WorldWideScience

Sample records for optical models

  1. Models of optical quantum computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krovi Hari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available I review some work on models of quantum computing, optical implementations of these models, as well as the associated computational power. In particular, we discuss the circuit model and cluster state implementations using quantum optics with various encodings such as dual rail encoding, Gottesman-Kitaev-Preskill encoding, and coherent state encoding. Then we discuss intermediate models of optical computing such as boson sampling and its variants. Finally, we review some recent work in optical implementations of adiabatic quantum computing and analog optical computing. We also provide a brief description of the relevant aspects from complexity theory needed to understand the results surveyed.

  2. Modeling of semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Bischoff, Svend; Berg, Tommy Winther

    We discuss the modelling of semiconductor optical amplifiers with emphasis on their high-speed properties. Applications in linear amplification as well as ultrafast optical signal processing are reviewed. Finally, the possible role of quantum-dot based optical amplifiers is discussed.......We discuss the modelling of semiconductor optical amplifiers with emphasis on their high-speed properties. Applications in linear amplification as well as ultrafast optical signal processing are reviewed. Finally, the possible role of quantum-dot based optical amplifiers is discussed....

  3. Deuteron microscopic optical model potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Hairui; Han Yinlu; Shen Qingbiao; Xu Yongli

    2010-01-01

    A deuteron microscopic optical model potential is obtained by the Green function method through nuclear-matter approximation and local-density approximation based on the effective Skyrme interaction. The microscopic optical model potential is used to calculate the deuteron reaction cross sections and the elastic scattering angular distributions for some target nuclei in the mass range 6≤A≤208 with incident deuteron energies up to 200 MeV. The calculated results are compared with the experimental data.

  4. Collision models in quantum optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarello, Francesco

    2017-12-01

    Quantum collision models (CMs) provide advantageous case studies for investigating major issues in open quantum systems theory, and especially quantum non-Markovianity. After reviewing their general definition and distinctive features, we illustrate the emergence of a CM in a familiar quantum optics scenario. This task is carried out by highlighting the close connection between the well-known input-output formalism and CMs. Within this quantum optics framework, usual assumptions in the CMs' literature - such as considering a bath of noninteracting yet initially correlated ancillas - have a clear physical origin.

  5. The neutron optical model potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, P.E.

    1989-01-01

    The present status of optical model calculations of neutron scattering and interactions is reviewed, with special emphasis on more recent developments and the more promising lines of research. The use of dispersion relations to provide an extra constraint on the potential is discussed, together with their application to studies of the Fermi surface anomaly. The application of potential inversion techniques to determine the form of the potential is also considered. (author). 39 refs, figs

  6. Integrable models of quantum optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudson Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We give an overview of exactly solvable many-body models of quantum optics. Among them is a system of two-level atoms which interact with photons propagating in a one-dimensional (1D chiral waveguide; exact eigenstates of this system can be explicitly constructed. This approach is used also for a system of closely located atoms in the usual (non-chiral waveguide or in 3D space. Moreover, it is shown that for an arbitrary atomic system with a cascade spontaneous radiative decay, the fluorescence spectrum can be described by an exact analytic expression which accounts for interference of emitted photons. Open questions related with broken integrability are discussed.

  7. Optical models of the human eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, David A; Thibos, Larry N

    2016-03-01

    Optical models of the human eye have been used in visual science for purposes such as providing a framework for explaining optical phenomena in vision, for predicting how refraction and aberrations are affected by change in ocular biometry and as computational tools for exploring the limitations imposed on vision by the optical system of the eye. We address the issue of what is understood by optical model eyes, discussing the 'encyclopaedia' and 'toy train' approaches to modelling. An extensive list of purposes of models is provided. We discuss many of the theoretical types of optical models (also schematic eyes) of varying anatomical accuracy, including single, three and four refracting surface variants. We cover the models with lens structure in the form of nested shells and gradient index. Many optical eye models give accurate predictions only for small angles and small fields of view. If aberrations and image quality are important to consider, such 'paraxial' model eyes must be replaced by 'finite model' eyes incorporating features such as aspheric surfaces, tilts and decentrations, wavelength-dependent media and curved retinas. Many optical model eyes are population averages and must become adaptable to account for age, gender, ethnicity, refractive error and accommodation. They can also be customised for the individual when extensive ocular biometry and optical performance data are available. We consider which optical model should be used for a particular purpose, adhering to the principle that the best model is the simplest fit for the task. We provide a glimpse into the future of optical models of the human eye. This review is interwoven with historical developments, highlighting the important people who have contributed so richly to our understanding of visual optics. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2016 Optometry Australia.

  8. Theoretical study on optical model potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim Hung Gi.

    1984-08-01

    The optical model potential of non-local effect on the rounded edge of the potential is derived. On the basis of this potential the functional form of the optical model potential, the energy dependence and relationship of its parameters, and the dependency of the values of the parameters on energy change are shown in this paper. (author)

  9. Nonlinear optical model for strip plasmonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysenko, Oleg; Bache, Morten; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical model of nonlinear optical properties for strip plasmonic waveguides. The particular waveguides geometry that we investigate contains a gold core, adhesion layers, and silicon dioxide cladding. It is shown that the third-order susceptibility of the gold core...... significantly depends on the layer thickness and has the dominant contribution to the effective third-order susceptibility of the long-range plasmon polariton mode. This results in two nonlinear optical effects in plasmonic waveguides, which we experimentally observed and reported in [Opt. Lett. 41, 317 (2016...... approaches. (C) 2016 Optical Society of America...

  10. Modeling and optimization of LCD optical performance

    CERN Document Server

    Yakovlev, Dmitry A; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present the theoretical foundations of modeling the optical characteristics of liquid crystal displays, critically reviewing modern modeling methods and examining areas of applicability. The modern matrix formalisms of optics of anisotropic stratified media, most convenient for solving problems of numerical modeling and optimization of LCD, will be considered in detail. The benefits of combined use of the matrix methods will be shown, which generally provides the best compromise between physical adequacy and accuracy with computational efficiency and optimization fac

  11. Analysis of a Thin Optical Lens Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivchenko, Vladimir V.

    2011-01-01

    In this article a thin optical lens model is considered. It is shown that the limits of its applicability are determined not only by the ratio between the thickness of the lens and the modules of the radii of curvature, but above all its geometric type. We have derived the analytical criteria for the applicability of the model for different types…

  12. Optical Coherence Tomography: Advanced Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter E.; Thrane, Lars; Yura, Harold T.

    2013-01-01

    - and multiple-scattering regimes is derived. An advanced Monte Carlo model for calculating the OCT signal is also derived, and the validity of this model is shown through a mathematical proof based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. From the analytical model, an algorithm for enhancing OCT images...... are discussed. Finally, the Wigner phase-space distribution function is derived in a closed-form solution, which may have applications in OCT....

  13. FDTD method and models in optical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaogang; Wan, Nan; Weng, Lingdong; Zhu, Hao; Du, Jihe

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method has been proposed as a pedagogical way in optical education. Meanwhile, FDTD solutions, a simulation software based on the FDTD algorithm, has been presented as a new tool which helps abecedarians to build optical models and to analyze optical problems. The core of FDTD algorithm is that the time-dependent Maxwell's equations are discretized to the space and time partial derivatives, and then, to simulate the response of the interaction between the electronic pulse and the ideal conductor or semiconductor. Because the solving of electromagnetic field is in time domain, the memory usage is reduced and the simulation consequence on broadband can be obtained easily. Thus, promoting FDTD algorithm in optical education is available and efficient. FDTD enables us to design, analyze and test modern passive and nonlinear photonic components (such as bio-particles, nanoparticle and so on) for wave propagation, scattering, reflection, diffraction, polarization and nonlinear phenomena. The different FDTD models can help teachers and students solve almost all of the optical problems in optical education. Additionally, the GUI of FDTD solutions is so friendly to abecedarians that learners can master it quickly.

  14. Analytical model of the optical vortex microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płocinniczak, Łukasz; Popiołek-Masajada, Agnieszka; Masajada, Jan; Szatkowski, Mateusz

    2016-04-20

    This paper presents an analytical model of the optical vortex scanning microscope. In this microscope the Gaussian beam with an embedded optical vortex is focused into the sample plane. Additionally, the optical vortex can be moved inside the beam, which allows fine scanning of the sample. We provide an analytical solution of the whole path of the beam in the system (within paraxial approximation)-from the vortex lens to the observation plane situated on the CCD camera. The calculations are performed step by step from one optical element to the next. We show that at each step, the expression for light complex amplitude has the same form with only four coefficients modified. We also derive a simple expression for the vortex trajectory of small vortex displacements.

  15. The optical model in atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, I.E.

    1978-01-01

    The optical model for electron scattering on atoms has quite a short history in comparison with nuclear physics. The main reason for this is that there were insufficient data. Angular distribution for elastic and some inelastic scattering have now been measured for the atoms which exist in gaseous form at reasonable temperatures, inert gases, hydrogen, alkalies and mercury being the main ones out in. The author shows that the optical model makes sense in atomic physics by considering its theory and recent history. (orig./AH) [de

  16. Modeling GMPLS and Optical MPLS Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann; Wessing, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    . The MPLS concept is attractive because it can work as a unifying control structure. covering all technologies. This paper describes how a novel scheme for optical MPLS and circuit switched GMPLS based networks can incorporated in such multi-domain, MPLS-based scenarios and how it could be modeled. Network...

  17. Theoretical aspects of the optical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahaux, C.

    1980-01-01

    We first recall the definition of the optical-model potential for nucleons and the physical interpretation of the main related quantities. We then survey the recent theoretical progress towards a reliable calculation of this potential. The present limitations of the theory and some prospects for future developments are outlined. (author)

  18. Parametric uncertainty in optical image modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potzick, James; Marx, Egon; Davidson, Mark

    2006-10-01

    Optical photomask feature metrology and wafer exposure process simulation both rely on optical image modeling for accurate results. While it is fair to question the accuracies of the available models, model results also depend on several input parameters describing the object and imaging system. Errors in these parameter values can lead to significant errors in the modeled image. These parameters include wavelength, illumination and objective NA's, magnification, focus, etc. for the optical system, and topography, complex index of refraction n and k, etc. for the object. In this paper each input parameter is varied over a range about its nominal value and the corresponding images simulated. Second order parameter interactions are not explored. Using the scenario of the optical measurement of photomask features, these parametric sensitivities are quantified by calculating the apparent change of the measured linewidth for a small change in the relevant parameter. Then, using reasonable values for the estimated uncertainties of these parameters, the parametric linewidth uncertainties can be calculated and combined to give a lower limit to the linewidth measurement uncertainty for those parameter uncertainties.

  19. Phenomenological optical potentials and optical model computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, A.

    1980-01-01

    An introduction to the Optical Model is presented. Starting with the purpose and nature of the physical problems to be analyzed, a general formulation and the various phenomenological methods of solution are discussed. This includes the calculation of observables based on assumed potentials such as local and non-local and their forms, e.g. Woods-Saxon, folded model etc. Also discussed are the various calculational methods and model codes employed to describe nuclear reactions in the spherical and deformed regions (e.g. coupled-channel analysis). An examination of the numerical solutions and minimization techniques associated with the various codes, is briefly touched upon. Several computer programs are described for carrying out the calculations. The preparation of input, (formats and options), determination of model parameters and analysis of output are described. The class is given a series of problems to carry out using the available computer. Interpretation and evaluation of the samples includes the effect of varying parameters, and comparison of calculations with the experimental data. Also included is an intercomparison of the results from the various model codes, along with their advantages and limitations. (author)

  20. Anatomically accurate, finite model eye for optical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, H L; Brennan, N A

    1997-08-01

    There is a need for a schematic eye that models vision accurately under various conditions such as refractive surgical procedures, contact lens and spectacle wear, and near vision. Here we propose a new model eye close to anatomical, biometric, and optical realities. This is a finite model with four aspheric refracting surfaces and a gradient-index lens. It has an equivalent power of 60.35 D and an axial length of 23.95 mm. The new model eye provides spherical aberration values within the limits of empirical results and predicts chromatic aberration for wavelengths between 380 and 750 nm. It provides a model for calculating optical transfer functions and predicting optical performance of the eye.

  1. Advanced modelling of optical coherence tomography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Peter E; Thrane, Lars; Yura, Harold T; Tycho, Andreas; Joergensen, Thomas M; Frosz, Michael H

    2004-01-01

    Analytical and numerical models for describing and understanding the light propagation in samples imaged by optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems are presented. An analytical model for calculating the OCT signal based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle valid both for the single and multiple scattering regimes is reviewed. An advanced Monte Carlo model for calculating the OCT signal is also reviewed, and the validity of this model is shown through a mathematical proof based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. Moreover, for the first time the model is verified experimentally. From the analytical model, an algorithm for enhancing OCT images is developed; the so-called true-reflection algorithm in which the OCT signal may be corrected for the attenuation caused by scattering. For the first time, the algorithm is demonstrated by using the Monte Carlo model as a numerical tissue phantom. Such algorithm holds promise for improving OCT imagery and to extend the possibility for functional imaging

  2. A Thermo-Optic Propagation Modeling Capability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrader, Karl; Akau, Ron

    2014-10-01

    A new theoretical basis is derived for tracing optical rays within a finite-element (FE) volume. The ray-trajectory equations are cast into the local element coordinate frame and the full finite-element interpolation is used to determine instantaneous index gradient for the ray-path integral equation. The FE methodology (FEM) is also used to interpolate local surface deformations and the surface normal vector for computing the refraction angle when launching rays into the volume, and again when rays exit the medium. The method is implemented in the Matlab(TM) environment and compared to closed- form gradient index models. A software architecture is also developed for implementing the algorithms in the Zemax(TM) commercial ray-trace application. A controlled thermal environment was constructed in the laboratory, and measured data was collected to validate the structural, thermal, and optical modeling methods.

  3. Optical Imaging and Radiometric Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kong Q.; Fitzmaurice, Michael W.; Moiser, Gary E.; Howard, Joseph M.; Le, Chi M.

    2010-01-01

    OPTOOL software is a general-purpose optical systems analysis tool that was developed to offer a solution to problems associated with computational programs written for the James Webb Space Telescope optical system. It integrates existing routines into coherent processes, and provides a structure with reusable capabilities that allow additional processes to be quickly developed and integrated. It has an extensive graphical user interface, which makes the tool more intuitive and friendly. OPTOOL is implemented using MATLAB with a Fourier optics-based approach for point spread function (PSF) calculations. It features parametric and Monte Carlo simulation capabilities, and uses a direct integration calculation to permit high spatial sampling of the PSF. Exit pupil optical path difference (OPD) maps can be generated using combinations of Zernike polynomials or shaped power spectral densities. The graphical user interface allows rapid creation of arbitrary pupil geometries, and entry of all other modeling parameters to support basic imaging and radiometric analyses. OPTOOL provides the capability to generate wavefront-error (WFE) maps for arbitrary grid sizes. These maps are 2D arrays containing digital sampled versions of functions ranging from Zernike polynomials to combination of sinusoidal wave functions in 2D, to functions generated from a spatial frequency power spectral distribution (PSD). It also can generate optical transfer functions (OTFs), which are incorporated into the PSF calculation. The user can specify radiometrics for the target and sky background, and key performance parameters for the instrument s focal plane array (FPA). This radiometric and detector model setup is fairly extensive, and includes parameters such as zodiacal background, thermal emission noise, read noise, and dark current. The setup also includes target spectral energy distribution as a function of wavelength for polychromatic sources, detector pixel size, and the FPA s charge

  4. Green Network Planning Model for Optical Backbones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez Lopez, Jose Manuel; Riaz, M. Tahir; Jensen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    on the environment in general. In network planning there are existing planning models focused on QoS provisioning, investment minimization or combinations of both and other parameters. But there is a lack of a model for designing green optical backbones. This paper presents novel ideas to be able to define......Communication networks are becoming more essential for our daily lives and critically important for industry and governments. The intense growth in the backbone traffic implies an increment of the power demands of the transmission systems. This power usage might have a significant negative effect...

  5. Geometrical optics model of Mie resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll; Schweiger

    2000-07-01

    The geometrical optics model of Mie resonances is presented. The ray path geometry is given and the resonance condition is discussed with special emphasis on the phase shift that the rays undergo at the surface of the dielectric sphere. On the basis of this model, approximate expressions for the positions of first-order resonances are given. Formulas for the cavity mode spacing are rederived in a simple manner. It is shown that the resonance linewidth can be calculated regarding the cavity losses. Formulas for the mode density of Mie resonances are given that account for the different width of resonances and thus may be adapted to specific experimental situations.

  6. Optical Model and Cross Section Uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman,M.W.; Pigni, M.T.; Dietrich, F.S.; Oblozinsky, P.

    2009-10-05

    Distinct minima and maxima in the neutron total cross section uncertainties were observed in model calculations using spherical optical potential. We found this oscillating structure to be a general feature of quantum mechanical wave scattering. Specifically, we analyzed neutron interaction with 56Fe from 1 keV up to 65 MeV, and investigated physical origin of the minima.We discuss their potential importance for practical applications as well as the implications for the uncertainties in total and absorption cross sections.

  7. The forward tracking, an optical model method

    CERN Document Server

    Benayoun, M

    2002-01-01

    This Note describes the so-called Forward Tracking, and the underlying optical model, developed in the context of LHCb-Light studies. Starting from Velo tracks, cheated or found by real pattern recognition, the tracks are found in the ST1-3 chambers after the magnet. The main ingredient to the method is a parameterisation of the track in the ST1-3 region, based on the Velo track parameters and an X seed in one ST station. Performance with the LHCb-Minus and LHCb-Light setups is given.

  8. Optical model representation of coupled channel effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, N.S.; Cowley, A.A.; Johnson, R.C.; Kobas, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    A modification to the usual 6-parameter Woods-Saxon parameterization of the optical model for the scattering of composite particles is proposed. This additional real term reflects the effect of coupling other channels to the elastic scattering. The analyses favor a repulsive interaction for this term, especially for alpha particles. It is found that the repulsive term when combined with a Woods-Saxon term yields potentials with central values and volume integrals similar to those found by uncoupled elastic scattering calculations. These values are V(r = 0) approximately equal to 125 MeV and J/4A approximately equal to 300 MeV-fm 3

  9. Optical modeling and simulation of thin-film photovoltaic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Krc, Janez

    2013-01-01

    In wafer-based and thin-film photovoltaic (PV) devices, the management of light is a crucial aspect of optimization since trapping sunlight in active parts of PV devices is essential for efficient energy conversions. Optical modeling and simulation enable efficient analysis and optimization of the optical situation in optoelectronic and PV devices. Optical Modeling and Simulation of Thin-Film Photovoltaic Devices provides readers with a thorough guide to performing optical modeling and simulations of thin-film solar cells and PV modules. It offers insight on examples of existing optical models

  10. Optical trapping of a spherically symmetric sphere in the ray-optics regime: a model for optical tweezers upon cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Yiren; Hsu Long; Chi Sien

    2006-01-01

    Since their invention in 1986, optical tweezers have become a popular manipulation and force measurement tool in cellular and molecular biology. However, until recently there has not been a sophisticated model for optical tweezers on trapping cells in the ray-optics regime. We present a model for optical tweezers to calculate the optical force upon a spherically symmetric multilayer sphere representing a common biological cell. A numerical simulation of this model shows that not only is the magnitude of the optical force upon a Chinese hamster ovary cell significantly three times smaller than that upon a polystyrene bead of the same size, but the distribution of the optical force upon a cell is also much different from that upon a uniform particle, and there is a 30% difference in the optical trapping stiffness of these two cases. Furthermore, under a small variant condition for the refractive indices of any adjacent layers of the sphere, this model provides a simple approximation to calculate the optical force and the stiffness of an optical tweezers system

  11. Space Object Radiometric Modeling for Hardbody Optical Signature Database Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Introduction This presentation summarizes recent activity in monitoring spacecraft health status using passive remote optical nonimaging ...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Space Object Radiometric Modeling for Hardbody Optical Signature Database Generation...It is beneficial to the observer/analyst to understand the fundamental optical signature variability associated with these detection and

  12. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes routinely used in the synchrotron community.

  13. Physical model of optical inhomogeneities of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shybanov, E. B.

    2017-11-01

    The paper is devoted to theoretical aspects of the light scattering of water that does not contain suspended particles. To be consistent with current physical point of view the water as far as any liquid is regarded as a complex unstable nonergodic media. It was proposed that at fixed time the water as a condensed medium had global inhomogeneities similar to linear and planar defects in a solid. Anticipated own global inhomogeneities of water have been approximated by the system randomly distributed spherical clusters filling the entire water bulk. An analytical expression for the single scattered light has been derived. The formula simultaneously describes both the high anisotropy of light scattering and the high degree of polarization which one close to those for molecular scattering. It is shown that at general angles there is a qualitative coincidence with the two-component Kopelevich's model for the light scattering by marine particles. On the contrary towards to forwards angles the spectral law becomes much more prominent i.e. it corresponds to results for model of optically soft particles.

  14. Constitutive Modeling of the Mechanical Properties of Optical Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeti, L.; Moghazy, S.; Veazie, D.; Cuddihy, E.

    1998-01-01

    Micromechanical modeling of the composite mechanical properties of optical fibers was conducted. Good agreement was obtained between the values of Young's modulus obtained by micromechanics modeling and those determined experimentally for a single mode optical fiber where the wave guide and the jacket are physically coupled. The modeling was also attempted on a polarization-maintaining optical fiber (PANDA) where the wave guide and the jacket are physically decoupled, and found not to applicable since the modeling required perfect bonding at the interface. The modeling utilized constituent physical properties such as the Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and shear modulus to establish bounds on the macroscopic behavior of the fiber.

  15. Program description of FIBRAM (Fiber Optic Radiation Attenuation Model): a radiation attenuation model for optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingram, W.J.

    1987-06-01

    The report describes a fiber-optics system model and its computer implementation. This implementation can calculate the bit error ratio (BER) versus time for optical fibers that have been exposed to gamma radiation. The program is designed so that the user may arbitrarily change any or all of the system input variables and produce separate outputs. The primary output of the program is a table of the BER as a function of time. This table may be stored on magnetic media and later incorporated into computer graphic programs. The program was written in FORTRAN 77 for the IBM PC/AT/XT computers. Flow charts and program listings are included in the report

  16. Measuring optical properties of a blood vessel model using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitz, David; Hinds, Monica T.; Tran, Noi; Vartanian, Keri; Hanson, Stephen R.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2006-02-01

    In this paper we develop the concept of a tissue-engineered optical phantom that uses engineered tissue as a phantom for calibration and optimization of biomedical optics instrumentation. With this method, the effects of biological processes on measured signals can be studied in a well controlled manner. To demonstrate this concept, we attempted to investigate how the cellular remodeling of a collagen matrix affected the optical properties extracted from optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the samples. Tissue-engineered optical phantoms of the vascular system were created by seeding smooth muscle cells in a collagen matrix. Four different optical properties were evaluated by fitting the OCT signal to 2 different models: the sample reflectivity ρ and attenuation parameter μ were extracted from the single scattering model, and the scattering coefficient μ s and root-mean-square scattering angle θ rms were extracted from the extended Huygens-Fresnel model. We found that while contraction of the smooth muscle cells was clearly evident macroscopically, on the microscopic scale very few cells were actually embedded in the collagen. Consequently, no significant difference between the cellular and acellular samples in either set of measured optical properties was observed. We believe that further optimization of our tissue-engineering methods is needed in order to make the histology and biochemistry of the cellular samples sufficiently different from the acellular samples on the microscopic level. Once these methods are optimized, we can better verify whether the optical properties of the cellular and acellular collagen samples differ.

  17. Optical Fibres in the Modeling of Translucent Concrete Blocks

    OpenAIRE

    M.N.V.Padma Bhushan, D.Johnson, Md. Afzal Basheer Pasha And Ms. K. Prasanthi

    2013-01-01

    Translucent concrete is a concrete based material with light-transmissive properties, obtained due to embedded light optical elements like Optical fibers in it. Light is conducted through the stone from one end to the other. This results into a certain light pattern on the other surface, depending on the fibre structure. Optical fibres transmit light so effectively that there is virtually no loss of light conducted through the fibres. Our paper deals with the modelling of such translucent or ...

  18. Wave-optics modeling of the optical-transport line for passive optical stochastic cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andorf, M. B.; Lebedev, V. A.; Piot, P.; Ruan, J.

    2018-03-01

    Optical stochastic cooling (OSC) is expected to enable fast cooling of dense particle beams. Transition from microwave to optical frequencies enables an achievement of stochastic cooling rates which are orders of magnitude higher than ones achievable with the classical microwave based stochastic cooling systems. A subsystemcritical to the OSC scheme is the focusing optics used to image radiation from the upstream "pickup" undulator to the downstream "kicker" undulator. In this paper, we present simulation results using wave-optics calculation carried out with the SYNCHROTRON RADIATION WORKSHOP (SRW). Our simulations are performed in support to a proof-of-principle experiment planned at the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) at Fermilab. The calculations provide an estimate of the energy kick received by a 100-MeV electron as it propagates in the kicker undulator and interacts with the electromagnetic pulse it radiated at an earlier time while traveling through the pickup undulator.

  19. Wave-Optics Modeling of the Optical-Transport Line for Passive Optical Stochastic Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andorf, M. B. [NICADD, DeKalb; Lebedev, V. A. [Fermilab; Piot, P. [Fermilab; Ruan, J. [Fermilab

    2018-03-01

    Optical stochastic cooling (OSC) is expected to enable fast cooling of dense particle beams. Transition from microwave to optical frequencies enables an achievement of stochastic cooling rates which are orders of magnitude higher than ones achievable with the classical microwave based stochastic cooling systems. A subsytem critical to the OSC scheme is the focusing optics used to image radiation from the upstream "pickup" undulator to the downstream "kicker" undulator. In this paper, we present simulation results using wave-optics calculation carried out with the {\\sc Synchrotron Radiation Workshop} (SRW). Our simulations are performed in support to a proof-of-principle experiment planned at the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) at Fermilab. The calculations provide an estimate of the energy kick received by a 100-MeV electron as it propagates in the kicker undulator and interacts with the electromagnetic pulse it radiated at an earlier time while traveling through the pickup undulator.

  20. Novel applications of the dispersive optical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickhoff, W. H.; Charity, R. J.; Mahzoon, M. H.

    2017-03-01

    A review of recent developments of the dispersive optical model (DOM) is presented. Starting from the original work of Mahaux and Sartor, several necessary steps are developed and illustrated which increase the scope of the DOM allowing its interpretation as generating an experimentally constrained functional form of the nucleon self-energy. The method could therefore be renamed as the dispersive self-energy method. The aforementioned steps include the introduction of simultaneous fits of data for chains of isotopes or isotones allowing a data-driven extrapolation for the prediction of scattering cross sections and level properties in the direction of the respective drip lines. In addition, the energy domain for data was enlarged to include results up to 200 MeV where available. An important application of this work was implemented by employing these DOM potentials to the analysis of the (d, p) transfer reaction using the adiabatic distorted wave approximation. We review these calculations which suggest that physically meaningful results are easier to obtain by employing DOM ingredients as compared to the traditional approach which relies on a phenomenologically-adjusted bound-state wave function combined with a global (nondispersive) optical-model potential. Application to the exotic 132Sn nucleus also shows great promise for the extrapolation of DOM potentials towards the drip line with attendant relevance for the physics of FRIB. We note that the DOM method combines structure and reaction information on the same footing providing a unique approach to the analysis of exotic nuclei. We illustrate the importance of abandoning the custom of representing the non-local Hartree-Fock (HF) potential in the DOM by an energy-dependent local potential as it impedes the proper normalization of the solution of the Dyson equation. This important step allows for the interpretation of the DOM potential as representing the nucleon self-energy permitting the calculations of

  1. The Maxwell-Lorentz Model for optical Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Peter; Brio, Moysey

    2007-01-01

    Dynamics of optical pulses, especially of ultra short femtosecond pulses, are of great technological and theoretical interest. The dynamics of optical pulses is usually studied using the nonlinear Schrodinger (NLS) equation model. While such approach works surprisingly well for description of pulse...

  2. Modelling of Extrinsic Fiber Optic Sagnac Ultrasound Interferometer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ultrasonic waves are used extensively in nondestructive testing both for characterization of material properties, in this paper, we describe a fiber optic sensor suitable for detection of ultrasonic waves. This sensor is based on an extrinsic fiber optic sagnac interferometer. The proposed sensor model can act as a conventional ...

  3. Full optical model of micro-endoscope with optical coherence microscopy, multiphoton microscopy and visible capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, David; Kiekens, Kelli C.; Syson, Nikolas C.; Romano, Gabriella; Baker, Tressa; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2018-02-01

    While Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM), Multiphoton Microscopy (MPM), and narrowband imaging are powerful imaging techniques that can be used to detect cancer, each imaging technique has limitations when used by itself. Combining them into an endoscope to work in synergy can help achieve high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis at the point of care. Such complex endoscopes have an elevated risk of failure, and performing proper modelling ensures functionality and minimizes risk. We present full 2D and 3D models of a multimodality optical micro-endoscope to provide real-time detection of carcinomas, called a salpingoscope. The models evaluate the endoscope illumination and light collection capabilities of various modalities. The design features two optical paths with different numerical apertures (NA) through a single lens system with a scanning optical fiber. The dual path is achieved using dichroic coatings embedded in a triplet. A high NA optical path is designed to perform OCM and MPM while a low NA optical path is designed for the visible spectrum to navigate the endoscope to areas of interest and narrowband imaging. Different tests such as the reflectance profile of homogeneous epithelial tissue were performed to adjust the models properly. Light collection models for the different modalities were created and tested for efficiency. While it is challenging to evaluate the efficiency of multimodality endoscopes, the models ensure that the system is design for the expected light collection levels to provide detectable signal to work for the intended imaging.

  4. Analytical models of optical response in one-dimensional semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2015-01-01

    The quantum mechanical description of the optical properties of crystalline materials typically requires extensive numerical computation. Including excitonic and non-perturbative field effects adds to the complexity. In one dimension, however, the analysis simplifies and optical spectra can be computed exactly. In this paper, we apply the Wannier exciton formalism to derive analytical expressions for the optical response in four cases of increasing complexity. Thus, we start from free carriers and, in turn, switch on electrostatic fields and electron–hole attraction and, finally, analyze the combined influence of these effects. In addition, the optical response of impurity-localized excitons is discussed. - Highlights: • Optical response of one-dimensional semiconductors including excitons. • Analytical model of excitonic Franz–Keldysh effect. • Computation of optical response of impurity-localized excitons

  5. The accuracy of heavy ion optical model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozik, T.

    1980-01-01

    There is investigated in detail the sources and magnitude of numerical errors in heavy ion optical model calculations. It is shown on example of 20 Ne + 24 Mg scattering at Esub(LAB)=100 MeV. (author)

  6. NLOM - a program for nonlocal optical model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, B.T.; Kyum, M.C.; Hong, S.W.; Park, M.H.; Udagawa, T.

    1992-01-01

    A FORTRAN program NLOM for nonlocal optical model calculations is described. It is based on a method recently developed by Kim and Udagawa, which utilizes the Lanczos technique for solving integral equations derived from the nonlocal Schroedinger equation. (orig.)

  7. Multiple Scattering Model for Optical Coherence Tomography with Rytov Approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Muxingzi

    2017-01-01

    of speckles due to multiple scatterers within the coherence length, and other random noise. Motivated by the above two challenges, a multiple scattering model based on Rytov approximation and Gaussian beam optics is proposed for the OCT setup. Some previous

  8. Analytical solution of dispersion relations for the nuclear optical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanderKam, J.M. [Center for Communications Research, Thanet Road, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Weisel, G.J. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, and Duke University, Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States); Penn State Altoona, 3000 Ivyside Park, Altoona, PA 16601-3760 (United States); Tornow, W. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, and Duke University, Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708-0308 (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Analytical solutions of dispersion integral relations, linking the real and imaginary parts of the nuclear optical model, have been derived. These are displayed for some widely used forms of the volume- and surface-absorptive nuclear potentials. When the analytical solutions are incorporated into the optical-model search code GENOA, replacing a numerical integration, the code runs three and a half to seven times faster, greatly aiding the analysis of direct-reaction, elastic scattering data. (author)

  9. Optical Propagation Modeling for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, W H; Auerbach, J M; Henesian, M A; Jancaitis, K S; Manes, K R; Mehta, N C; Orth, C D; Sacks, R A; Shaw, M J; Widmayer, C C

    2004-01-12

    Optical propagation modeling of the National Ignition Facility has been utilized extensively from conceptual design several years ago through to early operations today. In practice we routinely (for every shot) model beam propagation starting from the waveform generator through to the target. This includes the regenerative amplifier, the 4-pass rod amplifier, and the large slab amplifiers. Such models have been improved over time to include details such as distances between components, gain profiles in the laser slabs and rods, transient optical distortions due to the flashlamp heating of laser slabs, measured transmitted and reflected wavefronts for all large optics, the adaptive optic feedback loop, and the frequency converter. These calculations allow nearfield and farfield predictions in good agreement with measurements.

  10. Modeling illumination performance of plastic optical fiber passive daylighting system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulaiman, F; Ahmad, A [Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam (Malaysia). Faculty of Electrical Engineering; Ahmed, A Z [Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam (Malaysia). Bureau of Reseaarch and Consultancy

    2006-12-15

    of the most direct methods of utilizing solar energy for energy conservation is to bring natural light indoors to light up an area. This paper reports on the investigation of the feasibility to utilize large core optical fibers to convey and distribute solar light passively throughout residential or commercial structures. The focus of this study is on the mathematical modeling of the illumination performance and the light transmission efficiency of solid core end light fiber for optical day lighting systems. The Meatball simulations features the optical fiber transmittance for glass and plastic fibers, illumination performance over lengths of plastic end-lit fiber, spectral transmission, light intensity loss through the large diameter solid core optical fibers as well as the transmission efficiency of the optical fiber itself. It was found that plastic optical fiber has less transmission loss over the distance of the fiber run which clearly shows that the Plastic Optical Fiber should be optimized for emitting visible light. The findings from the analysis on the performance of large diameter optical fibers for day lighting systems seems feasible for energy efficient lighting system in commercial or residential buildings.

  11. Modeling illumination performance of plastic optical fiber passive daylighting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulaiman, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, A.Z.

    2006-01-01

    One of the most direct methods of utilizing solar energy for energy conservation is to bring natural light indoors to light up an area. This paper reports on the investigation of the feasibility to utilize large core optical fibers to convey and distribute solar light passively throughout residential or commercial structures. The focus of this study is on the mathematical modeling of the illumination performance and the light transmission efficiency of solid core end light fiber for optical day lighting systems. The Meatball simulations features the optical fiber transmittance for glass and plastic fibers, illumination performance over lengths of plastic end-lit fiber, spectral transmission, light intensity loss through the large diameter solid core optical fibers as well as the transmission efficiency of the optical fiber itself. It was found that plastic optical fiber has less transmission loss over the distance of the fiber run which clearly shows that the Plastic Optical Fiber should be optimized for emitting visible light. The findings from the analysis on the performance of large diameter optical fibers for day lighting systems seems feasible for energy efficient lighting system in commercial or residential buildings

  12. Generic distortion model for metrology under optical microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingjian; Li, Zhongwei; Zhong, Kai; Chao, YuhJin; Miraldo, Pedro; Shi, Yusheng

    2018-04-01

    For metrology under optical microscopes, lens distortion is the dominant source of error. Previous distortion models and correction methods mostly rely on the assumption that parametric distortion models require a priori knowledge of the microscopes' lens systems. However, because of the numerous optical elements in a microscope, distortions can be hardly represented by a simple parametric model. In this paper, a generic distortion model considering both symmetric and asymmetric distortions is developed. Such a model is obtained by using radial basis functions (RBFs) to interpolate the radius and distortion values of symmetric distortions (image coordinates and distortion rays for asymmetric distortions). An accurate and easy to implement distortion correction method is presented. With the proposed approach, quantitative measurement with better accuracy can be achieved, such as in Digital Image Correlation for deformation measurement when used with an optical microscope. The proposed technique is verified by both synthetic and real data experiments.

  13. Optical modelling data for room temperature optical properties of organic–inorganic lead halide perovskites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajie Jiang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The optical properties of perovskites at ambient temperatures are important both to the design of optimised solar cells as well as in other areas such as the refinement of electronic band structure calculations. Limited previous information on the optical modelling has been published. The experimental fitting parameters for optical constants of CH3NH3PbI3−xClx and CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite films are reported at 297 K as determined by detailed analysis of reflectance and transmittance data. The data in this study is related to the research article “Room temperature optical properties of organic–inorganic lead halide perovskites” in Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells [1].

  14. Modelling of new generation plasma optical devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litovko Irina V.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents new generation plasma optical devices based on the electrostatic plasma lens configuration that opens a novel attractive possibility for effective high-tech practical applications. Original approaches to use of plasma accelerators with closed electron drift and open walls for the creation of a cost-effective low-maintenance plasma lens with positive space charge and possible application for low-cost, low-energy rocket engine are described. The preliminary experimental, theoretical and simulation results are presented. It is noted that the presented plasma devices are attractive for many different applications in the state-of-the-art vacuum-plasma processing.

  15. Deep-lying hole states in the optical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klevansky, S.P.; Lemmer, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    The strength function for deep-lying hole states in an optical potential is studied by the method of Green's functions. The role of isospin is emphasized. It is shown that, while the main trends of the experimental data on hole states in isotopes of Sn and Pd can be described by an energy independent optical potential, intermediate structures in these data indicate the specific nuclear polarization effects have to be included. This is done by introducing doorway states of good isospin into the optical model potential. Such states consist of neutron hole plus proton core vibrations as well as more complicated excitations that are analog states of proton hole plus neutron core vibrations of the parent nuclear system. Specific calculations for 115 Sn and 103 Pd give satisfactory fits to the strength function data using optical model and doorway state parameters that are reasonable on physical grounds

  16. ECISVIEW. An interactive toolbox for optical model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, A.J.; Van Wijk, J.J.; Delaroche, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The software package ECISVIEW is a graphical interface built around the multi-disciplinary nuclear reaction code ECIS-95. The key feature of the working method is that the user can specify the value of optical potential parameters as any mathematical function of the energy, A, Z or user defined parameters. This enables us to obtain conveniently the optimal optical potential parameters for a given nucleus over the whole energy region of interest. ECISVIEW makes it possible to simultaneously study the dependence of all calculated angular distributions, polarizations and total cross sections on optical model parameters. This method is perhaps more than 100 times faster than the conventional method of preparing an input file, running the code, editing the output file and finally viewing the data with a graphical program. As an example, a spherical 0-200 MeV nucleon optical model for 90 Zr is presented. A demonstration of ECISVIEW has been given at this Specialist's Meeting. (author)

  17. Quantum model for electro-optical amplitude modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capmany, José; Fernández-Pousa, Carlos R

    2010-11-22

    We present a quantum model for electro-optic amplitude modulation, which is built upon quantum models of the main photonic components that constitute the modulator, that is, the guided-wave beamsplitter and the electro-optic phase modulator and accounts for all the different available modulator structures. General models are developed both for single and dual drive configurations and specific results are obtained for the most common configurations currently employed. Finally, the operation with two-photon input for the control of phase-modulated photons and the important topic of multicarrier modulation are also addressed.

  18. Extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juergensen, Ole

    2015-06-05

    In this thesis, the phase diagrams and dynamics of various extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices are studied. Hubbard models are the primary description for many interacting particles in periodic potentials with the paramount example of the electrons in solids. The very same models describe the behavior of ultracold quantum gases trapped in the periodic potentials generated by interfering beams of laser light. These optical lattices provide an unprecedented access to the fundamentals of the many-particle physics that govern the properties of solid-state materials. They can be used to simulate solid-state systems and validate the approximations and simplifications made in theoretical models. This thesis revisits the numerous approximations underlying the standard Hubbard models with special regard to optical lattice experiments. The incorporation of the interaction between particles on adjacent lattice sites leads to extended Hubbard models. Offsite interactions have a strong influence on the phase boundaries and can give rise to novel correlated quantum phases. The extended models are studied with the numerical methods of exact diagonalization and time evolution, a cluster Gutzwiller approximation, as well as with the strong-coupling expansion approach. In total, this thesis demonstrates the high relevance of beyond-Hubbard processes for ultracold atoms in optical lattices. Extended Hubbard models can be employed to tackle unexplained problems of solid-state physics as well as enter previously inaccessible regimes.

  19. Optical linear algebra processors - Noise and error-source modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasent, D.; Ghosh, A.

    1985-01-01

    The modeling of system and component noise and error sources in optical linear algebra processors (OLAPs) are considered, with attention to the frequency-multiplexed OLAP. General expressions are obtained for the output produced as a function of various component errors and noise. A digital simulator for this model is discussed.

  20. Optical linear algebra processors: noise and error-source modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasent, D; Ghosh, A

    1985-06-01

    The modeling of system and component noise and error sources in optical linear algebra processors (OLAP's) are considered, with attention to the frequency-multiplexed OLAP. General expressions are obtained for the output produced as a function of various component errors and noise. A digital simulator for this model is discussed.

  1. Event-based Simulation Model for Quantum Optics Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.; Jaeger, G; Khrennikov, A; Schlosshauer, M; Weihs, G

    2011-01-01

    We present a corpuscular simulation model of optical phenomena that does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation of the whole system and reproduces the results of Maxwell's theory by generating detection events one-by-one. The event-based corpuscular model gives a unified

  2. Optical Associative Memory Model With Threshold Modification Using Complementary Vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Shaoping; Xu, Kebin; Hong, Jing

    1989-02-01

    A new criterion to evaluate the similarity between two vectors in associative memory is presented. According to it, an experimental research about optical associative memory model with threshold modification using complementary vector is carried out. This model is capable of eliminating the posibility to recall erroneously. Therefore the accuracy of reading out is improved.

  3. Extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juergensen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the phase diagrams and dynamics of various extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices are studied. Hubbard models are the primary description for many interacting particles in periodic potentials with the paramount example of the electrons in solids. The very same models describe the behavior of ultracold quantum gases trapped in the periodic potentials generated by interfering beams of laser light. These optical lattices provide an unprecedented access to the fundamentals of the many-particle physics that govern the properties of solid-state materials. They can be used to simulate solid-state systems and validate the approximations and simplifications made in theoretical models. This thesis revisits the numerous approximations underlying the standard Hubbard models with special regard to optical lattice experiments. The incorporation of the interaction between particles on adjacent lattice sites leads to extended Hubbard models. Offsite interactions have a strong influence on the phase boundaries and can give rise to novel correlated quantum phases. The extended models are studied with the numerical methods of exact diagonalization and time evolution, a cluster Gutzwiller approximation, as well as with the strong-coupling expansion approach. In total, this thesis demonstrates the high relevance of beyond-Hubbard processes for ultracold atoms in optical lattices. Extended Hubbard models can be employed to tackle unexplained problems of solid-state physics as well as enter previously inaccessible regimes.

  4. Event-Based Corpuscular Model for Quantum Optics Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K.; Jin, F.; Raedt, H. De

    A corpuscular simulation model of optical phenomena that does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation of the whole system and reproduces the results of Maxwell's theory by generating detection events one-by-one is presented. The event-based corpuscular model is shown to give a

  5. The Watanabe model for 6Li-nucleus optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abul-Magd, A.Y.; Rabie, A.; El-Gazzar, M.A.

    1980-09-01

    Optical potentials for the scattering of 6 Li projectiles are calculated using the Watanabe model and an α+d cluster model wave function for 6 Li. Reasonable fits to the elastic differential cross-section and vector polarization are obtained. (author)

  6. Optical-model analysis of exotic atom data. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batty, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    Data for kaonic atoms are fitted using a simple optical model with a potential proportional to the nuclear density. Very satisfactory fits to strong interaction shift and width values are obtained but difficulties in fitting yield values indicate that the model is not completely satisfactory. The potential strength can be related to the free kaon-nucleon scattering lengths using a model due to Deloff. A good overall representation of the data is obtained with a black-sphere model. (orig.)

  7. A Novel Rodent Model of Posterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Brown, Dale P.; Duan, Yuanli; Kong, Wei; Watson, Brant D.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To develop a reliable, reproducible rat model of posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION) and study the cellular responses in the optic nerve and retina. Methods Posterior ischemic optic neuropathy was induced in adult rats by photochemically induced ischemia. Retinal and optic nerve vasculature was examined by fluorescein isothiocyanate–dextran extravasation. Tissue sectioning and immunohistochemistry were used to investigate the pathologic changes. Retinal ganglion cell survival at different times after PION induction, with or without neurotrophic application, was quantified by fluorogold retrograde labeling. Results Optic nerve injury was confirmed after PION induction, including local vascular leakage, optic nerve edema, and cavernous degeneration. Immunostaining data revealed microglial activation and focal loss of astrocytes, with adjacent astrocytic hypertrophy. Up to 23%, 50%, and 70% retinal ganglion cell loss was observed at 1 week, 2 weeks, and 3 weeks, respectively, after injury compared with a sham control group. Experimental treatment by brain-derived neurotrophic factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor remarkably prevented retinal ganglion cell loss in PION rats. At 3 weeks after injury, more than 40% of retinal ganglion cells were saved by the application of neurotrophic factors. Conclusions Rat PION created by photochemically induced ischemia is a reproducible and reliable animal model for mimicking the key features of human PION. Clinical Relevance The correspondence between the features of this rat PION model to those of human PION makes it an ideal model to study the pathophysiologic course of the disease, most of which remains to be elucidated. Furthermore, it provides an optimal model for testing therapeutic approaches for optic neuropathies. PMID:23544206

  8. Advanced modelling of optical coherence tomography systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter E.; Thrane, L.; Yura, H.T.

    2004-01-01

    and multiple scattering regimes is reviewed. An advanced Monte Carlo model for calculating the OCT signal is also reviewed, and the validity of this model is shown through a mathematical proof based on the extended Huygens–Fresnel principle. Moreover, for the first time the model is verified experimentally...... tissue phantom. Such algorithm holds promise for improving OCT imagery and to extend the possibility for functional imaging....

  9. Linking Aerosol Optical Properties Between Laboratory, Field, and Model Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, S. M.; Pokhrel, R. P.; Foster, K. A.; Brown, H.; Liu, X.

    2017-12-01

    The optical properties of aerosol emissions from biomass burning have a significant impact on the Earth's radiative balance. Based on measurements made during the Fourth Fire Lab in Missoula Experiment, our group published a series of parameterizations that related optical properties (single scattering albedo and absorption due to brown carbon at multiple wavelengths) to the elemental to total carbon ratio of aerosols emitted from biomass burning. In this presentation, the ability of these parameterizations to simulate the optical properties of ambient aerosol is assessed using observations collected in 2017 from our mobile laboratory chasing wildfires in the Western United States. The ambient data includes measurements of multi-wavelength absorption, scattering, and extinction, size distribution, chemical composition, and volatility. In addition to testing the laboratory parameterizations, this combination of measurements allows us to assess the ability of core-shell Mie Theory to replicate observations and to assess the impact of brown carbon and mixing state on optical properties. Finally, both laboratory and ambient data are compared to the optical properties generated by a prominent climate model (Community Earth System Model (CESM) coupled with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5)). The discrepancies between lab observations, ambient observations and model output will be discussed.

  10. An optical channel modeling of a single mode fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavi, Neda; Liu, Peng; Hall, Trevor James

    2018-05-01

    The evaluation of the optical channel model that accurately describes the single mode fibre as a coherent transmission medium is reviewed through analytical, numerical and experimental analysis. We used the numerical modelling of the optical transmission medium and experimental measurements to determine the polarization drift as a function of time for a fixed length of fibre. The probability distribution of the birefringence vector was derived, which is associated to the 'Poole' equation. The theory and experimental evidence that has been disclosed in the literature in the context of polarization mode dispersion - Stokes & Jones formulations and solutions for key statistics by integration of stochastic differential equations has been investigated. Besides in-depth definition of the single-mode fibre-optic channel, the modelling which concerns an ensemble of fibres each with a different instance of environmental perturbation has been analysed.

  11. Modeling and analysis of laser active interference optical path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Cong-miao; Sun, Hua-yan; Zhao, Yan-zhong; Chen, Jian-biao; Ren, Jian-ying

    2017-10-01

    By using the geometrical optics and physical optics method, the models of wedge plate interference optical path, Michelson interferometer and Mach Zehnder interferometer thus three different active interference pattern are built. The optical path difference (OPD) launched by different interference patterns, fringe spacing and contrast expression have been derived. The results show that far field interference peak intensity of the wedge plate interference is small, so the detection distance is limited, Michelson interferometer with low contrast affects the performance of detection system, Mach Zehnder interferometer has greater advantages in peak intensity, the variable range of interference fringe spacing and contrast ratio. The results of this study are useful for the theoretical research and practical application of laser active interference detection.

  12. A Fourier Optical Model for the Laser Doppler Velocimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lading, Lars

    1972-01-01

    The treatment is based on a fourier optical model. It is shown how the various configurations (i.e. ldquodifferential moderdquo and reference beam mode with both one and two incident beams) are incorporated in the model, and how it can be extended to three dimensions. The particles are represented...... filtering ability vanishes as the aperture size converges towards zero. The results based on fourier optics are compared with the rough estimates obtainable by using the "antenna formular" for heterodyning (ArΩr≈λ2)....

  13. ABC Algorithm based Fuzzy Modeling of Optical Glucose Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SARACOGLU, O. G.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a modeling approach based on the use of fuzzy reasoning mechanism to define a measured data set obtained from an optical sensing circuit. For this purpose, we implemented a simple but effective an in vitro optical sensor to measure glucose content of an aqueous solution. Measured data contain analog voltages representing the absorbance values of three wavelengths measured from an RGB LED in different glucose concentrations. To achieve a desired model performance, the parameters of the fuzzy models are optimized by using the artificial bee colony (ABC algorithm. The modeling results presented in this paper indicate that the fuzzy model optimized by the algorithm provide a successful modeling performance having the minimum mean squared error (MSE of 0.0013 which are in clearly good agreement with the measurements.

  14. Establishing a cat model of acute optic nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In order to investigate the progress in optic nerve injury and the following regeneration and repair, many kinds of animal models of optic nerve injury have been established, such as models of acute and chronic ocular hypertension, compression, amputating wound, ischemia reperfusion or hypoxia,intravitreal injection of excitatory amino acids, etc. However, most of these models are established by squeezing intraorbital optic nerve, and suitable for ophthalmology, and there are fewer models suitable for the acute cranial contusion in neurosurgery.OBJECTIVE: To observe the changes of optic nerve after acute injury, and the characteristics of methods for establishing model of acute optic nerve injury in cats.DESIGN: A complete randomized grouping and controlled animal trial.SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Ji'nan Military Area Command of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: Twenty-eight healthy adult cats, common degree, either sex, weighing 2.0 - 3.5 kg, were provided by the animal experimental center of Fudan University. The cats were randomly divided into control group (n =3) and model group (n =25), and 5 cats in the model group were observed at 6 hours and 1,3, 7 and 14 days after injury respectively. JX-2000 biological signal processing system (Department of Physiology, Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLA, Shanghai); Inverted phase contrast microscope (Olympus); Axioplan 2 imaging microgram analytical system (Labsystems).METHODS: The experiments were carried out in the Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Jinan Military Area Command of Chinese PLA from June 2004 to June 2005. The cats in the model groups were made into models of acute optic nerve injury: The cats were anesthetized, then the limbs were fixed in a lateral recumbent position. Pterion approach in human was imitated, the operative incision was made along the line between lateral canthus and tragus, and it could be seen deep along the skull base that white

  15. Optical model and calibration of a sun tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, Sergei N.; Samokhvalov, Ignatii V.; Cheong, Hai Du; Kim, Dukhyeon

    2016-01-01

    Sun trackers are widely used to investigate scattering and absorption of solar radiation in the Earth's atmosphere. We present a method for optimization of the optical altazimuth sun tracker model with output radiation direction aligned with the axis of a stationary spectrometer. The method solves the problem of stability loss in tracker pointing at the Sun near the zenith. An optimal method for tracker calibration at the measurement site is proposed in the present work. A method of moving calibration is suggested for mobile applications in the presence of large temperature differences and errors in the alignment of the optical system of the tracker. - Highlights: • We present an optimal optical sun tracker model for atmospheric spectroscopy. • The problem of loss of stability of tracker pointing at the Sun has been solved. • We propose an optimal method for tracker calibration at a measurement site. • Test results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed optimization methods.

  16. Optical Coherence Tomography: Modeling and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Lars

    this system. A demonstration of the imaging capabilities of the OCT system is given. Moreover, a novel truereflection OCT imaging algorithm, based on the new OCT model presented in this thesis, is demonstrated. Finally, a theoretical analysis of the Wigner phase-space distribution function for the OCT...... geometry, i.e., reflection geometry, is developed. As in the new OCT model, multiple scattered photons has been taken into account together with multiple scattering effects. As an important result, a novel method of creating images based on measurements of the momentum width of the Wigner phase...

  17. Mathematical modeling of optical glazing performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijnatten, van P.A.; Wittwer, V.; Granqvist, C.G.; Lampert, C.M.

    1994-01-01

    Mathematical modelling can be a powerful tool in the design and optimalization of glazing. By calculation, the specifications of a glazing design and the optimal design parameters can be predicted without building costly prototypes first. Furthermore, properties which are difficult to measure, like

  18. Electron Correlation Models for Optical Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höhn, E. G.; O. E. Weigang, Jr.

    1968-01-01

    A two-system no-overlap model for rotatory strength is developed for electric-dipole forbidden as well as allowed transitions. General equations which allow for full utilization of symmetry in the chromophore and in the environment are obtained. The electron correlation terms are developed in full...

  19. Building better optical model potentials for nuclear astrophysics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauge, Eric; Dupuis, Marc

    2004-01-01

    In nuclear astrophysics, optical model potentials play an important role, both in the nucleosynthesis models, and in the interpretation of astrophysics related nuclear physics measurements. The challenge of nuclear astrophysics resides in the fact that it involves many nuclei far from the stability line, implying than very few (if any) experimental results are available for these nuclei. The answer to this challenge is a heavy reliance on microscopic optical models with solid microscopic physics foundations that can predict the relevant physical quantities with good accuracy. This use of microscopic information limits the likelihood of the model failing spectacularly (except if some essential physics was omitted in the modeling) when extrapolating away from the stability line, in opposition to phenomenological models which are only suited for interpolation between measured data points and not for extrapolating towards unexplored areas of the chart of the nuclides.We will show how these microscopic optical models are built, how they link to our present knowledge of nuclear structure, and how they affect predictions of nuclear astrophysics models and the interpretation of some key nuclear physics measurements for astrophysics

  20. ECISVIEW. An interactive toolbox for optical model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, A.J.; Van Wijk, J.J.; Delaroche, J.P.

    1997-09-01

    The software package ECISVIEW is a graphical interface built around the multi-disciplinary nuclear reaction code ECIS-95. The basic purpose of ECISVIEW is the possibility to change optical potential parameters interactively, with the keyboard or the mouse, and to display the calculated result immediately on the screen. The key feature of the working method is that the user can specify the value of optical potential parameters as any mathematical function of the energy, A, Z or user defined parameters. This enables us to obtain conveniently the optimal optical potential parameters for a given nucleus over the whole energy region of interest. ECISVIEW makes it possible to simultaneously study the dependence of all calculated angular distributions, polarizations and total cross sections on optical model parameters. This method is perhaps more than 100 times faster than the conventional method of preparing an input file, running the code, editing the output file and finally viewing the data with a graphical program. ECISVIEW has been developed at ECN in Petten, Netherlands, and has been extensively used at CEA, Bruyeres-le-Chatel, France. A spherical 0-200 MeV nucleon optical model for 90 Zr is presented as an example. 4 figs., 1 tab., 5 refs

  1. Convenient models of the atmosphere: optics and solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Ginsburg; Victor, Frolkis; Irina, Melnikova; Sergey, Novikov; Dmitriy, Samulenkov; Maxim, Sapunov

    2017-11-01

    Simple optical models of clear and cloudy atmosphere are proposed. Four versions of atmospheric aerosols content are considered: a complete lack of aerosols in the atmosphere, low background concentration (500 cm-3), high concentrations (2000 cm-3) and very high content of particles (5000 cm-3). In a cloud scenario, the model of external mixture is assumed. The values of optical thickness and single scattering albedo for 13 wavelengths are calculated in the short wavelength range of 0.28-0.90 µm, with regard to the molecular absorption bands, that is simulated with triangle function. A comparison of the proposed optical parameters with results of various measurements and retrieval (lidar measurement, sampling, processing radiation measurements) is presented. For a cloudy atmosphere models of single-layer and two-layer atmosphere are proposed. It is found that cloud optical parameters with assuming the "external mixture" agrees with retrieved values from airborne observations. The results of calculating hemispherical fluxes of the reflected and transmitted solar radiation and the radiative divergence are obtained with the Delta-Eddington approach. The calculation is done for surface albedo values of 0, 0.5, 0.9 and for spectral values of the sandy surface. Four values of solar zenith angle: 0°, 30°, 40° and 60° are taken. The obtained values are compared with data of radiative airborne observations. Estimating the local instantaneous radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols and clouds for considered models is presented together with the heating rate.

  2. Classification of scalar and dyadic nonlocal optical response models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wubs, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Nonlocal optical response is one of the emerging effects on the nanoscale for particles made of metals or doped semiconductors. Here we classify and compare both scalar and tensorial nonlocal response models. In the latter case the nonlocality can stem from either the longitudinal response...

  3. Modelling exciton–phonon interactions in optically driven quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazir, Ahsan; McCutcheon, Dara

    2016-01-01

    We provide a self-contained review of master equation approaches to modelling phonon effects in optically driven self-assembled quantum dots. Coupling of the (quasi) two-level excitonic system to phonons leads to dissipation and dephasing, the rates of which depend on the excitation conditions...

  4. Mathematical model of an optically pumped molecular laser

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, LR

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model was developed that accurately predicts the performance of an optically pumped HBr laser. Relatively high conversion efficiency was achieved. Tm pumped Ho:YLF is a viable source for pumping HBr laser, while HBr can be scaled...

  5. Features of optical modeling in educational and scientific activity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article discusses the functionality of existing software for the modeling, analysis and optimization of lighting systems and optical elements, through which the stage of their design can be automated completely. The use of these programs is shown using the example of scientific work and the educational activity of ...

  6. Model of optical response of marine aerosols to Forbush decreases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondo, Torsten; Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Svensmark, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    In order to elucidate the effect of galactic cosmic rays on cloud formation, we investigate the optical response of marine aerosols to Forbush decreases - abrupt decreases in galactic cosmic rays - by means of modeling. We vary the nucleation rate of new aerosols, in a sectional coagulation...

  7. Modeling light–tissue interaction in optical coherence tomography systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter E.; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Thrane, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) performs high-resolution, cross-sectional tomographic imaging of the internal tissue microstructure by measuring backscattered or backreflected light. The scope of this chapter is to present analytical and numerical models that are able to describe light-tissue ...

  8. Geometrical optics modeling of the grating-slit test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chao-Wen; Sasian, Jose

    2007-02-19

    A novel optical testing method termed the grating-slit test is discussed. This test uses a grating and a slit, as in the Ronchi test, but the grating-slit test is different in that the grating is used as the incoherent illuminating object instead of the spatial filter. The slit is located at the plane of the image of a sinusoidal intensity grating. An insightful geometrical-optics model for the grating-slit test is presented and the fringe contrast ratio with respect to the slit width and object-grating period is obtained. The concept of spatial bucket integration is used to obtain the fringe contrast ratio.

  9. Quantum Electrostatic Model for Optical Properties of Nanoscale Gold Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Haoliang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The optical properties of thin gold films with thickness varying from 2.5 nm to 30 nm are investigated. Due to the quantum size effect, the optical constants of the thin gold film deviate from the Drude model for bulk material as film thickness decreases, especially around 2.5 nm, where the electron energy level becomes discrete. A theory based on the self-consistent solution of the Schrödinger equation and the Poisson equation is proposed and its predictions agree well with experimental results.

  10. Modelling the response of quasi-optical corner cube mixers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, W.M.; Eivers, J.G.; Gans, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    A three-dimensional modeling technique is developed to analyze and predict the optical performance of Schottky-diode corner-cube/wire-antenna devices for submm-astronomy applications. The model determines the antenna efficiency for the case of Gaussian input beams, and simulations of performance in a variety of configurations can be used to optimize instrument designs. Corner-to-whisker spacing and antenna/beam orientation are found to be the most important coupling parameters. 12 references

  11. Use of the optical model in the actinide region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvy, J.

    1985-11-01

    This paper reviews current methods as well as recent developments in the use of optical model for calculating actinide nuclear data in the incident neutron energy range from 10 keV to 20 MeV. Special consideration is given of the general role of the model, parameterization procedures with taking account of nuclear deformations, parameters sets to be recommended, and some utilization problems [fr

  12. Optical conductivity of the Hubbard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente Alvarez, J.J.; Balseiro, C.A.; Ceccatto, H.A.

    1996-07-01

    We study the response to a static electric field (charge stiffness) and the frequency-dependent conductivity of the Hubbard model in a resonant-valence-bond-type paramagnetic phase. This phase is described by means of a charge and spin rotational-invariant approach, based on a mixed fermion-boson representation of the original strongly correlated electrons. We found that the Mott transition at half filling is well described by the charge stiffness behaviour, and that the values for this quantity off half filling agree reasonably well with numerical results. Furthermore, for the frequency-dependent conductivity we trace back the origin of the band which appears inside the Hubbard gap to magnetic pair breaking. This points to a magnetic origin of midinfrared band in high-T c compounds, with no relation to superconductivity. (author). 12 refs, 2 tabs

  13. Computational Modeling of Ultrafast Pulse Propagation in Nonlinear Optical Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Agrawal, Govind P.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    There is an emerging technology of photonic (or optoelectronic) integrated circuits (PICs or OEICs). In PICs, optical and electronic components are grown together on the same chip. rib build such devices and subsystems, one needs to model the entire chip. Accurate computer modeling of electromagnetic wave propagation in semiconductors is necessary for the successful development of PICs. More specifically, these computer codes would enable the modeling of such devices, including their subsystems, such as semiconductor lasers and semiconductor amplifiers in which there is femtosecond pulse propagation. Here, the computer simulations are made by solving the full vector, nonlinear, Maxwell's equations, coupled with the semiconductor Bloch equations, without any approximations. The carrier is retained in the description of the optical pulse, (i.e. the envelope approximation is not made in the Maxwell's equations), and the rotating wave approximation is not made in the Bloch equations. These coupled equations are solved to simulate the propagation of femtosecond optical pulses in semiconductor materials. The simulations describe the dynamics of the optical pulses, as well as the interband and intraband.

  14. Welding wire velocity modelling and control using an optical sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten M.; Pedersen, Tom S.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a method for controlling the velocity of a welding wire at the tip of the handle is described. The method is an alternative to the traditional welding apparatus control system where the wire velocity is controlled internal in the welding machine implying a poor disturbance reduction....... To obtain the tip velocity a dynamic model of the wire/liner system is developed and verified.  In the wire/liner system it turned out that backlash and reflections are influential factors. An idea for handling the backlash has been suggested. In addition an optical sensor for measuring the wire velocity...... at the tip has been constructed. The optical sensor may be used but some problems due to focusing cause noise in the control loop demanding a more precise mechanical wire feed system or an optical sensor with better focusing characteristics....

  15. Fast neutrons and the optical model: some observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.; Lawson, R.D.; Guenther, P.T.

    1985-01-01

    The optical model of fast-neutron-induced phenomena is considered from the observational viewpoint. Experimental characteristics governing the reliability of the modeling are outlined with attention to implications on model parameters and their uncertainties. The physical characteristics of experimentally-deduced ''regional'' and ''specific'' model parameters are examined including: parameter trends with mass and energy, implications of collective effects, and fundamental relations between real and imaginary potentials. These physical properties are illustrated by studies in the A=60 and 90 regions. General trends are identified and outstanding issues cited. Throughout, the approach is that of observational interpretation for basic and applied purposes. 20 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Some Advances in the Circuit Modeling of Extraordinary Optical Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Medina

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of extraordinary optical transmission (EOT through electrically small holes perforated on opaque metal screens has been a hot topic in the optics community for more than one decade. This experimentally observed frequency-selective enhanced transmission of electromagnetic power through holes, for which classical Bethe's theory predicts very poor transmission, later attracted the attention of engineers working on microwave engineering or applied electromagnetics. Extraordinary transmission was first linked to the plasma-like behavior of metals at optical frequencies. However, the primary role played by the periodicity of the distribution of holes was soon made evident, in such a way that extraordinary transmission was disconnected from the particular behavior of metals at optical frequencies. Indeed, the same phenomenon has been observed in the microwave and millimeter wave regime, for instance. Nowadays, the most commonly accepted theory explains EOT in terms of the interaction of the impinging plane wave with the surface plasmon-polariton-Bloch waves (SPP-Bloch supported by the periodically perforated plate. The authors of this paper have recently proposed an alternative model whose details will be briefly summarized here. A parametric study of the predictions of the model and some new potential extensions will be reported to provide additional insight.

  17. FDTD modeling of anisotropic nonlinear optical phenomena in silicon waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Chethiya M; Premaratne, Malin; Rukhlenko, Ivan D; Agrawal, Govind P

    2010-09-27

    A deep insight into the inherent anisotropic optical properties of silicon is required to improve the performance of silicon-waveguide-based photonic devices. It may also lead to novel device concepts and substantially extend the capabilities of silicon photonics in the future. In this paper, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, we present a three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for modeling optical phenomena in silicon waveguides, which takes into account fully the anisotropy of the third-order electronic and Raman susceptibilities. We show that, under certain realistic conditions that prevent generation of the longitudinal optical field inside the waveguide, this model is considerably simplified and can be represented by a computationally efficient algorithm, suitable for numerical analysis of complex polarization effects. To demonstrate the versatility of our model, we study polarization dependence for several nonlinear effects, including self-phase modulation, cross-phase modulation, and stimulated Raman scattering. Our FDTD model provides a basis for a full-blown numerical simulator that is restricted neither by the single-mode assumption nor by the slowly varying envelope approximation.

  18. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieu, Jean Paul

    1975-01-01

    Optics, Parts 1 and 2 covers electromagnetic optics and quantum optics. The first part of the book examines the various of the important properties common to all electromagnetic radiation. This part also studies electromagnetic waves; electromagnetic optics of transparent isotropic and anisotropic media; diffraction; and two-wave and multi-wave interference. The polarization states of light, the velocity of light, and the special theory of relativity are also examined in this part. The second part is devoted to quantum optics, specifically discussing the classical molecular theory of optical p

  19. Use of results from microscopic methods in optical model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagrange, C.

    1985-11-01

    A concept of vectorization for coupled-channel programs based upon conventional methods is first presented. This has been implanted in our program for its use on the CRAY-1 computer. In a second part we investigate the capabilities of a semi-microscopic optical model involving fewer adjustable parameters than phenomenological ones. The two main ingredients of our calculations are, for spherical or well-deformed nuclei, the microscopic optical-model calculations of Jeukenne, Lejeune and Mahaux and nuclear densities from Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations using the density-dependent force D1. For transitional nuclei deformation-dependent nuclear structure wave functions are employed to weigh the scattering potentials for different shapes and channels [fr

  20. Probabilistic Modeling of Intracranial Pressure Effects on Optic Nerve Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, Andrew J.; Raykin, Julia; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Altered intracranial pressure (ICP) is involved/implicated in several ocular conditions: papilledema, glaucoma and Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. The biomechanical effects of altered ICP on optic nerve head (ONH) tissues in these conditions are uncertain but likely important. We have quantified ICP-induced deformations of ONH tissues, using finite element (FE) and probabilistic modeling (Latin Hypercube Simulations (LHS)) to consider a range of tissue properties and relevant pressures.

  1. Explicit versus Implicit Solvent Modeling of Raman Optical Activity Spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hopmann, K. H.; Ruud, K.; Pecul, M.; Kudelski, A.; Dračínský, Martin; Bouř, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 14 (2011), s. 4128-4137 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11033; GA ČR GAP208/11/0105 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200550902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : raman optical activity * lactamide * solvent models Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.696, year: 2011

  2. Optical model calculations with the code ECIS95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, B V [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico da Aeronautica, Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (Brazil)

    2001-12-15

    The basic features of elastic and inelastic scattering within the framework of the spherical and deformed nuclear optical models are discussed. The calculation of cross sections, angular distributions and other scattering quantities using J. Raynal's code ECIS95 is described. The use of the ECIS method (Equations Couplees en Iterations Sequentielles) in coupled-channels and distorted-wave Born approximation calculations is also reviewed. (author)

  3. Monte Carlo modeling of human tooth optical coherence tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Boya; Meng, Zhuo; Wang, Longzhi; Liu, Tiegen

    2013-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo model for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of human tooth. The model is implemented by combining the simulation of a Gaussian beam with simulation for photon propagation in a two-layer human tooth model with non-parallel surfaces through a Monte Carlo method. The geometry and the optical parameters of the human tooth model are chosen on the basis of the experimental OCT images. The results show that the simulated OCT images are qualitatively consistent with the experimental ones. Using the model, we demonstrate the following: firstly, two types of photons contribute to the information of morphological features and noise in the OCT image of a human tooth, respectively. Secondly, the critical imaging depth of the tooth model is obtained, and it is found to decrease significantly with increasing mineral loss, simulated as different enamel scattering coefficients. Finally, the best focus position is located below and close to the dental surface by analysis of the effect of focus positions on the OCT signal and critical imaging depth. We anticipate that this modeling will become a powerful and accurate tool for a preliminary numerical study of the OCT technique on diseases of dental hard tissue in human teeth. (paper)

  4. Universal squash model for optical communications using linear optics and threshold detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, Chi-Hang Fred; Chau, H. F.; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2011-01-01

    Transmission of photons through open-air or optical fibers is an important primitive in quantum-information processing. Theoretical descriptions of this process often consider single photons as information carriers and thus fail to accurately describe experimental implementations where any number of photons may enter a detector. It has been a great challenge to bridge this big gap between theory and experiments. One powerful method for achieving this goal is by conceptually squashing the received multiphoton states to single-photon states. However, until now, only a few protocols admit a squash model; furthermore, a recently proven no-go theorem appears to rule out the existence of a universal squash model. Here we show that a necessary condition presumed by all existing squash models is in fact too stringent. By relaxing this condition, we find that, rather surprisingly, a universal squash model actually exists for many protocols, including quantum key distribution, quantum state tomography, Bell's inequality testing, and entanglement verification.

  5. Semi-analytical model of filtering effects in microwave phase shifters based on semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui; Xue, Weiqi; Öhman, Filip

    2008-01-01

    We present a model to interpret enhanced microwave phase shifts based on filter assisted slow and fast light effects in semiconductor optical amplifiers. The model also demonstrates the spectral phase impact of input optical signals.......We present a model to interpret enhanced microwave phase shifts based on filter assisted slow and fast light effects in semiconductor optical amplifiers. The model also demonstrates the spectral phase impact of input optical signals....

  6. Behavioral Model of High Performance Camera for NIF Optics Inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackel, B M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop software that will model the behavior of the high performance Spectral Instruments 1000 series Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera located in the Final Optics Damage Inspection (FODI) system on the National Ignition Facility. NIF's target chamber will be mounted with 48 Final Optics Assemblies (FOAs) to convert the laser light from infrared to ultraviolet and focus it precisely on the target. Following a NIF shot, the optical components of each FOA must be carefully inspected for damage by the FODI to ensure proper laser performance during subsequent experiments. Rapid image capture and complex image processing (to locate damage sites) will reduce shot turnaround time; thus increasing the total number of experiments NIF can conduct during its 30 year lifetime. Development of these rapid processes necessitates extensive offline software automation -- especially after the device has been deployed in the facility. Without access to the unique real device or an exact behavioral model, offline software testing is difficult. Furthermore, a software-based behavioral model allows for many instances to be running concurrently; this allows multiple developers to test their software at the same time. Thus it is beneficial to construct separate software that will exactly mimic the behavior and response of the real SI-1000 camera

  7. Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and its experimental models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Steven L.; Johnson, Mary A.; Miller, Neil R.

    2011-01-01

    Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) can be divided into nonarteritic (NAION) and arteritic (AAION) forms. NAION makes up ~85% of all cases of AION, and until recently was poorly understood. There is no treatment for NAION, and its initiating causes are poorly understood, in part because NAION is not lethal, making it difficult to obtain fresh, newly affected tissue for study. In-vivo electrophysiology and post-mortem studies reveal specific responses that are associated with NAION. New models of NAION have been developed which enable insights into the pathophysiological events surrounding this disease. These models include both rodent and primate species, and the power of a `vertically integrated' multi-species approach can help in understanding the common cellular mechanisms and physiological responses to clinical NAION, and to identify potential approaches to treatment. The models utilize laser light to activate intravascular photoactive dye to induce capillary vascular thrombosis, while sparing the larger vessels. The observable optic nerve changes associated with rodent models of AION (rAION) and primate NAION (pNAION) are indistinguishable from that seen in clinical disease, including sectoral axonal involvement, and in-vivo electrophysiological data from these models are consistent with clinical data. Early post-infarct events reveal an unexpected inflammatory response, and changes in intraretinal gene expression for both stress response, while sparing outer retinal function, which occurs in AAION models. Histologically, the NAION models reveal an isolated loss of retinal ganglion cells by apoptosis. There are changes detectable by immunohistochemistry suggesting that other retinal cells mount a brisk response to retinal ganglion cell distress without themselves dying. The optic nerve ultimately shows axonal loss and scarring. Inflammation is a prominent early histological feature. This suggests that clinically, specific modulation of inflammation may

  8. Simplifying BRDF input data for optical signature modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, Tomas; Pohl, Anna; Fagerström, Jan

    2017-05-01

    Scene simulations of optical signature properties using signature codes normally requires input of various parameterized measurement data of surfaces and coatings in order to achieve realistic scene object features. Some of the most important parameters are used in the model of the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) and are normally determined by surface reflectance and scattering measurements. Reflectance measurements of the spectral Directional Hemispherical Reflectance (DHR) at various incident angles can normally be performed in most spectroscopy labs, while measuring the BRDF is more complicated or may not be available at all in many optical labs. We will present a method in order to achieve the necessary BRDF data directly from DHR measurements for modeling software using the Sandford-Robertson BRDF model. The accuracy of the method is tested by modeling a test surface by comparing results from using estimated and measured BRDF data as input to the model. These results show that using this method gives no significant loss in modeling accuracy.

  9. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Ninth Edition Optics: Ninth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommen

  10. On unitarity of the particle-hole dispersive optical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, M. L.; Shlomo, S.; Tulupov, B. A.; Urin, M. H.

    2018-02-01

    For the recently developed particle-hole dispersive optical model, weak violations of unitarity due to a phenomenological description of the spreading effect are considered. Methods for unitarity restoration are proposed and implemented for the 208Pb nucleus in the description of the energy-averaged isoscalar monopole double transition density and strength functions in a wide excitation energy interval that includes the isoscalar giant monopole resonance and its overtone. To illustrate abilities of the model, direct neutron decay of the mentioned giant resonance is also considered.

  11. Multiple Scattering Model for Optical Coherence Tomography with Rytov Approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Muxingzi

    2017-04-24

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a coherence-gated, micrometer-resolution imaging technique that focuses a broadband near-infrared laser beam to penetrate into optical scattering media, e.g. biological tissues. The OCT resolution is split into two parts, with the axial resolution defined by half the coherence length, and the depth-dependent lateral resolution determined by the beam geometry, which is well described by a Gaussian beam model. The depth dependence of lateral resolution directly results in the defocusing effect outside the confocal region and restricts current OCT probes to small numerical aperture (NA) at the expense of lateral resolution near the focus. Another limitation on OCT development is the presence of a mixture of speckles due to multiple scatterers within the coherence length, and other random noise. Motivated by the above two challenges, a multiple scattering model based on Rytov approximation and Gaussian beam optics is proposed for the OCT setup. Some previous papers have adopted the first Born approximation with the assumption of small perturbation of the incident field in inhomogeneous media. The Rytov method of the same order with smooth phase perturbation assumption benefits from a wider spatial range of validity. A deconvolution method for solving the inverse problem associated with the first Rytov approximation is developed, significantly reducing the defocusing effect through depth and therefore extending the feasible range of NA.

  12. Optical choppers with rotational elements: modeling, design and prototypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duma, Virgil-Florin; Cira, Octavian; Demian, Dorin

    2017-05-01

    We present a brief overview of our contributions regarding the analysis and design of optical choppers. Their applications range numerous domains, from optical sensing in radiometry or telescopes to laser manufacturing and biomedical imaging - for example for the controlled attenuation of light, the elimination of selected spectral domains, or the switching of optical paths. While these aspects are pointed out, the paper describes our analysis, modeling, and manufacturing of prototypes for choppers with: (a) wheels with windows with linear margins; (b) wheels with windows with non-linear margins (semi-circular or elliptical), outward or inward; (c) rotational shafts with different shapes, with slits or with holes. While variant (a) represents classical choppers, variant (b) represents the "eclipse" choppers that we have developed and also patented for the solution with two adjustable wheels that can produce circular windows. Variant (c), of choppers with shafts is also a patent application. Their transmission functions are discussed, for the shape of the laser pulses produced and for the attenuation coefficients obtained. While this discussion has been completed analytically for top-hat laser beams, it has been modeled using simulations for Gaussian and Bessel beams. Design, manufacturing aspects, and prototypes of the different chopper configurations complete the presentation.

  13. Optical modelling of photoluminescence emitted by thin doped films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigeat, P.; Easwarakhanthan, T.; Briancon, J.L.; Rinnert, H.

    2011-01-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) spectra emitted by doped films are deformed owing to film thickness-dependent wave interference. This hampers knowing well their PL generating mechanisms as well as designing photonic devices with suitable geometries that improve their PL efficiency. We develop in this paper an energy model for PL emitted by doped films considering the interaction between the wavelength-differing incident standing and emitted waves, their energy transfer in-between, and the interferences undergone by both. The film optical constants are estimated fitting the model to the measured PL. This simple model has thus allowed us to interpret the evolution of PL emitted by Er-doped AlN films prepared on Si substrates by reactive magnetron sputtering. The shapes, the amplitudes, and the illusive sub-spectral features of the PL spectra depend essentially on the film thickness. The model further predicts high sensitivity for PL emitted by non-homogenously doped stacked-films to incident light wavelengths and film-thickness variations. This property has potential applications in tracking wavelength variations and in measuring physical quantities producing thickness variations. This model may be used to optimise PL efficiency of photonic devices through different film geometries and optical properties.

  14. Wavefront Sensing for WFIRST with a Linear Optical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurling, Alden S.; Content, David A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we develop methods to use a linear optical model to capture the field dependence of wavefront aberrations in a nonlinear optimization-based phase retrieval algorithm for image-based wavefront sensing. The linear optical model is generated from a ray trace model of the system and allows the system state to be described in terms of mechanical alignment parameters rather than wavefront coefficients. This approach allows joint optimization over images taken at different field points and does not require separate convergence of phase retrieval at individual field points. Because the algorithm exploits field diversity, multiple defocused images per field point are not required for robustness. Furthermore, because it is possible to simultaneously fit images of many stars over the field, it is not necessary to use a fixed defocus to achieve adequate signal-to-noise ratio despite having images with high dynamic range. This allows high performance wavefront sensing using in-focus science data. We applied this technique in a simulation model based on the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Intermediate Design Reference Mission (IDRM) imager using a linear optical model with 25 field points. We demonstrate sub-thousandth-wave wavefront sensing accuracy in the presence of noise and moderate undersampling for both monochromatic and polychromatic images using 25 high-SNR target stars. Using these high-quality wavefront sensing results, we are able to generate upsampled point-spread functions (PSFs) and use them to determine PSF ellipticity to high accuracy in order to reduce the systematic impact of aberrations on the accuracy of galactic ellipticity determination for weak-lensing science.

  15. Modeling, fabrication and high power optical characterization of plasmonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Lysenko, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes modeling, fabrication and high power optical characterization of thin gold films embedded in silicon dioxide. The propagation vector of surface plasmon polaritons has been calculated by the effective index method for the wavelength range of 750-1700 nm and film thickness of 15......, 30 and 45 nm. The fabrication process of such plasmonic waveguides with width in the range of 1-100 μm and their quality inspection are described. The results of optical characterization of plasmonic waveguides using a high power laser with the peak power wavelength 1064 nm show significant deviation...... from the linear propagation regime of surface plasmon polaritons at the average input power of 100 mW and above. Possible reasons for this deviation are heating of the waveguides and subsequent changes in the coupling and propagation losses....

  16. Numerical modelling of multimode fibre-optic communication lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidelnikov, O S; Fedoruk, M P [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Sygletos, S; Ferreira, F [Aston University, England, Birmingham, B4 7ET (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-31

    The results of numerical modelling of nonlinear propagation of an optical signal in multimode fibres with a small differential group delay are presented. It is found that the dependence of the error vector magnitude (EVM) on the differential group delay can be reduced by increasing the number of ADC samples per symbol in the numerical implementation of the differential group delay compensation algorithm in the receiver. The possibility of using multimode fibres with a small differential group delay for data transmission in modern digital communication systems is demonstrated. It is shown that with increasing number of modes the strong coupling regime provides a lower EVM level than the weak coupling one. (fibre-optic communication lines)

  17. Optical model calculation of neutron-nucleus scattering cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.E.; Camarda, H.S.

    1980-01-01

    A program to calculate the total, elastic, reaction, and differential cross section of a neutron interacting with a nucleus is described. The interaction between the neutron and the nucleus is represented by a spherically symmetric complex potential that includes spin-orbit coupling. This optical model problem is solved numerically, and is treated with the partial-wave formalism of scattering theory. The necessary scattering theory required to solve this problem is briefly stated. Then, the numerical methods used to integrate the Schroedinger equation, calculate derivatives, etc., are described, and the results of various programming tests performed are presented. Finally, the program is discussed from a user's point of view, and it is pointed out how and where the program (OPTICAL) can be changed to satisfy particular needs

  18. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs. IV. Polarization timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Lobos, P. A.; Goosmann, R. W.; Marin, F.; Savić, D.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Optical observations cannot resolve the structure of active galactic nuclei (AGN), and a unified model for AGN was inferred mostly from indirect methods, such as spectroscopy and variability studies. Optical reverberation mapping allowed us to constrain the spatial dimension of the broad emission line region and thereby to measure the mass of supermassive black holes. Recently, reverberation was also applied to the polarized signal emerging from different AGN components. In principle, this should allow us to measure the spatial dimensions of the sub-parsec reprocessing media. Aim. We conduct numerical modeling of polarization reverberation and provide theoretical predictions for the polarization time lag induced by different AGN components. The model parameters are adjusted to the observational appearance of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151. Methods: We modeled scattering-induced polarization and tested different geometries for the circumnuclear dust component. Our tests included the effects of clumpiness and different dust prescriptions. To further extend the model, we also explored the effects of additional ionized winds stretched along the polar direction, and of an equatorial scattering ring that is responsible for the polarization angle observed in pole-on AGN. The simulations were run using a time-dependent version of the STOKES code. Results: Our modeling confirms the previously found polarization characteristics as a function of the observer`s viewing angle. When the dust adopts a flared-disk geometry, the lags reveal a clear difference between type 1 and type 2 AGN. This distinction is less clear for a torus geometry where the time lag is more sensitive to the geometry and optical depth of the inner surface layers of the funnel. The presence of a scattering equatorial ring and ionized outflows increased the recorded polarization time lags, and the polar outflows smooths out dependence on viewing angle, especially for the higher optical depth of the

  19. Human tissue optical properties measurements and light propagation modelling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dam, JS

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical Optics is the study of the optical properties of living biological material, especially its scattering and absorption characteristics, and their significance to light propagation within the material. Determination of tissue optical...

  20. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Eighth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommended for engineering st

  1. Analytical Modeling Tool for Design of Hydrocarbon Sensitive Optical Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Al Handawi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pipelines are the main transportation means for oil and gas products across large distances. Due to the severe conditions they operate in, they are regularly inspected using conventional Pipeline Inspection Gages (PIGs for corrosion damage. The motivation for researching a real-time distributed monitoring solution arose to mitigate costs and provide a proactive indication of potential failures. Fiber optic sensors with polymer claddings provide a means of detecting contact with hydrocarbons. By coating the fibers with a layer of metal similar in composition to that of the parent pipeline, corrosion of this coating may be detected when the polymer cladding underneath is exposed to the surrounding hydrocarbons contained within the pipeline. A Refractive Index (RI change occurs in the polymer cladding causing a loss in intensity of a traveling light pulse due to a reduction in the fiber’s modal capacity. Intensity losses may be detected using Optical Time Domain Reflectometry (OTDR while pinpointing the spatial location of the contact via time delay calculations of the back-scattered pulses. This work presents a theoretical model for the above sensing solution to provide a design tool for the fiber optic cable in the context of hydrocarbon sensing following corrosion of an external metal coating. Results are verified against the experimental data published in the literature.

  2. Analytical Modeling Tool for Design of Hydrocarbon Sensitive Optical Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Handawi, Khalil; Vahdati, Nader; Shiryayev, Oleg; Lawand, Lydia

    2017-09-28

    Pipelines are the main transportation means for oil and gas products across large distances. Due to the severe conditions they operate in, they are regularly inspected using conventional Pipeline Inspection Gages (PIGs) for corrosion damage. The motivation for researching a real-time distributed monitoring solution arose to mitigate costs and provide a proactive indication of potential failures. Fiber optic sensors with polymer claddings provide a means of detecting contact with hydrocarbons. By coating the fibers with a layer of metal similar in composition to that of the parent pipeline, corrosion of this coating may be detected when the polymer cladding underneath is exposed to the surrounding hydrocarbons contained within the pipeline. A Refractive Index (RI) change occurs in the polymer cladding causing a loss in intensity of a traveling light pulse due to a reduction in the fiber's modal capacity. Intensity losses may be detected using Optical Time Domain Reflectometry (OTDR) while pinpointing the spatial location of the contact via time delay calculations of the back-scattered pulses. This work presents a theoretical model for the above sensing solution to provide a design tool for the fiber optic cable in the context of hydrocarbon sensing following corrosion of an external metal coating. Results are verified against the experimental data published in the literature.

  3. Yanqing solar field: Dynamic optical model and operational safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Dongming; Wang, Zhifeng; Xu, Ershu; Zhu, Lingzhi; Lei, Dongqiang; Xu, Li; Yuan, Guofeng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A dynamic optical model of the Yanqing solar field was built. • Tracking angle characteristics were studied with different SCA layouts and time. • The average energy flux was simulated across four clear days. • Influences of defocus angles for energy flux were analyzed. - Abstract: A dynamic optical model was established for the Yanqing solar field at the parabolic trough solar thermal power plant and a simulation was conducted on four separate days of clear weather (March 3rd, June 2nd, September 25th, December 17th). The solar collector assembly (SCA) was comprised of a North-South and East-West layout. The model consisted of the following modules: DNI, SCA operational, and SCA optical. The tracking angle characteristics were analyzed and the results showed that the East-West layout of the tracking system was the most viable. The average energy flux was simulated for a given time period and different SCA layouts, yielding an average flux of 6 kW/m 2 , which was then used as the design and operational standards of the Yanqing parabolic trough plant. The mass flow of North-South layout was relatively stable. The influences of the defocus angles on both the average energy flux and the circumferential flux distribution were also studied. The results provided a theoretical basis for the following components: solar field design, mass flow control of the heat transfer fluid, design and operation of the tracking system, operational safety of SCAs, and power production prediction in the Yanqing 1 MW parabolic trough plant.

  4. Optical model with multiple band couplings using soft rotator structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyanov, Dmitry; Soukhovitskii, Efrem; Capote, Roberto; Quesada, Jose Manuel; Chiba, Satoshi

    2017-09-01

    A new dispersive coupled-channel optical model (DCCOM) is derived that describes nucleon scattering on 238U and 232Th targets using a soft-rotator-model (SRM) description of the collective levels of the target nucleus. SRM Hamiltonian parameters are adjusted to the observed collective levels of the target nucleus. SRM nuclear wave functions (mixed in K quantum number) have been used to calculate coupling matrix elements of the generalized optical model. Five rotational bands are coupled: the ground-state band, β-, γ-, non-axial- bands, and a negative parity band. Such coupling scheme includes almost all levels below 1.2 MeV of excitation energy of targets. The "effective" deformations that define inter-band couplings are derived from SRM Hamiltonian parameters. Conservation of nuclear volume is enforced by introducing a monopolar deformed potential leading to additional couplings between rotational bands. The present DCCOM describes the total cross section differences between 238U and 232Th targets within experimental uncertainty from 50 keV up to 200 MeV of neutron incident energy. SRM couplings and volume conservation allow a precise calculation of the compound-nucleus (CN) formation cross sections, which is significantly different from the one calculated with rigid-rotor potentials with any number of coupled levels.

  5. Efficient Weibull channel model for salinity induced turbulent underwater wireless optical communications

    KAUST Repository

    Oubei, Hassan M.; Zedini, Emna; Elafandy, Rami T.; Kammoun, Abla; Ng, Tien Khee; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim; Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in underwater wireless optical communications necessitate a better understanding of the underwater channel. We propose the Weibull model to characterize the fading of salinity induced turbulent underwater wireless optical channels

  6. Measurement of infrared refractive indices of organic and organophosphorous compounds for optical modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonkyn, Russell G.; Danby, Tyler O.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Myers, Tanya L.

    2017-05-03

    The complex optical refractive index contains the optical constants, n($\\tilde{u}$)and k($\\tilde{u}$), which correspond to the dispersion and absorption of light within a medium, respectively. By obtaining the optical constants one can in principle model most optical phenomena in media and at interfaces including reflection, refraction and dispersion. We have developed improved protocols based on the use of multiple path lengths to determine the optical constants for dozens of liquids, including organic and organophosphorous compounds. Detailed description of the protocols to determine the infrared indices will be presented, along with preliminary results using the constants with their applications to optical modeling.

  7. Modeling bidirectional reflectance of forests and woodlands using Boolean models and geometric optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahler, Alan H.; Jupp, David L. B.

    1990-01-01

    Geometric-optical discrete-element mathematical models for forest canopies have been developed using the Boolean logic and models of Serra. The geometric-optical approach is considered to be particularly well suited to describing the bidirectional reflectance of forest woodland canopies, where the concentration of leaf material within crowns and the resulting between-tree gaps make plane-parallel, radiative-transfer models inappropriate. The approach leads to invertible formulations, in which the spatial and directional variance provides the means for remote estimation of tree crown size, shape, and total cover from remotedly sensed imagery.

  8. Optical model analysis of intermediate energy p-4He scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greben, J.M.; Gourishankar, R.

    1983-03-01

    Recent Wolfenstein R-parameter data are used to explain and resolve previous problems with optical model descriptions of p- 4 He elastic scattering at 500 MeV. An essential component in this optical model analysis is a qualitative interpretation of different features of the elastic data in terms of the Born approximation. First we show that the R-data require the real spin-orbit potential to have certain geometrical properties which were missing in previous analyses. We can then show that the fast fall-off of the cross-section for small angles, together with the rapid increase and subsequent decrease of the polarization, establishes the need for an attractive tail in the real central potentials can also be inferred from this qualitative analysis, in particular a strong reduction of the spin-orbit potential. Our final potential gives a reduction of the X 2 /datapoint by about 20 in comparison to previous potentials, and underlines the usefulness of the qualitative Born analysis

  9. [Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy animal model and its treatment applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuman, Hideki

    2014-04-01

    Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is one of the most common acute unilaterally onset optic nerve diseases. One management problem in terms of NAION is the difficulty of differential diagnosis between NAION and anterior optic neuritis (ON). A second problem is that there is no established treatment for the acute stage of NAION. A third problem is that there is no preventive treatment for a subsequent attack on the fellow eye, estimated to occur in 15 to 25% of patients with NAION. For differentiation of acute NAION from anterior optic neuritis, we investigated the usefulness of laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG). In the normal control group, the tissue blood flow did not significantly differ between the right and left eyes. In the NAION group, all 6 patients had 29.5% decreased mean blur rate (MBR), which correlates to optic disc blood flow, of the NAION eye compared with the unaffected eye. In the anterior ON group, all 6 cases had 15.9% increased MBR of the anterior ON eye compared with the unaffected eye. Thus, LSFG showed a difference of the underlying pathophysiology between NAION and anterior ON despite showing disc swelling in both groups and could be useful for differentiating both groups. For the treatment of acute stage of NAION, we tried to reproduce the rodent model of NAION (rNAION) developed by Bernstein and colleagues. To induce rNAION, after the administration of rose bengal(RB) (2.5 mM) into the tail vein of SD rats, the small vessels of the left optic nerve were photoactivated using a 514 nm argon green laser (RB-laser-induction). In the RB-laser-induction eyes, the capillaries within the optic disc were reduced markedly, the optic disc became swollen, and fluorescein angiography showed filling defect in the choroid and the optic disc at an early stage, followed by hyperfluorescence at a late stage. Electrophysiological evaluation revealed that visual evoked potential (VEP) amplitude was significantly decreased but an electroretinogram

  10. Dual permeability FEM models for distributed fiber optic sensors development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-López, Juan Pablo; Bogaard, Thom

    2017-04-01

    Fiber optic cables are commonly known for being robust and reliable mediums for transferring information at the speed of light in glass. Billions of kilometers of cable have been installed around the world for internet connection and real time information sharing. Yet, fiber optic cable is not only a mean for information transfer but also a way to sense and measure physical properties of the medium in which is installed. For dike monitoring, it has been used in the past for detecting inner core and foundation temperature changes which allow to estimate water infiltration during high water events. The DOMINO research project, aims to develop a fiber optic based dike monitoring system which allows to directly sense and measure any pore pressure change inside the dike structure. For this purpose, questions like which location, how many sensors, which measuring frequency and which accuracy are required for the sensor development. All these questions may be initially answered with a finite element model which allows to estimate the effects of pore pressure change in different locations along the cross section while having a time dependent estimation of a stability factor. The sensor aims to monitor two main failure mechanisms at the same time; The piping erosion failure mechanism and the macro-stability failure mechanism. Both mechanisms are going to be modeled and assessed in detail with a finite element based dual permeability Darcy-Richards numerical solution. In that manner, it is possible to assess different sensing configurations with different loading scenarios (e.g. High water levels, rainfall events and initial soil moisture and permeability conditions). The results obtained for the different configurations are later evaluated based on an entropy based performance evaluation. The added value of this kind of modelling approach for the sensor development is that it allows to simultaneously model the piping erosion and macro-stability failure mechanisms in a time

  11. Virtual optical network provisioning with unified service logic processing model for software-defined multidomain optical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongli; Li, Shikun; Song, Yinan; Sun, Ji; Zhang, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Hierarchical control architecture is designed for software-defined multidomain optical networks (SD-MDONs), and a unified service logic processing model (USLPM) is first proposed for various applications. USLPM-based virtual optical network (VON) provisioning process is designed, and two VON mapping algorithms are proposed: random node selection and per controller computation (RNS&PCC) and balanced node selection and hierarchical controller computation (BNS&HCC). Then an SD-MDON testbed is built with OpenFlow extension in order to support optical transport equipment. Finally, VON provisioning service is experimentally demonstrated on the testbed along with performance verification.

  12. Adaptive optics for reduced threshold energy in femtosecond laser induced optical breakdown in water based eye model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anja; Krueger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2013-03-01

    In ophthalmic microsurgery tissue dissection is achieved using femtosecond laser pulses to create an optical breakdown. For vitreo-retinal applications the irradiance distribution in the focal volume is distorted by the anterior components of the eye causing a raised threshold energy for breakdown. In this work, an adaptive optics system enables spatial beam shaping for compensation of aberrations and investigation of wave front influence on optical breakdown. An eye model was designed to allow for aberration correction as well as detection of optical breakdown. The eye model consists of an achromatic lens for modeling the eye's refractive power, a water chamber for modeling the tissue properties, and a PTFE sample for modeling the retina's scattering properties. Aberration correction was performed using a deformable mirror in combination with a Hartmann-Shack-sensor. The influence of an adaptive optics aberration correction on the pulse energy required for photodisruption was investigated using transmission measurements for determination of the breakdown threshold and video imaging of the focal region for study of the gas bubble dynamics. The threshold energy is considerably reduced when correcting for the aberrations of the system and the model eye. Also, a raise in irradiance at constant pulse energy was shown for the aberration corrected case. The reduced pulse energy lowers the potential risk of collateral damage which is especially important for retinal safety. This offers new possibilities for vitreo-retinal surgery using femtosecond laser pulses.

  13. Modeling silica aerogel optical performance by determining its radiative properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Silica aerogel has been known as a promising candidate for high performance transparent insulation material (TIM. Optical transparency is a crucial metric for silica aerogels in many solar related applications. Both scattering and absorption can reduce the amount of light transmitted through an aerogel slab. Due to multiple scattering, the transmittance deviates from the Beer-Lambert law (exponential attenuation. To better understand its optical performance, we decoupled and quantified the extinction contributions of absorption and scattering separately by identifying two sets of radiative properties. The radiative properties are deduced from the measured total transmittance and reflectance spectra (from 250 nm to 2500 nm of synthesized aerogel samples by solving the inverse problem of the 1-D Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE. The obtained radiative properties are found to be independent of the sample geometry and can be considered intrinsic material properties, which originate from the aerogel’s microstructure. This finding allows for these properties to be directly compared between different samples. We also demonstrate that by using the obtained radiative properties, we can model the photon transport in aerogels of arbitrary shapes, where an analytical solution is difficult to obtain.

  14. Modeling silica aerogel optical performance by determining its radiative properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lin; Yang, Sungwoo; Bhatia, Bikram; Strobach, Elise; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2016-02-01

    Silica aerogel has been known as a promising candidate for high performance transparent insulation material (TIM). Optical transparency is a crucial metric for silica aerogels in many solar related applications. Both scattering and absorption can reduce the amount of light transmitted through an aerogel slab. Due to multiple scattering, the transmittance deviates from the Beer-Lambert law (exponential attenuation). To better understand its optical performance, we decoupled and quantified the extinction contributions of absorption and scattering separately by identifying two sets of radiative properties. The radiative properties are deduced from the measured total transmittance and reflectance spectra (from 250 nm to 2500 nm) of synthesized aerogel samples by solving the inverse problem of the 1-D Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE). The obtained radiative properties are found to be independent of the sample geometry and can be considered intrinsic material properties, which originate from the aerogel's microstructure. This finding allows for these properties to be directly compared between different samples. We also demonstrate that by using the obtained radiative properties, we can model the photon transport in aerogels of arbitrary shapes, where an analytical solution is difficult to obtain.

  15. Model for optical-laser-induced impulse in vacuo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingus, R.S.; Goldman, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    A simple model, along with its derivation, is presented for calculating the impulse from targets in a vacuum exposed to single-pulse, optical lasers. Figures demonstrate that throughout most of the range of interest, results from the model agree well with experimental data and LASNEX radiation-hydrodynamic computer code calculations. The model assumes isothermal blowoff and thus takes advantage of the insensitivity of impulse to energy distribution within the ablated mass. The density profile in the blowoff is estimated and the Saha equation is used to evaluate the degree of ionization. The laser absorption coefficient and thermal radiation opacity are evaluated as a function of position in the blowoff in order to evaluate the energy reaching the ablation surface. An overall energy balance plus an energy balance at the ablation surface are used to determine the blowoff mass and temperature. The success of the model indicates that the impulse is insensitive to detailed interactions in the vicinity of the ablation surface. 11 refs., 6 figs

  16. Phenomenological optical model for p-/sup 4/He elastic scattering. [560 to 1730 MeV: Dirac equation optical model analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercer, R L [International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, N.Y. (USA); Arnold, L G; Clark, B C [Ohio State Univ., Columbus (USA). Dept. of Physics

    1978-01-30

    The results of a Dirac equation optical model analysis of p-/sup 4/He elastic scattering data are reported. The optical potential obtained at 1029 MeV reproduces the systematics of p-/sup 4/He data over the energy range from 560 to 1730 MeV.

  17. Modeling the behavior of optical elements in radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlow, T.A.; Rhoades, C.E. Jr.; Merker, M.; Triplett, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Calculation of heating caused by the deposition of x-rays in thin film optical elements is complicated because the mean free path of photo and autoionization electrons is comparable to the thin film thickness and thus the electron deposition cannot be considered local. This paper describes the modeling in a 1-D code of: (a) x-ray deposition and transport; (b) electron production, deposition and transport; and (c) thermal conduction and transport. X-ray transport is handled by multigroup discrete ordinates, electron transport is done by the method of characteristics, applied to the two term spherical harmonics expansion approximation (P1) to the Spencer-Lewis transport equation, and thermal transport is computed by a simple Richardson extrapolation of a backward Euler solution to the heat conduction equations. Results of a few test cases are presented. 8 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Optical solitons in nematic liquid crystals: model with saturation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgna, Juan Pablo; Panayotaros, Panayotis; Rial, Diego; de la Vega, Constanza Sánchez F.

    2018-04-01

    We study a 2D system that couples a Schrödinger evolution equation to a nonlinear elliptic equation and models the propagation of a laser beam in a nematic liquid crystal. The nonlinear elliptic equation describes the response of the director angle to the laser beam electric field. We obtain results on well-posedness and solitary wave solutions of this system, generalizing results for a well-studied simpler system with a linear elliptic equation for the director field. The analysis of the nonlinear elliptic problem shows the existence of an isolated global branch of solutions with director angles that remain bounded for arbitrary electric field. The results on the director equation are also used to show local and global existence, as well as decay for initial conditions with sufficiently small L 2-norm. For sufficiently large L 2-norm we show the existence of energy minimizing optical solitons with radial, positive and monotone profiles.

  19. MILES extended : Stellar population synthesis models from the optical to the infrared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rock, B.; Vazdekis, A.; Ricciardelli, E.; Peletier, R. F.; Knapen, J. H.; Falcon-Barroso, J.

    We present the first single-burst stellar population models, which covers the optical and the infrared wavelength range between 3500 and 50 000 angstrom and which are exclusively based on empirical stellar spectra. To obtain these joint models, we combined the extended MILES models in the optical

  20. An efficient method for model refinement in diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirak, A. R.; Khademi, M.

    2007-11-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a non-linear, ill-posed, boundary value and optimization problem which necessitates regularization. Also, Bayesian methods are suitable owing to measurements data are sparse and correlated. In such problems which are solved with iterative methods, for stabilization and better convergence, the solution space must be small. These constraints subject to extensive and overdetermined system of equations which model retrieving criteria specially total least squares (TLS) must to refine model error. Using TLS is limited to linear systems which is not achievable when applying traditional Bayesian methods. This paper presents an efficient method for model refinement using regularized total least squares (RTLS) for treating on linearized DOT problem, having maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimator and Tikhonov regulator. This is done with combination Bayesian and regularization tools as preconditioner matrices, applying them to equations and then using RTLS to the resulting linear equations. The preconditioning matrixes are guided by patient specific information as well as a priori knowledge gained from the training set. Simulation results illustrate that proposed method improves the image reconstruction performance and localize the abnormally well.

  1. An Optic Nerve Crush Injury Murine Model to Study Retinal Ganglion Cell Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhongshu; Zhang, Shuihua; Lee, Chunsik; Kumar, Anil; Arjunan, Pachiappan; Li, Yang; Zhang, Fan; Li, Xuri

    2011-01-01

    Injury to the optic nerve can lead to axonal degeneration, followed by a gradual death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which results in irreversible vision loss. Examples of such diseases in human include traumatic optic neuropathy and optic nerve degeneration in glaucoma. It is characterized by typical changes in the optic nerve head, progressive optic nerve degeneration, and loss of retinal ganglion cells, if uncontrolled, leading to vision loss and blindness. The optic nerve crush (ONC) injury mouse model is an important experimental disease model for traumatic optic neuropathy, glaucoma, etc. In this model, the crush injury to the optic nerve leads to gradual retinal ganglion cells apoptosis. This disease model can be used to study the general processes and mechanisms of neuronal death and survival, which is essential for the development of therapeutic measures. In addition, pharmacological and molecular approaches can be used in this model to identify and test potential therapeutic reagents to treat different types of optic neuropathy. Here, we provide a step by step demonstration of (I) Baseline retrograde labeling of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) at day 1, (II) Optic nerve crush injury at day 4, (III) Harvest the retinae and analyze RGC survival at day 11, and (IV) Representative result. PMID:21540827

  2. Modeling the video distribution link in the Next Generation Optical Access Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amaya, F.; Cárdenas, A.; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present a model for the design and optimization of the video distribution link in the next generation optical access network. We analyze the video distribution performance in a SCM-WDM link, including the noise, the distortion and the fiber optic nonlinearities. Additionally, we...... consider in the model the effect of distributed Raman amplification, used to extent the capacity and the reach of the optical link. In the model, we use the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with the purpose to obtain capacity limitations and design constrains of the next generation optical access networks....

  3. Modeling the video distribution link in the Next Generation Optical Access Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaya, F; Cardenas, A; Tafur, I

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present a model for the design and optimization of the video distribution link in the next generation optical access network. We analyze the video distribution performance in a SCM-WDM link, including the noise, the distortion and the fiber optic nonlinearities. Additionally, we consider in the model the effect of distributed Raman amplification, used to extent the capacity and the reach of the optical link. In the model, we use the nonlinear Schroedinger equation with the purpose to obtain capacity limitations and design constrains of the next generation optical access networks.

  4. Optical character recognition of handwritten Arabic using hidden Markov models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulama, Mohannad M.; Natsheh, Asem M.; Abandah, Gheith A.; Olama, Mohammed M.

    2011-04-01

    The problem of optical character recognition (OCR) of handwritten Arabic has not received a satisfactory solution yet. In this paper, an Arabic OCR algorithm is developed based on Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) combined with the Viterbi algorithm, which results in an improved and more robust recognition of characters at the sub-word level. Integrating the HMMs represents another step of the overall OCR trends being currently researched in the literature. The proposed approach exploits the structure of characters in the Arabic language in addition to their extracted features to achieve improved recognition rates. Useful statistical information of the Arabic language is initially extracted and then used to estimate the probabilistic parameters of the mathematical HMM. A new custom implementation of the HMM is developed in this study, where the transition matrix is built based on the collected large corpus, and the emission matrix is built based on the results obtained via the extracted character features. The recognition process is triggered using the Viterbi algorithm which employs the most probable sequence of sub-words. The model was implemented to recognize the sub-word unit of Arabic text raising the recognition rate from being linked to the worst recognition rate for any character to the overall structure of the Arabic language. Numerical results show that there is a potentially large recognition improvement by using the proposed algorithms.

  5. Electro-optical modeling of bulk heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchartz, Thomas; Pieters, Bart E.; Taretto, Kurt; Rau, Uwe

    2008-11-01

    We introduce a model for charge separation in bulk heterojunction solar cells that combines exciton transport to the interface between donor and acceptor phases with the dissociation of the bound electron/hole pair. We implement this model into a standard semiconductor device simulator, thereby creating a convenient method to simulate the optical and electrical characteristics of a bulk heterojunction solar cell with a commercially available program. By taking into account different collection probabilities for the excitons in the polymer and the fullerene, we are able to reproduce absorptance, internal and external quantum efficiency, as well as current/voltage curves of bulk heterojunction solar cells. We further investigate the influence of mobilities of the free excitons as well as the mobilities of the free charge carriers on the performance of bulk heterojunction solar cells. We find that, in general, the highest efficiencies are achieved with the highest mobilities. However, an optimum finite mobility of free charge carriers can result from a large recombination velocity at the contacts. In contrast, Langevin-type of recombination cannot lead to finite optimum mobilities even though this mechanism has a strong dependence on the free carrier mobilities.

  6. Electro-optical parameters of bond polarizability model for aluminosilicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Konstantin S; Bougeard, Daniel; Tandon, Poonam

    2006-04-06

    Electro-optical parameters (EOPs) of bond polarizability model (BPM) for aluminosilicate structures were derived from quantum-chemical DFT calculations of molecular models. The tensor of molecular polarizability and the derivatives of the tensor with respect to the bond length are well reproduced with the BPM, and the EOPs obtained are in a fair agreement with available experimental data. The parameters derived were found to be transferable to larger molecules. This finding suggests that the procedure used can be applied to systems with partially ionic chemical bonds. The transferability of the parameters to periodic systems was tested in molecular dynamics simulation of the polarized Raman spectra of alpha-quartz. It appeared that the molecular Si-O bond EOPs failed to reproduce the intensity of peaks in the spectra. This limitation is due to large values of the longitudinal components of the bond polarizability and its derivative found in the molecular calculations as compared to those obtained from periodic DFT calculations of crystalline silica polymorphs by Umari et al. (Phys. Rev. B 2001, 63, 094305). It is supposed that the electric field of the solid is responsible for the difference of the parameters. Nevertheless, the EOPs obtained can be used as an initial set of parameters for calculations of polarizability related characteristics of relevant systems in the framework of BPM.

  7. General MACOS Interface for Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigrist, Norbert; Basinger, Scott A.; Redding, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The General MACOS Interface (GMI) for Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems (MACOS) enables the use of MATLAB as a front-end for JPL s critical optical modeling package, MACOS. MACOS is JPL s in-house optical modeling software, which has proven to be a superb tool for advanced systems engineering of optical systems. GMI, coupled with MACOS, allows for seamless interfacing with modeling tools from other disciplines to make possible integration of dynamics, structures, and thermal models with the addition of control systems for deformable optics and other actuated optics. This software package is designed as a tool for analysts to quickly and easily use MACOS without needing to be an expert at programming MACOS. The strength of MACOS is its ability to interface with various modeling/development platforms, allowing evaluation of system performance with thermal, mechanical, and optical modeling parameter variations. GMI provides an improved means for accessing selected key MACOS functionalities. The main objective of GMI is to marry the vast mathematical and graphical capabilities of MATLAB with the powerful optical analysis engine of MACOS, thereby providing a useful tool to anyone who can program in MATLAB. GMI also improves modeling efficiency by eliminating the need to write an interface function for each task/project, reducing error sources, speeding up user/modeling tasks, and making MACOS well suited for fast prototyping.

  8. Efficient Weibull channel model for salinity induced turbulent underwater wireless optical communications

    KAUST Repository

    Oubei, Hassan M.

    2017-12-13

    Recent advances in underwater wireless optical communications necessitate a better understanding of the underwater channel. We propose the Weibull model to characterize the fading of salinity induced turbulent underwater wireless optical channels. The model shows an excellent agreement with the measured data under all channel conditions.

  9. Improving Estimated Optical Constants With MSTM and DDSCAT Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, K. M.; Wolff, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    We present numerical experiments to determine quantitatively the effects of mineral particle clustering on Mars spacecraft spectral signatures and to improve upon the values of refractive indices (optical constants n, k) derived from Mars dust laboratory analog spectra such as those from RELAB and MRO CRISM libraries. Whereas spectral properties for Mars analog minerals and actual Mars soil are dominated by aggregates of particles smaller than the size of martian atmospheric dust, the analytic radiative transfer (RT) solutions used to interpret planetary surfaces assume that individual, well-separated particles dominate the spectral signature. Both in RT models and in the refractive index derivation methods that include analytic RT approximations, spheres are also over-used to represent nonspherical particles. Part of the motivation is that the integrated effect over randomly oriented particles on quantities such as single scattering albedo and phase function are relatively less than for single particles. However, we have seen in previous numerical experiments that when varying the shape and size of individual grains within a cluster, the phase function changes in both magnitude and slope, thus the "relatively less" effect is more significant than one might think. Here we examine the wavelength dependence of the forward scattering parameter with multisphere T-matrix (MSTM) and discrete dipole approximation (DDSCAT) codes that compute light scattering by layers of particles on planetary surfaces to see how albedo is affected and integrate our model results into refractive index calculations to remove uncertainties in approximations and parameters that can lower the accuracy of optical constants. By correcting the single scattering albedo and phase function terms in the refractive index determinations, our data will help to improve the understanding of Mars in identifying, mapping the distributions, and quantifying abundances for these minerals and will address long

  10. The Dynamics of Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers – Modeling and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Nielsen, Mads Lønstrup; Berg, Tommy Winther

    2003-01-01

    The importance of semiconductor optical amplifiers is discussed. A semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) is a semiconductor laser with anti-reflection coated facets that amplifies an injected light signal by means of stimulated emission. SOAs have a number of unique properties that open up...

  11. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations on the Validity of Geometrical Optics Model for Calculating the Stability of Optical Traps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker schut, T.C.; Bakker Schut, Tom C.; Hesselink, Gerlo; Hesselink, Gerlo; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a computer program based on the geometrical optics approach proposed by Roosen to calculate the forces on dielectric spheres in focused laser beams. We have explicitly taken into account the polarization of the laser light and thd divergence of the laser beam. The model can be used

  12. A fluorescence model of the murine lung for optical detection of pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkee, Madeleine S.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2017-07-01

    We present a computer model of intravital excitation and external fluorescence detection in the murine lungs validated with a three-dimensional lung tissue phantom. The model is applied to optical detection of pulmonary tuberculosis infection.

  13. Semi-classical analysis of optical model ambiguities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuer, M.

    1979-01-01

    The ambiguities in the inverse problem at fixed energy in quantum mechanics are analyzed in the framework of the JWKB method. When the classical turning point is unique for all values of the impact parameter (high energies region), the ambiguities proceed only from the quantization of the angular momentum. In the asymptotic region the difference between two particular equivalent potentials changes sign infinitely often. In addition, the set of equivalent potentials which have a given asymptotic form is bounded (except perhaps at the origin). When there are several turning points for small values of the impact parameter (low-energy region), new ambiguities arise from the fact that the parts of the potential that are located between turning points are not ''visible'' in the classical limit. The set of equivalent potentials wich have a given asymptotic form is then not bounded. Mumerical examples (of real and complex equivalent potentials) are given. The optical model ambiguities are studied. The potential depth ambiguities also appear in classical mechanics, but their discrete nature is a quantum property. The VR/sup p//sup( V/)=constant ambiguities can be explained by the quantum corrections to the spiral scattering phenomenon. An attempt to explain why ambiguities arise only with heavy particles scattering is also given

  14. Modelling of bio-optical parameters of open ocean waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim N. Pelevin

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available An original method for estimating the concentration of chlorophyll pigments, absorption of yellow substance and absorption of suspended matter without pigments and yellow substance in detritus using spectral diffuse attenuation coefficient for downwelling irradiance and irradiance reflectance data has been applied to sea waters of different types in the open ocean (case 1. Using the effective numerical single parameter classification with the water type optical index m as a parameter over the whole range of the open ocean waters, the calculations have been carried out and the light absorption spectra of sea waters tabulated. These spectra are used to optimize the absorption models and thus to estimate the concentrations of the main admixtures in sea water. The value of m can be determined from direct measurements of the downward irradiance attenuation coefficient at 500 nm or calculated from remote sensing data using the regressions given in the article. The sea water composition can then be readily estimated from the tables given for any open ocean area if that one parameter m characterizing the basin is known.

  15. Optical Evaluation of the Rear Contacts of Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells by Coupled Electromagnetic and Statistical Ray-Optics Modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Dabirian, Ali

    2017-02-15

    High-efficiency crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells increasingly feature sophisticated electron and hole contacts aimed at minimizing electronic losses. At the rear of photovoltaic devices, such contacts—usually consisting of stacks of functional layers—offer opportunities to enhance the infrared response of the solar cells. Here, we propose an accurate and simple modeling procedure to evaluate the infrared performance of rear contacts in c-Si solar cells. Our method combines full-wave electromagnetic modeling of the rear contact with a statistical ray optics model to obtain the fraction of optical energy dissipated from the rear contact relative to that absorbed by the Si wafer. Using this technique, we study the impact of the refractive index, extinction coefficient, and thickness of the rear-passivating layer and establish basic design rules. In addition, we evaluate novel optical structures, including stratified thin films, nanoparticle composites, and conductive nanowires embedded in a low-index dielectric matrix, for integration into advanced rear contacts in c-Si photovoltaic devices. From an optical perspective, nanowire structures preserving low contact resistance appear to be the most effective approach to mitigating dissipation losses from the rear contact.

  16. Hierarchy Bayesian model based services awareness of high-speed optical access networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hui-feng

    2018-03-01

    As the speed of optical access networks soars with ever increasing multiple services, the service-supporting ability of optical access networks suffers greatly from the shortage of service awareness. Aiming to solve this problem, a hierarchy Bayesian model based services awareness mechanism is proposed for high-speed optical access networks. This approach builds a so-called hierarchy Bayesian model, according to the structure of typical optical access networks. Moreover, the proposed scheme is able to conduct simple services awareness operation in each optical network unit (ONU) and to perform complex services awareness from the whole view of system in optical line terminal (OLT). Simulation results show that the proposed scheme is able to achieve better quality of services (QoS), in terms of packet loss rate and time delay.

  17. Optical roughness BRDF model for reverse Monte Carlo simulation of real material thermal radiation transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Peiran; Eri, Qitai; Wang, Qiang

    2014-04-10

    Optical roughness was introduced into the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model to simulate the reflectance characteristics of thermal radiation. The optical roughness BRDF model stemmed from the influence of surface roughness and wavelength on the ray reflectance calculation. This model was adopted to simulate real metal emissivity. The reverse Monte Carlo method was used to display the distribution of reflectance rays. The numerical simulations showed that the optical roughness BRDF model can calculate the wavelength effect on emissivity and simulate the real metal emissivity variance with incidence angles.

  18. Optical model theory of elastic electron- and positron-atom scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joachain, C.J.

    1977-01-01

    It is stated that the basic idea of the optical model theory is to enable analysis of the elastic scattering of a particle from a complex target by replacing the complicated interactions between the beam and the target by an optical potential, or pseudopotential, in which the incident particle moves. Once the optical potential is determined the original many-body elastic scattering problem reduces to a one-body situation. The resulting optical potential is, however, a very complicated operator, and the formal expressions obtained from first principles for the optical potential can only be evaluated approximately in a few simple cases, such as high energy elastic hadron-nucleus scattering, for the the optical potential can be expressed in terms of two-body hadron-nucleon amplitudes, and the non-relativistic elastic scattering of fast charged particles by atoms. The elastic scattering of an electron or positron by a neutral atom at intermediate energies is here considered. Exchange effects between the projectile and the atomic electrons are considered; also absorption and polarisation effects. Applications of the full-wave optical model have so far only been made to the elastic scattering of fast electrons and positrons by atomic H, He, Ne, and Ar. Agreements of the optical model results with absolute measurements of differential cross sections for electron scattering are very good, an agreement that improves as the energy increases, but deteriorates quickly as the incident energy becomes lower than 50 eV for atomic H or 100 eV for He. For more complex atoms the optical model calculations also appear very encouraging. With regard to positron-atom elastic scattering the optical model results for positron-He scattering differ markedly at small angles from the corresponding electron-He values. It would be interesting to have experimental angular distributions of positron-atom elastic scattering in order to check predictions of the optical model theory. (U.K.)

  19. Measurement and modelization of silica opal optical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Avoine , Amaury; Ngoc Hong , Phan; Frederich , Hugo; Aregahegn , Kifle; Bénalloul , Paul; Coolen , Laurent; Schwob , Catherine; Thu Nga , Pham; Gallas , Bruno; Maître , Agnès

    2014-01-01

    International audience; We present the synthesis process and optical characterization of artificial silica opals. The specular reflection spectra are analyzed and compared to band structure calculations and finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. The silica optical index is a key parameter to correctly describe an opal and is usually not known and treated as a free parameter. Here we propose a method to infer the silica index, as well as the silica spheres diameter, from the reflect...

  20. Fiber-optical sensor with intensity compensation model in college teaching of physics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Liping; Zhang, Yang; Li, Kun; Zhang, Yu

    2017-08-01

    Optical fiber sensor technology is one of the main contents of modern information technology, which has a very important position in modern science and technology. Fiber optic sensor experiment can improve students' enthusiasm and broaden their horizons in college physics experiment. In this paper the main structure and working principle of fiberoptical sensor with intensity compensation model are introduced. And thus fiber-optical sensor with intensity compensation model is applied to measure micro displacement of Young's modulus measurement experiment and metal linear expansion coefficient measurement experiment in the college physics experiment. Results indicate that the measurement accuracy of micro displacement is higher than that of the traditional methods using fiber-optical sensor with intensity compensation model. Meanwhile this measurement method makes the students understand on the optical fiber, sensor and nature of micro displacement measurement method and makes each experiment strengthen relationship and compatibility, which provides a new idea for the reform of experimental teaching.

  1. Optical modeling of induction-linac driven free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharlemann, E.T.; Fawley, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    The free-electron laser (FEL) simulation code FRED, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) primarily to model single-pass FEL amplifiers driven by induction linear accelerators, is described. The main emphasis is on the modeling of optical propagation in the laser and on the differences between the requirements for modeling rf-linac-driven vs. induction-linac-driven FELs. Examples of optical guiding and mode cleanup are presented for a 50 μm FEL

  2. Intraocular Telescopic System Design: Optical and Visual Simulation in a Human Eye Model

    OpenAIRE

    Zoulinakis, Georgios; Ferrer-Blasco, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To design an intraocular telescopic system (ITS) for magnifying retinal image and to simulate its optical and visual performance after implantation in a human eye model. Methods. Design and simulation were carried out with a ray-tracing and optical design software. Two different ITS were designed, and their visual performance was simulated using the Liou-Brennan eye model. The difference between the ITS was their lenses’ placement in the eye model and their powers. Ray tracing in bot...

  3. Femtosecond laser excitation of dielectric materials: experiments and modeling of optical properties and ablation depths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wædegaard, Kristian Juncher; Frislev, Martin Thomas; Balling, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of the interaction between a dielec- tric material and ultrashort laser pulses provides the tem- poral evolution of the electronic excitation and the optical properties of the dielectric. Experimentally determined re- flectances and ablation depths for sapphire are compared...... to the calculations. A decrease in reflectance at high fluences is observed experimentally, which demonstrates the neces- sity of a temperature-dependent electron scattering rate in the model. The comparison thus provides new constraints on the optical parameters of the model....

  4. Underwater wireless optical communications: From system-level demonstrations to channel modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Oubei, Hassan M.

    2018-01-09

    In this paper, we discuss about recent experimental advances in underwater wireless optical communications (UWOC) over various underwater channel water types using different modulation schemes as well as modelling and describing the statistical properties of turbulence-induced fading in underwater wireless optical channels using laser beam intensity fluctuations measurements.

  5. On the computations analyzing natural optic flow : Quantitative model analysis of the blowfly motion vision pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindemann, J.P.; Kern, R.; Hateren, J.H. van; Ritter, H.; Egelhaaf, M.

    2005-01-01

    For many animals, including humans, the optic flow generated on the eyes during locomotion is an important source of information about self-motion and the structure of the environment. The blowfly has been used frequently as a model system for experimental analysis of optic flow processing at the

  6. Modelling of the Optical Detector System in a Compact Disc Player

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle

    2003-01-01

    The cross-couplings between focus and radial tracking servos in compact disc players are important, but the optical cross couplings are not well described in the literature. In this paper an optical model of a compact disc player based on the three beam single foucault detector principle is found...

  7. Light radiation pressure upon a wrinkled membrane – parametrization of an optically orthotropic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerovny, N. A.; Zimin, V. N.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the problem of representing the light pressure force upon the surface of a thin wrinkled film is discussed. The common source of wrinkles is the shear deformation of the membrane sample. The optical model of such a membrane is assumed to be optically orthotropic and an analytic equation for infinitesimal light pressure force is written. A linear regression model in the case of wrinkle geometry, where a surface element can have different optical parameters, is constructed and the Bayesian approach is used to calculate the parameters of this model.

  8. Modeling and Control of Magnetic Fluid Deformable Mirrors for Adaptive Optics Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zhizheng; Ben Amara, Foued

    2013-01-01

    Modeling and Control of Magnetic Fluid Deformable Mirrors for Adaptive Optics Systems presents a novel design of wavefront correctors based on magnetic fluid deformable mirrors (MFDM) as well as corresponding control algorithms. The presented wavefront correctors are characterized by their linear, dynamic response. Various mirror surface shape control algorithms are presented along with experimental evaluations of the performance of the resulting adaptive optics systems. Adaptive optics (AO) systems are used in various fields of application to enhance the performance of optical systems, such as imaging, laser, free space optical communication systems, etc. This book is intended for undergraduate and graduate students, professors, engineers, scientists and researchers working on the design of adaptive optics systems and their various emerging fields of application. Zhizheng Wu is an associate professor at Shanghai University, China. Azhar Iqbal is a research associate at the University of Toronto, Canada. Foue...

  9. The Linearity of Optical Tomography: Sensor Model and Experimental Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Zarina MOHD. MUJI

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to show the linearization of optical sensor. Linearity of the sensor response is a must in optical tomography application, which affects the tomogram result. Two types of testing are used namely, testing using voltage parameter and testing with time unit parameter. For the former, the testing is by measuring the voltage when the obstacle is placed between transmitter and receiver. The obstacle diameters are between 0.5 until 3 mm. The latter is also the same testing but the obstacle is bigger than the former which is 59.24 mm and the testing purpose is to measure the time unit spend for the ball when it cut the area of sensing circuit. Both results show a linear relation that proves the optical sensors is suitable for process tomography application.

  10. Modeling for deformable mirrors and the adaptive optics optimization program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henesian, M.A.; Haney, S.W.; Trenholme, J.B.; Thomas, M.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss aspects of adaptive optics optimization for large fusion laser systems such as the 192-arm National Ignition Facility (NIF) at LLNL. By way of example, we considered the discrete actuator deformable mirror and Hartmann sensor system used on the Beamlet laser. Beamlet is a single-aperture prototype of the 11-0-5 slab amplifier design for NIF, and so we expect similar optical distortion levels and deformable mirror correction requirements. We are now in the process of developing a numerically efficient object oriented C++ language implementation of our adaptive optics and wavefront sensor code, but this code is not yet operational. Results are based instead on the prototype algorithms, coded-up in an interpreted array processing computer language

  11. Two-dimensional models for the optical response of thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yilei; Heinz, Tony F.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we present a systematic study of 2D optical models for the response of thin layers of material under excitation by normally incident light. The treatment, within the framework of classical optics, analyzes a thin film supported by a semi-infinite substrate, with both the thin layer and the substrate assumed to exhibit local, isotropic linear response. Starting from the conventional three-dimensional (3D) slab model of the system, we derive a two-dimensional (2D) sheet model for the thin film in which the optical response is described by a sheet optical conductivity. We develop criteria for the applicability of this 2D sheet model for a layer with an optical thickness far smaller than the wavelength of the light. We examine in detail atomically thin semi-metallic and semiconductor van-der-Waals layers and ultrathin metal films as representative examples. Excellent agreement of the 2D sheet model with the 3D slab model is demonstrated over a broad spectral range from the radio frequency limit to the near ultraviolet. A linearized version of system response for the 2D model is also presented for the case where the influence of the optically thin layer is sufficiently weak. Analytical expressions for the applicability and accuracy of the different optical models are derived, and the appropriateness of the linearized treatment for the materials is considered. We discuss the advantages, as well as limitations, of these models for the purpose of deducing the optical response function of the thin layer from experiment. We generalize the theory to take into account in-plane anisotropy, layered thin film structures, and more general substrates. Implications of the 2D model for the transmission of light by the thin film and for the implementation of half- and totally absorbing layers are discussed.

  12. Optical-potential model for electron-atom scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callaway, J.; Oza, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    It is proposed that the addition of a matrix optical potential to a close-coupling calculation should lead to improved results in studies of electron-atom scattering. This procedure is described with use of a pseudostate expansion to evaluate the optical potential. The integro-differential equations are solved by a linear-algebraic method. As a test case, applications are made to electron-hydrogen scattering, and the results are compared with those obtained by other calculational procedures, and with experiment

  13. Measurement and modelization of silica opal optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avoine, Amaury; Hong, Phan Ngoc; Frederich, Hugo; Aregahegn, Kifle; Bénalloul, Paul; Coolen, Laurent; Schwob, Catherine; Thu Nga, Pham; Gallas, Bruno; Maître, Agnès

    2014-03-01

    We present the synthesis process and optical characterization of artificial silica opals. The specular reflection spectra are analyzed and compared to band structure calculations and finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. The silica optical index is a key parameter to correctly describe an opal and is usually not known and treated as a free parameter. Here we propose a method to infer the silica index, as well as the silica spheres diameter, from the reflection spectra and we validate it by comparison with two independent infrared methods for the index and, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements for the spheres diameter.

  14. Measurement and modelization of silica opal optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avoine, Amaury; Ngoc Hong, Phan; Frederich, Hugo; Aregahegn, Kifle; Bénalloul, Paul; Coolen, Laurent; Schwob, Catherine; Gallas, Bruno; Maître, Agnès; Thu Nga, Pham

    2014-01-01

    We present the synthesis process and optical characterization of artificial silica opals. The specular reflection spectra are analyzed and compared to band structure calculations and finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. The silica optical index is a key parameter to correctly describe an opal and is usually not known and treated as a free parameter. Here we propose a method to infer the silica index, as well as the silica spheres diameter, from the reflection spectra and we validate it by comparison with two independent infrared methods for the index and, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements for the spheres diameter. (paper)

  15. Optical fiber communication systems with Matlab and Simulink models

    CERN Document Server

    Binh, Le Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    ""This book adds an aspect of programming and simulation not so well developed in other books. It is complete in this sense and enables directly linking the physics of optical components and systems to realistic results.""-Martin Rochette, Associate Professor, McGill University, Quebec, Canada""…this will be an excellent textbook since it has all new development and information on optical communication systems…I think this book can easily replace many other textbooks in this field.""-Massoud Moussavi, California State Polytechnic University-Pomona""The book is well written. It describes the fu

  16. Wave optics modeling of real-time holographic wavefront compensation systems using OSSim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Margarita A.; Guthals, Dennis M.; Logan, Jerry D.

    2005-08-01

    OSSim (Optical System Simulation) is a wave-optics, time-domain simulation toolbox with both optical and data processing components developed for adaptive optics (AO) systems. Diffractive wavefront control elements have recently been added that accurately model optically and electrically addressed spatial light modulators as real time holographic (RTH) devices in diffractive wavefront control systems. The developed RTH toolbox has found multiple applications for a variety of Boeing programs in solving problems of AO system analysis and design. Several complex diffractive wavefront control systems have been modeled for compensation of static and dynamic aberrations such as imperfect segmented primary mirrors and atmospheric and boundary layer turbulence. The results of OSSim simulations of RTH wavefront compensation show very good agreement with available experimental data.

  17. Numerical model for the deformation of nucleated cells by optical stretchers

    KAUST Repository

    Sraj, Ihab; Francois, Joshua; Marr, David W M; Eggleton, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we seek to numerically study the deformation of nucleated cells by single diode-laser bar optical stretchers. We employ a recently developed computational model, the dynamic ray-tracing method, to determine the force distribution

  18. Numerical Modelling of Spontaneous Emission in Optical Parametric Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Andersen, Ulrik Lund; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Fiber optical parametric processes offer a wide range of applications including phase sensitive as well as phase insensitive amplification, wavelength conversion and signal regeneration. One of the difficult challenges is any of these applications is to predict their associated noise performance....

  19. The optical/ultraviolet excess of isolated neutron stars in the resonant cyclotron scattering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Hao; Xu, Ren-Xin; Song, Li-Ming

    2011-12-01

    X-ray dim isolated neutron stars are peculiar pulsar-like objects, characterized by their Planck-like spectrum. In studying their spectral energy distributions, optical/ultraviolet (UV) excess is a long standing problem. Recently Kaplan et al. measured the optical/UV excess for all seven sources, which is understandable in the resonant cyclotron scattering (RCS) model previously addressed. The RCS model calculations show that the RCS process can account for the observed optical/UV excess for most sources. The flat spectrum of RX J2143.0+0654 may be due to contributions from the bremsstrahlung emission of the electron system in addition to the RCS process.

  20. Numerical models and experiment of air flow in a simulation box for optical wireless communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latal Jan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the authors focused on real measurements of mechanical turbulence generated by ventilators in the simulation box for Optical Wireless Communications. The mechanical turbulences disturb the optical beam that propagates along the central axis of the simulation box. The aim of authors is to show the effect of mechanical turbulence on optical beams at different heights in the simulation box. In the Ansys Fluent, we created numerical models which were then compared with real measurements. Authors compared the real and numerical models according to statistical methods.

  1. Using optical remote sensing model to estimate oil slick thickness based on satellite image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Y C; Tian, Q J; Lyu, C G; Fu, W X; Han, W C

    2014-01-01

    An optical remote sensing model has been established based on two-beam interference theory to estimate marine oil slick thickness. Extinction coefficient and normalized reflectance of oil are two important parts in this model. Extinction coefficient is an important inherent optical property and will not vary with the background reflectance changed. Normalized reflectance can be used to eliminate the background differences between in situ measured spectra and remotely sensing image. Therefore, marine oil slick thickness and area can be estimated and mapped based on optical remotely sensing image and extinction coefficient

  2. Light Path Model of Fiber Optic Liquid Level Sensor Considering Residual Liquid Film on the Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The working principle of the refractive-type fiber optic liquid level sensor is analyzed in detail based on the light refraction principle. The optic path models are developed in consideration of common simplification and the residual liquid film on the glass tube wall. The calculating formulae for the model are derived, constraint conditions are obtained, influencing factors are discussed, and the scopes and skills of application are analyzed through instance simulations. The research results are useful in directing the correct usage of the fiber optic liquid level sensor, especially in special cases, such as those involving viscous liquid in the glass tube monitoring.

  3. Parametric Covariance Model for Horizon-Based Optical Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikes, Jacob; Liounis, Andrew J.; Christian, John A.

    2016-01-01

    This Note presents an entirely parametric version of the covariance for horizon-based optical navigation measurements. The covariance can be written as a function of only the spacecraft position, two sensor design parameters, the illumination direction, the size of the observed planet, the size of the lit arc to be used, and the total number of observed horizon points. As a result, one may now more clearly understand the sensitivity of horizon-based optical navigation performance as a function of these key design parameters, which is insight that was obscured in previous (and nonparametric) versions of the covariance. Finally, the new parametric covariance is shown to agree with both the nonparametric analytic covariance and results from a Monte Carlo analysis.

  4. OPT13B and OPTIM4 - computer codes for optical model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, S.; Srivastava, D.K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Ganguly, N.K.

    1975-01-01

    OPT13B is a computer code in FORTRAN for optical model calculations with automatic search. A summary of different formulae used for computation is given. Numerical methods are discussed. The 'search' technique followed to obtain the set of optical model parameters which produce best fit to experimental data in a least-square sense is also discussed. Different subroutines of the program are briefly described. Input-output specifications are given in detail. A modified version of OPT13B specifications are given in detail. A modified version of OPT13B is OPTIM4. It can be used for optical model calculations where the form factors of different parts of the optical potential are known point by point. A brief description of the modifications is given. (author)

  5. Advanced optical modeling of TiN metal hard mask for scatterometric critical dimension metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersbach, Peter; Urbanowicz, Adam M.; Likhachev, Dmitriy; Hartig, Carsten

    2017-03-01

    The majority of scatterometric production control models assume constant optical properties of the materials and only dimensional parameters are allowed to vary. However, this assumption, especially in case of thin-metal films, negatively impacts model precision and accuracy. In this work we focus on optical modeling of the TiN metal hardmask for scatterometry applications. Since the dielectric function of TiN exhibits thickness dependence, we had to take this fact into account. Moreover, presence of the highly absorbing films influences extracted thicknesses of dielectric layers underneath the metal films. The later phenomenon is often not reflected by goodness of fit. We show that accurate optical modeling of metal is essential to achieve desired scatterometric model quality for automatic process control in microelectronic production. Presented modeling methodology can be applied to other TiN applications such as diffusion barriers and metal gates as well as for other metals used in microelectronic manufacturing for all technology nodes.

  6. Modeling hemoglobin at optical frequency using the unconditionally stable fundamental ADI-FDTD method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heh, Ding Yu; Tan, Eng Leong

    2011-04-12

    This paper presents the modeling of hemoglobin at optical frequency (250 nm - 1000 nm) using the unconditionally stable fundamental alternating-direction-implicit finite-difference time-domain (FADI-FDTD) method. An accurate model based on complex conjugate pole-residue pairs is proposed to model the complex permittivity of hemoglobin at optical frequency. Two hemoglobin concentrations at 15 g/dL and 33 g/dL are considered. The model is then incorporated into the FADI-FDTD method for solving electromagnetic problems involving interaction of light with hemoglobin. The computation of transmission and reflection coefficients of a half space hemoglobin medium using the FADI-FDTD validates the accuracy of our model and method. The specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution of human capillary at optical frequency is also shown. While maintaining accuracy, the unconditionally stable FADI-FDTD method exhibits high efficiency in modeling hemoglobin.

  7. Optical modeling of the Jefferson Lab IR Demo FEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neil, G.; Benson, S.; Shinn, M.; Davidson, P.; Kloppel, P.

    1997-01-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (formerly known as CEBAF) has embarked on the construction of a 1 kW free-electron laser operating initially at 3 microns that is designed for laser-material interaction experiments and to explore the feasibility of scaling the system in power and wavelength for industrial and Navy defense applications. The superconducting radio-frequency linac, and single-pass transport which accelerates the beam from injector to wiggler, followed by energy-recovery deceleration to a dump. The electron and optical beam time structure in the design consists of a train of pecosecond pulses at a 37.425 MHz pulse repetition rate. The initial optical configuration is a conventional near-concentric resonator with transmissive outcoupling. Future upgrades of the system will increase the power and shorten the operating wavelength, and utilize a more advanced resonator system capable of scaling to high powers. The optical system of the laser has been mode led using the GLAD code by using a Beer's-law region to mimic the FEL interaction. Effects such as mirror heating have been calculated and compared with analytical treatments. The magnitude of the distorium for several materials and wavelengths has been estimated. The advantages as well as the limitations of this approach are discussed

  8. Fast and accurate modeling of stray light in optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Jean-Claude

    2017-11-01

    The first problem to be solved in most optical designs with respect to stray light is that of internal reflections on the several surfaces of individual lenses and mirrors, and on the detector itself. The level of stray light ratio can be considerably reduced by taking into account the stray light during the optimization to determine solutions in which the irradiance due to these ghosts is kept to the minimum possible value. Unhappily, the routines available in most optical design software's, for example CODE V, do not permit all alone to make exact quantitative calculations of the stray light due to these ghosts. Therefore, the engineer in charge of the optical design is confronted to the problem of using two different software's, one for the design and optimization, for example CODE V, one for stray light analysis, for example ASAP. This makes a complete optimization very complex . Nevertheless, using special techniques and combinations of the routines available in CODE V, it is possible to have at its disposal a software macro tool to do such an analysis quickly and accurately, including Monte-Carlo ray tracing, or taking into account diffraction effects. This analysis can be done in a few minutes, to be compared to hours with other software's.

  9. Modelling the optical turbulence boiling and its effect on finite-exposure differential image motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdja, A.; Borgnino, J.

    2007-07-01

    It is usually accepted that whenever dealing with astronomical observation through the atmosphere, the optical turbulence temporal evolution can be sufficiently described with the so-called frozen turbulence hypothesis. In this model, turbulence is supposed to be equivalent to a series of solid phase screens that slide horizontally in front of the observation field of view. Experimental evidence shows, however, that an additional physical process must be taken into account when describing the temporal behaviour of the optical turbulence. In fact, while translating above the observer, turbulence undergoes a proper temporal evolution and affects differently the astronomical and, more specifically, the astrometric observations. The proper temporal evolution of the turbulence-induced optical turbulence observable quantities is here called the optical turbulence boiling. We are proposing through this paper a theoretical approach to the modelling of the optical turbulence temporal evolution when the turbulent layer horizontal translation and the optical turbulence boiling are both involved. The model we propose, as a working hypothesis though, has a direct relevance to differential astrometry because of its explicit dependence upon the optical turbulence temporal evolution. It can also be generalized to other techniques of high angular resolution astronomical observation through the atmospheric turbulence.

  10. Calculation of real optical model potential for heavy ions in the framework of the folding model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, S.A.; Timofeyuk, N.K.; Kazacha, G.S.

    1987-01-01

    The code for calculation of a real optical model potential in the framework of the folding model is realized. The program of numerical Fourier-Bessel transformation based on Filon's integration rule is used. The accuracy of numerical calculations is ∼ 10 -4 for a distance interval up to a bout (2.5-3) times the size of nuclei. The potentials are calculated for interactions of 3,4 He with nuclei from 9 Be to 27 Al with different effective NN-interactions and densities obtained from electron scattering data. Calculated potentials are similar to phenomenological potentials in Woods-Saxon form. With calculated potentials the available elastic scattering data for the considered nuclei in the energy interval 18-56 MeV are analysed. The needed renormalizations for folding potentials are < or approx. 20%

  11. Optical modeling of fiber organic photovoltaic structures using a transmission line method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshonas, N; Stathopoulos, N A; O'Connor, B T; Bedeloglu, A Celik; Savaidis, S P; Vasiliadis, S

    2017-12-01

    An optical model has been developed and evaluated for the calculation of the external quantum efficiency of cylindrical fiber photovoltaic structures. The model is based on the transmission line theory and has been applied on single and bulk heterojunction fiber-photovoltaic cells. Using this model, optimum design characteristics have been proposed for both configurations, and comparison with experimental results has been assessed.

  12. Equivalent circuit modelling of integrated traveling-wave optical modulator in InP foundry platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, W.; Gilardi, G.; Smit, M.K.; Wale, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present an electro-optical model for traveling-wave modulator devices utilizing measurement-based equivalent circuit model extraction in conjunction with microwave CAD simulation techniques. Model verification is performed with frequencydomain and time-domain characterization of an

  13. Physical optics modeling of modal patterns in a crossed porro prism resonator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Litvin, IA

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A physical optics model is proposed to describe the transverse modal patterns in crossed Porro prism resonators. The model departs from earlier attempts in that the prisms are modeled as non-classical rotating elements with amplitude and phase...

  14. Dynamic measurement of the optical properties of bovine enamel demineralization models using four-dimensional optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aden, Abdirahman; Anthony, Arthi; Brigi, Carel; Merchant, Muhammad Sabih; Siraj, Huda; Tomlins, Peter H.

    2017-07-01

    Dental enamel mineral loss is multifactorial and is consequently explored using a variety of in vitro models. Important factors include the presence of acidic pH and its specific ionic composition, which can both influence lesion characteristics. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been demonstrated as a promising tool for studying dental enamel demineralization. However, OCT-based characterization and comparison of demineralization model dynamics are challenging without a consistent experimental environment. Therefore, an automated four-dimensional OCT system was integrated with a multispecimen flow cell to measure and compare the optical properties of subsurface enamel demineralization in different models. This configuration was entirely automated, thus mitigating any need to disturb the specimens and ensuring spatial registration of OCT image volumes at multiple time points. Twelve bovine enamel disks were divided equally among three model groups. The model demineralization solutions were citric acid (pH 3.8), acetic acid (pH 4.0), and acetic acid with added calcium and phosphate (pH 4.4). Bovine specimens were exposed to the solution continuously for 48 h. Three-dimensional OCT data were obtained automatically from each specimen at a minimum of 1-h intervals from the same location within each specimen. Lesion dynamics were measured in terms of the depth below the surface to which the lesion extended and the attenuation coefficient. The net loss of surface enamel was also measured for comparison. Similarities between the dynamics of each model were observed, although there were also distinct characteristic differences. Notably, the attenuation coefficients showed a systematic offset and temporal shift with respect to the different models. Furthermore, the lesion depth curves displayed a discontinuous increase several hours after the initial acid challenge. This work demonstrated the capability of OCT to distinguish between different enamel demineralization

  15. Identified state-space prediction model for aero-optical wavefronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Azin; Tesch, Jonathan; Gibson, Steve

    2013-07-01

    A state-space disturbance model and associated prediction filter for aero-optical wavefronts are described. The model is computed by system identification from a sequence of wavefronts measured in an airborne laboratory. Estimates of the statistics and flow velocity of the wavefront data are shown and can be computed from the matrices in the state-space model without returning to the original data. Numerical results compare velocity values and power spectra computed from the identified state-space model with those computed from the aero-optical data.

  16. A model for negative ion extraction and comparison of negative ion optics calculations to experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pamela, J.

    1990-10-01

    Negative ion extraction is described by a model which includes electron diffusion across transverse magnetic fields in the sheath. This model allows a 2-Dimensional approximation of the problem. It is used to introduce electron space charge effects in a 2-D particle trajectory code, designed for negative ion optics calculations. Another physical effect, the stripping of negative ions on neutral gas atoms, has also been included in our model; it is found to play an important role in negative ion optics. The comparison with three sets of experimental data from very different negative ion accelerators, show that our model is able of accurate predictions

  17. [Computer optical topography: a study of the repeatability of the results of human body model examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnadskiĭ, V N

    2007-01-01

    The problem of repeatability of the results of examination of a plastic human body model is considered. The model was examined in 7 positions using an optical topograph for kyphosis diagnosis. The examination was performed under television camera monitoring. It was shown that variation of the model position in the camera view affected the repeatability of the results of topographic examination, especially if the model-to-camera distance was changed. A study of the repeatability of the results of optical topographic examination can help to increase the reliability of the topographic method, which is widely used for medical screening of children and adolescents.

  18. Hierarchical Models for Type Ia Supernova Light Curves in the Optical and Near Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Kaisey; Narayan, G.; Kirshner, R. P.

    2011-01-01

    I have constructed a comprehensive statistical model for Type Ia supernova optical and near infrared light curves. Since the near infrared light curves are excellent standard candles and are less sensitive to dust extinction and reddening, the combination of near infrared and optical data better constrains the host galaxy extinction and improves the precision of distance predictions to SN Ia. A hierarchical probabilistic model coherently accounts for multiple random and uncertain effects, including photometric error, intrinsic supernova light curve variations and correlations across phase and wavelength, dust extinction and reddening, peculiar velocity dispersion and distances. An improved BayeSN MCMC code is implemented for computing probabilistic inferences for individual supernovae and the SN Ia and host galaxy dust populations. I use this hierarchical model to analyze nearby Type Ia supernovae with optical and near infared data from the PAIRITEL, CfA3, and CSP samples and the literature. Using cross-validation to test the robustness of the model predictions, I find that the rms Hubble diagram scatter of predicted distance moduli is 0.11 mag for SN with optical and near infrared data versus 0.15 mag for SN with only optical data. Accounting for the dispersion expected from random peculiar velocities, the rms intrinsic prediction error is 0.08-0.10 mag for SN with both optical and near infrared light curves. I discuss results for the inferred intrinsic correlation structures of the optical-NIR SN Ia light curves and the host galaxy dust distribution captured by the hierarchical model. The continued observation and analysis of Type Ia SN in the optical and near infrared is important for improving their utility as precise and accurate cosmological distance indicators.

  19. Symbolic-computation study of the perturbed nonlinear Schrodinger model in inhomogeneous optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Bo; Gao Yitian

    2005-01-01

    A realistic, inhomogeneous fiber in the optical communication systems can be described by the perturbed nonlinear Schrodinger model (also named as the normalized nonlinear Schrodinger model with periodically varying coefficients, dispersion managed nonlinear Schrodinger model or nonlinear Schrodinger model with variable coefficients). Hereby, we extend to this model a direct method, perform symbolic computation and obtain two families of the exact, analytic bright-solitonic solutions, with or without the chirp respectively. The parameters addressed include the shape of the bright soliton, soliton amplitude, inverse width of the soliton, chirp, frequency, center of the soliton and center of the phase of the soliton. Of optical and physical interests, we discuss some previously-published special cases of our solutions. Those solutions could help the future studies on the optical communication systems. ms

  20. Optimal model-based sensorless adaptive optics for epifluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, Paolo; Soloviev, Oleg; Wilding, Dean; Vdovin, Gleb; Verhaegen, Michel

    2018-01-01

    We report on a universal sample-independent sensorless adaptive optics method, based on modal optimization of the second moment of the fluorescence emission from a point-like excitation. Our method employs a sample-independent precalibration, performed only once for the particular system, to establish the direct relation between the image quality and the aberration. The method is potentially applicable to any form of microscopy with epifluorescence detection, including the practically important case of incoherent fluorescence emission from a three dimensional object, through minor hardware modifications. We have applied the technique successfully to a widefield epifluorescence microscope and to a multiaperture confocal microscope.

  1. Improved theoretical model of InN optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira da Silva, A.; Chubaci, J.F.D.; Matsuoka, M.; Freitas, J.A. Jr.; Tischler, J.G.; Baldissera, G.; Persson, C.

    2014-01-01

    The optical properties of InN are investigated theoretically by employing the projector augmented wave (PAW) method within Green's function and the screened Coulomb interaction approximation (GW o ). The calculated results are compared to previously reported calculations which use local density approximation combined with the scissors-operator approximation. The results of the present calculation are compared with reported values of the InN bandgap and with low temperature near infrared luminescence measurements of InN films deposited by a modified Ion Beam Assisted Deposition technique. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Transition polarizability model of induced resonance Raman optical activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yamamoto, S.; Bouř, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 25 (2013), s. 2152-2158 ISSN 0192-8651 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0105; GA ČR GA13-03978S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11033 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200551205 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : induced resonance Raman optical activity * europium complexes * density functional computations * light scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.601, year: 2013

  3. Modelling the optical bleaching of the thermoluminescence of K2YF5:Pr3+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcazzó, J.; Santiago, M.; Khaidukov, N.; Caselli, E.

    2012-01-01

    Optical bleaching of the thermoluminescence (TL) curve of K 2 YF 5 :Pr 3+ has been observed after optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) readout of pre-irradiated crystals. The traps being responsible for the TL signal are not emptied completely by the optical stimulation. Furthermore, if the illumination time is increased a constant intensity level of the residual TL glow curve is eventually achieved. On the other hand, if the low temperature peak of the glow curve is thermally cleaned, no subsequent OSL is measured. This behavior has been successfully explained by assuming that part of the electrons in the trap being responsible for the low temperature glow peak of K 2 YF 5 :Pr 3+ recombine with holes via localized transitions during optical stimulation. During TL all trapped electrons recombine via delocalized transitions. Simulations have been carried out in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the model. - Highlights: ► The optical bleaching of the thermoluminescence of K2YF5:Pr 3+ has been studied. ► A model accounting for the optical bleaching has been put forward. ► Thermoluminescence occurs via delocalized transitions. ► Localized transitions occur during optical stimulation.

  4. Modeling a space-based quantum link that includes an adaptive optics system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchane, Alexander W.; Hodson, Douglas D.; Mailloux, Logan O.

    2017-10-01

    Quantum Key Distribution uses optical pulses to generate shared random bit strings between two locations. If a high percentage of the optical pulses are comprised of single photons, then the statistical nature of light and information theory can be used to generate secure shared random bit strings which can then be converted to keys for encryption systems. When these keys are incorporated along with symmetric encryption techniques such as a one-time pad, then this method of key generation and encryption is resistant to future advances in quantum computing which will significantly degrade the effectiveness of current asymmetric key sharing techniques. This research first reviews the transition of Quantum Key Distribution free-space experiments from the laboratory environment to field experiments, and finally, ongoing space experiments. Next, a propagation model for an optical pulse from low-earth orbit to ground and the effects of turbulence on the transmitted optical pulse is described. An Adaptive Optics system is modeled to correct for the aberrations caused by the atmosphere. The long-term point spread function of the completed low-earth orbit to ground optical system is explored in the results section. Finally, the impact of this optical system and its point spread function on an overall quantum key distribution system as well as the future work necessary to show this impact is described.

  5. Optical asymmetric cryptography using a three-dimensional space-based model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present optical asymmetric cryptography combined with a three-dimensional (3D) space-based model. An optical multiple-random-phase-mask encoding system is developed in the Fresnel domain, and one random phase-only mask and the plaintext are combined as a series of particles. Subsequently, the series of particles is translated along an axial direction, and is distributed in a 3D space. During image decryption, the robustness and security of the proposed method are further analyzed. Numerical simulation results are presented to show the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed optical image encryption method

  6. Cylindrical integrated optical microresonators: modeling by 3-D vectorial coupled mode theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stoffer, R.; Hiremath, K. R.; Hammer, M.; Prkna, Ladislav; Čtyroký, Jiří

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 256, 1/3 (2005), s. 46-67 ISSN 0030-4018 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/05/0987 Grant - others:European Commission(XE) IST-2000-28018 NAIS Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : integrated optics * optical waveguide theory * modelling Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.456, year: 2005

  7. Effective-mass model and magneto-optical properties in hybrid perovskites

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Z. G.

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid inorganic-organic perovskites have proven to be a revolutionary material for low-cost photovoltaic applications. They also exhibit many other interesting properties, including giant Rashba splitting, large-radius Wannier excitons, and novel magneto-optical effects. Understanding these properties as well as the detailed mechanism of photovoltaics requires a reliable and accessible electronic structure, on which models of transport, excitonic, and magneto-optical properties can be effici...

  8. Accurate Measurement of the Optical Constants n and k for a Series of 57 Inorganic and Organic Liquids for Optical Modeling and Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Tanya L; Tonkyn, Russell G; Danby, Tyler O; Taubman, Matthew S; Bernacki, Bruce E; Birnbaum, Jerome C; Sharpe, Steven W; Johnson, Timothy J

    2018-04-01

    For optical modeling and other purposes, we have created a library of 57 liquids for which we have measured the complex optical constants n and k. These liquids vary in their nature, ranging in properties that include chemical structure, optical band strength, volatility, and viscosity. By obtaining the optical constants, one can model most optical phenomena in media and at interfaces including reflection, refraction, and dispersion. Based on the works of others, we have developed improved protocols using multiple path lengths to determine the optical constants n/k for dozens of liquids, including inorganic, organic, and organophosphorus compounds. Detailed descriptions of the measurement and data reduction protocols are discussed; agreement of the derived optical constant n and k values with literature values are presented. We also present results using the n/k values as applied to an optical modeling scenario whereby the derived data are presented and tested for models of 1 µm and 100 µm layers for dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) on both metal (aluminum) and dielectric (soda lime glass) substrates to show substantial differences between the reflected signal from highly reflective substrates and less-reflective substrates.

  9. A radiometric model of an earth radiation budget radiometer optical system with diffuse-specular surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, M. R.

    1981-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) is to fly on NASA's Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and on NOAA F and NOAA G. Large spatial scale earth energy budget data will be derived primarily from measurements made by the ERBE nonscanning instrument (ERBE-NS). A description is given of a mathematical model capable of simulating the radiometric response of any of the ERBE-NS earth viewing channels. The model uses a Monte Carlo method to accurately account for directional distributions of emission and reflection from optical surfaces which are neither strictly diffuse nor strictly specular. The model computes radiation exchange factors among optical system components, and determines the distribution in the optical system of energy from an outside source. Attention is also given to an approach for implementing the model and results obtained from the implementation.

  10. A linear ion optics model for extraction from a plasma ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, J.

    1987-01-01

    A linear ion optics model for ion extraction from a plasma ion source is presented, based on the paraxial equations which account for lens effects, space charge and finite source ion temperature. This model is applied to three- and four-electrode extraction systems with circular apertures. The results are compared with experimental data and numerical calculations in the literature. It is shown that the improved calculations of space charge effects and lens effects allow better agreement to be obtained than in earlier linear optics models. A principal result is that the model presented here describes the dependence of the optimum perveance on the aspect ratio in a manner similar to the nonlinear optics theory. (orig.)

  11. A bio-optical model suitable for use in forward and inverse coupled atmosphere-ocean radiative transfer models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Kexin; Li Wei; Eide, Hans; Stamnes, Knut

    2007-01-01

    A simple, yet complete bio-optical model for the inherent optical properties (IOPs) of oceanic waters is developed. This bio-optical model is specifically designed for use in comprehensive, multiple scattering radiative transfer models for the coupled atmosphere-ocean system. Such models can be used to construct next-generation algorithms for simultaneous retrieval of aerosol and marine parameters. The computed remote sensing reflectance R rs (λ) is validated against field measurements of R rs (λ) compiled in the SeaBASS data base together with simultaneous chlorophyll concentrations (C) ranging from 0.03 to 100mgm -3 . This connection between R rs and C is used to construct a chlorophyll concentration retrieval algorithm that yields reliable results for a large range of chlorophyll concentrations. The overall performance of a MODIS/VIIRS chlorophyll concentration retrieval algorithm is found to be less satisfactory

  12. Nucleon-nucleus optical model up to 200 MeV. Proceedings of a specialist meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OECD Nuclear Energy Agency; Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique

    1997-01-01

    The proceedings of the Specialists Meeting on Nucleon-Nucleus Optical Model up to 200 MeV contains papers on different topics in connection with the nuclear optical potential research. The purpose of the meeting was to reach a common understanding between nuclear theorists, experimentalists and the applied community on the most reliable approaches to predicting nuclear cross-sections in the medium energy region. The discussion centred around such questions as 'What are the better theoretical models today?', and 'What experimental data are required to test the models?'. 23 items are indexed separately for the INIS database. (K.A.)

  13. Modeling fiber Bragg grating device networks in photomechanical polymer optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanska, Joseph T.; Kuzyk, Mark G.; Sullivan, Dennis M.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the modeling of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) networks in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) polymer fibers doped with azo dyes. Our target is the development of Photomechanical Optical Devices (PODs), comprised of two FBGs in series, separated by a Fabry-Perot cavity of photomechanical material. PODs exhibit photomechanical multi-stability, with the capacity to access multiple length states for a fixed input intensity when a mechanical shock is applied. Using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical methods, we modeled the photomechanical response of both Fabry-Perot and Bragg-type PODs in a single polymer optical fiber. The polymer fiber was modeled as an instantaneous Kerr-type nonlinear χ(3) material. Our model correctly predicts the essential optical features of FBGs as well as the photomechanical multi-stability of nonlinear Fabry-Perot cavity-based PODs. Networks of PODs may provide a framework for smart shape-shifting materials and fast optical computation where the decision process is distributed over the entire network. In addition, a POD can act as memory, and its response can depend on input history. Our models inform and will accelerate targeted development of novel Bragg grating-based polymer fiber device networks for a variety of applications in optical computing and smart materials.

  14. CRAPONE, Optical Model Potential Fit of Neutron Scattering Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabbri, F.; Fratamico, G.; Reffo, G.

    2004-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: Automatic search for local and non-local optical potential parameters for neutrons. Total, elastic, differential elastic cross sections, l=0 and l=1 strength functions and scattering length can be considered. 2 - Method of solution: A fitting procedure is applied to different sets of experimental data depending on the local or non-local approximation chosen. In the non-local approximation the fitting procedure can be simultaneously performed over the whole energy range. The best fit is obtained when a set of parameters is found where CHI 2 is at its minimum. The solution of the system equations is obtained by diagonalization of the matrix according to the Jacobi method

  15. Statistical modeling of optical attenuation measurements in continental fog conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Saeed; Amin, Muhammad; Awan, Muhammad Saleem; Minhas, Abid Ali; Saleem, Jawad; Khan, Rahimdad

    2017-03-01

    Free-space optics is an innovative technology that uses atmosphere as a propagation medium to provide higher data rates. These links are heavily affected by atmospheric channel mainly because of fog and clouds that act to scatter and even block the modulated beam of light from reaching the receiver end, hence imposing severe attenuation. A comprehensive statistical study of the fog effects and deep physical understanding of the fog phenomena are very important for suggesting improvements (reliability and efficiency) in such communication systems. In this regard, 6-months real-time measured fog attenuation data are considered and statistically investigated. A detailed statistical analysis related to each fog event for that period is presented; the best probability density functions are selected on the basis of Akaike information criterion, while the estimates of unknown parameters are computed by maximum likelihood estimation technique. The results show that most fog attenuation events follow normal mixture distribution and some follow the Weibull distribution.

  16. A cost-performance model for ground-based optical communications receiving telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesh, J. R.; Robinson, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical cost-performance model for a ground-based optical communications receiving telescope is presented. The model considers costs of existing telescopes as a function of diameter and field of view. This, coupled with communication performance as a function of receiver diameter and field of view, yields the appropriate telescope cost versus communication performance curve.

  17. Mathematical modelling of solar ultraviolet radiation induced optical degradation in anodized aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruley, John D.

    1986-01-01

    In the design of spacecraft for proper thermal balance, accurate information on the long-term optical behavior of the spacecraft outer skin materials is necessary. A phenomenological model for such behavior is given. The underlying principles are explained and some examples are given of the model's fit to actual measurements under simulated Earth-orbit conditions. Comments are given on the applicability of the model to materials testing and thermal modelling.

  18. Comparison of three optical models and analysis of geometric parameters for parabolic trough solar collectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Hongbo; You, Shijun; Zhang, Huan

    2016-01-01

    A PTC (parabolic trough solar collector) focuses direct solar radiation reflected by the reflector onto a receiver located on its focal line. The solar flux distribution on the absorber is non-uniform generally, thus it needs to carry out optical simulation to analyze the concentrated flux density and optical performance. In this paper, three different optical models based on ray tracing for a PTC were proposed and compared in detail. They were proved to be feasible and reliable in comparison with other literature. Model 1 was based on MCM (Monte Carlo Method). Model 2 initialized photon distribution with FVM (Finite Volume Method), and calculated reflection, transmission, and absorption by means of MCM. Model 3 utilized FVM to determine ray positions initially, while it changed the photon energy by multiplying reflectivity, transmissivity and absorptivity. The runtime and computation effort of Model 3 were approximately 40% and 60% of that of Model 1 in the present work. Moreover, the simulation result of Model 3 was not affected by the algorithm for generating random numbers, however, it needed to take account of suitable grid configurations for different sections of the system. Additionally, effects of varying the geometric parameters for a PTC on optical efficiency were estimated. Effect of offsetting the absorber in width direction of aperture was greater than that in its normal direction at the same offset distance, which was more obvious with offset distance increasing. Furthermore, absorber offset at the opposite direction of tracking error was beneficial for improving optical performance. The larger rim angle (≤90°) was, the less sensitive optical efficiency was to tracking error for the same aperture width of a PTC. In contrast, a larger aperture width was more sensitive to tracking error for a certain rim angle. - Highlights: • Three different optical models for parabolic trough solar collectors were derived. • Their running time, computation

  19. Modeling heading and path perception from optic flow in the case of independently moving objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudies, Florian; Neumann, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    Humans are usually accurate when estimating heading or path from optic flow, even in the presence of independently moving objects (IMOs) in an otherwise rigid scene. To invoke significant biases in perceived heading, IMOs have to be large and obscure the focus of expansion (FOE) in the image plane, which is the point of approach. For the estimation of path during curvilinear self-motion no significant biases were found in the presence of IMOs. What makes humans robust in their estimation of heading or path using optic flow? We derive analytical models of optic flow for linear and curvilinear self-motion using geometric scene models. Heading biases of a linear least squares method, which builds upon these analytical models, are large, larger than those reported for humans. This motivated us to study segmentation cues that are available from optic flow. We derive models of accretion/deletion, expansion/contraction, acceleration/deceleration, local spatial curvature, and local temporal curvature, to be used as cues to segment an IMO from the background. Integrating these segmentation cues into our method of estimating heading or path now explains human psychophysical data and extends, as well as unifies, previous investigations. Our analysis suggests that various cues available from optic flow help to segment IMOs and, thus, make humans' heading and path perception robust in the presence of such IMOs. PMID:23554589

  20. A novel method of rapidly modeling optical properties of actual photonic crystal fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li-Wen, Wang; Shu-Qin, Lou; Wei-Guo, Chen; Hong-Lei, Li

    2010-01-01

    The flexible structure of photonic crystal fibre not only offers novel optical properties but also brings some difficulties in keeping the fibre structure in the fabrication process which inevitably cause the optical properties of the resulting fibre to deviate from the designed properties. Therefore, a method of evaluating the optical properties of the actual fibre is necessary for the purpose of application. Up to now, the methods employed to measure the properties of the actual photonic crystal fibre often require long fibre samples or complex expensive equipments. To our knowledge, there are few studies of modeling an actual photonic crystal fibre and evaluating its properties rapidly. In this paper, a novel method, based on the combination model of digital image processing and the finite element method, is proposed to rapidly model the optical properties of the actual photonic crystal fibre. Two kinds of photonic crystal fibres made by Crystal Fiber A/S are modeled. It is confirmed from numerical results that the proposed method is simple, rapid and accurate for evaluating the optical properties of the actual photonic crystal fibre without requiring complex equipment. (rapid communication)

  1. Model of optical phantoms thermal response upon irradiation with 975 nm dermatological laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, M. S.; Bashkatov, A. N.; Yakunin, A. N.; Avetisyan, Yu. A.; Genina, E. A.; Galla, S.; Sekowska, A.; Truchanowicz, D.; Cenian, A.; Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, M.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2018-04-01

    We have developed a numerical model describing the optical and thermal behavior of optical tissue phantoms upon laser irradiation. According to our previous studies, the phantoms can be used as substitute of real skin from the optical, as well as thermal point of view. However, the thermal parameters are not entirely similar to those of real tissues thus there is a need to develop mathematical model, describing the thermal and optical response of such materials. This will facilitate the correction factors, which would be invaluable in translation between measurements on skin phantom to real tissues, and gave a good representation of a real case application. Here, we present the model dependent on the data of our optical phantoms fabricated and measured in our previous preliminary study. The ambiguity between the modeling and the thermal measurements depend on lack of accurate knowledge of material's thermal properties and some exact parameters of the laser beam. Those parameters were varied in the simulation, to provide an overview of possible parameters' ranges and the magnitude of thermal response.

  2. Modeling Heading and Path Perception from Optic Flow in the Case of Independently Moving Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian eRaudies

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Humans are usually accurate when estimating heading or path from optic flow, even in the presence of independently moving objects (IMO in an otherwise rigid scene. To invoke significant biases in perceived heading, IMOs have to be large and obscure the focus of expansion (FOE in the image plane, which is the point of approach. For the estimation of path during curvilinear self-motion no significant biases were found in the presence of IMOs. What makes humans robust in their estimation of heading or path using optic flow? We derive analytical models of optic flow for linear and curvilinear self-motion using geometric scene models. Heading biases of a linear least squares method, which builds upon these analytical models, are large, larger than those reported for humans. This motivated us to study segmentation cues that are available from optic flow. We derive models of accretion / deletion, expansion / contraction, acceleration / deceleration, local spatial curvature, and local temporal curvature, to be used as cues to segment an IMO from the background. Integrating these segmentation cues into our method of estimating heading or path now explains human psychophysical data and extends, as well as unifies, previous investigations. Our analysis suggests that various cues available from optic flow help to segment IMOs and, thus, make humans’ heading and path perception robust in the presence of such IMOs.

  3. Experimental and modelling study of pulsed optically stimulated luminescence in quartz, marble and beta irradiated salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagonis, V; Mian, S M; Barnold, C; Chithambo, M L; Christensen, E

    2009-01-01

    Optical stimulation luminescence (OSL) signals can be obtained using continuous-wave optical stimulation (CW-OSL), the linear modulation optical stimulation method (LM-OSL) and the time-resolved optical stimulation (TR-OSL) method. During TR-OSL measurements, the stimulation and emission of luminescence are experimentally separated in time by using short light pulses. This paper presents new TR-OSL data for annealed high purity synthetic quartz, for marble and for commercially available iodized salt. A new type of behaviour for TR-OSL signals for quartz and iodized salt is presented, in which the OSL signal exhibits a nonmonotonic behaviour during optical stimulation; this type of behaviour has not been reported previously in the literature for quartz. Furthermore, a luminescence component with very long luminescence lifetime is reported for some quartz aliquots, which may be due to the presence of a delayed-OSL (DOSL) mechanism in quartz. A new kinetic model for TR-OSL in quartz is presented, which is based on a main electron trap and on several luminescence centres. The model is used to quantitatively fit several sets of experimental data of pulsed optically stimulated luminescence from quartz.

  4. Statistical Analysis of Coherent Ultrashort Light Pulse CDMA With Multiple Optical Amplifiers Using Additive Noise Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Kambiz; Salehi, Jawad A.

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes a study of the performance of various configurations for placing multiple optical amplifiers in a typical coherent ultrashort light pulse code-division multiple access (CULP-CDMA) communication system using the additive noise model. For this study, a comprehensive performance analysis was developed that takes into account multiple-access noise, noise due to optical amplifiers, and thermal noise using the saddle-point approximation technique. Prior to obtaining the overall system performance, the input/output statistical models for different elements of the system such as encoders/decoders,star coupler, and optical amplifiers were obtained. Performance comparisons between an ideal and lossless quantum-limited case and a typical CULP-CDMA with various losses exhibit more than 30 dB more power requirement to obtain the same bit-error rate (BER). Considering the saturation effect of optical amplifiers, this paper discusses an algorithm for amplifiers' gain setting in various stages of the network in order to overcome the nonlinear effects on signal modulation in optical amplifiers. Finally, using this algorithm,various configurations of multiple optical amplifiers in CULP-CDMA are discussed and the rules for the required optimum number of amplifiers are shown with their corresponding optimum locations to be implemented along the CULP-CDMA system.

  5. Focusing behavior of the fractal vector optical fields designed by fractal lattice growth model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xu-Zhen; Pan, Yue; Zhao, Meng-Dan; Zhang, Guan-Lin; Zhang, Yu; Tu, Chenghou; Li, Yongnan; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2018-01-22

    We introduce a general fractal lattice growth model, significantly expanding the application scope of the fractal in the realm of optics. This model can be applied to construct various kinds of fractal "lattices" and then to achieve the design of a great diversity of fractal vector optical fields (F-VOFs) combinating with various "bases". We also experimentally generate the F-VOFs and explore their universal focusing behaviors. Multiple focal spots can be flexibly enginnered, and the optical tweezers experiment validates the simulated tight focusing fields, which means that this model allows the diversity of the focal patterns to flexibly trap and manipulate micrometer-sized particles. Furthermore, the recovery performance of the F-VOFs is also studied when the input fields and spatial frequency spectrum are obstructed, and the results confirm the robustness of the F-VOFs in both focusing and imaging processes, which is very useful in information transmission.

  6. Fog Density Estimation and Image Defogging Based on Surrogate Modeling for Optical Depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yutong; Sun, Changming; Zhao, Yu; Yang, Li

    2017-05-03

    In order to estimate fog density correctly and to remove fog from foggy images appropriately, a surrogate model for optical depth is presented in this paper. We comprehensively investigate various fog-relevant features and propose a novel feature based on the hue, saturation, and value color space which correlate well with the perception of fog density. We use a surrogate-based method to learn a refined polynomial regression model for optical depth with informative fog-relevant features such as dark-channel, saturation-value, and chroma which are selected on the basis of sensitivity analysis. Based on the obtained accurate surrogate model for optical depth, an effective method for fog density estimation and image defogging is proposed. The effectiveness of our proposed method is verified quantitatively and qualitatively by the experimental results on both synthetic and real-world foggy images.

  7. Bridging the Gap between RF and Optical Patch Antenna Analysis via the Cavity Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, G S; Aksun, M I

    2015-11-02

    Although optical antennas with a variety of shapes and for a variety of applications have been proposed and studied, they are still in their infancy compared to their radio frequency (rf) counterparts. Optical antennas have mainly utilized the geometrical attributes of rf antennas rather than the analysis tools that have been the source of intuition for antenna engineers in rf. This study intends to narrow the gap of experience and intuition in the design of optical patch antennas by introducing an easy-to-understand and easy-to-implement analysis tool in rf, namely, the cavity model, into the optical regime. The importance of this approach is not only its simplicity in understanding and implementation but also its applicability to a broad class of patch antennas and, more importantly, its ability to provide the intuition needed to predict the outcome without going through the trial-and-error simulations with no or little intuitive guidance by the user.

  8. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) Signals Using an Analytical Transport Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez Villa, A.; Delgado Atencio, J. A.; Vazquez y Montiel, S.; Cunill Rodriguez, M.; Martinez Rodriguez, A. E.; Ramos, J. Castro; Villanueva, A.

    2010-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive low coherent interferometric technique that provides cross-sectional images of turbid media. OCT is based on the classical Michelson interferometer where the mirror of the reference arm is oscillating and the signal arm contains a biological sample. In this work, we analyzed theoretically the heterodyne optical signal adopting the so called extended Huygens-Fresnel principle (EHFP). We use simulated OCT images with known optical properties to test an algorithm developed by ourselves to recover the scattering coefficient and we recovered the scattering coefficient with a relative error less than 5% for noisy signals. In addition, we applied this algorithm to OCT images from phantoms of known optical properties; in this case curves were indistinguishable. A revision of the validity of the analytical model applied to our system should be done.

  9. Semi-analytical Model for Estimating Absorption Coefficients of Optically Active Constituents in Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Cui, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The objectives of this paper are to validate the applicability of a multi-band quasi-analytical algorithm (QAA) in retrieval absorption coefficients of optically active constituents in turbid coastal waters, and to further improve the model using a proposed semi-analytical model (SAA). The ap(531) and ag(531) semi-analytically derived using SAA model are quite different from the retrievals procedures of QAA model that ap(531) and ag(531) are semi-analytically derived from the empirical retrievals results of a(531) and a(551). The two models are calibrated and evaluated against datasets taken from 19 independent cruises in West Florida Shelf in 1999-2003, provided by SeaBASS. The results indicate that the SAA model produces a superior performance to QAA model in absorption retrieval. Using of the SAA model in retrieving absorption coefficients of optically active constituents from West Florida Shelf decreases the random uncertainty of estimation by >23.05% from the QAA model. This study demonstrates the potential of the SAA model in absorption coefficients of optically active constituents estimating even in turbid coastal waters. Keywords: Remote sensing; Coastal Water; Absorption Coefficient; Semi-analytical Model

  10. Modelling and prediction of non-stationary optical turbulence behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doelman, N.J.; Osborn, J.

    2016-01-01

    There is a strong need to model the temporal fluctuations in turbulence parameters, for instance for scheduling, simulation and prediction purposes. This paper aims at modelling the dynamic behaviour of the turbulence coherence length r0, utilising measurement data from the Stereo-SCIDAR instrument

  11. Working sketch of an anatomically and optically equivalent physical model eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakaraju, Ravi Chandra; Ehrmann, Klaus; Falk, Darrin; Papas, Eric B.; Ho, Arthur

    2009-02-01

    Our aim was to fabricate a bench-top physical model eye that closely replicates anatomical and optical properties of the average human eye, and to calibrate and standardize this model to suit normal viewing conditions and subsequently utilize it to understand the optical performance of corrective lens designs; especially multifocal soft contact lenses. Using available normative data on ocular biometrics and Zemax ray-tracing software as a tool, we modeled 25, 45 and 55 year-old average adult human eyes with discrete accommodation levels and pupil sizes. Specifications for the components were established following manufacturing tolerance analyses. The cornea was lathed from an optical material with refractive index of 1.376 @ 589 nm and the crystalline lenses were made of Boston RGP polymers with refractive indices of 1.423 (45 & 55yr) and 1.429 (25yr) @ 589 nm. These two materials served to model the equivalent crystalline lens of the different age-groups. A camera, the acting retina, was hosted on the motor-base having translatory and rotary functions to facilitate the simulation of different states of ametropia and peripheral refraction respectively. We report on the implementation of the first prototype and present some simulations of the optical performance of certain contact lenses with specific levels of ametropia, to demonstrate the potential use of such a physical model eye. On completion of development, calibration and standardization, optical quality assessment and performance predictions of different ophthalmic lenses can be studied in great detail. Optical performance with corrective lenses may be reliably simulated and predicted by customized combined computational and physical models giving insight into the merits and pitfalls of their designs

  12. Neutron strength functions: the link between resolved resonances and the optical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldauer, P.A.

    1980-01-01

    Neutron strength functions and scattering radii are useful as energy and channel radius independent parameters that characterize neutron scattering resonances and provide a connection between R-matrix resonance analysis and the optical model. The choice of R-matrix channel radii is discussed, as are limitations on the accuracies of strength functions. New definitions of the p-wave strength function and scattering radius are proposed. For light nuclei, where strength functions display optical model energy variations over the resolved resonances, a doubly reduced partial neutron width is introduced for more meaningful statistical analyses of widths. The systematic behavior of strength functions and scattering radii is discussed

  13. Numerical modeling of optical coherent transient processes with complex configurations-III: Noisy laser source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Tiejun; Tian Mingzhen

    2007-01-01

    A previously developed numerical model based on Maxwell-Bloch equations was modified to simulate optical coherent transient and spectral hole burning processes with noisy laser sources. Random walk phase noise was simulated using laser-phase sequences generated numerically according to the normal distribution of the phase shift. The noise model was tested by comparing the simulated spectral hole burning effect with the analytical solution. The noise effects on a few typical optical coherence transient processes were investigated using this numerical tool. Flicker and random walk frequency noises were considered in accumulation process

  14. STRESS MODELING IN COMPOSITE PRODUCTS USING STANDARD OPTICALLY SENSITIVE MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elifkhan K. Agakhanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Objectives The problem of physically modelling stresses in a compound solid body of revolution having a complex shape and with a complex load distribution is considered. According to the similarity criteria of stress, deformations and displacements from the volume forces decrease proportionally to the scale of similarity of geometric dimensions, which complicates their direct modelling by the photoelasticity method typically using models made from epoxy materials. Methods Based on the principle of the independent action of the forces, the initial problem is represented as the sum of two problems. In the first uniform problem, the stresses in the body of revolution from the centrifugal forces are simulated by the conventional “freezing” method. In order to solve the second nonuniform problem, the stresses in the region of the model, corresponding to the acting centrifugal forces, are “frozen”. The models are glued in a natural state at room temperature, and the compound model is annealed. Results The band patterns in sections as well as components of radial, tangential and axial stresses on contours and in sections of models are obtained by the methods of normal transmission and numerical integration of the equilibrium equation. According to the modelling criteria, the formula for the transition from stresses in models to stresses in the natural structure is established. The results of the analysis of the effect of a body's material density ratio on the stress state of the entire structure are obtained. Conclusion  Axial stresses have insignificant value as compared to radial and tangential stresses; in addition, the ratio of the densities of the compound body has both a quantitative and qualitative influence on the stress state of the structure.

  15. Multivariable Parametric Cost Model for Ground Optical Telescope Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Rowell, Ginger Holmes; Reese, Gayle; Byberg, Alicia

    2005-01-01

    A parametric cost model for ground-based telescopes is developed using multivariable statistical analysis of both engineering and performance parameters. While diameter continues to be the dominant cost driver, diffraction-limited wavelength is found to be a secondary driver. Other parameters such as radius of curvature are examined. The model includes an explicit factor for primary mirror segmentation and/or duplication (i.e., multi-telescope phased-array systems). Additionally, single variable models Based on aperture diameter are derived.

  16. Multivariable Parametric Cost Model for Ground Optical: Telescope Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Rowell, Ginger Holmes; Reese, Gayle; Byberg, Alicia

    2004-01-01

    A parametric cost model for ground-based telescopes is developed using multi-variable statistical analysis of both engineering and performance parameters. While diameter continues to be the dominant cost driver, diffraction limited wavelength is found to be a secondary driver. Other parameters such as radius of curvature were examined. The model includes an explicit factor for primary mirror segmentation and/or duplication (i.e. multi-telescope phased-array systems). Additionally, single variable models based on aperture diameter were derived.

  17. An optical flow-based state-space model of the vocal folds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granados, Alba; Brunskog, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    High-speed movies of the vocal fold vibration are valuable data to reveal vocal fold features for voice pathology diagnosis. This work presents a suitable Bayesian model and a purely theoretical discussion for further development of a framework for continuum biomechanical features estimation. A l...... to capture different deformation patterns between the computed optical flow and the finite element deformation, controlled by the choice of the model tissue parameters........ A linear and Gaussian nonstationary state-space model is proposed and thoroughly discussed. The evolution model is based on a self-sustained three-dimensional finite element model of the vocal folds, and the observation model involves a dense optical flow algorithm. The results show that the method is able...

  18. An optical flow-based state-space model of the vocal folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, Alba; Brunskog, Jonas

    2017-06-01

    High-speed movies of the vocal fold vibration are valuable data to reveal vocal fold features for voice pathology diagnosis. This work presents a suitable Bayesian model and a purely theoretical discussion for further development of a framework for continuum biomechanical features estimation. A linear and Gaussian nonstationary state-space model is proposed and thoroughly discussed. The evolution model is based on a self-sustained three-dimensional finite element model of the vocal folds, and the observation model involves a dense optical flow algorithm. The results show that the method is able to capture different deformation patterns between the computed optical flow and the finite element deformation, controlled by the choice of the model tissue parameters.

  19. Optical characterisation of nanostructures using a discretised forward model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karamehmedovic, Mirza; Sørensen, Mads Peter; Hansen, Poul-Erik

    2012-01-01

    problem. Finally, the size of the measured nanostructure is typically comparable to the wavelength of the illuminating light, so the scattering needs to be described using the full Maxwellian electromagnetic model, rather than (numerically inexpensive) asymptotic formulations. We here describe...... an efficient, accurate and robust forward scattering model [1,2] based on discrete sources and tailor-made for the reconstruction of 2D nanoparticles on substrates from ODM data. We adopt an analysis-based modelling paradigm, and attempt to incorporate as much available a priori information as possible...... be extended to include the roughness and contamination of the substrate without sacricing the speed of computation [3]. We validate the model and show its feasibility in a decomposition-type inverse scheme with synthetic measurement data ([1], figure 1), as well as in the inversion of experimental...

  20. REFINED MODEL OF THE OPTICAL SYSTEM FOR SPACE MINI-VEHICLES WITH LASER PROPULSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Egorov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Simulation results for on-board optical system of a space mini-vehicle with laser propulsion are presented. This system gives the possibility for receiving theremote laser radiation power independently of a system telescope mutual orientation to the vehicle orbiting direction. The on-board optical system is designed with the use of such optical elements as optical hinges and turrets. The system incorporates the optical switch that is a special optical system adapting optically both receiving telescope and laser propulsion engines. Modeling and numerical simulation of the system have been performed with the use of ZEMAX software (Radiant Ltd. The object matter of calculations lied in size definition of system optical elements, requirements to accuracy of their manufacturing and reciprocal adjusting to achieve an efficient radiation energy delivery to laser propulsion engine. Calculations have been performed with account to the limitations on the mini-vehicle mass, its overall dimensions, and radiation threshold density of the optical elements utilized. The requirements to the laser beam quality at the entrance aperture of laser propulsion engine have been considered too. State-of-the-art optical technologies make it possible to manufacture space reflectors made of CO-115M glassceramics with weight-reducing coefficient of 0.72 and the radiation threshold of 5 J/cm2 for the radiation with a 1.064 microns wavelength at 10-20 ns pulse duration. The optimal diameter of a receiving telescope primary mirror has been 0.5 m when a coordinated transmitting telescope diameter is equal to 1 m. This provides the reception of at least 84% of laser energy. The main losses of radiation energy are caused by improper installation of receiving telescope mirrors and by in-process errors arising at manufacturing the telescope mirrors with a parabolic surface. It is shown that requirements to the in-process admissible errors for the on-board optical system elements

  1. Late time optical spectra from the /sup 56/Ni model for Type I supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axelrod, T.S.

    1980-07-01

    The hypothesis that the optical luminosity of Type I supernovae results from the radioactive decay of /sup 56/Ni synthesized and ejected by the explosion has been investigated by numerical simulation of the optical spectrum resulting from a homologously expanding shell composed initially of pure /sup 56/Ni core. This model, which neglects the effects of material external to the /sup 56/Ni core, is expected to provide a reasonable representation of the supernova at late times when the star is nearly transparent to optical photons. The numerical simulation determines the temperature, ionization state, and non-LTE level populations which result from energy deposition by the radioactive decay products of /sup 56/Ni and /sup 56/Co. The optical spectrum includes the effects of both allowed and forbidden lines. The optical spectra resulting from the simulation are found to be sensitive to the mass and ejection velocity of the /sup 56/Ni shell. A range of these parameters has been found which results in good agreement with the observed spectra of SN1972e over a considerable range of time. In particular, evidence for the expected decaying abundance of /sup 56/Co has been found in the spectra of SN1972e. These results are used to assess the validity of the /sup 56/Ni model and set limits on the mass and explosion mechanism of the Type I progenitor. The possibilities for improvement of the numerical model are discussed and future atomic data requirements defined.

  2. Late time optical spectra from the 56Ni model for Type I supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axelrod, T.S.

    1980-07-01

    The hypothesis that the optical luminosity of Type I supernovae results from the radioactive decay of 56 Ni synthesized and ejected by the explosion has been investigated by numerical simulation of the optical spectrum resulting from a homologously expanding shell composed initially of pure 56 Ni core. This model, which neglects the effects of material external to the 56 Ni core, is expected to provide a reasonable representation of the supernova at late times when the star is nearly transparent to optical photons. The numerical simulation determines the temperature, ionization state, and non-LTE level populations which result from energy deposition by the radioactive decay products of 56 Ni and 56 Co. The optical spectrum includes the effects of both allowed and forbidden lines. The optical spectra resulting from the simulation are found to be sensitive to the mass and ejection velocity of the 56 Ni shell. A range of these parameters has been found which results in good agreement with the observed spectra of SN1972e over a considerable range of time. In particular, evidence for the expected decaying abundance of 56 Co has been found in the spectra of SN1972e. These results are used to assess the validity of the 56 Ni model and set limits on the mass and explosion mechanism of the Type I progenitor. The possibilities for improvement of the numerical model are discussed and future atomic data requirements defined

  3. Integrated model-based retargeting and optical proximity correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Kanak B.; Banerjee, Shayak

    2011-04-01

    Conventional resolution enhancement techniques (RET) are becoming increasingly inadequate at addressing the challenges of subwavelength lithography. In particular, features show high sensitivity to process variation in low-k1 lithography. Process variation aware RETs such as process-window OPC are becoming increasingly important to guarantee high lithographic yield, but such techniques suffer from high runtime impact. An alternative to PWOPC is to perform retargeting, which is a rule-assisted modification of target layout shapes to improve their process window. However, rule-based retargeting is not a scalable technique since rules cannot cover the entire search space of two-dimensional shape configurations, especially with technology scaling. In this paper, we propose to integrate the processes of retargeting and optical proximity correction (OPC). We utilize the normalized image log slope (NILS) metric, which is available at no extra computational cost during OPC. We use NILS to guide dynamic target modification between iterations of OPC. We utilize the NILS tagging capabilities of Calibre TCL scripting to identify fragments with low NILS. We then perform NILS binning to assign different magnitude of retargeting to different NILS bins. NILS is determined both for width, to identify regions of pinching, and space, to locate regions of potential bridging. We develop an integrated flow for 1x metal lines (M1) which exhibits lesser lithographic hotspots compared to a flow with just OPC and no retargeting. We also observe cases where hotspots that existed in the rule-based retargeting flow are fixed using our methodology. We finally also demonstrate that such a retargeting methodology does not significantly alter design properties by electrically simulating a latch layout before and after retargeting. We observe less than 1% impact on latch Clk-Q and D-Q delays post-retargeting, which makes this methodology an attractive one for use in improving shape process windows

  4. Experience at Los Alamos with use of the optical model for applied nuclear data calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, P.G.

    1994-01-01

    While many nuclear models are important in calculations of nuclear data, the optical model usually provides the basic underpinning of analyses directed at data for applications. An overview is given here of experience in the Nuclear Theory and Applications Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the use of the optical model for calculations of nuclear cross section data for applied purposes. We consider the direct utilization of total, elastic, and reaction cross sections for neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, 3 He and alpha particles in files of evaluated nuclear data covering the energy range of 0 to 200 MeV, as well as transmission coefficients for reaction theory calculations and neutron and proton wave functions direct-reaction and Feshbach-Kerman-Koonin analyses. Optical model codes such as SCAT and ECIS and the reaction theory codes COMNUC, GNASH FKK-GNASH, and DWUCK have primarily been used in our analyses. A summary of optical model parameterizations from past analyses at Los Alamos will be given, including detailed tabulations of the parameters for a selection of nuclei

  5. Experience at Los Alamos with use of the optical model for applied nuclear data calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, P.G.

    1998-01-01

    While many nuclear models are important in calculations of nuclear data, the optical model usually provides the basic underpinning of analyses directed at data for applications. An overview is given here of experience in the Nuclear Theory and Applications Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the use of the optical model for calculations of nuclear cross section data for applied purposes. We consider the direct utilization of total, elastic, and reaction cross sections for neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, 3 He and alpha particles in files of evaluated nuclear data covering the energy range of 0 to 200 MeV, as well as transmission coefficients for reaction theory calculations and neutron and proton wave functions in direct-reaction and Feshbach-Kerman-Koonin analyses. Optical model codes such as SCAT and ECIS and the reaction theory codes COMNUC, GNASH, FKK-GNASH, and DWUCK have primarily been used in our analyses. A summary of optical model parameterizations from past analyses at Los Alamos will be given, including detailed tabulations of the parameters for a selection of nuclei. (author)

  6. The Research of Optical Turbulence Model in Underwater Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to research the effect of turbulence on underwater imaging system and image restoration, the underwater turbulence model is simulated by computer fluid dynamics. This model is obtained in different underwater turbulence intensity, which contains the pressure data that influences refractive index distribution. When the pressure value is conversed to refractive index, the refractive index distribution can be received with the refraction formula. In the condition of same turbulent intensity, the distribution of refractive index presents gradient in the whole region, with disorder and mutations in the local region. With the turbulence intensity increase, the holistic variation of the refractive index in the image is larger, and the refractive index change more tempestuously in the local region. All the above are illustrated by the simulation results with he ray tracing method and turbulent refractive index model. According to different turbulence intensity analysis, it is proved that turbulence causes image distortion and increases noise.

  7. Analysis of optical near-field energy transfer by stochastic model unifying architectural dependencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naruse, Makoto, E-mail: naruse@nict.go.jp [Photonic Network Research Institute, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, 4-2-1 Nukui-kita, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8795 (Japan); Nanophotonics Research Center, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Akahane, Kouichi; Yamamoto, Naokatsu [Photonic Network Research Institute, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, 4-2-1 Nukui-kita, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8795 (Japan); Holmström, Petter [Laboratory of Photonics and Microwave Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-164 40 Kista (Sweden); Thylén, Lars [Laboratory of Photonics and Microwave Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-164 40 Kista (Sweden); Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Huant, Serge [Institut Néel, CNRS and Université Joseph Fourier, 25 rue des Martyrs BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Ohtsu, Motoichi [Nanophotonics Research Center, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-04-21

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate energy transfer mediated by optical near-field interactions in a multi-layer InAs quantum dot (QD) structure composed of a single layer of larger dots and N layers of smaller ones. We construct a stochastic model in which optical near-field interactions that follow a Yukawa potential, QD size fluctuations, and temperature-dependent energy level broadening are unified, enabling us to examine device-architecture-dependent energy transfer efficiencies. The model results are consistent with the experiments. This study provides an insight into optical energy transfer involving inherent disorders in materials and paves the way to systematic design principles of nanophotonic devices that will allow optimized performance and the realization of designated functions.

  8. Analysis of optical near-field energy transfer by stochastic model unifying architectural dependencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, Makoto; Akahane, Kouichi; Yamamoto, Naokatsu; Holmström, Petter; Thylén, Lars; Huant, Serge; Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate energy transfer mediated by optical near-field interactions in a multi-layer InAs quantum dot (QD) structure composed of a single layer of larger dots and N layers of smaller ones. We construct a stochastic model in which optical near-field interactions that follow a Yukawa potential, QD size fluctuations, and temperature-dependent energy level broadening are unified, enabling us to examine device-architecture-dependent energy transfer efficiencies. The model results are consistent with the experiments. This study provides an insight into optical energy transfer involving inherent disorders in materials and paves the way to systematic design principles of nanophotonic devices that will allow optimized performance and the realization of designated functions

  9. Concentrator optical characterization using computer mathematical modelling and point source testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, E. W.; John, S. L.; Trentelman, G. F.

    1984-01-01

    The optical characteristics of a paraboloidal solar concentrator are analyzed using the intercept factor curve (a format for image data) to describe the results of a mathematical model and to represent reduced data from experimental testing. This procedure makes it possible not only to test an assembled concentrator, but also to evaluate single optical panels or to conduct non-solar tests of an assembled concentrator. The use of three-dimensional ray tracing computer programs to calculate the mathematical model is described. These ray tracing programs can include any type of optical configuration from simple paraboloids to array of spherical facets and can be adapted to microcomputers or larger computers, which can graphically display real-time comparison of calculated and measured data.

  10. Optical modeling based on mean free path calculations for quantum dot phosphors applied to optoelectronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Min-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jun; Kim, Young-Joo

    2017-02-20

    We proposed an optical simulation model for the quantum dot (QD) nanophosphor based on the mean free path concept to understand precisely the optical performance of optoelectronic devices. A measurement methodology was also developed to get the desired optical characteristics such as the mean free path and absorption spectra for QD nanophosphors which are to be incorporated into the simulation. The simulation results for QD-based white LED and OLED displays show good agreement with the experimental values from the fabricated devices in terms of spectral power distribution, chromaticity coordinate, CCT, and CRI. The proposed simulation model and measurement methodology can be applied easily to the design of lots of optoelectronics devices using QD nanophosphors to obtain high efficiency and the desired color characteristics.

  11. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA LIGHT CURVE INFERENCE: HIERARCHICAL MODELS IN THE OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandel, Kaisey S.; Narayan, Gautham; Kirshner, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    We have constructed a comprehensive statistical model for Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves spanning optical through near-infrared (NIR) data. A hierarchical framework coherently models multiple random and uncertain effects, including intrinsic supernova (SN) light curve covariances, dust extinction and reddening, and distances. An improved BAYESN Markov Chain Monte Carlo code computes probabilistic inferences for the hierarchical model by sampling the global probability density of parameters describing individual SNe and the population. We have applied this hierarchical model to optical and NIR data of 127 SNe Ia from PAIRITEL, CfA3, Carnegie Supernova Project, and the literature. We find an apparent population correlation between the host galaxy extinction A V and the ratio of total-to-selective dust absorption R V . For SNe with low dust extinction, A V ∼ V ∼ 2.5-2.9, while at high extinctions, A V ∼> 1, low values of R V < 2 are favored. The NIR luminosities are excellent standard candles and are less sensitive to dust extinction. They exhibit low correlation with optical peak luminosities, and thus provide independent information on distances. The combination of NIR and optical data constrains the dust extinction and improves the predictive precision of individual SN Ia distances by about 60%. Using cross-validation, we estimate an rms distance modulus prediction error of 0.11 mag for SNe with optical and NIR data versus 0.15 mag for SNe with optical data alone. Continued study of SNe Ia in the NIR is important for improving their utility as precise and accurate cosmological distance indicators.

  12. Light Scatter in Optical Materials: Advanced Haze Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-31

    contrast sensitivity with glare. This study measured angular scatter in the test articles , and showed that the cumulative (total) scatter beyond...Sample under laser illumination for angular scatter measurements ................................4  Figure 3: Scatter measurement system at a small...scatter effects image quality , visual performance and user acceptance. The purpose of the present effort was to develop a computational model that

  13. Optical mathematical model of medical tourism village at Euan Mousa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faten H Fahmy

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a computer simulation model of the main components of the designed photovoltaic energy system to feed the suggested whole load of the presented medical village. The main topic of this paper is to serve a medical services for special patients who need benefits of natural water spots, and special sand that exist in Euan Mousa, Safaga, South of Sinai. For that, a healthy PV medical tourism village contains all the necessary requirements for these patients and tourists is designed. Also, it presents full hospitality for tourists. The energy flow through the photovoltaic system is determined as time-integrated value of power being produced during each hour. The energy balance model, which governs the behaviour of the different components (array, battery and load), is obtained by considering the energy flow at each component of the system

  14. An analog model for quantum lightcone fluctuations in nonlinear optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, L.H.; De Lorenci, V.A.; Menezes, G.; Svaiter, N.F.

    2013-01-01

    We propose an analog model for quantum gravity effects using nonlinear dielectrics. Fluctuations of the spacetime lightcone are expected in quantum gravity, leading to variations in the flight times of pulses. This effect can also arise in a nonlinear material. We propose a model in which fluctuations of a background electric field, such as that produced by a squeezed photon state, can cause fluctuations in the effective lightcone for probe pulses. This leads to a variation in flight times analogous to that in quantum gravity. We make some numerical estimates which suggest that the effect might be large enough to be observable. - Highlights: ► Lightcone fluctuations, quantum fluctuations of the effective speed of light, are a feature of quantum gravity. ► Nonlinear dielectrics have a variable speed of light, analogous to the effects of gravity. ► Fluctuating electric fields create the effect of lightcone fluctuations in a nonlinear material. ► We propose to use squeezed light in a nonlinear material as an analog model of lightcone fluctuations. ► Variation in the speed of propagation of pulses is the observational signature of lightcone fluctuations.

  15. Mathematical Model of the One-stage Magneto-optical Sensor Based on Faraday Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaev, O. G.; Paranin, V. D.; Sinitsin, L. I.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work is to refine a model of magneto-optical sensors based on Faraday’s longitudinal magneto-optical effect. The tasks of the study include computer modeling and analysis of the transfer characteristic of a single-stage magneto-optical sensor for various polarization of the input beam and non-ideal optical components. The proposed mathematical model and software make it possible to take into account the non-ideal characteristics of film polaroids observed in operation in the near infrared region and at increased temperatures. On the basis of the results of the model analysis it was found that the dependence of normalized transmission T(γ2) has periodic nature. Choosing the angle (γ 2-γ 1) makes it possible to shift the initial operation point and change the sensitivity dT/dγ 2. The influence of the input beam polarization increases with the increase of polaroid parameter deviation from ideal and shows itself as reduction of modulation depth and angular shift of the sensor conversion response.

  16. Manufacturing a Micro-model with Integrated Fibre Optic Pressure Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarikos, I.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.; van Oosterhout, L.M.; van Oordt, Wim

    The measurement of fluid pressure inside pores is a major challenge in experimental studies of two-phase flow in porous media. In this paper, we describe the manufacturing procedure of a micro-model with integrated fibre optic pressure sensors. They have a circular measurement window with a diameter

  17. Optical modeling of nickel-base alloys oxidized in pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clair, A. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon cedex (France); Foucault, M.; Calonne, O. [Areva ANP, Centre Technique Departement Corrosion-Chimie, 30 Bd de l' industrie, BP 181, 71205 Le Creusot (France); Finot, E., E-mail: Eric.Finot@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon cedex (France)

    2012-10-01

    The knowledge of the aging process involved in the primary water of pressurized water reactor entails investigating a mixed growth mechanism in the corrosion of nickel-base alloys. A mixed growth induces an anionic inner oxide and a cationic diffusion parallel to a dissolution-precipitation process forms the outer zone. The in situ monitoring of the oxidation kinetics requires the modeling of the oxide layer stratification with the full knowledge of the optical constants related to each component. Here, we report the dielectric constants of the alloys 600 and 690 measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry and fitted to a Drude-Lorentz model. A robust optical stratification model was determined using focused ion beam cross-section of thin foils examined by transmission electron microscopy. Dielectric constants of the inner oxide layer depleted in chromium were assimilated to those of the nickel thin film. The optical constants of both the spinels and extern layer were determined. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spectroscopic ellipsometry of Ni-base alloy oxidation in pressurized water reactor Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurements of the dielectric constants of the alloys Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical simulation of the mixed oxidation process using a three stack model Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scattered crystallites cationic outer layer; linear Ni-gradient bottom layer Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of the refractive index of the spinel and the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers.

  18. Iota-dependent resonance absorption in the optical model description of alpha particle elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chyla, K.; Jarczyk, L.; Maciuk, B.; Zipper, W.

    1976-01-01

    Alpha particle scattering from 28 Si has been studied at five bombarding energies from 23.5 to 28.5 MeV. iota-dependent resonance absorption has been introduced to the optical model analysis of 28 Si (α,β) 28 Si reaction. (author)

  19. Derivation of a Monte Carlo method for modeling heterodyne detection in optical coherence tomography systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tycho, Andreas; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Andersen, Peter E.

    2002-01-01

    A Monte Carlo (MC) method for modeling optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurements of a diffusely reflecting discontinuity emb edded in a scattering medium is presented. For the first time to the authors' knowledge it is shown analytically that the applicability of an MC approach to this opti...

  20. HADES. A computer code for fast neutron cross section from the Optical Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.; Navarro, C.

    1973-01-01

    A FORTRAN V computer code for UNIVAC 1108/6 using a local Optical Model with spin-orbit interaction is described. The code calculates fast neutron cross sections, angular distribution, and Legendre moments for heavy and intermediate spherical nuclei. It allows for the possibility of automatic variation of potential parameters for experimental data fitting. (Author) 55 refs

  1. Importance of the energy-dependent geometry in the 16O+ 16O optical model potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantis, G.; Ioannidis, K.; Poirier, P.

    1985-01-01

    Optical model potentials with various forms of energy-dependent geometry have been considered for the description of 16 O+ 16 O elastic scattering. It is shown that the variation with energy of the imaginary radius leads to a reasonable fit of the cross-section data, throughout the energy range

  2. Simple method of modelling of digital holograms registering and their optical reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evtikhiev, N N; Cheremkhin, P A; Krasnov, V V; Kurbatova, E A; Molodtsov, D Yu; Porshneva, L A; Rodin, V G

    2016-01-01

    The technique of modeling of digital hologram recording and image optical reconstruction from these holograms is described. The method takes into account characteristics of the object, digital camera's photosensor and spatial light modulator used for digital holograms displaying. Using the technique, equipment can be chosen for experiments for obtaining good reconstruction quality and/or holograms diffraction efficiency. Numerical experiments were conducted. (paper)

  3. A framework for performance evaluation of model-based optical trackers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, F.A.; Liere, van R.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a software framework to evaluate the performance of model-based optical trackers in virtual environments. The framework can be used to evaluate and compare the performance of different trackers under various conditions, to study the effects of varying intrinsic and extrinsic camera

  4. Electromagnetic modeling and characterization of an optically-controlled microwave phase shifterin GaAs integrated technology

    OpenAIRE

    Tripon-Canseliet, C.; Faci, S.; Deshours, F.; Algani, C.; Alquié, G.; Formont, S.; Chazelas, J.

    2005-01-01

    A state of the art of the modeling of microwave photoswitching devices is exposed. A new 3 D electromagnetic modeling allows the design of an optically-controlled microwave phase shifter microwave starting from the traditional circuit of a microwave photoswitch. Measurements of the parameters S of this optically-controlled microwave phase shifter attests the function of this circuit by optical way and highlights the interest of the integration of this new type of microwave phase shifters in ...

  5. Accuracy and performance of 3D mask models in optical projection lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudelo, Viviana; Evanschitzky, Peter; Erdmann, Andreas; Fühner, Tim; Shao, Feng; Limmer, Steffen; Fey, Dietmar

    2011-04-01

    Different mask models have been compared: rigorous electromagnetic field (EMF) modeling, rigorous EMF modeling with decomposition techniques and the thin mask approach (Kirchhoff approach) to simulate optical diffraction from different mask patterns in projection systems for lithography. In addition, each rigorous model was tested for two different formulations for partially coherent imaging: The Hopkins assumption and rigorous simulation of mask diffraction orders for multiple illumination angles. The aim of this work is to closely approximate results of the rigorous EMF method by the thin mask model enhanced with pupil filtering techniques. The validity of this approach for different feature sizes, shapes and illumination conditions is investigated.

  6. Comparison of three ice cloud optical schemes in climate simulations with community atmospheric model version 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenjie; Peng, Yiran; Wang, Bin; Yi, Bingqi; Lin, Yanluan; Li, Jiangnan

    2018-05-01

    A newly implemented Baum-Yang scheme for simulating ice cloud optical properties is compared with existing schemes (Mitchell and Fu schemes) in a standalone radiative transfer model and in the global climate model (GCM) Community Atmospheric Model Version 5 (CAM5). This study systematically analyzes the effect of different ice cloud optical schemes on global radiation and climate by a series of simulations with a simplified standalone radiative transfer model, atmospheric GCM CAM5, and a comprehensive coupled climate model. Results from the standalone radiative model show that Baum-Yang scheme yields generally weaker effects of ice cloud on temperature profiles both in shortwave and longwave spectrum. CAM5 simulations indicate that Baum-Yang scheme in place of Mitchell/Fu scheme tends to cool the upper atmosphere and strengthen the thermodynamic instability in low- and mid-latitudes, which could intensify the Hadley circulation and dehydrate the subtropics. When CAM5 is coupled with a slab ocean model to include simplified air-sea interaction, reduced downward longwave flux to surface in Baum-Yang scheme mitigates ice-albedo feedback in the Arctic as well as water vapor and cloud feedbacks in low- and mid-latitudes, resulting in an overall temperature decrease by 3.0/1.4 °C globally compared with Mitchell/Fu schemes. Radiative effect and climate feedback of the three ice cloud optical schemes documented in this study can be referred for future improvements on ice cloud simulation in CAM5.

  7. Comparison of stellar population model predictions using optical and infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, C.; McDermid, R. M.; Kuntschner, H.; Maraston, C.; Conroy, C.

    2018-02-01

    We present Gemini/GNIRS cross-dispersed near-infrared spectra of 12 nearby early-type galaxies, with the aim of testing commonly used stellar population synthesis models. We select a subset of galaxies from the ATLAS3D sample which span a wide range of ages (single stellar population equivalent ages of 1-15 Gyr) at approximately solar metallicity. We derive star formation histories using four different stellar population synthesis models, namely those of Bruzual & Charlot, Conroy, Gunn & White, Maraston & Strömbäck and Vazdekis et al. We compare star formation histories derived from near-infrared spectra with those derived from optical spectra using the same models. We find that while all models agree in the optical, the derived star formation histories vary dramatically from model to model in the near-infrared. We find that this variation is largely driven by the choice of stellar spectral library, such that models including high-quality spectral libraries provide the best fits to the data, and are the most self-consistent when comparing optically derived properties with near-infrared ones. We also find the impact of age variation in the near-infrared to be subtle, and largely encoded in the shape of the continuum, meaning that the common approach of removing continuum information with a high-order polynomial greatly reduces our ability to constrain ages in the near-infrared.

  8. On the Performance Analysis of Free-Space Optical Links under Generalized Turbulence and Misalignment Models

    KAUST Repository

    AlQuwaiee, Hessa

    2016-11-01

    One of the potential solutions to the radio frequency (RF) spectrum scarcity problem is optical wireless communications (OWC), which utilizes the unlicensed optical spectrum. Long-range outdoor OWC are usually referred to in the literature as free-space optical (FSO) communications. Unlike RF systems, FSO is immune to interference and multi-path fading. Also, the deployment of FSO systems is flexible and much faster than optical fibers. These attractive features make FSO applicable for broadband wireless transmission such as optical fiber backup, metropolitan area network, and last mile access. Although FSO communication is a promising technology, it is negatively affected by two physical phenomenon, namely, scintillation due to atmospheric turbulence and pointing errors. These two critical issues have prompted intensive research in the last decade. To quantify the effect of these two factors on FSO system performance, we need effective mathematical models. In this work, we propose and study a generalized pointing error model based on the Beckmann distribution. Then, we aim to generalize the FSO channel model to span all turbulence conditions from weak to strong while taking pointing errors into consideration. Since scintillation in FSO is analogous to the fading phenomena in RF, diversity has been proposed too to overcome the effect of irradiance fluctuations. Thus, several combining techniques of not necessarily independent dual-branch free-space optical links were investigated over both weak and strong turbulence channels in the presence of pointing errors. On another front, improving the performance, enhancing the capacity and reducing the delay of the communication link has been the motivation of any newly developed schemes, especially for backhauling. Recently, there has been a growing interest in practical systems to integrate RF and FSO technologies to solve the last mile bottleneck. As such, we also study in this thesis asymmetric an RF-FSO dual-hop relay

  9. Optics Elements for Modeling Electrostatic Lenses and Accelerator Components: III. Electrostatic Deflectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.A.; Gillespie, G.H.

    1999-01-01

    Ion-beam optics models for simulating electrostatic prisms (deflectors) of different geometries have been developed for the computer code TRACE 3-D. TRACE 3-D is an envelope (matrix) code, which includes a linear space charge model, that was originally developed to model bunched beams in magnetic transport systems and radiofrequency (RF) accelerators. Several new optical models for a number of electrostatic lenses and accelerator columns have been developed recently that allow the code to be used for modeling beamlines and accelerators with electrostatic components. The new models include a number of options for: (1) Einzel lenses, (2) accelerator columns, (3) electrostatic prisms, and (4) electrostatic quadrupoles. A prescription for setting up the initial beam appropriate to modeling 2-D (continuous) beams has also been developed. The models for electrostatic prisms are described in this paper. The electrostatic prism model options allow the modeling of cylindrical, spherical, and toroidal electrostatic deflectors. The application of these models in the development of ion-beam transport systems is illustrated through the modeling of a spherical electrostatic analyzer as a component of the new low energy beamline at CAMS

  10. Activities at Los Alamos for the optical model segment of the RIPL CRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, P.G.

    1997-01-01

    A computer code was developed that permitted various potentials compiled at Bombay to be included in the Optical Model Library. Subroutines were developed for reading and writing the library, and a simple code was written to produce a summary of the potentials in the library. It was observed that, if a global optical potential must be used for incident neutrons, then the Wilmore and Hodgson potential often gave reasonable results below 30 Mev in the limited tests performed, and the Madland Semmering potential usually gave reasonable results for both neutrons and protons from ∼ 30 to 200 Mev

  11. Quantum-mechanical analysis of the VRsup(n) ambiguity in the optical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shastry, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    Using analytical methods and without adopting numerical calculations or semiclassical arguments, it is shown that the well known VRsup(n), n is approximately equal to 2, parameter ambiguity in the neutron-nucleus optical potential can be attributed to the closeness of the Woods-Saxon potential to the corresponding square well inside the nucleus. This parameter ambiguity is absent in individual partial waves but is more apparent in the differential cross section. The analysis is generalised to the proton-nucleus optical model. The present method clearly pinpoints the mathematical origin of the VRsup(n) ambiguity which is difficult to deduce by purely numerical methods. (author)

  12. Web Platform for Sharing Modeling Software in the Field of Nonlinear Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubenskaya, Julia; Kryukov, Alexander; Demichev, Andrey

    2018-02-01

    We describe the prototype of a Web platform intended for sharing software programs for computer modeling in the rapidly developing field of the nonlinear optics phenomena. The suggested platform is built on the top of the HUBZero open-source middleware. In addition to the basic HUBZero installation we added to our platform the capability to run Docker containers via an external application server and to send calculation programs to those containers for execution. The presented web platform provides a wide range of features and might be of benefit to nonlinear optics researchers.

  13. Web Platform for Sharing Modeling Software in the Field of Nonlinear Optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubenskaya Julia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the prototype of a Web platform intended for sharing software programs for computer modeling in the rapidly developing field of the nonlinear optics phenomena. The suggested platform is built on the top of the HUBZero open-source middleware. In addition to the basic HUBZero installation we added to our platform the capability to run Docker containers via an external application server and to send calculation programs to those containers for execution. The presented web platform provides a wide range of features and might be of benefit to nonlinear optics researchers.

  14. Program description of FIBRAM: a radiation attenuation model for optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingram, W.J.

    1987-06-01

    The report describes a fiber optics system model and its computer implementation. This implementation can calculate the bit error ratio (BER) versus time for optical fibers that have been exposed to gamma radiation. The program is designed so that the user may arbitrarily change any or all of the system input variables and produce separate output calculations. The primary output of the program is a table of the BER as a function of time. This table may be stored on magnetic media and later incorporated into computer graphics programs

  15. Optical modelling of thin-film silicon solar cells deposited on textured substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krc, J.; Zeman, M.; Smole, F.; Topic, M.

    2004-01-01

    Optical modelling is used to investigate effects of light scattering in amorphous silicon and microcrystalline silicon solar cells. The role of enhanced haze parameter and different angular distribution function of scattered light is analyzed. Results of optical simulation show that enhanced haze parameter compared to that of Asahi U-type SnO 2 :F does not improve external quantum efficiency and short-circuit current density of amorphous silicon solar cell significantly, whereas for microcrystalline silicon solar cell the improvement is larger. Angular distribution function affects the external quantum efficiency and the short-circuit current density significantly

  16. Rate equation modelling of the optically pumped spin-exchange source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenger, J.; Rith, K.

    1995-01-01

    Sources for spin polarized hydrogen or deuterium, polarized via spin-exchange of a laser optically pumped alkali metal, can be modelled by rate equations. The rate equations for this type of source, operated either with hydrogen or deuterium, are given explicitly with the intention of providing a useful tool for further source optimization and understanding. Laser optical pumping of alkali metal, spin-exchange collisions of hydrogen or deuterium atoms with each other and with alkali metal atoms are included, as well as depolarization due to flow and wall collisions. (orig.)

  17. Modeling update for the Thirty Meter Telescope laser guide star dual-conjugate adaptive optics system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, Luc; Wang, Lianqi; Ellerbroek, Brent

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes the modeling efforts undertaken in the past couple of years to derive wavefront error (WFE) performance estimates for the Narrow Field Infrared Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS), which is the facility laser guide star (LGS) dual-conjugate adaptive optics (AO) system for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). The estimates describe the expected performance of NFIRAOS as a function of seeing on Mauna Kea, zenith angle, and galactic latitude (GL). They have been developed through a combination of integrated AO simulations, side analyses, allocations, lab and lidar experiments.

  18. Modeling of Thermal Phase Noise in a Solid Core Photonic Crystal Fiber-Optic Gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ningfang; Ma, Kun; Jin, Jing; Teng, Fei; Cai, Wei

    2017-10-26

    A theoretical model of the thermal phase noise in a square-wave modulated solid core photonic crystal fiber-optic gyroscope has been established, and then verified by measurements. The results demonstrate a good agreement between theory and experiment. The contribution of the thermal phase noise to the random walk coefficient of the gyroscope is derived. A fiber coil with 2.8 km length is used in the experimental solid core photonic crystal fiber-optic gyroscope, showing a random walk coefficient of 9.25 × 10 -5 deg/√h.

  19. Disturbance Observer based internal Model Controller Design: Applications to Tracking Control of Optical Disk Drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyun Taek; Suh, Il Hong [Hanyang University (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-01

    A digital tracking controller is proposed for a precise positioning control under a large repetitive and/or non repetitive disturbances. The proposed controller consists of the internal model controller and the disturbance observer to eliminate the modeling uncertainty. A sufficient condition is given for robust stability of the proposed control system. Numerical Examples are illustrated for a precise head positioning of optical disk drives regardless of a torque disturbance and/or output disturbance. (author). 8 refs., 19 figs.

  20. A simple model explaining super-resolution in absolute optical instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Ulf; Sahebdivan, Sahar; Kogan, Alex; Tyc, Tomáš

    2015-05-01

    We develop a simple, one-dimensional model for super-resolution in absolute optical instruments that is able to describe the interplay between sources and detectors. Our model explains the subwavelength sensitivity of a point detector to a point source reported in previous computer simulations and experiments (Miñano 2011 New J. Phys.13 125009; Miñano 2014 New J. Phys.16 033015).

  1. Cavity Formation Modeling of Fiber Fuse in Single-Mode Optical Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshito Shuto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of a fiber-fuse phenomenon in a single-mode optical fiber was studied theoretically. To clarify both the silica-glass densification and cavity formation, which have been observed in fiber fuse propagation, we investigated a nonlinear oscillation model using the Van Der Pol equation. This model was able to phenomenologically explain both the densification of the core material and the formation of periodic cavities in the core layer as a result of a relaxation oscillation.

  2. Neutron penetrabilities using an optical model potential (1963); Penetrabilites des neutrons selon le modele du potentiel optique (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mani, G S; Melkanoff, M A; Iori, I [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The neutron penetrabilities and reaction cross-sections are presented in these tables for the case of an optical model potential for the nucleus, for nuclei up to mass 230. (authors) [French] Les penetrabilites et les sections efficaces de reaction pour les neutrons sont donnees dans ces tables en utilisant le modele du potentiel optique, pour les noyaux cibles jusqu'a la masse 230. (auteurs)

  3. Neutron penetrabilities using an optical model potential (1963); Penetrabilites des neutrons selon le modele du potentiel optique (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mani, G.S.; Melkanoff, M.A.; Iori, I. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The neutron penetrabilities and reaction cross-sections are presented in these tables for the case of an optical model potential for the nucleus, for nuclei up to mass 230. (authors) [French] Les penetrabilites et les sections efficaces de reaction pour les neutrons sont donnees dans ces tables en utilisant le modele du potentiel optique, pour les noyaux cibles jusqu'a la masse 230. (auteurs)

  4. Anisotropic elasticity of silicon and its application to the modelling of X-ray optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lin; Barrett, Raymond; Cloetens, Peter; Detlefs, Carsten; Sanchez del Rio, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Anisotropic elasticity of single-crystal silicon, applications to modelling of a bent X-ray mirror, and thermal deformation of a liquid-nitrogen-cooled monochromator crystal are presented. The crystal lattice of single-crystal silicon gives rise to anisotropic elasticity. The stiffness and compliance coefficient matrix depend on crystal orientation and, consequently, Young’s modulus, the shear modulus and Poisson’s ratio as well. Computer codes (in Matlab and Python) have been developed to calculate these anisotropic elasticity parameters for a silicon crystal in any orientation. These codes facilitate the evaluation of these anisotropy effects in silicon for applications such as microelectronics, microelectromechanical systems and X-ray optics. For mechanically bent X-ray optics, it is shown that the silicon crystal orientation is an important factor which may significantly influence the optics design and manufacturing phase. Choosing the appropriate crystal orientation can both lead to improved performance whilst lowering mechanical bending stresses. The thermal deformation of the crystal depends on Poisson’s ratio. For an isotropic constant Poisson’s ratio, ν, the thermal deformation (RMS slope) is proportional to (1 + ν). For a cubic anisotropic material, the thermal deformation of the X-ray optics can be approximately simulated by using the average of ν 12 and ν 13 as an effective isotropic Poisson’s ratio, where the direction 1 is normal to the optic surface, and the directions 2 and 3 are two normal orthogonal directions parallel to the optical surface. This average is independent of the direction in the optical surface (the crystal plane) for Si(100), Si(110) and Si(111). Using the effective isotropic Poisson’s ratio for these orientations leads to an error in thermal deformation smaller than 5.5%

  5. Anisotropic elasticity of silicon and its application to the modelling of X-ray optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lin, E-mail: zhang@esrf.fr; Barrett, Raymond; Cloetens, Peter; Detlefs, Carsten; Sanchez del Rio, Manuel [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France)

    2014-04-04

    Anisotropic elasticity of single-crystal silicon, applications to modelling of a bent X-ray mirror, and thermal deformation of a liquid-nitrogen-cooled monochromator crystal are presented. The crystal lattice of single-crystal silicon gives rise to anisotropic elasticity. The stiffness and compliance coefficient matrix depend on crystal orientation and, consequently, Young’s modulus, the shear modulus and Poisson’s ratio as well. Computer codes (in Matlab and Python) have been developed to calculate these anisotropic elasticity parameters for a silicon crystal in any orientation. These codes facilitate the evaluation of these anisotropy effects in silicon for applications such as microelectronics, microelectromechanical systems and X-ray optics. For mechanically bent X-ray optics, it is shown that the silicon crystal orientation is an important factor which may significantly influence the optics design and manufacturing phase. Choosing the appropriate crystal orientation can both lead to improved performance whilst lowering mechanical bending stresses. The thermal deformation of the crystal depends on Poisson’s ratio. For an isotropic constant Poisson’s ratio, ν, the thermal deformation (RMS slope) is proportional to (1 + ν). For a cubic anisotropic material, the thermal deformation of the X-ray optics can be approximately simulated by using the average of ν{sub 12} and ν{sub 13} as an effective isotropic Poisson’s ratio, where the direction 1 is normal to the optic surface, and the directions 2 and 3 are two normal orthogonal directions parallel to the optical surface. This average is independent of the direction in the optical surface (the crystal plane) for Si(100), Si(110) and Si(111). Using the effective isotropic Poisson’s ratio for these orientations leads to an error in thermal deformation smaller than 5.5%.

  6. Modeling the influence of LASIK surgery on optical properties of the human eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szul-Pietrzak, Elżbieta; Hachoł, Andrzej; Cieślak, Krzysztof; Drożdż, Ryszard; Podbielska, Halina

    2011-11-01

    The aim was to model the influence of LASIK surgery on the optical parameters of the human eye and to ascertain which factors besides the central corneal radius of curvature and central thickness play the major role in postsurgical refractive change. Ten patients were included in the study. Pre- and postsurgical measurements included standard refraction, anterior corneal curvature and pachymetry. The optical model used in the analysis was based on the Le Grand and El Hage schematic eye, modified by the measured individual parameters of corneal geometry. A substantial difference between eye refractive error measured after LASIK and estimated from the eye model was observed. In three patients, full correction of the refractive error was achieved. However, analysis of the visual quality in terms of spot diagrams and optical transfer functions of the eye optical system revealed some differences in these measurements. This suggests that other factors besides corneal geometry may play a major role in postsurgical refraction. In this paper we investigated whether the biomechanical properties of the eyeball and changes in intraocular pressure could account for the observed discrepancies.

  7. Retrieval of optical properties of skin from measurement and modeling the diffuse reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douven, Lucien F. A.; Lucassen, Gerald W.

    2000-06-01

    We present results on the retrieval of skin optical properties obtained by fitting of measurements of the diffuse reflectance of human skin. Reflectance spectra are simulated using an analytical model based on the diffusion approximation. This model is implemented in a simplex fit routine. The skin optical model used consists of five layers representing epidermis, capillary blood plexus, dermis, deep blood plexus and hypodermis. The optical properties of each layer are assumed homogeneously distributed. The main optical absorbers included are melanin in epidermis and blood. The experimental setup consists of a HP photospectrometer equipped with a remote fiber head. Total reflectance spectra were measured in the 400 - 820 nm wavelength range on the volar underarm of 19 volunteers under various conditions influencing the blood content and oxygenation degree. Changes in the reflectance spectra were observed. Using the fit routine changes in blood content in the capillary blood plexus and in the deep blood plexus could be quantified. These showed different influences on the total reflectance. The method can be helpful to quantitatively assess changes in skin color appearance such as occurs in the treatment of port wine stains, blanching, skin irritation and tanning.

  8. Enabling full-field physics-based optical proximity correction via dynamic model generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Michael; Clifford, Chris; Raghunathan, Ananthan; Fenger, Germain; Adam, Kostas

    2017-07-01

    As extreme ultraviolet lithography becomes closer to reality for high volume production, its peculiar modeling challenges related to both inter and intrafield effects have necessitated building an optical proximity correction (OPC) infrastructure that operates with field position dependency. Previous state-of-the-art approaches to modeling field dependency used piecewise constant models where static input models are assigned to specific x/y-positions within the field. OPC and simulation could assign the proper static model based on simulation-level placement. However, in the realm of 7 and 5 nm feature sizes, small discontinuities in OPC from piecewise constant model changes can cause unacceptable levels of edge placement errors. The introduction of dynamic model generation (DMG) can be shown to effectively avoid these dislocations by providing unique mask and optical models per simulation region, allowing a near continuum of models through the field. DMG allows unique models for electromagnetic field, apodization, aberrations, etc. to vary through the entire field and provides a capability to precisely and accurately model systematic field signatures.

  9. Modifying Geometric-Optical Bidirectional Reflectance Model for Direct Inversion of Forest Canopy Leaf Area Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congrong Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Forest canopy leaf area index (LAI inversion based on remote sensing data is an important method to obtain LAI. Currently, the most widely-used model to achieve forest canopy structure parameters is the Li-Strahler geometric-optical bidirectional reflectance model, by considering the effect of crown shape and mutual shadowing, which is referred to as the GOMS model. However, it is difficult to retrieve LAI through the GOMS model directly because LAI is not a fundamental parameter of the model. In this study, a gap probability model was used to obtain the relationship between the canopy structure parameter nR2 and LAI. Thus, LAI was introduced into the GOMS model as an independent variable by replacing nR2 The modified GOMS (MGOMS model was validated by application to Dayekou in the Heihe River Basin of China. The LAI retrieved using the MGOMS model with optical multi-angle remote sensing data, high spatial resolution images and field-measured data was in good agreement with the field-measured LAI, with an R-square (R2 of 0.64, and an RMSE of 0.67. The results demonstrate that the MGOMS model obtained by replacing the canopy structure parameter nR2 of the GOMS model with LAI can be used to invert LAI directly and precisely.

  10. Modeling of Distributed Sensing of Elastic Waves by Fiber-Optic Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Just Agbodjan Prince

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the transduction of strain accompanying elastic waves in solids by firmly attached optical fibers. Stretching sections of optical fibers changes the time required by guided light to pass such sections. Exploiting interferometric techniques, highly sensitive fiber-optic strain transducers are feasible based on this fiber-intrinsic effect. The impact on the actual strain conversion of the fiber segment’s shape and size, as well as its inclination to the elastic wavefront is studied. FEM analyses show that severe distortions of the interferometric response occur when the attached fiber length spans a noticeable fraction of the elastic wavelength. Analytical models of strain transduction are presented for typical transducer shapes. They are used to compute input-output relationships for the transduction of narrow-band strain pulses as a function of the mechanical wavelength. The described approach applies to many transducers depending on the distributed interaction with the investigated object.

  11. Can disorder act as a chemical pressure? An optical study of the Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, H.; Laad, M. S.; Hassan, S. R.

    2018-05-01

    The optical properties have been studied using the dynamical mean-field theory on a disordered Hubbard model. Despite the fact that disorder turns a metal to an insulator in high dimensional correlated materials, we notice that it can enhance certain metallic behavior as if a chemical pressure is applied to the system resulting in an increase of the effective lattice bandwidth (BW). We study optical properties in such a scenario and compare results with experiments where the BW is changed through isovalent chemical substitution (keeping electron filling unaltered) and obtain remarkable similarities vindicating our claim. We also make the point that these similarities differ from some other forms of BW tuned optical effects.

  12. Linear-Optical Generation of Eigenstates of the Two-Site XY Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Barz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Much of the anticipation accompanying the development of a quantum computer relates to its application to simulating dynamics of another quantum system of interest. Here, we study the building blocks for simulating quantum spin systems with linear optics. We experimentally generate the eigenstates of the XY Hamiltonian under an external magnetic field. The implemented quantum circuit consists of two cnot gates, which are realized experimentally by harnessing entanglement from a photon source and applying a cphase gate. We tune the ratio of coupling constants and the magnetic field by changing local parameters. This implementation of the XY model using linear quantum optics might open the door to future studies of quenching dynamics using linear optics.

  13. Absorptive and dispersive optical profiles in fluctuating environments: A stochastic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paz, J.L.; Mendoza-Garcia, A.; Mastrodomenico, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we determined the absorptive and dispersive optical profiles of a molecular system coupled with a thermal bath. Solvent effects were explicitly considered by modelling the non-radiative interaction with the solute as a random variable. The optical stochastical Bloch equations (OSBE) were solved using a time-ordered cumulant expansion with white noise as a correlation function. We found a solution for the Fourier component of coherence at the third order of perturbation for the nonlinear Four-wave mixing signal and produced analytical expressions for the optical responses of the system. Finally, we examined the behaviour of these properties with respect to the noise parameter, frequency detuning of the dynamic perturbation, and relaxation times.

  14. Integrated Model of the Eye/Optic Nerve Head Biomechanical Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, A.; Myers, J. G.; Nelson, E.; Raykin, J.; Samuels, B.

    2017-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a concern for long-duration space flight. Previously, it has been suggested that ocular changes observed in VIIP syndrome are related to the cephalad fluid shift that results in altered fluid pressures [1]. We are investigating the impact of changes in intracranial pressure (ICP) using a combination of numerical models, which simulate the effects of various environment conditions, including finite element (FE) models of the posterior eye. The specific interest is to understand how altered pressures due to gravitational changes affect the biomechanical environment of tissues of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath. METHODS: Additional description of the numerical modeling is provided in the IWS abstract by Nelson et al. In brief, to simulate the effects of a cephalad fluid shift on the cardiovascular and ocular systems, we utilized a lumped-parameter compartment model of these systems. The outputs of this lumped-parameter model then inform boundary conditions (pressures) for a finite element model of the optic nerve head (Figure 1). As an example, we show here a simulation of postural change from supine to 15 degree head-down tilt (HDT), with primary outcomes being the predicted change in strains at the optic nerve head (ONH) region, specifically in the lamina cribrosa (LC), retrolaminar optic nerve, and prelaminar neural tissue (PLNT). The strain field can be decomposed into three orthogonal components, denoted as the first, second and third principal strains. We compare the peak tensile (first principal) and compressive (third principal) strains, since elevated strain alters cell phenotype and induces tissue remodeling. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Our lumped-parameter model predicted an IOP increase of c. 7 mmHg after 21 minutes of 15 degree HDT, which agreed with previous reports of IOP in HDT [1]. The corresponding FEM simulations predicted a relative increase in the magnitudes of the peak tensile

  15. Modelling optical fibers acquisition and transmission systems for their use in nuclear environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van-Uffelen, Marco

    2001-01-01

    In order to introduce connections based on optical fibres in the field of civil nuclear activities, it is important to have a good knowledge of their behaviour under irradiation. The objective of this research thesis is thus to develop a tool to predict the lifetime of such an optical connection which would allow a predictive maintenance. The adopted methodology relies on a modular approach and consists in the characterization of the behaviour of individual components under test conditions which are representative of addressed applications. Transfer functions are then chained to obtain the connection predictive model. Various components have been studied: mono- and multi-mode optical fibres, light-emitting diodes, vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diodes (VCSEL), as well as Si and InGaAs sensors. These components have been submitted to a range of dose rates and cumulated dose under temperatures reaching 85 C. Based on on-line measurements, a pragmatic approach has been assessed to predict the evolution of optical losses induced in optical fibres during several months. The difference between measurements and predictions ranges between 10 and 20 per cent depending on the fibre type and on the wavelength. VCSELs display a high tolerance to gamma radiation and a steady operation at high temperatures, whereas sensors appear to be the weakest link [fr

  16. Modeling and Performance Analysis of 10 Gbps Inter-satellite Optical Wireless Communication Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mehtab

    2017-12-01

    Free-space optical (FSO) communication has the advantages of two of the most predominant data transmission technologies - optical fiber communication and wireless communication. Most of the technical aspects of FSO are similar to that of optical fiber communication, with major difference in the information signal propagation medium which is free space in case of FSO rather than silica glass in optical fiber communication. One of the most important applications of FSO is inter-satellite optical wireless communication (IsOWC) links which will be deployed in the future in space. The IsOWC links have many advantages over the previously existing microwave satellite communication technologies such as higher bandwidth, lower power consumption, low cost of implementation, light size, and weight. In this paper, modeling and performance analysis of a 10-Gbps inter-satellite communication link with two satellites separated at a distance of 1,200 km has been done using OPTISYSTEM simulation software. Performance has been analyzed on the basis of quality factor, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and total power of the received signal.

  17. Spatial-temporal-covariance-based modeling, analysis, and simulation of aero-optics wavefront aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Curtis R; Tyler, Glenn A; Wittich, Donald J

    2014-07-01

    We introduce a framework for modeling, analysis, and simulation of aero-optics wavefront aberrations that is based on spatial-temporal covariance matrices extracted from wavefront sensor measurements. Within this framework, we present a quasi-homogeneous structure function to analyze nonhomogeneous, mildly anisotropic spatial random processes, and we use this structure function to show that phase aberrations arising in aero-optics are, for an important range of operating parameters, locally Kolmogorov. This strongly suggests that the d5/3 power law for adaptive optics (AO) deformable mirror fitting error, where d denotes actuator separation, holds for certain important aero-optics scenarios. This framework also allows us to compute bounds on AO servo lag error and predictive control error. In addition, it provides us with the means to accurately simulate AO systems for the mitigation of aero-effects, and it may provide insight into underlying physical processes associated with turbulent flow. The techniques introduced here are demonstrated using data obtained from the Airborne Aero-Optics Laboratory.

  18. Feasibility of spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) for optically characterizing a preclinical oncology model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Syeda; Zhao, Yanyu; Istfan, Raeef; Wu, Junjie; Waxman, David J; Roblyer, Darren

    2016-10-01

    Determination of chemotherapy efficacy early during treatment would provide more opportunities for physicians to alter and adapt treatment plans. Diffuse optical technologies may be ideally suited to track early biological events following chemotherapy administration due to low cost and high information content. We evaluated the use of spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) to characterize a small animal tumor model in order to move towards the goal of endogenous optical monitoring of cancer therapy in a controlled preclinical setting. The effects of key measurement parameters including the choice of imaging spatial frequency and the repeatability of measurements were evaluated. The precision of SFDI optical property extractions over repeat mouse measurements was determined to be within 3.52% for move and replace experiments. Baseline optical properties and chromophore values as well as intratumor heterogeneity were evaluated over 25 tumors. Additionally, tumor growth and chemotherapy response were monitored over a 45 day longitudinal study in a small number of mice to demonstrate the ability of SFDI to track treatment effects. Optical scattering and oxygen saturation increased as much as 70% and 25% respectively in treated tumors, suggesting SFDI may be useful for preclinical tracking of cancer therapies.

  19. Optical modeling of plasma-deposited ZnO films: Electron scattering at different length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoops, Harm C. M.; Loo, Bas W. H. van de; Smit, Sjoerd; Ponomarev, Mikhail V.; Weber, Jan-Willem; Sharma, Kashish; Kessels, Wilhelmus M. M.; Creatore, Mariadriana

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an optical modeling study on electron scattering mechanisms in plasma-deposited ZnO layers is presented. Because various applications of ZnO films pose a limit on the electron carrier density due to its effect on the film transmittance, higher electron mobility values are generally preferred instead. Hence, insights into the electron scattering contributions affecting the carrier mobility are required. In optical models, the Drude oscillator is adopted to represent the free-electron contribution and the obtained optical mobility can be then correlated with the macroscopic material properties. However, the influence of scattering phenomena on the optical mobility depends on the considered range of photon energy. For example, the grain-boundary scattering is generally not probed by means of optical measurements and the ionized-impurity scattering contribution decreases toward higher photon energies. To understand this frequency dependence and quantify contributions from different scattering phenomena to the mobility, several case studies were analyzed in this work by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry and Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The obtained electrical parameters were compared to the results inferred by Hall measurements. For intrinsic ZnO (i-ZnO), the in-grain mobility was obtained by fitting reflection data with a normal Drude model in the IR range. For Al-doped ZnO (Al:ZnO), besides a normal Drude fit in the IR range, an Extended Drude fit in the UV-vis range could be used to obtain the in-grain mobility. Scattering mechanisms for a thickness series of Al:ZnO films were discerned using the more intuitive parameter “scattering frequency” instead of the parameter “mobility”. The interaction distance concept was introduced to give a physical interpretation to the frequency dependence of the scattering frequency. This physical interpretation furthermore allows the prediction of which Drude models can be used in a specific

  20. Modeling a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope Focusing Column - Lessons Learned in Electron Optics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, Jody; Gregory, Don; Gaskin, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This presentation discusses work done to assess the design of a focusing column in a miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for use in-situ on the Moon-in particular for mineralogical analysis. The MSFC beam column design uses purely electrostatic fields for focusing, because of the severe constraints on mass and electrical power consumption imposed by the goals of lunar exploration and of spaceflight in general. The resolution of an SEM ultimately depends on the size of the focused spot of the scanning beam probe, for which the stated goal here is a diameter of 10 nanometers. Optical aberrations are the main challenge to this performance goal, because they blur the ideal geometrical optical image of the electron source, effectively widening the ideal spot size of the beam probe. In the present work the optical aberrations of the mini SEM focusing column were assessed using direct tracing of non-paraxial rays, as opposed to mathematical estimates of aberrations based on paraxial ray-traces. The geometrical ray-tracing employed here is completely analogous to ray-tracing as conventionally understood in the realm of photon optics, with the major difference being that in electron optics the lens is simply a smoothly varying electric field in vacuum, formed by precisely machined electrodes. Ray-tracing in this context, therefore, relies upon a model of the electrostatic field inside the focusing column to provide the mathematical description of the "lens" being traced. This work relied fundamentally on the boundary element method (BEM) for this electric field model. In carrying out this research the authors discovered that higher accuracy in the field model was essential if aberrations were to be reliably assessed using direct ray-tracing. This led to some work in testing alternative techniques for modeling the electrostatic field. Ultimately, the necessary accuracy was attained using a BEM

  1. Modeling of Semiconductor Optical Amplifier Gain Characteristics for Amplification and Switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahad, Farah Diana; Sahmah, Abu; Supa'at, M.; Idrus, Sevia Mahdaliza; Forsyth, David

    2011-05-01

    The Semiconductor Optical Amplifier (SOA) is presently commonly used as a booster or pre-amplifier in some communication networks. However, SOAs are also a strong candidate for utilization as multi-functional elements in future all-optical switching, regeneration and also wavelength conversion schemes. With this in mind, the purpose of this paper is to simulate the performance of the SOA for improved amplification and switching functions. The SOA is modeled and simulated using OptSim software. In order to verify the simulated results, a MATLAB mathematical model is also used to aid the design of the SOA. Using the model, the gain difference between simulated and mathematical results in the unsaturated region is <1dB. The mathematical analysis is in good agreement with the simulation result, with only a small offset due to inherent software limitations in matching the gain dynamics of the SOA.

  2. The dispersive optical model for n + [sup 208]Pb and n + [sup 209]Bi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, R.L. (Dept. of Physics, Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States) Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States)); Weisel, G.J. (Dept. of Physics, Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States) Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States)); Das, R.K. (Dept. of Physics, Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States) Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States)); Tornow, W. (Dept. of Physics, Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States) Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States)); Howell, C.R. (Dept. of Physics, Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States) Triangle Univ. Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States))

    1993-06-01

    The dispersive optical model (DOM) provides a natural connection between the shell model potential for bound states and the optical model for nucleon scattering at positive energies. At TUNL we have developed DOMs for neutron scattering for ten nuclei between [sup 27]Al and [sup 209]Bi. In these studies we rely on TUNL measurements of differential cross-section ([sigma]([theta])) and analyzing power, as well as a wealth of [sigma]([theta]) and total cross section measurements from numerous other laboratories. In this paper we briefly outline the DOM method and the achievements in describing scattering data for n + [sup 208]Pb and n + [sup 209]Bi and single-particle bound-state data for neutrons in [sup 208]Pb. (orig.)

  3. Novel formulation of the ℳ model through the Generalized-K distribution for atmospheric optical channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Balsells, José María; Jurado-Navas, Antonio; Paris, José Francisco; Castillo-Vazquez, Miguel; Puerta-Notario, Antonio

    2015-03-09

    In this paper, a novel and deeper physical interpretation on the recently published Málaga or ℳ statistical distribution is provided. This distribution, which is having a wide acceptance by the scientific community, models the optical irradiance scintillation induced by the atmospheric turbulence. Here, the analytical expressions previously published are modified in order to express them by a mixture of the known Generalized-K and discrete Binomial and Negative Binomial distributions. In particular, the probability density function (pdf) of the ℳ model is now obtained as a linear combination of these Generalized-K pdf, in which the coefficients depend directly on the parameters of the ℳ distribution. In this way, the Málaga model can be physically interpreted as a superposition of different optical sub-channels each of them described by the corresponding Generalized-K fading model and weighted by the ℳ dependent coefficients. The expressions here proposed are simpler than the equations of the original ℳ model and are validated by means of numerical simulations by generating ℳ -distributed random sequences and their associated histogram. This novel interpretation of the Málaga statistical distribution provides a valuable tool for analyzing the performance of atmospheric optical channels for every turbulence condition.

  4. Optics elements for modeling electrostatic lenses and accelerator components: III. Electrostatic deflectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.A.; Gillespie, G.H.

    2000-01-01

    Ion-beam optics models for simulating electrostatic prisms (deflectors) of different geometries have been developed for the envelope (matrix) computer code TRACE 3-D as a part of the development of a suite of electrostatic beamline element models which includes lenses, acceleration columns, quadrupoles and prisms. The models for electrostatic prisms are described in this paper. The electrostatic prism model options allow the first-order modeling of cylindrical, spherical and toroidal electrostatic deflectors. The application of these models in the development of ion-beam transport systems is illustrated through the modeling of a spherical electrostatic analyzer as a component of the new low-energy beamline at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Although initial tests following installation of the new beamline showed that the new spherical electrostatic analyzer was not behaving as predicted by these first-order models, operational conditions were found under which the analyzer now works properly as a double-focusing spherical electrostatic prism

  5. Dynamic PET and Optical Imaging and Compartment Modeling using a Dual-labeled Cyclic RGD Peptide Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Guo, Ning; Li, Quanzheng; Ma, Ying; Jacboson, Orit; Lee, Seulki; Choi, Hak Soo; Mansfield, James R; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if dynamic optical imaging could provide comparable kinetic parameters to that of dynamic PET imaging by a near-infrared dye/(64)Cu dual-labeled cyclic RGD peptide. The integrin α(v)β(3) binding RGD peptide was conjugated with a macrocyclic chelator 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) for copper labeling and PET imaging and a near-infrared dye ZW-1 for optical imaging. The in vitro biological activity of RGD-C(DOTA)-ZW-1 was characterized by cell staining and receptor binding assay. Sixty-min dynamic PET and optical imaging were acquired on a MDA-MB-435 tumor model. Singular value decomposition (SVD) method was applied to compute the dynamic optical signal from the two-dimensional optical projection images. Compartment models were used to quantitatively analyze and compare the dynamic optical and PET data. The dual-labeled probe (64)Cu-RGD-C(DOTA)-ZW-1 showed integrin specific binding in vitro and in vivo. The binding potential (Bp) derived from dynamic optical imaging (1.762 ± 0.020) is comparable to that from dynamic PET (1.752 ± 0.026). The signal un-mixing process using SVD improved the accuracy of kinetic modeling of 2D dynamic optical data. Our results demonstrate that 2D dynamic optical imaging with SVD analysis could achieve comparable quantitative results as dynamic PET imaging in preclinical xenograft models.

  6. Numerical model for the deformation of nucleated cells by optical stretchers

    KAUST Repository

    Sraj, Ihab

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we seek to numerically study the deformation of nucleated cells by single diode-laser bar optical stretchers. We employ a recently developed computational model, the dynamic ray-tracing method, to determine the force distribution induced by optical stretchers on a cell encapsulating a nucleus of different optical properties. These optical forces are shape dependent and can deform real non-rigid objects; thus resulting in dynamically changing distributions with cell and nucleus deformation. A Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell is a common biological cell that is of interest to the biomedical community because of its use in recombinant protein therapeutics and is an example of a nucleated cell. To this end, we model CHO cells as two concentric three-dimensional elastic capsules immersed in a fluid where the hydrodynamic forces are calculated using the immersed boundary method. We vary the inner capsule size to simulate different nucleus sizes. Our results show that the presence of a nucleus has a major effect on the force distribution on the cell surface and consequently on its net deformation. Scattering and gradient forces are reported for different nucleus sizes and the effect of nucleus size on the cell deformation is discussed quantitatively. © 2015 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  7. Theoretical modeling of the dynamics of a semiconductor laser subject to double-reflector optical feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakry, A. [King Abdulaziz University, 80203, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science (Saudi Arabia); Abdulrhmann, S. [Jazan University, 114, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences (Saudi Arabia); Ahmed, M., E-mail: mostafa.farghal@mu.edu.eg [King Abdulaziz University, 80203, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-15

    We theoretically model the dynamics of semiconductor lasers subject to the double-reflector feedback. The proposed model is a new modification of the time-delay rate equations of semiconductor lasers under the optical feedback to account for this type of the double-reflector feedback. We examine the influence of adding the second reflector to dynamical states induced by the single-reflector feedback: periodic oscillations, period doubling, and chaos. Regimes of both short and long external cavities are considered. The present analyses are done using the bifurcation diagram, temporal trajectory, phase portrait, and fast Fourier transform of the laser intensity. We show that adding the second reflector attracts the periodic and perioddoubling oscillations, and chaos induced by the first reflector to a route-to-continuous-wave operation. During this operation, the periodic-oscillation frequency increases with strengthening the optical feedback. We show that the chaos induced by the double-reflector feedback is more irregular than that induced by the single-reflector feedback. The power spectrum of this chaos state does not reflect information on the geometry of the optical system, which then has potential for use in chaotic (secure) optical data encryption.

  8. Optical measurements for the gaseous phase speciation of HIx mixtures: experiments and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis Doizi; Vincent Dauvois; Vincent Delanne; Jean Luc Roujou; Bruno Larousse; Olivier Hercher; Christophe Moulin; Pierre Fauvet; P Carles; Jean Michel Hartmann

    2006-01-01

    To design and optimize the efficiency of the reactive distillation column of HI we have proposed for the HI section of the I-S cycle, analytical optical 'online' techniques have been proposed to measure the partial and total pressures of the liquid vapour equilibrium of the ternary HI/I 2 /H 2 O mixtures: - FTIR spectrometry for the measurement of hydrogen iodide and water vapours, - Visible spectrometry for the measurement of iodine vapour. The use of these optical techniques has been validated in an experimental device around 130 C and 2 bars. This device is composed of a glass cell equipped with two optical path lengths and placed in a thermo-regulated oven to allow the optical measurements of the concentrations of the three species in the vapour phase. Using an experimental design analysis, the infrared spectra of hydrogen iodide and water have been measured in a selected wavelength range versus temperature and for different HI x compositions. The spectra are then analyzed in particular using a model especially developed for this objective. This model relies on the fitting of the experimental infrared data using a root mean square method and an appropriate spectroscopic database. The visible spectrum of iodine has also been measured. (authors)

  9. Dynamical model of coherent circularly polarized optical pulse interactions with two-level quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavcheva, G.; Hess, O.

    2005-01-01

    We propose and develop a method for theoretical description of circularly (elliptically) polarized optical pulse resonant coherent interactions with two-level atoms. The method is based on the time-evolution equations of a two-level quantum system in the presence of a time-dependent dipole perturbation for electric dipole transitions between states with total angular-momentum projection difference (ΔJ z =±1) excited by a circularly polarized electromagnetic field [Feynman et al., J. Appl. Phys. 28, 49 (1957)]. The adopted real-vector representation approach allows for coupling with the vectorial Maxwell's equations for the optical wave propagation and thus the resulting Maxwell pseudospin equations can be numerically solved in the time domain without any approximations. The model permits a more exact study of the ultrafast coherent pulse propagation effects taking into account the vector nature of the electromagnetic field and hence the polarization state of the optical excitation. We demonstrate self-induced transparency effects and formation of polarized solitons. The model represents a qualitative extension of the well-known optical Maxwell-Bloch equations valid for linearly polarized light and a tool for studying coherent quantum control mechanisms

  10. Effect of the internal optics on the outcome of custom-LASIK in an eye model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manns, Fabrice; Ho, Arthur; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2004-07-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if changes in the aberration-contribution of the internal optics of the eye have a significant effect on the outcome of wavefront-guided corneal reshaping. Methods. The Navarro-Escudero eye model was simulated using optical analysis software. The eye was rendered myopic by shifting the plane of the retina. Custom-LASIK was simulated by changing the radius of curvature and asphericity of the anterior corneal surface of the eye model. The radius of curvature was adjusted to provide a retinal conjugate at infinity. Three approaches were used to determine the postoperative corneal asphericity: minimizing third-order spherical aberration, minimizing third-order coma, and maximizing the Strehl ratio. The aberration contribution of the anterior corneal surface and internal optics was calculated before and after each simulated customized correction. Results. For a 5.2mm diameter pupil, the contribution of the anterior corneal surface to third-order spherical aberration and coma (in micrometers) was 2.22 and 2.49 preop, -0.36 and 2.83 postop when spherical aberration is minimized, 5.88 and 1.10 postop when coma is minimized, and -0.63 and 2.91 postop when Strehl ratio is maximized. The contribution of the internal optics of the eye to spherical aberration and coma for the same four conditions was: 0.43 and -1.13, 0.37 and -1.10, 0.37 and -1.10 and 0.37 and -1.10, respectively. Conclusion. In the model eye, the contribution of the internal optics of the eye to the change in the ocular aberration state is negligible.

  11. Electron optics

    CERN Document Server

    Grivet, Pierre; Bertein, F; Castaing, R; Gauzit, M; Septier, Albert L

    1972-01-01

    Electron Optics, Second English Edition, Part I: Optics is a 10-chapter book that begins by elucidating the fundamental features and basic techniques of electron optics, as well as the distribution of potential and field in electrostatic lenses. This book then explains the field distribution in magnetic lenses; the optical properties of electrostatic and magnetic lenses; and the similarities and differences between glass optics and electron optics. Subsequent chapters focus on lens defects; some electrostatic lenses and triode guns; and magnetic lens models. The strong focusing lenses and pris

  12. The scintillating optical fiber isotope experiment: Bevalac calibrations of test models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connell, J.J.; Binns, W.R.; Dowkontt, P.F.; Epstein, J.W.; Israel, M.H.; Klarmann, J.; Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO; Webber, W.R.; Kish, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    The Scintillating Optical Fiber Isotope Experiment (SOFIE) is a Cherenkov dE/dx-range experiment being developed to study the isotopic composition of cosmic rays in the iron region with sufficient resolution to resolve isotopes separated by one mass unit at iron. This instrument images stopping particles with a block of scintillating optical fibers coupled to an image intensified video camera. From the digitized video data the trajectory and range of particles stopping in the fiber bundle can be determined; this information, together with a Cherenkov measurement, is used to determine mass. To facilitate this determination, a new Cherenkov response equation was derived for heavy ions at energies near threshold in thick Cherenkov radiators. Test models of SOFIE were calibrated at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac heavy ion accelerator in 1985 and 1986 using beams of iron nuclei with energies of 465 to 515 MeV/nucleon. This paper presents the results of these calibrations and discusses the design of the SOFIE Bevalac test models in the context of the scientific objectives of the eventual balloon experiment. The test models show a mass resolution of σ A ≅0.30 amu and a range resolution of σ R ≅250 μm. These results are sufficient for a successful cosmic ray isotope experiment, thus demonstrating the feasibility of the detector system. The SOFIE test models represent the first successful application in the field of cosmic ray astrophysics of the emerging technology of scintillating optical fibers. (orig.)

  13. Development of global medium-energy nucleon-nucleus optical model potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madland, D.G.; Sierk, A.J.

    1997-01-01

    The authors report on the development of new global optical model potentials for nucleon-nucleus scattering at medium energies. Using both Schroedinger and Dirac scattering formalisms, the goal is to construct a physically realistic optical potential describing nucleon-nucleus elastic scattering observables for a projectile energy range of (perhaps) 20 meV to (perhaps) 2 GeV and a target mass range of 16 to 209, excluding regions of strong nuclear deformation. They use a phenomenological approach guided by conclusions from recent microscopic studies. The experimental database consists largely of proton-nucleus elastic differential cross sections, analyzing powers, spin-rotation functions, and total reaction cross sections, and neutron-nucleus total cross sections. They will use this database in a nonlinear least-squares adjustment of optical model parameters in both relativistic equivalent Schroedinger (including relativistic kinematics) and Dirac (second-order reduction) formalisms. Isospin will be introduced through the standard Lane model and a relativistic generalization of that model

  14. Optical model calculations of nucleon interactions with 93Nb, from 10 keV up to 50 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagrange, C.

    1979-01-01

    The neutron spherical optical potential is determined following the SPRT method by a fit to strength functions, scattering radius, total cross section and neutron elastic scattering data. Comparison to the potential obtained with existing proton scattering data, (p,p) (p,n), provides a basis for the determination of the complex symmetry term of the optical potential. Calculations using the J.L.M. optical model will be also presented and discussed. 18 references

  15. Simple statistical channel model for weak temperature-induced turbulence in underwater wireless optical communication systems

    KAUST Repository

    Oubei, Hassan M.

    2017-06-16

    In this Letter, we use laser beam intensity fluctuation measurements to model and describe the statistical properties of weak temperature-induced turbulence in underwater wireless optical communication (UWOC) channels. UWOC channels with temperature gradients are modeled by the generalized gamma distribution (GGD) with an excellent goodness of fit to the measured data under all channel conditions. Meanwhile, thermally uniform channels are perfectly described by the simple gamma distribution which is a special case of GGD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first model that comprehensively describes both thermally uniform and gradient-based UWOC channels.

  16. Modelling the transport of optical photons in scintillation detectors for diagnostic and radiotherapy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncali, Emilie; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Badano, Aldo

    2017-10-01

    Computational modelling of radiation transport can enhance the understanding of the relative importance of individual processes involved in imaging systems. Modelling is a powerful tool for improving detector designs in ways that are impractical or impossible to achieve through experimental measurements. Modelling of light transport in scintillation detectors used in radiology and radiotherapy imaging that rely on the detection of visible light plays an increasingly important role in detector design. Historically, researchers have invested heavily in modelling the transport of ionizing radiation while light transport is often ignored or coarsely modelled. Due to the complexity of existing light transport simulation tools and the breadth of custom codes developed by users, light transport studies are seldom fully exploited and have not reached their full potential. This topical review aims at providing an overview of the methods employed in freely available and other described optical Monte Carlo packages and analytical models and discussing their respective advantages and limitations. In particular, applications of optical transport modelling in nuclear medicine, diagnostic and radiotherapy imaging are described. A discussion on the evolution of these modelling tools into future developments and applications is presented. The authors declare equal leadership and contribution regarding this review.

  17. Influence of excitation light rejection on forward model mismatch in optical tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, K; Pan, T; Joshi, A; Rasmussen, J C; Bangerth, W; Sevick-Muraca, E M

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescence enhanced tomography for molecular imaging requires low background for detection and accurate image reconstruction. In this contribution, we show that excitation light leakage is responsible for elevated background and can be minimized with the use of gradient index (GRIN) lenses when using fibre optics to collect propagated fluorescence light from tissue or other biological media. We show that the model mismatch between frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM) measurements and the diffusion approximation prediction is decreased when GRIN lenses are placed prior to the interference filters to provide efficient excitation light rejection. Furthermore, model mismatch is correlated to the degree of excitation light leakage. This work demonstrates the importance of proper light filtering when designing fluorescence optical imaging and tomography

  18. A simple model for fibre optics: planar dielectric waveguides in rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Ocon, F; Pena, A; Jimenez, J R; Diaz, J A

    2006-01-01

    In planar dielectric waveguides, there is only one type of propagated ray: the one that crosses the waveguide axis after each total internal reflection. According to the model of geometrical optics, there are two types of guided ray in fibre optics: meridional and skew. Each one is formulated by a suitable mathematical treatment. In this work, we demonstrate that the complex mathematical treatment for the skew rays can be avoided by considering a planar waveguide (with the same refractive index profile as the fibre and thickness equal to its diameter) that rotates around the direction of the axis with angular velocity ω. A section of this fibre is inscribed in the hypothetical slab. This model has been successfully introduced to students of engineering and physics

  19. Numerical modeling of optical coherent transient processes with complex configurations - I. Angled beam geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Tiejun; Tian Mingzhen; Randall Babbitt, Wm.

    2004-01-01

    We present a theoretical model for optical coherent transient (OCT) processes based on Maxwell-Bloch equations for angled beam geometry. This geometry is critical in various OCT applications where the desired coherence outputs need to be spatially separated from the rest of the field. The model takes into account both the local interactions between inhomogeneously broadened two-level atoms and the laser fields, and the field propagation in optically thick media. Under the small-angle condition, the spatial dimensions transversing to the main propagation direction were treated with spatial Fourier transform to make the numerical computations for the practical settings confined within a reasonable time frame. The simulations for analog correlators and continuous processing based on stimulated photon echo have been performed using the simulator developed using the theory

  20. Evolving and energy dependent optical model description of heavy-ion elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaelian, K.

    1996-01-01

    We present the application of a genetic algorithm to the problem of determining an energy dependent optical model description of heavy-ion elastic scattering. The problem requires a search for the global best optical model potential and its energy dependence in a very rugged 12 dimensional parameter space of complex topographical features with many local minima. Random solutions are created in the first generation. The fitness of a solution is related to the χ 2 fit of the calculated differential cross sections with the experimental data. Best fit solutions are evolved through cross over and mutation following the biological example. This genetic algorithm approach combined with local gradient minimization is shown to provide a global, complete and extremely efficient search method, well adapted to complex fitness landscapes. These characteristics, combined with the facility of application, should make it the search method of choice for a wide variety of problems from nuclear physics. (Author)

  1. Optical fiber Bragg gratings. Part II. Modeling of finite-length gratings and grating arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaro, Vittorio M N; Diana, Roberto; Armenise, Mario N

    2002-09-01

    A model of both uniform finite-length optical fiber Bragg gratings and grating arrays is presented. The model is based on the Floquet-Bloch formalism and allows rigorous investigation of all the physical aspects in either single- or multiple-periodic structures realized on the core of a monomodal fiber. Analytical expressions of reflectivity and transmittivity for both single gratings and grating arrays are derived. The influence of the grating length and the index modulation amplitude on the reflected and transmitted optical power for both sinusoidal and rectangular profiles is evaluated. Good agreement between our method and the well-known coupled-mode theory (CMT) approach has been observed for both single gratings and grating arrays only in the case of weak index perturbation. Significant discrepancies exist there in cases of strong index contrast because of the increasing approximation of the CMT approach. The effects of intragrating phase shift are also shown and discussed.

  2. Channel modelling for free-space optical inter-HAP links using adaptive ARQ transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, S.; Giggenbach, D.; Kirstädter, A.

    2014-10-01

    Free-space optical (FSO) communication systems have seen significant developments in recent years due to growing need for very high data rates and tap-proof communication. The operation of an FSO link is suited to diverse variety of applications such as satellites, High Altitude Platforms (HAPs), Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), aircrafts, ground stations and other areas involving both civil and military situations. FSO communication systems face challenges due to different effects of the atmospheric channel. FSO channel primarily suffers from scintillation effects due to Index of Refraction Turbulence (IRT). In addition, acquisition and pointing becomes more difficult because of the high directivity of the transmitted beam: Miss-pointing of the transmitted beam and tracking errors at the receiver generate additional fading of the optical signal. High Altitude Platforms (HAPs) are quasi-stationary vehicles operating in the stratosphere. The slowly varying but precisely determined time-of-flight of the Inter-HAP channel adds to its characteristics. To propose a suitable ARQ scheme, proper theoretical understanding of the optical atmospheric propagation and modeling of a specific scenario FSO channel is required. In this paper, a bi-directional symmetrical Inter-HAP link has been selected and modeled. The Inter-HAP channel model is then investigated via simulations in terms of optical scintillation induced by IRT and in presence of pointing error. The performance characteristic of the model is then quantified in terms of fading statistics from which the Packet Error Probability (PEP) is calculated. Based on the PEP characteristics, we propose suitable ARQ schemes.

  3. Mathematic models for a ray tracing method and its applications in wireless optical communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minglun; Zhang, Yangan; Yuan, Xueguang; Zhang, Jinnan

    2010-08-16

    This paper presents a new ray tracing method, which contains a whole set of mathematic models, and its validity is verified by simulations. In addition, both theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the computational complexity of the method is much lower than that of previous ones. Therefore, the method can be used to rapidly calculate the impulse response of wireless optical channels for complicated systems.

  4. Integration of adaptive optics into highEnergy laser modeling and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    contain hundreds of actuators with high control bandwidths and low hysteresis, all of which are ideal parameters for accurate reconstruction of higher... Available : https://web.archive.org/web/20110111093235/http: //csis.org/blog/missile-defense-umbrella [10] C. Kopp, “ High energy laser directed energy...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS INTEGRATION OF ADAPTIVE OPTICS INTO HIGH ENERGY LASER MODELING AND SIMULATION by Donald Puent

  5. Isospin term of the real part of the Lane optical-model potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandenberger, J.D.; Schrils, R.

    1976-01-01

    Previous neutron differential cross section measurements for Ni, Fe, and Co at 9 MeV are reanalyzed to obtain the isospin term in the real part of the Lane optical model potential employing a surface-centered form factor. The strength determined is 1.4 +- 0.2 MeV. It is further shown that analysis of the data is little affected by the choice of a volume or surface form for the isospin term in the real potential

  6. Modelling and processing of data from a fibre-optic sensor of vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morawski, R Z; Makowski, P L; Michalik, L; Domanski, A W

    2010-01-01

    A new technique of vibration sensing, based on a polarimetric fibre-optic strain sensor, is presented; it is designed for localisation of multiple sources of disturbances in a broad spectrum without using fibre gratings. A mathematical model of the sensor is used for development of a variational method for estimation of amplitudes of component vibrations on the basis of noisy samples of the voltage at the output of the sensor.

  7. Theoretical Models of Optical Transients. I. A Broad Exploration of the Duration-Luminosity Phase Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, V. Ashley; Berger, Edo; Metzger, Brian D.; Guillochon, James

    2017-11-01

    The duration-luminosity phase space (DLPS) of optical transients is used, mostly heuristically, to compare various classes of transient events, to explore the origin of new transients, and to influence optical survey observing strategies. For example, several observational searches have been guided by intriguing voids and gaps in this phase space. However, we should ask, do we expect to find transients in these voids given our understanding of the various heating sources operating in astrophysical transients? In this work, we explore a broad range of theoretical models and empirical relations to generate optical light curves and to populate the DLPS. We explore transients powered by adiabatic expansion, radioactive decay, magnetar spin-down, and circumstellar interaction. For each heating source, we provide a concise summary of the basic physical processes, a physically motivated choice of model parameter ranges, an overall summary of the resulting light curves and their occupied range in the DLPS, and how the various model input parameters affect the light curves. We specifically explore the key voids discussed in the literature: the intermediate-luminosity gap between classical novae and supernovae, and short-duration transients (≲ 10 days). We find that few physical models lead to transients that occupy these voids. Moreover, we find that only relativistic expansion can produce fast and luminous transients, while for all other heating sources events with durations ≲ 10 days are dim ({M}{{R}}≳ -15 mag). Finally, we explore the detection potential of optical surveys (e.g., Large Synoptic Survey Telescope) in the DLPS and quantify the notion that short-duration and dim transients are exponentially more difficult to discover in untargeted surveys.

  8. Optical response in Weyl semimetal in model with gapped Dirac phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S. P.; Carbotte, J. P.

    2017-10-01

    We study the optical properties of Weyl semimetal (WSM) in a model which features, in addition to the usual term describing isolated Dirac cones proportional to the Fermi velocity v F, a gap term m and a Zeeman spin-splitting term b with broken time reversal symmetry. Transport is treated within Kubo formalism and particular attention is payed to the modifications that result from a finite m and b. We consider how these modifications change when a finite residual scattering rate \

  9. A review on channel models in free space optical communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbarasi, K.; Hemanth, C.; Sangeetha, R. G.

    2017-12-01

    Free Space Optical communication (FSO) is a wireless communication technology which uses light to transmit the data in free space. FSO has advantages like unlicensed spectrum and higher bandwidth. In this paper FSO system merits and demerits, challenges in FSO, and various channel models are discussed. To mitigate the turbulence in FSO the mitigation techniques like relaying, diversity schemes and adopting different modulation techniques used in different channels are discussed and its performance comparison is given.

  10. A spinal cord window chamber model for in vivo longitudinal multimodal optical and acoustic imaging in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Figley

    Full Text Available In vivo and direct imaging of the murine spinal cord and its vasculature using multimodal (optical and acoustic imaging techniques could significantly advance preclinical studies of the spinal cord. Such intrinsically high resolution and complementary imaging technologies could provide a powerful means of quantitatively monitoring changes in anatomy, structure, physiology and function of the living cord over time after traumatic injury, onset of disease, or therapeutic intervention. However, longitudinal in vivo imaging of the intact spinal cord in rodent models has been challenging, requiring repeated surgeries to expose the cord for imaging or sacrifice of animals at various time points for ex vivo tissue analysis. To address these limitations, we have developed an implantable spinal cord window chamber (SCWC device and procedures in mice for repeated multimodal intravital microscopic imaging of the cord and its vasculature in situ. We present methodology for using our SCWC to achieve spatially co-registered optical-acoustic imaging performed serially for up to four weeks, without damaging the cord or induction of locomotor deficits in implanted animals. To demonstrate the feasibility, we used the SCWC model to study the response of the normal spinal cord vasculature to ionizing radiation over time using white light and fluorescence microscopy combined with optical coherence tomography (OCT in vivo. In vivo power Doppler ultrasound and photoacoustics were used to directly visualize the cord and vascular structures and to measure hemoglobin oxygen saturation through the complete spinal cord, respectively. The model was also used for intravital imaging of spinal micrometastases resulting from primary brain tumor using fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging. Our SCWC model overcomes previous in vivo imaging challenges, and our data provide evidence of the broader utility of hybridized optical-acoustic imaging methods for obtaining

  11. Microscopic optical model potential based on Brueckner-Hartree-Fock theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lulu; Zhao Enguang; Zhou Shangui; Li Zenghua; Zuo Wei; Bonaccorso, Angela; Lonbardo, Umberto

    2010-01-01

    The optical model is one of the most important models in the study of nuclear reactions. In the optical model, the elastic channel is considered to be dominant and the contributions of all other absorption channels are described by introducing an imaginary potential, Koning and Delaroche obtained empirically the so-called KDR optical potentials based on a best-fitting of massive experimental data on nucleon-nucleus scattering reactions. The volume part is found to be dominant in the real component of the OMP at low energies. Using the Bruckner-Hartree-Fock theory with Bonn B potential plus self consistent three body force, the nucleon-nucleus optical potential is studied in this thesis. In the Bruckner theory, the on-shell self energy, is corresponding to the depth of the volume part of the optical model potential (OMP) for nucleon-nucleus scattering. Using Bruckner-Hartree-Fock theory, the nucleon on-shell self energy is calculated based on Hughenoltz-Van Hove (HVH) theorem. The microscopic optical potentials thus obtained agree well with the volume part of the KDR potentials. Furthermore, the isospin splitting in the volume part of the OMP is also reproduced satisfactorily. The isospin effect in the volume part of the OMP is directly related to the isospin splitting of the effective mass of the nucleon. According to our results, the isospin splitting of neutron to proton effective mass is such that the neutron effective mass increases with isospin, whereas the proton effective mass decreases. The isovector potential U n (E) - U p (E) vanishes at energy E ≈ 200 MeV and then changes sign indicating a possible inversion in the effective mass isospin spitting. We also calculated from the Bruckner theory the imaginary part of the OMP, and the microscopic calculations predict that the isospin splitting exists also in the imaginary OMP whereas the empirical KDR potentials do not show this feature. The shape of the real component of the nucleon-nucleus OMP is

  12. Simulink models for performance analysis of high speed DQPSK modulated optical link

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharan, Lucky; Rupanshi,; Chaubey, V. K.

    2016-01-01

    This paper attempts to present the design approach for development of simulation models to study and analyze the transmission of 10 Gbps DQPSK signal over a single channel Peer to Peer link using Matlab Simulink. The simulation model considers the different optical components used in link design with their behavior represented initially by theoretical interpretation, including the transmitter topology, Mach Zehnder Modulator(MZM) module and, the propagation model for optical fibers etc. thus allowing scope for direct realization in experimental configurations. It provides the flexibility to incorporate the various photonic components as either user-defined or fixed and, can also be enhanced or removed from the model as per the design requirements. We describe the detailed operation and need of every component model and its representation in Simulink blocksets. Moreover the developed model can be extended in future to support Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) system, thereby allowing high speed transmission with N × 40 Gbps systems. The various compensation techniques and their influence on system performance can be easily investigated by using such models.

  13. Simulink models for performance analysis of high speed DQPSK modulated optical link

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharan, Lucky, E-mail: luckysharan@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in; Rupanshi,, E-mail: f2011222@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in; Chaubey, V. K., E-mail: vkc@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in [EEE Department, BITS-Pilani, Rajasthan, 333031 (India)

    2016-03-09

    This paper attempts to present the design approach for development of simulation models to study and analyze the transmission of 10 Gbps DQPSK signal over a single channel Peer to Peer link using Matlab Simulink. The simulation model considers the different optical components used in link design with their behavior represented initially by theoretical interpretation, including the transmitter topology, Mach Zehnder Modulator(MZM) module and, the propagation model for optical fibers etc. thus allowing scope for direct realization in experimental configurations. It provides the flexibility to incorporate the various photonic components as either user-defined or fixed and, can also be enhanced or removed from the model as per the design requirements. We describe the detailed operation and need of every component model and its representation in Simulink blocksets. Moreover the developed model can be extended in future to support Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) system, thereby allowing high speed transmission with N × 40 Gbps systems. The various compensation techniques and their influence on system performance can be easily investigated by using such models.

  14. Simultaneous thermal and optical imaging of two-phase flow in a micro-model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadimitriou, N K; Nuske, P; Kleingeld, P J; Hassanizadeh, S M; Helmig, R

    2014-07-21

    In the study of non-equilibrium heat transfer in multiphase flow in porous media, parameters and constitutive relations, like heat transfer coefficients between phases, are unknown. In order to study the temperature development of a relatively hot invading immiscible non-wetting fluid and, ultimately, approximate heat transfer coefficients, a transparent micro-model is used as an artificial porous medium. In the last few decades, micro-models have become popular experimental tools for two-phase flow studies. In this work, the design of an innovative, elongated, PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) micro-model with dimensions of 14.4 × 39 mm(2) and a constant depth of 100 microns is described. A novel setup for simultaneous thermal and optical imaging of flow through the micro-model is presented. This is the first time that a closed flow cell like a micro-model is used in simultaneous thermal and optical flow imaging. The micro-model is visualized by a novel setup that allowed us to monitor and record the distribution of fluids throughout the length of the micro-model continuously and also record the thermal signature of the fluids. Dynamic drainage and imbibition experiments were conducted in order to obtain information about the heat exchange between the phases. In this paper the setup as well as analysis and qualitative results are presented.

  15. Establishing an experimental model of photodynamic induced anterior ischemic optic neuropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Runsheng Wang; Xiaodi Wang; Peilin Lü; Jianwei Bai; Jianzhou Wang; Xiaoqin Lei; Xiaoliang Zhou; Hongfen Sun; Aizhu Pan

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Scholars have supposed to establish animal models of optic neuropathy by pressing and partially amputating optic nerve, increasing intraocular pressure and injecting vasoconstrictor, etc., but the models are greatly different from anterior ischemia optic neuropathy. Therefore, a more ideal method is needed to establish animal model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION).OBJECTIVE: To establish AION models in rats, observe the functional changes of fundus, fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA), optical coherence tomography (OCT), flash visual evoked potential (F-VEP), and histopathologically confirm its reliability.DESIGN: A randomized control trial.SETTINGS: Department of Ophthalmology, Xi'an Fourth Hospital; Xi'an Institute of Ocular Fundus Diseases.MATERIALS: The experiments were carried out in the research room of Xi'an Institute of Ocular Fundus Diseases from February 2005 to May 2006. Thirty healthy male SD rats of 4-5 weeks old, weighing 140-160 g,were provided by the animal experimental center of the Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA [SCXK (Military)2002-005], and those without eye disease examined by slit lamp and direct ophthalmoscope after mydriasis were enrolled. The conditions for feeding mice without special pathogen were strictly followed.The rats were randomly divided into blank control group (n =5), laser group (n =5), hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) group and AION group (n =15), each group was numbered randomly. For each rat, the right eye was taken as the experimental eye, and the left one as the control one.METHODS: In the AION group, the rats were injected with HPD (10 mg/kg) via caudal vein, and then the optic discs were exposed to krypton red (647 nm, 80 mV) for 120 s, and the rats were in avoidance of light for 2 weeks postoperatively. Rats in the laser group were only exposed to krypton red (647 nm, 80 mV) for 120 s, and in avoidance of light for 2 weeks postoperatively; Those in the HPD group were only

  16. Extracting Optical Fiber Background from Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Spectra Based on Bi-Objective Optimization Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie; Shi, Tielin; Tang, Zirong; Zhu, Wei; Liao, Guanglan; Li, Xiaoping; Gong, Bo; Zhou, Tengyuan

    2017-08-01

    We propose a bi-objective optimization model for extracting optical fiber background from the measured surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectrum of the target sample in the application of fiber optic SERS. The model is built using curve fitting to resolve the SERS spectrum into several individual bands, and simultaneously matching some resolved bands with the measured background spectrum. The Pearson correlation coefficient is selected as the similarity index and its maximum value is pursued during the spectral matching process. An algorithm is proposed, programmed, and demonstrated successfully in extracting optical fiber background or fluorescence background from the measured SERS spectra of rhodamine 6G (R6G) and crystal violet (CV). The proposed model not only can be applied to remove optical fiber background or fluorescence background for SERS spectra, but also can be transferred to conventional Raman spectra recorded using fiber optic instrumentation.

  17. Mass number dependence of total neutron cross section; a discussion based on the semi-classical optical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeli, Istvan

    1990-01-01

    The dependence of total neutron cross section on mass number can be calculated by the black nucleus formula, according to the optical model. The fine structure of mass number dependence is studied, and a correction factor formula is given on the basis of a semi-classical optical model. Yielding results in good agreement with experimental data. In addition to the mass number dependence, the neutron-energy dependence can also be calculated using this model. (K.A.)

  18. A New Simple Model for Underwater Wireless Optical Channels in the Presence of Air Bubbles

    KAUST Repository

    Zedini, Emna

    2018-01-15

    A novel statistical model is proposed to characterize turbulence-induced fading in underwater wireless optical channels in the presence of air bubbles for fresh and salty waters, based on experimental data. In this model, the channel irradiance fluctuations are characterized by the mixture Exponential-Gamma distribution. We use the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm to obtain the maximum likelihood parameter estimation of the new model. Interestingly, the proposed model is shown to provide a perfect fit with the measured data under all the channel conditions for both types of water. The major advantage of the new model is that it has a simple mathematical form making it attractive from a performance analysis point of view. Indeed, the application of the Exponential-Gamma model leads to closed-form and analytically tractable expressions for key system performance metrics such as the outage probability and the average bit-error rate.

  19. A New Simple Model for Underwater Wireless Optical Channels in the Presence of Air Bubbles

    KAUST Repository

    Zedini, Emna; Oubei, Hassan M.; Kammoun, Abla; Hamdi, Mounir; Ooi, Boon S.; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2018-01-01

    A novel statistical model is proposed to characterize turbulence-induced fading in underwater wireless optical channels in the presence of air bubbles for fresh and salty waters, based on experimental data. In this model, the channel irradiance fluctuations are characterized by the mixture Exponential-Gamma distribution. We use the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm to obtain the maximum likelihood parameter estimation of the new model. Interestingly, the proposed model is shown to provide a perfect fit with the measured data under all the channel conditions for both types of water. The major advantage of the new model is that it has a simple mathematical form making it attractive from a performance analysis point of view. Indeed, the application of the Exponential-Gamma model leads to closed-form and analytically tractable expressions for key system performance metrics such as the outage probability and the average bit-error rate.

  20. Modeling of N2 and O optical emissions for ionosphere HF powerful heating experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergienko, T.; Gustavsson, B.

    Analyses of experiments of F region ionosphere modification by HF powerful radio waves show that optical observations are very useful tools for diagnosing of the interaction of the probing radio wave with the ionospheric plasma Hitherto the emissions usually measured in the heating experiment have been the 630 0 nm and the 557 7 nm lines of atomic oxygen Other emissions for instance O 844 8 nm and N2 427 8 nm have been measured episodically in only a few experiments although the very rich optical spectrum of molecular nitrogen potentially involves important information about ionospheric plasma in the heated region This study addresses the modeling of optical emissions from the O and the N2 triplet states first positive second positive Vegard-Kaplan infrared afterglow and Wu-Benesch band systems excited under a condition of the ionosphere heating experiment The auroral triplet state population distribution model was modified for the ionosphere heating conditions by using the different electron distribution functions suggested by Mishin et al 2000 2003 and Gustavsson at al 2004 2005 Modeling results are discussed from the point of view of efficiency of measurements of the N2 emissions in future experiments

  1. Multilayer four-flux model for the optical degradation of thermal control coatings in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonon, C.; Rozé, C.; Girasole, T.; Duvignacq, Carole

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to generalize the four-flux radiative transfer model to the case of a multilayer medium. An application is presented with the study of the optical degradation of a white paint in simulated space environment. This paint is constituted of a mixing a zinc oxide and a silicone resin. A sample was irradiated with 45 keV protons and reflectance measurements were achieved in situ after each step of irradiation in order to see the evolution of the thermo-optical properties of the coating. These tests were completed after irradiation by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in order to characterize the structure of the material and to detect possible structural changes due to the irradiation. This experimental investigation allowed us to define hypothesis to be introduced in the model. In particular, we assume that the optical degradation centered on 410 nm is due to a variation a-/+ of the imaginary part of the refractive index of zinc oxide in the damaged layer. The generalized four-flux model was validated by comparing numerical calculation with experiment.

  2. SIMO optical wireless links with nonzero boresight pointing errors over M modeled turbulence channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varotsos, G. K.; Nistazakis, H. E.; Petkovic, M. I.; Djordjevic, G. T.; Tombras, G. S.

    2017-11-01

    Over the last years terrestrial free-space optical (FSO) communication systems have demonstrated an increasing scientific and commercial interest in response to the growing demands for ultra high bandwidth, cost-effective and secure wireless data transmissions. However, due the signal propagation through the atmosphere, the performance of such links depends strongly on the atmospheric conditions such as weather phenomena and turbulence effect. Additionally, their operation is affected significantly by the pointing errors effect which is caused by the misalignment of the optical beam between the transmitter and the receiver. In order to address this significant performance degradation, several statistical models have been proposed, while particular attention has been also given to diversity methods. Here, the turbulence-induced fading of the received optical signal irradiance is studied through the M (alaga) distribution, which is an accurate model suitable for weak to strong turbulence conditions and unifies most of the well-known, previously emerged models. Thus, taking into account the atmospheric turbulence conditions along with the pointing errors effect with nonzero boresight and the modulation technique that is used, we derive mathematical expressions for the estimation of the average bit error rate performance for SIMO FSO links. Finally, proper numerical results are given to verify our derived expressions and Monte Carlo simulations are also provided to further validate the accuracy of the analysis proposed and the obtained mathematical expressions.

  3. Nucleon-nucleon optical model for energies to 3 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funk, A.; Von Geramb, H.V.; University of Melbourne, VIC; Amos, K.A.

    2001-01-01

    Several nucleon-nucleon potentials, Paris, Nijmegen, Argonne, and those derived by quantum inversion, which describe the NN interaction for T Lab ≤ 300 MeV are extended in their range of application as NN optical models. Extensions are made in r-space using complex separable potentials definable with a wide range of form factor options including those of boundary condition models. We use the latest phase shift analyses SP00 (FA00, WI00) of Arndt et al. from 300 MeV to 3 GeV to determine these extensions. The imaginary parts of the optical model interactions account for loss of flux into direct or resonant production processes. The optical potential approach is of particular value as it permits one to visualize fusion, and subsequent fission, of nucleons when T Lab > 2 GeV. We do so by calculating the scattering wave functions to specify the energy and radial dependences of flux losses and of probability distributions. Furthermore, half-off the energy shell t-matrices are presented as they are readily deduced with this approach. Such t-matrices are required for studies of few- and many-body nuclear reactions

  4. Isobar contributions to the imaginary part of the optical-model potential for finite nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjort-Jensen, M.; Borromeo, M.; Muether, H.; Polls, A.

    1992-03-01

    A recently developed non-relativistic method for calculating the nucleon optical-model potential has been employed to evaluate the contributions from isobaric degrees of freedom to the imaginary part of the nucleon optical-model potential. To evaluate the imaginary part of the optical-model potential, the authors include the contributions from terms to second order in the Brueckner G-matrix with and without the inclusion of isobars Δ. Results for 16 O are presented in this work. The contributions to the imaginary part are given by the two-particle-one-hole (2p1h) and three-particle-two-hole (3p2h) diagrams. The latter contributes at negative energies only and the contribution from isobar intermediate states is rather small. The 2p1h receives significant contributions from isobars at energies near the resonance and above the threshold for the excitation of ΔΔ states. In particular, the importance of ΔΔ configurations is rather sensitive to the treatment of short-range correlations. The parameterization of the self-energy in terms of local potentials is discussed. The depletion of the occupation of the single-particle orbits due to nucleon-nucleon correlations and Δ excitations is evaluated. 49 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Particle optics and accelerator modeling software for industrial and laboratory beamline design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, G.H.; Hill, B.W.

    1998-01-01

    The expanding variety of accelerator applications in research and industry places increased demands upon scientists and engineers involved in developing new accelerator and beamline designs. Computer codes for particle optics simulation have always played an important role in the design process and enhanced software tools offer the promise of improved productivity for beamline designers. This paper summarizes recent work on the development of advanced graphic user interface (GUI) software components, that can be linked directly to many of the standard particle optics programs used in the accelerator community, and which are aimed at turning that promise of improved productivity into a reality. An object oriented programming (OOP) approach has been adopted and a number of GUI components have been developed that run on several different operating systems. The emphasis is on assisting users in the setup and running of the optics programs without requiring any knowledge of the format, syntax, or similar requirements of the input. The components are being linked with several popular optics programs, including TRANSPORT, TURTLE, TRACE 3-D and PARMILA, to form integrated easy-to-use applications. Several advanced applications linking the GUI components with Lie algebra and other high-order simulation codes, as well as system level and facility modeling codes, are also under development. An overview of the work completed to date is presented, and examples of the new tools running on the Windows 95 operating system are illustrated. (orig.)

  6. Online to offline teaching model in optics education: resource sharing course and flipped class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaotong; Cen, Zhaofeng; Liu, Xiangdong; Zheng, Zhenrong

    2016-09-01

    Since the platform "Coursera" is created by the professors of Stanford University Andrew Ng and Daphne Koller, more and more universities have joined in it. From the very beginning, online education is not only about education itself, but also connected with social equality. This is especially significant for the economic transformation in China. In this paper the research and practice on informatization of optical education are described. Online to offline (O2O) education activities, such as online learning and offline meeting, online homework and online to offline discussion, online tests and online to offline evaluation, are combined into our teaching model in the course of Applied Optics. These various O2O strategies were implemented respectively in the autumn-winter small class and the spring-summer middle class according to the constructivism and the idea of open education. We have developed optical education resources such as videos of lectures, light transmission or ray trace animations, online tests, etc. We also divide the learning procedure into 4 steps: First, instead of being given a course offline, students will learn the course online; Second, once a week or two weeks, students will have a discussion in their study groups; Third, students will submit their homework and study reports; Fourth, they will do online and offline tests. The online optical education resources have been shared in some universities in China, together with new challenges to teachers and students when facing the revolution in the e-learning future.

  7. Programs OPTMAN and SHEMMAN Version 6 (1999) - Coupled-Channels optical model and collective nuclear structure calculation -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jong Hwa; Lee, Jeong Yeon; Lee, Young Ouk; Sukhovitski, Efrem Sh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-01-01

    Programs SHEMMAN and OPTMAN (Version 6) have been developed for determinations of nuclear Hamiltonian parameters and for optical model calculations, respectively. The optical model calculations by OPTMAN with coupling schemes built on wave functions functions of non-axial soft-rotator are self-consistent, since the parameters of the nuclear Hamiltonian are determined by adjusting the energies of collective levels to experimental values with SHEMMAN prior to the optical model calculation. The programs have been installed at Nuclear Data Evaluation Laboratory of KAERI. This report is intended as a brief manual of these codes. 43 refs., 9 figs., 1 tabs. (Author)

  8. Temperature-dependent relativistic microscopic optical potential and the mean free path of a nucleon based on Walecka's model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Yinlu; Shen Qingbiao; Zhuo Yizhong

    1994-01-01

    The relativistic microscopic optical potential, the Schroedinger equivalent potential, and mean free paths of a nucleon at finite temperature in nuclear matter and finite nuclei are studied based on Walecka's model and thermo-field dynamics. We let only the Hartree-Fock self-energy of a nucleon represent the real part of the microscopic optical potential and the fourth order of meson exchange diagrams, i.e. the polarization diagrams represent the imaginary part of the microscopic optical potential in nuclear matter. The microscopic optical potential of finite nuclei is obtained by means of the local density approximation. (orig.)

  9. Capturing optically important constituents and properties in a marine biogeochemical and ecosystem model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, S.; Hickman, A. E.; Jahn, O.; Gregg, W. W.; Mouw, C. B.; Follows, M. J.

    2015-07-01

    We present a numerical model of the ocean that couples a three-stream radiative transfer component with a marine biogeochemical-ecosystem component in a dynamic three-dimensional physical framework. The radiative transfer component resolves the penetration of spectral irradiance as it is absorbed and scattered within the water column. We explicitly include the effect of several optically important water constituents (different phytoplankton functional types; detrital particles; and coloured dissolved organic matter, CDOM). The model is evaluated against in situ-observed and satellite-derived products. In particular we compare to concurrently measured biogeochemical, ecosystem, and optical data along a meridional transect of the Atlantic Ocean. The simulation captures the patterns and magnitudes of these data, and estimates surface upwelling irradiance analogous to that observed by ocean colour satellite instruments. We find that incorporating the different optically important constituents explicitly and including spectral irradiance was crucial to capture the variability in the depth of the subsurface chlorophyll a (Chl a) maximum. We conduct a series of sensitivity experiments to demonstrate, globally, the relative importance of each of the water constituents, as well as the crucial feedbacks between the light field, the relative fitness of phytoplankton types, and the biogeochemistry of the ocean. CDOM has proportionally more importance at attenuating light at short wavelengths and in more productive waters, phytoplankton absorption is relatively more important at the subsurface Chl a maximum, and water molecules have the greatest contribution when concentrations of other constituents are low, such as in the oligotrophic gyres. Scattering had less effect on attenuation, but since it is important for the amount and type of upwelling irradiance, it is crucial for setting sea surface reflectance. Strikingly, sensitivity experiments in which absorption by any of the

  10. Model-based software engineering for an optical navigation system for spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, T.; Lüdtke, D.; Maibaum, O.; Gerndt, A.

    2018-06-01

    The project Autonomous Terrain-based Optical Navigation (ATON) at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) is developing an optical navigation system for future landing missions on celestial bodies such as the moon or asteroids. Image data obtained by optical sensors can be used for autonomous determination of the spacecraft's position and attitude. Camera-in-the-loop experiments in the Testbed for Robotic Optical Navigation (TRON) laboratory and flight campaigns with unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) are performed to gather flight data for further development and to test the system in a closed-loop scenario. The software modules are executed in the C++ Tasking Framework that provides the means to concurrently run the modules in separated tasks, send messages between tasks, and schedule task execution based on events. Since the project is developed in collaboration with several institutes in different domains at DLR, clearly defined and well-documented interfaces are necessary. Preventing misconceptions caused by differences between various development philosophies and standards turned out to be challenging. After the first development cycles with manual Interface Control Documents (ICD) and manual implementation of the complex interactions between modules, we switched to a model-based approach. The ATON model covers a graphical description of the modules, their parameters and communication patterns. Type and consistency checks on this formal level help to reduce errors in the system. The model enables the generation of interfaces and unified data types as well as their documentation. Furthermore, the C++ code for the exchange of data between the modules and the scheduling of the software tasks is created automatically. With this approach, changing the data flow in the system or adding additional components (e.g., a second camera) have become trivial.

  11. Model-based software engineering for an optical navigation system for spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, T.; Lüdtke, D.; Maibaum, O.; Gerndt, A.

    2017-09-01

    The project Autonomous Terrain-based Optical Navigation (ATON) at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) is developing an optical navigation system for future landing missions on celestial bodies such as the moon or asteroids. Image data obtained by optical sensors can be used for autonomous determination of the spacecraft's position and attitude. Camera-in-the-loop experiments in the Testbed for Robotic Optical Navigation (TRON) laboratory and flight campaigns with unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) are performed to gather flight data for further development and to test the system in a closed-loop scenario. The software modules are executed in the C++ Tasking Framework that provides the means to concurrently run the modules in separated tasks, send messages between tasks, and schedule task execution based on events. Since the project is developed in collaboration with several institutes in different domains at DLR, clearly defined and well-documented interfaces are necessary. Preventing misconceptions caused by differences between various development philosophies and standards turned out to be challenging. After the first development cycles with manual Interface Control Documents (ICD) and manual implementation of the complex interactions between modules, we switched to a model-based approach. The ATON model covers a graphical description of the modules, their parameters and communication patterns. Type and consistency checks on this formal level help to reduce errors in the system. The model enables the generation of interfaces and unified data types as well as their documentation. Furthermore, the C++ code for the exchange of data between the modules and the scheduling of the software tasks is created automatically. With this approach, changing the data flow in the system or adding additional components (e.g., a second camera) have become trivial.

  12. Málaga statistical distribution: the new universal analytical propagation model for atmospheric optical communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurado-Navas, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    in homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. Málaga distribution was demonstrated to have the advantage of unifying most of the proposed statistical models derived until now in the scientific literature in a closed-form and mathematically-tractable expression. Furthermore, it unifies most of the proposed statistical...... models for the irradiance fluctuations derived in the bibliography providing, in addition, an excellent agreement with published plane wave and spherical wave simulation data over a wide range of turbulence conditions (weak to strong). In this communication, reviews of its different features...... scintillation in atmospheric optical communication links under any turbulence conditions...

  13. Stress strain modelling and analysis of a piezo-coated optical fibre sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Raweshidy, H.; Ali, H.; Obayya, S. S. A.; Langley, R.; Batchelor, J.

    2005-02-01

    A finite element model, using commercially available software, is presented to simulate the piezoelectrically induced stresses and strains in an optical fibre to be used as antenna. These stresses and strains are generated by a layer of piezoelectric polymer deposited on the cladding of a short fibre sample. The theoretical basis for the work is briefly explained and the modelling process is emphasised. Two types of fibre are investigated - circular fibre and D-fibre, and the results compared, analysed and discussed. It is shown that in the D-fibre, the stress and displacement increased by 1.46 and 115 times, respectively, in comparison with the circular fibre.

  14. Optical modeling of waveguide coupled TES detectors towards the SAFARI instrument for SPICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappe, N.; Bracken, C.; Doherty, S.; Gao, J. R.; Glowacka, D.; Goldie, D.; Griffin, D.; Hijmering, R.; Jackson, B.; Khosropanah, P.; Mauskopf, P.; Morozov, D.; Murphy, A.; O'Sullivan, C.; Ridder, M.; Withington, S.

    2012-09-01

    The next generation of space missions targeting far-infrared wavelengths will require large-format arrays of extremely sensitive detectors. The development of Transition Edge Sensor (TES) array technology is being developed for future Far-Infrared (FIR) space applications such as the SAFARI instrument for SPICA where low-noise and high sensitivity is required to achieve ambitious science goals. In this paper we describe a modal analysis of multi-moded horn antennas feeding integrating cavities housing TES detectors with superconducting film absorbers. In high sensitivity TES detector technology the ability to control the electromagnetic and thermo-mechanical environment of the detector is critical. Simulating and understanding optical behaviour of such detectors at far IR wavelengths is difficult and requires development of existing analysis tools. The proposed modal approach offers a computationally efficient technique to describe the partial coherent response of the full pixel in terms of optical efficiency and power leakage between pixels. Initial wok carried out as part of an ESA technical research project on optical analysis is described and a prototype SAFARI pixel design is analyzed where the optical coupling between the incoming field and the pixel containing horn, cavity with an air gap, and thin absorber layer are all included in the model to allow a comprehensive optical characterization. The modal approach described is based on the mode matching technique where the horn and cavity are described in the traditional way while a technique to include the absorber was developed. Radiation leakage between pixels is also included making this a powerful analysis tool.

  15. Calculating the bidirectional reflectance of natural vegetation covers using Boolean models and geometric optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahler, Alan H.; Li, Xiao-Wen; Jupp, David L. B.

    1991-01-01

    The bidirectional radiance or reflectance of a forest or woodland can be modeled using principles of geometric optics and Boolean models for random sets in a three dimensional space. This model may be defined at two levels, the scene includes four components; sunlight and shadowed canopy, and sunlit and shadowed background. The reflectance of the scene is modeled as the sum of the reflectances of the individual components as weighted by their areal proportions in the field of view. At the leaf level, the canopy envelope is an assemblage of leaves, and thus the reflectance is a function of the areal proportions of sunlit and shadowed leaf, and sunlit and shadowed background. Because the proportions of scene components are dependent upon the directions of irradiance and exitance, the model accounts for the hotspot that is well known in leaf and tree canopies.

  16. Continuous monitoring of arthritis in animal models using optical imaging modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Taeyoon; Yoon, Hyung-Ju; Lee, Saseong; Jang, Won Seuk; Jung, Byungjo; Kim, Wan-Uk

    2014-10-01

    Given the several difficulties associated with histology, including difficulty in continuous monitoring, this study aimed to investigate the feasibility of optical imaging modalities-cross-polarization color (CPC) imaging, erythema index (EI) imaging, and laser speckle contrast (LSC) imaging-for continuous evaluation and monitoring of arthritis in animal models. C57BL/6 mice, used for the evaluation of arthritis, were divided into three groups: arthritic mice group (AMG), positive control mice group (PCMG), and negative control mice group (NCMG). Complete Freund's adjuvant, mineral oil, and saline were injected into the footpad for AMG, PCMG, and NCMG, respectively. LSC and CPC images were acquired from 0 through 144 h after injection for all groups. EI images were calculated from CPC images. Variations in feet area, EI, and speckle index for each mice group over time were calculated for quantitative evaluation of arthritis. Histological examinations were performed, and the results were found to be consistent with those from optical imaging analysis. Thus, optical imaging modalities may be successfully applied for continuous evaluation and monitoring of arthritis in animal models.

  17. Modelling and simulation of a thermally induced optical transparency in a dual micro-ring resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydiate, Joseph

    2017-07-01

    This paper introduces the simulation and modelling of a novel dual micro-ring resonator. The geometric configuration of the resonators, and the implementation of a simulated broadband excitation source, results in the realization of optical transparencies in the combined through port output spectrum. The 130 nm silicon on insulator rib fabrication process is adopted for the simulation of the dual-ring configuration. Two titanium nitride heaters are positioned over the coupling regions of the resonators, which can be operated independently, to control the spectral position of the optical transparency. A third heater, centrally located above the dual resonator rings, can be used to red shift the entire spectrum to a required reference resonant wavelength. The free spectral range with no heater currents applied is 4.29 nm. For a simulated heater current of 7 mA (55.7 mW heater power) applied to one of the through coupling heaters, the optical transparency exhibits a red shift of 1.79 nm from the reference resonant wavelength. The ring-to-ring separation of approximately 900 nm means that it can be assumed that there is a zero ring-to-ring coupling field in this model. This novel arrangement has potential applications as a gas mass airflow sensor or a gas species identification sensor.

  18. The effective Schroedinger equation of the optical model of composite nuclei elastic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondragon, A.; Hernandez, E.

    1980-01-01

    An effective hamiltonian for elastic collisions between composite nuclei is obtained from the Schroedinger equation of the complete many-body system and its fully antisymmetric wave functions by means of a projection operator technique. This effective hamiltonian, defined in such a way that it has to reproduce the scattering amplitude in full detail, including exchange effects, is explicitly Galilean invariant. The effective interaction operator is a function of the relative distance between the centers of mass of the colliding nuclei and the constants of the motion of the whole system. The interaction operator of the optical model is obtained next, requiring as usual, that it reproduces the average over the energy of the scattering amplitude and keeping the Galilean invariance. The resulting optical potential operator has some terms identical to those obtained in the Resonating Group Method, and others coming from the elimination of all non elastic channels and the delayed elastic scattering. This result makes the relation existing among the projection operator method to the Feshbach and the cluster model equations of motion for positive energies (RGM) explicit. The additional interaction terms due to the flux loss in the elastic channel are non-local, and non-hermitean operators expressed in terms of the transition amplitudes and the density of states of the compound nucleus in such a way that an approximate evaluation, in a systematic fashion, seems possible. Theangular momentum dependence of the optical potential operator is discussed in some detail. (author)

  19. Reference dataset of volcanic ash physicochemical and optical properties for atmospheric measurement retrievals and transport modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Andreas; Durant, Adam; Sytchkova, Anna; Diplas, Spyros; Bonadonna, Costanza; Scarnato, Barbara; Krüger, Kirstin; Kylling, Arve; Kristiansen, Nina; Stohl, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions emit up to 50 wt.% (total erupted mass) of fine ash particles (estimates of the volcanic source term and the nature of the constituent volcanic ash properties. Consequently, it is important to include a quantitative assessment of measurement uncertainties of ash properties to provide realistic ash forecast uncertainty. Currently, information on volcanic ash physicochemical and optical properties is derived from a small number of somewhat dated publications. In this study, we provide a reference dataset for physical (size distribution and shape), chemical (bulk vs. surface chemistry) and optical properties (complex refractive index in the UV-vis-NIR range) of a representative selection of volcanic ash samples from 10 different volcanic eruptions covering the full variability in silica content (40-75 wt.% SiO2). Through the combination of empirical analytical methods (e.g., image analysis, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and UV/Vis/NIR/FTIR Spectroscopy) and theoretical models (e.g., Bruggeman effective medium approach), it was possible to fully capture the natural variability of ash physicochemical and optical characteristics. The dataset will be applied in atmospheric measurement retrievals and atmospheric transport modelling to determine the sensitivity to uncertainty in ash particle characteristics.

  20. Multiconjugate adaptive optics applied to an anatomically accurate human eye model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedggood, P A; Ashman, R; Smith, G; Metha, A B

    2006-09-04

    Aberrations of both astronomical telescopes and the human eye can be successfully corrected with conventional adaptive optics. This produces diffraction-limited imagery over a limited field of view called the isoplanatic patch. A new technique, known as multiconjugate adaptive optics, has been developed recently in astronomy to increase the size of this patch. The key is to model atmospheric turbulence as several flat, discrete layers. A human eye, however, has several curved, aspheric surfaces and a gradient index lens, complicating the task of correcting aberrations over a wide field of view. Here we utilize a computer model to determine the degree to which this technology may be applied to generate high resolution, wide-field retinal images, and discuss the considerations necessary for optimal use with the eye. The Liou and Brennan schematic eye simulates the aspheric surfaces and gradient index lens of real human eyes. We show that the size of the isoplanatic patch of the human eye is significantly increased through multiconjugate adaptive optics.

  1. Multiconjugate adaptive optics applied to an anatomically accurate human eye model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedggood, P. A.; Ashman, R.; Smith, G.; Metha, A. B.

    2006-09-01

    Aberrations of both astronomical telescopes and the human eye can be successfully corrected with conventional adaptive optics. This produces diffraction-limited imagery over a limited field of view called the isoplanatic patch. A new technique, known as multiconjugate adaptive optics, has been developed recently in astronomy to increase the size of this patch. The key is to model atmospheric turbulence as several flat, discrete layers. A human eye, however, has several curved, aspheric surfaces and a gradient index lens, complicating the task of correcting aberrations over a wide field of view. Here we utilize a computer model to determine the degree to which this technology may be applied to generate high resolution, wide-field retinal images, and discuss the considerations necessary for optimal use with the eye. The Liou and Brennan schematic eye simulates the aspheric surfaces and gradient index lens of real human eyes. We show that the size of the isoplanatic patch of the human eye is significantly increased through multiconjugate adaptive optics.

  2. Atmospheric effects of nuclar war aerosols in general circulation model simulations: Influence of smoke optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, S.L.; Ramaswamy, V.; Covey, C.

    1987-01-01

    A global atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) is modified to include radiative transfer parameterizations for the absorption and scattering of solar radiation and the absorption of thermal infrared (IR) radiation by smoke aerosols. The solar scattering modifications include a parameterization for diagnosing smoke optical properties as a function of the time- and space-dependent smoke particle radii. The aerosol IR modifications allow for both the ''grey'' absorber approximation and a broadband approximation that resolves the aerosol absorption in four spectral intervals. We examine the sensitivity of some GCM-simulated atmospheric and climatic effects to the optical properties and radiative transfer parameterizations used in studies of massive injections of smoke. Specifically, we test the model response to solar scattering versus nonscattering smoke, variations in prescribed smoke single scattering albedo and IR specific absorption, and interactive versus fixed smoke optical properties. Hypothetical nuclear war created smoke scenarios assume the July injection of 60 or 180 Tg of smoke over portions of the mid-latitude land areas of the northern hemisphere. Atmospheric transport and scavenging of the smoke are included. Nonscattering smoke cases produce roughly 40 Wm/sup -2/ more Earth-atmosphere solar irradiance absorption over the northern hemisphere, when compared to scattering smoke cases having equivalent specific absorption efficiencies. Varying the elemental carbon content of smoke over a plausible range produces a 4 0 --6 0 C change in average mid-latitude land surface temperature, and a variation of about 0.1 in zonally averaged planetary albedo in the northern hemisphere

  3. Multilayer Markov Random Field models for change detection in optical remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, Csaba; Shadaydeh, Maha; Kato, Zoltan; Szirányi, Tamás; Zerubia, Josiane

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we give a comparative study on three Multilayer Markov Random Field (MRF) based solutions proposed for change detection in optical remote sensing images, called Multicue MRF, Conditional Mixed Markov model, and Fusion MRF. Our purposes are twofold. On one hand, we highlight the significance of the focused model family and we set them against various state-of-the-art approaches through a thematic analysis and quantitative tests. We discuss the advantages and drawbacks of class comparison vs. direct approaches, usage of training data, various targeted application fields and different ways of Ground Truth generation, meantime informing the Reader in which roles the Multilayer MRFs can be efficiently applied. On the other hand we also emphasize the differences between the three focused models at various levels, considering the model structures, feature extraction, layer interpretation, change concept definition, parameter tuning and performance. We provide qualitative and quantitative comparison results using principally a publicly available change detection database which contains aerial image pairs and Ground Truth change masks. We conclude that the discussed models are competitive against alternative state-of-the-art solutions, if one uses them as pre-processing filters in multitemporal optical image analysis. In addition, they cover together a large range of applications, considering the different usage options of the three approaches.

  4. Optical model calculation for the unresolved/resolved resonance region of Fe-56

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Toshihiko [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Froehner, F.H.

    1997-03-01

    We have studied optical model fits to total neutron cross sections of structural materials using the accurate data base for {sup 56}Fe existing in the resolved and unresolved resonance region. Averages over resolved resonances were calculated with Lorentzian weighting in Reich-Moore (reduced R matrix) approximation. Starting from the best available optical potentials we found that adjustment of the real and imaginary well depths does not work satisfactorily with the conventional weak linear energy dependence of the well depths. If, however, the linear dependences are modified towards low energies, the average total cross sections can be fitted quite well, from the resolved resonance region up to 20 MeV and higher. (author)

  5. Theoretical limit of spatial resolution in diffuse optical tomography using a perturbation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konovalov, A B; Vlasov, V V

    2014-01-01

    We have assessed the limit of spatial resolution of timedomain diffuse optical tomography (DOT) based on a perturbation reconstruction model. From the viewpoint of the structure reconstruction accuracy, three different approaches to solving the inverse DOT problem are compared. The first approach involves reconstruction of diffuse tomograms from straight lines, the second – from average curvilinear trajectories of photons and the third – from total banana-shaped distributions of photon trajectories. In order to obtain estimates of resolution, we have derived analytical expressions for the point spread function and modulation transfer function, as well as have performed a numerical experiment on reconstruction of rectangular scattering objects with circular absorbing inhomogeneities. It is shown that in passing from reconstruction from straight lines to reconstruction using distributions of photon trajectories we can improve resolution by almost an order of magnitude and exceed the accuracy of reconstruction of multi-step algorithms used in DOT. (optical tomography)

  6. Measurement and modelization of silica opal reflection properties: Optical determination of the silica index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avoine, Amaury; Hong, Phan Ngoc; Frederich, Hugo; Frigerio, Jean-Marc; Coolen, Laurent; Schwob, Catherine; Nga, Pham Thu; Gallas, Bruno; Maître, Agnès

    2012-10-01

    Self-assembled artificial opals (in particular silica opals) constitute a model system to study the optical properties of three-dimensional photonic crystals. The silica optical index is a key parameter to correctly describe an opal but is difficult to measure at the submicrometer scale and usually treated as a free parameter. Here, we propose a method to extract the silica index from the opal reflection spectra and we validate it by comparison with two independent methods based on infrared measurements. We show that this index gives a correct description of the opal reflection spectra, either by a band structure or by a Bragg approximation. In particular, we are able to provide explanations in quantitative agreement with the measurements for two features : the observation of a second reflection peak in specular direction, and the quasicollapse of the p-polarized main reflection peak at a typical angle of 54∘.

  7. Use of an UROV to develop 3-D optical models of submarine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Null, W. D.; Landry, B. J.

    2017-12-01

    The ability to rapidly obtain high-fidelity bathymetry is crucial for a broad range of engineering, scientific, and defense applications ranging from bridge scour, bedform morphodynamics, and coral reef health to unexploded ordnance detection and monitoring. The present work introduces the use of an Underwater Remotely Operated Vehicle (UROV) to develop 3-D optical models of submarine environments. The UROV used a Raspberry Pi camera mounted to a small servo which allowed for pitch control. Prior to video data collection, in situ camera calibration was conducted with the system. Multiple image frames were extracted from the underwater video for 3D reconstruction using Structure from Motion (SFM). This system provides a simple and cost effective solution to obtaining detailed bathymetry in optically clear submarine environments.

  8. Models of few optical cycle solitons beyond the slowly varying envelope approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblond, H.; Mihalache, D.

    2013-01-01

    In the past years there was a huge interest in experimental and theoretical studies in the area of few-optical-cycle pulses and in the broader fast growing field of the so-called extreme nonlinear optics. This review concentrates on theoretical studies performed in the past decade concerning the description of few optical cycle solitons beyond the slowly varying envelope approximation (SVEA). Here we systematically use the powerful reductive expansion method (alias multiscale analysis) in order to derive simple integrable and nonintegrable evolution models describing both nonlinear wave propagation and interaction of ultrashort (femtosecond) pulses. To this aim we perform the multiple scale analysis on the Maxwell–Bloch equations and the corresponding Schrödinger–von Neumann equation for the density matrix of two-level atoms. We analyze in detail both long-wave and short-wave propagation models. The propagation of ultrashort few-optical-cycle solitons in quadratic and cubic nonlinear media are adequately described by generic integrable and nonintegrable nonlinear evolution equations such as the Korteweg–de Vries equation, the modified Korteweg–de Vries equation, the complex modified Korteweg–de Vries equation, the sine–Gordon equation, the cubic generalized Kadomtsev–Petviashvili equation, and the two-dimensional sine–Gordon equation. Moreover, we consider the propagation of few-cycle optical solitons in both (1+1)- and (2+1)-dimensional physical settings. A generalized modified Korteweg–de Vries equation is introduced in order to describe robust few-optical-cycle dissipative solitons. We investigate in detail the existence and robustness of both linearly polarized and circularly polarized few-cycle solitons, that is, we also take into account the effect of the vectorial nature of the electric field. Some of these results concerning the systematic use of the reductive expansion method beyond the SVEA can be relatively easily extended to few

  9. Optical modeling and electrical properties of cadmium oxide nanofilms: Developing a meta–heuristic calculation process model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdolahzadeh Ziabari, Ali, E-mail: ali.abd.ziabari@gmail.com [Nano Research Lab, Lahijan Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 1616, Lahijan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Refahi Sheikhani, A. H. [Department of Applied Mathematics, Lahijan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Lahijan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nezafat, Reza Vatani [Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Technology, University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haghighidoust, Kasra Monsef [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Technology, University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-04-07

    Cadmium oxide thin films were deposited onto glass substrates by sol–gel dip-coating method and annealed in air. The normal incidence transmittance of the films was measured by a spectrophotometer. D.C electrical parameters such as carrier concentration and mobility were analyzed by Hall Effect measurements. A combination of Forouhi–Bloomer and standard Drude model was used to simulate the optical constants and thicknesses of the films from transmittance data. The transmittance spectra of the films in the visible domain of wavelengths were successfully fitted by using the result of a hybrid particle swarm optimization method and genetic algorithm. The simulated transmittance is in good accordance with the measured spectrum in the whole measurement wavelength range. The electrical parameters obtained from the optical simulation are well consistent with those measured electrically by Hall Effect measurements.

  10. Offline estimation of decay time for an optical cavity with a low pass filter cavity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallapur, Abhijit G; Boyson, Toby K; Petersen, Ian R; Harb, Charles C

    2012-08-01

    This Letter presents offline estimation results for the decay-time constant for an experimental Fabry-Perot optical cavity for cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). The cavity dynamics are modeled in terms of a low pass filter (LPF) with unity DC gain. This model is used by an extended Kalman filter (EKF) along with the recorded light intensity at the output of the cavity in order to estimate the decay-time constant. The estimation results using the LPF cavity model are compared to those obtained using the quadrature model for the cavity presented in previous work by Kallapur et al. The estimation process derived using the LPF model comprises two states as opposed to three states in the quadrature model. When considering the EKF, this means propagating two states and a (2×2) covariance matrix using the LPF model, as opposed to propagating three states and a (3×3) covariance matrix using the quadrature model. This gives the former model a computational advantage over the latter and leads to faster execution times for the corresponding EKF. It is shown in this Letter that the LPF model for the cavity with two filter states is computationally more efficient, converges faster, and is hence a more suitable method than the three-state quadrature model presented in previous work for real-time estimation of the decay-time constant for the cavity.

  11. A systematics of optical model compound nucleus formation cross sections for neutrons, proton, deuteron, 3He and alpha particle incidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Toru

    2000-01-01

    Simple formulae to reproduce the optical model compound nucleus formation cross sections for neutron, proton, deuteron, triton, 3 He and alpha particles are presented for target nuclei of light to medium weight mass region. (author)

  12. The relationship between wave and geometrical optics models of coded aperture type x-ray phase contrast imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Peter R T; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Speller, Robert D; Olivo, Alessandro

    2010-03-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging is a very promising technique which may lead to significant advancements in medical imaging. One of the impediments to the clinical implementation of the technique is the general requirement to have an x-ray source of high coherence. The radiation physics group at UCL is currently developing an x-ray phase contrast imaging technique which works with laboratory x-ray sources. Validation of the system requires extensive modelling of relatively large samples of tissue. To aid this, we have undertaken a study of when geometrical optics may be employed to model the system in order to avoid the need to perform a computationally expensive wave optics calculation. In this paper, we derive the relationship between the geometrical and wave optics model for our system imaging an infinite cylinder. From this model we are able to draw conclusions regarding the general applicability of the geometrical optics approximation.

  13. Optical model analysis of quasielastic (p, n) reactions at 22.8 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, J.D.; Zafiratos, C.D.; Lind, D.A.

    1975-01-01

    Quasielastic (p, n) differential cross sections have been measured for 29 nuclei ranging from 9 Be to 208 Pb at an energy of 22.8 MeV in approximately 7.5 0 steps from 10 0 to 152 0 . The results have been analysed with a distorted-wave Born approximation in terms of the generalized optical model due to Lane. Starting with a complex isospin interaction form factor, U 1 , deduced from the Becchetti-Greenlees global set of proton optical parameters, the shape of the surface-peaked, imaginary part of U 1 was varied until good fits to the data were obtained. The shape of the real part of U 1 and the ratio of the real to imaginary well depths were kept fixed at the Becchetti-Greenlees values. The resulting best-fit form factors had overall strengths 20-30% less than the Becchetti-Greenlees value. Further, the resulting imaginary part of U 1 was found to peak at a decreasing radius relative to the real part of U 1 with an increasing width as A increased. A smoothed parametrization of the best-fit U 1 is given for all nuclei with A > 40. The individual best-fit U 1 is used to generate self-consistent neutron optical potentials from the Becchetti-Greenlees proton optical potentials as prescribed by the Lane model. Neutron elastic scattering angular distributions and reaction cross sections predicted by these self-consistent potentials are in good agreement with observed neutron scattering data. (Auth.)

  14. Post processing of optically recognized text via second order hidden Markov model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Srijana

    In this thesis, we describe a postprocessing system on Optical Character Recognition(OCR) generated text. Second Order Hidden Markov Model (HMM) approach is used to detect and correct the OCR related errors. The reason for choosing the 2nd order HMM is to keep track of the bigrams so that the model can represent the system more accurately. Based on experiments with training data of 159,733 characters and testing of 5,688 characters, the model was able to correct 43.38 % of the errors with a precision of 75.34 %. However, the precision value indicates that the model introduced some new errors, decreasing the correction percentage to 26.4%.

  15. A photoionization model for the optical line emission from cooling flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Megan; Voit, G. M.

    1991-01-01

    The detailed predictions of a photoionization model previously outlined in Voit and Donahue (1990) to explain the optical line emission associated with cooling flows in X-ray emitting clusters of galaxies are presented. In this model, EUV/soft X-ray radiation from condensing gas photoionizes clouds that have already cooled. The energetics and specific consequences of such a model, as compared to other models put forth in the literature is discussed. Also discussed are the consequences of magnetic fields and cloud-cloud shielding. The results illustrate how varying the individual column densities of the ionized clouds can reproduce the range of line ratios observed and strongly suggest that the emission-line nebulae are self-irradiated condensing regions at the centers of cooling flows.

  16. Heat Transfer Modeling and Validation for Optically Thick Alumina Fibrous Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran

    2009-01-01

    Combined radiation/conduction heat transfer through unbonded alumina fibrous insulation was modeled using the diffusion approximation for modeling the radiation component of heat transfer in the optically thick insulation. The validity of the heat transfer model was investigated by comparison to previously reported experimental effective thermal conductivity data over the insulation density range of 24 to 96 kg/cu m, with a pressure range of 0.001 to 750 torr (0.1 to 101.3 x 10(exp 3) Pa), and test sample hot side temperature range of 530 to 1360 K. The model was further validated by comparison to thermal conductivity measurements using the transient step heating technique on an insulation sample at a density of 144 kg/cu m over a pressure range of 0.001 to 760 torr, and temperature range of 290 to 1090 K.

  17. Modeling of edge effect in subaperture tool influence functions of computer controlled optical surfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Songlin; Zhang, Xiangchao; He, Xiaoying; Xu, Min

    2016-12-20

    Computer controlled optical surfacing requires an accurate tool influence function (TIF) for reliable path planning and deterministic fabrication. Near the edge of the workpieces, the TIF has a nonlinear removal behavior, which will cause a severe edge-roll phenomenon. In the present paper, a new edge pressure model is developed based on the finite element analysis results. The model is represented as the product of a basic pressure function and a correcting function. The basic pressure distribution is calculated according to the surface shape of the polishing pad, and the correcting function is used to compensate the errors caused by the edge effect. Practical experimental results demonstrate that the new model can accurately predict the edge TIFs with different overhang ratios. The relative error of the new edge model can be reduced to 15%.

  18. Photonic Beamformer Model Based on Analog Fiber-Optic Links’ Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, V A; Gordeev, D A; Ivanov, S I; Lavrov, A P; Saenko, I I

    2016-01-01

    The model of photonic beamformer for wideband microwave phased array antenna is investigated. The main features of the photonic beamformer model based on true-time-delay technique, DWDM technology and fiber chromatic dispersion are briefly analyzed. The performance characteristics of the key components of photonic beamformer for phased array antenna in the receive mode are examined. The beamformer model composed of the components available on the market of fiber-optic analog communication links is designed and tentatively investigated. Experimental demonstration of the designed model beamforming features includes actual measurement of 5-element microwave linear array antenna far-field patterns in 6-16 GHz frequency range for antenna pattern steering up to 40°. The results of experimental testing show good accordance with the calculation estimates. (paper)

  19. Modeling an Optical and Infrared Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Survey with Exoplanet Direct Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vides, Christina; Macintosh, Bruce; Ruffio, Jean-Baptiste; Nielsen, Eric; Povich, Matthew Samuel

    2018-01-01

    Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is a direct high contrast imaging instrument coupled to the Gemini South Telescope. Its purpose is to image extrasolar planets around young (~Intelligence), we modeled GPI’s capabilities to detect an extraterrestrial continuous wave (CW) laser broadcasted within the H-band have been modeled. By using sensitivity evaluated for actual GPI observations of young target stars, we produced models of the CW laser power as a function of distance from the star that could be detected if GPI were to observe nearby (~ 3-5 pc) planet-hosting G-type stars. We took a variety of transmitters into consideration in producing these modeled values. GPI is known to be sensitive to both pulsed and CW coherent electromagnetic radiation. The results were compared to similar studies and it was found that these values are competitive to other optical and infrared observations.

  20. Aspects of scintillation modelling in LEO-ground free-space optical communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Florian

    2017-10-01

    Free-space optical communications can be used to transmit data from low Earth orbit satellites to ground with very high data rate. In the last section of the downlink, the electro-magnetic wave propagates through the turbulent atmosphere which is characterized by random index of refraction fluctuations. The propagating wave experiences phase distortions that lead to intensity scintillation in the aperture plane of the receiving telescope. For quantification, an appropriate scintillation model is needed. Approaches to analytically model the scintillation exist. Parameterization of the underlying turbulence profile (Cn2 profile) is however difficult. The Cn2 profiles are often site-specific and thus inappropriate or generic and thus too complex for a feasible deployment. An approach that directly models the scintillation effect based on measurements without claiming to be generic is therefore more feasible. Since measurements are sparse, a combination with existing theoretical framework is feasible to develop a new scintillation model that focuses on low earth orbit to ground free-space optical communications link design with direct detection. The paper addresses several questions one has to answer while analyzing the measurements data and selection of the theoretical models for the LEO downlink scenario. The first is the question of a suitable yet ease to use simple Cn2 profile. The HAP model is analyzed for its feasibility in this scenario since it includes a more realistic boundary layer profile decay than the HV model. It is found that the HAP model needs to be modified for a feasible deployment in the LEO downlink scenario for night time. The validity of the plane wave assumption in the downlink is discussed by model calculations of the scintillation index for a plane and Gaussian beam wave. Inaccuracies when using the plane earth model instead of the spherical earth model are investigated by analyzing the Rytov index. Impact of beam wander and non

  1. Phototransduction early steps model based on Beer-Lambert optical law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salido, Ezequiel M; Servalli, Leonardo N; Gomez, Juan Carlos; Verrastro, Claudio

    2017-02-01

    The amount of available rhodopsin on the photoreceptor outer segment and its change over time is not considered in classic models of phototransduction. Thus, those models do not take into account the absorptance variation of the outer segment under different brightness conditions. The relationship between the light absorbed by a medium and its absorptance is well described by the Beer-Lambert law. This newly proposed model implements the absorptance variation phenomenon in a set of equations that admit photons per second as input and results in active rhodopsins per second as output. This study compares the classic model of phototransduction developed by Forti et al. (1989) to this new model by using different light stimuli to measure active rhodopsin and photocurrent. The results show a linear relationship between light stimulus and active rhodopsin in the Forti model and an exponential saturation in the new model. Further, photocurrent values have shown that the new model behaves equivalently to the experimental and theoretical data as published by Forti in dark-adapted rods, but fits significantly better under light-adapted conditions. The new model successfully introduced a physics optical law to the standard model of phototransduction adding a new processing layer that had not been mathematically implemented before. In addition, it describes the physiological concept of saturation and delivers outputs in concordance to input magnitudes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Study on the Response Characteristics of a Fiber-Optic Radiation Sensor Model Based on Cerenkov Principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hwa Jeong; Kim, Beom Kyu; Park, Byung Gi [Soonchunhyang Univ., Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In recent year, various fiber-optic radiation sensors using Cerenkov principle have been developed without employing any scintillators for measuring high-energy photon, electron, etc. The main advantages of the optical fibers are the remote transmission of the light signal and immunity to pressure and electromagnetic waves. Therefore, the sensors utilizing the optical fibers can be used in hazardous radiation environments, such as the high-level radiation areas of a nuclear facility. The study to be simulated a fiber-optic radiation sensor based on Cerenkov principle and to be analyzed the response characteristics of the sensor. For the aforementioned study, the GEANT simulation toolkit was used. It is able to take into all the optical properties of fibers and is found to be appropriate to realistically describe the response of fiber-optic radiation sensor. In the recently, the fiber-optic radiation sensor have been developed in nuclear industry. Because sensor can detect gamma ray in harsh nuclear environments. In this study, we analyzed response characteristics of the fiber-optic radiation sensor. We have simulated the Monte Carlo model, for detecting the Cerenkov radiation using the fiber-optic radiation sensor. And the y-axis distribution of Cerenkov photons was obtained using output file. Simulation is performed with reference to the method of the previous research, and then the simulation results exhibited a good agreement with the previous research.

  3. Associations between the molecular and optical properties of dissolved organic matter in the Florida Everglades, a model coastal wetland system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Sasha; Jaffe, Rudolf; Cawley, Kaelin; Dittmar, Thorsten; Stubbins, Aron

    2015-11-01

    Optical properties are easy-to-measure proxies for dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition, source and reactivity. However, the molecular signature of DOM associated with such optical parameters remains poorly defined. The Florida coastal Everglades is a subtropical wetland with diverse vegetation (e.g., sawgrass prairies, mangrove forests, seagrass meadows) and DOM sources (e.g., terrestrial, microbial and marine). As such, the Everglades is an excellent model system from which to draw samples of diverse origin and composition to allow classically-defined optical properties to be linked to molecular properties of the DOM pool. We characterized a suite of seasonally- and spatially-collected DOM samples using optical measurements (EEM-PARAFAC, SUVA254, S275-295, S350-400, SR, FI, freshness index and HIX) and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Spearman’s rank correlations between FTICR-MS signal intensities of individual molecular formulae and optical properties determined which molecular formulae were associated with each PARAFAC component and optical index. The molecular families that tracked with the optical indices were generally in agreement with conventional biogeochemical interpretations. Therefore, although they represent only a small portion of the bulk DOM pool, absorbance and fluorescence measurements appear to be appropriate proxies for the aquatic cycling of both optically-active and associated optically-inactive DOM in coastal wetlands.

  4. Associations between the molecular and optical properties of dissolved organic matter in the Florida Everglades, a model coastal wetland system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasha eWagner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Optical properties are easy-to-measure proxies for dissolved organic matter (DOM composition, source and reactivity. However, the molecular signature of DOM associated with such optical parameters remains poorly defined. The Florida coastal Everglades is a subtropical wetland with diverse vegetation (e.g., sawgrass prairies, mangrove forests, seagrass meadows and DOM sources (e.g., terrestrial, microbial and marine. As such, the Everglades is an excellent model system from which to draw samples of diverse origin and composition to allow classically-defined optical properties to be linked to molecular properties of the DOM pool. We characterized a suite of seasonally- and spatially-collected DOM samples using optical measurements (EEM-PARAFAC, SUVA254, S275-295, S350-400, SR, FI, freshness index and HIX and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS. Spearman’s rank correlations between FTICR-MS signal intensities of individual molecular formulae and optical properties determined which molecular formulae were associated with each PARAFAC component and optical index. The molecular families that tracked with the optical indices were generally in agreement with conventional biogeochemical interpretations. Therefore, although they represent only a small portion of the bulk DOM pool, absorbance and fluorescence measurements appear to be appropriate proxies for the aquatic cycling of both optically-active and associated optically-inactive DOM in coastal wetlands.

  5. A Study on the Response Characteristics of a Fiber-Optic Radiation Sensor Model Based on Cerenkov Principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Hwa Jeong; Kim, Beom Kyu; Park, Byung Gi

    2016-01-01

    In recent year, various fiber-optic radiation sensors using Cerenkov principle have been developed without employing any scintillators for measuring high-energy photon, electron, etc. The main advantages of the optical fibers are the remote transmission of the light signal and immunity to pressure and electromagnetic waves. Therefore, the sensors utilizing the optical fibers can be used in hazardous radiation environments, such as the high-level radiation areas of a nuclear facility. The study to be simulated a fiber-optic radiation sensor based on Cerenkov principle and to be analyzed the response characteristics of the sensor. For the aforementioned study, the GEANT simulation toolkit was used. It is able to take into all the optical properties of fibers and is found to be appropriate to realistically describe the response of fiber-optic radiation sensor. In the recently, the fiber-optic radiation sensor have been developed in nuclear industry. Because sensor can detect gamma ray in harsh nuclear environments. In this study, we analyzed response characteristics of the fiber-optic radiation sensor. We have simulated the Monte Carlo model, for detecting the Cerenkov radiation using the fiber-optic radiation sensor. And the y-axis distribution of Cerenkov photons was obtained using output file. Simulation is performed with reference to the method of the previous research, and then the simulation results exhibited a good agreement with the previous research

  6. Modelling the performance of interferometric gravitational-wave detectors with realistically imperfect optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochner, Brett

    1998-12-01

    The LIGO project is part of a world-wide effort to detect the influx of Gravitational Waves upon the earth from astrophysical sources, via their interaction with laser beams in interferometric detectors that are designed for extraordinarily high sensitivity. Central to the successful performance of LIGO detectors is the quality of their optical components, and the efficient optimization of interferometer configuration parameters. To predict LIGO performance with optics possessing realistic imperfections, we have developed a numerical simulation program to compute the steady-state electric fields of a complete, coupled-cavity LIGO interferometer. The program can model a wide variety of deformations, including laser beam mismatch and/or misalignment, finite mirror size, mirror tilts, curvature distortions, mirror surface roughness, and substrate inhomogeneities. Important interferometer parameters are automatically optimized during program execution to achieve the best possible sensitivity for each new set of perturbed mirrors. This thesis includes investigations of two interferometer designs: the initial LIGO system, and an advanced LIGO configuration called Dual Recycling. For Initial-LIGO simulations, the program models carrier and sideband frequency beams to compute the explicit shot-noise-limited gravitational wave sensitivity of the interferometer. It is demonstrated that optics of exceptional quality (root-mean-square deformations of less than ~1 nm in the central mirror regions) are necessary to meet Initial-LIGO performance requirements, but that they can be feasibly met. It is also shown that improvements in mirror quality can substantially increase LIGO's sensitivity to selected astrophysical sources. For Dual Recycling, the program models gravitational- wave-induced sidebands over a range of frequencies to demonstrate that the tuned and narrow-banded signal responses predicted for this configuration can be achieved with imperfect optics. Dual Recycling

  7. 3D Monte Carlo model of optical transport in laser-irradiated cutaneous vascular malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majaron, Boris; Milanič, Matija; Jia, Wangcun; Nelson, J. S.

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional Monte Carlo (MC) model of optical transport in skin and applied it to analysis of port wine stain treatment with sequential laser irradiation and intermittent cryogen spray cooling. Our MC model extends the approaches of the popular multi-layer model by Wang et al.1 to three dimensions, thus allowing treatment of skin inclusions with more complex geometries and arbitrary irradiation patterns. To overcome the obvious drawbacks of either "escape" or "mirror" boundary conditions at the lateral boundaries of the finely discretized volume of interest (VOI), photons exiting the VOI are propagated in laterally infinite tissue layers with appropriate optical properties, until they loose all their energy, escape into the air, or return to the VOI, but the energy deposition outside of the VOI is not computed and recorded. After discussing the selection of tissue parameters, we apply the model to analysis of blood photocoagulation and collateral thermal damage in treatment of port wine stain (PWS) lesions with sequential laser irradiation and intermittent cryogen spray cooling.

  8. 2nd-order optical model of the isotopic dependence of heavy ion absorption cross sections for radiation transport studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Yan, Congchong; Saganti, Premkumar B.

    2018-01-01

    Heavy ion absorption cross sections play an important role in radiation transport codes used in risk assessment and for shielding studies of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposures. Due to the GCR primary nuclei composition and nuclear fragmentation leading to secondary nuclei heavy ions of charge number, Z with 3 ≤ Z ≥ 28 and mass numbers, A with 6 ≤ A ≥ 60 representing about 190 isotopes occur in GCR transport calculations. In this report we describe methods for developing a data-base of isotopic dependent heavy ion absorption cross sections for interactions. Calculations of a 2nd-order optical model solution to coupled-channel solutions to the Eikonal form of the nucleus-nucleus scattering amplitude are compared to 1st-order optical model solutions. The 2nd-order model takes into account two-body correlations in the projectile and target ground-states, which are ignored in the 1st-order optical model. Parameter free predictions are described using one-body and two-body ground state form factors for the isotopes considered and the free nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude. Root mean square (RMS) matter radii for protons and neutrons are taken from electron and muon scattering data and nuclear structure models. We report on extensive comparisons to experimental data for energy-dependent absorption cross sections for over 100 isotopes of elements from Li to Fe interacting with carbon and aluminum targets. Agreement between model and experiments are generally within 10% for the 1st-order optical model and improved to less than 5% in the 2nd-order optical model in the majority of comparisons. Overall the 2nd-order optical model leads to a reduction in absorption compared to the 1st-order optical model for heavy ion interactions, which influences estimates of nuclear matter radii.

  9. Modeling and Optimization of Optical Half Adder in Two Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonth, Mahesh V.; Soma, Savita; Gowre, Sanjaykumar C.; Biradar, Nagashettappa

    2018-05-01

    The output of photonic integrated devices is enhanced using crystal waveguides and cavities but optimization of these devices is a topic of research. In this paper, optimization of the optical half adder in two-dimensional (2-D) linear photonic crystals using four symmetric T-shaped waveguides with 180° phase shift inputs is proposed. The input section of a T-waveguide acts as a beam splitter, and the output section acts as a power combiner. The constructive and destructive interference phenomenon will provide an output optical power. Output port Cout will receive in-phase power through the 180° phase shifter cavity designed near the junction. The optical half adder is modeled in a 2-D photonic crystal using the finite difference time domain method (FDTD). It consists of a cubic lattice with an array of 39 × 43 silicon rods of radius r 0.12 μm and 0.6 μm lattice constant a. The extinction ratio r e of 11.67 dB and 12.51 dB are achieved at output ports using the RSoft FullWAVE-6.1 software package.

  10. An optical model for implementing Parrondo’s game and designing stochastic game with long-term memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Si Tieyan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Using a photon propagating through a designed array of beam splitters to simulate Parrondo’s game paradox. ► Design the optical flowchart for implementing Parrondo history-dependent game paradox. ► Design new game with long-term memory on a designed tree lattice and loop lattice. - Abstract: An optical model for a photon propagating through a designed array of beam splitters is developed to give a physical implementation of Parrondo’s game and Parrondo’s history-dependent game. The winner in this optical model is a photon passed the beam splitter. The loser is a photon being reflected by the beam splitter. The optical beam splitter is the coin-tosser. We designed new games with long-term memory by using this optical diagram method. The optical output of the combined game of two losing games could be a win, or a loss, or an oscillation between win and loss. The modern technology to implement this optical model is well developed. A circularly polarized photon is a possible candidate for this physical implementation in laboratory.

  11. Correlations in microscopic optical model for nucleon elastic scattering off doubly closed-shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, M.; Karataglidis, S.; Bauge, E.; Delaroche, J.P.; Gogny, D.

    2006-01-01

    The random phase approximation (RPA) long-range correlations are known to play a significant role in understanding the depletion of single particle-hole states observed in (e,e ' ) and (e,e ' p) measurements. Here the RPA theory, implemented using the D1S force is considered for the specific purpose of building correlated ground states and related one-body density matrix elements. These may be implemented and tested in a fully microscopic optical model for NA scattering off doubly closed-shell nuclei. A method is presented to correct for the correlations overcounting inherent to the RPA formalism. One-body density matrix elements in the uncorrelated (i.e., Hartree-Fock) and correlated (i.e., RPA) ground states are then challenged in proton scattering studies based on the Melbourne microscopic optical model to highlight the role played by the RPA correlations. Agreement between the parameter free scattering predictions and measurements is good for incident proton energies ranging from 200 MeV down to approximately 60 MeV and becomes gradually worse in the lower energy range. Those features point unambiguously to the relevance of the g-matrix method to build microscopic optical model potentials at medium energies, and emphasize the need to include nucleon-phonon coupling, that is, a second-order component of the Feshbach type in the potential at lower energies. Illustrations are given for proton scattering observables measured up to 201 MeV for the 16 O, 40 Ca, 48 Ca, and 208 Pb target nuclei

  12. Nonlinear optical spectroscopy and microscopy of model random and biological media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yici

    Nonlinear optical (NLO) spectroscopy and microscopy applied to biomedical science are emerging as new and rapidly growing areas which offer important insight into basic phenomena. Ultrafast NLO processes provide temporal, spectral and spatial sensitivities complementary or superior to those achieved through conventional linear optical approaches. The goal of this thesis is to explore the potential of two fundamental NLO processes to produce noninvasive histological maps of biological tissues. Within the goal of the thesis, steady state intensity, polarization and angular measurements of second- and third-harmonic generations (SHG, THG) have been performed on model random scattering and animal tissue samples. The nonlinear optical effects have been evaluated using models. Conversion efficiencies of SHG and THG from animal tissue interfaces have been determined, ranging from 10-7 to 10-10. The changes in the multiharmonic signals were found to depend on both local and overall histological structures of biological samples. The spectral signatures of two photon excitation induced fluorescence from intrinsic fluorophores have been acquired and used to characterize the physical state and types of tissues. Two dimensional scanning SHG and TPF tomographic images have been obtained from in vitro animal tissues, normal and diseased human breast tissues, and resolved subsurface layers and histo-chemical distributions. By combining consecutive 2D maps, a 3D image can be produced. The structure and morphology dependence of the SH signal has been utilized to image and evaluate subsurface tumor progression depth. Second harmonic microscopy in model random and biological cells has been studied using a CCD camera to obtain direct images from subcellular structures. Finally, near infrared (NIR) NLO spectroscopy and microscopy based on SHG and TPF have demonstrated high spatial resolution, deeper penetration depth, low level photo-damaging and enhanced morphological sensitivity for

  13. Dynamic PET and Optical Imaging and Compartment Modeling using a Dual-labeled Cyclic RGD Peptide Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhu, Ning Guo, Quanzheng Li, Ying Ma, Orit Jacboson, Seulki Lee, Hak Soo Choi, James R. Mansfield, Gang Niu, Xiaoyuan Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to determine if dynamic optical imaging could provide comparable kinetic parameters to that of dynamic PET imaging by a near-infrared dye/64Cu dual-labeled cyclic RGD peptide.Methods: The integrin αvβ3 binding RGD peptide was conjugated with a macrocyclic chelator 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA for copper labeling and PET imaging and a near-infrared dye ZW-1 for optical imaging. The in vitro biological activity of RGD-C(DOTA-ZW-1 was characterized by cell staining and receptor binding assay. Sixty-min dynamic PET and optical imaging were acquired on a MDA-MB-435 tumor model. Singular value decomposition (SVD method was applied to compute the dynamic optical signal from the two-dimensional optical projection images. Compartment models were used to quantitatively analyze and compare the dynamic optical and PET data.Results: The dual-labeled probe 64Cu-RGD-C(DOTA-ZW-1 showed integrin specific binding in vitro and in vivo. The binding potential (Bp derived from dynamic optical imaging (1.762 ± 0.020 is comparable to that from dynamic PET (1.752 ± 0.026.Conclusion: The signal un-mixing process using SVD improved the accuracy of kinetic modeling of 2D dynamic optical data. Our results demonstrate that 2D dynamic optical imaging with SVD analysis could achieve comparable quantitative results as dynamic PET imaging in preclinical xenograft models.

  14. ABAREX -- A neutron spherical optical-statistical-model code -- A user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.B. [ed.; Lawson, R.D.

    1998-06-01

    The contemporary version of the neutron spherical optical-statistical-model code ABAREX is summarized with the objective of providing detailed operational guidance for the user. The physical concepts involved are very briefly outlined. The code is described in some detail and a number of explicit examples are given. With this document one should very quickly become fluent with the use of ABAREX. While the code has operated on a number of computing systems, this version is specifically tailored for the VAX/VMS work station and/or the IBM-compatible personal computer.

  15. Optical model analysis for 30MeV polarized proton elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, D.-L.; Swiniarski, R. de.

    1977-05-01

    The proton elastic scattering cross sections and analyzing powers at 30MeV have been used to derive optical model parameters for ten elements from 10 B to 32 S. A set of average geometrical parameters (rsub(o)=1.10fm, rsub(LS)=1.0fm and asub(I)=0.60fm) is found to give good fits to the entire data, the other geometrical parameters being rsub(I)=(1.35+-0.15)fm, asub(o)=(0.75+-0.10)fm and asub(LS)=(0.35+-0.07)fm. The dynamical parameters with fixed geometry are presented

  16. Neutron-/sup 90/Zr mean field from a dispersive optical model analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaroche, J.P.; Wang, Y.; Rapaport, J.

    1989-01-01

    Elastic scattering cross sections have been measured for 8, 10, and 24 MeV neutrons incident on /sup 90/Zr. These measurements, together with other neutron elastic scattering and total cross section data available up to 29 MeV, are used in grid searches to obtain an optical model potential which contains a dispersion relation term. This potential is then extrapolated toward negative energies to predict bound single-particle state properties. An overall good description of the data at positive and negative energies is achieved

  17. Theoretical model for a background noise limited laser-excited optical filter for doubled Nd lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, Thomas M.; Garcia, Daniel F.

    1990-01-01

    A simple theoretical model for the calculation of the dependence of filter quantum efficiency versus laser pump power in an atomic Rb vapor laser-excited optical filter is reported. Calculations for Rb filter transitions that can be used to detect the practical and important frequency-doubled Nd lasers are presented. The results of these calculations show the filter's quantum efficiency versus the laser pump power. The required laser pump powers required range from 2.4 to 60 mW/sq cm of filter aperture.

  18. The optical interface of a photonic crystal: Modeling an opal with a stratified effective index

    OpenAIRE

    Maurin, Isabelle; Moufarej, Elias; Laliotis, Athanasios; Bloch, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    An artificial opal is a compact arrangement of transparent spheres, and is an archetype of a three-dimensional photonic crystal. Here, we describe the optics of an opal using a flexible model based upon a stratified medium whose (effective) index is governed by the opal density in a small planar slice of the opal. We take into account the effect of the substrate and assume a well- controlled number of layers, as it occurs for an opal fabricated by Langmuir-Blodgett deposition. The calculation...

  19. Ionization potential depression and optical spectra in a Debye plasma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chengliang; Röpke, Gerd; Reinholz, Heidi; Kraeft, Wolf-Dietrich

    2017-11-01

    We show how optical spectra in dense plasmas are determined by the shift of energy levels as well as the broadening owing to collisions with the plasma particles. In lowest approximation, the interaction with the plasma particles is described by the RPA dielectric function, leading to the Debye shift of the continuum edge. The bound states remain nearly un-shifted, their broadening is calculated in Born approximation. The role of ionization potential depression as well as the Inglis-Teller effect are shown. The model calculations have to be improved going beyond the lowest (RPA) approximation when applying to WDM spectra.

  20. Expression of the degree of polarization based on the geometrical optics pBRDF model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Zhu, Jingping; Liu, Hong; Du, Bingzheng

    2017-02-01

    An expression of the degree of polarization (DOP) based on the geometrical optics polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function model is presented. In this expression, the DOP is related to the surface roughness and decreases at different reflection angles because diffuse reflection is taken into consideration. A shadowing/masking function introduced into the specular reflection expression makes the DOP values decrease as the angle of incidence or observation approaches grazing. Different kinds of materials were measured to validate the accuracy of this DOP expression. The measured results suggest that the errors of the DOP are reduced significantly, and the polarized reflection characteristics can be described more reasonably and accurately.

  1. Effective-mass model and magneto-optical properties in hybrid perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Z. G.

    2016-06-01

    Hybrid inorganic-organic perovskites have proven to be a revolutionary material for low-cost photovoltaic applications. They also exhibit many other interesting properties, including giant Rashba splitting, large-radius Wannier excitons, and novel magneto-optical effects. Understanding these properties as well as the detailed mechanism of photovoltaics requires a reliable and accessible electronic structure, on which models of transport, excitonic, and magneto-optical properties can be efficiently developed. Here we construct an effective-mass model for the hybrid perovskites based on the group theory, experiment, and first-principles calculations. Using this model, we relate the Rashba splitting with the inversion-asymmetry parameter in the tetragonal perovskites, evaluate anisotropic g-factors for both conduction and valence bands, and elucidate the magnetic-field effect on photoluminescence and its dependence on the intensity of photoexcitation. The diamagnetic effect of exciton is calculated for an arbitrarily strong magnetic field. The pronounced excitonic peak emerged at intermediate magnetic fields in cyclotron resonance is assigned to the 3D±2 states, whose splitting can be used to estimate the difference in the effective masses of electron and hole.

  2. Intraocular Telescopic System Design: Optical and Visual Simulation in a Human Eye Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Zoulinakis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To design an intraocular telescopic system (ITS for magnifying retinal image and to simulate its optical and visual performance after implantation in a human eye model. Methods. Design and simulation were carried out with a ray-tracing and optical design software. Two different ITS were designed, and their visual performance was simulated using the Liou-Brennan eye model. The difference between the ITS was their lenses’ placement in the eye model and their powers. Ray tracing in both centered and decentered situations was carried out for both ITS while visual Strehl ratio (VSOTF was computed using custom-made MATLAB code. Results. The results show that between 0.4 and 0.8 mm of decentration, the VSOTF does not change much either for far or near target distances. The image projection for these decentrations is in the parafoveal zone, and the quality of the image projected is quite similar. Conclusion. Both systems display similar quality while they differ in size; therefore, the choice between them would need to take into account specific parameters from the patient’s eye. Quality does not change too much between 0.4 and 0.8 mm of decentration for either system which gives flexibility to the clinician to adjust decentration to avoid areas of retinal damage.

  3. Intraocular Telescopic System Design: Optical and Visual Simulation in a Human Eye Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoulinakis, Georgios; Ferrer-Blasco, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To design an intraocular telescopic system (ITS) for magnifying retinal image and to simulate its optical and visual performance after implantation in a human eye model. Methods. Design and simulation were carried out with a ray-tracing and optical design software. Two different ITS were designed, and their visual performance was simulated using the Liou-Brennan eye model. The difference between the ITS was their lenses' placement in the eye model and their powers. Ray tracing in both centered and decentered situations was carried out for both ITS while visual Strehl ratio (VSOTF) was computed using custom-made MATLAB code. Results. The results show that between 0.4 and 0.8 mm of decentration, the VSOTF does not change much either for far or near target distances. The image projection for these decentrations is in the parafoveal zone, and the quality of the image projected is quite similar. Conclusion. Both systems display similar quality while they differ in size; therefore, the choice between them would need to take into account specific parameters from the patient's eye. Quality does not change too much between 0.4 and 0.8 mm of decentration for either system which gives flexibility to the clinician to adjust decentration to avoid areas of retinal damage.

  4. New variational image decomposition model for simultaneously denoising and segmenting optical coherence tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Jinming; Bai, Li; Tench, Christopher; Gottlob, Irene; Proudlock, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging plays an important role in clinical diagnosis and monitoring of diseases of the human retina. Automated analysis of optical coherence tomography images is a challenging task as the images are inherently noisy. In this paper, a novel variational image decomposition model is proposed to decompose an OCT image into three components: the first component is the original image but with the noise completely removed; the second contains the set of edges representing the retinal layer boundaries present in the image; and the third is an image of noise, or in image decomposition terms, the texture, or oscillatory patterns of the original image. In addition, a fast Fourier transform based split Bregman algorithm is developed to improve computational efficiency of solving the proposed model. Extensive experiments are conducted on both synthesised and real OCT images to demonstrate that the proposed model outperforms the state-of-the-art speckle noise reduction methods and leads to accurate retinal layer segmentation. (paper)

  5. Diagnostics of helium plasma by collisional-radiative modeling and optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wonwook; Kwon, Duck-Hee [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Optical diagnostics for the electron temperature (T{sub e}) and the electron density (n{sub e}) of fusion plasma is important for understanding and controlling the edge and the divertor plasmas in tokamak. Since the line intensity ratio method using the collisional-radiative modeling and OES (optical emission spectroscopy) is simple and does not disturb the plasma, many fusion devices with TEXTOR, JET, JT-60U, LHD, and so on, have employed the line intensity ratio method as a basic diagnostic tool for neutral helium (He I). The accuracy of the line intensity ratio method depends on the reliability of the cross sections and rate coefficients. We performed state-of-the-art R-matrix calculations including couplings up to n=7 states and the distorted wave (DW) calculations for the electron-impact excitation (EIE) cross sections of He I using the flexible atomic code (FAC). The collisional-radiative model for He I was constructed using the calculated the cross sections. The helium collisional-radiative model for He I was constructed to diagnose the electron temperature and the electron density of the plasma. The electron temperature and density were determined by using the line intensity ratio method.

  6. Modeling the focusing efficiency of lobster-eye optics for image shifting depending on the soft x-ray wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Luning; Li, Wei; Wu, Mingxuan; Su, Yun; Guo, Chongling; Ruan, Ningjuan; Yang, Bingxin; Yan, Feng

    2017-08-01

    Lobster-eye optics is widely applied to space x-ray detection missions and x-ray security checks for its wide field of view and low weight. This paper presents a theoretical model to obtain spatial distribution of focusing efficiency based on lobster-eye optics in a soft x-ray wavelength. The calculations reveal the competition mechanism of contributions to the focusing efficiency between the geometrical parameters of lobster-eye optics and the reflectivity of the iridium film. In addition, the focusing efficiency image depending on x-ray wavelengths further explains the influence of different geometrical parameters of lobster-eye optics and different soft x-ray wavelengths on focusing efficiency. These results could be beneficial to optimize parameters of lobster-eye optics in order to realize maximum focusing efficiency.

  7. Failure of Stadard Optical Models to Reproduce Neutron Total Cross Section Difference in the W Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J D; Bauer, R W; Dietrich, F S; Grimes, S M; Finlay, R W; Abfalterer, W P; Bateman, F B; Haight, R C; Morgan, G L; Bauge, E; Delaroche, J P; Romain, P

    2001-11-01

    Recently cross section differences among the isotopes{sup 182,184,186}W have been measured as part of a study of total cross sections in the 5-560 MeV energy range. These measurements show oscillations up to 150 mb between 5 and 100 MeV. Spherical and deformed phenomenological optical potentials with typical radial and isospin dependences show very small oscillations, in disagreement with the data. In a simple Ramsauer model, this discrepancy can be traced to a cancellation between radial and isospin effects. Understanding this problem requires a more detailed model that incorporates a realistic description of the neutron and proton density distributions. This has been done with results of Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov calculations using the Gogny force, together with a microscopic folding model employing a modification of the JLM potential as an effective interaction. This treatment yields a satisfactory interpretation of the observed total cross section differences.

  8. Atmospheric lidar co-alignment sensor: flight model electro-optical characterization campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde Guijarro, Ángel Luis; Belenguer Dávila, Tomás.; Laguna Hernandez, Hugo; Ramos Zapata, Gonzalo

    2017-10-01

    Due to the difficulty in studying the upper layer of the troposphere by using ground-based instrumentation, the conception of a space-orbit atmospheric LIDAR (ATLID) becomes necessary. ATLID born in the ESA's EarthCare Programme framework as one of its payloads, being the first instrument of this kind that will be in the Space. ATLID will provide vertical profiles of aerosols and thin clouds, separating the relative contribution of aerosol and molecular scattering to know aerosol optical depth. It operates at a wavelength of 355 nm and has a high spectral resolution receiver and depolarization channel with a vertical resolution up to 100m from ground to an altitude of 20 km and, and up to 500m from 20km to 40km. ATLID measurements will be done from a sun-synchronous orbit at 393 km altitude, and an alignment (co-alignment) sensor (CAS) is revealed as crucial due to the way in which LIDAR analyses the troposphere. As in previous models, INTA has been in charge of part of the ATLID instrument co-alignment sensor (ATLID-CAS) electro-optical characterization campaign. CAS includes a set of optical elements to take part of the useful signal, to direct it onto the memory CCD matrix (MCCD) used for the co-alignment determination, and to focus the selected signal on the MCCD. Several tests have been carried out for a proper electro-optical characterization: CAS line of sight (LoS) determination and stability, point spread function (PSF), absolute response (AbsRes), pixel response non uniformity (PRNU), response linearity (ResLin) and spectral response. In the following lines, a resume of the flight model electrooptical characterization campaign is reported on. In fact, results concerning the protoflight model (CAS PFM) will be summarized. PFM requires flight-level characterization, so most of the previously mentioned tests must be carried out under simulated working conditions, i.e., the vacuum level (around 10-5 mbar) and temperature range (between 50°C and -30°C) that

  9. Simultaneous optical and electrical modeling of plasmonic light trapping in thin-film amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Keyur K.; Nejim, Ahmed; Beliatis, Michail J.; Mills, Christopher A.; Henley, Simon J.; Silva, S. Ravi P.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid prototyping of photovoltaic (PV) cells requires a method for the simultaneous simulation of the optical and electrical characteristics of the device. The development of nanomaterial-enabled PV cells only increases the complexity of such simulations. Here, we use a commercial technology computer aided design (TCAD) software, Silvaco Atlas, to design and model plasmonic gold nanoparticles integrated in optoelectronic device models of thin-film amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) PV cells. Upon illumination with incident light, we simulate the optical and electrical properties of the cell simultaneously and use the simulation to produce current-voltage (J-V) and external quantum efficiency plots. Light trapping due to light scattering and localized surface plasmon resonance interactions by the nanoparticles has resulted in the enhancement of both the optical and electrical properties due to the reduction in the recombination rates in the photoactive layer. We show that the device performance of the modeled plasmonic a-Si:H PV cells depends significantly on the position and size of the gold nanoparticles, which leads to improvements either in optical properties only, or in both optical and electrical properties. The model provides a route to optimize the device architecture by simultaneously optimizing the optical and electrical characteristics, which leads to a detailed understanding of plasmonic PV cells from a design perspective and offers an advanced tool for rapid device prototyping.

  10. New earth system model for optical performance evaluation of space instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Dongok; Kim, Sug-Whan; Breault, Robert P

    2017-03-06

    In this study, a new global earth system model is introduced for evaluating the optical performance of space instruments. Simultaneous imaging and spectroscopic results are provided using this global earth system model with fully resolved spatial, spectral, and temporal coverage of sub-models of the Earth. The sun sub-model is a Lambertian scattering sphere with a 6-h scale and 295 lines of solar spectral irradiance. The atmospheric sub-model has a 15-layer three-dimensional (3D) ellipsoid structure. The land sub-model uses spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (BRDF) defined by a semi-empirical parametric kernel model. The ocean is modeled with the ocean spectral albedo after subtracting the total integrated scattering of the sun-glint scatter model. A hypothetical two-mirror Cassegrain telescope with a 300-mm-diameter aperture and 21.504 mm × 21.504-mm focal plane imaging instrument is designed. The simulated image results are compared with observational data from HRI-VIS measurements during the EPOXI mission for approximately 24 h from UTC Mar. 18, 2008. Next, the defocus mapping result and edge spread function (ESF) measuring result show that the distance between the primary and secondary mirror increases by 55.498 μm from the diffraction-limited condition. The shift of the focal plane is determined to be 5.813 mm shorter than that of the defocused focal plane, and this result is confirmed through the estimation of point spread function (PSF) measurements. This study shows that the earth system model combined with an instrument model is a powerful tool that can greatly help the development phase of instrument missions.

  11. AN AUTOMATIC OPTICAL AND SAR IMAGE REGISTRATION METHOD USING ITERATIVE MULTI-LEVEL AND REFINEMENT MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Xu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Automatic image registration is a vital yet challenging task, particularly for multi-sensor remote sensing images. Given the diversity of the data, it is unlikely that a single registration algorithm or a single image feature will work satisfactorily for all applications. Focusing on this issue, the mainly contribution of this paper is to propose an automatic optical-to-SAR image registration method using –level and refinement model: Firstly, a multi-level strategy of coarse-to-fine registration is presented, the visual saliency features is used to acquire coarse registration, and then specific area and line features are used to refine the registration result, after that, sub-pixel matching is applied using KNN Graph. Secondly, an iterative strategy that involves adaptive parameter adjustment for re-extracting and re-matching features is presented. Considering the fact that almost all feature-based registration methods rely on feature extraction results, the iterative strategy improve the robustness of feature matching. And all parameters can be automatically and adaptively adjusted in the iterative procedure. Thirdly, a uniform level set segmentation model for optical and SAR images is presented to segment conjugate features, and Voronoi diagram is introduced into Spectral Point Matching (VSPM to further enhance the matching accuracy between two sets of matching points. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively and robustly generate sufficient, reliable point pairs and provide accurate registration.

  12. Modelling the thermal quenching mechanism in quartz based on time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagonis, V.; Ankjaergaard, C.; Murray, A.S.; Jain, M.; Chen, R.; Lawless, J.; Greilich, S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new numerical model for thermal quenching in quartz, based on the previously suggested Mott-Seitz mechanism. In the model electrons from a dosimetric trap are raised by optical or thermal stimulation into the conduction band, followed by an electronic transition from the conduction band into an excited state of the recombination center. Subsequently electrons in this excited state undergo either a direct radiative transition into a recombination center, or a competing thermally assisted non-radiative process into the ground state of the recombination center. As the temperature of the sample is increased, more electrons are removed from the excited state via the non-radiative pathway. This reduction in the number of available electrons leads to both a decrease of the intensity of the luminescence signal and to a simultaneous decrease of the luminescence lifetime. Several simulations are carried out of time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence (TR-OSL) experiments, in which the temperature dependence of luminescence lifetimes in quartz is studied as a function of the stimulation temperature. Good quantitative agreement is found between the simulation results and new experimental data obtained using a single-aliquot procedure on a sedimentary quartz sample.

  13. Universal in vivo Textural Model for Human Skin based on Optical Coherence Tomograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adabi, Saba; Hosseinzadeh, Matin; Noei, Shahryar; Conforto, Silvia; Daveluy, Steven; Clayton, Anne; Mehregan, Darius; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2017-12-20

    Currently, diagnosis of skin diseases is based primarily on the visual pattern recognition skills and expertise of the physician observing the lesion. Even though dermatologists are trained to recognize patterns of morphology, it is still a subjective visual assessment. Tools for automated pattern recognition can provide objective information to support clinical decision-making. Noninvasive skin imaging techniques provide complementary information to the clinician. In recent years, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become a powerful skin imaging technique. According to specific functional needs, skin architecture varies across different parts of the body, as do the textural characteristics in OCT images. There is, therefore, a critical need to systematically analyze OCT images from different body sites, to identify their significant qualitative and quantitative differences. Sixty-three optical and textural features extracted from OCT images of healthy and diseased skin are analyzed and, in conjunction with decision-theoretic approaches, used to create computational models of the diseases. We demonstrate that these models provide objective information to the clinician to assist in the diagnosis of abnormalities of cutaneous microstructure, and hence, aid in the determination of treatment. Specifically, we demonstrate the performance of this methodology on differentiating basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) from healthy tissue.

  14. Parallel Solver for Diffuse Optical Tomography on Realistic Head Models With Scattering and Clear Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placati, Silvio; Guermandi, Marco; Samore, Andrea; Scarselli, Eleonora Franchi; Guerrieri, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Diffuse optical tomography is an imaging technique, based on evaluation of how light propagates within the human head to obtain the functional information about the brain. Precision in reconstructing such an optical properties map is highly affected by the accuracy of the light propagation model implemented, which needs to take into account the presence of clear and scattering tissues. We present a numerical solver based on the radiosity-diffusion model, integrating the anatomical information provided by a structural MRI. The solver is designed to run on parallel heterogeneous platforms based on multiple GPUs and CPUs. We demonstrate how the solver provides a 7 times speed-up over an isotropic-scattered parallel Monte Carlo engine based on a radiative transport equation for a domain composed of 2 million voxels, along with a significant improvement in accuracy. The speed-up greatly increases for larger domains, allowing us to compute the light distribution of a full human head ( ≈ 3 million voxels) in 116 s for the platform used.

  15. Asymmetry dependence of nucleon correlations in spherical nuclei extracted from a dispersive-optical-model analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J. M.; Shane, R.; Waldecker, S. J.; Dickhoff, W. H.; Charity, R. J.; Sobotka, L. G.; Crowell, A. S.; Esterline, J. H.; Fallin, B.; Howell, C. R.; Westerfeldt, C.; Youngs, M.; Crowe, B. J. III; Pedroni, R. S.

    2011-01-01

    Neutron elastic-scattering angular distributions were measured at beam energies of 11.9 and 16.9 MeV on 40,48 Ca targets. These data plus other elastic-scattering measurements, total and reaction cross-sections measurements, (e,e ' p) data, and single-particle energies for magic and doubly magic nuclei have been analyzed in the dispersive optical-model (DOM), generating nucleon self-energies (optical-model potentials) that can be related, via the many-body Dyson equation, to spectroscopic factors and occupation probabilities. It is found that, for stable nuclei with N≥Z, the imaginary surface potential for protons exhibits a strong dependence on the neutron-proton asymmetry. This result leads to a more modest dependence of the spectroscopic factors on asymmetry. The measured data and the DOM analysis of all considered nuclei clearly demonstrate that the neutron imaginary surface potential displays very little dependence on the neutron-proton asymmetry for nuclei near stability (N≥Z).

  16. Optical modelling of far-infrared astronomical instrumentation exploiting multimode horn antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Murphy, J. Anthony; Mc Auley, Ian; Wilson, Daniel; Gradziel, Marcin L.; Trappe, Neil; Cahill, Fiachra; Peacocke, T.; Savini, G.; Ganga, K.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we describe the optical modelling of astronomical telescopes that exploit bolometric detectors fed by multimoded horn antennas. In cases where the horn shape is profiled rather than being a simple cone, we determine the beam at the horn aperture using an electromagnetic mode-matching technique. Bolometers, usually placed in an integrating cavity, can excite many hybrid modes in a corrugated horn; we usually assume they excite all modes equally. If the waveguide section feeding the horn is oversized these modes can propagate independently, thereby increasing the throughput of the system. We use an SVD analysis on the matrix that describes the scattering between waveguide (TE/TM) modes to recover the independent orthogonal fields (hybrid modes) and then propagate these to the sky independently where they are added in quadrature. Beam patterns at many frequencies across the band are then added with a weighting appropriate to the source spectrum. Here we describe simulations carried out on the highest-frequency (857-GHz) channel of the Planck HFI instrument. We concentrate in particular on the use of multimode feedhorns and consider the effects of possible manufacturing tolerances on the beam on the sky. We also investigate the feasibility of modelling far-out sidelobes across a wide band for electrically large structures and bolometers fed by multi-mode feedhorns. Our optical simulations are carried out using the industry-standard GRASP software package.

  17. Modeling the optical radiation of the precataclysmic variable SDSS J212531-010745

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimansky, V. V.; Borisov, N. V.; Nurtdinova, D. N.; Solovyeva, Yu. N.; Sakhibullin, N. A.; Spiridonova, O. I.

    2015-03-01

    Optical observations are analyzed to derive a set of basic parameters for the precataclysmic variable star SDSS J212531-010745, whose primary is a PG1159-type star. Spectroscopic and multiband photometric observations of the star were performed in 2008-2011 with the 6-m telescope and the Zeiss-1000 telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory. The shape of the binary's orbital light curves is nearly sinusoidal, with the amplitude increasing with wavelength from Δ m = 0.40 m in the B band to Δ m = 0.73 m in the R band. The spectra contain absorption lines of HeII and neutral atoms, along with HI, HeI, CII, MgII, FeII emission lines, whose intensity increases synchronously with the brightness of the system. The optical radiation from SDSS J212531-010745 has a composite nature, corresponding to a model for a pre-cataclysmic variable with strong reflection effects. Cross-correlation techniques are used to measure the radial velocities and derive the component masses. Numerical modeling of the binary's light curves, radial velocities, and spectra is performed, and a complete set of parameters determined. Considerable abundance anomalies (to 1 dex) were detected for the secondary. The primary's characteristics correspond to the evolutionary predictions for DAO dwarfs with masses M ≈ 0.5 M ⊙, and the secondary's characteristics to low-mass, main-sequence stars with the solar metallicity.

  18. Visualisation of details of a complicated inner structure of model objects by the method of diffusion optical tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tret'yakov, Evgeniy V; Shuvalov, Vladimir V; Shutov, I V

    2002-01-01

    An approximate algorithm is tested for solving the problem of diffusion optical tomography in experiments on the visualisation of details of the inner structure of strongly scattering model objects containing scattering and semitransparent inclusions, as well as absorbing inclusions located inside other optical inhomogeneities. The stability of the algorithm to errors is demonstrated, which allows its use for a rapid (2 - 3 min) image reconstruction of the details of objects with a complicated inner structure. (laser biology and medicine)

  19. KOP program for calculating cross sections of neutron and charged particle interactions with atomic nuclei using the optical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grudzevich, O.D.; Zelenetskij, A.V.; Pashchenko, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    The last version of the KOP program for calculating cross sections of neutron and charged particle interaction with atomic nuclei within the scope of the optical model is described. The structure and program organization, library of total parameters of the optical potential, program identificators and peculiarities of its operation, input of source data and output of calculational results for printing are described in detail. The KOP program is described in Fortran- and adapted for EC-1033 computer

  20. Generalized Ocean Color Inversion Model for Retrieving Marine Inherent Optical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdell, P. Jeremy; Franz, Bryan A.; Bailey, Sean W.; Feldman, Gene C.; Boss, Emmanuel; Brando, Vittorio E.; Dowell, Mark; Hirata, Takafumi; Lavender, Samantha J.; Lee, ZhongPing; hide

    2013-01-01

    Ocean color measured from satellites provides daily, global estimates of marine inherent optical properties (IOPs). Semi-analytical algorithms (SAAs) provide one mechanism for inverting the color of the water observed by the satellite into IOPs. While numerous SAAs exist, most are similarly constructed and few are appropriately parameterized for all water masses for all seasons. To initiate community-wide discussion of these limitations, NASA organized two workshops that deconstructed SAAs to identify similarities and uniqueness and to progress toward consensus on a unified SAA. This effort resulted in the development of the generalized IOP (GIOP) model software that allows for the construction of different SAAs at runtime by selection from an assortment of model parameterizations. As such, GIOP permits isolation and evaluation of specific modeling assumptions, construction of SAAs, development of regionally tuned SAAs, and execution of ensemble inversion modeling. Working groups associated with the workshops proposed a preliminary default configuration for GIOP (GIOP-DC), with alternative model parameterizations and features defined for subsequent evaluation. In this paper, we: (1) describe the theoretical basis of GIOP; (2) present GIOP-DC and verify its comparable performance to other popular SAAs using both in situ and synthetic data sets; and, (3) quantify the sensitivities of their output to their parameterization. We use the latter to develop a hierarchical sensitivity of SAAs to various model parameterizations, to identify components of SAAs that merit focus in future research, and to provide material for discussion on algorithm uncertainties and future ensemble applications.

  1. Leaf optical system modeled as a stochastic process. [solar radiation interaction with terrestrial vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, C. J.; Garratt, M. W.

    1977-01-01

    A stochastic leaf radiation model based upon physical and physiological properties of dicot leaves has been developed. The model accurately predicts the absorbed, reflected, and transmitted radiation of normal incidence as a function of wavelength resulting from the leaf-irradiance interaction over the spectral interval of 0.40-2.50 micron. The leaf optical system has been represented as Markov process with a unique transition matrix at each 0.01-micron increment between 0.40 micron and 2.50 micron. Probabilities are calculated at every wavelength interval from leaf thickness, structure, pigment composition, and water content. Simulation results indicate that this approach gives accurate estimations of actual measured values for dicot leaf absorption, reflection, and transmission as a function of wavelength.

  2. LAI inversion from optical reflectance using a neural network trained with a multiple scattering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James A.

    1992-01-01

    The inversion of the leaf area index (LAI) canopy parameter from optical spectral reflectance measurements is obtained using a backpropagation artificial neural network trained using input-output pairs generated by a multiple scattering reflectance model. The problem of LAI estimation over sparse canopies (LAI 1000 percent for low LAI. Minimization methods applied to merit functions constructed from differences between measured reflectances and predicted reflectances using multiple-scattering models are unacceptably sensitive to a good initial guess for the desired parameter. In contrast, the neural network reported generally yields absolute percentage errors of <30 percent when weighting coefficients trained on one soil type were applied to predicted canopy reflectance at a different soil background.

  3. Generalized Tensor Analysis Model for Multi-Subcarrier Analog Optical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Ying; Yu, Xianbin; Zheng, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    We propose and develop a general tensor analysis framework for a subcarrier multiplex analog optical fiber link for applications in microwave photonics. The goal of this work is to construct an uniform method to address nonlinear distortions of a discrete frequency transmission system. We employ....... In addition, it is demonstrated that each corresponding tensor is formally determined by device structures, which allows for a synthesized study of device combinations more systematically. For implementing numerical methods, the practical significance of the tensor model is it simplifies the derivation...... details compared with series-based approaches by hiding the underlying multi-fold summation and index operation. The integrity of the proposed methodology is validated by investigating the classical intensity modulated system. Furthermore, to give an application model of the tensor formalism, we make...

  4. Effects of source shape on the numerical aperture factor with a geometrical-optics model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Der-Shen; Schmit, Joanna; Novak, Erik

    2004-04-01

    We study the effects of an extended light source on the calibration of an interference microscope, also referred to as an optical profiler. Theoretical and experimental numerical aperture (NA) factors for circular and linear light sources along with collimated laser illumination demonstrate that the shape of the light source or effective aperture cone is critical for a correct NA factor calculation. In practice, more-accurate results for the NA factor are obtained when a linear approximation to the filament light source shape is used in a geometric model. We show that previously measured and derived NA factors show some discrepancies because a circular rather than linear approximation to the filament source was used in the modeling.

  5. Model of the lines of sight for an off-axis optical instrument Pleiades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvage, Dominique; Gaudin-Delrieu, Catherine; Tournier, Thierry

    2017-11-01

    The future Earth observation missions aim at delivering images with a high resolution and a large field of view. These images have to be processed to get a very accurate localisation. In that goal, the individual lines of sight of each photosensitive element must be evaluated according to the localisation of the pixels in the focal plane. But, with off-axis Korsch telescope (like PLEIADES), the classical model has to be adapted. This is possible by using optical ground measurements made after the integration of the instrument. The processing of these results leads to several parameters, which are function of the offsets of the focal plane and the real focal length. All this study which has been proposed for the PLEIADES mission leads to a more elaborated model which provides the relation between the lines of sight and the location of the pixels, with a very good accuracy, close to the pixel size.

  6. Visible and Mid-Infrared Gypsum Optical Constants for Modeling of Martian Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roush, Ted L.; Esposito, Francesca; Rossmann, George R.; Colangeli, Luigi

    2007-08-01

    Introduction: Recent and on-going remote and in situ observations indicate that sulfates are present in significant abundances at various locations on Mars [1-7]. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) imaging spectrometer (CRISM) is returning hyperspectral data at higher spatial resolution [8] than the OMEGA instrument on the Mars Express Mission [3]. Data from both OMEGA and CRISM have provided spectral evidence for the presence of gypsum and various hydrated sulfates on the Martian surface [e.g. 3-7] Thus, the optical properties of sulfates, in general, are of interest to quantitative interpretation of this increasing volume of remotely sensed data. This is because optical constants describe how a material interacts with electromagnetic radiation and represent the fundamental values used in radiative transfer calculations describing a variety of physical environments. Such environments include atmospheres where aerosols are present, planetary and satellite regoliths, and circumstellar dust clouds. Here we focus upon gypsum because of its applicability due to its identification on Mars. Also, gypsum is a mineral that is readily available in samples sizes that are suitable for study using a variety of spectral measurements. In the infrared (>5 μm) several studies reporting the optical constants of gypsum can be used in evaluating the approach used here. Most importantly, there is a general lack of data regarding the optical constants for gypsum at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths (0.4-5 μm) that are being observed by OMEGA and CRISM. Background: In the infrared, there have been several studies focused at determining the optical constants of gypsum using classical dispersion models [9-11]. These have used a variety of samples including; crystals, compressed pellets of pure materials, and grains suspended in a KBr matrix. Spectral measurements of gypsum, and other sulfates, have existed for about 100 years at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths (0.4-5 μm) [e

  7. Building the Nanoplasmonics Toolbox Through Shape Modeling and Single Particle Optical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringe, Emilie

    Interest in nanotechnology is driven by unprecedented properties tailorability, achievable by controlling particle structure and composition. Unlike bulk components, minute changes in size and shape affect the optical and electronic properties of nanoparticles. Characterization of such structure-function relationships and better understanding of structure control mechanisms is crucial to the development of applications such as plasmonic sensors and devices. The objective of the current research is thus twofold: to theoretically predict and understand how shape is controlled by synthesis conditions, and to experimentally unravel, through single particle studies, how shape, composition, size, and surrounding environment affect plasmonic properties in noble metal particles. Quantitative, predictive rules and fundamental knowledge obtained from this research contributes to the "nanoplasmonics toolbox", a library designed to provide scientists and engineers the tools to create and optimize novel nanotechnology applications. In this dissertation, single particle approaches are developed and used to unravel the effects of size, shape, substrate, aggregation state and surrounding environment on the optical response of metallic nanoparticles. Ag and Au nanocubes on different substrates are first presented, followed by the discussion of the concept of plasmon length, a universal parameter to describe plasmon energy for a variety of particle shapes and plasmon modes. Plasmonic sensing (both refractive index sensing and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy) and polarization effects are then studied at the single particle level. In the last two Chapters, analytical shape models based on the Wulff construction provide unique modeling tools for alloy and kinetically grown nanoparticles. The former reveals a size-dependence of the shape of small alloy particles (such as those used in catalysis) because of surface segregation, while the latter uniquely models the shape of many

  8. Fast-neutron interaction with elemental zirconium, and the dispersive optical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiba, S.; Guenther, P.T.; Smith, A.B.; Sugimoto, M.; Lawson, R.D.

    1991-06-01

    Differential neutron elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections of elemental zirconium are measured from {approx} 1.5 to 10 MeV. Below 3 MeV the measurements are made at incident-neutron energy intervals of {approx} 100 keV, from 3 to 4 MeV at intervals of {approx} 200 keV, and at intervals of {approx} 500 keV at higher energies. the angular range of the measurements is {approx} 18{degrees} to 160{degrees}, with up to more than 100 differential values per distribution. this comprehensive data base, augmented with a 24-MeV elastic-scattering distribution from the literature, is used to develop two phenomenological optical-statistical models which both describe the data very well. First, the parameters of the conventional spherical optical model (SOM) are deduced. Secondly, the model in which the change in the real potential brought about by the dispersion relationship (DOM) is examined. the SOM parameters are consistent with systematics previously reported from this laboratory, and the volume integral-integral-per-nucleon of the real potential strength, J{sub v}, and the radius, r{sub v}, are energy dependent. When the DOM is used, a substantial part of the enrgy dependence of J{sub v}({approx} 30%) disappears. However, the change in the energy dependence of r{sub v} is small, so that a significant energy dependence remains when the DOM is used. Both models are extrapolated to the bound-state regime where they have modest success in predicting the binding energies of the single-particle and single-hole states in {sup 90}Zr. 55 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Modeling the South American regional smoke plume: aerosol optical depth variability and surface shortwave flux perturbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Rosário

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Intra-seasonal variability of smoke aerosol optical depth (AOD and downwelling solar irradiance at the surface during the 2002 biomass burning season in South America was modeled using the Coupled Chemistry-Aerosol-Tracers Transport model with the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (CCATT-BRAMS. Measurements of total and fine mode fraction (FMF AOD from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET and solar irradiance at the surface from the Solar Radiation Network (SolRad-NET were used to evaluate model results. In general, the major features associated with AOD evolution over the southern part of the Amazon basin and cerrado ecosystem are captured by the model. The main discrepancies were found for high aerosol loading events. In the northeastern portion of the Amazon basin the model systematically underestimated total AOD, as expected, since smoke contribution is not dominant as it is in the southern portion and emissions other than smoke were not considered in the simulation. Better agreement was obtained comparing the model results with observed FMF AOD, which pointed out the relevance of coarse mode aerosol emission in that region. Likewise, major discrepancies over cerrado during high AOD events were found to be associated with coarse mode aerosol omission in our model. The issue of high aerosol loading events in the southern part of the Amazon was related to difficulties in predicting the smoke AOD field, which was discussed in the context of emissions shortcomings. The Cuiabá cerrado site was the only one where the highest quality AERONET data were unavailable for both total and FMF AOD. Thus, lower quality data were used. Root-mean-square error (RMSE between the model and observed FMF AOD decreased from 0.34 to 0.19 when extreme AOD events (FMF AOD550 nm ≥ 1.0 and Cuiabá were excluded from the analysis. Downward surface solar irradiance comparisons also followed similar trends when extreme AOD were excluded

  10. Experimental mouse model of optic neuritis with inflammatory demyelination produced by passive transfer of neuromyelitis optica-immunoglobulin G

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Although optic neuritis (ON) is a defining feature of neuromyelitis optica (NMO), appropriate animal models of NMO ON are lacking. Most NMO patients are seropositive for immunoglobulin G autoantibodies (NMO-IgG) against the astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4). Methods Several approaches were tested to develop a robust, passive-transfer mouse model of NMO ON, including NMO-IgG and complement delivery by: (i) retrobulbar infusion; (ii) intravitreal injection; (iii) a single intracranial injection near the optic chiasm; and (iv) 3-days continuous intracranial infusion near the optic chiasm. Results Little ON or retinal pathology was seen using approaches (i) to (iii). Using approach (iv), however, optic nerves showed characteristic NMO pathology, with loss of AQP4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity, granulocyte and macrophage infiltration, deposition of activated complement, demyelination and axonal injury. Even more extensive pathology was created in mice lacking complement inhibitor protein CD59, or using a genetically modified NMO-IgG with enhanced complement effector function, including significant loss of retinal ganglion cells. In control studies, optic nerve pathology was absent in treated AQP4-deficient mice, or in wild-type mice receiving control (non-NMO) IgG and complement. Conclusion Passive transfer of NMO-IgG and complement by continuous infusion near the optic chiasm in mice is sufficient to produce ON with characteristic NMO pathology. The mouse model of NMO ON should be useful in further studies of NMO pathogenesis mechanisms and therapeutics. PMID:24468108

  11. New model for assessing dose and dose rate sensitivity of Gamma ray radiation loss in polarization maintaining optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongchen; Liu Hai; Qiao Wenqiang; Xue Huijie; He Shiyu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Building a new phenomenological theory model to investigate the relation about the irradiation induced loss with irradiation dose and dose rate. ► The Gamma ray irradiation induced loss of the “Capsule” type and “Panda” type polarization maintaining optical fibers at 1310 nm wavelength are investigated. ► The anti irradiation performance of the “Panda” type polarization maintaining optical fiber is better than that of the “Capsule” type polarization maintaining optical fiber, the reason is that the stress region doped by GeO 2 . - Abstract: The Gamma ray irradiation induced loss of the “Capsule” type and “Panda” type polarization maintaining optical fibers at 1310 nm wavelength are investigated. A phenomenological theory model is introduced and the influence of irradiation dose and dose rate on the irradiation induced loss is discussed. The phenomenological theoretical results are consistent with the experimental results of the irradiation induced loss for the two types of polarization maintaining optical fibers. The anti irradiation performance of the “Panda” type polarization maintaining optical fiber is better than that of the “Capsule” type polarization maintaining optical fiber, the reason is that the stress region dope with GeO 2 . Meanwhile, both of the polarization maintaining optical fiber irradiation induced loss increase with increasing the irradiation dose. In the case of same dose, the high dose rate Gamma ray irradiation induced optical fiber losses are higher than that of the low dose rate.

  12. Optics/Optical Diagnostics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optics/Optical Diagnostics Laboratory supports graduate instruction in optics, optical and laser diagnostics and electro-optics. The optics laboratory provides...

  13. Integrated optical and electrical modeling of plasmon-enhanced thin film photovoltaics: A case-study on organic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rourke, Devin; Ahn, Sungmo; Nardes, Alexandre M.; Lagemaat, Jao van de; Kopidakis, Nikos; Park, Wounjhang

    2014-01-01

    The nanoscale light control for absorption enhancement of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices inevitably produces strongly non-uniform optical fields. These non-uniformities due to the localized optical modes are a primary route toward absorption enhancement in OPV devices. Therefore, a rigorous modeling tool taking into account the spatial distribution of optical field and carrier generation is necessary. Presented here is a comprehensive numerical model to describe the coupled optical and electrical behavior of plasmon-enhanced polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. In this model, a position-dependent electron-hole pair generation rate that could become highly non-uniform due to photonic nanostructures is directly calculated from the optical simulations. By considering the absorption and plasmonic properties of nanophotonic gratings included in two different popular device architectures, and applying the Poisson, current continuity, and drift/diffusion equations, the model predicts quantum efficiency, short-circuit current density, and desired carrier mobility ratios for bulk heterojunction devices incorporating nanostructures for light management. In particular, the model predicts a significant degradation of device performance when the carrier species with lower mobility are generated far from the collecting electrode. Consequently, an inverted device architecture is preferred for materials with low hole mobility. This is especially true for devices that include plasmonic nanostructures. Additionally, due to the incorporation of a plasmonic nanostructure, we use simulations to theoretically predict absorption band broadening of a BHJ into energies below the band gap, resulting in a 4.8% increase in generated photocurrent.

  14. Integrated optical and electrical modeling of plasmon-enhanced thin film photovoltaics: A case-study on organic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rourke, Devin [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0390 (United States); Ahn, Sungmo [Department of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0425 (United States); Nardes, Alexandre M.; Lagemaat, Jao van de; Kopidakis, Nikos [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Park, Wounjhang, E-mail: won.park@colorado.edu [Department of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0425 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States)

    2014-09-21

    The nanoscale light control for absorption enhancement of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices inevitably produces strongly non-uniform optical fields. These non-uniformities due to the localized optical modes are a primary route toward absorption enhancement in OPV devices. Therefore, a rigorous modeling tool taking into account the spatial distribution of optical field and carrier generation is necessary. Presented here is a comprehensive numerical model to describe the coupled optical and electrical behavior of plasmon-enhanced polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. In this model, a position-dependent electron-hole pair generation rate that could become highly non-uniform due to photonic nanostructures is directly calculated from the optical simulations. By considering the absorption and plasmonic properties of nanophotonic gratings included in two different popular device architectures, and applying the Poisson, current continuity, and drift/diffusion equations, the model predicts quantum efficiency, short-circuit current density, and desired carrier mobility ratios for bulk heterojunction devices incorporating nanostructures for light management. In particular, the model predicts a significant degradation of device performance when the carrier species with lower mobility are generated far from the collecting electrode. Consequently, an inverted device architecture is preferred for materials with low hole mobility. This is especially true for devices that include plasmonic nanostructures. Additionally, due to the incorporation of a plasmonic nanostructure, we use simulations to theoretically predict absorption band broadening of a BHJ into energies below the band gap, resulting in a 4.8% increase in generated photocurrent.

  15. Detection of oral early cancerous lesion by using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography: mice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong-Yi; Chen, Ping-Hsien; Lee, Tzu-Han; Chang, Kuo-Wei; Kuo, Wen-Chuan

    2018-02-01

    Oral cancer is the 11th most common cancer worldwide, especially in a male adult. The median age of death in oral cancer was 55 years, 10-20 years earlier than other cancers. Presently, oral cancer is often found in late stage, because the lesion is often flat in early stage and is difficult to diagnose under traditional white light imaging. The only definitive method for determining cancer is an invasive biopsy and then using histology examination. How to detect precancerous lesions or early malignant lesions is an important issue for improving prognosis of oral cancer. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a new optical tool for diagnosing early malignant lesions in the skin or gastrointestinal tract recently. Here we report a new method for detecting precancerous or early malignant oral lesions by using swept source polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) with center-wavelength 1310 nm, bandwidth 110 nm and 100 kHz swept rate. We used all single-mode fiber design to detect the change of birefringence information in the epithelium structure. This system has an advantage that enables measurement of backscattered intensity and birefringence simultaneously with only one A-scan per transverse location. In preliminary result, we computed the slope of the every A-scan signal in tissue part using a linear-curve fitting in backscattered intensity and birefringence on the enface. In this research, we used an oral cancer mice model for observing the change of structure and birefringence properties in different stages of oral cancer mice. We presented the parametric enface imaging that can detect the early oral malignant lesions.

  16. Lowered threshold energy for femtosecond laser induced optical breakdown in a water based eye model by aberration correction with adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anja; Géneaux, Romain; Günther, Axel; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2013-06-01

    In femtosecond laser ophthalmic surgery tissue dissection is achieved by photodisruption based on laser induced optical breakdown. In order to minimize collateral damage to the eye laser surgery systems should be optimized towards the lowest possible energy threshold for photodisruption. However, optical aberrations of the eye and the laser system distort the irradiance distribution from an ideal profile which causes a rise in breakdown threshold energy even if great care is taken to minimize the aberrations of the system during design and alignment. In this study we used a water chamber with an achromatic focusing lens and a scattering sample as eye model and determined breakdown threshold in single pulse plasma transmission loss measurements. Due to aberrations, the precise lower limit for breakdown threshold irradiance in water is still unknown. Here we show that the threshold energy can be substantially reduced when using adaptive optics to improve the irradiance distribution by spatial beam shaping. We found that for initial aberrations with a root-mean-square wave front error of only one third of the wavelength the threshold energy can still be reduced by a factor of three if the aberrations are corrected to the diffraction limit by adaptive optics. The transmitted pulse energy is reduced by 17% at twice the threshold. Furthermore, the gas bubble motions after breakdown for pulse trains at 5 kilohertz repetition rate show a more transverse direction in the corrected case compared to the more spherical distribution without correction. Our results demonstrate how both applied and transmitted pulse energy could be reduced during ophthalmic surgery when correcting for aberrations. As a consequence, the risk of retinal damage by transmitted energy and the extent of collateral damage to the focal volume could be minimized accordingly when using adaptive optics in fs-laser surgery.

  17. The optical smoothing for high power laser chain. Fundamental concepts and analytical modeling, computerized simulations, experiments on smoothing by multimode optical fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videau, Laurent

    1998-01-01

    Laser-plasma interaction experiments require a focal spot whose spatial width is imposed and whose energy distribution is uniform. Optical smoothing techniques have been developed for high power laser chains in order to reach the required uniformity level. We present theoretical principles for optical smoothing and we develop a statistical approach which allows a precise study of smoothing techniques. This study deals with the contrast of the time-integrated pattern and with the hot spot motion and their life time. We give more details about the technique of Smoothing by Optical Fiber (SOF). A broadband pulse is injected into a multimode optical fiber. At the output of the fiber, the spatial modes, correlated to a propagation angle in the core of the fiber, are statistically independent and produce a speckle pattern. The speckles move because of the temporal incoherence and the time-integrated pattern is smoothed. The smoothing is characterized by the spectral correlation width defined as the width of the spectral correlation function. We show a smoothing difference between the fiber image plane and the convergence one which is the Fourier plane. Furthermore, we analyze the mode coupling into the core of the fiber which allows an explanation of experimental results compared to theoretical ones. A second study presents experimental results of Smoothing by Optical Fiber on a high power laser chain. In fact, SOF implies amplitude modulations in spatial and temporal domains which induce nonlinear effects. We show that the amplification efficiency decreases and we compare experimental results with an analytic model which takes into account spatial and temporal incoherencies. Finally, we propose a different setup using the cascading effect which creates spatially and/or temporally incoherent pulses. (author) [fr

  18. A forward model for ground penetrating radar imaging of buried perfect electric conductors within the physical optics approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polat, Burak; Meincke, Peter

    2004-01-01

    A forward model for ground penetrating radar imaging of buried 3-D perfect electric conductors is addressed within the framework of diffraction tomography. The similarity of the present forward model derived within the physical optics approximation with that derived within the first Born...

  19. Deep-tissue temperature mapping by multi-illumination photoacoustic tomography aided by a diffusion optical model: a numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan; Tang, Eric; Luo, Jianwen; Yao, Junjie

    2018-01-01

    Temperature mapping during thermotherapy can help precisely control the heating process, both temporally and spatially, to efficiently kill the tumor cells and prevent the healthy tissues from heating damage. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has been used for noninvasive temperature mapping with high sensitivity, based on the linear correlation between the tissue's Grüneisen parameter and temperature. However, limited by the tissue's unknown optical properties and thus the optical fluence at depths beyond the optical diffusion limit, the reported PAT thermometry usually takes a ratiometric measurement at different temperatures and thus cannot provide absolute measurements. Moreover, ratiometric measurement over time at different temperatures has to assume that the tissue's optical properties do not change with temperatures, which is usually not valid due to the temperature-induced hemodynamic changes. We propose an optical-diffusion-model-enhanced PAT temperature mapping that can obtain the absolute temperature distribution in deep tissue, without the need of multiple measurements at different temperatures. Based on the initial acoustic pressure reconstructed from multi-illumination photoacoustic signals, both the local optical fluence and the optical parameters including absorption and scattering coefficients are first estimated by the optical-diffusion model, then the temperature distribution is obtained from the reconstructed Grüneisen parameters. We have developed a mathematic model for the multi-illumination PAT of absolute temperatures, and our two-dimensional numerical simulations have shown the feasibility of this new method. The proposed absolute temperature mapping method may set the technical foundation for better temperature control in deep tissue in thermotherapy.

  20. Naval Research Laboratory Ecological -- Photochemical -- Bio-optical--Numerical Experiment (Neptune) Version 1: A Portable, Flexible Modeling Environment Designed to Resolve Time-dependent Feedbacks Between Upper Ocean Ecology, Photochemistry, and Optics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jolliff, Jason K; Kindle, John C

    2007-01-01

    A modeling system has been constructed that combines ecological element cycling, photochemical processes, and bio-optical processes into a single simulation that may be coupled to hydrodynamic models...

  1. A comprehensive simulation model of the performance of photochromic films in absorbance-modulation-optical-lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apratim Majumder

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical lithography is the most prevalent method of fabricating micro-and nano-scale structures in the semiconductor industry due to the fact that patterning using photons is fast, accurate and provides high throughput. However, the resolution of this technique is inherently limited by the physical phenomenon of diffraction. Absorbance-Modulation-Optical Lithography (AMOL, a recently developed technique has been successfully demonstrated to be able to circumvent this diffraction limit. AMOL employs a dual-wavelength exposure system in conjunction with spectrally selective reversible photo-transitions in thin films of photochromic molecules to achieve patterning of features with sizes beyond the far-field diffraction limit. We have developed a finite-element-method based full-electromagnetic-wave solution model that simulates the photo-chemical processes that occur within the thin film of the photochromic molecules under illumination by the exposure and confining wavelengths in AMOL. This model allows us to understand how the material characteristics influence the confinement to sub-diffraction dimensions, of the transmitted point spread function (PSF of the exposure wavelength inside the recording medium. The model reported here provides the most comprehensive analysis of the AMOL process to-date, and the results show that the most important factors that govern the process, are the polarization of the two beams, the ratio of the intensities of the two wavelengths, the relative absorption coefficients and the concentration of the photochromic species, the thickness of the photochromic layer and the quantum yields of the photoreactions at the two wavelengths. The aim of this work is to elucidate the requirements of AMOL in successfully circumventing the far-field diffraction limit.

  2. A comprehensive simulation model of the performance of photochromic films in absorbance-modulation-optical-lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumder, Apratim; Helms, Phillip L.; Menon, Rajesh, E-mail: rmenon@eng.utah.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Andrew, Trisha L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Optical lithography is the most prevalent method of fabricating micro-and nano-scale structures in the semiconductor industry due to the fact that patterning using photons is fast, accurate and provides high throughput. However, the resolution of this technique is inherently limited by the physical phenomenon of diffraction. Absorbance-Modulation-Optical Lithography (AMOL), a recently developed technique has been successfully demonstrated to be able to circumvent this diffraction limit. AMOL employs a dual-wavelength exposure system in conjunction with spectrally selective reversible photo-transitions in thin films of photochromic molecules to achieve patterning of features with sizes beyond the far-field diffraction limit. We have developed a finite-element-method based full-electromagnetic-wave solution model that simulates the photo-chemical processes that occur within the thin film of the photochromic molecules under illumination by the exposure and confining wavelengths in AMOL. This model allows us to understand how the material characteristics influence the confinement to sub-diffraction dimensions, of the transmitted point spread function (PSF) of the exposure wavelength inside the recording medium. The model reported here provides the most comprehensive analysis of the AMOL process to-date, and the results show that the most important factors that govern the process, are the polarization of the two beams, the ratio of the intensities of the two wavelengths, the relative absorption coefficients and the concentration of the photochromic species, the thickness of the photochromic layer and the quantum yields of the photoreactions at the two wavelengths. The aim of this work is to elucidate the requirements of AMOL in successfully circumventing the far-field diffraction limit.

  3. Smoke inputs to climate models: optical properties and height distribution for nuclear winter studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penner, J.E.; Haselman, L.C. Jr.

    1985-04-01

    Smoke from fires produced in the aftermath of a major nuclear exchange has been predicted to cause large decreases in land surface temperatures. The extent of the decrease and even the sign of the temperature change depend on the optical characteristics of the smoke and how it is distributed with altitude. The height distribution of smoke over a fire is determined by the amount of buoyant energy produced by the fire and the amount of energy released by the latent heat of condensation of water vapor. The optical properties of the smoke depend on the size distribution of smoke particles which changes due to coagulation within the lofted plume. We present calculations demonstrating these processes and estimate their importance for the smoke source term input for climate models. For high initial smoke densities and for absorbing smoke ( m = 1.75 - 0.3i), coagulation of smoke particles within the smoke plume is predicted to first increase, then decrease, the size-integrated extinction cross section. However, at the smoke densities predicted in our model (assuming a 3% emission rate for smoke) and for our assumed initial size distribution, the attachment rates for brownian and turbulent collision processes are not fast enough to alter the smoke size distribution enough to significantly change the integrated extinction cross section. Early-time coagulation is, however, fast enough to allow further coagulation, on longer time scales, to act to decrease the extinction cross section. On these longer time scales appropriate to climate models, coagulation can decrease the extinction cross section by almost a factor of two before the smoke becomes well mixed around the globe. This process has been neglected in past climate effect evaluations, but could have a significant effect, since the extinction cross section enters as an exponential factor in calculating the light attenuation due to smoke. 10 refs., 20 figs

  4. Optical Modeling of Sea Salt Aerosols: The Effects of Nonsphericity and Inhomogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Lei; Lin, Wushao; Wang, Zheng; Tang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yi, Bingqi

    2018-01-01

    The nonsphericity and inhomogeneity of marine aerosols (sea salts) have not been addressed in pertinent radiative transfer calculations and remote sensing studies. This study investigates the optical properties of nonspherical and inhomogeneous sea salts using invariant imbedding T-matrix simulations. Dry sea salt aerosols are modeled based on superellipsoidal geometries with a prescribed aspect ratio and roundness parameter. Wet sea salt particles are modeled as coated superellipsoids, as spherical particles with a superellipsoidal core, and as homogeneous spheres depending on the level of relative humidity. Aspect ratio and roundness parameters are found to be critical to interpreting the linear depolarization ratios (LDRs) of NaCl crystals from laboratory measurements. The optimal morphology parameters of NaCl necessary to reproduce the measurements are found to be consistent with data gleaned from an electron micrograph. The LDRs of wet sea salts are computed based on inhomogeneous models and compared with the measured data from ground-based LiDAR. The dependence of the LDR on relative humidity is explicitly considered. The increase in the LDR with relative humidity at the initial phase of deliquescence is attributed to both the size increase and the inhomogeneity effect. For large humidity values, the LDR substantially decreases because the overall particle shape becomes more spherical and the inhomogeneity effect in a particle on the LDR is suppressed for submicron sea salts. However, the effect of inhomogeneity on optical properties is pronounced for coarse-mode sea salts. These findings have important implications for atmospheric radiative transfer and remote sensing involving sea salt aerosols.

  5. Analytical model of the optical response of periodically structured metallic films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabbas, A; Halté, V; Bigot, J-Y

    2005-10-31

    In this paper we investigate the optical response of periodically structured metallic films constituted of sub-wavelength apertures. Our approach consists in studying the diffraction of transverse magnetic polarized electromagnetic waves by a one-dimensional grating. The method that we use is the Rigorous Coupled Waves Analysis allowing us to obtain an analytical model to calculate the diffraction efficiencies. The zero and first order terms allow determining the transmission, reflectivity and absorption of symmetric or asymmetric nanostructures surrounded either by identical or different dielectric media. For both type of nanostructures the spectral shape of the enhanced resonant transmission associated to surface plasmons displays a Fano profile. In the case of symmetric nanostructures, we study the conditions of formation of coupled surface plasmon-polaritons as well as their effect on the optical response of the modulated structure. For asymmetric nanostructures, we discuss the non-reciprocity of the reflectivity and we investigate the spectral dependency of the enhanced resonant transmission on the refractive index of the dielectric surrounding the metal film.

  6. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy to detect hepatic necrosis after normothermic ischemia: animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Renan A.; Vollet-Filho, Jose D.; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Fernandez, Jorge L.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Castro-e-Silva, Orlando; Sankarankutty, Ajith K.

    2015-06-01

    Liver transplantation is a well-established treatment for liver failure. However, the success of the transplantation procedure depends on liver graft conditions. The tissue function evaluation during the several transplantation stages is relevant, in particular during the organ harvesting, when a decision is made concerning the viability of the graft. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy is a good option because it is a noninvasive and fast technique. A partial normothermic hepatic ischemia was performed in rat livers, with a vascular occlusion of both median and left lateral lobes, allowing circulation only for the right lateral lobe and the caudate lobe. Fluorescence spectra under excitation at 532 nm (doubled frequency Nd:YAG laser) were collected using a portable spectrometer (USB2000, Ocean Optics, USA). The fluorescence emission was collected before vascular occlusion, after ischemia, and 24 hours after reperfusion. A morphometric histology analysis was performed as the gold standard evaluation - liver samples were analyzed, and the percentage of necrotic tissue was obtained. The results showed that changes in the fluorescence emission after ischemia can be correlated with the amount of necrosis evaluated by a morphometric analysis, the Pearson correlation coefficient of the generated model was 0.90 and the root mean square error was around 20%. In this context, the laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique after normothermic ischemia showed to be a fast and efficient method to differentiate ischemic injury from viable tissues.

  7. Shell and isotopic effects in neutron interaction with nuclei. [Optical model and nucleus asymmetry correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasechnik, M V

    1978-01-01

    Major results of investigations into the shell structure of deformed nuclei with the number of neutrons of approximately 100, as well as new isotopic effects in the inelastic scattering of fast neutrons with nuclei are reported. The experiments conducted at the WWR-M research reactor have shown a substantial dependence of the nuclear excited energy-level density on the mass number and the number of neutrons. The fact resulted in a conclusion that the deformed nuclei possess filled shells, that was an incentive to revise the whole nuclear shell concept. In particular it was established that the property of magicity rests not only on the sphericity of nuclei but it may be also observed in strongly deformed nuclei. The isotope-spin dependence of the nuclear potential was studied at the AG-5 pulse electrostatic generator. The parameters of the potential were determined by comparing the experimental data on inelastic scattering and polarization of fast neutrons by nuclei from /sup 48/Ti to /sup 209/Bi with the calculations in terms of the optical model. Simple correlations were established between the optical potential and the nucleus asymmetry parameter ..cap alpha..=N-Z/A in wide ranges of mass numbers and neutron energy.

  8. Comparison of cloud optical depth and cloud mask applying BRDF model-based background surface reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H. W.; Yeom, J. M.; Woo, S. H.

    2017-12-01

    Over the thin cloud region, satellite can simultaneously detect the reflectance from thin clouds and land surface. Since the mixed reflectance is not the exact cloud information, the background surface reflectance should be eliminated to accurately distinguish thin cloud such as cirrus. In the previous research, Kim et al (2017) was developed the cloud masking algorithm using the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI), which is one of significant instruments for Communication, Ocean, and Meteorology Satellite (COMS). Although GOCI has 8 spectral channels including visible and near infra-red spectral ranges, the cloud masking has quantitatively reasonable result when comparing with MODIS cloud mask (Collection 6 MYD35). Especially, we noticed that this cloud masking algorithm is more specialized in thin cloud detections through the validation with Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) data. Because this cloud masking method was concentrated on eliminating background surface effects from the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance. Applying the difference between TOA reflectance and the bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model-based background surface reflectance, cloud areas both thick cloud and thin cloud can be discriminated without infra-red channels which were mostly used for detecting clouds. Moreover, when the cloud mask result was utilized as the input data when simulating BRDF model and the optimized BRDF model-based surface reflectance was used for the optimized cloud masking, the probability of detection (POD) has higher value than POD of the original cloud mask. In this study, we examine the correlation between cloud optical depth (COD) and its cloud mask result. Cloud optical depths mostly depend on the cloud thickness, the characteristic of contents, and the size of cloud contents. COD ranges from less than 0.1 for thin clouds to over 1000 for the huge cumulus due to scattering by droplets. With

  9. In vitro optical detection of simulated blood pulse in a human tooth pulp model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklas, A; Hiller, K-A; Jaeger, A; Brandt, M; Putzger, J; Ermer, C; Schulz, I; Monkman, G; Giglberger, S; Hirmer, M; Danilov, S; Ganichev, S; Schmalz, G

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive optical methods such as photoplethysmography, established for blood pulse detection in organs, have been proposed for vitality testing of human dental pulp. However, no information is available on the mechanism of action in a closed pulp chamber and on the impairing influence of other than pulpal blood flow sources. Therefore, the aim of the present in vitro study was to develop a device for the optical detection of pulpal blood pulse and to investigate the influence of different parameters (including gingival blood flow [GBF] simulation) on the derived signals. Air, Millipore water, human erythrocyte suspensions (HES), non-particulate hemoglobin suspension (NPHS), and lysed hemoglobin suspension (LHES) were pulsed through a flexible (silicone) or a rigid (glass) tube placed within an extracted human molar in a tooth-gingiva model. HES was additionally pulsed through a rigid tube around the tooth, simulating GBF alone or combined with the flow through the tooth by two separate peristaltic pumps. Light from high-power light-emitting diodes (625 nm (red) and 940 nm (infrared [IR]); Golden Dragon, Osram, Germany) was introduced to the coronal/buccal part of the tooth, and the signal amplitude [∆U, in volts] of transmitted light was detected by a sensor at the opposite side of the tooth. Signal processing was carried out by means of a newly developed blood pulse detector. Finally, experiments were repeated with the application of rubber dam (blue, purple, pink, and black), aluminum foil, and black antistatic plastic foil. Nonparametric statistical analysis was applied (n = 5; α = 0.05). Signals were obtained for HES and LHES, but not with air, Millipore water, or NPHS. Using a flexible tube, signals for HES were higher for IR compared to red light, whereas for the rigid tube, the signals were significantly higher for red light than for IR. In general, significantly less signal amplitude was recorded for HES with the rigid glass tube than with the

  10. Modeling skin cooling using optical windows and cryogens during laser induced hyperthermia in a multilayer vascularized tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Rupesh; Das, Koushik; Okajima, Junnosuke; Maruyama, Shigenao; Mishra, Subhash C.

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with the spatial and the temporal evolution of tissue temperature during skin surface cooled laser induced hyperthermia. Three different skin surface cooling methodologies viz., optical window contact cooling, cryogenic spray cooling and cryogen cooled optical window contact cooling are considered. Sapphire, yttrium aluminum garnet, lithium tantalate, and magnesium oxide doped lithium niobate are the considered optical windows. The cryogens considered are liquid CO_2 and R1234yf. Heat transfer in the multilayer skin tissue embedded with thermally significant blood vessels pairs is modeled using the Pennes and Weinbaum–Jiji bioheat equations. Weinbaum–Jiji bioheat equation is used for the vascularized tissue. Laser transport in the tissue is modeled using the radiative transfer equation. Axial and radial (skin surface) temperature distributions for different combinations of optical windows and cryogens are analyzed. Liquid CO_2 cooled yttrium aluminum garnet is found to be the best surface cooling mechanism. - Highlights: • Skin surface cooled laser induced hyperthermia is studied. • A multi-layer 2-D cylindrical tissue geometry is considered. • Both Pennes and Weinbaum–Jiji bioheat models are considered. • Laser transport in the tissue is modeled using discrete ordinate method. • Results for 4 optical windows and 2 cryogens for skin cooling are presented.

  11. Global phenomenological optical model potential for nucleon-actinide reactions at energies up to 300 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Yinlu; Liang Haiying; Guo Hairui; Shen Qingbiao; Xu Yongli

    2010-01-01

    A set of new global phenomenological optical model potential parameters for the actinide region with incident nucleon energies from 1 keV up to 300 MeV is obtained. They are based on a smooth, unique functional form for the energy dependence of the potential depths and on physically constrained geometry parameters. The available experimental data including the neutron total cross sections, nonelastic cross sections, elastic scattering cross sections, elastic scattering angular distributions, and proton reaction cross sections and elastic scattering angular distributions of 232 Th and 238 U are used. The new nucleon global optical model potential parameters obtained are analyzed and used to analyze the experimental data of nucleon-actinide reactions. It is found that the present form of the global optical model potential could reproduce both the neutron and the proton experimental data.

  12. Expansions of the neurovascular scleral canal and contained optic nerve occur early in the hypertonic saline rat experimental glaucoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Marta; Yang, Hongli; Gardiner, Stuart K; Cepurna, William O; Johnson, Elaine C; Morrison, John C; Burgoyne, Claude F

    2016-04-01

    To characterize early optic nerve head (ONH) structural change in rat experimental glaucoma (EG). Unilateral intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation was induced in Brown Norway rats by hypertonic saline injection into the episcleral veins and animals were sacrificed 4 weeks later by perfusion fixation. Optic nerve cross-sections were graded from 1 (normal) to 5 (extensive injury) by 5 masked observers. ONHs with peripapillary retina and sclera were embedded, serial sectioned, 3-D reconstructed, delineated, and quantified. Overall and animal-specific EG versus Control eye ONH parameter differences were assessed globally and regionally by linear mixed effect models with significance criteria adjusted for multiple comparisons. Expansions of the optic nerve and surrounding anterior scleral canal opening achieved statistical significance overall (p < 0.0022), and in 7 of 8 EG eyes (p < 0.005). In at least 5 EG eyes, significant expansions (p < 0.005) in Bruch's membrane opening (BMO) (range 3-10%), the anterior and posterior scleral canal openings (8-21% and 5-21%, respectively), and the optic nerve at the anterior and posterior scleral canal openings (11-30% and 8-41%, respectively) were detected. Optic nerve expansion was greatest within the superior and inferior quadrants. Optic nerve expansion at the posterior scleral canal opening was significantly correlated to optic nerve damage (R = 0.768, p = 0.042). In the rat ONH, the optic nerve and surrounding BMO and neurovascular scleral canal expand early in their response to chronic experimental IOP elevation. These findings provide phenotypic landmarks and imaging targets for detecting the development of experimental glaucomatous optic neuropathy in the rat eye. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Extended Bose Hubbard model of interacting bosonic atoms in optical lattices: From superfluidity to density waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzarella, G.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.

    2006-01-01

    For systems of interacting, ultracold spin-zero neutral bosonic atoms, harmonically trapped and subject to an optical lattice potential, we derive an Extended Bose Hubbard (EBH) model by developing a systematic expansion for the Hamiltonian of the system in powers of the lattice parameters and of a scale parameter, the lattice attenuation factor. We identify the dominant terms that need to be retained in realistic experimental conditions, up to nearest-neighbor interactions and nearest-neighbor hoppings conditioned by the on-site occupation numbers. In the mean field approximation, we determine the free energy of the system and study the phase diagram both at zero and at finite temperature. At variance with the standard on site Bose Hubbard model, the zero-temperature phase diagram of the EBH model possesses a dual structure in the Mott insulating regime. Namely, for specific ranges of the lattice parameters, a density wave phase characterizes the system at integer fillings, with domains of alternating mean occupation numbers that are the atomic counterparts of the domains of staggered magnetizations in an antiferromagnetic phase. We show as well that in the EBH model, a zero-temperature quantum phase transition to pair superfluidity is, in principle, possible, but completely suppressed at the lowest order in the lattice attenuation factor. Finally, we determine the possible occurrence of the different phases as a function of the experimentally controllable lattice parameters

  14. Characterization of rat model of acute anterior uveitis using optical coherence tomography angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo June; Pepple, Kathryn L.; Zhi, Zhongwei; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-03-01

    Uveitis, or ocular inflammation, is a cause of severe visual impairment. Rodent models of uveitis are powerful tools used to investigate the pathological mechanisms of ocular inflammation and to study the efficacy of new therapies prior to human testing. In this paper, we report the utility of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) angiography in characterizing the inflammatory changes induced in the anterior segment of a rat model of uveitis. Acute anterior uveitis (AAU) was induced in two rats by intravitreal injection of a killed mycobacterial extract. One of them received a concurrent periocular injection of steroids to model a treatment effect. OCT imaging was performed prior to inflammation induction on day 0 (baseline), and 2 days post-injection (peak inflammation). Baseline and inflamed images were compared. OCT angiography identified swelling of the cornea, inflammatory cells in the anterior and posterior chambers, a fibrinous papillary membrane, and dilation of iris vessels in the inflamed eyes when compared to baseline images. Steroid treatment was shown to prevent the changes associated with inflammation. This is a novel application of anterior OCT imaging in animal models of uveitis, and provides a high resolution, in vivo assay for detecting and quantifying ocular inflammation and the response to new therapies.

  15. Mapping Pyroclastic Flow Inundation Using Radar and Optical Satellite Images and Lahar Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Wook Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sinabung volcano, located above the Sumatra subduction of the Indo-Australian plate under the Eurasian plate, became active in 2010 after about 400 years of quiescence. We use ALOS/PALSAR interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR images to measure surface deformation from February 2007 to January 2011. We model the observed preeruption inflation and coeruption deflation using Mogi and prolate spheroid sources to infer volume changes of the magma chamber. We interpret that the inflation was due to magma accumulation in a shallow reservoir beneath Mount Sinabung and attribute the deflation due to magma withdrawal from the shallow reservoir during the eruption as well as thermoelastic compaction of erupted material. The pyroclastic flow extent during the eruption is then derived from the LAHARZ model based on the coeruption volume from InSAR modeling and compared to that derived from the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+ image. The pyroclastic flow inundation extents between the two different methods agree at about 86%, suggesting the capability of mapping pyroclastic flow inundation by combing radar and optical imagery as well as flow modeling.

  16. and three-dimensional models for analysis of optical absorption in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The optical energy gaps of WS2 single crystal were determined from the analysis of the absorption spectrum near ... Optical band gap; two- and three-dimensional; optical absorption. 1. ..... ssion, New Delhi, in the form of a research project is.

  17. Hydraulic description of a flood event with optical remote sensors: a constructive constraint on modelling uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Stéphanie; Allenbach, Bernard

    2010-05-01

    compartments; high resolution optical imagery allow the exhaustive inventory of breaches and overflows; turbidity variations and draw-off give information on stream directions. These facts are of primary interest to help in deriving a firm understanding of the flooding processes, but also comprise a powerful source for the necessary parameterization and/or calibration of hydraulic models. Thus the accuracy of flood extents derived from remote sensing data could, on the one hand, be valuable inputs to historical flood info-bases within overall risk-linked databases, and on the other hand, test the validity of hydrological modelling, while helping to lift equifinality uncertainties. These first investigations highlight that space imagery of events constitutes an unrivalled tool for flood disaster observation. This 2D record is complementary to all field measurements and the integration of "space derived flood products" is valuable for all stages of risk management. This potential of EO optical sensors for flood monitoring is also confirmed in a detailed analysis making a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the results, confronting ten optical and radar remote sensing platforms with field observations.

  18. Neutron Skin Thickness of 48Ca from a Nonlocal Dispersive Optical-Model Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahzoon, M. H.; Atkinson, M. C.; Charity, R. J.; Dickhoff, W. H.

    2017-12-01

    A nonlocal dispersive optical-model analysis has been carried out for neutrons and protons in 48Ca. Elastic-scattering angular distributions, total and reaction cross sections, single-particle energies, the neutron and proton numbers, and the charge distribution have been fitted to extract the neutron and proton self-energies both above and below the Fermi energy. From the single-particle propagator resulting from these self-energies, we have determined the charge and neutron matter distributions in 48Ca. A best fit neutron skin of 0.249 ±0.023 fm is deduced, but values up to 0.33 fm are still consistent. The energy dependence of the total neutron cross sections is shown to have a strong sensitivity to the skin thickness.

  19. Size dependent diffusive parameters and tensorial diffusion equations in neutronic models for optically small nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Premuda, F.

    1983-01-01

    Two lines in improved neutron diffusion theory extending the efficiency of finite-difference diffusion codes to the field of optically small systems, are here reviewed. The firs involves the nodal solution for tensorial diffusion equation in slab geometry and tensorial formulation in parallelepiped and cylindrical gemometry; the dependence of critical eigenvalue from small slab thicknesses is also analitically investigated and finally a regularized tensorial diffusion equation is derived for slab. The other line refer to diffusion models formally unchanged with respect to the classical one, but where new size-dependent RTGB definitions for diffusion parameters are adopted, requiring that they allow to reproduce, in diffusion approach, the terms of neutron transport global balance; the trascendental equation for the buckling, arising in slab, sphere and parallelepiped geometry from the above requirement, are reported and the sizedependence of the new diffusion coefficient and extrapolated end point is investigated

  20. FAST TCP over optical burst switched networks: Modeling and stability analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Shihada, Basem

    2013-04-01

    FAST TCP is important for promoting data-intensive applications since it can cleverly react to both packet loss and delay for detecting network congestion. This paper provides a continuous time model and extensive stability analysis of FAST TCP congestion-control mechanism in bufferless Optical Burst Switched Networks (OBS). The paper first shows that random burst contentions are essential to stabilize the network, but cause throughput degradation in FAST TCP flows when a burst with all the packets from a single round is dropped. Second, it shows that FAST TCP is vulnerable to burst delay and fails to detect network congestion due to the little variation of round-trip time, thus unstable. Finally it shows that introducing extra delays by implementing burst retransmission stabilizes FAST TCP over OBS. The paper proves that FAST TCP is not stable over barebone OBS. However, it is locally, exponentially, and asymptotically stable over OBS with burst retransmission.

  1. EPR, optical and superposition model study of Mn2+ doped L+ glutamic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripal, Ram; Singh, Manju

    2015-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of Mn2+ doped L+ glutamic acid single crystal is done at room temperature. Four interstitial sites are observed and the spin Hamiltonian parameters are calculated with the help of large number of resonant lines for various angular positions of external magnetic field. The optical absorption study is also done at room temperature. The energy values for different orbital levels are calculated, and observed bands are assigned as transitions from 6A1g(s) ground state to various excited states. With the help of these assigned bands, Racah inter-electronic repulsion parameters B = 869 cm-1, C = 2080 cm-1 and cubic crystal field splitting parameter Dq = 730 cm-1 are calculated. Zero field splitting (ZFS) parameters D and E are calculated by the perturbation formulae and crystal field parameters obtained using superposition model. The calculated values of ZFS parameters are in good agreement with the experimental values obtained by EPR.

  2. Design and Modeling of Symmetric Three Branch Polymer Planar Optical Power Dividers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Prajzler

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Two types of polymer-based three-branch symmetric planar optical power dividers (splitters were designed, multimode interference (MMI splitter and triangular shape-spacing splitter. By means of modeling the real structures were simulated as made of Epoxy Novolak Resin on silicon substrate, with silica buffer layer and polymethylmethacrylate as protection cover layer. The design of polymer waveguide structure was done by Beam Propagation Method. After comparing properties of both types of the splitters we have demonstrated that our new polymer based triangular shaped splitter can work simultaneously in broader spectrum, the only condition would be that the waveguides are single-mode guiding. It practically means that, what concerns communication wavelengths, it can on principle simultaneously operate at two mainly used wavelengths, 1310 and 1550 nm.

  3. Progress in the development of global medium-energy nucleon-nucleus optical model potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madland, D.G.

    1997-01-01

    Two existing global medium-energy nucleon-nucleus phenomenological optical model potentials are described and compared with experiment and with each other. The first of these employs a Dirac approach (second-order reduction) that is global in projectile energy and projectile isospin and applies to the target nucleus 208 Pb. The second of these employs a relativistic equivalent to the Schroedinger equation (including relativistic kinematics) that is global in projectile energy, projectile isospin, and target (Z,A). Finally, current work is described and the influence of the nuclear bound state problem (treated in relativistic mean field theory) on the Dirac scattering problem is mentioned. Spherical target nuclei are treated in the present work and strongly-collective target nuclei (rotational and vibrational) requiring coupled-channels approaches will be treated in a future paper. (author)

  4. Electrical and optical 3D modelling of light-trapping single-photon avalanche diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tianzhe; Zang, Kai; Morea, Matthew; Xue, Muyu; Lu, Ching-Ying; Jiang, Xiao; Zhang, Qiang; Kamins, Theodore I.; Harris, James S.

    2018-02-01

    Single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) have been widely used to push the frontier of scientific research (e.g., quantum science and single-molecule fluorescence) and practical applications (e.g., Lidar). However, there is a typical compromise between photon detection efficiency and jitter distribution. The light-trapping SPAD has been proposed to break this trade-off by coupling the vertically incoming photons into a laterally propagating mode while maintaining a small jitter and a thin Si device layer. In this work, we provide a 3D-based optical and electrical model based on practical fabrication conditions and discuss about design parameters, which include surface texturing, photon injection position, device area, and other features.

  5. Spiking cortical model-based nonlocal means method for speckle reduction in optical coherence tomography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuming; Li, Liu; Zhu, Fei; Hou, Wenguang; Chen, Xinjian

    2014-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images are usually degraded by significant speckle noise, which will strongly hamper their quantitative analysis. However, speckle noise reduction in OCT images is particularly challenging because of the difficulty in differentiating between noise and the information components of the speckle pattern. To address this problem, the spiking cortical model (SCM)-based nonlocal means method is presented. The proposed method explores self-similarities of OCT images based on rotation-invariant features of image patches extracted by SCM and then restores the speckled images by averaging the similar patches. This method can provide sufficient speckle reduction while preserving image details very well due to its effectiveness in finding reliable similar patches under high speckle noise contamination. When applied to the retinal OCT image, this method provides signal-to-noise ratio improvements of >16 dB with a small 5.4% loss of similarity.

  6. Study of neutron shell structure of even-even 40-56Ca isotopes by the dispersive optical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bespalova, O.V.; Boboshin, I.N.; Varlamov, V.V.; Ermakova, T.A.; Ishkhanov, B.S.; Romanovskij, E.A.; Spasskaya, T.I.; Timokhina, T.P.

    2005-01-01

    The single-particle energies and occupation probabilities of the bound neutron states in 40,42,44,46,48 Ca isotopes were obtained by the joint evaluation of the stripping and pick-up reaction data. The results were analyzed by the dispersive optical model and a good agreement was achieved. The dispersive optical potential was extrapolated to unstable 50,52,54,56 Ca nuclei. The calculated single-particle energies of the bound neutron states in unstable Ca isotopes were compared with the nuclear shell-model calculations, which predicted new magic number N = 34 for nuclei with Z = 20 [ru

  7. Model Deformation and Optical Angle of Attack Measurement System in the NASA Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Laura K.; Drain, Bethany A.; Schairer, Edward T.; Heineck, James T.; Bell, James H.

    2017-01-01

    Both AoA and MDM measurements can be made using an optical system that relies on photogrammetry. Optical measurements are being requested by customers in wind tunnels with increasing frequency due to their non-intrusive nature and recent hardware and software advances that allow measurements to become near real time. The NASA Ames Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel is currently developing a system based on photogrammetry to measure model deformation and model angle of attack. This paper describes the new system, its development, its use on recent tests and plans to further develop the system.

  8. Optical model potential analysis of n ¯A and n A interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Teck-Ghee; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2018-05-01

    We use a momentum-dependent optical model potential to analyze the annihilation cross sections of the antineutron n ¯ on C, Al, Fe, Cu, Ag, Sn, and Pb nuclei for projectile momenta plab ≲500 MeV /c . We obtain a good description of annihilation cross section data of Barbina et al. [Nucl. Phys. A 612, 346 (1997), 10.1016/S0375-9474(96)00331-4] and of Astrua et al. [Nucl. Phys. A 697, 209 (2002), 10.1016/S0375-9474(01)01252-0] which exhibit an interesting dependence of the cross sections on plab as well as on the target mass number A . We also obtain the neutron (n ) nonelastic reaction cross sections for the same targets. Comparing the n A reaction cross sections σrecn A to the n ¯A annihilation cross sections σannn ¯A, we find that σannn ¯A is significantly larger than σrecn A, that is, the σannn ¯A/σrecn A cross section ratio lies between the values of about 1.5 to 4.0 in the momentum region where comparison is possible. The dependence of the n ¯ annihilation cross section on the projectile charge is also examined in comparison with the antiproton p ¯. Here we predict the p ¯A annihilation cross section on the simplest assumption that both p ¯A and n ¯A interactions have the same nuclear part of the optical potential but differ only in the electrostatic Coulomb interaction. Deviation from a such simple model extrapolation in measurements will provide new information on the difference between n ¯A and p ¯A potentials.

  9. Optical modeling and polarization calibration for CMB measurements with ACTPol and Advanced ACTPol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Brian; Austermann, Jason; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Coughlin, Kevin P.; Duff, Shannon M.; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Hasselfield, Matthew; Henderson, Shawn W.; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hubmayr, Johannes; Irwin, Kent D.; Li, Dale; McMahon, Jeff; Nati, Federico; Niemack, Michael D.; Newburgh, Laura; Page, Lyman A.; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmitt, Benjamin L.; Simon, Sara M.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Ward, Jonathan T.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-07-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarimeter (ACTPol) is a polarization sensitive upgrade to the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, located at an elevation of 5190 m on Cerro Toco in Chile. ACTPol uses transition edge sensor bolometers coupled to orthomode transducers to measure both the temperature and polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Calibration of the detector angles is a critical step in producing polarization maps of the CMB. Polarization angle offsets in the detector calibration can cause leakage in polarization from E to B modes and induce a spurious signal in the EB and TB cross correlations, which eliminates our ability to measure potential cosmological sources of EB and TB signals, such as cosmic birefringence. We calibrate the ACTPol detector angles by ray tracing the designed detector angle through the entire optical chain to determine the projection of each detector angle on the sky. The distribution of calibrated detector polarization angles are consistent with a global offset angle from zero when compared to the EB-nulling offset angle, the angle required to null the EB cross-correlation power spectrum. We present the optical modeling process. The detector angles can be cross checked through observations of known polarized sources, whether this be a galactic source or a laboratory reference standard. To cross check the ACTPol detector angles, we use a thin film polarization grid placed in front of the receiver of the telescope, between the receiver and the secondary reflector. Making use of a rapidly rotating half-wave plate (HWP) mount we spin the polarizing grid at a constant speed, polarizing and rotating the incoming atmospheric signal. The resulting sinusoidal signal is used to determine the detector angles. The optical modeling calibration was shown to be consistent with a global offset angle of zero when compared to EB nulling in the first ACTPol results and will continue to be a part of our calibration implementation. The first

  10. Mathematical Modeling of Optical Radiation Emission as a Function of Welding Power during Gas Shielded Metal Arc Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Stefan; Janßen, Marco; Schmitz, Martin; Ott, Günter

    2017-11-01

    Arc welding is accompanied by intense optical radiation emission that can be detrimental not only for the welder himself but also for people working nearby or for passersby. Technological progress advances continuously in the field of joining, so an up-to-date radiation database is necessary. Additionally, many literature irradiance data have been measured for a few welding currents or for parts of the optical spectral region only. Within this paper, a comprehensive study of contemporary metal active gas, metal inert gas, and cold metal transfer welding is presented covering optical radiation emission from 200 up to 2,700 nm by means of (spectro-) radiometric measurements. The investigated welding currents range from 70 to 350 A, reflecting values usually applied in industry. Based upon these new irradiance data, three mathematical models were derived in order to describe optical radiation emission as a function of welding power. The linear, exponential, and sigmoidal emission models depend on the process variant (standard or pulsed) as well as on the welding material (mild and stainless steel, aluminum). In conjunction with the corresponding exposure limit values for incoherent optical radiation maximum permissible exposure durations were calculated as a function of welding power. Typical times are shorter than 1 s for the ultraviolet spectral region and range from 1 to 10 s for visible radiation. For the infrared regime, exposure durations are of the order of minutes to hours. Finally, a validation of the metal active gas emission models was carried out with manual arc welding.

  11. Impact of Bio-optical Data Assimilation on Short-term Coupled Physical, Bio-optical Model Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) which drives photosynthesis of the ecosystem model, and relevant to the forecast of the underwater light...highly uncertain model parameters. Only P\\ and PI are prognostic variables in (1) and (2). [is] Phytoplankton photosynthesis in the biochemical model...Application to remote sensing and database activities, Mar. Chem., #5(2004), 41-61. Cossarini G.. P. F. J. Lcrmusiaux. and C. Solidoro (2009), Lagoon of

  12. Ground truth methods for optical cross-section modeling of biological aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalter, J.; Thrush, E.; Santarpia, J.; Chaudhry, Z.; Gilberry, J.; Brown, D. M.; Brown, A.; Carter, C. C.

    2011-05-01

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) systems have demonstrated some capability to meet the needs of a fastresponse standoff biological detection method for simulants in open air conditions. These systems are designed to exploit various cloud signatures, such as differential elastic backscatter, fluorescence, and depolarization in order to detect biological warfare agents (BWAs). However, because the release of BWAs in open air is forbidden, methods must be developed to predict candidate system performance against real agents. In support of such efforts, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab (JHU/APL) has developed a modeling approach to predict the optical properties of agent materials from relatively simple, Biosafety Level 3-compatible bench top measurements. JHU/APL has fielded new ground truth instruments (in addition to standard particle sizers, such as the Aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) or GRIMM aerosol monitor (GRIMM)) to more thoroughly characterize the simulant aerosols released in recent field tests at Dugway Proving Ground (DPG). These instruments include the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), the Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVAPS), and the Aspect Aerosol Size and Shape Analyser (Aspect). The SMPS was employed as a means of measuring smallparticle concentrations for more accurate Mie scattering simulations; the UVAPS, which measures size-resolved fluorescence intensity, was employed as a path toward fluorescence cross section modeling; and the Aspect, which measures particle shape, was employed as a path towards depolarization modeling.

  13. Soft-edged magnet models for higher-order beam-optics map codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walstrom, P.L.

    2004-01-01

    Continuously varying surface and volume source-density distributions are used to model magnetic fields inside of cylindrical volumes. From these distributions, a package of subroutines computes on-axis generalized gradients and their derivatives at arbitrary points on the magnet axis for input to the numerical map-generating subroutines of the Lie-algebraic map code Marylie. In the present version of the package, the magnet menu includes: (1) cylindrical current-sheet or radially thick current distributions with either open boundaries or with a surrounding cylindrical boundary with normal field lines (which models high-permeability iron), (2) Halbach-type permanent multipole magnets, either as sheet magnets or as radially thick magnets, (3) modeling of arbitrary fields inside a cylinder by use of a fictitious current sheet. The subroutines provide on-axis gradients and their z derivatives to essentially arbitrary order, although in the present third- and fifth-order Marylie only the zeroth through sixth derivatives are needed. The formalism is especially useful in beam-optics applications, such as magnetic lenses, where realistic treatment of fringe-field effects is needed

  14. Optics Studies for the CERN Proton Synchrotron Machine Linear and Nonlinear Modelling using Beam Based Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Cappi, R; Martini, M; Métral, Elias; Métral, G; Steerenberg, R; Müller, A S

    2003-01-01

    The CERN Proton Synchrotron machine is built using combined function magnets. The control of the linear tune as well as the chromaticity in both planes is achieved by means of special coils added to the main magnets, namely two pole-face-windings and one figure-of-eight loop. As a result, the overall magnetic field configuration is rather complex not to mention the saturation effects induced at top-energy. For these reasons a linear model of the PS main magnet does not provide sufficient precision to model particle dynamics. On the other hand, a sophisticated optical model is the key element for the foreseen intensity upgrade and, in particular, for the novel extraction mode based on adiabatic capture of beam particles inside stable islands in transverse phase space. A solution was found by performing accurate measurement of the nonlinear tune as a function of both amplitude and momentum offset so to extract both linear and nonlinear properties of the lattice. In this paper the measurement results are present...

  15. Electromagnetic field modeling and ion optics calculations for a continuous-flow AMS system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, B.X.; Reden, K.F. von; Roberts, M.L.; Schneider, R.J.; Hayes, J.M.; Jenkins, W.J.

    2007-01-01

    A continuous-flow 14 C AMS (CFAMS) system is under construction at the NOSAMS facility. This system is based on a NEC Model 1.5SDH-1 0.5 MV Pelletron accelerator and will utilize a combination of a microwave ion source (MIS) and a charge exchange canal (CXC) to produce negative carbon ions from a continuously flowing stream of CO 2 gas. For high-efficiency transmission of the large emittance, large energy-spread beam from the ion source unit, a large-acceptance and energy-achromatic injector consisting of a 45 o electrostatic spherical analyzer (ESA) and a 90 o double-focusing magnet has been designed. The 45 o ESA is rotatable to accommodate a 134-sample MC-SNICS as a second ion source. The high-energy achromat (90 o double focusing magnet and 90 o ESA) has also been customized for large acceptance. Electromagnetic field modeling and ion optics calculations of the beamline were done with Infolytica MagNet, ElecNet, and Trajectory Evaluator. PBGUNS and SIMION were used for the modeling of ion source unit

  16. Modelling of airflow in a closed simulation box with regard to atmospheric optical link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajek Lukas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Article is dealing with defining of mathematical turbulent air flow numerical model in the laboratory box with help of ANSYS Fluent software application. The paper describes real measurement of parameters of mechanical turbulences created by high-speed ventilator mounted on the simulation box. The real measurement took place in two planes perpendicular to each other, input and output slot. Subsequently the simulation of mechanical air flow was performed by the help of k-ε and k-ω turbulent models. The results of individual simulations were evaluated by statistical model in the same points, planes respectively, in which the real measurement was made. Other simulation was dealing with effect of heaters inside of closed laboratory box with regards to optical beam degradation. During real measurement was performed temperature point measurement by probe placed inside of the box. The probe was recording air temperature every one second during seven minutes long measurement. The results comparison of simulated and measured data was made in the end. The maximal temperature reached approximately 50 °C in both cases. Also the air flow character in dependence on the number of hot-air extraction ventilators was monitored.

  17. Effective scattering coefficient of the cerebral spinal fluid in adult head models for diffuse optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custo, Anna; Wells, William M., III; Barnett, Alex H.; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Boas, David A.

    2006-07-01

    An efficient computation of the time-dependent forward solution for photon transport in a head model is a key capability for performing accurate inversion for functional diffuse optical imaging of the brain. The diffusion approximation to photon transport is much faster to simulate than the physically correct radiative transport equation (RTE); however, it is commonly assumed that scattering lengths must be much smaller than all system dimensions and all absorption lengths for the approximation to be accurate. Neither of these conditions is satisfied in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Since line-of-sight distances in the CSF are small, of the order of a few millimeters, we explore the idea that the CSF scattering coefficient may be modeled by any value from zero up to the order of the typical inverse line-of-sight distance, or approximately 0.3 mm-1, without significantly altering the calculated detector signals or the partial path lengths relevant for functional measurements. We demonstrate this in detail by using a Monte Carlo simulation of the RTE in a three-dimensional head model based on clinical magnetic resonance imaging data, with realistic optode geometries. Our findings lead us to expect that the diffusion approximation will be valid even in the presence of the CSF, with consequences for faster solution of the inverse problem.

  18. Preclinical, fluorescence and diffuse optical tomography: non-contact instrumentation, modeling and time-resolved 3D reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouizi, F.

    2011-09-01

    Time-Resolved Diffuse Optical Tomography (TR-DOT) is a new non-invasive imaging technique increasingly used in the clinical and preclinical fields. It yields optical absorption and scattering maps of the explored organs, and related physiological parameters. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Diffuse Optical Tomography (TR-FDOT) is based on the detection of fluorescence photons. It provides spatio-temporal maps of fluorescent probe concentrations and life times, and allows access to metabolic and molecular imaging which is important for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring, particularly in oncology. The main goal of this thesis was to reconstruct 3D TR-DOT/TR-FDOT images of small animals using time-resolved optical technology. Data were acquired using optical fibers fixed around the animal without contact with its surface. The work was achieved in four steps: 1)- Setting up an imaging device to record the 3D coordinates of an animal's surface; 2)- Modeling the no-contact approach to solve the forward problem; 3)- Processing of the measured signals taking into account the impulse response of the device; 4)- Implementation of a new image reconstruction method based on a selection of carefully chosen points. As a result, good-quality 3D optical images were obtained owing to reduced cross-talk between absorption and scattering. Moreover, the computation time was cut down, compared to full-time methods using whole temporal profiles. (author)

  19. Identification of muscle necrosis in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy using three-dimensional optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyen, Blake R.; Shavlakadze, Thea; Radley-Crabb, Hannah G.; Grounds, Miranda D.; Sampson, David D.

    2011-07-01

    Three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (3D-OCT) was used to image the structure and pathology of skeletal muscle tissue from the treadmill-exercised mdx mouse model of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of excised muscle samples were compared with co-registered hematoxylin and eosin-stained and Evans blue dye fluorescence histology. We show, for the first time, structural 3D-OCT images of skeletal muscle dystropathology well correlated with co-located histology. OCT could identify morphological features of interest and necrotic lesions within the muscle tissue samples based on intrinsic optical contrast. These findings demonstrate the utility of 3D-OCT for the evaluation of small-animal skeletal muscle morphology and pathology, particularly for studies of mouse models of muscular dystrophy.

  20. Universal dispersion model for characterization of optical thin films over wide spectral range: Application to magnesium fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franta, Daniel; Nečas, David; Giglia, Angelo; Franta, Pavel; Ohlídal, Ivan

    2017-11-01

    Optical characterization of magnesium fluoride thin films is performed in a wide spectral range from far infrared to extreme ultraviolet (0.01-45 eV) utilizing the universal dispersion model. Two film defects, i.e. random roughness of the upper boundaries and defect transition layer at lower boundary are taken into account. An extension of universal dispersion model consisting in expressing the excitonic contributions as linear combinations of Gaussian and truncated Lorentzian terms is introduced. The spectral dependencies of the optical constants are presented in a graphical form and by the complete set of dispersion parameters that allows generating tabulated optical constants with required range and step using a simple utility in the newAD2 software package.

  1. Calculation of inelastic mean free path and stopping power for electrons in solids from an optical-data model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Varea, J.M.; Mayol, R.; Salvat, F.; Liljequist, D.

    1992-11-01

    The numerical calculation of electron inelastic mean free path and stopping power from an optical-data model recently proposed by Fernandez-Varea et al. is described in detail. Explicit expressions for the one-electron total cross sections of the two-modes model of the free-electron gas and the δ-oscillator are derived. The inelastic mean free path and the stopping power are obtained as integrals of these one-electron total cross sections weighted by the optical as integrals of these one-electron total cross sections weighted by the optical oscillator strength. The integrals can be easily evaluated, with a selected accuracy, by using the FORTRAN 77 subroutine GABQ described here, which implements a 20-points Gauss adaptive bipartition quadrature method. Source listings of FORTRAN 77 subroutines to compute the one-electron total cross sections are also given

  2. Estimation of biomedical optical properties by simultaneous use of diffuse reflectometry and photothermal radiometry: investigation of light propagation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, E. S. R.; de Jesus, M. E. P.

    2007-07-01

    The estimation of optical properties of highly turbid and opaque biological tissue is a difficult task since conventional purely optical methods rapidly loose sensitivity as the mean photon path length decreases. Photothermal methods, such as pulsed or frequency domain photothermal radiometry (FD-PTR), on the other hand, show remarkable sensitivity in experimental conditions that produce very feeble optical signals. Photothermal Radiometry is primarily sensitive to absorption coefficient yielding considerably higher estimation errors on scattering coefficients. Conversely, purely optical methods such as Local Diffuse Reflectance (LDR) depend mainly on the scattering coefficient and yield much better estimates of this parameter. Therefore, at moderate transport albedos, the combination of photothermal and reflectance methods can improve considerably the sensitivity of detection of tissue optical properties. The authors have recently proposed a novel method that combines FD-PTR with LDR, aimed at improving sensitivity on the determination of both optical properties. Signal analysis was performed by global fitting the experimental data to forward models based on Monte-Carlo simulations. Although this approach is accurate, the associated computational burden often limits its use as a forward model. Therefore, the application of analytical models based on the diffusion approximation offers a faster alternative. In this work, we propose the calculation of the diffuse reflectance and the fluence rate profiles under the δ-P I approximation. This approach is known to approximate fluence rate expressions better close to collimated sources and boundaries than the standard diffusion approximation (SDA). We extend this study to the calculation of the diffuse reflectance profiles. The ability of the δ-P I based model to provide good estimates of the absorption, scattering and anisotropy coefficients is tested against Monte-Carlo simulations over a wide range of scattering to

  3. 3 dimensional modelling of early human brain development using optical projection tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strachan Tom

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As development proceeds the human embryo attains an ever more complex three dimensional (3D structure. Analyzing the gene expression patterns that underlie these changes and interpreting their significance depends on identifying the anatomical structures to which they map and following these patterns in developing 3D structures over time. The difficulty of this task greatly increases as more gene expression patterns are added, particularly in organs with complex 3D structures such as the brain. Optical Projection Tomography (OPT is a new technology which has been developed for rapidly generating digital 3D models of intact specimens. We have assessed the resolution of unstained neuronal structures within a Carnegie Stage (CS17 OPT model and tested its use as a framework onto which anatomical structures can be defined and gene expression data mapped. Results Resolution of the OPT models was assessed by comparison of digital sections with physical sections stained, either with haematoxylin and eosin (H&E or by immunocytochemistry for GAP43 or PAX6, to identify specific anatomical features. Despite the 3D models being of unstained tissue, peripheral nervous system structures from the trigeminal ganglion (~300 μm by ~150 μm to the rootlets of cranial nerve XII (~20 μm in diameter were clearly identifiable, as were structures in the developing neural tube such as the zona limitans intrathalamica (core is ~30 μm thick. Fourteen anatomical domains have been identified and visualised within the CS17 model. Two 3D gene expression domains, known to be defined by Pax6 expression in the mouse, were clearly visible when PAX6 data from 2D sections were mapped to the CS17 model. The feasibility of applying the OPT technology to all stages from CS12 to CS23, which encompasses the major period of organogenesis for the human developing central nervous system, was successfully demonstrated. Conclusion In the CS17 model considerable detail

  4. Modelling single shot damage thresholds of multilayer optics for high-intensity short-wavelength radiation sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loch, R.A.; Sobierajski, R.; Louis, Eric; Bosgra, J.; Bosgra, J.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    The single shot damage thresholds of multilayer optics for highintensity short-wavelength radiation sources are theoretically investigated, using a model developed on the basis of experimental data obtained at the FLASH and LCLS free electron lasers. We compare the radiation hardness of commonly

  5. First test model of the optical microscope which images the whole vertical particle tracks without any depth scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soroko, L.M.

    2001-01-01

    The first test model of the optical microscope which produces the in focus image of the whole vertical particle track without depth scanning is described. The in focus image of the object consisting of the linear array of the point-like elements was obtained. A comparison with primary out of focus image of such an object has been made

  6. Type Ia Supernova Light Curve Inference: Hierarchical Models for Nearby SN Ia in the Optical and Near Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Kaisey; Kirshner, R. P.; Narayan, G.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Friedman, A. S.; Hicken, M.

    2010-01-01

    I have constructed a comprehensive statistical model for Type Ia supernova light curves spanning optical through near infrared data simultaneously. The near infrared light curves are found to be excellent standard candles (sigma(MH) = 0.11 +/- 0.03 mag) that are less vulnerable to systematic error from dust extinction, a major confounding factor for cosmological studies. A hierarchical statistical framework incorporates coherently multiple sources of randomness and uncertainty, including photometric error, intrinsic supernova light curve variations and correlations, dust extinction and reddening, peculiar velocity dispersion and distances, for probabilistic inference with Type Ia SN light curves. Inferences are drawn from the full probability density over individual supernovae and the SN Ia and dust populations, conditioned on a dataset of SN Ia light curves and redshifts. To compute probabilistic inferences with hierarchical models, I have developed BayeSN, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm based on Gibbs sampling. This code explores and samples the global probability density of parameters describing individual supernovae and the population. I have applied this hierarchical model to optical and near infrared data of over 100 nearby Type Ia SN from PAIRITEL, the CfA3 sample, and the literature. Using this statistical model, I find that SN with optical and NIR data have a smaller residual scatter in the Hubble diagram than SN with only optical data. The continued study of Type Ia SN in the near infrared will be important for improving their utility as precise and accurate cosmological distance indicators.

  7. Optical imaging of oxidative stress in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in rodent model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanian, Zahra; Maleki, Sepideh; Gopalakrishnan, Sandeep; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Eells, Janis T.; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-02-01

    Oxidative stress (OS), which increases during retinal degenerative disorders, contributes to photoreceptor cell loss. The objective of this study was to investigate the changes in the metabolic state of the eye tissue in rodent models of retinitis pigmentosa by using the cryofluorescence imaging technique. The mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes NADH and FADH2 are autofluorescent and can be monitored without exogenous labels using optical techniques. The NADH redox ratio (RR), which is the ratio of the fluorescence intensity of these fluorophores (NADH/FAD), was used as a quantitative diagnostic marker. The NADH RR was examined in an established rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), the P23H rat, and compared to that of control Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and P23H NIR treated rats. Our results demonstrated 24% decrease in the mean NADH RR of the eyes from P23H transgenic rats compared to normal rats and 20% increase in the mean NADH RR of the eyes from the P23H NIR treated rats compared to P23H non-treated rats.

  8. Transport and collective radiance in a basic quantum chiral optical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornovan, D. F.; Petrov, M. I.; Iorsh, I. V.

    2017-09-01

    In our work, we theoretically study the dynamics of a single excitation in a one-dimensional array of two-level systems, which are chirally coupled through a single mode waveguide. The chirality is achieved owing to a strong optical spin-locking effect, which in an ideal case gives perfect unidirectional excitation transport. We obtain a simple analytical solution for a single excitation dynamics in the Markovian limit, which directly shows the tolerance of the system with respect to the fluctuations of emitters position. We also show that the Dicke state, which is well known to be superradiant, has twice lower emission rate in the case of unidirectional quantum interaction. Our model is supported and verified with the numerical computations of quantum emitters coupled via surface plasmon modes in a metallic nanowire. The obtained results are based on a very general model and can be applied to any chirally coupled system that gives a new outlook on quantum transport in chiral nanophotonics.

  9. Virtual Deformation Control of the X-56A Model with Simulated Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Peter M.; Chin, Alexander W.; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2014-01-01

    A robust control law design methodology is presented to stabilize the X-56A model and command its wing shape. The X-56A was purposely designed to experience flutter modes in its flight envelope. The methodology introduces three phases: the controller design phase, the modal filter design phase, and the reference signal design phase. A mu-optimal controller is designed and made robust to speed and parameter variations. A conversion technique is presented for generating sensor strain modes from sensor deformation mode shapes. The sensor modes are utilized for modal filtering and simulating fiber optic sensors for feedback to the controller. To generate appropriate virtual deformation reference signals, rigid-body corrections are introduced to the deformation mode shapes. After successful completion of the phases, virtual deformation control is demonstrated. The wing is deformed and it is shown that angle-ofattack changes occur which could potentially be used to an advantage. The X-56A program must demonstrate active flutter suppression. It is shown that the virtual deformation controller can achieve active flutter suppression on the X-56A simulation model.

  10. Modeling astronomical adaptive optics performance with temporally filtered Wiener reconstruction of slope data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Carlos M.; Bond, Charlotte Z.; Sauvage, Jean-François; Fusco, Thierry; Conan, Rodolphe; Wizinowich, Peter L.

    2017-10-01

    We build on a long-standing tradition in astronomical adaptive optics (AO) of specifying performance metrics and error budgets using linear systems modeling in the spatial-frequency domain. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive tool for the calculation of error budgets in terms of residual temporally filtered phase power spectral densities and variances. In addition, the fast simulation of AO-corrected point spread functions (PSFs) provided by this method can be used as inputs for simulations of science observations with next-generation instruments and telescopes, in particular to predict post-coronagraphic contrast improvements for planet finder systems. We extend the previous results and propose the synthesis of a distributed Kalman filter to mitigate both aniso-servo-lag and aliasing errors whilst minimizing the overall residual variance. We discuss applications to (i) analytic AO-corrected PSF modeling in the spatial-frequency domain, (ii) post-coronagraphic contrast enhancement, (iii) filter optimization for real-time wavefront reconstruction, and (iv) PSF reconstruction from system telemetry. Under perfect knowledge of wind velocities, we show that $\\sim$60 nm rms error reduction can be achieved with the distributed Kalman filter embodying anti- aliasing reconstructors on 10 m class high-order AO systems, leading to contrast improvement factors of up to three orders of magnitude at few ${\\lambda}/D$ separations ($\\sim1-5{\\lambda}/D$) for a 0 magnitude star and reaching close to one order of magnitude for a 12 magnitude star.

  11. Optical imaging of mitochondrial redox state in rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Sepideh; Gopalakrishnan, Sandeep; Ghanian, Zahra; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Schmitt, Heather; Eells, Janis; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to photoreceptor cell loss in retinal degenerative disorders. The metabolic state of the retina in a rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) was investigated using a cryo-fluorescence imaging technique. The mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are autofluorescent and can be monitored without exogenous labels using optical techniques. The cryo-fluorescence redox imaging technique provides a quantitative assessment of the metabolism. More specifically, the ratio of the fluorescence intensity of these fluorophores (NADH/FAD), the NADH redox ratio (RR), is a marker of the metabolic state of the tissue. The NADH RR and retinal function were examined in an established rodent model of RP, the P23H rat compared to that of nondystrophic Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The NADH RR mean values were 1.11±0.03 in the SD normal and 0.841±0.01 in the P23H retina, indicating increased OS in the P23H retina. Electroretinographic data revealed a significant reduction in photoreceptor function in P23H animals compared to SD nozrmal rats. Thus, cryo-fluorescence redox imaging was used as a quantitative marker of OS in eyes from transgenic rats and demonstrated that alterations in the oxidative state of eyes occur during the early stages of RP.

  12. Rigorous numerical modeling of scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinzhong; Lo, Chiu Fan Bowen; Zheng, William; Hu, Hai; Dai, Qing; Liu, Mengkun

    2017-11-01

    Over the last decade, scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy have been widely used in nano-photonics and material research due to their fine spatial resolution and broad spectral range. A number of simplified analytical models have been proposed to quantitatively understand the tip-scattered near-field signal. However, a rigorous interpretation of the experimental results is still lacking at this stage. Numerical modelings, on the other hand, are mostly done by simulating the local electric field slightly above the sample surface, which only qualitatively represents the near-field signal rendered by the tip-sample interaction. In this work, we performed a more comprehensive numerical simulation which is based on realistic experimental parameters and signal extraction procedures. By directly comparing to the experiments as well as other simulation efforts, our methods offer a more accurate quantitative description of the near-field signal, paving the way for future studies of complex systems at the nanoscale.

  13. Investigation in clinical potential of polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography in laryngeal tumor model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Oak, Chulho; Ahn, Yeh-Chan; Kim, Sung Won; Tang, Shuo

    2018-02-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) is capable of measuring tissue birefringence. It has been widely applied to access the birefringence in tissues such as skin and cartilage. The vocal cord tissue consists of three anatomical layers from the surface to deep inside, the epithelium that contains almost no collagen, the lamina propria that is composed with abundant collagen, and the vocalis muscle layer. Due to the variation in the organization of collagen fibers, the different tissue layers show different tissue birefringence, which can be evaluated by PS-OCT phase retardation measurement. Furthermore, collagen fibers in healthy connective tissues are usually well organized, which provides relatively high birefringence. When the collagen organization is destroyed by diseases such as tumor, the birefringence of the tissue will decrease. In this study, a rabbit laryngeal tumor model with different stages of tumor progression is investigated ex-vivo by PS-OCT. The PS-OCT images show a gradual decrease in birefringence from normal tissue to severe tumor tissue. A phase retardation slope-based analysis is conducted to distinguish the epithelium, lamina propria, and muscle layers, respectively. The phase retardation slope quantifies the birefringence in different layers. The quantitative study provides a more detailed comparison among different stages of the rabbit laryngeal tumor model. The PS-OCT result is validated by the corresponding histology images of the same samples.

  14. Comparison of optical-model and Lane-model analyses of sub-Coulomb protons on /sup 92,94/Zr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrils, R.; Flynn, D.S.; Hershberger, R.L.; Gabbard, F.

    1979-01-01

    Accurate proton elastic-scattering cross sections were measured with enriched targets of /sup 92,94/Zr from E/sub p/ = 2.0 to 6.5 MeV. The elastic-scattering cross sections, together with absorption cross sections, were analyzed with a Lane model which employed the optical potential of Johnson et al. The resulting parameters were compared with those obtained with a single-channel optical model and negligible differences were found. Significant differences between the 92 Zr and 94 Zr real diffusenesses resulted from the inclusion of the (p,p) data in the analyses

  15. Optical modeling activities for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST): IV. Overview and introduction of MATLAB based toolkits used to interface with optical design software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Joseph M.

    2007-09-01

    This paper is part four of a series on the ongoing optical modeling activities for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The first two papers discussed modeling JWST on-orbit performance using wavefront sensitivities to predict line of sight motion induced blur, and stability during thermal transients. The third paper investigates the aberrations resulting from alignment and figure compensation of the controllable degrees of freedom (primary and secondary mirrors), which may be encountered during ground alignment and on-orbit commissioning of the observatory. The work here introduces some of the math software tools used to perform the work of the previous three papers of this series. NASA has recently approved these in-house tools for public release as open source, so this presentation also serves as a quick tutorial on their use. The tools are collections of functions written for use in MATLAB to interface with optical design software (CODE V, OSLO, and ZEMAX) using either COM or DDE communication protocol. The functions are discussed, and examples are given.

  16. Thermo-optical vacuum testing of IRNSS laser retroreflector array qualification model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcelli, L.; Boni, A.; Ciocci, E.; Contessa, S.; Dell'Agnello, S.; Delle Monache, G.; Intaglietta, N.; Martini, M.; Mondaini, C.; Patrizi, G.; Salvatori, L.; Tibuzzi, M.; Lops, C.; Cantone, C.; Tuscano, P.; Maiello, M.; Venkateswaran, R.; Chakraborty, P.; Ramana Reddy, C. V.; Sriram, K. V.

    2017-09-01

    We describe the activities performed by SCF_Lab (Satellite/lunar/GNSS laser ranging/altimetry and cube/microsat Characterization Facilities Laboratory) of INFN-LNF for the thermo-optical vacuum testing activity of a IRNSS (Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System) LRA (Laser Retroreflector Array), under contract for ISRO-LEOS. To our knowledge, this is the first publication on the characterization of the optical performance of an LRA operating at about 36,000 km altitude (typical of regional GNSS segments, namely QZSS, COMPASS-G) executed in fully representative, carefully lab-simulated space conditions. In particular, this is the only such publication concerning IRNSS. Since laser ranging to its altitude is more challenging than to GNSS altitudes (from about 19,100 km for GLONASS to about 23,200 km for Galileo), comparative measurements were long awaited by ILRS (International Laser Ranging Service) and we present measurements of the absolute laser return to ground stations of the ILRS in terms of lidar OCS (Optical Cross Section) at the IRNSS relevant value of velocity aberration, in turn derived from measurements of the full FFDP (Far Field Diffraction Pattern) over a very large range of velocity aberrations. These measurements were acquired: (i) on a full-size qualification model of a IRNSS CCR (Cube Corner Retroreflector) LRA that ISRO-LEOS provided to INFN-LNF; (ii) during the lab-simulation of a 1/4 orbit segment, in which the LRA CCRs are exposed to the perturbation of the sun heat at varying angles, from grazing incidence (90° with respect to the direction perpendicular to the plane of array), up to the perpendicular to the LRA, with a same time variation consistent with the actual space orbit. In this 1/4 orbit condition, the LRA experiences potentially large thermal degradations of the OCS, depending on the detailed thermal and mechanical design of the LRA. Since all GNSS constellations have different LRA designs or configurations, this is another

  17. Microsurgical training model for residents to approach to the orbit and the optic nerve in fresh cadaveric sheep cranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Emre Altunrende

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neurosurgery and ophthalmology residents need many years to improve microsurgical skills. Laboratory training models are very important for developing surgical skills before clinical application of microsurgery. A simple simulation model is needed for residents to learn how to handle microsurgical instruments and to perform safe dissection of intracranial or intraorbital nerves, vessels, and other structures. Materials and Methods: The simulation material consists of a one-year-old fresh cadaveric sheep cranium. Two parts (Part 1 and Part 2 were designed to approach structures of the orbit. Part 1 consisted of a 2-step approach to dissect intraorbital structures, and Part 2 consisted of a 3-step approach to dissect the optic nerve intracranially. Results: The model simulates standard microsurgical techniques using a variety of approaches to structures in and around the orbit and the optic nerve. Conclusions: This laboratory training model enables trainees to gain experience with an operating microscope, microsurgical instruments and orbital structures.

  18. 3D Viscoelastic Finite Element Modelling of Polymer Flow in the Fiber Drawing Process for Microstructured Polymer Optical Fiber Fabrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasano, Andrea; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Marín, J. M. R.

    2015-01-01

    The process of drawing an optical fiber from a polymer preform is still not completely understood,although it represents one of the most critical steps in the process chain for the fabrication of microstructuredpolymer optical fibers (mPOFs). Here we present a new approach for the numerical...... modelling of the fiber drawingprocess using a fully three-dimensional and time-dependent finite element method, giving significant insightinto this widely spread mPOF production technique. Our computational predictions are physically based on theviscoelastic fluid dynamics of polymers. Until now...

  19. Optical gain in InAs/InGaAs quantum-dot structures: Experiments and theoretical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliseev, P G; Li, H; Liu, G T; Stintz, A; Newell, T C; Lester, L E; Malloy, K J

    2000-01-01

    The dependence of the mode optical gain on current in InAs/InGaAs quantum-dot structures grown by the method of molecular-beam epitaxy is obtained from the experimental study of ultra-low-threshold laser diodes. The record lowest inversion threshold at room temperature was about 13 A cm -2 . A theoretical model is proposed that relates the optical gain to the ground-state transitions in quantum dots. The effective gain cross section is estimated to be ∼7 x 10 -15 cm -2 . (lasers)

  20. Prediction of Aerosol Optical Depth in West Asia: Machine Learning Methods versus Numerical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omid Nabavi, Seyed; Haimberger, Leopold; Abbasi, Reyhaneh; Samimi, Cyrus

    2017-04-01

    Dust-prone areas of West Asia are releasing increasingly large amounts of dust particles during warm months. Because of the lack of ground-based observations in the region, this phenomenon is mainly monitored through remotely sensed aerosol products. The recent development of mesoscale Numerical Models (NMs) has offered an unprecedented opportunity to predict dust emission, and, subsequently Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), at finer spatial and temporal resolutions. Nevertheless, the significant uncertainties in input data and simulations of dust activation and transport limit the performance of numerical models in dust prediction. The presented study aims to evaluate if machine-learning algorithms (MLAs), which require much less computational expense, can yield the same or even better performance than NMs. Deep blue (DB) AOD, which is observed by satellites but also predicted by MLAs and NMs, is used for validation. We concentrate our evaluations on the over dry Iraq plains, known as the main origin of recently intensified dust storms in West Asia. Here we examine the performance of four MLAs including Linear regression Model (LM), Support Vector Machine (SVM), Artificial Neural Network (ANN), Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS). The Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled to Chemistry (WRF-Chem) and the Dust REgional Atmosphere Model (DREAM) are included as NMs. The MACC aerosol re-analysis of European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) is also included, although it has assimilated satellite-based AOD data. Using the Recursive Feature Elimination (RFE) method, nine environmental features including soil moisture and temperature, NDVI, dust source function, albedo, dust uplift potential, vertical velocity, precipitation and 9-month SPEI drought index are selected for dust (AOD) modeling by MLAs. During the feature selection process, we noticed that NDVI and SPEI are of the highest importance in MLAs predictions. The data set was divided