WorldWideScience

Sample records for optical lattice clock

  1. Lattice-induced nonadiabatic frequency shifts in optical lattice clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beloy, K.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the frequency shift in optical lattice clocks which arises from the coupling of the electronic motion to the atomic motion within the lattice. For the simplest of three-dimensional lattice geometries this coupling is shown to affect only clocks based on blue-detuned lattices. We have estimated the size of this shift for the prospective strontium lattice clock operating at the 390-nm blue-detuned magic wavelength. The resulting fractional frequency shift is found to be on the order of 10 -18 and is largely overshadowed by the electric quadrupole shift. For lattice clocks based on more complex geometries or other atomic systems, this shift could potentially be a limiting factor in clock accuracy.

  2. Optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baillard, X.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents the latest achievements regarding the optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms developed at LNE-SYRTE. After a review of the different types of optical clocks that are currently under development, we stress on the concept of optical lattice clock which was first imagined for Sr 87 using the 1 S 0 → 3 P 0 transition. We exhibit the features of this atom, in particular the concept of magic wavelength for the trap, and the achievable performances for this kind of clock. The second part presents the experimental aspects, insisting particularly on the ultra-stable laser used for the interrogation of the atoms which is a central part of the experiment. Among the latest improvements, an optical pumping phase and an interrogation phase using a magnetic field have been added in order to refine the evaluation of the Zeeman effect. Finally, the last part presents the experimental results. The last evaluation of the clock using Sr 87 atoms allowed us to reach a frequency accuracy of 2.6*10 -15 and a measurement in agreement with the one made at JILA (Tokyo university) at the 10 -15 level. On another hand, thanks to recent theoretical proposals, we made a measurement using the bosonic isotope Sr 88 by adapting the experimental setup. This measurement represents the first evaluation for this type of clock, with a frequency accuracy of 7*10 -14 . (author)

  3. Strontium Optical Lattice Clock: In Quest of the Ultimate Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westergaard, Ph.G.

    2010-10-01

    This thesis presents the latest achievements regarding the Sr optical lattice clock experiment at LNESYRTE, Observatoire de Paris. After having described the general principles for optical lattice clocks and the operation of the clock in question, the emphasis is put on the features that have been added to the experiment since 2007. The most important new elements are an ultra-stable reference cavity for the clock laser, the development of a non-destructive detection technique, and the construction of a second Sr lattice clock. The ultra-stable cavity is constructed from a ULE spacer and fused silica mirrors and has shown a thermal noise floor at 6.5 * 10 -16 , placing it among the best in the world. The non-destructive detection is effectuated by a phase measurement of a weak probe beam that traverses the atoms placed in one arm of a Mach-Zender interferometer. The non-destructive aspect enables a recycling of the atoms from cycle to cycle which consequently increases the duty cycle, allowing for an increase of the stability of the clock. With these new tools the frequency stability is expected to be 2.2 * 10 -16 /√τ for an optimized sequence. The most recent comparisons between the two Sr clocks reach an accuracy level of 10 -16 after about 1000 s, and this way we have been able to characterize lattice related frequency shifts with an unprecedented accuracy. The measurements ensure a control of lattice related effects at the 10 -18 level even for trap depths as large as 50E r . (authors)

  4. Probing many-body interactions in an optical lattice clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rey, A.M., E-mail: arey@jilau1.colorado.edu [JILA, NIST and University of Colorado, Department of Physics, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Gorshkov, A.V. [Joint Quantum Institute, NIST and University of Maryland, Department of Physics, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Kraus, C.V. [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Martin, M.J. [JILA, NIST and University of Colorado, Department of Physics, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bishof, M.; Swallows, M.D.; Zhang, X.; Benko, C.; Ye, J. [JILA, NIST and University of Colorado, Department of Physics, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Lemke, N.D.; Ludlow, A.D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    We present a unifying theoretical framework that describes recently observed many-body effects during the interrogation of an optical lattice clock operated with thousands of fermionic alkaline earth atoms. The framework is based on a many-body master equation that accounts for the interplay between elastic and inelastic p-wave and s-wave interactions, finite temperature effects and excitation inhomogeneity during the quantum dynamics of the interrogated atoms. Solutions of the master equation in different parameter regimes are presented and compared. It is shown that a general solution can be obtained by using the so called Truncated Wigner Approximation which is applied in our case in the context of an open quantum system. We use the developed framework to model the density shift and decay of the fringes observed during Ramsey spectroscopy in the JILA {sup 87}Sr and NIST {sup 171}Yb optical lattice clocks. The developed framework opens a suitable path for dealing with a variety of strongly-correlated and driven open-quantum spin systems. -- Highlights: •Derived a theoretical framework that describes many-body effects in a lattice clock. •Validated the analysis with recent experimental measurements. •Demonstrated the importance of beyond mean field corrections in the dynamics.

  5. Collisional shifts in optical-lattice atom clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Band, Y. B.; Vardi, A.

    2006-01-01

    We theoretically study the effects of elastic collisions on the determination of frequency standards via Ramsey-fringe spectroscopy in optical-lattice atom clocks. Interparticle interactions of bosonic atoms in multiply occupied lattice sites can cause a linear frequency shift, as well as generate asymmetric Ramsey-fringe patterns and reduce fringe visibility due to interparticle entanglement. We propose a method of reducing these collisional effects in an optical lattice by introducing a phase difference of π between the Ramsey driving fields in adjacent sites. This configuration suppresses site-to-site hopping due to interference of two tunneling pathways, without degrading fringe visibility. Consequently, the probability of double occupancy is reduced, leading to cancellation of collisional shifts

  6. Optical lattice clock with strontium atoms: a second generation of cold atom clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Targat, R.

    2007-07-01

    Atomic fountains, based on a microwave transition of Cesium or Rubidium, constitute the state of the art atomic clocks, with a relative accuracy close to 10 -16 . It nevertheless appears today that it will be difficult to go significantly beyond this level with this kind of device. The use of an optical transition, the other parameters being unchanged, gives hope for a 4 or 5 orders of magnitude improvement of the stability and of the relative uncertainty on most systematic effects. As for motional effects on the atoms, they can be controlled on a very different manner if they are trapped in an optical lattice instead of experiencing a free ballistic flight stage, characteristic of fountains. The key point of this approach lies in the fact that the trap can be operated in such a way that a well chosen, weakly allowed, J=0 → J=0 clock transition can be free from light shift effects. In this respect, the strontium atom is one of the most promising candidate, the 1S 0 → 3P 0 transition has a natural width of 1 mHz, and several other easily accessible transitions can be used to efficiently laser cool atoms down to 10 μK. This thesis demonstrates the experimental feasibility of an optical lattice clock based on the strontium atom, and reports on a preliminary evaluation of the relative accuracy with the fermionic isotope 87 Sr, at a level of a few 10 -15 . (author)

  7. Optical lattice clock with strontium atoms; Horloge a reseau optique a atomes de strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baillard, X.; Le Targat, R.; Fouche, M.; Brusch, A.; Westergaard, Ph.G.; Lecallier, A.; Lodewyck, J.; Lemonde, P. [Observatoire de Paris, LNE-SYRTE, Systemes de Reference Temps Espace, 75 (France)

    2009-07-01

    Optical lattice clocks, which were first imagined in 2000, should allow one to achieve unprecedented performances in the domain of atomic clocks. We present here the Strontium lattice clock, developed at LNE-SYRTE. The principle, in particular trapping atoms in the Lamb-Dicke regime and the notion of magic wavelength, is first explained. We then present the results obtained for the {sup 87}Sr isotope, with a frequency accuracy of 2,6.10{sup -15}, and the {sup 88}Sr isotope, with. which we perform the first frequency measurement of an optical lattice clock with bosonic atoms. (authors)

  8. Toward A Neutral Mercury Optical Lattice Clock: Determination of the Magic Wavelength for the Ultraviolet clock Transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejri, Sinda

    2012-01-01

    A lattice clock combines the advantages of ion and neutral atom based clocks, namely the recoil and first order Doppler free spectroscopy allowed by the Lamb-Dicke regime. This lattice light field shifts the energy levels of the clock transition. However a wavelength can be found where the light-shift of the clock states cancelled to first order. In this thesis, we present the latest advances in optical lattice clock with mercury atoms developed at LNE-SYRTE. After a review of the current performances of different optical clock are currently under development, we focus on the concept of optical lattice clock and the features of the mercury that make him an excellent candidate for the realization of an optical lattice clock achievement the uncertainty of the level of 10 -17 . The second part is devoted to the characterization of the mercury MOT, using a sensitive detection system, which allowed us to evaluate the temperature of different isotopes present in the MOT and have a good evidence of sub-Doppler cooling for the fermionic isotopes. The third part of this these, present the experimental aspects of the implementation and the development of the laser source required for trapping mercury atoms operating near the predicted magic wavelength. Finally, we report on the Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of the 1S0 →3 P0 clock transition in the 199 Hg atoms confined in lattice trap. With use of the ultra-stable laser system, linked to LNE-SYRTE primary frequency reference, we have determined the center frequency of the transition for a range of lattice wavelengths and different lattice depths. Analyzing these measurement, we have carried out the first experimental determination of the magic wavelength, which is the crucial step towards achieving a highly accurate frequency standard using mercury. (author)

  9. Dual-Mode Operation of an Optical Lattice Clock Using Strontium and Ytterbium Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Takumi; Hisai, Yusuke; Tanabe, Takehiko; Hosaka, Kazumoto; Yasuda, Masami; Hong, Feng-Lei

    2018-06-01

    We have developed an optical lattice clock that can operate in dual modes: a strontium (Sr) clock mode and an ytterbium (Yb) clock mode. Dual-mode operation of the Sr-Yb optical lattice clock is achieved by alternately cooling and trapping 87 Sr and 171 Yb atoms inside the vacuum chamber of the clock. Optical lattices for Sr and Yb atoms were arranged with horizontal and vertical configurations, respectively, resulting in a small distance of the order of between the trapped Sr and Yb atoms. The 1 S 0 - 3 P 0 clock transitions in the trapped atoms were interrogated in turn and the clock lasers were stabilized to the transitions. We demonstrated the frequency ratio measurement of the Sr and Yb clock transitions by using the dual-mode operation of the Sr-Yb optical lattice clock. The dual-mode operation can reduce the uncertainty of the blackbody radiation shift in the frequency ratio measurement, because both Sr and Yb atoms share the same blackbody radiation.

  10. Systematic evaluation of a 171Yb optical clock by synchronous comparison between two lattice systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qi; Zhou, Min; Han, Chengyin; Li, Shangyan; Zhang, Shuang; Yao, Yuan; Li, Bo; Qiao, Hao; Ai, Di; Lou, Ge; Zhang, Mengya; Jiang, Yanyi; Bi, Zhiyi; Ma, Longsheng; Xu, Xinye

    2018-05-22

    Optical clocks are the most precise measurement devices. Here we experimentally characterize one such clock based on the 1 S 0 - 3 P 0 transition of neutral 171 Yb atoms confined in an optical lattice. Given that the systematic evaluation using an interleaved stabilization scheme is unable to avoid noise from the clock laser, synchronous comparisons against a second 171 Yb lattice system were implemented to accelerate the evaluation. The fractional instability of one clock falls below 4 × 10 -17 after an averaging over a time of 5,000 seconds. The systematic frequency shifts were corrected with a total uncertainty of 1.7 × 10 -16 . The lattice polarizability shift currently contributes the largest source. This work paves the way to measuring the absolute clock transition frequency relative to the primary Cs standard or against the International System of Units (SI) second.

  11. Cancellation of collisional frequency shifts in optical lattice clocks with Rabi spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sangkyung; Park, Chang Yong; Lee, Won-Kyu; Yu, Dai-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    We analyze both the s- and p-wave collision induced frequency shifts and propose an over-π pulse scheme to cancel the shifts in optical lattice clocks interrogated by a Rabi pulse. The collisional frequency shifts are analytically solved as a function of the pulse area and the inhomogeneity of the Rabi frequencies. Experimentally measured collisional frequency shifts in an Yb optical lattice clock are in good agreement with the analytical calculations. Based on our analysis, the over-π pulse combined with a small inhomogeneity below 0.1 allows a fractional uncertainty on a level of 10 −18 in both Sr and Yb optical lattice clocks by canceling the collisional frequency shift. (paper)

  12. Faraday-Shielded dc Stark-Shift-Free Optical Lattice Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloy, K.; Zhang, X.; McGrew, W. F.; Hinkley, N.; Yoon, T. H.; Nicolodi, D.; Fasano, R. J.; Schäffer, S. A.; Brown, R. C.; Ludlow, A. D.

    2018-05-01

    We demonstrate the absence of a dc Stark shift in an ytterbium optical lattice clock. Stray electric fields are suppressed through the introduction of an in-vacuum Faraday shield. Still, the effectiveness of the shielding must be experimentally assessed. Such diagnostics are accomplished by applying high voltage to six electrodes, which are grounded in normal operation to form part of the Faraday shield. Our measurements place a constraint on the dc Stark shift at the 10-20 level, in units of the clock frequency. Moreover, we discuss a potential source of error in strategies to precisely measure or cancel nonzero dc Stark shifts, attributed to field gradients coupled with the finite spatial extent of the lattice-trapped atoms. With this consideration, we find that Faraday shielding, complemented with experimental validation, provides both a practically appealing and effective solution to the problem of dc Stark shifts in optical lattice clocks.

  13. Optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms; Horloge a reseau optique a atomes de strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baillard, X

    2008-01-15

    This thesis presents the latest achievements regarding the optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms developed at LNE-SYRTE. After a review of the different types of optical clocks that are currently under development, we stress on the concept of optical lattice clock which was first imagined for Sr{sup 87} using the {sup 1}S{sub 0} {yields} {sup 3}P{sub 0} transition. We exhibit the features of this atom, in particular the concept of magic wavelength for the trap, and the achievable performances for this kind of clock. The second part presents the experimental aspects, insisting particularly on the ultra-stable laser used for the interrogation of the atoms which is a central part of the experiment. Among the latest improvements, an optical pumping phase and an interrogation phase using a magnetic field have been added in order to refine the evaluation of the Zeeman effect. Finally, the last part presents the experimental results. The last evaluation of the clock using Sr{sup 87} atoms allowed us to reach a frequency accuracy of 2.6*10{sup -15} and a measurement in agreement with the one made at JILA (Tokyo university) at the 10{sup -15} level. On another hand, thanks to recent theoretical proposals, we made a measurement using the bosonic isotope Sr{sup 88} by adapting the experimental setup. This measurement represents the first evaluation for this type of clock, with a frequency accuracy of 7*10{sup -14}. (author)

  14. Transportable Optical Lattice Clock with 7×10^{-17} Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, S B; Grotti, J; Vogt, St; Al-Masoudi, A; Dörscher, S; Häfner, S; Sterr, U; Lisdat, Ch

    2017-02-17

    We present a transportable optical clock (TOC) with ^{87}Sr. Its complete characterization against a stationary lattice clock resulted in a systematic uncertainty of 7.4×10^{-17}, which is currently limited by the statistics of the determination of the residual lattice light shift, and an instability of 1.3×10^{-15}/sqrt[τ] with an averaging time τ in seconds. Measurements confirm that the systematic uncertainty can be reduced to below the design goal of 1×10^{-17}. To our knowledge, these are the best uncertainties and instabilities reported for any transportable clock to date. For autonomous operation, the TOC has been installed in an air-conditioned car trailer. It is suitable for chronometric leveling with submeter resolution as well as for intercontinental cross-linking of optical clocks, which is essential for a redefinition of the International System of Units (SI) second. In addition, the TOC will be used for high precision experiments for fundamental science that are commonly tied to precise frequency measurements and its development is an important step to space-borne optical clocks.

  15. Transportable Optical Lattice Clock with 7 ×10-17 Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, S. B.; Grotti, J.; Vogt, St.; Al-Masoudi, A.; Dörscher, S.; Häfner, S.; Sterr, U.; Lisdat, Ch.

    2017-02-01

    We present a transportable optical clock (TOC) with Sr 87 . Its complete characterization against a stationary lattice clock resulted in a systematic uncertainty of 7.4 ×10-17, which is currently limited by the statistics of the determination of the residual lattice light shift, and an instability of 1.3 ×10-15/√{τ } with an averaging time τ in seconds. Measurements confirm that the systematic uncertainty can be reduced to below the design goal of 1 ×10-17. To our knowledge, these are the best uncertainties and instabilities reported for any transportable clock to date. For autonomous operation, the TOC has been installed in an air-conditioned car trailer. It is suitable for chronometric leveling with submeter resolution as well as for intercontinental cross-linking of optical clocks, which is essential for a redefinition of the International System of Units (SI) second. In addition, the TOC will be used for high precision experiments for fundamental science that are commonly tied to precise frequency measurements and its development is an important step to space-borne optical clocks.

  16. Dynamics of interacting fermions under spin-orbit coupling in an optical lattice clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, S. L.; Kolkowitz, S.; Bothwell, T.; Kedar, D.; Safavi-Naini, A.; Wall, M. L.; Salomon, C.; Rey, A. M.; Ye, J.

    2018-04-01

    Quantum statistics and symmetrization dictate that identical fermions do not interact via s-wave collisions. However, in the presence of spin-orbit coupling (SOC), fermions prepared in identical internal states with distinct momenta become distinguishable. The resulting strongly interacting system can exhibit exotic topological and pairing behaviours, many of which are yet to be observed in condensed matter systems. Ultracold atomic gases offer a promising pathway for simulating these rich phenomena, but until recently have been hindered by heating and losses. Here we enter a new regime of many-body interacting SOC in a fermionic optical lattice clock (OLC), where the long-lived electronic clock states mitigate unwanted dissipation. Using clock spectroscopy, we observe the precession of the collective magnetization and the emergence of spin-locking effects arising from an interplay between p-wave and SOC-induced exchange interactions. The many-body dynamics are well captured by a collective XXZ spin model, which describes a broad class of condensed matter systems ranging from superconductors to quantum magnets. Furthermore, our work will aid in the design of next-generation OLCs by offering a route for avoiding the observed large density shifts caused by SOC-induced exchange interactions.

  17. Strontium Optical Lattice Clock: In Quest of the Ultimate Performance; Horloge a reseau optique au strontium: en quete de la performance ultime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westergaard, Ph.G.

    2010-10-15

    This thesis presents the latest achievements regarding the Sr optical lattice clock experiment at LNESYRTE, Observatoire de Paris. After having described the general principles for optical lattice clocks and the operation of the clock in question, the emphasis is put on the features that have been added to the experiment since 2007. The most important new elements are an ultra-stable reference cavity for the clock laser, the development of a non-destructive detection technique, and the construction of a second Sr lattice clock. The ultra-stable cavity is constructed from a ULE spacer and fused silica mirrors and has shown a thermal noise floor at 6.5 * 10{sup -16}, placing it among the best in the world. The non-destructive detection is effectuated by a phase measurement of a weak probe beam that traverses the atoms placed in one arm of a Mach-Zender interferometer. The non-destructive aspect enables a recycling of the atoms from cycle to cycle which consequently increases the duty cycle, allowing for an increase of the stability of the clock. With these new tools the frequency stability is expected to be 2.2 * 10{sup -16}/{radical}{tau} for an optimized sequence. The most recent comparisons between the two Sr clocks reach an accuracy level of 10{sup -16} after about 1000 s, and this way we have been able to characterize lattice related frequency shifts with an unprecedented accuracy. The measurements ensure a control of lattice related effects at the 10{sup -18} level even for trap depths as large as 50E{sub r}. (authors)

  18. Determination of the thermal radiation effect on an optical strontium lattice clock; Bestimmung des Einflusses thermischer Strahlung auf eine optische Strontium-Gitteruhr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middelmann, Thomas

    2013-05-31

    Optical clocks have the potential to be 100 times more accurate than current best cesium atomic clocks within a fraction of the averaging time. This corresponds to a fractional uncertainty of the clock frequency on the level of 10{sup -18} and requires highaccuracy knowledge of systematic frequency shifts, such that they can be avoided or corrected for. In strontium optical lattice clocks an ensemble of ultracold strontium atoms is confined in an optical lattice, to allow for spectroscopy of the reference transition 5s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}-5s5p {sup 3}P{sub 0} in the Lamb-Dicke regime. The by far largest systematic frequency shift of the strontium clock transition is caused by its high sensitivity to blackbody radiation (BBR). The knowledge of the resulting frequency shift limited the achievable clock uncertainty to about 1 x 10{sup -16}. In this thesis for the first time an experimental approach was followed, to determine the sensitivity of the strontium clock transition to blackbody radiation. At an environmental temperature of 300 K the resulting frequency shift corresponds to 2.277 8(23) Hz. The achieved uncertainty contributes with 5 x 10{sup -18} to the fractional systematic uncertainty of the clock frequency. The determination is based on a precision measurement of the difference of static polarizabilities of the two clock states {Delta}{alpha}{sub dc} = {alpha}(5s5p {sup 3}P{sub 0})-{alpha}(5s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}) = 4.078 73(11) x 10{sup -39} Cm{sup 2} /V. For this the de Stark shift of the clock transition has been measured in the accurately known electric field of a precision plate capacitor, which has been developed in this work. The attained static polarizability difference {Delta}{alpha}{sub dc} corresponds to the first term of a power series of the sensitivity to BBR. Higher orders are accumulated as dynamic part of the BBR shift. Which has been modelled using {Delta}{alpha}{sub dc} and experimental data for other atomic properties. To

  19. Inelastic collisions and density-dependent excitation suppression in a 87Sr optical lattice clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishof, M.; Martin, M. J.; Swallows, M. D.; Benko, C.; Lin, Y.; Quemener, G.; Rey, A. M.; Ye, J.

    2011-01-01

    We observe two-body loss of 3 P 0 87 Sr atoms trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice. We measure loss rate coefficients for atomic samples between 1 and 6 μK that are prepared either in a single nuclear-spin sublevel or with equal populations in two sublevels. The measured temperature and nuclear-spin preparation dependence of rate coefficients agree well with calculations and reveal that rate coefficients for distinguishable atoms are only slightly enhanced over those of indistinguishable atoms. We further observe a suppression of excitation and losses during interrogation of the 1 S 0 - 3 P 0 transition as density increases and Rabi frequency decreases, which suggests the presence of strong interactions in our dynamically driven many-body system.

  20. Wave-function analysis of dynamic cancellation of ac Stark shifts in optical lattice clocks by use of pulsed Raman and electromagnetically-induced-transparency techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2007-01-01

    We study analytically the dynamic cancellation of ac Stark shift in the recently proposed pulsed electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT-)Raman optical lattice clock based on the wave-function formalism. An explicit expression for the time evolution operator corresponding to the effective two-level interaction Hamiltonian has been obtained in order to explain the atomic phase shift cancellation due to the ac Stark shift induced by the time-separated laser pulses. We present how to determine an optimum value of the common detuning of the driving fields at which the atomic phase shift cancels completely with the parameters for the practical realization of the EIT-Raman optical lattice clock with alkaline-earth-metal atoms

  1. Hanle Detection for Optical Clocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the strong inhomogeneous spatial polarization and intensity distribution of spontaneous decay fluorescence due to the Hanle effect, we propose and demonstrate a universe Hanle detection configuration of electron-shelving method for optical clocks. Experimental results from Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard with electron-shelving method show that a designed Hanle detection geometry with optimized magnetic field direction, detection laser beam propagation and polarization direction, and detector position can improve the fluorescence collection rate by more than one order of magnitude comparing with that of inefficient geometry. With the fixed 423 nm fluorescence, the improved 657 nm optical frequency standard signal intensity is presented. The potential application of the Hanle detection geometry designed for facilitating the fluorescence collection for optical lattice clock with a limited solid angle of the fluorescence collection has been discussed. The Hanle detection geometry is also effective for ion detection in ion optical clock and quantum information experiments. Besides, a cylinder fluorescence collection structure is designed to increase the solid angle of the fluorescence collection in Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard.

  2. Optical lattice clock with strontium atoms: a second generation of cold atom clocks; Horloge a reseau optique au strontium: une 2. generation d'horloges a atomes froids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Targat, R

    2007-07-15

    Atomic fountains, based on a microwave transition of Cesium or Rubidium, constitute the state of the art atomic clocks, with a relative accuracy close to 10{sup -16}. It nevertheless appears today that it will be difficult to go significantly beyond this level with this kind of device. The use of an optical transition, the other parameters being unchanged, gives hope for a 4 or 5 orders of magnitude improvement of the stability and of the relative uncertainty on most systematic effects. As for motional effects on the atoms, they can be controlled on a very different manner if they are trapped in an optical lattice instead of experiencing a free ballistic flight stage, characteristic of fountains. The key point of this approach lies in the fact that the trap can be operated in such a way that a well chosen, weakly allowed, J=0 {yields} J=0 clock transition can be free from light shift effects. In this respect, the strontium atom is one of the most promising candidate, the 1S{sub 0} {yields} 3P{sub 0} transition has a natural width of 1 mHz, and several other easily accessible transitions can be used to efficiently laser cool atoms down to 10 {mu}K. This thesis demonstrates the experimental feasibility of an optical lattice clock based on the strontium atom, and reports on a preliminary evaluation of the relative accuracy with the fermionic isotope {sup 87}Sr, at a level of a few 10{sup -15}. (author)

  3. A strontium lattice clock with reduced blackbody radiation shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Masoudi, Ali Khalas Anfoos

    2016-09-30

    Optical clocks have been quickly moving to the forefront of the frequency standards field due to their high spectral resolution, and therefore the potential high stability and accuracy. The accuracy and stability of the optical clocks are nowadays two orders of magnitude better than microwave Cs clocks, which realize the SI second. Envisioned applications of highly accurate optical clocks are to perform tests of fundamental physics, for example, searching for temporal drifts of the fine structure constant α, violations of the Local Position Invariance (LPI), dark matter and dark energy, or to performance relativistic geodesy. In this work, the uncertainty of a strontium lattice clock, based on the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition in {sup 87}Sr, due to the blackbody radiation (BBR) shift has been reduced to less than 1 x 10{sup -18} by more than one order of magnitude compared to the previous evaluation of the BBR shift uncertainty in this clock. The BBR shift has been reduced by interrogating the atoms in a cryogenic environment. The systematic uncertainty of the cryogenic lattice clock is evaluated to be 1.3 x 10{sup -17} which is dominated by the uncertainty of the AC Stark shift of the lattice laser and the uncertainty contribution of the BBR shift is negligible. Concerning the instability of the clock, the detection noise of the clock has been measured, and a model linking noise and clock instability has been developed. This noise model shows that, in our lattice clock, quantum projection noise is reached if more than 130 atoms are interrogated. By combining the noise model with the degradation due to the Dick effect reflecting the frequency noise of the interrogation laser, the instability of the clock is estimated to be 1.6 x 10{sup -16}/√(τ/s) in regular operation. During this work, several high-accuracy comparisons to other atomic clocks have been performed, including several absolute frequency measurements. The Sr clock transition frequency

  4. Frequency comparison of lattice clocks toward the redefinition of the second

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ido, T

    2014-01-01

    Strontium is the most popular species for optical lattice clocks. Recent reports of the accuracies from Boulder, U.S. and Tokyo reach 10 −18 level, which is better than state-of-the-art caesium clocks more than one order of magnitude. While this achievement accelerates the discussion to redefine the second, the agreement of frequencies in separate laboratories is of critical importance. For this context, intercontinental comparison of Sr lattice clocks were demonstrated between Japan and Germany using a satellite-based technique. The frequency difference was consistent with zero with an uncertainty of 1.6 × 10 −15

  5. Geodesy and metrology with a transportable optical clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotti, Jacopo; Koller, Silvio; Vogt, Stefan; Häfner, Sebastian; Sterr, Uwe; Lisdat, Christian; Denker, Heiner; Voigt, Christian; Timmen, Ludger; Rolland, Antoine; Baynes, Fred N.; Margolis, Helen S.; Zampaolo, Michel; Thoumany, Pierre; Pizzocaro, Marco; Rauf, Benjamin; Bregolin, Filippo; Tampellini, Anna; Barbieri, Piero; Zucco, Massimo; Costanzo, Giovanni A.; Clivati, Cecilia; Levi, Filippo; Calonico, Davide

    2018-05-01

    Optical atomic clocks, due to their unprecedented stability1-3 and uncertainty3-6, are already being used to test physical theories7,8 and herald a revision of the International System of Units9,10. However, to unlock their potential for cross-disciplinary applications such as relativistic geodesy11, a major challenge remains: their transformation from highly specialized instruments restricted to national metrology laboratories into flexible devices deployable in different locations12-14. Here, we report the first field measurement campaign with a transportable 87Sr optical lattice clock12. We use it to determine the gravity potential difference between the middle of a mountain and a location 90 km away, exploiting both local and remote clock comparisons to eliminate potential clock errors. A local comparison with a 171Yb lattice clock15 also serves as an important check on the international consistency of independently developed optical clocks. This campaign demonstrates the exciting prospects for transportable optical clocks.

  6. An optical clock to go

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Andrew D.

    2018-05-01

    Bringing next-generation atomic clocks out of the lab is not an easy task, but doing so will unlock many new possibilities. As a crucial first step, a portable atomic clock has now been deployed for relativistic geodesy measurements in the Alps.

  7. All-optical clock recovery of NRZ-DPSK signals using optical resonator-type filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peucheret, Christophe; Seoane, Jorge; Ji, Hua

    2009-01-01

    It is shown how introducing a limited rise time to the driving signal enables all-optical clock recovery of NRZ-DPSK signals generated using a phase modulator. A Fabry-Perot filter is used to generate the optical clock.......It is shown how introducing a limited rise time to the driving signal enables all-optical clock recovery of NRZ-DPSK signals generated using a phase modulator. A Fabry-Perot filter is used to generate the optical clock....

  8. Test of Special Relativity Using a Fiber Network of Optical Clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delva, P; Lodewyck, J; Bilicki, S; Bookjans, E; Vallet, G; Le Targat, R; Pottie, P-E; Guerlin, C; Meynadier, F; Le Poncin-Lafitte, C; Lopez, O; Amy-Klein, A; Lee, W-K; Quintin, N; Lisdat, C; Al-Masoudi, A; Dörscher, S; Grebing, C; Grosche, G; Kuhl, A; Raupach, S; Sterr, U; Hill, I R; Hobson, R; Bowden, W; Kronjäger, J; Marra, G; Rolland, A; Baynes, F N; Margolis, H S; Gill, P

    2017-06-02

    Phase compensated optical fiber links enable high accuracy atomic clocks separated by thousands of kilometers to be compared with unprecedented statistical resolution. By searching for a daily variation of the frequency difference between four strontium optical lattice clocks in different locations throughout Europe connected by such links, we improve upon previous tests of time dilation predicted by special relativity. We obtain a constraint on the Robertson-Mansouri-Sexl parameter |α|≲1.1×10^{-8}, quantifying a violation of time dilation, thus improving by a factor of around 2 the best known constraint obtained with Ives-Stilwell type experiments, and by 2 orders of magnitude the best constraint obtained by comparing atomic clocks. This work is the first of a new generation of tests of fundamental physics using optical clocks and fiber links. As clocks improve, and as fiber links are routinely operated, we expect that the tests initiated in this Letter will improve by orders of magnitude in the near future.

  9. Experimental generation of optical coherence lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yahong; Cai, Yangjian, E-mail: serpo@dal.ca, E-mail: yangjiancai@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Key Lab of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Technologies of Jiangsu Province and Key Lab of Modern Optical Technologies of Education Ministry of China, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Ponomarenko, Sergey A., E-mail: serpo@dal.ca, E-mail: yangjiancai@suda.edu.cn [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3J 2X4 (Canada)

    2016-08-08

    We report experimental generation and measurement of recently introduced optical coherence lattices. The presented optical coherence lattice realization technique hinges on a superposition of mutually uncorrelated partially coherent Schell-model beams with tailored coherence properties. We show theoretically that information can be encoded into and, in principle, recovered from the lattice degree of coherence. Our results can find applications to image transmission and optical encryption.

  10. Anomalous diffusion in a dynamical optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Cooper, Nigel R.

    2018-02-01

    Motivated by experimental progress in strongly coupled atom-photon systems in optical cavities, we study theoretically the quantum dynamics of atoms coupled to a one-dimensional dynamical optical lattice. The dynamical lattice is chosen to have a period that is incommensurate with that of an underlying static lattice, leading to a dynamical version of the Aubry-André model which can cause localization of single-particle wave functions. We show that atomic wave packets in this dynamical lattice generically spread via anomalous diffusion, which can be tuned between superdiffusive and subdiffusive regimes. This anomalous diffusion arises from an interplay between Anderson localization and quantum fluctuations of the cavity field.

  11. Optical lattice on an atom chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallego, D.; Hofferberth, S.; Schumm, Thorsten

    2009-01-01

    Optical dipole traps and atom chips are two very powerful tools for the quantum manipulation of neutral atoms. We demonstrate that both methods can be combined by creating an optical lattice potential on an atom chip. A red-detuned laser beam is retroreflected using the atom chip surface as a high......-quality mirror, generating a vertical array of purely optical oblate traps. We transfer thermal atoms from the chip into the lattice and observe cooling into the two-dimensional regime. Using a chip-generated Bose-Einstein condensate, we demonstrate coherent Bloch oscillations in the lattice....

  12. Recent results of the pulsed optically pumped rubidium clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, F.; Micalizio, S.; Godone, A.; Calosso, C.; Bertacco, E.

    2017-11-01

    A laboratory prototype of a pulsed optically pumped (POP) clock based on a rubidium cell with buffer gas is described. This clock has shown very interesting physical and metrological features, such as negligible light-shift, strongly reduced cavity-pulling and very good frequency stability. In this regard, an Allan deviation of σy(τ) = 1.2 τ-1/2 for measurement times up to τ = 105 s has been measured. These results confirm the interesting perspectives of such a frequency standard and make it very attractive for several technological applications, such as radionavigation.

  13. Cold collisions in dissipative optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piilo, J; Suominen, K-A

    2005-01-01

    The invention of laser cooling methods for neutral atoms allows optical and magnetic trapping of cold atomic clouds in the temperature regime below 1 mK. In the past, light-assisted cold collisions between laser cooled atoms have been widely studied in magneto-optical atom traps (MOTs). We describe here theoretical studies of dynamical interactions, specifically cold collisions, between atoms trapped in near-resonant, dissipative optical lattices. The extension of collision studies to the regime of optical lattices introduces several complicating factors. For the lattice studies, one has to account for the internal substates of atoms, position-dependent matter-light coupling, and position-dependent couplings between the atoms, in addition to the spontaneous decay of electronically excited atomic states. The developed one-dimensional quantum-mechanical model combines atomic cooling and collision dynamics in a single framework. The model is based on Monte Carlo wavefunction simulations and is applied when the lattice-creating lasers have frequencies both below (red-detuned lattice) and above (blue-detuned lattice) the atomic resonance frequency. It turns out that the radiative heating mechanism affects the dynamics of atomic cloud in a red-detuned lattice in a way that is not directly expected from the MOT studies. The optical lattice and position-dependent light-matter coupling introduces selectivity of collision partners. The atoms which are most mobile and energetic are strongly favoured to participate in collisions, and are more often ejected from the lattice, than the slow ones in the laser parameter region selected for study. Consequently, the atoms remaining in the lattice have a smaller average kinetic energy per atom than in the case of non-interacting atoms. For blue-detuned lattices, we study how optical shielding emerges as a natural part of the lattice and look for ways to optimize the effect. We find that the cooling and shielding dynamics do not mix

  14. Ultrafast all-optical clock recovery based on phase-only linear optical filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maram, Reza; Kong, Deming; Galili, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We report on a novel technique for all-optical clock recovery from RZ OOK data based on phase-only filtering, significantly enhancing the recovered clock quality and energy-efficiency compared to the use of a Fabry-Perot filter....

  15. Vortex-Peierls States in Optical Lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkov, A.A.; Demler, Eugene

    2006-01-01

    We show that vortices, induced in cold atom superfluids in optical lattices, may order in a novel vortex-Peierls ground state. In such a state vortices do not form a simple lattice but arrange themselves in clusters, within which the vortices are partially delocalized, tunneling between classically degenerate configurations. We demonstrate that this exotic quantum many-body state is selected by an order-from-disorder mechanism for a special combination of the vortex filling and lattice geometry that has a macroscopic number of classically degenerate ground states

  16. Rydberg dressing of atoms in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrı, T.; Pohl, T.

    2014-01-01

    We study atoms in optical lattices whose electronic ground state is off-resonantly coupled to a highly excited state with strong binary interactions. We present a time-dependent treatment of the resulting quantum dynamics, which—contrary to recent predictions [36 Li, Ates, and Lesanovsky, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 213005 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.213005]—proves that the strong repulsion between the weakly admixed Rydberg states does not lead to atomic trap loss. This finding provides an important basis for creating and manipulating coherent long-range interactions in optical lattice experiments.

  17. Ultracold Dipolar Gases in Optical Lattices

    OpenAIRE

    Trefzger, C.; Menotti, C.; Capogrosso-Sansone, B.; Lewenstein, M.

    2011-01-01

    This tutorial is a theoretical work, in which we study the physics of ultra-cold dipolar bosonic gases in optical lattices. Such gases consist of bosonic atoms or molecules that interact via dipolar forces, and that are cooled below the quantum degeneracy temperature, typically in the nK range. When such a degenerate quantum gas is loaded into an optical lattice produced by standing waves of laser light, new kinds of physical phenomena occur. These systems realize then extended Hubbard-type m...

  18. Optical lattices on wings of Apatura butterflies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krizek, G.O.; Hagen, G.M.; Křížek, P.; Havlová, M.; Křížek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 124, č. 3 (2014), s. 176-185 ISSN 0013-872X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-02067S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : photonic nanostructures * iridescence * optical lattices Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.447, year: 2014 http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.3157/021.124.0302

  19. Optical Stabilization of a Microwave Oscillator for Fountain Clock Interrogation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipphardt, Burghard; Gerginov, Vladislav; Weyers, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    We describe an optical frequency stabilization scheme of a microwave oscillator that is used for the interrogation of primary cesium fountain clocks. Because of its superior phase noise properties, this scheme, which is based on an ultrastable laser and a femtosecond laser frequency comb, overcomes the frequency instability limitations of fountain clocks given by the previously utilized quartz-oscillator-based frequency synthesis. The presented scheme combines the transfer of the short-term frequency instability of an optical cavity and the long-term frequency instability of a hydrogen maser to the microwave oscillator and is designed to provide continuous long-term operation for extended measurement periods of several weeks. The utilization of the twofold stabilization scheme on the one hand ensures the referencing of the fountain frequency to the hydrogen maser frequency and on the other hand results in a phase noise level of the fountain interrogation signal, which enables fountain frequency instabilities at the 2.5 ×10 -14 (τ/s) -1/2 level that are quantum projection noise limited.

  20. Statistical Transmutation in Floquet Driven Optical Lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedrakyan, Tigran A; Galitski, Victor M; Kamenev, Alex

    2015-11-06

    We show that interacting bosons in a periodically driven two dimensional (2D) optical lattice may effectively exhibit fermionic statistics. The phenomenon is similar to the celebrated Tonks-Girardeau regime in 1D. The Floquet band of a driven lattice develops the moat shape, i.e., a minimum along a closed contour in the Brillouin zone. Such degeneracy of the kinetic energy favors fermionic quasiparticles. The statistical transmutation is achieved by the Chern-Simons flux attachment similar to the fractional quantum Hall case. We show that the velocity distribution of the released bosons is a sensitive probe of the fermionic nature of their stationary Floquet state.

  1. Superexchange-mediated magnetization dynamics with ultracold alkaline-earth atoms in an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shaobing; Qian Jun; Wang Yuzhu

    2017-01-01

    Superexchange and inter-orbital spin-exchange interactions are key ingredients for understanding (orbital) quantum magnetism in strongly correlated systems and have been realized in ultracold atomic gases. Here we study the spin dynamics of ultracold alkaline-earth atoms in an optical lattice when the two exchange interactions coexist. In the superexchange interaction dominating regime, we find that the time-resolved spin imbalance shows a remarkable modulated oscillation, which can be attributed to the interplay between local and nonlocal quantum mechanical exchange mechanisms. Moreover, the filling of the long-lived excited atoms affects the collapse and revival of the magnetization dynamics. These observations can be realized in state-dependent optical lattices combined with the state-of-the-art advances in optical lattice clock spectroscopy. (paper)

  2. New Forms of Matter in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-19

    12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 optical lattice, quantum simulator, many body physics REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S...Reviewed Conference Proceeding publications (other than abstracts): Books Number of Manuscripts: 165.00Number of Presentations: Non Peer-Reviewed...Conference Proceeding publications (other than abstracts): (d) Manuscripts Received Paper TOTAL: Received Paper TOTAL: Received Paper TOTAL: Received Book

  3. Optical Lattice Gases of Interacting Fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-02

    interacting Fermi gases has topological properties similar to the conventional chiral p- wave state. These include a non-zero Chern number and the...interacting cold gases with broad impacts on the interfaces with condensed matter and particle physics . Applications and experiments of some of the physics ...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0016 Optical Lattice Gases of Interacting Fermions Wensheng Vincent Liu UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH Final Report 12/02/2015

  4. Atomic interferometers in an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelle, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the ForCa-G project, for Casimir force and short range Gravitation, lies into the measurement of short range forces between atoms and a mirror using atomic interferometry techniques. Particularly, the Casimir-Polder force and the pursuit of short range gravitational tests in the frame of potential deviations of Newton's law are aimed. This experiment is based on the trapping of neutral atoms in a 1D vertical optical lattice, where the energy eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian describing this system is the so-called Wannier-Stark ladder of discrete energy states localized in each lattice well. This work constitutes a demonstration of principle of this project with atoms set far from the mirror. Each energy state is thus separated from the one of the adjacent well by the potential energy increment between those two wells, called the Bloch frequency ν B . Then, atomic interferometers are realized in the lattice using Raman or microwave pulses where the trapped atomic wave functions are placed, and then recombined, in a superposition of states between different energy states localized either in the same well, either in adjacent wells. This work presents the study of different kinds of atomic interferometers in this optical lattice, characterized in terms of sensibility and systematic effects on the Bloch frequency measurement. One of the studied interferometers accessed to a sensitivity on the Bloch frequency of σ δ ν B /ν B =9.0x10 -6 at 1∼s in relative, which integrates until σ δ ν B /ν B =1. 10 -7 in 2800∼s. This corresponds to a state-of-the-art measurement of the gravity acceleration g for a trapped atomic gravimeter. (author)

  5. High Time-Resolution 640-Gb/s Clock Recovery Using Time-Domain Optical Fourier Transformation and Narrowband Optical Filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, P.; Mulvad, Hans Christian Hansen; Kasai, K.

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel scheme for subharmonic clock recovery from an optical time-division-multiplexing signal using time-domain optical Fourier transformation and a narrowband optical filter. High-resolution 640-Gb/s clock recovery is successfully demonstrated with no pattern dependence. The clock...

  6. Chiral Topological Orders in an Optical Raman Lattice (Open Source)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    PAPER • OPEN ACCESS Chiral topological orders in an optical Raman lattice To cite this article: Xiong-Jun Liu et al 2016 New J. Phys. 18...... chiral spin liquid Abstract Wefind an optical Raman lattice without spin-orbit coupling showing chiral topological orders for cold atoms. Two

  7. Vortex matter and ultracold superstrings in optical lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, M.

    2006-01-01

    The combination of a rotating cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate with a one-dimensional optical lattice gives rise to very interesting physics. The one-dimensional optical lattice splits the Bose-Einstein condensate into two-dimensional pancake-condensates, each containing a small number of

  8. Remote atomic clock synchronization via satellites and optical fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Piester, D.; Rost, M.; Fujieda, M.; Feldmann, T.; Bauch, A.

    2011-01-01

    In the global network of institutions engaged with the realization of International Atomic Time (TAI), atomic clocks and time scales are compared by means of the Global Positioning System (GPS) and by employing telecommunication satellites for two-way satellite time and frequency transfer (TWSTFT). The frequencies of the state-of-the-art primary caesium fountain clocks can be compared at the level of 10−15 (relative, 1 day averaging) and time scales can be synchronized...

  9. Spinor bose gases in cubic optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobarak, Mohamed Saidan Sayed Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the quantum simulation of condensed-matter physics problems has resulted from exciting experimental progress in the realm of ultracold atoms and molecules in optical lattices. In this thesis we analyze theoretically a spinor Bose gas loaded into a three-dimensional cubic optical lattice. In order to account for different superfluid phases of spin-1 bosons with a linear Zeeman effect, we work out a Ginzburg-Landau theory for the underlying spin-1 Bose-Hubbard model. To this end we add artificial symmetry-breaking currents to the spin-1 Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian in order to break the global U (1) symmetry. With this we determine a diagrammatic expansion of the grand-canonical free energy up to fourth order in the symmetry-breaking currents and up to the leading non-trivial order in the hopping strength which is of first order. As a cross-check we demonstrate that the resulting grand-canonical free energy allows to recover the mean-field theory. Applying a Legendre transformation to the grand-canonical free energy, where the symmetry-breaking currents are transformed to order parameters, we obtain the effective Ginzburg-Landau action. With this we calculate in detail at zero temperature the Mott insulator-superfluid quantum phase boundary as well as condensate and particle number density in the superfluid phase. We find that both mean-field and Ginzburg-Landau theory yield the same quantum phase transition between the Mott insulator and superfluid phases, but the range of validity of the mean-field theory turns out to be smaller than that of the Ginzburg-Landau theory. Due to this finding we expect that the Ginzburg-Landau theory gives better results for the superfluid phase and, thus, we restrict ourselves to extremize only the effective Ginzburg-Landau action with respect to the order parameters. Without external magnetic field the superfluid phase is a polar (ferromagnetic) state for anti-ferromagnetic (ferromagnetic) interactions, i.e. only the

  10. A Next-Generation Apparatus for Lithium Optical Lattice Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshet, Aviv

    hardware. Output sequences running on multiple servers and output cards can be synchronized using a shared clock. By using an FPGA-generated variable frequency clock, redundant buffers can be dramatically shortened, and a time resolution of 100ns achieved over effectively arbitrary sequence lengths. Experimental set-ups for producing, manipulating, and probing ultracold atomic gases can be quite complicated. To move forward with a quantum simulation program, it is necessary to have an apparatus that operates with a reliability that is not easily achieved in the face of this complexity. The design of a new apparatus is discussed. This Sodium-Lithium ultracold gas production machine has been engineered to incorporate as much experimental experience as possible to enhance its reliability. Particular attention has been paid to maximizing optical access and the utilization of this optical access, controlling the ambient temperature of the experiment, achieving a high vacuum, and simplifying subsystems where possible. The apparatus is now on the verge of producing degenerate gases, and should serve as a stable platform on which to perform future lattice quantum simulation experiments. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs mit.edu)

  11. Feedback control of atomic motion in an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrow, N.V.; Dutta, S.K.; Raithel, G.

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate a real-time feedback scheme to manipulate wave-packet oscillations of atoms in an optical lattice. The average position of the atoms in the lattice wells is measured continuously and nondestructively. A feedback loop processes the position signal and translates the lattice potential. Depending on the feedback loop characteristics, we find amplification, damping, or an entire alteration of the wave-packet oscillations. Our results are well supported by simulations

  12. Fractional quantum Hall states of atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, Anders S.; Demler, Eugene; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a method to create fractional quantum Hall states of atoms confined in optical lattices. We show that the dynamics of the atoms in the lattice is analogous to the motion of a charged particle in a magnetic field if an oscillating quadrupole potential is applied together with a periodic modulation of the tunneling between lattice sites. In a suitable parameter regime the ground state in the lattice is of the fractional quantum Hall type, and we show how these states can be reached by melting a Mott-insulator state in a superlattice potential. Finally, we discuss techniques to observe these strongly correlated states

  13. Preparing a highly degenerate Fermi gas in an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J. R.; Huckans, J. H.; Stites, R. W.; Hazlett, E. L.; O'Hara, K. M.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a method to prepare fermionic atoms in a three-dimensional optical lattice at unprecedentedly low temperatures and uniform filling factors. The process involves adiabatic loading of degenerate atoms into multiple energy bands of an optical lattice followed by a filtering stage whereby atoms from all but the lowest band are removed. Of critical importance is the use of a nonharmonic trapping potential to provide external confinement for the atoms. For realistic experimental parameters, this procedure will produce a Fermi gas in a lattice with a reduced temperature T/T F ∼0.003 and an entropy per particle of s∼0.02 k B .

  14. Optical properties of graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Garm; Flindt, Christian; Pedersen, Jesper Goor

    2008-01-01

    Undoped graphene is semimetallic and thus not suitable for many electronic and optoelectronic applications requiring gapped semiconductor materials. However, a periodic array of holes (antidot lattice) renders graphene semiconducting with a controllable band gap. Using atomistic modeling, we demo...

  15. Solutions for ultra-high speed optical wavelength conversion and clock recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Galili, Michael; Mulvad, Hans Christian Hansen

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on our recent advances in ultra-fast optical communications relying on ultra-short pulses densely stacked in ultra-high bit rate serial data signals at a single wavelength. The paper describes details in solutions for the network functionalities of wavelength conversion and clock...... recovery at bit rates up to 320 Gb/s...

  16. Ra+ ion trapping : toward an atomic parity violation measurement and an optical clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portela, M. Nunez; Dijck, E. A.; Mohanty, A.; Bekker, H.; van den Berg, Joost E.; Giri, G. S.; Hoekstra, S.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Schlesser, S.; Timmermans, R.G.E.; Versolato, O. O.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W.; Jungmann, K.

    2014-01-01

    A single Ra+ ion stored in a Paul radio frequency ion trap has excellent potential for a precision measurement of the electroweak mixing angle at low momentum transfer and as the most stable optical clock. The effective transport and cooling of singly charged ions of the isotopes Ra-209 to Ra-214 in

  17. All-optical pulse data generation in a semiconductor optical amplifier gain controlled by a reshaped optical clock injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Gong-Ru; Chang, Yung-Cheng; Yu, Kun-Chieh

    2006-05-01

    Wavelength-maintained all-optical pulse data pattern transformation based on a modified cross-gain-modulation architecture in a strongly gain-depleted semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) is investigated. Under a backward dark-optical-comb injection with 70% duty-cycle reshaping from the received data clock at 10GHz, the incoming optical data stream is transformed into a pulse data stream with duty cycle, rms timing jitter, and conversion gain of 15%, 4ps, and 3dB, respectively. The high-pass filtering effect of the gain-saturated SOA greatly improves the extinction ratio of data stream by 8dB and reduces its bit error rate to 10-12 at -18dBm.

  18. Posterior Lattice Degeneration Characterized by Spectral Domain Optical Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Manjunath, Varsha; Taha, Mohammed; Fujimoto, James G.; Duker, Jay S.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To utilize high-resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in the characterization of retinal and vitreal morphological changes overlying posterior lattice degeneration. METHODS: A cross-sectional, retrospective analysis was performed on 13 eyes of 13 nonconsecutive subjects with posterior lattice degeneration seen at the New England Eye Center, Tufts Medical Center between October 2009 and January 2010. SD-OCT images taken through the region of latti...

  19. Posterior lattice degeneration characterized by spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunath, Varsha; Taha, Mohammed; Fujimoto, James G; Duker, Jay S

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to use high-resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography in the characterization of retinal and vitreal morphological changes overlying posterior lattice degeneration. A cross-sectional retrospective analysis was performed on 13 eyes of 13 nonconsecutive subjects with posterior lattice degeneration seen at the New England Eye Center, Tufts Medical Center between October 2009 and January 2010. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography images taken through the region of lattice degeneration were qualitatively analyzed. Four characteristic changes of the retina and vitreous were seen in the 13 eyes with lattice degeneration: 1) anterior/posterior U-shaped vitreous traction; 2) retinal breaks; 3) focal retinal thinning; and 4) vitreous membrane formation. The morphologic appearance of vitreous traction and retinal breaks were found to be consistent with previous histologic reports. It is possible to image posterior lattice degeneration in many eyes using spectral domain optical coherence tomography and to visualize the spectrum of retinal and vitreous changes throughout the area of lattice degeneration.

  20. Dimensional crossover in Bragg scattering from an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slama, S.; Cube, C. von; Ludewig, A.; Kohler, M.; Zimmermann, C.; Courteille, Ph.W.

    2005-01-01

    We study Bragg scattering at one-dimensional (1D) optical lattices. Cold atoms are confined by the optical dipole force at the antinodes of a standing wave generated inside a laser-driven high-finesse cavity. The atoms arrange themselves into a chain of pancake-shaped layers located at the antinodes of the standing wave. Laser light incident on this chain is partially Bragg reflected. We observe an angular dependence of this Bragg reflection which is different from what is known from crystalline solids. In solids, the scattering layers can be taken to be infinitely spread (three-dimensional limit). This is not generally true for an optical lattice consistent of a 1D linear chain of pointlike scattering sites. By an explicit structure factor calculation, we derive a generalized Bragg condition, which is valid in the intermediate regime. This enables us to determine the aspect ratio of the atomic lattice from the angular dependance of the Bragg scattered light

  1. Extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juergensen, Ole

    2015-06-05

    In this thesis, the phase diagrams and dynamics of various extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices are studied. Hubbard models are the primary description for many interacting particles in periodic potentials with the paramount example of the electrons in solids. The very same models describe the behavior of ultracold quantum gases trapped in the periodic potentials generated by interfering beams of laser light. These optical lattices provide an unprecedented access to the fundamentals of the many-particle physics that govern the properties of solid-state materials. They can be used to simulate solid-state systems and validate the approximations and simplifications made in theoretical models. This thesis revisits the numerous approximations underlying the standard Hubbard models with special regard to optical lattice experiments. The incorporation of the interaction between particles on adjacent lattice sites leads to extended Hubbard models. Offsite interactions have a strong influence on the phase boundaries and can give rise to novel correlated quantum phases. The extended models are studied with the numerical methods of exact diagonalization and time evolution, a cluster Gutzwiller approximation, as well as with the strong-coupling expansion approach. In total, this thesis demonstrates the high relevance of beyond-Hubbard processes for ultracold atoms in optical lattices. Extended Hubbard models can be employed to tackle unexplained problems of solid-state physics as well as enter previously inaccessible regimes.

  2. Extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juergensen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the phase diagrams and dynamics of various extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices are studied. Hubbard models are the primary description for many interacting particles in periodic potentials with the paramount example of the electrons in solids. The very same models describe the behavior of ultracold quantum gases trapped in the periodic potentials generated by interfering beams of laser light. These optical lattices provide an unprecedented access to the fundamentals of the many-particle physics that govern the properties of solid-state materials. They can be used to simulate solid-state systems and validate the approximations and simplifications made in theoretical models. This thesis revisits the numerous approximations underlying the standard Hubbard models with special regard to optical lattice experiments. The incorporation of the interaction between particles on adjacent lattice sites leads to extended Hubbard models. Offsite interactions have a strong influence on the phase boundaries and can give rise to novel correlated quantum phases. The extended models are studied with the numerical methods of exact diagonalization and time evolution, a cluster Gutzwiller approximation, as well as with the strong-coupling expansion approach. In total, this thesis demonstrates the high relevance of beyond-Hubbard processes for ultracold atoms in optical lattices. Extended Hubbard models can be employed to tackle unexplained problems of solid-state physics as well as enter previously inaccessible regimes.

  3. Coupled matter-wave solitons in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golam Ali, Sk; Talukdar, B.

    2009-06-01

    We make use of a potential model to study the dynamics of two coupled matter-wave or Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) solitons loaded in optical lattices. With separate attention to linear and nonlinear lattices we find some remarkable differences for response of the system to effects of these lattices. As opposed to the case of linear optical lattice (LOL), the nonlinear lattice (NOL) can be used to control the mutual interaction between the two solitons. For a given lattice wave number k, the effective potentials in which the two solitons move are such that the well (Veff(NOL)), resulting from the juxtaposition of soliton interaction and nonlinear lattice potential, is deeper than the corresponding well Veff(LOL). But these effective potentials have opposite k dependence in the sense that the depth of Veff(LOL) increases as k increases and that of Veff(NOL) decreases for higher k values. We verify that the effectiveness of optical lattices to regulate the motion of the coupled solitons depends sensitively on the initial locations of the motionless solitons as well as values of the lattice wave number. For both LOL and NOL the two solitons meet each other due to mutual interaction if their initial locations are taken within the potential wells with the difference that the solitons in the NOL approach each other rather rapidly and take roughly half the time to meet as compared with the time needed for such coalescence in the LOL. In the NOL, the soliton profiles can move freely and respond to the lattice periodicity when the separation between their initial locations are as twice as that needed for a similar free movement in the LOL. We observe that, in both cases, slow tuning of the optical lattices by varying k with respect to a time parameter τ drags the oscillatory solitons apart to take them to different locations. In our potential model the oscillatory solitons appear to propagate undistorted. But a fully numerical calculation indicates that during evolution

  4. Coupled matter-wave solitons in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golam Ali, Sk; Talukdar, B.

    2009-01-01

    We make use of a potential model to study the dynamics of two coupled matter-wave or Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) solitons loaded in optical lattices. With separate attention to linear and nonlinear lattices we find some remarkable differences for response of the system to effects of these lattices. As opposed to the case of linear optical lattice (LOL), the nonlinear lattice (NOL) can be used to control the mutual interaction between the two solitons. For a given lattice wave number k, the effective potentials in which the two solitons move are such that the well (V eff (NOL)), resulting from the juxtaposition of soliton interaction and nonlinear lattice potential, is deeper than the corresponding well V eff (LOL). But these effective potentials have opposite k dependence in the sense that the depth of V eff (LOL) increases as k increases and that of V eff (NOL) decreases for higher k values. We verify that the effectiveness of optical lattices to regulate the motion of the coupled solitons depends sensitively on the initial locations of the motionless solitons as well as values of the lattice wave number. For both LOL and NOL the two solitons meet each other due to mutual interaction if their initial locations are taken within the potential wells with the difference that the solitons in the NOL approach each other rather rapidly and take roughly half the time to meet as compared with the time needed for such coalescence in the LOL. In the NOL, the soliton profiles can move freely and respond to the lattice periodicity when the separation between their initial locations are as twice as that needed for a similar free movement in the LOL. We observe that, in both cases, slow tuning of the optical lattices by varying k with respect to a time parameter τ drags the oscillatory solitons apart to take them to different locations. In our potential model the oscillatory solitons appear to propagate undistorted. But a fully numerical calculation indicates that during

  5. Lattice QCD simulations on big cats, sea monsters and clock towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Balint, E-mail: bjoo@jlab.or [Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2009-07-01

    We present details of lattice QCD computations we are performing on the Cray XT series of computers, from BigBen - an XT3 hosted at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) - through Jaguar (XT4) and Kraken (XT5) - which are hosted at the National Center for Computational Science (NCCS) and the National Institute of Computational Science (NICS), respectively, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). We discuss algorithmic tuning to make the computation more efficient and present some recent results.

  6. Lattice QCD simulations on big cats, sea monsters and clock towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Balint

    2009-01-01

    We present details of lattice QCD computations we are performing on the Cray XT series of computers, from BigBen - an XT3 hosted at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) - through Jaguar (XT4) and Kraken (XT5) - which are hosted at the National Center for Computational Science (NCCS) and the National Institute of Computational Science (NICS), respectively, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). We discuss algorithmic tuning to make the computation more efficient and present some recent results.

  7. Manipulation of single neutral atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chuanwei; Das Sarma, S.; Rolston, S. L.

    2006-01-01

    We analyze a scheme to manipulate quantum states of neutral atoms at individual sites of optical lattices using focused laser beams. Spatial distributions of focused laser intensities induce position-dependent energy shifts of hyperfine states, which, combined with microwave radiation, allow selective manipulation of quantum states of individual target atoms. We show that various errors in the manipulation process are suppressed below 10 -4 with properly chosen microwave pulse sequences and laser parameters. A similar idea is also applied to measure quantum states of single atoms in optical lattices

  8. Clock-distribution with instantaneous synchronisation for 160 Gbit/s optical time-domain multiplexed packet transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez-Agis, F.; Calabretta, N.; Albores Mejia, A.; Dorren, H.J.S.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, a clock-distribution method for ultra-high-speed optical time-domain multiplexed systems data packets that provides instantaneous synchronization, fast locking/unlocking times, and a highly stable bursty clock, enabling error-free operation of 160

  9. Lattice of optical islets: a novel treatment modality in photomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altshuler, Gregory; Smirnov, Mikhail; Yaroslavsky, Ilya

    2005-01-01

    A majority of photothermal applications of laser and non-laser light sources in medicine (in particular, in dermatology) are based on the paradigm of (extended) selective photothermolysis. However, realization of this principle in its strict form may not always be possible and/or practical. Spatial (or geometric) selectivity (as opposed to wavelength and temporal selectivity) can provide an alternative approach delivering effective and safe treatment techniques. A method of creating a lattice of localized areas of light-tissue interaction (optical islets) is an example of this 'spatially confined' approach. The lattice of optical islets can be formed using a variety of energy sources and delivery optics, including application of lenslet arrays, phase masks and matrices of exogenous chromophores. Using a state-of-the-art theory of optical and thermal light-tissue interactions and a comprehensive computer model of skin, we have conducted a theoretical and numerical analysis of the process of formation of such a lattice in human tissue. Effects of the wavelength, beam geometry, pulsewidth and physical properties of tissues have been considered. Conditions for obtaining optical, thermal and damage islet lattices in the human skin without inducing adverse side effects (e.g. bulk damage) have been established

  10. Stability of matter-wave solitons in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sk. Golam; Roy, S. K.; Talukdar, B.

    2010-08-01

    We consider localized states of both single- and two-component Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) confined in a potential resulting from the superposition of linear and nonlinear optical lattices and make use of Vakhitov-Kolokolov criterion to investigate the effect of nonlinear lattice on the stability of the soliton solutions in the linear optical lattice (LOL). For the single-component case we show that a weak nonlinear lattice has very little effect on the stability of such solitons while sufficiently strong nonlinear optical lattice (NOL) squeezes them to produce narrow bound states. For two-component condensates we find that when the strength of the NOL (γ1) is less than that of the LOL (V0) a relatively weak intra-atomic interaction (IAI) has little effect on the stability of the component solitons. This is true for both attractive and repulsive IAI. A strong attractive IAI, however, squeezes the BEC solitons while a similar repulsive IAI makes the component solitons wider. For γ1 > V0, only a strong attractive IAI squeezes the BEC solitons but the squeezing effect is less prominent than that found for γ1 < V0. We make useful checks on the results of our semianalytical stability analysis by solving the appropriate Gross-Pitaevskii equations numerically.

  11. Mixtures of bosonic and fermionic atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albus, Alexander; Illuminati, Fabrizio; Eisert, Jens

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the theory of mixtures of bosonic and fermionic atoms in periodic potentials at zero temperature. We derive a general Bose-Fermi Hubbard Hamiltonian in a one-dimensional optical lattice with a superimposed harmonic trapping potential. We study the conditions for linear stability of the mixture and derive a mean-field criterion for the onset of a bosonic superfluid transition. We investigate the ground-state properties of the mixture in the Gutzwiller formulation of mean-field theory, and present numerical studies of finite systems. The bosonic and fermionic density distributions and the onset of quantum phase transitions to demixing and to a bosonic Mott-insulator are studied as a function of the lattice potential strength. The existence is predicted of a disordered phase for mixtures loaded in very deep lattices. Such a disordered phase possessing many degenerate or quasidegenerate ground states is related to a breaking of the mirror symmetry in the lattice

  12. Compact Optical Atomic Clock Based on a Two-Photon Transition in Rubidium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kyle W.; Phelps, Gretchen; Lemke, Nathan D.; Bigelow, Matthew S.; Stuhl, Benjamin; Wojcik, Michael; Holt, Michael; Coddington, Ian; Bishop, Michael W.; Burke, John H.

    2018-01-01

    Extralaboratory atomic clocks are necessary for a wide array of applications (e.g., satellite-based navigation and communication). Building upon existing vapor-cell and laser technologies, we describe an optical atomic clock, designed around a simple and manufacturable architecture, that utilizes the 778-nm two-photon transition in rubidium and yields fractional-frequency instabilities of 4 ×10-13/√{τ (s ) } for τ from 1 to 10 000 s. We present a complete stability budget for this system and explore the required conditions under which a fractional-frequency instability of 1 ×10-15 can be maintained on long time scales. We provide a precise characterization of the leading sensitivities to external processes, including magnetic fields and fluctuations of the vapor-cell temperature and 778-nm laser power. The system is constructed primarily from commercially available components, an attractive feature from the standpoint of the commercialization and deployment of optical frequency standards.

  13. Matter-wave dark solitons in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louis, Pearl J Y; Ostrovskaya, Elena A; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2004-01-01

    We analyse the Floquet-Bloch spectrum of matter waves in Bose-Einstein condensates loaded into single-periodic optical lattices and double-periodic superlattices. In the framework of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, we describe the structure and analyse the mobility properties of matter-wave dark solitons residing on backgrounds of extended nonlinear Bloch-type states. We demonstrate that interactions between dark solitons can be effectively controlled in optical superlattices

  14. Optical Lattice Design Assisted by Non-Hermitian Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez-Lara, B M

    2016-01-01

    A brief introduction to non-Hermitian arrays of coupled waveguides is presented. The PT-symmetric dimer is revisited for the sake of clarity. It belongs to the class of photonic lattices with underlying SO(2,1) symmetry that have been shown to provide all-optical conversion from phase to amplitude. (paper)

  15. Quantum degenerate atomic gases in controlled optical lattice potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemelke, Nathan D.

    2007-12-01

    Since the achievement of Bose Einstein condensation in cold atomic gases, mean-field treatments of the condensed phase have provided an excellent description for the static and dynamic properties observed in experiments. Recent experimental efforts have focused on studying deviations from mean-field behavior. I will describe work on two experiments which introduce controlled single particle degeneracies with time-dependent optical potentials, aiming to induce correlated motion and nontrivial statistics in the gas. In the first experiment, an optical lattice with locally rotating site potentials is produced to investigate fractional quantum Hall effects (FQHE) in rotating Bose gases. Here, the necessary gauge potential is provided by the rotating reference frame of the gas, which, in direct analogy to the electronic system, organizes single particle states into degenerate Landau levels. At low temperatures the repulsive interaction provided by elastic scattering is expected to produce ground states with structure nearly identical to those in the FQHE. I will discuss how these effects are made experimentally feasible by working at small particle numbers in the tight trapping potentials of an optical lattice, and present first results on the use of photoassociation to probe correlation in this system. In the second experiment, a vibrated optical lattice potential alters the single-particle dispersion underlying a condensed Bose gas and offers tailored phase-matching for nonlinear atom optical processes. I will demonstrate how this leads to parametric instability in the condensed gas, and draw analogy to an optical parametric oscillator operating above threshold.

  16. Mixtures of Strongly Interacting Bosons in Optical Lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonsante, P.; Penna, V.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.; Vezzani, A.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the properties of strongly interacting heteronuclear boson-boson mixtures loaded in realistic optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the physics of interfaces. In particular, we numerically reproduce the recent experimental observation that the addition of a small fraction of 41 K induces a significant loss of coherence in 87 Rb, providing a simple explanation. We then investigate the robustness against the inhomogeneity typical of realistic experimental realizations of the glassy quantum emulsions recently predicted to occur in strongly interacting boson-boson mixtures on ideal homogeneous lattices

  17. Optical-lattice Hamiltonians for relativistic quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapit, Eliot; Mueller, Erich

    2011-01-01

    We show how interpenetrating optical lattices containing Bose-Fermi mixtures can be constructed to emulate the thermodynamics of quantum electrodynamics (QED). We present models of neutral atoms on lattices in 1+1, 2+1, and 3+1 dimensions whose low-energy effective action reduces to that of photons coupled to Dirac fermions of the corresponding dimensionality. We give special attention to (2+1)-dimensional quantum electrodynamics (QED3) and discuss how two of its most interesting features, chiral symmetry breaking and Chern-Simons physics, could be observed experimentally.

  18. Light-Induced Hofstadter's Butterfly Spectrum in Optical Lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Jingmin

    2009-01-01

    We propose a scheme to create an effective magnetic field, which can be perceived by cold neutral atoms in a two-dimensional optical lattice, with a laser field with a space-dependent phase and a conventional laser field acting on Λ-type three-level atoms. When the dimensionless parameter α, being the ratio of flux through a lattice cell to one flux quantum, is rational, the energy spectrum shows a fractal band structure, which is so-called Hofstadter's butterfly. (general)

  19. Cold atoms in optical cavities and lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, P.

    1996-11-01

    The thesis is organized in three chapters covering different aspects of the interaction of atoms and light in the framework of theoretical quantum optics. In chapter 1 a special case of a microscopic laser where one or two atoms interact with several quantized cavity modes is discussed. In particular I investigate the properties of the light field created in one of the cavity modes. It is shown that a single-atom model already predicts average photon numbers in agreement with a semiclassical many-atom theory. The two-atom model exhibits additional collective features, such as superradiance and subradiance. In chapter 2 effects of the photon recoil on cold atoms in the limit of long-lived atomic transitions are investigated. First, I demonstrate that, in principle, relying on this scheme, a continuous-wave laser in the ultraviolet frequency domain could be established. Second, the splitting of an atomic beam into two coherent subbeams is discussed within the same scheme. Such beamsplitters play an important role in high-precision measurements using atomic interferometers. Finally, chapter 3 deals with cooling and trapping of atoms by the interaction with laser light. I discuss the properties and the light scattering of atoms trapped in a new light field configuration, a so-called dark optical superlattice. In principle, such systems allow the trapping of more than one atom in the ground state of a single optical potential well. This could give rise to the observation of e.g. atom-atom interactions and quantum statistical effects. (author)

  20. Optical spectra and lattice dynamics of molecular crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Zhizhin, GN

    1995-01-01

    The current volume is a single topic volume on the optical spectra and lattice dynamics of molecular crystals. The book is divided into two parts. Part I covers both the theoretical and experimental investigations of organic crystals. Part II deals with the investigation of the structure, phase transitions and reorientational motion of molecules in organic crystals. In addition appendices are given which provide the parameters for the calculation of the lattice dynamics of molecular crystals, procedures for the calculation of frequency eigenvectors of utilizing computers, and the frequencies and eigenvectors of lattice modes for several organic crystals. Quite a large amount of Russian literature is cited, some of which has previously not been available to scientists in the West.

  1. Weyl solitons in three-dimensional optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Ce; Zheng, Yuanlin; Malomed, Boris A.

    2018-04-01

    Weyl fermions are massless chiral quasiparticles existing in materials known as Weyl semimetals. Topological surface states, associated with the unusual electronic structure in the Weyl semimetals, have been recently demonstrated in linear systems. Ultracold atomic gases, featuring laser-assisted tunneling in three-dimensional optical lattices, can be used for the emulation of Weyl semimetals, including nonlinear effects induced by the collisional nonlinearity of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates. We demonstrate that this setting gives rise to topological states in the form of Weyl solitons at the surface of the underlying optical lattice. These nonlinear modes, being exceptionally robust, bifurcate from linear states for a given quasimomentum. The Weyl solitons may be used to design an efficient control scheme for topologically protected unidirectional propagation of excitations in light-matter-interaction physics. After the recently introduced Majorana and Dirac solitons, the Weyl solitons proposed in this work constitute the third (and the last) member in this family of topological solitons.

  2. Anti-ferromagnetic spinor BECs in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossini, Davide [NEST-CNR-INFM and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Rizzi, Matteo [NEST-CNR-INFM and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Chiara, Gabriele De [NEST-CNR-INFM and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Montangero, Simone [NEST-CNR-INFM and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Fazio, Rosario [NEST-CNR-INFM and Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); International School for Advanced Studies SISSA/ISAS, via Beirut 2-4, I-34014 Trieste (Italy)

    2006-05-28

    Spinor Bose condensates loaded in optical lattices have a rich phase diagram characterized by different magnetic order. In this work we evaluated the phase boundary between the Mott insulator and the superfluid phase by means of the density matrix renormalization group. Furthermore, we studied the properties of the insulating phase for odd fillings. The results obtained in this work are also relevant for the determination of the ground state phase diagram of the S = 1 Heisenberg model with biquadratic interaction.

  3. Cavity assisted measurements of heat and work in optical lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Villa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a method to experimentally measure the internal energy of a system of ultracold atoms trapped in optical lattices by coupling them to the fields of two optical cavities. We show that the tunnelling and self-interaction terms of the one-dimensional Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian can be mapped to the field and photon number of each cavity, respectively. We compare the energy estimated using this method with numerical results obtained using the density matrix renormalisation group algorithm. Our method can be employed for the assessment of power and efficiency of thermal machines whose working substance is a strongly correlated many-body system.

  4. Quantum optics and nuclear clocks: a look at the 2012 physics nobel prize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera-Sancho, Oscar-Andrey

    2013-01-01

    Pioneering researches in the field of quantum optics are presented. These have laid the foundation for photonics research, that has grasped the particle properties of light to create new technologies and deepen the understanding of the physical laws. The quantum computation and quantum clocks have been highlighted. Individual particles have managed to manipulate without losing its properties in quantum, using photons to immobilize atoms with electric charges (ions) and study their properties. Researches conducted by the French scientist Serge Haroche and American David Wineland nobel prize winners for Physics 2012, have been commented [es

  5. Radio frequency phototube and optical clock: High resolution, high rate and highly stable single photon timing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaryan, Amur

    2011-10-01

    A new timing technique for single photons based on the radio frequency phototube and optical clock or femtosecond optical frequency comb generator is proposed. The technique has a 20 ps resolution for single photons, is capable of operating with MHz frequencies and achieving 10 fs instability level.

  6. All-optical clocked flip-flops and random access memory cells using the nonlinear polarization rotation effect of low-polarization-dependent semiconductor optical amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Xinyu; Tian, Qinghua; Wang, Lina; Xin, Xiangjun

    2018-03-01

    Basic configurations of various all-optical clocked flip-flops (FFs) and optical random access memory (RAM) based on the nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) effect of low-polarization-dependent semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA) are proposed. As the constituent elements, all-optical logic gates and all-optical SR latches are constructed by taking advantage of the SOA's NPR switch. Different all-optical FFs (AOFFs), including SR-, D-, T-, and JK-types as well as an optical RAM cell were obtained by the combination of the proposed all-optical SR latches and logic gates. The effectiveness of the proposed schemes were verified by simulation results and demonstrated by a D-FF and 1-bit RAM cell experimental system. The proposed all-optical clocked FFs and RAM cell are significant to all-optical signal processing.

  7. Optical trapping via guided resonance modes in a Slot-Suzuki-phase photonic crystal lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Martínez, Luis Javier; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2012-03-12

    A novel photonic crystal lattice is proposed for trapping a two-dimensional array of particles. The lattice is created by introducing a rectangular slot in each unit cell of the Suzuki-Phase lattice to enhance the light confinement of guided resonance modes. Large quality factors on the order of 10⁵ are predicted in the lattice. A significant decrease of the optical power required for optical trapping can be achieved compared to our previous design.

  8. Hofstadter butterflies in nonlinear Harper lattices, and their optical realizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manela, Ofer; Segev, Mordechai; Christodoulides, Demetrios N; Kip, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    The ubiquitous Hofstadter butterfly describes a variety of systems characterized by incommensurable periodicities, ranging from Bloch electrons in magnetic fields and the quantum Hall effect to cold atoms in optical lattices and more. Here, we introduce nonlinearity into the underlying (Harper) model and study the nonlinear spectra and the corresponding extended eigenmodes of nonlinear quasiperiodic systems. We show that the spectra of the nonlinear eigenmodes form deformed versions of the Hofstadter butterfly and demonstrate that the modes can be classified into two families: nonlinear modes that are a 'continuation' of the linear modes of the system and new nonlinear modes that have no counterparts in the linear spectrum. Finally, we propose an optical realization of the linear and nonlinear Harper models in transversely modulated waveguide arrays, where these Hofstadter butterflies can be observed. This work is relevant to a variety of other branches of physics beyond optics, such as disorder-induced localization in ultracold bosonic gases, localization transition processes in disordered lattices, and more.

  9. Hofstadter butterflies in nonlinear Harper lattices, and their optical realizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manela, Ofer; Segev, Mordechai [Department of Physics and Solid State Institute, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Christodoulides, Demetrios N [College of Optics/CREOL, University of Central Florida, FL 32816-2700 (United States); Kip, Detlef, E-mail: msegev@tx.technion.ac.i [Department of Electrical Engineering, Helmut Schmidt University, 22043 Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    The ubiquitous Hofstadter butterfly describes a variety of systems characterized by incommensurable periodicities, ranging from Bloch electrons in magnetic fields and the quantum Hall effect to cold atoms in optical lattices and more. Here, we introduce nonlinearity into the underlying (Harper) model and study the nonlinear spectra and the corresponding extended eigenmodes of nonlinear quasiperiodic systems. We show that the spectra of the nonlinear eigenmodes form deformed versions of the Hofstadter butterfly and demonstrate that the modes can be classified into two families: nonlinear modes that are a 'continuation' of the linear modes of the system and new nonlinear modes that have no counterparts in the linear spectrum. Finally, we propose an optical realization of the linear and nonlinear Harper models in transversely modulated waveguide arrays, where these Hofstadter butterflies can be observed. This work is relevant to a variety of other branches of physics beyond optics, such as disorder-induced localization in ultracold bosonic gases, localization transition processes in disordered lattices, and more.

  10. Strongly correlated Fermi-Bose mixtures in disordered optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Palencia, L; Ahufinger, V; Kantian, A; Zakrzewski, J; Sanpera, A; Lewenstein, M

    2006-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the low-temperature physics of a two-component ultracold mixture of bosons and fermions in disordered optical lattices. We focus on the strongly correlated regime. We show that, under specific conditions, composite fermions, made of one fermion plus one bosonic hole, form. The composite picture is used to derive an effective Hamiltonian whose parameters can be controlled via the boson-boson and the boson-fermion interactions, the tunnelling terms and the inhomogeneities. We finally investigate the quantum phase diagram of the composite fermions and show that it corresponds to the formation of Fermi glasses, spin glasses and quantum percolation regimes

  11. Wilson Fermions and Axion Electrodynamics in Optical Lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermudez, A.; Martin-Delgado, M. A.; Mazza, L.; Rizzi, M.; Goldman, N.; Lewenstein, M.

    2010-01-01

    We show that ultracold Fermi gases in optical superlattices can be used as quantum simulators of relativistic lattice fermions in 3+1 dimensions. By exploiting laser-assisted tunneling, we find an analogue of the so-called naive Dirac fermions, and thus provide a realization of the fermion doubling problem. Moreover, we show how to implement Wilson fermions, and discuss how their mass can be inverted by tuning the laser intensities. In this regime, our atomic gas corresponds to a phase of matter where Maxwell electrodynamics is replaced by axion electrodynamics: a 3D topological insulator.

  12. Strongly correlated Fermi-Bose mixtures in disordered optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Palencia, L [Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l' Institut d' Optique, CNRS and Universite Paris-Sud XI, Bat 503, Centre scientifique, F-91403 Orsay Cedex (France); Ahufinger, V [ICREA and Grup d' optica, Departament de FIsica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Belaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Kantian, A [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Zakrzewski, J [Instytut Fizyki imienia Mariana Smoluchowskiego i Centrum Badan Ukladow Zlozonych imienia Marka Kaca, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland); Sanpera, A [ICREA and Grup de FIsica Teorica, Departament de FIsica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Belaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Lewenstein, M [ICREA and ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Parc Mediterrani de la TecnologIa, E-08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2006-05-28

    We investigate theoretically the low-temperature physics of a two-component ultracold mixture of bosons and fermions in disordered optical lattices. We focus on the strongly correlated regime. We show that, under specific conditions, composite fermions, made of one fermion plus one bosonic hole, form. The composite picture is used to derive an effective Hamiltonian whose parameters can be controlled via the boson-boson and the boson-fermion interactions, the tunnelling terms and the inhomogeneities. We finally investigate the quantum phase diagram of the composite fermions and show that it corresponds to the formation of Fermi glasses, spin glasses and quantum percolation regimes.

  13. Tight-binding tunneling amplitude of an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzamasovs, Maksims; Liu, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The particle in a periodic potential is an important topic in an undergraduate quantum mechanics curriculum and a stepping stone on the way to more advanced topics, such as courses on interacting electrons in crystalline solids, and graduate-level research in solid-state and condensed matter physics. The interacting many-body phenomena are usually described in terms of the second quantized lattice Hamiltonians which treat single-particle physics on the level of tight-binding approximation and add interactions on top of it. The aim of this paper is to show how the tight-binding tunneling amplitude can be related to the strength of the periodic potential for the case of a cosine potential used in the burgeoning field of ultracold atoms. We show how to approach the problem of computing the tunneling amplitude of a deep lattice using the JWKB (Jeffreys–Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin, also known as semiclassical) approximation. We also point out that care should be taken when applying the method of the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) in an optical lattice context. A summary of the exact solution in terms of Mathieu functions is also given. (paper)

  14. Tight-binding tunneling amplitude of an optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzamasovs, Maksims; Liu, Bo

    2017-11-01

    The particle in a periodic potential is an important topic in an undergraduate quantum mechanics curriculum and a stepping stone on the way to more advanced topics, such as courses on interacting electrons in crystalline solids, and graduate-level research in solid-state and condensed matter physics. The interacting many-body phenomena are usually described in terms of the second quantized lattice Hamiltonians which treat single-particle physics on the level of tight-binding approximation and add interactions on top of it. The aim of this paper is to show how the tight-binding tunneling amplitude can be related to the strength of the periodic potential for the case of a cosine potential used in the burgeoning field of ultracold atoms. We show how to approach the problem of computing the tunneling amplitude of a deep lattice using the JWKB (Jeffreys-Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin, also known as semiclassical) approximation. We also point out that care should be taken when applying the method of the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) in an optical lattice context. A summary of the exact solution in terms of Mathieu functions is also given.

  15. Optics and lattice optimizations for the LHC upgrade project

    CERN Document Server

    Holzer, B; Chance, A; Dalena, B; Payet, J; Bogomyagkov, A; Appleby, R; Korostelev, M; Hock, K; Wolski, A; Milardi, C; Faus-Golfe, A; Resta, J

    2012-01-01

    The luminosity upgrade of the LHC collider at CERN is based on a strong focusing scheme to reach lowest values of the beta function at the collision points. Several issues have to be addressed in this context, that are considered as mid term goals for the optimisation of the lattice and beam optics: Firstly a number of beam optics have been developed to establish a baseline for the hardware R&D, and that will define the specifications for the new magnets that will be needed, in Nb$_{3}$Sn as well as in NbTi technology. Secondly, the need for sufficient flexibility of the beam optics especially for smallest β * values, the need for a smooth transition between the injection and the collision optics, the comparison of the optics performance between flat and round beams and finally different ways to optimise the chromatic correction, including the study of local correction schemes. This paper presents the status of this work, which is a result of an international collaboration, and summarises the main parame...

  16. Band structure engineering for ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, Malte

    2014-01-01

    The energy band structure fundamentally influences the physical properties of a periodic system. It may give rise to highly exotic phenomena in yet uncharted physical regimes. Ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices provide an ideal playground for the investigation of a large variety of such intriguing effects. Experiments presented here address several issues that require the systematic manipulation of energy band structures in optical lattices with diverse geometries. These artificial crystals of light, generated by interfering laser beams, allow for an unprecedented degree of control over a wide range of parameters. A major part of this thesis employs time-periodic driving to engineer tunneling matrix elements and, thus, the dispersion relation for bosonic quantum gases in optical lattices. Resonances emerging in the excitation spectrum due to the particularly strong forcing can be attributed to multi-photon transitions that are investigated systematically. By changing the sign of the tunneling, antiferromagnetic spin-spin interactions can be emulated. In a triangular lattice this leads to geometrical frustration with a doubly degenerate ground state as the simultaneous minimization of competing interactions is inhibited. Moreover, complex-valued tunneling matrix elements can be generated with a suitable breaking of time-reversal symmetry in the driving scheme. The associated Peierls phases mimic the presence of an electromagnetic vector gauge potential acting on charged particles. First proof-of-principle experiments reveal an excellent agreement with theoretical calculations. In the weakly interacting superfluid regime, these artificial gauge fields give rise to an Ising-XY model with tunable staggered magnetic fluxes and a complex interplay between discrete and continuous symmetries. A thermal phase transition from an ordered ferromagnetic- to an unordered paramagnetic state could be observed. In the opposite hard-core boson limit of strong interactions

  17. Quantum tunneling of Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Fan Wen Bin

    2003-01-01

    In quantum tunneling a particle with energy E can pass through a high potential barrier V(>E) due to the wave character of the particle. Bose-Einstein condensates can display very strong tunneling depending on the structure of the trap, which may be a double-well or optical lattices. The employed for the first time to our knowledge the periodic instanton method to investigate tunneling of Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices. The results show that there are two kinds of tunneling in this system, Landau-Zener tunneling between extended states of the system and Wannier-Stark tunneling between localized states of the system, and that the latter is 1000 times faster than the former. The also obtain the total decay rate for a wide range of temperature, including classical thermal activation, thermally assisted tunneling and quantum tunneling. The results agree with experimental data in references. Finally, the propose an experimental protocol to observe this new phenomenon in future experiments

  18. High precision optical spectroscopy and quantum state selected photodissociation of ultracold 88Sr2 molecules in an optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Mickey

    2017-04-01

    Over the past several decades, rapid progress has been made toward the accurate characterization and control of atoms, epitomized by the ever-increasing accuracy and precision of optical atomic lattice clocks. Extending this progress to molecules will have exciting implications for chemistry, condensed matter physics, and precision tests of physics beyond the Standard Model. My thesis describes work performed over the past six years to establish the state of the art in manipulation and quantum control of ultracold molecules. We describe a thorough set of measurements characterizing the rovibrational structure of weakly bound 88Sr2 molecules from several different perspectives, including determinations of binding energies; linear, quadratic, and higher order Zeeman shifts; transition strengths between bound states; and lifetimes of narrow subradiant states. Finally, we discuss measurements of photofragment angular distributions produced by photodissociation of molecules in single quantum states, leading to an exploration of quantum-state-resolved ultracold chemistry. The images of exploding photofragments produced in these studies exhibit dramatic interference effects and strongly violate semiclassical predictions, instead requiring a fully quantum mechanical description.

  19. Many-body localization of bosons in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierant, Piotr; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2018-04-01

    Many-body localization for a system of bosons trapped in a one-dimensional lattice is discussed. Two models that may be realized for cold atoms in optical lattices are considered. The model with a random on-site potential is compared with previously introduced random interactions model. While the origin and character of the disorder in both systems is different they show interesting similar properties. In particular, many-body localization appears for a sufficiently large disorder as verified by a time evolution of initial density wave states as well as using statistical properties of energy levels for small system sizes. Starting with different initial states, we observe that the localization properties are energy-dependent which reveals an inverted many-body localization edge in both systems (that finding is also verified by statistical analysis of energy spectrum). Moreover, we consider computationally challenging regime of transition between many body localized and extended phases where we observe a characteristic algebraic decay of density correlations which may be attributed to subdiffusion (and Griffiths-like regions) in the studied systems. Ergodicity breaking in the disordered Bose–Hubbard models is compared with the slowing-down of the time evolution of the clean system at large interactions.

  20. Interference patterns of Bose-condensed gases in a two-dimensional optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shujuan; Xiong Hongwei; Xu Zhijun; Huang Guoxiang

    2003-01-01

    For a Bose-condensed gas confined in a magnetic trap and in a two-dimensional (2D) optical lattice, the non-uniform distribution of atoms in different lattice sites is considered based on the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. A propagator method is used to investigate the time evolution of 2D interference patterns after (i) only the optical lattice is switched off, and (ii) both the optical lattice and the magnetic trap are switched off. An analytical description on the motion of side peaks in the interference patterns is presented by using the density distribution in a momentum space

  1. Orbit, optics and chromaticity correction for PS2 negative momentum compaction lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papaphilippou,Y.; Barranco, J.; Bartmann, W.; Benedikt, M.; Carli, C.; de Maria, R.; Peggs, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2009-05-04

    The effect of magnet misalignments in the beam orbit and linear optics functions are reviewed and correction schemes are applied to the negative momentum compaction lattice of PS2. Chromaticity correction schemes are also proposed and tested with respect to off-momentum optics properties. The impact of the correction schemes in the dynamic aperture of the lattice is finally evaluated.

  2. Optically trapped atom interferometry using the clock transition of large 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altin, P A; McDonald, G; Doering, D; Debs, J E; Barter, T H; Close, J D; Robins, N P; Haine, S A; Hanna, T M; Anderson, R P

    2011-01-01

    We present a Ramsey-type atom interferometer operating with an optically trapped sample of 10 6 Bose-condensed 87 Rb atoms. We investigate this interferometer experimentally and theoretically with an eye to the construction of future high precision atomic sensors. Our results indicate that, with further experimental refinements, it will be possible to produce and measure the output of a sub-shot-noise-limited, large atom number BEC-based interferometer. The optical trap allows us to couple the |F=1, m F =0)→|F=2, m F =0) clock states using a single photon 6.8 GHz microwave transition, while state selective readout is achieved with absorption imaging. We analyse the process of absorption imaging and show that it is possible to observe atom number variance directly, with a signal-to-noise ratio ten times better than the atomic projection noise limit on 10 6 condensate atoms. We discuss the technical and fundamental noise sources that limit our current system, and present theoretical and experimental results on interferometer contrast, de-phasing and miscibility.

  3. Localization Spectroscopy of a Single Ion in an Optical Lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legrand, Olivier Philippe Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The work reported in this thesis primarily focuses on studies of the dynamics of a single laser-cooled ion, simultaneously confined in the harmonic potential of a linear Paul trap and a rapidly varying periodic potential – a so-called optical lattice – generated from an optical standing-wave. Bes...... as a new tool for future cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments in the Ion trap group at Aarhus University.......-wave. Besides providing a better understanding of the dynamics of an ion subjected to varying trapping conditions, this work establishes a basis for future studies of various quantum many-body physics models, for manipulations of the structure of large ion Coulomb crystals, and for optimization...... of the interaction between light and matter in connection with quantum information experiments. In addition to the deep, three-dimensional harmonic potential of the linear Paul trap which confines the ion in regions of several millimeters, one of the directions of the ion motion is constrained by the application...

  4. Long-Lived Feshbach Molecules in a Three-Dimensional Optical Lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thalhammer, G.; Winkler, K.; Lang, F.; Schmid, S.; Denschlag, J. Hecker; Grimm, R.

    2006-01-01

    We have created and trapped a pure sample of 87 Rb 2 Feshbach molecules in a three-dimensional optical lattice. Compared to previous experiments without a lattice, we find dramatic improvements such as long lifetimes of up to 700 ms and a near unit efficiency for converting tightly confined atom pairs into molecules. The lattice shields the trapped molecules from collisions and, thus, overcomes the problem of inelastic decay by vibrational quenching. Furthermore, we have developed an advanced purification scheme that removes residual atoms, resulting in a lattice in which individual sites are either empty or filled with a single molecule in the vibrational ground state of the lattice

  5. Strongly-correlated ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, Tung-Lam

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the theoretical study of strongly correlated quantum states of ultra-cold fermionic atoms trapped in optical lattices. This field has grown considerably in recent years, following the experimental progress made in cooling and controlling atomic gases, which has led to the observation of the first Bose-Einstein condensation (in 1995). The trapping of these gases in optical lattices has opened a new field of research at the interface between atomic physics and condensed matter physics. The observation of the transition from a superfluid to a Mott insulator for bosonic atoms paved the way for the study of strongly correlated phases and quantum phase transitions in these systems. Very recently, the investigation of the Mott insulator state of fermionic atoms provides additional motivation to conduct such theoretical studies. This thesis can be divided broadly into two types of work: - On the one hand, we have proposed a new type of spectroscopy to measure single-particle correlators and associated physical observables in these strongly correlated states. - On the other hand, we have studied the ground state of the fermionic Hubbard model under different conditions (mass imbalance, population imbalance) by using analytical techniques and numerical simulations. In a collaboration with J. Dalibard and C. Salomon (LKB at the ENS Paris) and I. Carusotto (Trento, Italy), we have proposed and studied a novel spectroscopic method for the measurement and characterization of single particle excitations (in particular, the low energy excitations, namely the quasiparticles) in systems of cold fermionic atoms, with energy and momentum resolution. This type of spectroscopy is an analogue of angular-resolved photoemission in solid state physics (ARPES). We have shown, via simple models, that this method of measurement can characterize quasiparticles not only in the 'conventional' phases such as the weakly interacting gas in the lattice or in Fermi

  6. Radiation Pressure in a Rubidium Optical Lattice: An Atomic Analog to the Photorefractive Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guibal, S.; Mennerat-Robilliard, C.; Larousserie, D.; Triche, C.; Courtois, J.; Grynberg, G.

    1997-01-01

    Probe gain in a rubidium optical lattice is observed when the probe and lattice beams have identical frequencies. This effect is shown to arise from the radiation pressure that shifts the atomic density distribution with respect to the optical potential. This effect is compared with two-beam coupling in photorefractive materials. The experimental results obtained by changing the parameters of the optical lattice (intensity, detuning, periodicity) are in reasonable agreement with numerical simulations based on the model case of a 1/2→3/2 atomic transition. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  7. A clock network for geodesy and fundamental science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisdat, C; Grosche, G; Quintin, N; Shi, C; Raupach, S M F; Grebing, C; Nicolodi, D; Stefani, F; Al-Masoudi, A; Dörscher, S; Häfner, S; Robyr, J-L; Chiodo, N; Bilicki, S; Bookjans, E; Koczwara, A; Koke, S; Kuhl, A; Wiotte, F; Meynadier, F; Camisard, E; Abgrall, M; Lours, M; Legero, T; Schnatz, H; Sterr, U; Denker, H; Chardonnet, C; Le Coq, Y; Santarelli, G; Amy-Klein, A; Le Targat, R; Lodewyck, J; Lopez, O; Pottie, P-E

    2016-08-09

    Leveraging the unrivalled performance of optical clocks as key tools for geo-science, for astronomy and for fundamental physics beyond the standard model requires comparing the frequency of distant optical clocks faithfully. Here, we report on the comparison and agreement of two strontium optical clocks at an uncertainty of 5 × 10(-17) via a newly established phase-coherent frequency link connecting Paris and Braunschweig using 1,415 km of telecom fibre. The remote comparison is limited only by the instability and uncertainty of the strontium lattice clocks themselves, with negligible contributions from the optical frequency transfer. A fractional precision of 3 × 10(-17) is reached after only 1,000 s averaging time, which is already 10 times better and more than four orders of magnitude faster than any previous long-distance clock comparison. The capability of performing high resolution international clock comparisons paves the way for a redefinition of the unit of time and an all-optical dissemination of the SI-second.

  8. Nonlinear atom optics and bright-gap-soliton generation in finite optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carusotto, Iacopo; Embriaco, Davide; La Rocca, Giuseppe C.

    2002-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the transmission dynamics of coherent matter wave pulses across finite optical lattices in both the linear and the nonlinear regimes. The shape and the intensity of the transmitted pulse are found to strongly depend on the parameters of the incident pulse, in particular its velocity and density: a clear physical picture of the main features observed in the numerical simulations is given in terms of the atomic band dispersion in the periodic potential of the optical lattice. Signatures of nonlinear effects due to the atom-atom interaction are discussed in detail, such as atom-optical limiting and atom-optical bistability. For positive scattering lengths, matter waves propagating close to the top of the valence band are shown to be subject to modulational instability. A scheme for the experimental generation of narrow bright gap solitons from a wide Bose-Einstein condensate is proposed: the modulational instability is seeded starting from the strongly modulated density profile of a standing matter wave and the solitonic nature of the generated pulses is checked from their shape and their collisional properties

  9. Mott-insulating phases and magnetism of fermions in a double-well optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin; Zhou, Qi; Das Sarma, S.

    2011-01-01

    We theoretically investigate, using nonperturbative strong correlation techniques, Mott-insulating phases and magnetic ordering of two-component fermions in a two-dimensional double-well optical lattice. At filling of two fermions per site, there are two types of Mott insulators, one of which is characterized by spin-1 antiferromagnetism below the Neel temperature. The superexchange interaction in this system is induced by the interplay between the interband interaction and the spin degree of freedom. A great advantage of the double-well optical lattice is that the magnetic quantum phase diagram and the Neel temperature can be easily controlled by tuning the orbital energy splitting of the two-level system. Particularly, the Neel temperature can be one order of magnitude larger than that in standard optical lattices, facilitating the experimental search for magnetic ordering in optical lattice systems.

  10. Study of additive manufactured microwave cavities for pulsed optically pumped atomic clock applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affolderbach, C.; Moreno, W.; Ivanov, A. E.; Debogovic, T.; Pellaton, M.; Skrivervik, A. K.; de Rijk, E.; Mileti, G.

    2018-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) of passive microwave components is of high interest for the cost-effective and rapid prototyping or manufacture of devices with complex geometries. Here, we present an experimental study on the properties of recently demonstrated microwave resonator cavities manufactured by AM, in view of their applications to high-performance compact atomic clocks. The microwave cavities employ a loop-gap geometry using six electrodes. The critical electrode structures were manufactured monolithically using two different approaches: Stereolithography (SLA) of a polymer followed by metal coating and Selective Laser Melting (SLM) of aluminum. The tested microwave cavities show the desired TE011-like resonant mode at the Rb clock frequency of ≈6.835 GHz, with a microwave magnetic field highly parallel to the quantization axis across the vapor cell. When operated in an atomic clock setup, the measured atomic Rabi oscillations are comparable to those observed for conventionally manufactured cavities and indicate a good uniformity of the field amplitude across the vapor cell. Employing a time-domain Ramsey scheme on one of the SLA cavities, high-contrast (34%) Ramsey fringes are observed for the Rb clock transition, along with a narrow (166 Hz linewidth) central fringe. The measured clock stability of 2.2 × 10-13 τ-1/2 up to the integration time of 30 s is comparable to the current state-of-the-art stabilities of compact vapor-cell clocks based on conventional microwave cavities and thus demonstrates the feasibility of the approach.

  11. Dynamical control of matter-wave splitting using time-dependent optical lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Sung Jong; Andersen, Henrik Kjær; Mai, Sune

    2012-01-01

    We report on measurements of splitting Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) by using a time-dependent optical lattice potential. First, we demonstrate the division of a BEC into a set of equally populated components by means of time-dependent control of Landau-Zener tunneling in a vertical lattice....... Finally, a combination of multiple Bragg reflections and Landau-Zener tunneling allows for the generation of macroscopic arrays of condensates with potential applications in atom optics and atom interferometry....

  12. Simulation and detection of massive Dirac fermions with cold atoms in one-dimensional optical lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Yafei, E-mail: yfyuks@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, LQIT and SIPSE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Shan Chuanjia [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, LQIT and SIPSE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); College of Physics and Electronic Science, Hubei Normal University, Huangshi 435002 (China); Mei Feng; Zhang Zhiming [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, LQIT and SIPSE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2012-09-15

    We propose a simple but feasible experimental scheme to simulate and detect Dirac fermions with cold atoms trapped in one-dimensional optical lattice. In our scheme, through tuning the laser intensity, the one-dimensional optical lattice can have two sites in each unit cell and the atoms around the low energy behave as massive Dirac fermions. Furthermore, we show that these relativistic quasiparticles can be detected experimentally by using atomic density profile measurements and Bragg scattering.

  13. Dynamics of surface solitons at the edge of chirped optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V.; Torner, Lluis; Vysloukh, Victor A.

    2007-01-01

    We address soliton formation at the edge of chirped optical lattices imprinted in Kerr-type nonlinear media. We find families of power thresholdless surface waves that do not exist at other types of lattice interfaces. Such solitons form due to combined action of internal reflection at the interface, distributed Bragg-type reflection, and focusing nonlinearity. Remarkably, we discover that surfaces of chirped lattices are soliton attractors: Below an energy threshold, solitons launched well within the lattice self-bend toward the interface, and then stick to it

  14. Sub-mm Scale Fiber Guided Deep/Vacuum Ultra-Violet Optical Source for Trapped Mercury Ion Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Lin; Burt, Eric A.; Huang, Shouhua; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the functionality of a mercury capillary lamp with a diameter in the sub-mm range and deep ultraviolet (DUV)/ vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation delivery via an optical fiber integrated with the capillary. DUV spectrum control is observed by varying the fabrication parameters such as buffer gas type and pressure, capillary diameter, electrical resonator design, and temperature. We also show spectroscopic data of the 199Hg+ hyper-fine transition at 40.5GHz when applying the above fiber optical design. We present efforts toward micro-plasma generation in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber with related optical design and theoretical estimations. This new approach towards a more practical DUV optical interface could benefit trapped ion clock developments for future ultra-stable frequency reference and time-keeping applications.

  15. Inducing spin-dependent tunneling to probe magnetic correlations in optical lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim-Georg; Andersen, Brian; Syljuåsen, Olav

    2012-01-01

    We suggest a simple experimental method for probing antiferromagnetic spin correlations of two-component Fermi gases in optical lattices. The method relies on a spin selective Raman transition to excite atoms of one spin species to their first excited vibrational mode where the tunneling is large....... The resulting difference in the tunneling dynamics of the two spin species can then be exploited, to reveal the spin correlations by measuring the number of doubly occupied lattice sites at a later time. We perform quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the spin system and solve the optical lattice dynamics...

  16. Robust calibration of an optical-lattice depth based on a phase shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Gutiérrez, C.; Michon, E.; Brunaud, V.; Kawalec, T.; Fortun, A.; Arnal, M.; Billy, J.; Guéry-Odelin, D.

    2018-04-01

    We report on a method to calibrate the depth of an optical lattice. It consists of triggering the intrasite dipole mode of the cloud by a sudden phase shift. The corresponding oscillatory motion is directly related to the interband frequencies on a large range of lattice depths. Remarkably, for a moderate displacement, a single frequency dominates the oscillation of the zeroth and first orders of the interference pattern observed after a sufficiently long time of flight. The method is robust against atom-atom interactions and the exact value of the extra weak external confinement superimposed to the optical lattice.

  17. Perfect pattern formation of neutral atoms in an addressable optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vala, J.; Whaley, K.B.; Thapliyal, A.V.; Vazirani, U.; Myrgren, S.; Weiss, D.S.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a physical scheme for formation of an arbitrary pattern of neutral atoms in an addressable optical lattice. We focus specifically on the generation of a perfect optical lattice of simple orthorhombic structure with unit occupancy, as required for initialization of a neutral atom quantum computer. The scheme employs a compacting process that is accomplished by sequential application of two types of operations: a flip operator that changes the internal state of the atoms, and a shift operator that selectively moves the atoms in one internal state along the lattice principal axis. Realizations of these elementary operations and their physical limitations are analyzed. The complexity of the compacting scheme is analyzed and we show that this scales linearly with the number of lattice sites per row of the lattice

  18. Lattice design of the integrable optics test accelerator and optical stochastic cooling experiment at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kafka, Gene [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) storage ring at Fermilab will serve as the backbone for a broad spectrum of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments, and as such, must be designed with signi cant exibility in mind, but without compromising cost e ciency. The nonlinear experiments at IOTA will include: achievement of a large nonlinear tune shift/spread without degradation of dynamic aperture; suppression of strong lattice resonances; study of stability of nonlinear systems to perturbations; and studies of di erent variants of nonlinear magnet design. The ring optics control has challenging requirements that reach or exceed the present state of the art. The development of a complete self-consistent design of the IOTA ring optics, meeting the demands of all planned AARD experiments, is presented. Of particular interest are the precise control for nonlinear integrable optics experiments and the transverse-to-longitudinal coupling and phase stability for the Optical Stochastic Cooling Experiment (OSC). Since the beam time-of- ight must be tightly controlled in the OSC section, studies of second order corrections in this section are presented.

  19. Optical properties of two-dimensional magnetoelectric point scattering lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Lunnemann; Sersic, Ivana; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2013-01-01

    of split ring resonators and provide a quantitative comparison of measured and calculated transmission spectra at normal incidence as a function of lattice density, showing excellent agreement. We further show angle-dependent transmission calculations for circularly polarized light and compare...... with the angle-dependent response of a single split ring resonator, revealing the importance of cross coupling between electric dipoles and magnetic dipoles for quantifying the pseudochiral response under oblique incidence of split ring lattices....

  20. A Circadian Clock Gene, Cry, Affects Heart Morphogenesis and Function in Drosophila as Revealed by Optical Coherence Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneesh Alex

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are endogenous, entrainable oscillations of physical, mental and behavioural processes in response to local environmental cues such as daylight, which are present in the living beings, including humans. Circadian rhythms have been related to cardiovascular function and pathology. However, the role that circadian clock genes play in heart development and function in a whole animal in vivo are poorly understood. The Drosophila cryptochrome (dCry is a circadian clock gene that encodes a major component of the circadian clock negative feedback loop. Compared to the embryonic stage, the relative expression levels of dCry showed a significant increase (>100-fold in Drosophila during the pupa and adult stages. In this study, we utilized an ultrahigh resolution optical coherence microscopy (OCM system to perform non-invasive and longitudinal analysis of functional and morphological changes in the Drosophila heart throughout its post-embryonic lifecycle for the first time. The Drosophila heart exhibited major morphological and functional alterations during its development. Notably, heart rate (HR and cardiac activity period (CAP of Drosophila showed significant variations during the pupa stage, when heart remodeling took place. From the M-mode (2D + time OCM images, cardiac structural and functional parameters of Drosophila at different developmental stages were quantitatively determined. In order to study the functional role of dCry on Drosophila heart development, we silenced dCry by RNAi in the Drosophila heart and mesoderm, and quantitatively measured heart morphology and function in those flies throughout its development. Silencing of dCry resulted in slower HR, reduced CAP, smaller heart chamber size, pupal lethality and disrupted posterior segmentation that was related to increased expression of a posterior compartment protein, wingless. Collectively, our studies provided novel evidence that the circadian clock gene, dCry, plays

  1. A Circadian Clock Gene, Cry, Affects Heart Morphogenesis and Function in Drosophila as Revealed by Optical Coherence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xianxu; Tate, Rebecca E.; McKee, Mary L.; Capen, Diane E.; Zhang, Zhan; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are endogenous, entrainable oscillations of physical, mental and behavioural processes in response to local environmental cues such as daylight, which are present in the living beings, including humans. Circadian rhythms have been related to cardiovascular function and pathology. However, the role that circadian clock genes play in heart development and function in a whole animal in vivo are poorly understood. The Drosophila cryptochrome (dCry) is a circadian clock gene that encodes a major component of the circadian clock negative feedback loop. Compared to the embryonic stage, the relative expression levels of dCry showed a significant increase (>100-fold) in Drosophila during the pupa and adult stages. In this study, we utilized an ultrahigh resolution optical coherence microscopy (OCM) system to perform non-invasive and longitudinal analysis of functional and morphological changes in the Drosophila heart throughout its post-embryonic lifecycle for the first time. The Drosophila heart exhibited major morphological and functional alterations during its development. Notably, heart rate (HR) and cardiac activity period (CAP) of Drosophila showed significant variations during the pupa stage, when heart remodeling took place. From the M-mode (2D + time) OCM images, cardiac structural and functional parameters of Drosophila at different developmental stages were quantitatively determined. In order to study the functional role of dCry on Drosophila heart development, we silenced dCry by RNAi in the Drosophila heart and mesoderm, and quantitatively measured heart morphology and function in those flies throughout its development. Silencing of dCry resulted in slower HR, reduced CAP, smaller heart chamber size, pupal lethality and disrupted posterior segmentation that was related to increased expression of a posterior compartment protein, wingless. Collectively, our studies provided novel evidence that the circadian clock gene, dCry, plays an essential

  2. Time-variable gravity potential components for optical clock comparisons and the definition of international time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, C.; Denker, H.; Timmen, L.

    2016-01-01

    The latest generation of optical atomic clocks is approaching the level of one part in 10 18 in terms of frequency stability and uncertainty. For clock comparisons and the definition of international time scales, a relativistic redshift effect of the clock frequencies has to be taken into account at a corresponding uncertainty level of about 0.1 m 2 s -2 and 0.01 m in terms of gravity potential and height, respectively. Besides the predominant static part of the gravity potential, temporal variations must be considered in order to avoid systematic frequency shifts. Time-variable gravity potential components induced by tides and non-tidal mass redistributions are investigated with regard to the level of one part in 10 18 . The magnitudes and dominant time periods of the individual gravity potential contributions are investigated globally and for specific laboratory sites together with the related uncertainty estimates. The basics of the computation methods are presented along with the applied models, data sets and software. Solid Earth tides contribute by far the most dominant signal with a global maximum amplitude of 4.2 m 2 s -2 for the potential and a range (maximum-to-minimum) of up to 1.3 and 10.0 m 2 s -2 in terms of potential differences between specific laboratories over continental and intercontinental scales, respectively. Amplitudes of the ocean tidal loading potential can amount up to 1.25 m 2 s -2 , while the range of the potential between specific laboratories is 0.3 and 1.1 m 2 s -2 over continental and intercontinental scales, respectively. These are the only two contributors being relevant at a 10 -17 level. However, several other time-variable potential effects can particularly affect clock comparisons at the 10 -18 level. Besides solid Earth pole tides, these are non-tidal mass redistributions in the atmosphere, the oceans and the continental water storage. (authors)

  3. Flattened optical frequency-locked multi-carrier generation by cascading one DML and one phase modulator driven by different RF frequency clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xinying; Yu, Jianjun; Zhang, Junwen; Chi, Nan

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme for flattened optical frequency-locked multi-carrier generation based on one directly modulated laser (DML) and one phase modulator (PM) in cascade driven by different sinusoidal radio-frequency (RF) clocks. We experimentally demonstrate that when the clock frequencies for the cascaded DML and the PM are respectively 12.5 GHz and 25 GHz, over 24 optical subcarriers can be generated with 12.5-GHz frequency spacing and amplitude fluctuation less than 3 dB. Furthermore, the number of generated optical subcarriers can be further increased when we increase the driving power for the DML. (letter)

  4. Matter-wave two-dimensional solitons in crossed linear and nonlinear optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luz, H. L. F. da; Gammal, A.; Abdullaev, F. Kh.; Salerno, M.; Tomio, Lauro

    2010-01-01

    The existence of multidimensional matter-wave solitons in a crossed optical lattice (OL) with a linear optical lattice (LOL) in the x direction and a nonlinear optical lattice (NOL) in the y direction, where the NOL can be generated by a periodic spatial modulation of the scattering length using an optically induced Feshbach resonance is demonstrated. In particular, we show that such crossed LOLs and NOLs allow for stabilizing two-dimensional solitons against decay or collapse for both attractive and repulsive interactions. The solutions for the soliton stability are investigated analytically, by using a multi-Gaussian variational approach, with the Vakhitov-Kolokolov necessary criterion for stability; and numerically, by using the relaxation method and direct numerical time integrations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Very good agreement of the results corresponding to both treatments is observed.

  5. Matter-wave two-dimensional solitons in crossed linear and nonlinear optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz, H. L. F.; Abdullaev, F. Kh.; Gammal, A.; Salerno, M.; Tomio, Lauro

    2010-10-01

    The existence of multidimensional matter-wave solitons in a crossed optical lattice (OL) with a linear optical lattice (LOL) in the x direction and a nonlinear optical lattice (NOL) in the y direction, where the NOL can be generated by a periodic spatial modulation of the scattering length using an optically induced Feshbach resonance is demonstrated. In particular, we show that such crossed LOLs and NOLs allow for stabilizing two-dimensional solitons against decay or collapse for both attractive and repulsive interactions. The solutions for the soliton stability are investigated analytically, by using a multi-Gaussian variational approach, with the Vakhitov-Kolokolov necessary criterion for stability; and numerically, by using the relaxation method and direct numerical time integrations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Very good agreement of the results corresponding to both treatments is observed.

  6. Large-amplitude superexchange of high-spin fermions in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jürgensen, Ole; Heinze, Jannes; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2013-01-01

    We show that fermionic high-spin systems with spin-changing collisions allow one to monitor superexchange processes in optical superlattices with large amplitudes and strong spin fluctuations. By investigating the non-equilibrium dynamics, we find a superexchange dominated regime at weak interactions. The underlying mechanism is driven by an emerging tunneling-energy gap in shallow few-well potentials. As a consequence, the interaction-energy gap that is expected to occur only for strong interactions in deep lattices is re-established. By tuning the optical lattice depth, a crossover between two regimes with negligible particle number fluctuations is found: firstly, the common regime with vanishing spin-fluctuations in deep lattices and, secondly, a novel regime with strong spin fluctuations in shallow lattices. We discuss the possible experimental realization with ultracold 40 K atoms and observable quantities in double wells and two-dimensional plaquettes. (paper)

  7. Measuring the spin Chern number in time-reversal-invariant Hofstadter optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dan-Wei, E-mail: zdanwei@126.com [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, SPTE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Cao, Shuai, E-mail: shuaicao2004@163.com [Department of Applied Physics, College of Electronic Engineering, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 China (China)

    2016-10-14

    We propose an experimental scheme to directly measure the spin Chern number of the time-reversal-invariant Hofstadter model in optical lattices. We first show that this model can be realized by using ultracold Fermi atoms with two pseudo-spin states encoded by the internal Zeeman states in a square optical lattice and the corresponding topological Bloch bands are characterized by the spin Chern number. We then propose and numerically demonstrate that this topological invariant can be extracted from the shift of the hybrid Wannier center in the optical lattice. By spin-resolved in situ detection of the atomic densities along the transverse direction combined with time-of-flight measurement along another spatial direction, the spin Chern number in this system is directly measured. - Highlights: • The cold-atom optical-lattice scheme for realizing the time-reversal-invariant Hofstadter model is proposed. • The intrinsic spin Chern number related to the hybrid Wannier center in the optical lattice is investigated. • Direct measurement of the spin Chern number in the proposed system is theoretically demonstrated.

  8. Position and Momentum Entanglement of Dipole-Dipole Interacting Atoms in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opatrný, T.; Kolář, M.; Kurizki, G.

    We consider a possible realization of the position- and momentum-correlated atomic pairs that are confined to adjacent sites of two mutually shifted optical lattices and are entangled via laser-induced dipole-dipole interactions. The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) "paradox" [Einstein 1935] with translational variables is then modified by lattice-diffraction effects. We study a possible mechanism of creating such diatom entangled states by varying the effective mass of the atoms.

  9. Translational Entanglement of Dipole-Dipole Interacting Atoms in Optical Lattices

    OpenAIRE

    Opatrny, T.; Deb, B.; Kurizki, G.

    2003-01-01

    We propose and investigate a realization of the position- and momentum-correlated Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) states [Phys. Rev. 47, 777 (1935)] that have hitherto eluded detection. The realization involves atom pairs that are confined to adjacent sites of two mutually shifted optical lattices and are entangled via laser-induced dipole-dipole interactions. The EPR "paradox" with translational variables is then modified by lattice-diffraction effects, and can be verified to a high degree of ...

  10. All optical detection of picosecond spin-wave dynamics in 2D annular antidot lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porwal, Nikita; Mondal, Sucheta; Choudhury, Samiran; De, Anulekha; Sinha, Jaivardhan; Barman, Anjan; Datta, Prasanta Kumar

    2018-02-01

    Novel magnetic structures with precisely controlled dimensions and shapes at the nanoscale have potential applications in spin logic, spintronics and other spin-based communication devices. We report the fabrication of 2D bi-structure magnonic crystal in the form of embedded nanodots in a periodic Ni80Fe20 antidot lattice structure (annular antidot) by focused ion-beam lithography. The spin-wave spectra of the annular antidot sample, studied for the first time by a time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect microscopy show a remarkable variation with bias field, which is important for the above device applications. The optically induced spin-wave spectra show multiple modes in the frequency range 14.7 GHz-3.5 GHz due to collective interactions between the dots and antidots as well as the annular elements within the whole array. Numerical simulations qualitatively reproduce the experimental results, and simulated mode profiles reveal the spatial distribution of the spin-wave modes and internal magnetic fields responsible for these observations. It is observed that the internal field strength increases by about 200 Oe inside each dot embedded within the hole of annular antidot lattice as compared to pure antidot lattice and pure dot lattice. The stray field for the annular antidot lattice is found to be significant (0.8 kOe) as opposed to the negligible values of the same for the pure dot lattice and pure antidot lattice. Our findings open up new possibilities for development of novel artificial crystals.

  11. Sound waves and dynamics of superfluid Fermi gases in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Aixia; Xue Jukui

    2009-01-01

    The sound waves, the stability of Bloch waves, the Bloch oscillation, and the self-trapping phenomenon in interacting two-component Fermi gases throughout the BEC-BCS crossover in one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) optical lattices are discussed in detail. Within the hydrodynamical theory and by using the perturbative and tight-binding approximation, sound speed in both weak and tight 1D, 2D, 3D optical lattices, and the criteria for occurrences of instability of Bloch waves and self-trapping of Fermi gases along the whole BEC-BCS crossover in tight 1D, 2D, 3D optical lattices are obtained analytically. The results show that the sound speed, the criteria for occurrences of instability of Bloch waves and self-trapping, and the destruction of Bloch oscillation are modified dramatically by the lattice parameters (lattice dimension and lattice strength), the atom density or atom number, and the atom interaction.

  12. Ultracold atoms in one-dimensional optical lattices approaching the Tonks-Girardeau regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollet, L.; Rombouts, S.M.A.; Denteneer, P.J. H.

    2004-01-01

    Recent experiments on ultracold atomic alkali gases in a one-dimensional optical lattice have demonstrated the transition from a gas of soft-core bosons to a Tonks-Girardeau gas in the hard-core limit, where one-dimensional bosons behave like fermions in many respects. We have studied the underlying many-body physics through numerical simulations which accommodate both the soft-core and hard-core limits in one single framework. We find that the Tonks-Girardeau gas is reached only at the strongest optical lattice potentials. Results for slightly higher densities, where the gas develops a Mott-like phase already at weaker optical lattice potentials, show that these Mott-like short-range correlations do not enhance the convergence to the hard-core limit

  13. Flat-Passband 3 × 3 Interleaving Filter Designed With Optical Directional Couplers in Lattice Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi Jie; Zhang, Ying; Soh, Yeng Chai

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents a novel lattice optical delay-line circuit using 3 × 3 directional couplers to implement three-port optical interleaving filters. It is shown that the proposed circuit can deliver three channels of 2pi/3 phase-shifted interleaving transmission spectra if the coupling ratios of the last two directional couplers are selected appropriately. The other performance requirements of an optical interleaver can be achieved by designing the remaining part of the lattice circuit. A recursive synthesis design algorithm is developed to calculate the design parameters of the lattice circuit that will yield the desired filter response. As illustrative examples, interleavers with maximally flat-top passband transmission and with given transmission performance on passband ripples and passband bandwidth, respectively, are designed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed design scheme.

  14. Low-Entropy States of Neutral Atoms in Polarization-Synthesized Optical Lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robens, Carsten; Zopes, Jonathan; Alt, Wolfgang; Brakhane, Stefan; Meschede, Dieter; Alberti, Andrea

    2017-02-10

    We create low-entropy states of neutral atoms by utilizing a conceptually new optical-lattice technique that relies on a high-precision, high-bandwidth synthesis of light polarization. Polarization-synthesized optical lattices provide two fully controllable optical lattice potentials, each of them confining only atoms in either one of the two long-lived hyperfine states. By employing one lattice as the storage register and the other one as the shift register, we provide a proof of concept using four atoms that selected regions of the periodic potential can be filled with one particle per site. We expect that our results can be scaled up to thousands of atoms by employing an atom-sorting algorithm with logarithmic complexity, which is enabled by polarization-synthesized optical lattices. Vibrational entropy is subsequently removed by sideband cooling methods. Our results pave the way for a bottom-up approach to creating ultralow-entropy states of a many-body system.

  15. Quantum Entangled Dark Solitons Formed by Ultracold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishmash, R. V.; Carr, L. D.

    2009-01-01

    Inspired by experiments on Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices, we study the quantum evolution of dark soliton initial conditions in the context of the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian. An extensive set of quantum measures is utilized in our analysis, including von Neumann and generalized quantum entropies, quantum depletion, and the pair correlation function. We find that quantum effects cause the soliton to fill in. Moreover, soliton-soliton collisions become inelastic, in strong contrast to the predictions of mean-field theory. These features show that the lifetime and collision properties of dark solitons in optical lattices provide clear signals of quantum effects.

  16. Competing bosonic condensates in optical lattice with a mixture of single and pair hoppings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travin, V.M., E-mail: v.travin@int.pan.wroc.pl; Kopeć, T.K., E-mail: t.kopec@int.pan.wroc.pl

    2017-01-15

    A system of ultra-cold atoms with single boson and pair tunneling of bosonic atoms is considered in an optical lattice at arbitrary temperature. A mean-field theory was applied to the extended Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian describing the system in order to investigate the competition between superfluid and pair superfluid as a function of the chemical potential and the temperature. To this end we have applied a method based on the Laplace transform method for the efficient calculation of the statistical sum for the quantum Hamiltonian. These results may be of interest for experiments on cold atom systems in optical lattices.

  17. Many-body dynamics with cold atoms and molecules in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schachenmayer, J.

    2012-01-01

    Systems of cold atoms or molecules, trapped in a periodic potential formed from standing waves of laser light, provide an experimental possibility to study strongly correlated many-body lattice models, which are traditionally used in condensed matter physics. Due to the relatively weak energy scales in these ''optical lattices'' (next-neighbor tunneling energies are typically on the order of tens of Hertz), the time-scales of the dynamics in these systems is relatively slow and can be observed in experiments. Furthermore, the microscopic parameters of the models can be very well controlled by lattice laser intensities and external fields. Thus, optical lattices provide an excellent framework to study many-body quantum non-equilibrium dynamics, which on the theoretical level is the topic of this thesis. This thesis contains a study of many-body dynamics in optical lattices for both idealized isolated models and realistic models with imperfections. It is centered around four main topics: The first two topics are studies of coherent many-body dynamics. This contains explicitly: (i) an analysis of the possibility to dynamically prepare crystalline states of Rydberg atoms or polar molecules by adiabatically tuning laser parameters; and (ii) a study of the collapses and revivals of the momentum-distribution of a Bose-Einstein condensate with a fixed number of atoms, which is suddenly loaded into a deep optical lattice. The third main topic is entanglement and specifically the dynamical growth of entanglement between portions of an optical lattice in quench experiments. A method to create and measure large-scale entanglement is presented in this thesis. The fourth main topic addresses classical noise. Specifically, a system of atoms in an optical lattice, which is created from lasers with intensity fluctuations, is analyzed in this work. The noisy evolution of many-body correlation functions is studied and a method to cancel this noise in a realistic experimental setup is

  18. DNA-linked NanoParticle Lattices with Diamond Symmetry: Stability, Shape and Optical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamy, Hamed; Tkachenko, Alexei; Gang, Oleg; Starr, Francis

    The linking of nanoparticles (NP) by DNA has been proven to be an effective means to create NP lattices with specific order. Lattices with diamond symmetry are predicted to offer novel photonic properties, but self-assembly of such lattices has proven to be challenging due to the low packing fraction, sensitivity to bond orientation, and local heterogeneity. Recently, we reported an approach to create diamond NP lattices based on the association between anisotropic particles with well-defined tetravalent DNA binding topology and isotropically functionalized NP. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate the Gibbs free energy of these lattices, and thereby determine the stability of these lattices as a function of NP size and DNA stiffness. We also predict the equilibrium shape for the cubic diamond crystallite using the Wulff construction method. Specifically, we predict the equilibrium shape using the surface energy for different crystallographic planes. We evaluate surface energy directly form molecular dynamics simulation, which we correlate with theoretical estimates from the expected number of broken DNA bonds along a facet. Furthermore we study the optical properties of this structure, e.g optical bandgap.

  19. Dicke superradiance as nondestructive probe for the state of atoms in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Brinke, Nicolai; Schützhold, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    We present a proposal for a probing scheme utilizing Dicke superradiance to obtain information about ultracold atoms in optical lattices. A probe photon is absorbed collectively by an ensemble of lattice atoms generating a Dicke state. The lattice dynamics (e.g., tunneling) affects the coherence properties of that Dicke state and thus alters the superradiant emission characteristics - which in turn provides insight into the lattice (dynamics). Comparing the Bose-Hubbard and the Fermi-Hubbard model, we find similar superradiance in the strongly interacting Mott insulator regime, but crucial differences in the weakly interacting (superfluid or metallic) phase. Furthermore, we study the possibility to detect whether a quantum phase transition between the two regimes can be considered adiabatic or a quantum quench.

  20. Phase-controlled localization and directed transport in an optical bipartite lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Kuo; Luo, Yunrong; Lu, Gengbiao; Hai, Wenhua

    2014-02-24

    We investigate coherent control of a single atom interacting with an optical bipartite lattice via a combined high-frequency modulation. Our analytical results show that the quantum tunneling and dynamical localization can depend on phase difference between the modulation components, which leads to a different route for the coherent destruction of tunneling and a convenient phase-control method for stabilizing the system to implement the directed transport of atom. The similar directed transport and the phase-controlled quantum transition are revealed for the corresponding many-particle system. The results can be referable for experimentally manipulating quantum transport and transition of cold atoms in the tilted and shaken optical bipartite lattice or of analogical optical two-mode quantum beam splitter, and also can be extended to other optical and solid-state systems.

  1. A novel optical beam splitter based on photonic crystal with hybrid lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Qing-Yi; Fu Yong-Qi; Zhang Zhi-Min; Hu De-Qing

    2012-01-01

    A novel optical beam splitter constructed on the basis of photonic crystal (PC) with hybrid lattices is proposed in this paper. The band gap of square-lattice PC is so designed that the incident light is divided into several branch beams. Triangular-lattice graded-index PCs are combined for focusing each branch. Computational calculations are carried out on the basis of finite-different time-domain algorithm to prove the feasibility of our design. The waveguide is unnecessary in the design. Thus the device has functions of both splitting and focusing beams. Size of the divided beam at site of full-width at half-maximum is of the order of λ/2. The designed splitter has the advantages that it has a small volume and can be integrated by conventional semiconductor manufacturing process. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  2. Effective-mass analysis of Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices: Stabilization and levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu, H.; Zhang, W.; Meystre, P.; Baksmaty, L.O.; Bigelow, N.P.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the time evolution of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a periodic optical potential. Using an effective mass formalism, we study the equation of motion for the envelope function modulating the Bloch states of the lattice potential. In particular, we show how the negative effective-mass affects the dynamics of the condensate

  3. Critical temperature of noninteracting bosonic gases in cubic optical lattices at arbitrary integer fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhimov, Abdulla; Askerzade, Iman N

    2014-09-01

    We have shown that the critical temperature of a Bose-Einstein condensate to a normal phase transition of noninteracting bosons in cubic optical lattices has a linear dependence on the filling factor, especially at large densities. The condensed fraction exhibits a linear power law dependence on temperature in contrast to the case of ideal homogeneous Bose gases.

  4. Capacity upgrade in short-reach optical fibre networks: simultaneous 4-PAM 20 Gbps data and polarization-modulated PPS clock signal using a single VCSEL carrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoe, G. M.; Wassin, S.; Gamatham, R. R. G.; Leitch, A. W. R.; Gibbon, T. B.

    2017-11-01

    In this work, a four-level pulse amplitude modulation (4-PAM) format with a polarization-modulated pulse per second (PPS) clock signal using a single vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) carrier is for the first time experimentally demonstrated. We propose uncomplex alternative technique for increasing capacity and flexibility in short-reach optical communication links through multi-signal modulation onto a single VCSEL carrier. A 20 Gbps 4-PAM data signal is directly modulated onto a single mode 10 GHz bandwidth VCSEL carrier at 1310 nm, therefore, doubling the network bit rate. Carrier spectral efficiency is further maximized by exploiting the inherent orthogonal polarization switching of the VCSEL carrier with changing bias in transmission of a PPS clock signal. We, therefore, simultaneously transmit a 20 Gbps 4-PAM data signal and a polarization-based PPS clock signal using a single VCSEL carrier. It is the first time a signal VCSEL carrier is reported to simultaneously transmit a directly modulated 20 Gbps 4-PAM data signal and a polarization-based PPS clock signal. We further demonstrate on the design of a software-defined digital signal processing (DSP)-assisted receiver as an alternative to costly receiver hardware. Experimental results show that a 3.21 km fibre transmission with simultaneous 20 Gbps 4-PAM data signal and polarization-based PPS clock signal introduced a penalty of 3.76 dB. The contribution of polarization-based PPS clock signal to this penalty was found out to be 0.41 dB. Simultaneous distribution of data and timing clock signals over shared network infrastructure significantly increases the aggregated data rate at different optical network units (ONUs), without costly investment.

  5. Dynamical Disentangling and Cooling of Atoms in Bilayer Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantian, A.; Langer, S.; Daley, A. J.

    2018-02-01

    We show how experimentally available bilayer lattice systems can be used to prepare quantum many-body states with exceptionally low entropy in one layer, by dynamically disentangling the two layers. This disentangling operation moves one layer—subsystem A —into a regime where excitations in A develop a single-particle gap. As a result, this operation maps directly to cooling for subsystem A , with entropy being shuttled to the other layer. For both bosonic and fermionic atoms, we study the corresponding dynamics showing that disentangling can be realized cleanly in ongoing experiments. The corresponding entanglement entropies are directly measurable with quantum gas microscopes, and, as a tool for producing lower-entropy states, this technique opens a range of applications beginning with simplifying production of magnetically ordered states of bosons and fermions.

  6. Robust Frequency Combs and Lasers for Optical Clocks and Sensing, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optical frequency combs are the key enabling technology that enabled the immense fractional stability of highly-stabilized lasers in the optical regime to be...

  7. Dynamics of matter solitons in weakly modulated optical lattices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brazhnyi, V. A.; Konotop, V.; Kuzmiak, Vladimír

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 4 (2004), 0436041-0436046 ISSN 1050-2947 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC P11.001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : Bose-Einstein condesation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.902, year: 2004

  8. FROM STABLE LASERS TO OPTICAL-FREQUENCY CLOCKS:. Merging the UltraFast and the UltraStable, for a New Epoch of Optical Frequency Measurements, Standards, & Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J. L.; Ye, J.; Ma, L.-S.; Peng, J.-L.; Notcutt, M.; Jost, J. D.; Marian, A.

    2002-04-01

    This is a report on behalf of the World Team of Stable Laser and Optical Frequency Measurement Enthusiasts, even if most detailed illustrations draw mainly from our work at JILA. Specifically we trace some of the key ideas that have led from the first stabilized lasers, to frequency measurement up to 88 THz using frequency chains, revision of the Definition of the Metre, extension of coherent frequency chain technology into the visible, development of a vast array of stabilized lasers, and finally the recent explosive growth of direct frequency measurement capability in the visible using fs comb techniques. We present our recent work showing a Molecular Iodine-based Optical Clock which delivers, over a range of time scales, rf output at a stability level basically equivalent to the RF stability prototype, the Hydrogen Maser. We note the bifurcation between single-ion-based clocks - likely to be the stability/reproducibility ultimate winners in the next generation - and simpler systems based on gas cells, which can have impressive stabilities but may suffer from a variety of reproducibility-limiting processes. Active Phase-Lock synchronization of independent fs lasers allows sub-fs timing control. Copies of related works in our labs may be found/obtained at our website .

  9. Extended Bose Hubbard model of interacting bosonic atoms in optical lattices: From superfluidity to density waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzarella, G.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.

    2006-01-01

    For systems of interacting, ultracold spin-zero neutral bosonic atoms, harmonically trapped and subject to an optical lattice potential, we derive an Extended Bose Hubbard (EBH) model by developing a systematic expansion for the Hamiltonian of the system in powers of the lattice parameters and of a scale parameter, the lattice attenuation factor. We identify the dominant terms that need to be retained in realistic experimental conditions, up to nearest-neighbor interactions and nearest-neighbor hoppings conditioned by the on-site occupation numbers. In the mean field approximation, we determine the free energy of the system and study the phase diagram both at zero and at finite temperature. At variance with the standard on site Bose Hubbard model, the zero-temperature phase diagram of the EBH model possesses a dual structure in the Mott insulating regime. Namely, for specific ranges of the lattice parameters, a density wave phase characterizes the system at integer fillings, with domains of alternating mean occupation numbers that are the atomic counterparts of the domains of staggered magnetizations in an antiferromagnetic phase. We show as well that in the EBH model, a zero-temperature quantum phase transition to pair superfluidity is, in principle, possible, but completely suppressed at the lowest order in the lattice attenuation factor. Finally, we determine the possible occurrence of the different phases as a function of the experimentally controllable lattice parameters

  10. Focusing behavior of the fractal vector optical fields designed by fractal lattice growth model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xu-Zhen; Pan, Yue; Zhao, Meng-Dan; Zhang, Guan-Lin; Zhang, Yu; Tu, Chenghou; Li, Yongnan; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2018-01-22

    We introduce a general fractal lattice growth model, significantly expanding the application scope of the fractal in the realm of optics. This model can be applied to construct various kinds of fractal "lattices" and then to achieve the design of a great diversity of fractal vector optical fields (F-VOFs) combinating with various "bases". We also experimentally generate the F-VOFs and explore their universal focusing behaviors. Multiple focal spots can be flexibly enginnered, and the optical tweezers experiment validates the simulated tight focusing fields, which means that this model allows the diversity of the focal patterns to flexibly trap and manipulate micrometer-sized particles. Furthermore, the recovery performance of the F-VOFs is also studied when the input fields and spatial frequency spectrum are obstructed, and the results confirm the robustness of the F-VOFs in both focusing and imaging processes, which is very useful in information transmission.

  11. Optical lattice-like cladding waveguides by direct laser writing: fabrication, luminescence, and lasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Weijie; He, Ruiyun; Cheng, Chen; Rocha, Uéslen; Rodríguez Vázquez de Aldana, Javier; Jaque, Daniel; Chen, Feng

    2016-05-15

    We report on the fabrication of optical lattice-like waveguide structures in an Nd:YAP laser crystal by using direct femtosecond laser writing. With periodically arrayed laser-induced tracks, the waveguiding cores can be located in either the regions between the neighbored tracks or the central zone surrounded by a number of tracks as outer cladding. The polarization of the femtosecond laser pulses for the inscription has been found to play a critical role in the anisotropic guiding behaviors of the structures. The confocal photoluminescence investigations reveal different stress-induced modifications of the structures inscribed by different polarization of the femtosecond laser beam, which are considered to be responsible for the refractive index changes of the structures. Under optical pump at 808 nm, efficient waveguide lasing at ∼1  μm wavelength has been realized from the optical lattice-like structure, which exhibits potential applications as novel miniature light sources.

  12. Proposal for Translational Entanglement of Dipole-Dipole Interacting Atoms in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opatrný, Tomáš; Deb, Bimalendu; Kurizki, Gershon

    2003-06-01

    We propose and investigate a realization of the position- and momentum-correlated Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) states [Phys. Rev. 47, 777 (1935)] that have hitherto eluded detection. The realization involves atom pairs that are confined to adjacent sites of two mutually shifted optical lattices and are entangled via laser-induced dipole-dipole interactions. The EPR “paradox” with translational variables is then modified by lattice-diffraction effects and can be verified to a high degree of accuracy in this scheme.

  13. Graph-state preparation and quantum computation with global addressing of optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, Alastair; Pachos, Jiannis K.; Adams, Charles S.

    2006-01-01

    We present a way to manipulate ultracold atoms where four atomic levels are trapped by appropriately tuned optical lattices. When employed to perform quantum computation via global control, this unique structure dramatically reduces the number of steps involved in the control procedures, either for the standard, network, model, or for one-way quantum computation. The use of a far-blue-detuned lattice and a magnetically insensitive computational basis makes the scheme robust against decoherence. The present scheme is a promising candidate for experimental implementation of quantum computation and for graph-state preparation in one, two, or three spatial dimensions

  14. Position and Momentum Entanglement of Dipole-Dipole Interacting Atoms in Optical Lattices: The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Paradox on a Lattice

    OpenAIRE

    Opatrny, T.; Kolar, M.; Kurizki, G.; Deb, B.

    2004-01-01

    We study a possible realization of the position- and momentum-correlated atomic pairs that are confined to adjacent sites of two mutually shifted optical lattices and are entangled via laser-induced dipole-dipole interactions. The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) ``paradox'' [Phys. Rev. 47, 777 (1935)] with translational variables is then modified by lattice-diffraction effects. This ``paradox'' can be verified to a high degree of accuracy in this scheme.

  15. Atomic clocks for geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlstäubler, Tanja E.; Grosche, Gesine; Lisdat, Christian; Schmidt, Piet O.; Denker, Heiner

    2018-06-01

    We review experimental progress on optical atomic clocks and frequency transfer, and consider the prospects of using these technologies for geodetic measurements. Today, optical atomic frequency standards have reached relative frequency inaccuracies below 10‑17, opening new fields of fundamental and applied research. The dependence of atomic frequencies on the gravitational potential makes atomic clocks ideal candidates for the search for deviations in the predictions of Einstein’s general relativity, tests of modern unifying theories and the development of new gravity field sensors. In this review, we introduce the concepts of optical atomic clocks and present the status of international clock development and comparison. Besides further improvement in stability and accuracy of today’s best clocks, a large effort is put into increasing the reliability and technological readiness for applications outside of specialized laboratories with compact, portable devices. With relative frequency uncertainties of 10‑18, comparisons of optical frequency standards are foreseen to contribute together with satellite and terrestrial data to the precise determination of fundamental height reference systems in geodesy with a resolution at the cm-level. The long-term stability of atomic standards will deliver excellent long-term height references for geodetic measurements and for the modelling and understanding of our Earth.

  16. A study of ultra-stable optical clocks, frequency sources and standards for space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, H.A.; Knight, D.J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Optical or laser-based communication systems are expected to supplement microwave based systems for satellite-to-satellite and spacecraft-to-satellite communications early in the next millennium. Optical systems can carry far more traffic than microwave and address the need to increase communication bandwidths to meet the demands of commerce and the entertainment industry. There is already significant research and commercial interest in this area (now driven particularly by the multi-media and Internet services delivery sector) and there is a strong need to establish which are the best choices of optical sources to develop for space based optical communications. In addition to communication requirements there are strong arguments for developing ultra-stable optical frequency sources and detectors in space for at least two other purposes. At present the microwave radiation that is used for communications is also used for other purposes, for example navigation or tracking, and 'space science' experiments. With the switch from the microwave to the optical for communications it may well be convenient to switch to the optical for these and other functions. This study has examined the potential stable laser requirements for a range of space applications. An interim report was presented in the form of a conference paper summarising our initial findings (see Appendix 5). This final report gives our conclusions in more detail and recommends areas for further study

  17. Optically trapped atom interferometry using the clock transition of large {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altin, P A; McDonald, G; Doering, D; Debs, J E; Barter, T H; Close, J D; Robins, N P [Department of Quantum Science, ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Atom Optics, the Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia); Haine, S A [School of Mathematics and Physics, ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics, The University of Queensland, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Hanna, T M [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Maryland, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8423, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8423 (United States); Anderson, R P, E-mail: paul.altin@anu.edu.au [School of Physics, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2011-06-15

    We present a Ramsey-type atom interferometer operating with an optically trapped sample of 10{sup 6} Bose-condensed {sup 87}Rb atoms. We investigate this interferometer experimentally and theoretically with an eye to the construction of future high precision atomic sensors. Our results indicate that, with further experimental refinements, it will be possible to produce and measure the output of a sub-shot-noise-limited, large atom number BEC-based interferometer. The optical trap allows us to couple the |F=1, m{sub F}=0){yields}|F=2, m{sub F}=0) clock states using a single photon 6.8 GHz microwave transition, while state selective readout is achieved with absorption imaging. We analyse the process of absorption imaging and show that it is possible to observe atom number variance directly, with a signal-to-noise ratio ten times better than the atomic projection noise limit on 10{sup 6} condensate atoms. We discuss the technical and fundamental noise sources that limit our current system, and present theoretical and experimental results on interferometer contrast, de-phasing and miscibility.

  18. Cascaded optical fiber link using the internet network for remote clocks comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodo, Nicola; Quintin, Nicolas; Stefani, Fabio; Wiotte, Fabrice; Camisard, Emilie; Chardonnet, Christian; Santarelli, Giorgio; Amy-Klein, Anne; Pottie, Paul-Eric; Lopez, Olivier

    2015-12-28

    We report a cascaded optical link of 1100 km for ultra-stable frequency distribution over an Internet fiber network. The link is composed of four spans for which the propagation noise is actively compensated. The robustness and the performance of the link are ensured by five fully automated optoelectronic stations, two of them at the link ends, and three deployed on the field and connecting the spans. This device coherently regenerates the optical signal with the heterodyne optical phase locking of a low-noise laser diode. Optical detection of the beat-note signals for the laser lock and the link noise compensation are obtained with stable and low-noise fibered optical interferometer. We show 3.5 days of continuous operation of the noise-compensated 4-span cascaded link leading to fractional frequency instability of 4x10(-16) at 1-s measurement time and 1x10(-19) at 2000 s. This cascaded link was extended to 1480-km with the same performance. This work is a significant step towards a sustainable wide area ultra-stable optical frequency distribution and comparison network at a very high level of performance.

  19. Optical absorption enhancement in silicon nanowire arrays with a large lattice constant for photovoltaic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chenxi; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2009-10-26

    In this paper, we use the transfer matrix method to calculate the optical absorptance of vertically-aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays. For fixed filling ratio, significant optical absorption enhancement occurs when the lattice constant is increased from 100 nm to 600 nm. The enhancement arises from an increase in field concentration within the nanowire as well as excitation of guided resonance modes. We quantify the absorption enhancement in terms of ultimate efficiency. Results show that an optimized SiNW array with lattice constant of 600 nm and wire diameter of 540 nm has a 72.4% higher ultimate efficiency than a Si thin film of equal thickness. The enhancement effect can be maintained over a large range of incidence angles.

  20. Mean-field description of ultracold bosons on disordered two-dimensional optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonsante, Pierfrancesco; Massel, Francesco; Penna, Vittorio; Vezzani, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    In the present communication, we describe the properties induced by disorder on an ultracold gas of bosonic atoms loaded into a two-dimensional optical lattice with global confinement ensured by a parabolic potential. Our analysis is centred on the spatial distribution of the various phases, focusing particularly on the superfluid properties of the system as a function of external parameters and disorder amplitude. In particular, it is shown how disorder can suppress superfluidity, while partially preserving the system coherence. (fast track communication)

  1. Hofstadter's butterfly energy spectrum of ultracold fermions on the two-dimensional triangular optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Jingmin; Lu Qingqing

    2009-01-01

    We study the energy spectrum of ultracold fermionic atoms on the two-dimensional triangular optical lattice subjected to a perpendicular effective magnetic field, which can be realized with laser beams. We derive the generalized Harper's equations and numerically solve them, then we obtain the Hofstadter's butterfly-like energy spectrum, which has a novel fractal structure. The observability of the Hofstadter's butterfly spectrum is also discussed

  2. Localization of Cold Atoms in State-Dependent Optical Lattices via a Rabi Pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horstmann, Birger; Duerr, Stephan; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel realization of Anderson localization in nonequilibrium states of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A Rabi pulse transfers part of the population to a different internal state with infinite effective mass. These frozen atoms create a quantum superposition of different disorder potentials, localizing the mobile atoms. For weakly interacting mobile atoms, Anderson localization is obtained. The localization length increases with increasing disorder and decreasing interaction strength, contrary to the expectation for equilibrium localization.

  3. Bloch oscillations and accelerated Bose–Einstein condensates in an optical lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacchetti, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.sacchetti@unimore.it

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • Discrete nonlinear Schrödinger model for accelerated BECs in optical lattices. • Numerical computation of wavefunction BECs dynamics. • Correlation between nonlinearity and the oscillating period of the BEC's center of mass. • Discussion of the validity of the Bloch Theorem for accelerated BECs in an optical lattice. - Abstract: We discuss the method for the measurement of the gravity acceleration g by means of Bloch oscillations of an accelerated BEC in an optical lattice. This method has a theoretical critical point due to the fact that the period of the Bloch oscillations depends, in principle, on the initial shape of the BEC wavepacket. Here, by making use of the nearest-neighbor model for the numerical analysis of the BEC wavefunction, we show that in real experiments the period of the Bloch oscillations does not really depend on the shape of the initial wavepacket and that the relative uncertainty, due to the fact that the initial shape of the wavepacket may be asymmetrical, is smaller than the one due to experimental errors. Furthermore, we also show that the relation between the oscillation period and the scattering length of the BEC's atoms is linear; this fact suggests us a new experimental procedure for the measurement of the scattering length of atoms.

  4. Optical NOR logic gate design on square lattice photonic crystal platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D’souza, Nirmala Maria, E-mail: nirmala@cukerala.ac.in; Mathew, Vincent, E-mail: vincent@cukerala.ac.in [Department of Physics, Central University of Kerala, Kasaragod, Kerala-671 314 (India)

    2016-05-06

    We numerically demonstrate a new configuration of all-optical NOR logic gate with square lattice photonic crystal (PhC) waveguide using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The logic operations are based on interference effect of optical waves. We have determined the operating frequency range by calculating the band structure for a perfectly periodic PhC using plane wave expansion (PWE) method. Response time of this logic gate is 1.98 ps and it can be operated with speed about 513 GB/s. The proposed device consists of four linear waveguides and a square ring resonator waveguides on PhC platform.

  5. Sub-Doppler cooling in reduced-period optical lattice geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, P.R.; Raithel, G.; Zhang, R.; Malinovsky, V.S.

    2005-01-01

    It is shown that sub-Doppler cooling occurs in an atom-field geometry that can lead to reduced-period optical lattices. Four optical fields are combined to produce a 'standing wave' Raman field that drives transitions between two ground state sublevels. In contrast to conventional Sisyphus cooling, sub-Doppler cooling to zero velocity occurs when all fields are polarized in the same direction. Solutions are obtained using both semiclassical and quantum Monte Carlo methods in the case of exact two-photon resonance. The connection of the results with conventional Sisyphus cooling is established using a dressed state basis

  6. On-chip non-reciprocal optical devices based on quantum inspired photonic lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ganainy, R.; Eisfeld, A.; Levy, Miguel; Christodoulides, D. N.

    2013-10-01

    We propose integrated optical structures that can be used as isolators and polarization splitters based on engineered photonic lattices. Starting from optical waveguide arrays that mimic Fock space (quantum state with a well-defined particle number) representation of a non-interacting two-site Bose Hubbard Hamiltonian, we show that introducing magneto-optic nonreciprocity to these structures leads to a superior optical isolation performance. In the forward propagation direction, an input TM polarized beam experiences a perfect state transfer between the input and output waveguide channels while surface Bloch oscillations block the backward transmission between the same ports. Our analysis indicates a large isolation ratio of 75 dB after a propagation distance of 8 mm inside seven coupled waveguides. Moreover, we demonstrate that, a judicious choice of the nonreciprocity in this same geometry can lead to perfect polarization splitting.

  7. Matter-wave solitons and finite-amplitude Bloch waves in optical lattices with a spatially modulated nonlinearity

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jie-Fang; Li, Yi-Shen; Meng, Jianping; Wu, Lei; Malomed, Boris A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate solitons and nonlinear Bloch waves in Bose-Einstein condensates trapped in optical lattices. By introducing specially designed localized profiles of the spatial modulation of the attractive nonlinearity, we construct an infinite number of exact soliton solutions in terms of the Mathieu and elliptic functions, with the chemical potential belonging to the semi-infinite bandgap of the optical-lattice-induced spectrum. Starting from the exact solutions, we employ the relaxation met...

  8. 8-dimensional lattice optimized formats in 25-GBaud/s VCSEL based IM/DD optical interconnections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Xiaofeng; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2015-01-01

    Temporally combined 4- and 8-dimensional lattice grids optimized modulation formats for VCSEL based IM/DD short-reach optical inter-connections has been proposed and investigated numerically together with its conventional counterpart PAM-4. © 2015 OSA.......Temporally combined 4- and 8-dimensional lattice grids optimized modulation formats for VCSEL based IM/DD short-reach optical inter-connections has been proposed and investigated numerically together with its conventional counterpart PAM-4. © 2015 OSA....

  9. Quantum many-body dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, Stefan

    2014-04-15

    Ultracold atoms can be trapped in periodic intensity patterns of light created by counterpropagating laser beams, so-called optical lattices. In contrast to its natural counterpart, electrons in a solid state crystal, this man-made setup is very clean and highly isolated from environmental degrees of freedom. Moreover, to a large extent, the experimenter has dynamical control over the relevant system parameters: the interaction between atoms, the tunneling amplitude between lattice sites, and even the dimensionality of the lattice. These advantages render this system a unique platform for the simulation of quantum many-body dynamics for various lattice Hamiltonians as has been demonstrated in several experiments by now. The most significant step in recent times has arguably been the introduction of single-site detection of individual atoms in optical lattices. This technique, based on fluorescence microscopy, opens a new doorway for the study of quantum many-body states: the detection of the microscopic atom configuration. In this thesis, we theoretically explore the dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices for various setups realized in present-day experiments. Our main focus lies on aspects that become experimentally accessible by (realistic extensions of) the novel single-site measurement technique. The first part deals with the expansion of initially confined atoms in a homogeneous lattice, which is one way to create atomic motion in experiments. We analyze the buildup of spatial correlations during the expansion of a finitely extended band insulating state in one dimension. The numerical simulation reveals the creation of remote spin-entangled fermions in the strongly interacting regime. We discuss the experimental observation of such spin-entangled pairs by means of a single-site measurement. Furthermore, we suggest studying the impact of observations on the expansion dynamics for the extreme case of a projective measurement in the spatial occupation

  10. Quantum many-body dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Ultracold atoms can be trapped in periodic intensity patterns of light created by counterpropagating laser beams, so-called optical lattices. In contrast to its natural counterpart, electrons in a solid state crystal, this man-made setup is very clean and highly isolated from environmental degrees of freedom. Moreover, to a large extent, the experimenter has dynamical control over the relevant system parameters: the interaction between atoms, the tunneling amplitude between lattice sites, and even the dimensionality of the lattice. These advantages render this system a unique platform for the simulation of quantum many-body dynamics for various lattice Hamiltonians as has been demonstrated in several experiments by now. The most significant step in recent times has arguably been the introduction of single-site detection of individual atoms in optical lattices. This technique, based on fluorescence microscopy, opens a new doorway for the study of quantum many-body states: the detection of the microscopic atom configuration. In this thesis, we theoretically explore the dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices for various setups realized in present-day experiments. Our main focus lies on aspects that become experimentally accessible by (realistic extensions of) the novel single-site measurement technique. The first part deals with the expansion of initially confined atoms in a homogeneous lattice, which is one way to create atomic motion in experiments. We analyze the buildup of spatial correlations during the expansion of a finitely extended band insulating state in one dimension. The numerical simulation reveals the creation of remote spin-entangled fermions in the strongly interacting regime. We discuss the experimental observation of such spin-entangled pairs by means of a single-site measurement. Furthermore, we suggest studying the impact of observations on the expansion dynamics for the extreme case of a projective measurement in the spatial occupation

  11. Emergent pseudospin-1 Maxwell fermions with a threefold degeneracy in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Dan-Wei; Yan, Hui; Xing, Ding-Yu; Zhu, Shi-Liang

    2017-09-01

    The discovery of relativistic spin-1/2 fermions such as Dirac and Weyl fermions in condensed-matter or artificial systems opens a new era in modern physics. An interesting but rarely explored question is whether other relativistic spinal excitations could be realized with artificial systems. Here, we construct two- and three-dimensional tight-binding models realizable with cold fermionic atoms in optical lattices, where the low energy excitations are effectively described by the spin-1 Maxwell equations in the Hamiltonian form. These relativistic (linear dispersion) excitations with unconventional integer pseudospin, beyond the Dirac-Weyl-Majorana fermions, are an exotic kind of fermions named as Maxwell fermions. We demonstrate that the systems have rich topological features. For instance, the threefold degenerate points called Maxwell points may have quantized Berry phases and anomalous quantum Hall effects with spin-momentum locking may appear in topological Maxwell insulators in the two-dimensional lattices. In three dimensions, Maxwell points may have nontrivial monopole charges of ±2 with two Fermi arcs connecting them, and the merging of the Maxwell points leads to topological phase transitions. Finally, we propose realistic schemes for realizing the model Hamiltonians and detecting the topological properties of the emergent Maxwell quasiparticles in optical lattices.

  12. Bound states and Cooper pairs of molecules in 2D optical lattices bilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho-Guardian, A.; Dominguez-Castro, G.A.; Paredes, R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-08-15

    We investigate the formation of Cooper pairs, bound dimers and the dimer-dimer elastic scattering of ultracold dipolar Fermi molecules confined in a 2D optical lattice bilayer configuration. While the energy and their associated bound states are determined in a variational way, the correlated two-molecule pair is addressed as in the original Cooper formulation. We demonstrate that the 2D lattice confinement favors the formation of zero center mass momentum bound states. Regarding the Cooper pairs binding energy, this depends on the molecule populations in each layer. Maximum binding energies occur for non-zero (zero) pair momentum when the Fermi system is polarized (unpolarized). We find an analytic expression for the dimer-dimer effective interaction in the deep BEC regime. The present analysis represents a route for addressing the BCS-BEC crossover in dipolar Fermi gases confined in 2D optical lattices within the current experimental panorama. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. History of early atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, N.F.

    2005-01-01

    This review of the history of early atomic clocks includes early atomic beam magnetic resonance, methods of separated and successive oscillatory fields, microwave absorption, optical pumping and atomic masers. (author)

  14. Simulation of 4-turn algorithms for reconstructing lattice optic functions from orbit measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koscielniak, S.; Iliev, A.

    1994-06-01

    We describe algorithms for reconstructing tune, closed-orbit, beta-function and phase advance from four individual turns of beam orbit acquisition data, under the assumption of coherent, almost linear and uncoupled betatron oscillations. To estimate the beta-function at, and phase advance between, position monitors, we require at least one anchor location consisting of two monitors separated by a drift. The algorithms were submitted to a Monte Carlo analysis to find the likely measurement accuracy of the optics functions in the KAON Factory Booster ring racetrack lattice, assuming beam position monitors with surveying and reading errors, and assuming an imperfect lattice with gradient and surveying errors. Some of the results of this study are reported. (author)

  15. Squeezed Dirac and Topological Magnons in a Bosonic Honeycomb Optical Lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owerre, Solomon; Nsofini, Joachim

    2017-09-20

    Quantum information storage using charge-neutral quasiparticles are expected to play a crucial role in the future of quantum computers. In this regard, magnons or collective spin-wave excitations in solid-state materials are promising candidates in the future of quantum computing. Here, we study the quantum squeezing of Dirac and topological magnons in a bosonic honeycomb optical lattice with spin-orbit interaction by utilizing the mapping to quantum spin-$1/2$ XYZ Heisenberg model on the honeycomb lattice with discrete Z$_2$ symmetry and a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. We show that the squeezed magnons can be controlled by the Z$_2$ anisotropy and demonstrate how the noise in the system is periodically modified in the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases of the model. Our results also apply to solid-state honeycomb (anti)ferromagnetic insulators. . © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  16. Spatiotemporal dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates in linear- and circular-chain optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, N.

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices that have a linear-or a circular-chain configuration with the tunneling couplings between nearest-neighbor lattice sites. A discrete nonlinear Schroedinger equation has been solved for various initial conditions and for a definite range of repulsive and attractive interatomic interactions. It is shown that the diversity of the spatiotemporal dynamics of the atomic population distribution such as a macroscopic self-trapping, bright and dark solitons, and symmetry breaking is derived from the positive and negative interatomic interactions. For the circular-chain configuration, two types of rotational modes are obtained as we introduce a definite relation for the initial phase conditions

  17. Squeezed Dirac and topological magnons in a bosonic honeycomb optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owerre, S. A.; Nsofini, J.

    2017-11-01

    Quantum information storage using charge-neutral quasiparticles is expected to play a crucial role in the future of quantum computers. In this regard, magnons or collective spin-wave excitations in solid-state materials are promising candidates in the future of quantum computing. Here, we study the quantum squeezing of Dirac and topological magnons in a bosonic honeycomb optical lattice with spin-orbit interaction by utilizing the mapping to quantum spin-1/2 XYZ Heisenberg model on the honeycomb lattice with discrete Z2 symmetry and a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. We show that the squeezed magnons can be controlled by the Z2 anisotropy and demonstrate how the noise in the system is periodically modified in the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases of the model. Our results also apply to solid-state honeycomb (anti)ferromagnetic insulators.

  18. Damping-free collective oscillations of a driven two-component Bose gas in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchedrin, Gavriil; Jaschke, Daniel; Carr, Lincoln D.

    2018-04-01

    We explore the quantum many-body physics of a driven Bose-Einstein condensate in optical lattices. The laser field induces a gap in the generalized Bogoliubov spectrum proportional to the effective Rabi frequency. The lowest-lying modes in a driven condensate are characterized by zero group velocity and nonzero current. Thus, the laser field induces roton modes, which carry interaction in a driven condensate. We show that collective excitations below the energy of the laser-induced gap remain undamped, while above the gap they are characterized by a significantly suppressed Landau damping rate.

  19. Stability of dark solitons in a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped in an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevrekidis, P. G.; Carretero-Gonzalez, R.; Theocharis, G.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.; Malomed, B. A.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the stability of dark solitons (DSs) in an effectively one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate in the presence of the magnetic parabolic trap and an optical lattice (OL). The analysis is based on both the full Gross-Pitaevskii equation and its tight-binding approximation counterpart (discrete nonlinear Schroedinger equation). We find that DSs are subject to weak instabilities with an onset of instability mainly governed by the period and amplitude of the OL. The instability, if present, sets in at large times and it is characterized by quasiperiodic oscillations of the DS about the minimum of the parabolic trap

  20. Stability of trapped Bose—Einstein condensates in one-dimensional tilted optical lattice potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Jian-Shu; Liao Xiang-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Using the direct perturbation technique, this paper obtains a general perturbed solution of the Bose—Einstein condensates trapped in one-dimensional tilted optical lattice potential. We also gave out two necessary and sufficient conditions for boundedness of the perturbed solution. Theoretical analytical results and the corresponding numerical results show that the perturbed solution of the Bose-Einstein condensate system is unbounded in general and indicate that the Bose—Einstein condensates are Lyapunov-unstable. However, when the conditions for boundedness of the perturbed solution are satisfied, then the Bose-Einstein condensates are Lyapunov-stable. (general)

  1. Influence of trapping potentials on the phase diagram of bosonic atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giampaolo, S.M.; Illuminati, F.; Mazzarella, G.; De Siena, S.

    2004-01-01

    We study the effect of external trapping potentials on the phase diagram of bosonic atoms in optical lattices. We introduce a generalized Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian that includes the structure of the energy levels of the trapping potential, and show that these levels are in general populated both at finite and zero temperature. We characterize the properties of the superfluid transition for this situation and compare them with those of the standard Bose-Hubbard description. We briefly discuss similar behaviors for fermionic systems

  2. Coherent Addressing of Individual Neutral Atoms in a 3D Optical Lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Xianli; Corcovilos, Theodore A; Kumar, Aishwarya; Weiss, David S

    2015-07-24

    We demonstrate arbitrary coherent addressing of individual neutral atoms in a 5×5×5 array formed by an optical lattice. Addressing is accomplished using rapidly reconfigurable crossed laser beams to selectively ac Stark shift target atoms, so that only target atoms are resonant with state-changing microwaves. The effect of these targeted single qubit gates on the quantum information stored in nontargeted atoms is smaller than 3×10^{-3} in state fidelity. This is an important step along the path of converting the scalability promise of neutral atoms into reality.

  3. Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices: Band-gap structure and solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louis, Pearl J. Y.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Ostrovskaya, Elena A.; Savage, Craig M.

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the existence and stability of spatially extended (Bloch-type) and localized states of a Bose-Einstein condensate loaded into an optical lattice. In the framework of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation with a periodic potential, we study the band-gap structure of the matter-wave spectrum in both the linear and nonlinear regimes. We demonstrate the existence of families of spatially localized matter-wave gap solitons, and analyze their stability in different band gaps, for both repulsive and attractive atomic interactions

  4. Chiral phase from three-spin interactions in an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Cruz, Christian; Pachos, Jiannis K.

    2005-01-01

    A spin-1/2 chain model that includes three-spin interactions can effectively describe the dynamics of two species of bosons trapped in an optical lattice with a triangular-ladder configuration. A perturbative theoretical approach and numerical study of its ground state is performed that reveals a rich variety of phases and criticalities. We identify phases with periodicity one, two, or three, as well as critical points that belong in the same universality class as the Ising or the three-state Potts model. We establish a range of parameters, corresponding to a large degeneracy present between phases with period 2 and 3, that nests a gapless incommensurate chiral phase

  5. Preparing and probing atomic Majorana fermions and topological order in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, C V; Diehl, S; Zoller, P; Baranov, M A

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a one-dimensional system of fermionic atoms in an optical lattice whose phase diagram includes topological states of different symmetry classes with a simple possibility to switch between them. The states and topological phase transitions between them can be identified by looking at their zero-energy edge modes which are Majorana fermions. We propose several universal methods of detecting the Majorana edge states, based on their genuine features: the zero-energy, localized character of the wave functions and the induced non-local fermionic correlations. (paper)

  6. Deconfinement and Phase Diagram of Bosons in a Linear Optical Lattice with a Particle Reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, Kingshuk; Fertig, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the zero-temperature phases of bosons in a one-dimensional optical lattice with an explicit tunnel coupling to a Bose-condensed particle reservoir. Renormalization group analysis of this system is shown to reveal three phases: one in which the linear system is fully phase locked to the reservoir; one in which Josephson vortices between the one-dimensional system and the particle reservoir deconfine due to quantum fluctuations, leading to a decoupled state in which the one-dimensional system is metallic; and one in which the one-dimensional system is in a Mott insulating state

  7. Spatial chaos of trapped Bose-Einstein condensate in one-dimensional weak optical lattice potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong Guishu; Hai Wenhua; Xie Qiongtao

    2004-01-01

    The spatially chaotic attractor in an elongated cloud of Bose-Einstein condensed atoms perturbed by a weak optical lattice potential is studied. The analytical insolvability and numerical incomputability of the atomic number density are revealed by a perturbed solution that illustrates the unpredictability of the deterministic chaos. Although this could lead the nonphysical explosion and unboundedness to the numerical solution, the theoretical analysis offers a criterion to avoid them. Moreover, the velocity field is investigated that exhibits the superfluid property of the chaotic system

  8. Defect solitons in saturable nonlinearity media with parity-time symmetric optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Sumei [Department of Physics, Guangdong University of Petrochemical Technology, Maoming 525000 (China); Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Hu, Wei, E-mail: huwei@scnu.edu.cn [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)

    2013-11-15

    We reported the existence and stability of defect solitons in saturable nonlinearity media with parity-time (PT) symmetric optical lattices. Families of fundamental and dipole solitons are found in the semi-infinite gap and the first gap. The power of solitons increases with the increasing of the propagation constant and saturation parameter. The existence areas of fundamental and dipole solitons shrink with the growth of saturation parameter. The instability of dipole solitons for positive and no defect induced by the imaginary part of PT symmetric potentials can be suppressed by the saturation nonlinearity, but for negative defect it cannot be suppressed by the saturation nonlinearity.

  9. Full-asynchronous gigabit-symmetric DPSK downstream and OOK upstream OCDMA-PON with source-free ONUs employing all-optical self-clocked time gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Bo; Shimizu, Satoshi; Wang, Xu; Wada, Naoya

    2012-12-10

    We propose an asynchronous gigabit-symmetric optical code division multiplexing access passive optical network (OCDMA-PON) in which optical network units (ONUs) are source-free. In the experiment, we demonstrate a duplex OCDMA system with a 50 km 10 Gbit/s/user 4-user DPSK-OCDMA downlink and a 50 km 10 Gbit/s/user 4-user OOK-OCDMA uplink and error-free duplex transmissions are achieved. Besides, we investigate an all-optical self-clocked time gate, which is used for the signal regeneration of decoded signals and ensures asynchronization in the up/downstream transmissions. Furthermore, we evaluate the power budget of the proposed duplex transmission.

  10. Electronic, Optical, and Lattice Dynamical Properties of Tetracalcium Trialuminate (Ca4Al6O13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huayue Mei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The electronic, optical, and lattice dynamical properties of tetracalcium trialuminate (Ca4Al6O13 with a special sodalite cage structure were calculated based on the density functional theory. Theoretical results show that Ca4Al6O13 is ductile and weakly anisotropic. The calculated Young’s modulus and Poisson ratio are 34.18 GPa and 0.32, respectively. Ca4Al6O13 is an indirect-gap semiconductor with a band gap of 5.41 eV. The top of the valence band derives from O 2p states, and the bottom of conduction band consists of Ca 3d states. Transitions from O 2p, 2s states to empty Ca 4s, 3d and Al 3s, 3p states constitute the major peaks of the imaginary part of the dielectric function. Ca4Al6O13 is a good UV absorber for photoelectric devices due to the high absorption coefficient and low reflectivity. The lattice vibration analysis reveals that O atoms contribute to the high-frequency portions of the phonon spectra, while Ca and Al atoms make important contributions to the middle- and low-frequency portions. At the center of the first Brillouin zone, lattice vibrations include the Raman active modes (E, A1, infrared active mode (T2, and silentmodes (T1, A2. Typical atomic displacement patterns were also investigated to understand the vibration modes more intuitively.

  11. Nonlinear localized modes in dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas-Rojas, S.; Vicencio, R. A.; Molina, M. I.; Abdullaev, F. Kh.

    2011-01-01

    Modulational instability and discrete matter wave solitons in dipolar BECs, loaded into a deep optical lattice, are investigated analytically and numerically. The process of modulational instability of nonlinear plane matter waves in a dipolar nonlinear lattice is studied and the regions of instability are established. The existence and stability of bulk discrete solitons are analyzed analytically and confirmed by numerical simulations. In marked contrast with the usual discrete nonlinear Schroedinger behavior (no dipolar interactions), we found a region where the two fundamental modes are simultaneously unstable, allowing enhanced mobility across the lattice for large norm values. To study the existence and properties of surface discrete solitons, an analysis of the dimer configuration is performed. The properties of symmetric and antisymmetric modes including stability diagrams and bifurcations are investigated in closed form. For the case of a bulk medium, properties of fundamental on-site and intersite localized modes are analyzed. On-site and intersite surface localized modes are studied, and we find that they do not exist when nonlocal interactions predominate with respect to local ones.

  12. Probing SU(N)-symmetric orbital interactions with ytterbium Fermi gases in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scazza, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    This thesis reports on the creation and investigation of interacting two-orbital quantum gases of ytterbium in optical lattices. Degenerate fermionic gases of ytterbium or other alkaline-earth-like atoms have been recently proposed as model systems for orbital phenomena in condensed matter, such as Kondo screening, heavy-Fermi behaviour and colossal magnetoresistance. Such gases are moreover expected to obey a high SU(N) symmetry, owing to their highly decoupled nuclear spin, for which the emergence of novel, exotic phases of matter has been predicted. With the two lowest (meta-) stable electronic states mimicking electrons in distinct orbitals of solid materials, the two-orbital SU(N) Hubbard model and its spin-exchange inter-orbital interactions are realised. The interactions in two-orbital degenerate mixtures of different nuclear spin states of 173 Yb are probed by addressing the transition to the metastable state in a state-independent optical lattice. The complete characterisation of the two-orbital scattering channels and the demonstration of the SU(N=6) symmetry within the experimental uncertainty are presented. Most importantly, a strong spin- exchange coupling between the two orbitals is identified and the associated exchange process is observed through the dynamic equilibration of spin imbalances between ensembles in different orbitals. These findings are enabled by the implementation of high precision spectroscopic techniques and of full coherent control of the metastable state population. The realisation of SU(N)-symmetric gases with spin-exchange interactions, the elementary building block of orbital quantum magnetism, represents an important step towards the simulation of paradigmatic many-body models, such as the Kondo lattice model.

  13. Shortcut loading a Bose–Einstein condensate into an optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoji; Jin, Shengjie; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2018-05-01

    We present an effective and fast (few microseconds) procedure for transferring a Bose–Einstein condensate from the ground state in a harmonic trap into the desired bands of an optical lattice. Our shortcut method is a designed pulse sequence where the time duration and the interval in each step are fully optimized in order to maximize robustness and fidelity of the final state with respect to the target state. The atoms can be prepared in a single band with even or odd parity, and superposition states of different bands can be prepared and manipulated. Furthermore, we extend this idea to the case of two-dimensional or three-dimensional optical lattices where the energies of excited states are degenerate. We experimentally demonstrate various examples and show very good agreement with the theoretical model. Efficient shortcut methods will find applications in the preparation of quantum systems, in quantum information processing, in precise measurement and as a starting point to investigate dynamics in excited bands.

  14. External meeting - Geneva University: A lab in a trap: quantum gases in optical lattices

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY ECOLE DE PHYSIQUE Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 - Tél: 022 379 62 73 - Fax: 022 379 69 92 Monday 16 April 2007 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 - Stückelberg Auditorium A lab in a trap: quantum gases in optical lattices by Prof. Tilman Esslinger / Department of Physics, ETH Zurich The field of ultra cold quantum gases has seen an astonishing development during the last ten years. With the demonstration of Bose-Einstein condensation in weakly interacting atomic gases a theoretical concept of unique beauty could be witnessed experimentally. Very recent developments have now made it possible to engineer atomic many-body systems which are dominated by strong interactions. A major driving force for these advances are experiments in which ultracold atoms are trapped in optical lattices. These systems provide anew avenue for designing and studying quantum many-body systems. Exposed to the crystal structure of interfering laser wave...

  15. Symmetry Breaking Ground States of Bose-Einstein Condensates in 1D Double Square Well and Optical Lattice Well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Qingxin; Ding Guohui

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the phenomena of symmetry breaking and phase transition in the ground state of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) trapped in a double square well and in an optical lattice well, respectively. By using standing-wave expansion method, we present symmetric and asymmetric ground state solutions of nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE) with a symmetric double square well potential for attractive nonlinearity. In particular, we study the ground state wave function's properties by changing the depth of potential and atomic interactions (here we restrict ourselves to the attractive regime). By using the Fourier grid Hamiltonian method, we also reveal a phase transition of BECs trapped in one-dimensional optical lattice potential.

  16. Dynamics of attractively interacting Fermi atoms in one-dimensional optical lattices: Non-equilibrium simulations of fermion superfluidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, M., E-mail: okumura.masahiko@jaea.go.j [CCSE, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 6-9-3 Higashi-Ueno, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-0015 (Japan); CREST (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Onishi, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Yamada, S. [CCSE, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 6-9-3 Higashi-Ueno, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-0015 (Japan); CREST (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Machida, M. [CCSE, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 6-9-3 Higashi-Ueno, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-0015 (Japan); CREST (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan) and JST, TRIP, Sambancho Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    We study center of mass (CoM) motions of attractively interacting fermionic atoms loaded on an one-dimensional optical lattice confined by a harmonic potential at zero temperature by using adaptive time-dependent density-matrix renormalization-group method. We find that the CoM motions in weak and strong attraction show underdamped and overdamped motions, respectively, which are consistent with the experimental results of the CoM motion in the three-dimensional optical lattice. In addition, we find spin-imbalance effects on the CoM motion, which slow the CoM motion down.

  17. Tunneling dynamics of superfluid Fermi gases in an accelerating optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tie Lu; Xue Jukui

    2010-01-01

    The nonlinear Landau-Zener tunneling and the nonlinear Rabi oscillations of superfluid Fermi gases between Bloch bands in an accelerating optical lattice are discussed. Within the hydrodynamic theory and a two-level model, the tunneling probability of superfluid Fermi gases between Bloch bands is obtained. We find that, as the system crosses from the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) side to the BCS side, the tunneling rate is closely related to the particle density: when the density is smaller (larger) than a critical value, the tunneling rate at unitarity is larger (smaller) than that in the BEC limit. This is well explained in terms of an effective interaction and an effective potential. Furthermore, the nonlinear Rabi oscillations of superfluid Fermi gases between the bands are discussed by imposing a periodic modulation on the level bias and the strength of the lattice. Analytical expressions of the critical density for suppressing or enhancing the Rabi oscillations are obtained. It is shown that, as the system crosses from the BEC side to the BCS side, the critical density strongly depends on the modulation parameters (i.e., the modulation amplitude and the modulation frequency). For a fixed density, a high-frequency or low-frequency modulation can suppress or enhance the Rabi oscillations both at unitarity and in the BEC limit. For an intermediate modulation frequency, the Rabi oscillations are chaotic along the entire BEC-BCS crossover, especially, on the BCS side. Interestingly, we find that the modulation of the lattice strength only with an intermediate modulation frequency has significant effect on the Rabi oscillations both in the BEC limit and at unitarity; that is, an intermediate-frequency modulation can enhance the Rabi oscillations, especially on the BCS side.

  18. Molecule condensate production from an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate via Feshbach scattering in an optical lattice: Gap solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasgal, Richard S.; Menabde, G.; Band, Y. B.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a scheme for making a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of molecules from a BEC of atoms in a strongly confining two-dimensional optical lattice and a weak one-dimensional optical lattice in the third dimension. The stable solutions obtained for the order parameters take the form of a different type of gap soliton, with both atomic and molecular BECs, and also standard gap solitons with only a molecular BEC. The strongly confining dimensions of the lattice stabilize the BEC against inelastic energy transfer in atom-molecule collisions. The solitons with atoms and molecules may be obtained by starting with an atomic BEC, and gradually tuning the resonance by changing the external magnetic-field strength until the desired atom-molecule soliton is obtained. A gap soliton of a BEC of only molecules may be obtained nonadiabatically by starting from an atom-only gap soliton, far from a Feshbach resonance and adjusting the magnetic field to near Feshbach resonance. After a period of time in which the dimer field grows, change the magnetic field such that the detuning is large and negative and Feshbach effects wash out, turn off the optical lattice in phase with the atomic BEC, and turn on an optical lattice in phase with the molecules. The atoms disperse, leaving a gap soliton composed of a molecular BEC. Regarding instabilities in the dimension of the weak optical lattice, the solitons which are comprised of both atoms and molecules are sometimes stable and sometimes unstable--we present numerically obtained results. Gap solitons comprised of only molecules have the same stability properties as the standard gap solitons: stable from frequencies slightly below the middle of the band gap to the top, and unstable below that point. Instabilities are only weakly affected by the soliton velocities, and all instabilities are oscillatory

  19. Decamp Clock Board Firmware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente, J. de; Castilla, J.; Martinez, G.

    2007-01-01

    Decamp (Dark Energy Survey Camera) is a new instrument designed to explore the universe aiming to reveal the nature of Dark Energy. The camera consists of 72 CCDs and 520 Mpixels. The readout electronics of DECam is based on the Monsoon system. Monsoon is a new image acquisition system developed by the NOAO (National Optical Astronomical Observatory) for the new generation of astronomical cameras. The Monsoon system uses three types of boards inserted in a Eurocard format based crate: master control board, acquisition board and clock board. The direct use of the Monsoon system for DECam readout electronics requires nine crates mainly due to the high number of clock boards needed. Unfortunately, the available space for DECam electronics is constrained to four crates at maximum. The major drawback to achieve such desired compaction degree resides in the clock board signal density. This document describes the changes performed at CIEMAT on the programmable logic of the Monsoon clock board aiming to meet such restricted space constraints. (Author) 5 refs

  20. Decamp Clock Board Firmware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, J. de; Castilla, J.; Martinez, G.

    2007-09-27

    Decamp (Dark Energy Survey Camera) is a new instrument designed to explore the universe aiming to reveal the nature of Dark Energy. The camera consists of 72 CCDs and 520 Mpixels. The readout electronics of DECam is based on the Monsoon system. Monsoon is a new image acquisition system developed by the NOAO (National Optical Astronomical Observatory) for the new generation of astronomical cameras. The Monsoon system uses three types of boards inserted in a Eurocard format based crate: master control board, acquisition board and clock board. The direct use of the Monsoon system for DECam readout electronics requires nine crates mainly due to the high number of clock boards needed. Unfortunately, the available space for DECam electronics is constrained to four crates at maximum. The major drawback to achieve such desired compaction degree resides in the clock board signal density. This document describes the changes performed at CIEMAT on the programmable logic of the Monsoon clock board aiming to meet such restricted space constraints. (Author) 5 refs.

  1. High Efficiency Optical MEMS by the Integration of Photonic Lattices with Surface MEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FLEMING, JAMES G.; LIN, SHAWN-YU; MANI, SEETHAMBAL S.; RODGERS, M. STEVEN; DAGEL, DARYL J.

    2002-11-01

    This report outlines our work on the integration of high efficiency photonic lattice structures with MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems). The simplest of these structures were based on 1-D mirror structures. These were integrated into a variety of devices, movable mirrors, switchable cavities and finally into Bragg fiber structures which enable the control of light in at least 2 dimensions. Of these devices, the most complex were the Bragg fibers. Bragg fibers consist of hollow tubes in which light is guided in a low index media (air) and confined by surrounding Bragg mirror stacks. In this work, structures with internal diameters from 5 to 30 microns have been fabricated and much larger structures should also be possible. We have demonstrated the fabrication of these structures with short wavelength band edges ranging from 400 to 1600nm. There may be potential applications for such structures in the fields of integrated optics and BioMEMS. We have also looked at the possibility of waveguiding in 3 dimensions by integrating defects into 3-dimensional photonic lattice structures. Eventually it may be possible to tune such structures by mechanically modulating the defects.

  2. Particle jumps between optical traps in a one-dimensional (1D) optical lattice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, Aug 2 (2010), 083001:1-20 ISSN 1367-2630 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06007; GA MŠk OC08034 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : stochastic resonance * brownian-motion * tweezers * forces * manipulation * calibration * separation * interface * diffusion * tracking Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.849, year: 2010

  3. Thermally activated phase slips of one-dimensional Bose gases in shallow optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunimi, Masaya; Danshita, Ippei

    2017-03-01

    We study the decay of superflow via thermally activated phase slips in one-dimensional Bose gases in a shallow optical lattice. By using the Kramers formula, we numerically calculate the nucleation rate of a thermally activated phase slip for various values of the filling factor and flow velocity in the absence of a harmonic trapping potential. Within the local density approximation, we derive a formula connecting the phase-slip nucleation rate with the damping rate of a dipole oscillation of the Bose gas in the presence of a harmonic trap. We use the derived formula to directly compare our theory with the recent experiment done by the LENS group [L. Tanzi et al., Sci. Rep. 6, 25965 (2016), 10.1038/srep25965]. From the comparison, the observed damping of dipole oscillations in a weakly correlated and small velocity regime is attributed dominantly to thermally activated phase slips rather than quantum phase slips.

  4. Quench-induced resonant tunneling mechanisms of bosons in an optical lattice with harmonic confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistakidis, Simeon; Koutentakis, Georgios; Schmelcher, Peter; Theory Group of Fundamental Processes in Quantum Physics Team

    2017-04-01

    The non-equilibrium dynamics of small boson ensembles in one-dimensional optical lattices is explored upon a sudden quench of an additional harmonic trap from strong to weak confinement. We find that the competition between the initial localization and the repulsive interaction leads to a resonant response of the system for intermediate quench amplitudes, corresponding to avoided crossings in the many-body eigenspectrum with varying final trap frequency. In particular, we show that these avoided crossings can be utilized to prepare the system in a desired state. The dynamical response is shown to depend on both the interaction strength as well as the number of atoms manifesting the many-body nature of the tunneling dynamics. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) in the framework of the SFB 925 ``Light induced dynamics and control of correlated quantum systems''.

  5. Phase diagram of two-component bosons on an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altman, Ehud; Hofstetter, Walter; Demler, Eugene; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2003-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the phase diagram of two-component bosons on an optical lattice. A new formalism is developed which treats the effective spin interactions in the Mott and superfluid phases on the same footing. Using this new approach we chart the phase boundaries of the broken spin symmetry states up to the Mott to superfluid transition and beyond. Near the transition point, the magnitude of spin exchange can be very large, which facilitates the experimental realization of spin-ordered states. We find that spin and quantum fluctuations have a dramatic effect on the transition, making it first order in extended regions of the phase diagram. When each species is at integer filling, an additional phase transition may occur, from a spin-ordered insulator to a Mott insulator with no broken symmetries. We determine the phase boundaries in this regime and show that this is essentially a Mott transition in the spin sector

  6. Disordered ultracold atomic gases in optical lattices: A case study of Fermi-Bose mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahufinger, V.; Sanchez-Palencia, L.; Kantian, A.; Sanpera, A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2005-01-01

    We present a review of properties of ultracold atomic Fermi-Bose mixtures in inhomogeneous and random optical lattices. In the strong interacting limit and at very low temperatures, fermions form, together with bosons or bosonic holes, composite fermions. Composite fermions behave as a spinless interacting Fermi gas, and in the presence of local disorder they interact via random couplings and feel effective random local potential. This opens a wide variety of possibilities of realizing various kinds of ultracold quantum disordered systems. In this paper we review these possibilities, discuss the accessible quantum disordered phases, and methods for their detection. The discussed quantum phases include Fermi glasses, quantum spin glasses, 'dirty' superfluids, disordered metallic phases, and phases involving quantum percolation

  7. Slow quench dynamics of a one-dimensional Bose gas confined to an optical lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Jean-Sébastien; Roux, Guillaume; Kollath, Corinna

    2011-05-20

    We analyze the effect of a linear time variation of the interaction strength on a trapped one-dimensional Bose gas confined to an optical lattice. The evolution of different observables such as the experimentally accessible on site particle distribution are studied as a function of the ramp time by using time-dependent numerical techniques. We find that the dynamics of a trapped system typically displays two regimes: For long ramp times, the dynamics is governed by density redistribution, while at short ramp times, local dynamics dominates as the evolution is identical to that of an homogeneous system. In the homogeneous limit, we also discuss the nontrivial scaling of the energy absorbed with the ramp time.

  8. Quantum anomalous Hall phase in a one-dimensional optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng; Shao, L. B.; Hou, Qi-Zhe; Xue, Zheng-Yuan

    2018-03-01

    We propose to simulate and detect quantum anomalous Hall phase with ultracold atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice, with the other synthetic dimension being realized by modulating spin-orbit coupling. We show that the system manifests a topologically nontrivial phase with two chiral edge states which can be readily detected in this synthetic two-dimensional system. Moreover, it is interesting that at the phase transition point there is a flat energy band and this system can also be in a topologically nontrivial phase with two Fermi zero modes existing at the boundaries by considering the synthetic dimension as a modulated parameter. We also show how to measure these topological phases experimentally in ultracold atoms. Another model with a random Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling strength is also found to exhibit topological nontrivial phase, and the impact of the disorder to the system is revealed.

  9. Laser cooling of quasi-free atoms in a nondissipative optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveeva, N. A.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Tumaikin, A. M.; Yudin, V. I.

    2007-01-01

    A quasi-classical theory of laser cooling is applied to the analysis of cooling of unbound atoms with the angular momenta 1/2 in the ground and excited states in a one-dimensional nondissipative optical lattice. In the low-saturation limit with respect to the pumping field, the mechanisms of cooling can be interpreted within the framework of an effective two-level system of ground-state sublevels. In the limit of weak Raman transitions, the mechanism of cooling of unbound atoms is similar to the Doppler mechanism known in the theory of a two-level atom; in the limit of strong transitions, the mechanism of cooling is analogous to the well-known Sisyphys mechanism. In the slow-atom approximation, analytical expressions are obtained for the friction (drag) coefficient and the induced and spontaneous diffusion, and the kinetic temperature is estimated

  10. Physics Colloquium - Tight-binding in a new light: Photons in optical lattices

    CERN Multimedia

    Ecole de Physique - Université de Genève

    2011-01-01

    Geneva University Physics Department 24, Quai Ernest Ansermet CH-1211 Geneva 4   Lundi 21 mars 2011, 17h00 Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg Tight-binding in a new light: Photons in optical lattices Dr. Niels Madsen Department of Physics, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea, United Kingdom   Antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, has been produced at low energies at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) since 2002. Antihydrogen is of interest for use in a precision test of nature's fundamental symmetries. The charge conjugation/parity/time reversal (CPT) theorem, a crucial part of the foundation of the standard model of elementary particles and interactions, demands that hydrogen and antihydrogen have the same spectrum. Given the current experimental precision of measurements on the hydrogen atom, subjecting antihydrogen to rigorous spectroscopic examination would constitute a compelling, model-independent test of CPT. Antihydrogen co...

  11. Superfluidity of a dipolar Fermi gas in 2D optical lattices bilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho-Guardian, A.; Paredes, R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-12-15

    Ultracold Fermi molecules lying in 2D square optical lattices bilayers with its dipole moment perpendicularly aligned to the layers, having interlayer finite range s-wave interactions, are shown to form superfluid phases, both, in the Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer (BCS) regime of Cooper pairs, and in the condensate regime of bound dimeric molecules. We demonstrate this result using a functional integral scheme within the Ginzburg-Landau theory. For the deep Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) phase transition, we predict critical temperatures around 5 nK and 20 nK for {sup 23}Na{sup 40}K and OH molecules, which are within reach of current experiments [J. W. Park, S. Will and M. Zwierlein, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 205302 (2015)]. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Optical spectra of composite silver-porous silicon (Ag-pSi) nanostructure based periodical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amedome Min-Dianey, Kossi Aniya; Zhang, Hao-Chun; Brohi, Ali Anwar; Yu, Haiyan; Xia, Xinlin

    2018-03-01

    Numerical finite differential time domain (FDTD) tools were used in this study for predicting the optical characteristics through the nanostructure of composite silver-porous silicon (Ag-pSi) based periodical lattice. This is aimed at providing an interpretation of the optical spectra at known porosity in improvement of the light manipulating efficiency through a proposed structure. With boundary conditions correctly chosen, the numerical simulation was achieved using FDTD Lumerical solutions. This was used to investigate the effect of porosity and the number of layers on the reflection, transmission and absorption characteristics through a proposed structure in a visible wavelength range of 400-750 nm. The results revealed that the higher the number of layers, the lower the reflection. Also, the reflection increases with porosity increase. The transmission characteristics were the inverse to those found in the case of reflection spectra and optimum transmission was attained at high number of layers. Also, increase in porosity results in reduced transmission. Increase in porosity as well as in the number of layers led to an increase in absorption. Therefore, absorption into such structure can be enhanced by elevating the number of layers and the degree of porosity.

  13. Gate-tunable gigantic changes in lattice parameters and optical properties in VO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Masaki; Okuyama, Daisuke; Shibuya, Keisuke; Ogawa, Naoki; Hatano, Takafumi; Kawasaki, Masashi; Arima, Taka-Hisa; Iwasa, Yoshihiro; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2014-03-01

    The field-effect transistor provides an electrical switching function of current flowing through a channel surface by external gate voltage (VG). We recently reported that an electric-double-layer transistor (EDLT) based on vanadium dioxide (VO2) enables electrical switching of the metal-insulator phase transition, where the low-temperature insulating state can be completely switched to the metallic state by application of VG. Here we demonstrate that VO2-EDLT enables electrical switching of lattice parameters and optical properties as well as electrical current. We performed in-situ x-ray diffraction and optical transmission spectroscopy measurements, and found that the c-axis length and the infrared transmittance of VO2 can be significantly modulated by more than 1% and 40%, respectively, by application of VG. We emphasize that these distinguished features originate from the electric-field induced bulk phase transition available with VO2-EDLT. This work was supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) through its ``Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST Program).''

  14. On Variations in the Level of PER in Glial Clocks of Drosophila Optic Lobe and Its Negative Regulation by PDF Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górska-Andrzejak, Jolanta; Chwastek, Elżbieta M; Walkowicz, Lucyna; Witek, Kacper

    2018-01-01

    We show that the level of the core protein of the circadian clock Period (PER) expressed by glial peripheral oscillators depends on their location in the Drosophila optic lobe. It appears to be controlled by the ventral lateral neurons (LNvs) that release the circadian neurotransmitter Pigment Dispersing Factor (PDF). We demonstrate that glial cells of the distal medulla neuropil (dMnGl) that lie in the vicinity of the PDF-releasing terminals of the LNvs possess receptors for PDF (PDFRs) and express PER at significantly higher level than other types of glia. Surprisingly, the amplitude of PER molecular oscillations in dMnGl is increased twofold in PDF-free environment, that is in Pdf 0 mutants. The Pdf 0 mutants also reveal an increased level of glia-specific protein REPO in dMnGl. The photoreceptors of the compound eye (R-cells) of the PDF-null flies, on the other hand, exhibit de-synchrony of PER molecular oscillations, which manifests itself as increased variability of PER-specific immunofluorescence among the R-cells. Moreover, the daily pattern of expression of the presynaptic protein Bruchpilot (BRP) in the lamina terminals of the R-cells is changed in Pdf 0 mutant. Considering that PDFRs are also expressed by the marginal glia of the lamina that surround the R-cell terminals, the LNv pacemakers appear to be the likely modulators of molecular cycling in the peripheral clocks of both the glial cells and the photoreceptors of the compound eye. Consequently, some form of PDF-based coupling of the glial clocks and the photoreceptors of the eye with the central LNv pacemakers must be operational.

  15. Ultrahigh lattice thermal conductivity in topological semimetal TaN caused by a large acoustic-optical gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, San-Dong; Liu, Bang-Gui

    2018-03-01

    Topological semimetals may have potential applications such as in topological qubits, spintronics and quantum computations. Efficient heat dissipation is a key factor for the reliability and stability of topological semimetal-based nano-electronics devices, which is closely related to high thermal conductivity. In this work, the elastic properties and lattice thermal conductivity of TaN are investigated using first-principles calculations and the linearized phonon Boltzmann equation within the single-mode relaxation time approximation. According to the calculated bulk modulus, shear modulus and C 44, TaN can be regarded as a potential incompressible and hard material. The room-temperature lattice thermal conductivity is predicted to be 838.62 W~m-1~K^{-1} along the a axis and 1080.40 W~m-1~K^{-1} along the c axis, showing very strong anisotropy. It is found that the lattice thermal conductivity of TaN is several tens of times higher than other topological semimetals, such as TaAs, MoP and ZrTe, which is due to the very longer phonon lifetimes for TaN than other topological semimetals. The very different atomic masses of Ta and N atoms lead to a very large acoustic-optical band gap, and then prohibit the scattering between acoustic and optical phonon modes, which gives rise to very long phonon lifetimes. Calculated results show that isotope scattering has little effect on lattice thermal conductivity, and that phonons with mean free paths larger than 20 (80) μm along the c direction at 300 K have little contribution to the total lattice thermal conductivity. This work implies that TaN-based nano-electronics devices may be more stable and reliable due to efficient heat dissipation, and motivates further experimental works to study lattice thermal conductivity of TaN.

  16. Ultrahigh lattice thermal conductivity in topological semimetal TaN caused by a large acoustic-optical gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, San-Dong; Liu, Bang-Gui

    2018-03-14

    Topological semimetals may have potential applications such as in topological qubits, spintronics and quantum computations. Efficient heat dissipation is a key factor for the reliability and stability of topological semimetal-based nano-electronics devices, which is closely related to high thermal conductivity. In this work, the elastic properties and lattice thermal conductivity of TaN are investigated using first-principles calculations and the linearized phonon Boltzmann equation within the single-mode relaxation time approximation. According to the calculated bulk modulus, shear modulus and C 44 , TaN can be regarded as a potential incompressible and hard material. The room-temperature lattice thermal conductivity is predicted to be 838.62 [Formula: see text] along the a axis and 1080.40 [Formula: see text] along the c axis, showing very strong anisotropy. It is found that the lattice thermal conductivity of TaN is several tens of times higher than other topological semimetals, such as TaAs, MoP and ZrTe, which is due to the very longer phonon lifetimes for TaN than other topological semimetals. The very different atomic masses of Ta and N atoms lead to a very large acoustic-optical band gap, and then prohibit the scattering between acoustic and optical phonon modes, which gives rise to very long phonon lifetimes. Calculated results show that isotope scattering has little effect on lattice thermal conductivity, and that phonons with mean free paths larger than 20 (80) [Formula: see text] along the c direction at 300 K have little contribution to the total lattice thermal conductivity. This work implies that TaN-based nano-electronics devices may be more stable and reliable due to efficient heat dissipation, and motivates further experimental works to study lattice thermal conductivity of TaN.

  17. Mesoscopic effects in quantum phases of ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, L. D.; Schirmer, D. G.; Wall, M. L.; Brown, R. C.; Williams, J. E.; Clark, Charles W.

    2010-01-01

    We present a wide array of quantum measures on numerical solutions of one-dimensional Bose- and Fermi-Hubbard Hamiltonians for finite-size systems with open boundary conditions. Finite-size effects are highly relevant to ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices, where an external trap creates smaller effective regions in the form of the celebrated 'wedding cake' structure and the local density approximation is often not applicable. Specifically, for the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian we calculate number, quantum depletion, local von Neumann entropy, generalized entanglement or Q measure, fidelity, and fidelity susceptibility; for the Fermi-Hubbard Hamiltonian we also calculate the pairing correlations, magnetization, charge-density correlations, and antiferromagnetic structure factor. Our numerical method is imaginary time propagation via time-evolving block decimation. As part of our study we provide a careful comparison of canonical versus grand canonical ensembles and Gutzwiller versus entangled simulations. The most striking effect of finite size occurs for bosons: we observe a strong blurring of the tips of the Mott lobes accompanied by higher depletion, and show how the location of the first Mott lobe tip approaches the thermodynamic value as a function of system size.

  18. Nonlinear localized modes in dipolar Bose–Einstein condensates in two-dimensional optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas-Rojas, Santiago; Naether, Uta; Delgado, Aldo; Vicencio, Rodrigo A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We study discrete two-dimensional breathers in dipolar Bose–Einstein Condensates. • Important differences in the properties of three fundamental modes are found. • Norm threshold for existence of 2D breathers varies with dipolar interaction. • The Effective Potential Method is implemented for stability analysis. • Uncommon mobility of 2D discrete solitons is observed. - Abstract: We analyze the existence and properties of discrete localized excitations in a Bose–Einstein condensate loaded into a periodic two-dimensional optical lattice, when a dipolar interaction between atoms is present. The dependence of the Number of Atoms (Norm) on the energy of solutions is studied, along with their stability. Two important features of the system are shown, namely, the absence of the Norm threshold required for localized solutions to exist in finite 2D systems, and the existence of regions in the parameter space where two fundamental solutions are simultaneously unstable. This feature enables mobility of localized solutions, which is an uncommon feature in 2D discrete nonlinear systems. With attractive dipolar interaction, a non-trivial behavior of the Norm dependence is obtained, which is well described by an analytical model.

  19. Nonlinear localized modes in dipolar Bose–Einstein condensates in two-dimensional optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas-Rojas, Santiago, E-mail: srojas@cefop.cl [Center for Optics and Photonics and MSI-Nucleus on Advanced Optics, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Naether, Uta [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón and Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Delgado, Aldo [Center for Optics and Photonics and MSI-Nucleus on Advanced Optics, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Vicencio, Rodrigo A. [Center for Optics and Photonics and MSI-Nucleus on Advanced Optics, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    2016-09-16

    Highlights: • We study discrete two-dimensional breathers in dipolar Bose–Einstein Condensates. • Important differences in the properties of three fundamental modes are found. • Norm threshold for existence of 2D breathers varies with dipolar interaction. • The Effective Potential Method is implemented for stability analysis. • Uncommon mobility of 2D discrete solitons is observed. - Abstract: We analyze the existence and properties of discrete localized excitations in a Bose–Einstein condensate loaded into a periodic two-dimensional optical lattice, when a dipolar interaction between atoms is present. The dependence of the Number of Atoms (Norm) on the energy of solutions is studied, along with their stability. Two important features of the system are shown, namely, the absence of the Norm threshold required for localized solutions to exist in finite 2D systems, and the existence of regions in the parameter space where two fundamental solutions are simultaneously unstable. This feature enables mobility of localized solutions, which is an uncommon feature in 2D discrete nonlinear systems. With attractive dipolar interaction, a non-trivial behavior of the Norm dependence is obtained, which is well described by an analytical model.

  20. Optical Lattice Bose-Einstein Condensates and the dd Fusion - Iwamura Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Talbot

    2003-03-01

    My conjecture: LENR dd fusion occurs in PdDx when a subset of the interstitial deuterons occupy tetrahedral sites in a PdDx crystallite. The tetrahedral deuterons(d's), which occupy shallow potential wells, behave as a superfluid, similar to ultracold Na atoms in shallow-well optical traps, as modeled by Jaksch et al.(D. Jaksch, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett., 81, 3108 (1998).) The tetrahedral d's form a deuteron (d) subsystem, which is neutralized by an electron subsystem containing an equal number of electrons. In the superfluid all the properties of each quasiparticle d are partitioned among N_s_i_te equivalent sites. The partitioning of the d point charge reduces the Coulomb self-repulsion within each quasiparticle pair, which causes wave function overlap at large N_s_i_t_e, allowing d-d fusion. Similarly, partitioning of the point charge of each single quasiparticle d reduces the Coulomb repulsion between it and an obstructing impurity atom, which causes wave function overlap between quasiparticle and atom at large N_s_i_t_e, allowing transmutation of the impurity atom. The Iwamura reaction(Y. Iwamura, et al, Japan J. of Appl. Physics, 41A, 4642 (2002).) is 4 ^2D^+_B_l_o_ch + 4 e^-_B_l_o_ch + ^1^3^3Cs arrow ^1^4^1Pr, with the reaction energy incoherently transferred to the lattice.

  1. Phase transitions and spin excitations of spin-1 bosons in optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min-Jie; Zhao, Bo

    2018-03-01

    For spin-1 bosonic system trapped in optical lattice, we investigate two main problems, including MI-SF phase transition and magnetic phase separations in MI phase, with extended standard basis operator (SBO) method. For both ferromagnetic (U2 0) systems, we analytically figure out the symmetry properties in Mott-insulator and superfluid phases, which would provide a deeper insight into the MI-SF phase transition process. Then by applying self-consistent approach to the method, we include the effect of quantum and thermal fluctuations and derive the MI-SF transition phase diagram, which is in quantitative agreement with recent Monte-Carlo simulation at zero temperature, and at finite temperature, we find the underestimation of finite-temperature-effect in the mean-field approximation method. If we further consider the spin excitations in the insulating states of spin-1 system in external field, distinct spin phases are expected. Therefore, in the Mott lobes with n = 1 and n = 2 atoms per site, we give analytical and numerical boundaries of the singlet, nematic, partially magnetic and ferromagnetic phases in the magnetic phase diagrams.

  2. Phase controlled metal–insulator transition in multi-leg quasiperiodic optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiti, Santanu K.; Sil, Shreekantha; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2017-01-01

    A tight-binding model of a multi-leg ladder network with a continuous quasiperiodic modulation in both the site potential and the inter-arm hopping integral is considered. The model mimics optical lattices where ultra-cold fermionic or bosonic atoms are trapped in double well potentials. It is observed that, the relative phase difference between the on-site potential and the inter-arm hopping integral, which can be controlled by the tuning of the interfering laser beams trapping the cold atoms, can result in a mixed spectrum of one or more absolutely continuous subband(s) and point like spectral measures. This opens up the possibility of a re-entrant metal–insulator transition. The subtle role played by the relative phase difference mentioned above is revealed, and we corroborate it numerically by working out the multi-channel electronic transmission for finite two-, and three-leg ladder networks. The extension of the calculation beyond the two-leg case is trivial, and is discussed in the work. - Graphical abstract: ▪ - Highlights: • Phase controlled metal–insulator transition is discussed. • An analytical prescription is given to understand MI transition. • Our work provides a way of designing experiments involving laser beams.

  3. Symmetry breaking in a localized interacting binary Bose-Einstein condensate in a bichromatic optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Yongshan; Adhikari, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    By direct numerical simulation of the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation using the split-step Fourier spectral method, we study different aspects of the localization of a cigar-shaped interacting binary (two-component) Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in a one-dimensional bichromatic quasiperiodic optical-lattice potential, as used in a recent experiment on the localization of a BEC [Roati et al., Nature 453, 895 (2008)]. We consider two types of localized states: (i) when both localized components have a maximum of density at the origin x=0, and (ii) when the first component has a maximum of density and the second a minimum of density at x=0. In the noninteracting case, the density profiles are symmetric around x=0. We numerically study the breakdown of this symmetry due to interspecies and intraspecies interactions acting on the two components. Where possible, we have compared the numerical results with a time-dependent variational analysis. We also demonstrate the stability of the localized symmetry-broken BEC states under small perturbation.

  4. ``Trickle Meter Gravimetry'': Precision Interferometry from Residual Berry Phase Edge Effects Involving Atoms Exiting an Accelerating Optical Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Scott

    2007-03-01

    From a generalization of conventional band theory, derived from a many-body form of multiple scattering theory, I rigorously showed that the semi-classical theory of cold atom transport in optical lattices could be related to changes in the zero of momentum of the ground state. The new formulation includes finite size effects. When the effects of excitation, associated with the loss of atoms at the boundaries of the lattice are included, in the adiabatic limit, in which the perturbing potential acts sufficiently slowly and weakly, topological changes in phase (which are equivalent to Berry phase effects in the conventional semi-classical theory) take place that introduce discontinuous changes in wave function phase (and flux). In a situation involving an accelerating optical lattice, containing ultra cold atoms in a Bose Einstein Condensate, these changes in wave function phase can be monitored and used to systematically alter the acceleration of the lattice (by altering the chirp frequency of one of one of the counter-propogating lasers), in such a way that a form of edge-effect interferometry can be performed, which, in principle, can be used to make precision measurements of gravity, with unprecedented accuracy. S.R.Chubb, Proc Roy Soc A, submitted (2006).

  5. Enhanced optical spin current injection in the hexagonal lattice with intrinsic and Rashba spin–orbit interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Jianfei, E-mail: zoujianfei@hhu.edu.cn; Tang, Chunmei; Zhang, Aimei

    2017-04-04

    We study the photo-induced spin current injection in a hexagonal lattice with both intrinsic and Rashba spin–orbit interactions which is irradiated by a polarized light beam. It is found that the spin current injection rate could be enhanced as the graphene lattice is in the topological insulator state. Furthermore, the spin current injection rate could be remarkably modulated by the degree of polarization of light and its frequency. - Highlights: • The optical spin current could be enhanced by the intrinsic spin–orbit interaction. • The optical spin current could be modulated by the degree of polarization of light. • The maximum of the spin current injection rate is obtained.

  6. Expansion of a Bose-Einstein condensate formed on a joint harmonic and one-dimensional optical-lattice potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, Sadhan K

    2003-01-01

    We study the expansion of a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped in a combined optical-lattice and axially-symmetric harmonic potential using the numerical solution of the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii equation. First, we consider the expansion of such a condensate under the action of the optical-lattice potential alone. In this case the result of numerical simulation for the axial and radial sizes during expansion is in agreement with two experiments by Morsch et al (2002 Phys. Rev. A 66 021601(R) and 2003 Laser Phys. 13 594). Finally, we consider the expansion under the action of the harmonic potential alone. In this case the oscillation, and the disappearance and revival of the resultant interference pattern is in agreement with the experiment by Mueller et al (2003 J. Opt. B: Quantum Semiclass. Opt. 5 S38)

  7. Trapped ultracold molecular ions: candidates for an optical molecular clock for a fundamental physics mission in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, B.; Koelemeij, J.; Daerr, H.; Ernsting, I.; Jorgensen, S.; Okhapkin, M.; Wicht, A.; Nevsky, A.; Schiller, S.

    2017-11-01

    Narrow ro-vibrational transitions in ultracold molecules are excellent candidates for frequency references in the near-IR to visible spectral domain and interesting systems for fundamental tests of physics, in particular for a satellite test of the gravitational redshift of clocks. We have performed laser spectroscopy of several ro-vibrational overtone transitions υ = 0 → υ = 4 in HD+ ions at around 1.4 μm. 1+1 REMPD was used as a detection method, followed by measurement of the number of remaining molecules. The molecular ions were stored in a linear radiofrequency trap and cooled to millikelvin temperatures, by sympathetic cooling using laser-cooled Be+ ions simultaneously stored in the same trap.

  8. Ultracold bosons in a one-dimensional optical lattice chain: Newton's cradle and Bose enhancement effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ji-Guo; Yang, Shi-Jie, E-mail: yangshijie@tsinghua.org.cn

    2017-05-18

    We study a model to realize the long-distance correlated tunneling of ultracold bosons in a one-dimensional optical lattice chain. The model reveals the behavior of a quantum Newton's cradle, which is the perfect transfer between two macroscopic quantum states. Due to the Bose enhancement effect, we find that the resonantly tunneling through a Mott domain is greatly enhanced.

  9. Energetic and dynamical instability of spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate in a deep optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zi-Fa; Chai, Xu-Dan; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the energetic and dynamical instability of spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate in a deep optical lattice via a tight-binding model. The stability phase diagram is completely revealed in full parameter space, while the dependence of superfluidity on the dispersion relation is illustrated explicitly. In the absence of spin-orbit coupling, the superfluidity only exists in the center of the Brillouin zone. However, the combination of spin-orbit coupling, Zeeman field, nonlinearity and optical lattice potential can modify the dispersion relation of the system, and change the position of Brillouin zone for generating the superfluidity. Thus, the superfluidity can appear in either the center or the other position of the Brillouin zone. Namely, in the center of the Brillouin zone, the system is either superfluid or Landau unstable, which depends on the momentum of the lowest energy. Therefore, the superfluidity can occur at optional position of the Brillouin zone by elaborating spin-orbit coupling, Zeeman splitting, nonlinearity and optical lattice potential. For the linear case, the system is always dynamically stable, however, the nonlinearity can induce the dynamical instability, and also expand the superfluid region. These predicted results can provide a theoretical evidence for exploring the superfluidity of the system experimentally.

  10. Two Clock Transitions in Neutral Yb for the Highest Sensitivity to Variations of the Fine-Structure Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronova, Marianna S.; Porsev, Sergey G.; Sanner, Christian; Ye, Jun

    2018-04-01

    We propose a new frequency standard based on a 4 f146 s 6 p P0 3 -4 f136 s25 d (J =2 ) transition in neutral Yb. This transition has a potential for high stability and accuracy and the advantage of the highest sensitivity among atomic clocks to variation of the fine-structure constant α . We find its dimensionless α -variation enhancement factor to be K =-15 , in comparison to the most sensitive current clock (Yb+ E 3 , K =-6 ), and it is 18 times larger than in any neutral-atomic clocks (Hg, K =0.8 ). Combined with the unprecedented stability of an optical lattice clock for neutral atoms, this high sensitivity opens new perspectives for searches for ultralight dark matter and for tests of theories beyond the standard model of elementary particles. Moreover, together with the well-established 1S0-3P0 transition, one will have two clock transitions operating in neutral Yb, whose interleaved interrogations may further reduce systematic uncertainties of such clock-comparison experiments.

  11. Relativistic Ideal Clock

    OpenAIRE

    Bratek, Łukasz

    2015-01-01

    Two particularly simple ideal clocks exhibiting intrinsic circular motion with the speed of light and opposite spin alignment are described. The clocks are singled out by singularities of an inverse Legendre transformation for relativistic rotators of which mass and spin are fixed parameters. Such clocks work always the same way, no matter how they move. When subject to high accelerations or falling in strong gravitational fields of black holes, the clocks could be used to test the clock hypo...

  12. 2D surface optical lattice formed by plasmon polaritons with application to nanometer-scale molecular deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yanning; Xu, Supeng; Li, Tao; Yin, Yaling; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jianping

    2017-08-10

    Surface plasmon polaritons, due to their tight spatial confinement and high local intensity, hold great promises in nanofabrication which is beyond the diffraction limit of conventional lithography. Here, we demonstrate theoretically the 2D surface optical lattices based on the surface plasmon polariton interference field, and the potential application to nanometer-scale molecular deposition. We present the different topologies of lattices generated by simple configurations on the substrate. By explicit theoretical derivations, we explain their formation and characteristics including field distribution, periodicity and phase dependence. We conclude that the topologies can not only possess a high stability, but also be dynamically manipulated via changing the polarization of the excitation laser. Nanometer-scale molecular deposition is simulated with these 2D lattices and discussed for improving the deposition resolution. The periodic lattice point with a width resolution of 33.2 nm can be obtained when the fullerene molecular beam is well-collimated. Our study can offer a superior alternative method to fabricate the spatially complicated 2D nanostructures, with the deposition array pitch serving as a reference standard for accurate and traceable metrology of the SI length standard.

  13. High-precision multiband spectroscopy of ultracold fermions in a nonseparable optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fläschner, Nick; Tarnowski, Matthias; Rem, Benno S.; Vogel, Dominik; Sengstock, Klaus; Weitenberg, Christof

    2018-05-01

    Spectroscopic tools are fundamental for the understanding of complex quantum systems. Here, we demonstrate high-precision multiband spectroscopy in a graphenelike lattice using ultracold fermionic atoms. From the measured band structure, we characterize the underlying lattice potential with a relative error of 1.2 ×10-3 . Such a precise characterization of complex lattice potentials is an important step towards precision measurements of quantum many-body systems. Furthermore, we explain the excitation strengths into different bands with a model and experimentally study their dependency on the symmetry of the perturbation operator. This insight suggests the excitation strengths as a suitable observable for interaction effects on the eigenstates.

  14. A coherent free space optical link for long distance clock comparison, navigation, and communication: The Mini-Doll project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djerroud, K.; Samain, E.; Clairon, A.; Acef, O.; Man, N.; Lemonde, P.; Wolf, P.

    2017-11-01

    We describe the realization of a 5 km free space coherent optical link through the turbulent atmosphere between a telescope and a ground target. We present the phase noise of the link, limited mainly by atmospheric turbulence and mechanical vibrations of the telescope and the target. We discuss the implications of our results for applications, with particular emphasis on optical Doppler ranging to satellites and long distance frequency transfer.

  15. Could Atomic clocks be affected by neutrinos?

    CERN Document Server

    Hanafi, Hanaa

    2016-01-01

    An atomic clock is a clock device that uses an electronic transition frequency of the electromagnetic spectrum of atoms as a frequency standard in order to derive a time standard since time is the reciprocal of frequency. If the electronic transition frequencies are in an "optical region", we are talking in this case about optical atomic clocks. If they are in an "microwave region" these atomic clocks are made of the metallic element cesium so they are called Cesium atomic clocks. Atomic clocks are the most accurate time and frequency standards known despite the different perturbations that can affect them, a lot of researches were made in this domain to show how the transitions can be different for different type of perturbations..Since atomic clocks are very sensitive devices, based on coherent states (A coherent state tends to loose coherence after interacting). One question can arise (from a lot of questions) which is why cosmic neutrinos are not affecting these clocks? The answer to this question requir...

  16. Lego clocks: building a clock from parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Michael; Simons, Mirre J P; Merrow, Martha

    2008-06-01

    A new finding opens up speculation that the molecular mechanism of circadian clocks in Synechococcus elongatus is composed of multiple oscillator systems (Kitayama and colleagues, this issue, pp. 1513-1521), as has been described in many eukaryotic clock model systems. However, an alternative intepretation is that the pacemaker mechanism-as previously suggested-lies primarily in the rate of ATP hydrolysis by the clock protein KaiC.

  17. Large Differences in the Optical Spectrum Associated with the Same Complex: The Effect of the Anisotropy of the Embedding Lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aramburu, José Antonio; García-Fernández, Pablo; García Lastra, Juan Maria

    2017-01-01

    of the electric field created by the rest of lattice ions over the complex. To illustrate this concept we analyze the origin of the surprisingly large differences in the d–d optical transitions of two systems containing square-planar CuF42– complexes, CaCuF4, and center II in Cu2+-doped Ba2ZnF6, even though...... the Cu2+–F–distance difference is just found to be 1%. Using a minimalist first-principles model we show that the different morphology of the host lattices creates an anisotropic field that red-shifts the in vacuo complex transitions to the 1.25–1.70 eV range in CaCuF4, while it blue-shifts them to the 1...

  18. Propagation of optical vortex beams and nucleation of vortex-antivortex pairs in disordered nonlinear photonic lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yeong-Kwon; Kim, Ki-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The propagation of optical vortex beams through disordered nonlinear photonic lattices is numerically studied. The vortex beams are generated by using a superposition of several Gaussian laser beams arranged in a radially-symmetric manner. The paraxial nonlinear Schroedinger equation describing the longitudinal propagation of the beam array through nonlinear triangular photonic lattices with two-dimensional disorder is solved numerically by using the split-step Fourier method. We find that due to the spatial disorder, the vortex beam is destabilized after propagating a finite distance and new vortex-antivortex pairs are nucleated at the positions of perfect destructive interference. We also find that in the presence of a self-focusing nonlinearity, the vortex-antivortex pair nucleation is suppressed and the vortex beam becomes more stable, while a self-defocusing nonlinearity enhances the vortex-antivortex pair nucleation.

  19. Matter-wave interference, Josephson oscillation and its disruption in a Bose-Einstein condensate on an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, Sadhan K.

    2004-01-01

    Using the axially-symmetric time-dependent mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii equation we study the Josephson oscillation in a repulsive Bose-Einstein condensate trapped by a harmonic plus an one-dimensional optical-lattice potential to describe the experiments by Cataliotti et al. [Science 293 (2001) 843, New J. Phys. 5 (2003) 71.1]. After a study of the formation of matter-wave interference upon releasing the condensate from the optical trap, we directly investigate the alternating atomic superfluid Josephson current upon displacing the harmonic trap along the optical axis. The Josephson current is found to be disrupted upon displacing the harmonic trap through a distance greater than a critical distance signaling a superfluid to a classical insulator transition in the condensate

  20. Towards Self-Clocked Gated OCDMA Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, S.; Osadola, T.; Glesk, I.

    2013-02-01

    A novel incoherent OCDMA receiver with incorporated all-optical clock recovery for self-synchronization of a time gate for the multi access interferences (MAI) suppression and minimizing the effect of data time jitter in incoherent OCDMA system was successfully developed and demonstrated. The solution was implemented and tested in a multiuser environment in an out of the laboratory OCDMA testbed with two-dimensional wavelength-hopping time-spreading coding scheme and OC-48 (2.5 Gbp/s) data rate. The self-clocked all-optical time gate uses SOA-based fibre ring laser optical clock, recovered all-optically from the received OCDMA traffic to control its switching window for cleaning the autocorrelation peak from the surrounding MAI. A wider eye opening was achieved when the all-optically recovered clock from received data was used for synchronization if compared to a static approach with the RF clock being generated by a RF synthesizer. Clean eye diagram was also achieved when recovered clock is used to drive time gating.

  1. Open quantum spin systems in semiconductor quantum dots and atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwager, Heike

    2012-07-04

    In this Thesis, we study open quantum spin systems from different perspectives. The first part is motivated by technological challenges of quantum computation. An important building block for quantum computation and quantum communication networks is an interface between material qubits for storage and data processing and travelling photonic qubits for communication. We propose the realisation of a quantum interface between a travelling-wave light field and the nuclear spins in a quantum dot strongly coupled to a cavity. Our scheme is robust against cavity decay as it uses the decay of the cavity to achieve the coupling between nuclear spins and the travelling-wave light fields. A prerequiste for such a quantum interface is a highly polarized ensemble of nuclear spins. High polarization of the nuclear spin ensemble is moreover highly desirable as it protects the potential electron spin qubit from decoherence. Here we present the theoretical description of an experiment in which highly asymmetric dynamic nuclear spin pumping is observed in a single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot. The second part of this Thesis is devoted to fundamental studies of dissipative spin systems. We study general one-dimensional spin chains under dissipation and propose a scheme to realize a quantum spin system using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice in which both coherent interaction and dissipation can be engineered and controlled. This system enables the study of non-equilibrium and steady state physics of open and driven spin systems. We find, that the steady state expectation values of different spin models exhibit discontinuous behaviour at degeneracy points of the Hamiltonian in the limit of weak dissipation. This effect can be used to dissipatively probe the spectrum of the Hamiltonian. We moreover study spin models under the aspect of state preparation and show that dissipation drives certain spin models into highly entangled state. Finally, we study a spin chain with

  2. Open quantum spin systems in semiconductor quantum dots and atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwager, Heike

    2012-01-01

    In this Thesis, we study open quantum spin systems from different perspectives. The first part is motivated by technological challenges of quantum computation. An important building block for quantum computation and quantum communication networks is an interface between material qubits for storage and data processing and travelling photonic qubits for communication. We propose the realisation of a quantum interface between a travelling-wave light field and the nuclear spins in a quantum dot strongly coupled to a cavity. Our scheme is robust against cavity decay as it uses the decay of the cavity to achieve the coupling between nuclear spins and the travelling-wave light fields. A prerequiste for such a quantum interface is a highly polarized ensemble of nuclear spins. High polarization of the nuclear spin ensemble is moreover highly desirable as it protects the potential electron spin qubit from decoherence. Here we present the theoretical description of an experiment in which highly asymmetric dynamic nuclear spin pumping is observed in a single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot. The second part of this Thesis is devoted to fundamental studies of dissipative spin systems. We study general one-dimensional spin chains under dissipation and propose a scheme to realize a quantum spin system using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice in which both coherent interaction and dissipation can be engineered and controlled. This system enables the study of non-equilibrium and steady state physics of open and driven spin systems. We find, that the steady state expectation values of different spin models exhibit discontinuous behaviour at degeneracy points of the Hamiltonian in the limit of weak dissipation. This effect can be used to dissipatively probe the spectrum of the Hamiltonian. We moreover study spin models under the aspect of state preparation and show that dissipation drives certain spin models into highly entangled state. Finally, we study a spin chain with

  3. LBNE lattice and optics for proton extraction at MI-10 and transport to a target above grade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnstone, John A.

    2011-01-01

    For the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) at Fermilab 120 GeV/c protons will be transported from the Main Injector (MI) to an on-site production target. The lattice design and optics discussed here has the beam extracted vertically upwards from MI-10 and the keeps the majority of the line at an elevation above the glacial till/rock interface and terminates on a target at 10 ft above grade. The LBNE beamline discussed here is a modular optics design comprised of 3 distinct lattice configurations, including the specialized MI → LBNE matching section and Final Focus. The remainder of the line is defined by six FODO cells, in which the length and phase advance are chosen specifically such that beam size does not exceed that of the MI while also making the most efficient use of space for achromatic insertions. Dispersion generated by variations in the beam trajectory are corrected locally and can not bleed out to corrupt the optics elsewhere in the line. Aperture studies indicate that the line should be able to transport the worst quality beam that the Main Injector might provide. New IDS dipole correctors located at every focusing center provide high-quality orbit control and further ensure that LBNE meets the stringent requirements for environmental protection.

  4. Intensity-modulated polarizabilities and magic trapping of alkali-metal and divalent atoms in infrared optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcu, Turker; Derevianko, Andrei

    2014-05-01

    Long range interactions between neutral Rydberg atoms has emerged as a potential means for implementing quantum logical gates. These experiments utilize hyperfine manifold of ground state atoms to act as a qubit basis, while exploiting the Rydberg blockade mechanism to mediate conditional quantum logic. The necessity for overcoming several sources of decoherence makes magic wavelength trapping in optical lattices an indispensable tool for gate experiments. The common wisdom is that atoms in Rydberg states see trapping potentials that are essentially that of a free electron, and can only be trapped at laser intensity minima. We show that although the polarizability of a Rydberg state is always negative, the optical potential can be both attractive or repulsive at long wavelengths (up to ~104 nm). This opens up the possibility of magic trapping Rydberg states with ground state atoms in optical lattices, thereby eliminating the necessity to turn off trapping fields during gate operations. Because the wavelengths are near the CO2 laser band, the photon scattering and the ensuing motional heating is also reduced compared to conventional traps near low lying resonances, alleviating an important source of decoherence. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant No. PHY-1212482.

  5. Experimental measurement of efficiency and transport coherence of a cold-atom Brownian motor in optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelan, M; Hagman, H; Labaigt, G; Jonsell, S; Dion, C M

    2011-02-01

    The rectification of noise into directed movement or useful energy is utilized by many different systems. The peculiar nature of the energy source and conceptual differences between such Brownian motor systems makes a characterization of the performance far from straightforward. In this work, where the Brownian motor consists of atoms interacting with dissipative optical lattices, we adopt existing theory and present experimental measurements for both the efficiency and the transport coherence. We achieve up to 0.3% for the efficiency and 0.01 for the Péclet number.

  6. Symmetry breaking states of Bose-Einstein condensates in 1D double square well and optical lattice well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Qingxin; Ding Guohui

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the phenomena of symmetry breaking and phase transition in the ground state of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). For BECs trapped in a double square well potential, we present symmetric and asymmetric ground states by using standing-wave expansion method. For BECs trapped in an optical lattice well potential (created by a standing laser wave, and not just an extension of the double square well potential), we reveal a phase transition by using plane-wave expansion method. At the same time we also study the ground state properties with changing the depth of potential and atomic interactions (restrict ourselves to the attractive regime)

  7. Dissipation-Managed Bright Soliton in a 1D Bose-Einstein Condensate in an Optical-Lattice Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Zheng; Yu Huiyou; Ao Shengmei; Yan Jiaren

    2010-01-01

    We study the formation of a dynamically-stabilized dissipation-managed bright soliton in a quasi-one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate by including an imaginary three-body recombination loss term and an imaginary linear feeding one in the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, trapped in a shallow optical-lattice potential. Based on the direct approach of perturbation theory for the nonlinear Schroedinger equation, we demonstrate that the height (as well as width) of bright soliton may have little change through selecting experimental parameters. (general)

  8. Design and optical characterization of high-Q guided-resonance modes in the slot-graphite photonic crystal lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Luis Javier; Huang, Ningfeng; Ma, Jing; Lin, Chenxi; Jaquay, Eric; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2013-12-16

    A new photonic crystal structure is generated by using a regular graphite lattice as the base and adding a slot in the center of each unit cell to enhance field confinement. The theoretical Q factor in an ideal structure is over 4 × 10(5). The structure was fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator wafer and optically characterized by transmission spectroscopy. The resonance wavelength and quality factor were measured as a function of slot height. The measured trends show good agreement with simulation.

  9. Matter waves of Bose-Fermi mixtures in one-dimensional optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bludov, Yu. V.; Santhanam, J.; Kenkre, V. M.; Konotop, V. V.

    2006-01-01

    We describe solitary wave excitations in a Bose-Fermi mixture loaded in a one-dimensional and strongly elongated lattice. We focus on the mean-field theory under the condition that the fermion number significantly exceeds the boson number, and limit our consideration to lattice amplitudes corresponding to the order of a few recoil energies or less. In such a case, the fermionic atoms display 'metallic' behavior and are well-described by the effective mass approximation. After classifying the relevant cases, we concentrate on gap solitons and coupled gap solitons in the two limiting cases of large and small fermion density, respectively. In the former, the fermionic atoms are distributed almost homogeneously and thus can move freely along the lattice. In the latter, the fermionic density becomes negligible in the potential maxima, and this leads to negligible fermionic current in the linear regime

  10. First Considerations on Beam Optics and Lattice Design for the Future Hadron-Hadron Collider FCC

    CERN Document Server

    Alemany Fernandez, R

    2014-01-01

    The present document explains the steps carried out in order to make the first design of the Future Hadron-Hadron Collider (FCC-hh) following the base line parameters that can be found in [1]. Two lattice layouts are presented, a ring collider with 12 arcs and 12 straight sections, four of them designed as interaction points, and a racetrack like collider with two arcs and two straight sections, each of them equipped with two interaction points. The lattice design presented in the paper is modular allowing the same modules be used for both layouts. The present document addresses as well the beta star reach at the interaction points.

  11. Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice with Raman-assisted two-dimensional spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jian-Song; Zhang, Wei; Yi, Wei; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-10-01

    In a recent experiment (Z. Wu, L. Zhang, W. Sun, X.-T. Xu, B.-Z. Wang, S.-C. Ji, Y. Deng, S. Chen, X.-J. Liu, and J.-W. Pan, arXiv:1511.08170 [cond-mat.quant-gas]), a Raman-assisted two-dimensional spin-orbit coupling has been realized for a Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice potential. In light of this exciting progress, we study in detail key properties of the system. As the Raman lasers inevitably couple atoms to high-lying bands, the behaviors of the system in both the single- and many-particle sectors are significantly affected. In particular, the high-band effects enhance the plane-wave phase and lead to the emergence of "roton" gaps at low Zeeman fields. Furthermore, we identify high-band-induced topological phase boundaries in both the single-particle and the quasiparticle spectra. We then derive an effective two-band model, which captures the high-band physics in the experimentally relevant regime. Our results not only offer valuable insights into the two-dimensional lattice spin-orbit coupling, but also provide a systematic formalism to model high-band effects in lattice systems with Raman-assisted spin-orbit couplings.

  12. Production and manipulation of wave packets from ultracold atoms in an optical lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Poul Lindholm; Gajdacz, Miroslav; Winter, Nils

    2013-01-01

    of the system. The modulation technique also allows for a controllable transfer (deexcitation) of atoms from such wave packets to a state bound by the lattice. Thus, it acts as a beam splitter for matter waves that can selectively address different bands, enabling the preparation of atoms in localized states...

  13. Ultrafast electron, lattice and spin dynamics on rare earth metal surfaces. Investigated with linear and nonlinear optical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, I.E.

    2006-03-15

    This thesis presents the femtosecond laser-induced electron, lattice and spin dynamics on two representative rare-earth systems: The ferromagnetic gadolinium Gd(0001) and the paramagnetic yttrium Y(0001) metals. The employed investigation tools are the time-resolved linear reflectivity and second-harmonic generation, which provide complementary information about the bulk and surface/interface dynamics, respectively. The femtosecond laser excitation of the exchange-split surface state of Gd(0001) triggers simultaneously the coherent vibrational dynamics of the lattice and spin subsystems in the surface region at a frequency of 3 THz. The coherent optical phonon corresponds to the vibration of the topmost atomic layer against the underlying bulk along the normal direction to the surface. The coupling mechanism between phonons and magnons is attributed to the modulation of the exchange interaction J between neighbour atoms due to the coherent lattice vibration. This leads to an oscillatory motion of the magnetic moments having the same frequency as the lattice vibration. Thus these results reveal a new type of phonon-magnon coupling mediated by the modulation of the exchange interaction and not by the conventional spin-orbit interaction. Moreover, we show that coherent spin dynamics in the THz frequency domain is achievable, which is at least one order of magnitude faster than previously reported. The laser-induced (de)magnetization dynamics of the ferromagnetic Gd(0001) thin films have been studied. Upon photo-excitation, the nonlinear magneto-optics measurements performed in this work show a sudden drop in the spin polarization of the surface state by more than 50% in a <100 fs time interval. Under comparable experimental conditions, the time-resolved photoemission studies reveal a constant exchange splitting of the surface state. The ultrafast decrease of spin polarization can be explained by the quasi-elastic spin-flip scattering of the hot electrons among spin

  14. Quantum measurement-induced dynamics of many-body ultracold bosonic and fermionic systems in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzucchi, Gabriel; Kozlowski, Wojciech; Caballero-Benitez, Santiago F.; Elliott, Thomas J.; Mekhov, Igor B.

    2016-02-01

    Trapping ultracold atoms in optical lattices enabled numerous breakthroughs uniting several disciplines. Coupling these systems to quantized light leads to a plethora of new phenomena and has opened up a new field of study. Here we introduce an unusual additional source of competition in a many-body strongly correlated system: We prove that quantum backaction of global measurement is able to efficiently compete with intrinsic short-range dynamics of an atomic system. The competition becomes possible due to the ability to change the spatial profile of a global measurement at a microscopic scale comparable to the lattice period without the need of single site addressing. In coherence with a general physical concept, where new competitions typically lead to new phenomena, we demonstrate nontrivial dynamical effects such as large-scale multimode oscillations, long-range entanglement, and correlated tunneling, as well as selective suppression and enhancement of dynamical processes beyond the projective limit of the quantum Zeno effect. We demonstrate both the breakup and protection of strongly interacting fermion pairs by measurement. Such a quantum optical approach introduces into many-body physics novel processes, objects, and methods of quantum engineering, including the design of many-body entangled environments for open systems.

  15. Quantum-optical magnets with competing short- and long-range interactions: Rydberg-dressed spin lattice in an optical cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Gelhausen, Michael Buchhold, Achim Rosch, Philipp Strack

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The fields of quantum simulation with cold atoms [1] and quantum optics [2] are currently being merged. In a set of recent pathbreaking experiments with atoms in optical cavities [3,4] lattice quantum many-body systems with both, a short-range interaction and a strong interaction potential of infinite range -mediated by a quantized optical light field- were realized. A theoretical modelling of these systems faces considerable complexity at the interface of: (i spontaneous symmetry-breaking and emergent phases of interacting many-body systems with a large number of atoms $N\\rightarrow\\infty$, (ii quantum optics and the dynamics of fluctuating light fields, and (iii non-equilibrium physics of driven, open quantum systems. Here we propose what is possibly the simplest, quantum-optical magnet with competing short- and long-range interactions, in which all three elements can be analyzed comprehensively: a Rydberg-dressed spin lattice [5] coherently coupled to a single photon mode. Solving a set of coupled even-odd sublattice Master equations for atomic spin and photon mean-field amplitudes, we find three key results. (R1: Superradiance and a coherent photon field can coexist with spontaneously broken magnetic translation symmetry. The latter is induced by the short-range nearest-neighbor interaction from weakly admixed Rydberg levels. (R2: This broken even-odd sublattice symmetry leaves its imprint in the light via a novel peak in the cavity spectrum beyond the conventional polariton modes. (R3: The combined effect of atomic spontaneous emission, drive, and interactions can lead to phases with anomalous photon number oscillations. Extensions of our work include nano-photonic crystals coupled to interacting atoms and multi-mode photon dynamics in Rydberg systems.

  16. Tunable spin-orbit coupling for ultracold atoms in two-dimensional optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grusdt, Fabian; Li, Tracy; Bloch, Immanuel; Demler, Eugene

    2017-06-01

    Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is at the heart of many exotic band structures and can give rise to many-body states with topological order. Here we present a general scheme based on a combination of microwave driving and lattice shaking for the realization of two-dimensional SOC with ultracold atoms in systems with inversion symmetry. We show that the strengths of Rashba and Dresselhaus SOC can be independently tuned in a spin-dependent square lattice. More generally, our method can be used to open gaps between different spin states without breaking time-reversal symmetry. We demonstrate that this allows for the realization of topological insulators with nontrivial spin textures closely related to the Kane-Mele model.

  17. Stable three-dimensional solitons in attractive Bose-Einstein condensates loaded in an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalache, D.; Mazilu, D.; Lederer, F.; Malomed, B.A.; Crasovan, L.-C.; Kartashov, Y.V.; Torner, L.

    2005-01-01

    The existence and stability of solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates with attractive interatomic interactions, described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation with a three-dimensional (3D) periodic potential, are investigated in a systematic form. We find a one-parameter family of stable 3D solitons in a certain interval of values of their norm, provided that the strength of the potential exceeds a threshold value. The minimum number of 7 Li atoms in the stable solitons is 60, and the energy of the soliton at the stability threshold is ≅6 recoil energies in the lattice. The respective energy versus norm diagram features two cuspidal points, resulting in a typical swallowtail pattern, which is a generic feature of 3D solitons supported by quasi-two-dimensional or fully dimensional lattice potentials

  18. Ultracold atoms in optical lattices simulating quantum many-body systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lewenstein, Maciej; Ahufinger, Verònica

    2012-01-01

    Quantum computers, though not yet available on the market, will revolutionize the future of information processing. Quantum computers for special purposes like quantum simulators are already within reach. The physics of ultracold atoms, ions and molecules offer unprecedented possibilities of control of quantum many body systems and novel possibilities of applications to quantum information processing and quantum metrology. Particularly fascinating is the possibility of usingultracold atoms in lattices to simulate condensed matter or even high energy physics.This book provides a complete and co

  19. GPS Composite Clock Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, James R.

    2008-01-01

    The GPS composite clock defines GPS time, the timescale used today in GPS operations. GPS time is illuminated by examination of its role in the complete estimation and control problem relative to UTC/TAI. The phase of each GPS clock is unobservable from GPS pseudorange measurements, and the mean phase of the GPS clock ensemble (GPS time) is unobservable. A new and useful observability definition is presented, together with new observability theorems, to demonstrate explicitly that GPS time is...

  20. Matter-wave solitons and finite-amplitude Bloch waves in optical lattices with spatially modulated nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie-Fang; Li, Yi-Shen; Meng, Jianping; Wu, Lei; Malomed, Boris A.

    2010-09-01

    We investigate solitons and nonlinear Bloch waves in Bose-Einstein condensates trapped in optical lattices (OLs). By introducing specially designed localized profiles of the spatial modulation of the attractive nonlinearity, we construct an infinite set of exact soliton solutions in terms of Mathieu and elliptic functions, with the chemical potential belonging to the semi-infinite gap of the OL-induced spectrum. Starting from the particular exact solutions, we employ the relaxation method to construct generic families of soliton solutions in a numerical form. The stability of the solitons is investigated through the computation of the eigenvalues for small perturbations, and also by direct simulations. Finally, we demonstrate a virtually exact (in the numerical sense) composition relation between nonlinear Bloch waves and solitons.

  1. Matter-wave solitons and finite-amplitude Bloch waves in optical lattices with spatially modulated nonlinearity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jiefang; Meng Jianping; Wu Lei; Li Yishen; Malomed, Boris A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate solitons and nonlinear Bloch waves in Bose-Einstein condensates trapped in optical lattices (OLs). By introducing specially designed localized profiles of the spatial modulation of the attractive nonlinearity, we construct an infinite set of exact soliton solutions in terms of Mathieu and elliptic functions, with the chemical potential belonging to the semi-infinite gap of the OL-induced spectrum. Starting from the particular exact solutions, we employ the relaxation method to construct generic families of soliton solutions in a numerical form. The stability of the solitons is investigated through the computation of the eigenvalues for small perturbations, and also by direct simulations. Finally, we demonstrate a virtually exact (in the numerical sense) composition relation between nonlinear Bloch waves and solitons.

  2. Modulational Instability and Quantum Discrete Breather States of Cold Bosonic Atoms in a Zig-Zag Optical Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xia; Xie, Jiayu; Wu, Tianle; Tang, Bing

    2018-07-01

    A theoretical study on modulational instability and quantum discrete breather states in a system of cold bosonic atoms in zig-zag optical lattices is presented in this work. The time-dependent Hartree approximation is employed to deal with the multiple body problem. By means of a linear stability analysis, we analytically study the modulational instability, and estimate existence conditions of the bright stationary localized solutions for different values of the second-neighbor hopping constant. On the other hand, we get analytical bright stationary localized solutions, and analyze the influence of the second-neighbor hopping on their existence conditions. The predictions of the modulational instability analysis are shown to be reliable. Using these stationary localized single-boson wave functions, the quantum breather states corresponding to the system with different types of nonlinearities are constructed.

  3. Dynamic behaviour of Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices with two- and three-body interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yan; Chen Yong; Zhang Kezhi

    2009-01-01

    We study the dynamic behaviour of Bose-Einstein condensates with two- and three-atom interactions in optical lattices with analytical and numerical methods. It is found that the steady-state relative population displays tuning-fork bifurcation when the system parameters are changed to certain critical values. In particular, the existence of the three-body interaction not only transforms the bifurcation point of the system but also greatly affects the macroscopic quantum self-trapping behaviours associated with the critically stable steady-state solution. In addition, we investigated the influence of the initial conditions, three-body interaction, and the energy bias on the macroscopic quantum self-trapping. Finally, by applying the periodic modulation on the energy bias, we observed that the relative population oscillation exhibits a process from order to chaos, via a series of period-doubling bifurcations.

  4. Mixed-symmetry localized modes and breathers in binary mixtures of Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, H. A.; Brazhnyi, V. A.; Konotop, V. V.; Alfimov, G. L.; Salerno, M.

    2007-01-01

    We study localized modes in binary mixtures of Bose-Einstein condensates embedded in one-dimensional optical lattices. We report a diversity of asymmetric modes and investigate their dynamics. We concentrate on the cases where one of the components is dominant, i.e., has a much larger number of atoms than the other one, and where both components have the numbers of atoms of the same order but different symmetries. In the first case we propose a method of systematically obtaining the modes, considering the ''small'' component as bifurcating from the continuum spectrum. A generalization of this approach combined with the use of the symmetry of the coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations allows for obtaining breather modes, which are also presented

  5. Disk-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates in the presence of an harmonic trap and an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapitula, Todd; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.

    2008-01-01

    We study the existence and stability of solutions of the two-dimensional nonlinear Schroedinger equation in the combined presence of a parabolic and a periodic potential. The motivating physical example consists of Bose-Einstein condensates confined in an harmonic (e.g., magnetic) trap and an optical lattice. By connecting the nonlinear problem with the underlying linear spectrum, we examine the bifurcation of nonlinear modes out of the linear ones for both focusing and defocusing nonlinearities. In particular, we find real-valued solutions (such as multipoles) and complex-valued ones (such as vortices). A primary motivation of the present work is to develop ''rules of thumb'' about what waveforms to expect emerging in the nonlinear problem and about the stability of those modes. As a case example of the latter, we find that among the real-valued solutions, the one with larger norm for a fixed value of the chemical potential is expected to be unstable

  6. Modulation of periodic field on the atomic current in optical lattices with Landau–Zener tunneling considered

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jie-Yun, E-mail: jyyan@bupt.edu.cn; Wang, Lan-Yu, E-mail: lan_yu_wang@163.com

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the atomic current in optical lattices under the presence of both constant and periodic external field with Landau–Zener tunneling considered. By simplifying the system to a two-band model, the atomic current is obtained based on the Boltzmann equations. We focus on three situations to discuss the influence of the Landau–Zener tunneling and periodic field on the atomic current. Numerical calculations show the atomic transient current would finally become the stable oscillation, whose amplitude and average value can be further adjusted by the periodic external field. It is concluded that the periodic external field could provide an effective modulation on the atomic current even when the Landau–Zener tunneling probability has almostly become a constant.

  7. Modulational Instability and Quantum Discrete Breather States of Cold Bosonic Atoms in a Zig-Zag Optical Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xia; Xie, Jiayu; Wu, Tianle; Tang, Bing

    2018-04-01

    A theoretical study on modulational instability and quantum discrete breather states in a system of cold bosonic atoms in zig-zag optical lattices is presented in this work. The time-dependent Hartree approximation is employed to deal with the multiple body problem. By means of a linear stability analysis, we analytically study the modulational instability, and estimate existence conditions of the bright stationary localized solutions for different values of the second-neighbor hopping constant. On the other hand, we get analytical bright stationary localized solutions, and analyze the influence of the second-neighbor hopping on their existence conditions. The predictions of the modulational instability analysis are shown to be reliable. Using these stationary localized single-boson wave functions, the quantum breather states corresponding to the system with different types of nonlinearities are constructed.

  8. Emerging bosons with three-body interactions from spin-1 atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazza, L.; Rizzi, M.; Cirac, J. I.; Lewenstein, M.

    2010-01-01

    We study two many-body systems of bosons interacting via an infinite three-body contact repulsion in a lattice: a pairs quasicondensate induced by correlated hopping and the discrete version of the Pfaffian wave function. We propose to experimentally realize systems characterized by such interaction by means of a proper spin-1 lattice Hamiltonian: spin degrees of freedom are locally mapped into occupation numbers of emerging bosons, in a fashion similar to spin-1/2 and hardcore bosons. Such a system can be realized with ultracold spin-1 atoms in a Mott insulator with a filling factor of 1. The high versatility of these setups allows us to engineer spin-hopping operators breaking the SU(2) symmetry, as needed to approximate interesting bosonic Hamiltonians with three-body hardcore constraint. For this purpose we combine bichromatic spin-independent superlattices and Raman transitions to induce a different hopping rate for each spin orientation. Finally, we illustrate how our setup could be used to experimentally realize the first setup, that is, the transition to a pairs quasicondensed phase of the emerging bosons. We also report on a route toward the realization of a discrete bosonic Pfaffian wave function and list some open problems for reaching this goal.

  9. Precision Clock Evaluation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Tests and evaluates high-precision atomic clocks for spacecraft, ground, and mobile applications. Supports performance evaluation, environmental testing,...

  10. Efficient Second Harmonic Generation in 3D Nonlinear Optical-Lattice-Like Cladding Waveguide Splitters by Femtosecond Laser Inscription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Weijie; Jia, Yuechen; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Chen, Feng

    2016-02-29

    Integrated photonic devices with beam splitting function are intriguing for a broad range of photonic applications. Through optical-lattice-like cladding waveguide structures fabricated by direct femtosecond laser writing, the light propagation can be engineered via the track-confined refractive index profiles, achieving tailored output beam distributions. In this work, we report on the fabrication of 3D laser-written optical-lattice-like structures in a nonlinear KTP crystal to implement 1 × 4 beam splitting. Second harmonic generation (SHG) of green light through these nonlinear waveguide beam splitter structures provides the capability for the compact visible laser emitting devices. With Type II phase matching of the fundamental wavelength (@ 1064 nm) to second harmonic waves (@ 532 nm), the frequency doubling has been achieved through this three-dimensional beam splitter. Under 1064-nm continuous-wave fundamental-wavelength pump beam, guided-wave SHG at 532 nm are measured with the maximum power of 0.65 mW and 0.48 mW for waveguide splitters (0.67 mW and 0.51 mW for corresponding straight channel waveguides), corresponding to a SH conversion efficiency of approximately ~14.3%/W and 13.9%/W (11.2%/W, 11.3%/W for corresponding straight channel waveguides), respectively. This work paves a way to fabricate compact integrated nonlinear photonic devices in a single chip with beam dividing functions.

  11. An Optomechanical Elevator: Transport of a Bloch Oscillating Bose–Einstein Condensate up and down an Optical Lattice by Cavity Sideband Amplification and Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Prasanna Venkatesh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we give a new description, in terms of optomechanics, of previous work on the problem of an atomic Bose–Einstein condensate interacting with the optical lattice inside a laser-pumped optical cavity and subject to a bias force, such as gravity. An atomic wave packet in a tilted lattice undergoes Bloch oscillations; in a high-finesse optical cavity the backaction of the atoms on the light leads to a time-dependent modulation of the intracavity lattice depth at the Bloch frequency which can in turn transport the atoms up or down the lattice. In the optomechanical picture, the transport dynamics can be interpreted as a manifestation of dynamical backaction-induced sideband damping/amplification of the Bloch oscillator. Depending on the sign of the pump-cavity detuning, atoms are transported either with or against the bias force accompanied by an up- or down-conversion of the frequency of the pump laser light. We also evaluate the prospects for using the optomechanical Bloch oscillator to make continuous measurements of forces by reading out the Bloch frequency. In this context, we establish the significant result that the optical spring effect is absent and the Bloch frequency is not modified by the backaction.

  12. Applied optics. Gain modulation by graphene plasmons in aperiodic lattice lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, S; Marshall, O P; Folland, T G; Kim, Y-J; Grigorenko, A N; Novoselov, K S

    2016-01-15

    Two-dimensional graphene plasmon-based technologies will enable the development of fast, compact, and inexpensive active photonic elements because, unlike plasmons in other materials, graphene plasmons can be tuned via the doping level. Such tuning is harnessed within terahertz quantum cascade lasers to reversibly alter their emission. This is achieved in two key steps: first, by exciting graphene plasmons within an aperiodic lattice laser and, second, by engineering photon lifetimes, linking graphene's Fermi energy with the round-trip gain. Modal gain and hence laser spectra are highly sensitive to the doping of an integrated, electrically controllable, graphene layer. Demonstration of the integrated graphene plasmon laser principle lays the foundation for a new generation of active, programmable plasmonic metamaterials with major implications across photonics, material sciences, and nanotechnology. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Narrow Line Cooling of 88Sr Atoms in the Magneto-optical Trap for Precision Frequency Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelkin, S. A.; Galyshev, A. A.; Berdasov, O. I.; Gribov, A. Yu.; Sutyrin, D. V.; Khabarova, K. Yu.; Kolachevsky, N. N.; Slyusarev, S. N.

    We report on our progress toward the realization of a Strontium optical lattice clock, which is under development at VNIIFTRI as a part of GLONASS program. We've prepared the narrow line width laser system for secondary cooling of 88Sr atoms which allows us to reach atom cloud temperature below 3 μK after second cooling stage.

  14. Egyptian "Star Clocks"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, Sarah

    Diagonal, transit, and Ramesside star clocks are tables of astronomical information occasionally found in ancient Egyptian temples, tombs, and papyri. The tables represent the motions of selected stars (decans and hour stars) throughout the Egyptian civil year. Analysis of star clocks leads to greater understanding of ancient Egyptian constellations, ritual astronomical activities, observational practices, and pharaonic chronology.

  15. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  16. A 2D Rods-in-Air Square-Lattice Photonic Crystal Optical Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    4] Tao Chu, Hirohito Yamada, Satomi Ishida, Yasuhiko Arakawa, Thermooptic switch based on photonic-crystal line-defect waveguides, IEEE Photon...Ishida, Yasuhiko Arakawa, Hiroyuki Fujita, Hiroshi Toshiyoshi, Design and fabrication on MEMS optical mod- ulators integrated with Phc waveguide, in

  17. Phase controllable dynamical localization of a quantum particle in a driven optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Navinder

    2012-01-01

    The Dunlap–Kenkre (DK) result states that dynamical localization of a driven quantum particle in a periodic lattice happens when the ratio of the field magnitude to the field frequency of the diagonal drive is a root of the ordinary Bessel function of order 0. This has been experimentally verified. A generalization of the DK result is presented here. The hitherto considered DK model contains only the diagonal forcing. In the present extended version of the DK model we consider both off-diagonal and diagonal driving fields with different frequencies and a definite relative phase between them. We analytically show that new dynamical localizations conditions exist where an important role is played by the relative phase. In appropriate limits our results reduce to DK result. -- Highlights: ► We give a generalization of the Dunlap–Kenkre result on dynamical localization. ► We consider the case of both off-diagonal and diagonal fields with a relative phase. ► We show that new dynamical localizations conditions exist. ► An important role is played by the hitherto neglected relative phase.

  18. [Study on Square Super-Lattice Pattern with Surface Discharge in Dielectric Barrier Discharge by Optical Emission Spectra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xue-jiao; Dong, Li-fang; Liu, Ying; Wang, Qian; Feng, Jian-yu

    2016-02-01

    Square super-lattice pattern with surface discharge consisting of central spots and dim spots is firstly observed in the mixture of argon and air by using a dielectric barrier discharge device with water electrodes. By observing the image, it is found that the central spot is located at the centriod of its surrounding four dim spots. The short-exposure image recorded by a high speed video camera shows that the dim spot results from the surface discharges (SDs). The brightness of the central spot and is quite different from that of the dim spot, which indicates that the plasma states of the central spot and the dim spot may be differentiated. The optical emission spectrum method is used to further study the several plasma parameters of the central spot and the dim spot in different argon content. The emission spectra of the N₂ second positive band (C³IIu --> B³ IIg) are measured, from which the molecule vibration temperatures of the central spot and the dim spot are calculated respectively. The broadening of spectral line 696.57 nm (2P₂-->1S₅) is used to study the electron densities of the central spot and the dim spot. It is found that the molecule vibration temperature and electron density of the dim spot are higher than those of the central spot in the same argon content The molecule vibration temperature and electron density of the central spot and the dim spot increase with the argon content increasing from 90% to 99.9%. The surface discharge induced by the volume discharge (VD) has the determinative effect on the formation of the dim spot The experimental results above play an important role in studying the formation mechanism of surface discharg&of square super-lattice pattern with surface discharge. In addition, the studies exert an influence on the application of surface discharge and volume discharge in different fields.

  19. Quantum dynamics of atoms in a resonator-generated optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschler, C.; Ritsch, H.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We investigate the quantum motion of coherently driven ultracold atoms in the field of a damped high-Q optical cavity mode. The laser field is chosen far detuned from the atomic transition but close to a cavity resonance, so that spontaneous emission is strongly suppressed but a coherent field builds up in the resonator by stimulated scattering. On one hand the shape of the atomic wave function determines the field dynamics via the magnitude of the scattering and the effective refractive index the atoms create for the mode. The mode intensity on the other hand determines the optical dipole force on the atoms.The system shows rich atom-field dynamics including self organization, self-trapping, cooling or heating. In the limit of deep trapping we are able to derive a system of closed, coupled equations for a finite set of atomic expectation values and the field. This allows us to determine the self-consistent ground state of the system as well as the eigenfrequencies and damping rates for excitations. To treat several atoms in more detail we introduce the Bose-Hubbard model. This allows us to investigate several aspects of the quantum motion of the atoms inside the cavity. (author)

  20. The quantum beat principles and applications of atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Major, F

    2007-01-01

    This work attempts to convey a broad understanding of the physical principles underlying the workings of these quantum-based atomic clocks, with introductory chapters placing them in context with the early development of mechanical clocks and the introduction of electronic time-keeping as embodied in the quartz-controlled clocks. While the book makes no pretense at being a history of atomic clocks, it nevertheless takes a historical perspective in its treatment of the subject. Intended for nonspecialists with some knowledge of physics or engineering, The Quantum Beat covers a wide range of salient topics relevant to atomic clocks, treated in a broad intuitive manner with a minimum of mathematical formalism. Detailed descriptions are given of the design principles of the rubidium, cesium, hydrogen maser, and mercury ion standards; the revolutionary changes that the advent of the laser has made possible, such as laser cooling, optical pumping, the formation of "optical molasses," and the cesium "fountain" stand...

  1. Atomic and gravitational clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canuto, V.M.; City Coll., New York; Goldman, I.

    1982-01-01

    Atomic and gravitational clocks are governed by the laws of electrodynamics and gravity respectively. While the strong equivalence principle (SEP) assumes that the two clocks have been synchronous at all times, recent planetary data seem to suggest a possible violation of the SEP. Past analysis of the implications of an SEP violation on different physical phenomena revealed no disagreement. However, these studies assumed that the two different clocks can be consistently constructed within the framework. The concept of scale invariance, and the physical meaning of different systems of units, are now reviewed and the construction of two clocks that do not remain synchronous-whose rates are related by a non-constant function βsub(a)-is demonstrated. The cosmological character of βsub(a) is also discussed. (author)

  2. Clock synchronization and dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovannetti, Vittorio; Lloyd, Seth; Maccone, Lorenzo; Wong, Franco N C

    2002-01-01

    We present a method to defeat effects of dispersion of timing signals when synchronizing clocks. It is based on the recently proposed 'conveyor belt synchronization' scheme and on the quantum dispersion cancellation effect

  3. Electronic structure, lattice dynamics, and optical properties of a novel van der Waals semiconductor heterostructure: InGaSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra-Hernández, Wilfredo; Elsayed, Hannan; Romero, Aldo H.; Bautista-Hernández, Alejandro; Olguín, Daniel; Cantarero, Andrés

    2017-07-01

    There is a growing interest in the property dependence of transition metal dichalcogenides as a function of the number of layers and formation of heterostructures. Depending on the stacking, doping, edge effects, and interlayer distance, the properties can be modified, which opens the door to novel applications that require a detailed understanding of the atomic mechanisms responsible for those changes. In this work, we analyze the electronic properties and lattice dynamics of a heterostructure constructed by simultaneously stacking InSe layers and GaSe layers bounded by van der Waals forces. We have assumed the same space group of GaSe, P 6 ¯m 2 as it becomes the lower energy configuration for other considered stackings. The structural, vibrational, and optical properties of this layered compound have been calculated using density functional theory. The structure is shown to be energetically, thermally, and elastically stable, which indicates its possible chemical synthesis. A correlation of the theoretical physical properties with respect to its parent compounds is extensively discussed. One of the most interesting properties is the low thermal conductivity, which indicates its potential use in thermolectric applications. Additionally, we discuss the possibility of using electronic gap engineering methods, which can help us to tune the optical emission in a variable range close to that used in the field of biological systems (NIR). Finally, the importance of considering properly van der Waals dispersion in layered materials has been emphasized as included in the exchange correlation functional. As for the presence of atoms with important spin-orbit coupling, relativistic corrections have been included.

  4. Density functional theory versus quantum Monte Carlo simulations of Fermi gases in the optical-lattice arena★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilati, Sebastiano; Zintchenko, Ilia; Troyer, Matthias; Ancilotto, Francesco

    2018-04-01

    We benchmark the ground state energies and the density profiles of atomic repulsive Fermi gases in optical lattices (OLs) computed via density functional theory (DFT) against the results of diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) simulations. The main focus is on a half-filled one-dimensional OLs, for which the DMC simulations performed within the fixed-node approach provide unbiased results. This allows us to demonstrate that the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) to the exchange-correlation functional of DFT is very accurate in the weak and intermediate interactions regime, and also to underline its limitations close to the strongly-interacting Tonks-Girardeau limit and in very deep OLs. We also consider a three-dimensional OL at quarter filling, showing also in this case the high accuracy of the LSDA in the moderate interaction regime. The one-dimensional data provided in this study may represent a useful benchmark to further develop DFT methods beyond the LSDA and they will hopefully motivate experimental studies to accurately measure the equation of state of Fermi gases in higher-dimensional geometries. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2018-90021-1.

  5. Response of the Higgs amplitude mode of superfluid Bose gases in a three-dimensional optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Kazuma; Takahashi, Yoshiro; Danshita, Ippei

    2018-04-01

    We study the Higgs mode of superfluid Bose gases in a three-dimensional optical lattice, which emerges near the quantum phase transition to the Mott insulator at commensurate fillings. Specifically, we consider responses of the Higgs mode to temporal modulations of the onsite interaction and the hopping energy. In order to calculate the response functions including the effects of quantum and thermal fluctuations, we map the Bose-Hubbard model onto an effective pseudospin-1 model and use a perturbative expansion based on the imaginary-time Green's function theory. We also include the effects of an inhomogeneous trapping potential by means of a local density approximation. We find that the response function for the hopping modulation is equal to that for the interaction modulation within our approximation. At the unit filling rate and in the absence of a trapping potential, we show that the Higgs mode can exist as a sharp resonance peak in the dynamical susceptibilities at typical temperatures. However, the resonance peak is significantly broadened due to the trapping potential when the modulations are applied globally to the entire system. We suggest that the Higgs mode can be detected as a sharp resonance peak by partial modulations around the trap center.

  6. Lattice damage assessment and optical waveguide properties in LaAlO3 single crystal irradiated with swift Si ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Crespillo, M. L.; Huang, Q.; Wang, T. J.; Liu, P.; Wang, X. L.

    2017-02-01

    As one of the representative ABO3 perovskite-structured oxides, lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO3) crystal has emerged as one of the most valuable functional-materials, and has attracted plenty of fundamental research and promising applications in recent years. Electronic, magnetic, optical and other properties of LaAlO3 strongly depend on its crystal structure, which could be strongly modified owing to the nuclear or electronic energy loss deposited in an ion irradiation environment and, therefore, significantly affecting the performance of LaAlO3-based devices. In this work, utilizing swift (tens of MeV) Si-ion irradiation, the damage behavior of LaAlO3 crystal induced by nuclear or electronic energy loss has been studied in detail utilizing complementary characterization techniques. Differing from other perovskite-structured crystals in which the electronic energy loss could lead to the formation of an amorphous region based on the thermal spike mechanism, in this case, intense electronic energy loss in LaAlO3 will not induce any obvious structural damage. The effects of ion irradiation on the mechanical properties, including hardness increase and elastic modulus decrease, have been confirmed. On the other hand, considering the potential applications of LaAlO3 in the field of integrated optoelectronics, the optical-waveguide properties of the irradiation region have been studied. The significant correspondence (symmetrical inversion) between the iWKB-reconstructed refractive-index profile and SRIM-simulated dpa profile further proves the effects (irradiation-damage production and refractive-index decrease) of nuclear energy loss during the swift-ion penetration process in LaAlO3 crystal. In the case of the rather-thick damage layer produced by swift-ion irradiation, obtaining a damage profile will be constrained owing to the analysis-depth limitation of the characterization techniques (RBS/channeling), and our analysis process (optical guided-mode measurement and

  7. Lattice damage assessment and optical waveguide properties in LaAlO3 single crystal irradiated with swift Si ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y; Wang, T J; Liu, P; Wang, X L; Crespillo, M L; Huang, Q

    2017-01-01

    As one of the representative ABO 3 perovskite-structured oxides, lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO 3 ) crystal has emerged as one of the most valuable functional-materials, and has attracted plenty of fundamental research and promising applications in recent years. Electronic, magnetic, optical and other properties of LaAlO 3 strongly depend on its crystal structure, which could be strongly modified owing to the nuclear or electronic energy loss deposited in an ion irradiation environment and, therefore, significantly affecting the performance of LaAlO 3 -based devices. In this work, utilizing swift (tens of MeV) Si-ion irradiation, the damage behavior of LaAlO 3 crystal induced by nuclear or electronic energy loss has been studied in detail utilizing complementary characterization techniques. Differing from other perovskite-structured crystals in which the electronic energy loss could lead to the formation of an amorphous region based on the thermal spike mechanism, in this case, intense electronic energy loss in LaAlO 3 will not induce any obvious structural damage. The effects of ion irradiation on the mechanical properties, including hardness increase and elastic modulus decrease, have been confirmed. On the other hand, considering the potential applications of LaAlO 3 in the field of integrated optoelectronics, the optical-waveguide properties of the irradiation region have been studied. The significant correspondence (symmetrical inversion) between the iWKB-reconstructed refractive-index profile and SRIM-simulated dpa profile further proves the effects (irradiation-damage production and refractive-index decrease) of nuclear energy loss during the swift-ion penetration process in LaAlO 3 crystal. In the case of the rather-thick damage layer produced by swift-ion irradiation, obtaining a damage profile will be constrained owing to the analysis-depth limitation of the characterization techniques (RBS/channeling), and our analysis process (optical guided

  8. Stability limits for gap solitons in a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped in a time-modulated optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayteevarunyoo, Thawatchai; Malomed, Boris A.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate stability of gap solitons (GSs) in the first two band gaps in the framework of the one-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation, combining the repulsive nonlinearity and a moderately strong optical lattice (OL), which is subjected to ''management,'' in the form of time-periodic modulation of its depth. The analysis is performed for parameters relevant to the experiment, characteristic values of the modulation frequency being ω∼2πx20 Hz. First, we present several GS species in the two band gaps in the absence of the management. These include fundamental solitons and their bound states, as well as a subfundamental soliton in the second gap, featuring two peaks of opposite signs in a single well of the periodic potential. This soliton is always unstable, and quickly transforms into a fundamental GS, losing a considerable part of its norm. In the first band gap (stable) bound states of two fundamental GSs are possible solely with opposite signs, if they are separated by an empty site. Under the periodic modulation of the OL depth, we identify stability regions for various GS species, in terms of ω and modulation amplitude, at fixed values of the soliton's norm, N. In either band gap, the GS species with smallest N has a largest stability area; in the first and second gaps, they are, respectively, the fundamental GS proper, or the one spontaneously generated from the subfundamental soliton. However, with the increase of N, the stability region of every species expands in the first gap, and shrinks in the second one. The outcome of the instability development is also different in the two band gaps: it is destruction of the GS in the first gap, and generation of extra side lobes by unstable GSs in the second one

  9. Simultaneous 10 Gbps data and polarization-based pulse-per-second clock transmission using a single VCSEL for high-speed optical fibre access networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoe, G. M.; Wassin, S.; Gamatham, R. R. G.; Leitch, A. W. R.; Gibbon, T. B.

    2017-01-01

    Access networks based on vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) transmitters offer alternative solution in delivering different high bandwidth, cost effective services to the customer premises. Clock and reference frequency distribution is critical for applications such as Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), GPS, banking and big data science projects. Simultaneous distribution of both data and timing signals over shared infrastructure is thus desirable. In this paper, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel, cost-effective technique for multi-signal modulation on a single VCSEL transmitter. Two signal types, an intensity modulated 10 Gbps data signal and a polarization-based pulse per second (PPS) clock signal are directly modulated onto a single VCSEL carrier at 1310 nm. Spectral efficiency is maximized by exploiting inherent orthogonal polarization switching of the VCSEL with changing bias in transmission of the PPS signal. A 10 Gbps VCSEL transmission with PPS over 11 km of G.652 fibre introduced a transmission penalty of 0.52 dB. The contribution of PPS to this penalty was found to be 0.08 dB.

  10. Active Faraday optical frequency standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2014-11-01

    We propose the mechanism of an active Faraday optical clock, and experimentally demonstrate an active Faraday optical frequency standard based on narrow bandwidth Faraday atomic filter by the method of velocity-selective optical pumping of cesium vapor. The center frequency of the active Faraday optical frequency standard is determined by the cesium 6 (2)S(1/2) F=4 to 6 (2)P(3/2) F'=4 and 5 crossover transition line. The optical heterodyne beat between two similar independent setups shows that the frequency linewidth reaches 281(23) Hz, which is 1.9×10(4) times smaller than the natural linewidth of the cesium 852-nm transition line. The maximum emitted light power reaches 75 μW. The active Faraday optical frequency standard reported here has advantages of narrow linewidth and reduced cavity pulling, which can readily be extended to other atomic transition lines of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms trapped in optical lattices at magic wavelengths, making it useful for new generation of optical atomic clocks.

  11. A precise clock distribution network for MRPC-based experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.; Cao, P.; Shang, L.; An, Q.

    2016-01-01

    In high energy physics experiments, the MRPC (Multi-Gap Resistive Plate Chamber) detectors are widely used recently which can provide higher-resolution measurement for particle identification. However, the application of MRPC detectors leads to a series of challenges in electronics design with large number of front-end electronic channels, especially for distributing clock precisely. To deal with these challenges, this paper presents a universal scheme of clock transmission network for MRPC-based experiments with advantages of both precise clock distribution and global command synchronization. For precise clock distributing, the clock network is designed into a tree architecture with two stages: the first one has a point-to-multipoint long range bidirectional distribution with optical channels and the second one has a fan-out structure with copper link inside readout crates. To guarantee the precision of clock frequency or phase, the r-PTP (reduced Precision Time Protocol) and the DDMTD (digital Dual Mixer Time Difference) methods are used for frequency synthesis, phase measurement and adjustment, which is implemented by FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) in real-time. In addition, to synchronize global command execution, based upon this clock distribution network, synchronous signals are coded with clock for transmission. With technique of encoding/decoding and clock data recovery, signals such as global triggers or system control commands, can be distributed to all front-end channels synchronously, which greatly simplifies the system design. The experimental results show that both the clock jitter (RMS) and the clock skew can be less than 100 ps.

  12. Lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenfratz, P.

    1983-01-01

    The author presents a general introduction to lattice gauge theories and discusses non-perturbative methods in the gauge sector. He then shows how the lattice works in obtaining the string tension in SU(2). Lattice QCD at finite physical temperature is discussed. Universality tests in SU(2) lattice QCD are presented. SU(3) pure gauge theory is briefly dealt with. Finally, fermions on the lattice are considered. (Auth.)

  13. Towards quantum simulation of the Kondo-Lattice-Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochanke, Andre

    2017-04-25

    Ultracold quantum gases of alkaline-earth-like metals are a versatile tool to investigate interacting many-body physics by realizing clean and controllable experimental model systems. Their intriguing properties range from energetically low-lying clock transitions, which allow for high-resolution spectroscopy, over meta-stable states, which can be regarded as a second species with orbital degree of freedom, to SU(N) symmetry, allowing novel magnetic phases. These open up new possibilities for quantum simulators. Using them in combination with optical lattices dissipative Fermi-Hubbard models and the Kondo-lattice-model can be realized, two promising examples for probing strongly correlated systems. This thesis presents an experimental apparatus for producing ultracold samples of fermionic {sup 173}Yb (N≤6). A new bicolor dipole trap was implemented with a final, average trap frequency of anti ω=36 Hz. Using optical, resonant pumping and an Optical-Stern-Gerlach scheme, the spin mixture can arbitrarily be changed from a six- to a one-component gas. Typically the degenerate Fermi gases consist of 87000 atoms at 17.5% T{sub F} (N=6) and of 47000 atoms at 19.4% T{sub F} (N=1). The lowest lying meta-stable state {sup 3}P{sub 0} (578 nm) is coherently controlled using a clock-laser setup with a linewidth of FWHM=1 Hz by means of Rabi oscillations or rapid adiabatic passage. By conducting spectroscopic measurements in a 3D magic lattice (759 nm) we demonstrate inter band transitions and observe the {sup 1}S{sub 0}<=>{sup 3}P{sub 0} excitation with a resolution of FWHM=50(2) Hz. Applying these techniques to a two-component spin mixture reveals a shift of the clock-transition caused by spin-exchange interaction between the orbital symmetric vertical stroke eg right angle {sup +} vertical stroke ↑↓ right angle {sup -} and the orbital antisymmetric vertical stroke eg right angle {sup -} vertical stroke ↑↓ right angle {sup +} state. Using the inelastic properties of

  14. Imaging Optical Frequencies with 100 μ Hz Precision and 1.1 μ m Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, G. Edward; Hutson, Ross B.; Goban, Akihisa; Campbell, Sara L.; Poli, Nicola; Ye, Jun

    2018-03-01

    We implement imaging spectroscopy of the optical clock transition of lattice-trapped degenerate fermionic Sr in the Mott-insulating regime, combining micron spatial resolution with submillihertz spectral precision. We use these tools to demonstrate atomic coherence for up to 15 s on the clock transition and reach a record frequency precision of 2.5 ×10-19. We perform the most rapid evaluation of trapping light shifts and record a 150 mHz linewidth, the narrowest Rabi line shape observed on a coherent optical transition. The important emerging capability of combining high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy will improve the clock precision, and provide a path towards measuring many-body interactions and testing fundamental physics.

  15. Comparisons of mental clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paivio, A

    1978-02-01

    Subjects in three experiments were presented with pairs of clock times and were required to choose the one in which the hour and minute hand formed the smaller angle. In Experiments 1 and 2, the times were presented digitally, necessitating a transformation into symbolic representations from which the angular size difference could be inferred. The results revealed orderly symbolic distance effects so that comparison reaction time increased as the angular size difference decreased. Moreover, subjects generally reported using imagery to make the judgment, and subjects scoring high on test of imagery ability were faster than those scoring low on such tests. Experiment 3 added a direct perceptual condition in which subjects compared angles between pairs of hands on two drawn (analog) clocks, as well as a mixed condition involving one digital and one analog clock time. The results showed comparable distance effects for all conditions. In addition, reaction time increased from the perceptual, to the mixed, to the pure-digital condition. These results are consistent with predictions from an image-based dual-coding theory.

  16. Prediction of GNSS satellite clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broederbauer, V.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis deals with the characterisation and prediction of GNSS-satellite-clocks. A prerequisite to develop powerful algorithms for the prediction of clock-corrections is the thorough study of the behaviour of the different clock-types of the satellites. In this context the predicted part of the IGU-clock-corrections provided by the Analysis Centers (ACs) of the IGS was compared to the IGS-Rapid-clock solutions to determine reasonable estimates of the quality of already existing well performing predictions. For the shortest investigated interval (three hours) all ACs obtain almost the same accuracy of 0,1 to 0,4 ns. For longer intervals the individual predictions results start to diverge. Thus, for a 12-hours- interval the differences range from nearly 10 ns (GFZ, CODE) until up to some 'tens of ns'. Based on the estimated clock corrections provided via the IGS Rapid products a simple quadratic polynomial turns out to be sufficient to describe the time series of Rubidium-clocks. On the other hand Cesium-clocks show a periodical behaviour (revolution period) with an amplitude of up to 6 ns. A clear correlation between these amplitudes and the Sun elevation angle above the orbital planes can be demonstrated. The variability of the amplitudes is supposed to be caused by temperature-variations affecting the oscillator. To account for this periodical behaviour a quadratic polynomial with an additional sinus-term was finally chosen as prediction model both for the Cesium as well as for the Rubidium clocks. The three polynomial-parameters as well as amplitude and phase shift of the periodic term are estimated within a least-square-adjustment by means of program GNSS-VC/static. Input-data are time series of the observed part of the IGU clock corrections. With the estimated parameters clock-corrections are predicted for various durations. The mean error of the prediction of Rubidium-clock-corrections for an interval of six hours reaches up to 1,5 ns. For the 12-hours

  17. PHARAO space atomic clock: new developments on the laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccoccio, Muriel; Loesel, Jacques; Coatantiec, Claude; Simon, Eric; Laurent, Philippe; Lemonde, Pierre; Maksimovic, I.; Abgrall, M.

    2017-11-01

    The PHARAO project purpose is to open the way for a new atomic clock generation in space, where laser cooling techniques and microgravity allow high frequency stability and accuracy. The French space agency, CNES is funding and managing the clock construction. The French SYRTE and LKB laboratories are scientific and technical advisers for the clock requirements and the follow-up of subsystem development in industrial companies. EADS SODERN is developing two main subsystems of the PHARAO clock: the Laser Source and the Cesium Tube where atoms are cooled, launched, selected and detected by laser beams. The Laser Source includes an optical bench and electronic devices to generate the laser beams required. This paper describes PHARAO and the role laser beams play in its principle of operation. Then we present the Laser Source design, the technologies involved, and the status of development. Lastly, we focus of a key equipment to reach the performances expected, which is the Extended Cavity Laser Diode.

  18. A bunch clock for the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenkszus, F.R.; Laird, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    A bunch clock timing module has been developed for use by Advanced Photon Source beamlines. The module provides bunch pattern and timing information that can be used to trigger beamline data collection equipment. The module is fully integrated into the control system software (EPICS) which automatically loads it with the storage ring fill pattern at injection time. Fast timing outputs (1 ns FWHM) for each stored bunch are generated using the storage ring low-level rf and revolution clock as input references. Fiber-optic-based transmitters and receivers are used to transmit a 352-MHz low-level rf reference to distributed bunch clock modules. The bunch clock module is a single-width VME module and may be installed in a VME crate located near beamline instrumentation. A prototype has been in use on the SRI CAT beamline for over a year. The design and integration into the control system timing software along with measured performance results are presented

  19. Differential maturation of rhythmic clock gene expression during early development in medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Ines H; Lahiri, Kajori; Lopez-Olmeda, Jose Fernando; Loosli, Felix; Foulkes, Nicholas S; Vallone, Daniela

    2014-05-01

    One key challenge for the field of chronobiology is to identify how circadian clock function emerges during early embryonic development. Teleosts such as the zebrafish are ideal models for studying circadian clock ontogeny since the entire process of development occurs ex utero in an optically transparent chorion. Medaka (Oryzias latipes) represents another powerful fish model for exploring early clock function with, like the zebrafish, many tools available for detailed genetic analysis. However, to date there have been no reports documenting circadian clock gene expression during medaka development. Here we have characterized the expression of key clock genes in various developmental stages and in adult tissues of medaka. As previously reported for other fish, light dark cycles are required for the emergence of clock gene expression rhythms in this species. While rhythmic expression of per and cry genes is detected very early during development and seems to be light driven, rhythmic clock and bmal expression appears much later around hatching time. Furthermore, the maturation of clock function seems to correlate with the appearance of rhythmic expression of these positive elements of the clock feedback loop. By accelerating development through elevated temperatures or by artificially removing the chorion, we show an earlier onset of rhythmicity in clock and bmal expression. Thus, differential maturation of key elements of the medaka clock mechanism depends on the developmental stage and the presence of the chorion.

  20. Matter-wave bright solitons in effective bichromatic lattice potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Matter-wave bright solitons in bichromatic lattice potentials are considered and their dynamics for different lattice environments are studied. Bichromatic potentials are created from superpositions of (i) two linear optical lattices and (ii) a linear and a nonlinear optical lattice. Effective potentials are found for the solitons in both ...

  1. Predicted Mobility Edges in One-Dimensional Incommensurate Optical Lattices: An Exactly Solvable Model of Anderson Localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, J.; Das Sarma, S.

    2010-01-01

    Localization properties of noninteracting quantum particles in one-dimensional incommensurate lattices are investigated with an exponential short-range hopping that is beyond the minimal nearest-neighbor tight-binding model. Energy dependent mobility edges are analytically predicted in this model and verified with numerical calculations. The results are then mapped to the continuum Schroedinger equation, and an approximate analytical expression for the localization phase diagram and the energy dependent mobility edges in the ground band is obtained.

  2. Radioisotope clocks in archaeology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedges, R E.M. [Oxford Univ. (UK). Research Lab. for Archaeology

    1979-09-06

    Methods of absolute dating which use the rate of disintegration of a radioactive nucleus as the clock, are reviewed. The use of the abundant radioisotopes (/sup 40/K, Th and U) and of the rare radioisotopes (/sup 14/C, /sup 10/Be, /sup 26/Al, /sup 32/Si, /sup 36/Cl, /sup 41/Ca, /sup 53/Mn) is discussed and radiation integration techniques (fission track dating, thermoluminescence and related techniques) are considered. Specific fields of use of the various methods and their accuracy are examined.

  3. Methodologies for steering clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadsey, Harold

    1995-01-01

    One of the concerns of the PTTI community is the coordination of one time scale with another. This is accomplished through steering one clock system to another, with a goal of a zero or constant offset in time and frequency. In order to attain this goal, rate differences are calculated and allowed for by the steering algorithm. This paper will present several of these different methods of determining rate differences. Ideally, any change in rate should not cause the offset to change sign (overshoot) by any amount, but certainly not by as much as its previous absolute value. The advantages and disadvantages of each depend on the user's situation.

  4. Clocks and special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacRoberts, D.T.

    1980-01-01

    A kinematic theory without precise definitions of the 'space' and 'time' used is an uninterpreted calculus. The definition of 'time' in special relativity is based on light propagation and the 'constant velocity of light' is a tautological consequence of the definition. When this definition is reified in a 'clock' the phenomenon of 'time dilation' occurs, in terms of the defined time, but is not reciprocal between moving systems; the postulate of relativity is not observed. The new definition of time is compatible with an ether theory without the relativity principle. The derivation of the Lorentz transformations, which requires both postulates, is purely formalistic and is not ontologically sound. (Auth.)

  5. Lattice design and beam optics calculations for the new large-scale electron-positron collider FCC-ee

    CERN Document Server

    Haerer, Bastian; Prof. Dr. Schmidt, Ruediger; Dr. Holzer, Bernhard

    Following the recommendations of the European Strategy Group for High Energy Physics, CERN launched the Future Circular Collider Study (FCC) to investigate the feasibility of large-scale circular colliders for future high energy physics research. This thesis presents the considerations taken into account during the design process of the magnetic lattice in the arc sections of the electron-positron version FCC-ee. The machine is foreseen to operate at four different centre-of-mass energies in the range of 90 to 350 GeV. Different beam parameters need to be achieved for every energy, which requires a flexible lattice design in the arc sections. Therefore methods to tune the horizontal beam emittance without re-positioning machine components are implemented. In combination with damping and excitation wigglers a precise adjustment of the emittance can be achieved. A very first estimation of the vertical emittance arising from lattice imperfections is performed. Special emphasis is put on the optimisation of the ...

  6. A Light Clock Satisfying the Clock Hypothesis of Special Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The design of the FMEL, a floor-mirrored Einstein-Langevin "light clock", is introduced. The clock provides a physically intuitive manner to calculate and visualize the time dilation effects for a spatially extended set of observers (an accelerated "frame") undergoing unidirectional acceleration or observers on a rotating cylinder of constant…

  7. Nano-spatial parameters from 3D to 2D lattice dimensionality by organic variant in [ZnCl4]- [R]+ hybrid materials: Structure, architecture-lattice dimensionality, microscopy, optical Eg and PL correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajit; Verma, Sanjay K.; Alvi, P. A.; Jasrotia, Dinesh

    2016-04-01

    The nanospatial morphological features of [ZnCl]- [C5H4NCH3]+ hybrid derivative depicts 28 nm granular size and 3D spreader shape packing pattern as analyzed by FESEM and single crystal XRD structural studies. The organic moiety connect the inorganic components through N-H+…Cl- hydrogen bond to form a hybrid composite, the replacement of organic derivatives from 2-methylpyridine to 2-Amino-5-choloropyridine results the increase in granular size from 28nm to 60nm and unit cell packing pattern from 3D-2D lattice dimensionality along ac plane. The change in optical energy direct band gap value from 3.01eV for [ZnCl]- [C5H4NCH3]+ (HM1) to 3.42eV for [ZnCl]- [C5H5ClN2]+ (HM2) indicates the role of organic moiety in optical properties of hybrid materials. The photoluminescence emission spectra is observed in the wavelength range of 370 to 600 nm with maximum peak intensity of 9.66a.u. at 438 nm for (HM1) and 370 to 600 nm with max peak intensity of 9.91 a.u. at 442 nm for (HM2), indicating that the emission spectra lies in visible range. PL excitation spectra depicts the maximum excitation intensity [9.8] at 245.5 nm for (HM1) and its value of 9.9 a.u. at 294 nm, specify the excitation spectra lies in UV range. Photoluminescence excitation spectra is observed in the wavelength range of 280 to 350 nm with maximum peak intensity of 9.4 a.u. at 285.5 nm and 9.9 a.u. at 294 and 297 nm, indicating excitation in the UV spectrum. Single crystal growth process and detailed physiochemical characterization such as XRD, FESEM image analysis photoluminescence property reveals the structure stability with non-covalent interactions, lattice dimensionality (3D-2D) correlations interweaving into the design of inorganic-organic hybrid materials.

  8. Lattices for antiproton rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autin, B.

    1984-01-01

    After a description of the constraints imposed by the cooling of Antiprotons on the lattice of the rings, the reasons which motivate the shape and the structure of these machines are surveyed. Linear and non-linear beam optics properties are treated with a special amplification to the Antiproton Accumulator. (orig.)

  9. Lattice Boltzmann methods applied to large-scale three-dimensional virtual cores constructed from digital optical borehole images of the karst carbonate Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukop, Michael C.; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2014-11-01

    Digital optical borehole images at approximately 2 mm vertical resolution and borehole caliper data were used to create three-dimensional renderings of the distribution of (1) matrix porosity and (2) vuggy megaporosity for the karst carbonate Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida. The renderings based on the borehole data were used as input into Lattice Boltzmann methods to obtain intrinsic permeability estimates for this extremely transmissive aquifer, where traditional aquifer test methods may fail due to very small drawdowns and non-Darcian flow that can reduce apparent hydraulic conductivity. Variogram analysis of the borehole data suggests a nearly isotropic rock structure at lag lengths up to the nominal borehole diameter. A strong correlation between the diameter of the borehole and the presence of vuggy megaporosity in the data set led to a bias in the variogram where the computed horizontal spatial autocorrelation is strong at lag distances greater than the nominal borehole size. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of flow across a 0.4 × 0.4 × 17 m (2.72 m3 volume) parallel-walled column of rendered matrix and vuggy megaporosity indicates a high hydraulic conductivity of 53 m s-1. This value is similar to previous Lattice Boltzmann calculations of hydraulic conductivity in smaller limestone samples of the Biscayne aquifer. The development of simulation methods that reproduce dual-porosity systems with higher resolution and fidelity and that consider flow through horizontally longer renderings could provide improved estimates of the hydraulic conductivity and help to address questions about the importance of scale.

  10. High Precision Clock Bias Prediction Model in Clock Synchronization System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zan Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Time synchronization is a fundamental requirement for many services provided by a distributed system. Clock calibration through the time signal is the usual way to realize the synchronization among the clocks used in the distributed system. The interference to time signal transmission or equipment failures may bring about failure to synchronize the time. To solve this problem, a clock bias prediction module is paralleled in the clock calibration system. And for improving the precision of clock bias prediction, the first-order grey model with one variable (GM(1,1 model is proposed. In the traditional GM(1,1 model, the combination of parameters determined by least squares criterion is not optimal; therefore, the particle swarm optimization (PSO is used to optimize GM(1,1 model. At the same time, in order to avoid PSO getting stuck at local optimization and improve its efficiency, the mechanisms that double subgroups and nonlinear decreasing inertia weight are proposed. In order to test the precision of the improved model, we design clock calibration experiments, where time signal is transferred via radio and wired channel, respectively. The improved model is built on the basis of clock bias acquired in the experiments. The results show that the improved model is superior to other models both in precision and in stability. The precision of improved model increased by 66.4%~76.7%.

  11. Regions of tunneling dynamics for few bosons in an optical lattice subjected to a quench of the imposed harmonic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistakidis, Simeon; Koutentakis, Georgios; Schmelcher, Peter; Theory Group of Fundamental Processes in Quantum Physics Team

    2016-05-01

    Recent experimental advances have introduced an interplay in the trapping length scales of the lattice and the harmonic confinement. This fact motivates the investigation to prepare atomic gases at certain quantum states by utilizing a composite atomic trap consisting of a lattice potential that is embedded inside an overlying harmonic trap. In the present work, we examine how frequency modulations of the overlying harmonic trap stimulate the dynamics of an 1D few-boson gas. The gas is initially prepared at a highly confined state, and the subsequent dynamics induced by a quench of the harmonic trap frequency to a lower value is examined. It is shown that a non-interacting gas always diffuses to the outer sites. In contrast the response of the interacting system is more involved and is dominated by a resonance, which is induced by the bifurcation of the low-lying eigenstates. Our study reveals that the position of the resonance depends both on the atom number and the interaction coupling, manifesting its many body nature. The corresponding mean field treatment as well as the single-band approximation have been found to be inadequate for the description of the tunneling dynamics in the interacting case. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, SFB 925 ``Light induced dynamics and control of correlated quantum systems''.

  12. Low-power, miniature {sup 171}Yb ion clock using an ultra-small vacuum package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Y.-Y.; Schwindt, P. D. D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Partner, H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Center for Quantum Information and Control (CQuIC), Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Prestage, J. D.; Kellogg, J. R.; Yu, N. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2012-12-17

    We report a demonstration of a very small microwave atomic clock using the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of the trapped {sup 171}Yb ions inside a miniature, completely sealed-off 3 cm{sup 3} ion-trap vacuum package. In the ion clock system, all of the components are highly miniaturized with low power consumption except the 369 nm optical pumping laser still under development for miniaturization. The entire clock, including the control electronics, consumes <300 mW. The fractional frequency instability of the miniature Yb{sup +} clock reaches the 10{sup -14} range after a few days of integration.

  13. Void lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadderton, L.T.; Johnson, E.; Wohlenberg, T.

    1976-01-01

    Void lattices in metals apparently owe their stability to elastically anisotropic interactions. An ordered array of voids on the anion sublattice in fluorite does not fit so neatly into this scheme of things. Crowdions may play a part in the formation of the void lattice, and stability may derive from other sources. (Auth.)

  14. Clocks around Sgr A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angélil, Raymond; Saha, Prasenjit

    2014-11-01

    The S stars near the Galactic Centre and any pulsars that may be on similar orbits can be modelled in a unified way as clocks orbiting a black hole, and hence are potential probes of relativistic effects, including black hole spin. The high eccentricities of many S stars mean that relativistic effects peak strongly around pericentre; for example, orbit precession is not a smooth effect but almost a kick at pericentre. We argue that concentration around pericentre will be an advantage when analysing redshift or pulse-arrival data to measure relativistic effects, because cumulative precession will be drowned out by Newtonian perturbations from other mass in the Galactic Centre region. Wavelet decomposition may be a way to disentangle relativistic effects from Newton perturbations. Assuming a plausible model for Newtonian perturbations on S2, relativity appears to be strongest in a two-year interval around pericentre, in wavelet modes of time-scale ≈6 months.

  15. Lattice fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randjbar-Daemi, S.

    1995-12-01

    The so-called doubling problem in the lattice description of fermions led to a proof that under certain circumstances chiral gauge theories cannot be defined on the lattice. This is called the no-go theorem. It implies that if Γ/sub/A is defined on a lattice then its infrared limit, which should correspond to the quantum description of the classical action for the slowly varying fields on lattice scale, is inevitably a vector like theory. In particular, if not circumvented, the no-go theorem implies that there is no lattice formulation of the Standard Weinberg-Salam theory or SU(5) GUT, even though the fermions belong to anomaly-free representations of the gauge group. This talk aims to explain one possible attempt at bypassing the no-go theorem. 20 refs

  16. Lattice fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randjbar-Daemi, S

    1995-12-01

    The so-called doubling problem in the lattice description of fermions led to a proof that under certain circumstances chiral gauge theories cannot be defined on the lattice. This is called the no-go theorem. It implies that if {Gamma}/sub/A is defined on a lattice then its infrared limit, which should correspond to the quantum description of the classical action for the slowly varying fields on lattice scale, is inevitably a vector like theory. In particular, if not circumvented, the no-go theorem implies that there is no lattice formulation of the Standard Weinberg-Salam theory or SU(5) GUT, even though the fermions belong to anomaly-free representations of the gauge group. This talk aims to explain one possible attempt at bypassing the no-go theorem. 20 refs.

  17. Non-equilibrium lattice dynamics of one-dimensional In chains on Si(111 upon ultrafast optical excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Frigge

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The photoinduced structural dynamics of the atomic wire system on the Si(111-In surface has been studied by ultrafast electron diffraction in reflection geometry. Upon intense fs-laser excitation, this system can be driven in around 1 ps from the insulating (8×2 reconstructed low temperature phase to a metastable metallic (4×1 reconstructed high temperature phase. Subsequent to the structural transition, the surface heats up on a 6 times slower timescale as determined from a transient Debye-Waller analysis of the diffraction spots. From a comparison with the structural response of the high temperature (4×1 phase, we conclude that electron-phonon coupling is responsible for the slow energy transfer from the excited electron system to the lattice. The significant difference in timescales is evidence that the photoinduced structural transition is non-thermally driven.

  18. Lattice strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorn, C.B.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of studying non-perturbative effects in string theory using a world sheet lattice is discussed. The light-cone lattice string model of Giles and Thorn is studied numerically to assess the accuracy of ''coarse lattice'' approximations. For free strings a 5 by 15 lattice seems sufficient to obtain better than 10% accuracy for the bosonic string tachyon mass squared. In addition a crude lattice model simulating string like interactions is studied to find out how easily a coarse lattice calculation can pick out effects such as bound states which would qualitatively alter the spectrum of the free theory. The role of the critical dimension in obtaining a finite continuum limit is discussed. Instead of the ''gaussian'' lattice model one could use one of the vertex models, whose continuum limit is the same as a gaussian model on a torus of any radius. Indeed, any critical 2 dimensional statistical system will have a stringy continuum limit in the absence of string interactions. 8 refs., 1 fig. , 9 tabs

  19. Physiological links of circadian clock and biological clock of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Chang, Hung-Chun

    2017-07-01

    Circadian rhythms orchestrate biochemical and physiological processes in living organisms to respond the day/night cycle. In mammals, nearly all cells hold self-sustained circadian clocks meanwhile couple the intrinsic rhythms to systemic changes in a hierarchical manner. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus functions as the master pacemaker to initiate daily synchronization according to the photoperiod, in turn determines the phase of peripheral cellular clocks through a variety of signaling relays, including endocrine rhythms and metabolic cycles. With aging, circadian desynchrony occurs at the expense of peripheral metabolic pathologies and central neurodegenerative disorders with sleep symptoms, and genetic ablation of circadian genes in model organisms resembled the aging-related features. Notably, a number of studies have linked longevity nutrient sensing pathways in modulating circadian clocks. Therapeutic strategies that bridge the nutrient sensing pathways and circadian clock might be rational designs to defy aging.

  20. Phase noise analysis of clock recovery based on an optoelectronic phase-locked loop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibar, Darko; Mørk, Jesper; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo

    2007-01-01

    A detailed theoretical analysis of a clock-recovery (CR) scheme based on an optoelectronic phase-locked loop is presented. The analysis emphasizes the phase noise performance, taking into account the noise of the input data signal, the local voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO), and the laser....... It is shown that a large loop length results in a higher timing jitter of the recovered clock signal. The impact of the loop length on the clock signal jitter can be reduced by using a low-noise VCO and a low loop filter bandwidth. Using the model, the timing jitter of the recovered optical and electrical...... clock signal can be evaluated. We numerically investigate the timing jitter requirements for combined electrical/optical local oscillators, in order for the recovered clock signal to have less jitter than that of the input signal. The timing jitter requirements for the free-running laser and the VCO...

  1. Hg-201 (+) CO-Magnetometer for HG-199(+) Trapped Ion Space Atomic Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Taghavi, Shervin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Local magnetic field strength in a trapped ion atomic clock is measured in real time, with high accuracy and without degrading clock performance, and the measurement is used to compensate for ambient magnetic field perturbations. First and second isotopes of an element are co-located within the linear ion trap. The first isotope has a resonant microwave transition between two hyperfine energy states, and the second isotope has a resonant Zeeman transition. Optical sources emit ultraviolet light that optically pump both isotopes. A microwave radiation source simultaneously emits microwave fields resonant with the first isotope's clock transition and the second isotope's Zeeman transition, and an optical detector measures the fluorescence from optically pumping both isotopes. The second isotope's Zeeman transition provides the measure of magnetic field strength, and the measurement is used to compensate the first isotope's clock transition or to adjust the applied C-field to reduce the effects of ambient magnetic field perturbations.

  2. Micro Mercury Ion Clock (MMIC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Demonstrate micro clock based on trapped Hg ions with more than 10x size reduction and power; Fractional frequency stability at parts per 1014 level, adequate for...

  3. Controllable clock circuit design in PEM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yunhua; Wang Peihua; Hu Tingting; Feng Baotong; Shuai Lei; Huang Huan; Wei Shujun; Li Ke; Zhao Jingwei; Wei Long

    2011-01-01

    A high-precision synchronized clock circuit design will be presented, which can supply steady, reliable and anti-jamming clock signal for the data acquirement (DAQ) system of Positron Emission Mammography (PEM). This circuit design is based on the Single-Chip Microcomputer and high-precision clock chip, and can achieve multiple controllable clock signals. The jamming between the clock signals can be reduced greatly with the differential transmission. Meanwhile, the adoption of CAN bus control in the clock circuit can prompt the clock signals to be transmitted or masked simultaneously when needed. (authors)

  4. Controllable clock circuit design in PEM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yunhua; Wang Peilin; Hu Tingting; Feng Baotong; Shuai Lei; Huang Huan; Wei Shujun; Li Ke; Zhao Jingwei; Wei Long

    2010-01-01

    A high-precision synchronized clock circuit design will be presented, which can supply steady, reliable and anti-jamming clock signal for the data acquirement (DAQ) system of Positron Emission Mammography (PEM). This circuit design is based on the Single-Chip Microcomputer and high-precision clock chip, and can achieve multiple controllable clock signals. The jamming between the clock signals can be reduced greatly with the differential transmission. Meanwhile, the adoption of CAN bus control in the clock circuit can prompt the clock signals to be transmitted or masked simultaneously when needed. (authors)

  5. ISABELLE lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis is given of a number of variants of the basic lattice of the planned ISABELLE storage rings. The variants were formed by removing cells from the normal part of the lattice and juggling the lengths of magnets, cells, and insertions in order to maintain a rational relation of circumference to that of the AGS and approximately the same dispersion. Special insertions, correction windings, and the working line with nonlinear resonances are discussed

  6. Time without clocks - an attempt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpman, G.

    1978-01-01

    A definition of time intervals separating two states of systems of elementary particles and observers is attempted. The definition is founded on the notion of instant state of the system and uses no information connected with the use of a clock. Applying the definition to a classical clock and to a sample of unstable particles, results are obtained in agreement with experiment. However, if the system contains 'few' elementary particles, the properties of the time interval present some different features. (author)

  7. Physical Layer Ethernet Clock Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    42 nd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting 77 PHYSICAL LAYER ETHERNET CLOCK SYNCHRONIZATION Reinhard Exel, Georg...oeaw.ac.at Nikolaus Kerö Oregano Systems, Mohsgasse 1, 1030 Wien, Austria E-mail: nikolaus.keroe@oregano.at Abstract Clock synchronization ...is a service widely used in distributed networks to coordinate data acquisition and actions. As the requirement to achieve tighter synchronization

  8. Phase diagrams of antiferromagnetic spin-1 bosons on a square optical lattice with the quadratic Zeeman effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Forges de Parny, L.; Rousseau, V. G.

    2018-02-01

    We study the quadratic Zeeman effect (QZE) in a system of antiferromagnetic spin-1 bosons on a square lattice and derive the ground-state phase diagrams by means of quantum Monte Carlo simulations and mean-field treatment. The QZE imbalances the populations of the magnetic sublevels σ =±1 and σ =0 , and therefore affects the magnetic and mobility properties of the phases. Both methods show that the tip of the even Mott lobes, stabilized by singlet state, is destroyed when turning on the QZE, thus leaving the space to the superfluid phase. Contrariwise, the tips of odd Mott lobes remain unaffected. Therefore, the Mott-superfluid transition with even filling strongly depends on the strength of the QZE, and we show that the QZE can act as a control parameter for this transition at fixed hopping. Using quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we elucidate the nature of the phase transitions and examine in detail the nematic order: the first-order Mott-superfluid transition with even filling observed in the absence of QZE becomes second order for weak QZE, in contradistinction to our mean-field results which predict a first-order transition in a larger range of QZE. Furthermore, a spin nematic order with director along the z axis is found in the odd Mott lobes and in the superfluid phase for energetically favored σ =±1 states. In the superfluid phase with even filling, the x y components of the nematic director remain finite only for moderate QZE.

  9. Thermal conductivity of electron-doped CaMnO3 perovskites: Local lattice distortions and optical phonon thermal excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yang; Sui Yu; Wang Xianjie; Su Wenhui; Liu Xiaoyang; Fan, Hong Jin

    2010-01-01

    The thermal transport properties of a series of electron-doped CaMnO 3 perovskites have been investigated. Throughout the temperature range 5-300 K, phonon thermal conductivity is dominant, and both electron and spin wave contributions are negligible. The short phonon mean free paths in this system result in the relatively low thermal conductivities. The strong phonon scatterings stem from the A-site mismatch and bond-length fluctuations induced by local distortions of MnO 6 octahedra. The thermal conductivity in the magnetically ordered state is enhanced as a result of the decrease in spin-phonon scattering. The results also indicate that above the magnetic ordering temperature, observable thermal excitation of optical phonons occurs. The contribution of optical phonons to thermal conductivity becomes non-negligible and is proposed to play an important role in the glass-like thermal transport behavior (i.e. positive temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity) in the paramagnetic state. These features can be understood in terms of an expression of thermal conductivity that includes both acoustic and optical phonon terms.

  10. Performance of a 229Thorium solid-state nuclear clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazakov, G A; Schreitl, M; Winkler, G; Schumm, T; Litvinov, A N; Romanenko, V I; Yatsenko, L P; Romanenko, A V

    2012-01-01

    The 7.8 eV nuclear isomer transition in 229 thorium has been suggested as a clock transition in a new type of optical frequency standard. Here we discuss the construction of a ‘solid-state nuclear clock’ from thorium nuclei implanted into single crystals transparent in the vacuum ultraviolet range. We investigate crystal-induced line shifts and broadening effects for the specific system of calcium fluoride. At liquid nitrogen temperatures, the clock performance will be limited by decoherence due to magnetic coupling of the thorium nuclei to neighboring nuclear moments, ruling out the commonly used Rabi or Ramsey interrogation schemes. We propose clock stabilization based on a fluorescence spectroscopy method and present optimized operation parameters. Taking advantage of the large number of quantum oscillators under continuous interrogation, a fractional instability level of 10 −19 might be reached within the solid-state approach. (paper)

  11. Optically induced lattice deformations, electronic structure changes, and enhanced superconductivity in YBa2Cu3O6.48

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mankowsky

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Resonant optical excitation of apical oxygen vibrational modes in the normal state of underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x induces a transient state with optical properties similar to those of the equilibrium superconducting state. Amongst these, a divergent imaginary conductivity and a plasma edge are transiently observed in the photo-stimulated state. Femtosecond hard x-ray diffraction experiments have been used in the past to identify the transient crystal structure in this non-equilibrium state. Here, we start from these crystallographic features and theoretically predict the corresponding electronic rearrangements that accompany these structural deformations. Using density functional theory, we predict enhanced hole-doping of the CuO2 planes. The empty chain Cu dy2-z2 orbital is calculated to strongly reduce in energy, which would increase c-axis transport and potentially enhance the interlayer Josephson coupling as observed in the THz-frequency response. From these results, we calculate changes in the soft x-ray absorption spectra at the Cu L-edge. Femtosecond x-ray pulses from a free electron laser are used to probe changes in absorption at two photon energies along this spectrum and provide data consistent with these predictions.

  12. Surface modifications and optical variations of (−1 1 1) lattice oriented CuO nanofilms for solar energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhanasekaran, V., E-mail: v.j.dhanasekaran@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630003 (India); Mahalingam, T. [Department of Physics, School of Science and Humanities, Karunya University, Coimbatore 641114 (India)

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The films are grown using a low cost SILAR method. • The pH value is found to play a significant role in the property of the resulting films. • The fabrication of band pass filters between 450 nm and 1000 nm is envisaged. • Electrical conductivity and optical band gap values were found to be 68.1 × 10{sup −3} Ω{sup −1} cm{sup −1} and 1.08 eV. • Coating may aid the small band of frequencies could pave way for enhancing the efficiency. - Abstract: This paper reports on the preparation and characterization of Successive Ionic Layer by Adsorption and Reaction (SILAR) grown CuO thin films. The films were deposited onto glass substrates at various solution pH values. The thickness of the film is increased with increase of solution pH values. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the prepared films exhibited the monoclinic structure with (−1 1 1) predominant orientation. The optimized pH value is 11 ± 0.1. The microstructure, morphology, optical and electrical properties are studied and reported. The transmission spectra (T) at normal incidence revealed that the films exhibit indirect transitions and may be tailored for passing selected bands of frequencies in visible near IR range. The activation energy is estimated to be about 0.29 eV.

  13. Surface modifications and optical variations of (−1 1 1) lattice oriented CuO nanofilms for solar energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhanasekaran, V.; Mahalingam, T.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The films are grown using a low cost SILAR method. • The pH value is found to play a significant role in the property of the resulting films. • The fabrication of band pass filters between 450 nm and 1000 nm is envisaged. • Electrical conductivity and optical band gap values were found to be 68.1 × 10 −3 Ω −1 cm −1 and 1.08 eV. • Coating may aid the small band of frequencies could pave way for enhancing the efficiency. - Abstract: This paper reports on the preparation and characterization of Successive Ionic Layer by Adsorption and Reaction (SILAR) grown CuO thin films. The films were deposited onto glass substrates at various solution pH values. The thickness of the film is increased with increase of solution pH values. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the prepared films exhibited the monoclinic structure with (−1 1 1) predominant orientation. The optimized pH value is 11 ± 0.1. The microstructure, morphology, optical and electrical properties are studied and reported. The transmission spectra (T) at normal incidence revealed that the films exhibit indirect transitions and may be tailored for passing selected bands of frequencies in visible near IR range. The activation energy is estimated to be about 0.29 eV

  14. Pitfalls of Insulin Pump Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Amy J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to raise awareness about the importance of ensuring that insulin pumps internal clocks are set up correctly at all times. This is a very important safety issue because all commercially available insulin pumps are not GPS-enabled (though this is controversial), nor equipped with automatically adjusting internal clocks. Special attention is paid to how basal and bolus dose errors can be introduced by daylight savings time changes, travel across time zones, and am-pm clock errors. Correct setting of insulin pump internal clock is crucial for appropriate insulin delivery. A comprehensive literature review is provided, as are illustrative cases. Incorrect setting can potentially result in incorrect insulin delivery, with potential harmful consequences, if too much or too little insulin is delivered. Daylight saving time changes may not significantly affect basal insulin delivery, given the triviality of the time difference. However, bolus insulin doses can be dramatically affected. Such problems may occur when pump wearers have large variations in their insulin to carb ratio, especially if they forget to change their pump clock in the spring. More worrisome than daylight saving time change is the am-pm clock setting. If this setting is set up incorrectly, both basal rates and bolus doses will be affected. Appropriate insulin delivery through insulin pumps requires correct correlation between dose settings and internal clock time settings. Because insulin pumps are not GPS-enabled or automatically time-adjusting, extra caution should be practiced by patients to ensure correct time settings at all times. Clinicians and diabetes educators should verify the date/time of insulin pumps during patients’ visits, and should remind their patients to always verify these settings. PMID:25355713

  15. Supersymmetric lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catterall, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Discretization of supersymmetric theories is an old problem in lattice field theory. It has resisted solution until quite recently when new ideas drawn from orbifold constructions and topological field theory have been brought to bear on the question. The result has been the creation of a new class of lattice gauge theory in which the lattice action is invariant under one or more supersymmetries. The resultant theories are local and free of doublers and in the case of Yang-Mills theories also possess exact gauge invariance. In principle they form the basis for a truly non-perturbative definition of the continuum supersymmetric field theory. In this talk these ideas are reviewed with particular emphasis being placed on N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory.

  16. Sound Clocks and Sonic Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Scott L.; Menicucci, Nicolas C.

    2017-10-01

    Sound propagation within certain non-relativistic condensed matter models obeys a relativistic wave equation despite such systems admitting entirely non-relativistic descriptions. A natural question that arises upon consideration of this is, "do devices exist that will experience the relativity in these systems?" We describe a thought experiment in which `acoustic observers' possess devices called sound clocks that can be connected to form chains. Careful investigation shows that appropriately constructed chains of stationary and moving sound clocks are perceived by observers on the other chain as undergoing the relativistic phenomena of length contraction and time dilation by the Lorentz factor, γ , with c the speed of sound. Sound clocks within moving chains actually tick less frequently than stationary ones and must be separated by a shorter distance than when stationary to satisfy simultaneity conditions. Stationary sound clocks appear to be length contracted and time dilated to moving observers due to their misunderstanding of their own state of motion with respect to the laboratory. Observers restricted to using sound clocks describe a universe kinematically consistent with the theory of special relativity, despite the preferred frame of their universe in the laboratory. Such devices show promise in further probing analogue relativity models, for example in investigating phenomena that require careful consideration of the proper time elapsed for observers.

  17. Circadian clocks, epigenetics, and cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Masri, Selma; Kinouchi, Kenichiro; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The interplay between circadian rhythm and cancer has been suggested for more than a decade based on the observations that shift work and cancer incidence are linked. Accumulating evidence implicates the circadian clock in cancer survival and proliferation pathways. At the molecular level, multiple control mechanisms have been proposed to link circadian transcription and cell-cycle control to tumorigenesis.The circadian gating of the cell cycle and subsequent control of cell proliferation is an area of active investigation. Moreover, the circadian clock is a transcriptional system that is intricately regulated at the epigenetic level. Interestingly, the epigenetic landscape at the level of histone modifications, DNA methylation, and small regulatory RNAs are differentially controlled in cancer cells. This concept raises the possibility that epigenetic control is a common thread linking the clock with cancer, though little scientific evidence is known to date.This review focuses on the link between circadian clock and cancer, and speculates on the possible connections at the epigenetic level that could further link the circadian clock to tumor initiation or progression.

  18. Titan's methane clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Romani, P. N.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Flasar, F. M.

    2010-04-01

    Measurements of the 12C/13C and D/H isotopic ratios in Titan's methane show intriguing differences from the values recorded in the giant planets. This implies that either (1) the atmosphere was differently endowed with material at the time of formation, or (2) evolutionary processes are at work in the moon's atmosphere - or some combination of the two. The Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer Instrument (GCMS) found 12CH4/13CH4 = 82 +/- 1 (Niemann et al. 2005), some 7% lower than the giant planets' value of 88 +/- 7 (Sada et al. 1996), which closely matches the terrestrial inorganic standard of 89. The Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) has previously reported 12CH4/13CH4 of 77 +/-3 based on nadir sounding, which we now revise upwards to 80 +/- 4 based on more accurate limb sounding. The CIRS and GCMS results are therefore in agreement about an overall enrichment in 13CH4 of ~10%. The value of D/H in Titan's CH4 has long been controversial: historical measurements have ranged from about 8-15 x 10-5 (e.g. Coustenis et al. 1989, Coustenis et al. 2003). A recent measurement based on CIRS limb data by Bezard et al. (2007) puts the D/H in CH4 at (13 +/- 1) x 10-5, very much greater than in Jupiter and Saturn, ~2 x 10-5 (Mahaffy et al. 1998, Fletcher et al. 2009). To add complexity, the 12C/13C and D/H vary among molecules in Titan atmosphere, typically showing enhancement in D but depletion in 13C in the daughter species (H2, C2H2, C2H6), relative to the photochemical progenitor, methane. Jennings et al. (2009) have sought to interpret the variance in carbon isotopes as a Kinetic Isotope Effect (KIE), whilst an explanation for the D/H in all molecules remains elusive (Cordier et al. 2008). In this presentation we argue that evolution of isotopic ratios in Titan's methane over time forms a ticking 'clock', somewhat analogous to isotopic ratios in geochronology. Under plausible assumptions about the initial values and subsequent replenishment, various

  19. Localized structures in Kagome lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Avadh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bishop, Alan R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Law, K J H [UNIV OF MASSACHUSETTS; Kevrekidis, P G [UNIV OF MASSACHUSETTS

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the existence and stability of gap vortices and multi-pole gap solitons in a Kagome lattice with a defocusing nonlinearity both in a discrete case and in a continuum one with periodic external modulation. In particular, predictions are made based on expansion around a simple and analytically tractable anti-continuum (zero coupling) limit. These predictions are then confirmed for a continuum model of an optically-induced Kagome lattice in a photorefractive crystal obtained by a continuous transformation of a honeycomb lattice.

  20. Lattice sums then and now

    CERN Document Server

    Borwein, J M; McPhedran, R C

    2013-01-01

    The study of lattice sums began when early investigators wanted to go from mechanical properties of crystals to the properties of the atoms and ions from which they were built (the literature of Madelung's constant). A parallel literature was built around the optical properties of regular lattices of atoms (initiated by Lord Rayleigh, Lorentz and Lorenz). For over a century many famous scientists and mathematicians have delved into the properties of lattices, sometimes unwittingly duplicating the work of their predecessors. Here, at last, is a comprehensive overview of the substantial body of

  1. Perspectives of optical lattices with state-dependent tunneling in approaching quantum magnetism in the presence of the external harmonic trapping potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotnikov, Andrii

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically potential advantages of two-component mixtures in optical lattices with state-dependent tunneling for approaching long-range-order phases and detecting easy-axis antiferromagnetic correlations. While we do not find additional advantages of mixtures with large hopping imbalance for approaching quantum magnetism in a harmonic trap, it is shown that a nonzero difference in hopping amplitudes remains highly important for a proper symmetry breaking in the pseudospin space for the single-site-resolution imaging and can be advantageously used for a significant increase of the signal-to-noise ratio and thus detecting long-range easy-axis antiferromagnetic correlations in the corresponding experiments. - Highlights: • The most optimal ways to observe magnetic correlations in a quantum-gas microscope are presented. • Importance of a controlled symmetry breaking for antiferromagnetism is studied. • A quantitative theoretical analysis for the entropy in ultracold fermionic mixtures is performed. • No advantages from realizations with the strong hopping asymmetry are found.

  2. Optical properties of lattice matched InxGa1-xP1-yNy heteroepitaxial layers on GaP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanishi, T.; Wakahara, A.; Kim, S.M.; Yonezu, H.; Furukawa, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Optical constants and band structure of In x Ga 1-x P 1-y N y lattice matched to GaP (100) substrate are investigated. Nitrogen concentration in the film estimated by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, was 1.4%, 1.8% and 3.5%. Refractive index and transition critical points E 0 (Γ v to Γ c ), E 1 (L v to L c ) and E 2 (X v to X c ) are evaluated by spectroscopic ellipsometry. When N composition increases from 1.4% to 3.5%, both photoluminescence (PL) peak energy, E PL , and E 0 shift to lower energy, and the energy difference ΔE=E 0 -E PL decrease from 380 meV to 110 meV. The large red-sift of E PL from the E 0 suggest that the luminescence is of defect-related luminescence, and crossover point of indirect band structure estimated by the extrapolation of N-composition dependence of ΔE is estimated to be around in In 0.1 Ga 0.9 P 0.96 N 0.04 . (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Lattice overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creutz, M.

    1984-01-01

    After reviewing some recent developments in supercomputer access, the author discusses a few areas where perturbation theory and lattice gauge simulations make contact. The author concludes with a brief discussion of a deterministic dynamics for the Ising model. This may be useful for numerical studies of nonequilibrium phenomena. 13 references

  4. Soliton solutions in a diatomic lattice system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajima, Nobuo; Satsuma, Junkichi.

    1979-04-01

    A continuum limit is considered for a diatomic lattice system with a cubic nonlinearity. A long wave equation describing the interaction of acoustic and optical modes is obtained. It reduces, in certain approximations, to equations having coupled wave solutions. The solutions exhibit trapping of an optical mode by an acoustic soliton. The form of the trapped optical wave depends on the mass ratio of adjacent particles in the diatomic lattice. (author)

  5. Naming analog clocks conceptually facilitates naming digital clocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuwissen, M.H.W.; Roelofs, A.P.A.; Levelt, W.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Naming digital clocks (e.g., 2:45, say "quarter to three") requires conceptual operations on the minute and hour information displayed in the input for producing the correct relative time expression. The interplay of these conceptual operations was investigated using a repetition priming paradigm.

  6. [Study on Hexagonal Super-Lattice Pattern with Light Spot and Dim Spot in Dielectric Barrier Discharge by Optical Emission Spectra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Dong, Li-fang; Niu, Xue-jiao; Zhang, Chao

    2016-02-01

    The hexagonal super-lattice pattern composed of the light spot and the dim spot is firstly observed and investigated in the discharge of gas mixture of air and argon by using the dielectric barrier discharge device with double water electrodes. It is found that the dim spot is located at the center of its surrounding three light spots by observing the discharge image. Obviously, the brightness of the light spot and the dim spot are different, which indicates that the plasma states of the light spot and the dim spot may be different. The optical emission spectrum method is used to further study the several plasma parameters of the light spot and the dim spot in different argon content. The emission spectra of the N₂ second positive band (C³IIu --> B³IIg) are measured, from which the molecule vibration temperatures of the light spot and the dim spot are calculated. Based on the relative intensity ratio of the line at 391.4 nm and the N₂ line at 394.1 nm, the average electron energies of the light spot and the dim spot are investigated. The broadening of spectral line 696.57 nm (2P₂-1S₅) is used to study the electron densities of the light spot and the dim spot. The experiment shows that the molecule vibration temperature, average electron energy and the electron density of the dim spot are higher than those of the light spot in the same argon content. The molecule vibration temperature and electron density of the light spot and dim spot increase with the argon content increasing from 70% to 95%, while average electron energies of the light spot and dim spot decrease gradually. The short-exposure image recorded by a high speed video camera shows that the dim spot results from the surface discharges (SDs). The surface discharge induced by the volume discharge (VD) has the decisive effect on the formation of the dim spot. The experiment above plays an important role in studying the formation mechanism of the hexagonal super-lattice pattern with light spot and

  7. Lattice thermal conductivity in layered BiCuSeO

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, S.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    structure of the phonon dispersion. For example, at room temperature the optical phonons account for an enormous 42% of the lattice thermal conductivity. We also quantify the anisotropy of the lattice thermal conductivity and determine the distribution

  8. Biological clocks: riding the tides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Iglesia, Horacio O; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2013-10-21

    Animals with habitats in the intertidal zone often display biological rhythms that coordinate with both the tidal and the daily environmental cycles. Two recent studies show that the molecular components of the biological clocks mediating tidal rhythms are likely different from the phylogenetically conserved components that mediate circadian (daily) rhythms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A network of (autonomic) clock outputs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalsbeek, A.; Perreau-Lenz, S.; Buijs, R. M.

    2006-01-01

    The circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) is composed of thousands of oscillator neurons, each of which is dependent on the cell-autonomous action of a defined set of circadian clock genes. A major question is still how these individual oscillators are organized into a biological clock

  10. A network of (autonomic) clock outputs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalsbeek, A.; Perreau-Lenz, S.; Buijs, R. M.

    2006-01-01

    The circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) is composed of thousands of oscillator neurons, each dependent on the cell-autonomous action of a defined set of circadian clock genes. A major question is still how these individual oscillators are organized into a biological clock that

  11. Light and the human circadian clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roenneberg, Till; Kantermann, Thomas; Juda, Myriam; Vetter, Céline; Allebrandt, Karla V

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock can only reliably fulfil its function if it is stably entrained. Most clocks use the light-dark cycle as environmental signal (zeitgeber) for this active synchronisation. How we think about clock function and entrainment has been strongly influenced by the early concepts of the

  12. Inhomogeneous spectral moment sum rules for the retarded Green function and self-energy of strongly correlated electrons or ultracold fermionic atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freericks, J. K.; Turkowski, V.

    2009-01-01

    Spectral moment sum rules are presented for the inhomogeneous many-body problem described by the fermionic Falicov-Kimball or Hubbard models. These local sum rules allow for arbitrary hoppings, site energies, and interactions. They can be employed to quantify the accuracy of numerical solutions to the inhomogeneous many-body problem such as strongly correlated multilayered devices, ultracold atoms in an optical lattice with a trap potential, strongly correlated systems that are disordered, or systems with nontrivial spatial ordering such as a charge-density wave or a spin-density wave. We also show how the spectral moment sum rules determine the asymptotic behavior of the Green function, self-energy, and dynamical mean field when applied to the dynamical mean-field theory solution of the many-body problem. In particular, we illustrate in detail how one can dramatically reduce the number of Matsubara frequencies needed to solve the Falicov-Kimball model while still retaining high precision, and we sketch how one can incorporate these results into Hirsch-Fye quantum Monte Carlo solvers for the Hubbard (or more complicated) models. Since the solution of inhomogeneous problems is significantly more time consuming than periodic systems, efficient use of these sum rules can provide a dramatic speed up in the computational time required to solve the many-body problem. We also discuss how these sum rules behave in nonequilibrium situations as well, where the Hamiltonian has explicit time dependence due to a driving field or due to the time-dependent change in a parameter such as the interaction strength or the origin of the trap potential.

  13. Different Levels of Expression of the Clock Protein PER and the Glial Marker REPO in Ensheathing and Astrocyte-Like Glia of the Distal Medulla of Drosophila Optic Lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzeptowski, Wojciech; Walkowicz, Lucyna; Płonczyńska, Alicja; Górska-Andrzejak, Jolanta

    2018-01-01

    Circadian plasticity of the visual system of Drosophila melanogaster depends on functioning of both the neuronal and glial oscillators. The clock function of the former is already quite well-recognized. The latter, however, is much less known and documented. In this study we focus on the glial oscillators that reside in the distal part of the second visual neuropil, medulla (dMnGl), in vicinity of the PIGMENT-DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF) releasing terminals of the circadian clock ventral Lateral Neurons (LNvs). We reveal the heterogeneity of the dMnGl, which express the clock protein PERIOD (PER) and the pan-glial marker REVERSED POLARITY (REPO) at higher (P1) or lower (P2) levels. We show that the cells with stronger expression of PER display also stronger expression of REPO, and that the number of REPO-P1 cells is bigger during the day than during the night. Using a combination of genetic markers and immunofluorescent labeling with anti PER and REPO Abs, we have established that the P1 and P2 cells can be associated with two different types of the dMnGl, the ensheathing (EnGl), and the astrocyte-like glia (ALGl). Surprisingly, the EnGl belong to the P1 cells, whereas the ALGl, previously reported to play the main role in the circadian rhythms, display the characteristics of the P2 cells (express very low level of PER and low level of REPO). Next to the EnGl and ALGl we have also observed another type of cells in the distal medulla that express PER and REPO, although at very low levels. Based on their morphology we have identified them as the T1 interneurons. Our study reveals the complexity of the distal medulla circadian network, which appears to consist of different types of glial and neuronal peripheral clocks, displaying molecular oscillations of higher (EnGl) and lower (ALGl and T1) amplitudes.

  14. Lattice QCD on fine lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Stefan [DESY (Germany). Neumann Inst. for Computing

    2016-11-01

    These configurations are currently in use in many on-going projects carried out by researchers throughout Europe. In particular this data will serve as an essential input into the computation of the coupling constant of QCD, where some of the simulations are still on-going. But also projects computing the masses of hadrons and investigating their structure are underway as well as activities in the physics of heavy quarks. As this initial project of gauge field generation has been successful, it is worthwhile to extend the currently available ensembles with further points in parameter space. These will allow to further study and control systematic effects like the ones introduced by the finite volume, the non-physical quark masses and the finite lattice spacing. In particular certain compromises have still been made in the region where pion masses and lattice spacing are both small. This is because physical pion masses require larger lattices to keep the effects of the finite volume under control. At light pion masses, a precise control of the continuum extrapolation is therefore difficult, but certainly a main goal of future simulations. To reach this goal, algorithmic developments as well as faster hardware will be needed.

  15. The electronic and optical properties of quaternary GaAs1-x-y N x Bi y alloy lattice-matched to GaAs: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoyang; Li, Dechun; Zhao, Shengzhi; Li, Guiqiu; Yang, Kejian

    2014-01-01

    First-principles calculations based on density functional theory have been performed for the quaternary GaAs1-x-y N x Bi y alloy lattice-matched to GaAs. Using the state-of-the-art computational method with the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE) hybrid functional, electronic, and optical properties were obtained, including band structures, density of states (DOSs), dielectric function, absorption coefficient, refractive index, energy loss function, and reflectivity. It is found that the lattice constant of GaAs1-x-y N x Bi y alloy with y/x =1.718 can match to GaAs. With the incorporation of N and Bi into GaAs, the band gap of GaAs1-x-y N x Bi y becomes small and remains direct. The calculated optical properties indicate that GaAs1-x-y N x Bi y has higher optical efficiency as it has less energy loss than GaAs. In addition, it is also found that the electronic and optical properties of GaAs1-x-y N x Bi y alloy can be further controlled by tuning the N and Bi compositions in this alloy. These results suggest promising applications of GaAs1-x-y N x Bi y quaternary alloys in optoelectronic devices.

  16. Automatic control of clock duty cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaoxin (Inventor); Roper, Weston (Inventor); Seefeldt, James D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    In general, this disclosure is directed to a duty cycle correction (DCC) circuit that adjusts a falling edge of a clock signal to achieve a desired duty cycle. In some examples, the DCC circuit may generate a pulse in response to a falling edge of an input clock signal, delay the pulse based on a control voltage, adjust the falling edge of the input clock signal based on the delayed pulse to produce an output clock signal, and adjust the control voltage based on the difference between a duty cycle of the output clock signal and a desired duty cycle. Since the DCC circuit adjusts the falling edge of the clock cycle to achieve a desired duty cycle, the DCC may be incorporated into existing PLL control loops that adjust the rising edge of a clock signal without interfering with the operation of such PLL control loops.

  17. Circadian clock, cell cycle and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cansu Özbayer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There are a few rhythms of our daily lives that we are under the influence. One of them is characterized by predictable changes over a 24-hour timescale called circadian clock. This cellular clock is coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the anterior hypothalamus. The clock consist of an autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loop compose of four genes/proteins; BMAL1, Clock, Cyrptochrome, and Period. BMAL 1 and Clock are transcriptional factors and Period and Cyrptochrome are their targets. Period and Cyrptochrome dimerize in the cytoplasm to enter the nucleus where they inhibit Clock/BMAL activity.It has been demonstrate that circadian clock plays an important role cellular proliferation, DNA damage and repair mechanisms, checkpoints, apoptosis and cancer.

  18. Molecular cogs of the insect circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasu, Naoto; Shimohigashi, Yasuyuki; Tominaga, Yoshiya; Shimohigashi, Miki

    2003-08-01

    During the last five years, enormous progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of circadian systems, mainly by molecular genetic studies using the mouse and fly. Extensive evidence has revealed that the core clock machinery involves "clock genes" and "clock proteins" functioning as molecular cogs. These participate in transcriptional/translational feedback loops and many homologous clock-components in the fruit fly Drosophila are also expressed in mammalian clock tissues with circadian rhythms. Thus, the mechanisms of the central clock seem to be conserved across animal kingdom. However, some recent studies imply that the present widely accepted molecular models of circadian clocks may not always be supported by the experimental evidence.

  19. How robust will the RHIC lattice be during commissioning?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, S.

    1991-09-01

    The question raised here is whether the RHIC lattice is robust enough to make all these commissioning manipulations possible. There are of course many factors involved in answering this question in a definitive manner. The purpose of this note is to see if there are any fundamental and serious shortcomings basic to the lattice. The lattice considered here is the one presented to the workshop by Steve Tepikian and called RHIC91. More specifically, we fix nine quadrupole parameters in all insertions except in the 6 o'clock insertion where the independent parameters is sixteen. The so-called perfect matching may require fourteen parameters instead of nine but the difference is insignificant. On the other hand, if the number of parameters is reduced from sixteen to nine in the 6 o'clock insertion, the mismatch in the arc beta function becomes non-trivial. For example, the horizontal beta may vary between 40m to 60m at QF locations

  20. Digital lattice gauge theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Erez; Farace, Alessandro; Reznik, Benni; Cirac, J. Ignacio

    2017-02-01

    We propose a general scheme for a digital construction of lattice gauge theories with dynamical fermions. In this method, the four-body interactions arising in models with 2 +1 dimensions and higher are obtained stroboscopically, through a sequence of two-body interactions with ancillary degrees of freedom. This yields stronger interactions than the ones obtained through perturbative methods, as typically done in previous proposals, and removes an important bottleneck in the road towards experimental realizations. The scheme applies to generic gauge theories with Lie or finite symmetry groups, both Abelian and non-Abelian. As a concrete example, we present the construction of a digital quantum simulator for a Z3 lattice gauge theory with dynamical fermionic matter in 2 +1 dimensions, using ultracold atoms in optical lattices, involving three atomic species, representing the matter, gauge, and auxiliary degrees of freedom, that are separated in three different layers. By moving the ancilla atoms with a proper sequence of steps, we show how we can obtain the desired evolution in a clean, controlled way.

  1. Entanglement of quantum clocks through gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Ruiz, Esteban; Giacomini, Flaminia; Brukner, Časlav

    2017-03-21

    In general relativity, the picture of space-time assigns an ideal clock to each world line. Being ideal, gravitational effects due to these clocks are ignored and the flow of time according to one clock is not affected by the presence of clocks along nearby world lines. However, if time is defined operationally, as a pointer position of a physical clock that obeys the principles of general relativity and quantum mechanics, such a picture is, at most, a convenient fiction. Specifically, we show that the general relativistic mass-energy equivalence implies gravitational interaction between the clocks, whereas the quantum mechanical superposition of energy eigenstates leads to a nonfixed metric background. Based only on the assumption that both principles hold in this situation, we show that the clocks necessarily get entangled through time dilation effect, which eventually leads to a loss of coherence of a single clock. Hence, the time as measured by a single clock is not well defined. However, the general relativistic notion of time is recovered in the classical limit of clocks.

  2. A VMEbus clock system for accelerator control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beechy, D.G.; McClure, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    Because an accelerator has many systems which must operate with a high degree of synchronization, a clock signal is typically generated which carries timing information to the various accelerator components. This paper discusses two VMEbus modules designed to generate and receive this clock signal. Together they implement a clock system which can generate timing markers with 200 nanosecond resolution and can generate timing delays of over one hour with one microsecond resolution. The Clock Generator module contains both a time line generator programmed to produce clock events at specific times and eight programmable input channels to produce clock events when externally triggered. Additional clock events are generated directly from the VMEbus. Generators can be cascaded for added capability. The Clock Timer module receives the signal from the generator. It can be programmed to recognize specific clock events which act as triggers to the eight timing channels on the module. Each timing channel is programmed with a 32-bit delay value. The channels are clocked at 1 MHz. At the end of the delay period, a timer channel produces an output pulse and optionally can generate a bus interrupt

  3. Area of Lattice Polygons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Paul

    2006-01-01

    A lattice is a (rectangular) grid of points, usually pictured as occurring at the intersections of two orthogonal sets of parallel, equally spaced lines. Polygons that have lattice points as vertices are called lattice polygons. It is clear that lattice polygons come in various shapes and sizes. A very small lattice triangle may cover just 3…

  4. Sexual Differentiation of Circadian Clock Function in the Adrenal Gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloehn, Ian; Pillai, Savin B; Officer, Laurel; Klement, Claire; Gasser, Paul J; Evans, Jennifer A

    2016-05-01

    Sex differences in glucocorticoid production are associated with increased responsiveness of the adrenal gland in females. However, the adrenal-intrinsic mechanisms that establish sexual dimorphic function remain ill defined. Glucocorticoid production is gated at the molecular level by the circadian clock, which may contribute to sexual dimorphic adrenal function. Here we examine sex differences in the adrenal gland using an optical reporter of circadian clock function. Adrenal glands were cultured from male and female Period2::Luciferase (PER2::LUC) mice to assess clock function in vitro in real time. We confirm that there is a pronounced sex difference in the intrinsic capacity to sustain PER2::LUC rhythms in vitro, with higher amplitude rhythms in adrenal glands collected from males than from females. Changes in adrenal PER2::LUC rhythms over the reproductive life span implicate T as an important factor in driving sex differences in adrenal clock function. By directly manipulating hormone levels in adult mice in vivo, we demonstrate that T increases the amplitude of PER2::LUC rhythms in adrenal glands of both male and female mice. In contrast, we find little evidence that ovarian hormones modify adrenal clock function. Lastly, we find that T in vitro can increase the amplitude of PER2::LUC rhythms in male adrenals but not female adrenals, which suggests the existence of sex differences in the mechanisms of T action in vivo. Collectively these results reveal that activational effects of T alter circadian timekeeping in the adrenal gland, which may have implications for sex differences in stress reactivity and stress-related disorders.

  5. Development of an atomic clock on an atom chip: Optimisation of the coherence time and preliminary characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroute, Clement

    2010-01-01

    We describe the construction and preliminary characterization of an atomic clock on an atom chip. A sample of magnetically trapped 87 Rb atoms is cooled below 1 μK, close to Bose- Einstein condensation temperature. The trapped states |F = 1; m F = -1> and |F = 2;m F = 1> define our two-photon clock transition. Atoms are trapped around a field B0 = 3.23 G, where the clock frequency is first-order insensitive to magnetic field fluctuations. We have designed an atom chip that includes a microwave coplanar waveguide which drives the 6.835 GHz transition. The whole clock cycle is performed in the vicinity of the chip surface, making the physics package compact (5 cm) 3 . We first describe the experimental setup of the clock, and the optical bench that has been developed and characterized during this thesis. We then give the results obtained for atom cooling, which led to obtaining a 3 10 4 atoms Bose-Einstein condensate. We finally present the results obtained by Ramsey spectroscopy of the clock transition. We measure coherence times exceeding 10 seconds with our setup, dominated by atom losses. A preliminary measurement shows that the clock relative frequency stability is of 6 10 -12 at 1 s, limited by technical noise. Our goal is to reach a stability in the low 10 -13 at 1 s, i.e. better than commercial clocks and competitive with today's best compact clocks. (author)

  6. The Implementation of E1 Clock Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ziyu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clock transform and recovery is of significant importance in microwave TDM service, and it is always extracted from the E1 line data stream in most cases. However, intrinsically uncertain delay and jitter caused by packet transmission of E1 data information, may lead to the indexes of the data recovery clock exceed the clock performance template. Through analysis of the E1 clock indexes and measuring methods, this paper proposes a new clock recovery method. The method employs two buffers, the first RAM is used as a buffer to deduct excess information, and the second FIFO is used as a buffer to recovery the clock and data. The first buffer has a feedback from the second one, and is able to actively respond to changes in the data link and requests from the second one. The test results validate the effectiveness of the method, and the corresponding scheme is also valuable for the other communication systems.

  7. The Square Light Clock and Special Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, J. Ronald; Amiri, Farhang

    2012-01-01

    A thought experiment that includes a square light clock is similar to the traditional vertical light beam and mirror clock, except it is made up of four mirrors placed at a 45[degree] angle at each corner of a square of length L[subscript 0], shown in Fig. 1. Here we have shown the events as measured in the rest frame of the square light clock. By…

  8. Space experiments with high stability clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vessot, R.F.C.

    1993-01-01

    Modern metrology depends increasingly on the accuracy and frequency stability of atomic clocks. Applications of such high-stability oscillators (or clocks) to experiments performed in space are described and estimates of the precision of these experiments are made in terms of clock performance. Methods using time-correlation to cancel localized disturbances in very long signal paths and a proposed space borne four station VLBI system are described. (TEC). 30 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  9. LATTICE: an interactive lattice computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, J.

    1976-10-01

    LATTICE is a computer code which enables an interactive user to calculate the functions of a synchrotron lattice. This program satisfies the requirements at LBL for a simple interactive lattice program by borrowing ideas from both TRANSPORT and SYNCH. A fitting routine is included

  10. TURNING BACK THE CLOCK: INFERRING THE HISTORY OF THE EIGHT O'CLOCK ARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkelstein, Steven L.; Papovich, Casey; Rudnick, Gregory; Egami, Eiichi; Rieke, Marcia J.; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Rigby, Jane R.

    2009-01-01

    We present the results from an optical and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic study of the ultraviolet-luminous z = 2.73 galaxy, the 8 o'clock arc. Due to gravitational lensing, this galaxy is magnified by a factor of μ > 10, allowing in-depth measurements which are usually unfeasible at such redshifts. In the optical spectra, we measured the systemic redshift of the galaxy, z = 2.7322± 0.0012, using stellar photospheric lines. This differs from the redshift of absorption lines in the interstellar medium, z = 2.7302 ± 0.0006, implying gas outflows on the order of 160 km s -1 . With H- and K-band NIR spectra, we have measured nebular emission lines of Hα, Hβ, Hγ, [N II], and [O III], which have a redshift z = 2.7333 ± 0.0001, consistent with the derived systemic redshift. From the Balmer decrement, we measured the dust extinction in this galaxy to be A 5500 = 1.17 ± 36 mag. Correcting the Hα line flux for dust extinction as well as the assumed lensing factor, we measure a star formation rate (SFR) of ∼270 M sun yr -1 , which is higher than ∼85% of star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 2-3. Using combinations of all detected emission lines, we find that the 8 o'clock arc has a gas-phase metallicity of ∼0.8 Z sun , showing that enrichment at high redshift is not rare, even in blue, star-forming galaxies. Studying spectra from two of the arc components separately, we find that one component dominates both the dust extinction and SFR, although the metallicities between the two components are similar. We derive the mass via stellar population modeling, and find that the arc has a total stellar mass of ∼4.2 x 10 11 M sun , which falls on the mass-metallicity relation at z ∼ 2. Finally, we estimate the total gas mass, and find it to be only ∼12% of the stellar mass, implying that the 8 o'clock arc is likely nearing the end of a starburst.

  11. High Performance Clocks and Gravity Field Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, J.; Dirkx, D.; Kopeikin, S. M.; Lion, G.; Panet, I.; Petit, G.; Visser, P. N. A. M.

    2018-02-01

    Time measured by an ideal clock crucially depends on the gravitational potential and velocity of the clock according to general relativity. Technological advances in manufacturing high-precision atomic clocks have rapidly improved their accuracy and stability over the last decade that approached the level of 10^{-18}. This notable achievement along with the direct sensitivity of clocks to the strength of the gravitational field make them practically important for various geodetic applications that are addressed in the present paper. Based on a fully relativistic description of the background gravitational physics, we discuss the impact of those highly-precise clocks on the realization of reference frames and time scales used in geodesy. We discuss the current definitions of basic geodetic concepts and come to the conclusion that the advances in clocks and other metrological technologies will soon require the re-definition of time scales or, at least, clarification to ensure their continuity and consistent use in practice. The relative frequency shift between two clocks is directly related to the difference in the values of the gravity potential at the points of clock's localization. According to general relativity the relative accuracy of clocks in 10^{-18} is equivalent to measuring the gravitational red shift effect between two clocks with the height difference amounting to 1 cm. This makes the clocks an indispensable tool in high-precision geodesy in addition to laser ranging and space geodetic techniques. We show how clock measurements can provide geopotential numbers for the realization of gravity-field-related height systems and can resolve discrepancies in classically-determined height systems as well as between national height systems. Another application of clocks is the direct use of observed potential differences for the improved recovery of regional gravity field solutions. Finally, clock measurements for space-borne gravimetry are analyzed along with

  12. Long-Term Clock Behavior of GPS IIR Satellites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Epstein, Marvin; Dass, Todd; Rajan, John; Gilmour, Paul

    2007-01-01

    .... Rubidium clocks, as opposed to cesium clocks, have significant long-term drift. The current literature describes an initial model of drift aging for rubidium atomic clocks followed by a long-term characteristic...

  13. A clock synchronization skeleton based on RTAI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Y.; Visser, P.M.; Broenink, Johannes F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a clock synchronization skeleton based on RTAI (Real Time Application Interface). The skeleton is a thin layer that provides unified but extendible interfaces to the underlying operating system, the synchronization algorithms and the upper level applications in need of clock

  14. The clock paradox as a cosmological problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, K.Y.

    1975-01-01

    In this paper the clock paradox is discussed within the framework of the general theory of relativity. It is shown that in general the aging asymmetry exists. It is also argued that the clock paradox, according to Mach's principle, is essentially a cosmological problem. (author)

  15. Fast Clock Recovery for Digital Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tell, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    Circuit extracts clock signal from random non-return-to-zero data stream, locking onto clock within one bit period at 1-gigabitper-second data rate. Circuit used for synchronization in opticalfiber communications. Derives speed from very short response time of gallium arsenide metal/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFET's).

  16. Internal Clock Drift Estimation in Computer Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham Marouani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Most computers have several high-resolution timing sources, from the programmable interrupt timer to the cycle counter. Yet, even at a precision of one cycle in ten millions, clocks may drift significantly in a single second at a clock frequency of several GHz. When tracing the low-level system events in computer clusters, such as packet sending or reception, each computer system records its own events using an internal clock. In order to properly understand the global system behavior and performance, as reported by the events recorded on each computer, it is important to estimate precisely the clock differences and drift between the different computers in the system. This article studies the clock precision and stability of several computer systems, with different architectures. It also studies the typical network delay characteristics, since time synchronization algorithms rely on the exchange of network packets and are dependent on the symmetry of the delays. A very precise clock, based on the atomic time provided by the GPS satellite network, was used as a reference to measure clock drifts and network delays. The results obtained are of immediate use to all applications which depend on computer clocks or network time synchronization accuracy.

  17. Lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, G.

    1982-01-01

    After a description of a pure Yang-Mills theory on a lattice, the author considers a three-dimensional pure U(1) lattice gauge theory. Thereafter he discusses the exact relation between lattice gauge theories with the gauge groups SU(2) and SO(3). Finally he presents Monte Carlo data on phase transitions in SU(2) and SO(3) lattice gauge models. (HSI)

  18. Processing of visually presented clock times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goolkasian, P; Park, D C

    1980-11-01

    The encoding and representation of visually presented clock times was investigated in three experiments utilizing a comparative judgment task. Experiment 1 explored the effects of comparing times presented in different formats (clock face, digit, or word), and Experiment 2 examined angular distance effects created by varying positions of the hands on clock faces. In Experiment 3, encoding and processing differences between clock faces and digitally presented times were directly measured. Same/different reactions to digitally presented times were faster than to times presented on a clock face, and this format effect was found to be a result of differences in processing that occurred after encoding. Angular separation also had a limited effect on processing. The findings are interpreted within the framework of theories that refer to the importance of representational codes. The applicability to the data of Bank's semantic-coding theory, Paivio's dual-coding theory, and the levels-of-processing view of memory are discussed.

  19. Global synchronization of parallel processors using clock pulse width modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Ellavsky, Matthew R.; Franke, Ross L.; Gara, Alan; Gooding, Thomas M.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Liebsch, Thomas A.; Littrell, Daniel; Ohmacht, Martin; Reed, Don D.; Schenck, Brandon E.; Swetz, Richard A.

    2013-04-02

    A circuit generates a global clock signal with a pulse width modification to synchronize processors in a parallel computing system. The circuit may include a hardware module and a clock splitter. The hardware module may generate a clock signal and performs a pulse width modification on the clock signal. The pulse width modification changes a pulse width within a clock period in the clock signal. The clock splitter may distribute the pulse width modified clock signal to a plurality of processors in the parallel computing system.

  20. Transitionless lattices for LAMPF II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franczak, B.J.

    1984-10-01

    Some techniques are described for the design of synchrotron lattices that have zero dispersion in the straight sections and/or imaginary transition energy (negative momentum-compaction factor) but no excessive amplitudes of the dispersion function. Included as an application is a single-stage synchrotron, with variable optics, that has different ion-optical properties at injection and extraction but requires a complex way of programming the quadrupoles. In addition, a two-stage facility consisting of a 45-GeV synchrotron of 1100-m circumference and a 9-GeV booster of half that size is presented. As alternates to these separated-function lattices, some combined-function modules are given that can be used to construct a synchrotron with similar properties

  1. Lattices with unique complements

    CERN Document Server

    Saliĭ, V N

    1988-01-01

    The class of uniquely complemented lattices properly contains all Boolean lattices. However, no explicit example of a non-Boolean lattice of this class has been found. In addition, the question of whether this class contains any complete non-Boolean lattices remains unanswered. This book focuses on these classical problems of lattice theory and the various attempts to solve them. Requiring no specialized knowledge, the book is directed at researchers and students interested in general algebra and mathematical logic.

  2. Lattice doped Zn–SnO{sub 2} nanospheres: A systematic exploration of dopant ion effects on structural, optical, and enhanced gas sensing properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baraneedharan, P. [Nanoscience and Technology, Anna University – BIT Campus, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India); Alternative Energy and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Imran Hussain, S. [Nanoscience and Technology, Anna University – BIT Campus, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India); Department of Applied Science and Technology, Anna University, Chennai 600 025 (India); Dinesh, V.P. [Nanosensor Laboratory, PSG Institute of Advanced Studies, Coimbatore 641004 (India); Siva, C. [Nanoscience and Technology, Anna University – BIT Campus, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India); Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, SRM University, Kattankulathur 603 203 (India); Biji, P. [Nanosensor Laboratory, PSG Institute of Advanced Studies, Coimbatore 641004 (India); Sivakumar, M., E-mail: muthusiva@gmail.com [Nanoscience and Technology, Anna University – BIT Campus, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A simple, novel and surfactant free hydrothermal route to prepare SnO{sub 2} nanospheres. • A systematic investigation of growth mechanism with the assist of time dependent HR-TEM images. • Incorporation of Zn ions into SnO{sub 2} lattices clearly elucidated with XRD and XPS spectrums. • Three fold time increased response in Zn–SnO{sub 2} nanospheres when compared to undoped SnO{sub 2}. - Abstract: A surfactant-free one step hydrothermal method is reported to synthesize zinc (Zn{sup 2+}) doped SnO{sub 2} nanospheres. The structural analysis of X-ray diffraction confirms the tetragonal crystal system of the material with superior crystalline nature. The shift in diffraction peak, variation in lattice constant and disparity in particle size confirm the incorporation of Zn{sup 2+} ions to the Sn host lattices. The lattice doped structure, the disparity in morphology, size and shape by the addition of Zn{sup 2+} ions are evident from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic and electron microscopic analysis. Significant changes in the absorption edge and the band gap with increased doping concentration were observed in UV–vis absorption spectral analysis. The formation of acceptor energy levels with the incorporation of Zn{sup 2+} ions has a significant effect on the electrical conductivity of SnO{sub 2} nanospheres. Comparative tests for gas sensors based on Zn doped SnO{sub 2} nanospheres and SnO{sub 2} nanospheres clearly show that the former exhibited excellent NO{sub 2} sensing performance. The responses of Zn{sup 2+} ions incorporated SnO{sub 2} nanospheres sensor were increased 3 fold at trace level NO{sub 2} gas concentrations ranging from 1 to 5 ppm. The excellent sensitivity, selectivity and fast response make the Zn{sup 2+} doped SnO{sub 2} nanospheres ideal for NO{sub 2} sensing.

  3. Dilatation effect of ''quantum clocks''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chylinski, Z.

    1981-01-01

    The relativistic dilatation effect of the life-time of unstable microparticles combined with quantum symmetry of their description results in the ''quantum-dilatation'' dilemma. It is due to the classical character of the relativity theory which here reveals itself in the classical world-line of the clock necessary in order to deduce the dilatation effect from the Lorentz transformation. It is shown how to solve this dilemma, basing on the relation continuum C 4 . Two types of measurements of time intervals, the direct and indirect one, are analyzed. The former type corresponds to the external space-time continuum, where any direct measurement takes place, and the latter, to the internal relation continuum C 4 , where the internal structures of isolated micro-systems are sunk. (author)

  4. Apiary B Factory lattice design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donald, M.H.R.; Garren, A.A.

    1991-04-01

    The Apiary B Factory is a proposed high-intensity electron-positron collider. This paper will present the lattice design for this facility, which envisions two rings with unequal energies in the PEP tunnel. The design has many interesting optical and geometrical features due to the needs to conform to the existing tunnel, and to achieve the necessary emittances, damping times and vacuum. Existing hardware is used to a maximum extent. 8 figs. 1 tab

  5. Lattices for the TRIUMF KAON factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servranckx, R.V.; Craddock, M.K.

    1989-09-01

    Separated-function racetrack lattices have been developed for the KAON Factory accelerators that have more flexibility than the old circular lattices. The arcs of the large rings have a regular FODO structure with a superimposed six-fold symmetric modulation of the betafunction in order to raise γ t to infinity. Straight sections with zero dispersion are provided for rf cavities and fast injection and extraction, and with controlled dispersion for H - injection and slow extraction. For the small rings, sixfold symmetric circular lattices with high γ t are retained. In the Accumulator lattice, a straight section with double waist and controlled η function allows for H - injection and phase-space painting. The ion-optical properties of the lattices and the results from tracking studies are discussed

  6. Synthesizing lattice structures in phase space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Lingzhen; Marthaler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In one dimensional systems, it is possible to create periodic structures in phase space through driving, which is called phase space crystals (Guo et al 2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 205303). This is possible even if for particles trapped in a potential without periodicity. In this paper we discuss ultracold atoms in a driven optical lattice, which is a realization of such a phase space crystals. The corresponding lattice structure in phase space is complex and contains rich physics. A phase space lattice differs fundamentally from a lattice in real space, because its coordinate system, i.e., phase space, has a noncommutative geometry, which naturally provides an artificial gauge (magnetic) field. We study the behavior of the quasienergy band structure and investigate the dissipative dynamics. Synthesizing lattice structures in phase space provides a new platform to simulate the condensed matter phenomena and study the intriguing phenomena of driven systems far away from equilibrium. (paper)

  7. Transmission delays in hardware clock synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kang G.; Ramanathan, P.

    1988-01-01

    Various methods, both with software and hardware, have been proposed to synchronize a set of physical clocks in a system. Software methods are very flexible and economical but suffer an excessive time overhead, whereas hardware methods require no time overhead but are unable to handle transmission delays in clock signals. The effects of nonzero transmission delays in synchronization have been studied extensively in the communication area in the absence of malicious or Byzantine faults. The authors show that it is easy to incorporate the ideas from the communication area into the existing hardware clock synchronization algorithms to take into account the presence of both malicious faults and nonzero transmission delays.

  8. Circadian clock components in the rat neocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin Fredensborg; Rohde, Kristian; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2013-01-01

    in the rat neocortex. Among these, Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Bmal1, Nr1d1 and Dbp were found to exhibit daily rhythms. The amplitude of circadian oscillation in neocortical clock gene expression was damped and the peak delayed as compared with the SCN. Lesions of the SCN revealed that rhythmic clock gene...... expression in the neocortex is dependent on the SCN. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed that products of the canonical clock gene Per2 are located in perikarya throughout all areas of the neocortex. These findings show that local circadian oscillators driven by the SCN reside within...... neurons of the neocortex....

  9. Racetrack lattices for the TRIUMF KAON factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servranckx, R.V.; Craddock, M.K.

    1989-05-01

    Separated-function racetrack lattices have been developed for the KAON Factory accelerators that have more flexibility than the old circular lattices. The arcs of the large rings have a regular FODO structure with a superimposed six-fold symmetric modulation of the betafunction in order to raise γ t to infinity. In the small rings, γ t is kept high enough by choosing a sufficiently large phase advance in the arcs. Straight sections with zero dispersion are provided for rf cavities and fast injection and extraction, and with controlled dispersion for H - injection and slow extraction. The ion-optical properties of the lattices and the results from tracking studies are discussed

  10. Electronic properties of graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fürst, Joachim Alexander; Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Flindt, C.

    2009-01-01

    Graphene antidot lattices constitute a novel class of nano-engineered graphene devices with controllable electronic and optical properties. An antidot lattice consists of a periodic array of holes that causes a band gap to open up around the Fermi level, turning graphene from a semimetal...... into a semiconductor. We calculate the electronic band structure of graphene antidot lattices using three numerical approaches with different levels of computational complexity, efficiency and accuracy. Fast finite-element solutions of the Dirac equation capture qualitative features of the band structure, while full...

  11. Reversal of the lattice structure in SrCoOx epitaxial thin films studied by real-time optical spectroscopy and first-principles calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Woo Seok; Jeen, Hyoungjeen; Lee, Jun Hee; Seo, S. S. Ambrose; Cooper, Valentino R.; Rabe, Karin M.; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2013-01-01

    Using real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry, we directly observed a reversible lattice and electronic structure evolution in SrCoOx (x = 2.5 - 3) epitaxial thin films. Drastically different electronic ground states, which are extremely susceptible to the oxygen content x, are found in the two topotactic phases, i.e. the brownmillerite SrCoO2.5 and the perovskite SrCoO3. First principles calculations confirmed substantial differences in the electronic structure, including a metal-insulator tran...

  12. Optimized eight-dimensional lattice modulation format for IM-DD 56 Gb/s optical interconnections using 850 nm VCSELs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Xiaofeng; Tatarczak, Anna; Lyubopytov, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    In this paper a novel eight-dimensional lattice optimized modulation format, Block Based 8-dimensional/8-level (BB8), is proposed, taking into account the tradeoff between high performance and modulation simplicity. We provide an experimental performance comparison with its n-level pulse amplitude...... threshold. A simplified bit-to-symbol mapping and corresponding symbol-to-bit demapping algorithms, together with a hyperspace hard-decision, are designed specifically for applications of short-reach data links. These algorithms are expected to use affordable computational resources with relatively low...

  13. Three-wave electron vortex lattices for measuring nanofields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, C; Boothroyd, C B; Chang, S L Y; Dunin-Borkowski, R E

    2015-01-01

    It is demonstrated how an electron-optical arrangement consisting of two electron biprisms can be used to generate three-wave vortex lattices with effective lattice spacings between 0.1 and 1 nm. The presence of vortices in these lattices was verified by using a third biprism to perform direct phase measurements via off-axis electron holography. The use of three-wave lattices for nanoscale electromagnetic field measurements via vortex interferometry is discussed, including the accuracy of vortex position measurements and the interpretation of three-wave vortex lattices in the presence of partial spatial coherence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Regulation of circadian clock transcriptional output by CLOCK:BMAL1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Alexandra J.

    2018-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock relies on the transcription factor CLOCK:BMAL1 to coordinate the rhythmic expression of 15% of the transcriptome and control the daily regulation of biological functions. The recent characterization of CLOCK:BMAL1 cistrome revealed that although CLOCK:BMAL1 binds synchronously to all of its target genes, its transcriptional output is highly heterogeneous. By performing a meta-analysis of several independent genome-wide datasets, we found that the binding of other transcription factors at CLOCK:BMAL1 enhancers likely contribute to the heterogeneity of CLOCK:BMAL1 transcriptional output. While CLOCK:BMAL1 rhythmic DNA binding promotes rhythmic nucleosome removal, it is not sufficient to generate transcriptionally active enhancers as assessed by H3K27ac signal, RNA Polymerase II recruitment, and eRNA expression. Instead, the transcriptional activity of CLOCK:BMAL1 enhancers appears to rely on the activity of ubiquitously expressed transcription factors, and not tissue-specific transcription factors, recruited at nearby binding sites. The contribution of other transcription factors is exemplified by how fasting, which effects several transcription factors but not CLOCK:BMAL1, either decreases or increases the amplitude of many rhythmically expressed CLOCK:BMAL1 target genes. Together, our analysis suggests that CLOCK:BMAL1 promotes a transcriptionally permissive chromatin landscape that primes its target genes for transcription activation rather than directly activating transcription, and provides a new framework to explain how environmental or pathological conditions can reprogram the rhythmic expression of clock-controlled genes. PMID:29300726

  15. Clock Drawing in Spatial Neglect: A Comprehensive Analysis of Clock Perimeter, Placement, and Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peii; Goedert, Kelly M.

    2012-01-01

    Clock drawings produced by right-brain-damaged (RBD) individuals with spatial neglect often contain an abundance of empty space on the left while numbers and hands are placed on the right. However, the clock perimeter is rarely compromised in neglect patients’ drawings. By analyzing clock drawings produced by 71 RBD and 40 healthy adults, this study investigated whether the geometric characteristics of the clock perimeter reveal novel insights to understanding spatial neglect. Neglect participants drew smaller clocks than either healthy or non-neglect RBD participants. While healthy participants’ clock perimeter was close to circular, RBD participants drew radially extended ellipses. The mechanisms for these phenomena were investigated by examining the relation between clock-drawing characteristics and performance on six subtests of the Behavioral Inattention Test (BIT). The findings indicated that the clock shape was independent of any BIT subtest or the drawing placement on the test sheet and that the clock size was significantly predicted by one BIT subtest: the poorer the figure and shape copying, the smaller the clock perimeter. Further analyses revealed that in all participants, clocks decreased in size as they were placed farther from the center of the paper. However, even when neglect participants placed their clocks towards the center of the page, they were smaller than those produced by healthy or non-neglect RBD participants. These results suggest a neglect-specific reduction in the subjectively available workspace for graphic production from memory, consistent with the hypothesis that neglect patients are impaired in the ability to enlarge the attentional aperture. PMID:22390278

  16. Transcripts from the Circadian Clock: Telling Time and Season

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Brand (Karl)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe all know it when we wake mere moments before an alarm clock is scheduled to wake us: our body clock made the alarm clock redundant. This phenomenon is driven by an endogenous timer known as the biological, or circadian clock. Each revolution of the Earth about its own axis produces

  17. Pittendrigh: The Darwinian Clock-Watcher

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to our current understanding of how timing systems work in living organisms. .... to periodic factors in the geophysical environment. He postulated .... clocks against temperature, nutrition and light, while the latter needs maintenance of a stable.

  18. Cell-permeable Circadian Clock Proteins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Carl

    2002-01-01

    .... These 'biological clocks' are important to human physiology. For example, psychiatric and medical studies have shown that circadian rhythmicity is involved in some forms of depressive illness, 'jet lag', drug tolerance/efficacy, memory, and insomnia...

  19. Programmable Clock Waveform Generation for CCD Readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, J. de; Castilla, J.; Martinez, G.; Marin, J.

    2006-07-01

    Charge transfer efficiency in CCDs is closely related to the clock waveform. In this paper, an experimental framework to explore different FPGA based clock waveform generator designs is described. Two alternative design approaches for controlling the rise/fall edge times and pulse width of the CCD clock signal have been implemented: level-control and time-control. Both approaches provide similar characteristics regarding the edge linearity and noise. Nevertheless, dissimilarities have been found with respect to the area and frequency range of application. Thus, while the time-control approach consumes less area, the level control approach provides a wider range of clock frequencies since it does not suffer capacitor discharge effect. (Author) 8 refs.

  20. The Mechanics of Mechanical Watches and Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Ruxu

    2013-01-01

    "The Mechanics of Mechanical Watches and Clocks" presents historical views and mathematical models of mechanical watches and clocks. Although now over six hundred years old, mechanical watches and clocks are still popular luxury items that fascinate many people around the world. However few have examined the theory of how they work as presented in this book. The illustrations and computer animations are unique and have never been published before. It will be of significant interest to researchers in mechanical engineering, watchmakers and clockmakers, as well as people who have an engineering background and are interested in mechanical watches and clocks. It will also inspire people in other fields of science and technology, such as mechanical engineering and electronics engineering, to advance their designs. Professor Ruxu Du works at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, China. Assistant Professor Longhan Xie works at the South China University of Technology, China.

  1. Cellular Reprogramming–Turning the Clock Back

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 6. Cellular Reprogramming - Turning the Clock Back - Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 2012. Deepa Subramanyam. General Article Volume 18 Issue 6 June 2013 pp 514-521 ...

  2. Magneto-optical measurement of spin-lattice relaxation time in KBr and in the Na and Cs halogenetes and Co++ ion magnetic circular dichroism study in KCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    A magnetic circular dicroism spectrometer is described, which was used in the following experiments: 1) The spin-lattice relaxation time (T 1 ) for F centers in NaCl, NaBr, CsBr and CsCl, at 1,8 0 K in magnetic fields up to 15000Gs is described. The suitability of the theory of ref. (08) to explain the differences observed for halides of differents alkali ions as well as for different structures is verified proves that the hyperfine interaction is the most important mechanism for this kind of centers. It is also verified that, for temperatures between 6 0 K and 15 0 K, T 1 experimental values fits the theory of ref. (21) reasonably well, for F centers in KBr. This theory us an extension of that of ref. (8). 2) The MCD spectra for KCl:Co ++ and Caf 2 :Co ++ in different magnetic fields up to 56KGs, and in temperature range between 1,8 0 K and 4,2 0 K is obtained. The results are consistent with the assumption that Co ++ centers are intersticial in KCl lattice [pt

  3. A GPS Satellite Clock Offset Prediction Method Based on Fitting Clock Offset Rates Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Fuhong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is proposed that a satellite atomic clock offset prediction method based on fitting and modeling clock offset rates data. This method builds quadratic model or linear model combined with periodic terms to fit the time series of clock offset rates, and computes the model coefficients of trend with the best estimation. The clock offset precisely estimated at the initial prediction epoch is directly adopted to calculate the model coefficient of constant. The clock offsets in the rapid ephemeris (IGR provided by IGS are used as modeling data sets to perform certain experiments for different types of GPS satellite clocks. The results show that the clock prediction accuracies of the proposed method for 3, 6, 12 and 24 h achieve 0.43, 0.58, 0.90 and 1.47 ns respectively, which outperform the traditional prediction method based on fitting original clock offsets by 69.3%, 61.8%, 50.5% and 37.2%. Compared with the IGU real-time clock products provided by IGS, the prediction accuracies of the new method have improved about 15.7%, 23.7%, 27.4% and 34.4% respectively.

  4. New integrable lattice hierarchies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickering, Andrew; Zhu Zuonong

    2006-01-01

    In this Letter we give a new integrable four-field lattice hierarchy, associated to a new discrete spectral problem. We obtain our hierarchy as the compatibility condition of this spectral problem and an associated equation, constructed herein, for the time-evolution of eigenfunctions. We consider reductions of our hierarchy, which also of course admit discrete zero curvature representations, in detail. We find that our hierarchy includes many well-known integrable hierarchies as special cases, including the Toda lattice hierarchy, the modified Toda lattice hierarchy, the relativistic Toda lattice hierarchy, and the Volterra lattice hierarchy. We also obtain here a new integrable two-field lattice hierarchy, to which we give the name of Suris lattice hierarchy, since the first equation of this hierarchy has previously been given by Suris. The Hamiltonian structure of the Suris lattice hierarchy is obtained by means of a trace identity formula

  5. Ultrafast Phase Comparator for Phase-Locked Loop-Based Optoelectronic Clock Recovery Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez-Agis, F.; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Kurimura, S.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report on a novel application of a chi((2)) nonlinear optical device as an ultrafast phase comparator, an essential element that allows an optoelectronic phase-locked loop to perform clock recovery of ultrahigh-speed optical time-division multiplexed (OTDM) signals. Particular interest...... is devoted to a quasi-phase-matching adhered-ridge-waveguide periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) device, which shows a sufficient high temporal resolution to resolve a 640 Gbits OTDM signal....

  6. Clock gene variation in Tachycineta swallows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dor, Roi; Cooper, Caren B; Lovette, Irby J; Massoni, Viviana; Bulit, Flor; Liljesthrom, Marcela; Winkler, David W

    2012-01-01

    Many animals use photoperiod cues to synchronize reproduction with environmental conditions and thereby improve their reproductive success. The circadian clock, which creates endogenous behavioral and physiological rhythms typically entrained to photoperiod, is well characterized at the molecular level. Recent work provided evidence for an association between Clock poly-Q length polymorphism and latitude and, within a population, an association with the date of laying and the length of the incubation period. Despite relatively high overall breeding synchrony, the timing of clutch initiation has a large impact on the fitness of swallows in the genus Tachycineta. We compared length polymorphism in the Clock poly-Q region among five populations from five different Tachycineta species that breed across a hemisphere-wide latitudinal gradient (Fig. 1). Clock poly-Q variation was not associated with latitude; however, there was an association between Clock poly-Q allele diversity and the degree of clutch size decline within breeding seasons. We did not find evidence for an association between Clock poly-Q variation and date of clutch initiation in for any of the five Tachycineta species, nor did we found a relationship between incubation duration and Clock genotype. Thus, there is no general association between latitude, breeding phenology, and Clock polymorphism in this clade of closely related birds.Figure 1Photos of Tachycineta swallows that were used in this study: A) T. bicolor from Ithaca, New York, B) T. leucorrhoa from Chascomús, Argentina, C) T. albilinea from Hill Bank, Belize, D) T. meyeni from Puerto Varas, Chile, and E) T. thalassina from Mono Lake, California, Photographers: B: Valentina Ferretti; A, C-E: David Winkler.

  7. Reduced Kalman Filters for Clock Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhall, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the author's work ontimescales based on Kalman filters that act upon the clock comparisons. The natural Kalman timescale algorithm tends to optimize long-term timescale stability at the expense of short-term stability. By subjecting each post-measurement error covariance matrix to a non-transparent reduction operation, one obtains corrected clocks with improved short-term stability and little sacrifice of long-term stability.

  8. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieu, Jean Paul

    1975-01-01

    Optics, Parts 1 and 2 covers electromagnetic optics and quantum optics. The first part of the book examines the various of the important properties common to all electromagnetic radiation. This part also studies electromagnetic waves; electromagnetic optics of transparent isotropic and anisotropic media; diffraction; and two-wave and multi-wave interference. The polarization states of light, the velocity of light, and the special theory of relativity are also examined in this part. The second part is devoted to quantum optics, specifically discussing the classical molecular theory of optical p

  9. Light-Shifts of an Integrated Filter-Cell Rubidium Atomic Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-25

    the light-shift coefficient for two different rf- discharge lamps (i.e., a pure 87Rb lamp and a lamp filled with the natural Rb isotope abundance...for the Galileo Rb clock under the assumption of a natural (or 85Rb isotopically enriched) rf- discharge lamp for the Galileo clock. I...satellites [14]. 6.8347… GHz 85Rb Filter Cell Cell Resonance Photodiode Microwave Cavity 87Rb Discharge Lamp 87Rb & N2 Rb & Xe, Kr Optical Pumping 87Rb

  10. Do Caucasian and Asian clocks tick differently?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Barbosa

    Full Text Available The Period 3 and Clock genes are important components of the mammalian molecular circadian system. Studies have shown association between polymorphisms in these clock genes and circadian phenotypes in different populations. Nevertheless, differences in the pattern of allele frequency and genotyping distribution are systematically observed in studies with different ethnic groups. To investigate and compare the pattern of distribution in a sample of Asian and Caucasian populations living in Brazil, we evaluated two well-studied polymorphisms in the clock genes: a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR in PER3 and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in CLOCK. The aim of this investigation was to search for clues about human evolutionary processes related to circadian rhythms. We selected 109 Asian and 135 Caucasian descendants. The frequencies of the shorter allele (4 repeats in the PER3 gene and the T allele in the CLOCK gene among Asians (0.86 and 0.84, respectively were significantly higher than among Caucasians (0.69 and 0.71, respectively. Our results directly confirmed the different distribution of these polymorphisms between the Asian and Caucasian ethnic groups. Given the genetic differences found between groups, two points became evident: first, ethnic variations may have implications for the interpretation of results in circadian rhythm association studies, and second, the question may be raised about which evolutionary conditions shaped these genetic clock variations.

  11. Reversal of the Lattice Structure in SrCoOx Epitaxial Thin Films Studied by Real-Time Optical Spectroscopy and First-Principles Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo Seok; Jeen, Hyoungjeen; Lee, Jun Hee; Seo, S. S. Ambrose; Cooper, Valentino R.; Rabe, Karin M.; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2013-08-01

    Using real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry, we directly observed a reversible lattice and electronic structure evolution in SrCoOx (x=2.5-3) epitaxial thin films. Drastically different electronic ground states, which are extremely susceptible to the oxygen content x, are found in the two topotactic phases: i.e., the brownmillerite SrCoO2.5 and the perovskite SrCoO3. First-principles calculations confirmed substantial differences in the electronic structure, including a metal-insulator transition, which originate from the modification in the Co valence states and crystallographic structures. More interestingly, the two phases can be reversibly controlled by changing the ambient pressure at greatly reduced temperatures. Our finding provides an important pathway to understanding the novel oxygen-content-dependent phase transition uniquely found in multivalent transition metal oxides.

  12. Reversal of the lattice structure in SrCoO(x) epitaxial thin films studied by real-time optical spectroscopy and first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo Seok; Jeen, Hyoungjeen; Lee, Jun Hee; Seo, S S Ambrose; Cooper, Valentino R; Rabe, Karin M; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2013-08-30

    Using real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry, we directly observed a reversible lattice and electronic structure evolution in SrCoO(x) (x=2.5-3) epitaxial thin films. Drastically different electronic ground states, which are extremely susceptible to the oxygen content x, are found in the two topotactic phases: i.e., the brownmillerite SrCoO2.5 and the perovskite SrCoO3. First-principles calculations confirmed substantial differences in the electronic structure, including a metal-insulator transition, which originate from the modification in the Co valence states and crystallographic structures. More interestingly, the two phases can be reversibly controlled by changing the ambient pressure at greatly reduced temperatures. Our finding provides an important pathway to understanding the novel oxygen-content-dependent phase transition uniquely found in multivalent transition metal oxides.

  13. Clock and trigger distribution for CBM-TOF quality evaluation of RPC super module detector assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.; Huang, X.; Cao, P.; Wang, J.; An, Q.

    2018-03-01

    RPC Super module (SM) detector assemblies are used for charged hadron identification in the Time-of-Flight (TOF) spectrometer at the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment. Each SM contains several multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPCs) and provides up to 320 electronic channels in total for high-precision time measurements. Time resolution of the Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) is required to be better than 20 ps. During mass production, the quality of each SM needs to be evaluated. In order to meet the requirements, the system clock signal as well as the trigger signal should be distributed precisely and synchronously to all electronics modules within the evaluation readout system. In this paper, a hierarchical clock and trigger distribution method is proposed for the quality evaluation of CBM-TOF SM detectors. In a first stage, the master clock and trigger module (CTM) allocated in a 6U PXI chassis distributes the clock and trigger signals to the slave CTM in the same chassis. In a second stage, the slave CTM transmits the clock and trigger signals to the TDC readout module (TRM) through one optical link. In a third stage, the TRM distributes the clock and trigger signals synchronously to 10 individual TDC boards. Laboratory test results show that the clock jitter at the third stage is less than 4 ps (RMS) and the trigger transmission latency from the master CTM to the TDC is about 272 ns with 11 ps (RMS) jitter. The overall performance complies well with the required specifications.

  14. Turning Back the Clock: Inferring the History of the Eight O'clock Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Steven L.; Papovich, Casey; Rudnick, Gregory; Egami, Eiichi; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Rieke, Marcia J.; Rigby, Jane R.; Willmer, Christopher N. A.

    2009-07-01

    We present the results from an optical and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic study of the ultraviolet-luminous z = 2.73 galaxy, the 8 o'clock arc. Due to gravitational lensing, this galaxy is magnified by a factor of μ > 10, allowing in-depth measurements which are usually unfeasible at such redshifts. In the optical spectra, we measured the systemic redshift of the galaxy, z = 2.7322± 0.0012, using stellar photospheric lines. This differs from the redshift of absorption lines in the interstellar medium, z = 2.7302 ± 0.0006, implying gas outflows on the order of 160 km s-1. With H- and K-band NIR spectra, we have measured nebular emission lines of Hα, Hβ, Hγ, [N II], and [O III], which have a redshift z = 2.7333 ± 0.0001, consistent with the derived systemic redshift. From the Balmer decrement, we measured the dust extinction in this galaxy to be A 5500 = 1.17 ± 36 mag. Correcting the Hα line flux for dust extinction as well as the assumed lensing factor, we measure a star formation rate (SFR) of ~270 M sun yr-1, which is higher than ~85% of star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2-3. Using combinations of all detected emission lines, we find that the 8 o'clock arc has a gas-phase metallicity of ~0.8 Z sun, showing that enrichment at high redshift is not rare, even in blue, star-forming galaxies. Studying spectra from two of the arc components separately, we find that one component dominates both the dust extinction and SFR, although the metallicities between the two components are similar. We derive the mass via stellar population modeling, and find that the arc has a total stellar mass of ~4.2 × 1011 M sun, which falls on the mass-metallicity relation at z ~ 2. Finally, we estimate the total gas mass, and find it to be only ~12% of the stellar mass, implying that the 8 o'clock arc is likely nearing the end of a starburst. Based partly on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy

  15. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Ninth Edition Optics: Ninth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommen

  16. Generalized isothermic lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doliwa, Adam

    2007-01-01

    We study multi-dimensional quadrilateral lattices satisfying simultaneously two integrable constraints: a quadratic constraint and the projective Moutard constraint. When the lattice is two dimensional and the quadric under consideration is the Moebius sphere one obtains, after the stereographic projection, the discrete isothermic surfaces defined by Bobenko and Pinkall by an algebraic constraint imposed on the (complex) cross-ratio of the circular lattice. We derive the analogous condition for our generalized isothermic lattices using Steiner's projective structure of conics, and we present basic geometric constructions which encode integrability of the lattice. In particular, we introduce the Darboux transformation of the generalized isothermic lattice and we derive the corresponding Bianchi permutability principle. Finally, we study two-dimensional generalized isothermic lattices, in particular geometry of their initial boundary value problem

  17. Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy of Yb sup 3 sup + ions in SrF sub 2 and BaF sub 2; an analysis of distortions of the crystal lattice near Yb sup 3 sup +

    CERN Document Server

    Falin, M L; Latypov, V A; Leushin, A M

    2003-01-01

    SrF sub 2 and BaF sub 2 crystals, doped with the Yb sup 3 sup + ions, have been investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy. As-grown crystals of SrF sub 2 and BaF sub 2 show the two paramagnetic centres for the cubic (T sub c) and trigonal (T sub 4) symmetries of the Yb sup 3 sup + ions. Empirical diagrams of the energy levels were established and the potentials of the crystal field were determined. Information was obtained on the SrF sub 2 and BaF sub 2 phonon spectra from the electron-vibrational structure of the optical spectra. The crystal field parameters were used to analyse the crystal lattice distortions in the vicinity of the impurity ion and the F sup - ion compensating for the excess positive charge in T sub 4. Within the frames of a superposition model, it is shown that three F sup - ions from the nearest surrounding cube, located symmetrically with respect to the C sub 3 axis from the side of the ion-compensator, approach the impurity ion and cling to the axis of the...

  18. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Eighth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommended for engineering st

  19. FY1995 research on nonlinear optical devices using super-lattice semiconductors; 1995 nendo chokoshi active hisenkei soshi wo mochiita chokosoku hikari seigyo gijutsu no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The purpose is to develop technologies on efficient generation and control of femtosecond optical pulses using a novel semiconductor optical devices. We studied a modelocked Cr:forsterite laser pumped by a diode pumped Nd:YVO4 laser. Both Kerr lens mode locking and semi-conductor saturable absorber initiated mode locking have been achieved. The minimum pulse width for pure Kerr lens mode locking is 26.4 fs, while for the semiconductor saturable absorber initiated mode locking, the pulse width is 36 fs. The latter is very resistant to the environment perturbations. We also present the measured dispersion data for the forsterite crystal and the SESAM, and discuss the dispersion compensation technique. (NEDO)

  20. A model of guarded recursion with clock synchronisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizjak, Aleš; Møgelberg, Rasmus Ejlers

    2015-01-01

    productivity to be captured in types. The calculus uses clocks representing time streams and clock quantifiers which allow limited and controlled elimination of modalities. The calculus has since been extended to dependent types by Møgelberg. Both works give denotational semantics but no rewrite semantics....... In previous versions of this calculus, different clocks represented separate time streams and clock synchronisation was prohibited. In this paper we show that allowing clock synchronisation is safe by constructing a new model of guarded recursion and clocks. This result will greatly simplify the type theory...... by removing freshness restrictions from typing rules, and is a necessary step towards defining rewrite semantics, and ultimately implementing the calculus....

  1. Monitoring of pipeline deformations using optical fiber sensors based on Bragg lattices; Monitoracao de deformacoes em dutos utilizando sensores a fibra optica com base em redes de Bragg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moszkowica, Viktor Nigri [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: vnigri@bol.com.br

    2002-06-01

    In the petroleum sector there is a growing need for the use of pipelines as well as for their monitoring. A way to avoid leaks that can cause great damage to the environment is by the monitoring of deformations. In case failures can not be avoided through operational procedures, the monitoring of deformations can identify the initial moment and location of the leak, allowing for quick action on the part of the cleaning and depollution teams. Also important is the monitoring of slopes and soil movements. The same thing applies to production and transfer submarine pipelines subject to complex dynamic loadings that combine internal and external pressure, torsion, axial stress and, the most common of all, flexion loading. For this type of application, optical fiber sensors present a number of interesting features. Multiplexing, remote operation and long distance distribution of sensors are characteristics that attract their use in deformation monitoring systems. Presented herein are the research results of works that had the objective of developing deformation monitoring techniques in pipelines using optical fiber sensors based on Bragg grating. The technical feasibility of this technology is demonstrated through laboratorial tests. Also discussed herein are methods for field implementation of sensors, optical signal multiplexing techniques and potential advantages of applying this technology. (author)

  2. GLAD: a generic lattice debugger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    Today, numerous simulation and analysis codes exist for the design, commission, and operation of accelerator beam lines. There is a need to develop a common user interface and database link to run these codes interactively. This paper will describe a proposed system, GLAD (Generic LAttice Debugger), to fulfill this need. Specifically, GLAD can be used to find errors in beam lines during commissioning, control beam parameters during operation, and design beam line optics and error correction systems for the next generation of linear accelerators and storage rings. (author)

  3. Sugars, the clock and transition to flowering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza eBolouri Moghaddam

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Sugars do not only act as source of energy, but they also act as signals in plants. This mini review summarizes the emerging links between sucrose-mediated signaling and the cellular networks involved in flowering time control and defense. Cross-talks with gibberellin (GA and jasmonate (JA signaling pathways are highlighted. The circadian clock fulfills a crucial role at the heart of cellular networks and the bilateral relation between sugar signaling and the clock is discussed. It is proposed that important factors controlling plant growth (DELLAs, PIFs, invertases and trehalose- 6-phosphate or T6P might fulfill central roles in the transition to flowering as well. The emerging concept of ‘sweet immunity’, modulated by the clock, might at least partly rely on a sucrose-specific signaling pathway that needs further exploration.

  4. Intact interval timing in circadian CLOCK mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, Sara; Gallistel, C R

    2008-08-28

    While progress has been made in determining the molecular basis for the circadian clock, the mechanism by which mammalian brains time intervals measured in seconds to minutes remains a mystery. An obvious question is whether the interval-timing mechanism shares molecular machinery with the circadian timing mechanism. In the current study, we trained circadian CLOCK +/- and -/- mutant male mice in a peak-interval procedure with 10 and 20-s criteria. The mutant mice were more active than their wild-type littermates, but there were no reliable deficits in the accuracy or precision of their timing as compared with wild-type littermates. This suggests that expression of the CLOCK protein is not necessary for normal interval timing.

  5. Lattice theory for nonspecialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hari Dass, N.D.

    1984-01-01

    These lectures were delivered as part of the academic training programme at the NIKHEF-H. These lectures were intended primarily for experimentalists, and theorists not specializing in lattice methods. The goal was to present the essential spirit behind the lattice approach and consequently the author has concentrated mostly on issues of principle rather than on presenting a large amount of detail. In particular, the author emphasizes the deep theoretical infra-structure that has made lattice studies meaningful. At the same time, he has avoided the use of heavy formalisms as they tend to obscure the basic issues for people trying to approach this subject for the first time. The essential ideas are illustrated with elementary soluble examples not involving complicated mathematics. The following subjects are discussed: three ways of solving the harmonic oscillator problem; latticization; gauge fields on a lattice; QCD observables; how to solve lattice theories. (Auth.)

  6. Lattice gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creutz, M.

    1983-04-01

    In the last few years lattice gauge theory has become the primary tool for the study of nonperturbative phenomena in gauge theories. The lattice serves as an ultraviolet cutoff, rendering the theory well defined and amenable to numerical and analytical work. Of course, as with any cutoff, at the end of a calculation one must consider the limit of vanishing lattice spacing in order to draw conclusions on the physical continuum limit theory. The lattice has the advantage over other regulators that it is not tied to the Feynman expansion. This opens the possibility of other approximation schemes than conventional perturbation theory. Thus Wilson used a high temperature expansion to demonstrate confinement in the strong coupling limit. Monte Carlo simulations have dominated the research in lattice gauge theory for the last four years, giving first principle calculations of nonperturbative parameters characterizing the continuum limit. Some of the recent results with lattice calculations are reviewed

  7. Searching for dilaton dark matter with atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Huang, Junwu; Van Tilburg, Ken

    2015-01-01

    We propose an experiment to search for ultralight scalar dark matter (DM) with dilatonic interactions. Such couplings can arise for the dilaton as well as for moduli and axion-like particles in the presence of C P violation. Ultralight dilaton DM acts as a background field that can cause tiny but coherent oscillations in Standard Model parameters such as the fine-structure constant and the proton-electron mass ratio. These minute variations can be detected through precise frequency comparisons of atomic clocks. Our experiment extends current searches for drifts in fundamental constants to the well-motivated high-frequency regime. Our proposed setups can probe scalars lighter than 1 0-15 eV with a discovery potential of dilatonic couplings as weak as 1 0-11 times the strength of gravity, improving current equivalence principle bounds by up to 8 orders of magnitude. We point out potential 1 04 sensitivity enhancements with future optical and nuclear clocks, as well as possible signatures in gravitational-wave detectors. Finally, we discuss cosmological constraints and astrophysical hints of ultralight scalar DM, and show they are complimentary to and compatible with the parameter range accessible to our proposed laboratory experiments.

  8. On Traveling Waves in Lattices: The Case of Riccati Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Zlatinka

    2012-09-01

    The method of simplest equation is applied for analysis of a class of lattices described by differential-difference equations that admit traveling-wave solutions constructed on the basis of the solution of the Riccati equation. We denote such lattices as Riccati lattices. We search for Riccati lattices within two classes of lattices: generalized Lotka-Volterra lattices and generalized Holling lattices. We show that from the class of generalized Lotka-Volterra lattices only the Wadati lattice belongs to the class of Riccati lattices. Opposite to this many lattices from the Holling class are Riccati lattices. We construct exact traveling wave solutions on the basis of the solution of Riccati equation for three members of the class of generalized Holling lattices.

  9. Crime clocks and target performance maps

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cooper, Antony K

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available the period of analysis. Each segment of a pie chart represents a selected part of the day (eg: a two- or three-hour period) or a day of the week. The first and last segments in the day or week are then adjacent, ensuring that there is no artificial break... clocks We have also used crime clocks to map the proportion of crimes that occur during normal police working hours (07:00 to 16:00, Monday to Friday, in the case of the Johannesburg Area), against those that occur outside these hours. 3. Target...

  10. The Fermilab D0 Master Clock System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotolo, C.; Fachin, M.; Chappa, S.; Rauch, M.; Needles, C.; Dyer, A.

    1991-11-01

    The Clock System provides bunch crossing related timing signals to various detector subsystems. Accelerator synchronization and monitoring as well as timing signal generation and distribution are discussed. The system is built using three module types implemented in Eurostandard hardware with a VME communications interface. The first two types of modules are used to facilitate synchronization with the accelerator and to generate 23 timing signals that are programmable with one RF bucket (18.8 ns) resolution and 1 ns accuracy. Fifty-four of the third module type are used to distribute the timing signals and two synchronous 53 MHz and 106 MHz clocks to various detector subsystems. 6 refs., 5 figs

  11. Clocking Scheme for Switched-Capacitor Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensgaard-Madsen, Jesper

    1998-01-01

    A novel clocking scheme for switched-capacitor (SC) circuits is presented. It can enhance the understanding of SC circuits and the errors caused by MOSFET (MOS) switches. Charge errors, and techniques to make SC circuits less sensitive to them are discussed.......A novel clocking scheme for switched-capacitor (SC) circuits is presented. It can enhance the understanding of SC circuits and the errors caused by MOSFET (MOS) switches. Charge errors, and techniques to make SC circuits less sensitive to them are discussed....

  12. Lattice degeneracies of fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raszillier, H.

    1983-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the minimal degeneracies of geometric (Kaehler) fermions on all the lattices of maximal symmetries in n = 1, ..., 4 dimensions. We also determine the isolated orbits of the maximal symmetry groups, which are related to the minimal numbers of ''naive'' fermions on the reciprocals of these lattices. It turns out that on the self-reciprocal lattices the minimal numbers of naive fermions are equal to the minimal numbers of degrees of freedom of geometric fermions. The description we give relies on the close connection of the maximal lattice symmetry groups with (affine) Weyl groups of root systems of (semi-) simple Lie algebras. (orig.)

  13. Twisted mass lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindler, A.

    2007-07-01

    I review the theoretical foundations, properties as well as the simulation results obtained so far of a variant of the Wilson lattice QCD formulation: Wilson twisted mass lattice QCD. Emphasis is put on the discretization errors and on the effects of these discretization errors on the phase structure for Wilson-like fermions in the chiral limit. The possibility to use in lattice simulations different lattice actions for sea and valence quarks to ease the renormalization patterns of phenomenologically relevant local operators, is also discussed. (orig.)

  14. Twisted mass lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shindler, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC

    2007-07-15

    I review the theoretical foundations, properties as well as the simulation results obtained so far of a variant of the Wilson lattice QCD formulation: Wilson twisted mass lattice QCD. Emphasis is put on the discretization errors and on the effects of these discretization errors on the phase structure for Wilson-like fermions in the chiral limit. The possibility to use in lattice simulations different lattice actions for sea and valence quarks to ease the renormalization patterns of phenomenologically relevant local operators, is also discussed. (orig.)

  15. Localisation assisted by the lattice relaxation and the optical absorption of extra-framework electrons in 12CaO.Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sushko, Peter V.; Shluger, Alexander L.; Hayashi, Katsuro; Hirano, Masahiro; Hosono, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    The crystalline framework of a complex oxide 12CaO.7Al 2 O 3 (C12A7) is built from positively charged sub-nanometer cages able to trap electrons. An embedded cluster approach is used to study the electronic structure and optical properties of electron-containing C12A7 for different concentration of extra-framework electrons. Our results suggest that the conduction band of the C12A7 consists of a relatively narrow band of empty cage states (cage conduction band) with one-electron energies between 5.5 and 6.1 eV above the top of the valence band (VB), and a framework conduction band at about 6.7 - 7.0 eV above the to of the VB. The gap between the cage conduction band and the framework conduction band is estimated to be about 1 - 1.5 eV. The energies of the lowest optical transitions from the top of the valence band to the cage conduction band are predicted to be at 5.2 - 5.5 eV. The extra-electrons occupy cage states, which split from the cage conduction band to about 4 eV above the top of the VB. The extra-framework electrons introduce two absorption bands with the experimental peaks at 0.4 eV and 2.8 eV. These bands are assigned to the inter-cage charge transfer and the intra-cage s-p transitions respectively. The changes in the optical absorption spectra as a function of the extra-electrons concentration are also discussed

  16. Wave transmission in nonlinear lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, D.; Tsironis, G.P.

    1999-01-01

    The interplay of nonlinearity with lattice discreteness leads to phenomena and propagation properties quite distinct from those appearing in continuous nonlinear systems. For a large variety of condensed matter and optics applications the continuous wave approximation is not appropriate. In the present review we discuss wave transmission properties in one dimensional nonlinear lattices. Our paradigmatic equations are discrete nonlinear Schroedinger equations and their study is done through a dynamical systems approach. We focus on stationary wave properties and utilize well known results from the theory of dynamical systems to investigate various aspects of wave transmission and wave localization. We analyze in detail the more general dynamical system corresponding to the equation that interpolates between the non-integrable discrete nonlinear Schroedinger equation and the integrable Albowitz-Ladik equation. We utilize this analysis in a nonlinear Kronig-Penney model and investigate transmission and band modification properties. We discuss the modifications that are effected through an electric field and the nonlinear Wannier-Stark localization effects that are induced. Several applications are described, such as polarons in one dimensional lattices, semiconductor superlattices and one dimensional nonlinear photonic band gap systems. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  17. Novel transcriptional networks regulated by CLOCK in human neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Miles R; Berto, Stefano; Liu, Yuxiang; Werthmann, Gordon; Douglas, Connor; Usui, Noriyoshi; Gleason, Kelly; Tamminga, Carol A; Takahashi, Joseph S; Konopka, Genevieve

    2017-11-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying human brain evolution are not fully understood; however, previous work suggested that expression of the transcription factor CLOCK in the human cortex might be relevant to human cognition and disease. In this study, we investigated this novel transcriptional role for CLOCK in human neurons by performing chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing for endogenous CLOCK in adult neocortices and RNA sequencing following CLOCK knockdown in differentiated human neurons in vitro. These data suggested that CLOCK regulates the expression of genes involved in neuronal migration, and a functional assay showed that CLOCK knockdown increased neuronal migratory distance. Furthermore, dysregulation of CLOCK disrupts coexpressed networks of genes implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders, and the expression of these networks is driven by hub genes with human-specific patterns of expression. These data support a role for CLOCK-regulated transcriptional cascades involved in human brain evolution and function. © 2017 Fontenot et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  18. Susceptibility of Redundant Versus Singular Clock Domains Implemented in SRAM-Based FPGA TMR Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Melanie D.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Pellish, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    We present the challenges that arise when using redundant clock domains due to their clock-skew. Radiation data show that a singular clock domain (DTMR) provides an improved TMR methodology for SRAM-based FPGAs over redundant clocks.

  19. Fluidic optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesides, George M.; Tang, Sindy K. Y.

    2006-09-01

    Fluidic optics is a new class of optical system with real-time tunability and reconfigurability enabled by the introduction of fluidic components into the optical path. We describe the design, fabrication, operation of a number of fluidic optical systems, and focus on three devices, liquid-core/liquid-cladding (L2) waveguides, microfluidic dye lasers, and diffraction gratings based on flowing, crystalline lattices of bubbles, to demonstrate the integration of microfluidics and optics. We fabricate these devices in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) with soft-lithographic techniques. They are simple to construct, and readily integrable with microanalytical or lab-on-a-chip systems.

  20. High-power Al-free active region (λ= 852nm) DFB laser diodes for atomic clocks and interferometry applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligeret, V.; Vermersch, F.-J.; Bansropun, S.; Lecomte, M.; Calligaro, M.; Parillaud, O.; Krakowski, M.

    2017-11-01

    Atomic clocks will be used in the future European positioning system Galileo. Among them, the optically pumped clocks provide a better alternative with comparable accuracy for a more compact system. For these systems, diode lasers emitting at 852nm are strategic components. The laser in a conventional bench for atomic clocks presents disadvantages for spatial applications. A better approach would be to realise a system based on a distributed-feedback laser (DFB). We have developed the technological foundations of such lasers operating at 852nm. These include an Al free active region, a single spatial mode ridge waveguide and a DFB structure. The device is a separate confinement heterostructure with a GaInP large optical cavity and a single compressive strained GaInAsP quantum well. The broad area laser diodes are characterised by low internal losses (value of less than 2MHz.

  1. Lattice site location of optical centers in GaN:Eu light emitting diode material grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Lorenz, K.; Alves, E.; Roqan, Iman S.; O’ Donnell, K. P.; Nishikawa, A.; Fujiwara, Y.; Boćkowski, M.

    2010-01-01

    Eu-doped GaN was grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy at temperatures from 900 to 1100 °C. Eu incorporation is influenced by temperature with the highest concentration found for growth at 1000 °C. In all samples, Eu is incorporated entirely on substitutional Ga sites with a slight displacement which is highest (∼0.2 Å) in the sample grown at 900 °C and mainly directed along the c-axis. The major optical Eu3+ centers are identical for in situdoped and ion-implanted samples after high temperature and pressure annealing. The dominant Eu3+luminescence lines are attributed to isolated, substitutional Eu.

  2. Lattice site location of optical centers in GaN:Eu light emitting diode material grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Lorenz, K.

    2010-09-16

    Eu-doped GaN was grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy at temperatures from 900 to 1100 °C. Eu incorporation is influenced by temperature with the highest concentration found for growth at 1000 °C. In all samples, Eu is incorporated entirely on substitutional Ga sites with a slight displacement which is highest (∼0.2 Å) in the sample grown at 900 °C and mainly directed along the c-axis. The major optical Eu3+ centers are identical for in situdoped and ion-implanted samples after high temperature and pressure annealing. The dominant Eu3+luminescence lines are attributed to isolated, substitutional Eu.

  3. Clock Synchronization for Multihop Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis Robles, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    In wireless sensor networks, more so generally than in other types of distributed systems, clock synchronization is crucial since by having this service available, several applications such as media access protocols, object tracking, or data fusion, would improve their performance. In this dissertation, we propose a set of algorithms to achieve…

  4. Food at work around the clock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl Lassen, Anne; Beck, Anne Marie; Thorsen, Anne Vibeke

    This report brings together 12 invited presentations and outcomes of a workshop on food and meals for employees working irregular hours “around the clock”. The workshop, “Food at work around the clock – The Nordic Model”, was hosted by the National Food Institute at the Technical University...

  5. Hands Together! An Analog Clock Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnest, Darrell; Radtke, Susan; Scott, Siri

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the authors first present the Hands Together! task. The mathematics in this problem concerns the relationship of hour and minute durations as reflected in the oft-overlooked proportional movements of the two hands of an analog clock. The authors go on to discuss the importance of problem solving in general. They then consider…

  6. The mammalian retina as a clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosini, Gianluca; Fukuhara, Chiaki

    2002-01-01

    Many physiological, cellular, and biochemical parameters in the retina of vertebrates show daily rhythms that, in many cases, also persist under constant conditions. This demonstrates that they are driven by a circadian pacemaker. The presence of an autonomous circadian clock in the retina of vertebrates was first demonstrated in Xenopus laevis and then, several years later, in mammals. In X. laevis and in chicken, the retinal circadian pacemaker has been localized in the photoreceptor layer, whereas in mammals, such information is not yet available. Recent advances in molecular techniques have led to the identification of a group of genes that are believed to constitute the molecular core of the circadian clock. These genes are expressed in the retina, although with a slightly different 24-h profile from that observed in the central circadian pacemaker. This result suggests that some difference (at the molecular level) may exist between the retinal clock and the clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of hypothalamus. The present review will focus on the current knowledge of the retinal rhythmicity and the mechanisms responsible for its control.

  7. Analytic clock frequency selection for global DVFS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerards, Marco Egbertus Theodorus; Hurink, Johann L.; Holzenspies, P.K.F.; Kuper, Jan; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2014-01-01

    Computers can reduce their power consumption by decreasing their speed using Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS). A form of DVFS for multicore processors is global DVFS, where the voltage and clock frequency is shared among all processor cores. Because global DVFS is efficient and cheap to

  8. Time Inter-Comparison Using Transportable Optical Combs, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AOSense proposes a free-space, two-way optical time transfer system compatible with global-scale synchronization of current-generation optical atomic clocks. In...

  9. Nuclear lattice simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epelbaum E.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We review recent progress on nuclear lattice simulations using chiral effective field theory. We discuss lattice results for dilute neutron matter at next-to-leading order, three-body forces at next-to-next-toleading order, isospin-breaking and Coulomb effects, and the binding energy of light nuclei.

  10. Lattice Higgs models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jersak, J.

    1986-01-01

    This year has brought a sudden interest in lattice Higgs models. After five years of only modest activity we now have many new results obtained both by analytic and Monte Carlo methods. This talk is a review of the present state of lattice Higgs models with particular emphasis on the recent development

  11. The potential of continuous, local atomic clock measurements for earthquake prediction and volcanology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarescu Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern optical atomic clocks along with the optical fiber technology currently being developed can measure the geoid, which is the equipotential surface that extends the mean sea level on continents, to a precision that competes with existing technology. In this proceeding, we point out that atomic clocks have the potential to not only map the sea level surface on continents, but also look at variations of the geoid as a function of time with unprecedented timing resolution. The local time series of the geoid has a plethora of applications. These include potential improvement in the predictions of earthquakes and volcanoes, and closer monitoring of ground uplift in areas where hydraulic fracturing is performed.

  12. Lattice thermal conductivity in layered BiCuSeO

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, S.

    2016-06-30

    We quantify the low lattice thermal conductivity in layered BiCuSeO (the oxide with the highest known figure of merit). It turns out that the scattering of acoustical into optical phonons is strongly enhanced in the material because of the special structure of the phonon dispersion. For example, at room temperature the optical phonons account for an enormous 42% of the lattice thermal conductivity. We also quantify the anisotropy of the lattice thermal conductivity and determine the distribution of the mean free path of the phonons at different temperatures to provide a guide for tuning the thermal properties. © the Owner Societies 2016.

  13. Experience with split transition lattices at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montag, C.; Tepikian, S.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    During the acceleration process, heavy ion beams in RHIC cross the transition energy. When RHIC was colliding deuterons and gold ions during Run-8, lattices with different integer tunes were used for the two rings. This resulted in the two rings crossing transition at different times, which proved beneficial for the 'Yellow' ring, the RF system of which is slaved to the 'Blue' ring. For the symmetric gold-gold run in FY2010, lattices with different transition energies but equal tunes were implemented. We report the optics design concept as well as operational experience with this configuration.

  14. Spectral tunneling of lattice nonlocal solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V.; Torner, Lluis; Vysloukh, Victor A.

    2010-01-01

    We address spectral tunneling of walking spatial solitons in photorefractive media with nonlocal diffusion component of the nonlinear response and an imprinted shallow optical lattice. In contrast to materials with local nonlinearities, where solitons traveling across the lattice close to the Bragg angle suffer large radiative losses, in photorefractive media with diffusion nonlinearity resulting in self-bending, solitons survive when their propagation angle approaches and even exceeds the Bragg angle. In the spatial frequency domain this effect can be considered as tunneling through the band of spatial frequencies centered around the Bragg frequency where the spatial group velocity dispersion is positive.

  15. Optical and electronic properties of GaInNP alloys - a new material system for lattice matching to GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buyanova, I.A.; Chen, W.M.; Tu, C.W.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we review our recent results from optical characterization studies of GaInNP. We show that N incorporation in these alloys affects their structural and defect properties, as well as the electronic structure. The main structural changes include (i) increasing carrier localization due to strong compositional fluctuations, which is typical for all dilute nitrides, and (ii) N-induced long range ordering effects, specific for GaInNP. The observed degradation of radiative efficiency of the alloys upon increasing N content is attributed to formation of several defects acting as centres of efficient non-radiative recombination. One of the defects is identified as a complex involving a Ga interstitial atom. N incorporation is also found to change the band line up from the type I in the GaInP/GaAs structures to the type II in the GaInNP/GaAs heterojunctions with [N]>0.5%. For the range of N compositions studied ([N]≤2%), a conduction band offset at the GaInNP/GaAs interface is found to nearly linearly depend on [N] at -0.10 eV/%, whereas the valence band offset remains unaffected. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Few quantum particles on one dimensional lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiente Cifuentes, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    There is currently a great interest in the physics of degenerate quantum gases and low-energy few-body scattering due to the recent experimental advances in manipulation of ultracold atoms by light. In particular, almost perfect periodic potentials, called optical lattices, can be generated. The lattice spacing is fixed by the wavelength of the laser field employed and the angle betwen the pair of laser beams; the lattice depth, defining the magnitude of the different band gaps, is tunable within a large interval of values. This flexibility permits the exploration of different regimes, ranging from the ''free-electron'' picture, modified by the effective mass for shallow optical lattices, to the tight-binding regime of a very deep periodic potential. In the latter case, effective single-band theories, widely used in condensed matter physics, can be implemented with unprecedent accuracy. The tunability of the lattice depth is nowadays complemented by the use of magnetic Feshbach resonances which, at very low temperatures, can vary the relevant atom-atom scattering properties at will. Moreover, optical lattices loaded with gases of effectively reduced dimensionality are experimentally accessible. This is especially important for one spatial dimension, since most of the exactly solvable models in many-body quantum mechanics deal with particles on a line; therefore, experiments with one-dimensional gases serve as a testing ground for many old and new theories which were regarded as purely academic not so long ago. The physics of few quantum particles on a one-dimensional lattice is the topic of this thesis. Most of the results are obtained in the tight-binding approximation, which is amenable to exact numerical or analytical treatment. For the two-body problem, theoretical methods for calculating the stationary scattering and bound states are developed. These are used to obtain, in closed form, the two-particle solutions of both the Hubbard and extended Hubbard models

  17. Few quantum particles on one dimensional lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valiente Cifuentes, Manuel

    2010-06-18

    There is currently a great interest in the physics of degenerate quantum gases and low-energy few-body scattering due to the recent experimental advances in manipulation of ultracold atoms by light. In particular, almost perfect periodic potentials, called optical lattices, can be generated. The lattice spacing is fixed by the wavelength of the laser field employed and the angle betwen the pair of laser beams; the lattice depth, defining the magnitude of the different band gaps, is tunable within a large interval of values. This flexibility permits the exploration of different regimes, ranging from the ''free-electron'' picture, modified by the effective mass for shallow optical lattices, to the tight-binding regime of a very deep periodic potential. In the latter case, effective single-band theories, widely used in condensed matter physics, can be implemented with unprecedent accuracy. The tunability of the lattice depth is nowadays complemented by the use of magnetic Feshbach resonances which, at very low temperatures, can vary the relevant atom-atom scattering properties at will. Moreover, optical lattices loaded with gases of effectively reduced dimensionality are experimentally accessible. This is especially important for one spatial dimension, since most of the exactly solvable models in many-body quantum mechanics deal with particles on a line; therefore, experiments with one-dimensional gases serve as a testing ground for many old and new theories which were regarded as purely academic not so long ago. The physics of few quantum particles on a one-dimensional lattice is the topic of this thesis. Most of the results are obtained in the tight-binding approximation, which is amenable to exact numerical or analytical treatment. For the two-body problem, theoretical methods for calculating the stationary scattering and bound states are developed. These are used to obtain, in closed form, the two-particle solutions of both the Hubbard and

  18. On singularities of lattice varieties

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Himadri

    2013-01-01

    Toric varieties associated with distributive lattices arise as a fibre of a flat degeneration of a Schubert variety in a minuscule. The singular locus of these varieties has been studied by various authors. In this article we prove that the number of diamonds incident on a lattice point $\\a$ in a product of chain lattices is more than or equal to the codimension of the lattice. Using this we also show that the lattice varieties associated with product of chain lattices is smooth.

  19. Molecular clock on a neutral network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Alpan

    2007-09-28

    The number of fixed mutations accumulated in an evolving population often displays a variance that is significantly larger than the mean (the overdispersed molecular clock). By examining a generic evolutionary process on a neutral network of high-fitness genotypes, we establish a formalism for computing all cumulants of the full probability distribution of accumulated mutations in terms of graph properties of the neutral network, and use the formalism to prove overdispersion of the molecular clock. We further show that significant overdispersion arises naturally in evolution when the neutral network is highly sparse, exhibits large global fluctuations in neutrality, and small local fluctuations in neutrality. The results are also relevant for elucidating aspects of neutral network topology from empirical measurements of the substitution process.

  20. Supporting Family Awareness with the Whereabouts Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellen, Abigail; Taylor, Alex S.; Kaye, Joseph ‘Jofish'; Brown, Barry; Izadi, Shahram

    We report the results of a field trial of a situated awareness device for families called the “Whereabouts Clock”. The Clock displays the location of family members using cellphone data as one of four privacy-preserving, deliberately coarse-grained categories ( HOME, WORK, SCHOOL or ELSEWHERE). The results show that awareness of others through the Clock supports not only family communication and coordination but also more emotive aspects of family life such as reassurance, connectedness, identity and social touch. We discuss how the term “awareness” means many things in practice and highlight the importance of designing not just for family activities, but in order to support the emotional, social and even moral aspects of family life.

  1. MEETING: Lattice 88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackenzie, Paul

    1989-01-01

    The forty-year dream of understanding the properties of the strongly interacting particles from first principles is now approaching reality. Quantum chromodynamics (QCD - the field theory of the quark and gluon constituents of strongly interacting particles) was initially handicapped by the severe limitations of the conventional (perturbation) approach in this picture, but Ken Wilson's inventions of lattice gauge theory and renormalization group methods opened new doors, making calculations of masses and other particle properties possible. Lattice gauge theory became a major industry around 1980, when Monte Carlo methods were introduced, and the first prototype calculations yielded qualitatively reasonable results. The promising developments over the past year were highlighted at the 1988 Symposium on Lattice Field Theory - Lattice 88 - held at Fermilab

  2. Angles in hyperbolic lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Morten S.; Södergren, Carl Anders

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that the angles in a lattice acting on hyperbolic n -space become equidistributed. In this paper we determine a formula for the pair correlation density for angles in such hyperbolic lattices. Using this formula we determine, among other things, the asymptotic behavior of the den......It is well known that the angles in a lattice acting on hyperbolic n -space become equidistributed. In this paper we determine a formula for the pair correlation density for angles in such hyperbolic lattices. Using this formula we determine, among other things, the asymptotic behavior...... of the density function in both the small and large variable limits. This extends earlier results by Boca, Pasol, Popa and Zaharescu and Kelmer and Kontorovich in dimension 2 to general dimension n . Our proofs use the decay of matrix coefficients together with a number of careful estimates, and lead...

  3. Reactor lattice codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikowska, T.

    1999-01-01

    The present lecture has a main goal to show how the transport lattice calculations are realised in a standard computer code. This is illustrated on the example of the WIMSD code, belonging to the most popular tools for reactor calculations. Most of the approaches discussed here can be easily modified to any other lattice code. The description of the code assumes the basic knowledge of reactor lattice, on the level given in the lecture on 'Reactor lattice transport calculations'. For more advanced explanation of the WIMSD code the reader is directed to the detailed descriptions of the code cited in References. The discussion of the methods and models included in the code is followed by the generally used homogenisation procedure and several numerical examples of discrepancies in calculated multiplication factors based on different sources of library data. (author)

  4. MEETING: Lattice 88

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackenzie, Paul

    1989-03-15

    The forty-year dream of understanding the properties of the strongly interacting particles from first principles is now approaching reality. Quantum chromodynamics (QCD - the field theory of the quark and gluon constituents of strongly interacting particles) was initially handicapped by the severe limitations of the conventional (perturbation) approach in this picture, but Ken Wilson's inventions of lattice gauge theory and renormalization group methods opened new doors, making calculations of masses and other particle properties possible. Lattice gauge theory became a major industry around 1980, when Monte Carlo methods were introduced, and the first prototype calculations yielded qualitatively reasonable results. The promising developments over the past year were highlighted at the 1988 Symposium on Lattice Field Theory - Lattice 88 - held at Fermilab.

  5. Computers for Lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christ, Norman H

    2000-01-01

    The architecture and capabilities of the computers currently in use for large-scale lattice QCD calculations are described and compared. Based on this present experience, possible future directions are discussed

  6. Reactor lattice codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikowska, T.

    2001-01-01

    The description of reactor lattice codes is carried out on the example of the WIMSD-5B code. The WIMS code in its various version is the most recognised lattice code. It is used in all parts of the world for calculations of research and power reactors. The version WIMSD-5B is distributed free of charge by NEA Data Bank. The description of its main features given in the present lecture follows the aspects defined previously for lattice calculations in the lecture on Reactor Lattice Transport Calculations. The spatial models are described, and the approach to the energy treatment is given. Finally the specific algorithm applied in fuel depletion calculations is outlined. (author)

  7. Effects of mass defect in atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.

    2018-01-01

    We consider some implications of the mass defect on the frequency of atomic transitions. We have found that some well-known frequency shifts (such as gravitational and quadratic Doppler shifts) can be interpreted as consequences of the mass defect, i.e., without the need for the concept of time dilation used in special and general relativity theories. Moreover, we show that the inclusion of the mass defect leads to previously unknown shifts for clocks based on trapped ions..

  8. Clock error models for simulation and estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meditch, J.S.

    1981-10-01

    Mathematical models for the simulation and estimation of errors in precision oscillators used as time references in satellite navigation systems are developed. The results, based on all currently known oscillator error sources, are directly implementable on a digital computer. The simulation formulation is sufficiently flexible to allow for the inclusion or exclusion of individual error sources as desired. The estimation algorithms, following from Kalman filter theory, provide directly for the error analysis of clock errors in both filtering and prediction

  9. Molecular clock in neutral protein evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilke Claus O

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A frequent observation in molecular evolution is that amino-acid substitution rates show an index of dispersion (that is, ratio of variance to mean substantially larger than one. This observation has been termed the overdispersed molecular clock. On the basis of in silico protein-evolution experiments, Bastolla and coworkers recently proposed an explanation for this observation: Proteins drift in neutral space, and can temporarily get trapped in regions of substantially reduced neutrality. In these regions, substitution rates are suppressed, which results in an overall substitution process that is not Poissonian. However, the simulation method of Bastolla et al. is representative only for cases in which the product of mutation rate μ and population size Ne is small. How the substitution process behaves when μNe is large is not known. Results Here, I study the behavior of the molecular clock in in silico protein evolution as a function of mutation rate and population size. I find that the index of dispersion decays with increasing μNe, and approaches 1 for large μNe . This observation can be explained with the selective pressure for mutational robustness, which is effective when μNe is large. This pressure keeps the population out of low-neutrality traps, and thus steadies the ticking of the molecular clock. Conclusions The molecular clock in neutral protein evolution can fall into two distinct regimes, a strongly overdispersed one for small μNe, and a mostly Poissonian one for large μNe. The former is relevant for the majority of organisms in the plant and animal kingdom, and the latter may be relevant for RNA viruses.

  10. Light and the human circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roenneberg, Till; Kantermann, Thomas; Juda, Myriam; Vetter, Céline; Allebrandt, Karla V

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock can only reliably fulfil its function if it is stably entrained. Most clocks use the light-dark cycle as environmental signal (zeitgeber) for this active synchronisation. How we think about clock function and entrainment has been strongly influenced by the early concepts of the field's pioneers, and the astonishing finding that circadian rhythms continue a self-sustained oscillation in constant conditions has become central to our understanding of entrainment.Here, we argue that we have to rethink these initial circadian dogmas to fully understand the circadian programme and how it entrains. Light is also the prominent zeitgeber for the human clock, as has been shown experimentally in the laboratory and in large-scale epidemiological studies in real life, and we hypothesise that social zeitgebers act through light entrainment via behavioural feedback loops (zeitnehmer). We show that human entrainment can be investigated in detail outside of the laboratory, by using the many 'experimental' conditions provided by the real world, such as daylight savings time, the 'forced synchrony' imposed by the introduction of time zones, or the fact that humans increasingly create their own light environment. The conditions of human entrainment have changed drastically over the past 100 years and have led to an increasing discrepancy between biological and social time (social jetlag). The increasing evidence that social jetlag has detrimental consequences for health suggests that shift-work is only an extreme form of circadian misalignment, and that the majority of the population in the industrialised world suffers from a similarly 'forced synchrony'.

  11. Analytic clock frequency selection for global DVFS

    OpenAIRE

    Gerards, Marco Egbertus Theodorus; Hurink, Johann L.; Holzenspies, P.K.F.; Kuper, Jan; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2014-01-01

    Computers can reduce their power consumption by decreasing their speed using Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS). A form of DVFS for multicore processors is global DVFS, where the voltage and clock frequency is shared among all processor cores. Because global DVFS is efficient and cheap to implement, it is used in modern multicore processors like the IBM Power 7, ARM Cortex A9 and NVIDIA Tegra 2. This theory oriented paper discusses energy optimal DVFS algorithms for such processors....

  12. The circadian clock, reward and memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs eAlbrecht

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available During our daily activities, we experience variations in our cognitive performance, which is often accompanied by cravings for small rewards, such as consuming coffee or chocolate. This indicates that the time of day, cognitive performance and reward may be related to one another. This review will summarize data that describes the influence of the circadian clock on addiction and mood-related behavior and put the data into perspective in relation to memory processes.

  13. GLONASS orbit/clock combination in VNIIFTRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezmenov, I.; Pasynok, S.

    2015-08-01

    An algorithm and a program for GLONASS satellites orbit/clock combination based on daily precise orbits submitted by several Analytic Centers were developed. Some theoretical estimates for combine orbit positions RMS were derived. It was shown that under condition that RMS of satellite orbits provided by the Analytic Centers during a long time interval are commensurable the RMS of combine orbit positions is no greater than RMS of other satellite positions estimated by any of the Analytic Centers.

  14. Lattice gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petronzio, R.

    1992-01-01

    Lattice gauge theories are about fifteen years old and I will report on the present status of the field without making the elementary introduction that can be found in the proceedings of the last two conferences. The talk covers briefly the following subjects: the determination of α s , the status of spectroscopy, heavy quark physics and in particular the calculation of their hadronic weak matrix elements, high temperature QCD, non perturbative Higgs bounds, chiral theories on the lattice and induced theories

  15. Permutohedral Lattice CNNs

    OpenAIRE

    Kiefel, Martin; Jampani, Varun; Gehler, Peter V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a convolutional layer that is able to process sparse input features. As an example, for image recognition problems this allows an efficient filtering of signals that do not lie on a dense grid (like pixel position), but of more general features (such as color values). The presented algorithm makes use of the permutohedral lattice data structure. The permutohedral lattice was introduced to efficiently implement a bilateral filter, a commonly used image processing operation....

  16. Clock distribution system for digital computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, H.H.; Wyman, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    An apparatus is disclosed for eliminating, in each clock distribution amplifier of a clock distribution system, sequential pulse catch-up error due to one pulse ''overtaking'' a prior clock pulse. The apparatus includes timing means to produce a periodic electromagnetic signal with a fundamental frequency having a fundamental frequency component v'01(T); an array of N signal characteristic detector means, with detector means no. 1 receiving the timing means signal and producing a change-of-state signal v1(T) in response to receipt of a signal above a predetermined threshold; N substantially identical filter means, one filter means being operatively associated with each detector means, for receiving the change-of-state signal vn(T) and producing a modified change-of-state signal v'n(T) (N 1, . . . , n) having a fundamental frequency component that is substantially proportional to v'01(T- theta n(T) with a cumulative phase shift theta n(T) having a time derivative that may be made uniformly and arbitrarily small; and with the detector means n+1 (1 < or = n< n) receiving a modified change-of-state signal vn(T) from filter means no. N and, in response to receipt of such a signal above a predetermined threshold, producing a change-of-state signal vn+1

  17. Additive lattice kirigami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D

    2016-09-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes.

  18. Biological timing and the clock metaphor: oscillatory and hourglass mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensing, L; Meyer-Grahle, U; Ruoff, P

    2001-05-01

    Living organisms have developed a multitude of timing mechanisms--"biological clocks." Their mechanisms are based on either oscillations (oscillatory clocks) or unidirectional processes (hourglass clocks). Oscillatory clocks comprise circatidal, circalunidian, circadian, circalunar, and circannual oscillations--which keep time with environmental periodicities--as well as ultradian oscillations, ovarian cycles, and oscillations in development and in the brain, which keep time with biological timescales. These clocks mainly determine time points at specific phases of their oscillations. Hourglass clocks are predominantly found in development and aging and also in the brain. They determine time intervals (duration). More complex timing systems combine oscillatory and hourglass mechanisms, such as the case for cell cycle, sleep initiation, or brain clocks, whereas others combine external and internal periodicities (photoperiodism, seasonal reproduction). A definition of a biological clock may be derived from its control of functions external to its own processes and its use in determining temporal order (sequences of events) or durations. Biological and chemical oscillators are characterized by positive and negative feedback (or feedforward) mechanisms. During evolution, living organisms made use of the many existing oscillations for signal transmission, movement, and pump mechanisms, as well as for clocks. Some clocks, such as the circadian clock, that time with environmental periodicities are usually compensated (stabilized) against temperature, whereas other clocks, such as the cell cycle, that keep time with an organismic timescale are not compensated. This difference may be related to the predominance of negative feedback in the first class of clocks and a predominance of positive feedback (autocatalytic amplification) in the second class. The present knowledge of a compensated clock (the circadian oscillator) and an uncompensated clock (the cell cycle), as well

  19. Lattice regularized chiral perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borasoy, Bugra; Lewis, Randy; Ouimet, Pierre-Philippe A.

    2004-01-01

    Chiral perturbation theory can be defined and regularized on a spacetime lattice. A few motivations are discussed here, and an explicit lattice Lagrangian is reviewed. A particular aspect of the connection between lattice chiral perturbation theory and lattice QCD is explored through a study of the Wess-Zumino-Witten term

  20. Vortex lattices in layered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokic, V.; Davidovic, D.; Dobrosavljevic-Grujic, L.

    1995-01-01

    We study vortex lattices in a superconductor--normal-metal superlattice in a parallel magnetic field. Distorted lattices, resulting from the shear deformations along the layers, are found to be unstable. Under field variation, nonequilibrium configurations undergo an infinite sequence of continuous transitions, typical for soft lattices. The equilibrium vortex arrangement is always a lattice of isocell triangles, without shear

  1. Sleep Loss Reduces the DNA-Binding of BMAL1, CLOCK, and NPAS2 to Specific Clock Genes in the Mouse Cerebral Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Mongrain, Valerie; La Spada, Francesco; Curie, Thomas; Franken, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that clock genes contribute to the homeostatic aspect of sleep regulation. Indeed, mutations in some clock genes modify the markers of sleep homeostasis and an increase in homeostatic sleep drive alters clock gene expression in the forebrain. Here, we investigate a possible mechanism by which sleep deprivation (SD) could alter clock gene expression by quantifying DNA-binding of the core-clock transcription factors CLOCK, NPAS2, and BMAL1 to the cis-regulatory s...

  2. Photoperiodic plasticity in circadian clock neurons in insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakiko eShiga

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Since Bünning’s observation of circadian rhythms and photoperiodism in the runner bean Phaseolus multiflorus in 1936, many studies have shown that photoperiodism is based on the circadian clock system. In insects, involvement of circadian clock genes or neurons has been recently shown in the photoperiodic control of developmental arrests, diapause. Based on molecular and neuronal studies in Drosophila melanogaster, photoperiodic changes have been reported for expression patterns of the circadian clock genes, subcellular distribution of clock proteins, fiber distribution, or the number of plausible clock neurons in different species. Photoperiod sets peaks of per or tim mRNA abundance at lights-off in Sarcophaga crassipalpis, Chymomyza costata and Protophormia terraenovae. Abundance of per and Clock mRNA changes by photoperiod in Pyrrhocoris apterus. Subcellular Per distribution in circadian clock neurons changes with photoperiod in P. terraenovae. Although photoperiodism is not known in Leucophaea maderae, under longer day length, more stomata and longer commissural fibers of circadian clock neurons have been found. These plastic changes in the circadian clock neurons could be an important constituent for photoperiodic clock mechanisms to integrate repetitive photoperiodic information and produce different outputs based on day length.

  3. Optical properties of lattice matched In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}P{sub 1-y}N{sub y} heteroepitaxial layers on GaP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanishi, T.; Wakahara, A.; Kim, S.M.; Yonezu, H.; Furukawa, Y. [Department of Electrical and Electron Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 411-8580 (Japan)

    2005-04-01

    Optical constants and band structure of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}P{sub 1-y}N{sub y} lattice matched to GaP (100) substrate are investigated. Nitrogen concentration in the film estimated by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, was 1.4%, 1.8% and 3.5%. Refractive index and transition critical points E{sub 0} ({gamma}{sub v} to {gamma}{sub c}), E{sub 1} (L{sub v} to L{sub c}) and E{sub 2} (X{sub v} to X{sub c}) are evaluated by spectroscopic ellipsometry. When N composition increases from 1.4% to 3.5%, both photoluminescence (PL) peak energy, E{sub PL}, and E{sub 0} shift to lower energy, and the energy difference {delta}E=E{sub 0}-E{sub PL} decrease from 380 meV to 110 meV. The large red-sift of E{sub PL} from the E{sub 0} suggest that the luminescence is of defect-related luminescence, and crossover point of indirect band structure estimated by the extrapolation of N-composition dependence of {delta}E is estimated to be around in In{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.9}P{sub 0.96}N{sub 0.04}. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. 5-Gb/s 0.18-{mu}m CMOS 2:1 multiplexer with integrated clock extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Changchun; Wang Zhigong; Shi Si; Miao Peng [Institute of RF- and OE-ICs, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Tian Ling, E-mail: zgwang@seu.edu.c [School of Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2009-09-15

    A 5-Gb/s 2:1 MUX (multiplexer) with an on-chip integrated clock extraction circuit which possesses the function of automatic phase alignment (APA), has been designed and fabricated in SMIC's 0.18 {mu}m CMOS technology. The chip area is 670 x 780 {mu}m{sup 2}. At a single supply voltage of 1.8 V, the total power consumption is 112 mW with an input sensitivity of less than 50 mV and an output single-ended swing of above 300 mV. The measurement results show that the IC can work reliably at any input data rate between 1.8 and 2.6 Gb/s with no need for external components, reference clock, or phase alignment between data and clock. It can be used in a parallel optic-fiber data interconnecting system.

  5. 5-Gb/s 0.18-μm CMOS 2:1 multiplexer with integrated clock extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Changchun; Wang Zhigong; Shi Si; Miao Peng; Tian Ling

    2009-01-01

    A 5-Gb/s 2:1 MUX (multiplexer) with an on-chip integrated clock extraction circuit which possesses the function of automatic phase alignment (APA), has been designed and fabricated in SMIC's 0.18 μm CMOS technology. The chip area is 670 x 780 μm 2 . At a single supply voltage of 1.8 V, the total power consumption is 112 mW with an input sensitivity of less than 50 mV and an output single-ended swing of above 300 mV. The measurement results show that the IC can work reliably at any input data rate between 1.8 and 2.6 Gb/s with no need for external components, reference clock, or phase alignment between data and clock. It can be used in a parallel optic-fiber data interconnecting system.

  6. 5-Gb/s 0.18-μm CMOS 2:1 multiplexer with integrated clock extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changchun, Zhang; Zhigong, Wang; Si, Shi; Peng, Miao; Ling, Tian

    2009-09-01

    A 5-Gb/s 2:1 MUX (multiplexer) with an on-chip integrated clock extraction circuit which possesses the function of automatic phase alignment (APA), has been designed and fabricated in SMIC's 0.18 μm CMOS technology. The chip area is 670 × 780 μm2. At a single supply voltage of 1.8 V, the total power consumption is 112 mW with an input sensitivity of less than 50 mV and an output single-ended swing of above 300 mV. The measurement results show that the IC can work reliably at any input data rate between 1.8 and 2.6 Gb/s with no need for external components, reference clock, or phase alignment between data and clock. It can be used in a parallel optic-fiber data interconnecting system.

  7. Relativity theory and time perception: single or multiple clocks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhusi, Catalin V; Meck, Warren H

    2009-07-22

    Current theories of interval timing assume that humans and other animals time as if using a single, absolute stopwatch that can be stopped or reset on command. Here we evaluate the alternative view that psychological time is represented by multiple clocks, and that these clocks create separate temporal contexts by which duration is judged in a relative manner. Two predictions of the multiple-clock hypothesis were tested. First, that the multiple clocks can be manipulated (stopped and/or reset) independently. Second, that an event of a given physical duration would be perceived as having different durations in different temporal contexts, i.e., would be judged differently by each clock. Rats were trained to time three durations (e.g., 10, 30, and 90 s). When timing was interrupted by an unexpected gap in the signal, rats reset the clock used to time the "short" duration, stopped the "medium" duration clock, and continued to run the "long" duration clock. When the duration of the gap was manipulated, the rats reset these clocks in a hierarchical order, first the "short", then the "medium", and finally the "long" clock. Quantitative modeling assuming re-allocation of cognitive resources in proportion to the relative duration of the gap to the multiple, simultaneously timed event durations was used to account for the results. These results indicate that the three event durations were effectively timed by separate clocks operated independently, and that the same gap duration was judged relative to these three temporal contexts. Results suggest that the brain processes the duration of an event in a manner similar to Einstein's special relativity theory: A given time interval is registered differently by independent clocks dependent upon the context.

  8. Relativity theory and time perception: single or multiple clocks?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin V Buhusi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Current theories of interval timing assume that humans and other animals time as if using a single, absolute stopwatch that can be stopped or reset on command. Here we evaluate the alternative view that psychological time is represented by multiple clocks, and that these clocks create separate temporal contexts by which duration is judged in a relative manner. Two predictions of the multiple-clock hypothesis were tested. First, that the multiple clocks can be manipulated (stopped and/or reset independently. Second, that an event of a given physical duration would be perceived as having different durations in different temporal contexts, i.e., would be judged differently by each clock.Rats were trained to time three durations (e.g., 10, 30, and 90 s. When timing was interrupted by an unexpected gap in the signal, rats reset the clock used to time the "short" duration, stopped the "medium" duration clock, and continued to run the "long" duration clock. When the duration of the gap was manipulated, the rats reset these clocks in a hierarchical order, first the "short", then the "medium", and finally the "long" clock. Quantitative modeling assuming re-allocation of cognitive resources in proportion to the relative duration of the gap to the multiple, simultaneously timed event durations was used to account for the results.These results indicate that the three event durations were effectively timed by separate clocks operated independently, and that the same gap duration was judged relative to these three temporal contexts. Results suggest that the brain processes the duration of an event in a manner similar to Einstein's special relativity theory: A given time interval is registered differently by independent clocks dependent upon the context.

  9. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Temperature Compensation of the Circadian Clock

    OpenAIRE

    David M. Virshup; Rajesh Narasimamurthy

    2017-01-01

    An approximately 24-h biological timekeeping mechanism called the circadian clock is present in virtually all light-sensitive organisms from cyanobacteria to humans. The clock system regulates our sleep–wake cycle, feeding–fasting, hormonal secretion, body temperature, and many other physiological functions. Signals from the master circadian oscillator entrain peripheral clocks using a variety of neural and hormonal signals. Even centrally controlled internal temperature fluctuations can entr...

  10. System-wide power management control via clock distribution network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan; Gooding, Thomas M.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Liebsch, Thomas A.; Reed, Don D.

    2015-05-19

    An apparatus, method and computer program product for automatically controlling power dissipation of a parallel computing system that includes a plurality of processors. A computing device issues a command to the parallel computing system. A clock pulse-width modulator encodes the command in a system clock signal to be distributed to the plurality of processors. The plurality of processors in the parallel computing system receive the system clock signal including the encoded command, and adjusts power dissipation according to the encoded command.

  11. OPTIMIZING THE DYNAMIC APERTURE FOR TRIPLE BEND ACHROMATIC LATTICES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KRAMER, S.L.; BENGTSSON, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Triple Bend Achromatic (TBA) lattice has the potential for lower natural emittance per period than the Double Bend Achromatic (DBA) lattice for high brightness light sources. However, the DBA has been chosen for 3rd generation light sources more often due to the higher number of undulator straight section available for a comparable emittance. The TBA has considerable flexibility in linear optics tuning while maintaining this emittance advantage. We have used the tune and chromaticity flexibility of a TBA lattice to minimize the lowest order nonlinearities to implement a 3rd order achromatic tune, while maintaining a constant emittance. This frees the geometric sextupoles to counter the higher order nonlinearities. This procedure is being used to improve the nonlinear dynamics of the TBA as a proposed lattice for NSLS-II facility. The flexibility of the TBA lattice will also provide for future upgrade capabilities of the beam parameters

  12. Precise determination of lattice phase shifts and mixing angles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Bing-Nan, E-mail: b.lu@fz-juelich.de [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Institut für Kernphysik, and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Lähde, Timo A. [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Institut für Kernphysik, and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Lee, Dean [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Meißner, Ulf-G. [Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universität Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Institute for Advanced Simulation, Institut für Kernphysik, and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); JARA – High Performance Computing, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2016-09-10

    We introduce a general and accurate method for determining lattice phase shifts and mixing angles, which is applicable to arbitrary, non-cubic lattices. Our method combines angular momentum projection, spherical wall boundaries and an adjustable auxiliary potential. This allows us to construct radial lattice wave functions and to determine phase shifts at arbitrary energies. For coupled partial waves, we use a complex-valued auxiliary potential that breaks time-reversal invariance. We benchmark our method using a system of two spin-1/2 particles interacting through a finite-range potential with a strong tensor component. We are able to extract phase shifts and mixing angles for all angular momenta and energies, with precision greater than that of extant methods. We discuss a wide range of applications from nuclear lattice simulations to optical lattice experiments.

  13. Lattice Design in High-energy Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Holzer, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    This lecture gives an introduction into the design of high-energy storage ring lattices. Applying the formalism that has been established in transverse be am optics, the basic principles of the development of a magnet lattice are explained and the characteristics of the resulting magnet structure are discussed. The periodic assembly of a storage ring cell with its boundary conditions concerning stability and scaling of the beam optics parameters is addressed as well as special lattice insertions such as drifts, mini beta sections, dispersion suppressors, etc. In addition to the exact calculations that are indispensable for a rigorous treatment of the matter, scaling rules are shown and simple rules of thumb are included that enable the lattice designer to do the first estimates and get the basic numbers ‘ on the back of an envelope.

  14. Lattice design in high-energy particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Holzer, B J

    2006-01-01

    This lecture introduces storage-ring lattice desing. Applying the formalism that has been established in transverse beam optics, the basic principles of the development of a magnet lattice are explained and the characteristics of the resulting magnet structure are discussed. The periodic assembly of a storage ring cell with its boundary conditions concerning stability and scaling of the beam optics parameters is addressed as well as special lattice structures: drifts, mini beta insertions, dispersion suppressors, etc. In addition to the exact calculations indispensable for a rigorous treatment of the matter, scaling rules are shown and simple rules of thumb are included that enable the lattice designer to do the first estimates and get the basic numbers ‘on the back of an envelope’.

  15. Dynamical lattice theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chodos, A.

    1978-01-01

    A version of lattice gauge theory is presented in which the shape of the lattice is not assumed at the outset but is a consequence of the dynamics. Other related features which are not specified a priori include the internal and space-time symmetry groups and the dimensionality of space-time. The theory possesses a much larger invariance group than the usual gauge group on a lattice, and has associated with it an integer k 0 analogous to the topological quantum numer of quantum chromodynamics. Families of semiclassical solutions are found which are labeled by k 0 and a second integer x, but the analysis is not carried far enough to determine which space-time and internal symmetry groups characterize the lowest-lying states of the theory

  16. Graphene antidot lattice waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Gunst, Tue; Markussen, Troels

    2012-01-01

    We introduce graphene antidot lattice waveguides: nanostructured graphene where a region of pristine graphene is sandwiched between regions of graphene antidot lattices. The band gaps in the surrounding antidot lattices enable localized states to emerge in the central waveguide region. We model...... the waveguides via a position-dependent mass term in the Dirac approximation of graphene and arrive at analytical results for the dispersion relation and spinor eigenstates of the localized waveguide modes. To include atomistic details we also use a tight-binding model, which is in excellent agreement...... with the analytical results. The waveguides resemble graphene nanoribbons, but without the particular properties of ribbons that emerge due to the details of the edge. We show that electrons can be guided through kinks without additional resistance and that transport through the waveguides is robust against...

  17. Diamond Electron-Spin Clocks For Space Navigation and Communication

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Precision clocks are needed in a broad range of applications, including satellite communication, high-bandwidth wireless communication, computing systems, and...

  18. The role of the mechanical clock in medieval science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Víctor Pérez

    2015-03-01

    The invention and spread of the mechanical clock is a complex and multifaceted historical phenomenon. Some of these facets, such as its social impact, have been widely studied, but their scientific dimensions have often been dismissed. The mechanical clock was probably born as a scientific instrument for driving a model of the universe, and not only natural philosophers but also kings, nobles and other members of the social elites showed an interest in clocks as scientific instruments. Public clocks later spread a new way of telling time based on equal hours, laying the foundations for changes in time consciousness that would accelerate scientific thinking. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthesizing genetic sequential logic circuit with clock pulse generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chia-Hua; Lin, Chun-Liang

    2014-05-28

    Rhythmic clock widely occurs in biological systems which controls several aspects of cell physiology. For the different cell types, it is supplied with various rhythmic frequencies. How to synthesize a specific clock signal is a preliminary but a necessary step to further development of a biological computer in the future. This paper presents a genetic sequential logic circuit with a clock pulse generator based on a synthesized genetic oscillator, which generates a consecutive clock signal whose frequency is an inverse integer multiple to that of the genetic oscillator. An analogous electronic waveform-shaping circuit is constructed by a series of genetic buffers to shape logic high/low levels of an oscillation input in a basic sinusoidal cycle and generate a pulse-width-modulated (PWM) output with various duty cycles. By controlling the threshold level of the genetic buffer, a genetic clock pulse signal with its frequency consistent to the genetic oscillator is synthesized. A synchronous genetic counter circuit based on the topology of the digital sequential logic circuit is triggered by the clock pulse to synthesize the clock signal with an inverse multiple frequency to the genetic oscillator. The function acts like a frequency divider in electronic circuits which plays a key role in the sequential logic circuit with specific operational frequency. A cascaded genetic logic circuit generating clock pulse signals is proposed. Based on analogous implement of digital sequential logic circuits, genetic sequential logic circuits can be constructed by the proposed approach to generate various clock signals from an oscillation signal.

  20. Improvement of an Atomic Clock using Squeezed Vacuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, I.; Lange, K; Peise, Jan

    2016-01-01

    , the vacuum noise restricts the precision of the interferometer to the standard quantum limit (SQL). Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel clock configuration that surpasses the SQL by squeezing the vacuum in the empty input state. We create a squeezed vacuum state containing an average of 0.......75 atoms to improve the clock sensitivity of 10000 atoms by 2.05+0.34−0.37  dB. The SQL poses a significant limitation for today’s microwave fountain clocks, which serve as the main time reference. We evaluate the major technical limitations and challenges for devising a next generation of fountain clocks...