOF and simultaneous optical characterization. While integrated in the chip, the MOF is functionalized towards the capture of a specific single-stranded DNA string by immobilizing a sensing layer on the microstructured internal surfaces of the fiber. The sensing layer contains the DNA string complementary to the target DNA sequence and thus operates through the highly selective DNA hybridization process. Optical detection of the captured DNA was carried out using the evanescent-wave-sensing principle. Owing to the small size of the chip, the presented technique allows for analysis of sample volumes down to 300 nL and the fabrication of miniaturized portable devices.

  5. Optical Fiber Pressure Sensor with Reference channel①

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUZhijing; TIANWei

    1997-01-01

    The principle of optical fiber pressure sensing probe with common diaphragm and the method for stabilizing the laser diodes are described in this paper at first.Then we discussed the improvement in characteristics of the system by means of taking the techniques of reference light channel and ratio measurement.

  6. Optical chemical and biochemical sensors: new trends (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, F.; Giannetti, A.

    2005-06-01

    Chemical and biochemical sensing is under the extensive research all over the world and many chemical and biochemical sensors are finding increasing number of applications in industry, environmental monitoring, medicine, biomedicine and chemical analysis. This is evidenced by each-year-growing number of international scientific conferences, in which advances in the field of the sensors are reported. One of the main reason why only a few sensors reach the international market, notwithstanding the high number of laboratory prototype described in many peer reviewed papers, lies in the fact that a biochemical sensor is a highly interdisciplinary "object" the realization of which requires the team work of scientists coming from different areas such as chemistry, physics, optoelectronics, engineering, biochemistry, and medicine. And this peculiarity is not easily found in the research teams. In the present paper, the fundamental bases of chemical and biochemical optical sensing are summarised and the new trends are described.

  7. Optical cloud detection from a disposable airborne sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Keri; Harrison, R. Giles; Brus, David

    2016-04-01

    In-situ measurement of cloud droplet microphysical properties is most commonly made from manned aircraft platforms due to the size and weight of the instrumentation, which is both costly and typically limited to sampling only a few clouds. This work describes the development of a small, lightweight (DMT Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS) which measures cloud droplets in the size range from 0.5 to 50 microns. Both sensors were installed at the hill top observatory of Sammaltunturi during a field campaign in October and November 2015, which experienced long periods of immersion inside cloud. Preliminary analysis shows very good agreement between the CAPS and the disposable cloud sensor for cloud droplets >5micron effective diameter. Such data and calibration of the sensor will be discussed here, as will simultaneous balloon launches of the optical cloud sensor through the same cloud layers.

  8. Toluene optical fibre sensor based on air microcavity in PDMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacik, Daniel; Martincek, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    We prepared and demonstrated a compact, simple-to-fabricate, air microcavity in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) placed at the end of a single-mode optical fibre. This microcavity creates a Fabry-Perot interferometer sensor able to measure concentrations of toluene vapour in air. Operation of the sensor is provided by diffusion of the toluene vapour to the PDMS, and the consequent extension of length d of the air microcavity in PDMS. The sensor response for the presence of vapours is fast and occurs within a few seconds. By using the prepared sensor toluene vapour concentration in air can be measured in the range from about 0.833 g.m-3 to saturation, with better sensitivity than 0.15 nm/g.m-3 up to maximal sensitivity 1.4 nm/g.m-3 at around concentration 100 g.m-3 in time 5 s.

  9. A Novel Extrinsic Fiber-Optic Fabry-Perot Strain Sensor System Based on Optical Amplification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Jiang Rao; Jian Jiang; Zheng-Lin Ran

    2003-01-01

    A novel extrinsic fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometric strain sensor system is demonstrated based on the simultaneous use of the amplified spontaneous emission and optical amplification. The improvement of 3~4 orders of magnitude in signal level can be achieved.

  10. A Novel Extrinsic Fiber-Optic Fabry-Perot Strain Sensor System Based on Optical Amplification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A novel extrinsic fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometric strain sensor system is demonstrated based on the simultaneous use of the amplified spontaneous emission and optical amplification. The improvement of 3~4 orders of magnitude in signal level can be achieved.

  11. 1st International Conference on Fiber-Optic Rotation Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Arditty, Hervé

    1982-01-01

    Currently there is considerable interest in the application of optical meth­ ods for the measurement of absolute rotation. Active approaches, so-called ring laser gyros, have been under serious development for at least 15 years. More recently, passive approaches using ring resonators or multi turn fiber interferometers have also demonstrated much pro~ise. The only previous conference devoted exclusively to optical rotation sensors, held in 1978 in San Diego, California, was organized by the Society of Photo-optical Instru­ mentation Engineers(S.P.I.E.J. Although the main emphasis at that conference was on ring laser gyros, a number of papers were also included that described the early development of fiber gyroscopes. Since then the field of fiber optic rotation sensors has grown so rapidly that a conference devoted primarily to this subject was needed. The First International Conference on Fiber-Optic Rotation Sensors was held at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, Nove~­ b...

  12. Miniature fiber optic sensor based on fluorescence energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, David L.; Schultz, Jerome S.

    1992-04-01

    Optical fiber biosensors based on fluorescence assays have several distinct advantages when measuring biological analytes such as metabolites, cofactors, toxins, etc. Not only are optical signals immune to electronic interferences, but the polychromatic nature of most fluorochemical assays provides more potentially useful data about the system being studied. One of the most common difficulties normally encountered with optical biosensors is the inability to routinely recalibrate the optical and electronic components of the system throughout the life of the sensor. With this in mind, we present an optical fiber assay system for glucose based on a homogeneous singlet/singlet energy transfer assay along with the electronic instrumentation built to support the sensor system. In the sensor probe, glucose concentrations are indirectly measured from the level of fluorescence quenching caused by the homogeneous competition assay between TRITC labeled concanavalin A (receptor) and FITC labeled Dextran (ligand). The FITC signal is used to indicate glucose concentrations and the TRITC signal is used for internal calibration. Data is also presented on a protein derivatization procedure that was used to prevent aggregation of the receptor protein in solution. Also, a molecular model is described for the singlet/singlet energy transfer interactions that can occur in a model system composed of a monovalent ligand (FITC labeled papain) and a monovalent receptor (TRITC labeled concanavalin A).

  13. Insect-Inspired Optical-Flow Navigation Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakoor, Sarita; Morookian, John M.; Chahl, Javan; Soccol, Dean; Hines, Butler; Zornetzer, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Integrated circuits that exploit optical flow to sense motions of computer mice on or near surfaces ( optical mouse chips ) are used as navigation sensors in a class of small flying robots now undergoing development for potential use in such applications as exploration, search, and surveillance. The basic principles of these robots were described briefly in Insect-Inspired Flight Control for Small Flying Robots (NPO-30545), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 1 (January 2005), page 61. To recapitulate from the cited prior article: The concept of optical flow can be defined, loosely, as the use of texture in images as a source of motion cues. The flight-control and navigation systems of these robots are inspired largely by the designs and functions of the vision systems and brains of insects, which have been demonstrated to utilize optical flow (as detected by their eyes and brains) resulting from their own motions in the environment. Optical flow has been shown to be very effective as a means of avoiding obstacles and controlling speeds and altitudes in robotic navigation. Prior systems used in experiments on navigating by means of optical flow have involved the use of panoramic optics, high-resolution image sensors, and programmable imagedata- processing computers.

  14. Fiber-Optic Vibration Sensor Based on Multimode Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Lujo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a fiberoptic vibration sensor based on the monitoring of the mode distribution in a multimode optical fiber. Detection of vibrations and their parameters is possible through observation of the output speckle pattern from the multimode optical fiber. A working experimental model has been built in which all used components are widely available and cheap: a CCD camera (a simple web-cam, a multimode laser in visible range as a light source, a length of multimode optical fiber, and a computer for signal processing. Measurements have shown good agreement with the actual frequency of vibrations, and promising results were achieved with the amplitude measurements although they require some adaptation of the experimental model. Proposed sensor is cheap and lightweight and therefore presents an interesting alternative for monitoring large smart structures.

  15. Optical sensor for measuring humidity, strain and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to an optical sensor (100) adapted to measure at least three physical parameters, said optical sensor comprising a polymer-based optical waveguide structure comprising a first Bragg grating structure (101) being adapted to provide information about a first, a second...... and a third physical parameter, a second Bragg grating structure (102) being adapted to provide information about the second and the third physical parameter only, and a third Bragg grating structure (103) being adapted to provide information about the third physical parameter only. The invention further...... relates to a method for measuring the first, the second and the third physical parameter. Preferably, the first, the second and the third physical parameter, are humidity, strain and temperature, respectively....

  16. Optical fiber temperature sensor based on wavelength-dependent detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang Li(李志刚); Zhenhui Du(杜振辉); Baoguang Wang(王宝光); Chengzhi Jiang(蒋诚志)

    2004-01-01

    Semiconductor fiber temperature sensors have been used widely in many fields, but most of them pick up temperature by measuring the optical intensity of certain fixed narrow-band in absorption spectrum.Furthermore, they are sensitive to the loss of optical intensity and the fluctuation of light source power.The novel temperature measurement system proposed in this paper is based on the semiconductor absorption theory and the spectral analysis of method. To measure temperature, the sensor model detects not the certain narrow-band spectrum but the most spectra of the optical absorption edge. Therefore the measurement accuracy and the stability can be improved greatly. Experimental results are in agreement with theoretical analysis results perfectly.

  17. Fiber optic stress-independent helical torsion sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Luís A; Grenier, Jason R; Aitchison, J Stewart; Herman, Peter R

    2015-02-15

    Femtosecond laser-fabricated waveguides have been formed into helical paths throughout the cladding of single-mode optical fibers to demonstrate a strain-independent fiber torsion sensor. A comparison between a Bragg grating sensor and a Mach-Zehnder based on helical waveguides (HWs) showed a much weaker twist sensitivity of 1.5 pm/(rad/m) for the grating in contrast with a value of 261 pm/(rad/m) for the interferometer. The HW geometry provided an unambiguous determination of the rotational direction of the twist while facilitating a convenient and efficient means for optical coupling into the single-mode core of the fiber. The flexible three-dimensional writing by the femtosecond laser fabrication method enabled the direct inscription of compact and robust optical cladding devices without the need for combining or splicing multiple-fiber segments.

  18. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila Using Fiber Optic Microchannel Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samla Gauri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on the detection of Aeromonas hydrophila using fiber optic microchannel biosensor. Microchannel was fabricated by photolithography method. The fiber optic was chosen as signal transmitting medium and light absorption characteristic of different microorganisms was investigated for possible detection. Experimental results showed that Aeromonas hydrophila can be detected at the region of UV-Vis spectra between 352 nm and 354 nm which was comparable to measurement provided by UV spectrophotometer and also theoretical calculation by Beer-Lambert Absorption Law. The entire detection can be done in less than 10 minutes using a total volume of 3 μL only. This result promises good potential of this fiber optic microchannel sensor as a reliable, portable, and disposable sensor.

  19. Pyridine Vapors Detection by an Optical Fibre Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Fernandez-Gutiérrez

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available An optical fibre sensor has been implemented towards pyridine vapors detection;to achieve this, a novel vapochromic material has been used, which, in solid state, suffers achange in colour from blue to pink-white in presence of pyridine vapours. This complex isadded to a solution of PVC (Poly Vinyl Chloride, TBP (Tributylphosphate andtetrahydrofuran (THF, forming a plasticized matrix; by dip coating technique, the sensingmaterial is fixed onto a cleaved ended optical fibre. The fabrication process was optimizedin terms of number of dips and dipping speed, evaluating the final devices by dynamicrange. Employing a reflection set up, the absorbance spectra and changes in the reflectedoptical power of the sensors were registered to determine their response. A linear relationbetween optical power versus vapor concentration was obtained, with a detection limit of 1ppm (v/v.

  20. 75 FR 34988 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... Department of the Navy Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems... Navy hereby gives notice of its intent to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation a.... Patent No. 7,149,374: Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor, Navy Case No. 84,557.//U.S. Patent No. 7,379,630...

  1. 78 FR 17187 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ... Department of the Navy Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems... to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation, a revocable, nonassignable, exclusive... its intent to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation a revocable, nonassignable...

  2. 77 FR 73456 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... Department of the Navy Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems... Navy hereby gives notice of its intent to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation a... described in U.S. Patent No. 7,020,354: Intensity Modulated Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor, Navy Case No. 83...

  3. OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR EFFICIENT AND ECONOMICAL OIL RECOVERY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anbo Wang; Kristie L. Cooper; Gary R. Pickrell

    2003-06-01

    Efficient recovery of petroleum reserves from existing oil wells has been proven to be difficult due to the lack of robust instrumentation that can accurately and reliably monitor processes in the downhole environment. Commercially available sensors for measurement of pressure, temperature, and fluid flow exhibit shortened lifetimes in the harsh downhole conditions, which are characterized by high pressures (up to 20 kpsi), temperatures up to 250 C, and exposure to chemically reactive fluids. Development of robust sensors that deliver continuous, real-time data on reservoir performance and petroleum flow pathways will facilitate application of advanced recovery technologies, including horizontal and multilateral wells. This is the final report for the four-year program ''Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery'', funded by the National Petroleum Technology Office of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech from October 1, 1999 to March 31, 2003. The main objective of this research program was to develop cost-effective, reliable optical fiber sensor instrumentation for real-time monitoring of various key parameters crucial to efficient and economical oil production. During the program, optical fiber sensors were demonstrated for the measurement of temperature, pressure, flow, and acoustic waves, including three successful field tests in the Chevron/Texaco oil fields in Coalinga, California, and at the world-class oil flow simulation facilities in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Research efforts included the design and fabrication of sensor probes, development of signal processing algorithms, construction of test systems, development and testing of strategies for the protection of optical fibers and sensors in the downhole environment, development of remote monitoring capabilities allowing real

  4. Optical coherent detection Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensor based on orthogonal polarization diversity reception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muping Song; Bin Zhao; Xianmin Zhang

    2005-01-01

    In Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensor, using optical coherent detection to detect Brillouin scattering optical signal is a good method, but there exists the polarization correlated detection problem. A novel detecting scheme is presented and demonstrated experimentally, which adopts orthogonal polarization diversity reception to resolve the polarization correlated detection problem. A laser is used as pump and reference light sources, a microwave electric-optical modulator (EOM) is adopted to produce frequency shift reference light, a polarization controller is used to control the polarization of the reference light which is changed into two orthogonal polarization for two adjacent acquisition periods. The Brillouin scattering light is coherently detected with the reference light, and the Brillouin scattering optical signal is taken out based on Brillouin frequency shift. After electronic processing, better Brillouin distributed sensing signal is obtained. A 25-km Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensor is achieved.

  5. A small sensor with matched optical antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepelev, A.V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Central Design Bureau for Unique Instrumentation

    1994-12-31

    Each device for radiation registration in the radio range contains an antenna. Mainly it is the antenna dimension that determines the sensitivity of the device. Can an antenna for the registration of more short wave radiation be constructed? The main feature of antenna action is the conversion of the incident radiation mode into the mode passing through the antenna. At this moment the radiation brightness (which is equivalent to a number of photons per mode) can increase. In accordance with the geometric optics (Shtraubel theorem) the length and mirror systems cannot raise the radiation brightness in principle and cannot be treated as an antenna. Recently it was established that definite optical processes and systems give a possibility of increasing the full radiation brightness. The device for effective registration of short wave radiation is worked out on the basis of these processes.

  6. Recovering Signals from Optical Fiber Interferometric Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    explained in numerous books on operational amplifiers (for example, see Sedra and Smith [Ref. 171) and so will not be further discussed here, except to say...618. 1 October 1982. 17. Sedra , A. S.. and Smith .- K. C.. Microelectronic CrciimHolt. Rinehart and Winston, 1982. 18. Abramowitz, M. and- Stegun. I.A...Interfcromctcrse, Applied Optics. Volume 21. Number 4. 689-693. 1982. 46. Smith , L. and Sheingold, D.H.. "Noise and Operational Amplifier Circuits’, Analog

  7. Precision Remote Sensor for Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase II project will lead to the design, construction, and field-testing of a prototype PHOCS instrument for atmospheric column retrievals of oxygen and carbon...

  8. Optical Sensors based on Raman Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jernshøj, Kit Drescher

    Formålet med denne afhandling er at give en systematisk og uddybende videnskabelig diskussion af molekylær Raman spredning, som kan danne grundlag for udviklingen af molekylespecifikke optiske sensorer til on-site, ikke-destruktiv måling. Afhandlingen falder i tre dele, to teoriafsnit, hvor første...... data fra denne type eksperimenter betyde et øget informationsindhold til anvendelse i den multivariate analyse. Diskussionen er bygget op omkring tre forskellige typer klassifikationsproblemer, hvor der i den første type sker en perturbering, som resulterer i enten en nedgang i symmetri eller en...... energiopsplitning for den ene molekylære specie ud af to tilstede i en opløsning. I det andet type klassifikationsproblem bygger det øgede informationsindhold på en forskydning af den elektroniske absorption og endelig i det tredje klassifikationsproblem er det en molekylær aggregering, der finder sted. I...

  9. Programmable logic controller optical fibre sensor interface module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allwood, Gary; Wild, Graham; Hinckley, Steven

    2011-12-01

    Most automated industrial processes use Distributed Control Systems (DCSs) or Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) for automated control. PLCs tend to be more common as they have much of the functionality of DCSs, although they are generally cheaper to install and maintain. PLCs in conjunction with a human machine interface form the basis of Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, combined with communication infrastructure and Remote Terminal Units (RTUs). RTU's basically convert different sensor measurands in to digital data that is sent back to the PLC or supervisory system. Optical fibre sensors are becoming more common in industrial processes because of their many advantageous properties. Being small, lightweight, highly sensitive, and immune to electromagnetic interference, means they are an ideal solution for a variety of diverse sensing applications. Here, we have developed a PLC Optical Fibre Sensor Interface Module (OFSIM), in which an optical fibre is connected directly to the OFSIM located next to the PLC. The embedded fibre Bragg grating sensors, are highly sensitive and can detect a number of different measurands such as temperature, pressure and strain without the need for a power supply.

  10. Fiber-Optic Sensor for Aircraft Lightning Current Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George G.; Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.; Snyder, Gary P.

    2012-01-01

    An electric current sensor based on Faraday rotation effect in optical fiber was developed for measuring aircraft lightning current. Compared to traditional sensors, the design has many advantages including the ability to measure total current and to conform to structure geometries. The sensor is also small, light weight, non-conducting, safe from interference, and free of hysteresis and saturation. Potential applications include characterization of lightning current waveforms, parameters and paths, and providing environmental data for aircraft certifications. In an optical fiber as the sensing medium, light polarization rotates when exposed to a magnetic field in the direction of light propagation. By forming closed fiber loops around a conductor and applying Ampere s law, measuring the total light rotation yields the enclosed current. A reflective polarimetric scheme is used, where polarization change is measured after the polarized light travels round-trip through the sensing fiber. The sensor system was evaluated measuring rocket-triggered lightning over the 2011 summer. Early results compared very well against a reference current shunt resistor, demonstrating the sensor s accuracy and feasibility in a lightning environment. While later comparisons show gradually increasing amplitude deviations for an undetermined cause, the overall waveforms still compared very well.

  11. A new fibre optic pulse oximeter probe for monitoring splanchnic organ arterial blood oxygen saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, M; Samuels, N; Randive, N; Langford, R; Kyriacou, P A

    2012-12-01

    A new, continuous method of monitoring splanchnic organ oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) would make the early detection of inadequate tissue oxygenation feasible, reducing the risk of hypoperfusion, severe ischaemia, and, ultimately, death. In an attempt to provide such a device, a new fibre optic based reflectance pulse oximeter probe and processing system were developed followed by an in vivo evaluation of the technology on seventeen patients undergoing elective laparotomy. Photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals of good quality and high signal-to-noise ratio were obtained from the small bowel, large bowel, liver and stomach. Simultaneous peripheral PPG signals from the finger were also obtained for comparison purposes. Analysis of the amplitudes of all acquired PPG signals indicated much larger amplitudes for those signals obtained from splanchnic organs than those obtained from the finger. Estimated SpO(2) values for splanchnic organs showed good agreement with those obtained from the finger fibre optic probe and those obtained from a commercial device. These preliminary results suggest that a miniaturized 'indwelling' fibre optic sensor may be a suitable method for pre-operative and post-operative evaluation of splanchnic organ SpO(2) and their health.

  12. New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell

    2005-10-31

    Development of practical, high-temperature optical claddings for improved waveguiding in sapphire fibers continued during the reporting period. A set of designed experiments using the Taguchi method was undertaken to efficiently determine the optimal set of processing variables to yield clad fibers with good optical and mechanical properties. Eighteen samples of sapphire fibers were prepared with spinel claddings, each with a unique set of variables. Statistical analyses of the results were then used to predict the set of factors that would result in a spinel cladding with the optimal geometrical, mechanical, and optical properties. To confirm the predictions of the Taguchi analysis, sapphire fibers were clad with the magnesium aluminate spinel coating using the predicted optimal set of factors. In general, the clad fibers demonstrated high quality, exceeding the best results obtained during the Phase I effort. Tests of the high-temperature stability of the clad fibers were also conducted. The results indicated that the clad fibers were stable at temperatures up to 1300 C for the duration of the three day test. At the higher temperatures, some changes in the geometry of the fibers were observed. The design, fabrication, and testing of a sapphire sensor for measurement of temperature was undertaken. The specific sensor configuration uses a polished sapphire wafer as the temperature-sensitive element. The wafer is attached to a sapphire fiber (clad or unclad), and interrogated as a Fabry-Perot sensor. Methods for assembling the sensor were investigated. A prototype sensor was fabricated and tested at room temperature and elevated temperatures. Results were difficult to interpret, due to the presence of modal noise which was found to result from the use of a spectrometer that was not designed for use with multimode fibers. A spectrometer optimized for use of multimode fiber has been obtained, and further evaluation of the sapphire temperature sensor is continuing.

  13. Wavefront sensors and algorithms for adaptive optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, V. P.; Botygina, N. N.; Emaleev, O. N.; Konyaev, P. A.

    2010-07-01

    The results of recent works related to techniques and algorithms for wave-front (WF) measurement using Shack-Hartmann sensors show their high efficiency in solution of very different problems of applied optics. The goal of this paper was to develop a sensitive Shack-Hartmann sensor with high precision WF measurement capability on the base of modern technology of optical elements making and new efficient methods and computational algorithms of WF reconstruction. The Shack-Hartmann sensors sensitive to small WF aberrations are used for adaptive optical systems, compensating the wave distortions caused by atmospheric turbulence. A high precision Shack-Hartmann WF sensor has been developed on the basis of a low-aperture off-axis diffraction lens array. The device is capable of measuring WF slopes at array sub-apertures of size 640×640 μm with an error not exceeding 4.80 arcsec (0.15 pixel), which corresponds to the standard deviation equal to 0.017λ at the reconstructed WF with wavelength λ . Also the modification of this sensor for adaptive system of solar telescope using extended scenes as tracking objects, such as sunspot, pores, solar granulation and limb, is presented. The software package developed for the proposed WF sensors includes three algorithms of local WF slopes estimation (modified centroids, normalized cross-correlation and fast Fourierdemodulation), as well as three methods of WF reconstruction (modal Zernike polynomials expansion, deformable mirror response functions expansion and phase unwrapping), that can be selected during operation with accordance to the application.

  14. Future electro-optical sensors and processing in urban operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönwall, Christina; Schwering, Piet B.; Rantakokko, Jouni; Benoist, Koen W.; Kemp, Rob A. W.; Steinvall, Ove; Letalick, Dietmar; Björkert, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    In the electro-optical sensors and processing in urban operations (ESUO) study we pave the way for the European Defence Agency (EDA) group of Electro-Optics experts (IAP03) for a common understanding of the optimal distribution of processing functions between the different platforms. Combinations of local, distributed and centralized processing are proposed. In this way one can match processing functionality to the required power, and available communication systems data rates, to obtain the desired reaction times. In the study, three priority scenarios were defined. For these scenarios, present-day and future sensors and signal processing technologies were studied. The priority scenarios were camp protection, patrol and house search. A method for analyzing information quality in single and multi-sensor systems has been applied. A method for estimating reaction times for transmission of data through the chain of command has been proposed and used. These methods are documented and can be used to modify scenarios, or be applied to other scenarios. Present day data processing is organized mainly locally. Very limited exchange of information with other platforms is present; this is performed mainly at a high information level. Main issues that arose from the analysis of present-day systems and methodology are the slow reaction time due to the limited field of view of present-day sensors and the lack of robust automated processing. Efficient handover schemes between wide and narrow field of view sensors may however reduce the delay times. The main effort in the study was in forecasting the signal processing of EO-sensors in the next ten to twenty years. Distributed processing is proposed between hand-held and vehicle based sensors. This can be accompanied by cloud processing on board several vehicles. Additionally, to perform sensor fusion on sensor data originating from different platforms, and making full use of UAV imagery, a combination of distributed and

  15. Fiber Optic Sensors For Detection of Toxic and Biological Threats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Yuan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Protection of public and military personnel from chemical and biological warfareagents is an urgent and growing national security need. Along with this idea, we havedeveloped a novel class of fiber optic chemical sensors, for detection of toxic and biologicalmaterials. The design of these fiber optic sensors is based on a cladding modificationapproach. The original passive cladding of the fiber, in a small section, was removed and thefiber core was coated with a chemical sensitive material. Any change in the opticalproperties of the modified cladding material, due to the presence of a specific chemicalvapor, changes the transmission properties of the fiber and result in modal powerredistribution in multimode fibers. Both total intensity and modal power distribution (MPDmeasurements were used to detect the output power change through the sensing fibers. TheMPD technique measures the power changes in the far field pattern, i.e. spatial intensitymodulation in two dimensions. Conducting polymers, such as polyaniline and polypyrrole,have been reported to undergo a reversible change in conductivity upon exposure tochemical vapors. It is found that the conductivity change is accompanied by optical propertychange in the material. Therefore, polyaniline and polypyrrole were selected as the modifiedcladding material for the detection of hydrochloride (HCl, ammonia (NH3, hydrazine(H4N2, and dimethyl-methl-phosphonate (DMMP {a nerve agent, sarin stimulant},respectively. Several sensors were prepared and successfully tested. The results showeddramatic improvement in the sensor sensitivity, when the MPD method was applied. In thispaper, an overview on the developed class of fiber optic sensors is presented and supportedwith successful achieved results.

  16. An Assessment of Three Different In Situ Oxygen Sensors for Monitoring Silage Production and Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Guilin; Sun, Yurui; Li, Menghua; Jungbluth, Kerstin H.; Maack, Christian; Buescher, Wolfgang; Schütt, Kai-Benjamin; Boeker, Peter; Schulze Lammers, Peter; Zhou, Haiyang; Cheng, Qiang; Ma, Daokun

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen (O2) concentration inside the substrate is an important measurement for silage-research and-practical management. In the laboratory gas chromatography is commonly employed for O2 measurement. Among sensor-based techniques, accurate and reliable in situ measurement is rare because of high levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) generated by the introduction of O2 in the silage. The presented study focused on assessing three types of commercial O2 sensors, including Clark oxygen electrodes (COE), galvanic oxygen cell (GOC) sensors and the Dräger chip measurement system (DCMS). Laboratory cross calibration of O2 versus CO2 (each 0–15 vol.%) was made for the COE and the GOC sensors. All calibration results verified that O2 measurements for both sensors were insensitive to CO2. For the O2 in situ measurement in silage, all O2 sensors were first tested in two sealed barrels (diameter 35.7 cm; height: 60 cm) to monitor the O2 depletion with respect to the ensiling process (Test-A). The second test (Test-B) simulated the silage unloading process by recording the O2 penetration dynamics in three additional barrels, two covered by dry ice (0.6 kg or 1.2 kg of each) on the top surface and one without. Based on a general comparison of the experimental data, we conclude that each of these in situ sensor monitoring techniques for O2 concentration in silage exhibit individual advantages and limitations. PMID:26784194

  17. An Assessment of Three Different In Situ Oxygen Sensors for Monitoring Silage Production and Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Guilin; Sun, Yurui; Li, Menghua; Jungbluth, Kerstin H; Maack, Christian; Buescher, Wolfgang; Schütt, Kai-Benjamin; Boeker, Peter; Lammers, Peter Schulze; Zhou, Haiyang; Cheng, Qiang; Ma, Daokun

    2016-01-14

    Oxygen (O₂) concentration inside the substrate is an important measurement for silage-research and-practical management. In the laboratory gas chromatography is commonly employed for O₂ measurement. Among sensor-based techniques, accurate and reliable in situ measurement is rare because of high levels of carbon dioxide (CO₂) generated by the introduction of O₂ in the silage. The presented study focused on assessing three types of commercial O₂ sensors, including Clark oxygen electrodes (COE), galvanic oxygen cell (GOC) sensors and the Dräger chip measurement system (DCMS). Laboratory cross calibration of O₂ versus CO₂ (each 0-15 vol.%) was made for the COE and the GOC sensors. All calibration results verified that O₂ measurements for both sensors were insensitive to CO₂. For the O₂ in situ measurement in silage, all O₂ sensors were first tested in two sealed barrels (diameter 35.7 cm; height: 60 cm) to monitor the O₂ depletion with respect to the ensiling process (Test-A). The second test (Test-B) simulated the silage unloading process by recording the O₂ penetration dynamics in three additional barrels, two covered by dry ice (0.6 kg or 1.2 kg of each) on the top surface and one without. Based on a general comparison of the experimental data, we conclude that each of these in situ sensor monitoring techniques for O₂ concentration in silage exhibit individual advantages and limitations.

  18. Microbend fiber optic sensor for perioperative pediatric vital signs monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhihao; Hee, Hwan Ing; Ng, Soon Huat; Teo, Ju Teng; Yang, Xiufeng; Wang, Dier

    2017-02-01

    We have demonstrated a highly sensitive microbend fiber optic sensor for perioperative pediatric vital signs monitoring that is free from direct contact with skin, cableless, electromagnetic interference free and low cost. The feasibility of our device was studied on infants undergoing surgery and 10 participants ranging from one month to 12 months were enrolled. The sensor was placed under a barrier sheet on the operating table. All patients received standard intraoperative monitoring. The results showed good agreement in heart rate and respiratory rate between our device and the standard physiological monitoring when signals are clean.

  19. Ground strain measuring system using optical fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tadanobu; Honda, Riki; Shibata, Shunjiro; Takegawa, Naoki

    2001-08-01

    This paper presents a device to measure the dynamic horizontal shear strain of the ground during earthquake. The proposed device consists of a bronze plate with fiber Bragg grating sensors attached on it. The device is vertically installed in the ground, and horizontal shear strain of the ground is measured as deflection angle of the plate. Employment of optical fiber sensors makes the proposed device simple in mechanism and highly durable, which makes it easy to install our device in the ground. We conducted shaking table tests using ground model to verify applicability of the proposed device.

  20. Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Kristie L.; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary R.

    2006-11-14

    This report summarizes technical progress during the program “Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries”, performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The objective of this program was to use technology recently invented at Virginia Tech to develop and demonstrate the application of self-calibrating optical fiber temperature and pressure sensors to several key energy-intensive industries where conventional, commercially available sensors exhibit greatly abbreviated lifetimes due primarily to environmental degradation. A number of significant technologies were developed under this program, including • a laser bonded silica high temperature fiber sensor with a high temperature capability up to 700°C and a frequency response up to 150 kHz, • the world’s smallest fiber Fabry-Perot high temperature pressure sensor (125 x 20 μm) with 700°C capability, • UV-induced intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors for distributed measurement, • a single crystal sapphire fiber-based sensor with a temperature capability up to 1600°C. These technologies have been well demonstrated and laboratory tested. Our work plan included conducting major field tests of these technologies at EPRI, Corning, Pratt & Whitney, and Global Energy; field validation of the technology is critical to ensuring its usefulness to U.S. industries. Unfortunately, due to budget cuts, DOE was unable to follow through with its funding commitment to support Energy Efficiency Science Initiative projects and this final phase was eliminated.

  1. Optical design of rotationally symmetric triangulation sensors with low-cost detectors based on reflective optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Peter

    2003-05-01

    Classical triangulation sensors exhibit an orientation depend signal if the scattering properties of the work-piece are not symmetrical like at curved surface locations. This problem is avoided by rotational symmetric triangulation sensors. Due to this attractive property in a lot of applications such a sensor was introduced very recently on the market. This sensor is based on refractive optics and a special PSD detector, both custom made resulting in high costs. Additionally, the existing optical design approach does not offer an optical layout to start with, thus a good amount of trial and error is required and non-optimal solutions are probable. Therefore, there is great interest for a clear optical design strategy that results in layouts that are suitable also to use low cost commercial available detectors, such as CCD or CMOS image detectors. In this paper such a design procedure is presented for optical designs that use reflecting optical surfaces. Several solutions are depicted and discussed. The designs are not only attractive from the optical point of view and from detector considerations, but also from opto-mechanical design issues. For example designs with only one opto-mechanical part are possible. The resulting optical designs consist of aspherical surfaces which are obtained directly by using only some new relations of first order optics for off-axis objects. The designs are validated by exact ray tracing. These ray tracing results show already very good performance. Nevertheless, it was possible to further optimize the optical designs very efficiently using ray tracing software, thus yielding improved optical properties.

  2. Fourier optics analysis of grating sensors with tilt errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferhanoglu, Onur; Toy, M Fatih; Urey, Hakan

    2011-06-15

    Dynamic diffraction gratings can be microfabricated with precision and offer extremely sensitive displacement measurements and light intensity modulation. The effect of pure translation of the moving part of the grating on diffracted order intensities is well known. This study focuses on the parameters that limit the intensity and the contrast of the interference. The effects of grating duty cycle, mirror reflectivities, sensor tilt and detector size are investigated using Fourier optics theory and Gaussian beam optics. Analytical findings reveal that fringe visibility becomes <0.3 when the optical path variation exceeds half the wavelength within the grating interferometer. The fringe visibility can be compensated by monitoring the interfering portion of the diffracted order light only through detector size reduction in the expense of optical power. Experiments were conducted with a grating interferometer that resulted in an eightfold increase in fringe visibility with reduced detector size, which is in agreement with theory. Findings show that diffraction grating readout principle is not limited to translating sensors but also can be used for sensors with tilt or other deflection modes.

  3. Optical-frequency-comb based ultrasound sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Ogura, Takashi; Masuoka, Takashi; Hase, Eiji; Nakajima, Yoshiaki; Yamaoka, Yoshihisa; Minoshima, Kaoru; Yasui, Takeshi

    2017-03-01

    Photo-acoustic imaging is a promising modality for deep tissue imaging with high spatial resolution in the field of biology and medicine. High penetration depth and spatial resolution of the photo-acoustic imaging is achieved by means of the advantages of optical and ultrasound imaging, i.e. tightly focused beam confines ultrasound-generated region within micrometer scale and the ultrasound can propagate through tissues without significant energy loss. To enhance the detection sensitivity and penetration depth of the photo-acoustic imaging, highly sensitive ultrasound detector is greatly desired. In this study, we proposed a novel ultrasound detector employing optical frequency comb (OFC) cavity. Ultrasound generated by the excitation of tightly focused laser beam onto a sample was sensed with a part of an OFC cavity, being encoded into OFC. The spectrally encoded OFC was converted to radio-frequency by the frequency link nature of OFC. The ultrasound-encoded radio-frequency can therefore be directly measured with a high-speed photodetector. We constructed an OFC cavity for ultrasound sensing with a ring-cavity erbium-doped fiber laser. We provided a proof-of-principle demonstration of the detection of ultrasound that was generated by a transducer operating at 10 MHz. Our proposed approach will serve as a unique and powerful tool for detecting ultrasounds for photo-acoustic imaging in the future.

  4. Fiber optic and laser sensors VII; Proceedings of the Meeting, Boston, MA, Sept. 5-7, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udd, Eric (Editor); Depaula, Ramon P. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on fiber optic and laser sensors are presented. Individual topics addressed include: fiber optic photoelastic pressure sensor for high-temperature gases, fiber optic gyroscope using an eight-component LiNbO3 integrated optic circuit, design and performance of a fiber optic gyroscope using integrated optics, digital angular position sensor using wavelength division multiplexing, simple repeatable fiber optic intensity sensor for temperature measurement, compensation for effects of ambient temperature on rare-earth-doped fiber optic thermometer.

  5. Radiation Tolerance Tests of Ultrasonic Oxygen Deficiency Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Brodzinski, K; Gizicki, W; Jedrusyna, A; Ostropolski, W; Riddone, G

    2006-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), presently under construction at CERN, will contain about 96 tons of high-density helium (liquid and supercritical), mostly located in the underground components of the LHC machine. To detect a dangerous decrease of oxygen concentration in the atmosphere caused by a potential release of helium, the Oxygen Deficiency Hazard Detection system will be applied for the LHC operation in the tunnel and other selected areas. The oxygen concentration is derived on the assumption that the gas added to the air is helium alone. A novel concept of oxygen deficiency detection system, built at the Wroclaw University of Technology (WUT) in Poland, allows verifying the oxygen concentration in the air by means of sound velocity measurements. The paper describes the design and functionality of two prototypes of ultrasonic ODH detection system tested by the WUT. In order to qualify the systems to be used in the LHC tunnel, the stability of ultrasonic transducers and electronics has been checked und...

  6. Optical sensors for process control and emissions monitoring in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. W. Alendorf; D. K. Ottensen; D. W. Hahn; T. J. Kulp; U. B. Goers

    1999-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has a number of ongoing projects developing optical sensors for industrial environments. Laser-based sensors can be attractive for relatively harsh environments where extractive sampling is difficult, inaccurate, or impractical. Tools developed primarily for laboratory research can often be adapted for the real world and applied to problems far from their original uses. Spectroscopic techniques, appropriately selected, have the potential to impact the bottom line of a number of industries and industrial processes. In this paper the authors discuss three such applications: a laser-based instrument for process control in steelmaking, a laser-induced breakdown method for hazardous metal detection in process streams, and a laser-based imaging sensor for evaluating surface cleanliness. Each has the potential to provide critical, process-related information in a real-time, continuous manner. These sensor techniques encompass process control applications and emissions monitoring for pollution prevention. They also span the range from a field-tested pre-commercial prototype to laboratory instrumentation. Finally, these sensors employ a wide range of sophistication in both the laser source and associated analytical spectroscopy. In the ultimate applications, however, many attributes of the sensors are in common, such as the need for robust operation and hardening for harsh industrial environments.

  7. Hypoxia Sensing in Plants: On a Quest for Ion Channels as Putative Oxygen Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feifei; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Shabala, Sergey

    2017-07-01

    Over 17 million km2 of land is affected by soil flooding every year, resulting in substantial yield losses and jeopardizing food security across the globe. A key step in resolving this problem and creating stress-tolerant cultivars is an understanding of the mechanisms by which plants sense low-oxygen stress. In this work, we review the current knowledge about the oxygen-sensing and signaling pathway in mammalian and plant systems and postulate the potential role of ion channels as putative oxygen sensors in plant roots. We first discuss the definition and requirements for the oxygen sensor and the difference between sensing and signaling. We then summarize the literature and identify several known candidates for oxygen sensing in the mammalian literature. This includes transient receptor potential (TRP) channels; K+-permeable channels (Kv, BK and TASK); Ca2+ channels (RyR and TPC); and various chemo- and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent oxygen sensors. Identified key oxygen-sensing domains (PAS, GCS, GAF and PHD) in mammalian systems are used to predict the potential plant counterparts in Arabidopsis. Finally, the sequences of known mammalian ion channels with reported roles in oxygen sensing were employed to BLAST the Arabidopsis genome for the candidate genes. Several plasma membrane and tonoplast ion channels (such as TPC, AKT and KCO) and oxygen domain-containing proteins with predicted oxygen-sensing ability were identified and discussed. We propose a testable model for potential roles of ion channels in plant hypoxia sensing. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Optical Sensors based on Raman Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jernshøj, Kit Drescher

    Formålet med denne afhandling er at give en systematisk og uddybende videnskabelig diskussion af molekylær Raman spredning, som kan danne grundlag for udviklingen af molekylespecifikke optiske sensorer til on-site, ikke-destruktiv måling. Afhandlingen falder i tre dele, to teoriafsnit, hvor første...... del omhandler den tilgangelige molekylære information ved overfladeforstærket resonans Raman spredning (SERRS), samt hvordan adgangen til denne information kan optimeres. Anden del omhandler, hvordan det molekylære informationsindhold kan forøges ved at kombinere polariserede Raman og resonans Raman...... målinger på frie molekyler med multivariat analyse. I tredje og sidste del, som er et eksperimentelt afsnit, præsenteres og diskuteres overfladeforstærkede Raman målinger (SERS) på tre udvalgte pesticider. Afhandlingen indledes med en diskussion af teorien bag SERRS med speciel fokus på den molekylære...

  9. Inhomogeneous Oxygen Vacancy Distribution in Semiconductor Gas Sensors: Formation, Migration and Determination on Gas Sensing Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianqiao; Gao, Yinglin; Wu, Xu; Jin, Guohua; Zhai, Zhaoxia; Liu, Huan

    2017-08-10

    The density of oxygen vacancies in semiconductor gas sensors was often assumed to be identical throughout the grain in the numerical discussion of the gas-sensing mechanism of the devices. In contrast, the actual devices had grains with inhomogeneous distribution of oxygen vacancy under non-ideal conditions. This conflict between reality and discussion drove us to study the formation and migration of the oxygen defects in semiconductor grains. A model of the gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy was proposed based on the effects of cooling rate and re-annealing on semiconductive thin films. The model established the diffusion equations of oxygen vacancy according to the defect kinetics of diffusion and exclusion. We described that the steady-state and transient-state oxygen vacancy distributions, which were used to calculate the gas-sensing characteristics of the sensor resistance and response to reducing gases under two different conditions. The gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy model had the applications in simulating the sensor performances, such as the power law, the grain size effect and the effect of depletion layer width.

  10. Inhomogeneous Oxygen Vacancy Distribution in Semiconductor Gas Sensors: Formation, Migration and Determination on Gas Sensing Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqiao Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The density of oxygen vacancies in semiconductor gas sensors was often assumed to be identical throughout the grain in the numerical discussion of the gas-sensing mechanism of the devices. In contrast, the actual devices had grains with inhomogeneous distribution of oxygen vacancy under non-ideal conditions. This conflict between reality and discussion drove us to study the formation and migration of the oxygen defects in semiconductor grains. A model of the gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy was proposed based on the effects of cooling rate and re-annealing on semiconductive thin films. The model established the diffusion equations of oxygen vacancy according to the defect kinetics of diffusion and exclusion. We described that the steady-state and transient-state oxygen vacancy distributions, which were used to calculate the gas-sensing characteristics of the sensor resistance and response to reducing gases under two different conditions. The gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy model had the applications in simulating the sensor performances, such as the power law, the grain size effect and the effect of depletion layer width.

  11. Optical fiber sensor having an active core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egalon, Claudio Oliveira (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An optical fiber is provided. The fiber is comprised of an active fiber core which produces waves of light upon excitation. A factor ka is identified and increased until a desired improvement in power efficiency is obtained. The variable a is the radius of the active fiber core and k is defined as 2 pi/lambda wherein lambda is the wavelength of the light produced by the active fiber core. In one embodiment, the factor ka is increased until the power efficiency stabilizes. In addition to a bare fiber core embodiment, a two-stage fluorescent fiber is provided wherein an active cladding surrounds a portion of the active fiber core having an improved ka factor. The power efficiency of the embodiment is further improved by increasing a difference between the respective indices of refraction of the active cladding and the active fiber core.

  12. Fiber optical Bragg grating sensors embedded in CFRP wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellen, Philipp M.; Frank, Andreas; Broennimann, Rolf; Meier, Urs; Sennhauser, Urs J.

    1999-05-01

    Based on the example application of Emmenbridge, a newly built steel-concrete-composite bridge in Switzerland with 47 m long built-in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) prestressing cables, we will present and analyze the process chain leading to a reliable surveillance of modern civil engineering structures with embedded fiber optical Bragg gratings. This consists first in the embedding of optical fibers and in-fiber Bragg gratings in long CFRP wires in an industrial environment, including fiber optical monitoring of the curing process. Then, various qualifying tests were done: annealing experiments for determining optical lifetime of the Bragg gratings used, dynamic and static tensile tests for estimating their mechanical lifetime under operation, push-out experiments to check adhesion of fiber/coating/matrix interfaces, and performance tests to determine strain and temperature sensitivity of the embedded Bragg gratings. Finally, the prestressing cables were equipped with the CFRP sensor wires and built into the bridge.

  13. Optical Fibre Sensors Using Graphene-Based Materials: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernaez, Miguel; Zamarreño, Carlos R.; Melendi-Espina, Sonia; Bird, Liam R.; Mayes, Andrew G.; Arregui, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    Graphene and its derivatives have become the most explored materials since Novoselov and Geim (Nobel Prize winners for Physics in 2010) achieved its isolation in 2004. The exceptional properties of graphene have attracted the attention of the scientific community from different research fields, generating high impact not only in scientific journals, but also in general-interest newspapers. Optical fibre sensing is one of the many fields that can benefit from the use of these new materials, combining the amazing morphological, chemical, optical and electrical features of graphene with the advantages that optical fibre offers over other sensing strategies. In this document, a review of the current state of the art for optical fibre sensors based on graphene materials is presented. PMID:28098825

  14. Optical Fibre Sensors Using Graphene-Based Materials: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Hernaez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene and its derivatives have become the most explored materials since Novoselov and Geim (Nobel Prize winners for Physics in 2010 achieved its isolation in 2004. The exceptional properties of graphene have attracted the attention of the scientific community from different research fields, generating high impact not only in scientific journals, but also in general-interest newspapers. Optical fibre sensing is one of the many fields that can benefit from the use of these new materials, combining the amazing morphological, chemical, optical and electrical features of graphene with the advantages that optical fibre offers over other sensing strategies. In this document, a review of the current state of the art for optical fibre sensors based on graphene materials is presented.

  15. Rockslide deformation monitoring with fiber optic strain sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Moore

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available With micro-strain resolution and the capability to sample at rates of 100 Hz and higher, fiber optic (FO strain sensors offer exciting new possibilities for in-situ landslide monitoring. Here we describe a new FO monitoring system based on long-gauge fiber Bragg grating sensors installed at the Randa Rockslide Laboratory in southern Switzerland. The new FO monitoring system can detect sub-micrometer scale deformations in both triggered-dynamic and continuous measurements. Two types of sensors have been installed: (1 fully embedded borehole sensors and (2 surface extensometers. Dynamic measurements are triggered by sensor deformation and recorded at 100 Hz, while continuous data are logged every 5 min. Deformation time series for all sensors show displacements consistent with previous monitoring. Accelerated shortening following installation of the borehole sensors is likely related to long-term shrinkage of the grout. A number of transient signals have been observed, which in some cases were large enough to trigger rapid sampling. The combination of short- and long-term observation offers new insight into the deformation process. Accelerated surface crack opening in spring is shown to have a diurnal trend, which we attribute to the effect of snowmelt seeping into the crack void space and freezing at night to generate pressure on the crack walls. Controlled-source tests investigated the sensor response to dynamic inputs, which compared an independent measure of ground motion against the strain measured across a surface crack. Low frequency signals were comparable but the FO record suffered from aliasing, where undersampling of higher frequency signals generated spectral peaks not related to ground motion.

  16. Optical sensor array platform based on polymer electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koetse, Marc M.; Rensing, Peter A.; Sharpe, Ruben B. A.; van Heck, Gert T.; Allard, Bart A. M.; Meulendijks, Nicole N. M. M.; Kruijt, Peter G. M.; Tijdink, Marcel W. W. J.; De Zwart, René M.; Houben, René J.; Enting, Erik; van Veen, Sjaak J. J. F.; Schoo, Herman F. M.

    2007-10-01

    Monitoring of personal wellbeing and optimizing human performance are areas where sensors have only begun to be used. One of the reasons for this is the specific demands that these application areas put on the underlying technology and system properties. In many cases these sensors will be integrated in clothing, be worn on the skin, or may even be placed inside the body. This implies that flexibility and wearability of the systems is essential for their success. Devices based on polymer semiconductors allow for these demands since they can be fabricated with thin film technology. The use of thin film device technology allows for the fabrication of very thin sensors (e.g. integrated in food product packaging), flexible or bendable sensors in wearables, large area/distributed sensors, and intrinsically low-cost applications in disposable products. With thin film device technology a high level of integration can be achieved with parts that analyze signals, process and store data, and interact over a network. Integration of all these functions will inherently lead to better cost/performance ratios, especially if printing and other standard polymer technology such as high precision moulding is applied for the fabrication. In this paper we present an optical transmission sensor array based on polymer semiconductor devices made by thin film technology. The organic devices, light emitting diodes, photodiodes and selective medium chip, are integrated with classic electronic components. Together they form a versatile sensor platform that allows for the quantitative measurement of 100 channels and communicates wireless with a computer. The emphasis is given to the sensor principle, the design, fabrication technology and integration of the thin film devices.

  17. Initial Photophysical Characterization of the Proteorhodopsin Optical Proton Sensor (PROPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay eNadeau

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence is not frequently used as a tool for investigating the photocycles of rhodopsins, largely because of the low quantum yield of the retinal chromophore. However, a new class of genetically encoded voltage sensors is based upon rhodopsins and their fluorescence. The first such sensor reported in the literature was the proteorhodopsin optical proton sensor (PROPS, which is capable of indicating membrane voltage changes in bacteria by means of changes in fluorescence. However, the properties of this fluorescence, such as its lifetime decay components and its origin in the protein photocycle, remain unknown. This paper reports steady-state and nanoscale time-resolved emission of this protein expressed in two strains of Escherichia coli, before and after membrane depolarization. The voltage-dependence of a particularly long lifetime component is established. Additional work to improve quantum yields and improve the general utility of PROPS is suggested.

  18. Ionic Liquid-Based Optical and Electrochemical Carbon Dioxide Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalakanta Behera

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to their unusual physicochemical properties (e.g., high thermal stability, low volatility, high intrinsic conductivity, wide electrochemical windows and good solvating ability, ionic liquids have shown immense application potential in many research areas. Applications of ionic liquid in developing various sensors, especially for the sensing of biomolecules, such as nucleic acids, proteins and enzymes, gas sensing and sensing of various important ions, among other chemosensing platforms, are currently being explored by researchers worldwide. The use of ionic liquids for the detection of carbon dioxide (CO2 gas is currently a major topic of research due to the associated importance of this gas with daily human life. This review focuses on the application of ionic liquids in optical and electrochemical CO2 sensors. The design, mechanism, sensitivity and detection limit of each type of sensor are highlighted in this review.

  19. Ionic Liquid-Based Optical and Electrochemical Carbon Dioxide Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Kamalakanta; Pandey, Shubha; Kadyan, Anu; Pandey, Siddharth

    2015-12-04

    Due to their unusual physicochemical properties (e.g., high thermal stability, low volatility, high intrinsic conductivity, wide electrochemical windows and good solvating ability), ionic liquids have shown immense application potential in many research areas. Applications of ionic liquid in developing various sensors, especially for the sensing of biomolecules, such as nucleic acids, proteins and enzymes, gas sensing and sensing of various important ions, among other chemosensing platforms, are currently being explored by researchers worldwide. The use of ionic liquids for the detection of carbon dioxide (CO₂) gas is currently a major topic of research due to the associated importance of this gas with daily human life. This review focuses on the application of ionic liquids in optical and electrochemical CO₂ sensors. The design, mechanism, sensitivity and detection limit of each type of sensor are highlighted in this review.

  20. Advanced optical position sensors for magnetically suspended wind tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, S.

    1985-01-01

    A major concern to aerodynamicists has been the corruption of wind tunnel test data by model support structures, such as stings or struts. A technique for magnetically suspending wind tunnel models was considered by Tournier and Laurenceau (1957) in order to overcome this problem. This technique is now implemented with the aid of a Large Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (LMSBS) and advanced position sensors for measuring model attitude and position within the test section. Two different optical position sensors are discussed, taking into account a device based on the use of linear CCD arrays, and a device utilizing area CID cameras. Current techniques in image processing have been employed to develop target tracking algorithms capable of subpixel resolution for the sensors. The algorithms are discussed in detail, and some preliminary test results are reported.

  1. DFB laser based electrical dynamic interrogation for optical fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, J. P.; Frazão, O.; Baptista, J. M.; Santos, J. L.; Barbero, A. P.

    2012-04-01

    An electrical dynamic interrogation technique previously reported by the authors for long-period grating sensors is now progressed by relying its operation exclusively on the modulation of a DFB Laser. The analysis of the detected first and second harmonic generated by the electrical modulation of the DFB Laser allows generating an optical signal proportional to the LPG spectral shift and resilient to optical power fluctuations along the system. This concept permits attenuating the effect of the 1/f noise of the photodetection, amplification and processing electronics on the sensing head resolution. This technique is employed in a multiplexing sensing scheme that measures refractive index variations.

  2. Optical fiber sensor for tracking line-focus solar collectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiczer, J J

    1982-08-01

    Currently there is a need to provide an alignment monitor feedback signal to the tracking mechanism of line-focus trough-type concentrating solar collectors. We report here on the novel use of an optical fiber as a distributed integrating sensor to generate such a signal. Experiments have shown that 3.0 m of optical fiber exposed to concentrated sunlight equal to ~40 suns in intensity will generate 1 microA of signal current in a silicon photodiode. These data were measured in an experimental line-focus solar collector using solar flux conditions common to this type of collector.

  3. An Optical Fiber Sensor for Electrification Measurement in Power Transformers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Static electrification and partial discharges caused by oil flow in power transformers lead to many accidents. In this paper, an optical fiber sensor which can be directly mounted inside high-voltage electric devices for electrification measurement in power transformers is introduced. Unlike the existing normal electrification measurement methods which only be used in static oil, the new one takes optical fiber as its probe and measures the electrification in flowing oil by detecting luminous flux, and is available for on-line monitoring.

  4. Adaptive optical design in surface plasma resonance sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Feng; ZHONG Jin-gang

    2006-01-01

    A double-prism adaptive optical design in surface plasma resonance (SPR) sensor is proposed,which consists of two identical isosceles right-triangular prisms. One prism is used as a component of Kretschmann configuration,and the other is for regulation of the optical path. When double-prism structure is angle-scanned by an immovable incident ray,the output ray will be always parallel with the incident ray and just has a small displacement with the shift of output point.The output ray can be focused on a fixed photodetector by a convex lens.Thus it can be avoided that a prism and a photodetector rotate by θ and 2θ respectively in conventional angular scanning SPR sensor.This new design reduces the number of the movable components,makes the structure simple and compact,and makes the manipulation convenient.

  5. Automatic Laser Glare Suppression in Electro-Optical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Ritt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress in laser technology has led to very compact but nevertheless powerful laser sources. In the visible and near infrared spectral region, lasers of any wavelength can be purchased. Continuous wave laser sources pose an especially serious threat to the human eye and electro-optical sensors due to their high proliferation and easy availability. The manifold of available wavelengths cannot be covered by conventional safety measures like absorption or interference filters. We present a protection concept for electro-optical sensors to suppress dazzling in the visible spectral region. The key element of the concept is the use of a digital micromirror device (DMD in combination with wavelength multiplexing. This approach allows selective spectral filtering in defined regions of interest in the scene. The system offers the possibility of automatic attenuation of dazzling laser radiation.

  6. New fiber optic sensor: application to refractive index sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriaudeau, Fabrice; Wig, A. G.; Passian, A.; Ferrell, Trinidad L.

    2000-08-01

    Optical fibers are more and more used as chemical sensors. This is, mainly due to their low cost, and their high efficiency to work in harsh and remote environments. Many devices are based on thin film plasmon excitation where a metal coating is evaporated onto the core of an etched optical fiber. In this paper, a new sensor configuration is presented. Instead of exciting surface plasmon waves on a thin film, surface plasma waves are excited on metal islands. The fiber is coated with 3 layers of gold. Each layer is annealed before the next layer is evaporated onto it. this is done to avoid any light leakage, fact which was found on a prior version with only one gold coating. Different sets of fibers were tested and sensitive and reproducible results for liquid with refraction indices varying from 1.3 to 1.7 were obtained.

  7. An Optical Fibre-Based Sensor for Respiratory Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Krehel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a textile-based respiratory sensing system is presented. Highly flexible polymeric optical fibres (POFs that react to applied pressure were integrated into a carrier fabric to form a wearable sensing system. After the evaluation of different optical fibres, different setups were compared. To demonstrate the feasibility of such a wearable sensor, the setup featuring the best performance was placed on the human torso, and thus it was possible to measure the respiratory rate. Furthermore, we show that such a wearable system enables to keep track of the way of breathing (diaphragmatic, upper costal and mixed when the sensor is placed at different positions of the torso. A comparison of the results with the output of some commercial respiratory measurements devices confirmed the utility of such a monitoring device.

  8. Optical Electronic Bragg Reflection Sensor System with Hydrodynamic Flow Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, D. R.

    2003-01-01

    This project, as described in the following report, involved design and fabrication of fiber optic sensors for the detection and measurement of dynamic fluid density variations. These devices are created using UV (ultraviolet) ablation and generally modified transverse holographic fiber grating techniques. The resulting phase gratings created on or immediately underneath the flat portion of D-shaped optical waveguides are characterized as evanescent field sensing devices. The primary applications include the sensor portion of a real-time localized or distributed measurement system for hydrodynamic flow, fluid density measurements, and phase change phenomena. Several design modifications were implemented in an attempt to accomplish the tasks specified in our original proposal. In addition, we have established key collaborative relationships with numerous people and institutions.

  9. Development of an optical fiber sensor for angular displacement measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Gu-In; Kim, Ji-Sun; Lee, Tae-Hee; Choi, Ju-Hyeon; Oh, Han-Byeol; Kim, A-Hee; Eom, Gwang-Moon; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Park, Jong-Rak; Lee, Young-Jae; Park, Hee-Jung; Jun, Jae-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    For diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, the joint angle measurement of a patient after an accident or a surgical operation is significant for monitoring and evaluating the recovering process. This paper proposed an optical fiber sensor for the measurement of angular displacement. The effect of beveled fiber angle on the detected light signal was investigated to find an appropriate mathematical model. Beveled fiber tips redirected the light over a range of angles away from the fiber axis. Inverse polynomial models were applied to directly obtain and display the joint angle change in real time with the Lab-VIEW program. The actual joint angle correlated well with the calculated LabVIEW output angle over the test range. The proposed optical sensor is simple, cost effective, small in size, and can evaluate the joint angle in real time. This method is expected to be useful in the field of rehabilitation and sport science.

  10. Persistent optically induced magnetism in oxygen-deficient strontium titanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, W D; Ambwani, P; Bombeck, M; Thompson, J D; Haugstad, G; Leighton, C; Crooker, S A

    2014-05-01

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is a foundational material in the emerging field of complex oxide electronics. Although its bulk electronic and optical properties are rich and have been studied for decades, SrTiO3 has recently become a renewed focus of materials research catalysed in part by the discovery of superconductivity and magnetism at interfaces between SrTiO3 and other non-magnetic oxides. Here we illustrate a new aspect to the phenomenology of magnetism in SrTiO3 by reporting the observation of an optically induced and persistent magnetization in slightly oxygen-deficient bulk SrTiO3-δ crystals using magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry. This zero-field magnetization appears below ~18 K, persists for hours below 10 K, and is tunable by means of the polarization and wavelength of sub-bandgap (400-500 nm) light. These effects occur only in crystals containing oxygen vacancies, revealing a detailed interplay between magnetism, lattice defects, and light in an archetypal complex oxide material.

  11. Smart aircraft composite structures with embedded small-diameter optical fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Nobuo; Minakuchi, Shu

    2012-02-01

    This talk describes the embedded optical fiber sensor systems for smart aircraft composite structures. First, a summary of the current Japanese national project on structural integrity diagnosis of aircraft composite structures is described with special emphasis on the use of embedded small-diameter optical fiber sensors including FBG sensors. Then, some examples of life-cycle monitoring of aircraft composite structures are presented using embedded small-diameter optical fiber sensors for low-cost and reliable manufacturing merits.

  12. Hazard monitoring in mines using fibre optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T.; Wang, C.; Wei, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Huo, D.; Shang, Y.; Wang, Z.; Ning, Y.

    2009-10-01

    We report the development of a comprehensive safety monitoring solution for coal mines. A number of fibre optic sensors have been developed and deployed for safety monitoring of mine roof integrity and hazardous gases. The FOS-based mine hazard detection system offers unique advantages of intrinsic safety, multi-location and multi-parameter monitoring. They can be potentially used to build expert systems for mine hazard early detection and prevention.

  13. Miniaturised Optical Fibre Sensor for Dew Detection Inside Organ Pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Baldini; Riccardo Falciai; Andrea Azelio Mencaglia; Folco Senesi; Dario Camuffo; Antonio della Valle; Carl Johan Bergsten

    2008-01-01

    A new optical sensor for the continuous monitoring of the dew formation inside organ pipes was designed. This aspect is particularly critical for the conservation of organs in unheated churches since the dew formation or the condensation on the pipe surfaces can contribute to many kinds of physical and chemical disruptive mechanisms. The working principle is based on the change in the reflectivity which is observed on the surface of the fibre tip, when a water layer is formed on its distal en...

  14. Research of optical rainfall sensor based on CCD linear array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Bifeng; LIU; Yuyan; LU; Ying; WU; Shangqian

    2015-01-01

    Rainfall monitoring is one of the most important meteorological observation elements for the disaster weather. The maintenance of current tipping bucket rain gauge and weighing type rain gauge is a critical issue. The optical rainfall sensor based on CCD linear array is mainly studied in this paper. Because of the maintenance-free time and good adaptability,it can be widely used in the automatic rainfall monitoring in severe environment and have a good perspective in using.

  15. Flight Hydrogen Sensor for use in the ISS Oxygen Generation Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    MSadoques, George, Jr.; Makel, Darby B.

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a description of the hydrogen sensor Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) used on the Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA), to be operated on the International Space Station (ISS). The hydrogen sensor ORU is being provided by Makel Engineering, Inc. (MEI) to monitor the oxygen outlet for the presence of hydrogen. The hydrogen sensor ORU is a triple redundant design where each sensor converts raw measurements to actual hydrogen partial pressure that is reported to the OGA system controller. The signal outputs are utilized for system shutdown in the event that the hydrogen concentration in the oxygen outlet line exceeds the specified shutdown limit. Improvements have been made to the Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) based sensing element, screening, and calibration process to meet OGA operating requirements. Two flight hydrogen sensor ORUs have successfully completed the acceptance test phase. This paper also describes the sensor s performance during acceptance testing, additional tests planned to extend the operational performance calibration cycle, and integration with the OGA system.

  16. Multiplexed detection of biological agents using optical microchip sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatta, D.; McDonnell, M. B.; Perkins, E.

    2010-10-01

    A multi-channel optical microchip sensor system suitable for real-time, label-free detection of a wide range of biological agents is presented. SpectroSensTM chips containing multiple high-precision planar Bragg gratings are exploited as lowcost, robust refractive index sensors. Sensitivity to biological agents is conferred by functionalising individual sensing regions with different antibodies selected against numerous targets of interest. Antigen binding to the surfaceimmobilised antibodies results in localised changes in refractive index; upon laser-induced interrogation of the sensing region via optical fibres, these antibody-antigen interactions manifest as increases in wavelength of light reflected from the sensor chip. Real-time detection of multiple biological agents including bacterial cells/spores, viruses and toxins has been demonstrated. Further improvements to sensor performance including physical and chemical methods are also investigated. This multi-analyte capability highlights the potential use of this sensing technology in applications ranging from bio-hazard detection for defence purposes to point-of-care clinical diagnostics.

  17. Interferometric and localized surface plasmon based fiber optic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muri, Harald Ian D. I.; Bano, Andon; Hjelme, Dag Roar

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a novel single point, multi-parameter, fiber optic sensor concept based on a combination of interferometric and plasmonic sensor modalities on an optical fiber end face. The sensor consists of a micro-Fabry-Perot interferometer in the form of a hemispherical stimuli-responsive hydrogel with immobilized gold nanoparticles. We present results of proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensing of refractive index (RI) in the visible range and interferometric measurements of volumetric changes of the pH stimuli-responsive hydrogel in near infrared range. The response of LSPR to RI (Δλr/ΔRI 877nm/RI) and the free spectral range (FSR) to pH (ΔpH/ΔFSR = 0.09624/nm) were measured with LSPR relatively constant for hydrogel swelling degree and FSR relatively constant for RI. We expect this novel sensor concept to be of great value for biosensors for medical applications.

  18. Improved fiber-optic chemical sensor for penicillin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Healy, B.G.; Walt, D.R. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    1995-12-15

    An optical penicillin biosensor is described, based on the enzyme penicillinase. The sensor is fabricated by selective photodeposition of analyte-sensitive polymer matrices on optical imaging fibers. The penicillin-sensitive matrices are fabricated by immobilizing the enzyme as micrometer-sized particles in a polymer hydrogel with a covalently bound pH indicator. An array of penicillin-sensitive and pH-sensitive matrices are fabricated on the same fiber. This array allows for the simultaneous, independent measurement of pH and penicillin. Independent measurement of the two analytes allows penicillin to be quantitated in the presence of a concurrent pH change. An analysis was conducted of enzyme kinetic parameters in order to model the penicillin response of the sensor at all pH values. This analysis accounts for the varying activity of the immobilized penicillinase at different pH values. The sensor detects penicillin in the range 0.25-10.0 mM in the pH range 6.2-7.5. The sensor was used to quantify penicillin concentration produced during a Penicillium chrysogenum fermentation. 27 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Optically Powered Temperature Sensor with Optical Fiber Ling①

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUZhijing; WANGYutian

    1997-01-01

    The principle of a new optical fiber temperature transducer is presented,and ingenious design scheme of this transducer is given.Because taking the special modulation and ratio measurement,this new transducer has provided with high characteristics:experimental transmitting distance is 500m;measurement error,in the measured temperature range of 0-250℃,,is less than ±0.5℃;power consumption of the probe is less than 300μW.Finally,some points of the experiment are given.

  20. Engineering materials for mid-infrared optical sensor applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson K. A

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Planar optical structures based on functionalized chalcogenide glasses provide a superb device platform for chemical and biological sensing applications. Chalcogenide glasses have demonstrated promise as materials for infrared sensing as they exhibit transparency over a large range of infrared wavelengths and tunable optical properties through doping and/or compositional tailoring. Waveguides, resonators and other components processed on-chip (silicon, Si can be realized such that the strong enhancement in the electromagnetic field confined within a high index contrast resonator, leads to highly sensitive photon-matter interactions in a small footprint. In this paper we discuss the development of highly sensitive chalcogenide glass based microdisk resonator sensors that measure resonant peak shifts caused by refractive index change upon exposure to a chemical analyte. The specificity of the microdisk resonator sensors is enhanced by applying specialized polymer films and nanofoams that respond in a predictable fashion when exposed to a chemical analyte of interest. Discussed are key material science challenges needed to enable highly sensitive and specific sensors based on such complex multi-material assemblies and the fabrication issues that ultimately define resulting optical performance.

  1. Distributed acoustic fibre optic sensors for condition monitoring of pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussels, Maria-Teresa; Chruscicki, Sebastian; Habib, Abdelkarim; Krebber, Katerina

    2016-05-01

    Industrial piping systems are particularly relevant to public safety and the continuous availability of infrastructure. However, condition monitoring systems based on many discrete sensors are generally not well-suited for widespread piping systems due to considerable installation effort, while use of distributed fibre-optic sensors would reduce this effort to a minimum. Specifically distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) is employed for detection of third-party threats and leaks in oil and gas pipelines in recent years and can in principle also be applied to industrial plants. Further possible detection routes amenable by DAS that could identify damage prior to emission of medium are subject of a current project at BAM, which aims at qualifying distributed fibre optic methods such as DAS as a means for spatially continuous monitoring of industrial piping systems. Here, first tests on a short pipe are presented, where optical fibres were applied directly to the surface. An artificial signal was used to define suitable parameters of the measurement system and compare different ways of applying the sensor.

  2. Curvature optical fiber sensor by using bend enhanced method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianrong ZHANG; Hairong LIU; Xinkun WU

    2009-01-01

    Deflection curvature measurement can offer a number of advantages compared with the well-established strain measurement alternative. It is able to measure thin structure; fiber has no resistance with force, which leads to a high precision. There are many kinds of curvature gauges with different operation principles. A low-cost curvature optical fiber sensor using bend enhanced method to improve its curvature measurement sensitivity was devel-oped in recent years. This sensor can distinguish between convex bending and concave bending and has a good linearity in measuring large curvature deformation. Whisper gallery ray theory and Monte Carlo simulation are new achievements by computer experiment. The operation mechanism of this curvature optical fiber sensor is presented based on light scattering theory. The attenuation is ascribed to the transmission mode changing by the curvature of the fiber, which affects the attenuation of the surface scattering. The mathematical model of relationship among light loss, bending curvature, surface roughness, and parameters of the fiber's configuration is also presented. We design different kinds of shapes of sensitive zones; each zone has different parameters. Through detecting their output optical attenuations in different curvatures and fitting the results by exponential decaying functions, the proposed model is demonstrated by experimental results. Also, we compare the experi-mental results with the theoretical analysis and discuss the sensitivity dependence on bending direction.

  3. Development of plasma bolometers using fiber-optic temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, M. L.; Han, M.; Liu, G.; van Eden, G. G.; Evenblij, R.; Haverdings, M.; Stratton, B. C.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of radiated power in magnetically confined plasmas are important for exhaust studies in present experiments and expected to be a critical diagnostic for future fusion reactors. Resistive bolometer sensors have long been utilized in tokamaks and helical devices but suffer from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Results are shown from initial testing of a new bolometer concept based on fiber-optic temperature sensor technology. A small, 80 μm diameter, 200 μm long silicon pillar attached to the end of a single mode fiber-optic cable acts as a Fabry-Pérot cavity when broadband light, λo ˜ 1550 nm, is transmitted along the fiber. Changes in temperature alter the optical path length of the cavity primarily through the thermo-optic effect, resulting in a shift of fringes reflected from the pillar detected using an I-MON 512 OEM spectrometer. While initially designed for use in liquids, this sensor has ideal properties for use as a plasma bolometer: a time constant, in air, of ˜150 ms, strong absorption in the spectral range of plasma emission, immunity to local EMI, and the ability to measure changes in temperature remotely. Its compact design offers unique opportunities for integration into the vacuum environment in places unsuitable for a resistive bolometer. Using a variable focus 5 mW, 405 nm, modulating laser, the signal to noise ratio versus power density of various bolometer technologies are directly compared, estimating the noise equivalent power density (NEPD). Present tests show the fiber-optic bolometer to have NEPD of 5-10 W/m2 when compared to those of the resistive bolometer which can achieve coatings, along with improving the spectral resolution of the interrogator.

  4. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III

    2004-04-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. The luminescence of Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} immobilized in a sol-gel matrix was measured as a function of heater temperature up to 200 C, in an inert environment. While the luminescence decreased with temperature, the integrated intensity at 200 C should be sufficient to enable detection of the luminescence in a fiber geometry. Previously we found that aging Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} at temperatures above 250 C converts the canary yellow Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} to a non-luminescent gray solid. Optical and thermal aging experiments show that the alkali metal salts of Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} have higher thermal stabilities and remain luminescent after aging at 280 C.

  5. Tri-Axial MRI Compatible Fiber-optic Force Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, U-Xuan; Yang, Bo; Gullapalli, Rao; Desai, Jaydev P.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been gaining popularity over standard imaging modalities like ultrasound and CT because of its ability to provide excellent soft-tissue contrast. However, due to the working principle of MRI, a number of conventional force sensors are not compatible. One popular solution is to develop a fiber-optic force sensor. However, the measurements along the principal axes of a number of these force sensors are highly cross-coupled. One of the objectives of this paper is to minimize this coupling effect. In addition, this paper describes the design of elastic frame structures that are obtained systematically using topology optimization techniques for maximizing sensor resolution and sensor bandwidth. Through the topology optimization approach, we ensure that the frames are linked from the input to output. The elastic frame structures are then fabricated using polymers materials, such as ABS and Delrin®, as they are ideal materials for use in MRI environment. However, the hysteresis effect seen in the displacement-load graph of plastic materials is known to affect the accuracy. Hence, this paper also proposes modeling and addressing this hysteretic effect using Prandtl-Ishlinskii play operators. Finally, experiments are conducted to evaluate the sensor’s performance, as well as its compatibility in MRI under continuous imaging. PMID:21666783

  6. Evaluation on Radiometric Capability of Chinese Optical Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Aixia; Zhong, Bo; Wu, Shanlong; Liu, Qinhuo

    2017-01-01

    The radiometric capability of on-orbit sensors should be updated on time due to changes induced by space environmental factors and instrument aging. Some sensors, such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), have onboard calibrators, which enable real-time calibration. However, most Chinese remote sensing satellite sensors lack onboard calibrators. Their radiometric calibrations have been updated once a year based on a vicarious calibration procedure, which has affected the applications of the data. Therefore, a full evaluation of the sensors’ radiometric capabilities is essential before quantitative applications can be made. In this study, a comprehensive procedure for evaluating the radiometric capability of several Chinese optical satellite sensors is proposed. In this procedure, long-term radiometric stability and radiometric accuracy are the two major indicators for radiometric evaluation. The radiometric temporal stability is analyzed by the tendency of long-term top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance variation; the radiometric accuracy is determined by comparison with the TOA reflectance from MODIS after spectrally matching. Three Chinese sensors including the Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera onboard Huan Jing 1 satellite (HJ-1), as well as the Visible and Infrared Radiometer (VIRR) and Medium-Resolution Spectral Imager (MERSI) onboard the Feng Yun 3 satellite (FY-3) are evaluated in reflective bands based on this procedure. The results are reasonable, and thus can provide reliable reference for the sensors’ application, and as such will promote the development of Chinese satellite data. PMID:28117745

  7. Optical monitoring of testicular torsion using a miniaturized near infrared spectroscopy sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadgan, Babak; Kajbafzadeh, Majid; Nigro, Mark; Kajbafzadeh, A. M.; Macnab, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    Background: Testicular torsion is an acute urological emergency occurring in children and adolescents. Accurate and fast diagnosis is important as the resulting ischemia can destroy the testis. Currently, Doppler ultrasound is the preferred diagnostic method. Ultrasound is not readily available in all centers which may delay surgical treatment. In this study, a rat model was used to examine the feasibility and sensitivity of using spatially-resolved near infrared spectroscopy (SR-NIRS) with a custom-made miniaturized optical sensor probe to detect and study changes in testicular hemodynamics and oxygenation during three degrees of induced testicular torsion, and after detorsion. Methods: Eight anesthetized rats (16 testes) were studied using SR-NIRS with the miniaturized optical probe applied directly onto the surface of the surgically exposed testis during 360, 720 and 1080 degrees of torsion followed by detorsion. Oxygenated, deoxygenated and total hemoglobin and TOI% were studied pre-and post-manipulations. Results: NIRS monitoring reflected acute testicular ischemia and hypoxia on induction of torsion, and tissue reperfusionreoxygenation after detorsion. Testicular torsion at 720 degrees induced the maximum observed degree of hypoxic changes. In all cases, rhythmic changes were observed in the NIRS signals before inducing torsion; these disappeared after applying 360 degrees of torsion and did not reappear after detorsion. Conclusion: This animal study indicates that SR-NIRS monitoring of the testes using a directly applied miniature sensor is a feasible and sensitive method to detect testicular ischemia and hypoxia immediately after torsion occurs, and testicular reperfusion upon detorsion. This study offers the potential for a SR-NIRS system with a miniaturized sensor to be explored further as a rapid, noninvasive, optical method for detecting testicular torsion in children.

  8. Electro-optic architecture (EOA) for sensors and actuators in aircraft propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glomb, W. L., Jr.

    1989-06-01

    Results of a study to design an optimal architecture for electro-optical sensing and control in advanced aircraft and space systems are described. The propulsion full authority digital Electronic Engine Control (EEC) was the focus for the study. The recommended architecture is an on-engine EEC which contains electro-optic interface circuits for fiber-optic sensors on the engine. Size and weight are reduced by multiplexing arrays of functionally similar sensors on a pair of optical fibers to common electro-optical interfaces. The architecture contains common, multiplex interfaces to seven sensor groups: (1) self luminous sensors; (2) high temperatures; (3) low temperatures; (4) speeds and flows; (5) vibration; (6) pressures; and (7) mechanical positions. Nine distinct fiber-optic sensor types were found to provide these sensing functions: (1) continuous wave (CW) intensity modulators; (2) time division multiplexing (TDM) digital optic codeplates; (3) time division multiplexing (TDM) analog self-referenced sensors; (4) wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) digital optic code plates; (5) wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) analog self-referenced intensity modulators; (6) analog optical spectral shifters; (7) self-luminous bodies; (8) coherent optical interferometers; and (9) remote electrical sensors. The report includes the results of a trade study including engine sensor requirements, environment, the basic sensor types, and relevant evaluation criteria. These figures of merit for the candidate interface types were calculated from the data supplied by leading manufacturers of fiber-optic sensors.

  9. Optical sensor for precision in-situ spindle health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rui

    An optical sensor which can record in-situ measurements of the dynamic runout of a precision miniature spindle system in a simple and low-cost manner is proposed in this dissertation. Spindle error measurement technology utilizes a cylindrical or spherical target artifact attached to the miniature spindle with non-contact sensors, typically capacitive sensors which are calibrated with a flat target surface not a curved target surface. Due to the different behavior of an electric field between a flat plate and a curved surface and an electric field between two flat plates, capacitive sensors is not suitable for measuring target surfaces smaller than its effective sensing area. The proposed sensor utilizes curved-edge diffraction (CED), which uses the effect of cylindrical surface curvature on the diffraction phenomenon in the transition regions adjacent to shadow, transmission, and reflection boundaries. The laser diodes light incident on the cylindrical surface of precision spindle and photodetectors collect the total field produced by the diffraction around the target surface. Laser diode in the different two direction are incident to the spindle shaft edges along the X and Y axes, four photodetectors collect the total fields produced by interference of multiple waves due to CED around the spindle shaft edges. The X and Y displacement can be obtained from the total fields using two differential amplifier configurations, respectively. Precision miniature spindle (shaft φ5.0mm) runout was measured, and the proposed sensor can perform curve at the different speed of rotation from 1500rpm to 8000rpm in the X and Y axes, respectively. On the other hand, CED also show changes for different running time and temperature of spindle. These results indicate that the proposed sensor promises to be effective for in-situ monitoring of the miniature spindle's health with high resolution, wide bandwidth, and low-cost.

  10. Bedside arterial blood gas monitoring system using fluorescent optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartnik, Daniel J.; Rymut, Russell A.

    1995-05-01

    We describe a bedside arterial blood gas (ABG) monitoring system which uses fluorescent optical sensors in the measurement of blood pH, PCO2 and PO2. The Point-of-Care Arterial Blood Gas Monitoring System consists of the SensiCathTM optical sensor unit manufactured by Optical Sensors Incorporated and the TramTM Critical Care Monitoring System with ABG Module manufactured by Marquette Electronics Incorporated. Current blood gas measurement techniques require a blood sample to be removed from the patient and transported to an electrochemical analyzer for analysis. The ABG system does not require removal of blood from the patient or transport of the sample. The sensor is added to the patient's existing arterial line. ABG measurements are made by drawing a small blood sample from the arterial line in sufficient quantity to ensure an undiluted sample at the sensor. Measurements of pH, PCO2 and PO2 are made within 60 seconds. The blood is then returned to the patient, the line flushed and results appear on the bedside monitor. The ABG system offers several advantages over traditional electrochemical analyzers. Since the arterial line remains closed during the blood sampling procedure the patient's risk of infection is reduced and the caregiver's exposure to blood is eliminated. The single-use, disposable sensor can be measure 100 blood samples over 72 hours after a single two-point calibration. Quality Assurance checks are also available and provide the caregiver the ability to assess system performance even after the sensor is patient attached. The ABG module integrates with an existing bedside monitoring system. This allows ABG results to appear on the same display as ECG, respiration, blood pressure, cardiac output, SpO2, and other clinical information. The small module takes up little space in the crowded intensive care unit. Performance studies compare the ABG system with an electrochemical blood gas analyzer. Study results demonstrated accurate and precise blood

  11. Optic nerve oxygen tension in pigs and the effect of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, E; Jensen, P K; Eysteinsson, T

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate how the oxygen tension of the optic nerve (ONP(O)2) is affected by the administration of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitors dorzolamide and acetazolamide and by alterations in oxygen and carbon dioxide in the breathing mixture.......To evaluate how the oxygen tension of the optic nerve (ONP(O)2) is affected by the administration of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitors dorzolamide and acetazolamide and by alterations in oxygen and carbon dioxide in the breathing mixture....

  12. Biochemical measurement of bilirubin with an evanescent wave optical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poscio, Patrick; Depeursinge, Christian D.; Emery, Y.; Parriaux, Olivier M.; Voirin, Guy

    1991-09-01

    Optical sensing techniques can be considered as powerful information sources on the biochemistry of tissue, blood, and physiological fluids. Various sensing modalities can be considered: spectroscopic determination of the fluorescence or optical absorption of the biological medium itself, or more generally, of a reagent in contact with the biological medium. The principle and realization of the optical sensor developed are based on the use of polished fibers: the cladding of a monomode fiber is removed on a longitudinal section. The device can then be inserted into an hypodermic needle for in-vivo measurements. Using this minute probe, local measurements of the tissue biochemistry or metabolic processes can be obtained. The sensing mechanism is based on the propagation of the evanescent wave in the tissues or reagent: the proximity of the fiber core allows the penetration of the model field tail into the sensed medium, with a uniquely defined field distribution. Single or multi-wavelength analysis of the light collected into the fiber yields the biochemical information. Here an example of this sensing technology is discussed. In-vitro measurement of bilirubin in gastric juice demonstrates that the evanescent wave optical sensor provides a sensitivity which matches the physiological concentrations. A device is proposed for in-vivo monitoring of bilirubin concentration in the gastro-oesophageal tract.

  13. Optical design of microlens array for CMOS image sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongzhu; Lai, Liping

    2016-10-01

    The optical crosstalk between the pixel units can influence the image quality of CMOS image sensor. In the meantime, the duty ratio of CMOS is low because of its pixel structure. These two factors cause the low detection sensitivity of CMOS. In order to reduce the optical crosstalk and improve the fill factor of CMOS image sensor, a microlens array has been designed and integrated with CMOS. The initial parameters of the microlens array have been calculated according to the structure of a CMOS. Then the parameters have been optimized by using ZEMAX and the microlens arrays with different substrate thicknesses have been compared. The results show that in order to obtain the best imaging quality, when the effect of optical crosstalk for CMOS is the minimum, the best distance between microlens array and CMOS is about 19.3 μm. When incident light successively passes through microlens array and the distance, obtaining the minimum facula is around 0.347 um in the active area. In addition, when the incident angle of the light is 0o 22o, the microlens array has obvious inhibitory effect on the optical crosstalk. And the anti-crosstalk distance between microlens array and CMOS is 0 μm 162 μm.

  14. Design of an optical sensor based on plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharwat, Marwa M.; AlSharif, Haya; Alshabani, Haifaa; Qadi, Eilaf; Sultan, Maha

    2016-04-01

    Plasmonic nano-structured array sensors have been highlighted by their tremendously promising applications, such as the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) optical biosensors. In this paper, within the visible spectrum region, the optical transmission properties of a metallic thin film deposited over dielectric films of various refraction indices are investigated. With finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, we investigate the optical transmission spectra of such plasmonic structures based on both nano-holes and nano-disc arrays. This investigation includes monitoring the modification in both the transmission resonance wavelengths and peak transmittance. The results of this study provide a better understanding of the interaction between light and plasmonic nano-hole and nano-disc arrays. It shows that the changing the shapes of the nano-holes can affect the resonance wavelengths and the intensity of transmitted spectra and alter its resonance peak transmittance values. We found that the interaction coupling between the localized plasmons (LSP) and the propagating surface plasmons (PSP) can be tuned to boost the performance of the optical sensor.

  15. Testing of a Fiber Optic Wear, Erosion and Regression Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Valentin; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2011-01-01

    The nature of the physical processes and harsh environments associated with erosion and wear in propulsion environments makes their measurement and real-time rate quantification difficult. A fiber optic sensor capable of determining the wear (regression, erosion, ablation) associated with these environments has been developed and tested in a number of different applications to validate the technique. The sensor consists of two fiber optics that have differing attenuation coefficients and transmit light to detectors. The ratio of the two measured intensities can be correlated to the lengths of the fiber optic lines, and if the fibers and the host parent material in which they are embedded wear at the same rate the remaining length of fiber provides a real-time measure of the wear process. Testing in several disparate situations has been performed, with the data exhibiting excellent qualitative agreement with the theoretical description of the process and when a separate calibrated regression measurement is available good quantitative agreement is obtained as well. The light collected by the fibers can also be used to optically obtain the spectra and measure the internal temperature of the wear layer.

  16. Effect of oxygen flow on the structure and optical properties of the Gd2O3 optical films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siyu; Ma, Ping; Pu, Yunti; Qiao, Zhao; Zhang, Mingxiao; Lu, Zhongwen; Peng, Dongxu

    2016-10-01

    Gd2O3 thin films were deposited by Ion-beam sputtering (IBS) under the oxygen flow of 0 sccm~30 sccm. The structure and optical properties of the Gd2O3 optical films were investigated by Lambdar950 spectrophotometer, laser calorimetry and atomic force microscopy (AFM). When oxygen flow was less than 10 sccm, with the increase of oxygen flow, the transmittance of the films increased, at the same time absorptance and the surface roughness of the films decreased. While the flow was more than 10 sccm, with the increase of the flow rate, the surface roughness of the films increased, but the transmittance and absorptance did not show any apparent change. The results show that both the structure and optical properties are closely related to the flow of oxygen. XPS measurements demonstrated that when the oxygen flow increase from 0 sccm to 10 sccm, the defect oxygen decreases. But when the oxygen flow increase from 10 sccm to 30 sccm, the defect oxygen increase. The XPS spectra show that when the oxygen flow was 10 sccm, the defect oxygen was the least. Thus when the oxygen flow was 10 sccm, the structure and optical properties of the Gd2O3 optical films were the best.

  17. Development and Performance Evaluation of Optical Sensors for High Temperature Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, G.; Varga, D.; Floyd, B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses fiber optic sensors designed and constructed to withstand extreme temperatures of aircraft engine. The paper describes development and performance evaluation of fiber optic Bragg grating based sensors. It also describes the design and presents test results of packaged sensors subjected to temperatures up to 1000 C for prolonged periods of time.

  18. Application of Optical Flow Sensors for Dead Reckoning, Heading Reference, Obstacle Detection, and Obstacle Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    OPTICAL FLOW SENSORS FOR DEAD RECKONING, HEADING REFERENCE, OBSTACLE DETECTION, AND OBSTACLE AVOIDANCE by Tarek M. Nejah September 2015... SENSORS FOR DEAD RECKONING, HEADING REFERENCE, OBSTACLE DETECTION, AND OBSTACLE AVOIDANCE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Nejah, Tarek M. 7...avoidance using only one optical mouse sensor was presented in this thesis. Odometry, position tracking, and obstacle avoidance are important issues in

  19. The oxygen sensor PHD3 limits glycolysis under hypoxia via direct binding to pyruvate kinase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Chen; Oliver Rinner; Dominika Czernik; Katarzyna J Nytko; Dan Zheng; Daniel P Stiehl; Nicola Zamboni; Matthias Gstaiger; Christian Frei

    2011-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Oxygen levels are critical for cellular physiology.Under low oxygen (hypoxia),cells increase glycolysis while limiting mitochondrial oxidative metabolism.Such adaptation is largely mediated by the transcription factors HIF,which accumulate under hypoxia [1,2].Prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHD) function as cellular oxygen sensors and target HIF for subsequent degradation under normoxia [2].The PHD/HIF pathway is conserved in Drosophila,where a single prolyl hydroxylase,Fatiga,has been characterized.We have previously reported that Fatiga regulates cellular growth rates in a HIF-independent manner,yet mechanisms remained elusive [3].

  20. Polymer Optical Fibre Sensors for Endoscopic Opto-Acoustic Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broadway, Christian; Gallego, Daniel; Woyessa, Getinet

    2015-01-01

    is the physical size of the device, allowing compatibility with current technology, while governing flexibility of the distal end of the endoscope based on the needs of the sensor. Polymer optical fibre (POF) presents a novel approach for endoscopic applications and has been positively discussed and compared...... in existing publications. A great advantage can be obtained for endoscopy due to a small size and array potential to provide discrete imaging speed improvements. Optical fibre exhibits numerous advantages over conventional piezo-electric transducers, such as immunity from electromagnetic interference...... and a higher resolution at small sizes. Furthermore, micro structured polymer optical fibres offer over 12 times the sensitivity of silica fibre. We present a polymer fibre Bragg grating ultrasound detector with a core diameter of 125 microns. We discuss the ultrasonic signals received and draw conclusions...

  1. Optical fiber temperature sensors: applications in heat treatments for foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Morales, María Elena; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; López-Malo, Aurelio

    2010-10-01

    Heat treatments are important methods to provide safe foods. Conventional heat treatments involve the application of steam and recently microwave treatments have been studied and applied as they are considered as fast, clean and efficient. Optical fiber sensing is an excellent tool to measure the temperature during microwave treatments. This paper shows the application of optical fiber temperature sensing during the heat treatment of different foods such as vegetables (jalapeño pepper and cilantro), cheese and ostrich meat. Reaching the target temperature, important bacteria were inactivated: Salmonella, Listeria and Escherichia coli. Thus, the use of optical fiber sensors has resulted be a useful way to develop protocols to inactivate microorganisms and to propose new methods for food processing.

  2. Development of a new catalase activity assay for biological samples using optical CUPRAC sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Alkan, Fulya Üstün; Apak, Reşat

    2014-11-01

    A novel catalase activity assay was developed for biological samples (liver and kidney tissue homogenates) using a rapid and low-cost optical sensor-based ‘cupric reducing antioxidant capacity' (CUPRAC) method. The reagent, copper(II)-neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, was immobilized onto a cation-exchanger film of Nafion, and the absorbance changes associated with the formation of the highly-colored Cu(I)-Nc chelate as a result of reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was measured at 450 nm. When catalase was absent, H2O2 produced the CUPRAC chromophore, whereas catalase, being an effective H2O2 scavenger, completely annihilated the CUPRAC signal due to H2O2. Thus, the CUPRAC absorbance due to H2O2 oxidation concomitant with Cu(I)-Nc formation decreased proportionally with catalase. The developed sensor gave a linear response over a wide concentration range of H2O2 (0.68-78.6 μM). This optical sensor-based method applicable to tissue homogenates proved to be efficient for low hydrogen peroxide concentrations (physiological and nontoxic levels) to which the widely used UV method is not accurately responsive. Thus, conventional problems of the UV method arising from relatively low sensitivity and selectivity, and absorbance disturbance due to gaseous oxygen evolution were overcome. The catalase findings of the proposed method for tissue homogenates were statistically alike with those of HPLC.

  3. Unbalanced Michelson's interferometer as a fiber optic distributed sensor of external signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacki, M.; Szustakowski, Mieczyslaw; Zyczkowski, Marek

    2001-08-01

    The subject of this work is a novel fiber optic distributed sensor system. The system uses a technique called multiplexed reflectometric interferometry to measure dynamic strain in a network of single mode optical fiber sensors. The sensor is constructed on unbalanced fiber optic Michelson's interferometer is activated by series of double pulse. The time interval between those pulses depends on the length of the section of sensor. Acousto-optical modulator acts as an optical frequency shifter. A change in a frequency of electrical pulses exciting the modulator result in a frequency shift in each generated wave packet.

  4. Fluorophore-based sensor for oxygen radicals in processing plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, Faraz A.; Shohet, J. Leon, E-mail: shohet@engr.wisc.edu [Plasma Processing and Technology Laboratory and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Sabat, Grzegorz; Sussman, Michael R. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Nishi, Yoshio [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    A high concentration of radicals is present in many processing plasmas, which affects the processing conditions and the properties of materials exposed to the plasma. Determining the types and concentrations of free radicals present in the plasma is critical in order to determine their effects on the materials being processed. Current methods for detecting free radicals in a plasma require multiple expensive and bulky instruments, complex setups, and often, modifications to the plasma reactor. This work presents a simple technique that detects reactive-oxygen radicals incident on a surface from a plasma. The measurements are made using a fluorophore dye that is commonly used in biological and cellular systems for assay labeling in liquids. Using fluorometric analysis, it was found that the fluorophore reacts with oxygen radicals incident from the plasma, which is indicated by degradation of its fluorescence. As plasma power was increased, the quenching of the fluorescence significantly increased. Both immobilized and nonimmobilized fluorophore dyes were used and the results indicate that both states function effectively under vacuum conditions. The reaction mechanism is very similar to that of the liquid dye.

  5. A carbon monoxide gas sensor using oxygen plasma modified carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weiyun; Fam, Derrick Wen Hui; Yin, Zongyou; Sun, Ting; Tan, Hui Teng; Liu, Weiling; Iing Yoong Tok, Alfred; Boey, Yin Chiang Freddy; Zhang, Hua; Hng, Huey Hoon; Yan, Qingyu

    2012-10-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a highly toxic gas that can be commonly found in many places. However, it is not easily detected by human olfaction due to its colorless and odorless nature. Therefore, highly sensitive sensors need to be developed for this purpose. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have an immense potential in gas sensing. However, CNT-based gas sensors for sensing CO are seldom reported due to the lack of reactivity between CO and CNTs. In this work, O2 plasma modified CNT was used to fabricate a CNT gas sensor. The plasma treated CNTs showed selectively towards CO, with the capability of sensing low concentrations of CO (5 ppm) at room temperature, while the pristine CNTs showed no response. UV spectra and oxygen reduction reaction provided evidence that the difference in sensing property was due to the elimination of metallic CNTs and enhancement of the oxygen reduction property.

  6. Optical-Based Artificial Palpation Sensors for Lesion Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Jun Park

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Palpation techniques are widely used in medical procedures to detect the presence of lumps or tumors in the soft breast tissues. Since these procedures are very subjective and depend on the skills of the physician, it is imperative to perform detailed a scientific study in order to develop more efficient medical sensors to measure and generate palpation parameters. In this research, we propose an optical-based, artificial palpation sensor for lesion characterization. This has been developed using a multilayer polydimethylsiloxane optical waveguide. Light was generated at the critical angle to reflect totally within the flexible and transparent waveguide. When a waveguide was compressed by an external force, its contact area would deform and cause the light to scatter. The scattered light was captured by a high-resolution camera and saved as an image format. To test the performance of the proposed system, we used a realistic tissue phantom with embedded hard inclusions. The experimental results show that the proposed sensor can detect inclusions and provide the relative value of size, depth, and Young’s modulus of an inclusion.

  7. Fiber-Optic Current Sensor Validation with Triggered Lightning Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.; Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.; Snyder, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    A fiber optic current sensor based on the Faraday Effect is developed that is highly suitable for aircraft installation and can measure total current enclosed in a fiber loop down to DC. Other attributes include being small, light-weight, non-conducting, safe from electromagnetic interference, and free of hysteresis and saturation. The Faraday Effect causes light polarization to rotate when exposed to a magnetic field in the direction of light propagation. Measuring the induced light polarization rotation in fiber loops yields the total current enclosed. Two sensor systems were constructed and installed at Camp Blanding, Florida, measuring rocket-triggered lightning. The systems were similar in design but with different laser wavelengths, sensitivities and ranges. Results are compared to a shunt resistor as reference. The 850nm wavelength system tested in summer 2011 showed good result comparison early. However, later results showed gradual amplitude increase with time, attributed to corroded connections affecting the 50-ohm output termination. The 1550nm system also yielded good results in the summer 2012. The successful measurements demonstrate the fiber optic sensor's accuracies in capturing real lightning currents, and represent an important step toward future aircraft installation.

  8. SINGLE-CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Wang; G. Pickrell; R. May

    2002-09-10

    Accurate measurement of temperature is essential for the safe and efficient operation and control of a wide range of industrial processes. Appropriate techniques and instrumentation are needed depending on the temperature measurement requirements in different industrial processes and working environments. Harsh environments are common in many industrial applications. These harsh environments may involve extreme physical conditions, such as high-temperature, high-pressure, corrosive agents, toxicity, strong electromagnetic interference, and high-energy radiation exposure. Due to these severe environmental conditions, conventional temperature sensors are often difficult to apply. This situation has opened a new but challenging opportunity for the sensor society to provide robust, high-performance, and cost-effective temperature sensors capable of operating in those harsh environments. The focus of this research program has been to develop a temperature measurement system for temperature measurements in the primary and secondary stages of slagging gasifiers. For this application the temperature measurement system must be able to withstand the extremely harsh environment posed by the high temperatures and corrosive agents present in these systems. Real-time, accurate and reliable monitoring of temperature for the coal gasification process is important to realize the full economic potential of these gasification systems. Long life and stability of operation in the high temperature environment is essential for the temperature measurement system to ensure the continuous running of the coal gasification system over the long term. In this high temperature and chemically corrosive environment, rather limited high temperature measurement techniques such as high temperature thermocouples and optical/acoustic pyrometers are available, each with their own limitations. In this research program, five different temperature sensing schemes based on the single crystal sapphire

  9. Optical fiber waveguide sensor for the colorimetric detection of ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Katrin; Rist, Jonas; Peter, Carolin; Wöllenstein, Jürgen

    2011-06-01

    We present the development and characterization of a fiber-optic colorimetric gas sensor combined with the electronic circuitry for measurement control and RFID communication. The gas sensor detects ammonia using a 300 μm polyolefin fiber coated with a gas-sensitive polymer film. The spectral and time-dependent sensitivity of various polymer films was tested in transmission measurements. Light from a standard LED at λ = 590 nm was coupled into the polyolefin fiber through the front face. A prototype of the gas sensor with the direct coupling method was tested under realistic measurement conditions, i.e. battery-driven and in a completely autonomous mode. The sensor system showed good sensitivity to the ammonia concentrations and response times in the order of minutes. The achievable power consumption was below 100μW.The films contained the pH-sensitive dyes bromocresol purple or bromophenol blue embedded in either ethyl cellulose or polyvinyl butyral, and optionally tributyl phosphate as plasticizer. The bromophenol blue based films showed a strong reaction to ammonia, with saturation concentrations around 1000 ppm and response times of about 15 seconds to 100ppm. The colorimetric reaction was simulated using a simple kinetic model which was in good agreement with the experimental results.

  10. The fiber optic gyroscope - a portable rotational ground motion sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassermann, J. M.; Bernauer, F.; Guattari, F.; Igel, H.

    2016-12-01

    It was already shown that a portable broadband rotational ground motion sensor will have large impact on several fields of seismological research such as volcanology, marine geophysics, seismic tomography and planetary seismology. Here, we present results of tests and experiments with one of the first broadband rotational motion sensors available. BlueSeis-3A, is a fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) especially designed for the needs of seismology, developed by iXBlue, France, in close collaboration with researchers financed by the European Research council project ROMY (Rotational motions - a new observable for seismology). We first present the instrument characteristics which were estimated by different standard laboratory tests, e.g. self noise using operational range diagrams or Allan deviation. Next we present the results of a field experiment which was designed to demonstrate the value of a 6C measurement (3 components of translation and 3 components of rotation). This field test took place at Mt. Stromboli volcano, Italy, and is accompanied by seismic array installation to proof the FOG output against more commonly known array derived rotation. As already shown with synthetic data an additional direct measurement of three components of rotation can reduce the ambiguity in source mechanism estimation and can be taken to correct for dynamic tilt of the translational sensors (i.e. seismometers). We can therefore demonstrate that the deployment of a weak motion broadband rotational motion sensor is in fact producing superior results by a reduction of the number of deployed instruments.

  11. An Assessment of Three Different In Situ Oxygen Sensors for Monitoring Silage Production and Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilin Shan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen (O2 concentration inside the substrate is an important measurement for silage-research and-practical management. In the laboratory gas chromatography is commonly employed for O2 measurement. Among sensor-based techniques, accurate and reliable in situ measurement is rare because of high levels of carbon dioxide (CO2 generated by the introduction of O2 in the silage. The presented study focused on assessing three types of commercial O2 sensors, including Clark oxygen electrodes (COE, galvanic oxygen cell (GOC sensors and the Dräger chip measurement system (DCMS. Laboratory cross calibration of O2 versus CO2 (each 0–15 vol.% was made for the COE and the GOC sensors. All calibration results verified that O2 measurements for both sensors were insensitive to CO2. For the O2 in situ measurement in silage, all O2 sensors were first tested in two sealed barrels (diameter 35.7 cm; height: 60 cm to monitor the O2 depletion with respect to the ensiling process (Test-A. The second test (Test-B simulated the silage unloading process by recording the O2 penetration dynamics in three additional barrels, two covered by dry ice (0.6 kg or 1.2 kg of each on the top surface and one without. Based on a general comparison of the experimental data, we conclude that each of these in situ sensor monitoring techniques for O2 concentration in silage exhibit individual advantages and limitations.

  12. A Novel Acoustic Emission Fiber Optic Sensor Based on a Single Mode Optical Fiber Coupler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Rongsheng; LIAO Yanbiao; ZHENG Gangtie; LIU Tongyu; Gerard Franklyn Fernando

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports, for the first time, on the use of a fused-taper single mode optical fiber coupler as a sensing element for the detection of acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasound. When an acoustic wave impinges on the mode-coupling region of a coupler, the coupling coefficient is modulated via the photo-elastic effect. Therefore, the transfer function of the coupler is modulated by an acoustic wave. The sensitivity of the sensor at 140 kHz was approximately 5.2 mV/Pa and the noise floor was 1 Pa. The bandwidth of the sensor was up to several hundred kHz. This AE sensor exhibits significant advantage compared with interferometer-based AE sensors.

  13. Development of Optical Fiber Sensor for Water Quality Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, A. F.; MatJafri, M. Z.

    2008-05-01

    The development of water quality fiber sensor through spectroscopy analysis utilizes the emission of incident light and detection of backscattered light through fiber optic cables as key elements of the design. The system has the capability to detect the light scattered 180° away from the incident light when there is an interaction between the light and the solids suspended in the water. The empirical analysis is conducted for the measurement of the capacity of clay suspended in water (in mg/L). The system consists of two separate light detector circuitry that is sensitive to blue (470 nm) and red (635 nm) monochromatic light. The heart of the system is the sensor, TSLB257 and TSLR257 that having a peak response at wavelength of 470 nm and 635 nm respectively. The final result of detection is submitted to Basic Stamp 2 microcontroller for processing and analysis. The level of turbidity is then defined and displayed by the microcontroller.

  14. Miniaturized fiber-optic Michelson-type interferometric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kent A.; Miller, William V., III; Tran, Tuan A.; Vengsarkar, Ashish M.; Claus, Richard O.

    1991-01-01

    A novel, miniaturized Michelson-type fiber-optic interferometric sensor that is relatively insensitive to temperature drifts is presented. A fused-biconical tapered coupler is cleaved immediately after the coupled length and polished down to the region of the fused cladding, but short of the interaction region. The end of one core is selectively coated with a reflective surface and is used as the reference arm; the other core serves as the sensing arm. The detection of surface acoustic waves, microdisplacements, and magnetic fields is reported. The sensor is shown to be highly stable in comparison to a classic homodyne, uncompensated Michelson interferometer, and signal-to-noise ratios of 65 dB have been obtained.

  15. Highly sensitive optical sensor system for blood leakage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Jie, Chen; Sanae, Mizuno; Touma, Yasunori

    A highly sensitive method for the detection of blood leakage has been developed, and a practical sensor system for blood concentration measurement has been constructed. The present method is based on the attenuation of laser light by blood cells. The effects of the fluctuations of the incident laser light power are eliminated by normalizing the attenuated light intensity by the incident light intensity. A part of the incident laser light is reflected by a beam splitter mounted at the entrance of the test cell, of which the power is measured to provide base data for normalization. The optical path is extended to enhance sensitivity by using a pair of side mirrors. This multi-reflection method is very effective to increase sensitivity; the maximum sensitivity obtained for blood concentration is about 4 X 10 -6 by volume, which is significantly higher than that of the conventional sensors.

  16. Amylin Detection with a Miniature Optical-Fiber Based Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaowen; Ann, Matsko; Hughes, Adam; Reeves, Mark

    We present results of a biosensor based on shifts in the localized surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles self-assembled on the end of an optical fiber. This system allows for detection of protein expression in low sensing volumes and for scanning in cell cultures and tissue samples. Positive and negative controls were done using biotin/avidin and the BSA/Anti-BSA system. These demonstrate that detection is specific and sensitive to nanomolar levels. Sensing of amylin, an important protein for pancreatic function, was performed with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. The measured data demonstrates the difference in sensitivity to the two types of antibodies, and titration experiments establish the sensitivity of the sensor. Further experiments demonstrate that the sensor can be regenerated and then reused.

  17. Coded access optical sensor (CAOS) imager and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riza, Nabeel A.

    2016-04-01

    Starting in 2001, we proposed and extensively demonstrated (using a DMD: Digital Micromirror Device) an agile pixel Spatial Light Modulator (SLM)-based optical imager based on single pixel photo-detection (also called a single pixel camera) that is suited for operations with both coherent and incoherent light across broad spectral bands. This imager design operates with the agile pixels programmed in a limited SNR operations starring time-multiplexed mode where acquisition of image irradiance (i.e., intensity) data is done one agile pixel at a time across the SLM plane where the incident image radiation is present. Motivated by modern day advances in RF wireless, optical wired communications and electronic signal processing technologies and using our prior-art SLM-based optical imager design, described using a surprisingly simple approach is a new imager design called Coded Access Optical Sensor (CAOS) that has the ability to alleviate some of the key prior imager fundamental limitations. The agile pixel in the CAOS imager can operate in different time-frequency coding modes like Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA), Code-Division Multiple Access (CDMA), and Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA). Data from a first CAOS camera demonstration is described along with novel designs of CAOS-based optical instruments for various applications.

  18. In-fiber integrated chemiluminiscence online optical fiber sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinghua; Yuan, Tingting; Yang, Jun; Dong, Biao; Liu, Yanxin; Zheng, Yao; Yuan, Libo

    2013-09-01

    We report an in-fiber integrated chemiluminiscence (CL) sensor based on a kind of hollow optical fiber with a suspended inner core. The path of microfluid is realized by etching microholes for inlets and outlets on the surface of the optical fiber without damaging the inner core and then constructing a melted point beside the microhole of the outlet. When samples are injected into the fiber, the liquids can be fully mixed and form steady microflows. Simultaneously, the photon emitted from the CL reaction is efficiently coupled into the core and can be detected at the end of the optical fiber. In this Letter, the concentration of H2O2 samples is analyzed through the emission intensity of the CL reaction among H2O2, luminol, K3Fe(CN)6, and NaOH in the optical fiber. The linear sensing range of 0.1-4.0 mmol/L of H2O2 concentration is obtained. The emission intensity can be determined within 400 ms at a total flow rate of 150 μL/min. Significantly, this work presents the information of developing in-fiber integrated online analyzing devices based on optical methods.

  19. Monitoring of Moisture in Transformer Oil Using Optical Fiber as Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Laskar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an optical fiber sensor and temperature sensor-based instrumentation system to measure the moisture content in transformer oil. The sensor system consists of (i Diode Laser Source, (ii a bare and bent multimode fiber as sensor probe, (iii an LDR as detector, (iv LM35-based temperature sensor, and (v microcontroller system having a trained ANN for processing and calibration. The bare and bent optical fiber sensor and the temperature sensor LM35 are used to provide the measures of refractive index (RI and temperature of a transformer oil sample. An ATmega32-microcontroller-based system with trained ANN algorithm has been developed to determine the moisture content of the transformer oil sample by sampling the readings of the bare bent optical fiber sensor and the temperature sensor.

  20. Development of plasma bolometers using fiber-optic temperature sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinke, M. L., E-mail: reinkeml@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Han, M.; Liu, G. [University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Eden, G. G. van [Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Evenblij, R.; Haverdings, M. [Technobis, Pyrietstraat 2, 1812 SC Alkmaar (Netherlands); Stratton, B. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Measurements of radiated power in magnetically confined plasmas are important for exhaust studies in present experiments and expected to be a critical diagnostic for future fusion reactors. Resistive bolometer sensors have long been utilized in tokamaks and helical devices but suffer from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Results are shown from initial testing of a new bolometer concept based on fiber-optic temperature sensor technology. A small, 80 μm diameter, 200 μm long silicon pillar attached to the end of a single mode fiber-optic cable acts as a Fabry–Pérot cavity when broadband light, λ{sub o} ∼ 1550 nm, is transmitted along the fiber. Changes in temperature alter the optical path length of the cavity primarily through the thermo-optic effect, resulting in a shift of fringes reflected from the pillar detected using an I-MON 512 OEM spectrometer. While initially designed for use in liquids, this sensor has ideal properties for use as a plasma bolometer: a time constant, in air, of ∼150 ms, strong absorption in the spectral range of plasma emission, immunity to local EMI, and the ability to measure changes in temperature remotely. Its compact design offers unique opportunities for integration into the vacuum environment in places unsuitable for a resistive bolometer. Using a variable focus 5 mW, 405 nm, modulating laser, the signal to noise ratio versus power density of various bolometer technologies are directly compared, estimating the noise equivalent power density (NEPD). Present tests show the fiber-optic bolometer to have NEPD of 5-10 W/m{sup 2} when compared to those of the resistive bolometer which can achieve <0.5 W/m{sup 2} in the laboratory, but this can degrade to 1-2 W/m{sup 2} or worse when installed on a tokamak. Concepts are discussed to improve the signal to noise ratio of this new fiber-optic bolometer by reducing the pillar height and adding thin metallic coatings, along with improving the spectral resolution of the interrogator.

  1. Application of conformal optical design in star sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Li, Lin; Huang, Yifan; Liu, Jiaguo

    2008-03-01

    Star sensor is a special high accuracy photoelectric instrument. It is often used in navigation of aircraft, cruise missiles, and ballistic missiles, so the imaging quality of the optical system in a star senor is very important. The spherical windows with a small impact to imaging performance are usually used in traditional star sensors. However, the spherical surfaces are not ideal aerodynamic surfaces and would cause problems such as high drag. In this paper the conformal window whose outer shape is neither spherical nor flat is used in a star sensor. Unfortunately, the conformal shape introduces amounts of aberration which may lead to low imaging resolution. The various correctors can be used to eliminate the aberrations, for example, the fixed corrector, the arch, Zernike wedges, and the deformable mirror. The fixed corrector method is selected to decrease aberrations from the conformal window in this paper. The surface of the conformal window in the star senor is described as the Von Karman equation. The field of view is 17.6°×13.5°, and the size of the CCD pixel is 6.45 um×6.45um. The optical design program ZEMAX is used to design this system. After the optimization, under the max frequency of 77.52lp/mm, the MFT can almost achieve 30%. The design results show that the aerodynamic requirements can be satisfied by the application of the conformal window in the star sensor, and the aberrations can be corrected by proper ways.

  2. Vibration sensing in flexible structures using a distributed-effect modal domain optical fiber sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Karl M.; Lindner, Douglas K.; Claus, Richard O.

    1991-01-01

    Modal domain optical fiber sensors have recently been employed in the implementation of system identification algorithms and the closed-loop control of vibrations in flexible structures. The mathematical model of the modal domain optical fiber sensor used in these applications, however, only accounted for the effects of strain in the direction of the fiber's longitudinal axis. In this paper, we extend this model to include the effects of arbitrary stress. Using this sensor model, we characterize the sensor's sensitivity and dynamic range.

  3. An optical water vapor sensor for unmanned aerial vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy A. Berkoff; Paul L. Kebabian; Robert A. McClatchy; Charles E. Kolb; Andrew Freedman

    1998-12-01

    The water vapor sensor developed by Aerodyne Research, based on the optical absorption of light at {approximately}935 nm, has been successfully demonstrated on board the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Gulfstream-1 research aircraft during the Department of Energy's ARM Intensive Operations Period in August 1998. Data taken during this field campaign show excellent agreement with a chilled mirror and Lyman-alpha hygrometers and measurements confirm the ability to measure rapid, absolute water vapor fluctuations with a high degree of instrument stability and accuracy, with a noise level as low 10 ppmv (1 Hz measurement bandwidth). The construction of this small, lightweight sensor contains several unique elements which result in several significant advantages when compared to other techniques. First, the low power consumption Argon discharge lamp provides an optical beam at a fixed wavelength without a need for temperature or precision current control. The multi-pass absorption cell developed for this instrument provides a compact, low cost method that can survive deployment in the field. Fiber-optic cables, which are used to convey to light between the absorption cell, light source, and detection modules enable remote placement of the absorption cell from the opto-electronics module. Finally, the sensor does not use any moving parts which removes a significant source of potential malfunction. The result is an instrument which maintained its calibration throughout the field measurement campaign, and was not affected by high vibration and large uncontrolled temperature excursions. We believe that the development of an accurate, fast response water vapor monitor described in this report will open up new avenues of aerial-vehicle-based atmospheric research which have been relatively unexplored due to the lack of suitable low-cost, light-weight instrumentation.

  4. Oxygen detection using evanescent fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Cao, Weenqing

    2007-08-28

    An apparatus and method for the detection of oxygen using optical fiber based evanescent light absorption. Methylene blue was immobilized using a sol-gel process on a portion of the exterior surface of an optical fiber for which the cladding has been removed, thereby forming an optical oxygen sensor. When light is directed through the optical fiber, transmitted light intensity varies as a result of changes in the absorption of evanescent light by the methylene blue in response to the oxygen concentration to which the sensor is exposed. The sensor was found to have a linear response to oxygen concentration on a semi-logarithmic scale within the oxygen concentration range between 0.6% and 20.9%, a response time and a recovery time of about 3 s, ant to exhibit good reversibility and repeatability. An increase in temperature from 21.degree. C. to 35.degree. C. does not affect the net absorption of the sensor.

  5. Feasibility of a Stack Integrated SOFC Optical Chemical Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael A. Carpenter

    2007-09-30

    The DOE-NETL Innovative Concepts (IC) phase II program investigated the feasibility of harsh environment compatible chemical sensors based on monitoring the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands of metal nanoparticle doped YSZ nano-cermets, as a function of fuel concentrations, impurities e.g. CO and temperature(500-900 C). In particular, Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) exhibit a strong surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band whose shape and spectral position is not only highly dependent on the refractive index of the host medium but also on chemical reactions at the interface between the metal and the surrounding environment. Studies have been completed on the oxygen and temperature dependence of the SPR band of the AuNPs, CO sensing studies, oxygen/hydrogen titration experiments, ethanol sensing studies and finally NO{sub 2} sensing studies. Reversible changes in the SPR band are observed for all chemical exposure studies with the sensing mechanism being determined by the oxidative or reductive properties of the exposure gases. Reactions which remove charge from the AuNPs was observed to cause a redshift in the SPR band, while charge donation to the AuNPs causes a blue shift in the SPR band. CO, hydrogen and ethanol in air mixtures were all reductive in nature as they reacted with the YSZ bound oxygen anions forming CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O thus ultimately inducing charge donation to the AuNPs and a blue shift in the SPR band. While NO{sub 2} and oxygen were oxidative and induced the production of YSZ bound oxygen anions, charge removal from the AuNPs and a redshift in the SPR band.

  6. Zinc selective ionophores for potentiometric and optical sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, E.; Horvath, M.; Toth, K.; Pungor, E.; Bitter, I.; Agai, B.; Toeke, L. (Technical Univ. of Budapest (Hungary))

    1992-03-01

    Iminodiacetamide derivatives were synthesized and studied as ionophores in plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) membranes with potentiometric and optical transduction. The N-benzyl and N-phenyl derivatives proved to have a distinct zinc selectivity preferring Zn{sup 2+} over Ca{sup 2+}, Na{sup +} by factors of 6x10{sup 5} and 3x10{sup 4}, respectively. All ionophores exhibit a serious proton interference (log K{sup pot}{sub Zn{sup ++}}, {sub H{sup +}} {approximately} 6) which suggests that all application of this type of ionophores based sensors are limited to hydrogen ion buffer solution at pH {>=} 6.

  7. Analysis of a plastic optical fiber-based displacement sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Felipe; Arrue, Jon; Aldabaldetreku, Gotzon; Durana, Gaizka; Zubia, Joseba; Ziemann, Olaf; Bunge, Christian-Alexander

    2007-09-01

    An easy-to-manufacture setup for a displacement sensor based on plastic optical fiber (POF) is analyzed, showing computational and experimental results. If the displacement is the consequence of force or pressure applied to the device, this can be used as a force or pressure transducer. Its principle of operation consists of bending a POF section around a flexible cylinder and measuring light attenuation when the whole set is subjected to side pressure. Attenuations are obtained computationally as a function of side deformation for different design parameters. Experimental results with an actually built prototype are also provided.

  8. Integrated optical electric field sensor with telescopic dipole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Sun; Fushen Chen; Yongjun Yang

    2008-01-01

    An integrated optical electric field sensor based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with the telescopic dipole is designed and fabricated, and its electrodes are segmented and connected with a telescopic dipole.The measured results show that when the frequency response is from 10kHz to 6GHz with the antenna length of 55mm, the minimum detectable electric field of 20mV/m can be obtained, and the linear dynamics range can reach 90dB at 250MHz.

  9. Design and Development of a Low-Cost Optical Current Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaizka Durana

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we demonstrate the design of a low-cost optical current sensor. The sensor principle is the Faraday rotation of a light beam through a magneto-optical material, SF2, when a magnetic field is present. The prototype has a high sensitivity and a high linearity for currents ranging from 0 up to 800 A. The error of the optical fibre sensor is smaller than 1% for electric currents over 175 A.

  10. Design and development of a low-cost optical current sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubia, Joseba; Casado, Luciano; Aldabaldetreku, Gotzon; Montero, Alfonso; Zubia, Eneko; Durana, Gaizka

    2013-10-10

    In this paper we demonstrate the design of a low-cost optical current sensor. The sensor principle is the Faraday rotation of a light beam through a magneto-optical material, SF2, when a magnetic field is present. The prototype has a high sensitivity and a high linearity for currents ranging from 0 up to 800 A. The error of the optical fibre sensor is smaller than 1% for electric currents over 175 A.

  11. Guided Wave and Damage Detection in Composite Laminates Using Different Fiber Optic Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Fucai Li; Hideaki Murayama; Kazuro Kageyama; Takehiro Shirai

    2009-01-01

    Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD) sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber r...

  12. Damage detection and characterization using fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glisic, Branko; Sigurdardottir, Dorotea; Yao, Yao; Hubbell, David

    2013-04-01

    Fiber optic sensors (FOS) have significantly evolved and have reached their market maturity during the last decade. Their widely recognized advantages are high precision, long-term stability, and durability. But in addition to these advantageous performances, FOS technologies allow for affordable instrumentation of large areas of structure enabling global large-scale monitoring based on long-gauge sensors and integrity monitoring based on distributed sensors. These two approaches are particularly suitable for damage detection and characterization, i.e., damage localization and to certain extent quantification and propagation, as illustrated by two applications presented in detail in this paper: post-tensioned concrete bridge and segmented concrete pipeline. Early age cracking was detected, localized and quantified in the concrete deck of a pedestrian bridge using embedded long-gauge FOS. Post-tensioning of deck closed the cracks; however, permanent weakening in a bridge joint occurred due to cracking and it was identified and quantified. The damage was confirmed using embedded distributed FOS and a separate load test of the bridge. Real-size concrete pipeline specimens and surrounding soil were equipped with distributed FOS and exposed to permanent ground displacement in a large-scale testing facility. Two tests were performed on different pipeline specimens. The sensors bonded on the pipeline specimens successfully detected and localized rupture of pipeline joints, while the sensors embedded in the soil were able to detect and localize the failure plane. Comparison with strain-gauges installed on the pipeline and visual inspection after the test confirmed accurate damage detection and characterization.

  13. Review of High-Speed Fiber Optic Grating Sensors Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udd, E; Benterou, J; May, C; Mihailov, S J; Lu, P

    2010-03-24

    Fiber grating sensors can be used to support a wide variety of high speed measurement applications. This includes measurements of vibrations on bridges, traffic monitoring on freeways, ultrasonic detection to support non-destructive tests on metal plates and providing details of detonation events. This paper provides a brief overview of some of the techniques that have been used to support high speed measurements using fiber grating sensors over frequency ranges from 10s of kHz, to MHZ and finally toward frequencies approaching the GHz regime. Very early in the development of fiber grating sensor systems it was realized that a high speed fiber grating sensor system could be realized by placing an optical filter that might be a fiber grating in front of a detector so that spectral changes in the reflection from a fiber grating were amplitude modulated. In principal the only limitation on this type of system involved the speed of the output detector which with the development of high speed communication links moved from the regime of 10s of MHz toward 10s of GHz. The earliest deployed systems involved civil structures including measurements of the strain fields on composite utility poles and missile bodies during break tests, bridges and freeways. This was followed by a series of developments that included high speed fiber grating sensors to support nondestructive testing via ultrasonic wave detection, high speed machining and monitoring ship hulls. Each of these applications involved monitoring mechanical motion of structures and thus interest was in speeds up to a few 10s of MHz. Most recently there has been interest in using fiber grating to monitor the very high speed events such as detonations and this has led to utilization of fiber gratings that are consumed during an event that may require detection speeds of hundreds of MHz and in the future multiple GHz.

  14. Response of electrochemical oxygen sensors to inert gas-air and carbon dioxide-air mixtures: measurements and mathematical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, P T; Gant, S E; Dowker, K P; Batt, R

    2011-02-15

    Electrochemical oxygen gas sensors are widely used for monitoring the state of inertisation of flammable atmospheres and to warn of asphyxiation risks. It is well established but not widely known by users of such oxygen sensors that the response of the sensor is affected by the nature of the diluent gas responsible for the decrease in ambient oxygen concentration. The present work investigates the response of electrochemical sensors, with either acid or alkaline electrolytes, to gas mixtures comprising air with enhanced levels of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon or helium. The measurements indicate that both types of sensors over-read the oxygen concentrations when atmospheres contain high levels of helium. Sensors with alkaline electrolytes are also shown to underestimate the severity of the hazard in atmospheres containing high levels of carbon dioxide. This deviation is greater for alkaline electrolyte sensors compared to acid electrolyte sensors. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model is developed to predict the response of an alkaline electrolyte, electrochemical gas sensor. Differences between predicted and measured sensor responses are less than 10% in relative terms for nearly all of the gas mixtures tested, and in many cases less than 5%. Extending the model to simulate responses of sensors with acid electrolytes would be straightforward.

  15. Miniaturised Optical Fibre Sensor for Dew Detection Inside Organ Pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Baldini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A new optical sensor for the continuous monitoring of the dew formation inside organ pipes was designed. This aspect is particularly critical for the conservation of organs in unheated churches since the dew formation or the condensation on the pipe surfaces can contribute to many kinds of physical and chemical disruptive mechanisms. The working principle is based on the change in the reflectivity which is observed on the surface of the fibre tip, when a water layer is formed on its distal end. Intensity changes of the order of 35% were measured, following the formation of the water layer on the distal end of a 400/430 μm optical fibre. Long-term tests carried out placing the fibre tip inside the base of an in-house-made metallic foot of an organ pipe located in an external environment revealed the consistency of the proposed system.

  16. Optical sensors and their applications for probing biological systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palanco, Marta Espina

    and mammalian cells. First, we performed Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) studies on intact plant materials via using silver plasmonic nanostructures. Our studies showed strong Raman signals which resemble to the presence of typical constituents such as carbohydrates, proteins and lipids of different......There is a great interest in exploring and developing new optical sensitive methodologies for probing complex biological systems. In this project we developed non-invasive and sensitive biosensor strategies for studying physiologically relevant chemical and physical properties of plant...... biological sample to provide a SERS-template where silver nanoparticles can grow, thus providing a new insight into SERS-based sensors for chemically sensing in-situ plant constituents. Optical manipulation techniques have been used to investigate mechanical properties of soft membrane cells, i.e. mammalian...

  17. Optical fiber sensor for low dose gamma irradiation monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrés, Ana I.; Esteban, Ã.`scar; Embid, Miguel

    2016-05-01

    An optical fiber gamma ray detector is presented in this work. It is based on a Terbium doped Gadolinium Oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) scintillating powder which cover a chemically etched polymer fiber tip. This etching improves the fluorescence gathering by the optical fiber. The final diameter has been selected to fulfill the trade-off between light gathering and mechanical strength. Powder has been encapsulated inside a microtube where the fiber tip is immersed. The sensor has been irradiated with different air Kerma doses up to 2 Gy/h with a 137Cs source, and the spectral distribution of the fluorescence intensity has been recorded in a commercial grade CCD spectrometer. The obtained signal-to-noise ratio is good enough even for low doses, which has allowed to reduce the integration time in the spectrometer. The presented results show the feasibility for using low cost equipment to detect/measure ionizing radiation as gamma rays are.

  18. Nanostructured Fiber Optic Cantilever Arrays and Hybrid MEMS Sensors for Chemical and Biological Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advancements in nano-/micro-scale sensor fabrication and molecular recognition surfaces offer promising opportunities to develop miniaturized hybrid fiber optic and...

  19. Cryogenic fiber optic temperature sensor and method of manufacturing the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochergin, Vladimir (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    This invention teaches the fiber optic sensors temperature sensors for cryogenic temperature range with improved sensitivity and resolution, and method of making said sensors. In more detail, the present invention is related to enhancement of temperature sensitivity of fiber optic temperature sensors at cryogenic temperatures by utilizing nanomaterials with a thermal expansion coefficient that is smaller than the thermal expansion coefficient of the optical fiber but larger in absolute value than the thermal expansion coefficient of the optical fiber at least over a range of temperatures.

  20. Optical Fiber Sensor Instrumentation for Slagging Coal Gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anbo Wang; Kristie Cooper

    2008-07-19

    Coal gasifier is one of the most promising solutions for clean fossil energy. Refractory thickness monitoring and online real-time temperature measurement is needed for improved reliability and advanced process control for current and future generation power plants. The objective of this program is to design and implement an optical fiber based sensing system that could potentially be used to monitor refractory wall thickness and temperature inside a coal gasifier. For the thickness monitoring, the system should be able to operate at temperatures up to 1000 C. For this temperature range, silica fiber can still work so it is chosen for the sensor design. The measurement is based on a photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. A narrow light pulse is launched into a silica fiber which could be embedded into the gasifier refractory wall, and is partially reflected by the far end of the fiber. The time of flight of the light pulse in the fiber then gives an indication of the position of the fiber end, which is a function of the wall thickness when the fiber is embedded. Results obtained show a measurement accuracy of {+-}2cm in environment of 1000 C with a saw cut fiber end. When the fiber end is corroded by sodium carbide at 900 C, the accuracy is {+-}3cm. For the temperature measurement, a single crystal sapphire fiber sensor is designed. The sapphire fiber guides the broadband light from a light emitting diode to a sapphire wafer functioning as a Fabry-Perot interferometer and the wafer optical thickness is a function of temperature. The returned optical signal is then demodulated by multimode fiber based whitelight interferometry. The system was tested up to 1500 C with a measurement accuracy of {+-}10 C for the entire measurement range.