WorldWideScience

Sample records for optical lattice clock

  1. Optical Lattice Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Chris

    2012-06-01

    Since they were first proposed in 2003 [1], optical lattice clocks have become one of the leading technologies for the next generation of atomic clocks, which will be used for advanced timing applications and in tests of fundamental physics [2]. These clocks are based on stabilized lasers whose frequency is ultimately referenced to an ultra-narrow neutral atom transition (natural linewidths magic'' value so as to yield a vanishing net AC Stark shift for the clock transition. As a result lattice clocks have demonstrated the capability of generating high stability clock signals with small absolute uncertainties (˜ 1 part in 10^16). In this presentation I will first give an overview of the field, which now includes three different atomic species. I will then use experiments with Yb performed in our laboratory to illustrate the key features of a lattice clock. Our research has included the development of state-of-the-art optical cavities enabling ultra-high-resolution optical spectroscopy (1 Hz linewidth). Together with the large atom number in the optical lattice, we are able to achieve very low clock instability (< 0.3 Hz in 1 s) [3]. Furthermore, I will show results from some of our recent investigations of key shifts for the Yb lattice clock, including high precision measurements of ultracold atom-atom interactions in the lattice and the dc Stark effect for the Yb clock transition (necessary for the evaluation of blackbody radiation shifts). [4pt] [1] H. Katori, M. Takamoto, V. G. Pal'chikov, and V. D. Ovsiannikov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 173005 (2003). [0pt] [2] Andrei Derevianko and Hidetoshi Katori, Rev. Mod. Phys. 83, 331 (2011). [0pt] [3] Y. Y. Jiang, A. D. Ludlow, N. D. Lemke, R. W. Fox, J. A. Sherman, L.-S. Ma, and C. W. Oates, Nature Photonics 5, 158 (2011).

  2. Colloquium: Physics of optical lattice clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Derevianko, Andrei

    2010-01-01

    Recently invented and demonstrated, optical lattice clocks hold great promise for improving the precision of modern timekeeping. These clocks aim at the 10^-18 fractional accuracy, which translates into a clock that would neither lose or gain a fraction of a second over an estimated age of the Universe. In these clocks, millions of atoms are trapped and interrogated simultaneously, dramatically improving clock stability. Here we discuss the principles of operation of these clocks and, in particular, a novel concept of "magic" trapping of atoms in optical lattices. We also highlight recently proposed microwave lattice clocks and several applications that employ the optical lattice clocks as a platform for precision measurements and quantum information processing.

  3. Optical lattice clocks and frequency comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katori, Hidetoshi; Takano, Tetsushi; Takamoto, Masao, E-mail: katori@amo.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama (Japan)

    2011-01-10

    We consider designs of optical lattice clocks in view of the quantum statistics, relevant atomic spins, and atom-lattice interactions. The first two issues lead to two optimal constructions for the clock: a one-dimensional (1D) optical lattice loaded with spin-polarized fermions and a 3D optical lattice loaded with bosons. By taking atomic multipolar interactions with the lattice fields into account, an 'atomic motion insensitive' wavelength is proposed to provide a precise definition of the 'magic wavelength'. We then present a frequency comparison of these two optical lattice clocks: spin-polarized fermionic {sup 87}Sr and bosonic {sup 88}Sr prepared in 1D and 3D optical lattices, respectively. Synchronous interrogations of these two optical lattice clocks by the same probe laser allowed canceling out its frequency noise as a common mode noise to achieve a relative stability of 3x10{sup -17} for an averaging time of {tau} = 350 s. The scheme, therefore, provides us with a powerful means to investigate intrinsic uncertainty of the clocks regardless of the probe laser stability. We discuss prospects of the synchronous operation of the clocks on the measurement of the geoid height difference and on the search of constancy of fundamental constants.

  4. A low maintenance Sr optical lattice clock

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, Ian R; Bowden, William; Bridge, Elizabeth M; Donnellan, Sean; Curtis, E Anne; Gill, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    We describe the Sr optical lattice clock apparatus at NPL with particular emphasis on techniques used to increase reliability and minimise the human requirement in its operation. Central to this is a clock-referenced transfer cavity scheme for the stabilisation of cooling and trapping lasers. We highlight several measures to increase the reliability of the clock with a view towards the realisation of an optical time-scale. The clock contributed 502 hours of data over a 25 day period (84% uptime) in a recent measurement campaign with several uninterrupted periods of more than 48 hours. An instability of $2\\times10^{-17}$ was reached after $10^5$ s of averaging in an interleaved self-comparison of the clock.

  5. Optical to microwave clock frequency ratios with a nearly continuous strontium optical lattice clock

    CERN Document Server

    Lodewyck, Jérôme; Bookjans, Eva; Robyr, Jean-Luc; Shi, Chunyan; Vallet, Grégoire; Targat, Rodolphe Le; Nicolodi, Daniele; Coq, Yann Le; Guéna, Jocelyne; Abgrall, Michel; Rosenbusch, Peter; Bize, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Optical lattice clocks are at the forefront of frequency metrology. Both the instability and systematic uncertainty of these clocks have been reported to be two orders of magnitude smaller than the best microwave clocks. For this reason, a redefinition of the SI second based on optical clocks seems possible in the near future. However, the operation of optical lattice clocks has not yet reached the reliability that microwave clocks have achieved so far. In this paper, we report on the operation of a strontium optical lattice clock that spans several weeks, with more than 80% uptime. We make use of this long integration time to demonstrate a reproducible measurement of frequency ratios between the strontium clock transition and microwave Cs primary and Rb secondary frequency standards.

  6. Synthetic Spin-Orbit Coupling in an Optical Lattice Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Michael L.; Koller, Andrew P.; Li, Shuming; Zhang, Xibo; Cooper, Nigel R.; Ye, Jun; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    We propose the use of optical lattice clocks operated with fermionic alkaline-earth atoms to study spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in interacting many-body systems. The SOC emerges naturally during the clock interrogation, when atoms are allowed to tunnel and accumulate a phase set by the ratio of the "magic" lattice wavelength to the clock transition wavelength. We demonstrate how standard protocols such as Rabi and Ramsey spectroscopy that take advantage of the sub-Hertz resolution of state-of-the-art clock lasers can perform momentum-resolved band tomography and determine SOC-induced s -wave collisions in nuclear-spin-polarized fermions. With the use of a second counterpropagating clock beam, we propose a method for engineering controlled atomic transport and study how it is modified by p - and s -wave interactions. The proposed spectroscopic probes provide clean and well-resolved signatures at current clock operating temperatures.

  7. Frequency comparison of optical lattice clocks beyond the Dick limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamoto, Masao; Takano, Tetsushi; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2011-05-01

    The supreme accuracy of atomic clocks relies on the universality of atomic transition frequencies. The stability of a clock, meanwhile, measures how quickly the clock's statistical uncertainties are reduced. The ultimate measure of stability is provided by the quantum projection noise, which improves as 1/√N by measuring N uncorrelated atoms. Quantum projection noise limited stabilities have been demonstrated in caesium clocks and in single-ion optical clocks, where the quantum noise overwhelms the Dick effect attributed to local oscillator noise. Here, we demonstrate a synchronous frequency comparison of two optical lattice clocks using 87Sr and 88Sr atoms, respectively, for which the Allan standard deviation reached 1 × 10-17 in an averaging time of 1,600 s by cancelling out the Dick effect to approach the quantum projection noise limit. The scheme demonstrates the advantage of using a large number (N ~ 1,000) of atoms in optical clocks and paves the way to investigating the inherent uncertainties of clocks and relativistic geodesy on a timescale of tens of minutes.

  8. Optimized geometries for future generation optical lattice clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Krämer, Sebastian; Ritsch, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Atoms trapped in magic wavelength optical lattices provide a Doppler- and collision-free dense ensemble of quantum emitters ideal for fast high precision spectroscopy and thus they are the basis of the best optical clock setups to date. Despite the minute optical dipole moments the inherent long range dipole-dipole interactions in such lattices at high densities generate measurable line shifts, increased dephasing and modified decay rates. We show that these effects can be resonantly enhanced or suppressed depending on lattice constant, geometry and excitation procedure. While these interactions generally limit the accuracy and precision of Ramsey spectroscopy, under optimal conditions collective effects can be exploited to yield zero effective shifts and long dipole lifetimes for a measurement precision beyond a noninteracting ensemble. In particular, 2D lattices with a lattice constant below the optical wavelength feature an almost ideal performance.

  9. Stability improvements for the NIST Yb optical lattice clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, R. J.; Schioppo, M.; McGrew, W. F.; Brown, R. C.; Hinkley, N.; Yoon, T. H.; Beloy, K.; Oates, C. W.; Ludlow, A. D.

    2016-05-01

    To reach the fundamental limit given by quantum projection noise, optical lattice clocks require advanced laser stabilization techniques. The NIST ytterbium clock has benefited from several generations of extremely high finesse optical cavities, with cavity linewidths below 1 kHz. Characterization of the cavity drift rate has allowed compensation to the mHz/s level, improving the medium-term stability of the cavity. Based on recent measurements using Ramsey spectroscopy with synchronous interrogation, we report a fractional instability σy(1s) thermal noise floor, which will improve our Dick-limited fractional instability at 1 s to below 10-16. Also at University of Colorado.

  10. Development of a strontium optical lattice clock for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-07-01

    With timekeeping being of paramount importance for modern life, much research and major scientific advances have been undertaken in the field of frequency metrology, particularly over the last few years. New Nobel-prize winning technologies have enabled a new era of atomic clocks; namely the optical clock. These have been shown to perform significantly better than the best microwave clocks reaching an inaccuracy of 1.6x10-18 [1]. With such results being found in large lab based apparatus, the focus now has shifted to portability - to enable the accuracy of various ground based clocks to be measured, and compact autonomous performance - to enable such technologies to be tested in space. This could lead to a master clock in space, improving not only the accuracy of technologies on which modern life has come to require such as GPS and communication networks. But also more fundamentally, this could lead to the redefinition of the second and tests of fundamental physics including applications in the fields of ground based and satellite geodesy, metrology, positioning, navigation, transport and logistics etc. Within the European collaboration, Space Optical Clocks (SOC2) [2-3] consisting of various institutes and industry partners across Europe we have tried to tackle this problem of miniaturisation whilst maintaining stability, accuracy (5x10-17) and robustness whilst keeping power consumption to a minimum - necessary for space applications. We will present the most recent results of the Sr optical clock in SOC2 and also the novel compact design features, new methods employed and outlook. References [1] B. J. Bloom, T. L. Nicholson, J. R. Williams, S. L. Campbell, M. Bishof, X. Zhang, W. Zhang, S. L. Bromley, and J. Ye, "An optical lattice clock with accuracy and stability at the 10-18 level," Nature 506, 71-75 (2014). [2] S. Schiller et al. "Towards Neutral-atom Space Optical Clocks (SOC2): Development of high-performance transportable and breadboard optical clocks and

  11. Spin-orbit coupled fermions in an optical lattice clock

    CERN Document Server

    Kolkowitz, S; Bothwell, T; Wall, M L; Marti, G E; Koller, A P; Zhang, X; Rey, A M; Ye, J

    2016-01-01

    Engineered spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in cold atom systems can aid in the study of novel synthetic materials and complex condensed matter phenomena. Despite great advances, alkali atom SOC systems are hindered by heating from spontaneous emission, which limits the observation of many-body effects. Here we demonstrate the use of optical lattice clocks (OLCs) to engineer and study SOC with metrological precision and negligible heating. We show that clock spectroscopy of the ultra-narrow transition in fermionic 87Sr represents a momentum- and spin-resolved in situ probe of the SOC band structure and eigenstates, providing direct access to the SOC dynamics and control over lattice band populations, internal electronic states, and quasimomenta. We utilize these capabilities to study Bloch oscillations, spin-momentum locking, and van Hove singularities in the transition density of states. Our results lay the groundwork for the use of OLCs to probe novel SOC phases including magnetic crystals, helical liquids, and to...

  12. Gravitational wave detection with optical lattice atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Kolkowitz, Shimon; Langellier, Nicholas; Lukin, Mikhail D; Walsworth, Ronald L; Ye, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We propose a space-based gravitational wave detector consisting of two spatially separated, drag-free satellites sharing ultra-stable optical laser light over a single baseline. Each satellite contains an optical lattice atomic clock, which serves as a sensitive, narrowband detector of the local frequency of the shared laser light. A synchronized two-clock comparison between the satellites will be sensitive to the effective Doppler shifts induced by incident gravitational waves (GWs) at a level competitive with other proposed space-based GW detectors, while providing complementary features. The detected signal is a differential frequency shift of the shared laser light due to the relative velocity of the satellites, rather than a phase shift arising from the relative satellite positions, and the detection window can be tuned through the control sequence applied to the atoms' internal states. This scheme enables the detection of GWs from continuous, spectrally narrow sources, such as compact binary inspirals, ...

  13. Experimenting an optical second with strontium lattice clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Targat, R Le; Coq, Y Le; Zawada, M; Guéna, J; Abgrall, M; Gurov, M; Rosenbusch, P; Rovera, D G; Nagórny, B; Gartman, R; Westergaard, P G; Tobar, M E; Lours, M; Santarelli, G; Clairon, A; Bize, S; Laurent, P; Lemonde, P; Lodewyck, J

    2013-01-01

    Progress in realizing the SI second had multiple technological impacts and enabled to further constraint theoretical models in fundamental physics. Caesium microwave fountains, realizing best the second according to its current definition with a relative uncertainty of 2-4x10^(-16), have already been superseded by atomic clocks referenced to an optical transition, both more stable and more accurate. Are we ready for a new definition of the second? Here we present an important step in this direction: our system of five clocks connects with an unprecedented consistency the optical and the microwave worlds. For the first time, two state-of-the-art strontium optical lattice clocks are proven to agree within their accuracy budget, with a total uncertainty of 1.6x10^(-16). Their comparison with three independent caesium fountains shows a degree of reproducibility henceforth solely limited at the level of 3.1x10^(-16) by the best realizations of the microwave-defined second.

  14. Frequency Ratio of ${}^{199}$Hg and ${}^{87}$Sr Optical Lattice Clocks beyond the SI Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanaka, Kazuhiro; Ushijima, Ichiro; Takamoto, Masao; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2015-01-01

    We report on a frequency ratio measurement of a ${}^{199}$Hg-based optical lattice clock referencing a ${}^{87}$Sr-based clock. Evaluations of lattice light shift, including atomic-motion-dependent shift, enable us to achieve a total systematic uncertainty of $7.2 \\times 10^{-17}$ for the Hg clock. The frequency ratio is measured to be $\

  15. Geopotential measurements with synchronously linked optical lattice clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Tetsushi; Takamoto, Masao; Ushijima, Ichiro; Ohmae, Noriaki; Akatsuka, Tomoya; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Kuroishi, Yuki; Munekane, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Basara; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2016-10-01

    According to Einstein's theory of relativity, the passage of time changes in a gravitational field. On Earth, raising a clock by 1 cm increases its apparent tick rate by 1.1 parts in 1018, allowing chronometric levelling through comparison of optical clocks. Here, we demonstrate such geopotential measurements by determining the height difference of master and slave clocks separated by 15 km with an uncertainty of 5 cm. A subharmonic of the master clock laser is delivered through a telecom fibre to synchronously operate the distant clocks. Clocks operated under such phase coherence reject clock laser noise and facilitate proposals for linking clocks and interferometers. Taken over half a year, 11 measurements determine the fractional frequency difference between the two clocks to be 1,652.9(5.9) × 10-18, consistent with an independent measurement by levelling and gravimetry. Our system demonstrates a building block for an internet of clocks, which may constitute ‘quantum benchmarks’, serving as height references with dynamic responses.

  16. Real-time geopotentiometry with synchronously linked optical lattice clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Takano, Tetsushi; Ushijima, Ichiro; Ohmae, Noriaki; Akatsuka, Tomoya; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Kuroishi, Yuki; Munekane, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Basara; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    According to the Einstein's theory of relativity, the passage of time changes in a gravitational field. On earth, raising a clock by one centimetre increases its tick rate by 1.1 parts in 10$^{18}$, enabling optical clocks to perform precision geodesy. Here, we demonstrate geopotentiometry by determining the height difference of master and slave clocks separated by 15 km with uncertainty of 5 cm. The subharmonic of the master clock is delivered through a telecom fibre to phase-lock and synchronously interrogate the slave clock. This protocol rejects laser noise in the comparison of two clocks, which improves the stability of measuring the gravitational red shift. Such phase-coherently operated clocks facilitate proposals for linking clocks and interferometers. Over half a year, 11 measurements determine the fractional frequency difference between the two clocks to be $1,652.9(5.9)\\times 10^{-18}$, or a height difference of 1,516(5) cm, consistent with an independent measurement by levelling and gravimetry. Ou...

  17. Comparing a mercury optical lattice clock with microwave and optical frequency standards

    CERN Document Server

    Tyumenev, R; Bilicki, S; Bookjans, E; Targat, R Le; Lodewyck, J; Nicolodi, D; Coq, Y Le; Abgrall, M; Guéna, J; De Sarlo, L; Bize, S

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report the evaluation of an optical lattice clock based on neutral mercury down to a relative uncertainty of $1.7\\times 10^{-16}$. Comparing this characterized frequency standard to a Cs atomic fountain we determine the absolute frequency of the $^1S_0 \\rightarrow \\phantom{}^3P_0$ transition of $^{199}$Hg as $\

  18. Frequency ratios of Sr, Yb and Hg based optical lattice clocks and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Takamoto, Masao; Das, Manoj; Nemitz, Nils; Ohkubo, Takuya; Yamanaka, Kazuhiro; Ohmae, Noriaki; Takano, Tetsushi; Akatsuka, Tomoya; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the recent progress of optical lattice clocks with neutral strontium ($^{87}$Sr), ytterbium ($^{171}$Yb) and mercury ($^{199}$Hg) atoms. In particular, we present frequency comparison between the clocks locally via an optical frequency comb and between two Sr clocks at remote sites using a phase-stabilized fibre link. We first review cryogenic Sr optical lattice clocks that reduce the room-temperature blackbody radiation shift by two orders of magnitude and serve as a reference in the following clock comparisons. Similar physical properties of Sr and Yb atoms, such as transition wavelengths and vapour pressure, have allowed our development of a compatible clock for both species. A cryogenic Yb clock is evaluated by referencing a Sr clock. We also report on a Hg clock, which shows one order of magnitude less sensitivity to blackbody radiation, while its large nuclear charge makes the clock sensitive to the variation of fine-structure constant. Connecting all three types of clocks by an o...

  19. Magic wavelengths for lattice trapped Rubidium four-level active optical clock

    CERN Document Server

    Zang, Xiaorun; Chen, Jingbiao

    2012-01-01

    After pumped from $5s_{1/2}$ ground state to $6p_{1/2}$ state, the population inversion between $6s_{1/2}$ and $5p_{1/2,3/2}$ will be established for Rubidium four-level active optical clock. In this paper, we calculate AC Stark shift due to lattice trapping laser which dominates the frequency shift of clock transition in lattice trapped Rubidium four-level active optical clock. Several blue detuned magic wavelengths are found that can form desired optical lattice trapping potential. When the trapping laser is tuned to the magic wavelength, with 1 MHz frequency uncertainty and 10 kW$\\cdot$cm$^{-2}$ intensity, the frequency uncertainty of clock transition due to AC Stark shift of trapping laser, is estimated to be below 0.05 mHz.

  20. Development of a strontium optical lattice clock for the SOC mission on the ISS

    CERN Document Server

    Bongs, K; Smith, L; He, W; Kock, O; Swierad, D; Hughes, J; Schiller, S; Alighanbari, S; Origlia, S; Vogt, S; Sterr, U; Lisdat, Ch; Targat, R Le; Lodewyck, J; Holleville, D; Venon, B; Bize, S; Barwood, G P; Gill, P; Hill, I R; Ovchinnikov, Y B; Poli, N; Tino, G M; Stuhler, J; Kaenders, W

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-precise optical clocks in space will allow new studies in fundamental physics and astronomy. Within an European Space Agency (ESA) program, the Space Optical Clocks (SOC) project aims to install and to operate an optical lattice clock on the International Space Station (ISS) towards the end of this decade. It would be a natural follow-on to the ACES mission, improving its performance by at least one order of magnitude. The payload is planned to include an optical lattice clock, as well as a frequency comb, a microwave link, and an optical link for comparisons of the ISS clock with ground clocks located in several countries and continents. Within the EU-FP7-SPACE-2010-1 project no. 263500, during the years 2011-2015 a compact, modular and robust strontium lattice optical clock demonstrator has been developed. Goal performance is a fractional frequency instability below 1x10^{-15}, tau^{-1/2} and a fractional inaccuracy below 5x10^{-17}. Here we describe the current status of the apparatus' development, i...

  1. Development of a strontium optical lattice clock for the SOC mission on the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Origlia, S.; Schiller, S.; Pramod, M. S.; Smith, L.; Singh, Y.; He, W.; Viswam, S.; Świerad, D.; Hughes, J.; Bongs, K.; Sterr, U.; Lisdat, Ch.; Vogt, S.; Bize, S.; Lodewyck, J.; Le Targat, R.; Holleville, D.; Venon, B.; Gill, P.; Barwood, G.; Hill, I. R.; Ovchinnikov, Y.; Kulosa, A.; Ertmer, W.; Rasel, E.-M.; Stuhler, J.; Kaenders, W.

    2016-04-01

    The ESA mission "Space Optical Clock" project aims at operating an optical lattice clock on the ISS in approximately 2023. The scientific goals of the mission are to perform tests of fundamental physics, to enable space-assisted relativistic geodesy and to intercompare optical clocks on the ground using microwave and optical links. The performance goal of the space clock is less than 1 × 10-17 uncertainty and 1 × 10-15 τ-1/2 instability. Within an EU-FP7-funded project, a strontium optical lattice clock demonstrator has been developed. Goal performances are instability below 1 × 10-15 τ-1/2 and fractional inaccuracy 5 × 10-17. For the design of the clock, techniques and approaches suitable for later space application are used, such as modular design, diode lasers, low power consumption subunits, and compact dimensions. The Sr clock apparatus is fully operational, and the clock transition in 88Sr was observed with linewidth as small as 9 Hz.

  2. Development of a strontium optical lattice clock for the SOC mission on the ISS

    CERN Document Server

    Origlia, S; Pramod, M S; Smith, L; Singh, Y; He, W; Viswam, S; Świerad, D; Hughes, J; Bongs, K; Sterr, U; Lisdat, Ch; Vogt, S; Bize, S; Lodewyck, J; Targat, R Le; Holleville, D; Venon, B; Gill, P; Barwood, G; Hill, I R; Ovchinnikov, Y; Kulosa, A; Ertmer, W; Rasel, E -M; Stuhler, J; Kaenders, W

    2016-01-01

    The ESA mission "Space Optical Clock" project aims at operating an optical lattice clock on the ISS in approximately 2023. The scientific goals of the mission are to perform tests of fundamental physics, to enable space-assisted relativistic geodesy and to intercompare optical clocks on the ground using microwave and optical links. The performance goal of the space clock is less than $1 \\times 10^{-17}$ uncertainty and $1 \\times 10^{-15} {\\tau}^{-1/2}$ instability. Within an EU-FP7-funded project, a strontium optical lattice clock demonstrator has been developed. Goal performances are instability below $1 \\times 10^{-15} {\\tau}^{-1/2}$ and fractional inaccuracy $5 \\times 10^{-17}$. For the design of the clock, techniques and approaches suitable for later space application are used, such as modular design, diode lasers, low power consumption subunits, and compact dimensions. The Sr clock apparatus is fully operational, and the clock transition in $^{88}$Sr was observed with linewidth as small as 9 Hz.

  3. Comparing a mercury optical lattice clock with microwave and optical frequency standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyumenev, R.; Favier, M.; Bilicki, S.; Bookjans, E.; Le Targat, R.; Lodewyck, J.; Nicolodi, D.; Le Coq, Y.; Abgrall, M.; Guéna, J.; De Sarlo, L.; Bize, S.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we report the evaluation of an optical lattice clock based on neutral mercury with a relative uncertainty of 1.7× {10}-16. Comparing this characterized frequency standard to a 133Cs atomic fountain we determine the absolute frequency of the {}1{{{S}}}0\\to {}3{{{P}}}0 transition of 199Hg as {ν }{Hg}=1128 575 290 808 154.62 {Hz}+/- 0.19 {Hz}({statistical})+/- 0.38 {Hz} (systematic), limited solely by the realization of the SI second. Furthermore, by comparing the mercury optical lattice clock to a 87Rb atomic fountain, we determine for the first time to our knowledge the ratio between the 199Hg clock transition and the 87Rb ground state hyperfine transition. Finally we present a direct optical to optical measurement of the 199Hg/87Sr frequency ratio. The obtained value of {ν }{Hg}/{ν }{Sr} = 2.629 314 209 898 909 15 with a fractional uncertainty of 1.8× {10}-16 is in excellent agreement with a similar measurement obtained by Yamanaka et al (2015 Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 230801). This makes this frequency ratio one of the few physical quantities agreed upon by different laboratories to this level of uncertainty. Frequency ratio measurements of the kind reported in this paper have a strong impact for frequency metrology and fundamental physics as they can be used to monitor putative variations of fundamental constants.

  4. Lattice Induced Frequency Shifts in Sr Optical Lattice Clocks at the $10^{-17}$ Level

    CERN Document Server

    Westergaard, Philip G; Lorini, Luca; Lecallier, Arnaud; Burt, Eric; Zawada, Michal; Millo, Jacques; Lemonde, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the frequency shifts associated with the lattice potential for a Sr lattice clock. By comparing two such clocks with a frequency stability reaching $5\\times 10^{-17}$ after a one hour integration time, and varying the lattice depth up to $U_0=900 \\, E_r$ with $E_r$ being the recoil energy, we evaluate lattice related shifts with an unprecedented accuracy. We put the first experimental upper bound on the recently predicted frequency shift due to the magnetic dipole (M1) and electric quadrupole (E2) interactions. This upper bound is significantly smaller than the theoretical upper limit. We also give a new upper limit on the effect of hyperpolarizability with an improvement by more than one order of magnitude. Finally, we report the first observation of the vector and tensor shifts in a lattice clock. Combining these measurements, we show that all known lattice related perturbation will not affect the clock accuracy down to the $10^{-17}$ level, even for very deep lattices, u...

  5. Direct comparison of optical lattice clocks with an intercontinental baseline of 9 000 km

    CERN Document Server

    Hachisu, H; Nagano, S; Gotoh, T; Nogami, A; Ido, T; Falke, St; Huntemann, N; Grebing, C; Lipphardt, B; Lisdat, Ch; Piester, D

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated a direct frequency comparison between two $^{87}{\\rm Sr}$ lattice clocks operated in intercontinentally separated laboratories in real time. Two-way satellite time and frequency transfer technique based on the carrier phase was employed for a direct comparison with a baseline of 9 000 km between Japan and Germany. A clock comparison was achieved for 83 640 s resulting in a fractional difference of $(1.1\\pm1.6) \\times 10^{-15}$, where the statistical part is the biggest contribution to the uncertainty. This measurement directly confirms the agreement of the two optical clocks on an intercontinental scale.

  6. Optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms; Horloge a reseau optique a atomes de strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baillard, X

    2008-01-15

    This thesis presents the latest achievements regarding the optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms developed at LNE-SYRTE. After a review of the different types of optical clocks that are currently under development, we stress on the concept of optical lattice clock which was first imagined for Sr{sup 87} using the {sup 1}S{sub 0} {yields} {sup 3}P{sub 0} transition. We exhibit the features of this atom, in particular the concept of magic wavelength for the trap, and the achievable performances for this kind of clock. The second part presents the experimental aspects, insisting particularly on the ultra-stable laser used for the interrogation of the atoms which is a central part of the experiment. Among the latest improvements, an optical pumping phase and an interrogation phase using a magnetic field have been added in order to refine the evaluation of the Zeeman effect. Finally, the last part presents the experimental results. The last evaluation of the clock using Sr{sup 87} atoms allowed us to reach a frequency accuracy of 2.6*10{sup -15} and a measurement in agreement with the one made at JILA (Tokyo university) at the 10{sup -15} level. On another hand, thanks to recent theoretical proposals, we made a measurement using the bosonic isotope Sr{sup 88} by adapting the experimental setup. This measurement represents the first evaluation for this type of clock, with a frequency accuracy of 7*10{sup -14}. (author)

  7. Magnetic field-induced spectroscopy of forbidden optical transitions with application to lattice-based optical atomic clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I; Oates, C W; Hoyt, C W; Barber, Z W; Hollberg, L

    2006-03-01

    We develop a method of spectroscopy that uses a weak static magnetic field to enable direct optical excitation of forbidden electric-dipole transitions that are otherwise prohibitively weak. The power of this scheme is demonstrated using the important application of optical atomic clocks based on neutral atoms confined to an optical lattice. The simple experimental implementation of this method--a single clock laser combined with a dc magnetic field--relaxes stringent requirements in current lattice-based clocks (e.g., magnetic field shielding and light polarization), and could therefore expedite the realization of the extraordinary performance level predicted for these clocks. We estimate that a clock using alkaline-earth-like atoms such as Yb could achieve a fractional frequency uncertainty of well below 10(-17) for the metrologically preferred even isotopes.

  8. Transportable Optical Lattice Clock with 7 ×10-17 Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, S. B.; Grotti, J.; Vogt, St.; Al-Masoudi, A.; Dörscher, S.; Häfner, S.; Sterr, U.; Lisdat, Ch.

    2017-02-01

    We present a transportable optical clock (TOC) with Sr 87 . Its complete characterization against a stationary lattice clock resulted in a systematic uncertainty of 7.4 ×10-17, which is currently limited by the statistics of the determination of the residual lattice light shift, and an instability of 1.3 ×10-15/√{τ } with an averaging time τ in seconds. Measurements confirm that the systematic uncertainty can be reduced to below the design goal of 1 ×10-17. To our knowledge, these are the best uncertainties and instabilities reported for any transportable clock to date. For autonomous operation, the TOC has been installed in an air-conditioned car trailer. It is suitable for chronometric leveling with submeter resolution as well as for intercontinental cross-linking of optical clocks, which is essential for a redefinition of the International System of Units (SI) second. In addition, the TOC will be used for high precision experiments for fundamental science that are commonly tied to precise frequency measurements and its development is an important step to space-borne optical clocks.

  9. Transportable Optical Lattice Clock with 7×10^{-17} Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, S B; Grotti, J; Vogt, St; Al-Masoudi, A; Dörscher, S; Häfner, S; Sterr, U; Lisdat, Ch

    2017-02-17

    We present a transportable optical clock (TOC) with ^{87}Sr. Its complete characterization against a stationary lattice clock resulted in a systematic uncertainty of 7.4×10^{-17}, which is currently limited by the statistics of the determination of the residual lattice light shift, and an instability of 1.3×10^{-15}/sqrt[τ] with an averaging time τ in seconds. Measurements confirm that the systematic uncertainty can be reduced to below the design goal of 1×10^{-17}. To our knowledge, these are the best uncertainties and instabilities reported for any transportable clock to date. For autonomous operation, the TOC has been installed in an air-conditioned car trailer. It is suitable for chronometric leveling with submeter resolution as well as for intercontinental cross-linking of optical clocks, which is essential for a redefinition of the International System of Units (SI) second. In addition, the TOC will be used for high precision experiments for fundamental science that are commonly tied to precise frequency measurements and its development is an important step to space-borne optical clocks.

  10. Analysis of the blackbody-radiation shift in an ytterbium optical lattice clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yi-Lin; Xu, Xin-Ye

    2016-10-01

    We accurately evaluate the blackbody-radiation shift in a 171Yb optical lattice clock by utilizing temperature measurement and numerical simulation. In this work. three main radiation sources are considered for the blackbody-radiation shift, including the heated atomic oven, the warm vacuum chamber, and the room-temperature vacuum windows. The temperatures on the outer surface of the vacuum chamber are measured during the clock operation period by utilizing seven calibrated temperature sensors. Then we infer the temperature distribution inside the vacuum chamber by numerical simulation according to the measured temperatures. Furthermore, we simulate the temperature variation around the cold atoms while the environmental temperature is fluctuating. Finally, we obtain that the total blackbody-radiation shift is -1.289(7) Hz with an uncertainty of 1.25 × 10-17 for our 171Yb optical lattice clock. The presented method is quite suitable for accurately evaluating the blackbody-radiation shift of the optical lattice clock in the case of lacking the sensors inside the vacuum chamber. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB821302), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11134003), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2014AA123401), and the Shanghai Excellent Academic Leaders Program of China (Grant No. 12XD1402400).

  11. Frequency shifts in an optical lattice clock due to magnetic-dipole and electric-quadrupole transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I; Ovsiannikov, V D; Pal'chikov, V G; Oates, C W

    2008-11-01

    We report a hitherto undiscovered frequency shift for forbidden J = 0-->J = 0 clock transitions excited in atoms confined to an optical lattice. These shifts result from magnetic-dipole and electric-quadrupole transitions, which have a spatial dependence in an optical lattice that differs from that of the stronger electric-dipole transitions. In combination with the residual translational motion of atoms in an optical lattice, this spatial mismatch leads to a frequency shift via differential energy level spacing in the lattice wells for ground state and excited state atoms. We estimate that this effect could lead to fractional frequency shifts as large as 10(-16), which might prevent lattice-based optical clocks from reaching their predicted performance levels. Moreover, these effects could shift the magic wavelength in lattice clocks in three dimensions by as much as 100 MHz, depending on the lattice configuration.

  12. Cryogenic optical lattice clocks with a relative frequency difference of $1\\times 10^{-18}$

    CERN Document Server

    Ushijima, Ichiro; Das, Manoj; Ohkubo, Takuya; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Time and frequency are the most accurately measurable quantities, providing foundations for science and modern technologies. The accuracy relies on the SI (Syst\\'eme International) second that refers to Cs microwave clocks with fractional uncertainties at $10^{-16}$. Recent revolutionary progress of optical clocks aims to achieve $1\\times 10^{-18}$ uncertainty, which however has been hindered by long averaging-times or by systematic uncertainties. Here, we demonstrate optical lattice clocks with $^{87}$Sr atoms interrogated in a cryogenic environment to address the blackbody radiation-induced frequency-shift, which remains the primary source of clocks' uncertainties and has initiated vigorous theoretical and experimental investigations. The quantum-limited stability for $N \\sim 1,000$ atoms allows investigation of the uncertainties at $2\\times 10^{-18}$ in two hours of clock operation. After 11 measurements performed over a month, the two cryo-clocks agree to within $(-1.1\\pm 1.6)\\times 10^{-18}$. Besides its...

  13. A transportable optical lattice clock with $7\\times10^{-17}$ uncertainty

    CERN Document Server

    Koller, S B; Vogt, St; Al-Masoudi, A; Dörscher, S; Häfner, S; Sterr, U; Lisdat, Ch

    2016-01-01

    We present a transportable optical clock (TOC) with $^{87}$Sr. Its complete characterization against a stationary lattice clock resulted in a systematic uncertainty of ${7.4 \\times 10^{-17}}$ which is currently limited by the statistics of the determination of the residual lattice light shift. The measurements confirm that the systematic uncertainty is reduceable to below the design goal of $1 \\times 10^{-17}$. The instability of our TOC is $1.3 \\times 10^{-15}/\\sqrt{(\\tau/s)}$. Both, the systematic uncertainty and the instability are to our best knowledge currently the best achieved with any type of transportable clock. For autonomous operation the TOC is installed in an air-conditioned car-trailer. It is suitable for chronometric leveling with sub-meter resolution as well as intercontinental cross-linking of optical clocks, which is essential for a redefiniton of the SI second. In addition, the TOC will be used for high precision experiments for fundamental science that are commonly tied to precise frequenc...

  14. Inner-shell magnetic dipole transition in Tm atom as a candidate for optical lattice clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Sukachev, D; Tolstikhina, I; Kalganova, E; Vishnyakova, G; Khabarova, K; Tregubov, D; Golovizin, A; Sorokin, V; Kolachevsky, N

    2016-01-01

    We consider a narrow magneto-dipole transition in the $^{169}$Tm atom at the wavelength of $1.14\\,\\mu$m as a candidate for a 2D optical lattice clock. Calculating dynamic polarizabilities of the two clock levels $[\\text{Xe}]4f^{13}6s^2 (J=7/2)$ and $[\\text{Xe}]4f^{13}6s^2 (J=5/2)$ in the spectral range from $250\\,$nm to $1200\\,$nm, we suggest the "magic" wavelength for the optical lattice at $807\\,$nm. Frequency shifts due to black-body radiation (BBR), the van der Waals interaction, the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction and other effects which can perturb the transition frequency are calculated. The transition at $1.14\\,\\mu$m demonstrates low sensitivity to the BBR shift corresponding to $8\\times10^{-17}$ in fractional units at room temperature which makes it an interesting candidate for high-performance optical clocks. The total estimated frequency uncertainty is less than $5 \\times 10^{-18}$ in fractional units. By direct excitation of the $1.14\\,\\mu$m transition in Tm atoms loaded into an optical dipole ...

  15. Active optical clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN JingBiao

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the principles and techniques of active optical clock, a special laser combining the laser physics of one-atom laser, bad-cavity gas laser, super-cavity stabilized laser and optical atomic clock together. As a simple example, an active optical clock based on thermal strontium atomic beam shows a quantum-limited linewidth of 0.51 Hz, which is insensitive to laser cavity-length noise, and may surpass the recorded narrowest 6.7 Hz of Hg ion optical clock and 1.5 Hz of very recent optical lattice clock. The estimated 0.1 Hz one-second instability and 0.27 Hz uncertainty are limited only by the rela-tivistic Doppler effect, and can be improved by cold atoms.

  16. High accuracy measure of atomic polarizability in an optical lattice clock

    OpenAIRE

    Sherman, J. A.; Lemke, N. D.; Hinkley, N.; Pizzocaro, M.; Fox, R. W.; Ludlow, A. D.; Oates, C. W.

    2011-01-01

    Despite being a canonical example of quantum mechanical perturbation theory, as well as one of the earliest observed spectroscopic shifts, the Stark effect contributes the largest source of uncertainty in a modern optical atomic clock through blackbody radiation. By employing an ultracold, trapped atomic ensemble and high stability optical clock, we characterize the quadratic Stark effect with unprecedented precision. We report the ytterbium optical clock's sensitivity to electric fields (suc...

  17. High accuracy correction of blackbody radiation shift in an optical lattice clock

    CERN Document Server

    Middelmann, Thomas; Lisdat, Christian; Sterr, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    We have determined the frequency shift that blackbody radiation is inducing on the $5s^2$ $^1$S$_0$ -- $5s5p$ $^3$P$_0$ clock transition in strontium. Previously its uncertainty limited the uncertainty of strontium lattice clocks to $1\\times10^{-16}$. Now the uncertainty associated to the black body radiation shift correction translates to $5\\times 10^{-18}$ relative frequency uncertainty at room temperature. Our evaluation is based on a measurement of the differential dc-polarizability of the two clock states and on a modeling of the dynamic contribution using this value and experimental data for other atomic properties.

  18. A quantum many-body spin system in an optical lattice clock

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, M J; Swallows, M D; Zhang, X; Benko, C; von-Stecher, J; Gorshkov, A V; Rey, A M; Ye, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Strongly interacting quantum many-body systems are fundamentally compelling and ubiquitous in science. However, their complexity generally prevents exact solutions of their dynamics. Precisely engineered ultracold atomic gases are emerging as a powerful tool to unravel these challenging physical problems. Here we present a new laboratory for the study of many-body effects: strongly interacting two-level systems formed by the clock states in ${}^{87}$Sr, which are used to realize a neutral atom optical clock that performs at the highest level of optical-atomic coherence and with precision near the limit set by quantum fluctuations. Our measurements of the collective spin evolution reveal signatures of many-body dynamics, including beyond-mean-field effects. We derive a many-body Hamiltonian that describes the experimental observation of severely distorted lineshapes, atomic spin coherence decay, density-dependent frequency shifts, and correlated quantum spin noise. These investigations open the door to explori...

  19. Entangling the lattice clock: Towards Heisenberg-limited timekeeping

    CERN Document Server

    Weinstein, Jonathan D; Derevianko, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    We present a scheme for entangling the atoms of an optical lattice to reduce the quantum projection noise of a clock measurement. The divalent clock atoms are held in a lattice at a ``magic'' wavelength that does not perturb the clock frequency -- to maintain clock accuracy -- while an open-shell J=1/2 ``head'' atom is coherently transported between lattice sites via the lattice polarization. This polarization-dependent ``Archimedes' screw'' transport at magic wavelength takes advantage of the vanishing vector polarizability of the scalar, J=0, clock states of bosonic isotopes of divalent atoms. The on-site interactions between the clock atoms and the head atom are used to engineer entanglement and for clock readout.

  20. Optical Clocks in Space

    CERN Document Server

    Schiller, S; Nevsky, A; Koelemeij, J C J; Wicht, A; Gill, P; Klein, H A; Margolis, H S; Mileti, G; Sterr, U; Riehle, F; Peik, E; Tamm, C; Ertmer, W; Rasel, E; Klein, V; Salomon, C; Tino, G M; Lemonde, P; Holzwarth, R; Hänsch, T W; Tamm, Chr.

    2007-01-01

    The performance of optical clocks has strongly progressed in recent years, and accuracies and instabilities of 1 part in 10^18 are expected in the near future. The operation of optical clocks in space provides new scientific and technological opportunities. In particular, an earth-orbiting satellite containing an ensemble of optical clocks would allow a precision measurement of the gravitational redshift, navigation with improved precision, mapping of the earth's gravitational potential by relativistic geodesy, and comparisons between ground clocks.

  1. Optical clock networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehle, Fritz

    2017-01-01

    Within the last decade, optical atomic clocks have surpassed the best cesium clocks, which are used to realize the unit of time and frequency, in terms of accuracy and stability by about two orders of magnitude. When remote optical atomic clocks are connected by links without degradation in the clock signals, an optical clock network is formed, with distinct advantages for the dissemination of time, geodesy, astronomy and basic and applied research. Different approaches for time and frequency transfer in the microwave and optical regime, via satellites and free-space links, optical fibre links, or transportable optical atomic clocks, can be used to form a hybrid clock network that may allow a future redefinition of the unit of time based on an optical reference transition.

  2. An Ultra-Stable Referenced Interrogation System in the Deep Ultraviolet for a Mercury Optical Lattice Clock

    CERN Document Server

    Dawkins, S T; Petersen, M; Millo, J; Magalhães, D V; Mandache, C; Coq, Y Le; Bize, S

    2010-01-01

    We have developed an ultra-stable source in the deep ultraviolet, suitable to fulfill the interrogation requirements of a future fully-operational lattice clock based on neutral mercury. At the core of the system is a Fabry-P\\'erot cavity which is highly impervious to temperature and vibrational perturbations. The mirror substrate is made of fused silica in order to exploit the comparatively low thermal noise limits associated with this material. By stabilizing the frequency of a 1062.6 nm Yb-doped fiber laser to the cavity, and including an additional link to LNE-SYRTE's fountain primary frequency standards via an optical frequency comb, we produce a signal which is both stable at the 1E-15 level in fractional terms and referenced to primary frequency standards. The signal is subsequently amplified and frequency-doubled twice to produce several milliwatts of interrogation signal at 265.6 nm in the deep ultraviolet.

  3. Strontium Optical Lattice Clock: In Quest of the Ultimate Performance; Horloge a reseau optique au strontium: en quete de la performance ultime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westergaard, Ph.G.

    2010-10-15

    This thesis presents the latest achievements regarding the Sr optical lattice clock experiment at LNESYRTE, Observatoire de Paris. After having described the general principles for optical lattice clocks and the operation of the clock in question, the emphasis is put on the features that have been added to the experiment since 2007. The most important new elements are an ultra-stable reference cavity for the clock laser, the development of a non-destructive detection technique, and the construction of a second Sr lattice clock. The ultra-stable cavity is constructed from a ULE spacer and fused silica mirrors and has shown a thermal noise floor at 6.5 * 10{sup -16}, placing it among the best in the world. The non-destructive detection is effectuated by a phase measurement of a weak probe beam that traverses the atoms placed in one arm of a Mach-Zender interferometer. The non-destructive aspect enables a recycling of the atoms from cycle to cycle which consequently increases the duty cycle, allowing for an increase of the stability of the clock. With these new tools the frequency stability is expected to be 2.2 * 10{sup -16}/{radical}{tau} for an optimized sequence. The most recent comparisons between the two Sr clocks reach an accuracy level of 10{sup -16} after about 1000 s, and this way we have been able to characterize lattice related frequency shifts with an unprecedented accuracy. The measurements ensure a control of lattice related effects at the 10{sup -18} level even for trap depths as large as 50E{sub r}. (authors)

  4. Determination of the thermal radiation effect on an optical strontium lattice clock; Bestimmung des Einflusses thermischer Strahlung auf eine optische Strontium-Gitteruhr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middelmann, Thomas

    2013-05-31

    Optical clocks have the potential to be 100 times more accurate than current best cesium atomic clocks within a fraction of the averaging time. This corresponds to a fractional uncertainty of the clock frequency on the level of 10{sup -18} and requires highaccuracy knowledge of systematic frequency shifts, such that they can be avoided or corrected for. In strontium optical lattice clocks an ensemble of ultracold strontium atoms is confined in an optical lattice, to allow for spectroscopy of the reference transition 5s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}-5s5p {sup 3}P{sub 0} in the Lamb-Dicke regime. The by far largest systematic frequency shift of the strontium clock transition is caused by its high sensitivity to blackbody radiation (BBR). The knowledge of the resulting frequency shift limited the achievable clock uncertainty to about 1 x 10{sup -16}. In this thesis for the first time an experimental approach was followed, to determine the sensitivity of the strontium clock transition to blackbody radiation. At an environmental temperature of 300 K the resulting frequency shift corresponds to 2.277 8(23) Hz. The achieved uncertainty contributes with 5 x 10{sup -18} to the fractional systematic uncertainty of the clock frequency. The determination is based on a precision measurement of the difference of static polarizabilities of the two clock states {Delta}{alpha}{sub dc} = {alpha}(5s5p {sup 3}P{sub 0})-{alpha}(5s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}) = 4.078 73(11) x 10{sup -39} Cm{sup 2} /V. For this the de Stark shift of the clock transition has been measured in the accurately known electric field of a precision plate capacitor, which has been developed in this work. The attained static polarizability difference {Delta}{alpha}{sub dc} corresponds to the first term of a power series of the sensitivity to BBR. Higher orders are accumulated as dynamic part of the BBR shift. Which has been modelled using {Delta}{alpha}{sub dc} and experimental data for other atomic properties. To

  5. Probing Many-Body Interactions in an Optical Lattice Clock (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    9,192,631,770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine energy levels of a caesium atom. Since then, the accuracy...as meter, volt and ampere. Thanks to the development of laser trapping and cooling techniques [1, 2], the best caesium standards have reached an...accuracy of one part in 1016. However, caesium clocks are limited by the fact that they are based on atomic transitions in the microwave domain. Because

  6. Optical Clocks and Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, C. W.; Hume, D. B.; Rosenband, T.; Wineland, D. J.

    2010-09-01

    Observers in relative motion or at different gravitational potentials measure disparate clock rates. These predictions of relativity have previously been observed with atomic clocks at high velocities and with large changes in elevation. We observed time dilation from relative speeds of less than 10 meters per second by comparing two optical atomic clocks connected by a 75-meter length of optical fiber. We can now also detect time dilation due to a change in height near Earth’s surface of less than 1 meter. This technique may be extended to the field of geodesy, with applications in geophysics and hydrology as well as in space-based tests of fundamental physics.

  7. Optical atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Poli, N; Gill, P; Tino, G M

    2014-01-01

    In the last ten years extraordinary results in time and frequency metrology have been demonstrated. Frequency-stabilization techniques for continuous-wave lasers and femto-second optical frequency combs have enabled a rapid development of frequency standards based on optical transitions in ultra-cold neutral atoms and trapped ions. As a result, today's best performing atomic clocks tick at an optical rate and allow scientists to perform high-resolution measurements with a precision approaching a few parts in $10^{18}$. This paper reviews the history and the state of the art in optical-clock research and addresses the implementation of optical clocks in a possible future redefinition of the SI second as well as in tests of fundamental physics.

  8. Hanle Detection for Optical Clocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the strong inhomogeneous spatial polarization and intensity distribution of spontaneous decay fluorescence due to the Hanle effect, we propose and demonstrate a universe Hanle detection configuration of electron-shelving method for optical clocks. Experimental results from Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard with electron-shelving method show that a designed Hanle detection geometry with optimized magnetic field direction, detection laser beam propagation and polarization direction, and detector position can improve the fluorescence collection rate by more than one order of magnitude comparing with that of inefficient geometry. With the fixed 423 nm fluorescence, the improved 657 nm optical frequency standard signal intensity is presented. The potential application of the Hanle detection geometry designed for facilitating the fluorescence collection for optical lattice clock with a limited solid angle of the fluorescence collection has been discussed. The Hanle detection geometry is also effective for ion detection in ion optical clock and quantum information experiments. Besides, a cylinder fluorescence collection structure is designed to increase the solid angle of the fluorescence collection in Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard.

  9. Optical lattice clock with strontium atoms: a second generation of cold atom clocks; Horloge a reseau optique au strontium: une 2. generation d'horloges a atomes froids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Targat, R

    2007-07-15

    Atomic fountains, based on a microwave transition of Cesium or Rubidium, constitute the state of the art atomic clocks, with a relative accuracy close to 10{sup -16}. It nevertheless appears today that it will be difficult to go significantly beyond this level with this kind of device. The use of an optical transition, the other parameters being unchanged, gives hope for a 4 or 5 orders of magnitude improvement of the stability and of the relative uncertainty on most systematic effects. As for motional effects on the atoms, they can be controlled on a very different manner if they are trapped in an optical lattice instead of experiencing a free ballistic flight stage, characteristic of fountains. The key point of this approach lies in the fact that the trap can be operated in such a way that a well chosen, weakly allowed, J=0 {yields} J=0 clock transition can be free from light shift effects. In this respect, the strontium atom is one of the most promising candidate, the 1S{sub 0} {yields} 3P{sub 0} transition has a natural width of 1 mHz, and several other easily accessible transitions can be used to efficiently laser cool atoms down to 10 {mu}K. This thesis demonstrates the experimental feasibility of an optical lattice clock based on the strontium atom, and reports on a preliminary evaluation of the relative accuracy with the fermionic isotope {sup 87}Sr, at a level of a few 10{sup -15}. (author)

  10. Laser controlled atom source for optical clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Ole; He, Wei; Świerad, Dariusz; Smith, Lyndsie; Hughes, Joshua; Bongs, Kai; Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-11-01

    Precision timekeeping has been a driving force in innovation, from defining agricultural seasons to atomic clocks enabling satellite navigation, broadband communication and high-speed trading. We are on the verge of a revolution in atomic timekeeping, where optical clocks promise an over thousand-fold improvement in stability and accuracy. However, complex setups and sensitivity to thermal radiation pose limitations to progress. Here we report on an atom source for a strontium optical lattice clock which circumvents these limitations. We demonstrate fast (sub 100 ms), cold and controlled emission of strontium atomic vapours from bulk strontium oxide irradiated by a simple low power diode laser. Our results demonstrate that millions of strontium atoms from the vapour can be captured in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Our method enables over an order of magnitude reduction in scale of the apparatus. Future applications range from satellite clocks testing general relativity to portable clocks for inertial navigation systems and relativistic geodesy.

  11. Relativity and Al^+ Optical Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chin-Wen; Hume, David B.; Wineland, David J.; Rosenband, Till

    2010-03-01

    We have constructed an optical clock based on quantum logic spectroscopy of an Al+ ion that has a fractional frequency inaccuracy of 8.6x10-18. The frequency of the ^1S0^3P0 clock transition is compared to that of a previously constructed Al^+ optical clock with a statistical measurement uncertainty of 7.0x10-18. The two clocks exhibit a relative stability of 2.8x10-15&-1/2circ;, and a fractional frequency difference of -1.8x10-17, consistent with the accuracy limit of the older clock. By comparing the frequencies of the clocks, we have observed relativistic effects, such as time dilation due to velocities less than 10 m/s and the gravitational red shift from a 0.33 m height change of one of the clocks.

  12. Feasibility of an optical fiber clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinova, Ekaterina; Babb, James F.; Derevianko, Andrei

    2017-09-01

    We explore the feasibility of a fiber clock, i.e., a compact, high-precision, optical lattice atomic clock based on atoms trapped inside a hollow-core optical fiber. Such a setup offers an intriguing potential both for a substantially increased number of interrogated atoms (and thereby an improved clock stability) and for miniaturization. We evaluate the sensitivity of the 1S0-3P0 clock transition in Hg and other divalent atoms to the fiber inner core surface at nonzero temperatures. The Casimir-Polder interaction induced 1S0-3P0 transition frequency shift is calculated for the atom inside the hollow capillary as a function of atomic position, capillary material, and geometric parameters. For Hg atoms on the axis of a silica capillary with inner radius ≥15 μ m and optimally chosen thickness d ˜1 μ m , the atom-surface interaction induced 1S0-3P0 clock transition frequency shift can be kept on the level δ ν /νHg˜10-19 . We also estimate the atom loss and heating due to collisions with the buffer gas, lattice intensity noise induced heating, spontaneous photon scattering heating, and residual birefringence induced frequency shifts.

  13. p-Wave cold collisions in a Yb lattice clock

    CERN Document Server

    Lemke, N D; von Stecher, J; Sherman, J A; Rey, A M; Oates, C W

    2011-01-01

    State-of-the-art optical clocks with neutral atoms employ an optical lattice to tightly confine the atoms, enabling high-resolution spectroscopy and the potential for high-accuracy timekeeping. Interrogating many atoms simultaneously facilitates high measurement precision, but also yields high atomic density and the potential for cold collisions. To suppress these atom-atom interactions, the use of ultracold, spin-polarized fermions was proposed to exploit the Fermi suppression of s-wave collisions while freezing out higher-wave contributions. However, small collision shifts have been measured in Sr and Yb. For Sr, the shifts were attributed to s-wave interactions enabled by excitation inhomogeneity. Here, we report definitive experimental evidence and a quantitative theoretical treatment of p-wave collisions in Yb. We also demonstrate a novel suppression of the collisional frequency shift utilizing strong interactions in a two-dimensional optical lattice. Understanding these interactions and dynamics for two...

  14. Atomic fountains and optical clocks at SYRTE: status and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Abgrall, M; De Sarlo, L; Guéna, J; Laurent, Ph; Coq, Y Le; Targat, R Le; Lodewyck, J; Lours, M; Rosenbusch, P; Rovera, D; Bize, S

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we report on the work done with the LNE-SYRTE atomic clock ensemble during the last 10 years. We cover progress made in atomic fountains and in their application to timekeeping. We also cover the development of optical lattice clocks based on strontium and on mercury. We report on tests of fundamental physical laws made with these highly accurate atomic clocks. We also report on work relevant to a future possible redefinition of the SI second.

  15. The Space Optical Clock project: status and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Stephan; Tino, Guglielmo M.; Sterr, Uwe; Lemonde, Pierre; Görlitz, Axel; Salomon, Christophe

    The Space Optical Clocks project aims at operating lattice clocks on the ISS for tests of funda-mental physics and for providing high-accuracy comparisons of future terrestrial optical clocks. A pre-phase-A study (2007-10), funded partially by ESA and DLR, includes the implementa-tion of several optical lattice clock systems using Strontium and Ytterbium as atomic systems and their characterization. Subcomponents of clock demonstrators with the added specification of transportability and using techniques that are suitable for later space use, such as all-solid-state lasers, low power consumption, and compact dimensions, have been developed and are being validated. The talk will give a brief overview over the achieved results and outline future developments.

  16. Realization of a time-scale with an optical clock

    CERN Document Server

    Grebing, C; Dörscher, S; Häfner, S; Gerginov, V; Weyers, S; Lipphardt, B; Riehle, F; Sterr, U; Lisdat, C

    2015-01-01

    Optical clocks are not only powerful tools for prime fundamental research, but are also deemed for the re-definition of the SI base unit second as they surpass the performance of caesium atomic clocks in both accuracy and stability by more than an order of magnitude. However, an important obstacle in this transition has so far been the limited reliability of the optical clocks that made a continuous realization of a time-scale impractical. In this paper, we demonstrate how this dilemma can be resolved and that a time-scale based on an optical clock can be established that is superior to one based on even the best caesium fountain clocks. The paper also gives further proof of the international consistency of strontium lattice clocks on the $10^{-16}$ accuracy level, which is another prerequisite for a change in the definition of the second.

  17. Microresonator Frequency Comb Optical Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-22

    Number Microresonator frequency comb optical clock Block 13: Supplementary Note © 2014 . Published in Optica , Vol. Ed. 0 1, (1) (2014), (, (1). DoD...Oscillators. http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/ OPTICA .1.000010 1. INTRODUCTION Optical frequency combs enable extraordinary measurement precision and accuracy...1, No. 1 / July 2014 / Optica 10 deviation for 1 s averaging is completely dominated by the Rb reference, and the microcomb contribution is only ɚ

  18. A strontium lattice clock with $3 \\times 10^{-17}$ inaccuracy and its frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Falke, Stephan; Grebing, Christian; Lipphardt, Burghard; Weyers, Stefan; Gerginov, Vladislav; Huntemann, Nils; Hagemann, Christian; Al-Masoudi, Ali; Häfner, Sebastian; Vogt, Stefan; Sterr, Uwe; Lisdat, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the absolute frequency of the optical lattice clock based on $^{87}$Sr at PTB with an uncertainty of $3.9\\times 10^{-16}$ using two caesium fountain clocks. This is close to the accuracy of today's best realizations of the SI second. The absolute frequency of the 5s$^2$ $^1$S$_0$-5s5p $^3$P$_0$ transition in $^{87}$Sr is 429,228,004,229,873.13(17) Hz. Our result is in excellent agreement with recent measurements performed in different laboratories worldwide. We improved the total systematic uncertainty of our Sr frequency standard by a factor of five and reach $3\\times 10^{-17}$, opening new prospects for frequency ratio measurements between optical clocks for fundamental research, geodesy, or optical clock evaluation.

  19. Using a transportable optical clock for chronometric levelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisdat, Christian; Sterr, Uwe; Koller, Silvio; Grotti, Jacopo; Vogt, Stefan; Häfner, Sebastian; Herbers, Sofia; Al-Masoudi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    With their supreme accuracy and precision, optical clocks in combination with new methods of long-distance frequency transfer can be used to determine height differences by measuring the gravitational red shift between two clocks without accumulation of measurement errors, as in classical levelling. We are developing transportable optical clocks for this purpose that will also serve for the technology development regarding optical clocks in Space and for international comparisons between optical clocks that cannot be linked with sufficient accuracy otherwise. In this talk we will focus on the transportable strontium lattice clock that we are developing and its first evaluation. Presently, we achieve a fractional frequency instability of 3 × 10^{-17} after 1000 s averaging time, which is equivalent to a height resolution of 30 cm. The first uncertainty evaluation of the system yielded 7 × 10^{-17}. We expect rapid improvements to an uncertainty of a few parts in 10^{17}. The clock is now located within a car trailer, which requires compact and rugged lasers systems and physics package. Special care has been taken in the design of the ultra-frequency stable interrogation laser that has to achieve fractional frequency instabilities of considerably below 10^{-15}. Typical laboratory constructions of the reference resonator system used to pre-stabilize the laser frequency are not compatible with the requirement of transportability. In an actual levelling campaign, this clock will be connected via a stabilized optical fibre link with another, stationary frequency standard. The measured gravitational red shift will be compared with the ones calculated from potential differences derived with state of the art geodetic data and models. We will discuss the status of measurements of geodetic relevance with optical clocks and give an outlook on our next steps. This work is supported by QUEST, DFG (RTG 1729, CRC 1128), EU-FP7 (FACT) and EMRP (ITOC). The EMRP is jointly funded

  20. The absolute frequency of the 87Sr optical clock transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Gretchen K.; Ludlow, Andrew D.; Blatt, Sebastian;

    2008-01-01

    The absolute frequency of the 1S0–3P0 clock transition of 87Sr has been measured to be 429 228 004 229 873.65 (37) Hz using lattice-confined atoms, where the fractional uncertainty of 8.6 × 10-16 represents one of the most accurate measurements of an atomic transition frequency to date. After a d...... is made possible using a femtosecond laser based optical frequency comb to phase coherently connect the optical and microwave spectral regions and by a 3.5 km fibre transfer scheme to compare the remotely located clock signals....

  1. Laser Cooling of Lanthanides: from Optical Clocks to Quantum Simulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golovizin A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss current progress in laser cooling of lanthanides (Er, Yb, Dy, Tm etc. focusing on applications. We describe some important peculiarities taking Thulium atom as an example: Two stage laser cooling, trapping in an optical lattice, anisotropic interactions and spectroscopy of narrow transitions. Specific level structure and presence of magic wavelengths make ultracold Thulium a favorable candidate for optical clock applications. On the other hand, abundance of Feshbach resonances allow to tune interactions in ultracold gases and thus reach quantum degeneracy. It opens intriguing perspectives for novel quantum simulators employing dipole-dipole interactions in an optical lattice.

  2. Making optical atomic clocks more stable with $10^{-16}$ level laser stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Y Y; Lemke, N D; Fox, R W; Sherman, J A; Ma, L -S; Oates, C W

    2011-01-01

    The superb precision of an atomic clock is derived from its stability. Atomic clocks based on optical (rather than microwave) frequencies are attractive because of their potential for high stability, which scales with operational frequency. Nevertheless, optical clocks have not yet realized this vast potential, due in large part to limitations of the laser used to excite the atomic resonance. To address this problem, we demonstrate a cavity-stabilized laser system with a reduced thermal noise floor, exhibiting a fractional frequency instability of $2 \\times 10^{-16}$. We use this laser as a stable optical source in a Yb optical lattice clock to resolve an ultranarrow 1 Hz transition linewidth. With the stable laser source and the signal to noise ratio (S/N) afforded by the Yb optical clock, we dramatically reduce key stability limitations of the clock, and make measurements consistent with a clock instability of $5 \\times 10^{-16} / \\sqrt{\\tau}$.

  3. Towards a Re-definition of the Second Based on Optical Atomic Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Riehle, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    The rapid increase in accuracy and stability of optical atomic clocks compared to the caesium atomic clock as primary standard of time and frequency asks for a future re-definition of the second in the International System of Units (SI). The status of the optical clocks based on either single ions in radio-frequency traps or on neutral atoms stored in an optical lattice is described with special emphasis of the current work at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Besides the development and operation of different optical clocks with estimated fractional uncertainties in the 10^-18 range, the supporting work on ultra-stable lasers as core elements and the means to compare remote optical clocks via transportable standards, optical fibers, or transportable clocks is reported. Finally, the conditions, methods and next steps are discussed that are the prerequisites for a future re-definition of the second.

  4. Generating and probing entangled states for optical atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletic, Vladan

    2016-05-01

    The precision of quantum measurements is inherently limited by projection noise caused by the measurement process itself. Spin squeezing and more complex forms of entanglement have been proposed as ways of surpassing this limitation. In our system, a high-finesse asymmetric micromirror-based optical cavity can mediate the atom-atom interaction necessary for generating entanglement in an 171 Yb optical lattice clock. I will discuss approaches for creating, characterizing, and optimally utilizing these nonclassical states for precision measurement, as well as recent progress toward their realization. This research is supported by DARPA QuASAR, NSF, and NSERC.

  5. Quantum phases in optical lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickerscheid, Dennis Brian Martin

    2006-01-01

    An important new development in the field of ultracold atomic gases is the study of the properties of these gases in a so-called optical lattice. An optical lattice is a periodic trapping potential for the atoms that is formed by the interference pattern of a few laser beams. A reason for the

  6. Miniaturized optical system for atomic fountain clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü De-Sheng; Qu Qiu-Zhi; Wang Bin; Zhao Jian-Bo; Li Tang; Liu Liang; Wang Yu-Zhu

    2011-01-01

    Using modularized components, we have built a miniaturized optical system for 87Rb atomic fountain clock that is fitted on an 80 cm × 60 cm optical breadboard. Compared with the conventional optical setup on the table, our system is more compact, more robust and miniaturized. Taking advantage of this system, laser beams are transmitted through eight optical fibre patch cords from the optical breadboard to an ultra high vacuum system. This optical setup has operated for five months in our fountain system and required no alignment.

  7. Direct laser cooling Al+ ions optical clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, J; Luo, J; Lu, Z H

    2016-01-01

    Al$^+$ ions optical clock is a very promising optical frequency standard candidate due to its extremely small blackbody radiation shift. It has been successfully demonstrated with indirect cooled, quantum-logic-based spectroscopy technique. Its accuracy is limited by second-order Doppler shift, and its stability is limited by the number of ions that can be probed in quantum logic processing. We propose a direct laser cooling scheme of Al$^+$ ions optical clocks where both the stability and accuracy of the clocks are greatly improved. In the proposed scheme, two Al$^+$ ions traps are utilized. The first trap is used to trap a large number of Al$^+$ ions to improve the stability of the clock laser, while the second trap is used to trap a single Al$^+$ ions to provide the ultimate accuracy. Both traps are cooled with a continuous wave 167 nm laser. The expected clock laser stability can reach $9.0\\times10^{-17}/\\sqrt{\\tau}$. For the second trap, in addition to 167 nm laser Doppler cooling, a second stage pulsed ...

  8. Radium single-ion optical clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versolato, O. O.; Wansbeek, L. W.; Jungmann, K.; Timmermans, R. G. E.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W.

    2011-01-01

    We explore the potential of the electric quadrupole transitions $7s\\,^2S_{1/2}$ - $6d\\,^2D_{3/2}$, $6d\\,^2D_{5/2}$ in radium isotopes as single-ion optical frequency standards. The frequency shifts of the clock transitions due to external fields and the corresponding uncertainties are calculated.

  9. A microresonator frequency comb optical clock

    CERN Document Server

    Papp, Scott B; DelHaye, Pascal; Quinlan, Franklyn; Lee, Hansuek; Vahala, Kerry J; Diddams, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Optical-frequency combs enable measurement precision at the 20th digit, and accuracy entirely commensurate with their reference oscillator. A new direction in experiments is the creation of ultracompact frequency combs by way of nonlinear parametric optics in microresonators. We refer to these as microcombs, and here we report a silicon-chip-based microcomb optical clock that phase-coherently converts an optical-frequency reference to a microwave signal. A low-noise comb spectrum with 25 THz span is generated with a 2 mm diameter silica disk and broadening in nonlinear fiber. This spectrum is stabilized to rubidium frequency references separated by 3.5 THz by controlling two teeth 108 modes apart. The optical clocks output is the electronically countable 33 GHz microcomb line spacing, which features an absolute stability better than the rubidium transitions by the expected factor of 108. Our work demonstrates the comprehensive set of tools needed for interfacing microcombs to state-of-the-art optical clocks.

  10. Accuracy budget of the 88Sr optical atomic clocks at KL FAMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzewicz, Czesław; Bober, Marcin; Morzyński, Piotr; Cygan, Agata; Lisak, Daniel; Bartoszek-Bober, Dobrosława; Masłowski, Piotr; Ablewski, Piotr; Zachorowski, Jerzy; Gawlik, Wojciech; Ciuryło, Roman; Zawada, Michał

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a detailed accuracy budget of two independent strontium optical lattice clocks at the National Laboratory FAMO (KL FAMO) probed with a single shared ultra-narrow laser. The combined instability of the two frequency standards was 7× {10}-17 after 105s of averaging.

  11. Radium single-ion optical clock

    CERN Document Server

    Versolato, O O; Jungmann, K; Timmermans, R G E; Willmann, L; Wilschut, H W

    2011-01-01

    We explore the potential of the electric quadrupole transitions $7s\\,^2S_{1/2}$ - $6d\\,^2D_{3/2}$, $6d\\,^2D_{5/2}$ in radium isotopes as single-ion optical frequency standards. The frequency shifts of the clock transitions due to external fields and the corresponding uncertainties are calculated. Several competitive $^A$Ra$^+$ candidates with $A=$ 223 - 229 are identified. In particular, we show that the transition $7s\\,^2S_{1/2}\\,(F=2,m_F=0)$ - $6d\\,^2D_{3/2}\\,(F=0,m_F=0)$ at 828 nm in $^{223}$Ra$^+$, with no linear Zeeman and electric quadrupole shifts, stands out as a relatively simple case, which could be exploited as a compact, robust, and low-cost atomic clock operating at a fractional frequency uncertainty of $10^{-17}$. With more experimental effort, the $^{223,225,226}$Ra$^+$ clocks could be pushed to a projected performance reaching the $10^{-18}$ level.

  12. Integrated optical fiber lattice accumulators

    OpenAIRE

    Atherton, Adam F

    1997-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Sigma-delta modulators track a signal by accumulating the error between an input signal and a feedback signal. The accumulated energy is amplitude analyzed by a comparator. The comparator output signal is fed back and subtracted from the input signal. This thesis is primarily concerned with designing accumulators for inclusion in an optical sigma-delta modulator. Fiber lattice structures with optical amplifiers are used to perform the...

  13. All-optical clock recovery of NRZ-DPSK signals using optical resonator-type filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peucheret, Christophe; Seoane, Jorge; Ji, Hua

    2009-01-01

    It is shown how introducing a limited rise time to the driving signal enables all-optical clock recovery of NRZ-DPSK signals generated using a phase modulator. A Fabry-Perot filter is used to generate the optical clock.......It is shown how introducing a limited rise time to the driving signal enables all-optical clock recovery of NRZ-DPSK signals generated using a phase modulator. A Fabry-Perot filter is used to generate the optical clock....

  14. Orbital optical lattices with bosons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, T.; Hippler, C.; Ewerbeck, A.; Hemmerich, A.

    2016-02-01

    This article provides a synopsis of our recent experimental work exploring Bose-Einstein condensation in metastable higher Bloch bands of optical lattices. Bipartite lattice geometries have allowed us to implement appropriate band structures, which meet three basic requirements: the existence of metastable excited states sufficiently protected from collisional band relaxation, a mechanism to excite the atoms initially prepared in the lowest band with moderate entropy increase, and the possibility of cross-dimensional tunneling dynamics, necessary to establish coherence along all lattice axes. A variety of bands can be selectively populated and a subsequent thermalization process leads to the formation of a condensate in the lowest energy state of the chosen band. As examples the 2nd, 4th and 7th bands in a bipartite square lattice are discussed. The geometry of the 2nd and 7th bands can be tuned such that two inequivalent energetically degenerate energy minima arise at the X ±-points at the edge of the 1st Brillouin zone. In this case even a small interaction energy is sufficient to lock the phase between the two condensation points such that a complex-valued chiral superfluid order parameter can emerge, which breaks time reversal symmetry. In the 4th band a condensate can be formed at the Γ-point in the center of the 1st Brillouin zone, which can be used to explore topologically protected band touching points. The new techniques to access orbital degrees of freedom in higher bands greatly extend the class of many-body scenarios that can be explored with bosons in optical lattices.

  15. Miniature Optical Atomic Clock: Stabilization of a Kerr Comb Oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Savchenkov, A A; Liang, W; Ilchenko, V S; Byrd, J; Matsko, A B; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical clocks consist of a pendulum and a clockwork that translates the pendulum period to displayed time. The most advanced clocks utilize optical transitions in atoms in place of the pendulum and an optical frequency comb generated by a femtosecond laser as the clockwork. The comb must be stabilized at two points along its frequency spectrum: one with a laser to lock a comb line to a transition in the atom, and another through self referencing to stabilize the frequency interval between the comb lines. This approach requires advanced techniques, so optical atomic clocks are currently laboratory devices in specialized labs. In this paper we leverage unique properties of Kerr comb oscillators for realization of optical atomic clocks in miniature form factors. In particular, we describe a clock based on D1 transition of 87Rb that fits in the palm of the hand, and can be further miniaturized to chip scale.

  16. Quantum Entanglement in Optical Lattice Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-18

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Optical lattice systems provide an ideal platform for investigating entanglement because of their unprecedented level of...ABSTRACT Final report for ARO grant entitled "Quantum Entanglement in Optical Lattice Systems" Report Title Optical lattice systems provide an ideal ...2010): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevA.82.063612 D. Blume, K. Daily. Breakdown of Universality for Unequal-Mass Fermi Gases with Infinite Scattering Length

  17. Optical Lattice Simulations of Correlated Fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-04

    simple-cubic optical lattice, , (06 2009): 0. doi: 09/20/2013 51.00 Tin-Lun Ho, Qi Zhou. Squeezing out the entropy of fermions in optical lattices...Convention and Exhibition Center, Hong Kong, May 12, 2009 "Reducing Entropy in Quantum Gases in optical lattices", Jason Ho, Aspen workshop on quantum...Sciences Randall Hulet: chosen as a 2010 Outstanding Referee of the Physical Review and Physical Review Letters Journals Randall Hulet: Willis E. Lamb

  18. Experimental generation of optical coherence lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yahong; Cai, Yangjian, E-mail: serpo@dal.ca, E-mail: yangjiancai@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Key Lab of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Technologies of Jiangsu Province and Key Lab of Modern Optical Technologies of Education Ministry of China, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Ponomarenko, Sergey A., E-mail: serpo@dal.ca, E-mail: yangjiancai@suda.edu.cn [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3J 2X4 (Canada)

    2016-08-08

    We report experimental generation and measurement of recently introduced optical coherence lattices. The presented optical coherence lattice realization technique hinges on a superposition of mutually uncorrelated partially coherent Schell-model beams with tailored coherence properties. We show theoretically that information can be encoded into and, in principle, recovered from the lattice degree of coherence. Our results can find applications to image transmission and optical encryption.

  19. Optical Lattices with Micromechanical Mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Hammerer, K; Genes, C; Zoller, P; Treutlein, P; Camerer, S; Hunger, D; Haensch, T W

    2010-01-01

    We investigate a setup where a cloud of atoms is trapped in an optical lattice potential of a standing wave laser field which is created by retro-reflection on a micro-membrane. The membrane vibrations itself realize a quantum mechanical degree of freedom. We show that the center of mass mode of atoms can be coupled to the vibrational mode of the membrane in free space, and predict a significant sympathetic cooling effect of the membrane when atoms are laser cooled. The controllability of the dissipation rate of the atomic motion gives a considerable advantage over typical optomechanical systems enclosed in optical cavities, in that it allows a segregation between the cooling and coherent dynamics regimes. The membrane can thereby be kept in a cryogenic environment, and the atoms at a distance in a vacuum chamber.

  20. Frequency Comparison of Two High-Accuracy Al+ Optical Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, C -W; Koelemeij, J C J; Wineland, D J; Rosenband, T

    2009-01-01

    We have constructed an optical clock with a fractional frequency inaccuracy of 8.6e-18, based on quantum logic spectroscopy of an Al+ ion. A simultaneously trapped Mg+ ion serves to sympathetically laser-cool the Al+ ion and detect its quantum state. The frequency of the 1S0->3P0 clock transition is compared to that of a previously constructed Al+ optical clock with a statistical measurement uncertainty of 7.0e-18. The two clocks exhibit a relative stability of 2.8e-15/ sqrt(tau), and a fractional frequency difference of -1.8e-17, consistent with the accuracy limit of the older clock.

  1. Frequency Comparison of Two High-Accuracy Al+ Optical Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, C. W.; Hume, D. B.; Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Wineland, D. J.; Rosenband, T.

    2010-02-01

    We have constructed an optical clock with a fractional frequency inaccuracy of 8.6×10-18, based on quantum logic spectroscopy of an Al+ ion. A simultaneously trapped Mg+ ion serves to sympathetically laser cool the Al+ ion and detect its quantum state. The frequency of the S01↔P03 clock transition is compared to that of a previously constructed Al+ optical clock with a statistical measurement uncertainty of 7.0×10-18. The two clocks exhibit a relative stability of 2.8×10-15τ-1/2, and a fractional frequency difference of -1.8×10-17, consistent with the accuracy limit of the older clock.

  2. Ultrastable optical clock with two cold-atom ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schioppo, M.; Brown, R. C.; McGrew, W. F.; Hinkley, N.; Fasano, R. J.; Beloy, K.; Yoon, T. H.; Milani, G.; Nicolodi, D.; Sherman, J. A.; Phillips, N. B.; Oates, C. W.; Ludlow, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Atomic clocks based on optical transitions are the most stable, and therefore precise, timekeepers available. These clocks operate by alternating intervals of atomic interrogation with the 'dead' time required for quantum state preparation and readout. This non-continuous interrogation of the atom system results in the Dick effect, an aliasing of frequency noise from the laser interrogating the atomic transition. Despite recent advances in optical clock stability that have been achieved by improving laser coherence, the Dick effect has continually limited the performance of optical clocks. Here we implement a robust solution to overcome this limitation: a zero-dead-time optical clock that is based on the interleaved interrogation of two cold-atom ensembles. This clock exhibits vanishingly small Dick noise, thereby achieving an unprecedented fractional frequency instability assessed to be for an averaging time τ in seconds. We also consider alternate dual-atom-ensemble schemes to extend laser coherence and reduce the standard quantum limit of clock stability, achieving a spectroscopy line quality factor of Q > 4 × 1015.

  3. Test of Special Relativity Using a Fiber Network of Optical Clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delva, P; Lodewyck, J; Bilicki, S; Bookjans, E; Vallet, G; Le Targat, R; Pottie, P-E; Guerlin, C; Meynadier, F; Le Poncin-Lafitte, C; Lopez, O; Amy-Klein, A; Lee, W-K; Quintin, N; Lisdat, C; Al-Masoudi, A; Dörscher, S; Grebing, C; Grosche, G; Kuhl, A; Raupach, S; Sterr, U; Hill, I R; Hobson, R; Bowden, W; Kronjäger, J; Marra, G; Rolland, A; Baynes, F N; Margolis, H S; Gill, P

    2017-06-02

    Phase compensated optical fiber links enable high accuracy atomic clocks separated by thousands of kilometers to be compared with unprecedented statistical resolution. By searching for a daily variation of the frequency difference between four strontium optical lattice clocks in different locations throughout Europe connected by such links, we improve upon previous tests of time dilation predicted by special relativity. We obtain a constraint on the Robertson-Mansouri-Sexl parameter |α|≲1.1×10^{-8}, quantifying a violation of time dilation, thus improving by a factor of around 2 the best known constraint obtained with Ives-Stilwell type experiments, and by 2 orders of magnitude the best constraint obtained by comparing atomic clocks. This work is the first of a new generation of tests of fundamental physics using optical clocks and fiber links. As clocks improve, and as fiber links are routinely operated, we expect that the tests initiated in this Letter will improve by orders of magnitude in the near future.

  4. All-optical link for direct comparison of distant optical clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Fujieda, Miho; Nagano, Shigeo; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Hachisu, Hidekazu; Ido, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    We developed an all-optical link system for making remote comparisons of two distant ultra-stable optical clocks. An optical carrier transfer system based on a fiber interferometer was employed to compensate the phase noise accumulated during the propagation through a fiber link. Transfer stabilities of $2\\times10^{-15}$ at 1 second and $4\\times10^{-18}$ at 1000 seconds were achieved in a 90-km link. An active polarization control system was additionally introduced to maintain the transmitted light in an adequate polarization, and consequently, a stable and reliable comparison was accomplished. The instabilities of the all-optical link system, including those of the erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) which are free from phase-noise compensation, were below $2\\times10^{-15}$ at 1 second and $7\\times10^{-17}$ at 1000 seconds. The system was available for the direct comparison of two distant $^{87}$Sr lattice clocks via an urban fiber link of 60 km. This technique will be essential for the measuring the repro...

  5. Automatic minimisation of micromotion in a 88Sr+ optical clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwood, G. P.; Huang, G.; Klein, H. A.; Gill, P.

    2015-07-01

    Optical clocks based on narrow linewidth transitions in single cold ions confined in RF traps are being developed at a number of laboratories worldwide. For these ion clock systems, excess micromotion can cause both Stark and Doppler frequency shifts and also a degradation of frequency stability as a result of a reduced excitation rate to the clock transition. At NPL, we detect micromotion in our 88Sr+ optical clocks by observing the correlation between photon arrival times and the zero crossing of the RF trap drive signal. Recently, two nominally identical 88Sr+ optical clocks have been operated over several days and their frequencies compared against one another. During this time the dc voltages on the endcap and compensation voltage electrodes required to minimise the micromotion can change significantly, particularly following the loading of an ion. This paper describes an automatic method to monitor and minimise micromotion applicable to single ion clocks and which we demonstrate using our two NPL 88Sr+ ion clocks.

  6. Experimental constraint on dark matter detection with optical atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wcisło, P.; Morzyński, P.; Bober, M.; Cygan, A.; Lisak, D.; Ciuryło, R.; Zawada, M.

    2016-12-01

    The total mass density of the Universe appears to be dominated by dark matter. However, beyond its gravitational interactions at the galactic scale, little is known about its nature1. Several proposals have been advanced in recent years for the detection of dark matter2-4. In particular, a network of atomic clocks could be used to search for transient indicators of hypothetical dark matter5 in the form of stable topological defects; for example, monopoles, strings or domain walls6. The clocks become desynchronized when a dark-matter object sweeps through the network. This pioneering approach5 requires a comparison between at least two distant optical atomic clocks7-9. Here, by exploiting differences in the susceptibilities of the atoms and the cavity to the fine-structure constant10,11, we show that a single optical atomic clock12 is already sensitive to dark-matter events. This implies that existing optical atomic clocks13,14 can serve as a global topological-defect dark-matter observatory, without any further developments in experimental apparatus or the need for long phase-noise-compensated optical-fibre links15. Using optical atomic clocks, we explored a new dimension of astrophysical observations by constraining the strength of atomic coupling to hypothetical dark-matter cosmic objects. Under the conditions of our experiments, the degree of constraint was found to exceed the previously reported limits16 by more than three orders of magnitude.

  7. Remote atomic clock synchronization via satellites and optical fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Piester, D; Fujieda, M; Feldmann, T; Bauch, A

    2011-01-01

    In the global network of institutions engaged with the realization of International Atomic Time (TAI), atomic clocks and time scales are compared by means of the Global Positioning System (GPS) and by employing telecommunication satellites for two-way satellite time and frequency transfer (TWSTFT). The frequencies of the state-of-the-art primary caesium fountain clocks can be compared at the level of 10e-15 (relative, 1 day averaging) and time scales can be synchronized with an uncertainty of one nanosecond. Future improvements of worldwide clock comparisons will require also an improvement of the local signal distribution systems. For example, the future ACES (atomic clock ensemble in space) mission shall demonstrate remote time scale comparisons at the uncertainty level of 100 ps. To ensure that the ACES ground instrument will be synchronized to the local time scale at PTB without a significant uncertainty contribution, we have developed a means for calibrated clock comparisons through optical fibers. An un...

  8. Ultrafast all-optical clock recovery based on phase-only linear optical filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maram, Reza; Kong, Deming; Galili, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We report on a novel, efficient technique for all-optical clock recovery from RZ-OOK data signals based on spectral phase-only (all-pass) optical filtering. This technique significantly enhances both the recovered optical clock quality and energy efficiency in comparison with conventional amplitude...... optical filtering approaches using a Fabry-Perot filter. The proposed concept is validated through recovery of the optical clock from a 640 Gbit/s RZ-OOK data signal using a commercial linear optical waveshaper. (C) 2014 Optical Society of America...

  9. Blackbody radiation shift in the Sr optical atomic clock

    CERN Document Server

    Safronova, M S; Safronova, U I; Kozlov, M G; Clark, Charles W

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the static and dynamic polarizabilities of the 5s^2 ^1S_0 and 5s5p ^3P_0^o states of Sr using the high-precision relativistic configuration interaction + all-order method. Our calculation explains the discrepancy between the recent experimental 5s^2 ^1S_0 - 5s5p ^3P_0^o dc Stark shift measurement \\Delta \\alpha = 247.374(7) a.u. [Middelmann et. al, arXiv:1208.2848 (2012)] and the earlier theoretical result of 261(4) a.u. [Porsev and Derevianko, Phys. Rev. A 74, 020502R (2006)]. Our present value of 247.5 a.u. is in excellent agreement with the experimental result. We also evaluated the dynamic correction to the BBR shift with 1 % uncertainty; -0.1492(16) Hz. The dynamic correction to the BBR shift is unusually large in the case of Sr (7 %) and it enters significantly into the uncertainty budget of the Sr optical lattice clock. We suggest future experiments that could further reduce the present uncertainties.

  10. Absolute measurement of the ${}^{1}S_{0}$ - ${}^{3}P_{0}$ clock transition in neutral ${}^{88}$Sr over the 330 km-long stabilized fibre optic link

    CERN Document Server

    Morzynski, Piotr; Bartoszek-Bober, Dobroslawa; Nawrocki, Jerzy; Krehlik, Przemyslaw; Sliwczynski, Lukasz; Lipinski, Marcin; Maslowski, Piotr; Cygan, Agata; Dunst, Piotr; Garus, Michal; Lisak, Daniel; Zachorowski, Jerzy; Gawlik, Wojciech; Radzewicz, Czeslaw; Ciurylo, Roman; Zawada, Michal

    2015-01-01

    We report a stability below $7\\times 10{}^{-17}$ of two independent optical lattice clocks operating with bosonic ${}^{88}$Sr isotope. The value (429228066418008.3(1.9)${}_{syst}$(0.9)${}_{stat}$~Hz) of the absolute frequency of the ${}^{1}S_{0}$ - ${}^{3}P_{0}$ transition was measured with an optical frequency comb referenced to the local representation of the UTC by the 330 km-long stabilized fibre optical link. The result was verified by series of measurements on two independent optical lattice clocks and agrees with recommendation of Bureau International des Poids et Mesures.

  11. Delivering pulsed and phase stable light to atoms of an optical clock

    CERN Document Server

    Falke, Stephan; Sterr, Uwe; Lisdat, Christian

    2011-01-01

    In optical clocks, transitions of ions or neutral atoms are interrogated using pulsed ultra-narrow laser fields. Systematic phase chirps of the laser or changes of the optical path length during the measurement cause a shift of the frequency seen by the interrogated atoms. While the stabilization of cw-optical links is now a well established technique even on long distances, phase stable links for pulsed light pose additional challanges and have not been demonstrated so far. In addition to possible temperature or pressure drift of the laboratory, which may lead to a Doppler shift by steadily changing the optical path length, the pulsing of the clock laser light calls for short settling times of stabilization locks. Our optical path length stabilization uses retro-reflected light from a mirror that is fixed with respect to the interrogated atoms and synthetic signals during the dark time. Length changes and frequency chirps are compensated for by the switching AOM. For our strontium optical lattice clock we ha...

  12. Optical lattice on an atom chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallego, D.; Hofferberth, S.; Schumm, Thorsten

    2009-01-01

    Optical dipole traps and atom chips are two very powerful tools for the quantum manipulation of neutral atoms. We demonstrate that both methods can be combined by creating an optical lattice potential on an atom chip. A red-detuned laser beam is retroreflected using the atom chip surface as a high......-quality mirror, generating a vertical array of purely optical oblate traps. We transfer thermal atoms from the chip into the lattice and observe cooling into the two-dimensional regime. Using a chip-generated Bose-Einstein condensate, we demonstrate coherent Bloch oscillations in the lattice....

  13. Cold atoms in a rotating optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot, Christopher J.

    2009-05-01

    We have demonstrated a novel experimental arrangement which can rotate a two-dimensional optical lattice at frequencies up to several kilohertz. Our arrangement also allows the periodicity of the optical lattice to be varied dynamically, producing a 2D ``accordion lattice'' [1]. The angles of the laser beams are controlled by acousto-optic deflectors and this allows smooth changes with little heating of the trapped cold (rubidium) atoms. We have loaded a BEC into lattices with periodicities ranging from 1.8μm to 18μm, observing the collapse and revival of the diffraction orders of the condensate over a large range of lattice parameters as recently reported by a group in NIST [2]. We have also imaged atoms in situ in a 2D lattice over a range of lattice periodicities. Ultracold atoms in a rotating lattice can be used for the direct quantum simulation of strongly correlated systems under large effective magnetic fields, i.e. the Hamiltonian of the atoms in the rotating frame resembles that of a charged particle in a strong magnetic field. In the future, we plan to use this to investigate a range of phenomena such as the analogue of the fractional quantum Hall effect. [4pt] [1] R. A. Williams, J. D. Pillet, S. Al-Assam, B. Fletcher, M. Shotter, and C. J. Foot, ``Dynamic optical lattices: two-dimensional rotating and accordion lattices for ultracold atoms,'' Opt. Express 16, 16977-16983 (2008) [0pt] [2] J. H. Huckans, I. B. Spielman, B. Laburthe Tolra, W. D. Phillips, and J. V. Porto, Quantum and Classical Dynamics of a BEC in a Large-Period Optical Lattice, arXiv:0901.1386v1

  14. Optical vortex array in spatially varying lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Kapoor, Amit; Senthilkumaran, P; Joseph, Joby

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental method based on a modified multiple beam interference approach to generate an optical vortex array arranged in a spatially varying lattice. This method involves two steps which are: numerical synthesis of a consistent phase mask by using two-dimensional integrated phase gradient calculations and experimental implementation of produced phase mask by utilizing a phase only spatial light modulator in an optical 4f Fourier filtering setup. This method enables an independent variation of the orientation and period of the vortex lattice. As working examples, we provide the experimental demonstration of various spatially variant optical vortex lattices. We further confirm the existence of optical vortices by formation of fork fringes. Such lattices may find applications in size dependent trapping, sorting, manipulation and photonic crystals.

  15. Bloch oscillations in optical dissipative lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremidis, Nikolaos K; Christodoulides, Demetrios N

    2004-11-01

    We show that Bloch oscillations are possible in dissipative optical waveguide lattices with a linearly varying propagation constant. These oscillations occur in spite of the fact that the Bloch wave packet experiences coupling gain and (or) loss. Experimentally, this process can be observed in different settings, such as in laser arrays and lattices of semiconductor optical amplifiers. In addition, we demonstrate that these systems can suppress instabilities arising from preferential mode noise growth.

  16. Light propagation in optically induced Fibonacci lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Boguslawski, Martin; Timotijevic, Dejan V; Denz, Cornelia; Savic, Dragana M Jovic

    2015-01-01

    We report on the optical induction of Fibonacci lattices in photorefractive strontium barium niobate by use of Bessel beam waveguide-wise writing techniques. Fibonacci elements A and B are used as lattice periods. We further use the induced structures to execute probing experiments with variously focused Gaussian beams in order to observe light confinement owing to the quasiperiodic character of Fibonacci word sequences. Essentially, we show that Gaussian beam expansion is just slowed down in Fibonacci lattices, as compared with appropriate periodic lattices.

  17. Synchronization of Fourier-Synthesized Optical Pulses to a Mode-Locked Optical Clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masaharu; Hyodo; Kazi; Sarwal; Abedin; Noriaki; Onodera; Masayoshi; Watanabe

    2003-01-01

    A Fourier-synthesized 40-GHz optical pulse train was successfully synchronized to an 8-GHz optical clock generated from a mode-locked fiber ring laser. The measured timing jitter of the synchronization was 0.43 ps.

  18. Searching for dark matter with optical atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Wcislo, Piotr; Bober, Marcin; Cygan, Agata; Lisak, Daniel; Ciurylo, Roman; Zawada, Michal

    2016-01-01

    One of the most fundamental questions of modern physics is the existence of yet unknown forms of matter and interactions. The total mass density of the Universe appears to be dominated by some hypothetical dark matter (DM). However, beyond its gravitational interaction at galactic scale, little is known about the DM nature and properties. One possibility is that it has a form of stable topological defects built from light scalar fields which, for nonzero DM-SM coupling, would result in transient variations of fundamental constants. Optical atomic clocks, highly sensitive to variations of the fine-structure constant, seem to be natural candidates for such searches. Here we demonstrate the first experimental constraint on the strength of transient DM-SM coupling determined with optical atomic clocks. Instead of measuring the phase difference between two distant clocks we determine a common component of their readouts. We show that our constraint, even for one-day measurement, greatly exceeds previous laboratory...

  19. The absolute frequency of the 87Sr optical clock transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Gretchen K.; Ludlow, Andrew D.; Blatt, Sebastian

    2008-01-01

    a detailed study of systematic effects, which reduced the total systematic uncertainty of the Sr lattice clock to 1.5 × 10-16, the clock frequency is measured against a hydrogen maser which is simultaneously calibrated to the US primary frequency standard, the NIST Cs fountain clock, NIST-F1. The comparison...

  20. Comparison of Two Independent Sr Optical Clocks with 1*10^-17 Stability at 10^3 s

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholson, T L; Williams, J R; Bloom, B J; Bishof, M; Swallows, M D; Campbell, S L; Ye, J

    2012-01-01

    Many-particle optical lattice clocks have the potential for unprecedented measurement precision and stability due to their low quantum projection noise (QPN). However, this potential has so far never been realized because clock stability has been limited by frequency noise of optical local oscillators. By synchronously probing two 87Sr lattice systems using a laser with a thermal noise floor of 1*10^-15, we remove classically correlated laser noise from the inter-comparison, but this approach does not improve the stability of an independent clock. With an improved optical oscillator that has a 1*10^-16 thermal noise floor, we demonstrate an order of magnitude improvement over the best reported independent clock stability, achieving a record fractional instability of 1*10^-17 in 1000 s of averaging time for synchronous or asynchronous comparisons. This result is within a factor of 2 of the combined QPN limit for a 160 ms probe time with ~10^3 atoms in each clock. We further demonstrate that even at this high p...

  1. Measuring the Scalar Curvature with Clocks and Photons: Voronoi-Delaunay Lattices in Regge Calculus

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, Jonathan R

    2008-01-01

    The Riemann scalar curvature plays a central role in Einstein's geometric theory of gravity. We describe a new geometric construction of this scalar curvature invariant at an event (vertex) in a discrete spacetime geometry. This allows one to constructively measure the scalar curvature using only clocks and photons. Given recent interest in discrete pre-geometric models of quantum gravity, we believe is it ever so important to reconstruct the curvature scalar with respect to a finite number of communicating observers. This derivation makes use of a new fundamental lattice cell built from elements inherited from both the original simplicial (Delaunay) spacetime and its circumcentric dual (Voronoi) lattice. The orthogonality properties between these two lattices yield an expression for the vertex-based scalar curvature which is strikingly similar to the corresponding hinge-based expression in Regge calculus (deficit angle per unit Voronoi dual area). In particular, we show that the scalar curvature is simply a ...

  2. Probing beyond the laser coherence time in optical clock comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David B.; Leibrandt, David R.

    2016-03-01

    We develop differential measurement protocols that circumvent the laser noise limit in the stability of optical clock comparisons by synchronous probing of two clocks using phase-locked local oscillators. This allows for probe times longer than the laser coherence time, avoids the Dick effect, and supports Heisenberg-limited measurement precision. We present protocols for such frequency comparisons and develop numerical simulations of the protocols with realistic noise sources. These methods provide a route to reduce frequency ratio measurement durations by more than an order of magnitude.

  3. Ultracold photodissociation and progress towards a molecular lattice clock with 88 Sr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chih-Hsi; McGuyer, Bart; McDonald, Mickey; Apfelback, Florian; Grier, Andrew; Zelevinsky, Tanya

    2016-05-01

    Techniques originally developed for the construction of atomic clocks can be adapted to the study of ultracold molecules, with applications ranging from studies of ultracold chemistry to searches for new physics. We present recent experimental results involving studies of fully quantum state-resolved photodissociation of 88 Sr2 molecules, as well as progress toward building a molecular clock. First, our system has allowed for precise, quantum state-resolved photodissociation studies, revealing not only excellent control over quantum states but also a more accurate way to describe the photodissociation of diatomic molecules and access ultracold chemistry. Second, the molecular clock will allow us to search for a possible time variation of the proton-electron mass ratio. The ``oscillator'' of such a molecular clock would consist of the frequency difference between two lasers driving a two-photon Raman transition between deeply and intermediately-bound rovibrational levels in the electronic ground state. Accomplishing this task requires exploring several research directions, including the precision spectroscopy of bound states and developing tools for the control and minimization of differential lattice light shifts.

  4. The Optical Potential on the Lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Agadjanov, Dimitri; Mai, Maxim; Meißner, Ulf-G; Rusetsky, Akaki

    2016-01-01

    The extraction of hadron-hadron scattering parameters from lattice data by using the L\\"uscher approach becomes increasingly complicated in the presence of inelastic channels. We propose a method for the direct extraction of the complex hadron-hadron optical potential on the lattice, which does not require the use of the multi-channel L\\"uscher formalism. Moreover, this method is applicable without modifications if some inelastic channels contain three or more particles.

  5. Experimental Progress on the NIST ^27Al^+ Optical Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chin-Wen; Hume, David B.; Koelemeij, Jeroen C. J.; Rosenband, Till; Bergquist, James C.; Wineland, Dave J.

    2009-05-01

    A recent measurement of the frequency ratio between single-ion optical clocks based on ^27Al^+ and ^199Hg^+ at NIST showed a combined statistical and systematic uncertainty of 5.2 x 10-17[1]. Here we report progress on improving both the accuracy and stability of the ^27Al^+ optical clock. We have developed a new trap and laser systems that enable the use of ^25Mg^+ for sympathetic cooling and clock-state detection of ^27Al^+. These developments should reduce time-dilation shifts caused by harmonic motion of the ions and thus lower the dominant systematic uncertainty below 10-17. In the new clock apparatus we have demonstrated spectroscopy of the ^27Al^+ ^1S0 to ^3P0 transition with a quality factor of Q = 3.5 x 10^14 and simultaneously a contrast approaching unity. In addition, we have developed techniques for the sympathetic laser cooling and quantum logic spectroscopy of multiple aluminum ions with the goal of further improving measurement stability [2]. *supported by ONR and NIST [1] T. Rosenband et al., Science 319, 1808 (2008) [2] D. B. Hume et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 120502 (2007)

  6. Optical Stabilization of a Microwave Oscillator for Fountain Clock Interrogation

    CERN Document Server

    Lipphardt, Burghard; Weyers, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We describe an optical frequency stabilization scheme of a microwave oscillator that is used for the interrogation of primary caesium fountain clocks. Because of its superior phase noise properties, the new scheme, which is based on an ultrastable laser and a femtosecond laser frequency comb, overcomes the fountain clock frequency instability limitations given by the previously utilized quartz oscillator based frequency synthesis. The presented scheme combines the transfer of the short-term frequency instability of an optical cavity and the long-term frequency instability of a hydrogen maser to the microwave oscillator and is designed to provide continuous long-term operation for extended measurement periods of weeks. The utilization of the twofold stabilization scheme on the one hand ensures referencing of the fountain frequency to the hydrogen maser frequency and on the other hand results in a phase noise level of the fountain interrogation signal, which enables quantum projection noise limited fountain fre...

  7. Research on the optical system for space optical clock at NTSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, X.; Han, J. X.; Zhang, S.; Zou, H. X.; Chang, H.

    2016-11-01

    Optical clocks surpass the primary Cs microwave clocks with excellent performances. This allows new studies both in fundamental physics and engineering. The paper presents the optical system for our space optical clock at NTSC. Different from it in the laboratory, novel approaches and techniques were used to meet the space requirement of compactness and reliability. The modular consisting of three robust subunits was developed, which was one laser sources breadboard and two optical paths systems breadboards. The compact dimension of the optical system is 540mm×440mm×130mm and the total mass was approximate 28 kilogram. The deformation of two optical paths systems was calculated under an overload test by a mechanical analysis and it could meet the requirement. It is a advancement from lab to engineering application based on the work, which provides effective foundation for improving the optical system.

  8. Local gauge symmetry on optical lattices?

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yuzhi; Tsai, Shan-Wen

    2012-01-01

    The versatile technology of cold atoms confined in optical lattices allows the creation of a vast number of lattice geometries and interactions, providing a promising platform for emulating various lattice models. This opens the possibility of letting nature take care of sign problems and real time evolution in carefully prepared situations. Up to now, experimentalists have succeeded to implement several types of Hubbard models considered by condensed matter theorists. In this proceeding, we discuss the possibility of extending this effort to lattice gauge theory. We report recent efforts to establish the strong coupling equivalence between the Fermi Hubbard model and SU(2) pure gauge theory in 2+1 dimensions by standard determinantal methods developed by Robert Sugar and collaborators. We discuss the possibility of using dipolar molecules and external fields to build models where the equivalence holds beyond the leading order in the strong coupling expansion.

  9. Optical Lattice Gases of Interacting Fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-02

    theoretical research supported by this grant focused on discovering new phases of quantum matter for ultracold fermionic atoms or molecules confined in optical... theoretically a “topological ladder”, i.e. a ladder-like optical lattice containing ultracold atoms in higher orbital bands [15] in the absence of...seemed hard or impossible to achieve in traditional solids. Publications stemming from the research effort: 1. Xiaopeng Li, W. Vincent Liu

  10. Delocalized Entanglement of Atoms in optical Lattices

    OpenAIRE

    Vollbrecht, K. G. H.; Cirac, J. I.

    2006-01-01

    We show how to detect and quantify entanglement of atoms in optical lattices in terms of correlations functions of the momentum distribution. These distributions can be measured directly in the experiments. We introduce two kinds of entanglement measures related to the position and the spin of the atoms.

  11. Feasibility of Extreme Ultraviolet Active Optical Clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANG Wei; CHEN Jing-Biao

    2011-01-01

    @@ We propose an experimental scheme of vacuum ultraviolet(VUV)and extreme ultraviolet(XUV)optical fre-quency standards with noble gas atoms.Considering metastable state 3P2 noble atoms pumped by a conventional discharging method,the atomic beam is collimated with transverse laser cooling at the metastable state and en-ters into the laser cavity in the proposed setup.Due to stimulated emission from the metasable state to the ground state inside the laser cavity consisting of VUV reflection coating mirrors,our calculations show that with enough population inversion to compensate for the cavity loss,an active optical frequency standard at VUV and XUV is feasible.

  12. Statistical Transmutation in Floquet Driven Optical Lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedrakyan, Tigran A; Galitski, Victor M; Kamenev, Alex

    2015-11-06

    We show that interacting bosons in a periodically driven two dimensional (2D) optical lattice may effectively exhibit fermionic statistics. The phenomenon is similar to the celebrated Tonks-Girardeau regime in 1D. The Floquet band of a driven lattice develops the moat shape, i.e., a minimum along a closed contour in the Brillouin zone. Such degeneracy of the kinetic energy favors fermionic quasiparticles. The statistical transmutation is achieved by the Chern-Simons flux attachment similar to the fractional quantum Hall case. We show that the velocity distribution of the released bosons is a sensitive probe of the fermionic nature of their stationary Floquet state.

  13. Fibonacci optical lattices for tunable quantum quasicrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, K.; Saha, K.; Parameswaran, S. A.; Weld, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    We describe a quasiperiodic optical lattice, created by a physical realization of the abstract cut-and-project construction underlying all quasicrystals. The resulting potential is a generalization of the Fibonacci tiling. Calculation of the energies and wave functions of ultracold atoms loaded into such a lattice demonstrate a multifractal energy spectrum, a singular continuous momentum-space structure, and the existence of controllable edge states. These results open the door to cold atom quantum simulation experiments in tunable or dynamic quasicrystalline potentials, including topological pumping of edge states and phasonic spectroscopy.

  14. Spectroscopy and frequency measurement of the $^{87}$Sr clock transition by laser linewidth transfer using an optical frequency comb

    CERN Document Server

    Akamatsu, Daisuke; Hosaka, Kazumoto; Yasuda, Masami; Onae, Atsushi; Suzuyama, Tomonari; Amemiya, Masaki; Hong, Feng-Lei

    2014-01-01

    We perform spectroscopic observations of the 698-nm clock transition in $^{87}$Sr confined in an optical lattice using a laser linewidth transfer technique. A narrow-linewidth laser interrogating the clock transition is prepared by transferring the linewidth of a master laser (1064 nm) to that of a slave laser (698 nm) with a high-speed controllable fiber-based frequency comb. The Fourier-limited spectrum is observed for an 80-ms interrogating pulse. We determine that the absolute frequency of the 5s$^{2}$ $^{1}$S$_{0}$ - 5s5p $^{3}$P$_{0}$ clock transition in $^{87}$Sr is 429 228 004 229 872.0 (1.6) Hz referenced to the SI second.

  15. Measuring the Scalar Curvature with Clocks and Photons: Voronoi-Delaunay Lattices in Regge Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Warner; McDonald, Jonathan

    2008-04-01

    The Riemann scalar curvature plays a central role in Einstein's geometric theory of gravity. We describe a new geometric construction of this scalar curvature invariant at an event (vertex) in a discrete spacetime geometry. This allows one to constructively measure the scalar curvature using only clocks and photons. Given recent interest in discrete pre-geometric models of quantum gravity, we believe it is ever so important to reconstruct the curvature scalar with respect to a finite number of communicating observers. This derivation makes use of a fundamental lattice cell built from elements inherited from both the original simplicial (Delaunay) spacetime and its circumcentric dual (Voronoi) lattice. The orthogonality properties between these two lattices yield an expression for the vertex-based scalar curvature which is strikingly similar to the corresponding hinge-based expression in Regge Calculus (deficit angle per unit Voronoi dual area). In particular, we show that the scalar curvature is simply a vertex-based weighted average of deficits per weighted average of dual areas.

  16. Theory of vortex-lattice melting in a one-dimensional optical lattice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, M.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate quantum and temperature fluctuations of a vortex lattice in a one-dimensional optical lattice. We discuss in particular the Bloch bands of the Tkachenko modes and calculate the correlation function of the vortex positions along the direction of the optical lattice. Because of the

  17. Strongly Correlated Quantum Walks in Optical Lattices

    OpenAIRE

    Preiss, Philipp M.; Ma, Ruichao; Tai, M. Eric; Lukin, Alexander; Rispoli, Matthew; Zupancic, Philip; Lahini, Yoav; Islam, Rajibul; Greiner, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Full control over the dynamics of interacting, indistinguishable quantum particles is an important prerequisite for the experimental study of strongly correlated quantum matter and the implementation of high-fidelity quantum information processing. Here we demonstrate such control over the quantum walk - the quantum mechanical analogue of the classical random walk - in the strong interaction regime. Using interacting bosonic atoms in an optical lattice, we directly observe fundamental effects...

  18. Absolute measurement of the 1S0 - 3P0 clock transition in neutral 88Sr over the 330 km-long stabilized fibre optic link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morzyński, Piotr; Bober, Marcin; Bartoszek-Bober, Dobrosława; Nawrocki, Jerzy; Krehlik, Przemysław; Śliwczyński, Łukasz; Lipiński, Marcin; Masłowski, Piotr; Cygan, Agata; Dunst, Piotr; Garus, Michał; Lisak, Daniel; Zachorowski, Jerzy; Gawlik, Wojciech; Radzewicz, Czesław; Ciuryło, Roman; Zawada, Michał

    2015-12-07

    We report a stability below 7 × 10(-17) of two independent optical lattice clocks operating with bosonic (88)Sr isotope. The value (429 228 066 418 008.3(1.9)(syst) (0.9)(stat) Hz) of the absolute frequency of the (1)S(0) - (3)P(0) transition was measured with an optical frequency comb referenced to the local representation of the UTC by the 330 km-long stabilized fibre optical link. The result was verified by series of measurements on two independent optical lattice clocks and agrees with recommendation of Bureau International des Poids et Mesures.

  19. Designing Zeeman slower for strontium atoms - towards optical atomic clock

    CERN Document Server

    Bober, Marcin; Gawlik, Wojciech

    2010-01-01

    We report on design and construction of a Zeeman slower for strontium atoms which will be used in an optical atomic clock experiment. The paper describes briefly required specifications of the device, possible solutions, and concentrates on the chosen design. The magnetic field produced by the built Zeeman slower has been measured and compared with the simulations. The system consisting of an oven and Zeeman slower are designed to produce an atomic beam of 10-12 s-1 flux and final velocity of ~30 m/s.

  20. Designing Zeeman slower for strontium atoms - towards optical atomic clock

    OpenAIRE

    Bober, Marcin; Zachorowski, Jerzy; Gawlik, Wojciech

    2010-01-01

    We report on design and construction of a Zeeman slower for strontium atoms which will be used in an optical atomic clock experiment. The paper describes briefly required specifications of the device, possible solutions, and concentrates on the chosen design. The magnetic field produced by the built Zeeman slower has been measured and compared with the simulations. The system consisting of an oven and Zeeman slower are designed to produce an atomic beam of 10-12 s-1 flux and final velocity of...

  1. High-resolution 640 Gbit/s clock recovery using time-domain optical Fourier transformation and narrowband optical filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulvad, Hans Christian Hansen; Guan, P.; Kasai, K.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate pre-scaled 40 GHz clock recovery from 640 Gbit/s optical time-division-multiplexed data using LiNbO$_3$ modulators, based on time-domain optical Fourier transformation and optical filtering. The clock recovery is used in a 640 Gbit/s error-free transmission over 300 km....

  2. Ultra-stable optical clock with two cold-atom ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Schioppo, M; McGrew, W F; Hinkley, N; Fasano, R J; Beloy, K; Yoon, T H; Milani, G; Nicolodi, D; Sherman, J A; Phillips, N B; Oates, C W; Ludlow, A D

    2016-01-01

    Atomic clocks based on optical transitions are the most stable, and therefore precise, timekeepers available. These clocks operate by alternating intervals of atomic interrogation with dead time required for quantum state preparation and readout. This non-continuous interrogation of the atom system results in the Dick effect, an aliasing of frequency noise of the laser interrogating the atomic transition. Despite recent advances in optical clock stability achieved by improving laser coherence, the Dick effect has continually limited optical clock performance. Here we implement a robust solution to overcome this limitation: a zero-dead-time optical clock based on the interleaved interrogation of two cold-atom ensembles. This clock exhibits vanishingly small Dick noise, thereby achieving an unprecedented fractional frequency instability of $6 \\times 10^{-17} / \\sqrt{\\tau}$ for an averaging time $\\tau$ in seconds. We also consider alternate dual-atom-ensemble schemes to extend laser coherence and reduce the stan...

  3. Divalent Rydberg atoms in optical lattices: intensity landscape and magic trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Topcu, Turker

    2013-01-01

    We develop a theoretical understanding of trapping divalent Rydberg atoms in optical lattices. Because the size of the Rydberg electron cloud can be comparable to the scale of spatial variations of laser intensity, we pay special attention to averaging optical fields over the atomic wavefunctions. Optical potential is proportional to the ac Stark polarizability. We find that in the independent particle approximation for the valence electrons, this polarizability breaks into two contributions: the singly ionized core polarizability and the contribution from the Rydberg electron. Unlike the usually employed free electron polarizability, the Rydberg contribution depends both on laser intensity profile and the rotational symmetry of the total electronic wavefunction. We focus on the $J=0$ Rydberg states of Sr and evaluate the dynamic polarizabilities of the 5s$n$s($^1S_0$) and 5s$n$p($^3P_0$) Rydberg states. We specifically choose Sr atom for its optical lattice clock applications. We find that there are several ...

  4. Ultra-cold atoms in far-detuned optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, P H

    2001-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and construction of a laser cooling experiment for the study of optical lattices, and reports on the results of experiments aimed at 'quantum state preparation' by means of resolved-sideband Raman cooling in a far-detuned optical lattice. Preliminary experiments were performed on cold atoms in a magneto-optical trap, in an optical molasses and in an optical lattice to determine their properties and optimise the conditions for the loading of a far-detuned optical lattice. Temperature measurement techniques such as ballistic expansion and recoil-induced resonances were used. The vibrational levels and coherences of the optical lattice were investigated with conventional probe absorption spectroscopy and a novel method based on coherent transients, which revealed evidence that the anharmonicity of the potential wells is the dominant factor in determining the widths of Raman transitions between levels. A two-dimensional far-detuned (non-dissipative) lattice was loaded from a spati...

  5. Reduction of Timing Jitter by Clock Recovery based on an Optical Phase-Locked Loop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibar, Darko; Mørk, Jesper; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo

    2006-01-01

    We numerically investigate the phase noise requirements for combined electrical/optical local oscillators in a PLL-based clock recovery. Suggestions for reducing the timing jitter are given.......We numerically investigate the phase noise requirements for combined electrical/optical local oscillators in a PLL-based clock recovery. Suggestions for reducing the timing jitter are given....

  6. Dark propagation modes in optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Schiavoni, M; Carminati, F R; Renzoni, F; Grynberg, G; Schiavoni, Michele; Sanchez-Palencia, Laurent; Carminati, Francois-Regis; Renzoni, Ferruccio; Proxy, Gilbert Grynberg; ccsd-00000108, ccsd

    2002-01-01

    We examine the stimulated light scattering onto the propagation modes of a dissipative optical lattice. We show that two different pump-probe configurations may lead to the excitation, via different mechanisms, of the same mode. We found that in one configuration the scattering on the propagation mode results in a resonance in the probe transmission spectrum while in the other configuration no modification of the scattering spectrum occurs, i.e. the mode is dark. A theoretical explanation of this behaviour is provided.

  7. Antiferromagnetic noise correlations in optical lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Niels Bohr International Academy, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark, Georg Morten; Syljuåsen, F. T.; Pedersen, K. G. L.;

    2009-01-01

    We analyze how noise correlations probed by time-of-flight experiments reveal antiferromagnetic (AF) correlations of fermionic atoms in two-dimensional and three-dimensional optical lattices. Combining analytical and quantum Monte Carlo calculations using experimentally realistic parameters, we...... show that AF correlations can be detected for temperatures above and below the critical temperature for AF ordering. It is demonstrated that spin-resolved noise correlations yield important information about the spin ordering. Finally, we show how to extract the spin correlation length and the related...

  8. Vortex-lattice melting in a one-dimensional optical lattice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, M.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate quantum fluctuations of a vortex lattice in a one-dimensional optical lattice. Our method gives full access to all the modes of the vortex lattice and we discuss in particular the Bloch bands of the Tkachenko modes. Because of the small number of particles in the pancake

  9. Vortex-lattice melting in a one-dimensional optical lattice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, M.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate quantum fluctuations of a vortex lattice in a one-dimensional optical lattice for realistic numbers of particles and vortices. Our method gives full access to all the modes of the vortex lattice and we discuss in particular the Bloch bands of the Tkachenko modes. Because of the

  10. Optical clock recovery employing an optical PLL using cross-phase modulation in a Sagnac-interferometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Schubert, C.; Schmidt, C.

    2001-01-01

    Clock recovery (CR) is an essential part of any transmission system. In this paper, we propose a new type of optical clock recovery based on an optical PLL, where a SLALOM (Eiselt et al., 1995) acts as an ultrafast phase comparator. The scheme has been demonstrated successfully at bit rates up...

  11. Optical clock recovery employing an optical PLL using cross-phase modulation in a Sagnac-interferometer

    OpenAIRE

    Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Schubert, C.; Schmidt, C.; Hilliger, E.; Berger, J.; Feiste, U; R. Ludwig; Weber, H. G.

    2001-01-01

    Clock recovery (CR) is an essential part of any transmission system. In this paper, we propose a new type of optical clock recovery based on an optical PLL, where a SLALOM (Eiselt et al., 1995) acts as an ultrafast phase comparator. The scheme has been demonstrated successfully at bit rates up to 160 Gb/s.

  12. Optical lattice trap for Kerr solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Hossein; Matsko, Andrey B.; Maleki, Lute

    2017-06-01

    We show theoretically and numerically that dichromatic pumping of a nonlinear microresonator by two continuous wave coherent optical pumps creates an optical lattice trap that results in the localization of intra-cavity Kerr solitons with soliton positions defined by the beat frequency of the two pumps. This phenomenon corresponds to the stabilization of the comb repetition rate. The locking of the second pump, through adiabatic tuning of its frequency, to the comb generated by the first pump allows transitioning to single-soliton states, manipulating the position of Kerr solitons in the cavity, and tuning the frequency comb repetition rate within the locking range. It also explains soliton crystal formation in resonators supporting a dispersive wave emitted as a result of higher-order group velocity dispersion or avoided mode crossing. We show that dichromatic pumping by externally stabilized pumps can be utilized for stabilization of microresonator-based optical frequency combs when the comb span does not cover an octave or a significant fraction thereof and standard self-referencing techniques cannot be employed. Our findings have significant ramifications for high-precision applications of optical frequency combs in spectrally pure signal generation, metrology, and timekeeping.

  13. Dynamical Gauge Fields on Optical Lattices: A Lattice Gauge Theorist Point of View

    CERN Document Server

    Meurice, Yannick

    2011-01-01

    Dynamical gauge fields are essential to capture the short and large distance behavior of gauge theories (confinement, mass gap, chiral symmetry breaking, asymptotic freedom). I propose two possible strategies to use optical lattices to mimic simulations performed in lattice gauge theory. I discuss how new developments in optical lattices could be used to generate local invariance and link composite operators with adjoint quantum numbers that could play a role similar to the link variables used in lattice gauge theory. This is a slightly expanded version of a poster presented at the KITP Conference: Frontiers of Ultracold Atoms and Molecules (Oct 11-15, 2010) that I plan to turn into a more comprehensive tutorial that could be used by members of the optical lattice and lattice gauge theory communities. Suggestions are welcome.

  14. Landau Levels in Strained Optical Lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Binbin; Endres, Manuel; Pekker, David

    2015-12-01

    We propose a hexagonal optical lattice system with spatial variations in the hopping matrix elements. Just like in the valley Hall effect in strained graphene, for atoms near the Dirac points the variations in the hopping matrix elements can be described by a pseudomagnetic field and result in the formation of Landau levels. We show that the pseudomagnetic field leads to measurable experimental signatures in momentum resolved Bragg spectroscopy, Bloch oscillations, cyclotron motion, and quantization of in situ densities. Our proposal can be realized by a slight modification of existing experiments. In contrast to previous methods, pseudomagnetic fields are realized in a completely static system avoiding common heating effects and therefore opening the door to studying interaction effects in Landau levels with cold atoms.

  15. Spatial entanglement of bosons in optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, M; Bernard, A; Fabbri, N; Fallani, L; Fort, C; Rosi, S; Caruso, F; Inguscio, M; Plenio, M B

    2013-01-01

    Entanglement is a fundamental resource for quantum information processing, occurring naturally in many-body systems at low temperatures. The presence of entanglement and, in particular, its scaling with the size of system partitions underlies the complexity of quantum many-body states. The quantitative estimation of entanglement in many-body systems represents a major challenge, as it requires either full-state tomography, scaling exponentially in the system size, or the assumption of unverified system characteristics such as its Hamiltonian or temperature. Here we adopt recently developed approaches for the determination of rigorous lower entanglement bounds from readily accessible measurements and apply them in an experiment of ultracold interacting bosons in optical lattices of ~10(5) sites. We then study the behaviour of spatial entanglement between the sites when crossing the superfluid-Mott insulator transition and when varying temperature. This constitutes the first rigorous experimental large-scale entanglement quantification in a scalable quantum simulator.

  16. Resonant superfluidity in an optical lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titvinidze, Irakli; Hofstetter, Walter [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Snoek, Michiel [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-07-01

    We study a system of ultracold fermionic Potassium ({sup 40}K) atoms in a three-dimensional optical lattice in the neighborhood of an s-wave Feshbach resonance. Close to resonance, the system is described by a multi-band Bose-Fermi Hubbard Hamiltonian. We derive an effective lowest-band Hamiltonian in which the effect of the higher band is incorporated by a self-consistent mean-field approximation. The resulting model is solved by means of Generalized Dynamical Mean-Field Theory. In addition to the BEC/BCS crossover we find on the BCS side of the resonance a phase transition to a fermionic Mott insulator at half filling, induced by the repulsive fermionic background scattering length. We also calculate the critical temperature of the BEC/BCS-state across the resonance and find it to be minimal at resonance.

  17. Vortex matter and ultracold superstrings in optical lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, M.

    2006-01-01

    The combination of a rotating cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate with a one-dimensional optical lattice gives rise to very interesting physics. The one-dimensional optical lattice splits the Bose-Einstein condensate into two-dimensional pancake-condensates, each containing a small number of

  18. High Time-Resolution 640-Gb/s Clock Recovery Using Time-Domain Optical Fourier Transformation and Narrowband Optical Filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, P.; Mulvad, Hans Christian Hansen; Kasai, K.

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel scheme for subharmonic clock recovery from an optical time-division-multiplexing signal using time-domain optical Fourier transformation and a narrowband optical filter. High-resolution 640-Gb/s clock recovery is successfully demonstrated with no pattern dependence. The clock...

  19. Collisionally induced atomic clock shifts and correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Band, Y. B.; Osherov, I. [Departments of Chemistry and Electro-Optics and the Ilse Katz Center for Nano-Science, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2011-07-15

    We develop a formalism to incorporate exchange symmetry considerations into the calculation of collisional frequency shifts for atomic clocks using a density-matrix formalism. The formalism is developed for both fermionic and bosonic atomic clocks. Numerical results for a finite-temperature {sup 87}Sr {sup 1}S{sub 0} (F=9/2) atomic clock in a magic wavelength optical lattice are presented.

  20. Tunneling of Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensates in Optical Lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In this letter, we have studied the tunneling effects and fluctuations of spinor Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattice. It is found that there exist tunneling effects and fluctuations between lattices l and l + 1, l and l - 1,respectively. In particular, when the optical lattice is infinitely long and the spin excitations are in the long-wavelength limit, tunneling effects disappear between lattices l and l+ 1, and l and l - 1. In this case the fluctuations are a constant,and the magnetic soliton appears.

  1. Lattice gaugefixing and other optics in lattice gauge theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Ken

    1992-06-01

    We present results from four projects. In the first, quark and gluon propagators and effective masses and {Delta}I = 1/2 Rule operator matching coefficients are computed numerically in gaugefixed lattice QCD. In the second, the same quantities are evaluated analytically in the strong coupling, N {yields} {infinity} limit. In the third project, the Schwinger model is studied in covariant gauges, where we show that the effective electron mass varies with the gauge parameter and that longitudinal gaugefixing ambiguities affect operator product expansion coefficients (analogous to {Delta}I = 1/2 Rule matching coefficients) determined by matching gauge variant matrix elements. However, we find that matching coefficients even if shifted by the unphysical modes are {xi} invariant. In the fourth project, we show that the strong coupling parallelogram lattice Schwinger model as a different thermodynamic limit than the weak coupling continuum limit. As a function of lattice skewness angle these models span the {Delta} = {minus}1 critical line of 6-vertex models which, in turn, have been identified as c = 1 conformal field theories.

  2. Lattice gaugefixing and other optics in lattice gauge theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Ken.

    1992-06-01

    We present results from four projects. In the first, quark and gluon propagators and effective masses and {Delta}I = 1/2 Rule operator matching coefficients are computed numerically in gaugefixed lattice QCD. In the second, the same quantities are evaluated analytically in the strong coupling, N {yields} {infinity} limit. In the third project, the Schwinger model is studied in covariant gauges, where we show that the effective electron mass varies with the gauge parameter and that longitudinal gaugefixing ambiguities affect operator product expansion coefficients (analogous to {Delta}I = 1/2 Rule matching coefficients) determined by matching gauge variant matrix elements. However, we find that matching coefficients even if shifted by the unphysical modes are {xi} invariant. In the fourth project, we show that the strong coupling parallelogram lattice Schwinger model as a different thermodynamic limit than the weak coupling continuum limit. As a function of lattice skewness angle these models span the {Delta} = {minus}1 critical line of 6-vertex models which, in turn, have been identified as c = 1 conformal field theories.

  3. Spinor bose gases in cubic optical lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mobarak, Mohamed Saidan Sayed Mohamed

    2014-01-27

    In recent years the quantum simulation of condensed-matter physics problems has resulted from exciting experimental progress in the realm of ultracold atoms and molecules in optical lattices. In this thesis we analyze theoretically a spinor Bose gas loaded into a three-dimensional cubic optical lattice. In order to account for different superfluid phases of spin-1 bosons with a linear Zeeman effect, we work out a Ginzburg-Landau theory for the underlying spin-1 Bose-Hubbard model. To this end we add artificial symmetry-breaking currents to the spin-1 Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian in order to break the global U (1) symmetry. With this we determine a diagrammatic expansion of the grand-canonical free energy up to fourth order in the symmetry-breaking currents and up to the leading non-trivial order in the hopping strength which is of first order. As a cross-check we demonstrate that the resulting grand-canonical free energy allows to recover the mean-field theory. Applying a Legendre transformation to the grand-canonical free energy, where the symmetry-breaking currents are transformed to order parameters, we obtain the effective Ginzburg-Landau action. With this we calculate in detail at zero temperature the Mott insulator-superfluid quantum phase boundary as well as condensate and particle number density in the superfluid phase. We find that both mean-field and Ginzburg-Landau theory yield the same quantum phase transition between the Mott insulator and superfluid phases, but the range of validity of the mean-field theory turns out to be smaller than that of the Ginzburg-Landau theory. Due to this finding we expect that the Ginzburg-Landau theory gives better results for the superfluid phase and, thus, we restrict ourselves to extremize only the effective Ginzburg-Landau action with respect to the order parameters. Without external magnetic field the superfluid phase is a polar (ferromagnetic) state for anti-ferromagnetic (ferromagnetic) interactions, i.e. only the

  4. A Next-Generation Apparatus for Lithium Optical Lattice Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshet, Aviv

    hardware. Output sequences running on multiple servers and output cards can be synchronized using a shared clock. By using an FPGA-generated variable frequency clock, redundant buffers can be dramatically shortened, and a time resolution of 100ns achieved over effectively arbitrary sequence lengths. Experimental set-ups for producing, manipulating, and probing ultracold atomic gases can be quite complicated. To move forward with a quantum simulation program, it is necessary to have an apparatus that operates with a reliability that is not easily achieved in the face of this complexity. The design of a new apparatus is discussed. This Sodium-Lithium ultracold gas production machine has been engineered to incorporate as much experimental experience as possible to enhance its reliability. Particular attention has been paid to maximizing optical access and the utilization of this optical access, controlling the ambient temperature of the experiment, achieving a high vacuum, and simplifying subsystems where possible. The apparatus is now on the verge of producing degenerate gases, and should serve as a stable platform on which to perform future lattice quantum simulation experiments. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs mit.edu)

  5. Towards a Mg lattice clock: Observation of the $^1S_{0}-$$^3P_{0}$ transition and determination of the magic wavelength

    CERN Document Server

    Kulosa, A P; Zipfel, K H; Rühmann, S; Sauer, S; Jha, N; Gibble, K; Ertmer, W; Rasel, E M; Safronova, M S; Safronova, U I; Porsev, S G

    2015-01-01

    We optically excite the electronic state $3s3p~^3P_{0}$ in $^{24}$Mg atoms, laser-cooled and trapped in a magic-wavelength lattice. An applied magnetic field enhances the coupling of the light to the otherwise strictly forbidden transition. We determine the magic wavelength, the quadratic magnetic Zeeman shift and the transition frequency to be 468.463(207)$\\,$nm, -206.6(2.0)$\\,$MHz/T$^2$ and 655 058 646 691(101)$\\,$kHz, respectively. These are compared with theoretical predictions and results from complementary experiments. We also developed a high-precision relativistic structure model for magnesium, give an improved theoretical value for the blackbody radiation shift and discuss a clock based on bosonic magnesium.

  6. Strongly Interacting Fermions in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koetsier, A. O.

    2009-07-01

    presented here concerns fermionic atoms in periodic potential formed by interfering laser beams. Indeed, the standing light wave created by the interfering beams gives rise to a lattice potential because of the Stark effect which couples the electronic energy levels of the atoms to the spatially undulating electric field. Furthermore, fermionic atoms can be prepared in two different hyperfine states corresponding to the the spin-up and spin-down quantum states, and as such mimic electrons moving in the lattice structure of solids. This system is well described by the famous Hubbard model which we introduce in chapter 2 and, under certain conditions, undergoes a phase transition into the Néel state which believed to be a precursor to superconductivity in certain high-temperature superconductors. In chapter 3, we calculate precisely how the Néel state may be achieved in an ultracold fermionic atom gas. When the number of spin-up and spin-down atoms is unequal the system becomes spin-canted and exhibits both ferro- and antiferromagnetic characteristics, as we show in chapter 4. We also find there are topological excitations present in the quantum spin texture known as merons which have never unambiguously been observed before. In order to form a Bose-Einstein condensate, fermionic atoms must first form pairs, and can do so in two contrasting ways. The relationship between these two qualitatively di erent forms of pairing is described in chapter 5, and we examine how these two types of pairs transform into one another in an optical lattice in chapter 6. Finally, chapter 7 is a detailed eld-theoretic study of pairing as it occurs in an ultracold Bose gas. There, we find there is an intriguing bosonic analogy of the two forms of fermion pairing and explore the properties of these pairs.

  7. Estimating strong correlations in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertis, J.; Friesdorf, M.; Riofrío, C. A.; Eisert, J.

    2016-11-01

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices provide one of the most promising platforms for analog quantum simulations of complex quantum many-body systems. Large-size systems can now routinely be reached and are already used to probe a large variety of different physical situations, ranging from quantum phase transitions to artificial gauge theories. At the same time, measurement techniques are still limited and full tomography for these systems seems out of reach. Motivated by this observation, we present a method to directly detect and quantify to what extent a quantum state deviates from a local Gaussian description, based on available noise correlation measurements from in situ and time-of-flight measurements. This is an indicator of the significance of strong correlations in ground and thermal states, as Gaussian states are precisely the ground and thermal states of noninteracting models. We connect our findings, augmented by numerical tensor network simulations, to notions of equilibration, disordered systems, and the suppression of transport in Anderson insulators.

  8. Correlations of Pairs in Bichromatic Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; He, Zhi

    2017-09-01

    Correlation functions of two interacting bosons in bound states confined in a quasi-periodic 1D optical lattice are investigated. This two-body problem is exactly solvable, and therefore, various correlation functions can be directly calculated. The first-order correlation and the resulting momentum distribution behave smoothly across the phase boundary and exhibit a strong dependence on the sign of on-site interactions. We demonstrate that this special signature of momentum distribution exists for both the extended phase and the localized phase. In addition to the dependence on the sign of on-site interactions, the second-order quantum coherence reveals complementary information about the quasi-periodic order of the system, the underling structure of the bound states and the characterization of the different phases of the bound states. We also study the second-order correlation in momentum space of the bound states in both the weak and strong coupling regimes and demonstrate different correlation patterns in these two regimes.

  9. Classical Ising Models Realised on Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirio, Mauro; Brennen, G. K.; Twamley, J.; Iblisdir, S.; Boada, O.

    2012-02-01

    We describe a simple quantum algorithm acting on a register of qubits in d spatial dimensions which computes statistical properties of d+1 dimensional classical Ising models. The algorithm works by measuring scattering matrix elements for quantum processes and Wick rotating to provide estimates for real partition functions of classical systems. This method can be implemented in a straightforward way in ensembles of qubits, e.g. three dimensional optical lattices with only nearest neighbor Ising like interactions. By measuring noise in the estimate useful information regarding location of critical points and scaling laws can be extracted for classical Ising models, possibly with inhomogeneity. Unlike the case of quantum simulation of quantum hamiltonians, this algorithm does not require Trotter expansion of the evolution operator and thus has the advantage of being amenable to fault tolerant gate design in a straightforward manner. Through this setting it is possible to study the quantum computational complexity of the estimation of a classical partition function for a 2D Ising model with non uniform couplings and magnetic fields. We provide examples for the 2 dimensional case.

  10. Kinetic view of chirped optical lattice gas heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graul, J. S.; Gimelshein, S. F.; Lilly, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    With a focus on optical lattice gas heating, direct simulation Monte Carlo was used to investigate the interaction between molecular nitrogen, argon and methane, initially at 300 K and 0.8 atm, with pulsed, chirped optical lattices. Created from two 700 mJ, 532 nm, flattop laser pulses, the optical lattice parameters simulated are based on published optical lattice-based experiments, to ensure that pulse energies and durations do not exceed published optical breakdown (ionization) thresholds. Resultant translational gas temperatures, as well as induced bulk velocities, were used quantify energy and momentum deposition. To maximize available gas temperature changes achieved using the technique, laser pulses were linearly chirped to produce lattice velocities able to more effectively facilitate energy deposition throughout the pulse duration. From the initial conditions, the maximum, end pulse axial translational temperature obtained in nitrogen was approximately 755 K, at a lattice velocity of 400 m/s linearly chirped at 25 Gm/s2 over the 40 ns pulse duration. To date, this stands as the single largest, numerically-predicted temperature change from optical lattice gas heating under the numerical integration of real world energy and laser-based limitations.

  11. Quantum phase transitions in low-dimensional optical lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Liberto, M.F.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, we discuss quantum phase transitions in low-dimensional optical lattices, namely one- and two-dimensional lattices. The dimensional confinement is realized in experiments by suppressing the hopping in the extra dimensions through a deep potential barrier that prevents the atoms to tu

  12. Pinning an Ion with an Intracavity Optical Lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Rasmus Bogh; Leroux, Ian Daniel; Marciante, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    We report one-dimensional pinning of a single ion by an optical lattice. A standing-wave cavity produces the lattice potential along the rf-field-free axis of a linear Paul trap. The ion’s localization is detected by measuring its fluorescence when excited by standing-wave fields with the same...

  13. Edge Transport in 2D Cold Atom Optical Lattices

    OpenAIRE

    V. W. Scarola; Sarma, S. Das

    2006-01-01

    We theoretically study the observable response of edge currents in two dimensional cold atom optical lattices. As an example we use Gutzwiller mean-field theory to relate persistent edge currents surrounding a Mott insulator in a slowly rotating trapped Bose-Hubbard system to time of flight measurements. We briefly discuss an application, the detection of Chern number using edge currents of a topologically ordered optical lattice insulator.

  14. Physics of higher orbital bands in optical lattices: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaopeng; Liu, W. Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Orbital degree of freedom plays a fundamental role in understanding the unconventional properties in solid state materials. Experimental progress in quantum atomic gases has demonstrated that high orbitals in optical lattices can be used to construct quantum emulators of exotic models beyond natural crystals, where novel many-body states such as complex Bose-Einstein condensation and topological semimetals emerge. A brief introduction of orbital degree of freedom in optical lattices is given ...

  15. Microscopic theory of photonic band gaps in optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Samoylova, M; Bachelard, R; Courteille, Ph W

    2013-01-01

    We propose a microscopic model to describe the scattering of light by atoms in optical lattices. The model is shown to efficiently capture Bragg scattering, spontaneous emission and photonic band gaps. A connection to the transfer matrix formalism is established in the limit of a one-dimensional optical lattice, and we find the two theories to yield results in good agreement. The advantage of the microscopic model is, however, that it suits better for studies of finite-size and disorder effects.

  16. Testing spatial α-variation with optical atomic clocks based on highly charged ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berengut J. C.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We review recent works illustrating the potential use of highly charged ions as the basis of optical atomic clocks of exceptional accuracy and very high sensitivity to variation of the fine structure constant, α. The tendency towards large transition energies in highly charged ions can be overcome using level crossings, which allow transitions between different orbitals to be within the range of usual lasers. We present simple scaling laws that demonstrate reduced systematics that could be realised in highly charged ion clocks. Such clocks could allow us to corroborate astronomical studies that suggest a spatial gradient in values of α across the Universe.

  17. Super-resolution microscopy of single atoms in optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Alberti, Andrea; Alt, Wolfgang; Brakhane, Stefan; Karski, Michał; Reimann, René; Widera, Artur; Meschede, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    We report on image processing techniques and experimental procedures to determine the lattice-site positions of single atoms in an optical lattice with high reliability, even for limited acquisition time or optical resolution. Determining the positions of atoms beyond the diffraction limit relies on parametric deconvolution in close analogy to methods employed in super-resolution microscopy. We develop a deconvolution method that makes effective use of the prior knowledge of the optical transfer function, noise properties, and discreteness of the optical lattice. We show that accurate knowledge of the image formation process enables a dramatic improvement on the localization reliability. This is especially relevant for closely packed ensembles of atoms where the separation between particles cannot be directly optically resolved. Furthermore, we demonstrate experimental methods to precisely reconstruct the point spread function with sub-pixel resolution from fluorescence images of single atoms, and we give a m...

  18. Realizing type-II Weyl points in an optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastri, Kunal; Yang, Zhaoju; Zhang, Baile

    2017-01-01

    The recent discovery of the Lorentz symmetry-violating "type-II" Weyl semimetal phase has renewed interest in the study of Weyl physics in condensed-matter systems. However, tuning the exceptional properties of this novel state has remained a challenge. Optical lattices, created using standing laser beams, provide a convenient platform to tune tunneling parameters continuously in time. In this paper, we propose a generalized two level system exhibiting type-II Weyl points that can be realized using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. The system is engineered using a three-dimensional lattice with complex π phase tunneling amplitudes. Various unique properties of the type-II Weyl semimetal such as open Fermi surface, anomalous chirality, and topological Fermi arcs can be probed using the proposed optical lattice scheme.

  19. Digital Square-Wave Frequency Modulated Microwave Sources for a Miniature Optically Pumped Cesium Beam Clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jingbiao; ZHU Chengjin; LIU Ge; WANG Fengzhi; WANG Yiqiu; YANG Donghai

    2001-01-01

    Three different digital frequencymodulated microwave sources have been designed andapplied to our miniature optically pumped cesiumbeam clock.The main features and their influenceon clock accuracy have been experimentally tested.Itis proved that a digital square-wave frequency modu-lated microwave source using a microprocessor con-trolled direct-digital frequency synthesizer (DDFS)for our miniature optically pumped cesium beamclock works well,the frequency short term stability2 × 10 11/x r and the long term stability 3.5 x 10-13 forone day sample time have been obtained.

  20. Spectroscopy of 171Yb in an optical lattice based on laser linewidth transfer using a narrow linewidth frequency comb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Hajime; Hosaka, Kazumoto; Yasuda, Masami; Nakajima, Yoshiaki; Iwakuni, Kana; Akamatsu, Daisuke; Okubo, Sho; Kohno, Takuya; Onae, Atsushi; Hong, Feng-Lei

    2013-04-08

    We propose a novel, high-performance, and practical laser source system for optical clocks. The laser linewidth of a fiber-based frequency comb is reduced by phase locking a comb mode to an ultrastable master laser at 1064 nm with a broad servo bandwidth. A slave laser at 578 nm is successively phase locked to a comb mode at 578 nm with a broad servo bandwidth without any pre-stabilization. Laser frequency characteristics such as spectral linewidth and frequency stability are transferred to the 578-nm slave laser from the 1064-nm master laser. Using the slave laser, we have succeeded in observing the clock transition of (171)Yb atoms confined in an optical lattice with a 20-Hz spectral linewidth.

  1. Dimensional Crossover in Bragg Scattering from an Optical Lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Slama, S; Ludewig, A; Köhler, M; Zimmermann, C; Courteille, P W; Courteille, Ph.W.

    2005-01-01

    We study Bragg scattering at 1D optical lattices. Cold atoms are confined by the optical dipole force at the antinodes of a standing wave generated inside a laser-driven high-finesse cavity. The atoms arrange themselves into a chain of pancake-shaped layers located at the antinodes of the standing wave. Laser light incident on this chain is partially Bragg-reflected. We observe an angular dependence of this Bragg reflection which is different to what is known from crystalline solids. In solids the scattering layers can be taken to be infinitely spread (3D limit). This is not generally true for an optical lattice consistent of a 1D linear chain of point-like scattering sites. By an explicit structure factor calculation we derive a generalized Bragg condition, which is valid in the intermediate regime. This enables us to determine the aspect ratio of the atomic lattice from the angular dependance of the Bragg scattered light.

  2. Magnetic-dipole transitions in highly charged ions as a basis of ultraprecise optical clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudin, V I; Taichenachev, A V; Derevianko, A

    2014-12-05

    We evaluate the feasibility of using magnetic-dipole (M1) transitions in highly charged ions as a basis of an optical atomic clockwork of exceptional accuracy. We consider a range of possibilities, including M1 transitions between clock levels of the same fine-structure and hyperfine-structure manifolds. In highly charged ions these transitions lie in the optical part of the spectra and can be probed with lasers. The most direct advantage of our proposal comes from the low degeneracy of clock levels and the simplicity of atomic structure in combination with negligible quadrupolar shift. We demonstrate that such clocks can have projected fractional accuracies below the 10^{-20}-10^{-21} level for all common systematic effects, such as blackbody radiation, Zeeman, ac-Stark, and quadrupolar shifts.

  3. Bloch-Zener oscillations in a tunable optical honeycomb lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uehlinger, Thomas; Greif, Daniel; Jotzu, Gregor; Esslinger, Tilman [Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Tarruell, Leticia [Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich, Switzerland and LP2N, Universite Bordeaux 1, IOGS, CNRS, 351 cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence (France)

    2013-12-04

    Ultracold gases in optical lattices have proved to be a flexible tool to simulate many different phenomena of solid state physics [1, 2]. Recently, optical lattices with complex geometries have been realized [3, 4, 5, 6, 7], paving the way to simulating more realistic systems. The honeycomb structure has recently become accessible in an optical lattice composed of mutually perpendicular laser beams. This lattice structure exhibits topological features in its band structure – the Dirac points. At these points, two energy bands intersect linearly and the particles behave as relativistic Dirac fermions. In optical lattices, Bloch oscillations [8] resolved both in time and in quasi-momentum space can be directly observed. We make use of such Bloch-Zener oscillations to probe the vanishing energy gap at the Dirac points as well as their position in the band structure. In small band gap regions, we observe Landau-Zener tunneling [7, 9] to the second band and the regions of maximum transfer can be identified with the position of the Dirac points.

  4. Extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juergensen, Ole

    2015-06-05

    In this thesis, the phase diagrams and dynamics of various extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices are studied. Hubbard models are the primary description for many interacting particles in periodic potentials with the paramount example of the electrons in solids. The very same models describe the behavior of ultracold quantum gases trapped in the periodic potentials generated by interfering beams of laser light. These optical lattices provide an unprecedented access to the fundamentals of the many-particle physics that govern the properties of solid-state materials. They can be used to simulate solid-state systems and validate the approximations and simplifications made in theoretical models. This thesis revisits the numerous approximations underlying the standard Hubbard models with special regard to optical lattice experiments. The incorporation of the interaction between particles on adjacent lattice sites leads to extended Hubbard models. Offsite interactions have a strong influence on the phase boundaries and can give rise to novel correlated quantum phases. The extended models are studied with the numerical methods of exact diagonalization and time evolution, a cluster Gutzwiller approximation, as well as with the strong-coupling expansion approach. In total, this thesis demonstrates the high relevance of beyond-Hubbard processes for ultracold atoms in optical lattices. Extended Hubbard models can be employed to tackle unexplained problems of solid-state physics as well as enter previously inaccessible regimes.

  5. Localization Spectroscopy of a Single Ion in an Optical Lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legrand, Olivier Philippe Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The work reported in this thesis primarily focuses on studies of the dynamics of a single laser-cooled ion, simultaneously confined in the harmonic potential of a linear Paul trap and a rapidly varying periodic potential – a so-called optical lattice – generated from an optical standing-wave. Bes......The work reported in this thesis primarily focuses on studies of the dynamics of a single laser-cooled ion, simultaneously confined in the harmonic potential of a linear Paul trap and a rapidly varying periodic potential – a so-called optical lattice – generated from an optical standing...... calibration and analysis of the detection system, several theoretical simulations of the expected dynamics and associated optical response of the ion were undertaken. Finally, a new laser source based on second harmonic generation was developed in order to perform laser-cooling of Ca+ ions, and to serve...

  6. Trapped ions in optical lattices for probing oscillator chain models

    CERN Document Server

    Pruttivarasin, Thaned; Talukdar, Ishan; Kreuter, Axel; Haeffner, Hartmut

    2011-01-01

    We show that a chain of trapped ions embedded in microtraps generated by an optical lattice can be used to study oscillator models related to dry friction and energy transport. Numerical calculations with realistic experimental parameters demonstrate that both static and dynamic properties of the ion chain change significantly as the optical lattice power is varied. Finally, we lay out an experimental scheme to use the spin degree of freedom to probe the phase space structure and quantum critical behavior of the ion chain.

  7. Physics of higher orbital bands in optical lattices: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaopeng; Liu, W. Vincent

    2016-11-01

    The orbital degree of freedom plays a fundamental role in understanding the unconventional properties in solid state materials. Experimental progress in quantum atomic gases has demonstrated that high orbitals in optical lattices can be used to construct quantum emulators of exotic models beyond natural crystals, where novel many-body states such as complex Bose-Einstein condensates and topological semimetals emerge. A brief introduction of orbital degrees of freedom in optical lattices is given and a summary of exotic orbital models and resulting many-body phases is provided. Experimental consequences of the novel phases are also discussed.

  8. The magneto-optical effect of cold atoms in an integrating sphere for atomic clock and optical magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Wan, Jinyin; Meng, Yanling; Xiao, Ling; Liu, Peng; Wang, Xiumei; Wang, Yaning; Liu, Liang

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the magneto-optical effect of cold atoms in an integrating sphere both experimentally and theoretically. The dependence of magneto-optical rotation angle on the biased magnetic field, the probe light intensity, and the probe light detuning are investigated. The probe light background is blocked and the shot noise is strongly suppressed. This detection scheme may provide a new approach for high contrast cold atom clock and cold atom optical magnetometer.

  9. Optical properties of graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Garm; Flindt, Christian; Pedersen, Jesper Goor

    2008-01-01

    demonstrate that this artificial nanomaterial is a dipole-allowed direct-gap semiconductor with a very pronounced optical-absorption edge. Hence, optical infrared spectroscopy should be an ideal probe of the electronic structure. To address realistic experimental situations, we include effects due to disorder...

  10. Fluorescence spectra of atomic ensembles in a magneto-optical trap as an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Seokchan; Kang, Sungsam; Kim, Wook-Rae; Kim, Jung-Ryul; An, Kyungwon

    2015-01-01

    We present a study on characteristics of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) as an optical lattice. Fluorescence spectra of atoms trapped in a MOT with a passively phase-stabilized beam configuration have been measured by means of the photon-counting heterodyne spectroscopy. We observe a narrow Rayleigh peak and well-resolved Raman sidebands in the fluorescence spectra which clearly show that the MOT itself behaves as a three-dimensional optical lattice. Optical-lattice-like properties of the phase-stabilized MOT such as vibrational frequencies and lineshapes of Rayleigh peak and Raman sidebands are investigated systematically for various trap conditions.

  11. All-optical pulse data generation in a semiconductor optical amplifier gain controlled by a reshaped optical clock injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Gong-Ru; Chang, Yung-Cheng; Yu, Kun-Chieh

    2006-05-01

    Wavelength-maintained all-optical pulse data pattern transformation based on a modified cross-gain-modulation architecture in a strongly gain-depleted semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) is investigated. Under a backward dark-optical-comb injection with 70% duty-cycle reshaping from the received data clock at 10GHz, the incoming optical data stream is transformed into a pulse data stream with duty cycle, rms timing jitter, and conversion gain of 15%, 4ps, and 3dB, respectively. The high-pass filtering effect of the gain-saturated SOA greatly improves the extinction ratio of data stream by 8dB and reduces its bit error rate to 10-12 at -18dBm.

  12. Solutions for ultra-high speed optical wavelength conversion and clock recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Galili, Michael; Mulvad, Hans Christian Hansen

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on our recent advances in ultra-fast optical communications relying on ultra-short pulses densely stacked in ultra-high bit rate serial data signals at a single wavelength. The paper describes details in solutions for the network functionalities of wavelength conversion and clock...... recovery at bit rates up to 320 Gb/s...

  13. Quantitative monitoring of relative clock wander between signal and sampling sources in asynchronous optical under-sampling system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huixing Zhang; Wei Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Optical performance monitoring using asynchronous optical or electrical sampling has gained considerable attention. Relative clock wander between data signal and sampling source is a typical occurrence in such systems. A method for the quantitative monitoring of the relative clock wander in asynchronous optical under-sampling system is presented. With a series of simulations, the clock wanders recovered using this method are in good agreement with the preset clock wanders of different amounts and frequencies for both RZ and NRZ signals. Hence, the reliability and robustness of the method are proven.%Optical performance monitoring using asynchronous optical or electrical sampling has gained considerable attention.Relative clock wander between data signal and sampling source is a typical occurrence in such systems.A method for the quantitative monitoring of the relative clock wander in asynchronous optical under-sampling system is presented.With a series of simulations,the clock wanders recovered using this method are in good agreement with the preset clock wanders of different amounts and frequencies for both RZ and NRZ signals.Hence,the reliability and robustness of the method are proven.

  14. Triangular and honeycomb lattices of cold atoms in optical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Shabnam; Miniatura, Christian; Grémaud, Benoît.

    2015-10-01

    We consider a two-dimensional homogeneous ensemble of cold bosonic atoms loaded inside two optical cavities and pumped by a far-detuned external laser field. We examine the conditions for these atoms to self-organize into triangular and honeycomb lattices as a result of superradiance. By collectively scattering the pump photons, the atoms feed the initially empty cavity modes. As a result, the superposition of the pump and cavity fields creates a space-periodic light-shift external potential and atoms self-organize into the potential wells of this optical lattice. Depending on the phase of the cavity fields with respect to the pump laser, these minima can either form a triangular or a hexagonal lattice. By numerically solving the dynamical equations of the coupled atom-cavity system, we have shown that the two stable atomic structures at long times are the triangular lattice and the honeycomb lattice with equally populated sites. We have also studied how to drive atoms from one lattice structure to another by dynamically changing the phase of the cavity fields with respect to the pump laser.

  15. Different models of gravitating Dirac fermions in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celi, Alessio

    2017-07-01

    In this paper I construct the naive lattice Dirac Hamiltonian describing the propagation of fermions in a generic 2D optical metric for different lattice and flux-lattice geometries. First, I apply a top-down constructive approach that we first proposed in [Boada et al., New J. Phys. 13, 035002 (2011)] to the honeycomb and to the brickwall lattices. I carefully discuss how gauge transformations that generalize momentum (and Dirac cone) shifts in the Brillouin zone in the Minkowski homogeneous case can be used in order to change the phases of the hopping. In particular, I show that lattice Dirac Hamiltonian for Rindler spacetime in the honeycomb and brickwall lattices can be realized by considering real and isotropic (but properly position dependent) tunneling terms. For completeness, I also discuss a suitable formulation of Rindler Dirac Hamiltonian in semi-synthetic brickwall and π-flux square lattices (where one of the dimension is implemented by using internal spin states of atoms as we originally proposed in [Boada et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 133001 (2012)] and [Celi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 043001 (2014)]).

  16. An atom interferometer with a shaken optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Weidner, C A; Kosloff, Ronnie; Anderson, and Dana Z

    2016-01-01

    We introduce shaken lattice interferometry with atoms trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice. The atoms undergo an interferometer sequence of splitting, propagation, reflection, and recombination by phase modulation of the lattice through a sequence of shaking functions. Each function in the sequence is determined by a learning procedure that is implemented with a genetic algorithm. Numerical simulations determine the momentum state of the atoms, which is experimentally accessible with time-of-flight imaging. The shaking function is then optimized to achieve the desired state transitions. The sensitivity of the interferometer to perturbations such as those introduced by inertial forces scales the same way as for conventional matter wave interferometers. The shaken lattice interferometer may be optimized to sense signals of interest while rejecting others, such as the measurement of an AC signal while rejecting a DC bias.

  17. Stability analysis for solitons in PT-symmetric optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Nixon, Sean; Yang, Jianke

    2012-01-01

    Stability of solitons in parity-time (PT)-symmetric periodic potentials (optical lattices) is analyzed in both one- and two-dimensional systems. First we show analytically that when the strength of the gain-loss component in the PT lattice rises above a certain threshold (phase-transition point), an infinite number of linear Bloch bands turn complex simultaneously. Second, we show that while stable families of solitons can exist in PT lattices, increasing the gain-loss component has an overall destabilizing effect on soliton propagation. Specifically, when the gain-loss component increases, the parameter range of stable solitons shrinks as new regions of instability appear. Thirdly, we investigate the nonlinear evolution of unstable PT solitons under perturbations, and show that the energy of perturbed solitons can grow unbounded even though the PT lattice is below the phase transition point.

  18. Veselago lensing with ultracold atoms in an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Leder, Martin; Weitz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Veselago pointed out that electromagnetic wave theory allows for materials with a negative index of refraction, in which most known optical phenomena would be reversed. A slab of such a material can focus light by negative refraction, an imaging technique strikingly different from conventional positive refractive index optics, where curved surfaces bend the rays to form an image of an object. Here we demonstrate Veselago lensing for matter waves, using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A relativistic, i.e. photon-like, dispersion relation for rubidium atoms is realized with a bichromatic optical lattice potential. We rely on a Raman $\\pi$-pulse technique to transfer atoms between two different branches of the dispersion relation, resulting in a focusing completely analogous to the effect described by Veselago for light waves. Future prospects of the demonstrated effects include novel sub-de Broglie wave imaging applications.

  19. Direct Tunneling Delay Time Measurement in an Optical Lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortun, A; Cabrera-Gutiérrez, C; Condon, G; Michon, E; Billy, J; Guéry-Odelin, D

    2016-07-01

    We report on the measurement of the time required for a wave packet to tunnel through the potential barriers of an optical lattice. The experiment is carried out by loading adiabatically a Bose-Einstein condensate into a 1D optical lattice. A sudden displacement of the lattice by a few tens of nanometers excites the micromotion of the dipole mode. We then directly observe in momentum space the splitting of the wave packet at the turning points and measure the delay between the reflected and the tunneled packets for various initial displacements. Using this atomic beam splitter twice, we realize a chain of coherent micron-size Mach-Zehnder interferometers at the exit of which we get essentially a wave packet with a negative momentum, a result opposite to the prediction of classical physics.

  20. Expansion of Bose-Hubbard Mott insulators in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jreissaty, Mark; Carrasquilla, Juan; Rigol, Marcos [Department of Physics, Georgetown University, Washington DC 20057 (United States); Wolf, F. Alexander [Department of Physics, Georgetown University, Washington DC 20057 (United States); Theoretical Physics III, Center for Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, Institute of Physics, Augsburg University, D-86135 Augsburg (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    We study the expansion of bosonic Mott insulators in the presence of an optical lattice after switching off a confining potential. We use the Gutzwiller mean-field approximation and consider two different setups. In the first one, the expansion is restricted to one direction. We show that this leads to the emergence of two condensates with well-defined momenta, and argue that such a construct can be used to create atom lasers in optical lattices. In the second setup, we study Mott insulators that are allowed to expand in all directions in the lattice. In this case, a simple condensate is seen to develop within the mean-field approximation. However, its constituent bosons are found to populate many nonzero momentum modes. An analytic understanding of both phenomena in terms of the exact dispersion relation in the hard-core limit is presented.

  1. One single trapped and laser cooled radium ion: Towards an all-optical atomic clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Versolato, Oscar; Wansbeek, Lotje; Willmann, Lorenz; Timmermans, Rob; Jungmann, Klaus [KVI, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    One single trapped radium ion is an ideal candidate for an all-optical frequency standard (*clock*). This system provides a long coherence time and tractable systematics. If the ion is laser cooled to the Lamb-Dicke regime, first order Doppler shifts are eliminated. Ultra-narrow transitions in radium ions provide an excellent basis for such a high stability clock, using commercially available semiconductor lasers in the visible regime. In certain odd isotopes of radium, the nuclear electric quadrupole shift is absent. Further, the radium ion is an excellent candidate for a high sensitivity experiment to search for a time variation of the finestructure constant.

  2. Synthetic dimensions and spin-orbit coupling with an optical clock transition

    CERN Document Server

    Livi, L F; Diem, M; Franchi, L; Clivati, C; Frittelli, M; Levi, F; Calonico, D; Catani, J; Inguscio, M; Fallani, L

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel way of synthesizing spin-orbit interactions in ultracold quantum gases, based on a single-photon optical clock transition coupling two long-lived electronic states of two-electron $^{173}$Yb atoms. By mapping the electronic states onto effective sites along a synthetic "electronic" dimension, we have engineered synthetic fermionic ladders with tunable magnetic fluxes. We have detected the spin-orbit coupling with fiber-link-enhanced clock spectroscopy and directly measured the emergence of chiral edge currents, probing them as a function of the magnetic field flux. These results open new directions for the investigation of topological states of matter with ultracold atomic gases.

  3. Stability Transfer between Two Clock Lasers Operating at Different Wavelengths for Absolute Frequency Measurement of Clock Transition in 87Sr

    CERN Document Server

    Yamaguchi, A; Nagano, S; Li, Y; Ishijima, H; Hachisu, H; Kumagai, M; Ido, T; 10.1143/APEX.5.022701

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrated transferring the stability of one highly stable clock laser operating at 729 nm to another less stable laser operating at 698 nm. The two different wavelengths were bridged using an optical frequency comb. The improved stability of the clock laser at 698 nm enabled us to evaluate the systematic frequency shifts of the Sr optical lattice clock with shorter averaging time. We determined the absolute frequency of the clock transition 1S0 - 3P0 in 87Sr to be 429 228 004 229 873.9 (1.4) Hz referenced to the SI second on the geoid via International Atomic Time (TAI).

  4. Extended Coherence Time on the Clock Transition of Optically Trapped Rubidium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleine Büning, G.; Will, J.; Ertmer, W.

    2011-01-01

    Optically trapped ensembles are of crucial importance for frequency measurements and quantum memories but generally suffer from strong dephasing due to inhomogeneous density and light shifts. We demonstrate a drastic increase of the coherence time to 21 s on the magnetic field insensitive clock...... transition of 87Rb by applying the recently discovered spin self-rephasing [C. Deutsch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 020401 (2010)]. This result confirms the general nature of this new mechanism and thus shows its applicability in atom clocks and quantum memories. A systematic investigation of all relevant...... frequency shifts and noise contributions yields a stability of 2.4×10-11τ-1/2, where τ is the integration time in seconds. Based on a set of technical improvements, the presented frequency standard is predicted to rival the stability of microwave fountain clocks in a potentially much more compact setup....

  5. Phase-coherent frequency comparison of optical clocks using a telecommunication fiber link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnatz, Harald; Terra, Osama; Predehl, Katharina; Feldmann, Thorsten; Legero, Thomas; Lipphardt, Burghard; Sterr, Uwe; Grosche, Gesine; Holzwarth, Ronald; Hänsch, Theodor W; Udem, Thomas; Lu, Zehuang H; Wang, Li J; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Friebe, Jan; Pape, Andrè; Rasel, Ernst-M; Riedmann, Mathias; Wübbena, Temmo

    2010-01-01

    We have explored the performance of 2 "dark fibers" of a commercial telecommunication fiber link for a remote comparison of optical clocks. These fibers establish a network in Germany that will eventually link optical frequency standards at PTB with those at the Institute of Quantum Optics (IQ) at the Leibniz University of Hanover, and the Max Planck Institutes in Erlangen (MPL) and Garching (MPQ). We demonstrate for the first time that within several minutes a phase coherent comparison of clock lasers at the few 10(-15) level can also be accomplished when the lasers are more than 100 km apart. Based on the performance of the fiber link to the IQ, we estimate the expected stability for the link from PTB to MPQ via MPL that bridges a distance of approximately 900 km.

  6. Lattice QCD simulations on big cats, sea monsters and clock towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Balint, E-mail: bjoo@jlab.or [Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2009-07-01

    We present details of lattice QCD computations we are performing on the Cray XT series of computers, from BigBen - an XT3 hosted at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) - through Jaguar (XT4) and Kraken (XT5) - which are hosted at the National Center for Computational Science (NCCS) and the National Institute of Computational Science (NICS), respectively, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). We discuss algorithmic tuning to make the computation more efficient and present some recent results.

  7. Super-resolution microscopy of single atoms in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Andrea; Robens, Carsten; Alt, Wolfgang; Brakhane, Stefan; Karski, Michał; Reimann, René; Widera, Artur; Meschede, Dieter

    2016-05-01

    We report on image processing techniques and experimental procedures to determine the lattice-site positions of single atoms in an optical lattice with high reliability, even for limited acquisition time or optical resolution. Determining the positions of atoms beyond the diffraction limit relies on parametric deconvolution in close analogy to methods employed in super-resolution microscopy. We develop a deconvolution method that makes effective use of the prior knowledge of the optical transfer function, noise properties, and discreteness of the optical lattice. We show that accurate knowledge of the image formation process enables a dramatic improvement on the localization reliability. This allows us to demonstrate super-resolution of the atoms’ position in closely packed ensembles where the separation between particles cannot be directly optically resolved. Furthermore, we demonstrate experimental methods to precisely reconstruct the point spread function with sub-pixel resolution from fluorescence images of single atoms, and we give a mathematical foundation thereof. We also discuss discretized image sampling in pixel detectors and provide a quantitative model of noise sources in electron multiplying CCD cameras. The techniques developed here are not only beneficial to neutral atom experiments, but could also be employed to improve the localization precision of trapped ions for ultra precise force sensing.

  8. Quantum Phases of Matter in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-30

    findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not contrued as an official Department of the Army position , policy or...phases in beyond-standard optical lattices”, Oct 25, 2013 Nikhil Monga, John Shumway, Kaden Hazzard, Erich Mueller, Steven Desch, " Renormalization of...Ho, “Cold Atoms in Curved Space ”, Quantum Materials-Perspectives and Opportunities, The Rice Center for Quantum Materials, December 15, 2014

  9. Light-Induced Hofstadter's Butterfly Spectrum in Optical Lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Jing-Min

    2009-01-01

    We propose a scheme to create an effective magnetic field, which can be perceived by cold neutral atoms in a two-dimensional optical lattice, with a laser field with a space-dependent phase and a conventional laser field acting on A-type three-level atoms. When the dimensionless parameter α, being the ratio of flux through a lattice cell to one flux quantum, is rational, the energy spectrum shows a fractal band structure, which is so-called Hofstadter's butterfly.

  10. Optical matrix for clock distribution and synchronous operation in two-dimensional array devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. S.; Shu, C.

    1996-06-01

    A scheme to generate an optical matrix from a mode-locked Nd:YAG laser has been theoretically explored and experimentally demonstrated. The matrix consists of highly synchronized and sequentially delayed optical pulses suitable for use with two-dimensional array optoelectronic devices and clock distribution system. The output pulses have the same state of polarization and no timing jitter is produced among the elements. Encoded outputs have been generated from the matrix using a set of photomasks. This technique can be applied to high-speed optical parallel processing.

  11. Optical spectra and lattice dynamics of molecular crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Zhizhin, GN

    1995-01-01

    The current volume is a single topic volume on the optical spectra and lattice dynamics of molecular crystals. The book is divided into two parts. Part I covers both the theoretical and experimental investigations of organic crystals. Part II deals with the investigation of the structure, phase transitions and reorientational motion of molecules in organic crystals. In addition appendices are given which provide the parameters for the calculation of the lattice dynamics of molecular crystals, procedures for the calculation of frequency eigenvectors of utilizing computers, and the frequencies and eigenvectors of lattice modes for several organic crystals. Quite a large amount of Russian literature is cited, some of which has previously not been available to scientists in the West.

  12. Cold bosons in optical lattices: a tutorial for exact diagonalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raventós, David; Graß, Tobias; Lewenstein, Maciej; Juliá-Díaz, Bruno

    2017-06-01

    Exact diagonalization (ED) techniques are a powerful method for studying many-body problems. Here, we apply this method to systems of few bosons in an optical lattice, and use it to demonstrate the emergence of interesting quantum phenomena such as fragmentation and coherence. Starting with a standard Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian, we first revise the characterisation of the superfluid to Mott insulator (MI) transitions. We then consider an inhomogeneous lattice, where one potential minimum is made much deeper than the others. The MI phase due to repulsive on-site interactions then competes with the trapping of all atoms in the deep potential. Finally, we turn our attention to attractively interacting systems, and discuss the appearance of strongly correlated phases and the onset of localisation for a slightly biased lattice. The article is intended to serve as a tutorial for ED of Bose-Hubbard models.

  13. Measuring spin correlations in optical lattices using superlattice potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Georg Lind; Andersen, Brian Møller; Bruun, Georg Morten;

    2011-01-01

    We suggest two experimental methods for probing both short- and long-range spin correlations of atoms in optical lattices using superlattice potentials. The first method involves an adiabatic doubling of the periodicity of the underlying lattice to probe neighboring singlet (triplet) correlations...... for fermions (bosons) by the occupation of the resulting vibrational ground state. The second method utilizes a time-dependent superlattice potential to generate spin-dependent transport by any number of prescribed lattice sites, and probes correlations by the resulting number of doubly occupied sites....... For experimentally relevant parameters, we demonstrate how both methods yield large signatures of antiferromagnetic correlations of strongly repulsive fermionic atoms in a single shot of the experiment. Lastly, we show how this method may also be applied to probe d-wave pairing, a possible ground-state candidate...

  14. All-optical clock recovery from 10-Gb/s NRZ data and NRZ to RZ format conversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lina Yin; Yumei Yan; Yunfeng Zhou; Jian Wu; Jintong Lin

    2006-01-01

    A non-return-to-zero (NRZ) to pseudo-return-to-zero (PRZ) converter consisting of a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and an arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) is proposed, by which the enhancement of clock frequency component and clock-to-data suppression ratio of the NRZ data are evidently achieved. Alloptical clock recovery from NRZ data at 10 Gb/s is successfully demonstrated with the proposed NRZ-to-PRZ converter and a mode-locked SOA fiber laser. Furthermore, NRZ-to-RZ format conversion of 10 Gb/s is realized by using the recovered clock as the control light of terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer(TOAD), which further proves that the proposed clock recovery scheme is applicable.

  15. Polarization Maintaining Fibre Loop Mirror for NRZ-to-PRZ Conversion in All-Optical Clock Recovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Fan; ZHANG Xin-Liang; LIU Hai-Rong; LIU De-Ming; HUANG De-Xiu

    2006-01-01

    @@ We propose a novel configuration for clock extraction by converting the NRZ data into the PRZ data and by employing a polarization-maintaining fibre loop mirror (PMFLM) which is usually used as an optical comb filter.

  16. 10Gb/s Bang-Bang Clock and Data Recovery (CDR for optical transmission systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Dodel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A Bang-Bang Clock-Data Recovery (CDR for 10Gb/s optical transmission systems is presented. A direct modulated architecture is used for the design. Its loop characteristics can be derived using an analogy to Σ Δ theory. The circuit was produced and measured in a commercial 0.25μm BiCMOS technology with a transition frequency fT70=GHz.

  17. 10Gb/s Bang-Bang Clock and Data Recovery (CDR) for optical transmission systems

    OpenAIRE

    N. Dodel; Klar, H.

    2005-01-01

    A Bang-Bang Clock-Data Recovery (CDR) for 10Gb/s optical transmission systems is presented. A direct modulated architecture is used for the design. Its loop characteristics can be derived using an analogy to Σ Δ theory. The circuit was produced and measured in a commercial 0.25μm BiCMOS technology with a transition frequency fT70=GHz.

  18. Massive Parallelization of STED Nanoscopy Using Optical Lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Bin; Mestre, Michael; Trebbia, Jean-Baptiste; Lounis, Brahim

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy achieved nanometer scale resolution and showed great potential in live cell imaging. Yet, STED nanoscopy techniques are based on single point-scanning. This constitutes a drawback for wide field imaging, since the gain in spatial resolution requires dense pixelation and hence long recording times. Here we achieve massive parallelization of STED nanoscopy using wide-field excitation together with well-designed optical lattices for depletion and a fast camera for detection. Acquisition of large field of view super-resolved images requires scanning over a single unit cell of the optical lattice which can be as small as 290 nm*290nm. Interference STED (In-STED) images of 2.9 {\\mu}m* 2.9 {\\mu}m with resolution down to 70 nm are obtained at 12.5 frames per second. The development of this technique opens many prospects for fast wide-field nanoscopy.

  19. Superfluid and Insulating Phases of Fermion Mixtures in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskin, M.; de Melo, C. A. R. Sá

    2007-08-01

    The ground state phase diagram of fermion mixtures in optical lattices is analyzed as a function of interaction strength, fermion filling factor, and tunneling parameters. In addition to standard superfluid, phase-separated or coexisting superfluid excess-fermion phases found in homogeneous or harmonically trapped systems, fermions in optical lattices have several insulating phases, including a molecular Bose-Mott insulator (BMI), a Fermi-Pauli (band) insulator (FPI), a phase-separated BMI-FPI mixture or a Bose-Fermi checkerboard (BFC). The molecular BMI phase is the fermion mixture counterpart of the atomic BMI found in atomic Bose systems, the BFC or BMI-FPI phases exist in Bose-Fermi mixtures, and lastly the FPI phase is particular to the Fermi nature of the constituent atoms of the mixture.

  20. Could optical lattices be used to simulate real materials?

    CERN Document Server

    Hague, J P

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of understanding whether it is possible to build a quantum simulator that can probe multiband effects, we make DFT calculations for a system of cold atoms/ions. These move in a 1/r periodic potential convoluted by resolution effects, which represent the closest form of optical lattice to the nuclear potential in materials, that could be generated with painted potentials or holograms. We demonstrate that while resolution effects in optical lattices affect bandstructures, the physics of the bands closest to the fermi surface is sufficiently similar to that in real materials that they could give useful insight into complex multi-band processes. We determine that decoherence effects are sufficiently small that they do not destroy multiband effects, however there are strict constraints on the temperature and strength of interactions in experimental systems. The interaction form investigated here is most appropriate for cold ions, since inter-ion potentials have a native 1/r form. While a scaling argum...

  1. Pyramid diffraction in parity-time-symmetric optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Nixon, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamics of wave packets in two-dimensional parity-time-symmetric optical lattices near the phase-transition point are analytically studied. A novel fourth-order equation is derived for the envelope of these wave packets. A pyramid diffraction pattern is demonstrated in both the linear and nonlinear regimes. Blow-up is also possible in the nonlinear regime for both focusing and defocusing nonlinearities.

  2. Quantum phases of Fermi-Fermi mixtures in optical lattices

    OpenAIRE

    Iskin, M.; de Melo, C. A. R. Sa

    2007-01-01

    The ground state phase diagram of Fermi-Fermi mixtures in optical lattices is analyzed as a function of interaction strength, population imbalance, filling fraction and tunneling parameters. It is shown that population imbalanced Fermi-Fermi mixtures reduce to strongly interacting Bose-Fermi mixtures in the molecular limit, in sharp contrast to homogeneous or harmonically trapped systems where the resulting Bose-Fermi mixture is weakly interacting. Furthermore, insulating phases are found in ...

  3. One-dimensional photonic band gaps in optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Samoylova, Marina; Holynski, Michael; Courteille, Philippe Wilhelm; Bachelard, Romain

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon of photonic band gaps in one-dimensional optical lattices is reviewed using a microscopic approach. Formally equivalent to the transfer matrix approach in the thermodynamic limit, a microscopic model is required to study finite-size effects, such as deviations from the Bragg condition. Microscopic models describing both scalar and vectorial light are proposed, as well as for two- and three-level atoms. Several analytical results are compared to experimental data, showing a good agreement.

  4. Detecting atoms trapped in an optical lattice using a tapered optical nanofiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, T; Busch, Th

    2014-12-29

    Optical detection of structures with dimensions smaller than an optical wavelength requires devices that work on scales beyond the diffraction limit. Here we present the possibility of using a tapered optical nanofiber as a detector to resolve individual atoms trapped in an optical lattice in the Mott insulator phase. We show that the small size of the fiber combined with an enhanced photon collection rate can allow for the attainment of large and reliable measurement signals.

  5. Nonlocal optical properties in periodic lattice of graphene layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, Ruey-Lin; Han, Dezhuan

    2014-02-24

    Based on the effective medium model, nonlocal optical properties in periodic lattice of graphene layers with the period much less than the wavelength are investigated. Strong nonlocal effects are found in a broad frequency range for TM polarization, where the effective permittivity tensor exhibits the Lorentzian resonance. The resonance frequency varies with the wave vector and coincides well with the polaritonic mode. Nonlocal features are manifest on the emergence of additional wave and the occurrence of negative refraction. By examining the characters of the eigenmode, the nonlocal optical properties are attributed to the excitation of plasmons on the graphene surfaces.

  6. A compact, sub-Hertz linewidth 729 nm laser for a miniaturized 40Ca+ optical clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Junjuan; Cao, Jian; Cui, Kaifeng; Wang, Shaomao; Zhang, Ping; Yuan, Jinbo; Chao, Sijia; Shu, Hualin; Huang, Xueren

    2017-01-01

    We present a compact, sub-Hertz 729 nm laser for a miniaturized 40Ca+ single-ion optical clock. An external cavity diode laser is frequency-stabilized to a horizontally mounted, vibration-insensitive and high-fineness ultra-low-expansion (ULE) cavity with Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) method. The laser linewidth is measured to be about 0.9 Hz from a heterodyne beat note with the other 729 nm laser. After removing the linear drift of about 0.1 Hz/s, the fractional frequency instability is less than 2 × 10 - 15 (1 100 s). This compact, ultra-stable laser system with a volume about 0.1 m3 excluding the electronics has been employed into a miniaturized 40Ca+ single-ion optical clock. The clock frequency instability has been measured to be 3.4×10-14/τ1/2 (1 10,000 s) with a 729 nm laser probe pulse time of 20 ms.

  7. Half baudrate electrical clock based demultiplexing scheme for OTDM-DQPSK signal using SOA and optical filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Wang; Deming Kong; Yan Li; Junyi Zhang; Jian Wu; Jintong Lin

    2012-01-01

    A demultiplexing scheme based on semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and optical filter for optical time division multiplexing differential quadrature phase shift keying (OTDM-DQPSK) system is proposed and investigated experimentally.With only a common half baudrate electrical clock modulated 33% duty cycle return-to-zero (RZ-33) optical clock signal as pump,this scheme is cost-effective,energy-efficient,and integration-potential.A proof-of-concept experiment is carried out for the demultiplexing of a 2×40GBd OTDM-DQPSK signal.Error-free performance is demonstrated,and the average power penalty for both channels is about 3 dB.

  8. Nonlinear coherent dynamics of an atom in an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Argonov, V Y

    2006-01-01

    We consider a simple model of lossless interaction between a two-level single atom and a standing-wave single-mode laser field which creates a one-dimensional optical lattice. Internal dynamics of the atom is governed by the laser field which is treated to be classical with a large number of photons. Center-of-mass classical atomic motion is governed by the optical potential and the internal atomic degree of freedom. The resulting Hamilton-Schr\\"odinger equations of motion are a five-dimensional nonlinear dynamical system with two integrals of motion. The main focus of the paper is chaotic atomic motion that may be quantified strictly by positive values of the maximal Lyapunov exponent. It is shown that atom, depending on the value of its total energy, can either oscillate chaotically in a well of the optical potential or fly ballistically with weak chaotic oscillations of its momentum or wander in the optical lattice changing the direction of motion in a chaotic way. In the regime of chaotic wandering atomic...

  9. Zeptonewton force sensing with nanospheres in an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjit, Gambhir; Casey, Kirsten; Geraci, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    Optically trapped nanospheres in high-vaccum experience little friction and hence are promising for ultra-sensitive force detection. Here we demonstrate measurement times exceeding $10^5$ seconds and zeptonewton force sensitivity with laser-cooled silica nanospheres trapped in an optical lattice. The sensitivity achieved exceeds that of conventional room-temperature solid-state force sensors, and enables a variety of applications including electric field sensing, inertial sensing, and gravimetry. The optical potential allows the particle to be confined in a number of possible trapping sites, with precise localization at the anti-nodes of the optical standing wave. By studying the motion of a particle which has been moved to an adjacent trapping site, the known spacing of the lattice anti-nodes can be used to calibrate the displacement spectrum of the particle. Finally, we study the dependence of the trap stability and lifetime on the laser intensity and gas pressure, and examine the heating rate of the partic...

  10. Deviations from Boltzmann-Gibbs Statistics in Confined Optical Lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechant, Andreas; Kessler, David A; Barkai, Eli

    2015-10-23

    We investigate the semiclassical phase-space probability distribution P(x,p) of cold atoms in a Sisyphus cooling lattice with an additional harmonic confinement. We pose the question of whether this nonequilibrium steady state satisfies the equivalence of energy and probability. This equivalence is the foundation of Boltzmann-Gibbs and generalized thermostatic statistics, and a prerequisite for the description in terms of a temperature. At large energies, P(x,p) depends only on the Hamiltonian H(x,p) and the answer to the question is yes. In distinction to the Boltzmann-Gibbs state, the large-energy tails are power laws P(x,p)∝H(x,p)(-1/D), where D is related to the depth of the optical lattice. At intermediate energies, however, P(x,p) cannot be expressed as a function of the Hamiltonian and the equivalence between energy and probability breaks down. As a consequence the average potential and kinetic energy differ and no well-defined temperature can be assigned. The Boltzmann-Gibbs state is regained only in the limit of deep optical lattices. For strong confinement relative to the damping, we derive an explicit expression for the stationary phase-space distribution.

  11. Intrinsic Localized Modes in Optical Photonic Lattices and Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulides, Demetrios

    Discretizing light behavior requires optical elements that can confine optical energy at distinct sites. One possible scenario in implementing such arrangements is to store energy within low loss high Q-microcavities and then allow photon exchange between such components in time. This scheme requires high-contrast dielectric elements that became available with the advent of photonic crystal technologies. Another possible avenue where such light discretization can be directly observed and studied is that based on evanescently coupled waveguide arrays. As indicated in several studies, discrete systems open up whole new directions in terms of modifying light transport properties. One such example is that of discrete solitons. By nature, discrete solitons represent self-trapped wavepackets in nonlinear periodic structures and result from the interplay between lattice diffraction (or dispersion) and material nonlinearity. In optics, this class of self-localized states has been successfully observed in both one- and two-dimensional nonlinear waveguide arrays. In recent years such photonic lattices have been implemented or induced in a variety of material systems, including those with cubic (Kerr), quadratic, photorefractive, and liquid-crystal nonlinearities. In all cases the underlying periodicity or discreteness can lead to new families of optical solitons that have no counterpart whatsoever in continuous systems. Interestingly, these results paved the way for observations in other physical systems obeying similar evolution equations like Bose-Einstein condensates. New developments in laser writing ultrashort femtosecond laser pulses, now allow the realization of all-optical switching networks in fully 3D environments using nonlinear discrete optics. Using this approach all-optical routing can be achieved using blocking operations. The spatio-temporal evolution of optical pulses in both normally and anomalously dispersive arrays can lead to novel schemes for mode

  12. Optical trapping via guided resonance modes in a Slot-Suzuki-phase photonic crystal lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Martínez, Luis Javier; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2012-03-12

    A novel photonic crystal lattice is proposed for trapping a two-dimensional array of particles. The lattice is created by introducing a rectangular slot in each unit cell of the Suzuki-Phase lattice to enhance the light confinement of guided resonance modes. Large quality factors on the order of 10⁵ are predicted in the lattice. A significant decrease of the optical power required for optical trapping can be achieved compared to our previous design.

  13. Dynamical phase diagram of Gaussian wave packets in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, H.; Neff, T.; Fleischmann, R.

    2016-03-01

    We study the dynamics of self-trapping in Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) loaded in deep optical lattices with Gaussian initial conditions, when the dynamics is well described by the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation (DNLSE). In the literature an approximate dynamical phase diagram based on a variational approach was introduced to distinguish different dynamical regimes: diffusion, self-trapping, and moving breathers. However, we find that the actual DNLSE dynamics shows a completely different diagram than the variational prediction. We calculate numerically a detailed dynamical phase diagram accurately describing the different dynamical regimes. It exhibits a complex structure that can readily be tested in current experiments in BECs in optical lattices and in optical waveguide arrays. Moreover, we derive an explicit theoretical estimate for the transition to self-trapping in excellent agreement with our numerical findings, which may be a valuable guide as well for future studies on a quantum dynamical phase diagram based on the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian.

  14. Hofstadter butterflies in nonlinear Harper lattices, and their optical realizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manela, Ofer; Segev, Mordechai [Department of Physics and Solid State Institute, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Christodoulides, Demetrios N [College of Optics/CREOL, University of Central Florida, FL 32816-2700 (United States); Kip, Detlef, E-mail: msegev@tx.technion.ac.i [Department of Electrical Engineering, Helmut Schmidt University, 22043 Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    The ubiquitous Hofstadter butterfly describes a variety of systems characterized by incommensurable periodicities, ranging from Bloch electrons in magnetic fields and the quantum Hall effect to cold atoms in optical lattices and more. Here, we introduce nonlinearity into the underlying (Harper) model and study the nonlinear spectra and the corresponding extended eigenmodes of nonlinear quasiperiodic systems. We show that the spectra of the nonlinear eigenmodes form deformed versions of the Hofstadter butterfly and demonstrate that the modes can be classified into two families: nonlinear modes that are a 'continuation' of the linear modes of the system and new nonlinear modes that have no counterparts in the linear spectrum. Finally, we propose an optical realization of the linear and nonlinear Harper models in transversely modulated waveguide arrays, where these Hofstadter butterflies can be observed. This work is relevant to a variety of other branches of physics beyond optics, such as disorder-induced localization in ultracold bosonic gases, localization transition processes in disordered lattices, and more.

  15. Clock-distribution with instantaneous synchronization for 160 Gbit/s optical time-domain multiplexed systems packet transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Agis, Fausto; Calabretta, Nicola; Albores-Mejia, Aaron; Dorren, Harm J S

    2010-10-01

    We demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, a clock-distribution method for ultra-high-speed optical time-domain multiplexed systems data packets that provides instantaneous synchronization, fast locking/unlocking times, and a highly stable bursty clock, enabling error-free operation of 160 to 10 Gbit/s time demultiplexing with a power penalty of 1.5 dB after 51 km transmission in standard single-mode fiber (ITU G.652).

  16. Cold atoms in optical lattices a Hamiltonian ratchet

    CERN Document Server

    Monteiro, T S; Hutchings, N A C; Isherwood, M R

    2002-01-01

    We investigate a new type of quantum ratchet which may be realised by cold atoms in a double-well optical lattice which is pulsed with unequal periods. The classical dynamics is chaotic and we find the classical diffusion rate $D$ is asymmetric in momentum up to a finite time $t_r$. The quantum behaviour produces a corresponding asymmetry in the momentum distribution which is 'frozen-in' by Dynamical Localisation provided the break-time $t^* > t_r$. We conclude that the cold atom ratchets require $Db/ \\hbar \\sim 1$ where b is a small deviation from period-one pulses.

  17. Wilson fermions and axion electrodynamics in optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, A; Mazza, L; Rizzi, M; Goldman, N; Lewenstein, M; Martin-Delgado, M A

    2010-11-05

    We show that ultracold Fermi gases in optical superlattices can be used as quantum simulators of relativistic lattice fermions in 3+1 dimensions. By exploiting laser-assisted tunneling, we find an analogue of the so-called naive Dirac fermions, and thus provide a realization of the fermion doubling problem. Moreover, we show how to implement Wilson fermions, and discuss how their mass can be inverted by tuning the laser intensities. In this regime, our atomic gas corresponds to a phase of matter where Maxwell electrodynamics is replaced by axion electrodynamics: a 3D topological insulator.

  18. Energy spectrum of fermionized bosonic atoms in optical lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiurong Han; Haichao Zhang; Yuzhu Wang

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the energy spectrum of fermionized bosonic atoms, which behave very much like spinless noninteracting fermions, in optical lattices by means of the perturbation expansion and the retarded Green's function method. The results show that the energy spectrum splits into two energy bands with single-occupation; the fermionized bosonic atom occupies nonvanishing energy state and left hole has a vanishing energy at any given momentum, and the system is in Mott-insulating state with a energy gap.Using the characteristic of energy spectra we obtained a criterion with which one can judge whether the Tonks-Girardeau (TG) gas is achieved or not.

  19. Effective theory of interacting fermions in shaken square optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keleş, Ahmet; Zhao, Erhai; Liu, W. Vincent

    2017-06-01

    We develop a theory of weakly interacting fermionic atoms in shaken optical lattices based on the orbital mixing in the presence of time-periodic modulations. Specifically, we focus on fermionic atoms in a circularly shaken square lattice with near-resonance frequencies, i.e., tuned close to the energy separation between the s band and the p bands. First, we derive a time-independent four-band effective Hamiltonian in the noninteracting limit. Diagonalization of the effective Hamiltonian yields a quasienergy spectrum consistent with the full numerical Floquet solution that includes all higher bands. In particular, we find that the hybridized s band develops multiple minima and therefore nontrivial Fermi surfaces at different fillings. We then obtain the effective interactions for atoms in the hybridized s band analytically and show that they acquire momentum dependence on the Fermi surface even though the bare interaction is contactlike. We apply the theory to find the phase diagram of fermions with weak attractive interactions and demonstrate that the pairing symmetry is s +d wave. Our theory is valid for a range of shaking frequencies near resonance, and it can be generalized to other phases of interacting fermions in shaken lattices.

  20. Bose-Einstein condensation in a frustrated triangular optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Peter; Huang, Wen-Min; Mathey, L.

    2016-12-01

    The recent experimental condensation of ultracold atoms in a triangular optical lattice with a negative effective tunneling parameter paves the way for the study of frustrated systems in a controlled environment. Here, we explore the critical behavior of the chiral phase transition in such a frustrated lattice in three dimensions. We represent the low-energy action of the lattice system as a two-component Bose gas corresponding to the two minima of the dispersion. The contact repulsion between the bosons separates into intra- and intercomponent interactions, referred to as V0 and V12, respectively. We first employ a Huang-Yang-Luttinger approximation of the free energy. For V12/V0=2 , which corresponds to the bare interaction, this approach suggests a first-order phase transition, at which both the U (1 ) symmetry of condensation and the Z2 symmetry of the emergent chiral order are broken simultaneously. Furthermore, we perform a renormalization-group calculation at one-loop order. We demonstrate that the coupling regime 0 1 we show that V0 flows to a negative value, while V12 increases and remains positive. This results in a breakdown of the effective quartic-field theory due to a cubic anisotropy and, again, suggests a discontinuous phase transition.

  1. Radio frequency phototube and optical clock: High resolution, high rate and highly stable single photon timing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaryan, Amur

    2011-10-01

    A new timing technique for single photons based on the radio frequency phototube and optical clock or femtosecond optical frequency comb generator is proposed. The technique has a 20 ps resolution for single photons, is capable of operating with MHz frequencies and achieving 10 fs instability level.

  2. Amplified feedback DFB laser for 40 Gb/s all-optical clock recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng; Sun, Yu; Zhao, Lingjuan; Pan, Jiaoqing; Qiu, Jifang; Liang, Song; Wang, Wei; Lou, Caiyun

    2011-12-01

    A monolithic integrated amplified feedback semiconductor laser (AFL) was fabricated based on quantum well intermixing (QWI) technique. The AFL works as a self-pulsation laser. It consists of a gain-coupled multiple quantum well distribute feedback (DFB) laser diode (LD) section, a passive phase section and an amplified feedback section. The free-running repetition frequency of the AFL can be tuned from 32 GHz to 51 GHz via controlling the feedback strength. All-optical 40 Gb/s clock recovery was experimentally demonstrated using the AFL with a low timing jitter.

  3. Optical Clock and Drag-Free Requirements for a Shapiro Time-Delay Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Ashby, Neil

    2011-01-01

    In the next decade or two, extremely accurate tests of general relativity under extreme conditions are expected from gravitational wave observations of binary black hole mergers with a wide range of mass ratios. In addition, major improvements are planned in both strong and weak equivalence principle tests; clock measurements based on the ACES program on the ISS; more accurate light-bending measurements; and other new types of tests. However, whether these tests are all consistent with general relativity or not, it still appears desirable to proceed with a much improved measurement of the Shapiro time delay. A suggested approach is based on using a high-quality optical clock in a drag-free spacecraft near the sun-earth L1 point and a smaller drag-free transponder spacecraft in a two-year period solar orbit. Laser phase travel-time measurements would be made between the two spacecraft over a period of 10 or 20 days around the time when the line of sight passes through the Sun. The requirements on the optical c...

  4. Experiments on Linear and Nonlinear Localization of Optical Vortices in Optically Induced Photonic Lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daohong Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We provide a brief overview on our recent experimental work on linear and nonlinear localization of singly charged vortices (SCVs and doubly charged vortices (DCVs in two-dimensional optically induced photonic lattices. In the nonlinear case, vortex propagation at the lattice surface as well as inside the uniform square-shaped photonic lattices is considered. It is shown that, apart from the fundamental (semi-infinite gap discrete vortex solitons demonstrated earlier, the SCVs can self-trap into stable gap vortex solitons under the normal four-site excitation with a self-defocusing nonlinearity, while the DCVs can be stable only under an eight-site excitation inside the photonic lattices. Moreover, the SCVs can also turn into stable surface vortex solitons under the four-site excitation at the surface of a semi-infinite photonics lattice with a self-focusing nonlinearity. In the linear case, bandgap guidance of both SCVs and DCVs in photonic lattices with a tunable negative defect is investigated. It is found that the SCVs can be guided at the negative defect as linear vortex defect modes, while the DCVs tend to turn into quadrupole-like defect modes provided that the defect strength is not too strong.

  5. Phases of d-orbital bosons in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Fernanda; Matrikainen, Jani-Petri; Larson, Jonas

    2015-05-01

    We explore the properties of bosonic atoms loaded into the d bands of an isotropic square optical lattice. Following the recent experimental success reported in Zhai et al (2013 Phys. Rev. A 87 063638), in which populating d bands with a 99 % fidelity was demonstrated, we present a theoretical study of the possible phases that can appear in this system. Using the Gutzwiller ansatz for the three d band orbitals we map the boundaries of the Mott insulating phases. For not too large occupation, two of the orbitals are predominantly occupied, while the third, of a slightly higher energy, remains almost unpopulated. In this regime, in the superfluid phase we find the formation of a vortex lattice, where the vortices come in vortex/anti-vortex pairs with two pairs locked to every site. Due to the orientation of the vortices time-reversal symmetry is spontaneously broken. This state also breaks a discrete {{{Z}}2}-symmetry. We further derive an effective spin-1/2 model that describe the relevant physics of the lowest Mott-phase with unit filling. We argue that the corresponding two dimensional phase diagram should be rich with several different phases. We also explain how to generate anti-symmetric spin interactions that can give rise to novel effects like spin canting.

  6. Optics Design and Lattice Optimisation for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Holzer, B J; Fartoukh, S; Chancé, A; Dalena, B; Payet, J; Bogomyagkov, A; Appleby, R B; Kelly, S; Thomas, M B; Thompson, L; Korostelev, M; Hock, K M; Wolski, A; Milardi, C; Faus-Golfe, A; Resta Lopez, J

    2013-01-01

    The luminosity upgrade project of the LHC collider at CERN is based on a strong focusing scheme to reach lowest values of the β function at the collision points. Depending on the magnet technology (Nb3Sn or Nb-Ti) that will be available, a number of beam optics has been developed to define the specifications for the new superconducting magnets. In the context of the optics matching new issues have been addressed and new concepts have been used that play a major role in dealing with the extremely high beta functions. Quadrupole strength flexibility and chromatic corrections have been studied, the influence of the quadrupole fringe fields has been taken into account and the lattice in the matching section had been optimised including the needs of the crab cavities that will be installed. The transition between injection and low β optics has to guarantee smooth gradient changes over a wide range of β* values and the tolerances on misalignments and power converter ripple has been re-evaluated. Finally the succ...

  7. Tunable multiple layered Dirac cones in optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Z; Celi, A; Lu, W; Öhberg, P; Lewenstein, M

    2011-12-16

    We show that multiple layered Dirac cones can emerge in the band structure of properly addressed multicomponent cold fermionic gases in optical lattices. The layered Dirac cones contain multiple copies of massless spin-1/2 Dirac fermions at the same location in momentum space, whose different Fermi velocity can be tuned at will. On-site microwave Raman transitions can further be used to mix the different Dirac species, resulting in either splitting of or preserving the Dirac point (depending on the symmetry of the on-site term). The tunability of the multiple layered Dirac cones allows us to simulate a number of fundamental phenomena in modern physics, such as neutrino oscillations and exotic particle dispersions with E~p(N) for arbitrary integer N.

  8. Dynamics of pattern-loaded fermions in bichromatic optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichl, Matthew D.; Mueller, Erich J.

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by experiments in Munich [M. Schreiber et al., Science 349, 842 (2015)., 10.1126/science.aaa7432], we study the dynamics of interacting fermions initially prepared in charge density wave states in one-dimensional bichromatic optical lattices. The experiment sees a marked lack of thermalization, which has been taken as evidence for an interacting generalization of Anderson localization, dubbed "many-body localization." We model the experiments using an interacting Aubry-Andre model and develop a computationally efficient low-density cluster expansion to calculate the even-odd density imbalance as a function of interaction strength and potential strength. Our calculations agree with the experimental results and shed light on the phenomena. We also explore a two-dimensional generalization. The cluster expansion method we develop should have broad applicability to similar problems in nonequilibrium quantum physics.

  9. Quantum simulations with ultracold atoms in optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Christian; Bloch, Immanuel

    2017-09-08

    Quantum simulation, a subdiscipline of quantum computation, can provide valuable insight into difficult quantum problems in physics or chemistry. Ultracold atoms in optical lattices represent an ideal platform for simulations of quantum many-body problems. Within this setting, quantum gas microscopes enable single atom observation and manipulation in large samples. Ultracold atom-based quantum simulators have already been used to probe quantum magnetism, to realize and detect topological quantum matter, and to study quantum systems with controlled long-range interactions. Experiments on many-body systems out of equilibrium have also provided results in regimes unavailable to the most advanced supercomputers. We review recent experimental progress in this field and comment on future directions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  10. Quantum Computation with Neutral Atoms at Addressable Optical Lattice Sites and Atoms in Confined Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-13

    Félix Riou, Aaron Reinhard, Laura A. Zundel, David S. Weiss. Spontaneous-emission- induced transition rates between atomic states in optical lattices...complementary technique to measure the hyperfine states at each lattice site. We developed a technique to cool atoms so that they are mostly in the vibrational ...28-Feb-2013 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Quantum Computation with Neutral Atoms at Addressable Optical Lattice

  11. Orbit, optics and chromaticity correction for PS2 negative momentum compaction lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papaphilippou,Y.; Barranco, J.; Bartmann, W.; Benedikt, M.; Carli, C.; de Maria, R.; Peggs, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2009-05-04

    The effect of magnet misalignments in the beam orbit and linear optics functions are reviewed and correction schemes are applied to the negative momentum compaction lattice of PS2. Chromaticity correction schemes are also proposed and tested with respect to off-momentum optics properties. The impact of the correction schemes in the dynamic aperture of the lattice is finally evaluated.

  12. Properties of Controllable Soliton Switching in Optical Lattices with Longitudinal Exponential-Asymptotic Modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jun; XUE Chun-Hua; QI Yi-Hong; LOU Sen-Yue

    2008-01-01

    The properties of controllable soliton switching in Kerr-type optical lattices with different modulation are investigated theoretically and simulated numerically. The results show that the optical lattices can be available for all-optical soliton switching through utilization for length-scale competition effects. And through longitudinal exponential-asymptotic modulation for the linear refractive index, the properties of soliton switching in the optical lattices can be improved. The number of output channels of soliton switching can be controlled by the parameters such as incident angle, asymptotic rate of longitudinal modulation, guiding parameter and form factor.

  13. Critical temperature and condensed fraction of Bose-Einstein condensation in optical lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Critical temperature and condensate fraction of Bose-Einstein condensation in the optical lattice are studied. The results show that the critical temperature in optical lattices can be characterized with an equivalent critical temperature in a single lattice, which provide a fast evaluation of critical temperature and condensate fraction of Bose-Einstein condensation confined with pure optical trap. Critical temperature can be estimated with an equivalent critical temperature. It is predicted that critical temperature is proportional to q in q number lattices for superfluid state and should be equal to that in a single lattic for Mott insulate state. Required potential depth or Rabi frequency and maximum atom number in the lattices both for superfluid state and Mott state are presented based on views of thermal mechanical statistics.

  14. Compact Yb$^+$ optical atomic clock project: design principle and current status

    CERN Document Server

    Lacroûte, Clément; Bourgeois, Pierre-Yves; Millo, Jacques; Saleh, Khaldoun; Bigler, Emmanuel; Boudot, Rodolphe; Giordano, Vincent; Kersalé, Yann

    2016-01-01

    We present the design of a compact optical clock based on the $^2S_{1/2} \\rightarrow ^2D_{3/2}$ 435.5 nm transition in $^{171}$Yb$^+$. The ion trap will be based on a micro-fabricated circuit, with surface electrodes generating a trapping potential to localize a single Yb ion a few hundred $\\mu$m from the electrodes. We present our trap design as well as simulations of the resulting trapping pseudo-potential. We also present a compact, multi-channel wavelength meter that will permit the frequency stabilization of the cooling, repumping and clear-out lasers at 369.5 nm, 935.2 nm and 638.6 nm needed to cool the ion. We use this wavelength meter to characterize and stabilize the frequency of extended cavity diode lasers at 369.5 nm and 638.6 nm.

  15. Demonstration of flat-band image transmission in optically induced Lieb photonic lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shiqiang; Hu, Yi; Song, Daohong; Zong, Yuanyuan; Tang, Liqin; Chen, Zhigang

    2016-04-01

    We present a simple, yet effective, approach for optical induction of Lieb photonic lattices, which typically rely on the femtosecond laser writing technique. Such lattices are established by judiciously overlapping two sublattices (an "egg-crate" lattice and a square lattice) with different periodicities through a self-defocusing photorefractive medium. Furthermore, taking advantage of the superposition of localized flat-band states inherent in the Lieb lattices, we demonstrate distortion-free image transmission in such two-dimensional perovskite-like photonic structures. Our experimental observations find good agreement with numerical simulations.

  16. `Flat Phase' Loading of a Bose-Einstein Condensate into an Optical Lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Sklarz, S E; Tannor, D J; Band, Y B; Williams, C J; Sklarz, Shlomo E.; Friedler, Inbal; Tannor, David J.; Band, Yehuda B.; Williams, Carl J.

    2002-01-01

    It has been proposed that the adiabatic loading of a Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) into an optical lattice via the Mott-insulator transition can be used to initialize a quantum computer [D.~Jaksch, {\\it et al.}, Phys. Rev. Lett.~{\\bf 81}, 3108 (1998)]. The loading of a BEC into the lattice without causing band excitation is readily achievable; however, unless one switches on an optical lattice very slowly, the optical lattice causes a phase to accumulate across the condensate. We show analytically and numerically that a cancellation of this effect is possible by adjusting the harmonic trap force-constant of the magnetic trap appropriately, thereby facilitating quick loading of an optical lattice for quantum computing purposes. A simple analytical theory is developed for a non-stationary BEC in a harmonic trap.

  17. Frequency comparison of ${}^{171}$Yb${}^+$ ion optical clocks at PTB and NPL via GPS PPP

    CERN Document Server

    Leute, J; Lipphardt, B; Tamm, Chr; Nisbet-Jones, P B R; King, S A; Godun, R M; Jones, J M; Margolis, H S; Whibberley, P B; Wallin, A; Merimaa, M; Gill, P; Peik, E

    2015-01-01

    We used Precise Point Positioning, a well-established GPS carrier-phase frequency transfer method to perform a direct remote comparison of two optical frequency standards based on single laser-cooled $^{171}$Yb$^+$ ions operated at NPL, UK and PTB, Germany. At both institutes an active hydrogen maser serves as a flywheel oscillator; it is connected to a GPS receiver as an external frequency reference and compared simultaneously to a realization of the unperturbed frequency of the ${{}^2S_{1/2}(F=0)-{}^2D_{3/2}(F=2)}$ electric quadrupole transition in ${}^{171}$Yb${}^+$ via an optical femtosecond frequency comb. To profit from long coherent GPS link measurements we extrapolate over the various data gaps in the optical clock to maser comparisons which introduces maser noise to the frequency comparison but improves the uncertainty from the GPS link. We determined the total statistical uncertainty consisting of the GPS link uncertainty and the extrapolation uncertainties for several extrapolation schemes. Using t...

  18. Time Transfer Through Optical Fibers (TTTOF): First Results of Calibrated Clock Comparisons

    CERN Document Server

    Piester, D; Rost, M; Bauch, A

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a means for accurate time transfer using optical fibers and aim at the synchronization of clocks located at different places on an institute campus with an overall uncertainty of 100 ps or better. Such an installation shall be used as a part of the infrastructure connecting the ground station setups during forthcoming T2L2 and ACES experiments and the local installations at the PTB time laboratory. Our target transmission length is less than 1 km. To transfer time, a code-domain-multiple-access (CDMA) signal is used for modulation of a laser. Optical signals are exchanged in the two-way mode to cancel long-term fiber length variation. This is similar to the well known two-way satellite time and frequency transfer (TWSTFT) scheme. We discuss procedures for a proper calibration of such time transfer through optical fibers links and show first promising results of an experiment using a test loop on the PTB campus with a length of 2 km.

  19. Optical Bloch oscillations and Zener tunneling of Airy beams in ionic-type photonic lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fajun; Zhu, Weiren; Shang, Wuyun; Wang, Meirong; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Sheng; Premaratne, Malin; Zhao, Jianlin

    2016-08-01

    We report on the existence of optical Bloch oscillations (OBOs) and Zener tunneling (ZT) of Airy beams in ionic-type photonic lattices with a refractive index ramp. Different from their counterparts in uniform lattices, Airy beams undergoing OBOs show an alternatively switched concave and convex trajectory as well as a periodical revival of input beam profiles. Moreover, the ionic-type photonic lattice established in photorefractive crystal exhibits a reconfigurable lattice structure, which provides a flexible way to tune the amplitude and period of the OBOs. Remarkably, it is demonstrated that the band gap of the lattice can be readily controlled by rotating the lattice inducing beam, which forces the ZT rate to follow two significant different decay curves amidst decreasing index gradient. Our results open up new possibilities for all-optical switching, routing and manipulation of Airy beams.

  20. Atomic Bloch-Zener oscillations and Stückelberg interferometry in optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Sebastian; Salger, Tobias; Grossert, Christopher; Weitz, Martin

    2010-11-19

    We report on experiments investigating quantum transport and band interferometry of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice with a two-band miniband structure, realized with a Fourier-synthesized optical lattice potential. Bloch-Zener oscillations, the coherent superposition of Bloch oscillations and Landau-Zener tunneling between the two bands, are observed. When the relative phase between paths in different bands is varied, an interference signal is observed, demonstrating the coherence of the dynamics in the miniband system. Measured fringe patterns of this Stückelberg interferometer allow us to interferometrically map out the band structure of the optical lattice over the full Brillouin zone.

  1. Instabilities of bosonic spin currents in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui, Hoi-Yin; Barnett, Ryan; Sensarma, Rajdeep; Das Sarma, S. [Condensed Matter Theory Center and Joint Quantum Institute, Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    We analyze the dynamical and energetic instabilities of spin currents in a system of two-component bosons in an optical lattice, with a particular focus on the Neel state. We consider both the weakly interacting superfluid and the strongly interacting Mott insulating limits as well as the regime near the superfluid-insulator transition and establish the criteria for the onset of these instabilities. We use Bogoliubov theory to treat the weakly interacting superfluid regime. Near the Mott transition, we calculate the stability phase diagram within a variational Gutzwiller wave-function approach. In the deep Mott limit we discuss the emergence of the Heisenberg model and calculate the stability diagram within this model. Though the Bogoliubov theory and the Heisenberg model (appropriate for the deep superfluid and the deep Mott-insulating phase, respectively) predict no dynamical instabilities, we find, interestingly, that between these two limiting cases there is a regime of dynamical instability. This result is relevant for the ongoing experimental efforts to realize a stable Neel-ordered state in multicomponent ultracold bosons.

  2. Subharmonic Shapiro steps of sliding colloidal monolayers in optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paronuzzi Ticco, Stella V; Fornasier, Gabriele; Manini, Nicola; Santoro, Giuseppe E; Tosatti, Erio; Vanossi, Andrea

    2016-04-06

    We investigate theoretically the possibility to observe dynamical mode locking, in the form of Shapiro steps, when a time-periodic potential or force modulation is applied to a two-dimensional (2D) lattice of colloidal particles that are dragged by an external force over an optically generated periodic potential. Here we present realistic molecular dynamics simulations of a 2D experimental setup, where the colloid sliding is realized through the motion of soliton lines between locally commensurate patches or domains, and where the Shapiro steps are predicted and analyzed. Interestingly, the jump between one step and the next is seen to correspond to a fixed number of colloids jumping from one patch to the next, across the soliton line boundary, during each ac cycle. In addition to ordinary 'integer' steps, coinciding here with the synchronous rigid advancement of the whole colloid monolayer, our main prediction is the existence of additional smaller 'subharmonic' steps due to localized solitonic regions of incommensurate layers executing synchronized slips, while the majority of the colloids remains pinned to a potential minimum. The current availability and wide parameter tunability of colloid monolayers makes these predictions potentially easy to access in an experimentally rich 2D geometrical configuration.

  3. Hamiltonian chaos with a cold atom in an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Prants, S V

    2012-01-01

    We consider a basic model of the lossless interaction between a moving two-level atom and a standing-wave single-mode laser field. Classical treatment of the translational atomic motion provides the semiclassical Hamilton-Schrodinger equations which are a 5D nonlinear dynamical system with two integrals of motion. The atomic dynamics can be regular or chaotic in dependence on values of the control parameters, the atom-field detuning and recoil frequency. We develop a semiclassical theory of the chaotic atomic transport in terms of a random walk of the atomic electric dipole moment $u$. Based on a jump-like behavior of this variable for atoms crossing nodes of the standing wave, we construct a stochastic map that specifies the center-of-mass motion. We find the relations between the detuning, recoil frequency and the atomic energy, under which atoms may move in a optical lattice in a chaotic way. We obtain the analytical conditions under which deterministic atomic transport has fractal properties and explain a...

  4. Beam evolutions of solitons in strongly nonlocal media with fading optical lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai Zhi-Ping; Lu Shi-Zhuan; You Kai-Ming

    2013-01-01

    We address the impact of imprinted fading optical lattices on the beam evolution of solitons in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media.The results show that the width of the soliton experiences a change with the increasing propagation distance,the critical power for the soliton varies with the lattice fading away,and the soliton breathing is affected by the initial lattice depth and the nonlocality degree.

  5. Bose-Einstein Condensates in Optical Lattices with Higher-Order Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张爱霞; 薛具奎

    2012-01-01

    The higher-order interactions of Bose-Einstein condensate in multi-dimensional optical lattices are discussed both analytically and numerically.It is demonstrated that the effects of the higher-order atomic interactions on the sound speed and the stabilities of Bloch waves strongly depend on the lattice strength.In the presence of higher-order effects,tighter and high-dimensional lattices are confirmed to be two positive factors for maintaining the system's energetic stability,and the dynamical instability of Bloch waves can take place simultaneously with the energetic instability.In addition,we find that the higher-order interactions exhibit a long-range behavior and the long-lived coherent Bloch oscillations in a tilted optical lattice exist.Our results provide an effective way to probe the higher-order interactions in optical lattices.

  6. Ra{sup +} ion trapping - atomic parity violation measurement and an optical clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Amita; Dijck, Elwin A.; Nunez Portela, Mayerlin; Valappol, Nivedya; Boell, Oliver; Jungmann, Klaus; Onderwater, Cornelis G. G.; Schlesser, Sophie; Timmermans, Rob G.E.; Willmann, Lorenz; Wilschut, Hans W. [University of Groningen, FWN, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-07-01

    A single trapped Ra{sup +} ion has an excellent potential for a precision measurement of the Weinberg mixing angle at low momentum transfer and testing thereby the electroweak running. The absolute frequencies of the transition 7s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-7d{sup 2}D{sub 3/2} at wavelength 828 nm have been determined in {sup 212*214}Ra{sup +} to better than 19 MHz with laser spectroscopy on small samples of ions trapped in a linear Paul trap at the online facility TRIμP of KVI. The measurement of the Weinberg angle requires the localization of the ion within a fraction of an optical wavelength. The current experiments are focused on trapping and laser spectroscopy on a single Ba{sup +} as a precursor for Ra{sup +}. Work towards single ion trapping of Ra{sup +}, including the preparation of an offline {sup 223}Ra source is in progress. Most elements of the setup for single Ra+ ion parity measurement are also well suited for realizing a most stable optical clock.

  7. Fast-synchronization and low-timing-jitter self-clocking concept for 160 Gbit/s optical time-division multiplexing transmissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shangjian; Gomez-Agis, Fausto; Liu, Yong; Calabretta, Nicola; Tangdiongga, Eduward; Dorren, Harm J S

    2010-01-01

    We propose a self-clocking method based on in-band clock pilot insertion at the transmission data signal. The method can achieve clock recovery without the need for an ultrafast phase comparator and a phase-locked loop in the receiver. We demonstrate fast synchronization, low timing jitter, and a highly stable recovered clock from a 160 Gbit/s optical time-division multiplexing data signal after a 51 km fiber transmission. The recovered clock shows no patterning effect with a clock dynamic range of 10 dB for error-free operation of 160 to 40 Gbit/s demultiplexing with a power penalty of 1.1 dB.

  8. Synthetic-lattice enabled all-optical devices based on orbital angular momentum of light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xi-Wang; Zhou, Xingxiang; Xu, Jin-Shi; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can; Zhang, Chuanwei; Zhou, Zheng-Wei

    2017-07-01

    All-optical photonic devices are crucial for many important photonic technologies and applications, ranging from optical communication to quantum information processing. Conventional design of all-optical devices is based on photon propagation and interference in real space, which may rely on large numbers of optical elements, and the requirement of precise control makes this approach challenging. Here we propose an unconventional route for engineering all-optical devices using the photon's internal degrees of freedom, which form photonic crystals in such synthetic dimensions for photon propagation and interference. We demonstrate this design concept by showing how important optical devices such as quantum memory and optical filters can be realized using synthetic orbital angular momentum (OAM) lattices in degenerate cavities. The design route utilizing synthetic photonic lattices may significantly reduce the requirement for numerous optical elements and their fine tuning in conventional design, paving the way for realistic all-optical photonic devices with novel functionalities.

  9. Suppression of photothermal convection of microparticles in two dimensional nanoplasmonic optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Chung; Yossifon, Gilad; Yang, Ya-Tang

    2016-11-01

    Photothermal convection has been a major obstacle for stable particle trapping in plasmonic optical tweezer at high optical power. Here, we demonstrate a strategy to suppress the plasmonic photothermal convection by using vanishingly small thermal expansion coefficient of water at low temperature. A simple square nanoplasmonic array is illuminated with a loosely Gaussian beam to produce a two dimensional optical lattice for trapping of micro particles. We observe stable particle trapping due to near-field optical gradient forces at elevated optical power at low temperature. In contrast, for the same optical power at room temperature, the particles are convected away from the center of the optical lattice without their accumulation. This technique will greatly increase usable optical power and enhance the trapping capability of plasmonic optical tweezer.

  10. Crosstalk comparison of lattice-form optical interleaver with different coupler structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zhujun; Luo, Fengguang; Luo, Zhixiang

    2009-05-01

    Lattice circuit made from a cascade of couplers and delay-lines is a popular approach for optical interleaver based on planar lightwave circuit (PLC) technology. Different coupler structures can be employed in the lattice circuit, including 1-stage directional couplers (DCs), 4-stage DCs, and 2-stage multimode interference (MMI) couplers. We fabricated optical interleavers with above three coupler structures, respectively. The experimental results prove that the latter two coupler structures can help to reduce crosstalk, which meets the simulation results well.

  11. Detecting quantum coherence of Bose gases in optical lattices by scattering light intensity in cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoji; Xu, Xu; Yin, Lan; Liu, W M; Chen, Xuzong

    2010-07-19

    We propose a new method of detecting quantum coherence of a Bose gas trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice by measuring the light intensity from Raman scattering in cavity. After pump and displacement process, the intensity or amplitude of scattering light is different for different quantum states of a Bose gas, such as superfluid and Mott-Insulator states. This method can also be useful to detect quantum states of atoms with two components in an optical lattice.

  12. 2e-18 total uncertainty in an atomic clock

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholson, T L; Hutson, R B; Marti, G E; Bloom, B J; McNally, R L; Zhang, W; Barrett, M D; Safronova, M S; Strouse, G F; Tew, W L; Ye, J

    2014-01-01

    The pursuit of better atomic clocks has advanced many research areas, providing better quantum state control, new insights in quantum science, tighter limits on fundamental constant variation, and improved tests of relativity. The record for the best stability and accuracy is currently held by optical lattice clocks. This work takes an important step towards realizing the full potential of a many-particle clock with a state-of-the-art stable laser. Here, we achieve fractional stability of 2.2e-16 at 1 s by using seconds-long coherent interrogations of our clock transition in a low-density system not limited by atomic interactions. With this better stability, we perform a new accuracy evaluation of our clock, improving many systematic uncertainties that limited our previous measurements, such as the lattice ac Stark and blackbody radiation (BBR) shifts. For the lattice ac Stark systematic, we identify the lattice laser frequency where the scalar and tensor components of the shift cancel, allowing for state ind...

  13. A clock network for geodesy and fundamental science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisdat, C.; Grosche, G.; Quintin, N.; Shi, C.; Raupach, S. M. F.; Grebing, C.; Nicolodi, D.; Stefani, F.; Al-Masoudi, A.; Dörscher, S.; Häfner, S.; Robyr, J.-L.; Chiodo, N.; Bilicki, S.; Bookjans, E.; Koczwara, A.; Koke, S.; Kuhl, A.; Wiotte, F.; Meynadier, F.; Camisard, E.; Abgrall, M.; Lours, M.; Legero, T.; Schnatz, H.; Sterr, U.; Denker, H.; Chardonnet, C.; Le Coq, Y.; Santarelli, G.; Amy-Klein, A.; Le Targat, R.; Lodewyck, J.; Lopez, O.; Pottie, P.-E.

    2016-08-01

    Leveraging the unrivalled performance of optical clocks as key tools for geo-science, for astronomy and for fundamental physics beyond the standard model requires comparing the frequency of distant optical clocks faithfully. Here, we report on the comparison and agreement of two strontium optical clocks at an uncertainty of 5 × 10-17 via a newly established phase-coherent frequency link connecting Paris and Braunschweig using 1,415 km of telecom fibre. The remote comparison is limited only by the instability and uncertainty of the strontium lattice clocks themselves, with negligible contributions from the optical frequency transfer. A fractional precision of 3 × 10-17 is reached after only 1,000 s averaging time, which is already 10 times better and more than four orders of magnitude faster than any previous long-distance clock comparison. The capability of performing high resolution international clock comparisons paves the way for a redefinition of the unit of time and an all-optical dissemination of the SI-second.

  14. Phase-Stable Free-Space Optical Lattices for Trapped Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiegelow, C T; Kaufmann, H; Ruster, T; Schulz, J; Kaushal, V; Hettrich, M; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Poschinger, U G

    2016-01-22

    We demonstrate control of the absolute phase of an optical lattice with respect to a single trapped ion. The lattice is generated by off-resonant free-space laser beams, and we actively stabilize its phase by measuring its ac-Stark shift on a trapped ion. The ion is localized within the standing wave to better than 2% of its period. The locked lattice allows us to apply displacement operations via resonant optical forces with a controlled direction in phase space. Moreover, we observe the lattice-induced phase evolution of spin superposition states in order to analyze the relevant decoherence mechanisms. Finally, we employ lattice-induced phase shifts for inferring the variation of the ion position over the 157  μm range along the trap axis at accuracies of better than 6 nm.

  15. Phase-stable free-space optical lattices for trapped ions

    CERN Document Server

    Schmiegelow, Christian Tomas; Ruster, Thomas; Schulz, Jonas; Kaushal, Vidyut; Hettrich, Max; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand; Poschinger, Ulrich G

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate control of the absolute phase of an optical lattice with respect to a single trapped ion. The lattice is generated by off-resonant free-space laser beams, we actively stabilize its phase by measuring its ac-Stark shift on a trapped ion. The ion is localized within the standing wave to better than 2\\% of its period. The locked lattice allows us to apply displacement operations via resonant optical forces with a controlled direction in phase space. Moreover, we observe the lattice-induced phase evolution of spin superposition states in order to analyze the relevant decoherence mechanisms. Finally, we employ lattice-induced phase shifts for inferring the variation of the ion position over 157~$\\mu$m range along the trap axis at accuracies of better than 6~nm.

  16. Effective three-body interactions of neutral bosons in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P R [Department of Physics, American University, Washington, DC 20016 (United States); Tiesinga, E; Porto, J V; Williams, C J [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)], E-mail: pjohnson@american.edu

    2009-09-15

    We show that there are effective three- and higher-body interactions generated by the two-body collisions of atoms confined in the lowest vibrational states of a three-dimensional (3D) optical lattice. The collapse and revival dynamics of approximate coherent states loaded into a lattice are a particularly sensitive probe of these higher-body interactions; the visibility of interference fringes depend on both two-, three- and higher-body energy scales, and these produce an initial dephasing that can help explain the surprisingly rapid decay of revivals seen in experiments. If inhomogeneities in the lattice system are sufficiently reduced, longer timescale partial and nearly full revivals will be visible. Using Feshbach resonances or control of the lattice potential it is possible to tune the effective higher-body interactions and simulate effective field theories in optical lattices.

  17. Statics characteristics of two Bose-Einstein condensate dark solitons trapped in an optical lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Yong-shan; GONG Rong-zhou; LI Hong

    2006-01-01

    The statics characteristics of two coupled Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) dark solitons trapped in an optical lattice are investigated with the variational approach.It is found that the interaction between a ‘kink’ and an ‘anti-kink’ with opposite phase gradients is effectively repulsive, and the optical lattice can be controllably used to produce a pair of static BEC dark solitons.Its effect depends on the initial location of the BEC dark solitons, the lattice amplitude and wave number.

  18. Clocking the anisotropic lattice dynamics of multi-walled carbon nanotubes by four-dimensional ultrafast transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Gaolong; Sun, Shuaishuai; Li, Zhongwen; Tian, Huanfang; Yang, Huaixin; Li, Jianqi

    2015-02-01

    Recent advances in the four-dimensional ultrafast transmission electron microscope (4D-UTEM) with combined spatial and temporal resolutions have made it possible to directly visualize structural dynamics of materials at the atomic level. Herein, we report on our development on a 4D-UTEM which can be operated properly on either the photo-emission or the thermionic mode. We demonstrate its ability to obtain sequences of snapshots with high spatial and temporal resolutions in the study of lattice dynamics of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). This investigation provides an atomic level description of remarkable anisotropic lattice dynamics at the picosecond timescales. Moreover, our UTEM measurements clearly reveal that distinguishable lattice relaxations appear in intra-tubular sheets on an ultrafast timescale of a few picoseconds and after then an evident lattice expansion along the radial direction. These anisotropic behaviors in the MWCNTs are considered arising from the variety of chemical bonding, i.e. the weak van der Waals bonding between the tubular planes and the strong covalent sp2-hybridized bonds in the tubular sheets.

  19. Experimental and theoretical comparison of different optical excitation schemes for a compact coherent population trapping Rb vapor clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Z.; Shahriar, M. S.; Tripathi, R.; Pati, G. S.

    2017-08-01

    We have investigated, theoretically as well as experimentally, the relative merits and demerits of using three different optical configurations for a compact coherent population trapping (CPT) vapor clock using 87Rb. These correspond to the following choices of polarizations for the two Raman beams: \\text{lin} \\parallel \\text{lin} , (σ,~σ ), and push-pull optical pumping (PPOP), applied on the D1 manifold. We have used a multi-level atomic model to study the dependence of the CPT spectrum on axial as well as transverse magnetic fields for these three schemes. Corresponding experimental studies have been performed using a laboratory scale CPT clock employing a two cm long, isotopically pure rubidium cell, loaded with a buffer gas. We observed a CPT contrast close to 20% with a sub-kilohertz linewidth by adopting the PPOP scheme. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each of the three optical excitation schemes, and present frequency-stability measurement data for the prototype clock.

  20. Quantum lock-in force sensing using optical clock Doppler velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaniv, Ravid; Ozeri, Roee

    2017-01-01

    Force sensors are at the heart of different technologies such as atomic force microscopy or inertial sensing. These sensors often rely on the measurement of the displacement amplitude of mechanical oscillators under applied force. The best sensitivity is typically achieved when the force is alternating at the mechanical resonance frequency of the oscillator, thus increasing its response by the mechanical quality factor. The measurement of low-frequency forces, that are below resonance, is a more difficult task as the resulting oscillation amplitudes are significantly lower. Here we use a single-trapped 88Sr+ ion as a force sensor. The ion is electrically driven at a frequency much lower than the trap resonance frequency. We measure small amplitude of motion by measuring the periodic Doppler shift of an atomic optical clock transition, enhanced using the quantum lock-in technique. We report frequency force detection sensitivity as low as 2.8 × 10−20 NHz−1/2. PMID:28186103

  1. Microchip-Based Trapped-Atom Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Vuletic, Vladan; Schleier-Smith, Monika H

    2011-01-01

    This is a chapter of a recently published book entitled Atom Chips, edited by Jakob Reichel and Vladan Vuletic. The contents of this chapter include: Basic Principles; Atomic-Fountain versus Trapped-Atom Clocks; Optical-Transition Clocks versus Microwave Clocks; Clocks with Magnetically Trapped Atoms--Fundamental Limits and Experimental Demonstrations; Readout in Trapped-Atom Clocks; and Spin Squeezing.

  2. Lattice design of the integrable optics test accelerator and optical stochastic cooling experiment at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kafka, Gene [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) storage ring at Fermilab will serve as the backbone for a broad spectrum of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments, and as such, must be designed with signi cant exibility in mind, but without compromising cost e ciency. The nonlinear experiments at IOTA will include: achievement of a large nonlinear tune shift/spread without degradation of dynamic aperture; suppression of strong lattice resonances; study of stability of nonlinear systems to perturbations; and studies of di erent variants of nonlinear magnet design. The ring optics control has challenging requirements that reach or exceed the present state of the art. The development of a complete self-consistent design of the IOTA ring optics, meeting the demands of all planned AARD experiments, is presented. Of particular interest are the precise control for nonlinear integrable optics experiments and the transverse-to-longitudinal coupling and phase stability for the Optical Stochastic Cooling Experiment (OSC). Since the beam time-of- ight must be tightly controlled in the OSC section, studies of second order corrections in this section are presented.

  3. Simulating quantum-optical phenomena with cold atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarrete-Benlloch, Carlos [Departament d' Optica, Universitat de Valencia, Dr Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot (Spain); Vega, Ines de [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Porras, Diego [Departamento de Fisica Teorica I, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ignacio Cirac, J, E-mail: carlos.navarrete@uv.es, E-mail: ines.devega@uni-ulm.de, E-mail: diego.porras@fis.ucm.es, E-mail: ignacio.cirac@mpq.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    We propose a scheme involving cold atoms trapped in optical lattices to observe different phenomena traditionally linked to quantum-optical systems. The basic idea consists of connecting the trapped atomic state to a non-trapped state through a Raman scheme. The coupling between these two types of atoms (trapped and free) turns out to be similar to that describing light-matter interaction within the rotating-wave approximation, the role of matter and photons being played by the trapped and free atoms, respectively. We explain in particular how to observe phenomena arising from the collective spontaneous emission of atomic and harmonic oscillator samples, such as superradiance and directional emission. We also show how the same setup can simulate Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonians with extended hopping as well as Ising models with long-range interactions. We believe that this system can be realized with state of the art technology.

  4. Ultracold Molecules in Optical Lattices: Efficient Production and Application to Molecular Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-03

    experiment are creation and precise spectroscopy of ultracold alkaline- earth - metal atom dimers composed of two bosonic isotopes of strontium, 88Sr2. The...alkaline- earth metal dimers we have observed excited states with even J ′ that have ‘f -parity’, opposite to the previously known odd-J ′ ‘e-parity’ states...better understood and optimized the process , and tackled some outstanding major challenges. 1 25 50 75-25 0-75 Fr eq . ( kH z) 25 125 100 50 75 0 Sr 2 n um

  5. Deriving eigenmode excitation spectrum of synthetic photonic lattices by means of optical heterodyning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikan, A. M.; Vatnik, I. D.; Churkin, D. V.; Sukhorukov, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    A method based on optical heterodyning is proposed for measuring relative optical phases of pulses circulating in synthetic photonic lattices (SPL). The knowledge of the phases can be further used for qualitative reconstruction of an eigenmode excitation spectrum in the SPL.

  6. Frequency-doubled telecom fiber laser for a cold atom interferometer using optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theron, Fabien; Bidel, Yannick; Dieu, Emily; Zahzam, Nassim; Cadoret, Malo; Bresson, Alexandre

    2017-06-01

    A compact and robust frequency-doubled telecom laser system at 780 nm is presented for a rubidium cold atom interferometer using optical lattices. Adopting an optical switch at 1.5 μm and a dual-wavelength second harmonic generation system, only one laser amplifier is required for the laser system. Our system delivers a 900 mW laser beam with a detuning of 110 GHz for the optical lattice and a 650 mW laser beam with an adjustable detuning between 0 and -1 GHz for the laser cooling, the detection and the Raman transitions.

  7. Frequency doubled telecom fiber laser for a cold atom interferometer using optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Theron, Fabien; Dieu, Emily; Zahzam, Nassim; Cadoret, Malo; Zahzam, Nassim; Bresson, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    A compact and robust laser system, based on a frequency-doubled telecom laser, providing all the lasers needed for a rubidium cold atom interferometer using optical lattices is presented. Thanks to an optical switch at 1.5 \\mu m and a dual-wavelength second harmonic generation system, only one laser amplifier is needed for all the laser system. Our system delivers at 780 nm a power of 900 mW with a detuning of 110 GHz for the optical lattice and a power of 650 mW with an adjustable detuning between 0 and -1 GHz for the laser cooling, the detection and the Raman transitions.

  8. Effective mass approach for a Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN ZhengLu; STEEL M J; XU AiTing; ZHANG WeiPing

    2009-01-01

    We study the stationary and propagating solutions for a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in a periodic optical potential with an additional confining optical or magnetic potential.Using an effective mass approximation we express the condensate wave function in terms of slowly-varying envelopes modulating the Bloch modes of the optical lattice.In the limit of a weak nonlinearity,we derive a nonlinear Schr(o)dinger equation for propagation of the envelope function which does not contain the rapid oscillation of the lattice.We then consider the ground state solutions in detail in the regime of weak,moderate and strong nonlinear interactions.We describe the form of solution which is appropriate in each regime,and place careful limits on the validity of each type of solution.Finally we extend the study to the propagating dynamics of a spinor atomic BEC in an optical lattice and some interesting phenomena are revealed.

  9. Normal mode splitting and mechanical effects of an optical lattice in a ring cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Klinner, J; Lindholdt, M; Nagorny, B; Hemmerich, Andreas; Klinner, Julian; Lindholdt, Malik; Nagorny, Boris

    2005-01-01

    A novel regime of atom-cavity physics is explored, arising when large atom samples dispersively interact with high-finesse optical cavities. A stable far detuned optical lattice of several million rubidium atoms is formed inside an optical ring resonator by coupling equal amounts of laser light to each propagation direction of a longitudinal cavity mode. An adjacent longitudinal mode, detunedby about 3 GHz, is used to perform probe transmission spectroscopy of the system. The atom-cavity coupling for the lattice beams and the probe is dispersive and dissipation results only from the finite photon-storage time. The observation of two well-resolved normal modes demonstrates the regime of strong cooperative coupling. The details of the normal mode spectrum reveal mechanical effects associated with the retroaction of the probe upon the optical lattice.

  10. Normal Mode Splitting and Mechanical Effects of an Optical Lattice in a Ring Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinner, Julian; Lindholdt, Malik; Nagorny, Boris; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    A novel regime of atom-cavity physics is explored, arising when large atom samples dispersively interact with high-finesse optical cavities. A stable far-detuned optical lattice of several million rubidium atoms is formed inside an optical ring resonator by coupling equal amounts of laser light to each propagation direction of a longitudinal cavity mode. An adjacent longitudinal mode, detuned by about 3 GHz, is used to perform probe transmission spectroscopy of the system. The atom-cavity coupling for the lattice beams and the probe is dispersive and dissipation results only from the finite photon-storage time. The observation of two well-resolved normal modes demonstrates the regime of strong cooperative coupling. The details of the normal mode spectrum reveal mechanical effects associated with the retroaction of the probe upon the optical lattice.

  11. Effects of anisotropy in simple lattice geometries on many-body properties of ultracold fermions in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubeva, Anna; Sotnikov, Andrii; Hofstetter, Walter

    2015-10-01

    We study the effects of anisotropic hopping amplitudes on quantum phases of ultracold fermions in optical lattices described by the repulsive Fermi-Hubbard model. In particular, using dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) we investigate the dimensional crossover between the isotropic square and the isotropic cubic lattice. We analyze the phase transition from the antiferromagnetic to the paramagnetic state and observe a significant change in the critical temperature: depending on the interaction strength, the anisotropy can lead to both a suppression or increase. We also investigate the localization properties of the system, such as the compressibility and double occupancy. Using the local-density approximation in combination with DMFT we conclude that density profiles can be used to detect the mentioned anisotropy-driven transitions.

  12. Correlated hopping of bosonic atoms induced by optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckholt, Maria [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, Garching, D-85478 (Germany); Garcia-Ripoll, Juan Jose [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, c/Serrano 113b, Madrid E-28006 (Spain)], E-mail: maria.eckholt@mpq.mpg.de

    2009-09-15

    In this work, we analyze a particular setup with ultracold atoms trapped in state-dependent lattices. We show that any asymmetry in the contact interaction translates into one of two classes of correlated hopping. After deriving the effective lattice Hamiltonian for the atoms, we obtain analytically and numerically the different phases and quantum phase transitions. We find for weak correlated hopping both Mott insulators and charge density waves, while for stronger correlated hopping the system transitions into a pair superfluid. We demonstrate that this phase exists for a wide range of interaction asymmetries and has interesting correlation properties that differentiate it from an ordinary atomic Bose-Einstein condensate.

  13. Anderson localization in optical lattices with speckle disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sucu, Serpil; Aktas, Saban; Okan, S. Erol [Department of Physics, Trakya University, 22030 Edirne (Turkey); Akdeniz, Zehra [Piri Reis University, 34940 Tuzla-Istanbul (Turkey); Vignolo, Patrizia [Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Institut non Lineaire de Nice, CNRS, 1361 route des Lucioles, F-06560 Valbonne (France)

    2011-12-15

    We study the localization properties of noninteracting waves propagating in a speckle-like potential superposed on a one-dimensional lattice. Using a combined decimation-renormalization procedure, we estimate the localization length for a tight-binding Hamiltonian where site energies are square-sinc-correlated random variables. By decreasing the width of the correlation function, the disorder patterns approach a {delta}-correlated disorder, and the localization length becomes almost energy independent in the strong disorder limit. We show that this regime can be reached for a size of the speckle grains on the order of (lower than) four lattice steps.

  14. Bose-Einstein Condensates in a One-Dimensional Optical Lattice:from Superfluidity to Number-Squeezed States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Rui; YANG Lu; TAN Xin-Zhou; XIONG Hong-Wei; L(U) Bao-Long

    2009-01-01

    We study the phase coherence property of Bose-Einstein condensates confined in a one-dimensional optical lattice formed by a standing-wave laser field.The lattice depth is determined using a method of Kapitza-Dirac scattering between a condensate and a short pulse lattice potential.Condensates are then adiabatically loaded into the optical lattice.The phase coherence property of the confined condensates is reflected by the interference patterns of the expanded atomic cloud released from the optical lattice.For weak lattice,nearly all of the atoms stay in a superfluid state.However,as the lattice depth is increased,the phase coherence of the whole condensate sample is gradually lost,which confirms that the sub-condensates in each lattice well have evolved into number-squeezed states.

  15. Ultracold Nonreactive Molecules in an Optical Lattice: Connecting Chemistry to Many-Body Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doçaj, Andris; Wall, Michael L; Mukherjee, Rick; Hazzard, Kaden R A

    2016-04-01

    We derive effective lattice models for ultracold bosonic or fermionic nonreactive molecules (NRMs) in an optical lattice, analogous to the Hubbard model that describes ultracold atoms in a lattice. In stark contrast to the Hubbard model, which is commonly assumed to accurately describe NRMs, we find that the single on-site interaction parameter U is replaced by a multichannel interaction, whose properties we elucidate. Because this arises from complex short-range collisional physics, it requires no dipolar interactions and thus occurs even in the absence of an electric field or for homonuclear molecules. We find a crossover between coherent few-channel models and fully incoherent single-channel models as the lattice depth is increased. We show that the effective model parameters can be determined in lattice modulation experiments, which, consequently, measure molecular collision dynamics with a vastly sharper energy resolution than experiments in a free-space ultracold gas.

  16. Weyl points in three-dimensional optical lattices: synthetic magnetic monopoles in momentum space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buljan, Hrvoje; Dubcek, Tena; Kennedy, Colin; Lu, Ling; Ketterle, Wolfgang; Soljacic, Marin

    2015-05-01

    We show that Hamiltonians with Weyl points can be realized for ultracold atoms using laser-assisted tunneling in three-dimensional (3D) optical lattices. Weyl points are synthetic magnetic monopoles that exhibit a robust, 3D linear dispersion (e.g., see). They are associated with many interesting topological states of matter, such as Weyl semimetals and chiral Weyl fermions. However, Weyl points have yet to be experimentally observed in any system. We show that this elusive goal is well-within experimental reach with an extension of the techniques recently used to obtain the Harper Hamiltonian. We propose using laser assisted tunneling to create a 3D optical lattice, with specifically designed hopping between lattice sites that breaks inversion symmetry. The design leads to creation of four Weyl points in the Brillouin zone of the lattice, which are verified to be monopoles of the synthetic magnetic field. Supported by the Unity through Knowledge Fund (Grant 5/13).

  17. Optical properties of two-dimensional magnetoelectric point scattering lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Lunnemann; Sersic, Ivana; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2013-01-01

    of split ring resonators and provide a quantitative comparison of measured and calculated transmission spectra at normal incidence as a function of lattice density, showing excellent agreement. We further show angle-dependent transmission calculations for circularly polarized light and compare...

  18. Sub-mm Scale Fiber Guided Deep/Vacuum Ultra-Violet Optical Source for Trapped Mercury Ion Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Lin; Burt, Eric A.; Huang, Shouhua; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the functionality of a mercury capillary lamp with a diameter in the sub-mm range and deep ultraviolet (DUV)/ vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation delivery via an optical fiber integrated with the capillary. DUV spectrum control is observed by varying the fabrication parameters such as buffer gas type and pressure, capillary diameter, electrical resonator design, and temperature. We also show spectroscopic data of the 199Hg+ hyper-fine transition at 40.5GHz when applying the above fiber optical design. We present efforts toward micro-plasma generation in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber with related optical design and theoretical estimations. This new approach towards a more practical DUV optical interface could benefit trapped ion clock developments for future ultra-stable frequency reference and time-keeping applications.

  19. Sub-mm Scale Fiber Guided Deep/Vacuum Ultra-Violet Optical Source for Trapped Mercury Ion Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Lin; Burt, Eric A.; Huang, Shouhua; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the functionality of a mercury capillary lamp with a diameter in the sub-mm range and deep ultraviolet (DUV)/ vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation delivery via an optical fiber integrated with the capillary. DUV spectrum control is observed by varying the fabrication parameters such as buffer gas type and pressure, capillary diameter, electrical resonator design, and temperature. We also show spectroscopic data of the 199Hg+ hyper-fine transition at 40.5GHz when applying the above fiber optical design. We present efforts toward micro-plasma generation in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber with related optical design and theoretical estimations. This new approach towards a more practical DUV optical interface could benefit trapped ion clock developments for future ultra-stable frequency reference and time-keeping applications.

  20. The ac Stark shifts of the terahertz clock transitions of barium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余庚华; 耿鹰鸽; 李隆; 周超; 段丞博; 柴瑞鹏; 杨永明

    2015-01-01

    Wavelength-dependent AC Stark shifts and magic wavelengths of the terahertz clock transitions between the metastable triplet states 6s5d 3D1 and 6s5d 3D2 are investigated with considering the optical lattice trapping of barium atoms with the linearly polarized laser. The trap depths and the slopes of light shift difference with distinct magic wave-lengths of the optical lattices are also discussed in detail. Several potentially suitable working points for the optical lattice trapping laser are recommended and selected from these magic wavelengths.

  1. Realizing the Harper Hamiltonian with laser-assisted tunneling in optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Hirokazu; Siviloglou, Georgios A; Kennedy, Colin J; Burton, William Cody; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    We experimentally implement the Harper Hamiltonian for neutral particles in optical lattices using laser-assisted tunneling and a potential energy gradient provided by gravity or magnetic field gradients. This Hamiltonian describes the motion of charged particles in strong magnetic fields. Laser-assisted tunneling processes are characterized by studying the expansion of the atoms in the lattice. The band structure of this Hamiltonian should display Hofstadter's butterfly. For fermions, this scheme should realize the quantum Hall effect and chiral edge states.

  2. Dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a horizontally vibrating shallow optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh, A.; Jahanbani, Kh.; Kolahchi, M. R.

    2010-02-01

    We consider a solitonic solution of the self-attractive Bose-Einstein condensate in a one-dimensional external potential of a shallow optical lattice with large periodicity when the lattice is horizontally shaken. We investigate the dynamics of the bright soliton through the properties of the fixed points. The special type of bifurcation results in a simple criterion for the stability of the fixed points depending only on the amplitude of the shaking lattice. Because of the similarity of the equations with those of an ac-driven Josephson junction, some results may find applications in other branches of physics.

  3. Measuring the spin Chern number in time-reversal-invariant Hofstadter optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dan-Wei; Cao, Shuai

    2016-10-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to directly measure the spin Chern number of the time-reversal-invariant Hofstadter model in optical lattices. We first show that this model can be realized by using ultracold Fermi atoms with two pseudo-spin states encoded by the internal Zeeman states in a square optical lattice and the corresponding topological Bloch bands are characterized by the spin Chern number. We then propose and numerically demonstrate that this topological invariant can be extracted from the shift of the hybrid Wannier center in the optical lattice. By spin-resolved in situ detection of the atomic densities along the transverse direction combined with time-of-flight measurement along another spatial direction, the spin Chern number in this system is directly measured.

  4. Controllable Photonic Band Gap and Defect Mode in a 1D CO2-Laser Optical Lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qi; YIN Jian-Ping

    2008-01-01

    We Dropose a new method to form a novel controllable photonic crystal with cold atoms and study the photonic band gap(PBG)of an infinite 1D CO2-laser optical lattice of 85Rb atoms under the condition of quantum coherence.A significant gap generated near the resonant frequency of the atom is founded and its dependence on physical parameters is also discussed.Using the eigenquation of defect mode,we calculate the defect mode when a defect is introduced into such a lattice.Our study shows that the proposed new method can be used to optically probe optical lattice in situ and to design some novel and controllable photonic crystals.

  5. Observation of Parity-Time Symmetry in Optically Induced Atomic Lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Sheng, Jiteng; Yang, Liu; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Christodoulides, Demetrios N; He, Bing; Zhang, Yanpeng; Xiao, Min

    2016-01-01

    A wide class of non-Hermitian Hamiltonians can possess entirely real eigenvalues when they have parity-time (PT) symmetric potentials. Due to their unusual properties, this family of non-Hermitian systems has recently attracted considerable attention in diverse areas of physics, especially in coupled gain-loss waveguides and optical lattices. Given that multi-level atoms can be quite efficient in judiciously synthesizing refractive index profiles, schemes based on atomic coherence have been recently proposed to realize optical potentials with PT-symmetric properties. Here, we experimentally demonstrate for the first time PT-symmetric optical lattices in a coherently-prepared four-level N-type atomic system. By appropriately tuning the pertinent atomic parameters, the onset of PT symmetry breaking is observed through measuring an abrupt phase-shift jump. The experimental realization of such readily reconfigurable and effectively controllable PT-symmetric periodic lattice structures sets a new stage for further...

  6. A quantum gas of polar KRb molecules in an optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, Jacob; Miecnikowski, Matthew; Moses, Steven; Fu, Zhengkun; Jin, Deborah; Ye, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold polar molecules provide new opportunities for investigation of strongly correlated many-body spin systems such as many-body localization and quantum magnetism. In an effort to access such phenomena, we load polar KRb molecules into a three-dimensional optical lattice. In this system, we observed many-body spin dynamics between molecules pinned in a deep lattice, even though the filling fraction of the molecules was only 5%. We have recently performed a thorough investigation of the molecule creation process in an optical lattice, and consequently improved our filling fraction to 30% by preparing and overlapping Mott and band insulators of the initial atomic gases. More recently, we switched to a second generation KRb apparatus that will allow application of large, stable electric fields as well as high-resolution addressing and detection of polar molecules in optical lattices. We plan to use these capabilities to study non-equilibrium spin dynamics in an optical lattice with nearly single site resolution. I will present the status and direction of the second generation apparatus.

  7. Low-Entropy States of Neutral Atoms in Polarization-Synthesized Optical Lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robens, Carsten; Zopes, Jonathan; Alt, Wolfgang; Brakhane, Stefan; Meschede, Dieter; Alberti, Andrea

    2017-02-10

    We create low-entropy states of neutral atoms by utilizing a conceptually new optical-lattice technique that relies on a high-precision, high-bandwidth synthesis of light polarization. Polarization-synthesized optical lattices provide two fully controllable optical lattice potentials, each of them confining only atoms in either one of the two long-lived hyperfine states. By employing one lattice as the storage register and the other one as the shift register, we provide a proof of concept using four atoms that selected regions of the periodic potential can be filled with one particle per site. We expect that our results can be scaled up to thousands of atoms by employing an atom-sorting algorithm with logarithmic complexity, which is enabled by polarization-synthesized optical lattices. Vibrational entropy is subsequently removed by sideband cooling methods. Our results pave the way for a bottom-up approach to creating ultralow-entropy states of a many-body system.

  8. Preprocessing-Free All-Optical Clock Recovery from NRZ and NRZ-DPSK Signals Using an FP-SOA Based Active Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Zhang, Xin-Liang; Yu, Yu; Xu, En-Ming

    2011-06-01

    We demonstrate a simple scheme to perform all-optical clock recovery from the input nonreturn-to-zero (NRZ) and nonreturn-to-zero differential phase shifted keying (NRZ-DPSK) data, which are avoided using any preprocessing measures. A multi-quantum-well Fabry-Pérot semiconductor optical amplifier plays the dual role of the data format converter and the clock recovery device. Using this scheme, a stable and low jitter 35.80-GHz optical clock pulse sequence is directly extracted out from the input NRZ or NRZ-DPSK data. This scheme has some distinct advantages such as simple device fabrication, transparence to data format, multiwavelength operation, free preprocessing and convenient tuning. Potential powerful adaptability of this scheme is very important for next-generation optical networks, in which there exist various modulation formats and the used devices are required to be transparent to data formats.

  9. All-optical clock recovery based on simultaneous external injection-locking and self-seeding of a Fabry-Perot laser diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaohui; Wai, Ping Kong A.; Lu, Chao; Tam, Hwa Yaw; Qureshi, Khurram K.

    2011-02-01

    We proposed and demonstrated a novel, simple, and low cost method for all-optical clock recovery based on the switching between two injection-locked longitudinal modes in a dc-biased multi-quantum-well Fabry-Perot laser diode (FP-LD). The dc biased FP-LD is simultaneously injection-locked by a return-to-zero data signal at one of the longitudinal modes of the FP-LD and self-seeded at another longitudinal mode by using a uniform fiber Bragg grating as a feedback component. The powers and detunes of the data signal and self-seeding signal are chosen such that self-seeding is realized in the FP-LD only when data signal power is low. Clock signals of data streams at different data rates can be obtained by tuning the optical delay line in the external self-seeding loop. We have demonstrated all-optical clock recovery at 10 GHz. The pulse width, time-bandwidth product, side mode suppression ration, root mean square timing jitter, and average power of the recovered clock signals are 50 ps, 0.5, 50 dB, 248 fs, and 3.6 dBm, respectively. Clock recovery is possible at wavelength within the gain band of the FP-LD. We also find and explore in the experiment the influence of detune between the external data signal and the nearest FP-LD longitudinal mode to the recovered clock.

  10. Competing bosonic condensates in optical lattice with a mixture of single and pair hoppings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travin, V. M.; Kopeć, T. K.

    2017-01-01

    A system of ultra-cold atoms with single boson and pair tunneling of bosonic atoms is considered in an optical lattice at arbitrary temperature. A mean-field theory was applied to the extended Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian describing the system in order to investigate the competition between superfluid and pair superfluid as a function of the chemical potential and the temperature. To this end we have applied a method based on the Laplace transform method for the efficient calculation of the statistical sum for the quantum Hamiltonian. These results may be of interest for experiments on cold atom systems in optical lattices.

  11. Evolution of Matter Wave Interference of Bose-Condensed Gas in a 2D Optical Lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUZhi-Jun; LINGuo-Cheng; XUJun; LIZhen

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the average particle-number distribution of the atoms in the combined potential of 2D optical lattices and 31) harmonic magnetic trap based on the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. After the combined potential is switched of[, and only the optical lattice is switched off, we give the analytical results of the wavefunction of the Bosecondensed gas at any time t by using a propagator method. For both disk-shaped and cigar-shaped Bose-condensed gas,we discuss the evolution process of the central and side peaks of the interference pattern.

  12. Linear optics design of negative momentum compaction lattices for PS2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papaphilippou,Y.; de Maria,R.; Barranco, J.; Bartmann, W.; Benedikt, M.; Carli, C.; Goddard, B.; Peggs, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2009-05-04

    In view of the CERN Proton Synchrotron proposed replacement with a new ring (PS2), a detailed optics design has been undertaken following the evaluation of several lattice options. The basic arc module consists of cells providing negative momentum compaction. The straight section is formed with a combination of FODO and quadrupole triplet cells, to accommodate the injection and extraction systems, in particular the H{sup -} injection elements. The arc is matched to the straight section with a dispersion suppressor and matching module. Different lattices are compared with respect to their linear optics functions, tuning flexibility and geometrical acceptance properties.

  13. Majorana modes and topological superfluids for ultracold fermionic atoms in anisotropic square optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ya-Jie; Li, Ning; Kou, Su-Peng

    2016-12-01

    Motivated by the recent experimental realization of two-dimensional spin-orbit coupling through optical Raman lattice scheme, we study attractive interacting ultracold gases with spin-orbit interaction in anisotropic square optical lattices, and find that rich s-wave topological superfluids can be realized, including Z2 topological superfluids beyond the characterization of "tenfold way" in addition to chiral topological superfluids. The topological defects-superfluid vortex and edge dislocations-may host Majorana modes in some topological superfluids, which are helpful for realizing topological quantum computation and Majorana fermionic quantum computation. In addition, we also discuss the Berezinsky-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transitions for different topological superfluids.

  14. The solitons redistribution in Bose-Einstein condensate in quasiperiodic optical lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlak, G.N. [Center for Research on Engineering and Applied Sciences, Autonomous State University of Morelos, Cuernavaca, Mor. 62210 (Mexico)], E-mail: gburlak@uaem.mx; Klimov, A.B. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Guadalajara, Revolucion 1500, Guadalajara, Jalisco 44420 (Mexico)], E-mail: klimov@cencar.udg.mx

    2007-10-01

    We numerically study the dynamical excitations in Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) placed in periodic and quasiperiodic 2D optical lattice (OL). In case of the repulsive mean-field interaction the BEC quantum tunneling leads to a progressive soliton's splitting and generating of secondary solitons, which migrate to closest trapping potential minima. A nontrivial soliton dynamics appears when a series of {pi}-pulses (phase kicks) are applied to the optical lattice. Such sudden perturbation produces a dynamic redistribution of the secondary solitons, leading to a formation of an artificial solitonic superlattice. Different geometries of OL are analyzed.

  15. Excitation Spectrum of Spin-1 Bosonic Atoms in an Optical Lattice with High Filling Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Jing-Min

    2007-01-01

    The Green's function and the higher-order correlation functions of spin-1 cold atoms in an optical lattice are defined.Because we consider the problem of spin-1 Bose condensed atoms in an optical lattice with high filling factors,I.e.,the number density of Bose condensed atoms no is large,the fluctuation of them can be neglected and we take mean-field approximation for the higher-order terms.The excitation spectra for both the polar case and the ferromagnetic case are obtained and analyzed.

  16. Sympathetic Ground State Cooling and Time-Dilation Shifts in an ^{27}Al^{+} Optical Clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J-S; Brewer, S M; Chou, C W; Wineland, D J; Leibrandt, D R; Hume, D B

    2017-02-03

    We report on Raman sideband cooling of ^{25}Mg^{+} to sympathetically cool the secular modes of motion in a ^{25}Mg^{+}-^{27}Al^{+} two-ion pair to near the three-dimensional (3D) ground state. The evolution of the Fock-state distribution during the cooling process is studied using a rate-equation simulation, and various heating sources that limit the efficiency of 3D sideband cooling in our system are discussed. We characterize the residual energy and heating rates of all of the secular modes of motion and estimate a secular motion time-dilation shift of -(1.9±0.1)×10^{-18} for an ^{27}Al^{+} clock at a typical clock probe duration of 150 ms. This is a 50-fold reduction in the secular motion time-dilation shift uncertainty in comparison with previous ^{27}Al^{+} clocks.

  17. Sympathetic Ground State Cooling and Time-Dilation Shifts in an 27Al+ Optical Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.-S.; Brewer, S. M.; Chou, C. W.; Wineland, D. J.; Leibrandt, D. R.; Hume, D. B.

    2017-02-01

    We report on Raman sideband cooling of 25Mg+ to sympathetically cool the secular modes of motion in a 25Mg+-27Al+ two-ion pair to near the three-dimensional (3D) ground state. The evolution of the Fock-state distribution during the cooling process is studied using a rate-equation simulation, and various heating sources that limit the efficiency of 3D sideband cooling in our system are discussed. We characterize the residual energy and heating rates of all of the secular modes of motion and estimate a secular motion time-dilation shift of -(1.9 ±0.1 )×10-18 for an 27Al+ clock at a typical clock probe duration of 150 ms. This is a 50-fold reduction in the secular motion time-dilation shift uncertainty in comparison with previous 27Al+ clocks.

  18. Preprocessing-Free All-Optical Clock Recovery from NRZ and NRZ-DPSK Signals Using an FP-SOA Based Active Filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fei; ZHANG Xin-Liang; YU Yu; XU En-Ming

    2011-01-01

    @@ We demonstrate a simple scheme to perform all-optical clock recovery from the input nonreturn-to-zero (NRZ) and nonreturn-to-zero differential phase shifted keying (NRZ-DPSK) data, which are avoided using any pre- processing measures.A multi-quantum-well Fabry-Perot semiconductor optical amplifier plays the dual role of the data format converter and the clock recovery device.Using this scheme, a stable and low jitter 35.80-GHz optical clock pulse sequence is directly extracted out from the input NRZ or NRZ-DPSK data.This scheme has some distinct advantages such as simple device fabrication, transparence to data format, multiwavelength opera- tion, free preprocessing and convenient tuning.Potential powerful adaptability of this scheme is very important for next-generation optical networks, in which there exist various modulation formats and the used devices are required to be transparent to data formats.%We demonstrate a simple scheme to perform all-optical clock recovery from the input nonreturn-to-zero (NRZ) and nonreturn-to-zero differential phase shifted keying (NRZ-DPSK) data, which are avoided using any preprocessing measures. A multi-quantum-well Fabry-Perot semiconductor optical amplifier plays the dual role of the data format converter and the clock recovery device. Using this scheme, a stable and low jitter 35.80-GHz optical clock pulse sequence is directly extracted out from the input NRZ or NRZ-DPSK data. This scheme has some distinct advantages such as simple device fabrication, transparence to data format, multiwavelength operation, free preprocessing and convenient tuning. Potential powerful adaptability of this scheme is very important for next-generation optical networks, in which there exist various modulation formats and the used devices are required to be transparent to data formats.

  19. Time-variable gravity potential components for optical clock comparisons and the definition of international time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, C.; Denker, H.; Timmen, L.

    2016-12-01

    The latest generation of optical atomic clocks is approaching the level of one part in 1018 in terms of frequency stability and uncertainty. For clock comparisons and the definition of international time scales, a relativistic redshift effect of the clock frequencies has to be taken into account at a corresponding uncertainty level of about 0.1 m2 s-2 and 0.01 m in terms of gravity potential and height, respectively. Besides the predominant static part of the gravity potential, temporal variations must be considered in order to avoid systematic frequency shifts. Time-variable gravity potential components induced by tides and non-tidal mass redistributions are investigated with regard to the level of one part in 1018. The magnitudes and dominant time periods of the individual gravity potential contributions are investigated globally and for specific laboratory sites together with the related uncertainty estimates. The basics of the computation methods are presented along with the applied models, data sets and software. Solid Earth tides contribute by far the most dominant signal with a global maximum amplitude of 4.2 m2 s-2 for the potential and a range (maximum-to-minimum) of up to 1.3 and 10.0 m2 s-2 in terms of potential differences between specific laboratories over continental and intercontinental scales, respectively. Amplitudes of the ocean tidal loading potential can amount up to 1.25 m2 s-2, while the range of the potential between specific laboratories is 0.3 and 1.1 m2 s-2 over continental and intercontinental scales, respectively. These are the only two contributors being relevant at a 10-17 level. However, several other time-variable potential effects can particularly affect clock comparisons at the 10-18 level. Besides solid Earth pole tides, these are non-tidal mass redistributions in the atmosphere, the oceans and the continental water storage.

  20. Colorless detection of NRZ-DPSK signals using electro-optic clock re-modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zsigri, Beata; Tokle, Torger; Peucheret, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Wavelength-independent detection of NRZ-DPSK signals is proposed and demonstrated at 43 Gbit/s. The scheme relies on re-modulation of the incoming NRZ-DPSK signal with a recovered electrical clock. Good performance is obtained after dispersion managed transmission.......Wavelength-independent detection of NRZ-DPSK signals is proposed and demonstrated at 43 Gbit/s. The scheme relies on re-modulation of the incoming NRZ-DPSK signal with a recovered electrical clock. Good performance is obtained after dispersion managed transmission....

  1. Matter-wave propagation in optical lattices: geometrical and flat-band effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Mekena; Chern, Gia-Wei; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Chien, Chih-Chun

    2016-04-01

    The geometry of optical lattices can be engineered, allowing the study of atomic transport along paths arranged in patterns that are otherwise difficult to probe in the solid state. A question feasible to atomic systems is related to the speed of matter-wave propagation as a function of the lattice geometry. To address this issue, we investigated, theoretically, the quantum transport of noninteracting and weakly-interacting ultracold fermionic atoms in several 2D optical lattice geometries. We find that the triangular lattice has a higher propagation velocity compared to the square lattice, and the cross-linked square lattice has an even faster propagation velocity. The increase results from the mixing of the momentum states which leads to different group velocities in quantum systems. Standard band theory provides an explanation and allows for a systematic way to search and design systems with controllable matter-wave propagation. Moreover, the presence of a flat band such as in a two-leg ladder geometry leads to a dynamical density discontinuity due to its localized atoms. Possible realizations of those dynamical phenomena are discussed.

  2. Zitterbewegung with spin-orbit coupled ultracold atoms in a fluctuating optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argonov, V. Yu; Makarov, D. V.

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics of non-interacting ultracold atoms with artificial spin-orbit coupling is considered. Spin-orbit coupling is created using two moving optical lattices with orthogonal polarizations. Our main goal is to study influence of lattice noise on Rabi oscillations. Special attention is paid to the phenomenon of the Zitterbewegung being trembling motion caused by Rabi transitions between states with different velocities. Phase and amplitude fluctuations of lattices are modelled by means of the two-dimensional stochastic Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, also known as harmonic noise. In the the noiseless case the problem is solved analytically in terms of the momentum representation. It is shown that lattice noise significantly extends duration of the Zitterbewegung as compared to the noiseless case. This effect originates from noise-induced decoherence of Rabi oscillations.

  3. Creation of effective magnetic fields in optical lattices The Hofstadter butterfly for cold neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Jaksch, D

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of neutral atoms in a 2D optical lattice which traps two distinct internal states of the atoms in different columns. Two Raman lasers are used to coherently transfer atoms from one internal state to the other, thereby causing hopping between the different columns. By adjusting the laser parameters appropriately we can induce a non vanishing phase of particles moving along a closed path on the lattice. This phase is proportional to the enclosed area and we thus simulate a magnetic flux through the lattice. This setup is described by a Hamiltonian identical to the one for electrons on a lattice subject to a magnetic field and thus allows us to study this equivalent situation under very well defined controllable conditions. We consider the limiting case of huge magnetic fields -- which is not experimentally accessible for electrons in metals -- where a fractal band structure, the Hofstadter butterfly, characterizes the system.

  4. Optics for the lattice of the compact storage ring for a Compton X-ray source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Pei-Cheng; WANG Yu; SHEN Xiao-zhe; HUANG Wen-Hui; YAN Li-xin; DU Ying-Chao; LI Ren-Kai; TANG Chuan-Xiang

    2009-01-01

    We present two types of optics for the lattice of a compact storage ring for a Compton X-ray source.The optics design for different operation modes of the storage ring are discussed in detail.For the pulse mode optics,an IBS-suppression scheme is applied to optimize the optics for lower IBS emittance growth rate;as for the steady mode,the method to control momentum compact factor is adopted[Gladkikh P,Phys.Rev.ST Accel.Beams 8,050702]to obtain stability of the electron beam.

  5. Optically Induced Lattice Dynamics of hexagonal manganite using Ultrafast X-ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae Ja; Workman, J. B.; Hur, N.

    2005-03-01

    We have studied the picosecond lattice dynamics of optically pumped hexagonal manganite LuMnO3 using ultrafast x-ray diffraction. The results show a shift and broadening of the diffraction curve due to the stimulated lattice expansion. To understand the transient response of the lattice, the measured time- and angle-resolved diffraction curves are compared with a theoretical calculation based on dynamical diffraction theory modified for the hexagonal crystal structure of LuMnO3. Our simulations reveal that a large coupling coefficient between the a-b plane and the c-axis (c13) is required to the data. We compare this result to our previous coherent phonon studies of LuMnO3 using optical pump-probe spectroscopy.

  6. Cavity-aided magnetic-resonance microscopy of atoms in optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Purdy, Tom P; Brooks, Daniel W C; Botter, Thierry; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique for investigating the microscopic properties and dynamics of physical systems. In this work we demonstrate state-sensitive MRI of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. Single-shot spatial resolution is 120 nm, well below the lattice spacing, and number sensitivity is +/-2.4 for 150 atoms on a single site, well below Poissonian atom-number fluctuations. We achieve this by combining high-spatial-resolution control over the atomic spin using an atom chip, together with nearly quantum-limited spin measurement, obtained by dispersively coupling the atoms to light in a high-finesse optical cavity. The MRI is minimally disruptive of the atoms' internal state, preserving the magnetisation of the gas for subsequent experiments. Using this technique, we observe the nonequilibrium transport dynamics of the atoms among individual lattice sites. We see the atom cloud initially expand ballistically, followed by the onset of interaction-inhibited transport.

  7. Measuring finite-range phase coherence in an optical lattice using Talbot interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Bodhaditya; Baals, Christian; Labouvie, Ralf; Bhattacherjee, Aranya B.; Pelster, Axel; Ott, Herwig

    2017-06-01

    One of the important goals of present research is to control and manipulate coherence in a broad variety of systems, such as semiconductor spintronics, biological photosynthetic systems, superconducting qubits and complex atomic networks. Over the past decades, interferometry of atoms and molecules has proven to be a powerful tool to explore coherence. Here we demonstrate a near-field interferometer based on the Talbot effect, which allows us to measure finite-range phase coherence of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. We apply this interferometer to study the build-up of phase coherence after a quantum quench of a Bose-Einstein condensate residing in a one-dimensional optical lattice. Our technique of measuring finite-range phase coherence is generic, easy to adopt and can be applied in practically all lattice experiments without further modifications.

  8. Controlling a quantum gas of polar molecules in an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Covey, Jacob P; Ye, Jun; Jin, Deborah S

    2016-01-01

    The production of molecules from dual species atomic quantum gases has enabled experiments that employ molecules at nanoKelvin temperatures. As a result, every degree of freedom of these molecules is in a well-defined quantum state and exquisitely controlled. These ultracold molecules open a new world of precision quantum chemistry in which quantum statistics, quantum partial waves, and even many-body correlations can play important roles. Moreover, to investigate the strongly correlated physics of many interacting molecular dipoles, we can mitigate lossy chemical reactions by controlling the dimensionality of the system using optical lattices formed by interfering laser fields. In a full three-dimensional optical lattice, chemistry can be turned on or off by tuning the lattice depth, which allows us to configure an array of long-range interacting quantum systems with rich internal structure. Such a system represents an excellent platform for gaining fundamental insights to complex materials based on quantum ...

  9. Lattice location and optical activation of rare earth implanted GaN

    CERN Document Server

    Wahl, U; Lorenz, K; Correia, J G; Monteiro, T; De Vries, B; Vantomme, A; Vianden, R

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the current knowledge on rare earths (REs) implanted into GaN with a special focus on their lattice location and on the optical activation by means of thermal annealing. While emission channeling experiments have given information on the lattice location of rare earths following low-dose (around 10$^{13}$ cm$^{-2}$) implantation, both in the as-implanted state and after annealing up to 900°C, the lattice location of higher-dose implants (10$^{14}-10^{15}$ cm$^{-2}$) and their defect annealing behaviour were studied using the Rutherford backscattering/channeling method. The available channeling and luminescence results suggest that the optical activation of implanted REs in GaN is related to their incorporation in substitutional Ga sites combined with the effective removal of the implantation damage.

  10. Topological orbital superfluid with chiral d-wave order in a rotating optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ningning; Guo, Huaiming; Zhang, Ping

    2017-08-01

    Topological superfluid is an exotic state of quantum matter that possesses a nodeless superfluid gap in the bulk and Andreev edge modes at the boundary of a finite system. Here, we study a multi-orbital superfluid driven by an attractive s-wave interaction in a rotating optical lattice. Interestingly, we find that the rotation induces the inter-orbital hybridization and drives the system into topological orbital superfluid in accordance with intrinsically chiral d-wave pairing characteristics. Thanks to the conservation of spin, the topological orbital superfluid supports four rather than two chiral Andreev edge modes at the boundary of the lattice. Moreover, we find that the intrinsic harmonic confining potential forms a circular spatial barrier which accumulates atoms and supports a mass current under the injection of small angular momentum as an external driving force. This feature provides an experimentally detectable phenomenon to verify the topological orbital superfluid with chiral d-wave order in a rotating optical lattice.

  11. Calculation of the Spin-Dependent Optical Lattice in Rubidium Bose-Einstein Condensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Ming-Tao; HAN Liang; QI Yue-Rong; ZHANG Shou-Gang; GAO Hong; LI Fu-Li

    2012-01-01

    We provide a theoretical study to calculate the spin-dependent optical lattice with rubidium Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in a steady magnetic field.The optical dipole potential variation at different Zeeman levels are obtained.We also show that atoms can be transported in three dimensions by changing the polarization of the trapping field.An explanation of this transportation process in an atomic coordinate is presented.

  12. Amplified short-wavelength light scattered by relativistic electrons in the laser-induced optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Andriyash, I A; Malka, V; d'Humières, E; Balcou, Ph

    2014-01-01

    The scheme of the XUV/X-ray free electron laser based on the optical undulator created by two overlapped transverse laser beams is analyzed. A kinetic theoretical description and an ad hoc numerical model are developed to account for the finite energy spread, angular divergence and the spectral properties of the electron beam in the optical lattice. The theoretical findings are compared to the results of the one- and three-dimensional numerical modeling with the spectral free electron laser code PLARES.

  13. Trapped fermions with short-range and dipolar interactions in 2D optical lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne-Louise G.

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices are ideal quantum simulators of complex many-body Hamiltonians that arise in condensed matter systems. Manipulation of these model systems allows us to explore a variety of physical phenomena taking place in solid state systems. Here, we present mean...

  14. Adiabatic cooling of a tunable Bose-Fermi mixture in an optical lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole Søe; Nygaard, Nicolai; Blakie, P.B.

    2009-01-01

    We consider an atomic Fermi gas confined in a uniform optical lattice potential, where the atoms can pair into molecules via a magnetic field controlled narrow Feshbach resonance. Thus by adjusting the magnetic field the portion of fermionic and bosonic particles in the system can be continuously...

  15. Critical temperature of noninteracting bosonic gases in cubic optical lattices at arbitrary integer fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhimov, Abdulla; Askerzade, Iman N

    2014-09-01

    We have shown that the critical temperature of a Bose-Einstein condensate to a normal phase transition of noninteracting bosons in cubic optical lattices has a linear dependence on the filling factor, especially at large densities. The condensed fraction exhibits a linear power law dependence on temperature in contrast to the case of ideal homogeneous Bose gases.

  16. Multiparticle Entanglement and Spatial Addressability of Ultracold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    resolution imaging system will be located. • Magnetic trapping and evaporation We initially planned to realize a Bose - Einstein condensate in an... Bose Einstein Condensate in a hybrid trap consisting of the magnetic trap and a dipole trap. • Integration of the prepared optical lattice setup

  17. Statistical mechanics of a Feshbach-coupled Bose-Fermi gas in an optical lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole Søe; Nygaard, Nicolai; Blakie, P.B.

    2009-01-01

    We consider an atomic Fermi gas confined in a uniform optical lattice potential, where the atoms can pair into molecules via a magnetic-field-controlled narrow Feshbach resonance. The phase diagram of the resulting atom-molecule mixture in chemical and thermal equilibria is determined numerically...

  18. Quantum simulation of correlated-hopping models with fermions in optical lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liberto, M. Di; Creffield, C. E.; Japaridze, G. I.; Smith, C. Morais

    2014-01-01

    By using a modulated magnetic field in a Feshbach resonance for ultracold fermionic atoms in optical lattices, we show that it is possible to engineer a class of models usually referred to as correlated-hopping models. These models differ from the Hubbard model in exhibiting additional density-depen

  19. Controlling coherence via tuning of the population imbalance in a bipartite optical lattice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liberto, M. Di; Comparin, T.; Kock, T.; Ölschläger, M.; Hemmerich, A.; Smith, C. Morais

    2014-01-01

    The control of transport properties is a key tool at the basis of many technologically relevant effects in condensed matter. The clean and precisely controlled environment of ultracold atoms in optical lattices allows one to prepare simplified but instructive models, which can help to better underst

  20. Inducing spin-dependent tunneling to probe magnetic correlations in optical lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim-Georg; Andersen, Brian; Syljuåsen, Olav;

    2012-01-01

    We suggest a simple experimental method for probing antiferromagnetic spin correlations of two-component Fermi gases in optical lattices. The method relies on a spin selective Raman transition to excite atoms of one spin species to their first excited vibrational mode where the tunneling is large...

  1. Ultracold bosons in a one-dimensional optical lattice chain: Newton's cradle and Bose enhancement effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji-Guo; Yang, Shi-Jie

    2017-05-01

    We study a model to realize the long-distance correlated tunneling of ultracold bosons in a one-dimensional optical lattice chain. The model reveals the behavior of a quantum Newton's cradle, which is the perfect transfer between two macroscopic quantum states. Due to the Bose enhancement effect, we find that the resonantly tunneling through a Mott domain is greatly enhanced.

  2. A compact microchip atomic clock based on all-optical interrogation of ultra-cold trapped Rb atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, D. M.; Zozulya, A.; Anderson, D. Z.

    2010-12-01

    We propose a compact atomic clock that uses all-optical interrogation of ultra-cold Rb atoms that are magnetically trapped near the surface of an atom microchip. The interrogation scheme, which combines electromagnetically induced transparency with Ramsey's method of separated oscillatory fields, can achieve an atomic shot-noise-level performance better than 10^{-13}/sqrt{tau} for 106 atoms. A two-color Mach-Zehnder interferometer can detect a 100-pW probe beam at the optical shot-noise level using conventional photodetectors. This measurement scheme is nondestructive and therefore can be used to increase the operational duty cycle by reusing the trapped atoms for multiple clock cycles. Numerical calculations of the density matrix equations are used to identify realistic operating parameters at which AC Stark shifts are eliminated. By considering fluctuations in these parameters, we estimate that AC Stark shifts can be canceled to a level better than 2×10-14. An overview of the apparatus is presented with estimates of cycle time and power consumption.

  3. Two-dimensional novel optical lattices with multi-well traps for cold atoms or molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junfa Lu; Xianming Ji; Jianping Yin

    2006-01-01

    We propose some new schemes to constitute two-dimensional (2D) array of multi-well optical dipole traps for cold atoms (or molecules) by using an optical system consisting of a binary π-phase grating and a 2D array of rectangle microlens. We calculate the intensity distribution of each optical well in 2D array of multi-well traps and its geometric parameters and so on. The proposed 2D array of multi-well traps can be used to form novel 2D optical lattices with cold atoms (or molecules), and form various novel optical crystals with cold atoms (or molecules), or to perform quantum computing and quantum information processing on an atom chip, even to realize an array of all-optical multi-well atomic (or molecular) BoseEinstein condensates (BECs) on an all-optical integrated atom (or molecule) chip.

  4. Mode-locked laser realized by selective area growth for short pulse generation and optical clock recovery in TDM systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Eugen; Baums, Dieter; Bouayad-Amine, Jamal; Hache, Claudia; Haisch, Hansjorg; Kuhn, Edgar; Satzke, Klaus; Schilling, Michael; Weber, Juergen; Zielinski, Erich

    1996-04-01

    We report on monolithically integrated active/passive coupled cavity mode locked lasers for 1.55 micrometer realized by selective area growth technology of InGaAs(P) quantum wells. Mode locked FP or DBR lasers are fabricated with an integrated cavity comprising up to three different band gaps. The devices emit short light pulses at around 10 GHz repetition rate with pulse width down to 8.7 ps. A time-bandwidth product of 0.5 is achieved for mode locked DBR lasers. Active/passive integrated mode locked laser is used for generation of optical 10 GHz clock signal from optical 10 Gb/s PRBS RZ data stream injected into the laser cavity.

  5. Control of diffusion of nanoparticles in an optical vortex lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Ivar; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael; Sáenz, Juan José

    2016-06-01

    A two-dimensional periodic optical force field, which combines conservative dipolar forces with vortices from radiation pressure, is proposed in order to influence the diffusion properties of optically susceptible nanoparticles. The different deterministic flow patterns are identified. In the low-noise limit, the diffusion coefficient is computed from a mean first passage time and the most probable escape paths are identified for those flow patterns which possess a stable stationary point. Numerical simulations of the associated Langevin equations show remarkable agreement with the analytically deduced expressions. Modifications of the force field are proposed so that a wider range of phenomena could be tested.

  6. Engineering exciton interactions with Zeeman excitations of highly magnetic atoms on an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez, R A Vargas

    2015-01-01

    We show that Zeeman excitations in an ensemble of highly magnetic atoms trapped in an optical lattice lead to interacting Frenkel excitons described by a tunable $t$-$V$ model. The dispersion of the excitons and the interactions between excitons can be tuned in a wide range by transferring atoms to different Zeeman states. We show that these parameters are insensitive to an external magnetic field, which leads to an interesting possibility of engineering lattice models with significant particle-non-conserving terms. We consider the coupling of the Zeeman excitations to the translational motion of atoms in the lattice and show that the resulting Hamiltonian is equivalent to a polaron Hamiltonian, where the mathematical form of the particle - phonon interaction can be tuned by transferring atoms to different Zeeman states. We calculate the model parameters for the specific system of Dy atoms on an optical lattice with the lattice site separation 266 nm and show that the exciton interaction parameters can be tun...

  7. Optical Signatures of Antiferromagnetic Ordering of Fermionic Atoms in an Optical Lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Cordobes Aguilar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We show how off-resonant light scattering can provide quantitative information on antiferromagnetic ordering of a two-species fermionic atomic gas in a tightly-confined two-dimensional optical lattice. We analyze the emerging magnetic ordering of atoms in the mean-field and in random phase approximations and show how the many-body static and dynamic correlations, evaluated in the standard Feynman-Dyson perturbation series, can be detected in the scattered light signal. The staggered magnetization reveals itself in the magnetic Bragg peaks of the individual spin components. These magnetic peaks, however, can be considerably suppressed in the absence of a true long-range antiferromagnetic order. The light scattered outside the diffraction orders can be collected by a lens with highly improved signal-to-shot-noise ratio when the diffraction maxima are blocked. The collective and single-particle excitations are identified in the spectrum of the scattered light. We find that the spin-conserving and spin-exchanging atomic transitions convey information on density, longitudinal spin, and transverse spin correlations. The different correlations and scattering processes exhibit characteristic angular distribution profiles for the scattered light, and e.g., the diagnostic signal of transverse spin correlations could be separated from the optical response by the scattering direction, frequency, or polarization. We also analyze the detection accuracy by estimating the number of required measurements, constrained by the heating rate that is determined by inelastic light-scattering events. The imaging technique could be extended to the two-species fermionic states in other regions of the phase diagram where the ground-state properties are still not fully understood.

  8. Negative refraction of ultra-cold atoms in optical lattices with nonuniform artificial gauge fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ai-Xia, E-mail: zhangax@nwnu.edu.cn; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study the reflection and refraction of ultra-cold atoms in optical lattices exposed to a nonuniform artificial magnetic field. The introduction of the nonuniform artificial magnetic field to the optical lattice for suitable designer magnetic potential barrier can lead to a series of intriguing reflection and refraction phenomena of atoms, including reflection, positive refraction, negative refraction and atomic matter wave splitting. Both the occurrence and the distribution of these reflection and refraction scenarios can be coherently controlled by the nonuniform artificial magnetic field. In particular, the regions close to the boundary of reflection demonstrate two more interesting propagation modes, i.e., a reflected branch of atoms comprising a positive or negative refracted branch of atoms with almost same atom population will be excited simultaneously at the magnetic potential barrier. The results can be a guide for the coherent control of the matter waves in optical lattices and the design of new atom optics devices. - Highlights: • Ultra-cold atoms in OL with nonuniform magnetic field are studied. • Matter wave reflection, refraction and splitting are coherently controlled. • Results provide a guide for the design of new atomic optics devices.

  9. Optical lattice-like cladding waveguides by direct laser writing: fabrication, luminescence, and lasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Weijie; He, Ruiyun; Cheng, Chen; Rocha, Uéslen; Rodríguez Vázquez de Aldana, Javier; Jaque, Daniel; Chen, Feng

    2016-05-15

    We report on the fabrication of optical lattice-like waveguide structures in an Nd:YAP laser crystal by using direct femtosecond laser writing. With periodically arrayed laser-induced tracks, the waveguiding cores can be located in either the regions between the neighbored tracks or the central zone surrounded by a number of tracks as outer cladding. The polarization of the femtosecond laser pulses for the inscription has been found to play a critical role in the anisotropic guiding behaviors of the structures. The confocal photoluminescence investigations reveal different stress-induced modifications of the structures inscribed by different polarization of the femtosecond laser beam, which are considered to be responsible for the refractive index changes of the structures. Under optical pump at 808 nm, efficient waveguide lasing at ∼1  μm wavelength has been realized from the optical lattice-like structure, which exhibits potential applications as novel miniature light sources.

  10. Optical resonance problem in metamaterial arrays: a lattice dynamics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wanguo

    2016-11-01

    A systematic dynamic theory is established to deal with the optical collective resonance in metamaterial arrays. As a reference model, we consider an infinite split ring resonator (SRR) array illuminated by a linearly polarized wave and introduce an N-degree-of-freedom forced oscillator equation to simplify the coupled-mode vibration problem. We derive a strict formula of resonance frequency (RF) and its adjustable range from the steady-state response. Unlike a single SRR possesses invariant RF, it successfully explains the mechanism of RF shift effect in the SRR array when the incident angle changes. Instead of full wave analysis, only one or two adjacent resonance modes can give an accurate response line shape. Our approach is applicable for metallic arrays with any N-particle cell at all incident angles and well matched with numerical results. It provides a versatile way to study the vibration dynamics in optical periodic many-body systems.

  11. Fundamental and vortex solitons in a two-dimensional optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, J; Yang, Jianke; Musslimani, Ziad

    2003-01-01

    Fundamental and vortex solitons in a two-dimensional optically induced waveguide array are reported. In the strong localization regime, the fundamental soliton is largely confined to one lattice site, while the vortex state comprises of four fundamental modes superimposed in a square configuration with a phase structure that is topologically equivalent to the conventional vortex. However, in the weak localization regime, both the fundamental and vortex solitons spread over many lattice sites. We further show that fundamental and vortex solitons are stable against small perturbations in the strong localization regime.

  12. Vibrational mechanics in an optical lattice: controlling transport via potential renormalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickenbrock, A; Holz, P C; Wahab, N A Abdul; Phoonthong, P; Cubero, D; Renzoni, F

    2012-01-13

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally the phenomenon of vibrational resonance in a periodic potential, using cold atoms in an optical lattice as a model system. A high-frequency (HF) drive, with a frequency much larger than any characteristic frequency of the system, is applied by phase modulating one of the lattice beams. We show that the HF drive leads to the renormalization of the potential. We used transport measurements as a probe of the potential renormalization. The very same experiments also demonstrate that transport can be controlled by the HF drive via potential renormalization.

  13. Formulation of geopotential difference determination using optical-atomic clocks onboard satellites and on ground based on Doppler cancellation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ziyu; Shen, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Shuangxi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we propose an approach for determining the geopotential difference using high-frequency-stability microwave links between satellite and ground station based on Doppler cancellation system. Suppose a satellite and a ground station are equipped with precise optical-atomic clocks (OACs) and oscillators. The ground oscillator emits a signal with frequency fa towards the satellite and the satellite receiver (connected with the satellite oscillator) receives this signal with frequency fb which contains the gravitational frequency shift effect and other signals and noises. After receiving this signal, the satellite oscillator transmits and emits, respectively, two signals with frequencies fb and fc towards the ground station. Via Doppler cancellation technique, the geopotential difference between the satellite and the ground station can be determined based on gravitational frequency shift equation by a combination of these three frequencies. For arbitrary two stations on ground, based on similar procedures as described above, we may determine the geopotential difference between these two stations via a satellite. Our analysis shows that the accuracy can reach 1 m2 s- 2 based on the clocks' inaccuracy of about 10-17 (s s-1) level. Since OACs with instability around 10-18 in several hours and inaccuracy around 10-18 level have been generated in laboratory, the proposed approach may have prospective applications in geoscience, and especially, based on this approach a unified world height system could be realized with one-centimetre level accuracy in the near future.

  14. A novel optical beam splitter based on photonic crystal with hybrid lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Qing-Yi; Fu Yong-Qi; Hu De-Qing; Zhang Zhi-Min

    2012-01-01

    A novel optical beam splitter constructed on the basis of photonic crystal (PC) with hybrid lattices is proposed in this paper.The band gap of square-lattice PC is so designed that the incident light is divided into several branch beams.Triangular-lattice graded-index PCs are combined for focusing each branch.Computational calculations are carried out on the basis of finite-different time-domain algorithm to prove the feasibility of our design.The waveguide is unnecessary in the design.Thus the device has functions of both splitting and focusing beams.Size of the divided beam at site of full-width at half-maximum is of the order of λ/2.The designed splitter has the advantages that it has a small volume and can be integrated by conventional semiconductor manufacturing process.

  15. Weyl points and topological nodal superfluids in a face-centered-cubic optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Li-Jun; Zhang, Shao-Liang; Law, K. T.; Zhou, Qi

    2017-07-01

    We point out that a face-centered-cubic (fcc) optical lattice, which can be realized by a simple scheme using three lasers, provides one a highly controllable platform for creating Weyl points and topological nodal superfluids in ultracold atoms. In noninteracting systems, Weyl points automatically arise in the Floquet band structure when shaking such fcc lattices, and sophisticated design of the tunneling is not required. More interestingly, in the presence of attractive interaction between two hyperfine spin states, which experience the same shaken fcc lattice, a three-dimensional topological nodal superfluid emerges, and Weyl points show up as the gapless points in the quasiparticle spectrum. One could either create a double Weyl point of charge 2, or split it into two Weyl points of charge 1, which can be moved in the momentum space by tuning the interactions. Correspondingly, the Fermi arcs at the surface may be linked with each other or separated as individual ones.

  16. Lattice-supersolid phase of strongly correlated bosons in an optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongqiang; He, Liang; Hofstetter, Walter

    2013-05-01

    We numerically simulate strongly correlated ultracold bosons coupled to a high-finesse cavity field, pumped by a laser beam in the transverse direction. Assuming a weak classical optical lattice added in the cavity direction, we model this system by a generalized Bose-Hubbard model, which is solved by means of bosonic dynamical mean-field theory. The complete phase diagram is established, which contains two novel self-organized quantum phases, lattice supersolid and checkerboard solid, in addition to conventional phases such as superfluid and Mott insulator. At finite but low temperature, thermal fluctuations are found to enhance the buildup of the self-organized phases. We demonstrate that cavity-mediated long-range interactions can give rise to stable lattice supersolid and checkerboard solid phases even in the regime of strong s-wave scattering. In the presence of a harmonic trap, we discuss coexistence of these self-organized phases, as relevant to experiments.

  17. Clock and carrier recovery in high-speed coherent optical communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado, Sofia B.; Ferreira, Ricardo; Costa, Pedro S.; Guiomar, Fernando P.; Ziaie, Somayeh; Teixeira, António L.; Muga, Nelson J.; Pinto, Armando N.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, the implementations of clock and carrier recovery in digital domain are analyzed. Hardware implementation details, resources estimation and real-time results are presented. Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADC), operating at 1.25Gsa/s, and a Virtex-6 Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), have been used, allowing the implementation of a real-time Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (QPSK) system operating at 1.25Gb/s. The real-time mode operation is successfully demonstrated over 80 km of Standard Single Mode Fiber (SSMF).

  18. Coherent driving and freezing of bosonic matter wave in an optical Lieb lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taie, Shintaro; Ozawa, Hideki; Ichinose, Tomohiro; Nishio, Takuei; Nakajima, Shuta; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2015-11-01

    Although kinetic energy of a massive particle generally has quadratic dependence on its momentum, a flat, dispersionless energy band is realized in crystals with specific lattice structures. Such macroscopic degeneracy causes the emergence of localized eigenstates and has been a key concept in the context of itinerant ferromagnetism. We report the realization of a "Lieb lattice" configuration with an optical lattice, which has a flat energy band as the first excited state. Our optical lattice potential has various degrees of freedom in its manipulation, which enables coherent transfer of a Bose-Einstein condensate into the flat band. In addition to measuring lifetime of the flat band population for different tight-binding parameters, we investigate the inter-sublattice dynamics of the system by projecting the sublattice population onto the band population. This measurement clearly shows the formation of the localized state with the specific sublattice decoupled in the flat band, and even detects the presence of flat-band breaking perturbations, resulting in the delocalization. Our results will open up the possibilities of exploring the physics of flat bands with a highly controllable quantum system.

  19. Energy band gap and optical transition of metal ion modified double crossover DNA lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Ha, Taewoo; Gnapareddy, Bramaramba; Choi, Kyujin; Lee, Junwye; Kim, Byeonghoon; Kim, Jae Hoon; Park, Sung Ha

    2014-10-22

    We report on the energy band gap and optical transition of a series of divalent metal ion (Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), and Co(2+)) modified DNA (M-DNA) double crossover (DX) lattices fabricated on fused silica by the substrate-assisted growth (SAG) method. We demonstrate how the degree of coverage of the DX lattices is influenced by the DX monomer concentration and also analyze the band gaps of the M-DNA lattices. The energy band gap of the M-DNA, between the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), ranges from 4.67 to 4.98 eV as judged by optical transitions. Relative to the band gap of a pristine DNA molecule (4.69 eV), the band gap of the M-DNA lattices increases with metal ion doping up to a critical concentration and then decreases with further doping. Interestingly, except for the case of Ni(2+), the onset of the second absorption band shifts to a lower energy until a critical concentration and then shifts to a higher energy with further increasing the metal ion concentration, which is consistent with the evolution of electrical transport characteristics. Our results show that controllable metal ion doping is an effective method to tune the band gap energy of DNA-based nanostructures.

  20. Chaos and band structure in a three-dimensional optical lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boretz, Yingyue; Reichl, L E

    2015-04-01

    Classical chaos is known to affect wave propagation because it signifies the presence of broken symmetries. The effect of chaos has been observed experimentally for matter waves, electromagnetic waves, and acoustic waves. When these three types of waves propagate through a spatially periodic medium, the allowed propagation energies form bands. For energies in the band gaps, no wave propagation is possible. We show that optical lattices provide a well-defined system that allows a study of the effect of chaos on band structure. We have determined the band structure of a body-centered-cubic optical lattice for all theoretically possible couplings, and we find that the band structure for those lattices realizable in the laboratory differs significantly from that expected for the bands in an "empty" body-centered-cubic crystal. However, as coupling is increased, the lattice becomes increasingly chaotic and it becomes possible to produce band structure that has behavior qualitatively similar to the "empty" body-centered-cubic band structure, although with fewer degeneracies.

  1. Realization of the Harper Hamiltonian with Artificial Gauge Fields in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Hirokazu; Siviloglou, Georgios; Kennedy, Colin; Burton, William Cody; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Systems of charged particles in magnetic fields have led to many discoveries in science-such as the integer and fractional quantum Hall effects-and have become important paradigms of quantum many-body physics. We have proposed and implemented a scheme which realizes the Harper Hamiltonian, a lattice model for charged particles in magnetic fields, whose energy spectrum is the fractal Hofstadter butterfly. We experimentally realize this Hamiltonian for ultracold, charge neutral bosonic particles of 87Rb in a two-dimensional optical lattice by creating an artificial gauge field using laser-assisted tunneling and a potential energy gradient provided by gravity. Laser-assisted tunneling processes are characterized by studying the expansion of the atoms in the lattice. Furthermore, this scheme can be extended to realize spin-orbit coupling and the spin Hall effect for neutral atoms in optical lattices by modifying the motion of atoms in a spin-dependent way by laser recoil and Zeeman shifts created with a magnetic field gradient. Major advantages of our scheme are that it does not rely on near-resonant laser light to couple different spin states and should work even for fermionic particles. Our work is a step towards studying novel topological phenomena with ultracold atoms. Currently at the RAND Corporation.

  2. 10  GHz clock time-multiplexed degenerate optical parametric oscillators for a photonic Ising spin network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takesue, Hiroki; Inagaki, Takahiro

    2016-09-15

    A coherent Ising machine based on degenerate optical parametric oscillators (DOPOs) is drawing attention as a way to find a solution to the ground-state search problem of the Ising model. Here we report the generation of time-multiplexed DOPOs at a 10 GHz clock frequency. We successfully generated >50,000 DOPOs using dual-pump four-wave mixing in a highly nonlinear fiber that formed a 1 km cavity, and observed phase bifurcation of the DOPOs, which suggests that the DOPOs can be used as stable artificial spins. In addition, we demonstrated the generation of more than 1 million DOPOs by extending the cavity length to 21 km. We also confirmed that the binary numbers obtained from the DOPO phase-difference measurement passed the NIST random number test, which suggests that we can obtain unbiased artificial spins.

  3. A monolithically integrated dual-mode laser for photonic microwave generation and all-optical clock recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liqiang; Zhou, Daibing; Zhao, Lingjuan

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate a monolithically integrated dual-mode laser (DML) with narrow-beat-linewidth and wide-beat-tunability. Using a monolithic DFB laser subjected to amplified feedback, photonic microwave generation of up to 45 GHz is obtained with higher than 15 GHz beat frequency tunability. Thanks to the high phase correlation of the two modes and the narrow mode linewidth, a RF linewidth of lower than 50 kHz is measured. Simulations are also carried out to illustrate the dual-mode beat characteristic. Furthermore, using the DML, an all-optical clock recovery for 40  Gbaud NRZ-QPSK signals is demonstrated. Timing jitter of lower than 363 fs (integrated within a frequency range from 100 Hz to 1 GHz) is obtained.

  4. Selective distillation phenomenon in two-species Bose-Einstein condensates in open boundary optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Mei; Xiong, Jun; Yang, Guo-Jian; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the formation of discrete breathers (DBs) and the dynamics of the mixture of two-species Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) in open boundary optical lattices using the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equations. The results show that the coupling of intra- and interspecies interaction can lead to the existence of pure single-species DBs and symbiotic DBs (i.e., two-species DBs). Furthermore, we find that there is a selective distillation phenomenon in the dynamics of the mixture of two-species BECs. One can selectively distil one species from the mixture of two-species BECs and can even control dominant species fraction by adjusting the intra- and interspecies interaction in optical lattices. Our selective distillation mechanism may find potential application in quantum information storage and quantum information processing based on multi-species atoms. PMID:26597592

  5. Systematic studies on the effect of linear lattice optics for space-charge limited beams

    CERN Document Server

    Fitterer, M; Molodozhentsev, A; Müller, A S

    2015-01-01

    The HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) project aims to an increase of the luminosity of the LHC by a factor of 10. In order to realize this ambitious goal, the LHC itself has to undergo a major upgrade accompanied by an extensive upgrade of the complete injector complex referred to as LHC injector upgrade (LIU). In the framework of the LIU project, a new rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) as an alternative to the energy upgrade of the existing PS Booster has been proposed. Motivated by the optics studies conducted for this RCS, the more general question of the influence of the linear optics on the machine performance has been raised. In this paper, we want to investigate this question by comparing different lattices with the final aim of identifying lattice characteristics advantageous under strong space-charge effects.

  6. Controlling coherence via tuning of the population imbalance in a bipartite optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Liberto, Marco Fedele

    2015-03-01

    The control of transport properties is a key tool at the basis of many technologically relevant effects in condensed matter. The clean and precisely controlled environment of ultracold atoms in optical lattices allows one to prepare simplified but instructive models, which can help to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms. Here we show that by tuning a structural deformation of the unit cell in a bipartite optical lattice, one can induce a phase transition from a superfluid into various Mott insulating phases forming a shell structure in the superimposed harmonic trap. The Mott shells are identified via characteristic features in the visibility of Bragg maxima in momentum spectra. The experimental findings are explained by Gutzwiller mean-field and quantum Monte Carlo calculations. Our system bears similarities with the loss of coherence in cuprate superconductors, known to be associated with the doping induced buckling of the oxygen octahedra surrounding the copper sites.

  7. Evolution of Matter Wave Interference of Bose-Condensed Gas in a 1D Optical Lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zhi-Jun; ZHANG Dong-Mei

    2007-01-01

    For a Bose-condensed gas in a combined potential consisting of an axially-symmetric harmonic magnetic trap and one-dimensional (1D) optical lattice, using the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii (G-P) equation and the propagator method, we obtain the analytical result of the order parameter for matter wave interference at any time. The evolution of the interference pattern under a variation of the relative phase △φ between successive subcondensates trapped on an optical lattices is also studied. For △φ = π, the interference pattern is symmetric with two sharp peaks, which are symmetrically located on a straight line on both sides of a vacant central peak and moving apart from each other. This work is in agreement with available experimental results.

  8. Artificial topological models based on a one-dimensional spin-dependent optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhen; Pu, Han; Zou, Xubo; Guo, Guangcan

    2017-01-01

    Topological matter is a popular topic in both condensed matter and cold-atom research. In the past decades, a variety of models have been identified with fascinating topological features. Some, but not all, of the models can be found in materials. As a fully controllable system, cold atoms trapped in optical lattices provide an ideal platform to simulate and realize these topological models. Here we present a proposal for synthesizing topological models in cold atoms based on a one-dimensional spin-dependent optical lattice potential. In our system, features such as staggered tunneling, staggered Zeeman field, nearest-neighbor interaction, beyond-near-neighbor tunneling, etc. can be readily realized. They underlie the emergence of various topological phases. Our proposal can be realized with current technology and hence has potential applications in quantum simulation of topological matter.

  9. Surface-modified Wannier-Stark states in a 1D optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Maury, A; Gorza, M -P; Lambrecht, A; Guérout, R

    2016-01-01

    We study the energy spectrum of atoms trapped in a vertical 1D optical lattice in close proximity to a reflective surface. We propose an effective model to describe the interaction between the atoms and the surface at any distance. Our model includes the long-range Casimir-Polder potential together with a short-range Lennard-Jones potential, which are considered non-perturbatively with respect to the optical lattice potential. We find an intricate energy spectrum which contains a pair of loosely-bound states localized close to the surface in addition to a surface-modified Wannier-Stark ladder at long distances. Atomic interferometry involving those loosely-bound atom-surface states is proposed to probe the adsorption dynamics of atoms on mirrors.

  10. Controlled Production of Sub-Radiant States of a Diatomic Molecule in an Optical Lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Takasu, Yosuke; Takahashi, Yoshiro; Borkowski, Mateusz; Ciuryło, Roman; Julienne, Paul S

    2012-01-01

    We report successful production of sub-radiant states of a two-atom system in a three-dimensional optical lattice starting from doubly occupied sites in a Mott insulator phase of a quantum gas of atomic ytterbium. We can selectively produce either sub-radiant 1g state or super-radiant 0u state by choosing the excitation laser frequency. The inherent weak excitation rate for the sub-radiant 1g state is overcome by the increased atomic density due to the tight-confinement in a three-dimensional optical lattice. Our experimental measurements of binding energies, linewidth, and Zeeman shift confirm observation of sub-radiant levels of the 1g state of the Yb_2 molecule.

  11. Delocalization-enhanced Bloch oscillations and driven resonant tunneling in optical lattices for precision force measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Tarallo, M G; Poli, N; Chiofalo, M L; Wang, F -Y; Tino, G M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe and compare different methods used for accurate determination of forces acting on matter-wave packets in optical lattices. The quantum interference nature responsible for the production of both Bloch oscillations and coherent delocalization is investigated in detail. We study conditions for optimal detection of Bloch oscillation for a thermal ensemble of cold atoms with a large velocity spread. We report on the experimental observation of resonant tunneling in an amplitude-modulated (AM) optical lattice up to the sixth harmonic with Fourier-limited linewidth. We then explore the fundamental and technical phenomena which limit both the sensitivity and the final accuracy of the atomic force sensor at 10^{-7} precision level [1], with an analysis of the coherence time of the system and addressing few simple setup changes to go beyond the current accuracy.

  12. Self-consistent approach for Bose-condensed atoms in optical lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Yukalov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bose atoms in optical lattices are considered at low temperatures and weak interactions, when Bose-Einstein condensate is formed. A self-consistent approach, based on the use of a representative statistical ensemble, is employed, guaranteeing a gapless spectrum of collective excitations and the validity of conservation laws. In order to show that the approach is applicable to both weak and tight binding, the problem is treated in the Bloch as well as in the Wannier representations. Both these ways result in similar expressions that are compared for the self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogolubov approximation. A convenient general formula for the superfluid fraction of atoms in an optical lattice is derived.

  13. Ultra-cold mechanical resonators coupled to atoms in an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Geraci, Andrew A

    2009-01-01

    We propose an experiment utilizing an array of cooled micro-cantilevers coupled to a sample of ultra-cold atoms trapped near a micro-fabricated surface. The cantilevers allow individual lattice site addressing for atomic state control and readout, and potentially may be useful in optical lattice quantum computation schemes. Assuming resonators can be cooled to their vibrational ground state, the implementation of a two-qubit controlled-NOT gate with atomic internal states and the motional states of the resonator is described. We also consider a protocol for entangling two or more cantilevers on the atom chip with different resonance frequencies, using the trapped atoms as an intermediary. Although similar experiments could be carried out with magnetic microchip traps, the optical confinement scheme we consider may exhibit reduced near-field magnetic noise and decoherence. Prospects for using this novel system for tests of quantum mechanics at macroscopic scales or quantum information processing are discussed.

  14. Controlling and detecting spin correlations of ultracold atoms in optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotzky, Stefan; Chen, Yu-Ao; Schnorrberger, Ute; Cheinet, Patrick; Bloch, Immanuel

    2010-12-31

    We report on the controlled creation of a valence bond state of delocalized effective-spin singlet and triplet dimers by means of a bichromatic optical superlattice. We demonstrate a coherent coupling between the singlet and triplet states and show how the superlattice can be employed to measure the singlet-fraction employing a spin-blockade effect. Our method provides a reliable way to detect and control nearest-neighbor spin correlations in many-body systems of ultracold atoms. Being able to measure these correlations is an important ingredient in studying quantum magnetism in optical lattices. We furthermore employ a SWAP operation between atoms which are part of different triplets, thus effectively increasing their bond-length. Such a SWAP operation provides an important step towards the massively parallel creation of a multiparticle entangled state in the lattice.

  15. Optical absorption enhancement in silicon nanowire arrays with a large lattice constant for photovoltaic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chenxi; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2009-10-26

    In this paper, we use the transfer matrix method to calculate the optical absorptance of vertically-aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays. For fixed filling ratio, significant optical absorption enhancement occurs when the lattice constant is increased from 100 nm to 600 nm. The enhancement arises from an increase in field concentration within the nanowire as well as excitation of guided resonance modes. We quantify the absorption enhancement in terms of ultimate efficiency. Results show that an optimized SiNW array with lattice constant of 600 nm and wire diameter of 540 nm has a 72.4% higher ultimate efficiency than a Si thin film of equal thickness. The enhancement effect can be maintained over a large range of incidence angles.

  16. Nonlinear Sensing With Collective States of Ultracold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-02

    decimation algorithm , a method that takes into account quantum correlations. B.1. In collaboration with D. Blume and X.Y. Yin at Washington State...Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Nonlinear quantum sensing, quantum metrology, ultracold atoms, optical lattices REPORT...with applications to interaction-based quantum metrology, Physical Review A, (10 2014): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.041602 Khan W Mahmud, Lei Jiang

  17. Deconfinement and quantum liquid crystalline states of dipolar fermions in optical lattices

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    We describe a simple model of fermions in quasi-one dimension that features interaction induced deconfinement (a phase transition where the effective dimensionality of the system increases as interactions are turned on) and which can be realised using dipolar fermions in an optical lattice. The model provides a relisation of a "soft quantum matter" phase diagram of strongly-correlated fermions, featuring meta-nematic, smectic and crystalline states, in addition to the normal Fermi liquid. In ...

  18. Nonlinear dynamics of wave packets in PT-symmetric optical lattices near the phase transition point

    CERN Document Server

    Nixon, Sean; Yang, Jianke

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamics of wave packets in PT-symmetric optical lattices near the phase-transition point are analytically studied. A nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation is derived for the envelope of these wave packets. A variety of novel phenomena known to exist in this envelope equation are shown to also exist in the full equation including wave blowup, periodic bound states and solitary wave solutions.

  19. Bloch Oscillations of Two-Component Bose-Einstein Condensates in Optical Lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Huai-Qiang; WANG Zhi-Cheng; JIN Kang; TAN Lei

    2006-01-01

    @@ We study the Bloch oscillations of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates trapped in spin-dependent optical lattices. The influence of the intercomponent atom interaction on the system is discussed in detail Accelerated breakdown of the Bloch oscillations and revival phenomena are found respectively for the repulsive and attractive case. For both the cases, the system will finally be set in a quantum self-trapping state due to dynamical instability.

  20. Nonlinear control of chaotic walking of atoms in an optical lattice

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Argonov V.; Prants, S.V.

    2007-01-01

    Centre-of-mass atomic motion in an optical lattice near the resonance is shown to be a chaotic walking due to the interplay between coherent internal atomic dynamics and spontaneous emission. Statistical properties of chaotic atomic motion can be controlled by the single parameter, the detuning between the atomic transition frequency and the laser frequency. We derive a Fokker-Planck equation in the energetic space to describe the atomic transport near the resonance and demonstrate numericall...

  1. Quantum phases from competing short- and long-range interactions in an optical lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landig, Renate; Hruby, Lorenz; Dogra, Nishant; Landini, Manuele; Mottl, Rafael; Donner, Tobias; Esslinger, Tilman

    2016-04-28

    Insights into complex phenomena in quantum matter can be gained from simulation experiments with ultracold atoms, especially in cases where theoretical characterization is challenging. However, these experiments are mostly limited to short-range collisional interactions; recently observed perturbative effects of long-range interactions were too weak to reach new quantum phases. Here we experimentally realize a bosonic lattice model with competing short- and long-range interactions, and observe the appearance of four distinct quantum phases--a superfluid, a supersolid, a Mott insulator and a charge density wave. Our system is based on an atomic quantum gas trapped in an optical lattice inside a high-finesse optical cavity. The strength of the short-range on-site interactions is controlled by means of the optical lattice depth. The long (infinite)-range interaction potential is mediated by a vacuum mode of the cavity and is independently controlled by tuning the cavity resonance. When probing the phase transition between the Mott insulator and the charge density wave in real time, we observed a behaviour characteristic of a first-order phase transition. Our measurements have accessed a regime for quantum simulation of many-body systems where the physics is determined by the intricate competition between two different types of interactions and the zero point motion of the particles.

  2. Controllable Persistent Atom Current of Bose-Einstein Condensates in an Optical Lattice Ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Gong-Ping; LIANG Jiu-Qing

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the macroscopic quantum state of Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices is studied by solving the periodic Gross-Pitaevskii equation in one-dimensional geometry. It is shown that an exact solution seen to be a travelling wave of excited macroscopic quantum states resultes in a persistent atom current, which can be controlled by adjusting of the barrier height of the optical periodic potential. A critical condition to generate the travelling wave is demonstrated and we moreover propose a practical experiment to realize the persistent atom current in a toroidal atom waveguide.

  3. Magneto-optical response in the arbitrary-Chern number topological phase on square lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yi-Xiang, E-mail: wangyixiang@jiangnan.edu.cn

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we investigate the magneto-optical response in the arbitrary-Chern number topological phase. Based on the Dirac theory, we derive the analytic expressions for the magneto-optical response. More importantly, we construct the model on the possible square lattice and make the numerical calculations with the exact diagonalization method. We find the analytical and numerical results are in good agreement with each other. For the optical absorption spectrum, the low-energy absorptive peaks and the corresponding hopping processes are distinct in different Chern number phases, heavily depending on the filling factor of the system. While for the optical Hall conductivities, the physical mechanisms are revealed for the dichroism of the absorption peaks in response to the right- and left-circularly polarized light. We discuss the feasibility of these results in experiment. - Highlights: • The arbitrary-Chern number topological phase is constructed on square lattice. • The optical absorption spectra are distinct in different Chern number phases. • The physical mechanisms are revealed for the dichroism of the absorption peaks.

  4. 8-dimensional lattice optimized formats in 25-GBaud/s VCSEL based IM/DD optical interconnections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Xiaofeng; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2015-01-01

    Temporally combined 4- and 8-dimensional lattice grids optimized modulation formats for VCSEL based IM/DD short-reach optical inter-connections has been proposed and investigated numerically together with its conventional counterpart PAM-4. © 2015 OSA.......Temporally combined 4- and 8-dimensional lattice grids optimized modulation formats for VCSEL based IM/DD short-reach optical inter-connections has been proposed and investigated numerically together with its conventional counterpart PAM-4. © 2015 OSA....

  5. Bloch oscillations and mean-field effects of Bose-Einstein condensates in 1D optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsch, O; Müller, J H; Cristiani, M; Ciampini, D; Arimondo, E

    2001-10-01

    We have loaded Bose-Einstein condensates into one-dimensional, off-resonant optical lattices and accelerated them by chirping the frequency difference between the two lattice beams. For small values of the lattice well depth, Bloch oscillations were observed. Reducing the potential depth further, Landau-Zener tunneling out of the lowest lattice band, leading to a breakdown of the oscillations, was also studied and used as a probe for the effective potential resulting from mean-field interactions as predicted by Choi and Niu [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 2022 (1999)]. The effective potential was measured for various condensate densities and trap geometries, yielding good qualitative agreement with theoretical calculations.

  6. A quantum gas microscope for detecting single atoms in a Hubbard-regime optical lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakr, Waseem S; Gillen, Jonathon I; Peng, Amy; Fölling, Simon; Greiner, Markus

    2009-11-05

    Recent years have seen tremendous progress in creating complex atomic many-body quantum systems. One approach is to use macroscopic, effectively thermodynamic ensembles of ultracold atoms to create quantum gases and strongly correlated states of matter, and to analyse the bulk properties of the ensemble. For example, bosonic and fermionic atoms in a Hubbard-regime optical lattice can be used for quantum simulations of solid-state models. The opposite approach is to build up microscopic quantum systems atom-by-atom, with complete control over all degrees of freedom. The atoms or ions act as qubits and allow the realization of quantum gates, with the goal of creating highly controllable quantum information systems. Until now, the macroscopic and microscopic strategies have been fairly disconnected. Here we present a quantum gas 'microscope' that bridges the two approaches, realizing a system in which atoms of a macroscopic ensemble are detected individually and a complete set of degrees of freedom for each of them is determined through preparation and measurement. By implementing a high-resolution optical imaging system, single atoms are detected with near-unity fidelity on individual sites of a Hubbard-regime optical lattice. The lattice itself is generated by projecting a holographic mask through the imaging system. It has an arbitrary geometry, chosen to support both strong tunnel coupling between lattice sites and strong on-site confinement. Our approach can be used to directly detect strongly correlated states of matter; in the context of condensed matter simulation, this corresponds to the detection of individual electrons in the simulated crystal. Also, the quantum gas microscope may enable addressing and read-out of large-scale quantum information systems based on ultracold atoms.

  7. Sudden-quench dynamics of Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer states in deep optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuske, Marlon; Mathey, L.; Tiesinga, Eite

    2016-08-01

    We determine the exact dynamics of an initial Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) state of ultracold atoms in a deep hexagonal optical lattice. The dynamical evolution is triggered by a quench of the lattice potential such that the interaction strength Uf is much larger than the hopping amplitude Jf. The quench initiates collective oscillations with frequency | Uf|/2 π in the momentum occupation numbers and imprints an oscillating phase with the same frequency on the BCS order parameter Δ . The oscillation frequency of Δ is not reproduced by treating the time evolution in mean-field theory. In our theory, the momentum noise (i.e., density-density) correlation functions oscillate at frequency | Uf|/2 π as well as at its second harmonic. For a very deep lattice, with zero tunneling energy, the oscillations of momentum occupation numbers are undamped. Nonzero tunneling after the quench leads to dephasing of the different momentum modes and a subsequent damping of the oscillations. The damping occurs even for a finite-temperature initial BCS state, but not for a noninteracting Fermi gas. Furthermore, damping is stronger for larger order parameter and may therefore be used as a signature of the BCS state. Finally, our theory shows that the noise correlation functions in a honeycomb lattice will develop strong anticorrelations near the Dirac point.

  8. Optical induction of Bessel-like lattices in methyl-red doped liquid crystal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantashyan, Paytsar; Drampyan, Rafael; Beeckman, Jeroen; Willekens, Oliver; Neyts, Kristiaan

    2015-03-01

    The optical induction of annular photonic lattices by a traveling Bessel beam has been investigated in Methyl-red (MR) doped nematic liquid crystal (LC). Non-diffracting Bessel beams were formed by an axicon. The induced Bessel-like lattice had a ~15 μm period in the radial direction. The lattice was tested by measuring the forward diffracted power of the recording Bessel beam. The dependency on the angle between the polarization of the laser beam and the director of the LC and on the axial position of the LC cell had been investigated. A diffraction efficiency of 14% had been obtained. Investigations have been performed for different MR dye doping concentrations. An erasure time of the lattice of 60 s has been determined by a 532 nm probe Gaussian beam of 2 mW in a LC cell with MR dye concentration of 1.15 wt%. The induced periodically varying refractive index in the LC medium is analogous to microstructured fibers and allows the study of light localization and soliton behavior in highly nonlinear waveguide arrays.

  9. Quantum many-body dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, Stefan

    2014-04-15

    Ultracold atoms can be trapped in periodic intensity patterns of light created by counterpropagating laser beams, so-called optical lattices. In contrast to its natural counterpart, electrons in a solid state crystal, this man-made setup is very clean and highly isolated from environmental degrees of freedom. Moreover, to a large extent, the experimenter has dynamical control over the relevant system parameters: the interaction between atoms, the tunneling amplitude between lattice sites, and even the dimensionality of the lattice. These advantages render this system a unique platform for the simulation of quantum many-body dynamics for various lattice Hamiltonians as has been demonstrated in several experiments by now. The most significant step in recent times has arguably been the introduction of single-site detection of individual atoms in optical lattices. This technique, based on fluorescence microscopy, opens a new doorway for the study of quantum many-body states: the detection of the microscopic atom configuration. In this thesis, we theoretically explore the dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices for various setups realized in present-day experiments. Our main focus lies on aspects that become experimentally accessible by (realistic extensions of) the novel single-site measurement technique. The first part deals with the expansion of initially confined atoms in a homogeneous lattice, which is one way to create atomic motion in experiments. We analyze the buildup of spatial correlations during the expansion of a finitely extended band insulating state in one dimension. The numerical simulation reveals the creation of remote spin-entangled fermions in the strongly interacting regime. We discuss the experimental observation of such spin-entangled pairs by means of a single-site measurement. Furthermore, we suggest studying the impact of observations on the expansion dynamics for the extreme case of a projective measurement in the spatial occupation

  10. Optically induced lattice dynamics probed with ultrafast x-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. J.; Workman, J.; Wark, J. S.; Averitt, R. D.; Taylor, A. J.; Roberts, J.; McCulloch, Q.; Hof, D. E.; Hur, N.; Cheong, S.-W.; Funk, D. J.

    2008-04-01

    We have studied the picosecond lattice dynamics of optically pumped hexagonal LuMnO3 by using ultrafast x-ray diffraction. The results show a shift and broadening of the diffraction curve due to the stimulated lattice expansion. To understand the transient response of the lattice, the measured time- and angle-resolved diffraction curves are compared to a theoretical calculation based on the dynamical diffraction theory of coherent phonon propagation modified for the hexagonal crystal structure of LuMnO3 . Our simulations reveal that a large coupling coefficient (c13) between the a-b plane and the c axis is required to fit the data. Though we interpret the transient response within the framework of thermal coherent phonons, we do not exclude the possibility of strong nonthermal coupling of the electronic excitation to the atomic framework. We compare this result to our previous coherent phonon studies of LuMnO3 in which we used optical pump-probe spectroscopy.

  11. Bound states and Cooper pairs of molecules in 2D optical lattices bilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho-Guardian, A.; Dominguez-Castro, G.A.; Paredes, R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-08-15

    We investigate the formation of Cooper pairs, bound dimers and the dimer-dimer elastic scattering of ultracold dipolar Fermi molecules confined in a 2D optical lattice bilayer configuration. While the energy and their associated bound states are determined in a variational way, the correlated two-molecule pair is addressed as in the original Cooper formulation. We demonstrate that the 2D lattice confinement favors the formation of zero center mass momentum bound states. Regarding the Cooper pairs binding energy, this depends on the molecule populations in each layer. Maximum binding energies occur for non-zero (zero) pair momentum when the Fermi system is polarized (unpolarized). We find an analytic expression for the dimer-dimer effective interaction in the deep BEC regime. The present analysis represents a route for addressing the BCS-BEC crossover in dipolar Fermi gases confined in 2D optical lattices within the current experimental panorama. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Improved frequency measurement of the $^1S_{0}$-$^3P_{0}$ clock transition in $^{87}$Sr using the Cs fountain clock at NMIJ as a transfer oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Tanabe, Takehiko; Kobayashi, Takumi; Takamizawa, Akifumi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Ikegami, Takeshi; Suzuyama, Tomonari; Inaba, Hajime; Okubo, Sho; Yasuda, Masami; Hong, Feng-Lei; Onae, Atsushi; Hosaka, Kazumoto

    2015-01-01

    We performed an absolute frequency measurement of the $^1S_{0}$-$^3P_{0}$ transition in $^{87}$Sr with a fractional uncertainty of $1.2 \\times 10^{-15}$, which is less than one third that of our previous measurement. A caesium fountain atomic clock was used as a transfer oscillator to reduce the uncertainty of the link between a strontium optical lattice clock and the SI second. The absolute value of the transition frequency is 429 228 004 229 873.56(49) Hz.

  13. Study for optical manipulation of a surfactant-covered droplet using lattice Boltzmann method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Se Bin; Kondaraju, Sasidhar; Sang Lee, Joon

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we simulated deformation and surfactant distribution on the interface of a surfactant-covered droplet using optical tweezers as an external source. Two optical forces attracted a single droplet from the center to both sides. This resulted in an elliptical shape deformation. The droplet deformation was characterized as the change of the magnitudes of surface tension and optical force. In this process, a non-linear relationship among deformation, surface tension, and optical forces was observed. The change in the local surfactant concentration resulting from the application of optical forces was also analyzed and compared with the concentration of surfactants subjected to an extensional flow. Under the optical force influence, the surfactant molecules were concentrated at the droplet equator, which is totally opposite to the surfactants behavior under extensional flow, where the molecules were concentrated at the poles. Lastly, the quasi-equilibrium surfactant distribution was obtained by combining the effects of the optical forces with the extensional flow. All simulations were executed by the lattice Boltzmann method which is a powerful tool for solving micro-scale problems.

  14. Quantum Critical Dynamics of Bose-Einstein Condensates in a Shaken Optical Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Logan W.; Feng, Lei; Ha, Li-Chung; Chin, Cheng

    2016-05-01

    From condensed matter to cosmology, systems which cross a continuous, symmetry-breaking phase transition are expected to generate topological defects whose density scales universally with the rate at which the phase transition is crossed. We experimentally test the application of this universal Kibble-Zurek scaling prediction to quantum phase transitions by studying ultracold bosons in a shaken optical lattice. When the lattice shaking amplitude crosses a critical threshold, an ordinary Bose condensate transitions to an effectively ferromagnetic pseudo-spinor condensate with discrete, magnetized regions separated by domain walls. We appraise the dynamic scaling laws for both the time at which the domain structure forms and the typical size of the domains by varying the quench rate across the transition. We explore the regime in which the universal prediction applies, as well as potential deviations at extreme quench rates.

  15. Probing Matter-Field and Atom-Number Correlations in Optical Lattices by Global Nondestructive Addressing

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlowski, Wojciech; Mekhov, Igor B

    2014-01-01

    We show that light scattering from an ultracold gas reveals not only density correlations, but also matter-field interference at its shortest possible distance in an optical lattice, which defines key properties such as tunneling and matter-field phase gradients. This signal can be enhanced by concentrating probe light between lattice sites rather than at density maxima. As addressing between two single sites is challenging, we focus on global nondestructive scattering, allowing probing order parameters, matter-field quadratures and their squeezing. The scattering angular distribution displays peaks even if classical diffraction is forbidden and we derive generalized Bragg conditions. Light scattering distinguishes all phases in the Mott insulator - superfluid - Bose glass phase transition.

  16. Flow-induced charge modulation in superfluid atomic fermions loaded into an optical kagome lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Daisuke; Sato, Chika; Nikuni, Tetsuro; Tsuchiya, Shunji

    2013-04-05

    We study the superfluid state of atomic fermions in a tunable optical kagome lattice motivated by recent experiments. We show that the imposed superflow induces spatial modulations in the density and order parameter of the pair condensate and leads to a charge modulated superfluid state analogous to a supersolid state. The spatial modulations in the superfluid emerge due to the geometric effect of the kagome lattice that introduces anisotropy in hopping amplitudes of fermion pairs in the presence of superflow. We also study superflow instabilities and find that the critical current limited by the dynamical instability is quite enhanced due to the large density of states associated with the flatband. The charge modulated superfluid state can sustain high temperatures close to the transition temperature that is also enhanced due to the flatband and is therefore realizable in experiments.

  17. Interferometric approach to measuring band topology in 2D optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanin, Dmitry A; Kitagawa, Takuya; Bloch, Immanuel; Demler, Eugene

    2013-04-19

    Recently, optical lattices with nonzero Berry's phases of Bloch bands have been realized. New approaches for measuring Berry's phases and topological properties of bands with experimental tools appropriate for ultracold atoms need to be developed. In this Letter, we propose an interferometric method for measuring Berry's phases of two-dimensional Bloch bands. The key idea is to use a combination of Ramsey interference and Bloch oscillations to measure Zak phases, i.e., Berry's phases for closed trajectories corresponding to reciprocal lattice vectors. We demonstrate that this technique can be used to measure the Berry curvature of Bloch bands, the π Berry's phase of Dirac points, and the first Chern number of topological bands. We discuss several experimentally feasible realizations of this technique, which make it robust against low-frequency magnetic noise.

  18. Atom dynamics in optical lattices: Time-dependent simulation and decoherence suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rinaldis, Sergio; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2004-03-01

    We develop a model to simulate the dynamics of atoms trapped in an optical lattice with gravity in the presence of natural decoherence. The latter, measured by quantum process tomography, is dominated by pure dephasing. The wavefunction is represented on a grid and the time dependent evolution operator is expanded in Chebychev polynomials according to the (t,t') method (*), while a fictitious environment is introduced that simulates the observed dephasing. The control field consists in raising or lowering the potential wells of the atoms and modifying the phase of the laser fields (that results in a translation of the lattice). As an example relevant for quantum information processing, we simulate the effect of bang-bang pulses designed to suppress decoherence. (*) Ref. U.Peskin, R. Kosloff, N. Moiseyev, J. Chem. Phys. 8849 (1994)

  19. Stochastic resonance in periodic potentials realization in a dissipative optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Schiavoni, M; Sánchez-Palencia, L; Renzoni, F; Grynberg, G; Schiavoni, Michele; Carminati, Francois-Regis; Sanchez-Palencia, Laurent; Renzoni, Ferruccio; Proxy, Gilbert Grynberg; ccsd-00000107, ccsd

    2002-01-01

    We have observed the phenomenon of stochastic resonance on the Brillouin propagation modes of a dissipative optical lattice. Such a mode has been excited by applying a moving potential modulation with phase velocity equal to the velocity of the mode. Its amplitude has been characterized by the center-of-mass (CM) velocity of the atomic cloud. At Brillouin resonance, we studied the CM-velocity as a function of the optical pumping rate at a given depth of the potential wells. We have observed a resonant dependence of the CM velocity on the optical pumping rate, corresponding to the noise strength. This corresponds to the experimental observation of stochastic resonance in a periodic potential in the low-damping regime.

  20. On-chip non-reciprocal optical devices based on quantum inspired photonic lattices

    CERN Document Server

    El-Ganainy, Ramy; Eisfeld, Alexander; Christodoulides, Demetrios N

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel geometry for integrated photonic devices that can be used as isolators and polarization splitters based on engineered photonic lattices. Starting from optical waveguide arrays that mimic Fock space representation of a non-interacting two-site Bose Hubbard Hamiltonian, we show that introducing magneto-optic nonreciprocity to these structures leads to a superior optical isolation performance. In the forward propagation direction, an input TM polarized beam experiences a perfect state transfer between the input and output waveguide channels while surface Bloch oscillations block the backward transmission between the same ports. Our analysis indicates a large isolation ratio of 75 dB after a propagation distance of 8 mm inside seven coupled waveguides. Moreover, we demonstrate that, a judicious choice of the nonreciprocity in this same geometry can lead to perfect polarization splitting.

  1. Propagation of an optical vortex in fiber arrays with triangular lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushref, Muhammad Abdulrahman Abdulghani

    The propagation of optical vortices (OVs) in linear and nonlinear media is an important field of research in science and engineering. The most important goal is to explore the properties of guiding dynamics for potential applications such as sensing, all-optical switching, frequency mixing and modulation. In this dissertation, we present analytical methods and numerical techniques to investigate the propagation of an optical vortex in fiber array waveguides. Analytically, we model wave propagation in a waveguide by coupled mode Equations as a simplified approximation. The beam propagation method (BPM) is also employed to numerically solve the paraxial wave Equation by finite difference (FD) techniques. We will investigate the propagation of fields in a 2D triangular lattice with different core arrangements in the optical waveguide. In order to eliminate wave reflections at the boundaries of the computational area, the transparent boundary condition (TBC) is applied. In our explorations for the propagation properties of an optical vortex in a linear and a non-linear triangular lattice medium, images are numerically generated for the field phase and intensity in addition to the interferogram of the vortex field with a reference plane or Gaussian field. The finite difference beam propagation method (FD-BPM) with transparent boundary condition (TBC) is a robust approach to numerically deal with optical field propagations in waveguides. In a fiber array arranged in triangular lattices, new vortices vary with respect to the propagation distance and the number of cores in the fiber array for both linear and nonlinear regimes. With more cores and longer propagation distances, more vortices are created. However, they do not always survive and may disappear while other new vortices are formed at other points. In a linear triangular lattice, the results demonstrated that the number of vortices may increase or decrease with respect to the number of cores in the array lattice

  2. Cascaded optical fiber link using the Internet network for remote clocks comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Chiodo, Nicola; Stefani, Fabio; Wiotte, Fabrice; Camisard, Emilie; Chardonnet, Christian; Santarelli, Giorgio; Amy-Klein, Anne; Pottie, Paul-Eric; Lopez, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    We report a cascaded optical link of 1100 km for ultra-stable frequency distribution over an Internet fiber network. The link is composed of four spans for which the propagation noise is actively compensated. The robustness and the performance of the link are ensured by five fully automated optoelectronic stations, two of them at the link ends, and three deployed on the field and connecting the spans. This device coherently regenerates the optical signal with the heterodyne optical phase locking of a low-noise laser diode. Optical detection of the beat-note signals for the laser lock and the link noise compensation are obtained with stable and low-noise fibered optical interferometer. We show 3.5 days of continuous operation of the noise-compensated 4-span cascaded link leading to fractional frequency instability of 4x10-16 at 1-s measurement time and 1x10-19 at 2000 s. This cascaded link was extended to 1480-km with the same performance. This work is a significant step towards a sustainable wide area ultra-s...

  3. Widely tunable monolithic dual-mode laser for W-band photonic millimeter-wave generation and all-optical clock recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Biwei; Guo, Lu; Zhang, Limeng; Lu, Dna; Huo, Li; Lou, Caiyun; Zhao, Lingjuan

    2016-04-10

    We demonstrate a monolithic dual-mode amplified feedback laser for photonic millimeter-wave generation and all-optical clock recovery. Dual-mode lasing with beating frequency around 100 GHz was realized by using a single-mode distributed feedback (DFB) laser with a short feedback cavity that was integrated by simple quantum-well intermixing technology. By tuning the bias currents of the laser sections, the beating-frequency can be continuously tuned from 75 to 109 GHz, almost covering the entire W-band (75-110 GHz). Furthermore, by using this device, an all-optical clock recovery for 100 Gbit/s return-to-zero on-off-keying signal was achieved with a timing jitter of 301 fs.

  4. Proposal for a Chaotic Ratchet Using Cold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, T. S.; Dando, P. A.; Hutchings, N. A.; Isherwood, M. R.

    2002-10-01

    We investigate a new type of quantum ratchet which may be realized by cold atoms in a double-well optical lattice, pulsed with unequal periods. The classical dynamics is chaotic and we find the classical diffusion rate D is asymmetric in momentum up to a finite time tr. The quantum behavior produces a corresponding asymmetry in the momentum distribution which is ``frozen-in'' by dynamical localization provided the break time t*>=tr. We conclude that the cold atom ratchets require Db/ℏ~1, where b is a small deviation from period-one pulses.

  5. Stability of trapped Bose-Einstein condensates in one-dimensional tilted optical lattice potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Jian-Shu; Liao Xiang-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Using the direct perturbation technique, this paper obtains a general perturbed solution of the Bose-Einstein condensates trapped in one-dimensional tilted optical lattice potential. We also gave out two necessary and sufficient conditions for boundedness of the perturbed solution. Theoretical analytical results and the corresponding numerical results show that the perturbed solution of the Bose-Einstein condensate system is unbounded in general and indicate that the Bose-Einstein condensates are Lyapunov-unstable. However, when the conditions for boundedness of the perturbed solution are satisfied, then the Bose-Einstein condensates are Lyapunov-stable.

  6. Effect of interaction strength on gap solitons of Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Ru-Shu; Yang Jiang-He

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a systematic analytical approach to the study on the dynamic properties of the linear and the nonlinear excitations for quasi-one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate trapped in optical lattices. A novel linear dispersion relation and an algebraic soliton solution of the condensate are derived analytically under consideration of Bose-Einstein condensate with a periodic potential. By analysing the soliton solution, we find that the interatomic interaction strength has an important effect on soliton dynamic properties of Bose-Einstein condensate.

  7. Phase-sensitive detection of Bragg scattering at 1D optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Slama, S; Deh, B; Ludewig, A; Zimmermann, C; Courteille, P W; Courteille, Ph.W.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the observation of Bragg scattering at 1D atomic lattices. Cold atoms are confined by optical dipole forces at the antinodes of a standing wave generated by the two counter-propagating modes of a laser-driven high-finesse ring cavity. By heterodyning the Bragg-scattered light with a reference beam, we obtain detailed information on phase shifts imparted by the Bragg scattering process. Being deep in the Lamb-Dicke regime, the scattered light is not broadened by the motion of individual atoms. In contrast, we have detected signatures of global translatory motion of the atomic grating.

  8. Impurity-induced localization of Bose-Einstein condensates in one-dimensional optical lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jian-Jun; Zhang Ai-Xia; Xue Ju-Kui

    2011-01-01

    The impurity-induced localization of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates loaded into deep one-dimensional optical lattices is studied both analytically and numerically.It is shown that,the analytical criteria for self-trapping and moving soliton/breather of the primary-component condensate are modified significantly by an admixture of an impurity component(the second component).The realization of the self-trapped state and the moving soliton/breather states of the primary-component becomes more easy with the minor admixture of the impurity-component,even if the two components are partly overlapped.

  9. Schrodinger cat states prepared by Bloch oscillation in a spin-dependent optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, B J

    2011-01-01

    We propose to use Bloch oscillation of ultra-cold atoms in a spin-dependent optical lattice to prepare schrodinger cat states. Depending on its internal state, an atom feels different periodic potentials and thus has different energy band structures for its center-of-mass motion. Consequently, under the same gravity force, the wave packets associated with different internal states perform Bloch oscillation of different amplitudes in space and in particular they can be macroscopically displaced with respect to each other. In this way, a cat state can be prepared.

  10. Coherent addressing of individual neutral atoms in a 3D optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yang; Corcovilos, Theodore A; Kumar, Aishwarya; Weiss, David S

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate arbitrary coherent addressing of individual neutral atoms in a $5\\times 5\\times 5$ array formed by an optical lattice. Addressing is accomplished using rapidly reconfigurable crossed laser beams to selectively ac Stark shift target atoms, so that only target atoms are resonant with state-changing microwaves. The effect of these targeted single qubit gates on the quantum information stored in non-targeted atoms is smaller than $3\\times 10^{-3}$ in state fidelity. This is an important step along the path of converting the scalability promise of neutral atoms into reality.

  11. Modulational instability of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates in an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, G R; Nahm, K; Jin, Guang-Ri; Kim, Chul Koo; Nahm, Kyun

    2004-01-01

    We study modulational instability of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates in a deep optical lattice, which is modelled as a coupled discrete nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation. The excitation spectrum and the modulational instability condition of the total system are presented analytically. In the long-wavelength limit, our results agree with the homogeneous two-component Bose-Einstein condensates case. The discreteness effects result in the appearance of the modulational instability for the condensates in miscible region. The numerical calculations confirm our analytical results and show that the interspecies coupling can transfer the instability from one component to another.

  12. Elliptic Function Waves of Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensates in an Optical Lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yuan-Dong

    2009-01-01

    An improved nonlinear Schrodinger equation different from usual one of spinor Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) in an optical lattice are obtained by taking into account a nonlinear term in the equation of motion for probability amplitude of spins carefully. The elliptic function wave solutions of the model are found under specific boundary condition, for example, the two ends of the atomic chain are fixed. In the case of limit the elliptic function wave solutions are reduced into spin-wave-like or solitons.

  13. Coherent Addressing of Individual Neutral Atoms in a 3D Optical Lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Xianli; Corcovilos, Theodore A; Kumar, Aishwarya; Weiss, David S

    2015-07-24

    We demonstrate arbitrary coherent addressing of individual neutral atoms in a 5×5×5 array formed by an optical lattice. Addressing is accomplished using rapidly reconfigurable crossed laser beams to selectively ac Stark shift target atoms, so that only target atoms are resonant with state-changing microwaves. The effect of these targeted single qubit gates on the quantum information stored in nontargeted atoms is smaller than 3×10^{-3} in state fidelity. This is an important step along the path of converting the scalability promise of neutral atoms into reality.

  14. Generating topological optical flux lattices for ultracold atoms by modulated Raman and radio-frequency couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinlong; Xu, Zhi-Fang; You, Li

    2017-01-01

    We propose a scheme to dynamically generate optical flux lattices with nontrivial band topology using amplitude-modulated Raman lasers and radio-frequency (rf) magnetic fields. By tuning the strength of Raman and rf fields, three distinct phases are realized at unit filling for a unit cell. Respectively, these three phases correspond to normal insulator, topological Chern insulator, and semimetal. Nearly nondispersive bands are found to appear in the topological phase, which promises opportunities for investigating strongly correlated quantum states within a simple cold-atom setup. The validity of our proposal is confirmed by comparing the Floquet quasienergies from the evolution operator with the spectrum of the effective Hamiltonian.

  15. Magnetic ordering of three-component ultracold fermionic mixtures in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnikov, Andrii; Hofstetter, Walter

    2014-06-01

    We study finite-temperature magnetic phases of three-component mixtures of ultracold fermions with repulsive interactions in optical lattices with simple cubic or square geometry by means of dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). We focus on the case of one particle per site (1/3 band filling) at moderate interaction strength, where we observe a sequence of thermal phase transitions into two- and three-sublattice ordered states by means of the unrestricted real-space generalization of DMFT. From our quantitative analysis we conclude that long-range ordering in three-component mixtures should be observable at comparable temperatures as in two-component mixtures.

  16. Anisotropic pair superfluidity of trapped two-component Bose gases in an optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongqiang; He, Liang; Hofstetter, Walter

    2013-09-01

    We theoretically investigate the pair-superfluid phase of two-component ultracold gases with attractive inter-species interactions in an optical lattice. We establish the phase diagram for filling n = 1 at zero and finite temperatures, by applying bosonic dynamical mean-field theory, and observe stable pair-superfluid and charge-density wave quantum phases for asymmetric hopping of the two species. While the pair superfluid is found to be robust in the presence of a harmonic trap, we observe that it is destroyed already by a small population imbalance of the two species.

  17. Thermal entanglement in 1D optical lattice chains with nonlinear coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Ling; Yi Xue-Xi; Song He-Shan; Guo Yan-Qing

    2005-01-01

    he thermal entanglement of spin-1 atoms with nonlinear coupling in an optical lattice chain is investigated for two-particle and multi-particle systems. It is found that the relation between linear coupling and nonlinear coupling is the key to determine thermal entanglement, which shows in what kinds of atoms thermal entanglement exists. This result is true both for two-particle and multi-particle systems. For multi-particle systems, the thermal entanglement does not decrease greatly, and the critical temperature decreases only slightly.

  18. Two-component Fermions in Optical Lattice with Spatially Alternating Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Anh-Tuan; Nguyen, Thi-Hai-Yen; Tran, Thi-Thu-Trang; Le, Duc-Anh

    2016-10-01

    We investigate two-component mass-imbalanced fermions in an optical lattice with spatially modulated interactions by using two-site dynamical mean field theory. At half-filling and zero temperature, the phase diagram of the system is analytically obtained, in which the metallic region is reduced with increasing the mass imbalance. The ground-state properties of the fermionic system are discussed from the behaviors of both the spin-dependent quasi-particle weight at the Fermi level and the double occupancy for each sublattice as functions of the local interaction strengths for various values of the mass imbalance.

  19. Magnons interaction of spinor Bose–Einstein condensates in an optical lattice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yong-Qing Liu

    2009-12-01

    We study the interaction of magnons in dipolar spinor Bose–Einstein condensates in an optical lattice. By means of Holstein–Primakoff and Fourier transformations the energy spectra of the ground and the excited states is obtained analytically. Our results show that the collision of magnons is elastic which is expressed by the conservation of wave numbers in the process of collision. At last, we found that the interaction of magnons is attractive which tends to self-localization to form spin waves, i.e., a cluster of a macroscopic number of coherent magnons. Because of the attraction, the instability of spin wave brings about the existence of solitary wave.

  20. Chaos control of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a moving optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiying; Feng, Xiuqin; Yao, Zhihai

    2016-07-01

    Chaos control of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) loaded into a moving optical lattice with attractive interaction is investigated on the basis of Lyapunov stability theory. Three methods are designed to control chaos in BEC. As a controller, a bias constant, periodic force, or wavelet function feedback is added to the BEC system. Numerical simulations reveal that chaotic behavior can be well controlled to achieve periodicity by regulating control parameters. Different periodic orbits are available for different control parameters only if the maximal Lyapunov exponent of the system is negative. The abundant effect of chaotic control is also demonstrated numerically. Chaos control can be realized effectively by using our proposed control strategies.

  1. Prescaled phase-locked loop using phase modulation and spectral filtering and its application to clock extraction from 160-Gbit/s optical-time-division multiplexed signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Koji; Katoh, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Kazuro

    2006-05-01

    We propose a prescaled phase-locked loop (PLL) using a simple optoelectronic phase comparator based on phase modulation and spectral filtering. Our phase comparator has a high dynamic range of over 9 dB and a high sensitivity comparable to that using an electrical mixer. A PLL composed of our phase comparator enables to extract a low-noise 10-GHz clock from a 160-Gbit/s optical-time-division multiplexed (OTDM) signal.

  2. Optical generation of a spatially variant two-dimensional lattice structure by using a phase only spatial light modulator

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Manish

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple and straightforward method to generate a spatially variant lattice structures by optical interference lithography method. Using this method, it is possible to independently vary the orientation and period of the two-dimensional lattice. The method consists of two steps which are: numerical synthesis of corresponding phase mask by employing a two-dimensional integrated gradient calculations and experimental implementation of synthesized phase mask by making use of a phase only spatial light modulator in an optical 4f Fourier filtering setup. As a working example, we provide the experimental fabrication of a spatially variant square lattice structure which has the possibility to guide a Gaussian beam through a 90{\\deg} bend by photonic crystal self-collimation phenomena. The method is digitally reconfigurable, is completely scalable and could be extended to other kind of lattices as well.

  3. Optical generation of a spatially variant two-dimensional lattice structure by using a phase only spatial light modulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Manish, E-mail: manishk@physics.iitd.ac.in; Joseph, Joby, E-mail: joby@physics.iitd.ac.in [Photonics Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-08-04

    We propose a simple and straightforward method to generate spatially variant lattice structures by optical interference lithography method. Using this method, it is possible to independently vary the orientation and period of the two-dimensional lattice. The method consists of two steps which are: numerical synthesis of corresponding phase mask by employing a two-dimensional integrated gradient calculations and experimental implementation of synthesized phase mask by making use of a phase only spatial light modulator in an optical 4f Fourier filtering setup. As a working example, we provide the experimental fabrication of a spatially variant square lattice structure which has the possibility to guide a Gaussian beam through a 90° bend by photonic crystal self-collimation phenomena. The method is digitally reconfigurable, is completely scalable, and could be extended to other kind of lattices as well.

  4. Dynamic stability and manipulation of bright matter-wave solitons by optical lattices in Bose-Einstein condensates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Chang-Sheng; Li Jing; Zong Feng-De

    2012-01-01

    An extended variation approach to describing the dynamic evolution of self-attractive Bose-Einstein condensates is developed.We consider bright matter-wave solitons in the presence of a parabolic magnetic potential and a timespace periodic optical lattice.The dynamics of condensates is shown to be well approximated by four coupled nonlinear differential equations.A noteworthy feature is that the extended variation approach gives a critical strength ratio to support multiple stable lattice sites for the condensate.We further examine the existence of the solitons and their stabilities at the multiple stable lattice sites. In this case,the analytical predictions of Bose-Einstein condensates variational dynamics are found to be in good agreement with numerical simulations.We then find a stable region for successful manipulating matter-wave solitons without collapse,which are dragged from an initial stationary to a prescribed position by a moving periodic optical lattice.

  5. Inelastic light scattering to probe strongly correlated bosons in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fort, Chiara; Fabbri, Nicole; Fallani, Leonardo; Clement, David; Inguscio, Massimo, E-mail: fort@lens.unifi.it [European Laboratory for Nonlinear Spectroscopy (LENS), via Nello Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2011-01-10

    We have used inelastic light scattering to study correlated phases of an array of one-dimensional interacting Bose gases. In the linear response regime, the observed spectra are proportional to the dynamic structure factor. In particular we have investigated the superfluid to Mott insulator crossover loading the one-dimensional gases in an optical lattice and monitoring the appearance of an energy gap due to finite particle-hole excitation energy. We attribute the low frequency side of the spectra to the presence of some superfluid and normal phase fraction between the Mott insulator regions with different fillings produced in the inhomogeneous systems. In the Mott phase we also investigated excitations to higher excited bands of the optical lattice, the spectra obtained in this case being connected to the single particle spectral function. In one-dimensional systems the effect of thermal fluctuations and interactions is enhanced by the reduced dimensionality showing up in the dynamic structure factor. We measured the dynamic structure factor of an array of one-dimensional bosonic gases pointing out the effect of temperature-induced phase fluctuations in reducing the coherence length of the system.

  6. External meeting - Geneva University: A lab in a trap: quantum gases in optical lattices

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY ECOLE DE PHYSIQUE Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 - Tél: 022 379 62 73 - Fax: 022 379 69 92 Monday 16 April 2007 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 - Stückelberg Auditorium A lab in a trap: quantum gases in optical lattices by Prof. Tilman Esslinger / Department of Physics, ETH Zurich The field of ultra cold quantum gases has seen an astonishing development during the last ten years. With the demonstration of Bose-Einstein condensation in weakly interacting atomic gases a theoretical concept of unique beauty could be witnessed experimentally. Very recent developments have now made it possible to engineer atomic many-body systems which are dominated by strong interactions. A major driving force for these advances are experiments in which ultracold atoms are trapped in optical lattices. These systems provide anew avenue for designing and studying quantum many-body systems. Exposed to the crystal structure of interfering laser wave...

  7. History of early atomic clocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, N.F. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Lyman Lab. of Physics

    2005-06-01

    This review of the history of early atomic clocks includes early atomic beam magnetic resonance, methods of separated and successive oscillatory fields, microwave absorption, optical pumping and atomic masers. (author)

  8. Design and performance of clock-recovery GaAs ICs for high-speed optical communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Yuhki; Sano, Eiichi; Nakamura, Makoto; Ishihara, Noboru; Kikuchi, Hiroyuki; Ono, Takashi

    1993-05-01

    Design and performance of clock-recovery GaAs ICs are presented. Four kinds of ICs were developed: a limiting amplifier, a tuning amplifier, a rectifier, and a differentiator. The cascaded limiting amplifier together with a tuning amplifier achieved a 58-dB gain and a 10-degree phase deviation with 20-dB input dynamic range at 10 GHz. A clock-recovery circuit successfully extracts a low-jitter 10-GHz clock signal of 1-dBm constant power from 10-Gb/s NRZ pseudorandom bit streams using a pulse pattern generator.

  9. Bloch oscillation and Landau-Zener tunnelling in a modulated optical lattice in a photovoltaic photorefractive crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Bing-Zhi; Cui Hu; Li Xiang-Heng; She Wei-Long

    2009-01-01

    We theoretically study the beam dynamical hehaviour in a modulated optical lattice with a quadratic potential in a photovoltaic photorefractive crystal. We find that two different Bloch oscillation patterns appear for the excitation of both broad and narrow light beams. One kind of optical Landau-Zener tunnelling also appears upon the Bloch oscillation and can be controlled by adjusting the parameter of the optical lattice. Unlike the case of linear potential, the energy radiation due to Landau-Zener tunnelling can be confined in modulated lattices of this kind. For high input intensity levels, the Landau-Zener tunnelling is suppressed by the photovoltaic photorefractive nonlinearity and a symmetry breaking of beam propagation from the modulational instability appears.

  10. Optical Bloch oscillations of an Airy beam in a photonic lattice with a linear transverse index gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fajun; Li, Baoran; Wang, Meirong; Zhu, Weiren; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Sheng; Premaratne, Malin; Zhao, Jianlin

    2014-09-22

    We theoretically report the existence of optical Bloch oscillations (BO) of an Airy beam in a one-dimensional optically induced photonic lattice with a linear transverse index gradient. The Airy beam experiencing optical BO shows a more robust non-diffracting feature than its counterparts in free space or in a uniform photonic lattice. Interestingly, a periodical recurrence of Airy shape accompanied with constant alternation of its acceleration direction is also found during the BO. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the period and amplitude of BO of an Airy beam can be readily controlled over a wide range by varying the index gradient and/or the lattice period. Exploiting these features, we propose a scheme to rout an Airy beam to a predefined output channel without losing its characteristics by longitudinally modulating the transverse index gradient.

  11. Ultra-stable clock laser system development towards space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świerad, Dariusz; Häfner, Sebastian; Vogt, Stefan; Venon, Bertrand; Holleville, David; Bize, Sébastien; Kulosa, André; Bode, Sebastian; Singh, Yeshpal; Bongs, Kai; Rasel, Ernst Maria; Lodewyck, Jérôme; Le Targat, Rodolphe; Lisdat, Christian; Sterr, Uwe

    2016-09-01

    The increasing performance of optical lattice clocks has made them attractive for scientific applications in space and thus has pushed the development of their components including the interrogation lasers of the clock transitions towards being suitable for space, which amongst others requires making them more power efficient, radiation hardened, smaller, lighter as well as more mechanically stable. Here we present the development towards a space-compatible interrogation laser system for a strontium lattice clock constructed within the Space Optical Clock (SOC2) project where we have concentrated on mechanical rigidity and size. The laser reaches a fractional frequency instability of 7.9 × 10-16 at 300 ms averaging time. The laser system uses a single extended cavity diode laser that gives enough power for interrogating the atoms, frequency comparison by a frequency comb and diagnostics. It includes fibre link stabilisation to the atomic package and to the comb. The optics module containing the laser has dimensions 60 × 45 × 8 cm3 and the ultra-stable reference cavity used for frequency stabilisation with its vacuum system takes 30 × 30 × 30 cm3. The acceleration sensitivities in three orthogonal directions of the cavity are 3.6 × 10-10/g, 5.8 × 10-10/g and 3.1 × 10-10/g, where g ≈ 9.8 m/s2 is the standard gravitational acceleration.

  12. High-accuracy optical clock based on the octupole transition in 171Yb+

    CERN Document Server

    Huntemann, N; Lipphardt, B; Weyers, S; Tamm, Chr; Peik, E

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally investigate an optical frequency standard based on the 467 nm (642 THz) electric-octupole reference transition 2S1/2(F=0) -> F7/2(F=3) in a single trapped 171Yb+ ion. The extraordinary features of this transition result from the long natural lifetime and from the 4f136s2 configuration of the upper state. The electric quadrupole moment of the 2F7/2 state is measured as -0.041(5) e(a0)^2, where e is the elementary charge and a0 the Bohr radius. We also obtain information on the differential scalar and tensorial components of the static polarizability and of the probe light induced ac Stark shift of the octupole transition. With a real-time extrapolation scheme that eliminates this shift, the unperturbed transition frequency is realized with a fractional uncertainty of 7.1x10^(-17). The frequency is measured as 642 121 496 772 645.15(52) Hz with the uncertainty essentially determined by the employed caesium fountain reference.

  13. High-accuracy optical clock based on the octupole transition in 171Yb+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntemann, N; Okhapkin, M; Lipphardt, B; Weyers, S; Tamm, Chr; Peik, E

    2012-03-02

    We experimentally investigate an optical frequency standard based on the 467 nm (642 THz) electric-octupole reference transition (2)S(1/2)(F=0)→(2)F(7/2)(F=3) in a single trapped (171)Yb(+) ion. The extraordinary features of this transition result from the long natural lifetime and from the 4f(13)6s(2) configuration of the upper state. The electric-quadrupole moment of the (2)F(7/2) state is measured as -0.041(5)ea(0)(2), where e is the elementary charge and a(0) the Bohr radius. We also obtain information on the differential scalar and tensorial components of the static polarizability and of the probe-light-induced ac Stark shift of the octupole transition. With a real-time extrapolation scheme that eliminates this shift, the unperturbed transition frequency is realized with a fractional uncertainty of 7.1×10(-17). The frequency is measured as 642 121 496 772 645.15(52) Hz.

  14. Spatially localized structures and oscillons in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates confined in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charukhchyan, M. V.; Sedov, E. S.; Arakelian, S. M.; Alodjants, A. P.

    2014-06-01

    We consider the problem of formation of small-amplitude spatially localized oscillatory structures for atomic Bose-Einstein condensates confined in two- and three-dimensional optical lattices, respectively. Our approach is based on applying the regions with different signs of atomic effective masses where an atomic system exhibits effective hyperbolic dispersion within the first Brillouin zone. By using the kp method we have demonstrated mapping of the initial Gross-Pitaevskii equation on nonlinear Klein-Gordon and/or Ginzburg-Landau-Higgs equations, which is inherent in matter fields within ϕ4-field theories. Formation of breatherlike oscillating localized states—atomic oscillons—as well as kink-shaped states have been predicted in this case. Apart from classical field theories atomic field oscillons occurring in finite lattice structures possess a critical number of particles for their formation. The obtained results pave the way to simulating some analogues of fundamental cosmological processes occurring during our Universe's evolution and to modeling nonlinear hyperbolic metamaterials with condensed matter (atomic) systems.

  15. Topological semimetal: a probable new state of quantum optical lattice gases protected by D4 symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Liu, W. Vincent; Das Sarma, S.

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate that a novel topological semimetal emerges as a parity-protected critical theory for fermionic atoms loaded in the p and d orbital bands of a two-dimensional optical lattice. The new quantum state is characterized by a parabolic band-degeneracy point with Berry flux 2 π , in sharp contrast to the π flux of Dirac points as in graphene. We prove that this topological liquid is a universal property for all lattices of D4 point group symmetry and the band degeneracy is protected by odd parity. Turning on interparticle repulsive interaction, the system undergoes a phase transition to a topological insulator, whose experimental signature includes chiral gapless domain-wall modes, reminiscent of quantum Hall edge states. KS and SDS acknowledge the support of JQI-NSF-PFC, AFOSR-MURI, ARO-DARPA-OLE and ARO-MURI. W.V.L. is supported by ARO and ARO-DARPA-OLE. We thank the KITP at UCSB for its hospitality where this research is supported in part by NSF Grant No. PHY05-51164.

  16. Impact of Nb3Sn Dipoles on the LHC Lattice and Beam Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Holzer, B

    2014-01-01

    In view of the LHC operation at full energy (7 TeV) as well as in preparation for the HL-LHC luminosity upgrade an improved collimation system is planned, which foresees additional collimators in the dispersion suppressor region of the ring. To deliver the space needed in the cold part of the LHC lattice the use of new, stronger dipole magnets based on Nb3Sn technology is proposed to deliver room for the new collimators. Based on field calculations and assumptions for their multipole content the impact of these new magnets on the machine optics, the lattice design and finally the dynamic aperture is discussed. Persistent currents especially at low field play an essential role and accordingly additional multipole corrector coils might be needed to compensate the field errors at LHC injection energy and the low part of the acceleration procedure. The calculations presented here give estimates for the "allowed" multipole tolerances of the new magnets and propose - where needed - the installation of spool piece c...

  17. First-principles study of the electronic, optical properties and lattice dynamics of tantalum oxynitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pan; Fan, Weiliu; Li, Yanlu; Sun, Honggang; Cheng, Xiufeng; Zhao, Xian; Jiang, Minhua

    2010-08-01

    First-principles calculations of the electronic, optical properties and lattice dynamics of tantalum oxynitride are performed with the density functional theory plane-wave pseudopotential method. The analysis of the electronic structure shows a covalent nature in Ta-N bonds and Ta-O bonds. The hybridization of anion 2p and Ta 5d states results in enhanced dispersion of the valence band, raising the top of the valence band and leading to the visible-light response in TaON. It has a high dielectric constant, and the anisotropy is displayed obviously in the lower energy region. Our calculation indicated that TaON has excellent dielectric properties along [010] direction. Various optical properties, including the reflectivity, absorption coefficient, refractive index, and the energy-loss spectrum are derived from the complex dielectric function. We also present phonon dispersion relation, zone-center optical mode frequency, density of phonon states, and some thermodynamic properties. The experimental IR modes (B(u) at 808 cm(-1) and A(u) at 863 cm(-1)) are reproduced well and assigned to a combination of stretching and bending vibrations for the Ta-N bond and Ta-O bond. The thermodynamic properties of TaON, such as heat capacity and Debye temperature, which were important parameters for the measurement of crystal physical properties, were first given for reference. Our investigations provide useful information for the potential application of this material.

  18. Proposal for the Quantum Simulation of the CP(2) Model on Optical Lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Laflamme, Catherine; Dalmonte, Marcello; Gerber, Urs; Mejía-Díaz, Héctor; Bietenholz, Wolfgang; Wiese, Uwe-Jens; Zoller, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The 2d CP(N-1) models share a number of features with QCD, like asymptotic freedom, a dynamically generated mass gap and topological sectors. They have been formulated and analysed successfully in the framework of the so-called D-theory, which provides a smooth access to the continuum limit. In that framework, we propose an experimental set-up for the quantum simulation of the CP(2) model. It is based on ultra-cold Alkaline-Earth Atoms (AEAs) located on the sites of an optical lattice, where the nuclear spins represent the relevant degrees of freedom. We present numerical results for the correlation length and for the real time decay of a false vacuum, to be compared with such a future experiment. The latter could also enable the exploration of theta-vacua and of the phase diagram at finite chemical potentials, since it does not suffer from any sign problem.

  19. Quantum engineering of a low-entropy gas of heteronuclear bosonic molecules in an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Reichsöllner, Lukas; Takekoshi, Tetsu; Grimm, Rudolf; Nägerl, Hanns-Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We produce low-entropy samples of ultracold 87Rb133Cs Feshbach molecules in an optical lattice with a filling fraction exceeding 30%. Starting from two spatially separated Bose-Einstein condensates of Rb and Cs atoms, Rb-Cs atom pairs are efficiently produced in a sample mixing process that utilizes the superfluid-to-Mott insulator quantum phase transition twice, first for the Cs sample, then for the Rb sample, after nulling the Rb-Cs interaction at a Feshbach resonance's zero crossing. We characterize the mixing process in terms of sample overlap and mixing speed. The dense and ultracold sample of more than 5000 RbCs molecules is an ideal starting point for experiments in the context of quantum many-body physics with long-range dipolar interactions.

  20. Energy Spectrum of Two-Component Bose-Einstein Condensates in Optical Lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Jiu-Rong; LIU Jin-Ming; JING Hui; WANG Yu-Zhu

    2005-01-01

    With the method of Green's function, we investigate the energy spectra of two-component ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices. We find that there are two energy bands for each component. The critical condition of the superfluid-Mott insulator phase transition is determined by the energy band structure. We also find that the nearest neighboring and on-site interactions fail to change the structure of energy bands, but shift the energy bands only.According to the conditions of the phase transitions, three stable superfluid and Mott insulating phases can be found by adjusting the experiment parameters. We also discuss the possibility of observing these new phases and their transitions in further experiments.

  1. Self-localization of Bose–Einstein condensates in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Johannes; Fleischmann, Ragnar

    2017-03-01

    Mean field and beyond mean field model calculations of Bose–Einstein condensates trapped in optical lattices have shown that initially homogeneous condensates can evolve into self-trapped, strongly localized states in the presence of weak boundary dissipation, a phenomenon called self-localization. A dynamical phase transition from extended to localized states can be observed when the effective nonlinearity exceeds a critical threshold {{{Λ }}}{eff}{{c}}. We investigate this phase transition to self-localization in the mean field approximation of the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We quantitatively characterize the properties of the discrete breathers, i.e. the nonlinear localized solutions, at the phase transition. This leads us to propose and numerically verify an analytical lower bound {{{Λ }}}{eff}{{L}} for the critical nonlinearity based on the idea of self-induced Anderson localization.

  2. Topological superfluid state of fermions on a p-band optical square lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ya-Jie; He, Jing; Zang, Chun-Li; Kou, Su-Peng

    2012-08-01

    In this paper we study an interacting mixture of ultracold spinless fermions on the s band and bosons on the p band in a 2D square optical lattice, of which the effective model is reduced to a p-band fermionic system with nearest-neighbor attractive interaction. From this effective p-band model, we find a translation symmetry protected Z2 topological superfluid that is characterized by a special fermion parity pattern at high-symmetry points in momentum space k=(0,0), (0,π), (π,0), (π,π). Such Z2 topological superfluid supports the robust Majorana edge modes and a new type of low-energy excitation—(supersymmetric) Z2 link excitation.

  3. Formation of ultracold SrYb molecules in an optical lattice by photoassociation spectroscopy: theoretical prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Tomza, Michal; Jeziorska, Malgorzata; Koch, Christiane P; Moszynski, Robert

    2011-01-01

    State-of-the-art {\\em ab initio} techniques have been applied to compute the potential energy curves for the SrYb molecule in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for the ground state and first fifteen excited singlet and triplet states within the coupled-cluster framework. The leading long-range coefficients describing the dispersion interactions at large interatomic distances are also reported. The electric transition dipole moments have been obtained as the first residue of the polarization propagator computed with the linear response coupled-cluster method restricted to single and double excitations. Spin-orbit coupling matrix elements have been evaluated using the multireference configuration interaction method restricted to single and double excitations with a large active space. The electronic structure data was employed to investigate the possibility of forming deeply bound ultracold SrYb molecules in an optical lattice in a photoassociation experiment using continuous-wave lasers. Photoassociation near...

  4. Pair formation in Fermi systems with population imbalance in one- and two-dimensional optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batrouni, George

    2011-03-01

    I will discuss pairing in fermionic systems in one- and two-dimensional optical lattices with population imbalance. This will be done in the context of the attractive fermionic Hubbard model using the Stochastic Green Function algorithm in d=1 while for d=2 we use Determinant Quantum Monte Carlo. This is the first exact QMC study examining the effects of finite temperature which is very important in experiments on ultra-cold atoms. Our results show that, in the ground state, the dominant pairing mechanism is at nonzero center of mass momentum, i.e. FFLO. I will then discuss the effect of finite temperature in the uniform and confined systems and present finite temperature phase diagrams. The numerical results will be compared with experiments. With M. J. Wolak (CQT, National University of Singapore) and V. G. Rousseau (Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University).

  5. Tunneling dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates with higher-order interactions in optical lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tie Lu; Xue Ju-Kui

    2011-01-01

    The nonlinear Landau-Zener tunneling and nonlinear Rabi oscillations of Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) with higher-order atomic interaction between the Bloch bands in an accelerating optical lattice are discussed.Within the two-level model,the tunneling probability of BEC with higher-order atomic interaction between Bloch bands is obtained.We finds that the tunneling rate is closely related to the higher-order atomic interaction.Furthermore,the nonlinear Rabi oscillations of BEC with higher-order atomic interaction between the bands are discussed by imposing a periodic modulation on the level bias.Analytical expressions of the critical higher-order atomic interaction for suppressing/enhancing the Rabi oscillations are obtained.It is shown that the critical value strongly depends on the modulation parameters (i.e.,the modulation amplitude and frequency) and the strength of periodic potential.

  6. Chaotic synchronization in Bose Einstein condensate of moving optical lattices via linear coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志颖; 冯秀琴; 姚治海; 贾洪洋

    2015-01-01

    A systematic study of the chaotic synchronization of Bose–Einstein condensed body is performed using linear cou-pling method based on Lyapunov stability theory, Sylvester’s criterion, and Gerschgorin disc theorem. The chaotic synchro-nization of Bose–Einstein condensed body in moving optical lattices is realized by linear coupling. The relationship be-tween the synchronization time and coupling coefficient is obtained. Both the single-variable coupling and double-variable coupling are effective. The results of numerical calculation prove that the chaotic synchronization of double-variable cou-pling is faster than that of single-variable coupling and small coupling coefficient can achieve the chaotic synchronization. Weak noise has little influence on synchronization effect, so the linear coupling technology is suitable for the chaotic synchronization of Bose–Einstein condensate.

  7. Topological phase transition and charge pumping in a one-dimensional periodically driven optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhihao; Zhang, Yunbo; Chen, Shu

    2017-07-01

    Experimental realizations of topological quantum systems and detections of topological invariants in ultracold atomic systems have been a greatly attractive topic. In this work, we propose a scheme to realize topologically different phases in a bichromatic optical lattice subjected to a periodically driven tilt harmonic oscillation, which can be effectively described by a superlattice model with tunable long-range hopping processes. By tuning the ratio of nearest-neighbor (NN) and next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) hopping amplitudes, the system undergoes a topological phase transition accompanied by the change of topological numbers of the lowest band from -1 to 2. Using a slowly time-periodic modulation, the system emerges distinct quantized topological pumped charges (TPCs) of atoms in the filled band for different topological phases. Our scheme is realizable in current cold atomic technique.

  8. Uniform synthetic magnetic field and effective mass for cold atoms in a shaken optical lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sols, Fernando; Creffield, Charles E.; Pieplow, Gregor; Goldman, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    Cold atoms can be made to experience synthetic magnetic fields when placed in a suitably driven optical lattice. For coherent systems the switching protocol plays an essential role in determining the long time behavior. Relatively simple driving schemes may generate a uniform magnetic flux but an inhomogeneous effective mass. A two-stage split driving scheme can recover a uniform effective mass but at the price of rendering the magnetic field space dependent. We propose a four-stage split driving that generates uniform field and mass of arbitrary values for all driving amplitudes. Finally, we study a modified two-stage split driving approach that enables uniform field and mass for most of but not all values of the magnetic field. Work supported by MINECO (Spain) under Grant FIS2013-41716-P, by FRS-FNRS (Belgium), and by BSPO under PAI Project No. P7/18 DYGEST.

  9. Quench-induced resonant tunneling mechanisms of bosons in an optical lattice with harmonic confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Koutentakis, G M; Schmelcher, P

    2016-01-01

    The non-equilibrium dynamics of small boson ensembles in a one-dimensional optical lattice is explored upon a sudden quench of an additional harmonic trap from strong to weak confinement. We find that the competition between the initial localization and the repulsive interaction leads to a resonant response of the system for intermediate quench amplitudes, corresponding to avoided crossings in the many-body eigenspectrum with varying final trap frequency. In particular, we show that these avoided crossings can be utilized to prepare the system in a desired state. The dynamical response is shown to depend on both the interaction strength as well as the number of atoms manifesting the many-body nature of the tunneling dynamics.

  10. Quench-induced resonant tunneling mechanisms of bosons in an optical lattice with harmonic confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutentakis, G. M.; Mistakidis, S. I.; Schmelcher, P.

    2017-01-01

    The nonequilibrium dynamics of small boson ensembles in a one-dimensional optical lattice is explored upon a sudden quench of an additional harmonic trap from strong to weak confinement. We find that the competition between the initial localization and the repulsive interaction leads to a resonant response of the system for intermediate quench amplitudes, corresponding to avoided crossings in the many-body eigenspectrum with varying final trap frequency. In particular, we show that these avoided crossings can be utilized to prepare the system in a desired state. The dynamical response is shown to depend on both the interaction strength as well as the number of atoms manifesting the many-body nature of the tunneling dynamics.

  11. Phase diagram of two-component bosons on an optical lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altman, Ehud; Hofstetter, Walter; Demler, Eugene; Lukin, Mikhail D [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2003-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the phase diagram of two-component bosons on an optical lattice. A new formalism is developed which treats the effective spin interactions in the Mott and superfluid phases on the same footing. Using this new approach we chart the phase boundaries of the broken spin symmetry states up to the Mott to superfluid transition and beyond. Near the transition point, the magnitude of spin exchange can be very large, which facilitates the experimental realization of spin-ordered states. We find that spin and quantum fluctuations have a dramatic effect on the transition, making it first order in extended regions of the phase diagram. When each species is at integer filling, an additional phase transition may occur, from a spin-ordered insulator to a Mott insulator with no broken symmetries. We determine the phase boundaries in this regime and show that this is essentially a Mott transition in the spin sector.

  12. Magnetic phase transitions of spin-1 ultracold bosons in a cubic optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongqiang; He, Liang; Hofstetter, Walter

    2016-03-01

    We investigate strongly correlated spin-1 ultracold bosons with antiferromagnetic interactions in a cubic optical lattice, based on bosonic dynamical mean-field theory. Rich phase diagrams of the system are mapped out at both zero and finite temperature, and in particular the existence of a spin-singlet condensate is established. Interestingly, at finite temperature, we find that the superfluid can be heated into a Mott insulator with even (odd) filling via a first- (second-) order phase transition, analogous to the Pomeranchuk effect in 3He. Moreover, for typical experimental setups, we estimate the critical temperature (entropy) for different ordered phases and our results suggest that direct experimental observation of these phases is promising.

  13. Magnetic phases of mass- and population-imbalanced ultracold fermionic mixtures in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnikov, Andrii; Snoek, Michiel; Hofstetter, Walter

    2013-05-01

    We study magnetic phases of two-component mixtures of ultracold fermions with repulsive interactions in optical lattices in the presence of both hopping and population imbalance by means of dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). It is shown that these mixtures can have easy-axis antiferromagnetic, ferrimagnetic, charge-density wave, and canted-antiferromagnetic order or be unordered depending on parameters of the system. We study the resulting phase diagram in detail and investigate the stability of the different phases with respect to thermal fluctuations. We also perform a quantitative analysis for a gas confined in a harmonic trap, both within the local density approximation and using a full real-space generalization of DMFT.

  14. Bimodal momentum distribution of laser-cooled atoms in optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Dion, Claude M; Kastberg, Anders; Sjölund, Peder

    2016-01-01

    We study, numerically and experimentally, the momentum distribution of atoms cooled in optical lattices. Using semi-classical simulations, we show that this distribution is bimodal, made up of a central feature corresponding to "cold", trapped atoms, with tails of "hot", untrapped atoms, and that this holds true also for very shallow potentials. Careful analysis of the distribution of high-momentum untrapped atoms, both from simulations and experiments, shows that the tails of the distribution does not follow a normal law, hinting at a power-law distribution and non-ergodic behavior. We also revisit the phenomenon of d\\'ecrochage, the potential depth below which the temperature of the atoms starts increasing.

  15. Physics Colloquium - Tight-binding in a new light: Photons in optical lattices

    CERN Multimedia

    Ecole de Physique - Université de Genève

    2011-01-01

    Geneva University Physics Department 24, Quai Ernest Ansermet CH-1211 Geneva 4   Lundi 21 mars 2011, 17h00 Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg Tight-binding in a new light: Photons in optical lattices Dr. Niels Madsen Department of Physics, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea, United Kingdom   Antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, has been produced at low energies at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) since 2002. Antihydrogen is of interest for use in a precision test of nature's fundamental symmetries. The charge conjugation/parity/time reversal (CPT) theorem, a crucial part of the foundation of the standard model of elementary particles and interactions, demands that hydrogen and antihydrogen have the same spectrum. Given the current experimental precision of measurements on the hydrogen atom, subjecting antihydrogen to rigorous spectroscopic examination would constitute a compelling, model-independent test of CPT. Antihydrogen co...

  16. LIGHT SOURCE: Optics for the lattice of the compact storage ring for a Compton X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Pei-Cheng; Wang, Yu; Shen, Xiao-Zhe; Huang, Wen-Hui; Yan, Li-Xin; Du, Ying-Chao; Li, Ren-Kai; Tang, Chuan-Xiang

    2009-06-01

    We present two types of optics for the lattice of a compact storage ring for a Compton X-ray source. The optics design for different operation modes of the storage ring are discussed in detail. For the pulse mode optics, an IBS-suppression scheme is applied to optimize the optics for lower IBS emittance growth rate; as for the steady mode, the method to control momentum compact factor is adopted [Gladkikh P, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 050702] to obtain stability of the electron beam.

  17. Controllable diffusion of cold atoms in a harmonically driven and tilted optical lattice: decoherence by spontaneous emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Navinder

    2008-06-01

    We have studied some transport properties of cold atoms in an accelerated optical lattice in the presence of decohering effects due to spontaneous emission. One new feature added is the effect of an external ac drive. As a result we obtain a tunable diffusion coefficient and its nonlinear enhancement with increasing drive amplitude. We report an interesting maximum diffusion condition.

  18. Effects of intrinsic decoherence on the entanglement of a two-qutrit 1D optical lattice chain with nonlinear coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Wei

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the intrinsic decoherence on the entanglement of a two-qutrit one-dimensional (1D) optical lattice chain with nonlinear coupling.As a measure of the entanglement,the negativity of the system is calculated.It is shown that the influence of intrinsic decoherence on the entanglement varies in different initial systems.

  19. Ion clock and search for the variation of the fine structure constant using optical transitions in Nd$^{13+}$ and Sm$^{15+}$

    CERN Document Server

    Dzuba, V A; Flambaum, V V

    2012-01-01

    We study ultranarrow $5s_{1/2}$ - $4f_{5/2}$ transitions in Nd$^{13+}$ and Sm$^{15+}$ and demonstrate that they lie in the optical region. The transitions are insensitive to external perturbations. At the same time they are sensitive to the variation of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$. The fractional accuracy of the frequency of the transitions can be smaller than $10^{-19}$, which may provide a basis for atomic clocks of superb accuracy. Sensitivity to the variation of $\\alpha$ approaches $10^{-20}$ per year.

  20. Atom waveguide and 1D optical lattice using a two-color evanescent light field around an optical micro/nano-fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Fu; Xiang Yin; Ningyuan Li; Limin Tong

    2008-01-01

    We propose a two-color scheme of atom waveguides and one-dimensional(1D)optical lattices using evanescent wave fields of different transverse modes around an optical micro/nano-fiber.The atom guide potential can be produced when the optical fiber carries a red-detuned light with TE01 mode and a blue-detuned light with HE11 mode,and the 1D optical lattice potential can be produced when the red-detuned light is transformed to the superposition of the TE01 mode and HE11 mode.The two trapping potentials can be transformed to each other for accurately controlling mode transformation for the red-detuned light.This might provide a new approach to realize flexible transition between the guiding and trapping states of atoms.

  1. Collective non-equilibrium spin exchange in cold alkaline-earth atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Oscar Leonardo; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-05-01

    Alkaline-earth atomic (AEA) clocks have recently been shown to be reliable simulators of two-orbital SU(N) quantum magnetism. In this work, we study the non-equilibrium spin exchange dynamics during the clock interrogation of AEAs confined in a deep one-dimensional optical lattice and prepared in two nuclear levels. The two clock states act as an orbital degree of freedom. Every site in the lattice can be thought as populated by a frozen set of vibrational modes collectively interacting via predominantly p-wave collisions. Due to the exchange coupling, orbital state transfer between atoms with different nuclear states is expected to happen. At the mean field level, we observe that in addition to the expected suppression of population transfer in the presence of a large magnetic field, that makes the single particle levels off-resonance, there is also an interaction induced suppression for initial orbital population imbalance. This suppression resembles the macroscopic self-trapping mechanism seen in bosonic systems. However, by performing exact numerical solutions and also by using the so-called Truncated Wigner Approximation, we show that quantum correlations can significantly modify the mean field suppression. Our predictions should be testable in optical clock experiments. Project supported by NSF-PHY-1521080, JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, ARO, AFOSR, and MURI-AFOSR.

  2. An atomic clock with $1\\times 10^{-18}$ room-temperature blackbody Stark uncertainty

    CERN Document Server

    Beloy, K; Phillips, N B; Sherman, J A; Schioppo, M; Lehman, J; Feldman, A; Hanssen, L M; Oates, C W; Ludlow, A D

    2014-01-01

    The Stark shift due to blackbody radiation (BBR) is the key factor limiting the performance of many atomic frequency standards, with the BBR environment inside the clock apparatus being difficult to characterize at a high level of precision. Here we demonstrate an in-vacuum radiation shield that furnishes a uniform, well-characterized BBR environment for the atoms in an ytterbium optical lattice clock. Operated at room temperature, this shield enables specification of the BBR environment to a corresponding fractional clock uncertainty contribution of $5.5 \\times 10^{-19}$. Combined with uncertainty in the atomic response, the total uncertainty of the BBR Stark shift is now $1\\times10^{-18}$. Further operation of the shield at elevated temperatures enables a direct measure of the BBR shift temperature dependence and demonstrates consistency between our evaluated BBR environment and the expected atomic response.

  3. Magneto-optical properties for antiferromagnetically coupled CoPt stacked films with hexagonal anti-dot lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Haruki; Kobayashi, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    The influence of two-dimensional array structures (hexagonal anti-dot lattices) on magneto-optical (MO) properties was investigated in perpendicular antiferromagnetically coupled Co80Pt20 stacked films containing ZnO optical interference layers. Antiferromagnetic exchange coupling was generated in a [CoPt/Ru/CoPt] tri-layered structure, and anti-dot lattices were formed on both CoPt layers. The exchange coupling between the CoPt layers across a very thin 0.46-nm Ru interlayer was maintained even after nanofabrication. Characteristic MO hysteresis loops were measured by a 405-nm wavelength incident light on samples containing a 50-nm ZnO optical interference layer. The anti-dot lattice with a 200-nm diameter hole exhibited an increase in the residual Kerr rotation angle owing to the antiparallel magnetization alignment of the CoPt layers. Furthermore, compared with samples without the interference layer, the figure of merit for the anti-dot lattice with a 200-nm diameter hole was enhanced by inserting a 100-nm ZnO interference layer. These improvements are attributed to MO interference effects inside the stacked films.

  4. Static and dynamic properties of interacting spin-1 bosons in an optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natu, Stefan S.; Pixley, J. H.; Das Sarma, S.

    2015-04-01

    We study the physics of interacting spin-1 bosons in an optical lattice using a variational Gutzwiller technique. We compute the mean-field ground state wave function and discuss the evolution of the condensate, spin, nematic, and singlet order parameters across the superfluid-Mott transition. We then extend the Gutzwiller method to derive the equations governing the dynamics of low energy excitations in the lattice. Linearizing these equations, we compute the excitation spectra in the superfluid and Mott phases for both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic spin-spin interactions. In the superfluid phase, we recover the known excitation spectrum obtained from Bogoliubov theory. In the nematic Mott phase, we obtain gapped, quadratically dispersing particle and hole-like collective modes, whereas in the singlet Mott phase, we obtain a nondispersive gapped mode, corresponding to the breaking of a singlet pair. For the ferromagnetic Mott insulator, the Gutzwiller mean-field theory only yields particle-hole-like modes but no Goldstone mode associated with long-range spin order. To overcome this limitation, we supplement the Gutzwiller theory with a Schwinger boson mean-field theory which captures superexchange-driven fluctuations. In addition to the gapped particle-hole-like modes, we obtain a gapless quadratically dispersing ferromagnetic spin-wave Goldstone mode. We discuss the evolution of the singlet gap, particle-hole gap, and the effective mass of the ferromagnetic Goldstone mode as the superfluid-Mott phase boundary is approached from the insulating side. We discuss the relevance and validity of Gutzwiller mean-field theories to spinful systems, and potential extensions of this framework to include more exotic physics which appears in the presence of spin-orbit coupling or artificial gauge fields.

  5. Decamp Clock Board Firmware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, J. de; Castilla, J.; Martinez, G.

    2007-09-27

    Decamp (Dark Energy Survey Camera) is a new instrument designed to explore the universe aiming to reveal the nature of Dark Energy. The camera consists of 72 CCDs and 520 Mpixels. The readout electronics of DECam is based on the Monsoon system. Monsoon is a new image acquisition system developed by the NOAO (National Optical Astronomical Observatory) for the new generation of astronomical cameras. The Monsoon system uses three types of boards inserted in a Eurocard format based crate: master control board, acquisition board and clock board. The direct use of the Monsoon system for DECam readout electronics requires nine crates mainly due to the high number of clock boards needed. Unfortunately, the available space for DECam electronics is constrained to four crates at maximum. The major drawback to achieve such desired compaction degree resides in the clock board signal density. This document describes the changes performed at CIEMAT on the programmable logic of the Monsoon clock board aiming to meet such restricted space constraints. (Author) 5 refs.

  6. Frustrated Magnetism of Dipolar Molecules on a Square Optical Lattice: Prediction of a Quantum Paramagnetic Ground State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Haiyuan; Zhao, Erhai; Liu, W. Vincent

    2017-08-01

    Motivated by the experimental realization of quantum spin models of polar molecule KRb in optical lattices, we analyze the spin 1 /2 dipolar Heisenberg model with competing anisotropic, long-range exchange interactions. We show that, by tilting the orientation of dipoles using an external electric field, the dipolar spin system on square lattice comes close to a maximally frustrated region similar, but not identical, to that of the J1-J2 model. This provides a simple yet powerful route to potentially realize a quantum spin liquid without the need for a triangular or kagome lattice. The ground state phase diagrams obtained from Schwinger-boson and spin-wave theories consistently show a spin disordered region between the Néel, stripe, and spiral phase. The existence of a finite quantum paramagnetic region is further confirmed by an unbiased variational ansatz based on tensor network states and a tensor renormalization group.

  7. Nonlinear localized modes in dipolar Bose–Einstein condensates in two-dimensional optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas-Rojas, Santiago, E-mail: srojas@cefop.cl [Center for Optics and Photonics and MSI-Nucleus on Advanced Optics, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Naether, Uta [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón and Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Delgado, Aldo [Center for Optics and Photonics and MSI-Nucleus on Advanced Optics, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Vicencio, Rodrigo A. [Center for Optics and Photonics and MSI-Nucleus on Advanced Optics, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    2016-09-16

    Highlights: • We study discrete two-dimensional breathers in dipolar Bose–Einstein Condensates. • Important differences in the properties of three fundamental modes are found. • Norm threshold for existence of 2D breathers varies with dipolar interaction. • The Effective Potential Method is implemented for stability analysis. • Uncommon mobility of 2D discrete solitons is observed. - Abstract: We analyze the existence and properties of discrete localized excitations in a Bose–Einstein condensate loaded into a periodic two-dimensional optical lattice, when a dipolar interaction between atoms is present. The dependence of the Number of Atoms (Norm) on the energy of solutions is studied, along with their stability. Two important features of the system are shown, namely, the absence of the Norm threshold required for localized solutions to exist in finite 2D systems, and the existence of regions in the parameter space where two fundamental solutions are simultaneously unstable. This feature enables mobility of localized solutions, which is an uncommon feature in 2D discrete nonlinear systems. With attractive dipolar interaction, a non-trivial behavior of the Norm dependence is obtained, which is well described by an analytical model.

  8. Non-equilibrium dynamics and state preparation in bilayer optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Stephan; Daley, Andrew J.

    2014-03-01

    We study dynamical schemes to obtain low entropy ground states of strongly interacting many body systems. The focus of our work is on ultra-cold Bose and Fermi gases in bilayer optical lattice systems with separately tunable interlayer coupling, energy offset between the layers and repulsive interactions. The case of two coupled one-dimensional chains is treated in a numerically exact manner using the adaptive time-dependent density matrix renormalization group which allows us to study the change of offset and interlayer coupling in real time. We identify parameter regimes where the ground state of the coupled system in the limit of small interlayer coupling consists of a Mott insulator in one layer and a superfluid/metallic state in the other layer can serve as an entropy reservoir. We then investigate the time-dependent dynamics of this system, studying entropy transfer between layers and the emergence of characteristic many-body correlations as we change the layer offset energy and coupling strength. In addition to applications as a preparation scheme for fully interacting Mott-insulator states, feasible with available experimental techniques, the investigated protocols could be easily adapted to also allow for a controlled preparation of highly excited states.

  9. Sympathetic ground state cooling and time-dilation shifts in an $^{27}\\text{Al}^+$ optical clock

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, J -S; Hume, D B; Chou, C W; Wineland, D J; Leibrandt, D R

    2016-01-01

    We report Raman sideband cooling of $^{25}Mg^+$ to sympathetically cool the secular modes of motion in a $^{25}\\text{Mg}^+ \\text{-} ^{27}\\text{Al}^+$ two-ion pair to near the three-dimensional (3D) ground state. The evolution of the Fock state distribution during the cooling process is studied using a rate-equation simulation, and various heating sources that limit the efficiency of 3D sideband cooling in our system are discussed. We characterize the residual energy and heating rates of all the secular modes of motion and estimate a secular motion time-dilation shift of $-(1.92 \\pm 0.11)\\times 10^{-18}$ for an $^{27}\\text{Al}^+$ clock at a typical clock probe duration of 150 ms.

  10. Creation of p-wave Feshbach molecules in the selected angular momentum states using an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Waseem, Muhammad; Yoshida, Jun; Hattori, Keita; Saito, Taketo; Mukaiyama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    We selectively create p-wave Feshbach molecules in the $m_{l}=\\pm 1$ orbital angular momentum projection state of $^{6}$Li. We use an optical lattice potential to restrict the relative momentum of the atoms such that only the $m_{l}=\\pm 1$ molecular state couples to the atoms at the Feshbach resonance. We observe the hollow-centered dissociation profile, which is a clear indication of the selective creation of p-wave molecules in the $m_{l}=\\pm1$ states. We also measure the dissociation energy of the p-wave molecules created in the optical lattice and develop a theoretical formulation to explain the dissociation energy as a function of the magnetic field ramp rate for dissociation. The capability of selecting one of the two closely-residing p-wave Feshbach resonances is useful for the precise characterization of the p-wave Feshbach resonances.

  11. Quantum Measurement-induced Dynamics of Many-Body Ultracold Bosonic and Fermionic Systems in Optical Lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzucchi, Gabriel; Caballero-Benitez, Santiago F; Elliott, Thomas J; Mekhov, Igor B

    2015-01-01

    Trapping ultracold atoms in optical lattices enabled numerous breakthroughs uniting several disciplines. Although the light is a key ingredient in such systems, its quantum properties are typically neglected, reducing the role of light to a classical tool for atom manipulation. Here we show how elevating light to the quantum level leads to novel phenomena, inaccessible in setups based on classical optics. Interfacing a many-body atomic system with quantum light opens it to the environment in an essentially nonlocal way, where spatial coupling can be carefully designed. The competition between typical processes in strongly correlated systems (local tunnelling and interaction) with global measurement backaction leads to novel multimode dynamics and the appearance of long-range correlated tunnelling capable of entangling distant lattices sites, even when tunnelling between neighbouring sites is suppressed by the quantum Zeno effect. We demonstrate both the break-up and protection of strongly interacting fermion ...

  12. Enhanced optical spin current injection in the hexagonal lattice with intrinsic and Rashba spin–orbit interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Jianfei, E-mail: zoujianfei@hhu.edu.cn; Tang, Chunmei; Zhang, Aimei

    2017-04-04

    We study the photo-induced spin current injection in a hexagonal lattice with both intrinsic and Rashba spin–orbit interactions which is irradiated by a polarized light beam. It is found that the spin current injection rate could be enhanced as the graphene lattice is in the topological insulator state. Furthermore, the spin current injection rate could be remarkably modulated by the degree of polarization of light and its frequency. - Highlights: • The optical spin current could be enhanced by the intrinsic spin–orbit interaction. • The optical spin current could be modulated by the degree of polarization of light. • The maximum of the spin current injection rate is obtained.

  13. Body Clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2000-01-01

    “Body clocks” are biological methods of controling body activities.Every living thing has one. In humans, a body clock controls normal periods of sleeping and waking. It controls the time swhen you are most likely to feel pain.Eating, sleeping and exercising at about the same time each day will help keep body activities normal. But changes in your life, a new job, for example, destroy the balance and thus cause health problems.

  14. A topological semimetal model with f-wave symmetry in a non-Abelian triangular optical lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ling; Bai, Zhiming [School of Science, Hebei University of Science and Technology, Shijiazhuang 050018 (China); Hao, Ningning [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Liu, Guocai, E-mail: guocailiu@semi.ac.cn [School of Science, Hebei University of Science and Technology, Shijiazhuang 050018 (China)

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate that an chiral f-wave topological semimetal can be induced in a non-Abelian triangular optical lattice. We show that the f-wave symmetry topological semimetal is characterized by the topological invariant, i.e., the winding number W, with W=3 and is different from the semimetal with W=1 and 2 which have the p-wave and d-wave symmetry, respectively.

  15. Large Differences in the Optical Spectrum Associated with the Same Complex: The Effect of the Anisotropy of the Embedding Lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aramburu, José Antonio; García-Fernández, Pablo; García Lastra, Juan Maria

    2017-01-01

    of the electric field created by the rest of lattice ions over the complex. To illustrate this concept we analyze the origin of the surprisingly large differences in the d–d optical transitions of two systems containing square-planar CuF42– complexes, CaCuF4, and center II in Cu2+-doped Ba2ZnF6, even though...

  16. Ultracold bosons in a one-dimensional optical lattice chain: Newton's cradle and Bose enhancement effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ji-Guo; Yang, Shi-Jie, E-mail: yangshijie@tsinghua.org.cn

    2017-05-18

    We study a model to realize the long-distance correlated tunneling of ultracold bosons in a one-dimensional optical lattice chain. The model reveals the behavior of a quantum Newton's cradle, which is the perfect transfer between two macroscopic quantum states. Due to the Bose enhancement effect, we find that the resonantly tunneling through a Mott domain is greatly enhanced.

  17. A quantum network of clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kómár, P.; Kessler, E. M.; Bishof, M.; Jiang, L.; Sørensen, A. S.; Ye, J.; Lukin, M. D.

    2014-08-01

    The development of precise atomic clocks plays an increasingly important role in modern society. Shared timing information constitutes a key resource for navigation with a direct correspondence between timing accuracy and precision in applications such as the Global Positioning System. By combining precision metrology and quantum networks, we propose a quantum, cooperative protocol for operating a network of geographically remote optical atomic clocks. Using nonlocal entangled states, we demonstrate an optimal utilization of global resources, and show that such a network can be operated near the fundamental precision limit set by quantum theory. Furthermore, the internal structure of the network, combined with quantum communication techniques, guarantees security both from internal and external threats. Realization of such a global quantum network of clocks may allow construction of a real-time single international time scale (world clock) with unprecedented stability and accuracy.

  18. Electronic bandstructure and optical gain of lattice matched III-V dilute nitride bismide quantum wells for 1.55 μm optical communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, W. J.; Bose, Sumanta; Zhang, D. H.

    2016-09-01

    Dilute nitride bismide GaNBiAs is a potential semiconductor alloy for near- and mid-infrared applications, particularly in 1.55 μm optical communication systems. Incorporating dilute amounts of bismuth (Bi) into GaAs reduces the effective bandgap rapidly, while significantly increasing the spin-orbit-splitting energy. Additional incorporation of dilute amounts of nitrogen (N) helps to attain lattice matching with GaAs, while providing a route for flexible bandgap tuning. Here we present a study of the electronic bandstructure and optical gain of the lattice matched GaNxBiy As1 -x -y /GaAs quaternary alloy quantum well (QW) based on the 16-band k .p model. We have taken into consideration the interactions between the N and Bi impurity states with the host material based on the band anticrossing and valence band anticrossing model. The optical gain calculation is based on the density matrix theory. We have considered different lattice matched GaNBiAs QW cases and studied their energy dispersion curves, optical gain spectrum, maximum optical gain, and differential gain and compared their performances based on these factors. The thickness and composition of these QWs were varied in order to keep the emission peak fixed at 1.55 μm. The well thickness has an effect on the spectral width of the gain curves. On the other hand, a variation in the injection carrier density has different effects on the maximum gain and differential gain of QWs of varying thicknesses. Among the cases studied, we found that the 6.3 nm thick GaN3 Bi5.17 As91.83 lattice matched QW was most suited for 1.55 μm (0.8 eV) GaAs-based photonic applications.

  19. Highly charged W+13, Ir+16, and Pt+17 ions as promising optical clock candidates for probing variations of the fine-structure constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, D. K.; Sahoo, B. K.

    2016-09-01

    Transitions among the first three low-lying states in the highly charged W+13, Ir+16, and Pt+17 ions are found to be strongly forbidden with wavelengths in the optical regime. By determining their energy levels, lifetimes, and other spectroscopic properties that are decisive quantities for estimating dominant systematics due to stray electromagnetic interactions in an experiment, we demonstrate that it can be possible to measure frequencies of the lowest forbidden transitions below a 10-19 precision level in the above ions, and hence, they seem to be suitable for frequency standards. We employ a sophisticated relativistic coupled cluster method to carry out calculations of these properties of the above states involving 4 f - and 5 s -core orbitals. We also found, by estimating their relativistic sensitivity coefficients, that these clock transitions can be highly sensitive to the tiny drift in the fine-structure constant αe. Consequently, a clock based on one of these ions, particularly Pt+17, could be used for corroborating the hypothesis of temporal and spatial variation in αe.

  20. Rapid and effective synthesis of $\\text{}^{40}\\text{Ca}-\\text{}^{27}\\text{Al}$ ion pair towards quantum logic optical clock

    CERN Document Server

    Shang, Junjuan; Cao, Jian; Wang, Shaomao; Shu, Hualin; Huang, Xueren

    2016-01-01

    High precision atomic clocks have been applied not only to very important technological problems such as synchronization and global navigation systems, but to the fundament precision measurement physics. Single $\\text{}^{27}\\text{Al}^+$ is one of the most attractions of selection system due to its very low blackbody radiation effect which dominates frequency shifts in other optical clock systems. Up to now, the $\\text{}^{27}\\text{Al}^+$ still could not be laser-cooled directly by reason that the absence of 167nm laser. Sympathetic cooling is a viable method to solve this problem. In this work, we used a single laser cooled $\\text{}^{40}\\text{Ca}^+$ to sympathetically cool one $\\text{}^{27}\\text{Al}^+$ in linear Paul trap. Comparing to laser ablation method we got a much lower velocity atoms sprayed from a home-made atom oven, which would make loading aluminum ion more efficient and the sympathetic cooling much easier. By the method of precisely measuring the secular frequency of the ion pair, finally we prove...

  1. High precision optical spectroscopy and quantum state selected photodissociation of ultracold 88Sr2 molecules in an optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Mickey Patrick

    Over the past several decades, rapid progress has been made toward the accurate characterization and control of atoms, made possible largely by the development of narrow-linewidth lasers and techniques for trapping and cooling at ultracold temperatures. Extending this progress to molecules will have exciting implications for chemistry, condensed matter physics, and precision tests of physics beyond the Standard Model. These possibilities are all consequences of the richness of molecular structure, which is governed by physics substantially different from that characterizing atomic structure. This same richness of structure, however, increases the complexity of any molecular experiment manyfold over its atomic counterpart, magnifying the difficulty of everything from trapping and cooling to the comparison of theory with experiment. This thesis describes work performed over the past six years to establish the state of the art in manipulation and quantum control of ultracold molecules. Our molecules are produced via photoassociation of ultracold strontium atoms followed by spontaneous decay to a stable ground state. We describe a thorough set of measurements characterizing the rovibrational structure of very weakly bound (and therefore very large) 88Sr2 molecules from several different perspectives, including determinations of binding energies; linear, quadratic, and higher order Zeeman shifts; transition strengths between bound states; and lifetimes of narrow subradiant states. The physical intuition gained in these experiments applies generally to weakly bound diatomic molecules, and suggests extensive applications in precision measurement and metrology. In addition, we present a detailed analysis of the thermally broadened spectroscopic lineshape of molecules in a non-magic optical lattice trap, showing how such lineshapes can be used to directly determine the temperature of atoms or molecules in situ, addressing a long-standing problem in ultracold physics

  2. Three-dimensional topological solitons in PT-symmetric optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Huang, Guoxiang; Torner, Lluis

    2016-01-01

    We address the properties of fully three-dimensional solitons in complex parity-time (PT)-symmetric periodic lattices with focusing Kerr nonlinearity, and uncover that such lattices can stabilize both, fundamental and vortex-carrying soliton states. The imaginary part of the lattice induces internal currents in the solitons that strongly affect their domains of existence and stability. The domain of stability for fundamental solitons can extend nearly up to the PT-symmetry breaking point, where the linear lattice spectrum becomes complex. Vortex solitons feature spatially asymmetric profiles in the PT-symmetric lattices, but they are found to still exist as stable states within narrow regions. Our results provide the first example of continuous families of stable three-dimensional propagating solitons supported by complex potentials.

  3. Evolution and Collision of Bose-Condensed Gas in One-Dimensional Optical Lattices and a Far-Off Resonant Laser Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘淑娟; 徐志君; 隋成华; 黄琳; 熊宏伟

    2003-01-01

    Evolution of a Bose-condensed gas in one-dimensional optical lattices is investigated in the presence of a potential barrier created by a far-off resonant laser beam. After the magnetic trap and optical lattices are switched off,by using the propagator method, the analytical result of the evolution of the density distribution of the Bosecondensed gas is given. In particular, the collision between the condensate and the potential barrier is shown in this paper.

  4. Progress of the ~(87)Rb Fountain Clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zi-Chao; WEI Rong; SHI Chun-Yan; LV De-Sheng; LI Tang; WANG Yu-Zhu

    2009-01-01

    A fountain atomic clock based on cold ~(87)Rb atoms has been in operation in our laboratory for several months.We therefore report the design of the rubidium fountain clock including its physical package,optical system and daily operation.Ramsey fringes have been attained with the signal to noise ratio of about 100.

  5. Entangling Dipole-Dipole Interactions for Quantum Logic in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Ivan

    2000-06-01

    The ability to engineer the quantum state of a many-body system represents the ``holy grail" of coherent control and opens the door to a host of new applications and fundamental studies ranging from improvements in precision measurement to quantum computation. At the heart of these quantum-information processing tasks are entangled states. These can be created through a ``quantum-circuit" consisting of a series of simple quantum logic gates acting only on single or pairs of qubits. Any physical implementation of a quantum circuit must contend with an inherent conflict. Qubits must strongly couple to one another and to an external classical field which drives the algorithm, while simultaneously coupling very weakly to the noisy environment which decoheres the quantum superpositions. We have identified a new system for quantum-information processing: ultra-cold trapped neutral atoms (G. K. Brennen et al. ), Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 , 1060 (1999); see also eprint quant- ph/9910031. Neutrals interact very weakly with the environment and coupling between them can be induced on demand through resonant excitation or elastic collisions via direct overlap between wavepackets(D. Jaksch et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 1975 (1999).. The ability to turn interactions on and off reduces decoherence and the spread of errors amongst qubits. In the implementation presented here I will discuss entangling atoms with electric dipole-dipole interactions in optical lattices (P.S. Jessen and I. H. Deutsch, Adv. At. Mol. Phys. 36), 91 (1996).. These traps provide an extremely flexible environment for coherent control of both internal and external degrees of freedom of atom wave packets as in ion traps(D. Wineland et al.), Fortschr. Phys. 46, 363 (1998).. Dipole-dipole interactions can be coherent when atoms are tightly localized at a distance small compared to the optical wavelength. By inducing dipoles conditional on the logical state of the atoms we can engineer quantum gates. Detailed analysis

  6. Evaluation of trap-induced systematic frequency shifts for a multi-ion optical clock at the $10^{-19}$ level

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, J; Kalincev, D; Kiethe, J; Mehlstäubler, T E

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the short-term stability of trapped-ion optical clocks, we are developing a frequency standard based on ${}^{115}$In${}^+$ / ${}^{172}$Yb${}^+$ Coulomb crystals. For this purpose, we have developed scalable segmented Paul traps which allow a high level of control for multiple ion ensembles. In this article, we detail on our recent results regarding the reduction of the leading sources of frequency uncertainty introduced by the ion trap: 2nd-order Doppler shifts due to micromotion and the heating of secular motion, as well as the black-body radiation shift due to warming of the trap. We show that the fractional frequency uncertainty due to each of these effects can be reduced to well below $10^{-19}$.

  7. Optical properties, lattice dynamics, and structural phase transition in hexagonal 2 H -BaMn O3 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislavchuk, T. N.; Litvinchuk, A. P.; Hu, Rongwei; Jeon, Young Hun; Ji, Sung Dae; Cheong, S.-W.; Sirenko, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Optical properties and lattice dynamics of hexagonal 2 H -BaMn O3 single crystals are studied experimentally in a wide temperature range by means of rotating analyzer ellipsometry and Raman scattering. The magnitude of the direct electronic band gap is found to be Eg=3.2 eV . At room temperature the far-infrared (IR) ellipsometry spectra reveal six IR-active phonons; two of them are polarized along the c axis and four are polarized within the a-b plane. Seven phonon modes are identified in the Raman scattering experiments. Group theoretical mode analysis and complementary density functional theory lattice dynamics calculations are consistent with the 2 H -BaMn O3 structure belonging to the polar P 63m c space group at room temperature. All observed vibrational modes are assigned to specific eigenmodes of the lattice. The neutron diffraction measurements reveal a structural phase transition upon cooling below TC=130 ±5 K , which is accompanied by a lattice symmetry change from P 63m c to P 63c m . Simultaneously, at temperatures below TC several additional IR- and Raman-active modes are detected in experimental spectra. This confirms the occurrence of a structural transition, which is possibly associated with the appearance of electrical polarization along the c axis and a previously known tripling of the primitive cell volume at low temperatures.

  8. Fourier's law on a one-dimensional optical random lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platini, T [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Harris, R J [School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Karevski, D [Institut Jean Lamour, Departement Physique de la Matiere et des Materiaux, Groupe de Physique Statistique, Nancy-Universite CNRS, BP 70239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy Cedex (France)

    2010-04-02

    We study the transport properties of a one-dimensional hard-core bosonic lattice gas coupled to two particle reservoirs at different chemical potentials which generate a current flow through the system. In particular, the influence of random fluctuations of the underlying lattice on the stationary-state properties is investigated. We show analytically that the steady-state density presents a linear profile. The local steady-state current obeys the Fourier law j = -{kappa}({tau}){nabla}n where {tau} is a typical timescale of the lattice fluctuations and {nabla}n is the density gradient imposed by the reservoirs.

  9. A clock network for geodesy and fundamental science

    CERN Document Server

    Lisdat, C; Quintin, N; Shi, C; Raupach, S M F; Grebing, C; Nicolodi, D; Stefani, F; Al-Masoudi, A; Dörscher, S; Häfner, S; Robyr, J -L; Chiodo, N; Bilicki, S; Bookjans, E; Koczwara, A; Koke, S; Kuhl, A; Wiotte, F; Meynadier, F; Camisard, E; Abgrall, M; Lours, M; Legero, T; Schnatz, H; Sterr, U; Denker, H; Chardonnet, C; Coq, Y Le; Santarelli, G; Amy-Klein, A; Targat, R Le; Lodewyck, J; Lopez, O; Pottie, P -E

    2015-01-01

    Leveraging the unrivaled performance of optical clocks in applications in fundamental physics beyond the standard model, in geo-sciences, and in astronomy requires comparing the frequency of distant optical clocks truthfully. Meeting this requirement, we report on the first comparison and agreement of fully independent optical clocks separated by 700 km being only limited by the uncertainties of the clocks themselves. This is achieved by a phase-coherent optical frequency transfer via a 1415 km long telecom fiber link that enables substantially better precision than classical means of frequency transfer. The fractional precision in comparing the optical clocks of three parts in $10^{17}$ was reached after only 1000 s averaging time, which is already 10 times better and more than four orders of magnitude faster than with any other existing frequency transfer method. The capability of performing high resolution international clock comparisons paves the way for a redefinition of the unit of time and an all-optic...

  10. Optically induced spin wave dynamics in [Co/Pd]{sub 8} antidot lattices with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, S.; Das, K.; Barman, A., E-mail: abarman@ybose.res.in [Thematic Unit of Excellence on Nanodevice Technology and Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700 098 (India); Klos, J. W.; Gruszecki, P.; Krawczyk, M., E-mail: krawczyk@amu.edu.pl [Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Hellwig, O. [San Jose Research Center, HGST, a Western Digital Company, 3403 Yerba Buena Rd., San Jose, California 95135 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    We present an all-optical time-resolved measurement of spin wave (SW) dynamics in a series of antidot lattices based on [Co(0.75 nm)/Pd(0.9 nm)]{sub 8} multilayer (ML) systems with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The spectra depend significantly on the areal density of the antidots. The observed SW modes are qualitatively reproduced by the plane wave method. The interesting results found in our measurements and calculations at small lattice constants can be attributed to the increase of areal density of the shells with modified magnetic properties probably due to distortion of the regular ML structure by the Ga ion bombardment and to increased coupling between localized modes. We propose and discuss the possible mechanisms for this coupling including exchange interaction, tunnelling, and dipolar interactions.

  11. Squeezed magnons in an optical lattice: Application to simulation of the dynamical Casimir effect at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xing-Dong; Zhao, Xu; Jing, Hui; Zhou, Lu; Zhang, Weiping

    2013-05-01

    We propose to realize controllable squeezing states of ferromagnetic magnons with a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate confined in an optical lattice. We use an external laser field to induce optical dipole-dipole interaction, which leads to magnon excitations of the system. By focusing on the role of the long-range magnetic and the optical dipole-dipole interactions, we show that the existence and properties of the produced squeezed magnons can be well controlled by tuning the transverse trapping widths of the condensates. We also show that the magnon excitations in this system have a close analogy with the dynamical Casimir effect at finite temperature predicted by Plunien [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.84.1882 84, 1882 (2000)] and Jing [Phys. Lett. APYLAAG0375-960110.1016/S0375-9601(00)00165-1 268, 174 (2000)].

  12. Open quantum spin systems in semiconductor quantum dots and atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwager, Heike

    2012-07-04

    In this Thesis, we study open quantum spin systems from different perspectives. The first part is motivated by technological challenges of quantum computation. An important building block for quantum computation and quantum communication networks is an interface between material qubits for storage and data processing and travelling photonic qubits for communication. We propose the realisation of a quantum interface between a travelling-wave light field and the nuclear spins in a quantum dot strongly coupled to a cavity. Our scheme is robust against cavity decay as it uses the decay of the cavity to achieve the coupling between nuclear spins and the travelling-wave light fields. A prerequiste for such a quantum interface is a highly polarized ensemble of nuclear spins. High polarization of the nuclear spin ensemble is moreover highly desirable as it protects the potential electron spin qubit from decoherence. Here we present the theoretical description of an experiment in which highly asymmetric dynamic nuclear spin pumping is observed in a single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot. The second part of this Thesis is devoted to fundamental studies of dissipative spin systems. We study general one-dimensional spin chains under dissipation and propose a scheme to realize a quantum spin system using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice in which both coherent interaction and dissipation can be engineered and controlled. This system enables the study of non-equilibrium and steady state physics of open and driven spin systems. We find, that the steady state expectation values of different spin models exhibit discontinuous behaviour at degeneracy points of the Hamiltonian in the limit of weak dissipation. This effect can be used to dissipatively probe the spectrum of the Hamiltonian. We moreover study spin models under the aspect of state preparation and show that dissipation drives certain spin models into highly entangled state. Finally, we study a spin chain with

  13. Intensity-modulated polarizabilities and magic trapping of alkali-metal and divalent atoms in infrared optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcu, Turker; Derevianko, Andrei

    2014-05-01

    Long range interactions between neutral Rydberg atoms has emerged as a potential means for implementing quantum logical gates. These experiments utilize hyperfine manifold of ground state atoms to act as a qubit basis, while exploiting the Rydberg blockade mechanism to mediate conditional quantum logic. The necessity for overcoming several sources of decoherence makes magic wavelength trapping in optical lattices an indispensable tool for gate experiments. The common wisdom is that atoms in Rydberg states see trapping potentials that are essentially that of a free electron, and can only be trapped at laser intensity minima. We show that although the polarizability of a Rydberg state is always negative, the optical potential can be both attractive or repulsive at long wavelengths (up to ~104 nm). This opens up the possibility of magic trapping Rydberg states with ground state atoms in optical lattices, thereby eliminating the necessity to turn off trapping fields during gate operations. Because the wavelengths are near the CO2 laser band, the photon scattering and the ensuing motional heating is also reduced compared to conventional traps near low lying resonances, alleviating an important source of decoherence. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant No. PHY-1212482.

  14. Realizing the Harper Hamiltonian and Spin-Orbit Coupling with Laser-Assisted Tunneling in an Optical Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Colin; Miyake, Hiro; Burton, Cody; Chung, Woo Chang; Siviloglou, Georgios; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    The study of charged particles in a magnetic field has led to paradigm shifts in condensed matter physics including the discovery of topologically ordered states like the quantum Hall and fractional quantum Hall states. Quantum simulation of such systems using neutral atoms has drawn much interest recently in the atomic physics community due to the versatility and defect-free nature of such systems. We discuss our recent experimental realization of the Harper Hamiltonian and strong, uniform effective magnetic fields for neutral particles in an optical lattice. Additionally, our scheme represents a promising system to realize spin-orbit coupling and the quantum spin Hall states without flipping atomic spin states and thus without the intrinsic heating that comes with near-resonant Raman lasers. We point out that our scheme can be implemented all optically through the use of a period-tripling superlattice, offering faster switching times and more precise control than with magnetic field gradients. Finally, we show that this method is very general for engineering novel single particle spectra in an optical lattice and can be used to map out Hofstadter's butterfly.

  15. Determination of the fine structure constant based on BLOCH oscillations of ultracold atoms in a vertical optical lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cladé, Pierre; de Mirandes, Estefania; Cadoret, Malo; Guellati-Khélifa, Saïda; Schwob, Catherine; Nez, François; Julien, Lucile; Biraben, François

    2006-01-27

    We report an accurate measurement of the recoil velocity of 87Rb atoms based on Bloch oscillations in a vertical accelerated optical lattice. We transfer about 900 recoil momenta with an efficiency of 99.97% per recoil. A set of 72 measurements of the recoil velocity, each one with a relative uncertainty of about 33 ppb in 20 min integration time, leads to a determination of the fine structure constant with a statistical relative uncertainty of 4.4 ppb. The detailed analysis of the different systematic errors yields to a relative uncertainty of 6.7 ppb. The deduced value of alpha-1 is 137.035 998 78(91).

  16. Energy Spectrum of Ground State and Excitation Spectrum of Quasi-particle for Hard-Core Boson in Optical Lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the energy spectrum of ground state and quasi-particle excitation spectrum of hard-core bosons, which behave very much like spinless noninteracting fermions, in optical lattices by means of the perturbation expansion and Bogoliubov approach. The results show that the energy spectrum has a single band structure, and the energy is lower near zero momentum; the excitation spectrum gives corresponding energy gap, and the system is in Mott-insulating state at Tonks limit. The analytic result of energy spectrum is in good agreement with that calculated in terms of Green's function at strong correlation limit.

  17. Optical properties of GaAs 2D Archimedean photonic lattice tiling with the p4g symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Đ.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present our investigation of 2D Archimedean lattice photonic crystals with p4g space group symmetry. The structures are made of GaAs both as air holes and dielectric rods in air. In order to analyze the photonic crystal optical properties we performed calculations of the band structures, equi-frequency contours and electromagnetic propagation through the basic structures and waveguides. In addition, we investigated negative refraction and left-handedness in the p4g photonic crystal.

  18. Time-of-flight imaging method to observe signatures of antiferromagnetically ordered states of fermionic atoms in an optical lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Kensuke; Yamashita, Makoto

    2010-10-22

    We propose a simple method to detect the antiferromagnetic (AF) state of fermionic atoms in an optical lattice by combining a time-of-flight (TOF) imaging method and a Feshbach resonance. In this scheme, the nontrivial dynamics of fermionic atoms during the imaging process works as a probe with respect to the breaking of the translational symmetry in the AF state. Precise numerical simulations demonstrate that the characteristic oscillatory dynamics induced by the scattering process that transfers an AF ordering vector appears in TOF images, which can be easily observed experimentally.

  19. Design and optical characterization of high-Q guided-resonance modes in the slot-graphite photonic crystal lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Luis Javier; Huang, Ningfeng; Ma, Jing; Lin, Chenxi; Jaquay, Eric; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2013-12-16

    A new photonic crystal structure is generated by using a regular graphite lattice as the base and adding a slot in the center of each unit cell to enhance field confinement. The theoretical Q factor in an ideal structure is over 4 × 10(5). The structure was fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator wafer and optically characterized by transmission spectroscopy. The resonance wavelength and quality factor were measured as a function of slot height. The measured trends show good agreement with simulation.

  20. First Considerations on Beam Optics and Lattice Design for the Future Hadron-Hadron Collider FCC

    CERN Document Server

    Alemany Fernandez, R

    2014-01-01

    The present document explains the steps carried out in order to make the first design of the Future Hadron-Hadron Collider (FCC-hh) following the base line parameters that can be found in [1]. Two lattice layouts are presented, a ring collider with 12 arcs and 12 straight sections, four of them designed as interaction points, and a racetrack like collider with two arcs and two straight sections, each of them equipped with two interaction points. The lattice design presented in the paper is modular allowing the same modules be used for both layouts. The present document addresses as well the beta star reach at the interaction points.

  1. Could Atomic clocks be affected by neutrinos?

    CERN Document Server

    Hanafi, Hanaa

    2016-01-01

    An atomic clock is a clock device that uses an electronic transition frequency of the electromagnetic spectrum of atoms as a frequency standard in order to derive a time standard since time is the reciprocal of frequency. If the electronic transition frequencies are in an "optical region", we are talking in this case about optical atomic clocks. If they are in an "microwave region" these atomic clocks are made of the metallic element cesium so they are called Cesium atomic clocks. Atomic clocks are the most accurate time and frequency standards known despite the different perturbations that can affect them, a lot of researches were made in this domain to show how the transitions can be different for different type of perturbations..Since atomic clocks are very sensitive devices, based on coherent states (A coherent state tends to loose coherence after interacting). One question can arise (from a lot of questions) which is why cosmic neutrinos are not affecting these clocks? The answer to this question requir...

  2. Optical techniques for Rydberg physics in lattice geometries : A technical guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naber, J.B.; Vos, J.; Rengelink, R.J.; Nusselder, R.J.; Davtyan, D.

    2016-01-01

    We address the technical challenges when performing quantum information experiments with ultracold Rydberg atoms in lattice geometries. We discuss the following key aspects: (i) the coherent manipulation of atomic ground states, (ii) the coherent excitation of Rydberg states, and (iii) spatial addre

  3. Ultrafast electron, lattice and spin dynamics on rare earth metal surfaces. Investigated with linear and nonlinear optical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, I.E.

    2006-03-15

    This thesis presents the femtosecond laser-induced electron, lattice and spin dynamics on two representative rare-earth systems: The ferromagnetic gadolinium Gd(0001) and the paramagnetic yttrium Y(0001) metals. The employed investigation tools are the time-resolved linear reflectivity and second-harmonic generation, which provide complementary information about the bulk and surface/interface dynamics, respectively. The femtosecond laser excitation of the exchange-split surface state of Gd(0001) triggers simultaneously the coherent vibrational dynamics of the lattice and spin subsystems in the surface region at a frequency of 3 THz. The coherent optical phonon corresponds to the vibration of the topmost atomic layer against the underlying bulk along the normal direction to the surface. The coupling mechanism between phonons and magnons is attributed to the modulation of the exchange interaction J between neighbour atoms due to the coherent lattice vibration. This leads to an oscillatory motion of the magnetic moments having the same frequency as the lattice vibration. Thus these results reveal a new type of phonon-magnon coupling mediated by the modulation of the exchange interaction and not by the conventional spin-orbit interaction. Moreover, we show that coherent spin dynamics in the THz frequency domain is achievable, which is at least one order of magnitude faster than previously reported. The laser-induced (de)magnetization dynamics of the ferromagnetic Gd(0001) thin films have been studied. Upon photo-excitation, the nonlinear magneto-optics measurements performed in this work show a sudden drop in the spin polarization of the surface state by more than 50% in a <100 fs time interval. Under comparable experimental conditions, the time-resolved photoemission studies reveal a constant exchange splitting of the surface state. The ultrafast decrease of spin polarization can be explained by the quasi-elastic spin-flip scattering of the hot electrons among spin

  4. Uniaxial stress influence on lattice, band gap and optical properties of n-type ZnO:first-principles calculations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Ping; Li Pei; Zhang Li-Qiang; Wang Xiao-Liang; Wang Huan; Song Xi-Fu; Xie Fang-Wei

    2012-01-01

    The lattice,the band gap and the optical properties of n-type ZnO under uniaxial stress are investigated by firstprinciples calculations.The results show that the lattice constants change linearly with stress.Band gaps are broadened linearly as the uniaxial compressive stress increases.The change of band gap for n-type ZnO comes mainly from the contribution of stress in the c-axis direction,and the reason for band gap of n-type ZnO changing with stress is also explained.The calculated results of optical properties reveal that the imaginary part of the dielectric function decreases with the increase of uniaxial compressive stress at low energy.However,when the energy is higher than 4.0 eV,the imaginary part of the dielectric function increases with the increase of stress and a blueshift appears.There are two peaks in the absorption spectrum in an energy range of 4.0-13.0 eV.The stress coefficient of the band gap of n-type ZnO is larger than that of pure ZnO,which supplies the theoretical reference value for the modulation of the band gap of doped ZnO.

  5. Weyl semimetals in optical lattices: moving and merging of Weyl points, and hidden symmetry at Weyl points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jing-Min; Chen, Wei

    2016-09-01

    We propose to realize Weyl semimetals in a cubic optical lattice. We find that there exist three distinct Weyl semimetal phases in the cubic optical lattice for different parameter ranges. One of them has two pairs of Weyl points and the other two have one pair of Weyl points in the Brillouin zone. For a slab geometry with (010) surfaces, the Fermi arcs connecting the projections of Weyl points with opposite topological charges on the surface Brillouin zone is presented. By adjusting the parameters, the Weyl points can move in the Brillouin zone. Interestingly, for two pairs of Weyl points, as one pair of them meet and annihilate, the originial two Fermi arcs coneect into one. As the remaining Weyl points annihilate further, the Fermi arc vanishes and a gap is opened. Furthermore, we find that there always exists a hidden symmetry at Weyl points, regardless of anywhere they located in the Brillouin zone. The hidden symmetry has an antiunitary operator with its square being ‑1.

  6. Lego clocks: building a clock from parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Michael; Simons, Mirre J P; Merrow, Martha

    2008-06-01

    A new finding opens up speculation that the molecular mechanism of circadian clocks in Synechococcus elongatus is composed of multiple oscillator systems (Kitayama and colleagues, this issue, pp. 1513-1521), as has been described in many eukaryotic clock model systems. However, an alternative intepretation is that the pacemaker mechanism-as previously suggested-lies primarily in the rate of ATP hydrolysis by the clock protein KaiC.

  7. Ultracold Fermions in the P-Orbital Band of an Optical Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-27

    cooling and trapping of lithium atoms. Nd:YVO 4 etalon1 OC LD 808nm LD 808nm etalon2 PZT1 PZT2 OI M1 M2 M3 M4 PBS LBO ICPZT3 M7 M5 671nm M6 EOM HWP HWP...Haddad from the Colorado School of Mines which focussed on relativistic phe- nomena that can be studied with ultracold atoms in a honeycomb lattice

  8. Effect of geometric lattice design on optical/electrical properties of transparent silver grid for organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ju Won; Lee, Young Tack; Pandey, Rina; Yoo, Tae-Hee; Sang, Byoung-In; Ju, Byeong-Kwon; Hwang, Do Kyung; Choi, Won Kook

    2014-11-03

    Silver (Ag) grid transparent electrode is one of the most promising transparent conducting electrodes (TCEs) to replace conventional indium tin oxide (ITO). We systematically investigate an effect of geometric lattice modifications on optical and electrical properties of Ag grid electrode. The reference Ag grid with 5 μm width and 100 μm pitch (duty of 0.05) prepared by conventional photo-lithography and lift-off processes shows the sheet resistance of 13.27 Ω/sq, transmittance of 81.1%, and resultant figure of merit (FOM) of 129.05. Three different modified Ag grid electrodes with stripe added-mesh (SAM), triangle-added mesh (TAM), and diagonal-added mesh (DAM) are suggested to improve optical and electrical properties. Although all three of SAM, TAM, and DAM Ag grid electrodes exhibit the lower transmittance values of about 72 - 77%, they showed much decreased sheet resistance of 6 - 8 Ω/sq. As a result, all of the lattice-modified Ag grid electrodes display significant improvement of FOM and the highest value of 171.14 is obtained from DAM Ag grid, which is comparable to that of conventional ITO electrode (175.46). Also, the feasibility of DAM Ag gird electrode for use in organic solar cell is confirmed by finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. Unlike a conventional ITO electrode, DAM Ag grid electrode can induce light scattering and trapping due to the diffuse transmission that compensates for the loss in optical transparency, resulting in comparable light absorption in the photo active layer of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT): [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC₆₀BM). P3HT:PC₆₀BM based OSCs with the DAM Ag grid electrode were fabricated, which also showed the potential for ITO-free transparent electrode.

  9. Hatching controlled by the circatidal clock, and the role of the medulla terminalis in the optic peduncle of the eyestalk, in an estuarine crab Sesarma haematocheir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigusa, Masayuki

    2002-11-01

    Embryos attached to the female crab Sesarma haematocheir hatch synchronously within 1 h. Hatching is also synchronized near the time of the expected nocturnal high tide. These events are governed by a single circatidal clock (or pacemaker) in the female crab. The present study examined the role of the optic peduncle of the eyestalk on hatching and hatching synchrony. Surgery was performed either from the tip of the eyestalk [to remove the region of the optic peduncle from the compound eye-retina complex to the medulla interna (MI)] or from a small triangle 'window' opened on the eyestalk exoskeleton [to create lesions on the medulla terminalis (MT) of the optic peduncle]. Neither hatching nor hatching synchrony was affected by removal of the region of the optic peduncle from the compound eye-retina complex to the MI: the circatidal rhythm also remained. Removal of the MI probably caused damage to the sinus gland and the bundle of axons running from the sinus gland to the X organ. Nevertheless, maintenance of highly synchronized hatching indicates that the X organ-sinus gland system is not related to hatching. Hatching and hatching synchrony were not affected by dorsal-half cuts of the MT: the timing of hatching was not affected either. By contrast, transverse and ventral-half cuts of the MT caused severe damage to most females; hatching of many females was suppressed, while hatching of some females was either periodic, at intervals of approximately 24 h, or arrhythmic for a few days. The bundle of neuronal axons is tangled in the MT, and the axons inducing hatching pass through the ventral half of the MT. Complete incision of these axon bundles may have suppressed hatching. Incomplete incision of the axon bundle or partial damage to the neurons may have caused periodic or arrhythmic patterns of hatching. There are two possible roles for MT in hatching. One possibility is that neurons in the MT only induce hatching under the control of the circatidal pacemaker

  10. Lars Onsager Prize Talk: A New Challenge for Cold Atom Physics: Achieving the Strongly Correlated Regimes for Cold Atoms in Optical Lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tin-Lun

    2008-03-01

    Cold atoms in optical lattices show great promise to generate a whole host of new strongly correlated states and to emulate many theoretical models for strongly interacting electronic systems. However, to reach these strongly correlated regimes, we need to reach unprecedented low temperatures within current experimental settings. To achieve this, it is necessary to remove considerable amount of entropy from the system. Here, we point out a general principle for removing entropies of quantum gases in optical lattices which will allow one to reach some extraordinarily low temperature scales.

  11. Evaluation of blackbody radiation shift with temperature associated fractional uncertainty at 10E-18 level for 40Ca+ ion optical clock

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Ping; Shu, Hua-lin; Yuan, Jin-bo; Shang, Juan-juan; Cui, Kai-feng; Chao, Si-jia; Wang, Shao-mao; Liu, Dao-xin; Huang, Xue-ren

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, blackbody radiation (BBR) temperature rise seen by the $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ion confined in a miniature Paul trap and its uncertainty have been evaluated via finite-element method (FEM) modelling. The FEM model was validated by comparing with thermal camera measurements, which were calibrated by PT1000 resistance thermometer, at several points on a dummy trap. The input modelling parameters were analyzed carefully in detail, and their contributions to the uncertainty of environment temperature were evaluated on the validated FEM model. The result shows that the temperature rise seen by $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ion is 1.72 K with an uncertainty of 0.46 K. It results in a contribution of 2.2 mHz to the systematic uncertainty of $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ion optical clock, corresponding to a fractional uncertainty 5.4$\\times$10$^{-18}$. This is much smaller than the uncertainty caused by the BBR shift coefficient, which is evaluated to be 4.8 mHz and at 10$^{-17}$ level in fractional frequency units.

  12. Evaluation of blackbody radiation shift with temperature-associated fractional uncertainty at 10-18 level for 40Ca+ ion optical clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Cao, Jian; Shu, Hua-lin; Yuan, Jin-bo; Shang, Jun-juan; Cui, Kai-feng; Chao, Si-jia; Wang, Shao-mao; Liu, Dao-xin; Huang, Xue-ren

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the blackbody radiation (BBR) temperature rise experienced by a 40Ca+ ion confined in a miniature Paul trap and its uncertainty have been evaluated via finite-element method (FEM) modelling. The FEM model was validated through comparisons with thermal camera measurements at several points on a dummy trap. Before the validation, the thermal camera was calibrated by using a PT1000 resistance thermometer. The input modelling parameters were analyzed carefully, and their contributions to the uncertainty of the trap environment temperature were evaluated using the validated FEM model. The result shows that the temperature rise experienced by the 40Ca+ ion is 1.72 K with an uncertainty of 0.46 K. It results in a contribution of 2.2 mHz to the systematic uncertainty of a 40Ca+ ion optical clock, corresponding to a fractional uncertainty 5.4 × 10-18. This is much smaller than the uncertainty caused by the BBR shift coefficient, which is evaluated to be 4.8 mHz and at the 10-17 level in fractional frequency units.

  13. Dynamic polarizabilities and related properties of clock states of ytterbium atom

    CERN Document Server

    Dzuba, V A

    2009-01-01

    We carry out relativistic many-body calculations of the static and dynamic dipole polarizabilities of the ground $6s^2 ^1S_0$ and the first excited $6s6p ^3P^o_0$ states of Yb. With these polarizabilities, we compute several properties of Yb relevant to optical lattice clocks operating on the $6s^2 ^1S_0 - 6s6p ^3P^o_0$ transition. We determine (i) the first four {\\em magic} wavelengths of the laser field for which the frequency of the clock transition is insensitive to the laser intensity. While the first magic wavelength is known, we predict the second, the third and the forth magic wavelengths to be 551 nm, 465 nm, and 413 nm. (ii) We reevaluate the effect of black-body radiation on the frequency of the clock transition, the resulting clock shift at $T=300 \\mathrm{K}$ being $-1.41(17)$ Hz. (iii) We compute long-range interatomic van der Waals coefficients (in a.u.) $C_6(6s^2 ^1S_0 +6s^2 ^1S_0) = 1909(160)$, $C_6(6s^2 ^1S_0 + 6s6p ^3P_0) =2709(338) $, and $C_6(6s6p ^3P_0 + 6s6p ^3P_0) =3886(360) $. Finally,...

  14. Solitons in spiraling Vogel lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Torner, Lluis

    2012-01-01

    We address light propagation in Vogel optical lattices and show that such lattices support a variety of stable soliton solutions in both self-focusing and self-defocusing media, whose propagation constants belong to domains resembling gaps in the spectrum of a truly periodic lattice. The azimuthally-rich structure of Vogel lattices allows generation of spiraling soliton motion.

  15. Photonic analogue of Josephson effect in a dual-species optical-lattice cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Lei, Soi-Chan; Lee, Ray-Kuang

    2010-01-01

    We extend the idea of quantum phase transitions of light in the photonic Bose-Hubbard model with interactions to two atomic species by a self-consistent mean field theory. The excitation of two-level atoms interacting with coherent photon fields is analyzed with a finite temperature dependence of the order parameters. Four ground states of the system are found, including an isolated Mott-insulator phase and three different superfluid phases. Like two weakly coupled superconductors, our proposed dual-species lattice system shows a photonic analogue of Josephson effect. The dynamics of the proposed two species model provides a promising quantum simulator for possible quantum information processes.

  16. Ultracold atoms in optical lattices simulating quantum many-body systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lewenstein, Maciej; Ahufinger, Verònica

    2012-01-01

    Quantum computers, though not yet available on the market, will revolutionize the future of information processing. Quantum computers for special purposes like quantum simulators are already within reach. The physics of ultracold atoms, ions and molecules offer unprecedented possibilities of control of quantum many body systems and novel possibilities of applications to quantum information processing and quantum metrology. Particularly fascinating is the possibility of usingultracold atoms in lattices to simulate condensed matter or even high energy physics.This book provides a complete and co

  17. Cesium Atomic Fountain Clocks at NMIJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Wynands and S. Weyers, 2005, “Atomic fountain clocks,” Metrologia , 42, S64-S79. [2] M. Takamoto, F. L. Hong, R. Higashi, et al., 2005, “An optical...beam of laser-cooled cesium atoms,” Physical Review, A 60, R4241-R4244. [13] V. Gerginov, N. Nemitz, S. Weyers, et al., 2010, “Uncertainty evaluation of the caesium fountain clock PTB-CSF2,” Metrologia , 47, 65-79.

  18. Modulation of periodic field on the atomic current in optical lattices with Landau-Zener tunneling considered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jie-Yun; Wang, Lan-Yu

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the atomic current in optical lattices under the presence of both constant and periodic external field with Landau-Zener tunneling considered. By simplifying the system to a two-band model, the atomic current is obtained based on the Boltzmann equations. We focus on three situations to discuss the influence of the Landau-Zener tunneling and periodic field on the atomic current. Numerical calculations show the atomic transient current would finally become the stable oscillation, whose amplitude and average value can be further adjusted by the periodic external field. It is concluded that the periodic external field could provide an effective modulation on the atomic current even when the Landau-Zener tunneling probability has almostly become a constant.

  19. Localization of a two-component Bose–Einstein condensate in a two-dimensional bichromatic optical lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Kui-Tian, E-mail: kuitianxi@gmail.com; Li, Jinbin, E-mail: jinbin@nuaa.edu.cn; Shi, Da-Ning, E-mail: shi@nuaa.edu.cn

    2014-03-01

    We consider a weakly interacting two-component Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) in a two-dimensional (2D) quasi-periodic bichromatic optical lattice (BOL). The problem is studied by means of split-step Crank–Nicolson method. The effects of weak intra- and inter-component interactions on localization of a two-component BEC are investigated. It is shown that in the quasi-2D regime, due to the enhanced disorder, there is no symmetry breaking like that in the one-dimensional (1D) case under a sine-typed potential, while configurations of density profiles are also quite different from that in the 1D case. By modulating interactions, the interplay of disorder and weak repulsive or attractive interactions is studied in detail. The cases with sine- and cosine-typed potentials acting on components 1 and 2 respectively are also discussed.

  20. Superfluid-Mott-Insulator Phase Transition and Collective Fluctuations in both Phases of Bosons in an Optical Lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Rui

    2007-01-01

    The Bose Hubbard model describing interacting bosons in an optical lattice is reduced to a simple spin-1 XY model with single-ion anisotropy in the vicinity of the Mott phase. In the strong coupling Mott insulating regime,we propose a mean field theory based on a constraint SU(3) pseudo-boson representation on the effective model and discuss the excitation spectra and the phase transition to the superfluid state. Further to the superfluid phase, we use the coherent-state approach to derive the collective excitation modes. It is found that the Mott phase has two degenerate gapped quadratic excitation spectra which graduate into two degenerate gapless linear ones at the transition point, and one gapless linear mode with one gapped quadratic mode in the superfluid phase.