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Sample records for optical fluorescence microscopy

  1. Holographic fluorescence microscopy with incoherent digital holographic adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Changwon; Kim, Jonghyun; Clark, David C; Lee, Seungjae; Lee, Byoungho; Kim, Myung K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of adaptive optics technology into astronomy and ophthalmology has made great contributions in these fields, allowing one to recover images blurred by atmospheric turbulence or aberrations of the eye. Similar adaptive optics improvement in microscopic imaging is also of interest to researchers using various techniques. Current technology of adaptive optics typically contains three key elements: a wavefront sensor, wavefront corrector, and controller. These hardware elements tend to be bulky, expensive, and limited in resolution, involving, for example, lenslet arrays for sensing or multiactuator deformable mirrors for correcting. We have previously introduced an alternate approach based on unique capabilities of digital holography, namely direct access to the phase profile of an optical field and the ability to numerically manipulate the phase profile. We have also demonstrated that direct access and compensation of the phase profile are possible not only with conventional coherent digital holography, but also with a new type of digital holography using incoherent light: selfinterference incoherent digital holography (SIDH). The SIDH generates a complex—i.e., amplitude plus phase—hologram from one or several interferograms acquired with incoherent light, such as LEDs, lamps, sunlight, or fluorescence. The complex point spread function can be measured using guide star illumination and it allows deterministic deconvolution of the full-field image. We present experimental demonstration of aberration compensation in holographic fluorescence microscopy using SIDH. Adaptive optics by SIDH provides new tools for improved cellular fluorescence microscopy through intact tissue layers or other types of aberrant media.

  2. Holographic fluorescence microscopy with incoherent digital holographic adaptive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Changwon; Kim, Jonghyun; Clark, David C.; Lee, Seungjae; Lee, Byoungho; Kim, Myung K.

    2015-11-01

    Introduction of adaptive optics technology into astronomy and ophthalmology has made great contributions in these fields, allowing one to recover images blurred by atmospheric turbulence or aberrations of the eye. Similar adaptive optics improvement in microscopic imaging is also of interest to researchers using various techniques. Current technology of adaptive optics typically contains three key elements: a wavefront sensor, wavefront corrector, and controller. These hardware elements tend to be bulky, expensive, and limited in resolution, involving, for example, lenslet arrays for sensing or multiactuator deformable mirrors for correcting. We have previously introduced an alternate approach based on unique capabilities of digital holography, namely direct access to the phase profile of an optical field and the ability to numerically manipulate the phase profile. We have also demonstrated that direct access and compensation of the phase profile are possible not only with conventional coherent digital holography, but also with a new type of digital holography using incoherent light: self­interference incoherent digital holography (SIDH). The SIDH generates a complex-i.e., amplitude plus phase-hologram from one or several interferograms acquired with incoherent light, such as LEDs, lamps, sunlight, or fluorescence. The complex point spread function can be measured using guide star illumination and it allows deterministic deconvolution of the full-field image. We present experimental demonstration of aberration compensation in holographic fluorescence microscopy using SIDH. Adaptive optics by SIDH provides new tools for improved cellular fluorescence microscopy through intact tissue layers or other types of aberrant media.

  3. All-optically integrated multimodality imaging system: combined photoacoustic microscopy, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongjiang; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a multimodality imaging system by optically integrating all-optical photoacoustic microscopy (AOPAM), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence microscopy (FLM) to provide complementary information including optical absorption, optical back-scattering and fluorescence contrast of biological tissue. By sharing the same low-coherence Michelson interferometer, AOPAM and OCT could be organically optically combined to obtain the absorption and scattering information of the biological tissues. Also, owing to using the same laser source and objective lens, intrinsically registered photoacoustic and fluorescence signals are obtained to present the radiative and nonradiative transition process of absorption. Simultaneously photoacoustic angiography, tissue structure and fluorescence molecular in vivo images of mouse ear were acquired to demonstrate the capabilities of the optically integrated trimodality imaging system, which can present more information to study tumor angiogenesis, vasculature, anatomical structure and microenvironments in vivo.

  4. Correlative super-resolution fluorescence microscopy combined with optical coherence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungho; Kim, Gyeong Tae; Jang, Soohyun; Shim, Sang-Hee; Bae, Sung Chul

    2015-03-01

    Recent development of super-resolution fluorescence imaging technique such as stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) and photoactived localization microscope (PALM) has brought us beyond the diffraction limits. It allows numerous opportunities in biology because vast amount of formerly obscured molecular structures, due to lack of spatial resolution, now can be directly observed. A drawback of fluorescence imaging, however, is that it lacks complete structural information. For this reason, we have developed a super-resolution multimodal imaging system based on STORM and full-field optical coherence microscopy (FF-OCM). FF-OCM is a type of interferometry systems based on a broadband light source and a bulk Michelson interferometer, which provides label-free and non-invasive visualization of biological samples. The integration between the two systems is simple because both systems use a wide-field illumination scheme and a conventional microscope. This combined imaging system gives us both functional information at a molecular level (~20nm) and structural information at the sub-cellular level (~1μm). For thick samples such as tissue slices, while FF-OCM is readily capable of imaging the 3D architecture, STORM suffer from aberrations and high background fluorescence that substantially degrade the resolution. In order to correct the aberrations in thick tissues, we employed an adaptive optics system in the detection path of the STORM microscope. We used our multimodal system to obtain images on brain tissue samples with structural and functional information.

  5. Neural imaging in songbirds using fiber optic fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooshabadi, Fatemeh; Hearn, Gentry; Lints, Thierry; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2012-02-01

    The song control system of juvenile songbirds is an important model for studying the developmental acquisition and generation of complex learned vocal motor sequences, two processes that are fundamental to human speech and language. To understand the neural mechanisms underlying song production, it is critical to characterize the activity of identified neurons in the song control system when the bird is singing. Neural imaging in unrestrained singing birds, although technically challenging, will advance our understanding of neural ensemble coding mechanisms in this system. We are exploring the use of a fiber optic microscope for functional imaging in the brain of behaving and singing birds in order to better understand the contribution of a key brain nucleus (high vocal center nucleus; HVC) to temporal aspects of song motor control. We have constructed a fluorescence microscope with LED illumination, a fiber bundle for transmission of fluorescence excitation and emission light, a ~2x GRIN lens, and a CCD for image acquisition. The system has 2 μm resolution, 375 μm field of view, 200 μm working distance, and 1 mm outer diameter. As an initial characterization of this setup, neurons in HVC were imaged using the fiber optic microscope after injection of quantum dots or fluorescent retrograde tracers into different song nuclei. A Lucid Vivascope confocal microscope was used to confirm the imaging results. Long-term imaging of the activity of these neurons in juvenile birds during singing may lead us to a better understanding of the central motor codes for song and the central mechanism by which auditory experience modifies song motor commands to enable vocal learning and imitation.

  6. Recent Advances in Biological Single-Molecule Applications of Optical Tweezers and Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Shabestari, M; Meijering, A E C; Roos, W H; Wuite, G J L; Peterman, E J G

    2017-01-01

    Over the past two decades, single-molecule techniques have evolved into robust tools to study many fundamental biological processes. The combination of optical tweezers with fluorescence microscopy and microfluidics provides a powerful single-molecule manipulation and visualization technique that has found widespread application in biology. In this combined approach, the spatial (~nm) and temporal (~ms) resolution, as well as the force scale (~pN) accessible to optical tweezers is complemented with the power of fluorescence microscopy. Thereby, it provides information on the local presence, identity, spatial dynamics, and conformational dynamics of single biomolecules. Together, these techniques allow comprehensive studies of, among others, molecular motors, protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, biomolecular conformational changes, and mechanotransduction pathways. In this chapter, recent applications of fluorescence microscopy in combination with optical trapping are discussed. After an introductory section, we provide a description of instrumentation together with the current capabilities and limitations of the approaches. Next we summarize recent studies that applied this combination of techniques in biological systems and highlight some representative biological assays to mark the exquisite opportunities that optical tweezers combined with fluorescence microscopy provide. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Recent Advances in Biological Single-Molecule Applications of Optical Tweezers and Fluorescence Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hashemi Shabestari, M; Meijering, A E C; Roos, W H; Wuite, G J L; Peterman, E J G

    2017-01-01

    Over the past two decades, single-molecule techniques have evolved into robust tools to study many fundamental biological processes. The combination of optical tweezers with fluorescence microscopy and microfluidics provides a powerful single-molecule manipulation and visualization technique that

  8. Multiphoton microscopy, fluorescence lifetime imaging and optical spectroscopy for the diagnosis of neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skala, Melissa Caroline

    2007-12-01

    Cancer morbidity and mortality is greatly reduced when the disease is diagnosed and treated early in its development. Tissue biopsies are the gold standard for cancer diagnosis, and an accurate diagnosis requires a biopsy from the malignant portion of an organ. Light, guided through a fiber optic probe, could be used to inspect regions of interest and provide real-time feedback to determine the optimal tissue site for biopsy. This approach could increase the diagnostic accuracy of current biopsy procedures. The studies in this thesis have characterized changes in tissue optical signals with carcinogenesis, increasing our understanding of the sensitivity of optical techniques for cancer detection. All in vivo studies were conducted on the dimethylbenz[alpha]anthracene treated hamster cheek pouch model of epithelial carcinogenesis. Multiphoton microscopy studies in the near infrared wavelength region quantified changes in tissue morphology and fluorescence with carcinogenesis in vivo. Statistically significant morphological changes with precancer included increased epithelial thickness, loss of stratification in the epithelium, and increased nuclear diameter. Fluorescence changes included a statistically significant decrease in the epithelial fluorescence intensity per voxel at 780 nm excitation, a decrease in the fluorescence lifetime of protein-bound nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH, an electron donor in oxidative phosphorylation), and an increase in the fluorescence lifetime of protein-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD, an electron acceptor in oxidative phosphorylation) with precancer. The redox ratio (fluorescence intensity of FAD/NADH, a measure of the cellular oxidation-reduction state) did not significantly change with precancer. Cell culture experiments (MCF10A cells) indicated that the decrease in protein-bound NADH with precancer could be due to increased levels of glycolysis. Point measurements of diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectra in

  9. Optical mapping of a rice B AC clone using restriction endonuclease and imaging with fluorescent microscopy at single molecule level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A method of constructing restriction map by optical mapping and single molecule fluorescent microscopy is described. DNA molecules were aligned and adsorbed on a glass coverslip surface by a mbdified "molecular combing"technique, and then the surface-immobilized DNAs were cleaved in situ with a restriction endonuclease. Individual DNA molecules digested by the endonuclease EcoR I were observable with fluorescent microscopy. Using optical mapping, a physical map of a rice bacterial artificial chromosome clone was constructed. This method will facilitate genomic mapping and tracing the dynamic process in real time at a single molecule level with fluorescence microscopy.

  10. High-Contrast Fluorescence Microscopy for a Biomolecular Analysis Based on Polarization Techniques Using an Optical Interference Mirror Slide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuru Yasuda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence microscopy with an improved contrast for fluorescence images is developed using an optical interference mirror (OIM slide, which can enhance the fluorescence from a fluorophore as a result of the double interference of the excitation light and emission light. To improve the contrast of a fluorescence image using an OIM slide, a linearly-polarized excitation light was employed, and the fluorescence emission polarized perpendicular to the polarization of the excitation light was detected. The image contrast with this optical system was improved 110-fold for rhodamine B spotted on the OIM, in comparison with a glass slide using a general fluorescence microscopy optical system. Moreover, a 24-fold improvement of the image contrast was achieved for the detection of Cy3-labeled streptavidin bound to immobilize biotin.

  11. Fluorescent Nanodiamond-Gold Hybrid Particles for Multimodal Optical and Electron Microscopy Cellular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weina; Naydenov, Boris; Chakrabortty, Sabyasachi; Wuensch, Bettina; Hübner, Kristina; Ritz, Sandra; Cölfen, Helmut; Barth, Holger; Koynov, Kaloian; Qi, Haoyuan; Leiter, Robert; Reuter, Rolf; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Boldt, Felix; Scheuer, Jonas; Kaiser, Ute; Sison, Miguel; Lasser, Theo; Tinnefeld, Philip; Jelezko, Fedor; Walther, Paul; Wu, Yuzhou; Weil, Tanja

    2016-10-12

    There is a continuous demand for imaging probes offering excellent performance in various microscopy techniques for comprehensive investigations of cellular processes by more than one technique. Fluorescent nanodiamond-gold nanoparticles (FND-Au) constitute a new class of "all-in-one" hybrid particles providing unique features for multimodal cellular imaging including optical imaging, electron microscopy, and, and potentially even quantum sensing. Confocal and optical coherence microscopy of the FND-Au allow fast investigations inside living cells via emission, scattering, and photothermal imaging techniques because the FND emission is not quenched by AuNPs. In electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) analysis of FND-Au reveals greatly enhanced contrast due to the gold particles as well as an extraordinary flickering behavior in three-dimensional cellular environments originating from the nanodiamonds. The unique multimodal imaging characteristics of FND-Au enable detailed studies inside cells ranging from statistical distributions at the entire cellular level (micrometers) down to the tracking of individual particles in subcellular organelles (nanometers). Herein, the processes of endosomal membrane uptake and release of FNDs were elucidated for the first time by the imaging of individual FND-Au hybrid nanoparticles with single-particle resolution. Their convenient preparation, the availability of various surface groups, their flexible detection modalities, and their single-particle contrast in combination with the capability for endosomal penetration and low cytotoxicity make FND-Au unique candidates for multimodal optical-electronic imaging applications with great potential for emerging techniques, such as quantum sensing inside living cells.

  12. Polarization contrast in fluorescence scanning near-field optical microscopy in reflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalocha, A.; Hulst, van N.F.

    1995-01-01

    Polarization contrast is presented in fluorescence images of a Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer obtained with a scanning near-field optical microscope operated in reflection. A tapered optical fiber is used both to excite and to collect the fluorescence. The lateral resolution in the reflection fluoresce

  13. Dual wavelength fluorescent ratiometric pH measurement by scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongbo; Shinohara, Ryosuke; Iwami, Kentaro; Ohta, Yoshihiro; Umeda, Norihiro

    2010-08-01

    A novel method to observe pH distribution by dual wavelength fluorescent ratiometric pH measurement by scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) is developed. In this method, in order to investigate not only the pH of mitochondrial membrane but also its distribution in the vicinity, a pH sensitive fluorescent reagent covers mitochondria instead of injecting it to mitochondria. This method utilizes a dual-emission pH sensitive dye and SNOM with a themally-pulled and metal-coated optical fiber to improve the spatial resolution. Time-dependence of Fluorescent intensity ratio (FIR) under acid addition is investigated. As the distances between the dropped point and the SNOM probe becomes closer, the time when FIR changes becomes earlier. The response of mitochondria under supplement of nutrition is studied by using this method. While the probe is near to mitochondria, the ratio quickly becomes to increase. In conclusion, it was confirmed that the temporal variation of pH can be detected by this method, and pH distribution in the vicinity of mitochondria is able to be measured by this method.

  14. Fluorescence antibunching microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Osip

    2011-01-01

    Breaking the diffraction limit in microscopy by utilizing quantum properties of light has been the goal of intense research in the recent years. We propose a quantum superresolution technique based on non-classical emission statistics of fluorescent markers, routinely used as contrast labels for bio-imaging. The technique can be readily implemented using standard fluorescence microscopy equipment.

  15. LEDs for fluorescence microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, I.T.; Garini, Y.; Dietrich, H.R.C.; Van Oel, W.; Liqui Lung, G.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional light sources for fluorescence microscopy have been mercury lamps, xenon lamps, and lasers. These sources have been essential in the development of fluorescence microscopy but each can have serious disadvantages: lack of near monochromaticity, heat generation, cost, lifetime of the light

  16. Resolution enhancement of digital laser scanning fluorescence microscopy with a dual-lens optical pickup head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Chen, Jung-Po; Lee, Yuan-Chin; Chiang, Hung-Chih; Huang, Tai-Ting; Huang, Chun-Chieh; Cheng, Chih-Ming; Cheng, Chung-Ta; Lo, Feng-Hsiang; Tiao, Golden

    2016-10-01

    The resolution of the cell fluorescence image captured by a digital laser scanning microscopy with a modified dual-lens BD-ROM optical pickup head is enhanced by image registration and double sample frequency. A dual objective lens of red (655 nm) and blue (405 or 488 nm) laser sources with numerical apertures of 0.6 and 0.85 is used for sample focusing and position tracking and cell fluorescence image capturing, respectively. The image registration and capturing frequency are based on the address-coded patterns of a sample slide. The address-coded patterns are designed as a string of binary code, which comprises a plurality of base-straight lands and grooves and data-straight grooves. The widths of the base-straight lands, base-straight grooves, and data-straight grooves are 0.38, 0.38, and 0.76 μm, respectively. The numbers of sample signals in the x-direction are measured at every intersection point by intersecting the base intensity of the push-pull signal of the address-coded patterns, which has a minimum spacing of 0.38 μm. After taking a double sample frequency, the resolution of the measured cell fluorescence image is enhanced from 0.38 μm to the diffraction limit of the objective lens.

  17. Simultaneous confocal fluorescence microscopy and optical coherence tomography for drug distribution and tissue integrity assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Matthew T.; LaCroix, Jeffrey; Henderson, Marcus; Katz, David; Wax, Adam

    2011-03-01

    The effectiveness of microbicidal gels, topical products developed to prevent infection by sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS, is governed by extent of gel coverage, pharmacokinetics of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), and integrity of vaginal epithelium. While biopsies provide localized information about drug delivery and tissue structure, in vivo measurements are preferable in providing objective data on API and gel coating distribution as well as tissue integrity. We are developing a system combining confocal fluorescence microscopy with optical coherence tomography (OCT) to simultaneously measure local concentrations and diffusion coefficients of APIs during transport from microbicidal gels into tissue, while assessing tissue integrity. The confocal module acquires 2-D images of fluorescent APIs multiple times per second allowing analysis of lateral diffusion kinetics. The custom Fourier domain OCT module has a maximum a-scan rate of 54 kHz and provides depth-resolved tissue integrity information coregistered with the confocal fluorescence measurements. The combined system is validated by imaging phantoms with a surrogate fluorophore. Time-resolved API concentration measured at fixed depths is analyzed for diffusion kinetics. This multimodal system will eventually be implemented in vivo for objective evaluation of microbicide product performance.

  18. Dye-enhanced reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy as an optical pathology tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroslavsky, Anna N.; Salomatina, Elena; Novak, John; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Castano, Ana; Hamblin, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Early detection and precise excision of neoplasms are imperative requirements for successful cancer treatment. In this study we evaluated the use of dye-enhanced confocal microscopy as an optical pathology tool in the ex vivo trial with fresh thick non-melanoma skin cancer excisions and in vivo trial with B16F10 melanoma cancer in mice. For the experiments the tumors were rapidly stained using aqueous solutions of either toluidine blue or methylene blue and imaged using multimodal confocal microscope. Reflectance images were acquired at the wavelengths of 630nm and 650 nm. Fluorescence was excited at 630 nm and 650 nm. Fluorescence emission was registered in the range between 680 nm and 710 nm. The images were compared to the corresponding en face frozen H&E sections. The results of the study indicate confocal images of stained cancerous tissue closely resemble corresponding H&E sections both in vivo and in vitro. This remarkable similarity enables interpretation of confocal images in a manner similar to that of histopathology. The developed technique may provide an efficient real-time optical tool for detecting skin pathology.

  19. A simple optical fiber device for quantitative fluorescence microscopy of single living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graft, van Marja; Oosterhuis, Bernard; Werf, van der Kees O.; Grooth, de Bart G.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    simple and relatively inexpensive system is described for obtaining quantitative fluorescence measurements on single living cells loaded with a fluorescent probe to study cell physiological processes. The light emitted from the fluorescent cells is captured by and transported through an optical fibe

  20. Validating Intravascular Imaging with Serial Optical Coherence Tomography and Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardif, Pier-Luc; Bertrand, Marie-Jeanne; Abran, Maxime; Castonguay, Alexandre; Lefebvre, Joël; Stähli, Barbara E.; Merlet, Nolwenn; Mihalache-Avram, Teodora; Geoffroy, Pascale; Mecteau, Mélanie; Busseuil, David; Ni, Feng; Abulrob, Abedelnasser; Rhéaume, Éric; L’Allier, Philippe; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Lesage, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases are characterized by the formation of a plaque in the arterial wall. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) provides high-resolution images allowing delineation of atherosclerotic plaques. When combined with near infrared fluorescence (NIRF), the plaque can also be studied at a molecular level with a large variety of biomarkers. In this work, we present a system enabling automated volumetric histology imaging of excised aortas that can spatially correlate results with combined IVUS/NIRF imaging of lipid-rich atheroma in cholesterol-fed rabbits. Pullbacks in the rabbit aortas were performed with a dual modality IVUS/NIRF catheter developed by our group. Ex vivo three-dimensional (3D) histology was performed combining optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal fluorescence microscopy, providing high-resolution anatomical and molecular information, respectively, to validate in vivo findings. The microscope was combined with a serial slicer allowing for the imaging of the whole vessel automatically. Colocalization of in vivo and ex vivo results is demonstrated. Slices can then be recovered to be tested in conventional histology. PMID:27983695

  1. Validating Intravascular Imaging with Serial Optical Coherence Tomography and Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier-Luc Tardif

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases are characterized by the formation of a plaque in the arterial wall. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS provides high-resolution images allowing delineation of atherosclerotic plaques. When combined with near infrared fluorescence (NIRF, the plaque can also be studied at a molecular level with a large variety of biomarkers. In this work, we present a system enabling automated volumetric histology imaging of excised aortas that can spatially correlate results with combined IVUS/NIRF imaging of lipid-rich atheroma in cholesterol-fed rabbits. Pullbacks in the rabbit aortas were performed with a dual modality IVUS/NIRF catheter developed by our group. Ex vivo three-dimensional (3D histology was performed combining optical coherence tomography (OCT and confocal fluorescence microscopy, providing high-resolution anatomical and molecular information, respectively, to validate in vivo findings. The microscope was combined with a serial slicer allowing for the imaging of the whole vessel automatically. Colocalization of in vivo and ex vivo results is demonstrated. Slices can then be recovered to be tested in conventional histology.

  2. Local delivery of fluorescent dye for fiber-optics confocal microscopy of the living heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Kaza, Aditya K; Hitchcock, Robert W; Sachse, Frank B

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-optics confocal microscopy (FCM) is an emerging imaging technology with various applications in basic research and clinical diagnosis. FCM allows for real-time in situ microscopy of tissue at sub-cellular scale. Recently FCM has been investigated for cardiac imaging, in particular, for discrimination of cardiac tissue during pediatric open-heart surgery. FCM relies on fluorescent dyes. The current clinical approach of dye delivery is based on systemic injection, which is associated with high dye consumption, and adverse clinical events. In this study, we investigated approaches for local dye delivery during FCM imaging based on dye carriers attached to the imaging probe. Using three-dimensional confocal microscopy, automated bench tests, and FCM imaging we quantitatively characterized dye release of carriers composed of open-pore foam only and foam loaded with agarose hydrogel. In addition, we compared local dye delivery with a model of systemic dye delivery in the isolated perfused rodent heart. We measured the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of images acquired in various regions of the heart. Our evaluations showed that foam-agarose dye carriers exhibited a prolonged dye release vs. foam-only carriers. Foam-agarose dye carriers allowed reliable imaging of 5-9 lines, which is comparable to 4-8 min of continuous dye release. Our study in the living heart revealed that the SNR of FCM images using local and systemic dye delivery is not different. However, we observed differences in the imaged tissue microstructure with the two approaches. Structural features characteristic of microvasculature were solely observed for systemic dye delivery. Our findings suggest that local dye delivery approach for FCM imaging constitutes an important alternative to systemic dye delivery. We suggest that the approach for local dye delivery will facilitate clinical translation of FCM, for instance, for FCM imaging during pediatric heart surgery.

  3. Local Delivery of Fluorescent Dye For Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy of the Living Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao eHuang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-optics confocal microscopy (FCM is an emerging imaging technology with various applications in basic research and clinical diagnosis. FCM allows for real-time in situ microscopy of tissue at sub-cellular scale. Recently FCM has been investigated for cardiac imaging, in particular, for discrimination of cardiac tissue during pediatric open-heart surgery. FCM relies on fluorescent dyes. The current clinical approach of dye delivery is based on systemic injection, which is associated with high dye consumption and adverse clinical events. In this study, we investigated approaches for local dye delivery during FCM imaging based on dye carriers attached to the imaging probe. Using three-dimensional confocal microscopy, automated bench tests, and FCM imaging we quantitatively characterized dye release of carriers composed of open-pore foam only and foam loaded with agarose hydrogel. In addition, we compared local dye delivery with a model of systemic dye delivery in the isolated perfused rodent heart. We measured the signal-to-noise ratio of images acquired in various regions of the heart. Our evaluations showed that foam-agarose dye carriers exhibited a prolonged dye release versus foam-only carriers. Foam-agarose dye carriers allowed reliable imaging of 5-9 lines, which is comparable to 4-8 min of continuous dye release. Our study in the living heart revealed that the SNR of FCM images using local and systemic dye delivery is not different. However, we observed differences in the imaged tissue microstructure with the two approaches. Structural features characteristic of microvasculature were solely observed for systemic dye delivery. Our findings suggest that local dye delivery approach for FCM imaging constitutes an important alternative to systemic dye delivery. We suggest that the approach for local dye delivery will facilitate clinical translation of FCM, for instance, for FCM imaging during pediatric heart surgery.

  4. Fluorescent dyes with large Stokes shifts for super-resolution optical microscopy of biological objects: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sednev, Maksim V.; Belov, Vladimir N.; Hell, Stefan W.

    2015-12-01

    The review deals with commercially available organic dyes possessing large Stokes shifts and their applications as fluorescent labels in optical microscopy based on stimulated emission depletion (STED). STED microscopy breaks Abbe’s diffraction barrier and provides optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit. STED microscopy is non-invasive and requires photostable fluorescent markers attached to biomolecules or other objects of interest. Up to now, in most biology-related STED experiments, bright and photoresistant dyes with small Stokes shifts of 20-40 nm were used. The rapid progress in STED microscopy showed that organic fluorophores possessing large Stokes shifts are indispensable in multi-color super-resolution techniques. The ultimate result of the imaging relies on the optimal combination of a dye, the bio-conjugation procedure and the performance of the optical microscope. Modern bioconjugation methods, basics of STED microscopy, as well as structures and spectral properties of the presently available fluorescent markers are reviewed and discussed. In particular, the spectral properties of the commercial dyes are tabulated and correlated with the available depletion wavelengths found in STED microscopes produced by LEICA Microsytems, Abberior Instruments and Picoquant GmbH.

  5. Cell tracking with gadophrin-2: a bifunctional contrast agent for MR imaging, optical imaging, and fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E. [Department of Radiology, UCSF Medical Center, University of California in San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Ave, CA 94143, San Francisco (United States); Rudelius, Martina; Piontek, Guido; Schlegel, Juergen [Institute of Pathology, Technical University, Munich (Germany); Metz, Stephan; Settles, Marcus; Rummeny, Ernst J. [Department of Radiology, Technical University, Munich (Germany); Pichler, Bernd [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California Davis, Davis (United States); Heinzmann, Ulrich [National Research Center for Environment and Health, Technical University, Munich (Germany); Oostendorp, Robert A.J. [3. Clinic of Internal Medicine, Laboratory of Stem Cell Physiology, Technical University, Munich (Germany)

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of use of gadophrin-2 to trace intravenously injected human hematopoietic cells in athymic mice, employing magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, optical imaging (OI), and fluorescence microscopy. Mononuclear peripheral blood cells from GCSF-primed patients were labeled with gadophrin-2 (Schering AG, Berlin, Germany), a paramagnetic and fluorescent metalloporphyrin, using established transfection techniques with cationic liposomes. The labeled cells were evaluated in vitro with electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Then, 1 x 10{sup 6}-3 x 10{sup 8} labeled cells were injected into 14 nude Balb/c mice and the in vivo cell distribution was evaluated with MR imaging and OI before and 4, 24, and 48 h after intravenous injection (p.i.). Five additional mice served as controls: three mice were untreated controls and two mice were investigated after injection of unlabeled cells. The contrast agent effect was determined quantitatively for MR imaging by calculating signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) data. After completion of in vivo imaging studies, fluorescence microscopy of excised organs was performed. Intracellular cytoplasmatic uptake of gadophrin-2 was confirmed by electron microscopy. Spectrometry determined an uptake of 31.56 nmol Gd per 10{sup 6} cells. After intravenous injection, the distribution of gadophrin-2 labeled cells in nude mice could be visualized by MR, OI, and fluorescence microscopy. At 4 h p.i., the transplanted cells mainly distributed to lung, liver, and spleen, and 24 h p.i. they also distributed to the bone marrow. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed the distribution of gadophrin-2 labeled cells to these target organs. Gadophrin-2 is suited as a bifunctional contrast agent for MR imaging, OI, and fluorescence microscopy and may be used to combine the advantages of each individual imaging modality for in vivo tracking of intravenously injected hematopoietic cells

  6. Probing single processive molecular motors with high-speed optical tweezers and fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardini, L.; Pavone, F. S.; Capitanio, M.

    2017-02-01

    Here we present development of optical techniques for the study of single processive myosin motors based on the combination of high-speed optical tweezers force spectroscopy and single molecule fluorescence imaging. Ultrafast force-clamp spectroscopy1 is applied to study the dependence of single chemo-mechanical steps of processive myosin motors on the applied load. On the other hand, single molecule localization through FIONA (Fluorescence Imaging with One Nanometer Accuracy)2, 3 is applied to in vitro motility assay to measure parameters such as the runlength, velocity and step size of single myosin V motors, labeled with Quantum Dots, under unloaded conditions.

  7. Adaptive optics in multiphoton microscopy: comparison of two, three and four photon fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinefeld, David; Paudel, Hari P; Ouzounov, Dimitre G; Bifano, Thomas G; Xu, Chris

    2015-11-30

    We demonstrate adaptive optics system based on nonlinear feedback from 3- and 4-photon fluorescence. The system is based on femtosecond pulses created by soliton self-frequency shift of a 1550-nm fiber-based femtosecond laser together with micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) phase spatial light modulator (SLM). We perturb the 1020-segment SLM using an orthogonal Walsh sequence basis set with a modified version of three-point phase shifting interferometry. We show the improvement after aberrations correction in 3-photon signal from fluorescent beads. In addition, we compare the improvement obtained in the same adaptive optical system for 2-, 3- and 4-photon fluorescence using dye pool. We show that signal improvement resulting from aberration correction grows exponentially as a function of the order of nonlinearity.

  8. Multimodal optical setup for nonlinear and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopies: improvement on a commercial confocal inverted microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegati, V. B.; Adur, J.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Baratti, M. O.; Carvalho, H. F.; Cesar, C. L.

    2012-03-01

    In this work we proposed and built a multimodal optical setup that extends a commercially available confocal microscope (Olympus FV300) to include nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). The NLO microscopies included two-photon fluorescence (TPFE), Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and Third Harmonic Generation (THG). The whole system, including FLIM, used only one laser source composed of an 80 MHz femtosecond laser. The commercial Ti:sapphire lasers can be tuned up to 690-1040 nm bringing the THG signal to the 350 nm region where most microscope optics do not work. However, the third harmonic is only generated at the sample, meaning that we only have to take care of the collection optics. To do that we used a remote photomultiplier to acquire the THG signal at the 310-350 nm wavelength window. After performing the tests to guarantee that we are observing actually SHG/THG signals we than used this system to acquire multimodal images of several biological samples, from epithelial cancer to vegetables. The ability to see the collagen network together with the cell nuclei proved to be important for cancer tissues diagnosis. Moreover, FLIM provides information about the cell metabolism, also very important for cancer cell processes.

  9. Combining fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Kazuhito; Hatta-Ohashi, Yoko; Akiyoshi, Ryutaro; Sugiyama, Takashi; Sakai, Ikuko; Takahashi, Takeo; Suzuki, Hirobumi

    2015-08-01

    Bioluminescence microscopy has revealed that gene expression in individual cells can respond differently to the same stimulus. To understand this phenomenon, it is important to sequentially observe the series of events from cellular signal transduction to gene expression regulated by specific transcription factors derived from signaling cascades in individual cells. However, these processes have been separately analyzed with fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopy. Furthermore, in culture medium, the background fluorescence of luciferin-a substrate of luciferase in promoter assays of gene expression in cultured cells-confounds the simultaneous observation of fluorescence and bioluminescence. Therefore, we optimized conditions for optical filter sets based on spectral properties and the luciferin concentration based on cell permeability for fluorescence observation combined with bioluminescence microscopy. An excitation and emission filter set (492-506 nm and 524-578 nm) was suitable for green fluorescent protein and yellow fluorescent protein imaging of cells, and >100 μM luciferin was acceptable in culture medium based on kinetic constants and the estimated intracellular concentration. Using these parameters, we present an example of sequential fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopic observation of signal transduction (translocation of protein kinase C alpha from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane) coupled with activation of gene expression by nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide B in individual cells and show that the gene expression response is not completely concordant with upstream signaling following stimulation with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate. Our technique is a powerful imaging tool for analysis of heterogeneous gene expression together with upstream signaling in live single cells.

  10. Highlights of the optical highlighter fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, G H

    2011-07-01

    The development of super-resolution microscopy techniques using molecular localization, such as photoactivated localization microscopy, fluorescence photoactivated localization microscopy, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, photoactivated localization microscopy with independent running acquisition and many others, has heightened interest in molecules that will be grouped here into a category referred to as 'optical highlighter' fluorescent proteins. This review will survey many of the advances in development of fluorescent proteins for optically highlighting sub-populations of fluorescently labelled molecules.

  11. In vivo fluorescence fiber-optic microscopy of superfast Ca^2+ transients in syrinx muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Asén, Analía; Méndez, Jorge; Goller, Franz

    2010-03-01

    Optical techniques in conjunction with fluorescent markers have revolutionized the investigation of dynamical cellular processes, such as studies of calcium ion (Ca^2+) dynamics in muscles. Recently, it was shown that songbirds have superfast syringeal muscles, which can modulate song acoustics up to 250 Hz. Such rapid contraction cycles most likely require very rapid Ca^2+ kinetics. We developed a technique to measure Ca^2+ transients in syringeal muscles of anesthetized birds with a custom-built endoscope. The fluorescence measurements were carried out before and after applying a calcium indicator dye and while muscles were stimulated electrically. The results show fast (˜50-ms FWHM) and superfast (˜7-ms FWHM) Ca^2+ transients. The strongest signals were observed 30-40 minutes after applying the dye. This study confirms that rapid Ca^2+ transients in syringeal muscles facilitate superfast contraction kinetics and demonstrates the feasibility of this optical technique as a biosensor for detecting fluorescence signals of muscular calcium activity on a ms timescale of living animals.

  12. Pico-projector-based optical sectioning microscopy for 3D chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of mesophyll cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Yu; Hsu, Yu John; Yeh, Chia-Hua; Chen, S.-Wei; Chung, Chien-Han

    2015-03-01

    A pico-projector-based optical sectioning microscope (POSM) was constructed using a pico-projector to generate structured illumination patterns. A net rate of 5.8 × 106 pixel/s and sub-micron spatial resolution in three-dimensions (3D) were achieved. Based on the pico-projector’s flexibility in pattern generation, the characteristics of POSM with different modulation periods and at different imaging depths were measured and discussed. With the application of different modulation periods, 3D chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of mesophyll cells was carried out in freshly plucked leaves of four species without sectioning or staining. For each leaf, an average penetration depth of 120 μm was achieved. Increasing the modulation period along with the increment of imaging depth, optical sectioning images can be obtained with a compromise between the axial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. After ∼30 min imaging on the same area, photodamage was hardly observed. Taking the advantages of high speed and low damages of POSM, the investigation of the dynamic fluorescence responses to temperature changes was performed under three different treatment temperatures. The three embedded blue, green and red light-emitting diode light sources were applied to observe the responses of the leaves with different wavelength excitation.

  13. Characterization of bacterial spore germination using phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingbo; Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Guiwen; Yu, Jing; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-qing

    2011-05-01

    This protocol describes a method combining phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and optical tweezers to characterize the germination of single bacterial spores. The characterization consists of the following steps: (i) loading heat-activated dormant spores into a temperature-controlled microscope sample holder containing a germinant solution plus a nucleic acid stain; (ii) capturing a single spore with optical tweezers; (iii) simultaneously measuring phase-contrast images, Raman spectra and fluorescence images of the optically captured spore at 2- to 10-s intervals; and (iv) analyzing the acquired data for the loss of spore refractility, changes in spore-specific molecules (in particular, dipicolinic acid) and uptake of the nucleic acid stain. This information leads to precise correlations between various germination events, and takes 1-2 h to complete. The method can also be adapted to use multi-trap Raman spectroscopy or phase-contrast microscopy of spores adhered on a cover slip to simultaneously obtain germination parameters for multiple individual spores.

  14. Bridging fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N. G.

    Development of new fluorescent probes and fluorescence microscopes has led to new ways to study cell biology. With the emergence of specialized microscopy units at most universities and research centers, the use of these techniques is well within reach for a broad research community. A major

  15. Bridging fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N. G.

    2008-01-01

    Development of new fluorescent probes and fluorescence microscopes has led to new ways to study cell biology. With the emergence of specialized microscopy units at most universities and research centers, the use of these techniques is well within reach for a broad research community. A major breakth

  16. Innovations of wide-field optical-sectioning fluorescence microscopy: toward high-speed volumetric bio-imaging with simplicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiun-Yann

    Optical microscopy has become an indispensable tool for biological researches since its invention, mostly owing to its sub-cellular spatial resolutions, non-invasiveness, instrumental simplicity, and the intuitive observations it provides. Nonetheless, obtaining reliable, quantitative spatial information from conventional wide-field optical microscopy is not always intuitive as it appears to be. This is because in the acquired images of optical microscopy the information about out-of-focus regions is spatially blurred and mixed with in-focus information. In other words, conventional wide-field optical microscopy transforms the three-dimensional spatial information, or volumetric information about the objects into a two-dimensional form in each acquired image, and therefore distorts the spatial information about the object. Several fluorescence holography-based methods have demonstrated the ability to obtain three-dimensional information about the objects, but these methods generally rely on decomposing stereoscopic visualizations to extract volumetric information and are unable to resolve complex 3-dimensional structures such as a multi-layer sphere. The concept of optical-sectioning techniques, on the other hand, is to detect only two-dimensional information about an object at each acquisition. Specifically, each image obtained by optical-sectioning techniques contains mainly the information about an optically thin layer inside the object, as if only a thin histological section is being observed at a time. Using such a methodology, obtaining undistorted volumetric information about the object simply requires taking images of the object at sequential depths. Among existing methods of obtaining volumetric information, the practicability of optical sectioning has made it the most commonly used and most powerful one in biological science. However, when applied to imaging living biological systems, conventional single-point-scanning optical-sectioning techniques often

  17. Fundamentals of fluorescence and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, David E

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental physics of fluorescence. The application of fluorescence to microscopy represents an important transition in the development of microscopy, particularly as it applies to biology. It enables quantitating the amounts of specific molecules within a cell, determining whether molecules are complexing on a molecular level, measuring changes in ionic concentrations within cells and organelles, and measuring molecular dynamics. This chapter also discusses the issues important to quantitative measurement of fluorescence and focuses on four of quantitative measurements of fluorescence--boxcar-gated detection, streak cameras, photon correlation, and phase modulation. Although quantitative measurement presents many pitfalls to the beginner, it also presents significant opportunities to one skilled in the art. This chapter also examines how fluorescence is measured in the steady state and time domain and how fluorescence is applied in the modern epifluorescence microscope.

  18. Membranes and Fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    be provided by microscopy-related techniques. In this chapter, I will attempt to summarize representative examples concerning how microscopy (which provides information on membrane lateral organization by direct visualization) and spectroscopy techniques (which provides information about molecular interaction...

  19. Developing a New Biophysical Tool to Combine Magneto-Optical Tweezers with Super-Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaokun Zhou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel experimental setup in which magnetic and optical tweezers are combined for torque and force transduction onto single filamentous molecules in a transverse configuration to allow simultaneous mechanical measurement and manipulation. Previously we have developed a super-resolution imaging module which, in conjunction with advanced imaging techniques such as Blinking assisted Localisation Microscopy (BaLM, achieves localisation precision of single fluorescent dye molecules bound to DNA of ~30 nm along the contour of the molecule; our work here describes developments in producing a system which combines tweezing and super-resolution fluorescence imaging. The instrument also features an acousto-optic deflector that temporally divides the laser beam to form multiple traps for high throughput statistics collection. Our motivation for developing the new tool is to enable direct observation of detailed molecular topological transformation and protein binding event localisation in a stretching/twisting mechanical assay that previously could hitherto only be deduced indirectly from the end-to-end length variation of DNA. Our approach is simple and robust enough for reproduction in the lab without the requirement of precise hardware engineering, yet is capable of unveiling the elastic and dynamic properties of filamentous molecules that have been hidden using traditional tools.

  20. Exploring the limits of optical microscopy: live cell and superresolution fluorescence microscopy of HIV-1 Transfer Between T lymphocytes Across the Virological Synapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNerney, Gregory Paul

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) is a human retrovirus that efficiently, albeit gradually, overruns the immune system. An already infected T lymphocyte can latch onto another T lymphocyte whereby creating a virological synapse (VS); this junction drives viral assembly and transfer to the target cell in batches in an efficient, protective manor. My Ph.D. doctoral thesis focused on studying this transmission mechanism using advanced optical imaging modalities and the fully infectious fluorescent clone HIV Gag-iGFP. T lymphocytes are non-adherent cells (˜10 um thick) and the viral transmission process is fairly dynamic, hence we employed a custom spinning disk confocal microscope that revealed many interesting characteristics of this cooperative event. This methodology has low throughput as cell contact and transfer is at random. Optical tweezers was then added to the microscope to directly initiate cell contact at will. To assess when viral maturation occurs post-transfer, an optical assay based off of Forster resonance energy transfer was developed to monitor maturation. Structured illumination microscopy was further used to image the process at higher resolution and it showed that viral particles are not entering existing degradative compartments. Non-HIV-1 applications of the optical technologies are also reviewed.

  1. A dual-modality optical coherence tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy system for simultaneous morphological and biochemical tissue characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jesung; Jo, Javier A; Shrestha, Sebina; Pande, Paritosh; Wan, Qiujie; Applegate, Brian E

    2010-07-16

    Most pathological conditions elicit changes in the tissue optical response that may be interrogated by one or more optical imaging modalities. Any single modality typically only furnishes an incomplete picture of the tissue optical response, hence an approach that integrates complementary optical imaging modalities is needed for a more comprehensive non-destructive and minimally-invasive tissue characterization. We have developed a dual-modality system, incorporating optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), that is capable of simultaneously characterizing the 3-D tissue morphology and its biochemical composition. The Fourier domain OCT subsystem, at an 830 nm center wavelength, provided high-resolution morphological volumetric tissue images with an axial and lateral resolution of 7.3 and 13.4 µm, respectively. The multispectral FLIM subsystem, based on a direct pulse-recording approach (upon 355 nm laser excitation), provided two-dimensional superficial maps of the tissue autofluorescence intensity and lifetime at three customizable emission bands with 100 µm lateral resolution. Both subsystems share the same excitation/illumination optical path and are simultaneously raster scanned on the sample to generate coregistered OCT volumes and FLIM images. The developed OCT/FLIM system was capable of a maximum A-line rate of 59 KHz for OCT and a pixel rate of up to 30 KHz for FLIM. The dual-modality system was validated with standard fluorophore solutions and subsequently applied to the characterization of two biological tissue types: postmortem human coronary atherosclerotic plaques, and in vivo normal and cancerous hamster cheek pouch epithelial tissue.

  2. Characterization of X-ray polycapillary optics by LiF crystal radiation detectors through confocal fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfigli, Francesca; Hampai, Dariush; Dabagov, Sultan B.; Montereali, Rosa Maria

    2016-08-01

    Solid-state radiation imaging detectors based on photoluminescent colour centres in lithium fluoride (LiF) crystals have been successfully tested for both advanced 2D and 3D characterizations of X-ray polycapillary optics by a table-top laboratory system. Polycapillary optics can control X-ray beams propagation and allows obtaining quasi-parallel beam (half-lens) or focused beams (full-lens). The combination of a fine-focused micro X-ray tube and a polycapillary lens can provide the high intensity radiation fluxes that are necessary for high resolution X-ray imaging. In this paper we present novel results about advanced characterization of these complex optics by 2D as well as 3D confocal laser fluorescence microscopy of X-ray irradiated LiF crystal detectors. Two dimensional high spatial resolution images on a wide field of view of transmitted X-rays through a semi-lens and 3D direct inspection of the coloured volumes produced in LiF crystals by both focused and parallel X-ray beam transmitted by a full and a semi-lens, respectively, as well as their 3D reconstructions were obtained. The results show that the photoluminescent colour centres volume in LiF crystals combined with an optical sectioning reading system provide information about tomography of transmitted X-ray beams by policapillary optics in a single exposure process. For the first time, the use of LiF crystal plates as versatile radiation imaging luminescent detectors have been used to characterize the operation of polycapillary optics as X-ray lens, in focusing and parallel mode.

  3. Adaptive optics for fluorescence wide-field microscopy using spectrally independent guide star and markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Pierre; Muro, Eleonora; Pons, Thomas; Loriette, Vincent; Fragola, Alexandra

    2011-07-01

    We describe the implementation and use of an adaptive optics loop in the imaging path of a commercial wide field microscope. We show that it is possible to maintain the optical performances of the original microscope when imaging through aberrant biological samples. The sources used for illuminating the adaptive optics loop are spectrally independent, in excitation and emission, from the sample, so they do not appear in the final image, and their use does not contribute to the sample bleaching. Results are compared with equivalent images obtained with an identical microscope devoid of adaptive optics system.

  4. Correlative stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy and electron microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doory Kim

    Full Text Available Correlative fluorescence light microscopy and electron microscopy allows the imaging of spatial distributions of specific biomolecules in the context of cellular ultrastructure. Recent development of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy allows the location of molecules to be determined with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. However, correlative super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM still remains challenging because the optimal specimen preparation and imaging conditions for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and EM are often not compatible. Here, we have developed several experiment protocols for correlative stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM and EM methods, both for un-embedded samples by applying EM-specific sample preparations after STORM imaging and for embedded and sectioned samples by optimizing the fluorescence under EM fixation, staining and embedding conditions. We demonstrated these methods using a variety of cellular targets.

  5. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirra, Randall T; Zhang, Peijun

    2014-10-01

    Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy (CFEM) is a multimodal technique that combines dynamic and localization information from fluorescence methods with ultrastructural data from electron microscopy, to give new information about how cellular components change relative to the spatiotemporal dynamics within their environment. In this review, we will discuss some of the basic techniques and tools of the trade for utilizing this attractive research method, which is becoming a very powerful tool for biology labs. The information obtained from correlative methods has proven to be invaluable in creating consensus between the two types of microscopy, extending the capability of each, and cutting the time and expense associated with using each method separately for comparative analysis. The realization of the advantages of these methods in cell biology has led to rapid improvement in the protocols and has ushered in a new generation of instruments to reach the next level of correlation--integration.

  6. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Qingshan

    2017-05-12

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  7. The Principles of Super-Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    N.V. Klementieva; E.V. Zagaynova; К.А. Lukyanov; A.S. Mishin

    2016-01-01

    Diffraction limit of optical microscopy impedes imaging of biological objects much smaller than the wavelength of light. Conventional fluorescence microscopy does not enable to study fine structure and processes in a living cell at the macromolecular level. Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy techniques that overcome the diffraction barrier have opened up new opportunities for biological and biomedical research. These methods combine the resolution power comparable to electron microscopy...

  8. Optical-sectioning microscopy of protoporphyrin IX fluorescence in human gliomas: standardization and quantitative comparison with histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Linpeng; Chen, Ye; Yin, Chengbo; Borwege, Sabine; Sanai, Nader; Liu, Jonathan T. C.

    2017-04-01

    Systemic delivery of 5-aminolevulinic acid leads to enhanced fluorescence image contrast in many tumors due to the increased accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), a fluorescent porphyrin that is associated with tumor burden and proliferation. The value of PpIX-guided resection of malignant gliomas has been demonstrated in prospective randomized clinical studies in which a twofold greater extent of resection and improved progression-free survival have been observed. In low-grade gliomas and at the diffuse infiltrative margins of all gliomas, PpIX fluorescence is often too weak to be detected with current low-resolution surgical microscopes that are used in operating rooms. However, it has been demonstrated that high-resolution optical-sectioning microscopes are capable of detecting the sparse and punctate accumulations of PpIX that are undetectable via conventional low-power surgical fluorescence microscopes. To standardize the performance of high-resolution optical-sectioning devices for future clinical use, we have developed an imaging phantom and methods to ensure that the imaging of PpIX-expressing brain tissues can be performed reproducibly. Ex vivo imaging studies with a dual-axis confocal microscope demonstrate that these methods enable the acquisition of images from unsectioned human brain tissues that quantitatively and consistently correlate with images of histologically processed tissue sections.

  9. Optical imaging. Expansion microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Tillberg, Paul W; Boyden, Edward S

    2015-01-30

    In optical microscopy, fine structural details are resolved by using refraction to magnify images of a specimen. We discovered that by synthesizing a swellable polymer network within a specimen, it can be physically expanded, resulting in physical magnification. By covalently anchoring specific labels located within the specimen directly to the polymer network, labels spaced closer than the optical diffraction limit can be isotropically separated and optically resolved, a process we call expansion microscopy (ExM). Thus, this process can be used to perform scalable superresolution microscopy with diffraction-limited microscopes. We demonstrate ExM with apparent ~70-nanometer lateral resolution in both cultured cells and brain tissue, performing three-color superresolution imaging of ~10(7) cubic micrometers of the mouse hippocampus with a conventional confocal microscope.

  10. Dimensional metrology of lab-on-a-chip internal structures: a comparison of optical coherence tomography with confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, D R; Halter, M; Hwang, J

    2015-07-01

    The characterization of internal structures in a polymeric microfluidic device, especially of a final product, will require a different set of optical metrology tools than those traditionally used for microelectronic devices. We demonstrate that optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging is a promising technique to characterize the internal structures of poly(methyl methacrylate) devices where the subsurface structures often cannot be imaged by conventional wide field optical microscopy. The structural details of channels in the devices were imaged with OCT and analyzed with an in-house written ImageJ macro in an effort to identify the structural details of the channel. The dimensional values obtained with OCT were compared with laser-scanning confocal microscopy images of channels filled with a fluorophore solution. Attempts were also made using confocal reflectance and interferometry microscopy to measure the channel dimensions, but artefacts present in the images precluded quantitative analysis. OCT provided the most accurate estimates for the channel height based on an analysis of optical micrographs obtained after destructively slicing the channel with a microtome. OCT may be a promising technique for the future of three-dimensional metrology of critical internal structures in lab-on-a-chip devices because scans can be performed rapidly and noninvasively prior to their use.

  11. Use of astronomy filters in fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Jörg

    2012-02-01

    Monochrome astronomy filters are well suited for use as excitation or suppression filters in fluorescence microscopy. Because of their particular optical design, such filters can be combined with standard halogen light sources for excitation in many fluorescent probes. In this "low energy excitation," photobleaching (fading) or other irritations of native specimens are avoided. Photomicrographs can be taken from living motile fluorescent specimens also with a flash so that fluorescence images can be created free from indistinctness caused by movement. Special filter cubes or dichroic mirrors are not needed for our method. By use of suitable astronomy filters, fluorescence microscopy can be carried out with standard laboratory microscopes equipped with condensers for bright-field (BF) and dark-field (DF) illumination in transmitted light. In BF excitation, the background brightness can be modulated in tiny steps up to dark or black. Moreover, standard industry microscopes fitted with a vertical illuminator for examinations of opaque probes in DF or BF illumination based on incident light (wafer inspections, for instance) can also be used for excitation in epi-illumination when adequate astronomy filters are inserted as excitatory and suppression filters in the illuminating and imaging light path. In all variants, transmission bands can be modulated by transmission shift.

  12. Biological applications of confocal fluorescence polarization microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Chad E.

    Fluorescence polarization microscopy is a powerful modality capable of sensing changes in the physical properties and local environment of fluorophores. In this thesis we present new applications for the technique in cancer diagnosis and treatment and explore the limits of the modality in scattering media. We describe modifications to our custom-built confocal fluorescence microscope that enable dual-color imaging, optical fiber-based confocal spectroscopy and fluorescence polarization imaging. Experiments are presented that indicate the performance of the instrument for all three modalities. The limits of confocal fluorescence polarization imaging in scattering media are explored and the microscope parameters necessary for accurate polarization images in this regime are determined. A Monte Carlo routine is developed to model the effect of scattering on images. Included in it are routines to track the polarization state of light using the Mueller-Stokes formalism and a model for fluorescence generation that includes sampling the excitation light polarization ellipse, Brownian motion of excited-state fluorophores in solution, and dipole fluorophore emission. Results from this model are compared to experiments performed on a fluorophore-embedded polymer rod in a turbid medium consisting of polystyrene microspheres in aqueous suspension. We demonstrate the utility of the fluorescence polarization imaging technique for removal of contaminating autofluorescence and for imaging photodynamic therapy drugs in cell monolayers. Images of cells expressing green fluorescent protein are extracted from contaminating fluorescein emission. The distribution of meta-tetrahydroxypheny1chlorin in an EMT6 cell monolayer is also presented. A new technique for imaging enzyme activity is presented that is based on observing changes in the anisotropy of fluorescently-labeled substrates. Proof-of-principle studies are performed in a model system consisting of fluorescently labeled bovine

  13. Fluorescence microscopy: A tool to study autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Shashank; Manjithaya, Ravi

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy is a cellular recycling process through which a cell degrades old and damaged cellular components such as organelles and proteins and the degradation products are reused to provide energy and building blocks. Dysfunctional autophagy is reported in several pathological situations. Hence, autophagy plays an important role in both cellular homeostasis and diseased conditions. Autophagy can be studied through various techniques including fluorescence based microscopy. With the advancements of newer technologies in fluorescence microscopy, several novel processes of autophagy have been discovered which makes it an essential tool for autophagy research. Moreover, ability to tag fluorescent proteins with sub cellular targets has enabled us to evaluate autophagy processes in real time under fluorescent microscope. In this article, we demonstrate different aspects of autophagy in two different model organisms i.e. yeast and mammalian cells, with the help of fluorescence microscopy.

  14. Fundamentals of fluorescence microscopy exploring life with light

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2014-01-01

    This book starts at an introductory level and leads reader to the most advanced developments in fluorescence imaging and super-resolution techniques that have enabled the emergence of new disciplines such as nanobioimaging, multiphoton microscopy, photodynamic therapy, nanometrology and nanosensors. The interdisciplinary subject of fluorescence microscopy and imaging requires complete knowledge of imaging optics and molecular physics. So, this book approaches the subject by introducing optical imaging concepts before going deep into the advanced imaging systems and their applications. Molecular orbital theory forms the basis for understanding fluorescent molecules and thereby facilitates complete explanation of light-matter interaction at the geometrical focus. The two disciplines have some overlap since light controls the states of molecules and conversely, molecular states control the emitted light. These two mechanisms together determine essential fluorescence  factors and phenomena such as, molecular cro...

  15. Electron Microscopy of Living Cells During in Situ Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liv, Nalan; van Oosten Slingeland, Daan S B; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Kruit, Pieter; Piston, David W; Hoogenboom, Jacob P

    2016-01-26

    We present an approach toward dynamic nanoimaging: live fluorescence of cells encapsulated in a bionanoreactor is complemented with in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on an integrated microscope. This allows us to take SEM snapshots on-demand, that is, at a specific location in time, at a desired region of interest, guided by the dynamic fluorescence imaging. We show that this approach enables direct visualization, with EM resolution, of the distribution of bioconjugated quantum dots on cellular extensions during uptake and internalization.

  16. Application of tissue clearing and light sheet fluorescence microscopy to assess optic nerve regeneration in unsectioned tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xueting; Yungher, Benjamin; Park, Kevin K

    2014-01-01

    Optic nerve crush injury, as a model to study central nervous system (CNS) injury, is widely used to assess potential therapeutic strategies, aimed at promoting axon regeneration and neuronal survival. Traditional methods to evaluate optic nerve regeneration rely on histological sectioning. However, tissue sectioning results in inevitable loss of three-dimensional (3D) information, such as axonal trajectories and terminations. Here we describe a protocol for whole-tissue assessment of optic nerve regeneration in adult mice without the need for histological sectioning.

  17. Correlative Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy and Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Doory Kim; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Sigal, Yaron M.; Babcock, Hazen P.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Xiaowei Zhuang

    2015-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence light microscopy and electron microscopy allows the imaging of spatial distributions of specific biomolecules in the context of cellular ultrastructure. Recent development of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy allows the location of molecules to be determined with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. However, correlative super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM) still remains challenging because the optimal specimen preparation and ima...

  18. Optical Property Analyses of Plant Cells for Adaptive Optics Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamada, Yosuke; Murata, Takashi; Hattori, Masayuki; Oya, Shin; Hayano, Yutaka; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2014-04-01

    In astronomy, adaptive optics (AO) can be used to cancel aberrations caused by atmospheric turbulence and to perform diffraction-limited observation of astronomical objects from the ground. AO can also be applied to microscopy, to cancel aberrations caused by cellular structures and to perform high-resolution live imaging. As a step toward the application of AO to microscopy, here we analyzed the optical properties of plant cells. We used leaves of the moss Physcomitrella patens, which have a single layer of cells and are thus suitable for optical analysis. Observation of the cells with bright field and phase contrast microscopy, and image degradation analysis using fluorescent beads demonstrated that chloroplasts provide the main source of optical degradations. Unexpectedly, the cell wall, which was thought to be a major obstacle, has only a minor effect. Such information provides the basis for the application of AO to microscopy for the observation of plant cells.

  19. Speciation of europium (III) surface species on monocrystalline alumina using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence-scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaleb, K.A.; Viala, F.; Miserque, F.; Salmon, L. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC/SCP, Lab Reactivite Surface et Interface, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Reiller, P. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC/SECR, Lab Speciat Radionucleides et Mol, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Moutiers, G. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC, Serv Chim Phys, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this work was to perform highly localized spectroscopic surface measurements by combining time-resolved laser spectroscopy and scanning near-field optical microscopy. The final purpose of that was to study surface sorption at the molecular level of trivalent ions in the framework of nuclear waste disposal assessment. Time-resolved laser spectroscopy presents the advantages of being selective, sensitive, and noninvasive and scanning near-field optical microscopy is a promising technique for high resolution surface speciation. Investigation of the interaction between trivalent europium and a monocrystalline alumina (11-bar02) surface was made using different conditions of concentration and pH. We found that the distribution of sorbed europium was always homogeneous with a decay time of europium (III) equal to 350 {mu}s {+-} 15 {mu}s. On the other hand, carbonate species with a decay time of 210 {mu}s {+-} 10 {mu}s or other hydroxide species with a decay time of 180 {mu}s {+-} 10 {mu}s were detected on the surface when a higher concentration or a higher pH solution, respectively, were used. Distribution of these species was heterogeneous and their associated fluorescence signal was relatively high, evoking a precipitated form. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was also used on the same samples as a complementary technique. A binding energy of 1135.1 eV was obtained for the sorbed europium and another binding energy of 1134.4 eV was obtained for the hydroxide species, thus confirming the presence of two kinds of species on the surface. (authors)

  20. Solid-State Camera System for Fluorescence Lifetime Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Q.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a well-established platform for biology and biomedical research (Chapter 2). Based on this platform, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has been developed to measure fluorescence lifetimes, which are independent of fluorophore concentration and excitation inte

  1. Near-field Optical Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, A.G.T.

    1997-01-01

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is one of the most recent scanning probe techniques. In this technique, an optical probe is brought in the vicinity of the sample surface, in the near-field zone. The microscope can either work in illumination mode, in which the probe consists of a

  2. Near-field Optical Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, Anthonius Gerardus Theodorus

    1997-01-01

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is one of the most recent scanning probe techniques. In this technique, an optical probe is brought in the vicinity of the sample surface, in the near-field zone. The microscope can either work in illumination mode, in which the probe consists of a sub-w

  3. Optical Investigation of the Intergrowth Structure and Accessibility of Brønsted Acid Sites in Etched SSZ-13 Zeolite Crystals by Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sommer, L.; Svelle, S.; Lillerud, K.-P.; Stöcker, M; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Olsbye, U.

    2013-01-01

    Template decomposition followed by confocal fluorescence microscopy reveals a tetragonal-pyramidal intergrowth of subunits in micrometer-sized nearly cubic SSZ-13 zeolite crystals. In order to accentuate intergrowth boundaries and defect-rich areas within the individual large zeolite crystals, a tre

  4. Optical investigation of the intergrowth structure and accessibility of Brønsted acid sites in etched SSZ-13 zeolite crystals by confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Linn; Svelle, Stian; Lillerud, Karl Petter; Stöcker, Michael; Weckhuysen, Bert M; Olsbye, Unni

    2010-11-02

    Template decomposition followed by confocal fluorescence microscopy reveals a tetragonal-pyramidal intergrowth of subunits in micrometer-sized nearly cubic SSZ-13 zeolite crystals. In order to accentuate intergrowth boundaries and defect-rich areas within the individual large zeolite crystals, a treatment with an etching NaOH solution is applied. The defective areas are visualized by monitoring the spatial distribution of fluorescent tracer molecules within the individual SSZ-13 crystals by confocal fluorescence microscopy. These fluorescent tracer molecules are formed at the inner and outer crystal surfaces by utilizing the catalytic activity of the zeolite in the oligomerization reaction of styrene derivatives. This approach reveals various types of etching patterns that are an indication for the defectiveness of the studied crystals. We can show that specially one type of crystals, denoted as core-shell type, is highly accessible to the styrene molecules after etching. Despite the large crystal dimensions, the whole core-shell type SSZ-13 crystal is utilized for catalytic reaction. Furthermore, the confocal fluorescence microscopy measurements indicate a nonuniform distribution of the catalytically important Brønsted acid sites underlining the importance of space-resolved measurements.

  5. All-optical photoacoustic microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Liang Chen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional photoacoustic microscopy (PAM has gained considerable attention within the biomedical imaging community during the past decade. Detecting laser-induced photoacoustic waves by optical sensing techniques facilitates the idea of all-optical PAM (AOPAM, which is of particular interest as it provides unique advantages for achieving high spatial resolution using miniaturized embodiments of the imaging system. The review presents the technology aspects of optical-sensing techniques for ultrasound detection, such as those based on optical resonators, as well as system developments of all-optical photoacoustic systems including PAM, photoacoustic endoscopy, and multi-modality microscopy. The progress of different AOPAM systems and their representative applications are summarized.

  6. Optical waveguides formed by silver ion exchange in Schott SG11 glass for waveguide evanescent field fluorescence microscopy: evanescent images of HEK293 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Abdollah; Nitsche, Michael; Armstrong, Souzan; Nabavi, Noushin; Harrison, Rene; Dixon, S. Jeffrey; Langbein, Uwe; Mittler, Silvia

    2010-05-01

    Planar glass waveguides with a specific number of modes were fabricated by Ag+-Na+ exchange in Schott SG11 glass. The effective refractive indices were determined using m-line spectroscopy in both s- and p-polarization. By using the reversed Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation, the index profiles were described by a nonlinear diffusion equation. The diffusion coefficients for Ag+ were established, as well as the penetration depth of the evanescent field in an aqueous environment for the different modes. The integrals of |E|2 fields for the evanescent-guided fields were investigated. These are important when evanescent fields are used for illumination in interface microscopy, an alternative method to total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. The photoluminescent behavior of the waveguides was investigated as a function of ion exchange time and excitation wavelengths. Comparable images were obtained of fluorescently labeled HEK293 cells using TIRF microscopy and waveguide evanescent field fluorescence microscopy. Imaging was performed using HEK293 cells, delivering similar images and information.

  7. Waveguide evanescent field fluorescence microscopy & its application in cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Abdollah

    There are many powerful microscopy technologies available for the investigation of bulk materials as well as for thin film samples. Nevertheless, for imaging an interface, especially live cells on a substrate and ultra thin-films, only Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is available. This TIRF microscopy allows imaging without interference of the bulk. Various approaches are employed in fluorescence microscopy applications to restrict the excitation and detection of fluorophores to a thin region of the specimen. Elimination of background fluorescence from outside the focal plane can dramatically improve the signal-to-noise ratio, and consequently, the spatial resolution of the features or events of interest. TIRF microscopy is an evanescent field based microscopy. In this method, fluorescent dyes are only excited within an evanescent field: roughly within 100 nm above a glass coverslip. This will allow imaging surface and interfacial issues of the glass coverslip and an adjacent material. Waveguide evanescent field fluorescence (WEFF) microscopy is a new development for imaging cell-substrate interactions in real time and in vitro. It is an alternative to TIRF microscopy. In this method the light is coupled into a waveguide via an optical grating. The coupled light propagates as a waveguide mode and exhibits an evanescent field on top of the waveguide. This can be used as a surface-bound illumination source to excite fluorophores. This evanescent field serves as an extremely powerful tool for quality control of thin films, to study cell-substrate contacts, and investigating the effect of external agents and drugs on the cell-substrate interaction in real time and in vitro. This new method has been established and optimized to minimize non-uniformity, scattering and photo bleaching issues. Visualizing and quantifying of the cell-substrates and solid thin films have been carried out by WEFF microscopy. The images of the cell-substrate interface

  8. Virtual k -Space Modulation Optical Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Cuifang; Ma, Ye; Zhou, Renjie; Zheng, Guoan; Fang, Yue; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu; So, Peter T. C.

    2016-07-01

    We report a novel superresolution microscopy approach for imaging fluorescence samples. The reported approach, termed virtual k -space modulation optical microscopy (VIKMOM), is able to improve the lateral resolution by a factor of 2, reduce the background level, improve the optical sectioning effect and correct for unknown optical aberrations. In the acquisition process of VIKMOM, we used a scanning confocal microscope setup with a 2D detector array to capture sample information at each scanned x -y position. In the recovery process of VIKMOM, we first modulated the captured data by virtual k -space coding and then employed a ptychography-inspired procedure to recover the sample information and correct for unknown optical aberrations. We demonstrated the performance of the reported approach by imaging fluorescent beads, fixed bovine pulmonary artery endothelial (BPAE) cells, and living human astrocytes (HA). As the VIKMOM approach is fully compatible with conventional confocal microscope setups, it may provide a turn-key solution for imaging biological samples with ˜100 nm lateral resolution, in two or three dimensions, with improved optical sectioning capabilities and aberration correcting.

  9. Structured light sheet fluorescence microscopy based on four beam interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ming; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2010-08-30

    A 3D structured light sheet microscope using a four-faceted symmetric pyramid is presented. The sample is illuminated by the resulting four beam interference field. This approach combines advantages of standing wave and structured illumination microscopy. Examples of micrographs of fluorescently labeled Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells as well as of the compound eyes of drosophila are shown and the optical sectioning ability of our system is demonstrated. The capabilities and the limitations of the scheme are discussed.

  10. Mueller matrix signature in advanced fluorescence microscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Nirmal; Qiu, Jianjun; Kao, Fu-Jen; Diaspro, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    We have demonstrated the measurement and characterization of the polarization properties of a fluorescence signal using four-channel photon counting based Stokes-Mueller polarization microscopy. Thus, Lu-Chipman decomposition was applied to extract the critical polarization properties such as depolarization, linear retardance and the optical rotation of collagen type I fiber. We observed the spatial distribution of anisotropic and helical molecules of collagen from the reconstructed 2D Mueller images based on the fluorescence signal in a pixel-by-pixel manner.

  11. Optical Properties of Fluorescent Dyes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李戎; 陈东辉

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescent dyes have been widely used these years.Because of the special optical performance, conventional CCM systems seem to be unable to predict the recipes of fabrics dyed with fluorescent dyes. In order to enhance the functions of CCM systems, the optical properties of fluorescent dyes in their absorption region were investigated. It has been found that there was a fixed maximum absorption wavelength for each fluorescent dyes whatever its concentration is. Both absorption region and maximum absorption wavelength of the dyes in solution are the same to those in fabric, and that the absorption is directly proportional to the concentration of the dye. So the optical properties obtained in solutions cna be applied for describing the optics performance of fluorescent dyes in fabrics.

  12. Photobleaching correction in fluorescence microscopy images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, Nathalie B; Diaz Zamboni, Javier E; Adur, Javier F; Paravani, Enrique V; Casco, Victor H [Microscopy Laboratory, School of Engineering - Bioengineering, National University of Entre Rios (UNER), Ruta 11, Km 10 (3101), Oro Verde, Entre Rios (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Fluorophores are used to detect molecular expression by highly specific antigen-antibody reactions in fluorescence microscopy techniques. A portion of the fluorophore emits fluorescence when irradiated with electromagnetic waves of particular wavelengths, enabling its detection. Photobleaching irreversibly destroys fluorophores stimulated by radiation within the excitation spectrum, thus eliminating potentially useful information. Since this process may not be completely prevented, techniques have been developed to slow it down or to correct resulting alterations (mainly, the decrease in fluorescent signal). In the present work, the correction by photobleaching curve was studied using E-cadherin (a cell-cell adhesion molecule) expression in Bufo arenarum embryos. Significant improvements were observed when applying this simple, inexpensive and fast technique.

  13. Performance evaluation of spot detection algorithms in fluorescence microscopy images

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabaso, M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Detection of messenger Ribonucleic Acid (mRNA) spots in fluorescence microscopy images is of great importance for biologists seeking better understanding of cell functionality. Fluorescence microscopy and specific staining methods make biological...

  14. Quantitative high dynamic range beam profiling for fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, T. J., E-mail: t.j.mitchell@dur.ac.uk; Saunter, C. D.; O’Nions, W.; Girkin, J. M.; Love, G. D. [Centre for Advanced Instrumentation and Biophysical Sciences Institute, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15

    Modern developmental biology relies on optically sectioning fluorescence microscope techniques to produce non-destructive in vivo images of developing specimens at high resolution in three dimensions. As optimal performance of these techniques is reliant on the three-dimensional (3D) intensity profile of the illumination employed, the ability to directly record and analyze these profiles is of great use to the fluorescence microscopist or instrument builder. Though excitation beam profiles can be measured indirectly using a sample of fluorescent beads and recording the emission along the microscope detection path, we demonstrate an alternative approach where a miniature camera sensor is used directly within the illumination beam. Measurements taken using our approach are solely concerned with the illumination optics as the detection optics are not involved. We present a miniature beam profiling device and high dynamic range flux reconstruction algorithm that together are capable of accurately reproducing quantitative 3D flux maps over a large focal volume. Performance of this beam profiling system is verified within an optical test bench and demonstrated for fluorescence microscopy by profiling the low NA illumination beam of a single plane illumination microscope. The generality and success of this approach showcases a widely flexible beam amplitude diagnostic tool for use within the life sciences.

  15. Where Do We Stand with Super-Resolution Optical Microscopy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2016-01-29

    Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy has become an invaluable, powerful approach to study biomolecular dynamics and interactions via selective labeling and observation of specific molecules in living cells, tissues and even entire organisms. In this perspective, we present a brief overview of the main techniques and their application to cellular biophysics. We place special emphasis on super-resolution imaging via single-molecule localization microscopy and stimulated emission depletion/reversible saturable optical fluorescence transitions microscopy, and we also briefly address fluorescence fluctuation approaches, notably raster image correlation spectroscopy, as tools to record fast diffusion and transport.

  16. Non-radiative excitation fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riachy, Lina; Vézy, Cyrille; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2016-03-01

    Non-radiative Excitation Fluorescence Microscopy (NEFM) constitutes a new way to observe biological samples beyond the diffraction limit. Non-radiative excitation of the samples is achieved by coating the substrate with donor species, such as quantum dots (QDs). Thus the dyes are not excited directly by the laser source, as in common fluorescence microscopy, but through a non-radiative energy transfer. To prevent dewetting of the donor film, we have recently implemented a silanization process to covalently bond the QDs on the substrate. An homogeneous monolayer of QDs was then deposited on only one side of the coverslips. Atomic force microscopy was then used to characterize the QD layer. We highlight the potential of our method through the study of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) labeled with DiD as acceptor, in interaction with surface functionalized with poly-L-lysine. In the presence of GUVs, we observed a quenching of QDs emission, together with an emission of DiD located in the membrane, which clearly indicated that non-radiative energy transfer from QDs to DiD occurs.

  17. Spatial covariance reconstructive (SCORE) super-resolution fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi; Sun, Mingzhai; Lin, Pei-Hui; Ma, Jianjie; Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2014-01-01

    Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy has become a powerful tool to resolve structural information that is not accessible to traditional diffraction-limited imaging techniques such as confocal microscopy. Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) and photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) are promising super-resolution techniques due to their relative ease of implementation and instrumentation on standard microscopes. However, the application of STORM is critically limited by its long sampling time. Several recent works have been focused on improving the STORM imaging speed by making use of the information from emitters with overlapping point spread functions (PSF). In this work, we present a fast and efficient algorithm that takes into account the blinking statistics of independent fluorescence emitters. We achieve sub-diffraction lateral resolution of 100 nm from 5 to 7 seconds of imaging. Our method is insensitive to background and can be applied to different types of fluorescence sources, including but not limited to the organic dyes and quantum dots that we demonstrate in this work.

  18. Spatial covariance reconstructive (SCORE super-resolution fluorescence microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Deng

    Full Text Available Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy has become a powerful tool to resolve structural information that is not accessible to traditional diffraction-limited imaging techniques such as confocal microscopy. Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM and photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM are promising super-resolution techniques due to their relative ease of implementation and instrumentation on standard microscopes. However, the application of STORM is critically limited by its long sampling time. Several recent works have been focused on improving the STORM imaging speed by making use of the information from emitters with overlapping point spread functions (PSF. In this work, we present a fast and efficient algorithm that takes into account the blinking statistics of independent fluorescence emitters. We achieve sub-diffraction lateral resolution of 100 nm from 5 to 7 seconds of imaging. Our method is insensitive to background and can be applied to different types of fluorescence sources, including but not limited to the organic dyes and quantum dots that we demonstrate in this work.

  19. Excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy and time-gated Raman microscopy analysis of dental tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhin, M.; Sen, S.; Kouklin, Nikolai A.; Skliarov, A.; Dhuru, D. B.; Iacopino, A. M.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2007-02-01

    We applied two new spectroscopic techniques (time-gated Raman microscopy and excitation-emission fluorescence microspectroscopy) to characterize healthy and carious dental tissues. These methods were used together with visual inspection, DIAGNOdent, optical polarization microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and chemical microanalysis to get a more detailed picture of chemical and structural transformations in dental tissues as a result of caries development.

  20. Toward quantitative fluorescence microscopy with DNA origami nanorulers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beater, Susanne; Raab, Mario; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic development of fluorescence microscopy has created a large number of new techniques, many of which are able to overcome the diffraction limit. This chapter describes the use of DNA origami nanostructures as scaffold for quantifying microscope properties such as sensitivity and resolution. The DNA origami technique enables placing of a defined number of fluorescent dyes in programmed geometries. We present a variety of DNA origami nanorulers that include nanorulers with defined labeling density and defined distances between marks. The chapter summarizes the advantages such as practically free choice of dyes and labeling density and presents examples of nanorulers in use. New triangular DNA origami nanorulers that do not require photoinduced switching by imaging transient binding to DNA nanostructures are also reported. Finally, we simulate fluorescence images of DNA origami nanorulers and reveal that the optimal DNA nanoruler for a specific application has an intermark distance that is roughly 1.3-fold the expected optical resolution.

  1. Compressive Fluorescence Microscopy for Biological and Hyperspectral Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Studer, Vincent; Chahid, Makhlad; Moussavi, Hamed; Candes, Emmanuel; Dahan, Maxime

    2012-01-01

    The mathematical theory of compressed sensing (CS) asserts that one can acquire signals from measurements whose rate is much lower than the total bandwidth. Whereas the CS theory is now well developed, challenges concerning hardware implementations of CS-based acquisition devices---especially in optics---have only started being addressed. This paper presents an implementation of compressive sensing in fluorescence microscopy and its applications to biomedical imaging. Our CS microscope combines a dynamic structured wide-field illumination and a fast and sensitive single-point fluorescence detection to enable reconstructions of images of fluorescent beads, cells and tissues with undersampling ratios (between the number of pixels and number of measurements) up to 32. We further demonstrate a hyperspectral mode and record images with 128 spectral channels and undersampling ratios up to 64, illustrating the potential benefits of CS acquisition for higher dimensional signals which typically exhibits extreme redund...

  2. Optical Photon Reassignment Microscopy (OPRA)

    CERN Document Server

    Roth, Stephan; Wicker, Kai; Heintzmann, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    To enhance the resolution of a confocal laser scanning microscope the additional information of a pinhole plane image taken at every excitation scan position can be used [C. J. R. Sheppard, Super-resolution in confocal imaging, Optik 80, 5354 (1988)]. This photon reassignment principle is based on the fact that the most probable position of an emitter is at half way between the nominal focus of the excitation laser and the position corresponding to the (off centre) detection position. Therefore, by reassigning the detected photons to this place, an image with enhanced detection efficiency and resolution is obtained. Here we present optical photon reassignment microscopy (OPRA) which realises this concept in an all-optical way obviating the need for image-processing. With the help of an additional intermediate optical beam expansion between descanning and a further rescanning of the detected light, an image with the advantages of photon reassignment can be acquired. Due to its simplicity and flexibility this m...

  3. Confocal microscopy via multimode fibers: fluorescence bandwidth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loterie, Damien; Psaltis, Demetri; Moser, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    We recently described a method for confocal reflection imaging through fibers, as a way to increase contrast when imaging unstained biological specimens. Using a transmission matrix, focused spots can be created at the distal end of a fiber. The backscattered field coming back from the sample can be filtered using optical correlation to obtain spatial selectivity in the detection. In this proceedings article, we briefly review the working principle of this method, and we discuss how the scheme could be adapted to confocal fluorescence imaging. In particular, we show simulations of the achievable detection bandwidth when using step-index multimode fibers as imaging devices.

  4. Single molecule localization microscopy of the distribution of chromatin using Hoechst and DAPI fluorescent probes

    OpenAIRE

    Szczurek, Aleksander T; PRAKASH, KIRTI; Lee, Hyun-Keun; Żurek-Biesiada, Dominika J; Best, Gerrit; Hagmann, Martin; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Several approaches have been described to fluorescently label and image DNA and chromatin in situ on the single-molecule level. These superresolution microscopy techniques are based on detecting optically isolated, fluorescently tagged anti-histone antibodies, fluorescently labeled DNA precursor analogs, or fluorescent dyes bound to DNA. Presently they suffer from various drawbacks such as low labeling efficiency or interference with DNA structure. In this report, we demonstrate that DNA mino...

  5. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Daniel E.; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-06-09

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time: quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  6. Modulated CMOS camera for fluorescence lifetime microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongtao; Holst, Gerhard; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    Widefield frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FD-FLIM) is a fast and accurate method to measure the fluorescence lifetime of entire images. However, the complexity and high costs involved in construction of such a system limit the extensive use of this technique. PCO AG recently released the first luminescence lifetime imaging camera based on a high frequency modulated CMOS image sensor, QMFLIM2. Here we tested and provide operational procedures to calibrate the camera and to improve the accuracy using corrections necessary for image analysis. With its flexible input/output options, we are able to use a modulated laser diode or a 20 MHz pulsed white supercontinuum laser as the light source. The output of the camera consists of a stack of modulated images that can be analyzed by the SimFCS software using the phasor approach. The nonuniform system response across the image sensor must be calibrated at the pixel level. This pixel calibration is crucial and needed for every camera settings, e.g. modulation frequency and exposure time. A significant dependency of the modulation signal on the intensity was also observed and hence an additional calibration is needed for each pixel depending on the pixel intensity level. These corrections are important not only for the fundamental frequency, but also for the higher harmonics when using the pulsed supercontinuum laser. With these post data acquisition corrections, the PCO CMOS-FLIM camera can be used for various biomedical applications requiring a large frame and high speed acquisition.

  7. Adaptive optics in digital micromirror based confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, P.; Wilding, D.; Soloviev, O.; Vdovin, G.; Verhaegen, M.

    2016-03-01

    This proceeding reports early results in the development of a new technique for adaptive optics in confocal microscopy. The term adaptive optics refers to the branch of optics in which an active element in the optical system is used to correct inhomogeneities in the media through which light propagates. In its most classical form, mostly used in astronomical imaging, adaptive optics is achieved through a closed loop in which the actuators of a deformable mirror are driven by a wavefront sensor. This approach is severely limited in fluorescence microscopy, as the use of a wavefront sensor requires the presence of a bright, point like source in the field of view, a condition rarely satisfied in microscopy samples. Previously reported approaches to adaptive optics in fluorescence microscopy are therefore limited to the inclusion of fluorescent microspheres in the sample, to use as bright stars for wavefront sensors, or time consuming sensorless optimization procedures, requiring several seconds of optimization before the acquisition of a single image. We propose an alternative approach to the problem, implementing sensorless adaptive optics in a Programmable array microscope. A programmable array microscope is a microscope based on a digital micromirror device, in which the single elements of the micromirror act both as point sources and pinholes.

  8. Exploiting speckle correlations to improve the resolution of wide-field fluorescence microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yilmaz, H.; Putten, van E.G.; Bertolotti, J.; Lagendijk, A.; Vos, W.L.; Mosk, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is indispensable in nanoscience and biological sciences. The versatility of labeling target structures with fluorescent dyes permits to visualize structure and function at a subcellular resolution with a wide field of view. Due to the diffraction limit, conventional optical m

  9. Perspectives in Super-resolved Fluorescence Microscopy: What comes next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2016-04-01

    The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 has been awarded to three scientists involved in the development of STED and PALM super-resolution fluorescence microscopy (SRM) methods. They have proven that it is possible to overcome the hundred year old theoretical limit for the resolution potential of light microscopy (of about 200 nm for visible light), which for decades has precluded a direct glimpse of the molecular machinery of life. None of the present-day super-resolution techniques have invalidated the Abbe limit for light optical detection; however, they have found clever ways around it. In this report, we discuss some of the challenges still to be resolved before arising SRM approaches will be fit to bring about the revolution in Biology and Medicine envisaged. Some of the challenges discussed are the applicability to image live and/or large samples, the further enhancement of resolution, future developments of labels, and multi-spectral approaches.

  10. Perspectives in Super-resolved Fluorescence Microscopy: What comes next?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph eCremer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 has been awarded to three scientists involved in the development of STED and PALM super-resolution fluorescence microscopy (SRM methods. They have proven that it is possible to overcome the hundred year old theoretical limit for the resolution potential of light microscopy (of about 200 nm for visible light, which for decades has precluded a direct glimpse of the molecular machinery of life. None of the present-day super-resolution techniques have invalidated the Abbe limit for light optical detection; however, they have found clever ways around it. In this report, we discuss some of the challenges still to be resolved before arising SRM approaches will be fit to bring about the revolution in Biology and Medicine envisaged. Some of the challenges discussed are the applicability to image live and/or large samples, the further enhancement of resolution, future developments of labels, and multi-spectral approaches.

  11. In vivo multiphoton fluorescence microscopy of epithelial precancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Dong; Zeng, Yan; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2011-03-01

    Most human cancers arise from epithelium, the superficial layer covering the exterior of body or lining the internal body cavities. Endogenous fluorophores such as aromatic amino acids, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), flavoprotein (FAD), keratin, collagen, and elastin can provide abundant information to reveal the changes in biochemistry, metabolism, and morphology of living tissues. Thus, autofluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy have been recognized as potential tools for discrimination of cancer from normal tissues. However, current fluorescence diagnostic studies mostly rely on spectral analysis or morphological differentiation. It is challenged since the emission spectra of endogenous fluorophores are broad and usually overlapping with each other and the fluorescence intensity could be affected by many factors. In this study, we instrumented a nonlinear optical microscopy system to characterize the morphologic and biochemical features in the epithelial precancer in vivo. The 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracenetreated hamster cheek pouch were used as a living animal carcinogenesis model. And the autofluorescence signals of NADH, collagen and elastin were recorded by a time- and spectral- resolved detection system. The results show that there are obvious differences in the morphology of three-dimensional autofluorescence images between normal and precancerous epithelial tissues. The fluorescence lifetime of NADH and the SHG signal from collagen could provide additional approaches to identify cancer from normal tissue.

  12. Exploiting speckle correlations to improve the resolution of wide-field fluorescence microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Yilmaz, Hasan; Bertolotti, Jacopo; Lagendijk, Ad; Vos, Willem L; Mosk, Allard P

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is indispensable in nanoscience and biological sciences. The versatility of labeling target structures with fluorescent dyes permits to visualize structure and function at a subcellular resolution with a wide field of view. Due to the diffraction limit, conventional optical microscopes are limited to resolving structures larger than 200 nm. The resolution can be enhanced by near-field and far-field super-resolution microscopy methods. Near-field methods typically have a limited field of view and far-field methods are limited by the involved conventional optics. Here, we introduce a combined high-resolution and wide-field fluorescence microscopy method that improves the resolution of a conventional optical microscope by exploiting correlations in speckle illumination through a randomly scattering high-index medium: Speckle correlation resolution enhancement (SCORE). As a test, we collect two-dimensional fluorescence images of 100-nm diameter dye-doped nanospheres. We demonstrate a decon...

  13. [An application of the fibered fluorescence microscopy to continuously monitor the rat cerebral neurons in vivo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ying; Chen, Lu-Lan; Jiang, Min

    2012-12-25

    The aim of the present study was to establish an approach to continuously record fluorescent signals of rat cerebral cortical neurons in vivo, using the novel system composed of fiber-optic probe and fluorescence microscopy. To visualize cortical neurons, recombinant virus vectors carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene were microinjected into cerebral cortex in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Seven days later, imaging microprobe, composed of optical minifibers, was inserted into the microinjected region of cerebral cortex. By using the fibered fluorescence microscopy, we observed fluorescent signals of cortical neurons transfected with GFP in living animals. In the brain slices from the microinjected region, the fluorescence signals of GFP were recorded using fluorescence microscopy, which confirmed the observation of the fibered fluorescence microscopy. The novel technology established in the present study maintains physical condition of experimental animal, and meets the demands of fluorescence micro-imaging in neural tissue in vivo. Application of this technology allows a direct and rapid approach tracing fluorescent signals of neurons in living animals.

  14. Aberrations and adaptive optics in super-resolution microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Martin; Andrade, Débora; Burke, Daniel; Patton, Brian; Zurauskas, Mantas

    2015-08-01

    As one of the most powerful tools in the biological investigation of cellular structures and dynamic processes, fluorescence microscopy has undergone extraordinary developments in the past decades. The advent of super-resolution techniques has enabled fluorescence microscopy - or rather nanoscopy - to achieve nanoscale resolution in living specimens and unravelled the interior of cells with unprecedented detail. The methods employed in this expanding field of microscopy, however, are especially prone to the detrimental effects of optical aberrations. In this review, we discuss how super-resolution microscopy techniques based upon single-molecule switching, stimulated emission depletion and structured illumination each suffer from aberrations in different ways that are dependent upon intrinsic technical aspects. We discuss the use of adaptive optics as an effective means to overcome this problem.

  15. Fluorescence microscopy beyond the ballistic regime by ultrasound pulse guided digital phase conjugation

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Meng; Fiolka, Reto

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has revolutionized biomedical research over the past three decades. Its high molecular specificity and unrivaled single molecule level sensitivity have enabled breakthroughs in a variety of research fields. For in vivo applications, its major limitation is the superficial imaging depth as random scattering in biological tissues causes exponential attenuation of the ballistic component of a light wave. Here we present fluorescence microscopy beyond the ballistic regime by combining single cycle pulsed ultrasound modulation and digital optical phase conjugation. We demonstrate near isotropic 3D localized sound-light interaction with an imaging depth as high as thirteen scattering path lengths. With the exceptionally high optical gain provided by the digital optical phase conjugation system, we can deliver sufficient optical power to a focus inside highly scattering media for not only fluorescence microscopy but also a variety of linear and nonlinear spectroscopy measurements. This techno...

  16. Nonlinear optical microscopy for imaging thin films and surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smilowitz, L.B.; McBranch, D.W.; Robinson, J.M.

    1995-03-01

    We have used the inherent surface sensitivity of second harmonic generation to develop an instrument for nonlinear optical microscopy of surfaces and interfaces. We have demonstrated the use of several nonlinear optical responses for imaging thin films. The second harmonic response of a thin film of C{sub 60} has been used to image patterned films. Two photon absorption light induced fluorescence has been used to image patterned thin films of Rhodamine 6G. Applications of nonlinear optical microscopy include the imaging of charge injection and photoinduced charge transfer between layers in semiconductor heterojunction devices as well as across membranes in biological systems.

  17. Bioaerosol Analysis by Online Fluorescence Detection and Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Alex; Pöhlker, Christopher; Treutlein, Bärbel; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    substantial proportion of coarse aerosol particle number and mass in continental boundary layer air. Moreover, they suggest that the number concentration of viable bioparticles is dominated by fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria with aerodynamic diameters around 3 μm rather than single bacterial cells with diameters around 1 μm. Filter samples were later collected at the same sampling location and analyzed with a fluorescence microscope. By observing collected particles both with transmitted white light and with fluorescent emission from near-UV excitation, the technique provides information about whether individual particles are biological and regarding their viability. Characteristic images of FBAPs are shown. Further goals are to correlate size distributions from the UV-APS with size information gained from microscopy, and also to constrain uncertainties that arise from non-biological particles that also exhibit fluorescence. [1] Huffman et al. (2009) Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 9, 17705 - 17751.

  18. Enhanced live cell imaging via photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weili; Long, Kenneth D; Yu, Hojeong; Tan, Yafang; Choi, Ji Sun; Harley, Brendan A; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-11-21

    We demonstrate photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence (PCEF) microscopy as a surface-specific fluorescence imaging technique to study the adhesion of live cells by visualizing variations in cell-substrate gap distance. This approach utilizes a photonic crystal surface incorporated into a standard microscope slide as the substrate for cell adhesion, and a microscope integrated with a custom illumination source as the detection instrument. When illuminated with a monochromatic light source, angle-specific optical resonances supported by the photonic crystal enable efficient excitation of surface-confined and amplified electromagnetic fields when excited at an on-resonance condition, while no field enhancement occurs when the same photonic crystal is illuminated in an off-resonance state. By mapping the fluorescence enhancement factor for fluorophore-tagged cellular components between on- and off-resonance states and comparing the results to numerical calculations, the vertical distance of labelled cellular components from the photonic crystal substrate can be estimated, providing critical and quantitative information regarding the spatial distribution of the specific components of cells attaching to a surface. As an initial demonstration of the concept, 3T3 fibroblast cells were grown on fibronectin-coated photonic crystals with fluorophore-labelled plasma membrane or nucleus. We demonstrate that PCEF microscopy is capable of providing information about the spatial distribution of cell-surface interactions at the single-cell level that is not available from other existing forms of microscopy, and that the approach is amenable to large fields of view, without the need for coupling prisms, coupling fluids, or special microscope objectives.

  19. Fluorescence imaging spectrometer optical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taiti, A.; Coppo, P.; Battistelli, E.

    2015-09-01

    The optical design of the FLuORescence Imaging Spectrometer (FLORIS) studied for the Fluorescence Explorer (FLEX) mission is discussed. FLEX is a candidate for the ESA's 8th Earth Explorer opportunity mission. FLORIS is a pushbroom hyperspectral imager foreseen to be embarked on board of a medium size satellite, flying in tandem with Sentinel-3 in a Sun synchronous orbit at a height of about 815 km. FLORIS will observe the vegetation fluorescence and reflectance within a spectral range between 500 and 780 nm. Multi-frames acquisitions on matrix detectors during the satellite movement will allow the production of 2D Earth scene images in two different spectral channels, called HR and LR with spectral resolution of 0.3 and 2 nm respectively. A common fore optics is foreseen to enhance by design the spatial co-registration between the two spectral channels, which have the same ground spatial sampling (300 m) and swath (150 km). An overlapped spectral range between the two channels is also introduced to simplify the spectral coregistration. A compact opto-mechanical solution with all spherical and plane optical elements is proposed, and the most significant design rationales are described. The instrument optical architecture foresees a dual Babinet scrambler, a dioptric telescope and two grating spectrometers (HR and LR), each consisting of a modified Offner configuration. The developed design is robust, stable vs temperature, easy to align, showing very high optical quality along the whole field of view. The system gives also excellent correction for transverse chromatic aberration and distortions (keystone and smile).

  20. Fluorescence Microscopy of Nanoscale Silver Oxide Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Xin-Yu; JIANG Hong-Bing; LIU Chun-Ling; GONG Qi-Huang; ZHANG Xi-Yao; ZHANG Qi-Feng; XU Bei-Xue; WU Jin-Lei

    2003-01-01

    The experimental conditions for photoactivated intermittent fluorescence from nanoscale silver oxide were studied with fluorescence microscopy. Strong fluorescence was observed from the Ag?O particles with size of 10-20nm excited with both blue and green light. We observed the saturation of photoexcitation with blue light and explained the experimental results using the model of agglomeration of silver atoms to form small clusters and the fluorescence of Ag2 and Ags clusters.

  1. Disposable optics for microscopy diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilmi, Pauliina; Varjo, Sami; Sliz, Rafal; Hannuksela, Jari; Fabritius, Tapio

    2015-11-20

    The point-of-care testing (POCT) is having increasing role on modern health care systems due to a possibility to perform tests for patients conveniently and immediately. POCT includes lot of disposable devices because of the environment they are often used. For a disposable system to be reasonably utilized, it needs to be high in quality but low in price. Optics based POCT systems are interesting approach to be developed, and here we describe a low-cost fabrication process for microlens arrays for microscopy. Lens arrays having average lens diameter of 222 μm with 300 μm lens pitch were fabricated. The lenses were characterized to have standard deviation of 0.06 μm in height and 4.61 μm in diameter. The resolution limit of 3.9μm is demonstrated with real images, and the images were compared with ones made with glass and polycarbonate lens arrays. The image quality is at the same level than with the glass lenses and the manufacturing costs are very low, thus making them suitable for POCT applications.

  2. Disposable optics for microscopy diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilmi, Pauliina; Varjo, Sami; Sliz, Rafal; Hannuksela, Jari; Fabritius, Tapio

    2015-11-01

    The point-of-care testing (POCT) is having increasing role on modern health care systems due to a possibility to perform tests for patients conveniently and immediately. POCT includes lot of disposable devices because of the environment they are often used. For a disposable system to be reasonably utilized, it needs to be high in quality but low in price. Optics based POCT systems are interesting approach to be developed, and here we describe a low-cost fabrication process for microlens arrays for microscopy. Lens arrays having average lens diameter of 222 μm with 300 μm lens pitch were fabricated. The lenses were characterized to have standard deviation of 0.06 μm in height and 4.61 μm in diameter. The resolution limit of 3.9μm is demonstrated with real images, and the images were compared with ones made with glass and polycarbonate lens arrays. The image quality is at the same level than with the glass lenses and the manufacturing costs are very low, thus making them suitable for POCT applications.

  3. Optical Imaging and Microscopy Techniques and Advanced Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Török, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This text on contemporary optical systems is intended for optical researchers and engineers, graduate students and optical microscopists in the biological and biomedical sciences. This second edition contains two completely new chapters. In addition most of the chapters from the first edition have been revised and updated. The book consists of three parts: The first discusses high-aperture optical systems, which form the backbone of optical microscopes. An example is a chapter new in the second edition on the emerging field of high numerical aperture diffractive lenses which seems to have particular promise in improving the correction of lenses. In this part particular attention is paid to optical data storage. The second part is on the use of non-linear optical techniques, including nonlinear optical excitation (total internal reflection fluorescence, second and third harmonic generation and two photon microscopy) and non-linear spectroscopy (CARS). The final part of the book presents miscellaneous technique...

  4. Three-dimensional fluorescent microscopy via simultaneous illumination and detection at multiple planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Khademhosseinieh, Bahar; Huang, Eric; Qian, Haoliang; Bakowski, Malina A; Troemel, Emily R; Liu, Zhaowei

    2016-08-16

    The conventional optical microscope is an inherently two-dimensional (2D) imaging tool. The objective lens, eyepiece and image sensor are all designed to capture light emitted from a 2D 'object plane'. Existing technologies, such as confocal or light sheet fluorescence microscopy have to utilize mechanical scanning, a time-multiplexing process, to capture a 3D image. In this paper, we present a 3D optical microscopy method based upon simultaneously illuminating and detecting multiple focal planes. This is implemented by adding two diffractive optical elements to modify the illumination and detection optics. We demonstrate that the image quality of this technique is comparable to conventional light sheet fluorescent microscopy with the advantage of the simultaneous imaging of multiple axial planes and reduced number of scans required to image the whole sample volume.

  5. A framework for creating realistic synthetic fluorescence microscopy image sequences

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabaso, M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available of the 9th International Joint Conference on Biomedical Engineering Systems and Technologies, Rome, Italy. 21-23 February, 2016 A Framework for Creating Realistic Synthetic Fluorescence Microscopy Image Sequences Matsilele Mabaso1, Daniel Withey1...

  6. Digitally synthesized beat frequency multiplexing for sub-millisecond fluorescence microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Diebold, Eric D; Gossett, Daniel R; Jalali, Bahram

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is the most widely used method for unveiling the molecular composition of biological specimens. However, the weak optical emission of fluorescent probes and the tradeoff between imaging speed and sensitivity is problematic for acquiring blur-free images of fast phenomena, such as sub-millisecond biochemical dynamics in live cells and tissues, and cells flowing at high speed. We report a solution that achieves real-time pixel readout rates one order of magnitude faster than a modern electron multiplier charge coupled device (EMCCD) - the gold standard in high-speed fluorescence imaging technology. Deemed fluorescence imaging using radiofrequency-multiplexed excitation (FIRE), this approach maps the image into the radiofrequency spectrum using the beating of digitally synthesized optical fields. We demonstrate diffraction-limited confocal fluorescence imaging of stationary cells at a frame rate of 4.4 kHz, as well as fluorescence microscopy in flow at a throughput of approximately 50,000 ce...

  7. Saturated virtual fluorescence emission difference microscopy based on detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaocong; Sun, Shiyi; Kuang, Cuifang; Ge, Baoliang; Wang, Wensheng; Liu, Xu

    2017-07-01

    Virtual fluorescence emission difference microscopy (vFED) has been proposed recently to enhance the lateral resolution of confocal microscopy with a detector array, implemented by scanning a doughnut-shaped pattern. Theoretically, the resolution can be enhanced by around 1.3-fold compared with that in confocal microscopy. For further improvement of the resolving ability of vFED, a novel method is presented utilizing fluorescence saturation for super-resolution imaging, which we called saturated virtual fluorescence emission difference microscopy (svFED). With a point detector array, matched solid and hollow point spread functions (PSF) can be obtained by photon reassignment, and the difference results between them can be used to boost the transverse resolution. Results show that the diffraction barrier can be surpassed by at least 34% compared with that in vFED and the resolution is around 2-fold higher than that in confocal microscopy.

  8. Fibre-optic nonlinear optical microscopy and endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, L; Gu, M

    2007-06-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy has been an indispensable laboratory tool of high-resolution imaging in thick tissue and live animals. Rapid developments of fibre-optic components in terms of growing functionality and decreasing size provide enormous opportunities for innovations in nonlinear optical microscopy. Fibre-based nonlinear optical endoscopy is the sole instrumentation to permit the cellular imaging within hollow tissue tracts or solid organs that are inaccessible to a conventional optical microscope. This article reviews the current development of fibre-optic nonlinear optical microscopy and endoscopy, which includes crucial technologies for miniaturized nonlinear optical microscopy and their embodiments of endoscopic systems. A particular attention is given to several classes of photonic crystal fibres that have been applied to nonlinear optical microscopy due to their unique properties for ultrashort pulse delivery and signal collection. Furthermore, fibre-optic nonlinear optical imaging systems can be classified into portable microscopes suitable for imaging behaving animals, rigid endoscopes that allow for deep tissue imaging with minimally invasive manners, and flexible endoscopes enabling imaging of internal organs. Fibre-optic nonlinear optical endoscopy is coming of age and a paradigm shift leading to optical microscope tools for early cancer detection and minimally invasive surgery.

  9. Rotary-scanning optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Weizhi; Xi, Lei

    2016-10-01

    Optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ORPAM) is currently one of the fastest evolving photoacoustic imaging modalities. It has a comparable spatial resolution to pure optical microscopic techniques such as epifluorescence microscopy, confocal microscopy, and two-photon microscopy, but also owns a deeper penetration depth. In this paper, we report a rotary-scanning (RS)-ORPAM that utilizes a galvanometer scanner integrated with objective to achieve rotary laser scanning. A 15 MHz cylindrically focused ultrasonic transducer is mounted onto a motorized rotation stage to follow optical scanning traces synchronously. To minimize the loss of signal to noise ratio, the acoustic focus is precisely adjusted to reach confocal with optical focus. Black tapes and carbon fibers are firstly imaged to evaluate the performance of the system, and then in vivo imaging of vasculature networks inside the ears and brains of mice is demonstrated using this system.

  10. Fiber-optic system for monitoring fast photoactivation dynamics of optical highlighter fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Zhiguo; Qin, Lingsong; Zhang, Zhihong; Zeng, Shaoqun; Huang, Zhen-Li

    2011-08-01

    Characterizing the photoactivation performance of optical highlighter fluorescent proteins is crucial to the realization of photoactivation localization microscopy. In contrast to those fluorescence-based approaches that require complex data processing and calibration procedures, here we report a simple and quantitative alternative, which relies on the measurement of small absorption spectra changes over time with a fiber-optic system. Using Dronpa as a representative highlighter protein, we have investigated the capacity of this system in monitoring the fast photoactivation process.

  11. Characterization of Polymer Blends: Optical Microscopy (*Polarized, Interference and Phase Contrast Microscopy*) and Confocal Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanathan, Nathan Muruganathan [ORNL; Darling, Seth B. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

    2015-01-01

    Chapter 15 surveys the characterization of macro, micro and meso morphologies of polymer blends by optical microscopy. Confocal Microscopy offers the ability to view the three dimensional morphology of polymer blends, popular in characterization of biological systems. Confocal microscopy uses point illumination and a spatial pinhole to eliminate out-of focus light in samples that are thicker than the focal plane.

  12. Multimode fibres: a pathway towards deep-tissue fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plöschner, Martin; Tyc, TomáÅ.¡; Čižmár, TomáÅ.¡

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has emerged as a pivotal platform for imaging in the life sciences. In recent years, the overwhelming success of its different modalities has been accompanied by various efforts to carry out imaging deeper inside living tissues. A key challenge of these efforts is to overcome scattering and absorption of light in such environments. Multiple strategies (e.g. multi-photon, wavefront correction techniques) extended the penetration depth to the current state-of-the-art of about 1000μm at the resolution of approximately 1μm. The only viable strategy for imaging deeper than this is by employing a fibre bundle based endoscope. However, such devices lack resolution and have a significant footprint (1mm in diameter), which prohibits their use in studies involving tissues deep in live animals. We have recently demonstrated a radically new approach that delivers the light in/out of place of interest through an extremely thin (tens of microns in diameter) cylindrical glass tube called a multimode optical fibre (MMF). Not only is this type of delivery much less invasive compared to fibre bundle technology, it also enables higher resolution and has the ability to image at any plane behind the fibre without any auxiliary optics. The two most important limitations of this exciting technology are (i) the lack of bending flexibility and (ii) high demands on computational power, making the performance of such systems slow. We will discuss how to overcome these limitations.

  13. Optical tweezers for confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, A.; Meyer zu Hörste, G.; Pilarczyk, G.; Monajembashi, S.; Uhl, V.; Greulich, K. O.

    2000-11-01

    In confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSMs), lasers can be used for image formation as well as tools for the manipulation of microscopic objects. In the latter case, in addition to the imaging lasers, the light of an extra laser has to be focused into the object plane of the CLSM, for example as optical tweezers. Imaging as well as trapping by optical tweezers can be done using the same objective lens. In this case, z-sectioning for 3D imaging shifts the optical tweezers with the focal plane of the objective along the optical axis, so that a trapped object remains positioned in the focal plane. Consequently, 3D imaging of trapped objects is impossible without further measures. We present an experimental set-up keeping the axial trapping position of the optical tweezers at its intended position whilst the focal plane can be axially shifted over a distance of about 15 μm. It is based on fast-moving correctional optics synchronized with the objective movement. First examples of application are the 3D imaging of chloroplasts of Elodea densa (Canadian waterweed) in a vigorous cytoplasmic streaming and the displacement of zymogen granules in pancreatic cancer cells (AR42 J).

  14. Integrated structural and functional optical imaging combining spectral-domain optical coherence and multiphoton microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Vinegoni, C; Luo, W; Marks, D L; Ralston, T; Tan, W

    2005-01-01

    An integrated microscope that combines different optical techniques for simultaneous imaging is demonstrated. The microscope enables spectral-domain optical coherence microscopy based on optical backscatter, and multi-photon microscopy for the detection of two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation signals. The unique configuration of this integrated microscope allows for the simultaneous acquisition of both anatomical (structural) and functional imaging information with particular emphasis for applications in the fields of tissue engineering and cell biology. In addition, the contemporary analysis of the spectroscopic features can enhance contrast by differentiating among different tissue components.

  15. Multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy for imaging keratoconus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yen; Lo, Wen; Lin, Sung-Jan; Lin, Wei-Chou; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the possible application of multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy for imaging the structural features of keratoconus cornea and to evaluate its potential as being a clinical in vivo monitoring technique. Using the near-infrared excitation source from a titanium-sapphire laser pumped by a diode-pumped, solid state (DPSS) laser system, we can induce and simultaneously acquire multiphoton autofluorescence and SHG signals from the cornea specimens with keratoconus. A home-modified commercial microscope system with specified optical components is used for optimal signal detection. Keratoconus cornea button from patient with typical clinical presentation of keratoconus was obtained at the time of penetrating keratoplasty. The specimen was also sent for the histological examination as comparison. In all samples of keratoconus, destruction of lamellar structure with altered collagen fiber orientation was observed within whole layer of the diseased stromal area. In addition, the orientation of the altered collagen fibers within the cone area shows a trend directing toward the apex of the cone, which might implicate the biomechanical response of the keratoconus stroma to the intraocular pressure. Moreover, increased autofluorescent cells were also found in the cone area, with increased density as one approaches the apical area. In conclusion, multiphoton autofluorescence and SHG microscopy non-invasively demonstrated the morphological features of keratoconus cornea, especially the structural alternations of the stromal lamellae. We believe that in the future the multiphoton microscopy can be applied in vivo as an effective, non-invasive diagnostic and monitoring technique for keratoconus.

  16. A fluorescence microscopy study of quantum dots as fluorescent probes for brain tumor diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjing; Vernier, P. Thomas; Sun, Yinghua; Gundersen, Martin A.; Marcu, Laura

    2005-03-01

    In vivo fluorescent spectroscopy and imaging using endogenous and exogenous sources of contrast can provide new approaches for enhanced demarcation of brain tumor margins and infiltration. Quantum dots (QDs), nanometer-size fluorescent probes, represent excellent contrast agents for biomedical imaging due to their broader excitation spectrum, narrower emission spectra, and higher sensitivity and stability. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is implicated in the development and progression of a number of human solid tumors including brain tumors and thus a potential target for brain tumor diagnosis. In this study, we investigate the up-take of ODs by brain tumor cells and the potential use of EGFR-targeted QDs for enhanced optical imaging of brain tumors. We conducted fluorescence microscopy studies of the up-take mechanism of the anti-EGFR-ODs complexes by Human U87, and SKMG-3 glioblastoma cells. Our preliminary results show that QDs can enter into glioma cells through anti-EGFR mediated endocytosis, suggesting that these nano-size particles can tag brain tumor cells.

  17. Partial internal reflections on total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Sanford M

    2009-11-01

    Microscopy, especially fluorescence microscopy, has proven to be a powerful method for studying biological processes. Unfortunately, some of the same features that make biological membranes powerful (for example, all of the action taking place across a narrow 4nm film) also make it difficult to visualize by fluorescence. Over the past 30 years, numerous tricks have been developed to narrow the plane over which data is collected. One approach, total internal reflection (TIR) fluorescence microscopy, is particularly well suited for studying membrane events. A key issue to address when using TIR to tackle a new biological problem is: how can one judge whether the signals being observed are actually the biological phenomena that one wishes to study?

  18. Observation of DNA Molecules Using Fluorescence Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    This article describes experiments for an undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory that aim to observe individual double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). dsDNA molecules are observed under several different conditions to discuss their chemical and physical properties. In…

  19. Observation of DNA Molecules Using Fluorescence Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    This article describes experiments for an undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory that aim to observe individual double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). dsDNA molecules are observed under several different conditions to discuss their chemical and physical properties. In…

  20. Super-resolution microscopy of single atoms in optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Alberti, Andrea; Alt, Wolfgang; Brakhane, Stefan; Karski, Michał; Reimann, René; Widera, Artur; Meschede, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    We report on image processing techniques and experimental procedures to determine the lattice-site positions of single atoms in an optical lattice with high reliability, even for limited acquisition time or optical resolution. Determining the positions of atoms beyond the diffraction limit relies on parametric deconvolution in close analogy to methods employed in super-resolution microscopy. We develop a deconvolution method that makes effective use of the prior knowledge of the optical transfer function, noise properties, and discreteness of the optical lattice. We show that accurate knowledge of the image formation process enables a dramatic improvement on the localization reliability. This is especially relevant for closely packed ensembles of atoms where the separation between particles cannot be directly optically resolved. Furthermore, we demonstrate experimental methods to precisely reconstruct the point spread function with sub-pixel resolution from fluorescence images of single atoms, and we give a m...

  1. X-ray fluorescence microscopy of olfactory receptor neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducic, T; Herbst, J; Novakova, E; Salditt, T [Institute for X-ray Physics, Georg-August-University, Friedrich-Hund-Pl. 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Breunig, E; Schild, D [Department of Molecular Neurophysiology, Georg-August University Goettingen (Germany); Susini, J; Tucoulu, R, E-mail: tducic@gwdg.d [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble (France)

    2009-09-01

    We report a x-ray fluorescence microscopy study of cells and tissues from the olfactory system of Xenopus laevis. In this experiment we focus on sample preparation and experimental issues, and present first results of fluorescence maps of the elemental distribution of Cl, K, Ca, P, S and Na both in individual isolated neural cells and in cross-sections of the same tissue.

  2. Hybrid microscopy of human carotid atheroma by means of optical-resolution optoacoustic and non-linear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Markus; Karlas, Angelos; Soliman, Dominik; Pelisek, Jaroslav; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2017-03-01

    Carotid atheromatosis is causally related to stroke, a leading cause of disability and death. We present the analysis of a human carotid atheroma using a novel hybrid microscopy system that combines optical-resolution optoacoustic (photoacoustic) microscopy and several non-linear optical microscopy modalities (second and third harmonic generation, as well as, two-photon excitation fluorescence) to achieve a multimodal examination of the extracted tissue within the same imaging framework. Our system enables the label-free investigation of atheromatous human carotid tissue with a resolution of about 1 μm and allows for the congruent interrogation of plaque morphology and clinically relevant constituents such as red blood cells, collagen, and elastin. Our data reveal mutual interactions between blood embeddings and connective tissue within the atheroma, offering comprehensive insights into its stage of evolution and severity, and potentially facilitating the further development of diagnostic tools, as well as treatment strategies.

  3. Direct Evidence of Lack of Colocalisation of Fluorescently Labelled Gold Labels Used in Correlative Light Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Benjamin T.; Greenwood, Alexander B.; Benito-Alifonso, David; Tanner, Hugh; Galan, M. Carmen; Verkade, Paul; Gersen, Henkjan

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescently labelled nanoparticles are routinely used in Correlative Light Electron Microscopy (CLEM) to combine the capabilities of two separate microscope platforms: fluorescent light microscopy (LM) and electron microscopy (EM). The inherent assumption is that the fluorescent label observed under LM colocalises well with the electron dense nanoparticle observed in EM. Herein we show, by combining single molecule fluorescent imaging with optical detection of the scattering from single gold nanoparticles, that for a commercially produced sample of 10 nm gold nanoparticles tagged to Alexa-633 there is in fact no colocalisation between the fluorescent signatures of Alexa-633 and the scattering associated with the gold nanoparticle. This shows that the attached gold nanoparticle quenches the fluorescent signal by ~95%, or less likely that the complex has dissociated. In either scenario, the observed fluorescent signal in fact arises from a large population of untagged fluorophores; rendering these labels potentially ineffective and misleading to the field. PMID:28317888

  4. Automated quantification of synapses by fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schätzle, Philipp; Wuttke, René; Ziegler, Urs; Sonderegger, Peter

    2012-02-15

    The quantification of synapses in neuronal cultures is essential in studies of the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity. Conventional counting of synapses based on morphological or immunocytochemical criteria is extremely work-intensive. We developed a fully automated method which quantifies synaptic elements and complete synapses based on immunocytochemistry. Pre- and postsynaptic elements are detected by their corresponding fluorescence signals and their proximity to dendrites. Synapses are defined as the combination of a pre- and postsynaptic element within a given distance. The analysis is performed in three dimensions and all parameters required for quantification can be easily adjusted by a graphical user interface. The integrated batch processing enables the analysis of large datasets without any further user interaction and is therefore efficient and timesaving. The potential of this method was demonstrated by an extensive quantification of synapses in neuronal cultures from DIV 7 to DIV 21. The method can be applied to all datasets containing a pre- and postsynaptic labeling plus a dendritic or cell surface marker.

  5. Fiber optical assembly for fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, II, Robert W.; Rubenstein, Richard; Piltch, Martin; Gray, Perry

    2010-12-07

    A system for analyzing a sample for the presence of an analyte in a sample. The system includes a sample holder for containing the sample; an excitation source, such as a laser, and at least one linear array radially disposed about the sample holder. Radiation from the excitation source is directed to the sample, and the radiation induces fluorescent light in the sample. Each linear array includes a plurality of fused silica optical fibers that receive the fluorescent light and transmits a fluorescent light signal from the first end to an optical end port of the linear array. An end port assembly having a photo-detector is optically coupled to the optical end port. The photo-detector detects the fluorescent light signal and converts the fluorescent light signal into an electrical signal.

  6. Fluorescence cryo-microscopy: current challenges and prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Kaufmann, Rainer; Hagen, Christoph; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Studying biological structures with fine details does not only require a microscope with high resolution, but also a sample preparation process that preserves the structures in a near-native state. Live-cell imaging is restricted mostly to the field of light microscopy. For studies requiring much higher resolution, fast freezing techniques (vitrification) are successfully used to immobilize the sample in a near-native state for imaging with electron and X-ray cryo-microscopy. Fluorescence cry...

  7. Hybrid fluorescence and electron cryo-microscopy for simultaneous electron and photon imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Hirofumi; Fukuda, Yoshiyuki; Arai, Yoshihiro; Terakawa, Susumu; Yamamoto, Naoki; Nagayama, Kuniaki

    2014-01-01

    Integration of fluorescence light and transmission electron microscopy into the same device would represent an important advance in correlative microscopy, which traditionally involves two separate microscopes for imaging. To achieve such integration, the primary technical challenge that must be solved regards how to arrange two objective lenses used for light and electron microscopy in such a manner that they can properly focus on a single specimen. To address this issue, both lateral displacement of the specimen between two lenses and specimen rotation have been proposed. Such movement of the specimen allows sequential collection of two kinds of microscopic images of a single target, but prevents simultaneous imaging. This shortcoming has been made up by using a simple optical device, a reflection mirror. Here, we present an approach toward the versatile integration of fluorescence and electron microscopy for simultaneous imaging. The potential of simultaneous hybrid microscopy was demonstrated by fluorescence and electron sequential imaging of a fluorescent protein expressed in cells and cathodoluminescence imaging of fluorescent beads. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Single molecule localization microscopy of the distribution of chromatin using Hoechst and DAPI fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Aleksander T; Prakash, Kirti; Lee, Hyun-Keun; Zurek-Biesiada, Dominika J; Best, Gerrit; Hagmann, Martin; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Several approaches have been described to fluorescently label and image DNA and chromatin in situ on the single-molecule level. These superresolution microscopy techniques are based on detecting optically isolated, fluorescently tagged anti-histone antibodies, fluorescently labeled DNA precursor analogs, or fluorescent dyes bound to DNA. Presently they suffer from various drawbacks such as low labeling efficiency or interference with DNA structure. In this report, we demonstrate that DNA minor groove binding dyes, such as Hoechst 33258, Hoechst 33342, and DAPI, can be effectively employed in single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) with high optical and structural resolution. Upon illumination with low intensity 405 nm light, a small subpopulation of these molecules stochastically undergoes photoconversion from the original blue-emitting form to a green-emitting form. Using a 491 nm laser excitation, fluorescence of these green-emitting, optically isolated molecules was registered until "bleached". This procedure facilitated substantially the optical isolation and localization of large numbers of individual dye molecules bound to DNA in situ, in nuclei of fixed mammalian cells, or in mitotic chromosomes, and enabled the reconstruction of high-quality DNA density maps. We anticipate that this approach will provide new insights into DNA replication, DNA repair, gene transcription, and other nuclear processes.

  9. Single molecule localization microscopy of the distribution of chromatin using Hoechst and DAPI fluorescent probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Aleksander T; Prakash, Kirti; Lee, Hyun-Keun; Żurek-Biesiada, Dominika J; Best, Gerrit; Hagmann, Martin; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Several approaches have been described to fluorescently label and image DNA and chromatin in situ on the single-molecule level. These superresolution microscopy techniques are based on detecting optically isolated, fluorescently tagged anti-histone antibodies, fluorescently labeled DNA precursor analogs, or fluorescent dyes bound to DNA. Presently they suffer from various drawbacks such as low labeling efficiency or interference with DNA structure. In this report, we demonstrate that DNA minor groove binding dyes, such as Hoechst 33258, Hoechst 33342, and DAPI, can be effectively employed in single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) with high optical and structural resolution. Upon illumination with low intensity 405 nm light, a small subpopulation of these molecules stochastically undergoes photoconversion from the original blue-emitting form to a green-emitting form. Using a 491 nm laser excitation, fluorescence of these green-emitting, optically isolated molecules was registered until “bleached”. This procedure facilitated substantially the optical isolation and localization of large numbers of individual dye molecules bound to DNA in situ, in nuclei of fixed mammalian cells, or in mitotic chromosomes, and enabled the reconstruction of high-quality DNA density maps. We anticipate that this approach will provide new insights into DNA replication, DNA repair, gene transcription, and other nuclear processes. PMID:25482122

  10. Robust tumor morphometry in multispectral fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabesh, Ali; Vengrenyuk, Yevgen; Teverovskiy, Mikhail; Khan, Faisal M.; Sapir, Marina; Powell, Douglas; Mesa-Tejada, Ricardo; Donovan, Michael J.; Fernandez, Gerardo

    2009-02-01

    Morphological and architectural characteristics of primary tissue compartments, such as epithelial nuclei (EN) and cytoplasm, provide important cues for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic response prediction. We propose two feature sets for the robust quantification of these characteristics in multiplex immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy images of prostate biopsy specimens. To enable feature extraction, EN and cytoplasm regions were first segmented from the IF images. Then, feature sets consisting of the characteristics of the minimum spanning tree (MST) connecting the EN and the fractal dimension (FD) of gland boundaries were obtained from the segmented compartments. We demonstrated the utility of the proposed features in prostate cancer recurrence prediction on a multi-institution cohort of 1027 patients. Univariate analysis revealed that both FD and one of the MST features were highly effective for predicting cancer recurrence (p <= 0.0001). In multivariate analysis, an MST feature was selected for a model incorporating clinical and image features. The model achieved a concordance index (CI) of 0.73 on the validation set, which was significantly higher than the CI of 0.69 for the standard multivariate model based solely on clinical features currently used in clinical practice (p < 0.0001). The contributions of this work are twofold. First, it is the first demonstration of the utility of the proposed features in morphometric analysis of IF images. Second, this is the largest scale study of the efficacy and robustness of the proposed features in prostate cancer prognosis.

  11. Common fluorescent proteins for single-molecule localization microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klementieva, Natalia V.; Bozhanova, Nina G.; Mishina, Natalie M.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Mishin, Alexander S.

    2015-07-01

    Super-resolution techniques for breaking the diffraction barrier are spread out over multiple studies nowadays. Single-molecule localization microscopy such as PALM, STORM, GSDIM, etc allow to get super-resolved images of cell ultrastructure by precise localization of individual fluorescent molecules via their temporal isolation. However, these methods are supposed the use of fluorescent dyes and proteins with special characteristics (photoactivation/photoconversion). At the same time, there is a need for retaining high photostability of fluorophores during long-term acquisition. Here, we first showed the potential of common red fluorescent protein for single-molecule localization microscopy based on spontaneous intrinsic blinking. Also, we assessed the effect of different imaging media on photobleaching of these fluorescent proteins. Monomeric orange and red fluorescent proteins were examined for stochastic switching from a dark state to a bright fluorescent state. We studied fusions with cytoskeletal proteins in NIH/3T3 and HeLa cells. Imaging was performed on the Nikon N-STORM system equipped with EMCCD camera. To define the optimal imaging conditions we tested several types of cell culture media and buffers. As a result, high-resolution images of cytoskeleton structure were obtained. Essentially, low-intensity light was sufficient to initiate the switching of tested red fluorescent protein reducing phototoxicity and provide long-term live-cell imaging.

  12. Refractive Index Sensing of Green Fluorescent Proteins in Living Cells Using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manen, van Henk-Jan; Verkuijlen, Paul; Wittendorp, Paul; Subramaniam, Vinod; Berg, van den Timo K.; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2008-01-01

    We show that fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules in cells can be used to report on the local refractive index of intracellular GFP. We expressed GFP fusion constructs of Rac2 and gp91phox, which are both subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase

  13. Super-resolution optical microscopy: multiple choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo

    2010-02-01

    The recent invention of super-resolution optical microscopy enables the visualization of fine features in biological samples with unprecedented clarity. It creates numerous opportunities in biology because vast amount of previously obscured subcellular processes now can be directly observed. Rapid development in this field in the past two years offers many imaging modalities that address different needs but they also complicates the choice of the 'perfect' method for answering a specific question. Here I will briefly describe the principles of super-resolution optical microscopy techniques and then focus on comparing their characteristics in various aspects of practical applications.

  14. Deep-brain imaging via epi-fluorescence Computational Cannula Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ganghun; Nagarajan, Naveen; Pastuzyn, Elissa; Jenks, Kyle; Capecchi, Mario; Shepherd, Jason; Menon, Rajesh

    2017-03-01

    Here we demonstrate widefield (field diameter = 200 μm) fluorescence microscopy and video imaging inside the rodent brain at a depth of 2 mm using a simple surgical glass needle (cannula) of diameter 0.22 mm as the primary optical element. The cannula guides excitation light into the brain and the fluorescence signal out of the brain. Concomitant image-processing algorithms are utilized to convert the spatially scrambled images into fluorescent images and video. The small size of the cannula enables minimally invasive imaging, while the long length (>2 mm) allow for deep-brain imaging with no additional complexity in the optical system. Since no scanning is involved, widefield fluorescence video at the native frame rate of the camera can be achieved.

  15. Deep-brain imaging via epi-fluorescence Computational Cannula Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ganghun; Nagarajan, Naveen; Pastuzyn, Elissa; Jenks, Kyle; Capecchi, Mario; Shepherd, Jason; Menon, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Here we demonstrate widefield (field diameter = 200 μm) fluorescence microscopy and video imaging inside the rodent brain at a depth of 2 mm using a simple surgical glass needle (cannula) of diameter 0.22 mm as the primary optical element. The cannula guides excitation light into the brain and the fluorescence signal out of the brain. Concomitant image-processing algorithms are utilized to convert the spatially scrambled images into fluorescent images and video. The small size of the cannula enables minimally invasive imaging, while the long length (>2 mm) allow for deep-brain imaging with no additional complexity in the optical system. Since no scanning is involved, widefield fluorescence video at the native frame rate of the camera can be achieved. PMID:28317915

  16. DNA origami-based standards for quantitative fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmied, Jürgen J; Raab, Mario; Forthmann, Carsten; Pibiri, Enrico; Wünsch, Bettina; Dammeyer, Thorben; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Validating and testing a fluorescence microscope or a microscopy method requires defined samples that can be used as standards. DNA origami is a new tool that provides a framework to place defined numbers of small molecules such as fluorescent dyes or proteins in a programmed geometry with nanometer precision. The flexibility and versatility in the design of DNA origami microscopy standards makes them ideally suited for the broad variety of emerging super-resolution microscopy methods. As DNA origami structures are durable and portable, they can become a universally available specimen to check the everyday functionality of a microscope. The standards are immobilized on a glass slide, and they can be imaged without further preparation and can be stored for up to 6 months. We describe a detailed protocol for the design, production and use of DNA origami microscopy standards, and we introduce a DNA origami rectangle, bundles and a nanopillar as fluorescent nanoscopic rulers. The protocol provides procedures for the design and realization of fluorescent marks on DNA origami structures, their production and purification, quality control, handling, immobilization, measurement and data analysis. The procedure can be completed in 1-2 d.

  17. Photon budget analysis for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Q.; Young, I.T.; De Jong, J.G.S.

    2011-01-01

    We have constructed a mathematical model to analyze the photon efficiency of frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). The power of the light source needed for illumination in a FLIM system and the signal-to-noise ratio of the detector have led us to a photon “budget.” These

  18. Blind fluorescence structured illumination microscopy: A new reconstruction strategy

    CERN Document Server

    Labouesse, S; Idier, J; Bourguignon, S; Liu, P; Sentenac, A

    2016-01-01

    In this communication, a fast reconstruction algorithm is proposed for fluorescence \\textit{blind} structured illumination microscopy (SIM) under the sample positivity constraint. This new algorithm is by far simpler and faster than existing solutions, paving the way to 3D and/or real-time 2D reconstruction.

  19. Visualizing Single-molecule DNA Replication with Fluorescence Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanner, Nathan A.; Loparo, Joseph J.; Oijen, Antoine M. van

    2009-01-01

    We describe a simple fluorescence microscopy-based real-time method for observing DNA replication at the single-molecule level. A circular, forked DNA template is attached to a functionalized glass coverslip and replicated extensively after introduction of replication proteins and nucleotides. The

  20. Visualizing Single-molecule DNA Replication with Fluorescence Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanner, Nathan A.; Loparo, Joseph J.; Oijen, Antoine M. van

    2009-01-01

    We describe a simple fluorescence microscopy-based real-time method for observing DNA replication at the single-molecule level. A circular, forked DNA template is attached to a functionalized glass coverslip and replicated extensively after introduction of replication proteins and nucleotides. The g

  1. Extending single-molecule microscopy using optical Fourier processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, Adam S; Moerner, W E

    2014-07-17

    This article surveys the recent application of optical Fourier processing to the long-established but still expanding field of single-molecule imaging and microscopy. A variety of single-molecule studies can benefit from the additional image information that can be obtained by modulating the Fourier, or pupil, plane of a widefield microscope. After briefly reviewing several current applications, we present a comprehensive and computationally efficient theoretical model for simulating single-molecule fluorescence as it propagates through an imaging system. Furthermore, we describe how phase/amplitude-modulating optics inserted in the imaging pathway may be modeled, especially at the Fourier plane. Finally, we discuss selected recent applications of Fourier processing methods to measure the orientation, depth, and rotational mobility of single fluorescent molecules.

  2. Fluorescence cell imaging and manipulation using conventional halogen lamp microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Yamagata

    Full Text Available Technologies for vitally labeling cells with fluorescent dyes have advanced remarkably. However, to excite fluorescent dyes currently requires powerful illumination, which can cause phototoxic damage to the cells and increases the cost of microscopy. We have developed a filter system to excite fluorescent dyes using a conventional transmission microscope equipped with a halogen lamp. This method allows us to observe previously invisible cell organelles, such as the metaphase spindle of oocytes, without causing phototoxicity. Cells remain healthy even after intensive manipulation under fluorescence observation, such as during bovine, porcine and mouse somatic cell cloning using nuclear transfer. This method does not require expensive epifluorescence equipment and so could help to reduce the science gap between developed and developing countries.

  3. Single spin stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Pfender, Matthias; Waldherr, Gerald; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate precision addressing of single quantum emitters by combined optical microscopy and spin resonance techniques. To this end we utilize nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers in diamond confined within a few ten nanometers as individually resolvable quantum systems. By developing a stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) technique for NV centers we are able to simultaneously perform sub diffraction-limit imaging and optically detected spin resonance (ODMR) measurements on NV spins. This allows the assignment of spin resonance spectra to individual NV center locations with nanometer scale resolution and thus further improves spatial discrimination. For example, we resolved formerly indistinguishable emitters by their spectra. Furthermore, ODMR spectra contain metrology information allowing for sub diffraction-limit sensing of, for instance, magnetic or electric fields with inherently parallel data acquisition. As an example, we have detected nuclear spins with nanometer sca...

  4. Electron microscopy of primary cell cultures in solution and correlative optical microscopy using ASEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Kazumi; Kinoshita, Takaaki [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Department of Bioinformatics, Faculty of Engineering, Soka University, 1-236 Tangi-machi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-8577 (Japan); Uemura, Takeshi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology and Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Motohashi, Hozumi [Department of Gene Expression Regulation, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, 4-1 Seiryo-cho, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Watanabe, Yohei; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Nishiyama, Hidetoshi [JEOL Ltd., 1-2 Musashino 3-chome, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Sato, Mari [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Suga, Mitsuo [JEOL Ltd., 1-2 Musashino 3-chome, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Maruyama, Yuusuke; Tsuji, Noriko M. [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Yamamoto, Masayuki [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-cho, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Nishihara, Shoko, E-mail: shoko@soka.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Department of Bioinformatics, Faculty of Engineering, Soka University, 1-236 Tangi-machi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-8577 (Japan); Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    Correlative light-electron microscopy of cells in a natural environment of aqueous liquid facilitates high-throughput observation of protein complex formation. ASEM allows the inverted SEM to observe the wet sample from below, while an optical microscope observes it from above quasi-simultaneously. The disposable ASEM dish with a silicon nitride (SiN) film window can be coated variously to realize the primary-culture of substrate-sensitive cells in a few milliliters of culture medium in a stable incubator environment. Neuron differentiation, neural networking, proplatelet-formation and phagocytosis were captured by optical or fluorescence microscopy, and imaged at high resolution by gold-labeled immuno-ASEM with/without metal staining. Fas expression on the cell surface was visualized, correlated to the spatial distribution of F-actin. Axonal partitioning was studied using primary-culture neurons, and presynaptic induction by GluRδ2-N-terminus-linked fluorescent magnetic beads was correlated to the presynaptic-marker Bassoon. Further, megakaryocytes secreting proplatelets were captured, and P-selectins with adherence activity were localized to some of the granules present by immuno-ASEM. The phagocytosis of lactic acid bacteria by dendritic cells was also imaged. Based on these studies, ASEM correlative microscopy promises to allow the study of various mesoscopic-scale dynamics in the near future. - Highlights: • In situ correlative light electron microscopy of samples in open solution by ASEM. • Primary cultures for in-solution CLEM by developing SiN-film coating methods • First visualization of fluorescent magnetic beads in aqueous solution by CLEM. • Presynaptic induction of neurons by GluRδ2-N-terminus-coated beads studied by CLEM. • Axonal partitioning, bacterial phagocytosis, platelet formation imaged by CLEM.

  5. Fluorescent Probes and Fluorescence (Microscopy Techniques — Illuminating Biological and Biomedical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor P. C. Drummen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence, the absorption and re-emission of photons with longer wavelengths, is one of those amazing phenomena of Nature. Its discovery and utilization had, and still has, a major impact on biological and biomedical research, since it enables researchers not just to visualize normal physiological processes with high temporal and spatial resolution, to detect multiple signals concomitantly, to track single molecules in vivo, to replace radioactive assays when possible, but also to shed light on many pathobiological processes underpinning disease states, which would otherwise not be possible. Compounds that exhibit fluorescence are commonly called fluorochromes or fluorophores and one of these fluorescent molecules in particular has significantly enabled life science research to gain new insights in virtually all its sub-disciplines: Green Fluorescent Protein. Because fluorescent proteins are synthesized in vivo, integration of fluorescent detection methods into the biological system via genetic techniques now became feasible. Currently fluorescent proteins are available that virtually span the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Concomitantly, fluorescence imaging techniques were developed, and often progress in one field fueled innovation in the other. Impressively, the properties of fluorescence were utilized to develop new assays and imaging modalities, ranging from energy transfer to image molecular interactions to imaging beyond the diffraction limit with super-resolution microscopy. Here, an overview is provided of recent developments in both fluorescence imaging and fluorochrome engineering, which together constitute the “fluorescence toolbox” in life science research.

  6. Nanoscale resolution for fluorescence microscopy via adiabatic passage

    CERN Document Server

    Rubio, Juan Luis; Ahufinger, Verònica; Mompart, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    We propose the use of the subwavelength localization via adiabatic passage technique for fluorescence microscopy with nanoscale resolution in the far field. This technique uses a {\\Lambda}-type medium coherently coupled to two laser pulses: the pump, with a node in its spatial profile, and the Stokes. The population of the {\\Lambda} system is adiabatically transferred from one ground state to the other except at the node position, yielding a narrow population peak. This coherent localization allows fluorescence imaging with nanometer lateral resolution. We derive an analytical expression to asses the resolution and perform a comparison with the coherent population trapping and the stimulated-emission-depletion techniques.

  7. Fluorescent microscopy approaches of quantitative soil microbial analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Konstantin; Polyanskaya, Lubov

    2015-04-01

    Classical fluorescent microscopy method was used during the last decades in various microbiological studies of terrestrial ecosystems. The method provides representative results and simple application which is allow to use it both as routine part of amplitudinous research and in small-scaled laboratories. Furthermore, depending on research targets a lot of modifications of fluorescent microscopy method were established. Combination and comparison of several approaches is an opportunity of quantitative estimation of microbial community in soil. The first analytical part of the study was dedicated to soil bacterial density estimation by fluorescent microscopy in dynamic of several 30-days experiments. The purpose of research was estimation of changes in soil bacterial community on the different soil horizons under aerobic and anaerobic conditions with adding nutrients in two experimental sets: cellulose and chitin. Was modified the nalidixic acid method for inhibition of DNA division of gram-negative bacteria, and the method provides the quantification of this bacterial group by fluorescent microscopy. Established approach allowed to estimate 3-4 times more cells of gram-negative bacteria in soil. The functions of actinomyces in soil polymer destruction are traditionally considered as dominant in comparison to gram-negative bacterial group. However, quantification of gram-negative bacteria in chernozem and peatland provides underestimation of classical notion for this bacterial group. Chitin introduction had no positive effect to gram-negative bacterial population density changes in chernozem but concurrently this nutrient provided the fast growing dynamics at the first 3 days of experiment both under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This is confirming chitinolytic activity of gram-negative bacteria in soil organic matter decomposition. At the next part of research modified method for soil gram-negative bacteria quantification was compared to fluorescent in situ

  8. Sub-cellular structure studied by combined atomic force-fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trache, Andreea

    2009-03-01

    A novel experimental technique that integrates atomic force microscopy (AFM) with fluorescence imaging was used to study the role of extracellular matrix proteins in cellular organization. To understand the mechanism by which living cells sense mechanical forces, and how they respond and adapt to their environment, we developed a new technology able to investigate cellular behavior at sub-cellular level that integrates an AFM with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and fast-spinning disk (FSD) confocal microscopy. Live smooth muscle cells exhibited differences in focal adhesions and actin pattern depending on the extracellular matrix used for substrate coating. Data obtained by using the AFM-optical imaging integrated technique offer novel quantitative information that allows understanding the fundamental processes of cellular reorganization in response to extracellular matrix modulation. The integrated microscope presented here is broadly applicable across a wide range of molecular dynamic studies in any adherent live cells.

  9. Super-resolution optical microscopy of lipid plasma membrane dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggeling, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane dynamics are an important ruler of cellular activity, particularly through the interaction and diffusion dynamics of membrane-embedded proteins and lipids. FCS (fluorescence correlation spectroscopy) on an optical (confocal) microscope is a popular tool for investigating such dynamics. Unfortunately, its full applicability is constrained by the limited spatial resolution of a conventional optical microscope. The present chapter depicts the combination of optical super-resolution STED (stimulated emission depletion) microscopy with FCS, and why it is an important tool for investigating molecular membrane dynamics in living cells. Compared with conventional FCS, the STED-FCS approach demonstrates an improved possibility to distinguish free from anomalous molecular diffusion, and thus to give new insights into lipid-protein interactions and the traditional lipid 'raft' theory.

  10. Enhanced image reconstruction of three-dimensional fluorescent assays by subtractive structured-light illumination microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong-ryul; Kim, Donghyun

    2012-10-01

    We investigate improved image reconstruction of structured light illumination for high-resolution imaging of three-dimensional (3D) cell-based assays. For proof of concept, an in situ fluorescence optical detection system was built with a digital micromirror device as a spatial light modulator, for which phase and tilting angle in a grid pattern were varied to implement specific image reconstruction schemes. Subtractive reconstruction algorithms based on structured light illumination were used to acquire images of fluorescent microbeads deposited as a two-dimensional monolayer or in 3D alginate matrix. We have confirmed that an optical subtraction algorithm improves axial and lateral resolution by effectively removing out-of-focus fluorescence. The results suggest that subtractive image reconstruction can be useful for structured illumination microscopy of broad types of cell-based assays with high image resolution.

  11. Image processing for drift compensation in fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steffen; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Coutinho, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is characterized by low background noise, thus a fluorescent object appears as an area of high signal/noise. Thermal gradients may result in apparent motion of the object, leading to a blurred image. Here, we have developed an image processing methodology that may remove....../reduce blur significantly for any type of microscopy. A total of ~100 images were acquired with a pixel size of 30 nm. The acquisition time for each image was approximately 1second. We can quantity the drift in X and Y using the sub pixel accuracy computed centroid location of an image object in each frame....... We can measure drifts down to approximately 10 nm in size and a drift-compensated image can therefore be reconstructed on a grid of the same size using the “Shift and Add” approach leading to an image of identical size asthe individual image. We have also reconstructed the image using a 3 fold larger...

  12. MULTISCALE TENSOR ANISOTROPIC FILTERING OF FLUORESCENCE MICROSCOPY FOR DENOISING MICROVASCULATURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasath, V B S; Pelapur, R; Glinskii, O V; Glinsky, V V; Huxley, V H; Palaniappan, K

    2015-04-01

    Fluorescence microscopy images are contaminated by noise and improving image quality without blurring vascular structures by filtering is an important step in automatic image analysis. The application of interest here is to automatically extract the structural components of the microvascular system with accuracy from images acquired by fluorescence microscopy. A robust denoising process is necessary in order to extract accurate vascular morphology information. For this purpose, we propose a multiscale tensor with anisotropic diffusion model which progressively and adaptively updates the amount of smoothing while preserving vessel boundaries accurately. Based on a coherency enhancing flow with planar confidence measure and fused 3D structure information, our method integrates multiple scales for microvasculature preservation and noise removal membrane structures. Experimental results on simulated synthetic images and epifluorescence images show the advantage of our improvement over other related diffusion filters. We further show that the proposed multiscale integration approach improves denoising accuracy of different tensor diffusion methods to obtain better microvasculature segmentation.

  13. Detection of oxidative hair treatment using fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Silvana; Wunder, Cora; Paulke, Alexander; Verhoff, Marcel A; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Toennes, Stefan W

    2016-08-01

    In assessing abstinence from drug or alcohol abuse, hair analysis plays an important role. Cosmetic hair treatment influences the content of deposited drugs which is not always detectable during analysis. Since oxidation of melanin leads to an increase in fluorescence, a microscopic method was developed to distinguish natural from cosmetically treated hair. For validation, natural hair samples were treated with different types of cosmetics and inspected by fluorescence microscopy. Hair samples from 20 volunteers with documented cosmetic treatment and as a proof of concept 100 hair samples from forensic cases were analyzed by this method. Apart from autofluorescence with excitation at 365 nm, no obvious fluorescence was observed in untreated hair samples. Tinting and a natural plant product had no influence on fluorescence, but dyeing procedures including oxidation led to a marked increase in fluorescence. Proof of cosmetic treatment was achieved in hair samples from the 20 volunteers. In 100 forensic cases, 13 samples were characterized as oxidatively treated, which was in accordance with the respective disclosure except for one case where treatment was not admitted. This fluorescence microscopic procedure proved to be fast, easy, and reliable to identify oxidatively treated hair samples, which must be considered especially in evaluating cases of negative drug results. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Non-iterative adaptive optical microscopy using wavefront sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, X.; Azucena, O.; Kubby, J.

    2016-03-01

    This paper will review the development of wide-field and confocal microscopes with wavefront sensing and adaptive optics for correcting refractive aberrations and compensating scattering when imaging through thick tissues (Drosophila embryos and mouse brain tissue). To make wavefront measurements in biological specimens we have modified the laser guide-star techniques used in astronomy for measuring wavefront aberrations that occur as star light passes through Earth's turbulent atmosphere. Here sodium atoms in Earth's mesosphere, at an altitude of 95 km, are excited to fluoresce at resonance by a high-power sodium laser. The fluorescent light creates a guide-star reference beacon at the top of the atmosphere that can be used for measuring wavefront aberrations that occur as the light passes through the atmosphere. We have developed a related approach for making wavefront measurements in biological specimens using cellular structures labeled with fluorescent proteins as laser guide-stars. An example is a fluorescently labeled centrosome in a fruit fly embryo or neurons and dendrites in mouse brains. Using adaptive optical microscopy we show that the Strehl ratio, the ratio of the peak intensity of an aberrated point source relative to the diffraction limited image, can be improved by an order of magnitude when imaging deeply into live dynamic specimens, enabling near diffraction limited deep tissue imaging.

  15. A near-field optical microscopy nanoarray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semin, D.J.; Ambrose, W.P.; Goodwin, P.M.; Kwller, A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wendt, J.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Multiplexing near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) by the use of a nanoarray with parallel imaging is studied. The fabrication, characterization, and utilization of nanoarrays with {approximately} 100 nm diameter apertures spaced 500 nm center-to- center is presented. Extremely uniform nanoarrays with {approximately} 10{sup 8} apertures were fabricated by electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching. The nanoarrays were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In this paper we utilize these nanoarrays in a laser-illuminated microscope with parallel detection on a charge- coupled device (CCD). Detection of B-phycoerythrin (B-PE) molecules using near-field illumination is presented. In principle, our system can be used to obtain high lateral resolution NSOM images over a wide-field of view (e.g. 50-100 {mu}m) within seconds.

  16. Waveguide evanescent field fluorescence microscopy: Thin film fluorescence intensities and its application in cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Abdollah; Nitsche, Michael; Mittler, Silvia; Armstrong, Souzan; Dixon, Jeff; Langbein, Uwe

    2008-06-01

    We demonstrate an inexpensive alternative to total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. A method for imaging ultrathin films and living cells located on waveguides—illuminated with their evanescent fields—is introduced. An extensive analysis of ion-exchanged waveguides focusing on their application as microscopy substrates for studying interfacial phenomena is presented. Experimental results are in excellent agreement with the simulations. As an application osteoblasts (bone matrix forming cells) and ultrathin Langmuir-Blodgett films were imaged. The fluorescence intensity has been used to determine the cell attachment.

  17. Single cell genomic quantification by non-fluorescence nonlinear microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, Divya; Liu, Jing

    2017-02-01

    Human epidermal growth receptor 2 (Her2) is a gene which plays a major role in breast cancer development. The quantification of Her2 expression in single cells is limited by several drawbacks in existing fluorescence-based single molecule techniques, such as low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), strong autofluorescence and background signals from biological components. For rigorous genomic quantification, a robust method of orthogonal detection is highly desirable and we demonstrated it by two non-fluorescent imaging techniques -transient absorption microscopy (TAM) and second harmonic generation (SHG). In TAM, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are chosen as an orthogonal probes for detection of single molecules which gives background-free quantifications of single mRNA transcript. In SHG, emission from barium titanium oxide (BTO) nanoprobes was demonstrated which allows stable signal beyond the autofluorescence window. Her2 mRNA was specifically labeled with nanoprobes which are conjugated with antibodies or oligonucleotides and quantified at single copy sensitivity in the cancer cells and tissues. Furthermore, a non-fluorescent super-resolution concept, named as second harmonic super-resolution microscopy (SHaSM), was proposed to quantify individual Her2 transcripts in cancer cells beyond the diffraction limit. These non-fluorescent imaging modalities will provide new dimensions in biomarker quantification at single molecule sensitivity in turbid biological samples, offering a strong cross-platform strategy for clinical monitoring at single cell resolution.

  18. Raman microscopy of bladder cancer cells expressing green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandair, Gurjit S.; Han, Amy L.; Keller, Evan T.; Morris, Michael D.

    2016-11-01

    Gene engineering is a commonly used tool in cellular biology to determine changes in function or expression of downstream targets. However, the impact of genetic modulation on biochemical effects is less frequently evaluated. The aim of this study is to use Raman microscopy to assess the biochemical effects of gene silencing on T24 and UMUC-13 bladder cancer cell lines. Cellular biochemical information related to nucleic acid and lipogenic components was obtained from deconvolved Raman spectra. We show that the green fluorescence protein (GFP), the chromophore that served as a fluorescent reporter for gene silencing, could also be detected by Raman microscopy. Only the gene-silenced UMUC-13 cell lines exhibited low-to-moderate GFP fluorescence as determined by fluorescence imaging and Raman spectroscopic studies. Moreover, we show that gene silencing and cell phenotype had a greater effect on nucleic acid and lipogenic components with minimal interference from GFP expression. Gene silencing was also found to perturb cellular protein secondary structure in which the amount of disorderd protein increased at the expense of more ordered protein. Overall, our study identified the spectral signature for cellular GFP expression and elucidated the effects of gene silencing on cancer cell biochemistry and protein secondary structure.

  19. Atomic force fluorescence microscopy : combining the best of two worlds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassies, Roelf

    2005-01-01

    The complementary strengths and weaknesses of AFM and optical microscopy leads to the desire to integrate both techniques into a single microscope. This thesis describes the development of a com-bined AFM / confocal °uorescence microscope. This atomic force °uorescence microscope (AFFM) combines hig

  20. Self-labelling enzymes as universal tags for fluorescence microscopy, super-resolution microscopy and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Viktoria; Barlag, Britta; Nietschke, Monika; Hensel, Michael

    2015-12-08

    Research in cell biology demands advanced microscopy techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy (FM), super-resolution microscopy (SRM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an approach to combine data on the dynamics of proteins or protein complexes in living cells with the ultrastructural details in the low nanometre scale. To correlate both data sets, markers functional in FM, SRM and TEM are required. Genetically encoded markers such as fluorescent proteins or self-labelling enzyme tags allow observations in living cells. Various genetically encoded tags are available for FM and SRM, but only few tags are suitable for CLEM. Here, we describe the red fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) as a multimodal marker for CLEM. TMR is used as fluorochrome coupled to ligands of genetically encoded self-labelling enzyme tags HaloTag, SNAP-tag and CLIP-tag in FM and SRM. We demonstrate that TMR can additionally photooxidize diaminobenzidine (DAB) to an osmiophilic polymer visible on TEM sections, thus being a marker suitable for FM, SRM and TEM. We evaluated various organelle markers with enzymatic tags in mammalian cells labelled with TMR-coupled ligands and demonstrate the use as efficient and versatile DAB photooxidizer for CLEM approaches.

  1. Adaptive Optics for Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Leroux, Charles Edouard; Derouard, Jacques; Delon, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) yields measurement parameters (number of molecules, diffusion time) that characterize the concentration and kinetics of fluorescent molecules within a supposedly known observation volume. Absolute derivation of concentrations and diffusion constants therefore requires preliminary calibrations of the confocal Point Spread Function with phantom solutions under perfectly controlled environmental conditions. In this paper, we quantify the influence of optical aberrations on single photon FCS and demonstrate a simple Adaptive Optics system for aberration correction. Optical aberrations are gradually introduced by focussing the excitation laser beam at increasing depths in fluorescent solutions with various refractive indices, which leads to drastic depth-dependent bias in the estimated FCS parameters. Aberration correction with a Deformable Mirror stabilizes these parameters within a range of several tens of \\mum into the solution. We also demonstrate, both theoretically...

  2. Rapid global fitting of large fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean C Warren

    Full Text Available Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM is widely applied to obtain quantitative information from fluorescence signals, particularly using Förster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET measurements to map, for example, protein-protein interactions. Extracting FRET efficiencies or population fractions typically entails fitting data to complex fluorescence decay models but such experiments are frequently photon constrained, particularly for live cell or in vivo imaging, and this leads to unacceptable errors when analysing data on a pixel-wise basis. Lifetimes and population fractions may, however, be more robustly extracted using global analysis to simultaneously fit the fluorescence decay data of all pixels in an image or dataset to a multi-exponential model under the assumption that the lifetime components are invariant across the image (dataset. This approach is often considered to be prohibitively slow and/or computationally expensive but we present here a computationally efficient global analysis algorithm for the analysis of time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC or time-gated FLIM data based on variable projection. It makes efficient use of both computer processor and memory resources, requiring less than a minute to analyse time series and multiwell plate datasets with hundreds of FLIM images on standard personal computers. This lifetime analysis takes account of repetitive excitation, including fluorescence photons excited by earlier pulses contributing to the fit, and is able to accommodate time-varying backgrounds and instrument response functions. We demonstrate that this global approach allows us to readily fit time-resolved fluorescence data to complex models including a four-exponential model of a FRET system, for which the FRET efficiencies of the two species of a bi-exponential donor are linked, and polarisation-resolved lifetime data, where a fluorescence intensity and bi-exponential anisotropy decay model is applied to the analysis

  3. Assessment of fibrotic liver disease with multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fake; Zheng, Wei; Tai, Dean C. S.; Lin, Jian; Yu, Hanry; Huang, Zhiwei

    2010-02-01

    Liver fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins such as collagens, which may result in cirrhosis, liver failure, and portal hypertension. In this study, we apply a multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy platform developed to investigate the fibrotic liver diseases in rat models established by performing bile duct ligation (BDL) surgery. The three nonlinear microscopy imaging modalities are implemented on the same sectioned tissues of diseased model sequentially: i.e., second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging quantifies the contents of the collagens, the two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) imaging reveals the morphology of hepatic cells, while coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging maps the distributions of fats or lipids quantitatively across the tissue. Our imaging results show that during the development of liver fibrosis (collagens) in BDL model, fatty liver disease also occurs. The aggregated concentrations of collagen and fat constituents in liver fibrosis model show a certain correlationship between each other.

  4. Multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy in planar membrane systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Jonathan; Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Wagner, Kerstin; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2010-07-01

    The feasibility of applying multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy-related techniques in planar membrane systems, such as lipid monolayers at the air-water interface (named Langmuir films), is presented and discussed in this paper. The non-linear fluorescence microscopy approach, allows obtaining spatially and temporally resolved information by exploiting the fluorescent properties of particular fluorescence probes. For instance, the use of environmental sensitive probes, such as LAURDAN, allows performing measurements using the LAURDAN generalized polarization function that in turn is sensitive to the local lipid packing in the membrane. The fact that LAURDAN exhibit homogeneous distribution in monolayers, particularly in systems displaying domain coexistence, overcomes a general problem observed when "classical" fluorescence probes are used to label Langmuir films, i.e. the inability to obtain simultaneous information from the two coexisting membrane regions. Also, the well described photoselection effect caused by excitation light on LAURDAN allows: (i) to qualitative infer tilting information of the monolayer when liquid condensed phases are present and (ii) to provide high contrast to visualize 3D membranous structures at the film's collapse pressure. In the last case, computation of the LAURDAN GP function provides information about lipid packing in these 3D structures. Additionally, LAURDAN GP values upon compression in monolayers were compared with those obtained in compositionally similar planar bilayer systems. At similar GP values we found, for both DOPC and DPPC, a correspondence between the molecular areas reported in monolayers and bilayers. This correspondence occurs when the lateral pressure of the monolayer is 26+/-2 mN/m and 28+/-3 mN/m for DOPC and DPPC, respectively.

  5. Multiparallel Three-Dimensional Optical Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lam K.; Price, Jeffrey H.; Kellner, Albert L.; Bravo-Zanoquera, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Multiparallel three-dimensional optical microscopy is a method of forming an approximate three-dimensional image of a microscope sample as a collection of images from different depths through the sample. The imaging apparatus includes a single microscope plus an assembly of beam splitters and mirrors that divide the output of the microscope into multiple channels. An imaging array of photodetectors in each channel is located at a different distance along the optical path from the microscope, corresponding to a focal plane at a different depth within the sample. The optical path leading to each photodetector array also includes lenses to compensate for the variation of magnification with distance so that the images ultimately formed on all the photodetector arrays are of the same magnification. The use of optical components common to multiple channels in a simple geometry makes it possible to obtain high light-transmission efficiency with an optically and mechanically simple assembly. In addition, because images can be read out simultaneously from all the photodetector arrays, the apparatus can support three-dimensional imaging at a high scanning rate.

  6. Correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy with high spatial precision and improved sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schorb, Martin [Structural and Computational Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Briggs, John A.G., E-mail: john.briggs@embl.de [Structural and Computational Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-08-01

    Performing fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy on the same sample allows fluorescent signals to be used to identify and locate features of interest for subsequent imaging by electron microscopy. To carry out such correlative microscopy on vitrified samples appropriate for structural cryo-electron microscopy it is necessary to perform fluorescence microscopy at liquid-nitrogen temperatures. Here we describe an adaptation of a cryo-light microscopy stage to permit use of high-numerical aperture objectives. This allows high-sensitivity and high-resolution fluorescence microscopy of vitrified samples. We describe and apply a correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy workflow together with a fiducial bead-based image correlation procedure. This procedure allows us to locate fluorescent bacteriophages in cryo-electron microscopy images with an accuracy on the order of 50 nm, based on their fluorescent signal. It will allow the user to precisely and unambiguously identify and locate objects and events for subsequent high-resolution structural study, based on fluorescent signals. - Highlights: • Workflow for correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy. • Cryo-fluorescence microscopy setup incorporating a high numerical aperture objective. • Fluorescent signals located in cryo-electron micrographs with 50 nm spatial precision.

  7. Combined ion conductance and fluorescence confocal microscopy for biological cell membrane transport studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchuk, A. I.; Novak, P.; Velazquez, M. A.; Fleming, T. P.; Korchev, Y. E.

    2013-09-01

    Optical visualization of nanoscale morphological changes taking place in living biological cells during such important processes as endo- and exocytosis is challenging due to the low refractive index of lipid membranes. In this paper we summarize and discuss advances in the powerful combination of two complementary live imaging techniques, ion conductance and fluorescence confocal microscopy, that allows cell membrane topography to be related with molecular-specific fluorescence at high spatial and temporal resolution. We demonstrate the feasibility of the use of ion conductance microscopy to image apical plasma membrane of mouse embryo trophoblast outgrowth cells at a resolution sufficient to depict single endocytic pits. This opens the possibility to study individual endocytic events in embryo trophoblast outgrowth cells where endocytosis plays a crucial role during early stages of embryo development.

  8. Simultaneous Fluorescence and Phosphorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Karolina; Buschmann, Volker; Hille, Carsten

    2015-09-22

    In living cells, there are always a plethora of processes taking place at the same time. Their precise regulation is the basis of cellular functions, since small failures can lead to severe dysfunctions. For a comprehensive understanding of intracellular homeostasis, simultaneous multiparameter detection is a versatile tool for revealing the spatial and temporal interactions of intracellular parameters. Here, a recently developed time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) board was evaluated for simultaneous fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM/PLIM). Therefore, the metabolic activity in insect salivary glands was investigated by recording ns-decaying intrinsic cellular fluorescence, mainly related to oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and the μs-decaying phosphorescence of the oxygen-sensitive ruthenium-complex Kr341. Due to dopamine stimulation, the metabolic activity of salivary glands increased, causing a higher pericellular oxygen consumption and a resulting increase in Kr341 phosphorescence decay time. Furthermore, FAD fluorescence decay time decreased, presumably due to protein binding, thus inducing a quenching of FAD fluorescence decay time. Through application of the metabolic drugs antimycin and FCCP, the recorded signals could be assigned to a mitochondrial origin. The dopamine-induced changes could be observed in sequential FLIM and PLIM recordings, as well as in simultaneous FLIM/PLIM recordings using an intermediate TCSPC timing resolution.

  9. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of nanodiamonds in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yung; Hsu, Tsung-Yuan; Wu, Yi-Chun; Hsu, Jui-Hung; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2013-03-01

    The negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) center in bulk diamond is a photostable fluorophore with a radiative lifetime of 11.6 ns at room temperature. The lifetime substantially increases to ~20 ns for diamond nanoparticles (size ~ 100 nm) suspended in water due to the change in refractive index of the surrounding medium of the NV- centers. This fluorescence decay time is much longer than that (typically 1 - 4 ns) of endogenous and exogenous fluorophores commonly used in biological imaging, making it possible to detect NV--containing nanodiamonds in vivo at the single particle level by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach using Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) as a model organism.

  10. Fluorescence microscopy test in porphyrias, photodermatoses and lead exposed persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansky, A

    1975-07-18

    Fluorescence microscopy tests were carried out in different groups of patients Peripheral blood diluted with saline was used and 200 high power fields were inspected in every case. The results were presented as the number of fluorescing erythrocytes (FE) per 100000 red blood cells (or 200 fields). In the controls, porphyria cutanea tarda patients and patients with photodermatoses other than erythopoietic protoporphyria and pellagra almost no FE were detected. In erythropoietic protoporphyria the mean value was 10600, in lead poisoning 1032, in patients exposed to lead 48.2, in sideropenic anaemia 123 and in patients with pellagra 8.1 FE/100000 red blood cells. The conclusion is made that one has to take care, when using this test for detection of latent carriers in genetic studies of the relatives of patients with erythropoietic protoporphyria. The test is useful for the confirmation of the diagnosis of erythropoietic protoporphyria.

  11. Quantitative Super-Resolution Microscopy of Nanopipette-Deposited Fluorescent Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Simon; van de Linde, Sebastian; Bergmann, Stephan; Huser, Thomas; Sauer, Markus

    2015-08-25

    We describe a method for the deposition of minute amounts of fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotides with high local precision in conductive and transparent solid layers of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) doped with glycerin and cysteamine (PVA-G-C layers). Deposition of negatively charged fluorescent molecules was accomplished with a setup based on a scanning ion conductance microscope (SICM) using nanopipettes with tip diameters of ∼100 nm by using the ion flux flowing between two electrodes through the nanopipette. To investigate the precision of the local deposition process, we performed in situ super-resolution microscopy by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM). Exploiting the single-molecule sensitivity and reliability of dSTORM, we determine the number of fluorescent molecules deposited in single spots. The correlation of applied charge and number of deposited molecules enables the quantification of delivered molecules by measuring the charge during the delivery process. We demonstrate the reproducible deposition of 3-168 fluorescent molecules in single spots and the creation of fluorescent structures. The fluorescent structures are highly stable and can be reused several times.

  12. Fluorescence in situ hybridization applications for super-resolution 3D structured illumination microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markaki, Yolanda; Smeets, Daniel; Cremer, Marion; Schermelleh, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization on three-dimensionally preserved cells (3D-FISH) is an efficient tool to analyze the subcellular localization and spatial arrangement of targeted DNA sequences and RNA transcripts at the single cell level. 3D reconstructions from serial optical sections obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) have long been considered the gold standard for 3D-FISH analyses. Recent super-resolution techniques circumvent the diffraction-limit of optical resolution and have defined a new state-of-the-art in bioimaging. Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) represents one of these technologies. Notably, 3D-SIM renders an eightfold improved volumetric resolution over conventional imaging, and allows the simultaneous visualization of differently labeled target structures. These features make this approach highly attractive for the analysis of spatial relations and substructures of nuclear targets that escape detection by conventional light microscopy. Here, we focus on the application of 3D-SIM for the visualization of subnuclear 3D-FISH preparations. In comparison with conventional fluorescence microscopy, the quality of 3D-SIM data is dependent to a much greater extent on the optimal sample preparation, labeling and acquisition conditions. We describe typical problems encountered with super-resolution imaging of in situ hybridizations in mammalian tissue culture cells and provide optimized DNA-/(RNA)-FISH protocols including combinations with immunofluorescence staining (Immuno-FISH) and DNA replication labeling using click chemistry.

  13. Improved localization accuracy in stochastic super-resolution fluorescence microscopy by K-factor image deshadowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilovitsh, Tali; Meiri, Amihai; Ebeling, Carl G; Menon, Rajesh; Gerton, Jordan M; Jorgensen, Erik M; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2013-12-16

    Localization of a single fluorescent particle with sub-diffraction-limit accuracy is a key merit in localization microscopy. Existing methods such as photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) achieve localization accuracies of single emitters that can reach an order of magnitude lower than the conventional resolving capabilities of optical microscopy. However, these techniques require a sparse distribution of simultaneously activated fluorophores in the field of view, resulting in larger time needed for the construction of the full image. In this paper we present the use of a nonlinear image decomposition algorithm termed K-factor, which reduces an image into a nonlinear set of contrast-ordered decompositions whose joint product reassembles the original image. The K-factor technique, when implemented on raw data prior to localization, can improve the localization accuracy of standard existing methods, and also enable the localization of overlapping particles, allowing the use of increased fluorophore activation density, and thereby increased data collection speed. Numerical simulations of fluorescence data with random probe positions, and especially at high densities of activated fluorophores, demonstrate an improvement of up to 85% in the localization precision compared to single fitting techniques. Implementing the proposed concept on experimental data of cellular structures yielded a 37% improvement in resolution for the same super-resolution image acquisition time, and a decrease of 42% in the collection time of super-resolution data with the same resolution.

  14. Optical biomarkers of serous and mucinous human ovarian tumor assessed with nonlinear optics microscopies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Adur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nonlinear optical (NLO microscopy techniques have potential to improve the early detection of epithelial ovarian cancer. In this study we showed that multimodal NLO microscopies, including two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF, second-harmonic generation (SHG, third-harmonic generation (THG and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM can detect morphological and metabolic changes associated with ovarian cancer progression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We obtained strong TPEF + SHG + THG signals from fixed samples stained with Hematoxylin & Eosin (H&E and robust FLIM signal from fixed unstained samples. Particularly, we imaged 34 ovarian biopsies from different patients (median age, 49 years including 5 normal ovarian tissue, 18 serous tumors and 11 mucinous tumors with the multimodal NLO platform developed in our laboratory. We have been able to distinguish adenomas, borderline, and adenocarcinomas specimens. Using a complete set of scoring methods we found significant differences in the content, distribution and organization of collagen fibrils in the stroma as well as in the morphology and fluorescence lifetime from epithelial ovarian cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: NLO microscopes provide complementary information about tissue microstructure, showing distinctive patterns for serous and mucinous ovarian tumors. The results provide a basis to interpret future NLO images of ovarian tissue and lay the foundation for future in vivo optical evaluation of premature ovarian lesions.

  15. Contrast Induced by a Static Magnetic Field for Improved Detection in Nanodiamond Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singam, Shashi K. R.; Motylewski, Jaroslaw; Monaco, Antonina; Gjorgievska, Elena; Bourgeois, Emilie; Nesládek, Milos; Giugliano, Michele; Goovaerts, Etienne

    2016-12-01

    Diamond nanoparticles with negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers are highly efficient nonblinking emitters that exhibit spin-dependent intensity. An attractive application of these emitters is background-free fluorescence microscopy exploiting the fluorescence quenching induced either by resonant microwaves (RMWs) or by an applied static magnetic field (SMF). Here, we compare RMW- and SMF-induced contrast measurements over a wide range of optical excitation rates for fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) and for NV centers shallowly buried under the (100)-oriented surface of a diamond single crystal (SC). Contrast levels are found to be systematically lower in the FNDs than in the SC. At low excitation rates, the RMW contrast initially rises to a maximum (up to 7% in FNDs and 13% in the SC) but then decreases steadily at higher intensities. Conversely, the SMF contrast increases from approximately 12% at low excitation rates to high values of 20% and 38% for the FNDs and SC, respectively. These observations are well described in a rate-equations model for the charged NV defect using parameters in good agreement with the literature. The SMF approach yields higher induced contrast in image collection under commonly applied optical excitation. Unlike the RMW method, there is no thermal load exerted on the aqueous media in biological samples in the SMF approach. We demonstrate imaging by SMF-induced contrast in neuronal cultures incorporating FNDs (i) in a setup for patch-clamp experiments in parallel with differential-interference-contrast microscopy, (ii) after a commonly used staining procedure as an illustration of the high selectivity against background fluorescence, and (iii) in a confocal fluorescence microscope in combination with bright-field microscopy.

  16. Augmented microscopy: real-time overlay of bright-field and near-infrared fluorescence images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jeffrey R; Gainer, Christian F; Martirosyan, Nikolay; Skoch, Jesse; Lemole, G Michael; Anton, Rein; Romanowski, Marek

    2015-10-01

    Intraoperative applications of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent contrast agents can be aided by instrumentation capable of merging the view of surgical field with that of NIR fluorescence. We demonstrate augmented microscopy, an intraoperative imaging technique in which bright-field (real) and electronically processed NIR fluorescence (synthetic) images are merged within the optical path of a stereomicroscope. Under luminance of 100,000 lx, representing typical illumination of the surgical field, the augmented microscope detects 189 nM concentration of indocyanine green and produces a composite of the real and synthetic images within the eyepiece of the microscope at 20 fps. Augmentation described here can be implemented as an add-on module to visualize NIR contrast agents, laser beams, or various types of electronic data within the surgical microscopes commonly used in neurosurgical, cerebrovascular, otolaryngological, and ophthalmic procedures.

  17. Exciton-polaron quenching in organic thin-film transistors studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Baunegaard With; Leißner, Till; Osadnik, Andreas

    Organic semiconductors show great potential in electronic and optical applications. However, a major challenge is the degradation of the semiconductor materials that cause a reduction in device performance. Here, we present our investigations of Organic Thin Film Transistors (OTFT) based...... that correlates with the local charge density indicates a pronounced exciton quenching by the injected charges. Subsequent FLIM measurements on previously biased OTFT devices show a general decrease in fluorescence lifetime suggesting degradation of the organic semiconductor. This is correlated with the results...... on the material 5,5-bis(naphthyl)-2,20-bithiophene (NaT2). These types of OTFT have previously been shown to have light emitting properties. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) has been used to investigate the exciton-polaron quenching in biased OTFTs. A clear reduction in fluorescence lifetime...

  18. Structural and dynamical aspects of skin studied by multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy-based methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Bagatolli, Luis

    2013-01-01

    This mini-review reports on applications of particular multiphoton excitation microscopy-based methodologies employed in our laboratory to study skin. These approaches allow in-depth optical sectioning of the tissue, providing spatially resolved information on specific fluorescence probes......' parameters. Specifically, by applying these methods, spatially resolved maps of water dipolar relaxation (generalized polarization function using the 6-lauroyl-2-(N,N-dimethylamino)naphthale probe), activity of protons (fluorescence lifetime imaging using a proton sensitive fluorescence probe--2,7-bis-(2...... excised skin, including applications of fluctuation correlation spectroscopy on transdermal penetration of liposomes are presented and discussed. The data from the different studies reported reveal the intrinsic heterogeneity of skin and also prove these strategies to be powerful noninvasive tools...

  19. Reliability of acridine orange fluorescence microscopy in oral cytodiagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilima Prakash

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context and Aims: The oral cavity is the most predominant location in the head and neck region for primary malignant epithelial tumors. Oral cancer is estimated to be the sixth most common malignancy. Early recognition is imperative for successful treatment and good prognosis. Exfoliative cytology is a simple and reasonably effective technique for rapid initial evaluation of a suspicious oral lesion. The present study was conducted to determine the reliability of acridine orange fluorescence microscopy for cytodiagnosis as a more rapid and easier method for the final evaluation of the cytological specimen. Materials and Methods: Smears were collected from 20 individuals with oral lesions suspicious of malignancy, oral lesions not suggestive of malignancy and normal buccal mucosa. One smear was stained with Papanicolaou stain and another one with acridine orange stain. The differences in the study group and control group were compared by means of the χ2 (Chi-square test. The results were considered statistically significant whenever P was <0.05. Results: The acridine orange fluorescence stain reliably demonstrated malignant cells based on the differential fluorescence - a cytochemical criterion. The efficacy of the stain was higher than the conventional Papanicolaou stain in screening of oral lesions suspicious of malignancy. However, the acridine orange fluorescence stain did not differentiate effectively between malignant cells and rapidly proliferating cells, as the technique is based on the nucleic acid content. Conclusion: The fluorescent acridine orange method can be used reliably for the screening of carcinomas and it is especially helpful in the follow-up detection of recurrent carcinoma in previously treated cases.

  20. Super-resolution microscopy of single atoms in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Andrea; Robens, Carsten; Alt, Wolfgang; Brakhane, Stefan; Karski, Michał; Reimann, René; Widera, Artur; Meschede, Dieter

    2016-05-01

    We report on image processing techniques and experimental procedures to determine the lattice-site positions of single atoms in an optical lattice with high reliability, even for limited acquisition time or optical resolution. Determining the positions of atoms beyond the diffraction limit relies on parametric deconvolution in close analogy to methods employed in super-resolution microscopy. We develop a deconvolution method that makes effective use of the prior knowledge of the optical transfer function, noise properties, and discreteness of the optical lattice. We show that accurate knowledge of the image formation process enables a dramatic improvement on the localization reliability. This allows us to demonstrate super-resolution of the atoms’ position in closely packed ensembles where the separation between particles cannot be directly optically resolved. Furthermore, we demonstrate experimental methods to precisely reconstruct the point spread function with sub-pixel resolution from fluorescence images of single atoms, and we give a mathematical foundation thereof. We also discuss discretized image sampling in pixel detectors and provide a quantitative model of noise sources in electron multiplying CCD cameras. The techniques developed here are not only beneficial to neutral atom experiments, but could also be employed to improve the localization precision of trapped ions for ultra precise force sensing.

  1. Automated seeding-based nuclei segmentation in nonlinear optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medyukhina, Anna; Meyer, Tobias; Heuke, Sandro; Vogler, Nadine; Dietzek, Benjamin; Popp, Jürgen

    2013-10-01

    Nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopy based, e.g., on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) or two-photon-excited fluorescence (TPEF) is a fast label-free imaging technique, with a great potential for biomedical applications. However, NLO microscopy as a diagnostic tool is still in its infancy; there is a lack of robust and durable nuclei segmentation methods capable of accurate image processing in cases of variable image contrast, nuclear density, and type of investigated tissue. Nonetheless, such algorithms specifically adapted to NLO microscopy present one prerequisite for the technology to be routinely used, e.g., in pathology or intraoperatively for surgical guidance. In this paper, we compare the applicability of different seeding and boundary detection methods to NLO microscopic images in order to develop an optimal seeding-based approach capable of accurate segmentation of both TPEF and CARS images. Among different methods, the Laplacian of Gaussian filter showed the best accuracy for the seeding of the image, while a modified seeded watershed segmentation was the most accurate in the task of boundary detection. The resulting combination of these methods followed by the verification of the detected nuclei performs high average sensitivity and specificity when applied to various types of NLO microscopy images.

  2. Signal enhanced holographic fluorescence microscopy with guide-star reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Changwon; Clark, David C.; Kim, Jonghyun; Lee, Byoungho; Kim, Myung K.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a signal enhanced guide-star reconstruction method for holographic fluorescence microscopy. In the late 00’s, incoherent digital holography started to be vigorously studied by several groups to overcome the limitations of conventional digital holography. The basic concept of incoherent digital holography is to acquire the complex hologram from incoherent light by utilizing temporal coherency of a spatially incoherent light source. The advent of incoherent digital holography opened new possibility of holographic fluorescence microscopy (HFM), which was difficult to achieve with conventional digital holography. However there has been an important issue of low and noisy signal in HFM which slows down the system speed and degrades the imaging quality. When guide-star reconstruction is adopted, the image reconstruction gives an improved result compared to the conventional propagation reconstruction method. The guide-star reconstruction method gives higher imaging signal-to-noise ratio since the acquired complex point spread function provides optimal system-adaptive information and can restore the signal buried in the noise more efficiently. We present theoretical explanation and simulation as well as experimental results. PMID:27446653

  3. Tools and techniques to measure mitophagy using fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolman, Nick J; Chambers, Kevin M; Mandavilli, Bhaskar; Batchelor, Robert H; Janes, Michael S

    2013-11-01

    Mitophagy is a specialized form of autophagy that removes damaged mitochondria, thereby maintaining efficient cellular metabolism and reducing cellular stress caused by aberrant oxidative bursts. Deficits in mitophagy underlie several diseases, and a substantial body of research has elucidated key steps in the pathways that lead to and execute autophagic clearance of mitochondria. Many of these studies employ fluorescence microscopy to visualize mitochondrial morphology, mass, and functional state. Studies in this area also examine colocalization/recruitment of accessory factors, components of the autophagic machinery and signaling molecules to mitochondria. In this review, we provide a brief summary of the current understanding about the processes involved in mitophagy followed by a discussion of probes commonly employed and important considerations of the methodologies to study and analyze mitophagy using fluorescence microscopy. Representative data, where appropriate, are provided to highlight the use of key probes to monitor mitophagy. The review will conclude with a consideration of new possibilities for mitophagy research and a discussion of recently developed technologies for this emerging area of cell biology.

  4. Correlative super-resolution fluorescence and electron microscopy of the nuclear pore complex with molecular resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löschberger, Anna; Franke, Christian; Krohne, Georg; van de Linde, Sebastian; Sauer, Markus

    2014-10-15

    Here, we combine super-resolution fluorescence localization microscopy with scanning electron microscopy to map the position of proteins of nuclear pore complexes in isolated Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclear envelopes with molecular resolution in both imaging modes. We use the periodic molecular structure of the nuclear pore complex to superimpose direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy images with a precision of <20 nm on electron micrographs. The correlative images demonstrate quantitative molecular labeling and localization of nuclear pore complex proteins by standard immunocytochemistry with primary and secondary antibodies and reveal that the nuclear pore complex is composed of eight gp210 (also known as NUP210) protein homodimers. In addition, we find subpopulations of nuclear pore complexes with ninefold symmetry, which are found occasionally among the more typical eightfold symmetrical structures.

  5. Fluorescence microscopy techniques for quantitative evaluation of organic biocide distribution in antifouling paint coatings: Application to model antifouling coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goodes, L.R.; Dennington, S.P.; Schuppe, H.; Wharton, J.A.; Bakker, M.; Klijnstra, J.W.; Stokes, K.R.

    2012-01-01

    A test matrix of antifouling (AF) coatings including pMMA, an erodible binder and a novel trityl copolymer incorporating Cu 2O and a furan derivative (FD) natural product, were subjected to pontoon immersion and accelerated rotor tests. Fluorescence and optical microscopy techniques were applied to

  6. Fluorescent ligands for studying neuropeptide receptors by confocal microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaudet A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the use of confocal microscopy as it pertains to the identification of G-protein coupled receptors and the study of their dynamic properties in cell cultures and in mammalian brain following their tagging with specific fluorescent ligands. Principles that should guide the choice of suitable ligands and fluorophores are discussed. Examples are provided from the work carried out in the authors' laboratory using custom synthetized fluoresceinylated or BODIPY-tagged bioactive peptides. The results show that confocal microscopic detection of specifically bound fluorescent ligands permits high resolution appraisal of neuropeptide receptor distribution both in cell culture and in brain sections. Within the framework of time course experiments, it also allows for a dynamic assessment of the internalization and subsequent intracellular trafficking of bound fluorescent molecules. Thus, it was found that neurotensin, somatostatin and mu- and delta-selective opioid peptides are internalized in a receptor-dependent fashion and according to receptor-specific patterns into their target cells. In the case of neurotensin, this internalization process was found to be clathrin-mediated, to proceed through classical endosomal pathways and, in neurons, to result in a mobilization of newly formed endosomes from neural processes to nerve cell bodies and from the periphery of cell bodies towards the perinuclear zone. These mechanisms are likely to play an important role for ligand inactivation, receptor regulation and perhaps also transmembrane signaling.

  7. Fluorescence imaging and time-resolved spectroscopy of steroid using confocal synchrotron radiation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsen, Hans C.; van der Oord, C. J. R.; Levine, Yehudi K.; Munro, Ian H.; Jones, Gareth R.; Shaw, D. A.; Rommerts, Fokko F.

    1994-08-01

    The Confocal Synchrotron Radiation Microscope at Daresbury was used in a study of the transport and distribution of the steroid Coumestrol in single Leydig cells. The broad spectrum of synchrotron radiation in combination with UV compatible microscope optics affords the extension of confocal microscopy from the visible to the UV region down to about 200 nm. Consequently fluorescent molecules with absorption bands in the UV can be imaged. In addition the pulsed nature of the light source allows us to perform time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy experiments on microscopic volumes. Coumestrol is a naturally fluorescing plant steroid exhibiting estrogenic activity. In physiological environments it has an absorption peak in the UV at 340 nm and it emits around 440 nm. First results indicate that the Coumestrol transport through the cell membrane is diffusion limited. The weak fluorescence observed in the nuclei of the Leydig cells may be due to fluorescence quenching arising from the interaction of the Coumesterol with nuclear components. However, micro-volume time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy experiments on cell nuclei have revealed the same decay behavior for Coumesterol in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of the cells.

  8. Portable fiber-optic taper coupled optical microscopy platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiming; Yu, Yan; Huang, Hui; Ou, Jinping

    2017-04-01

    The optical fiber taper coupled with CMOS has advantages of high sensitivity, compact structure and low distortion in the imaging platform. So it is widely used in low light, high speed and X-ray imaging systems. In the meanwhile, the peculiarity of the coupled structure can meet the needs of the demand in microscopy imaging. Toward this end, we developed a microscopic imaging platform based on the coupling of cellphone camera module and fiber optic taper for the measurement of the human blood samples and ascaris lumbricoides. The platform, weighing 70 grams, is based on the existing camera module of the smartphone and a fiber-optic array which providing a magnification factor of 6x.The top facet of the taper, on which samples are placed, serves as an irregular sampling grid for contact imaging. The magnified images of the sample, located on the bottom facet of the fiber, are then projected onto the CMOS sensor. This paper introduces the portable medical imaging system based on the optical fiber coupling with CMOS, and theoretically analyzes the feasibility of the system. The image data and process results either can be stored on the memory or transmitted to the remote medical institutions for the telemedicine. We validate the performance of this cell-phone based microscopy platform using human blood samples and test target, achieving comparable results to a standard bench-top microscope.

  9. Refractive index sensing of green fluorescent proteins in living cells using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; Verkuijlen, Paul; Wittendorp, Paul; Subramaniam, Vinod; van den Berg, Timo K; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2008-04-15

    We show that fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules in cells can be used to report on the local refractive index of intracellular GFP. We expressed GFP fusion constructs of Rac2 and gp91(phox), which are both subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase enzyme, in human myeloid PLB-985 cells and showed by high-resolution confocal fluorescence microscopy that GFP-Rac2 and GFP-gp91(phox) are targeted to the cytosol and to membranes, respectively. Frequency-domain FLIM experiments on these PLB-985 cells resulted in average fluorescence lifetimes of 2.70 ns for cytosolic GFP-Rac2 and 2.31 ns for membrane-bound GFP-gp91(phox). By comparing these lifetimes with a calibration curve obtained by measuring GFP lifetimes in PBS/glycerol mixtures of known refractive index, we found that the local refractive indices of cytosolic GFP-Rac2 and membrane-targeted GFP-gp91(phox) are approximately 1.38 and approximately 1.46, respectively, which is in good correspondence with reported values for the cytosol and plasma membrane measured by other techniques. The ability to measure the local refractive index of proteins in living cells by FLIM may be important in revealing intracellular spatial heterogeneities within organelles such as the plasma and phagosomal membrane.

  10. Quantitative Fluorescence Sensing Through Highly Autofluorescent, Scattering, and Absorbing Media Using Mobile Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Göröcs, Zoltán

    2016-09-13

    Compact and cost-effective systems for in vivo fluorescence and near-infrared imaging in combination with activatable reporters embedded inside the skin to sample interstitial fluid or blood can enable a variety of biomedical applications. However, the strong autofluorescence of human skin creates an obstacle for fluorescence-based sensing. Here we introduce a method for quantitative fluorescence sensing through highly autofluorescent, scattering, and absorbing media. For this, we created a compact and cost-effective fluorescence microscope weighing <40 g and used it to measure various concentrations of a fluorescent dye embedded inside a tissue phantom, which was designed to mimic the optical characteristics of human skin. We used an elliptical Gaussian beam excitation to digitally separate tissue autofluorescence from target fluorescence, although they severely overlap in both space and optical spectrum. Using ∼10-fold less excitation intensity than the safety limit for skin radiation exposure, we successfully quantified the density of the embedded fluorophores by imaging the skin phantom surface and achieved a detection limit of ∼5 × 105 and ∼2.5 × 107 fluorophores within ∼0.01 μL sample volume that is positioned 0.5 and 2 mm below the phantom surface, corresponding to a concentration of 105.9 pg/mL and 5.3 ng/mL, respectively. We also confirmed that this approach can track the spatial misalignments of the mobile microscope with respect to the embedded target fluorescent volume. This wearable microscopy platform might be useful for designing implantable biochemical sensors with the capability of spatial multiplexing to continuously monitor a panel of biomarkers and chronic conditions even at patients’ home.

  11. The OPFOS microscopy family: High-resolution optical-sectioning of biomedical specimens

    CERN Document Server

    Buytaert, Jan A N; Adriaens, Dominique; Dirckx, Joris J J

    2011-01-01

    We report on the recently emerging (Laser) Light Sheet based Fluorescence Microscopy field (LSFM). The techniques used in this field allow to study and visualize biomedical objects non-destructively in high-resolution through virtual optical sectioning with sheets of laser light. Fluorescence originating in the cross section of the sheet and sample is recorded orthogonally with a camera. In this paper, the first implementation of LSFM to image biomedical tissue in three dimensions - Orthogonal-Plane Fluorescence Optical Sectioning microscopy (OPFOS) - is discussed. Since then many similar and derived methods have surfaced (SPIM, Ultramicroscopy, HR-OPFOS, mSPIM, DSLM, TSLIM...) which we all briefly discuss. All these optical sectioning methods create images showing histological detail. We illustrate the applicability of LSFM on several specimen types with application in biomedical and life sciences.

  12. Fluorescence imaging of reactive oxygen species by confocal laser scanning microscopy for track analysis of synchrotron X-ray photoelectric nanoradiator dose: X-ray pump-optical probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jae Kun; Han, Sung Mi; Kim, Jong Ki

    2016-09-01

    penetration by nanoradiators. In conclusion, the combined use of a synchrotron X-ray microbeam-irradiated three-dimensional ROS gel and confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy provides a simple dosimetry method for track analysis of X-ray photoelectric nanoradiator radiation, suggesting extensive cellular damage with dose-enhancement beyond a single cell containing IONs.

  13. Wide-field optical sectioning for live-tissue imaging by plane-projection multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiun-Yann; Kuo, Chun-Hung; Holland, Daniel B.; Chen, Yenyu; Ouyang, Mingxing; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Zadoyan, Ruben; Guo, Chin-Lin

    2011-11-01

    Optical sectioning provides three-dimensional (3D) information in biological tissues. However, most imaging techniques implemented with optical sectioning are either slow or deleterious to live tissues. Here, we present a simple design for wide-field multiphoton microscopy, which provides optical sectioning at a reasonable frame rate and with a biocompatible laser dosage. The underlying mechanism of optical sectioning is diffuser-based temporal focusing. Axial resolution comparable to confocal microscopy is theoretically derived and experimentally demonstrated. To achieve a reasonable frame rate without increasing the laser power, a low-repetition-rate ultrafast laser amplifier was used in our setup. A frame rate comparable to that of epifluorescence microscopy was demonstrated in the 3D imaging of fluorescent protein expressed in live epithelial cell clusters. In this report, our design displays the potential to be widely used for video-rate live-tissue and embryo imaging with axial resolution comparable to laser scanning microscopy.

  14. Confocal supercritical angle fluorescence microscopy for cell membrane imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Sivankutty, Siddharth; Mayet, Céline; Dupuis, Guillaume; Fort, Emmanuel; Lévêque-Fort, Sandrine

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate sub-wavelength sectioning on biological samples with a conventional confocal microscope. This optical sectioning is achieved by the phenomenon of supercritical angle fuorescence, wherein only a fluorophore next to the interface of a refractive index discontinuity can emit propagating components of radiation into the so-called forbidden angles. The simplicity of this technique allows it to be integrated with a high numerical aperture confocal scanning microscope by only a simple modi?cation on the detection channel. Confocal-SAF microscopy would be a powerful tool to achieve high resolution surface imaging, especially for membrane imaging in biological samples

  15. Distribution of albumin in the normal monkey eye as revealed by Evans blue fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L; Anderson, D R

    1980-03-01

    Since intravenously injected Evans blue binds irreversibly to serum albumin, its distribution reflects albumin exchange between the intravascular and extravascular tissue compartments. In histologic specimens examined by fluorescence, microscopy, extravasated Evans blue--albumin complex was identified within the ciliary body and trabecular meshwork of normal monkey eyes. In eyes fixed by intra-arterial perfusion of fixative, no dye was identified in the choroid, retina, or optic nerve. With immersion fixation, however, some extravasation was seen in the choroid and adjacent optic nerve. In some specimens, the optic nerve was stained not only with material apparently leaking from the choroid but also from a breakdown of the blood-brain barrier in the major disc vasculature during the interval before fixative penetrates into the tissue. Perfusion fixation must be used to avoid this artifact, and freezing techniques would be even better.

  16. Multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy used to discriminate epithelial ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adur, J.; Pelegati, V. B.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Bottcher-Luiz, F.; Andrade, L. A. L. A.; Cesar, C. L.

    2011-07-01

    We used human specimens of epithelial ovarian cancer (serous type) to test the feasibility of nonlinear imaging as complementary tools for ovarian cancer diagnosis. Classical hematoxylin-and-eosin stained sections were applied to combining two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), second (SHG), and third (THG) harmonic microscopy within the same imaging platform. We show that strong TPEF + SHG + THG signals can be obtained in fixed samples stained with Hematoxylin & Eosin (H&E) stored for a very long time and that H&E staining enhanced the THG signal. We demonstrate using anisotropy and morphological measurements, that SHG and THG of stained optical sections allow reproducible identification of neoplastic features such as architectural alterations of collagen fibrils at different stages of the neoplastic transformation and cellular atypia. Taken together, these results suggest that, with our viable imaging system, we can qualitatively and quantitatively assess endogenous optical biomarkers of the ovarian tissue with SHG and THG microscopy. This imaging capability may prove to be highly valuable in aiding to determine structural changes at the cellular and tissue levels, which may contribute to the development of new diagnostic techniques.

  17. Investigation of Nematode Diversity using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Fluorescent Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seacor, Taylor; Howell, Carina

    2013-03-01

    Nematode worms account for the vast majority of the animals in the biosphere. They are colossally important to global public health as parasites, and to agriculture both as pests and as beneficial inhabitants of healthy soil. Amphid neurons are the anterior chemosensory neurons in nematodes, mediating critical behaviors including chemotaxis and mating. We are examining the cellular morphology and external anatomy of amphid neurons, using fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively, of a wide range of soil nematodes isolated in the wild. We use both classical systematics (e.g. diagnostic keys) and molecular markers (e.g. ribosomal RNA) to classify these wild isolates. Our ultimate aim is to build a detailed anatomical database in order to dissect genetic pathways of neuronal development and function across phylogeny and ecology. Research supported by NSF grants 092304, 0806660, 1058829 and Lock Haven University FPDC grants

  18. Synergizing superresolution optical fluctuation imaging with single molecule localization microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Schidorsky, Shachar; Razvag, Yair; Golan, Yonatan; Weiss, Shimon; Sherman, Eilon

    2016-01-01

    Single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) techniques enable imaging biological samples well beyond the diffraction limit of light, but they vary significantly in their spatial and temporal resolutions. High-order statistical analysis of temporal fluctuations as in superresolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) also enable imaging beyond diffraction limit, but usually at a lower resolution as compared to SMLM. Since the same data format is acquired for both methods, their algorithms can be applied to the same data set, and thus may be combined synergistically to improve overall imaging performance. Here, we find that SOFI converges much faster than SMLM, provides additive information to SMLM, and can efficiently reject background. We then show how SOFI-assisted SMLM imaging can improve SMLM image reconstruction by rejecting common sources of background, especially under low signal-to-background conditions. The performance of our approach was evaluated using a realistic simulation of fluorescence imagi...

  19. Volumetric optical coherence microscopy enabled by aberrated optics (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey A.; Liu, Siyang; Adie, Steven G.

    2017-02-01

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is an interferometric imaging technique that enables high resolution, non-invasive imaging of 3D cell cultures and biological tissues. Volumetric imaging with OCM suffers a trade-off between high transverse resolution and poor depth-of-field resulting from defocus, optical aberrations, and reduced signal collection away from the focal plane. While defocus and aberrations can be compensated with computational methods such as interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) or computational adaptive optics (CAO), reduced signal collection must be physically addressed through optical hardware. Axial scanning of the focus is one approach, but comes at the cost of longer acquisition times, larger datasets, and greater image reconstruction times. Given the capabilities of CAO to compensate for general phase aberrations, we present an alternative method to address the signal collection problem without axial scanning by using intentionally aberrated optical hardware. We demonstrate the use of an astigmatic spectral domain (SD-)OCM imaging system to enable single-acquisition volumetric OCM in 3D cell culture over an extended depth range, compared to a non-aberrated SD-OCM system. The transverse resolution of the non-aberrated and astigmatic imaging systems after application of CAO were 2 um and 2.2 um, respectively. The depth-range of effective signal collection about the nominal focal plane was increased from 100 um in the non-aberrated system to over 300 um in the astigmatic system, extending the range over which useful data may be acquired in a single OCM dataset. We anticipate that this method will enable high-throughput cellular-resolution imaging of dynamic biological systems over extended volumes.

  20. Analysis of Septin Reorganization at Cytokinesis Using Polarized Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly McQuilken

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Septins are conserved filament-forming proteins that act in diverse cellular processes. They closely associate with membranes and, in some systems, components of the cytoskeleton. It is not well understood how filaments assemble into higher-order structures in vivo or how they are remodeled throughout the cell cycle. In the budding yeast S. cerevisiae, septins are found through most of the cell cycle in an hourglass organization at the mother-bud neck until cytokinesis when the collar splits into two rings that disassemble prior to the next cell cycle. Experiments using polarized fluorescence microscopy have suggested that septins are arranged in ordered, paired filaments in the hourglass and undergo a coordinated 90° reorientation during splitting at cytokinesis. This apparent reorganization could be due to two orthogonal populations of filaments disassembling and reassembling or being preferentially retained at cytokinesis. In support of this idea, we report a decrease in septin concentration at the mother-bud neck during cytokinesis consistent with other reports and the timing of the decrease depends on known septin regulators including the Gin4 kinase. We took a candidate-based approach to examine what factors control reorientation during splitting and used polarized fluorescence microscopy to screen mutant yeast strains deficient in septin interacting proteins. Using this method, we have linked known septin regulators to different aspects of the assembly, stability, and reorganization of septin assemblies. The data support that ring splitting requires Gin4 activity and an anillin-like protein Bud4, and normal accumulation of septins at the ring requires phosphorylation of Shs1. We found distinct regulatory requirements for septin organization in the hourglass compared to split rings. We propose that septin subpopulations can vary in their localization and assembly/disassembly behavior in a cell-cycle dependent manner at cytokinesis.

  1. An enhanced method of obtaining uniform excitation radiation for fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimas, Chris F.; Kuta, John J.; Hubert, Manfred

    2003-12-01

    A novel lightsource to provide the excitation radiation for fluorescence microscopy is presented and its performance is compared to the current de factor standard in the field: mercury short arc lamps. This novel light source is remote to the microscope, and the radiation is coupled to the microscope via a liquid lightguide or fiber optic cable using special coupling optics. We present measurements made on some common fluorescent microscopes that show the new light source provides for higher overall optical power delivered to the sample and provides more uniform illumination of the microscopes' field of view in comparison to the standard short arc lamps. Using the definition of the Koehler illumination rules it is shown that the inherent design of the remote source makes it resistant to many non-uniformities and misalignments commonly enountered with the short arc lamp sources; thereby providing for a consistent, uniform irradiance and intensity distribution of the entrance pupil to the microscope. The experimental method used to quantitatively measure the uniformity of the excitation radiation at the microscope's objective plane is also discussed and shown to be far more reliable than other techniques which rely upon fluorescent radiation from synthetic samples placed at the objective plane.

  2. Directional bilateral filters for smoothing fluorescence microscopy images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manasij Venkatesh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Images obtained through fluorescence microscopy at low numerical aperture (NA are noisy and have poor resolution. Images of specimens such as F-actin filaments obtained using confocal or widefield fluorescence microscopes contain directional information and it is important that an image smoothing or filtering technique preserve the directionality. F-actin filaments are widely studied in pathology because the abnormalities in actin dynamics play a key role in diagnosis of cancer, cardiac diseases, vascular diseases, myofibrillar myopathies, neurological disorders, etc. We develop the directional bilateral filter as a means of filtering out the noise in the image without significantly altering the directionality of the F-actin filaments. The bilateral filter is anisotropic to start with, but we add an additional degree of anisotropy by employing an oriented domain kernel for smoothing. The orientation is locally adapted using a structure tensor and the parameters of the bilateral filter are optimized for within the framework of statistical risk minimization. We show that the directional bilateral filter has better denoising performance than the traditional Gaussian bilateral filter and other denoising techniques such as SURE-LET, non-local means, and guided image filtering at various noise levels in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR. We also show quantitative improvements in low NA images of F-actin filaments.

  3. Detecting inactivated endospores in fluorescence microscopy using propidium monoazide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Alexander; Mahnert, Alexander; Weber, Christina; Haberer, Klaus; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2012-04-01

    The differentiation between living and dead bacterial endospores is crucial in many research areas of microbiology. The identification of inactivated, non-pathogenic Bacillus anthracis spores is one reason why improvement of decontamination protocols is so desirable. Another field interested in spore viability is planetary protection, a sub-discipline of astrobiology that estimates the bioburden of spacecraft prior to launch in order to avoid interplanetary cross-contamination. We developed a dedicated, rapid and cost-effective method for identifying bacterial endospores that have been inactivated and consequently show a compromised spore wall. This novel protocol is culture-independent and is based on fluorescence microscopy and propidium monoazide (PMA) as a fluorescent marker, which is suggested to bind to DNA of spores with compromised spore coat, cortex and membranes based on our results. Inactivated preparations (treated with wet heat, irradiation, ultracentrifugation) showed a significant increase in spores that were PMA stained in their core; moreover, Bacillus atrophaeus, Bacillus safensis and Geobacillus stearothermophilus seemed to be best suited for this technique, as the spore cores of all these endospores could be positively stained after inactivation. Lastly, we describe an additional counter-staining protocol and provide an example of the application of the coupled staining methods for planetary protection purposes. The introduction of this novel protocol is expected to provide an initial insight into the various possible future applications of PMA as a non-viability marker for spores in, for example, B. anthracis-related studies, food microbiology and astrobiology.

  4. Preparation of tissue samples for X-ray fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chwiej, Joanna [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland)]. E-mail: jchwiej@novell.ftj.agh.edu.pl; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Magdalena [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Lankosz, Marek [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Wojcik, Slawomir [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Falkenberg, Gerald [Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestr. 85, Hamburg (Germany); Stegowski, Zdzislaw [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Setkowicz, Zuzanna [Department of Neuroanatomy, Institute of Zoology, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 6, 30-060 Cracow (Poland)

    2005-12-15

    As is well-known, trace elements, especially metals, play an important role in the pathogenesis of many disorders. The topographic and quantitative elemental analysis of pathologically changed tissues may shed some new light on processes leading to the degeneration of cells in the case of selected diseases. An ideal and powerful tool for such purpose is the Synchrotron Microbeam X-ray Fluorescence technique. It enables the carrying out of investigations of the elemental composition of tissues even at the single cell level. The tissue samples for histopathological investigations are routinely fixed and embedded in paraffin. The authors try to verify the usefulness of such prepared tissue sections for elemental analysis with the use of X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Studies were performed on rat brain samples. Changes in elemental composition caused by fixation in formalin or paraformaldehyde and embedding in paraffin were examined. Measurements were carried out at the bending magnet beamline L of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB in Hamburg. The decrease in mass per unit area of K, Br and the increase in P, S, Fe, Cu and Zn in the tissue were observed as a result of the fixation. For the samples embedded in paraffin, a lower level of most elements was observed. Additionally, for these samples, changes in the composition of some elements were not uniform for different analyzed areas of rat brain.

  5. Single-molecule analysis of fluorescent carbon dots towards localization-based super-resolution microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Navneet C.; Khan, Syamantak; Nandi, Chayan K.

    2016-12-01

    The advancement of high-resolution bioimaging has always been dependent on the discovery of bright and easily available fluorescent probes. Fluorescent carbon nanodots, an interesting class of relatively new nanomaterials, have emerged as a versatile alternative due to their superior optical properties, non-toxicity, cell penetrability and easy routes to synthesis. Although a plethora of reports is available on bioimaging using carbon dots, single-molecule-based super-resolution imaging is rare in the literature. In this study, we have systematically characterized the single-molecule fluorescence of three carbon dots and compared them with a standard fluorescent probe. Each of these carbon dots showed a long-lived dark state in the presence of an electron acceptor. The electron transfer mechanism was investigated in single-molecule as well as in ensemble experiments. The average on-off rate between the fluorescent bright and dark states, which is one of the important parameters for single-molecule localization-based super-resolution microscopy, was measured by changing the laser power. We report that the photon budget and on-off rate of these carbon dots were good enough to achieve single-molecule localization with a precision of ~35 nm.

  6. Segmentation of fluorescence microscopy cell images using unsupervised mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xian; Dua, Sumeet

    2010-05-28

    The accurate measurement of cell and nuclei contours are critical for the sensitive and specific detection of changes in normal cells in several medical informatics disciplines. Within microscopy, this task is facilitated using fluorescence cell stains, and segmentation is often the first step in such approaches. Due to the complex nature of cell issues and problems inherent to microscopy, unsupervised mining approaches of clustering can be incorporated in the segmentation of cells. In this study, we have developed and evaluated the performance of multiple unsupervised data mining techniques in cell image segmentation. We adapt four distinctive, yet complementary, methods for unsupervised learning, including those based on k-means clustering, EM, Otsu's threshold, and GMAC. Validation measures are defined, and the performance of the techniques is evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively using synthetic and recently published real data. Experimental results demonstrate that k-means, Otsu's threshold, and GMAC perform similarly, and have more precise segmentation results than EM. We report that EM has higher recall values and lower precision results from under-segmentation due to its Gaussian model assumption. We also demonstrate that these methods need spatial information to segment complex real cell images with a high degree of efficacy, as expected in many medical informatics applications.

  7. Wide-field imaging through scattering media by scattered light fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yulan; Li, Xun

    2017-08-01

    To obtain images through scattering media, scattered light fluorescence (SLF) microscopy that utilizes the optical memory effect has been developed. However, the small field of view (FOV) of SLF microscopy limits its application. In this paper, we have introduced a re-modulation method to achieve wide-field imaging through scattering media by SLF microscopy. In the re-modulation method, to raster scan the focus across the object plane, the incident wavefront is re-modulated via a spatial light modulator (SLM) in the updated phase compensation calculated using the optimized iterative algorithm. Compared with the conventional optical memory effect method, the re-modulation method can greatly increase the FOV of a SLF microscope. With the phase compensation theoretically calculated, the process of updating the phase compensation of a high speed SLM is fast. The re-modulation method does not increase the imaging time. The re-modulation method is, therefore, expected to make SLF microscopy have much wider applications in biology, medicine and physiology.

  8. Quantitative analysis of autophagy using advanced 3D fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changou, Chun A; Wolfson, Deanna L; Ahluwalia, Balpreet Singh; Bold, Richard J; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Chuang, Frank Y S

    2013-05-03

    Prostate cancer is the leading form of malignancies among men in the U.S. While surgery carries a significant risk of impotence and incontinence, traditional chemotherapeutic approaches have been largely unsuccessful. Hormone therapy is effective at early stage, but often fails with the eventual development of hormone-refractory tumors. We have been interested in developing therapeutics targeting specific metabolic deficiency of tumor cells. We recently showed that prostate tumor cells specifically lack an enzyme (argininosuccinate synthase, or ASS) involved in the synthesis of the amino acid arginine(1). This condition causes the tumor cells to become dependent on exogenous arginine, and they undergo metabolic stress when free arginine is depleted by arginine deiminase (ADI)(1,10). Indeed, we have shown that human prostate cancer cells CWR22Rv1 are effectively killed by ADI with caspase-independent apoptosis and aggressive autophagy (or macroautophagy)(1,2,3). Autophagy is an evolutionarily-conserved process that allows cells to metabolize unwanted proteins by lysosomal breakdown during nutritional starvation(4,5). Although the essential components of this pathway are well-characterized(6,7,8,9), many aspects of the molecular mechanism are still unclear - in particular, what is the role of autophagy in the death-response of prostate cancer cells after ADI treatment? In order to address this question, we required an experimental method to measure the level and extent of autophagic response in cells - and since there are no known molecular markers that can accurately track this process, we chose to develop an imaging-based approach, using quantitative 3D fluorescence microscopy(11,12). Using CWR22Rv1 cells specifically-labeled with fluorescent probes for autophagosomes and lysosomes, we show that 3D image stacks acquired with either widefield deconvolution microscopy (and later, with super-resolution, structured-illumination microscopy) can clearly capture the early

  9. Recent developments in fluorescence-based microscopy applied in biomedical sciences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The present short review aims to give an overview of the most recent de velopments in fluorescence microscopy and its applications in biomedical science s. Apart from improvements in well-established methods based on conventional fl u orescence microscopy and confocal microscopy (fluorescence in situ hybridisa tion (FISH), tyramide signal amplification (TSA) in immunocytochemistry, new fluorop hores), more recently introduced techniques like fluorescence resonance energy t ransfer (FRET), fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), multiphoton m icroscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) will be discussed.

  10. Automated control of optical polarization for nonlinear microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brideau, Craig; Stys, Peter K.

    2012-03-01

    Laser-scanning non-linear optical techniques such as multi-photon fluorescence excitation microscopy (MPM), Second/ Third Harmonic Generation (SHG/THG), and Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) are being utilized in research laboratories worldwide. The efficiencies of these non-linear effects are dependent on the polarization state of the excitation light relative to the orientation of the sample being imaged. In highly ordered anisotropic biological samples this effect can become pronounced and the excitation polarization can have a dramatic impact on imaging experiments. Therefore, controlling the polarization state of the exciting light is important; however this is challenging when the excitation light passes through a complex optical system. In a typical laser-scanning microscope, components such as the dichroic filters, lenses, and even mirrors can alter the polarization state of a laser beam before it reaches the sample. We present an opto-mechanical solution to compensate for the polarization effects of an optical path, and to precisely program the polarization state of the exciting laser light. The device and accompanying procedures allow the delivery of precise laser polarization states at constant average power levels to a sample during an imaging experiment.

  11. Intracellular temperature mapping with a fluorescent polymeric thermometer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Kohki; Inada, Noriko; Gota, Chie; Harada, Yoshie; Funatsu, Takashi; Uchiyama, Seiichi

    2012-02-28

    Cellular functions are fundamentally regulated by intracellular temperature, which influences biochemical reactions inside a cell. Despite the important contributions to biological and medical applications that it would offer, intracellular temperature mapping has not been achieved. Here we demonstrate the first intracellular temperature mapping based on a fluorescent polymeric thermometer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The spatial and temperature resolutions of our thermometry were at the diffraction limited level (200 nm) and 0.18-0.58 °C. The intracellular temperature distribution we observed indicated that the nucleus and centrosome of a COS7 cell, both showed a significantly higher temperature than the cytoplasm and that the temperature gap between the nucleus and the cytoplasm differed depending on the cell cycle. The heat production from mitochondria was also observed as a proximal local temperature increase. These results showed that our new intracellular thermometry could determine an intrinsic relationship between the temperature and organelle function.

  12. Fused oblique incidence reflectometry and confocal fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risi, Matthew D.; Rouse, Andrew R.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2011-03-01

    Confocal microendoscopy provides real-time high resolution cellular level images via a minimally invasive procedure, but relies on exogenous fluorophores, has a relatively limited penetration depth (100 μm) and field of view (700 μm), and produces a high rate of detailed information to the user. A new catheter based multi-modal system has been designed that combines confocal imaging and oblique incidence reflectometry (OIR), which is a non-invasive method capable of rapidly extracting tissue absorption, μa, and reduced scattering, μ's, spectra from tissue. The system builds on previous developments of a custom slit-scan multi-spectral confocal microendoscope and is designed to rapidly switch between diffuse spectroscopy and confocal fluorescence imaging modes of operation. An experimental proof-of-principle catheter has been developed that consists of a fiber bundle for traditional confocal fluorescence imaging and a single OIR source fiber which is manually redirected at +/- 26 degrees. Diffusely scattered light from each orientation of the source fiber is collected via the fiber bundle, with a frame of data representing spectra collected at a range of distances from the OIR source point. Initial results with intralipid phantoms show good agreement to published data over the 550-650 nm spectral range. We successfully imaged and measured the optical properties of rodent cardiac muscle.

  13. Nanoscale contact line visualization based on Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, M J Z; Poelma, C; Westerweel, J

    2013-11-04

    We describe a novel measurement method to study the contact line of a droplet at nanoscale level. The method is based on Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRFM), which uses an evanescent excitation field produced by total internal reflection of light. The evanescent field depends on the angle of the incident light and has an exponential intensity decay, characterized by the penetration depth. The penetration depth is determined by imaging a fluorescent particle probe that is traversed using an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) setup. The result confirms the exponential behavior of the evanescent field intensity, and the value of the penetration depth also corresponds with the value predicted based on the optical configuration. By using the intensity distribution of a fluorescent dye and the value for the penetration depth of the evanescent wave, it is possible to reconstruct the interface of a partial wetting droplet. The reconstructed interface based on TIRFM is in good agreement with the interface obtained from two reference measurements: non-disturbing AFM-imaging and conventional contact angle measurement. The latter lacks spatial resolution, while the former is limited to particular droplets. This new non-contact measurement does not suffer from these drawbacks, making it a very useful tool to study the fundamental wetting behavior of both stationary and dynamic interfaces.

  14. HIV taken by STORM: Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy of a viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Cândida F

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The visualization of viral proteins has been hindered by the resolution limit of conventional fluorescent microscopes, as the dimension of any single fluorescent signal is often greater than most virion particles. Super-resolution microscopy has the potential to unveil the distribution of proteins at the resolution approaching electron microscopy without relying on morphological features of existing characteristics of the biological specimen that are needed in EM. Results Using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM to achieve a lateral resolution of 15–20 nm, we quantified the 2-D molecular distribution of the major structural proteins of the infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 before and after infection of lymphoid cells. We determined that the HIV-1 matrix and capsid proteins undergo restructuring soon after HIV-1 infection. Conclusions This study provides the proof-of-concept for the use of dSTORM to visualize the changes in the molecular distribution of viral proteins during an infection.

  15. SIMToolbox: a MATLAB toolbox for structured illumination fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Křížek, Pavel; Lukeš, Tomáš; Ovesný, Martin; Fliegel, Karel; Hagen, Guy M

    2016-01-15

    SIMToolbox is an open-source, modular set of functions for MATLAB equipped with a user-friendly graphical interface and designed for processing two-dimensional and three-dimensional data acquired by structured illumination microscopy (SIM). Both optical sectioning and super-resolution applications are supported. The software is also capable of maximum a posteriori probability image estimation (MAP-SIM), an alternative method for reconstruction of structured illumination images. MAP-SIM can potentially reduce reconstruction artifacts, which commonly occur due to refractive index mismatch within the sample and to imperfections in the illumination. SIMToolbox, example data and the online documentation are freely accessible at http://mmtg.fel.cvut.cz/SIMToolbox. ghagen@uccs.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Probing cytotoxicity of nanoparticles and organic compounds using scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong Yongpeng [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China)], E-mail: yongpengt@yahoo.com.cn; Li Changming [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637457 (Singapore); Liang Feng [Institute Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen Jianmin [Shenzhen Municipal Hospital for Chronic Disease Control and Prevention, Guangdong 518020 (China); Zhang Hong; Liu Guoqing; Sun Huibin [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Luong, John H.T. [Biotechnology Research Institute, National Research Council Canada, Montreal, Quebec, H4P 2R2 (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Scanning proton microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy have been used to probe the cytotoxicity effect of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), ethidium bromide (EB) and nanoparticles (ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}) on a T lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cell line. The increased calcium ion (from CaCl{sub 2}) in the culture medium stimulated the accumulation of BaP and EB inside the cell, leading to cell death. ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, however, showed a protective effect against these two organic compounds. Such inorganic nanoparticles complexed with BaP or EB which became less toxic to the cell. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles as an insoluble particle model scavenged by macrophage were investigated in rats. They were scavenged out of the lung tissue about 48 h after infection. This result suggest that some insoluble inorganic nanoparticles of PM (particulate matters) showed protective effects on organic toxins induced acute toxic effects as they can be scavenged by macrophage cells. Whereas, some inorganic ions such as calcium ion in PM may help environmental organic toxins to penetrate cell membrane and induce higher toxic effect.

  17. Nano-scale measurement of biomolecules by optical microscopy and semiconductor nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro eIchimura

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, great developments in optical microscopy have made this technology increasingly compatible with biological studies. Fluorescence microscopy has especially contributed to investigating the dynamic behaviors of live specimens and can now resolve objects with nanometer precision and resolution due to super-resolution imaging. Additionally, single particle tracking provides information on the dynamics of individual proteins at the nanometr scale both in vitro and in cells. Complementing advances in microscopy technologies has been the development of fluorescent probes. The quantum dot, a semi-conductor fluorescent nanoparticle, is particularly suitable for single particle tracking and super-resolution imaging. This article overviews the principles of single particle tracking and super resolution along with describing their application to the nanometer measurement/observation of biological systems when combined with quantum dot technologies.

  18. Timing and Operating Mode Design for Time-Gated Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Liu; Xinwei Wang; Yan Zhou; Yuliang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Steady-state fluorence imaging and time-resolved fluorescence imaging are two important areas in fluorescence imaging research. Fluorescence lifetime imaging is an absolute measurement method which is independent of excitation laser intensity, fluorophore concentration, and photobleaching compared to fluorescence intensity imaging techniques. Time-gated fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) can provide high resolution and high imaging frame during mature FLIM methods. An abstract ti...

  19. Ultrafast superresolution fluorescence imaging with spinning disk confocal microscope optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Okada, Yasushi

    2015-05-01

    Most current superresolution (SR) microscope techniques surpass the diffraction limit at the expense of temporal resolution, compromising their applications to live-cell imaging. Here we describe a new SR fluorescence microscope based on confocal microscope optics, which we name the spinning disk superresolution microscope (SDSRM). Theoretically, the SDSRM is equivalent to a structured illumination microscope (SIM) and achieves a spatial resolution of 120 nm, double that of the diffraction limit of wide-field fluorescence microscopy. However, the SDSRM is 10 times faster than a conventional SIM because SR signals are recovered by optical demodulation through the stripe pattern of the disk. Therefore a single SR image requires only a single averaged image through the rotating disk. On the basis of this theory, we modified a commercial spinning disk confocal microscope. The improved resolution around 120 nm was confirmed with biological samples. The rapid dynamics of micro-tubules, mitochondria, lysosomes, and endosomes were observed with temporal resolutions of 30-100 frames/s. Because our method requires only small optical modifications, it will enable an easy upgrade from an existing spinning disk confocal to a SR microscope for live-cell imaging. © 2015 Hayashi and Okada. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  20. Multiple signal classification algorithm for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Krishna; Macháň, Radek

    2016-12-01

    Single-molecule localization techniques are restricted by long acquisition and computational times, or the need of special fluorophores or biologically toxic photochemical environments. Here we propose a statistical super-resolution technique of wide-field fluorescence microscopy we call the multiple signal classification algorithm which has several advantages. It provides resolution down to at least 50 nm, requires fewer frames and lower excitation power and works even at high fluorophore concentrations. Further, it works with any fluorophore that exhibits blinking on the timescale of the recording. The multiple signal classification algorithm shows comparable or better performance in comparison with single-molecule localization techniques and four contemporary statistical super-resolution methods for experiments of in vitro actin filaments and other independently acquired experimental data sets. We also demonstrate super-resolution at timescales of 245 ms (using 49 frames acquired at 200 frames per second) in samples of live-cell microtubules and live-cell actin filaments imaged without imaging buffers.

  1. Structural Configuration of Myelin Figures Using Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobat Tayebi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Using epifluorescence microscopy, the configuration of myelin figures that are formed upon hydration of lipid stack was studied qualitatively. Little knowledge is currently available for conditions that determine the diameter of myelin figures and their degree of multilamellarity. Examining more than 300 samples, we realized that there are distinct populations of myelin figures protruding from discrete regions of lipid stack. Each population contains myelin figures with similar diameters. This indicates a direct relationship between local characteristics of parent lipid stack and the diameter of myelin figures. Evidenced by fluorescent images, we classified all the observed myelin figures into three major groups of (1 solid tubes, (2 thin tethers, and (3 hollow tubes. Solid tubes are the most common structure of myelin figures which appeared as dense shiny cylinders. Thin tethers, with long hair-shaped structure, were observed protruding from part of lipid plaque which is likely to be under tension. Hollow tubes were protruded from the parts that are unpinned from the substrate and possibly under low or no tension. The abrupt change in the configuration of myelin figures from solid tubes to hollow ones was described in a reproducible experiment where the pinned region of the parent stack became unpinned. Our observations can indicate a relation between the membrane tension of the source material and the diameter of the myelin figures.

  2. Fluorescence and fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to characterize yeast strains by autofluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatta, H.; Goldys, E. M.; Ma, J.

    2006-02-01

    We characterised populations of wild type baking and brewing yeast cells using intrinsic fluorescence and fluorescence lifetime microscopy, in order to obtain quantitative identifiers of different strains. The cell autofluorescence was excited at 405 nm and observed within 440-540 nm range where strong cell to cell variability was observed. The images were analyzed using customised public domain software, which provided information on cell size, intensity and texture-related features. In light of significant diversity of the data, statistical methods were utilized to assess the validity of the proposed quantitative identifiers for strain differentiation. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was applied to confirm that empirical distribution functions for size, intensity and entropy for different strains were statistically different. These characteristics were followed with culture age of 24, 48 and 72 h, (the latter corresponding to a stationary growth phase) and size, and to some extent entropy, were found to be independent of age. The fluorescence intensity presented a distinctive evolution with age, different for each of the examined strains. The lifetime analysis revealed a short decay time component of 1.4 ns and a second, longer one with the average value of 3.5 ns and a broad distribution. High variability of lifetime values within cells was observed however a lifetime texture feature in the studied strains was statistically different.

  3. Enhanced simulator software for image validation and interpretation for multimodal localization super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdélyi, Miklós; Sinkó, József; Gajdos, Tamás.; Novák, Tibor

    2017-02-01

    Optical super-resolution techniques such as single molecule localization have become one of the most dynamically developed areas in optical microscopy. These techniques routinely provide images of fixed cells or tissues with sub-diffraction spatial resolution, and can even be applied for live cell imaging under appropriate circumstances. Localization techniques are based on the precise fitting of the point spread functions (PSF) to the measured images of stochastically excited, identical fluorescent molecules. These techniques require controlling the rate between the on, off and the bleached states, keeping the number of active fluorescent molecules at an optimum value, so their diffraction limited images can be detected separately both spatially and temporally. Because of the numerous (and sometimes unknown) parameters, the imaging system can only be handled stochastically. For example, the rotation of the dye molecules obscures the polarization dependent PSF shape, and only an averaged distribution - typically estimated by a Gaussian function - is observed. TestSTORM software was developed to generate image stacks for traditional localization microscopes, where localization meant the precise determination of the spatial position of the molecules. However, additional optical properties (polarization, spectra, etc.) of the emitted photons can be used for further monitoring the chemical and physical properties (viscosity, pH, etc.) of the local environment. The image stack generating program was upgraded by several new features, such as: multicolour, polarization dependent PSF, built-in 3D visualization, structured background. These features make the program an ideal tool for optimizing the imaging and sample preparation conditions.

  4. Improved-throughput traction microscopy based on fluorescence micropattern for manual microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Liu

    Full Text Available Traction force microscopy (TFM is a quantitative technique for measuring cellular traction force, which is important in understanding cellular mechanotransduction processes. Traditional TFM has a significant limitation in that it has a low measurement throughput, commonly one per TFM dish, due to a lack of cell position information. To obtain enough cellular traction force data, an onerous workload is required including numerous TFM dish preparations and heavy cell-seeding activities, creating further difficulty in achieving identical experimental conditions among batches. In this paper, we present an improved-throughput TFM method using the well-developed microcontact printing technique and chemical modifications of linking microbeads to the gel surface to address these limitations. Chemically linking the microbeads to the gel surface has no significant influence on cell proliferation, morphology, cytoskeleton, and adhesion. Multiple pairs of force loaded and null force fluorescence images can be easily acquired by means of manual microscope with the aid of a fluorescence micropattern made by microcontact printing. Furthermore, keeping the micropattern separate from cells by using gels effectively eliminates the potential negative effect of the micropattern on the cells. This novel design greatly improves the analysis throughput of traditional TFM from one to at least twenty cells per petri dish without losing unique advantages, including a high spatial resolution of traction measurements. This newly developed method will boost the investigation of cell-matrix mechanical interactions.

  5. Nonlinear inversion schemes for fluorescence optical tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiberger, Manuel; Egger, Herbert; Scharfetter, Hermann

    2010-11-01

    Fluorescence optical tomography is a non-invasive imaging modality that employs the absorption and re-emission of light by fluorescent dyes. The aim is to reconstruct the fluorophore distribution in a body from measurements of light intensities at the boundary. Due to the diffusive nature of light propagation in tissue, fluorescence tomography is a nonlinear and severely ill-posed problem, and some sort of regularization is required for a stable solution. In this paper we investigate reconstruction methods based on Tikhonov regularization with nonlinear penalty terms, namely total-variation regularization and a levelset-type method using a nonlinear parameterization of the unknown function. Moreover, we use the full threedimensional nonlinear forward model, which arises from the governing system of partial differential equations. We discuss the numerical realization of the regularization schemes by Newtontype iterations, present some details of the discretization by finite element methods, and outline the efficient implementation of sensitivity systems via adjoint methods. As we will demonstrate in numerical tests, the proposed nonlinear methods provide better reconstructions than standard methods based on linearized forward models and linear penalty terms. We will additionally illustrate, that the careful discretization of the methods derived on the continuous level allows to obtain reliable, mesh independent reconstruction algorithms.

  6. Correction of cell-induced optical aberrations in a fluorescence fluctuation microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Leroux, Charles-Edouard; Wang, Irène; Delon, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    We describe the effect of optical aberrations on fluorescence fluctuations microscopy (FFM), when focusing through a single living cell. FFM measurements are performed in an aqueous fluorescent solution and prove to be a highly sensitive tool to assess the optical aberrations introduced by the cell. We demonstrate an adaptive optics (AO) system to remove the aberration-related bias in the FFM measurements. Our data show that AO is not only useful when imaging deep in tissues but also when performing FFM measurements through a single cellular layer. This work paves the way for the application of FFM to complex three-dimensional multicellular samples.

  7. Optical pump-probe microscopy for biomedicine and art conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy can provide contrast in highly heterogeneous media and a wide range of applications has emerged, primarily in biology, medicine, and materials science. Compared to linear microscopy methods, the localized nature of nonlinear interactions leads to high spatial resolution, optical sectioning, and larger possible imaging depth in scattering media. However, nonlinear contrast (other than fluorescence, harmonic generation or CARS) is generally difficult to measure because it is overwhelmed by the large background of detected illumination light. This background can be suppressed by using femtosecond pulse or pulse train shaping to encode nonlinear interactions in background-free regions of the frequency spectrum. We have developed this shaping technology to study novel intrinsic structural and molecular contrast in biological tissue, generally using less power than a laser pointer. For example we have recently been able to sensitively measure detailed transient absorption dynamics of melanin sub-types in a variety of skin lesions, showing clinically relevant differences of melanin type and distribution between cancerous and benign tissue.[1] Recently we have also applied this technology to paint samples and to historic artwork in order to provide detailed, depth-resolved pigment identification. Initial studies in different inorganic and organic pigments have shown a rich and pigment-specific nonlinear absorption signature.[2] Some pigments, for example lapis lazuli (natural ultramarine), even show marked differences in signal depending on its geographic origin and on age, demonstrating the potential of this technique to determine authenticity, provenance, technology of manufacture, or state of preservation of historic works of art.

  8. Applying two-photon excitation fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to study photosynthesis in plant leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broess, K.; Borst, J.W.; Amerongen, van H.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates to which extent two-photon excitation (TPE) fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy can be applied to study picosecond fluorescence kinetics of individual chloroplasts in leaves. Using femtosecond 860 nm excitation pulses, fluorescence lifetimes can be measured in leaves of

  9. Exploring lipids with nonlinear optical microscopy in multiple biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso-Garcia, Alba

    Lipids are crucial biomolecules for the well being of humans. Altered lipid metabolism may give rise to a variety of diseases that affect organs from the cardiovascular to the central nervous system. A deeper understanding of lipid metabolic processes would spur medical research towards developing precise diagnostic tools, treatment methods, and preventive strategies for reducing the impact of lipid diseases. Lipid visualization remains a complex task because of the perturbative effect exerted by traditional biochemical assays and most fluorescence markers. Coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy enables interrogation of biological samples with minimum disturbance, and is particularly well suited for label-free visualization of lipids, providing chemical specificity without compromising on spatial resolution. Hyperspectral imaging yields large datasets that benefit from tailored multivariate analysis. In this thesis, CRS microscopy was combined with Raman spectroscopy and other label-free nonlinear optical techniques to analyze lipid metabolism in multiple biological systems. We used nonlinear Raman techniques to characterize Meibum secretions in the progression of dry eye disease, where the lipid and protein contributions change in ratio and phase segregation. We employed similar tools to examine lipid droplets in mice livers aboard a spaceflight mission, which lose their retinol content contributing to the onset of nonalcoholic fatty-liver disease. We also focused on atherosclerosis, a disease that revolves around lipid-rich plaques in arterial walls. We examined the lipid content of macrophages, whose variable phenotype gives rise to contrasting healing and inflammatory activities. We also proposed new label-free markers, based on lifetime imaging, for macrophage phenotype, and to detect products of lipid oxidation. Cholesterol was also detected in hepatitis C virus infected cells, and in specific strains of age-related macular degeneration diseased cells by

  10. Optical super-resolution microscopy in neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigrist, Stephan J; Sabatini, Bernardo L

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the highly plastic nature of neurons requires the dynamic visualization of their molecular and cellular organization in a native context. However, due to the limited resolution of standard light microscopy, many of the structural specializations of neurons cannot be resolved. A recent revolution in light microscopy has given rise to several super-resolution light microscopy methods yielding 2-10-fold higher resolution than conventional microscopy. We here describe the principles behind these techniques as well as their application to the analysis of the molecular architecture of the synapse. Furthermore, we discuss the potential for continued development of super-resolution microscopy as necessary for live imaging of neuronal structure and function in the brain.

  11. Variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of intact cells of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Myung K

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM is a powerful tool for observing fluorescently labeled molecules on the plasma membrane surface of animal cells. However, the utility of TIRFM in plant cell studies has been limited by the fact that plants have cell walls, thick peripheral layers surrounding the plasma membrane. Recently, a new technique known as variable-angle epifluorescence microscopy (VAEM was developed to circumvent this problem. However, the lack of a detailed analysis of the optical principles underlying VAEM has limited its applications in plant-cell biology. Results Here, we present theoretical and experimental evidence supporting the use of variable-angle TIRFM in observations of intact plant cells. We show that when total internal reflection occurs at the cell wall/cytosol interface with an appropriate angle of incidence, an evanescent wave field of constant depth is produced inside the cytosol. Results of experimental TIRFM observations of the dynamic behaviors of phototropin 1 (a membrane receptor protein and clathrin light chain (a vesicle coat protein support our theoretical analysis. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that variable-angle TIRFM is appropriate for quantitative live imaging of cells in intact tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana.

  12. 3D live fluorescence imaging of cellular dynamics using Bessel beam plane illumination microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Shao, Lin; Chen, Bi-Chang; Betzig, Eric

    2014-05-01

    3D live imaging is important for a better understanding of biological processes, but it is challenging with current techniques such as spinning-disk confocal microscopy. Bessel beam plane illumination microscopy allows high-speed 3D live fluorescence imaging of living cellular and multicellular specimens with nearly isotropic spatial resolution, low photobleaching and low photodamage. Unlike conventional fluorescence imaging techniques that usually have a unique operation mode, Bessel plane illumination has several modes that offer different performance with different imaging metrics. To achieve optimal results from this technique, the appropriate operation mode needs to be selected and the experimental setting must be optimized for the specific application and associated sample properties. Here we explain the fundamental working principles of this technique, discuss the pros and cons of each operational mode and show through examples how to optimize experimental parameters. We also describe the procedures needed to construct, align and operate a Bessel beam plane illumination microscope by using our previously reported system as an example, and we list the necessary equipment to build such a microscope. Assuming all components are readily available, it would take a person skilled in optical instrumentation ∼1 month to assemble and operate a microscope according to this protocol.

  13. Red emitting neutral fluorescent glycoconjugates for membrane optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redon, Sébastien; Massin, Julien; Pouvreau, Sandrine; De Meulenaere, Evelien; Clays, Koen; Queneau, Yves; Andraud, Chantal; Girard-Egrot, Agnès; Bretonnière, Yann; Chambert, Stéphane

    2014-04-16

    A family of neutral fluorescent probes was developed, mimicking the overall structure of natural glycolipids in order to optimize their membrane affinity. Nonreducing commercially available di- or trisaccharidic structures were connected to a push-pull chromophore based on dicyanoisophorone electron-accepting group, which proved to fluoresce in the red region with a very large Stokes shift. This straightforward synthetic strategy brought structural variations to a series of probes, which were studied for their optical, biophysical, and biological properties. The insertion properties of the different probes into membranes were evaluated on a model system using the Langmuir monolayer balance technique. Confocal fluorescence microscopy performed on muscle cells showed completely different localizations and loading efficiencies depending on the structure of the probes. When compared to the commercially available ANEPPS, a family of commonly used membrane imaging dyes, the most efficient probes showed a similar brightness, but a sharper pattern was observed. According to this study, compounds bearing one chromophore, a limited size of the carbohydrate moiety, and an overall rod-like shape gave the best results.

  14. High-precision correlative fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy using two independent alignment markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schellenberger, Pascale [Oxford Particle Imaging Centre, Division of Structural Biology, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Kaufmann, Rainer [Oxford Particle Imaging Centre, Division of Structural Biology, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU (United Kingdom); Siebert, C. Alistair; Hagen, Christoph [Oxford Particle Imaging Centre, Division of Structural Biology, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Wodrich, Harald [Microbiologie Fondamentale et Pathogénicité, MFP CNRS UMR 5234, University of Bordeaux SEGALEN, 146 rue Leo Seignat, 33076 Bordeaux (France); Grünewald, Kay, E-mail: kay@strubi.ox.ac.uk [Oxford Particle Imaging Centre, Division of Structural Biology, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an emerging technique which combines functional information provided by fluorescence microscopy (FM) with the high-resolution structural information of electron microscopy (EM). So far, correlative cryo microscopy of frozen-hydrated samples has not reached better than micrometre range accuracy. Here, a method is presented that enables the correlation between fluorescently tagged proteins and electron cryo tomography (cryoET) data with nanometre range precision. Specifically, thin areas of vitrified whole cells are examined by correlative fluorescence cryo microscopy (cryoFM) and cryoET. Novel aspects of the presented cryoCLEM workflow not only include the implementation of two independent electron dense fluorescent markers to improve the precision of the alignment, but also the ability of obtaining an estimate of the correlation accuracy for each individual object of interest. The correlative workflow from plunge-freezing to cryoET is detailed step-by-step for the example of locating fluorescence-labelled adenovirus particles trafficking inside a cell. - Highlights: • Vitrified mammalian cell were imaged by fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy. • TetraSpeck fluorescence markers were added to correct shifts between cryo fluorescence channels. • FluoSpheres fiducials were used as reference points to assign new coordinates to cryoEM images. • Adenovirus particles were localised with an average correlation precision of 63 nm.

  15. Improved Fluorescent Protein Contrast and Discrimination by Optically Controlling Dark State Lifetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Cheng; Dickson, Robert M

    2017-02-16

    Modulation and optical control of photoswitchable fluorescent protein (PS-FP) dark state lifetimes drastically improves sensitivity and selectivity in fluorescence imaging. The dark state population of PS-FPs generates an out-of-phase fluorescence component relative to the sinusoidally modulated 488 nm laser excitation. Because this apparent phase advanced emission results from slow recovery to the fluorescent manifold, we hasten recovery and, therefore, modulation frequency by varying coillumination intensity at 405 nm. As 405 nm illumination regenerates the fluorescent ground state more rapidly than via thermal recovery, we experimentally demonstrate that secondary illumination can control PS-FPs dark state lifetime to act as an additional dimension for discriminating spatially and spectrally overlapping emitters. This experimental combination of out of phase imaging after optical modulation (OPIOM) and synchronously amplified fluorescence image recovery (SAFIRe) optically controls the fluorescent protein dark state lifetimes for improved time resolution, with the resulting modulation-based selective signal recovery being quantitatively modeled. The combined experimental results and quantitative numerical simulations further demonstrate the potential of SAFIRe-OPIOM for wide-field biological imaging with improved speed, sensitivity, and optical resolution over other modulation-based fluorescence microscopies.

  16. B-Spline potential function for maximum a-posteriori image reconstruction in fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Dilipkumar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An iterative image reconstruction technique employing B-Spline potential function in a Bayesian framework is proposed for fluorescence microscopy images. B-splines are piecewise polynomials with smooth transition, compact support and are the shortest polynomial splines. Incorporation of the B-spline potential function in the maximum-a-posteriori reconstruction technique resulted in improved contrast, enhanced resolution and substantial background reduction. The proposed technique is validated on simulated data as well as on the images acquired from fluorescence microscopes (widefield, confocal laser scanning fluorescence and super-resolution 4Pi microscopy. A comparative study of the proposed technique with the state-of-art maximum likelihood (ML and maximum-a-posteriori (MAP with quadratic potential function shows its superiority over the others. B-Spline MAP technique can find applications in several imaging modalities of fluorescence microscopy like selective plane illumination microscopy, localization microscopy and STED.

  17. Current limitations in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy for biological specimens: How deep can we go from the cover glass?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yasushi

    2017-04-01

    Diffraction limit of resolution has been one of the biggest limitations in the optical microscopy. Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy has enabled us to break this limit. However, for the observations of real biological specimens, especially for the imaging of tissues or whole body, the target structures of interest are often embedded deep inside the specimen. Here, we would present our results to extend the target of the super-resolution microscopy deeper into the cells. Confocal microscope optics work effectively to minimize the effect by the aberrations by the cellular components, but at the expense of the signal intensities. Spherical aberrations by the refractive index mismatch between the cellular environment and the immersion liquid can be much larger, but can be reduced by adjusting the correction collar at the objective lens.

  18. Fast Calcium Imaging with Optical Sectioning via HiLo Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Marcel A; Ronzitti, Emiliano; Sternberg, Jenna R; Wyart, Claire; Emiliani, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Imaging intracellular calcium concentration via reporters that change their fluorescence properties upon binding of calcium, referred to as calcium imaging, has revolutionized our way to probe neuronal activity non-invasively. To reach neurons densely located deep in the tissue, optical sectioning at high rate of acquisition is necessary but difficult to achieve in a cost effective manner. Here we implement an accessible solution relying on HiLo microscopy to provide robust optical sectioning with a high frame rate in vivo. We show that large calcium signals can be recorded from dense neuronal populations at high acquisition rates. We quantify the optical sectioning capabilities and demonstrate the benefits of HiLo microscopy compared to wide-field microscopy for calcium imaging and 3D reconstruction. We apply HiLo microscopy to functional calcium imaging at 100 frames per second deep in biological tissues. This approach enables us to discriminate neuronal activity of motor neurons from different depths in the spinal cord of zebrafish embryos. We observe distinct time courses of calcium signals in somata and axons. We show that our method enables to remove large fluctuations of the background fluorescence. All together our setup can be implemented to provide efficient optical sectioning in vivo at low cost on a wide range of existing microscopes.

  19. DMD-based LED-illumination super-resolution and optical sectioning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Dan; Lei, Ming; Yao, Baoli; Wang, Wen; Winterhalder, Martin; Zumbusch, Andreas; Qi, Yujiao; Xia, Liang; Yan, Shaohui; Yang, Yanlong; Gao, Peng; Ye, Tong; Zhao, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Super-resolution three-dimensional (3D) optical microscopy has incomparable advantages over other high-resolution microscopic technologies, such as electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, in the study of biological molecules, pathways and events in live cells and tissues. We present a novel approach of structured illumination microscopy (SIM) by using a digital micromirror device (DMD) for fringe projection and a low-coherence LED light for illumination. The lateral resolution of 90 nm and the optical sectioning depth of 120 μm were achieved. The maximum acquisition speed for 3D imaging in the optical sectioning mode was 1.6×10(7) pixels/second, which was mainly limited by the sensitivity and speed of the CCD camera. In contrast to other SIM techniques, the DMD-based LED-illumination SIM is cost-effective, ease of multi-wavelength switchable and speckle-noise-free. The 2D super-resolution and 3D optical sectioning modalities can be easily switched and applied to either fluorescent or non-fluorescent specimens.

  20. DMD-based LED-illumination Super-resolution and optical sectioning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Dan; Lei, Ming; Yao, Baoli; Wang, Wen; Winterhalder, Martin; Zumbusch, Andreas; Qi, Yujiao; Xia, Liang; Yan, Shaohui; Yang, Yanlong; Gao, Peng; Ye, Tong; Zhao, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Super-resolution three-dimensional (3D) optical microscopy has incomparable advantages over other high-resolution microscopic technologies, such as electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, in the study of biological molecules, pathways and events in live cells and tissues. We present a novel approach of structured illumination microscopy (SIM) by using a digital micromirror device (DMD) for fringe projection and a low-coherence LED light for illumination. The lateral resolution of 90 nm and the optical sectioning depth of 120 μm were achieved. The maximum acquisition speed for 3D imaging in the optical sectioning mode was 1.6×107 pixels/second, which was mainly limited by the sensitivity and speed of the CCD camera. In contrast to other SIM techniques, the DMD-based LED-illumination SIM is cost-effective, ease of multi-wavelength switchable and speckle-noise-free. The 2D super-resolution and 3D optical sectioning modalities can be easily switched and applied to either fluorescent or non-fluorescent specimens.

  1. Wavelength Independent Optical Microscopy and Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-31

    34Near-Field Imaging of Fluorescence," in Spectrosocpic Membrane Probes, ed. Leslie M. Loew (CRC press, 1986). 6. Y. Leviatin, "Study of Near Zone...years. mediately past the screen and the rate of spreading of Bethel treated the case of diffraction by a round hole in the radiation farther from the

  2. A novel Kalman filter based video image processing scheme for two-photon fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenqing; Huang, Xia; Li, Chunqiang; Xiao, Chuan; Qian, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPFM) is a perfect optical imaging equipment to monitor the interaction between fast moving viruses and hosts. However, due to strong unavoidable background noises from the culture, videos obtained by this technique are too noisy to elaborate this fast infection process without video image processing. In this study, we developed a novel scheme to eliminate background noises, recover background bacteria images and improve video qualities. In our scheme, we modified and implemented the following methods for both host and virus videos: correlation method, round identification method, tree-structured nonlinear filters, Kalman filters, and cell tracking method. After these procedures, most of noises were eliminated and host images were recovered with their moving directions and speed highlighted in the videos. From the analysis of the processed videos, 93% bacteria and 98% viruses were correctly detected in each frame on average.

  3. Super-resolution microscopy based on fluorescence emission difference of cylindrical vector beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Zihao; Kuang, Cuifang; Fang, Yue; Zhao, Guangyuan; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2015-11-01

    We propose a novel fluorescence emission difference microscopy (FED) system based on focusing cylindrical vector beams. In conventional FED, a Gaussian beam and a 0-2π vortex phase plate are used to generate solid and hollow spots. We focus radially polarized and azimuthally polarized cylindrical vector beams to obtain an expanded solid spot and a shrunken hollow spot, taking advantage of the optical properties of cylindrical vector beams to improve the conventional FED performance. Our novel method enhances FED performance because the hollow spot size determines the FED resolution and an expanded solid spot effectively reduces negative side-lobe emergence during image processing. We demonstrate improved performance theoretically and experimentally using an in-house built FED. Our FED achieved resolution of less than λ/4 in test images of 100 nm nanoparticles, better than the confocal image resolution by a factor of approximately 1/3. We also discuss detailed simulation analyses and FED imaging of biological cells.

  4. Quantitative photoacoustic microscopy of optical absorption coefficients from acoustic spectra in the optical diffusive regime

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Zijian; Favazza, Christopher; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Lihong V. Wang

    2012-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) microscopy (PAM) can image optical absorption contrast with ultrasonic spatial resolution in the optical diffusive regime. Conventionally, accurate quantification in PAM requires knowledge of the optical fluence attenuation, acoustic pressure attenuation, and detection bandwidth. We circumvent this requirement by quantifying the optical absorption coefficients from the acoustic spectra of PA signals acquired at multiple optical wavelengths. With the acoustic spectral method...

  5. Advanced 3D Optical Microscopy in ENS Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanden Berghe, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Microscopic techniques are among the few approaches that have survived the test of time. Being invented half way the seventeenth century by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek and Robert Hooke, this technology is still essential in modern biomedical labs. Many microscopy techniques have been used in ENS research to guide researchers in their dissections and later to enable electrode recordings. Apart from this, microscopy has been instrumental in the identification of subpopulations of cells in the ENS, using a variety of staining methods. A significant step forward in the use of microscopy was the introduction of fluorescence approaches. Due to the fact that intense excitation light is now filtered away from the longer wavelength emission light, the contrast can be improved drastically, which helped to identify subpopulations of enteric neurons in a variety of species. Later functionalized fluorescent probes were used to measure and film activity in muscle and neuronal cells. Another important impetus to the use of microscopy was the discovery and isolation of the green fluorescent protein (GFP), as it gave rise to the development of many different color variants and functionalized constructs. Recent advances in microscopy are the result of a continuous search to enhance contrast between the item of interest and its background but also to improve resolving power to tell two small objects apart. In this chapter three different microscopy approaches will be discussed that can aid to improve our understanding of ENS function within the gut wall.

  6. An integrated instrumental setup for the combination of atomic force microscopy with optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, R J; Heyes, C D; Knebel, D; Röcker, C; Nienhaus, G U

    2006-07-01

    In recent years, the study of single biomolecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques has resulted in a plethora of new information regarding the physics underlying these complex biological systems. It is especially advantageous to be able to measure the optical, topographical, and mechanical properties of single molecules simultaneously. Here an AFM is used that is especially designed for integration with an inverted optical microscope and that has a near-infrared light source (850 nm) to eliminate interference between the optical experiment and the AFM operation. The Tip Assisted Optics (TAO) system consists of an additional 100 x 100-microm(2) X-Y scanner for the sample, which can be independently and simultaneously used with the AFM scanner. This allows the offset to be removed between the confocal optical image obtained with the sample scanner and the simultaneously acquired AFM topography image. The tip can be positioned exactly into the optical focus while the user can still navigate within the AFM image for imaging or manipulation of the sample. Thus the tip-enhancement effect can be maximized and it becomes possible to perform single molecule manipulation experiments within the focus of a confocal optical image. Here this is applied to simultaneous measurement of single quantum dot fluorescence and topography with high spatial resolution.

  7. Adaptive optics in spinning disk microscopy: improved contrast and brightness by a simple and fast method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraisier, V; Clouvel, G; Jasaitis, A; Dimitrov, A; Piolot, T; Salamero, J

    2015-09-01

    Multiconfocal microscopy gives a good compromise between fast imaging and reasonable resolution. However, the low intensity of live fluorescent emitters is a major limitation to this technique. Aberrations induced by the optical setup, especially the mismatch of the refractive index and the biological sample itself, distort the point spread function and further reduce the amount of detected photons. Altogether, this leads to impaired image quality, preventing accurate analysis of molecular processes in biological samples and imaging deep in the sample. The amount of detected fluorescence can be improved with adaptive optics. Here, we used a compact adaptive optics module (adaptive optics box for sectioning optical microscopy), which was specifically designed for spinning disk confocal microscopy. The module overcomes undesired anomalies by correcting for most of the aberrations in confocal imaging. Existing aberration detection methods require prior illumination, which bleaches the sample. To avoid multiple exposures of the sample, we established an experimental model describing the depth dependence of major aberrations. This model allows us to correct for those aberrations when performing a z-stack, gradually increasing the amplitude of the correction with depth. It does not require illumination of the sample for aberration detection, thus minimizing photobleaching and phototoxicity. With this model, we improved both signal-to-background ratio and image contrast. Here, we present comparative studies on a variety of biological samples.

  8. Polymorphism of Two-Dimensional Cyanine Dye J-Aggregates and Its Genesis: Fluorescence Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorov, Valery V; Perelygina, Olga M; Pozin, Sergey I; Mal'tsev, Eugene I; Vannikov, Anatoly V

    2015-12-01

    Polymorphic J-aggregates of monomethine cyanine dye 3,3'-di(γ-sulfopropyl)-5,5'-dichlorotiamonomethinecyanine (TC) have been studied by fluorescence optical microscopy (FOM) and by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The in situ FOM observations in a solution drop distinguish two J-aggregate morphology classes: flexible strips and rigid rods. The AFM imaging of dried samples reveals a strong J-aggregate structural rearrangement under adsorption on a mica surface with the strips self-folding and the rods squashing into rectangular bilayers and much deeper destruction. In the present work, the following structural conclusions have been drawn on the basis of careful consideration of strip crystal habits and various structural features of squashed/destructed rods: (1) the tubular morphology of TC rods is directly proved by FOM measurements in the solution bulk; (2) the staircase model of molecular arrangement in strips is proposed explaining the characteristic ∼44° skew angle in strip vertices; (3) a model of tube formation by a close-packed helical winding of flexible monolayer strips is proposed and justified which explains the observed J-aggregate polymorphism and strip-to-rod polymorphic transformations in a wide spatiotemporal scale; (4) at a nanoscale, an unexpectedly complex quasi-one-dimensional organization in J-aggregate two-dimensional monolayers is observed by high-resolution AFM imaging of constituent nanostrips separated by a characteristic distance in the range of 6-10 nm. The obtained results indicate that the underlying monolayer structure is the same for all J-aggregate polymorphs.

  9. Internal Defect Measurement of Scattering Media by Optical Coherence Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yong-kai; ZHAO Hong; WANG Zhao; WANG Jun-li

    2005-01-01

    Optical coherence microscopy is applied to measure scattering media's internal defect, which based on low coherence interferometry and confocal microscopy. Optical coherence microscopy is more effective in the rejection of out of focus and multiple scattered photons originating further away of the focal plane. With the three-dimension scanning, the internal defect is detected by measuring the thickness of different points on the sample. The axial resolution is 6 μm and lateral resolution is 1.2 μm. This method is possessed of the advantages over the other measurement method of scattering media, such as non-destruction and highresolution.

  10. Optimization-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for multiphoton microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonello, J.; Werkhoven, T. van; Verhaegen, M.; Truong, H.H.; Keller, C.U.; Gerritsen, H.C.

    2014-01-01

    Optical aberrations have detrimental effects in multiphoton microscopy. These effects can be curtailed by implementing model-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics, which only requires the addition of a wavefront shaping device, such as a deformable mirror (DM) to an existing microscope. The abe

  11. Enhanced fluorescence and optical power limiting in Ag-nanocomposite glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udayabhaskar, R.; Karthikeyan, B.; Ollakkan, Muhamed Shafi; Mangalaraja, R. V.; Baesso, M. L.

    2014-02-01

    In this letter, we prepared and studied the plasmon, fluorescence and optical limiting properties of silver ion-exchanged glasses followed by an external thermal treatment for clusterization inside the glass matrix. TEM (Transmission electron microscopy) studies of the prepared samples provides information about the size of the nanoclusters, their size enhancement after TA (Thermal annealing) and supports the SPR band shape variations from the UV-Vis. absorption studies. Enhancement in fluorescence and optical-limiting (with excitation near to resonant value of the SPR) is ascribed to the amplified local field after metal nanocluster growth by thermal annealing.

  12. Developing methods based on light sheet fluorescence microscopy for biophysical investigations of larval zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taormina, Michael J.

    Adapting the tools of optical microscopy to the large-scale dynamic systems encountered in the development of multicellular organisms provides a path toward understanding the physical processes necessary for complex life to form and function. Obtaining quantitatively meaningful results from such systems has been challenging due to difficulty spanning the spatial and temporal scales representative of the whole, while also observing the many individual members from which complex and collective behavior emerges. A three-dimensional imaging technique known as light sheet fluorescence microscopy provides a number of significant benefits for surmounting these challenges and studying developmental systems. A thin plane of fluorescence excitation light is produced such that it coincides with the focal plane of an imaging system, providing rapid acquisition of optically sectioned images that can be used to construct a three-dimensional rendition of a sample. I discuss the implementation of this technique for use in larva of the model vertebrate Danio rerio (zebrafish). The nature of light sheet imaging makes it especially well suited to the study of large systems while maintaining good spatial resolution and minimizing damage to the specimen from excessive exposure to excitation light. I show the results from a comparative study that demonstrates the ability to image certain developmental processes non-destructively, while in contrast confocal microscopy results in abnormal growth due to phototoxicity. I develop the application of light sheet microscopy to the study of a previously inaccessible system: the bacterial colonization of a host organism. Using the technique, we are able to obtain a survey of the intestinal tract of a larval zebrafish and observe the location of microbes as they grow and establish a stable population in an initially germ free fish. Finally, I describe a new technique to measure the fluid viscosity of this intestinal environment in vivo using

  13. On the mobility of biomolecules : a fluorescence microscopy approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, Geert van den

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and application of a number of fluorescence spectroscopy related techniques (FCS, FRAP, DCFBA) to measure diffusion of biomolecules in cells, in membranes and through membrane pores.

  14. Characteristics of subgingival calculus detection by multiphoton fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Oi-Hong; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Lai, Yu-Lin; Chen, How-Foo

    2011-06-01

    Subgingival calculus has been recognized as a major cause of periodontitis, which is one of the main chronic infectious diseases of oral cavities and a principal cause of tooth loss in humans. Bacteria deposited in subgingival calculus or plaque cause gingival inflammation, function deterioration, and then periodontitis. However, subgingival calculus within the periodontal pocket is a complicated and potentially delicate structure to be detected with current dental armamentaria, namely dental x-rays and dental probes. Consequently, complete removal of subgingival calculus remains a challenge to periodontal therapies. In this study, the detection of subgingival calculus employing a multiphoton autofluorescence imaging method was characterized in comparison with a one-photon confocal fluorescence imaging technique. Feasibility of such a system was studied based on fluorescence response of gingiva, healthy teeth, and calculus with and without gingiva covered. The multiphoton fluorescence technology perceived the tissue-covered subgingival calculus that cannot be observed by the one-photon confocal fluorescence method.

  15. On the mobility of biomolecules : a fluorescence microscopy approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, Geert van den

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and application of a number of fluorescence spectroscopy related techniques (FCS, FRAP, DCFBA) to measure diffusion of biomolecules in cells, in membranes and through membrane pores.

  16. Review of near-field optical microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Shi-fa

    2006-01-01

    This review has introduced a new near-field optical microscope (NOM)-atomic force microscope combined with photon scanning tunneling microscope (AF/PSTM).During scanning,AF/PSTM could get two optical images of refractive index image and transmissivity image,and two AFM images of topography image and phase image.A reflected near-field optical microscope (AF/RSNOM) has also been developed on AF/PSTM platform.The NOM has been reviewed in this paper and the comparison between AF/PSTM & RSNOM and the commercial A-SNOM & RNOM has also been discussed.The functions of AF/PSTM & RSNOM are much better than A-SNOM & RNOM.

  17. Particles and waves in electron optics and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Pozzi, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics merges two long-running serials, Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical and Electron Microscopy. The series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science, digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains. * Contains contributions from leading authorities on the subject matter* Informs and updates all the latest developments in the field of imaging and electron physics* Provides practitioners interested in microscopy, optics, image processing, mathematical morphology, electromagnetic fields, electron, and ion emission with a valuable resource* Features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science, and digital image pro...

  18. Solid-immersion fluorescence microscopy with increased emission and super resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liau, Z. L.; Porter, J. M. [Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lexington, Massachusetts 02420 (United States); Liau, A. A.; Chen, J. J. [Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Salmon, W. C. [Whitehead Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Sheu, S. S. [Department of Medicine, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States)

    2015-01-07

    We investigate solid-immersion fluorescence microscopy suitable for super-resolution nanotechnology and biological imaging, and have observed limit of resolution as small as 15 nm with microspheres, mitochondria, and chromatin fibers. We have further observed that fluorescence efficiency increases with excitation power density, implicating appreciable stimulated emission and increased resolution. We discuss potential advantages of the solid-immersion microscopy, including combined use with previously established super-resolution techniques for reaching deeper beyond the conventional diffraction limit.

  19. Comparison of two detection algorithms for spot tracking in fluorescence microscopy images

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabaso, M

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available for spot tracking in fluorescence microscopy images Matsilele Mabaso∗, Daniel Withey‡, Bhekisipho Twala† ∗ ‡MDS(MIAS) Council for Scientific and Industrial Research Pretoria, South Africa, Email: ∗MMabaso@csir.co.za †Department of Electrical Engineering.... The quantitative comparative results demonstrated the importance of spot detection in tracking contexts. I. INTRODUCTION In recent years, the field of fluorescence microscopy has been improved and automated, and a large volume of image data are being generated...

  20. Multimodal combinational holographic and fluorescence fluctuation microscopy to obtain spatial super-resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudenkova, V. V.; Zakharov, Yu N.

    2016-08-01

    Ways of combination of holographic and super-resolution fluorescent techniques in the same optical scheme are described. The key parameters influencing achievement of maximum possible resolution are considered. The possibility to choose different fluorescence technic for different types of fluorophores without any optical scheme changes is presented. As a result in case of visualization of the samples, which transparent in optical band, three-dimensional super resolution is received that significantly expands possibilities of the noninvasive analysis of biological samples.

  1. Quantitative optical microscopy and micromanipulation studies on the lipid bilayer membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis; Needham, David

    2014-01-01

    some of their most important contributions to our understanding of lipid bilayer membranes; and (iii) outline studies that would utilize both techniques simultaneously on the same vesicle thus bringing the ability to characterize structure and strain responses together with the direct application......This manuscript discusses basic methodological aspects of optical microscopy and micromanipulation methods to study membranes and reviews methods to generate giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). In particular, we focus on the use of fluorescence microscopy and micropipette manipulation techniques...... to study composition-structure-property materials relationships of free-standing lipid bilayer membranes. Because their size (~5 to 100 m diameter) that is well above the resolution limit of regular light microscopes, GUVs are suitable membrane models for optical microscopy and micromanipulation...

  2. SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY STUDIES ON OPTICAL DISC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐磊; 顾冬红; 等

    1994-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope(STM) is used to investigate the optical dise.The areas with and without data stampers are all observedcarefully.Three-dimensional images of the disc surface clearly demonstrate the period.depth of the grooves and the shape of data stampers.Some phenomena of STM imaging are also discussed.

  3. Hybrid Microscopy: Enabling Inexpensive High-Performance Imaging through Combined Physical and Optical Magnifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Chang, Jae-Byum; Alvarez, Mario Moisés; Trujillo-de Santiago, Grissel; Aleman, Julio; Batzaya, Byambaa; Krishnadoss, Vaishali; Ramanujam, Aishwarya Aravamudhan; Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Chen, Fei; Tillberg, Paul W; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Boyden, Edward S; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-03-15

    To date, much effort has been expended on making high-performance microscopes through better instrumentation. Recently, it was discovered that physical magnification of specimens was possible, through a technique called expansion microscopy (ExM), raising the question of whether physical magnification, coupled to inexpensive optics, could together match the performance of high-end optical equipment, at a tiny fraction of the price. Here we show that such "hybrid microscopy" methods--combining physical and optical magnifications--can indeed achieve high performance at low cost. By physically magnifying objects, then imaging them on cheap miniature fluorescence microscopes ("mini-microscopes"), it is possible to image at a resolution comparable to that previously attainable only with benchtop microscopes that present costs orders of magnitude higher. We believe that this unprecedented hybrid technology that combines expansion microscopy, based on physical magnification, and mini-microscopy, relying on conventional optics--a process we refer to as Expansion Mini-Microscopy (ExMM)--is a highly promising alternative method for performing cost-effective, high-resolution imaging of biological samples. With further advancement of the technology, we believe that ExMM will find widespread applications for high-resolution imaging particularly in research and healthcare scenarios in undeveloped countries or remote places.

  4. The role of molecular dipole orientation in single-molecule fluorescence microscopy and implications for super-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backlund, Mikael P; Lew, Matthew D; Backer, Adam S; Sahl, Steffen J; Moerner, W E

    2014-03-17

    Numerous methods for determining the orientation of single-molecule transition dipole moments from microscopic images of the molecular fluorescence have been developed in recent years. At the same time, techniques that rely on nanometer-level accuracy in the determination of molecular position, such as single-molecule super-resolution imaging, have proven immensely successful in their ability to access unprecedented levels of detail and resolution previously hidden by the optical diffraction limit. However, the level of accuracy in the determination of position is threatened by insufficient treatment of molecular orientation. Here we review a number of methods for measuring molecular orientation using fluorescence microscopy, focusing on approaches that are most compatible with position estimation and single-molecule super-resolution imaging. We highlight recent methods based on quadrated pupil imaging and on double-helix point spread function microscopy and apply them to the study of fluorophore mobility on immunolabeled microtubules.

  5. Spectral and lifetime fluorescence imaging microscopies: new modalities of multiphoton microscopy applied to tissue or cell engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, D; Gaborit, N; Grossin, L; Riquelme, B; Gigant-Huselstein, C; De Isla, N; Gillet, P; Netter, P; Stoltz, J F

    2004-01-01

    Spectral and multiphoton imaging is the preferred approach for non-invasive study allowing deeper penetration to image molecular processes in living cells. But currently available fluorescence microscopic techniques based on fluorescence intensity, such as confocal or multiphoton excitation, cannot provide detailed quantitative information about the dynamic of complex cellular structure (molecular interaction). Due to the variation of the probe concentration, photostability, cross-talking, its effects cannot be distinguished in simple intensity images. Therefore, Time Resolved fluorescence image is required to investigate molecular interactions in biological systems. Fluorescence lifetimes are generally absolute, sensitive to environment, independent of the concentration of the probe and allow the use of probes with overlapping spectra but that not have the same fluorescence lifetime. In this work, we present the possibilities that are opened up by Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, firstly to collect images based on fluorescence lifetime contrast of GFP variants used as a reporter of gene expression in chondrocytes and secondly, to measure molecular proximity in erythrocyte (glycophorin/membrane) by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FLIM-FRET).

  6. Combination of a spinning disc confocal unit with frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Munster, E.B.; Goedhart, J.; Kremers, G.J.; Manders, E.M.M.; Gadella, Th.W.J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Wide-field frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is an established technique to determine fluorescence lifetimes. Disadvantage of wide-field imaging is that measurements are compromised by out-of-focus blur. Conventional scanning confocal typically means long

  7. Hybrid Rayleigh, Raman and TPE fluorescence spectral confocal microscopy of living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pully, V.V.; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; Otto, Cornelis

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid fluorescence–Raman confocal microscopy platform is presented, which integrates low-wavenumber-resolution Raman imaging, Rayleigh scatter imaging and two-photon fluorescence (TPE) spectral imaging, fast ‘amplitude-only’ TPE-fluorescence imaging and high-spectral-resolution Raman imaging.

  8. Monitoring photosensitizer uptake using two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Shu-Chi Allison; Diamond, Kevin R; Patterson, Michael S; Nie, Zhaojun; Hayward, Joseph E; Fang, Qiyin

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) provides an opportunity for treatment of various invasive tumors by the use of a cancer targeting photosensitizing agent and light of specific wavelengths. However, real-time monitoring of drug localization is desirable because the induction of the phototoxic effect relies on interplay between the dosage of localized drug and light. Fluorescence emission in PDT may be used to monitor the uptake process but fluorescence intensity is subject to variability due to scattering and absorption; the addition of fluorescence lifetime may be beneficial to probe site-specific drug-molecular interactions and cell damage. We investigated the fluorescence lifetime changes of Photofrin(®) at various intracellular components in the Mat-LyLu (MLL) cell line. The fluorescence decays were analyzed using a bi-exponential model, followed by segmentation analysis of lifetime parameters. When Photofrin(®) was localized at the cell membrane, the slow lifetime component was found to be significantly shorter (4.3 ± 0.5 ns) compared to those at other locations (cytoplasm: 7.3 ± 0.3 ns; mitochondria: 7.0 ± 0.2 ns, p < 0.05).

  9. Monitoring Photosensitizer Uptake Using Two Photon Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Chi Allison Yeh, Kevin R. Diamond, Michael S. Patterson, Zhaojun Nie, Joseph E. Hayward, Qiyin Fang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic Therapy (PDT provides an opportunity for treatment of various invasive tumors by the use of a cancer targeting photosensitizing agent and light of specific wavelengths. However, real-time monitoring of drug localization is desirable because the induction of the phototoxic effect relies on interplay between the dosage of localized drug and light. Fluorescence emission in PDT may be used to monitor the uptake process but fluorescence intensity is subject to variability due to scattering and absorption; the addition of fluorescence lifetime may be beneficial to probe site-specific drug-molecular interactions and cell damage. We investigated the fluorescence lifetime changes of Photofrin® at various intracellular components in the Mat-LyLu (MLL cell line. The fluorescence decays were analyzed using a bi-exponential model, followed by segmentation analysis of lifetime parameters. When Photofrin® was localized at the cell membrane, the slow lifetime component was found to be significantly shorter (4.3 ± 0.5 ns compared to those at other locations (cytoplasm: 7.3 ± 0.3 ns; mitochondria: 7.0 ± 0.2 ns, p < 0.05.

  10. Optical-sectioning microscopy by patterned illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, G.; Martinez-Corral, M.; Sanchez-Ortiga, E.; Doblas, A.

    2010-02-01

    We propose a very simple method for the flexible production of 1D structured illumination for high resolution 3D microscopy. Specifically, we propose the insertion of a Fresnel biprism after a monochromatic point source for producing a pair of twin, fully coherent, virtual point sources. The resulting interference fringes are projected into the 3D sample and, by simply varying the distance between the biprism and the point source, one can tune the period of the fringes, while keeping their contrast, in a very versatile and efficient way.

  11. Image correction in magneto-optical microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paturi, P.; Larsen, B.H.; Jacobsen, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    An image-processing procedure that assures correct determination of the magnetic field distribution of magneto-optical images is presented. The method remedies image faults resulting from sources that are proportional to the incident light intensity, such as different types of defects in the indi......An image-processing procedure that assures correct determination of the magnetic field distribution of magneto-optical images is presented. The method remedies image faults resulting from sources that are proportional to the incident light intensity, such as different types of defects...... in the indicator film and unevenness of light, as well as additive signals from detector bias, external light sources, etc. When properly corrected a better measurement of the local magnetic field can be made, even in the case of heavily damaged films. For superconductors the magnetic field distributions may...

  12. Specific DNA duplex formation at an artificial lipid bilayer: fluorescence microscopy after Sybr Green I staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Werz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the immobilization of different probe oligonucleotides (4, 7, 10 carrying each a racemic mixture of 2,3-bis(hexadecyloxypropan-1-ol (1a at the 5’-terminus on a stable artificial lipid bilayer composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC. The bilayer separates two compartments (cis/trans channel of an optical transparent microfluidic sample carrier with perfusion capabilities. Injection of unlabeled target DNA sequences (6, 8, or 9, differing in sequence and length, leads in the case of complementarity to the formation of stable DNA duplexes at the bilayer surface. This could be verified by Sybr Green I double strand staining, followed by incubation periods and thorough perfusions, and was visualized by single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. The different bilayer-immobilized complexes consisting of various DNA duplexes and the fluorescent dye were studied with respect to the kinetics of their formation as well as to their stability against perfusion.

  13. Optical Control of Fluorescence through Plasmonic Eigenmode Extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Xiaoying; Li, Quanshui; Zhang, Zhili; Ivanov, Ilia N; Li, Yuan; Wang, Wenbin; Gu, Baohua; Zhang, Zhenyu; Hsueh, Chun-Hway; Snijders, Paul C; Seal, Katyayani

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the concept of optical control of the fluorescence yield of CdSe quantum dots through plasmon-induced structural changes in random semicontinuous nanostructured gold films. We demonstrate that the wavelength- and polarization dependent coupling between quantum dots and the semicontinuous films, and thus the fluorescent emission spectrum, can be controlled and significantly increased through the optical extinction of a selective band of eigenmodes in the films. This optical method of effecting controlled changes in the metal nanostructure allows for versatile functionality in a single sample and opens a pathway to in situ control over the fluorescence spectrum.

  14. Perfect optical vortex enhanced surface plasmon excitation for plasmonic structured illumination microscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chonglei; Min, Changjun; Du, Luping; Yuan, X.-C.

    2016-05-01

    We propose an all-optical technique for plasmonic structured illumination microscopy (PSIM) with perfect optical vortex (POV). POV can improve the efficiency of the excitation of surface plasma and reduce the background noise of the excited fluorescence. The plasmonic standing wave patterns are excited by POV with fractional topological charges for accurate phase shift of {-2π/3, 0, and 2π/3}. The imaging resolution of less than 200 nm was produced. This PSIM technique is expected to be used as a wide field, super resolution imaging technique in dynamic biological imaging.

  15. Quantification of shrinkage microcracking in young mortar with fluorescence light microscopy and ESEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, J.; Van Mier, J.C.M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a method is described to quantify shrinkage microcracking in young mortar by means of crack mapping. Visualisation of the microcracks is realised with two techniques: Fluorescence Light Microscopy (FLM) and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM). The preliminary results obta

  16. Clustered localization of STAT3 during the cell cycle detected by super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Chen, Junling; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Tong, Ti; Wang, Hongda

    2017-06-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays a key role in various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and immune responses. In particular, STAT3 has emerged as a potential molecular target for cancer therapy. The functional role and standard activation mechanism of STAT3 have been well studied, however, the spatial distribution of STAT3 during the cell cycle is poorly known. Therefore, it is indispensable to study STAT3 spatial arrangement and nuclear-cytoplasimic localization at the different phase of cell cycle in cancer cells. By direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy imaging, we find that STAT3 forms various number and size of clusters at the different cell-cycle stage, which could not be clearly observed by conventional fluorescent microscopy. STAT3 clusters get more and larger gradually from G1 to G2 phase, during which time transcription and other related activities goes on consistently. The results suggest that there is an intimate relationship between the clustered characteristic of STAT3 and the cell-cycle behavior. Meanwhile, clustering would facilitate STAT3 rapid response to activating signals due to short distances between molecules. Our data might open a new door to develop an antitumor drug for inhibiting STAT3 signaling pathway by destroying its clusters.

  17. Physically-based in silico light sheet microscopy for visualizing fluorescent brain models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellah, Marwan; Bilgili, Ahmet; Eilemann, Stefan; Markram, Henry; Schürmann, Felix

    2015-01-01

    We present a physically-based computational model of the light sheet fluorescence microscope (LSFM). Based on Monte Carlo ray tracing and geometric optics, our method simulates the operational aspects and image formation process of the LSFM. This simulated, in silico LSFM creates synthetic images of digital fluorescent specimens that can resemble those generated by a real LSFM, as opposed to established visualization methods producing visually-plausible images. We also propose an accurate fluorescence rendering model which takes into account the intrinsic characteristics of fluorescent dyes to simulate the light interaction with fluorescent biological specimen. We demonstrate first results of our visualization pipeline to a simplified brain tissue model reconstructed from the somatosensory cortex of a young rat. The modeling aspects of the LSFM units are qualitatively analysed, and the results of the fluorescence model were quantitatively validated against the fluorescence brightness equation and characteristic emission spectra of different fluorescent dyes. Modelling and simulation.

  18. On-chip cell analysis platform: Implementation of contact fluorescence microscopy in microfluidic chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Kazutaka, Osawa; Haruta, Makito; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2017-09-01

    Although fluorescence microscopy is the gold standard tool for biomedical research and clinical applications, their use beyond well-established laboratory infrastructures remains limited. The present study investigated a novel on-chip cell analysis platform based on contact fluorescence microscopy and microfluidics. Combined use of a contact fluorescence imager based on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology and an ultra-thin glass bottom microfluidic chip enabled both to observe living cells with minimal image distortion and to ease controlling and handling of biological samples (e.g. cells and biological molecules) in the imaged area. A proof-of-concept experiment of on-chip detection of cellular response to endothelial growth factor demonstrated promising use for the recently developed on-chip cell analysis platform. Contact fluorescence microscopy has numerous desirable features including compatibility with plastic microfluidic chips and compatibility with the electrical control system, and thus will fulfill the requirements of a fully automated cell analysis system.

  19. Fluorescence microscopy of single autofluorescent proteins for cellular biology

    CERN Document Server

    Cognet, Laurent; Choquet, Daniel; Lounis, Brahim

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we review the applicability of autofluorescent proteins for single-molecule imaging in biology. The photophysical characteristics of several mutants of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and those of DsRed are compared and critically discussed for their use in cellular biology. The alternative use of two-photon excitation at the single-molecule level or Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy is envisaged for the study of individual autofluorescent proteins. Single-molecule experiments performed in live cells using eGFP and preferably eYFP fusion proteins are reviewed. Finally, the first use at the single-molecule level of citrine, a more photostable variant of the eYFP is reported when fused to a receptor for neurotransmitter in live cells.

  20. Imaging carious dental tissues with multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Po-Yen; Lyu, Hong-Chou; Hsu, Chin-Ying Stephen; Chang, Chia-Seng; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2011-01-01

    In this study, multiphoton excitation was utilized to image normal and carious dental tissues noninvasively. Unique structures in dental tissues were identified using the available multimodality (second harmonic, autofluorescence, and fluorescence lifetime analysis) without labeling. The collagen in dentin exhibits a strong second harmonic response. Both dentin and enamel emit strong autofluorescence that reveals in detail morphological features (such as dentinal tubules and enamel rods) and, despite their very similar spectral profiles, can be differentiated by lifetime analysis. Specifically, the carious dental tissue exhibits a greatly reduced autofluorescence lifetime, which result is consistent with the degree of demineralization, determined by micro-computed tomography. Our findings suggest that two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging may be a promising tool for diagnosing and monitoring dental caries. PMID:21326645

  1. 3D automatic quantification applied to optically sectioned images to improve microscopy analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JE Diaz-Zamboni

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available New fluorescence microscopy techniques, such as confocal or digital deconvolution microscopy, allow to easily obtain three-dimensional (3D information from specimens. However, there are few 3D quantification tools that allow extracting information of these volumes. Therefore, the amount of information acquired by these techniques is difficult to manipulate and analyze manually. The present study describes a model-based method, which for the first time shows 3D visualization and quantification of fluorescent apoptotic body signals, from optical serial sections of porcine hepatocyte spheroids correlating them to their morphological structures. The method consists on an algorithm that counts apoptotic bodies in a spheroid structure and extracts information from them, such as their centroids in cartesian and radial coordinates, relative to the spheroid centre, and their integrated intensity. 3D visualization of the extracted information, allowed us to quantify the distribution of apoptotic bodies in three different zones of the spheroid.

  2. Structured Illumination-Based Super-Resolution Optical Microscopy for Hemato- and Cyto-Pathology Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tieqiao Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Structured illumination fluorescence microscopy utilizes interfering light and the moiré effect to enhance spatial resolution to about a half of that of conventional light microscopy, i.e. approximately 90 nm. In addition to the enhancement in the x and y directions, it also allows enhancement of resolution in the z- direction by the same factor of two (to approximately 220 nm, making it a powerful tool for 3-D morphology studies of fluorescently labeled cells or thin tissue sections. In this report, we applied this technique to several types of blood cells that are commonly seen in hematopathology. Compared with standard brightfield and ordinary fluorescence microscopy images, the 3-D morphology results clearly reveal the morphological features of different types of normal blood cells. We have also used this technique to evaluate morphologies of abnormal erythrocytes and compare them with those recorded on normal cells. The results give a very intuitive presentation of morphological structures of erythrocytes with great details. This research illustrates the potential of this technique to be used in hematology and cyto-pathology studies aimed at identifying nanometer-sized features that cannot be distinguished otherwise with conventional optical microscopy.

  3. Structured illumination-based super-resolution optical microscopy for hemato- and cyto-pathology applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tieqiao; Osborn, Samantha; Brandow, Chloe; Dwyre, Denis; Green, Ralph; Lane, Stephen; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Structured illumination fluorescence microscopy utilizes interfering light and the moiré effect to enhance spatial resolution to about a half of that of conventional light microscopy, i.e. approximately 90 nm. In addition to the enhancement in the x and y directions, it also allows enhancement of resolution in the z- direction by the same factor of two (to approximately 220 nm), making it a powerful tool for 3-D morphology studies of fluorescently labeled cells or thin tissue sections. In this report, we applied this technique to several types of blood cells that are commonly seen in hematopathology. Compared with standard brightfield and ordinary fluorescence microscopy images, the 3-D morphology results clearly reveal the morphological features of different types of normal blood cells. We have also used this technique to evaluate morphologies of abnormal erythrocytes and compare them with those recorded on normal cells. The results give a very intuitive presentation of morphological structures of erythrocytes with great details. This research illustrates the potential of this technique to be used in hematology and cyto-pathology studies aimed at identifying nanometer-sized features that cannot be distinguished otherwise with conventional optical microscopy.

  4. Integrated optical measurement system for fluorescence spectroscopy in microfluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hübner, Jörg; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Jørgensen, Anders Michael

    2001-01-01

    A transportable miniaturized fiber-pigtailed measurement system is presented which allows quantitative fluorescence detection in microliquid handling systems. The microliquid handling chips are made in silica on silicon technology and the optical functionality is monolithically integrated...... with the microfluidic channel system. This results in inherent stability and photolithographic alignment precision. Permanently attached optical fibers provide a rugged connection to the light source, detection, and data processing unit, which potentially allows field use of such systems. Fluorescence measurements...

  5. Clinical applications of in vivo fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chilhwan; Park, Sangyong; Kim, Junhyung; Ha, Seunghan; Park, Gyuman; Lee, Gunwoo; Lee, Onseok; Chun, Byungseon; Gweon, Daegab

    2008-02-01

    Living skin for basic and clinical research can be evaluated by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) non-invasively. CLSM imaging system can achieve skin image its native state either "in vivo" or "fresh biopsy (ex vivo)" without fixation, sectioning and staining that is necessary for routine histology. This study examines the potential fluorescent CLSM with a various exogenous fluorescent contrast agent, to provide with more resolution images in skin. In addition, in vivo fluorescent CLSM researchers will be extended a range of potential clinical application. The prototype of our CLSM system has been developed by Prof. Gweon's group. The operating parameters are composed of some units, such as illuminated wavelength 488 nm, argon illumination power up to 20mW on the skin, objective lens, 0.9NA oil immersion, axial resolution 1.0μm, field of view 200μm x 100μm (lateral resolution , 0.3μm). In human volunteer, fluorescein sodium was administrated topically and intradermally. Animal studies were done in GFP transgenic mouse, IRC mouse and pig skin. For imaging of animal skin, fluorescein sodium, acridine orange, and curcumine were used for fluorescein contrast agent. We also used the GFP transgenic mouse for fluorescein CLSM imaging. In intact skin, absorption of fluorescein sodium by individual corneocyte and hair. Intradermal administrated the fluorescein sodium, distinct outline of keratinocyte cell border could be seen. Curcumin is a yellow food dye that has similar fluorescent properties to fluorescein sodium. Acridin Orange can be highlight nuclei in viable keratinocyte. In vivo CLSM of transgenic GFP mouse enable on in vivo, high resolution view of GFP expressing skin tissue. GFP signals are brightest in corneocyte, kertinocyte, hair and eccrine gland. In intact skin, absorption of fluorescein sodium by individual corneocyte and hair. Intradermal administrated the fluorescein sodium, distinct outline of keratinocyte cell border could be seen. In

  6. Optical tweezers and multiphoton microscopies integrated photonic tool for mechanical and biochemical cell processes studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Faustino, W. M.; Fontes, A.; Fernandes, H. P.; Barjas-Castro, M. d. L.; Metze, K.; Giorgio, S.; Barbosa, L. C.; Cesar, C. L.

    2007-09-01

    The research in biomedical photonics is clearly evolving in the direction of the understanding of biological processes at the cell level. The spatial resolution to accomplish this task practically requires photonics tools. However, an integration of different photonic tools and a multimodal and functional approach will be necessary to access the mechanical and biochemical cell processes. This way we can observe mechanicaly triggered biochemical events or biochemicaly triggered mechanical events, or even observe simultaneously mechanical and biochemical events triggered by other means, e.g. electricaly. One great advantage of the photonic tools is its easiness for integration. Therefore, we developed such integrated tool by incorporating single and double Optical Tweezers with Confocal Single and Multiphoton Microscopies. This system can perform 2-photon excited fluorescence and Second Harmonic Generation microscopies together with optical manipulations. It also can acquire Fluorescence and SHG spectra of specific spots. Force, elasticity and viscosity measurements of stretched membranes can be followed by real time confocal microscopies. Also opticaly trapped living protozoas, such as leishmania amazonensis. Integration with CARS microscopy is under way. We will show several examples of the use of such integrated instrument and its potential to observe mechanical and biochemical processes at cell level.

  7. Using electron microscopy to calculate optical properties of biological samples

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Wenli; Radosevich, Andrew J.; Eshein, Adam; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Yi, Ji; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Roy, Hemant K.; Szleifer, Igal; Backman, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    The microscopic structural origins of optical properties in biological media are still not fully understood. Better understanding these origins can serve to improve the utility of existing techniques and facilitate the discovery of other novel techniques. We propose a novel analysis technique using electron microscopy (EM) to calculate optical properties of specific biological structures. This method is demonstrated with images of human epithelial colon cell nuclei. The spectrum of anisotropy...

  8. Light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) reduces phototoxic effects and provides new means for the modern life sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampaloni, Francesco; Ansari, Nari; Girard, Philippe; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.

    2011-07-01

    Most optical technologies are applied to flat, basically two-dimensional cellular systems. However, physiological meaningful information relies on the morphology, the mechanical properties and the biochemistry of a cell's context. A cell requires the complex three-dimensional relationship to other cells. However, the observation of multi-cellular biological specimens remains a challenge. Specimens scatter and absorb light, thus, the delivery of the probing light and the collection of the signal light become inefficient; many endogenous biochemical compounds also absorb light and suffer degradation of some sort (photo-toxicity), which induces malfunction of a specimen. In conventional and confocal fluorescence microscopy, whenever a single plane, the entire specimen is illuminated. Recording stacks of images along the optical Z-axis thus illuminates the entire specimen once for each plane. Hence, cells are illuminated 10-20 and fish 100-300 times more often than they are observed. This can be avoided by changing the optical arrangement. The basic idea is to use light sheets, which are fed into the specimen from the side and overlap with the focal plane of a wide-field fluorescence microscope. In contrast to an epi-fluorescence arrangement, such an azimuthal fluorescence arrangement uses two independently operated lenses for illumination and detection. Optical sectioning and no photo-toxic damage or photo-bleaching outside a small volume close to the focal plane are intrinsic properties. Light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) takes advantage of modern camera technologies. LSFM can be operated with laser cutters and for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. During the last few years, LSFM was used to record zebrafish development from the early 32-cell stage until late neurulation with sub-cellular resolution and short sampling periods (60-90 sec/stack). The recording speed was five 4-Megapixel large frames/sec with a dynamic range of 12-14 bit. We followed

  9. Fluorescence Microscopy and Fluorescent Probes, Vol. 2, Edited by Jan Slavík 1998. Plenum Press, New York and London. 292 pages. (hardback, $95.00).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Brian

    1999-03-01

    In June of 1995, the first conference on Fluorescent Microscopy and Fluorescent Probes was held in the beautiful city of Prague in the Czech Republic and the proceedings of that meeting were published by Plenum Press in 1996 (Fluorescence Microscopy and Fluorescent Probes, Vol. 1, edited by Jan Slavík). Based on the success of the first conference, a second conference was held two years later again in Prague, and this book is the proceedings of that meeting.

  10. High-precision correlative fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy using two independent alignment markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Pascale; Kaufmann, Rainer; Siebert, C Alistair; Hagen, Christoph; Wodrich, Harald; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-08-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an emerging technique which combines functional information provided by fluorescence microscopy (FM) with the high-resolution structural information of electron microscopy (EM). So far, correlative cryo microscopy of frozen-hydrated samples has not reached better than micrometre range accuracy. Here, a method is presented that enables the correlation between fluorescently tagged proteins and electron cryo tomography (cryoET) data with nanometre range precision. Specifically, thin areas of vitrified whole cells are examined by correlative fluorescence cryo microscopy (cryoFM) and cryoET. Novel aspects of the presented cryoCLEM workflow not only include the implementation of two independent electron dense fluorescent markers to improve the precision of the alignment, but also the ability of obtaining an estimate of the correlation accuracy for each individual object of interest. The correlative workflow from plunge-freezing to cryoET is detailed step-by-step for the example of locating fluorescence-labelled adenovirus particles trafficking inside a cell. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Measuring Phagosomal pH by Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Johnathan; Grinstein, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Dual wavelength ratiometric imaging has become a powerful tool for the study of pH in intracellular compartments. It allows for the dynamic imaging of live cells while accounting for changes in the focal plane, differential loading of the fluorescent probe, and photobleaching caused by repeated image acquisitions. Ratiometric microscopic imaging has the added advantage over whole population methods of being able to resolve individual cells and even individual organelles. In this chapter we provide a detailed discussion of the basic principles of ratiometric imaging and its application to the measurement of phagosomal pH, including probe selection, the necessary instrumentation, and calibration methods.

  12. DAPI staining and fluorescence microscopy techniques for phytoplasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Nancy M; Arismendi, Nolberto L

    2013-01-01

    The 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) stain technique is a simple method that was developed for confirming the presence of phytoplasmas in hand-cut or freezing microtome sections of infected tissues. DAPI binds AT-rich DNA preferentially, so that phytoplasmas, localized among phloem cells, can be visualized in a fluorescence microscope. The procedure is quick, easy to use, inexpensive, and can be used as a preliminary or quantitative method to detect or quantify phytoplasma-like bodies in infected plants.

  13. Best practices for fluorescence microscopy of the cyanobacterial circadian clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Susan E.; Erb, Marcella L.; Pogliano, Joe; Golden, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary This chapter deals with methods of monitoring the subcellular localization of proteins in single cells in the circadian model system Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. While genetic, biochemical and structural insights into the cyanobacterial circadian oscillator have flourished, difficulties in achieving informative subcellular imaging in cyanobacterial cells have delayed progress of the cell biology aspects of the clock. Here, we describe best practices for using fluorescent protein tags to monitor localization. Specifically we address how to vet fusion proteins and overcome challenges in microscopic imaging of very small autofluorescent cells. PMID:25662459

  14. Synchronizing atomic force microscopy force mode and fluorescence microscopy in real time for immune cell stimulation and activation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazaux, Séverine; Sadoun, Anaïs; Biarnes-Pelicot, Martine; Martinez, Manuel; Obeid, Sameh [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); Bongrand, Pierre [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); APHM, Hôpital de la Conception, Laboratoire d’Immunologie, Marseille F-13385 (France); Limozin, Laurent [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); Puech, Pierre-Henri, E-mail: pierre-henri.puech@inserm.fr [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France)

    2016-01-15

    A method is presented for combining atomic force microscopy (AFM) force mode and fluorescence microscopy in order to (a) mechanically stimulate immune cells while recording the subsequent activation under the form of calcium pulses, and (b) observe the mechanical response of a cell upon photoactivation of a small G protein, namely Rac. Using commercial set-ups and a robust signal coupling the fluorescence excitation light and the cantilever bending, the applied force and activation signals were very easily synchronized. This approach allows to control the entire mechanical history of a single cell up to its activation and response down to a few hundreds of milliseconds, and can be extended with very minimal adaptations to other cellular systems where mechanotransduction is studied, using either purely mechanical stimuli or via a surface bound specific ligand. - Highlights: • A signal coupling AFM and fluorescence microscopy was characterized for soft cantilevers. • It can be used as an intrinsic timer to synchronize images and forces. • Mechanical stimulation of single immune cells while recording calcium fluxes was detailed. • Light-induced mechanical modifications of lymphocytes using a PA-Rac protein were demonstrated. • The precautions and limitations of use of this effect were presented.

  15. Analysis of human aorta using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira-Damiani, Gislaine; Adur, J.; Ferro, D. P.; Adam, R. L.; Pelegati, V.; Thomáz, A.; Cesar, C. L.; Metze, K.

    2012-03-01

    The use of photonics has improved our understanding of biologic phenomena. For the study of the normal and pathologic architecture of the aorta the use of Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (TPEF) and Second Harmonic Generation showed interesting details of morphologic changes of the elastin-collagen architecture during aging or development of hypertension in previous studies. In this investigation we tried to apply fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for the morphologic analysis of human aortas. The aim of our study was to use FLIM in non-stained formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples of the aorta ascendants in hypertensive and normotensive patients of various ages, examining two different topographical regions. The FLIM-spectra of collagen and elastic fibers were clearly distinguishable, thus permitting an exact analysis of unstained material on the microscopic level. Moreover the FLIM spectrum of elastic fibers revealed variations between individual cases, which indicate modifications on a molecular level and might be related to FLIM age or diseases states and reflect modifications on a molecular level.

  16. Large-field-of-view Chip-scale Talbot-grid-based Fluorescence Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Pang, Shuo; Kato, Mihoko; Sternberg, Paul W; Yang, Changhuei

    2012-01-01

    The fluorescence microscope is one of the most important tools in modern clinical diagnosis and biological science. However, its expense, size and limited field-of-view (FOV) are becoming bottlenecks in key applications such as large-scale phenotyping and low-resource-setting diagnostics. Here we report a low-cost, compact chip-scale fluorescence-imaging platform, termed the Fluorescence Talbot Microscopy (FTM), which utilizes the Talbot self-imaging effect to enable efficient fluorescence imaging over a large and directly-scalable FOV. The FTM prototype has a resolution of 1.2 microns and an FOV of 3.9 mm x 3.5 mm. We demonstrate the imaging capability of FTM on fluorescently labeled breast cancer cells (SK-BR-3) and HEK cells expressing green fluorescent protein.

  17. Applying fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to evaluate the efficacy of anticancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanabe, Satoshi; Araki, Yoshie; Uchimura, Tomohiro; Imasaka, Totaro

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy was applied to evaluate the efficacy of anticancer drugs. A decrease in the fluorescence lifetime of the nucleus in apoptotic cancer cells stained by SYTO 13 dye was detected after treatment with antitumor antibiotics such as doxorubicin or epirubicin. It was confirmed that the change in fluorescence lifetime occurred earlier than morphological changes in the cells. We found that the fluorescence lifetime of the nucleus in the cells treated with epirubicin decreased more rapidly than that of the cells treated with doxorubicin. This implies that epirubicin was more efficacious than doxorubicin in the treatment of cancer cells. The change in fluorescence lifetime was, however, not indicated when the cells were treated with cyclophosphamide. The decrease in fluorescence lifetime was associated with the processes involving caspase activation and chromatin condensation. Therefore, this technique would provide useful information about apoptotic cells, particularly in the early stages.

  18. Quantitative Topographical Characterization of Thermally Sprayed Coatings by Optical Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaller, P.; Züst, R.; Michler, J.

    2009-03-01

    Topography measurements and roughness calculations for different rough surfaces (Rugotest surface comparator and thermally sprayed coatings) are presented. The surfaces are measured with a novel quantitative topography measurement technique based on optical stereomicroscopy and a comparison is made with established scanning stylus and optical profilometers. The results show that for most cases the different methods yield similar results. Stereomicroscopy is therefore a valuable method for topographical investigations in both quality control and research. On the other hand, the method based on optical microscopy demands a careful optimization of the experimental settings like the magnification and the illumination to achieve satisfactory results.

  19. Optical filters for wavelength selection in fluorescence instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Turan

    2011-04-01

    Fluorescence imaging and analysis techniques have become ubiquitous in life science research, and they are poised to play an equally vital role in in vitro diagnostics (IVD) in the future. Optical filters are crucial for nearly all fluorescence microscopes and instruments, not only to provide the obvious function of spectral control, but also to ensure the highest possible detection sensitivity and imaging resolution. Filters make it possible for the sample to "see" light within only the absorption band, and the detector to "see" light within only the emission band. Without filters, the detector would not be able to distinguish the desired fluorescence from scattered excitation light and autofluorescence from the sample, substrate, and other optics in the system. Today the vast majority of fluorescence instruments, including the widely popular fluorescence microscope, use thin-film interference filters to control the spectra of the excitation and emission light. Hence, this unit emphasizes thin-film filters. After briefly introducing different types of thin-film filters and how they are made, the unit describes in detail different optical filter configurations in fluorescence instruments, including both single-color and multicolor imaging systems. Several key properties of thin-film filters, which can significantly affect optical system performance, are then described. In the final section, tunable optical filters are also addressed in a relative comparison.

  20. Detecting RNA viruses in living mammalian cells by fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraman, Divya; Biswas, Payal; Cella, Lakshmi N; Yates, Marylynn V; Chen, Wilfred

    2011-07-01

    Traditional methods that rely on viral isolation and culture techniques continue to be the gold standards used for detection of infectious viral particles. However, new techniques that rely on visualization of live cells can shed light on understanding virus-host interaction for early stage detection and potential drug discovery. Live-cell imaging techniques that incorporate fluorescent probes into viral components provide opportunities for understanding mRNA expression, interaction, and virus movement and localization. Other viral replication events inside a host cell can be exploited for non-invasive detection, such as single-virus tracking, which does not inhibit viral infectivity or cellular function. This review highlights some of the recent advances made using these novel approaches for visualization of viral entry and replication in live cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Combined nonlinear laser imaging (two-photon excitation fluorescence, second and third-harmonic generation, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopies) in ovarian tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adur, J.; Pelegati, V. B.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Bottcher-Luiz, F.; Andrade, L. A. L. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Carvalho, H. F.; Cesar, C. L.

    2012-03-01

    We applied Two-photon Excited Fluorescence (TPEF), Second/Third Harmonic Generation (SHG and THG) and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) Non Linear Optics (NLO) Laser-Scanning Microscopy within the same imaging platform to evaluate their use as a diagnostic tool in ovarian tumors. We assess of applicability of this multimodal approach to perform a pathological evaluation of serous and mucinous tumors in human samples. The combination of TPEF-SHG-THG imaging provided complementary information about the interface epithelium/stromal, such as the transformation of epithelium surface (THG) and the overall fibrillar tissue architecture (SHG). The fact that H&E staining is the standard method used in clinical pathology and that the stored samples are usually fixed makes it important a re-evaluation of these samples with NLO microscopy to compare new results with a library of already existing samples. FLIM, however, depends on the chemical environment around the fluorophors that was completely changed after fixation; therefore it only makes sense in unstained samples. Our FLIM results in unstained samples demonstrate that it is possible to discriminate healthy epithelia from serous or mucinous epithelia. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the different imaging modalities used showed that multimodal nonlinear microscopy has the potential to differentiate between cancerous and healthy ovarian tissue.

  2. Gabor-based fusion technique for Optical Coherence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Jannick P; Meemon, Panomsak; Murali, Supraja; Thompson, Kevin P; Lee, Kye-sung

    2010-02-15

    We recently reported on an Optical Coherence Microscopy technique, whose innovation intrinsically builds on a recently reported - 2 microm invariant lateral resolution by design throughout a 2 mm cubic full-field of view - liquid-lens-based dynamic focusing optical probe [Murali et al., Optics Letters 34, 145-147, 2009]. We shall report in this paper on the image acquisition enabled by this optical probe when combined with an automatic data fusion method developed and described here to produce an in-focus high resolution image throughout the imaging depth of the sample. An African frog tadpole (Xenopus laevis) was imaged with the novel probe and the Gabor-based fusion technique, demonstrating subcellular resolution in a 0.5 mm (lateral) x 0.5 mm (axial) without the need, for the first time, for x-y translation stages, depth scanning, high-cost adaptive optics, or manual intervention. In vivo images of human skin are also presented.

  3. Germanium Collimating micro-Channel Arrays For High Resolution, High Energy Confocal X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Agyeman-Budu, David N; Coulthard, Ian; Gordon, Robert; Hallin, Emil; Woll, Arthur R

    2016-01-01

    Confocal x-ray fluorescence microscopy (CXRF) allows direct detection of x-ray fluorescence from a micron-scale 3D volume of an extended, unthinned sample. We have previously demonstrated the use of a novel collection optic, fabricated from silicon, that improves the spatial resolution of this approach by an order of magnitude over CXRF using polycapillaries. The optic, called a collimating channel array (CCA), consists of micron-scale, lithographically-fabricated arrays of collimating channels, all directed towards a single source position. Due to the limited absorbing power of silicon, the useful energy range of these optics was limited to fluorescence emission below about 10 keV. Here, we report fabrication of CCAs from germanium substrates, and demonstrate their practical use for CXRF up to 20 keV. Specifically we demonstrate a nearly energy-independent critical spatial resolution $d_R$ of 2.1$\\pm$0.17 \\um from 2-20 keV, as well as excellent background reduction compared to silicon-based CCAs throughout t...

  4. Fluorescent layers for characterization of sectioning microscopy with coverslipuncorrected and water immersion objectives

    KAUST Repository

    Antonini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new method to generate thin (thickness > 200 nm) and ultrathin (thickness < 200 nm) fluorescent layers to be used for microscope optical characterization. These layers are obtained by ultramicrotomy sectioning of fluorescent acrylic slides. This technique generates sub-resolution sheets with high fluorescence emission and uniform thickness, permitting to determine the z-response of different optical sectioning systems. Compared to the state of the art, the here proposed technique allows shorter and easier manufacturing procedure. Moreover, these fluorescent layers can be employed without protective coverslips, allowing the use of the Sectioned Imaging Property (SIP)-chart characterization method with coverslip-uncorrected objectives, water immersion objectives and micro-endoscopes. © 2014 Optical Society of America.

  5. Ambient measurements of biological aerosol particles near Killarney, Ireland: a comparison between real-time fluorescence and microscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, D. A.; Huffman, J. A.; O'Connor, D. J.; Pöhlker, C.; Pöschl, U.; Sodeau, J. R.

    2014-08-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs) can contribute significantly to the coarse particle burden in many environments. PBAPs can thus influence climate and precipitation systems as cloud nuclei and can spread disease to humans, animals, and plants. Measurement data and techniques for PBAPs in natural environments at high time- and size resolution are, however, sparse, and so large uncertainties remain in the role that biological particles play in the Earth system. In this study two commercial real-time fluorescence particle sensors and a Sporewatch single-stage particle impactor were operated continuously from 2 August to 2 September 2010 at a rural sampling location in Killarney National Park in southwestern Ireland. A cascade impactor was operated periodically to collect size-resolved particles during exemplary periods. Here we report the first ambient comparison of a waveband integrated bioaerosol sensor (WIBS-4) with a ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) and also compare these real-time fluorescence techniques with results of fluorescence and optical microscopy of impacted samples. Both real-time instruments showed qualitatively similar behavior, with increased fluorescent bioparticle concentrations at night, when relative humidity was highest and temperature was lowest. The fluorescent particle number from the FL3 channel of the WIBS-4 and from the UV-APS were strongly correlated and dominated by a 3 μm mode in the particle size distribution. The WIBS FL2 channel exhibited particle modes at approx. 1 and 3 μm, and each was correlated with the concentration of fungal spores commonly observed in air samples collected at the site (ascospores, basidiospores, Ganoderma spp.). The WIBS FL1 channel exhibited variable multimodal distributions turning into a broad featureless single mode after averaging, and exhibited poor correlation with fungal spore concentrations, which may be due to the detection of bacterial and non-biological fluorescent

  6. Ambient measurements of biological aerosol particles near Killarney, Ireland: a comparison between real-time fluorescence and microscopy techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Healy

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP can contribute significantly to the coarse particle burden in many environments, may thus influence climate and precipitation systems as cloud nuclei, and can spread disease to humans, animals, and plants. Measurements of PBAP in natural environments taken at high time- and size- resolution are, however, sparse and so large uncertainties remain in the role that biological particles play in the Earth system. In this study two commercial real-time fluorescence particle sensors and a Sporewatch single-stage particle impactor were operated continuously from 2 August to 2 September 2010 at a rural sampling location in Killarney National Park in south western Ireland. A cascade impactor was operated periodically to collect size-resolved particles during exemplary periods. Here we report the first ambient comparison of the waveband integrated bioaerosol sensor (WIBS-4 with the ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS and also compare these real-time fluorescence techniques with results of fluorescence and optical microscopy of impacted samples. Both real-time instruments showed qualitatively similar behaviour, with increased fluorescent bioparticle concentrations at night when relative humidity was highest and temperature was lowest. The fluorescent particle number from the FL3 channel of the WIBS-4 and from the UV-APS were strongly correlated and dominated by a 3 μm mode in the particle size distribution. The WIBS FL2 channel exhibited particle modes at approx. 1 and 3 μm, and each were correlated with the concentration of fungal spores commonly observed in air samples collected at the site (ascospores, basidiospores, Ganoderma spp.. The WIBS FL1 channel exhibited variable multi-modal distributions turning into a broad featureless single mode after averaging and exhibited poor correlation with fungal spore concentrations, which may be due to the detection of bacterial and non-biological fluorescent

  7. 4-Trifluoromethyl-substituted coumarins with large Stokes shifts: synthesis, bioconjugates, and their use in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, Heiko; Nizamov, Shamil; Bottanelli, Francesca; Bierwagen, Jakob; Belov, Vladimir N; Hell, Stefan W

    2013-12-02

    Bright and photostable fluorescent dyes with large Stokes shifts are widely used as sensors, molecular probes, and light-emitting markers in chemistry, life sciences, and optical microscopy. In this study, new 7-dialkylamino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarins have been designed for use in bioconjugation reactions and optical microscopy. Their synthesis was based on the Stille reaction of 3-chloro-4-trifluoromethylcoumarins and available (hetero)aryl- or (hetero)arylethenyltin derivatives. Alternatively, the acylation of 2-trifluoroacetyl-5-dialkylaminophenols with available (hetero)aryl- or (hetero)arylethenylacetic acids followed by intramolecular condensation afforded coumarins with 3-(hetero)aryl or 3-[2-(hetero)aryl]ethenyl groups. Hydrophilic properties were provided by the introduction of a sulfonic acid residue or by phosphorylation of a primary hydroxy group attached at C-4 of the 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,2-dihydroquinoline fragment fused to the coumarin fluorophore. For use in immunolabeling procedures, the dyes were decorated with an (activated) carboxy group. The positions of the absorption and emission maxima vary in the ranges 413-480 and 527-668 nm, respectively. The phosphorylated dye, 9,CH=CH-2-py,H, with the 1-(3-carboxypropyl)-4-hydroxymethyl-2,2-dimethyl-1,2-dihydroquinoline fragment fused to the coumarin fluorophore bearing the 3-[2-(2-pyridyl)ethenyl] residue (absorption and emission maxima at 472 and 623 nm, respectively) was used in super-resolution light microscopy with stimulated emission depletion and provided an optical resolution better than 70 nm with a low background signal. As a result of their large Stokes shifts, good fluorescence quantum yields, and adequate photostabilities, phosphorylated coumarins enable two-color imaging (using several excitation sources and a single depletion laser) to be combined with subdiffractional optical resolution.

  8. Recognition of serous ovarian tumors in human samples by multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adur, Javier; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Costa, Leverson F. L.; Pietro, Luciana; de Thomaz, Andre A.; Almeida, Diogo B.; Bottcher-Luiz, Fatima; Andrade, Liliana A. L. A.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2011-09-01

    We used a multimodal nonlinear optics microscopy, specifically two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF), second and third harmonic generation (SHG/THG) microscopies, to observe pathological conditions of ovarian tissues obtained from human samples. We show that strong TPEF + SHG + THG signals can be obtained in fixed samples stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stored for a very long time, and that H&E staining enhanced the THG signal. We then used the multimodal TPEF-SHG-THG microscopies in a stored file of H&E stained samples of human ovarian cancer to obtain complementary information about the epithelium/stromal interface, such as the transformation of epithelium surface (THG) and the overall fibrillary tissue architecture (SHG). This multicontrast nonlinear optics microscopy is able to not only differentiate between cancerous and healthy tissue, but can also distinguish between normal, benign, borderline, and malignant specimens according to their collagen disposition and compression levels within the extracellular matrix. The dimensions of the layers of epithelia can also be measured precisely and automatically. Our data demonstrate that optical techniques can detect pathological changes associated with ovarian cancer.

  9. Hybrid Microscopy: Enabling Inexpensive High-Performance Imaging through Combined Physical and Optical Magnifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Chang, Jae-Byum; Alvarez, Mario Moisés; Trujillo-de Santiago, Grissel; Aleman, Julio; Batzaya, Byambaa; Krishnadoss, Vaishali; Ramanujam, Aishwarya Aravamudhan; Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Chen, Fei; Tillberg, Paul W.; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Boyden, Edward S.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-03-01

    To date, much effort has been expended on making high-performance microscopes through better instrumentation. Recently, it was discovered that physical magnification of specimens was possible, through a technique called expansion microscopy (ExM), raising the question of whether physical magnification, coupled to inexpensive optics, could together match the performance of high-end optical equipment, at a tiny fraction of the price. Here we show that such “hybrid microscopy” methods—combining physical and optical magnifications—can indeed achieve high performance at low cost. By physically magnifying objects, then imaging them on cheap miniature fluorescence microscopes (“mini-microscopes”), it is possible to image at a resolution comparable to that previously attainable only with benchtop microscopes that present costs orders of magnitude higher. We believe that this unprecedented hybrid technology that combines expansion microscopy, based on physical magnification, and mini-microscopy, relying on conventional optics—a process we refer to as Expansion Mini-Microscopy (ExMM)—is a highly promising alternative method for performing cost-effective, high-resolution imaging of biological samples. With further advancement of the technology, we believe that ExMM will find widespread applications for high-resolution imaging particularly in research and healthcare scenarios in undeveloped countries or remote places.

  10. Superior optical nonlinearity of an exceptional fluorescent stilbene dye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Tingchao [College of Physics Science and Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Division of Physics and Applied Physics, Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies (CDPT), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; Zhao, Yanli [Division of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Gao, Yang; Grimsdale, Andrew C. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Lin, Xiaodong, E-mail: linxd@szu.edu.cn, E-mail: hdsun@ntu.edu.sg [College of Physics Science and Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Sun, Handong, E-mail: linxd@szu.edu.cn, E-mail: hdsun@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies (CDPT), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2015-03-16

    Strong multiphoton absorption and harmonic generation in organic fluorescent chromophores are, respectively, significant in many fields of research. However, most of fluorescent chromophores fall short of the full potential due to the absence of the combination of such different nonlinear upconversion behaviors. Here, we demonstrate that an exceptional fluorescent stilbene dye could exhibit efficient two- and three-photon absorption under the excitation of femtosecond pulses in solution phase. Benefiting from its biocompatibility and strong excited state absorption behavior, in vitro two-photon bioimaging and superior optical limiting have been exploited, respectively. Simultaneously, the chromophore could generate efficient three-photon excited fluorescence and third-harmonic generation (THG) when dispersed into PMMA film, circumventing the limitations of classical fluorescent chromophores. Such chromophore may find application in the production of coherent light sources of higher photon energy. Moreover, the combination of three-photon excited fluorescence and THG can be used in tandem to provide complementary information in biomedical studies.

  11. Superior optical nonlinearity of an exceptional fluorescent stilbene dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tingchao; Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; Gao, Yang; Grimsdale, Andrew C.; Zhao, Yanli; Lin, Xiaodong; Sun, Handong

    2015-03-01

    Strong multiphoton absorption and harmonic generation in organic fluorescent chromophores are, respectively, significant in many fields of research. However, most of fluorescent chromophores fall short of the full potential due to the absence of the combination of such different nonlinear upconversion behaviors. Here, we demonstrate that an exceptional fluorescent stilbene dye could exhibit efficient two- and three-photon absorption under the excitation of femtosecond pulses in solution phase. Benefiting from its biocompatibility and strong excited state absorption behavior, in vitro two-photon bioimaging and superior optical limiting have been exploited, respectively. Simultaneously, the chromophore could generate efficient three-photon excited fluorescence and third-harmonic generation (THG) when dispersed into PMMA film, circumventing the limitations of classical fluorescent chromophores. Such chromophore may find application in the production of coherent light sources of higher photon energy. Moreover, the combination of three-photon excited fluorescence and THG can be used in tandem to provide complementary information in biomedical studies.

  12. A correlative optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy approach to locating nanoparticles in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempen, Paul J; Kircher, Moritz F; de la Zerda, Adam; Zavaleta, Cristina L; Jokerst, Jesse V; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Sinclair, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, demands the capability to exactly locate them within complex biological systems. In this work a correlative optical and scanning electron microscopy technique was developed to locate and observe multi-modal gold core nanoparticle accumulation in brain tumor models. Entire brain sections from mice containing orthotopic brain tumors injected intravenously with nanoparticles were imaged using both optical microscopy to identify the brain tumor, and scanning electron microscopy to identify the individual nanoparticles. Gold-based nanoparticles were readily identified in the scanning electron microscope using backscattered electron imaging as bright spots against a darker background. This information was then correlated to determine the exact location of the nanoparticles within the brain tissue. The nanoparticles were located only in areas that contained tumor cells, and not in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This correlative technique provides a powerful method to relate the macro- and micro-scale features visible in light microscopy with the nanoscale features resolvable in scanning electron microscopy.

  13. A New Cytotoxicity Assay for Brevetoxins Using Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R. McCall

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Brevetoxins are a family of ladder-framed polyether toxins produced during blooms of the marine dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. Consumption of shellfish or finfish exposed to brevetoxins can lead to the development of neurotoxic shellfish poisoning. The toxic effects of brevetoxins are believed to be due to the activation of voltage-sensitive sodium channels in cell membranes. The traditional cytotoxicity assay for detection of brevetoxins uses the Neuro-2A cell line, which must first be treated with the neurotoxins, ouabain and veratridine, in order to become sensitive to brevetoxins. In this study, we demonstrate several drawbacks of the Neuro-2A assay, which include variability for the EC50 values for brevetoxin and non-linear triphasic dose response curves. Ouabain/ veratridine-treated Neuro-2A cells do not show a typical sigmoidal dose response curve in response to brevetoxin, but rather, have a polynomial shaped curve, which makes calculating EC50 values highly variable. We describe a new fluorescence live cell imaging model, which allows for accurate calculation of cytotoxicity via nuclear staining and additional measurement of other viability parameters depending on which aspect of the cell is stained. In addition, the SJCRH30 cell line shows promise as an alternative to Neuro-2A cells for testing brevetoxins without the need for ouabain and veratridine.

  14. Measurement of intracellular calcium gradients in single living cells using optical sectioning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelamarty, Rao V.; Cheung, Joseph Y.

    1992-06-01

    Intracellular free calcium has been recognized as a regulator of many cellular processes and plays a key role in mediating actions of many drugs. To elucidate subcellular spatial calcium changes throughout the cell in three dimensions (3-D), optical sectioning microscopy was applied using digital imaging coupled fluorescence microscopy. The cell was loaded with a fluorescent indicator, fura-2, and a stack of sectional fluorescent images were acquired, digitized and finally stored on-line for post image analysis. Each sectional image was then deconvolved, to remove contaminating light signals from adjacent planes, using the Nearest Neighboring Deconvolution Algorithm (NNDA) and the overall imaging system's empirical Point Spread Function (PSF) that is measured with a 0.25 micrometers fluorescent bead. Using this technique, we measured that the addition of growth factors caused a 2 - 3 fold increase (1) in nuclear calcium compared to cytosolic calcium in blood cells and (2) in both nuclear and cytosolic calcium in liver cells. Such spatial information, which is important in understanding subcellular processes, would not be possible to measure with other methods.

  15. Noninvasive two-photon fluorescence microscopy imaging of mouse retina and RPE through the pupil of the eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palczewska, Grazyna; Dong, Zhiqian; Golczak, Marcin; Hunter, Jennifer J.; Williams, David R.; Alexander, Nathan S.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Two-photon excitation microscopy (TPM) can image retinal molecular processes in vivo. Intrinsically fluorescent retinyl esters in sub-cellular structures called retinosomes are an integral part of the visual chromophore regeneration pathway. Fluorescent condensation products of all–trans–retinal accumulate in the eye with age and are also associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Here we report repetitive, dynamic imaging of these compounds in live mice, through the pupil of the eye. Leveraging advanced adaptive optics we developed a data acquisition algorithm that permitted the identification of retinosomes and condensation products in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) by their characteristic localization, spectral properties, and absence in genetically modified or drug-treated mice. This imaging approach has the potential to detect early molecular changes in retinoid metabolism that trigger light and AMD-induced retinal defects and to assess the effectiveness of treatments for these conditions. PMID:24952647

  16. In vivo switchable optical- and acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Seungwan; Kim, Jaewoo; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) provides high resolution and large penetration depth by utilizing the high optical sensitivity and low scattering of ultrasound. Hybrid PAM systems can be classified into two categories: opticalresolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) and acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM). ORPAM provides a very high lateral resolution with a strong optical focus, but the penetration depth is limited to one optical transport mean free path. AR-PAM provides a relatively greater penetration depth using diffused light in biological tissues. The resolution of AR-PAM is determined by its ultrasonic parameters. In this study, we performed an in vivo testing of a switchable OR-/AR-PAM system. In this system, two modes can be switched by changing its collimator lens and optical fiber. The lateral resolution of OR-PAM was measured using a resolution test target, and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the edge spread function was 2.5 μm. To calculate the lateral resolution of ARPAM, a 6-μm-diameter carbon fiber was used, and the FWHM of the line spread function was 80.2 μm. We successfully demonstrated the multiscale imaging capability of the switchable OR-/AR-PAM system by visualizing microvascular networks in mouse ears, brain, legs, skin, and eyes.

  17. Vibrational and optical spectroscopies integrated with environmental transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picher, Matthieu; Mazzucco, Stefano [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6203 (United States); Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); Blankenship, Steve [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6203 (United States); Sharma, Renu, E-mail: renu.sharma@nist.gov [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6203 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Here, we present a measurement platform for collecting multiple types of spectroscopy data during high-resolution environmental transmission electron microscopy observations of dynamic processes. Such coupled measurements are made possible by a broadband, high-efficiency, free-space optical system. The critical element of the system is a parabolic mirror, inserted using an independent hollow rod and placed below the sample holder which can focus a light on the sample and/or collect the optical response. We demonstrate the versatility of this optical setup by using it to combine in situ atomic-scale electron microscopy observations with Raman spectroscopy. The Raman data is also used to measure the local temperature of the observed sample area. Other applications include, but are not limited to: cathodo- and photoluminescence spectroscopy, and use of the laser as a local, high-rate heating source. - Highlights: • Broadband, high-efficiency design adaptable to other electron microscopes. • Raman spectroscopy integrated with environmental transmission electron microscopy. • Raman spectra peak frequency shifts enable measurement of local sample temperature. • Multiple types of optical spectroscopy enabled, e.g. cathodoluminescence.

  18. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Characterization of Dendritic Polymer Nanoparticles and Applications in Nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Boreham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of nanomedicine provides new approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, for symptom relief and for monitoring of disease progression. One route of realizing this approach is through carefully constructed nanoparticles. Due to the small size inherent to the nanoparticles a proper characterization is not trivial. This review highlights the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM for the analysis of nanoparticles, covering aspects ranging from molecular properties to particle detection in tissue samples. The latter technique is particularly important as FLIM allows for distinguishing of target molecules from the autofluorescent background and, due to the environmental sensitivity of the fluorescence lifetime, also offers insights into the local environment of the nanoparticle or its interactions with other biomolecules. Thus, these techniques offer highly suitable tools in the fields of particle development, such as organic chemistry, and in the fields of particle application, such as in experimental dermatology or pharmaceutical research.

  19. State space approach to single molecule localization in fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahid, Milad R; Chao, Jerry; Kim, Dongyoung; Ward, E Sally; Ober, Raimund J

    2017-03-01

    Single molecule super-resolution microscopy enables imaging at sub-diffraction-limit resolution by producing images of subsets of stochastically photoactivated fluorophores over a sequence of frames. In each frame of the sequence, the fluorophores are accurately localized, and the estimated locations are used to construct a high-resolution image of the cellular structures labeled by the fluorophores. Many methods have been developed for localizing fluorophores from the images. The majority of these methods comprise two separate steps: detection and estimation. In the detection step, fluorophores are identified. In the estimation step, the locations of the identified fluorophores are estimated through an iterative approach. Here, we propose a non-iterative state space-based localization method which combines the detection and estimation steps. We demonstrate that the estimated locations obtained from the proposed method can be used as initial conditions in an estimation routine to potentially obtain improved location estimates. The proposed method models the given image as the frequency response of a multi-order system obtained with a balanced state space realization algorithm based on the singular value decomposition of a Hankel matrix. The locations of the poles of the resulting system determine the peak locations in the frequency domain, and the locations of the most significant peaks correspond to the single molecule locations in the original image. The performance of the method is validated using both simulated and experimental data.

  20. 3D reconstruction of cortical microtubules using multi-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Luhong; Xiu, Peng; Zhou, Xiaoxu; Fan, Jiannan; Kuang, Cuifang; Liu, Xu; Xu, Yingke

    2017-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) has been widely used in biomedical research to visualize cellular processes near the cell surface. In this study, a novel multi-angle ring-illuminated TIRFM system, equipped with two galvo mirrors that are on conjugate plan of a 4f optical system was developed. Multi-angle TIRFM generates images with different penetration depths through the controlled variation of the incident angle of illuminating laser. We presented a method to perform three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of microtubules from multi-angle TIRFM images. The performance of our method was validated in simulated microtubules with variable signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and the axial resolution and accuracy of reconstruction were evaluated in selecting different numbers of illumination angles or in different SNR conditions. In U373 cells, we reconstructed the 3-D localization of microtubules near the cell surface with high resolution using over a hundred different illumination angles. Theoretically, the presented TIRFM setup and 3-D reconstruction method can achieve 40 nm axial resolution in experimental conditions where SNR is as low as 2, with 35 different illumination angles. Moreover, our system and reconstruction method have the potential to be used in live cells to track membrane dynamics in 3-D.

  1. Correlative cryo-fluorescence light microscopy and cryo-electron tomography of Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Roman I; Celler, Katherine; Willemse, Joost; Bos, Erik; van Wezel, Gilles P; Koster, Abraham J

    2014-01-01

    Light microscopy and electron microscopy are complementary techniques that in a correlative approach enable identification and targeting of fluorescently labeled structures in situ for three-dimensional imaging at nanometer resolution. Correlative imaging allows electron microscopic images to be positioned in a broader temporal and spatial context. We employed cryo-correlative light and electron microscopy (cryo-CLEM), combining cryo-fluorescence light microscopy and cryo-electron tomography, on vitrified Streptomyces bacteria to study cell division. Streptomycetes are mycelial bacteria that grow as long hyphae and reproduce via sporulation. On solid media, Streptomyces subsequently form distinct aerial mycelia where cell division leads to the formation of unigenomic spores which separate and disperse to form new colonies. In liquid media, only vegetative hyphae are present divided by noncell separating crosswalls. Their multicellular life style makes them exciting model systems for the study of bacterial development and cell division. Complex intracellular structures have been visualized with transmission electron microscopy. Here, we describe the methods for cryo-CLEM that we applied for studying Streptomyces. These methods include cell growth, fluorescent labeling, cryo-fixation by vitrification, cryo-light microscopy using a Linkam cryo-stage, image overlay and relocation, cryo-electron tomography using a Titan Krios, and tomographic reconstruction. Additionally, methods for segmentation, volume rendering, and visualization of the correlative data are described.

  2. Visualization of mouse neuronal ganglia infected by Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1 using multimodal non-linear optical microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Alexandre Rochette

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 is a neurotropic virus that causes skin lesions and goes on to enter a latent state in neurons of the trigeminal ganglia. Following stress, the virus may reactivate from latency leading to recurrent lesions. The in situ study of neuronal infections by HSV-1 is critical to understanding the mechanisms involved in the biology of this virus and how it causes disease; however, this normally requires fixation and sectioning of the target tissues followed by treatment with contrast agents to visualize key structures, which can lead to artifacts. To further our ability to study HSV-1 neuropathogenesis, we have generated a recombinant virus expressing a second generation red fluorescent protein (mCherry, which behaves like the parental virus in vivo. By optimizing the application of a multimodal non-linear optical microscopy platform, we have successfully visualized in unsectioned trigeminal ganglia of mice both infected cells by two-photon fluorescence microscopy, and myelinated axons of uninfected surrounding cells by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS microscopy. These results represent the first report of CARS microscopy being combined with 2-photon fluorescence microscopy to visualize virus-infected cells deep within unsectioned explanted tissue, and demonstrate the application of multimodal non-linear optical microscopy for high spatial resolution biological imaging of tissues without the use of stains or fixatives.

  3. Visualization of mouse neuronal ganglia infected by Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) using multimodal non-linear optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Laliberté, Mathieu; Bertrand-Grenier, Antony; Houle, Marie-Andrée; Blache, Marie-Claire; Légaré, François; Pearson, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus that causes skin lesions and goes on to enter a latent state in neurons of the trigeminal ganglia. Following stress, the virus may reactivate from latency leading to recurrent lesions. The in situ study of neuronal infections by HSV-1 is critical to understanding the mechanisms involved in the biology of this virus and how it causes disease; however, this normally requires fixation and sectioning of the target tissues followed by treatment with contrast agents to visualize key structures, which can lead to artifacts. To further our ability to study HSV-1 neuropathogenesis, we have generated a recombinant virus expressing a second generation red fluorescent protein (mCherry), which behaves like the parental virus in vivo. By optimizing the application of a multimodal non-linear optical microscopy platform, we have successfully visualized in unsectioned trigeminal ganglia of mice both infected cells by two-photon fluorescence microscopy, and myelinated axons of uninfected surrounding cells by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. These results represent the first report of CARS microscopy being combined with 2-photon fluorescence microscopy to visualize virus-infected cells deep within unsectioned explanted tissue, and demonstrate the application of multimodal non-linear optical microscopy for high spatial resolution biological imaging of tissues without the use of stains or fixatives.

  4. Quantitative photoacoustic microscopy of optical absorption coefficients from acoustic spectra in the optical diffusive regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zijian; Favazza, Christopher; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Wang, Lihong V

    2012-06-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) microscopy (PAM) can image optical absorption contrast with ultrasonic spatial resolution in the optical diffusive regime. Conventionally, accurate quantification in PAM requires knowledge of the optical fluence attenuation, acoustic pressure attenuation, and detection bandwidth. We circumvent this requirement by quantifying the optical absorption coefficients from the acoustic spectra of PA signals acquired at multiple optical wavelengths. With the acoustic spectral method, the absorption coefficients of an oxygenated bovine blood phantom at 560, 565, 570, and 575 nm were quantified with errors of acoustic spectral method provides greater quantification accuracy in the optical diffusive regime. The limitations of the acoustic spectral method was also discussed.

  5. Nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging of an optical antenna with a single diamond NV center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beams, Ryan; Smith, Dallas; Johnson, Timothy W; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Novotny, Lukas; Vamivakas, A Nick

    2013-08-14

    Solid-state quantum emitters, such as artificially engineered quantum dots or naturally occurring defects in solids, are being investigated for applications ranging from quantum information science and optoelectronics to biomedical imaging. Recently, these same systems have also been studied from the perspective of nanoscale metrology. In this letter, we study the near-field optical properties of a diamond nanocrystal hosting a single nitrogen vacancy center. We find that the nitrogen vacancy center is a sensitive probe of the surrounding electromagnetic mode structure. We exploit this sensitivity to demonstrate nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with a single nitrogen vacancy center by imaging the local density of states of an optical antenna.

  6. Transfer functions in collection scanning near-field optical microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnaya, Elena A.

    1999-01-01

    It is generally accepted that, if in collection near-field optical microscopy the probe-sample coupling can be disregarded, a fiber probe can be considered as a detector of the near-field intensity whose size can be accounted for via an intensity transfer function. We show that, in general...... are considered with respect to the relation between near-field optical images and the corresponding intensity distributions. Our conclusions are supported with numerical simulations and experimental results obtained by using a photon scanning tunneling microscope with an uncoated fiber tip....

  7. Fluorescence enhancement with the optical (bi-) conical antenna

    CERN Document Server

    Mohammadi, Ahmad; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Agio, Mario

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the properties of finite gold nanocones as optical antennas for enhancing molecular fluorescence. We compute the modification of the excitation rate, spontaneous emission rate, and quantum efficiency as a function of the nanocone base and length, showing that the maximum field and fluorescence enhancements do not occur for the same nanocone parameters. We compare the results with those for nanorods and nanospheroids and find that nanocones perform better.

  8. Visualizing heterogeneity of photosynthetic properties of plant leaves with two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iermak, Ievgeniia; Vink, Jochem; Bader, Arjen N.; Wientjes, Emilie; Amerongen, van Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) was used to analyse the distribution and properties of Photosystem I (PSI) and Photosystem II (PSII) in palisade and spongy chloroplasts of leaves from the C3 plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the C4 plant Miscanthus x giganteus. This was ac

  9. Nanoscale contact line visualization based on total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, M.J.Z.; Poelma, C.; Westerweel, J.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel measurement method to study the contact line of a droplet at nanoscale level. The method is based on Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRFM), which uses an evanescent excitation field produced by total internal reflection of light. The evanescent field depends o

  10. Homogeneous vs heterogeneous polymerization catalysis revealed by single-particle fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandiari, N Melody; Blum, Suzanne A

    2011-11-16

    A high-sensitivity and high-resolution single-particle fluorescence microscopy technique differentiated between homogeneous and heterogeneous metathesis polymerization catalysis by imaging the location of the early stages of polymerization. By imaging single polymers and single crystals of Grubbs II, polymerization catalysis was revealed to be solely homogeneous rather than heterogeneous or both.

  11. Cytology 3D structure formation based on optical microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronichev, A. N.; Polyakov, E. V.; Shabalova, I. P.; Djangirova, T. V.; Zaitsev, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    The article the article is devoted to optimization of the parameters of imaging of biological preparations in optical microscopy using a multispectral camera in visible range of electromagnetic radiation. A model for the image forming of virtual preparations was proposed. The optimum number of layers was determined for the object scan in depth and holistic perception of its switching according to the results of the experiment.

  12. Chamber catalogues of optical and fluorescent signatures distinguish bioaerosol classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Mark; Perring, Anne E.; McCabe, Kevin; Kok, Greg; Granger, Gary; Baumgardner, Darrel

    2016-07-01

    Rapid bioaerosol characterization has immediate applications in the military, environmental and public health sectors. Recent technological advances have facilitated single-particle detection of fluorescent aerosol in near real time; this leverages controlled ultraviolet exposures with single or multiple wavelengths, followed by the characterization of associated fluorescence. This type of ultraviolet induced fluorescence has been used to detect airborne microorganisms and their fragments in laboratory studies, and it has been extended to field studies that implicate bioaerosol to compose a substantial fraction of supermicron atmospheric particles. To enhance the information yield that new-generation fluorescence instruments can provide, we report the compilation of a referential aerobiological catalogue including more than 50 pure cultures of common airborne bacteria, fungi and pollens, recovered at water activity equilibrium in a mesoscale chamber (1 m3). This catalogue juxtaposes intrinsic optical properties and select bandwidths of fluorescence emissions, which manifest to clearly distinguish between major classes of airborne microbes and pollens.

  13. Live imaging of Tribolium castaneum embryonic development using light-sheet-based fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobl, Frederic; Schmitz, Alexander; Stelzer, Ernst H K

    2015-10-01

    Tribolium castaneum has become an important insect model organism for evolutionary developmental biology, genetics and biotechnology. However, few protocols for live fluorescence imaging of Tribolium have been reported, and little image data is available. Here we provide a protocol for recording the development of Tribolium embryos with light-sheet-based fluorescence microscopy. The protocol can be completed in 4-7 d and provides procedural details for: embryo collection, microscope configuration, embryo preparation and mounting, noninvasive live imaging for up to 120 h along multiple directions, retrieval of the live embryo once imaging is completed, and image data processing, for which exemplary data is provided. Stringent quality control criteria for developmental biology studies are also discussed. Light-sheet-based fluorescence microscopy complements existing toolkits used to study Tribolium development, can be adapted to other insect species, and requires no advanced imaging or sample preparation skills.

  14. Correlated fluorescence and 3D electron microscopy with high sensitivity and spatial precision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukulski, Wanda; Schorb, Martin; Welsch, Sonja; Picco, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Correlative electron and fluorescence microscopy has the potential to elucidate the ultrastructural details of dynamic and rare cellular events, but has been limited by low precision and sensitivity. Here we present a method for direct mapping of signals originating from ∼20 fluorescent protein molecules to 3D electron tomograms with a precision of less than 100 nm. We demonstrate that this method can be used to identify individual HIV particles bound to mammalian cell surfaces. We also apply the method to image microtubule end structures bound to mal3p in fission yeast, and demonstrate that growing microtubule plus-ends are flared in vivo. We localize Rvs167 to endocytic sites in budding yeast, and show that scission takes place halfway through a 10-s time period during which amphiphysins are bound to the vesicle neck. This new technique opens the door for direct correlation of fluorescence and electron microscopy to visualize cellular processes at the ultrastructural scale. PMID:21200030

  15. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchuk, Kyle

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called "non-blinking" quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  16. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchuk, Kyle [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called “non-blinking” quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  17. Discrimination of Dendrobium officinale and Its Common Adulterants by Combination of Normal Light and Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Chu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The stems of Dendrobium officinale Kimura et Migo, named Tie-pi-shi-hu, is one of the most endangered and precious species in China. Because of its various pharmacodynamic effects, D. officinale is widely recognized as a high-quality health food in China and other countries in south and south-east Asia. With the rising interest of D. officinale, its products have a high price due to a limited supply. This high price has led to the proliferation of adulterants in the market. To ensure the safe use of D. officinale, a fast and convenient method combining normal and fluorescence microscopy was applied in the present study to distinguish D. officinale from three commonly used adulterants including Zi-pi-shi-hu (D. devonianum, Shui-cao-shi-hu (D. aphyllum, Guang-jie-shi-hu (D. gratiosissimum. The result demonstrated that D. officinale could be identified by the characteristic “two hat-shaped” vascular bundle sheath observed under the fluorescence microscopy and the distribution of raphides under normal light microscopy. The other three adulterants could be discriminated by the vascular bundle differences and the distribution of raphides under normal light microscopy. This work indicated that combination of normal light and fluorescence microscopy is a fast and efficient technique to scientifically distinguish D. officinale from the commonly confused species.

  18. Discrimination of Dendrobium officinale and its common adulterants by combination of normal light and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chu; Yin, Huimin; Xia, Li; Cheng, Dongping; Yan, Jizhong; Zhu, Lin

    2014-03-24

    The stems of Dendrobium officinale Kimura et Migo, named Tie-pi-shi-hu, is one of the most endangered and precious species in China. Because of its various pharmacodynamic effects, D. officinale is widely recognized as a high-quality health food in China and other countries in south and south-east Asia. With the rising interest of D. officinale, its products have a high price due to a limited supply. This high price has led to the proliferation of adulterants in the market. To ensure the safe use of D. officinale, a fast and convenient method combining normal and fluorescence microscopy was applied in the present study to distinguish D. officinale from three commonly used adulterants including Zi-pi-shi-hu (D. devonianum), Shui-cao-shi-hu (D. aphyllum), Guang-jie-shi-hu (D. gratiosissimum). The result demonstrated that D. officinale could be identified by the characteristic "two hat-shaped" vascular bundle sheath observed under the fluorescence microscopy and the distribution of raphides under normal light microscopy. The other three adulterants could be discriminated by the vascular bundle differences and the distribution of raphides under normal light microscopy. This work indicated that combination of normal light and fluorescence microscopy is a fast and efficient technique to scientifically distinguish D. officinale from the commonly confused species.

  19. Characterizing optical dipole trap via fluorescence of trapped cesium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Tao; GENG Tao; YAN Shubin; LI Gang; ZHANG Jing; WANG Junmin; PENG Kunchi; ZHANG Tiancai

    2006-01-01

    Optical dipole trap (ODT) is becoming an important tool of manipulating neutral atoms. In this paper ODT is realized with a far-off resonant laser beam strongly focused in the magneto-optical trap (MOT) of cesium atoms. The light shift is measured by simply monitoring the fluorescence of the atoms in the magneto-optical trap and the optical dipole trap simultaneously. The advantages of our experimental scheme are discussed, and the effect of the beam waist and power on the potential of dipole trap as well as heating rate is analyzed.

  20. Dynamic fluorescence lifetime imaging based on acousto-optic deflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; Peng, Xiao; Qi, Jing; Gao, Jian; Fan, Shunping; Wang, Qi; Qu, Junle; Niu, Hanben

    2014-11-01

    We report a dynamic fluorescence lifetime imaging (D-FLIM) system that is based on a pair of acousto-optic deflectors for the random regions of interest (ROI) study in the sample. The two-dimensional acousto-optic deflector devices are used to rapidly scan the femtosecond excitation laser beam across the sample, providing specific random access to the ROI. Our experimental results using standard fluorescent dyes in live cancer cells demonstrate that the D-FLIM system can dynamically monitor the changing process of the microenvironment in the ROI in live biological samples.

  1. High-Throughput Accurate Single-Cell Screening of Euglena gracilis with Fluorescence-Assisted Optofluidic Time-Stretch Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Baoshan; Lei, Cheng; Ito, Takuro; Jiang, Yiyue; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    The development of reliable, sustainable, and economical sources of alternative fuels is an important, but challenging goal for the world. As an alternative to liquid fossil fuels, algal biofuel is expected to play a key role in alleviating global warming since algae absorb atmospheric CO2 via photosynthesis. Among various algae for fuel production, Euglena gracilis is an attractive microalgal species as it is known to produce wax ester (good for biodiesel and aviation fuel) within lipid droplets. To date, while there exist many techniques for inducing microalgal cells to produce and accumulate lipid with high efficiency, few analytical methods are available for characterizing a population of such lipid-accumulated microalgae including E. gracilis with high throughout, high accuracy, and single-cell resolution simultaneously. Here we demonstrate high-throughput, high-accuracy, single-cell screening of E. gracilis with fluorescence-assisted optofluidic time-stretch microscopy–a method that combines the strengths of microfluidic cell focusing, optical time-stretch microscopy, and fluorescence detection used in conventional flow cytometry. Specifically, our fluorescence-assisted optofluidic time-stretch microscope consists of an optical time-stretch microscope and a fluorescence analyzer on top of a hydrodynamically focusing microfluidic device and can detect fluorescence from every E. gracilis cell in a population and simultaneously obtain its image with a high throughput of 10,000 cells/s. With the multi-dimensional information acquired by the system, we classify nitrogen-sufficient (ordinary) and nitrogen-deficient (lipid-accumulated) E. gracilis cells with a low false positive rate of 1.0%. This method holds promise for evaluating cultivation techniques and selective breeding for microalgae-based biofuel production. PMID:27846239

  2. Near-field scanning optical microscopy in cell biology and cytogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Michael; Perner, Birgit; Rapp, Alexander; Wollweber, Leo; Scherthan, Harry; Greulich, Karl-Otto

    2006-01-01

    Light microscopy has proven to be one of the most versatile analytical tools in cell biology and cytogenetics. The growing spectrum of scientific knowledge demands a continuous improvement of the optical resolution of the instruments. In far-field light microscopy, the attainable resolution is dictated by the limit of diffraction, which, in practice, is about 250 nm for high-numerical-aperture objective lenses. Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) was the first technique that has overcome this limit up to about one order of magnitude. Typically, the resolution range below 100 nm is accessed for biological applications. Using appropriately designed scanning probes allows for obtaining an extremely small near-field light excitation volume (some tens of nanometers in diameter). Because of the reduction of background illumination, high contrast imaging becomes feasible for light transmission and fluorescence microscopy. The height of the scanning probe is controlled by atomic force interactions between the specimen surface and the probe tip. The control signal can be used for the production of a topographic (nonoptical) image that can be acquired simultaneously. In this chapter, the principle of NSOM is described with respect to biological applications. A brief overview of some requirements in biology and applications described in the literature are given. Practical advice is focused on instruments with aperture-type illumination probes. Preparation protocols focussing on NSOM of cell surfaces and chromosomes are presented.

  3. Label-free imaging of developing vasculature in zebrafish with phase variance optical coherence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Fingler, Jeff; Trinh, Le A.; Fraser, Scott E.

    2016-03-01

    A phase variance optical coherence microscope (pvOCM) has been created to visualize blood flow in the vasculature of zebrafish embryos, without using exogenous labels. The pvOCM imaging system has axial and lateral resolutions of 2 μm in tissue, and imaging depth of more than 100 μm. Imaging of 2-5 days post-fertilization zebrafish embryos identified the detailed structures of somites, spinal cord, gut and notochord based on intensity contrast. Visualization of the blood flow in the aorta, veins and intersegmental vessels was achieved with phase variance contrast. The pvOCM vasculature images were confirmed with corresponding fluorescence microscopy of a zebrafish transgene that labels the vasculature with green fluorescent protein. The pvOCM images also revealed functional information of the blood flow activities that is crucial for the study of vascular development.

  4. Using electron microscopy to calculate optical properties of biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenli; Radosevich, Andrew J; Eshein, Adam; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Yi, Ji; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Roy, Hemant K; Szleifer, Igal; Backman, Vadim

    2016-11-01

    The microscopic structural origins of optical properties in biological media are still not fully understood. Better understanding these origins can serve to improve the utility of existing techniques and facilitate the discovery of other novel techniques. We propose a novel analysis technique using electron microscopy (EM) to calculate optical properties of specific biological structures. This method is demonstrated with images of human epithelial colon cell nuclei. The spectrum of anisotropy factor g, the phase function and the shape factor D of the nuclei are calculated. The results show strong agreement with an independent study. This method provides a new way to extract the true phase function of biological samples and provides an independent validation for optical property measurement techniques.

  5. Quantitative mapping of aqueous microfluidic temperature with sub-degree resolution using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Emmelyn M; Iwai, Kaoru; Uchiyama, Seiichi; de Silva, A Prasanna; Magennis, Steven W; Jones, Anita C

    2010-05-21

    The use of a water-soluble, thermo-responsive polymer as a highly sensitive fluorescence-lifetime probe of microfluidic temperature is demonstrated. The fluorescence lifetime of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) labelled with a benzofurazan fluorophore is shown to have a steep dependence on temperature around the polymer phase transition and the photophysical origin of this response is established. The use of this unusual fluorescent probe in conjunction with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) enables the spatial variation of temperature in a microfluidic device to be mapped, on the micron scale, with a resolution of less than 0.1 degrees C. This represents an increase in temperature resolution of an order of magnitude over that achieved previously by FLIM of temperature-sensitive dyes.

  6. Advanced fluorescence microscopy methods for the real-time study of transcription and chromatin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annibale, Paolo; Gratton, Enrico

    2014-03-12

    In this contribution we provide an overview of the recent advances allowed by the use of fluorescence microscopy methods in the study of transcriptional processes and their interplay with the chromatin architecture in living cells. Although the use of fluorophores to label nucleic acids dates back at least to about half a century ago, (1) two recent breakthroughs have effectively opened the way to use fluorescence routinely for specific and quantitative probing of chromatin organization and transcriptional activity in living cells: namely, the possibility of labeling first the chromatin loci and then the mRNA synthesized from a gene using fluorescent proteins. In this contribution we focus on methods that can probe rapid dynamic processes by analyzing fast fluorescence fluctuations.

  7. All-optical histology using two photon laser scanning microscopy and ablation with ultrashort pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Philbert S.

    This dissertation discusses the use of ultrashort laser pulses to image and manipulate tissue for the purpose of three-dimensional histological reconstruction of extended brain structures. Two photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) and ultrashort pulsed laser ablation are used to provide in situ three-dimensional imaging through thick preparations of fixed tissue. Surface regions of fixed tissue are first imaged using TPLSM. The imaged regions are then removed by ablation with amplified, ultrashort laser pulses, thereby exposing a previously underlying tissue region for imaging. This process of imaging and ablation proceeds iteratively until the desired tissue volume has been processed. First, the principles, design, and construction of a two photon laser scanning microscope are discussed, followed by a discussion of the physical mechanisms of tissue ablation with ultrashort laser pulses. The compatibility of tissue ablation using ultrashort pulses with subsequent histological analysis, particularly with fluorescent microscopy, is evaluated. Tissue ablation with ultrashort laser pulses is found to produce ablated tissue surfaces that are smooth to within a micrometer. Intrinsic fluorescence as well as immunoreactivity are found to be resilient to the ablation process. The all-optical histological technique is demonstrated on brain tissue from rats and mice, including tissue from embryonic mouse as early at E15. The ablation process is shown to preserve both macroscopic and microscopic structures within tissue. To facilitate the all-optical histological analysis of neuronal vasculature and its relative distribution to surrounding neuronal tissue, a fluorescent gel perfusion technique is developed that provides a temperature-stabilized fluorescent label of the neuronal vasculature. The use of immunohistochemistry to label specific cell populations throughout an 800 micrometer-thick tissue section is demonstrated. Additionally, the immersion of fixed tissue in high

  8. Fluorescence decay time measurement - a new optical sensing scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1994-02-01

    Optical sensors often suffer from poor long-term stability. This drawback can be overcome by using fluorescence decay-time measurement as the sensing principle. In this way calibration- free chemical sensors can be developed. The sensing scheme has been used so far mainly in connection with dynamic quenching, for example in oxygen sensors. We have succeeded in extending it to ground-state indicator-analyte reactions, thus obtaining stable optical sensors for decay-time sensing of various analytes.

  9. In Vivo Diffuse Optical Tomography and Fluorescence Molecular Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingze Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse optical tomography (DOT and fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT are two attractive imaging techniques for in vivo physiological and psychological research. They have distinct advantages such as non-invasiveness, non-ionizing radiation, high sensitivity and longitudinal monitoring. This paper reviews the key components of DOT and FMT. Light propagation model, mathematical reconstruction algorithm, imaging instrumentation and medical applications are included. Future challenges and perspective on optical tomography are discussed.

  10. Fluorescence Referencing for Fiber-optic Sensor Using Visible Wavelengths

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jin-ling; WANG Yu-tian; MA Hai-bin

    2006-01-01

    A kind of fluorescence optic-fiber thermometer is devised based on the ruby and absorbing glass sample. The optic- fiber temperature measurement probe based on ruby is developed. This system is particularly adaptable to the temperature measurement in the range of 0℃ to 130℃. A considerably improved performance is seen in this new device. The drive current to the LED can be easily kept within the required defined bounds through the control circuitry.

  11. Noninvasive label-free monitoring of cosmetics and pharmaceuticals in human skin using nonlinear optical microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osseiran, Sam; Wang, Hequn; Evans, Conor L.

    2017-02-01

    Over the past decade, nonlinear optical microscopy has seen a dramatic rise in its use in research settings due to its noninvasiveness, enhanced penetration depth, intrinsic optical sectioning, and the ability to probe chemical compounds with molecular specificity without exogenous contrast agents. Nonlinear optical techniques including two-photon excitation fluorescence (2PEF), fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), second harmonic generation (SHG), coherent anti-Stokes and stimulated Raman scattering (CARS and SRS, respectively), as well as transient and sum frequency absorption (TA and SFA, respectively), have been widely used to explore the physiology and microanatomy of skin. Recently, these modalities have shed light on dermal processes that could not have otherwise been observed, including the spatiotemporal monitoring of cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. However, a challenge quickly arises when studying such chemicals in a dermatological context: many exogenous compounds have optical signatures that can interfere with the signals that would otherwise be acquired from intact skin. For example, oily solvents exhibit strong signals when probing CH2 vibrations with CARS/SRS; chemical sun filters appear bright in 2PEF microscopy; and darkly colored compounds readily absorb light across a broad spectrum, producing strong TA/SFA signals. Thus, this discussion will first focus on the molecular contrast in skin that can be probed using the aforementioned nonlinear optical techniques. This will be followed by an overview of strategies that take advantage of the exogenous compounds' optical signatures to probe spatiotemporal dynamics while preserving endogenous information from skin.

  12. Bright field microscopy as an alternative to whole cell fluorescence in automated analysis of macrophage images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyrki Selinummi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fluorescence microscopy is the standard tool for detection and analysis of cellular phenomena. This technique, however, has a number of drawbacks such as the limited number of available fluorescent channels in microscopes, overlapping excitation and emission spectra of the stains, and phototoxicity. METHODOLOGY: We here present and validate a method to automatically detect cell population outlines directly from bright field images. By imaging samples with several focus levels forming a bright field -stack, and by measuring the intensity variations of this stack over the -dimension, we construct a new two dimensional projection image of increased contrast. With additional information for locations of each cell, such as stained nuclei, this bright field projection image can be used instead of whole cell fluorescence to locate borders of individual cells, separating touching cells, and enabling single cell analysis. Using the popular CellProfiler freeware cell image analysis software mainly targeted for fluorescence microscopy, we validate our method by automatically segmenting low contrast and rather complex shaped murine macrophage cells. SIGNIFICANCE: The proposed approach frees up a fluorescence channel, which can be used for subcellular studies. It also facilitates cell shape measurement in experiments where whole cell fluorescent staining is either not available, or is dependent on a particular experimental condition. We show that whole cell area detection results using our projected bright field images match closely to the standard approach where cell areas are localized using fluorescence, and conclude that the high contrast bright field projection image can directly replace one fluorescent channel in whole cell quantification. Matlab code for calculating the projections can be downloaded from the supplementary site: http://sites.google.com/site/brightfieldorstaining.

  13. Errors in confocal fluorescence ratiometric imaging microscopy due to chromatic aberration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuxiang; Gmitro, Arthur F

    2011-01-01

    Confocal fluorescence ratiometric imaging is an optical technique used to measure a variety of important biological parameters. A small amount of chromatic aberration in the microscope system can introduce a variation in the signal ratio dependent on the fluorophore concentration gradient along the optical axis and lead to bias in the measurement. We present a theoretical model of this effect. Experimental results and simulations clearly demonstrate that this error can be significant and should not be ignored.

  14. Homogeneous fluorescent thin films as long-term stable microscopy reference layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brülisauer, Martina; ćaǧin, Emine; Bertsch, Dietmar; Lüthi, Stefan; Dietrich, Klaus; Heeb, Peter; Stärker, Ulrich; Bernard, André

    2017-05-01

    Calibration and validation of fluorescence microscopy devices and components require a high level of stability and repeatability in their fluorescent properties, both spatially and temporally. In order to establish a dependable reference point, from which all variations within the microscope and peripheral devices can be tested, an exceedingly homogeneous fluorescence response must be provided through a calibration tool. We present material system optimization and microfabrication process development, as well as long-term stability considerations for such a calibration tool. Stringent specifications for film thickness (microscope lens. High spatial resolutions demands use of high quality lenses that typically show low field curvatures and good chromatic corrections. Therefore, the focal plane is flat and well defined in the z-plane. Fluorescent, ligand capped core-shell quantum dots (SMQDs) were embedded in diluted PMMA at low concentrations. The formulations were spin-coated on silicon and glass wafers to obtain films with thicknesses under 1 μm and low variations on a 100 mm wafer. Fluorescence properties of the SMQD were preserved in the matrix material, and agglomerations were not detectable in the fluorescence response nor in SEM images. Gradual degradation of the fluorescence response due to film aging was managed through robust packaging solutions.

  15. Applying fluorescence microscopy to the investigation of the behavior of foodborne pathogens on produce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, Maria T.

    2009-05-01

    In the past decade, the development of new tools to better visualize microbes at the cellular scale has spurred a renaissance in the application of microscopy to the study of bacteria in their natural environment. This renewed interest in microscopy may be largely attributable to the advent of the confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and to the discovery of the green fluorescent protein. This article provides information about the use of fluorescence microscopy combined with fluorescent labels such as GFP, DsRed, and DNA stains, with immunofluorescence, and with digital image analysis, to examine the behavior of bacteria and other microbes on plant surfaces. Some of the advantages and pitfalls of these methods will be described using practical examples derived from studies of the ecology of foodborne pathogens, namely Salmonella enterica and E. coli O157:H7, on fresh fruit and vegetables. Confocal microscopy has been a powerful approach to uncover some of the factors involved in the association of produce with epidemics caused by these human pathogens and their interaction with other microbes in their nonhost environment.

  16. Highly fluorescent silver nanoclusters in alumina-silica composite optical fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halder, A.; Chattopadhyay, R.; Majumder, S.; Paul, M. C.; Das, S.; Bhadra, S. K., E-mail: skbhadra@cgcri.res.in [Fiber Optics and Photonics Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja S. C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Bysakh, S.; Unnikrishnan, M. [Material Characterization Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja S. C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2015-01-05

    An efficient visible fluorescent optical fiber embedded with silver nanoclusters (Ag-NCs) having size ∼1 nm, uniformly distributed in alumina-silica composite core glass, is reported. Fibers are fabricated in a repetitive controlled way through modified chemical vapour deposition process associated with solution doping technique. Fibers are drawn from the transparent preforms by conventional fiber drawing process. Structural characteristics of the doped fibers are studied using transmission electron microscopy and electron probe micro analysis. The oxidation state of Ag within Ag-NCs is investigated by X-ray photo electron spectroscopy. The observed significant fluorescence of the metal clusters in fabricated fibers is correlated with electronic model. The experimentally observed size dependent absorption of the metal clusters in fabricated fibers is explained with the help of reported results calculated by ab-initio density functional theory. These optical fibers may open up an opportunity of realizing tunable wavelength fiber laser without the help of rare earth elements.

  17. Optical gating of perylene bisimide fluorescence using dithienylcyclopentene photochromic switches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pärs, Martti; Köhler, Jürgen, E-mail: juergen.koehler@uni-bayreuth.de [Experimental Physics IV, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Gräf, Katja; Bauer, Peter; Thelakkat, Mukundan [Applied Functional Polymers, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2013-11-25

    The emission of millions of fluorescence photons from a chromophore is controlled by the absorption of a few tens of photons in a photochromic molecule. The parameters that determine the efficiency of this process are investigated, providing insights for the development of an all-optical gate.

  18. Thermal maturity of Tasmanites microfossils from confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackley, Paul C.; Kus, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    We report here, for the first time, spectral properties of Tasmanites microfossils determined by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy (CLSM, using Ar 458 nm excitation). The Tasmanites occur in a well-characterized natural maturation sequence (Ro 0.48–0.74%) of Devonian shale (n = 3 samples) from the Appalachian Basin. Spectral property λmax shows excellent agreement (r2 = 0.99) with extant spectra from interlaboratory studies which used conventional fluorescence microscopy techniques. This result suggests spectral measurements from CLSM can be used to infer thermal maturity of fluorescent organic materials in geologic samples. Spectra of regions with high fluorescence intensity at fold apices and flanks in individual Tasmanites are blue-shifted relative to less-deformed areas in the same body that have lower fluorescence intensity. This is interpreted to result from decreased quenching moiety concentration at these locations, and indicates caution is needed in the selection of measurement regions in conventional fluorescence microscopy, where it is common practice to select high intensity regions for improved signal intensity and better signal to noise ratios. This study also documents application of CLSM to microstructural characterization of Tasmanites microfossils. Finally, based on an extant empirical relation between conventional λmax values and bitumen reflectance, λmax values from CLSM of Tasmanites microfossils can be used to calculate a bitumen reflectance equivalent value. The results presented herein can be used as a basis to broaden the future application of CLSM in the geological sciences into hydrocarbon prospecting and basin analysis.

  19. Fiber optical asssembly for fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltch, Martin S.; Gray, Perry Clayton; Rubenstein, Richard

    2015-08-18

    System is provided for detecting the presence of an analyte of interest in a sample, said system comprising an elongated, transparent container for a sample; an excitation source in optical communication with the sample, wherein radiation from the excitation source is directed along the length of the sample, and wherein the radiation induces a signal which is emitted from the sample; and, at least two linear arrays disposed about the sample holder, each linear array comprising a plurality of optical fibers having a first end and a second end, wherein the first ends of the fibers are disposed along the length of the container and in proximity thereto; the second ends of the fibers of each array are bundled together to form a single end port.

  20. Surface plasmon resonance microscopy: Achieving a quantitative optical response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Alexander W.; Halter, Michael; Plant, Anne L.; Elliott, John T.

    2016-09-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging allows real-time label-free imaging based on index of refraction and changes in index of refraction at an interface. Optical parameter analysis is achieved by application of the Fresnel model to SPR data typically taken by an instrument in a prism based figuration. We carry out SPR imaging on a microscope by launching light into a sample and collecting reflected light through a high numerical aperture microscope objective. The SPR microscope enables spatial resolution that approaches the diffraction limit and has a dynamic range that allows detection of subnanometer to submicrometer changes in thickness of biological material at a surface. However, unambiguous quantitative interpretation of SPR changes using the microscope system could not be achieved using the Fresnel model because of polarization dependent attenuation and optical aberration that occurs in the high numerical aperture objective. To overcome this problem, we demonstrate a model to correct for polarization diattenuation and optical aberrations in the SPR data and develop a procedure to calibrate reflectivity to index of refraction values. The calibration and correction strategy for quantitative analysis was validated by comparing the known indices of refraction of bulk materials with corrected SPR data interpreted with the Fresnel model. Subsequently, we applied our SPR microscopy method to evaluate the index of refraction for a series of polymer microspheres in aqueous media and validated the quality of the measurement with quantitative phase microscopy.

  1. Multispectral guided fluorescence diffuse optical tomography using upconverting nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svenmarker, Pontus, E-mail: pontus.svenmarker@physics.umu.se [Department of Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Department of Physics, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå (Sweden); Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR), Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå (Sweden); Xu, Can T.; Liu, Haichun; Wu, Xia; Andersson-Engels, Stefan [Department of Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-02-17

    We report on improved image detectability for fluorescence diffuse optical tomography using upconverting nanoparticles doped with rare-earth elements. Core-shell NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}@NaYF{sub 4} upconverting nanoparticles were synthesized through a stoichiometric method. The Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} sensitizer-activator pair yielded two anti-Stokes shifted fluorescence emission bands at 540 nm and 660 nm, here used to a priori estimate the fluorescence source depth with sub-millimeter precision. A spatially varying regularization incorporated the a priori fluorescence source depth estimation into the tomography reconstruction scheme. Tissue phantom experiments showed both an improved resolution and contrast in the reconstructed images as compared to not using any a priori information.

  2. Combination of Small Molecule Microarray and Confocal Microscopy Techniques for Live Cell Staining Fluorescent Dye Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Bokros

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Discovering new fluorochromes is significantly advanced by high-throughput screening (HTS methods. In the present study a combination of small molecule microarray (SMM prescreening and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM was developed in order to discover novel cell staining fluorescent dyes. Compounds with high native fluorescence were selected from a 14,585-member library and further tested on living cells under the microscope. Eleven compartment-specific, cell-permeable (or plasma membrane-targeted fluorochromes were identified. Their cytotoxicity was tested and found that between 1–10 micromolar range, they were non-toxic even during long-term incubations.

  3. Direct characterization of planar waveguide modes by Fourier plane fluorescence leakage radiation microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Douguo; Wang, Xiangxian; Wang, Pei; Ming, Hai

    2011-01-01

    In this letter, the leakage radiation microscopy (LRM) is extended into characterization of planar waveguide modes (WMs) rather than surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) taking advantages of the coupling between WMs and fluorescence emission. Propagation constants of different WMs allowed in the same planar waveguide can be simultaneously and rapidly derived from the Fourier plane image of fluorescence based LRM. Numerical simulations are also carried out to calculate propagation constants of these modes, which are consistent with experimental results. Our experiments provide a simple but high efficient method to characterize planar waveguides.

  4. Microplate-compatible total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy for receptor pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minghan; Zaytseva, Natalya V.; Wu, Qi; Li, Min; Fang, Ye

    2013-05-01

    We report the use of total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy for analyzing receptor pharmacology and the development of a microplate-compatible TIRF imaging system. Using stably expressed green fluorescence protein tagged β2-adrenergic receptor as the reporter, we found that the activation of different receptors results in distinct kinetic signatures of the TIRF intensity of cells. These TIRF signatures closely resemble the characteristics of their respective label-free dynamic mass redistribution signals in the same cells. This suggests that TIRF in microplate can be used for profiling and screening drugs.

  5. Fluorescence spectra of atomic ensembles in a magneto-optical trap as an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Seokchan; Kang, Sungsam; Kim, Wook-Rae; Kim, Jung-Ryul; An, Kyungwon

    2015-01-01

    We present a study on characteristics of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) as an optical lattice. Fluorescence spectra of atoms trapped in a MOT with a passively phase-stabilized beam configuration have been measured by means of the photon-counting heterodyne spectroscopy. We observe a narrow Rayleigh peak and well-resolved Raman sidebands in the fluorescence spectra which clearly show that the MOT itself behaves as a three-dimensional optical lattice. Optical-lattice-like properties of the phase-stabilized MOT such as vibrational frequencies and lineshapes of Rayleigh peak and Raman sidebands are investigated systematically for various trap conditions.

  6. Efficient Fiber Optic Detection of Trapped Ion Fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    VanDevender, A P; Amini, J; Leibfried, D; Wineland, D J

    2010-01-01

    Integration of fiber optics may play a critical role in the development of quantum information processors based on trapped ions and atoms by enabling scalable collection and delivery of light and coupling trapped ions to optical microcavities. We trap 24Mg+ ions in a surface-electrode Paul trap that includes an integrated optical fiber for detecting 280-nm fluorescence photons. The collection numerical aperture is 0.37 and total collection efficiency is 2.1 %. The ion can be positioned between 80 \\mum and 100 \\mum from the tip of the fiber by use of an adjustable rf-pseudopotential.

  7. Quantitative interferometric microscopy cytometer based on regularized optical flow algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Liang; Vargas, Javier; Wang, Shouyu; Li, Zhenhua; Liu, Fei

    2015-09-01

    Cell detections and analysis are important in various fields, such as medical observations and disease diagnoses. In order to analyze the cell parameters as well as observe the samples directly, in this paper, we present an improved quantitative interferometric microscopy cytometer, which can monitor the quantitative phase distributions of bio-samples and realize cellular parameter statistics. The proposed system is able to recover the phase imaging of biological samples in the expanded field of view via a regularized optical flow demodulation algorithm. This algorithm reconstructs the phase distribution with high accuracy with only two interferograms acquired at different time points simplifying the scanning system. Additionally, the method is totally automatic, and therefore it is convenient for establishing a quantitative phase cytometer. Moreover, the phase retrieval approach is robust against noise and background. Excitingly, red blood cells are readily investigated with the quantitative interferometric microscopy cytometer system.

  8. Nonlinear Optical Microscopy Signal Processing Strategies in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adur, Javier; Carvalho, Hernandes F; Cesar, Carlos L; Casco, Víctor H

    2014-01-01

    This work reviews the most relevant present-day processing methods used to improve the accuracy of multimodal nonlinear images in the detection of epithelial cancer and the supporting stroma. Special emphasis has been placed on methods of non linear optical (NLO) microscopy image processing such as: second harmonic to autofluorescence ageing index of dermis (SAAID), tumor-associated collagen signatures (TACS), fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis, and gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM)-based methods. These strategies are presented as a set of potential valuable diagnostic tools for early cancer detection. It may be proposed that the combination of NLO microscopy and informatics based image analysis approaches described in this review (all carried out on free software) may represent a powerful tool to investigate collagen organization and remodeling of extracellular matrix in carcinogenesis processes. PMID:24737930

  9. Nonlinear optical microscopy improvement by focal-point axial modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashtabi, Mahdi Mozdoor; Massudi, Reza

    2016-05-01

    Among the most important challenges of microscopy-even more important than the resolution enhancement, especially in biological and neuroscience applications-is noninvasive and label-free imaging deeper into live scattering samples. However, the fundamental limitation on imaging depth is the signal-to-background ratio in scattering biological tissues. Here, using a vibrating microscope objective in conjunction with a lock-in amplifier, we demonstrate the background cancellation in imaging the samples surrounded by turbid and scattering media, which leads to more clear images deeper into the samples. Furthermore, this technique offers the localization and resolution enhancement as well as resolves ambiguities in signal interpretation, using a single-color laser. This technique is applicable to most nonlinear as well as some linear point-scanning optical microscopies.

  10. DAPI-fluorescent fading: a problem in microscopy or a way to measure nuclear DNA content?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian; Álvarez-Borrego, Josué; Kober, V.; del Río-Portilla, Miguel Á.

    2006-01-01

    In observation by confocal or conventional fluorescence microscopy, the retardation of the lost in fluorescence, from highest signal of fluorescence to lowest intensity are important factors in order to obtain accurate images. This problem is very common in fluorochromes for nuclear DNA and especially for DAPI stain. The fluorescence of DAPI is rapidly lost when it is exposure to excitation by ultra violet (UV) light, and especially under optimal condition of observation. Although the fading process could be retardate by using of mounting medium with antifading solutions, the photochemical process underlying the fluorescence decay has not yet been fully explained. In addiction, neither relationship has been tested between the fluorescence fading and nuclear DNA content. However, the capacity of the DNA to absorb UV light is knows. In order to test this relationship we measured by means of image analysis the fluorescence intensity in several nuclei types during a fading period. The analysis was performed by an algorithm specifically built in MATLAB software. The relationship between nuclear DNA content and DAPI-fluorescence fading was found equal to 99%. This study demonstrates the feasibility for estimates genome size by quantification of fluorescence fading. In this context, the present method allows to measure nuclear DNA content in several medical applications (cancer, HIV, organ transplants, etc). Nowadays, for measuring DNA content, flow cytometry is widely used; however, with the flow cytometry method it is not possible to select a specific group of cells, such as from a specific region of a tumor. Moreover, the using of image analysis allows automatizing diagnostics procedures.

  11. Integrated Micro-Optical Fluorescence Detection System for Microfluidic Electrochromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; ARNOLD,DON W.; ASBILL,RANDOLPH E.; BAILEY,CHRISTOPHER G.; CARTER,TONY RAY; KEMME,SHANALYN A.; MATZKE,CAROLYN M.; SAMORA,SALLY; SWEATT,WILLIAM C.; WARREN,MIAL E.; WENDT,JOEL R.

    1999-09-16

    The authors describe the design and microfabrication of an extremely compact optical system as a key element in an integrated capillary-channel electrochromatograph with laser induced fluorescence detection. The optical design uses substrate-mode propagation within the fused silica substrate. The optical system includes a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) array, two high performance microlenses and a commercial photodetector. The microlenses are multilevel diffractive optics patterned by electron beam lithography and etched by reactive ion etching in fused silica. Two generations of optical subsystems are described. The first generation design is integrated directly onto the capillary channel-containing substrate with a 6 mm separation between the VCSEL and photodetector. The second generation design separates the optical system onto its own module and the source to detector length is further compressed to 3.5 mm. The systems are designed for indirect fluorescence detection using infrared dyes. The first generation design has been tested with a 750 nm VCSEL exciting a 10{sup -4} M solution of CY-7 dye. The observed signal-to-noise ratio of better than 100:1 demonstrates that the background signal from scattered pump light is low despite the compact size of the optical system and meets the system sensitivity requirements.

  12. Imaging photothermal microscopy for absorption measurements of optical coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunxian Tao; Yuanan Zhao; Hongbo He; Dawei Li; Jianda Shao; Zhengxiu Fan

    2009-01-01

    @@ For absorption measurement of large-aperture optical coatings, a novel method of imaging photothermal microscopy based on image lock-in technique is presented.Detailed theoretical analysis and numerical calculation are made based on the image photothermal technique.The feasibility of this imaging method is proved through the coincidence between the theoretical results of single spot method and multi-channel method.The measuring speed of this imaging method can be increased hundreds of times compared with that of the raster scanning.This technique can expand the applications of photothermal technique.

  13. Three-dimensional super-resolution imaging for fluorescence emission difference microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangting You

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose a method theoretically to break the diffraction limit and to improve the resolution in all three dimensions for fluorescence emission difference microscopy. We produce two kinds of hollow focal spot by phase modulation. By incoherent superposition, these two kinds of focal spot yield a 3D hollow focal spot. The optimal proportion of these two kinds of spot is given in the paper. By employing 3D hollow focal spot, super-resolution image can be yielded by means of fluorescence emission difference microscopy, with resolution enhanced both laterally and axially. According to computation result, size of point spread function of three-dimensional super-resolution imaging is reduced by about 40% in all three spatial directions with respect to confocal imaging.

  14. Functional screening of intracardiac cell transplants using two-photon fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wen; Soonpaa, Mark H; Field, Loren J; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Firulli, Anthony B; Shou, Weinian; Rubart, Michael

    2012-08-01

    Although the adult mammalian myocardium exhibits a limited ability to undergo regenerative growth, its intrinsic renewal rate is insufficient to compensate for myocyte loss during cardiac disease. Transplantation of donor cardiomyocytes or cardiomyogenic stem cells is considered a promising strategy for reconstitution of cardiac mass, provided the engrafted cells functionally integrate with host myocardium and actively contribute to its contractile force. The authors previously developed a two-photon fluorescence microscopy-based assay that allows in situ screening of donor cell function after intracardiac delivery of the cells. This report reviews the techniques of two-photon fluorescence microscopy and summarizes its application for quantifying the extent to which a variety of donor cell types stably and functionally couple with the recipient myocardium.

  15. Use of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) as a Timer of Cell Cycle S Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkelman, Irina A; Dmitriev, Ruslan I; Foley, Tara; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of thymidine analogues in replicating DNA, coupled with antibody and fluorophore staining, allows analysis of cell proliferation, but is currently limited to monolayer cultures, fixed cells and end-point assays. We describe a simple microscopy imaging method for live real-time analysis of cell proliferation, S phase progression over several division cycles, effects of anti-proliferative drugs and other applications. It is based on the prominent (~ 1.7-fold) quenching of fluorescence lifetime of a common cell-permeable nuclear stain, Hoechst 33342 upon the incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) in genomic DNA and detection by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We show that quantitative and accurate FLIM technique allows high-content, multi-parametric dynamic analyses, far superior to the intensity-based imaging. We demonstrate its uses with monolayer cell cultures, complex 3D tissue models of tumor cell spheroids and intestinal organoids, and in physiological study with metformin treatment.

  16. Fluorescence fluctuation microscopy: a diversified arsenal of methods to investigate molecular dynamics inside cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidemann, Thomas; Mücksch, Jonas; Schwille, Petra

    2014-10-01

    Fluorescence microscopy provides insight into the subcellular organization of biological functions. However, images are snap shots averaging over a highly dynamic molecular system. Fluorescence fluctuation microscopy, employing similar detection technology, encompasses a powerful arsenal of analysis tools that investigate the molecular heterogeneity in space and time. Analyzing signal fluctuations from small ensembles (several hundred particles) reveals their concentration, the stoichiometry, the stochastic motion, as well as superimposed signatures of the environment such as spatial confinement and binding events. Thus, fluctuation analysis provides access to dynamic molecular properties that can be used to build physical models of cellular processes. In the last decade these methods experienced a remarkable diversification, which we revisit here with a particular focus on live cell applications.

  17. Enzyme-Free Detection of Mutations in Cancer DNA Using Synthetic Oligonucleotide Probes and Fluorescence Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miotke, Laura; Maity, Arindam; Ji, Hanlee

    2015-01-01

    microscopy and nucleic acid analogues have been proposed so far. METHODS AND RESULTS: Here we report a novel enzyme-free approach to efficiently detect cancer mutations. This assay includes gene-specific target enrichment followed by annealing to oligonucleotides containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs...... 1000-fold above the potential detection limit. CONCLUSION: Overall, the novel assay we describe could become a new approach to rapid, reliable and enzyme-free diagnostics of cancer or other associated DNA targets. Importantly, stoichiometry of wild type and mutant targets is conserved in our assay...... of methods since they would allow rapid and relatively inexpensive detection of nucleic acids. Modern fluorescence microscopy is having a huge impact on detection of biomolecules at previously unachievable resolution. However, no straightforward methods to detect DNA in a non-enzymatic way using fluorescence...

  18. High speed sub-micrometric microscopy using optical polymer microlens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.H.Zeng; J.Plain; S.Jradi; P.Renaud Goud; R.Deturche; P.Royer; R.Bachelot

    2009-01-01

    We report the high speed scanning submicronic microscopy (SSM) using a low cost polymer microlens integrated at the extremity of an optical fiber.These microlenses are fabricated by a free-radical photopolymerization method.Using a polymer microlens with a radius of curvature of 250 nm,a sub-micrometric gold pattern is imaged experimentally by SSM.Different distances between the tip and the sample are used with a high scanning speed of 200 cm/s.In particular,metallic absorption contrasts are described with an optical spatial resolution of 250 nm at the wavelength of 532 nm.Moreover,finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations concerning the focal lengths of microlenses with different geometries and heights support the experimental data.

  19. Fluorescence microscopy studies of a peripheral-benzodiazepine-receptor-targeted molecular probe for brain tumor imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, Laura; Vernier, P. Thomas; Manning, H. Charles; Salemi, Sarah; Li, Aimin; Craft, Cheryl M.; Gundersen, Martin A.; Bornhop, Darryl J.

    2003-10-01

    This study investigates the potential of a new multi-modal lanthanide chelate complex for specifically targeting brain tumor cells. We report here results from ongoing studies of up-take, sub-cellular localization and binding specificity of this new molecular imaging probe. Fluorescence microscopy investigations in living rat C6 glioma tumor cells demonstrate that the new imaging agent has affinity for glioma cells and binds to mitochondria.

  20. Nuclear uptake of ultrasmall gold-doxorubicin conjugates imaged by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Shastry, Sathvik; Bradforth, Stephen E.; Nadeau, Jay L.

    2014-11-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has been used to image free and encapsulated doxorubicin (Dox) uptake into cells, since interaction of Dox with DNA leads to a characteristic lifetime change. However, none of the reported Dox conjugates were able to enter cell nuclei. In this work, we use FLIM to show nuclear uptake of 2.7 nm mean diameter Au nanoparticles conjugated to Dox. The pattern of labelling differed substantially from what was seen with free Dox, with slower nuclear entry and stronger cytoplasmic labelling at all time points. As the cells died, the pattern of labelling changed further as intracellular structures disintegrated, consistent with association of Au-Dox to membranes. The patterns of Au distribution and intracellular structure changes were confirmed using electron microscopy, and indicate different mechanisms of cytotoxicity with stable Au-Dox conjugates compared to Dox alone. Such conjugates are promising tools for overcoming resistance in Dox-resistant cancers.Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has been used to image free and encapsulated doxorubicin (Dox) uptake into cells, since interaction of Dox with DNA leads to a characteristic lifetime change. However, none of the reported Dox conjugates were able to enter cell nuclei. In this work, we use FLIM to show nuclear uptake of 2.7 nm mean diameter Au nanoparticles conjugated to Dox. The pattern of labelling differed substantially from what was seen with free Dox, with slower nuclear entry and stronger cytoplasmic labelling at all time points. As the cells died, the pattern of labelling changed further as intracellular structures disintegrated, consistent with association of Au-Dox to membranes. The patterns of Au distribution and intracellular structure changes were confirmed using electron microscopy, and indicate different mechanisms of cytotoxicity with stable Au-Dox conjugates compared to Dox alone. Such conjugates are promising tools for overcoming resistance in

  1. Functional imaging in bulk tissue specimens using optical emission tomography: fluorescence preservation during optical clearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhalkar, H. S.; Dewhirst, M.; Oliver, T.; Cao, Y.; Oldham, M.

    2007-04-01

    Optical emission computed tomography (optical-ECT) is a technique for imaging the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of fluorescent probes in biological tissue specimens with high contrast and spatial resolution. In optical-ECT, functional information can be imaged by (i) systemic application of functional labels (e.g. fluorophore labelled proteins) and/or (ii) endogenous expression of fluorescent reporter proteins (e.g. red fluorescent protein (RFP), green fluorescent protein (GFP)) in vivo. An essential prerequisite for optical-ECT is optical clearing, a procedure where tissue specimens are made transparent to light by sequential perfusion with fixing, dehydrating and clearing agents. In this study, we investigate clearing protocols involving a selection of common fixing (4% buffered paraformaldehyde (PFA), methanol and ethanol), dehydrating (methanol and ethanol) and clearing agents (methyl salicylate and benzyl-alcohol-benzyl-benzoate (BABB)) in order to determine a 'fluorescence friendly' clearing procedure. Cell culture experiments were employed to optimize the sequence of chemical treatments that best preserve fluorescence. Texas red (TxRed), fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), RFP and GFP were tested as fluorophores and fluorescent reporter proteins of interest. Fluorescent and control cells were imaged on a microscope using a DSred2 and FITC filter set. The most promising clearing protocols of cell culture experiments were applied to whole xenograft tumour specimens, to test their effectiveness in large unsectioned samples. Fluorescence of TxRed/FITC fluorophores was not found to be significantly affected by any of the test clearing protocols. RFP and GFP fluorescence, however, was found to be significantly greater when cell fixation was in ethanol. Fixation in either PFA or methanol resulted in diminished fluorescence. After ethanol fixation, the RFP and GFP fluorescence proved remarkably robust to subsequent exposure to either methyl salicylate or BABB

  2. Development of a dual-modal tissue diagnostic system combining time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and ultrasonic backscatter microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yang; Park, Jesung; Stephens, Douglas N.; Jo, Javier A.; Sun, Lei; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Saroufeem, Ramez M. G.; Shung, K. Kirk; Marcu, Laura

    2009-06-01

    We report a tissue diagnostic system which combines two complementary techniques of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) and ultrasonic backscatter microscopy (UBM). TR-LIFS evaluates the biochemical composition of tissue, while UBM provides tissue microanatomy and enables localization of the region of diagnostic interest. The TR-LIFS component consists of an optical fiber-based time-domain apparatus including a spectrometer, gated multichannel plate photomultiplier, and fast digitizer. It records the fluorescence with high sensitivity (nM concentration range) and time resolution as low as 300 ps. The UBM system consists of a transducer, pulser, receiving circuit, and positioning stage. The transducer used here is 45 MHz, unfocused, with axial and lateral resolutions 38 and 200 μm. Validation of the hybrid system and ultrasonic and spectroscopic data coregistration were conducted both in vitro (tissue phantom) and ex vivo (atherosclerotic tissue specimens of human aorta). Standard histopathological analysis of tissue samples was used to validate the UBM-TRLIFS data. Current results have demonstrated that spatially correlated UBM and TR-LIFS data provide complementary characterization of both morphology (necrotic core and calcium deposits) and biochemistry (collagen, elastin, and lipid features) of the atherosclerotic plaques at the same location. Thus, a combination of fluorescence spectroscopy with ultrasound imaging would allow for better identification of features associated with tissue pathologies. Current design and performance of the hybrid system suggests potential applications in clinical diagnosis of atherosclerotic plaque.

  3. High-speed confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy by analog mean-delay method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Youngjae; Kim, Donguk; Yang, Wenzhong; Kim, Dug Y.

    2010-02-01

    We have demonstrated the high-speed confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) by analog mean-delay (AMD) method. The AMD method is a new signal processing technique for calculation of fluorescence lifetime and it is very suitable for the high-speed confocal FLIM with good accuracy and photon economy. We achieved the acquisition speed of 7.7 frames per second for confocal FLIM imaging. Here, the highest photon detection rate for one pixel was larger than 125 MHz and averaged photon detection rate was more than 62.5 MHz. Based on our system, we successfully obtained a sequence of confocal fluorescence lifetime images of RBL-2H3 cell labeled with Fluo-3/AM and excited by 4αPDD (TRPV channel agonist) within one second.

  4. A new approach to dual-color two-photon microscopy with fluorescent proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebane Aleks

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two-photon dual-color imaging of tissues and cells labeled with fluorescent proteins (FPs is challenging because most two-photon microscopes only provide one laser excitation wavelength at a time. At present, methods for two-photon dual-color imaging are limited due to the requirement of large differences in Stokes shifts between the FPs used and their low two-photon absorption (2PA efficiency. Results Here we present a new method of dual-color two-photon microscopy that uses the simultaneous excitation of the lowest-energy electronic transition of a blue fluorescent protein and a higher-energy electronic transition of a red fluorescent protein. Conclusion Our method does not require large differences in Stokes shifts and can be extended to a variety of FP pairs with larger 2PA efficiency and more optimal imaging properties.

  5. In situ tracking of enzymatic breakdown of starch granules by synchrotron UV fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawil, Georges; Jamme, Frédéric; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Viksø-Nielsen, Anders; Colonna, Paul; Buléon, Alain

    2011-02-01

    Synchrotron UV fluorescence microscopy was used for the first time to visualize the adsorption and diffusion of an enzyme while degrading a solid substrate. The degradation pathway of single starch granules by two amylases, optimized for biofuel production and industrial starch hydrolysis, was followed by tryptophan fluorescence (excitation at 280 nm, emission filter at 300-400 nm) and visible light imaging. Thus, both the adsorption of enzyme onto starch granules at 283 nm resolution and the resulting morphological changes were recorded at different stages of hydrolysis. It is the first time that amylases were localized on starch without staining or adding a fluorescent probe at such high resolution. This technique presents a very high potential for imaging proteins in complex systems. Its sensitivity was demonstrated by the detection of GBSS (the granular bound starch synthase) at high recording times, GBSS being present at very low levels in maize starch granules.

  6. Comparison of Fluorescence Microscopy and Different Growth Media Culture Methods for Acanthamoeba Keratitis Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Avi; Geffen, Yuval; Socea, Soergiu D; Pastukh, Nina; Graffi, Shmuel

    2015-08-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK), a potentially blinding infection of the cornea, is caused by a free-living protozoan. Culture and microscopic examination of corneal scraping tissue material is the conventional method for identifying Acanthamoeba. In this article, we compared several methods for AK diagnosis of 32 patients: microscopic examination using fluorescent dye, specific culture on growth media-non-nutrient agar (NNA), culture on liquid growth media-peptone yeast glucose (PYG), and TYI-S-33. AK was found in 14 patients. Thirteen of the specimens were found AK positive by fluorescence microscopic examination, 11 specimens were found AK positive on PYG growth media, and 9 specimens were found AK positive on TYI-S-33 growth media. Only five specimens were found AK positive on NNA growth media. Therefore, we recommend using fluorescence microscopy technique and culture method, especially PYG liquid media.

  7. Role of fluorescence microscopy in the assessment of Indian Gondwana coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, B.D. [Birbal Sahni Institute of Paleobotany, Lucknow (India)

    1995-12-25

    When a light of short wavelength excites organic matter, light of relatively longer wavelength is emitted from it and this phenomenon is known as autofluorescence. The coal maceral analysis under fluorescence mode (blue light/UV light excitation), therefore, has been found to be best suited to properly identify, characterize and quantify hydrogen-rich macerals. Utilising this technique, macerals like bituminite, fluorinite and exsudatinite were recognized for the first time. Certain other macerals (alginite and liptodetrinite), normally mistaken for mineral matter under routine petrographic analysis, were also identified. Fluorescence microscopy, thus, not only added to the overall tally of liptinite group of macerals in Indian Gondwana coals, but also to their quantity. In addition to this, recognition of fluorescing vitrinite (perhydrous vitrinite) significantly contributed to the abundance of hydrogen-rich microconstitutents for these coals.

  8. Automatic measurement of compression wood cell attributes in fluorescence microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selig, B; Luengo Hendriks, C L; Bardage, S; Daniel, G; Borgefors, G

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a new automated method for analyzing compression wood fibers in fluorescence microscopy. Abnormal wood known as compression wood is present in almost every softwood tree harvested. Compression wood fibers show a different cell wall morphology and chemistry compared to normal wood fibers, and their mechanical and physical characteristics are considered detrimental for both construction wood and pulp and paper purposes. Currently there is the need for improved methodologies for characterization of lignin distribution in wood cell walls, such as from compression wood fibers, that will allow for a better understanding of fiber mechanical properties. Traditionally, analysis of fluorescence microscopy images of fiber cross-sections has been done manually, which is time consuming and subjective. Here, we present an automatic method, using digital image analysis, that detects and delineates softwood fibers in fluorescence microscopy images, dividing them into cell lumen, normal and highly lignified areas. It also quantifies the different areas, as well as measures cell wall thickness. The method is evaluated by comparing the automatic with a manual delineation. While the boundaries between the various fiber wall regions are detected using the automatic method with precision similar to inter and intra expert variability, the position of the boundary between lumen and the cell wall has a systematic shift that can be corrected. Our method allows for transverse structural characterization of compression wood fibers, which may allow for improved understanding of the micro-mechanical modeling of wood and pulp fibers.

  9. Cholesterol crystal binding of biliary immuno globulin A: visualization by fluorescence light microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frank Lammert; Stefan Sudfetd; Norbert Busch; Siegfried Matern

    2001-01-01

    AIM To assess potential contributions of biliary IgA for crystal agglomeration into gallstones, we visualized cholesterol crystal binding of biliary IgA.METHODS Crystal-binding biliary proteins were extracted from human gallbladder bile using lectin affinity chromatography. Biliary IgA was isolated from the bound protein fraction by immunoaffinity chromatography. Pure cholesterol monohydrate crystals were incubated with biliary IgA and fluoresceine isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated anti-lgA at 37C. Samples were examined under polarizing and fluorescence light microscopy with digital image processing.RESULTS Binding of biliary IgA to cholesterol monohydrate crystals could be visualized with FITC-conjugated anti-lgA antibodies. Peak fluorescence occurred at crystal edges and dislocations. Controls without biliary IgA or with biliary IgG showed no significant fluorescence.CONCLUSION Fluorescence light microscopy provided evidence for cholesterol crystal binding of biliary IgA. Cholesterol crystalbinding proteins like IgA might be important mediators of crystal agglomeration and growth of cholesterol gallstones by modifying the evolving crystal structures in vivo.

  10. Fluorescent quantum dots: synthesis, biomedical optical imaging, and biosafety assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaoyuan; Peng, Fei; Zhong, Yiling; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2014-12-01

    The marriage of nanomaterials with biology has significantly promoted advancement of biological techniques, profoundly facilitating basic research and practical applications in biological and biomedical fields. Taking advantages of unique optical properties (e.g., strong fluorescence, robust photostability, size-tunable emission wavelengths, etc.), fluorescent quantum dots (QDs), appearing as high-performance biological fluorescent nanoprobes, have been extensively explored for a variety of biomedical optical imaging applications. In this review, we present representative synthetic strategies for preparation of QDs and their applications in biomedical optical imaging, as well as risk assessments in vitro and in vivo. Briefly, we first summarize recent progress in fabrication of QDs via two rudimentary approaches, i.e., organometallic route and aqueous synthesis. Next we present representative achievement in QDs-based in vitro and in vivo biomedical optical imaging applications. We further discuss the toxicity assessment of QDs, ranging from cell studies to animal models. In the final section, we discuss challenges and perspectives for the QDs-relative bioapplications in the future.

  11. Volumetric label-free imaging and 3D reconstruction of mammalian cochlea based on two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Geng, Yang; Ye, Qing; Zhan, Zhenlin; Xie, Shusen

    2013-11-01

    The visualization of the delicate structure and spatial relationship of intracochlear sensory cells has relied on the laborious procedures of tissue excision, fixation, sectioning and staining for light and electron microscopy. Confocal microscopy is advantageous for its high resolution and deep penetration depth, yet disadvantageous due to the necessity of exogenous labeling. In this study, we present the volumetric imaging of rat cochlea without exogenous dyes using a near-infrared femtosecond laser as the excitation mechanism and endogenous two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) as the contrast mechanism. We find that TPEF exhibits strong contrast, allowing cellular and even subcellular resolution imaging of the cochlea, differentiating cell types, visualizing delicate structures and the radial nerve fiber. Our results further demonstrate that 3D reconstruction rendered with z-stacks of optical sections enables better revealment of fine structures and spatial relationships, and easily performed morphometric analysis. The TPEF-based optical biopsy technique provides great potential for new and sensitive diagnostic tools for hearing loss or hearing disorders, especially when combined with fiber-based microendoscopy.

  12. Multiple Signal Classification Algorithm (MUSICAL) for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Super-resolution microscopy is providing unprecedented insights into biology by resolving details much below the diffraction limit. State-of-the-art Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM) techniques for super-resolution are restricted by long acquisition and computational times, or the need of special fluorophores or chemical environments. Here, we propose a novel statistical super-resolution technique of wide-field fluorescence microscopy called MUltiple SIgnal Classification ALgorithm (MUSICAL) which has several advantages over SMLM techniques. MUSICAL provides resolution down to at least 50 nm, has low requirements on number of frames and excitation power and works even at high fluorophore concentrations. Further, it works with any fluorophore that exhibits blinking on the time scale of the recording. We compare imaging results of MUSICAL with SMLM and four contemporary statistical super-resolution methods for experiments of in-vitro actin filaments and datasets provided by independent research gro...

  13. Imaging of human differentiated 3D neural aggregates using light sheet fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio J Gualda

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of three dimensional cell cultures represents a big step for the better understanding of cell behavior and disease in a more natural like environment, providing not only single but multiple cell type interactions in a complex three dimensional matrix, highly resembling physiological conditions. Light sheet fluorescence microscopy is becoming an excellent tool for fast imaging of such three-dimensional biological structures. We demonstrate the potential of this technique for the imaging of human differentiated 3D neural aggregates in fixed and live samples, namely calcium imaging and cell death processes, showing the power of imaging modality compared with traditional microscopy. The combination of light sheet microscopy and 3D neural cultures will open the door to more challenging experiments involving drug testing at large scale as well as a better understanding of relevant biological processes in a more realistic environment.

  14. High-contrast fluorescence imaging in fixed and living cells using optimized optical switches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangxing Wu

    Full Text Available We present the design, synthesis and characterization of new functionalized fluorescent optical switches for rapid, all-visible light-mediated manipulation of fluorescence signals from labelled structures within living cells, and as probes for high-contrast optical lock-in detection (OLID imaging microscopy. A triazole-substituted BIPS (TzBIPS is identified from a rational synthetic design strategy that undergoes robust, rapid and reversible, visible light-driven transitions between a colorless spiro- (SP and a far-red absorbing merocyanine (MC state within living cells. The excited MC-state of TzBIPS may also decay to the MC-ground state emitting near infra-red fluorescence, which is used as a sensitive and quantitative read-out of the state of the optical switch in living cells. The SP to MC transition for a membrane-targeted TzBIPS probe (C₁₂-TzBIPS is triggered at 405 nm at an energy level compatible with studies in living cells, while the action spectrum of the reverse transition (MC to SP has a maximum at 650 nm. The SP to MC transition is complete within the 790 ns pixel dwell time of the confocal microscope, while a single cycle of optical switching between the SP and MC states in a region of interest is complete within 8 ms (125 Hz within living cells, the fastest rate attained for any optical switch probe in a biological sample. This property can be exploited for real-time correction of background signals in living cells. A reactive form of TzBIPS is linked to secondary antibodies and used, in conjunction with an enhanced scope-based analysis of the modulated MC-fluorescence in immuno-stained cells, for high-contrast immunofluorescence microscopic analysis of the actin cytoskeleton.

  15. Quantitative super-resolution localization microscopy of DNA in situ using Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Violet fluorescent probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominika Żurek-Biesiada

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM is a recently emerged optical imaging method that was shown to achieve a resolution in the order of tens of nanometers in intact cells. Novel high resolution imaging methods might be crucial for understanding of how the chromatin, a complex of DNA and proteins, is arranged in the eukaryotic cell nucleus. Such an approach utilizing switching of a fluorescent, DNA-binding dye Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Violet has been previously demonstrated by us (Żurek-Biesiada et al., 2015 [1]. Here we provide quantitative information on the influence of the chemical environment on the behavior of the dye, discuss the variability in the DNA-associated signal density, and demonstrate direct proof of enhanced structural resolution. Furthermore, we compare different visualization approaches. Finally, we describe various opportunities of multicolor DNA/SMLM imaging in eukaryotic cell nuclei.

  16. Quantitative super-resolution localization microscopy of DNA in situ using Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Violet fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żurek-Biesiada, Dominika; Szczurek, Aleksander T; Prakash, Kirti; Best, Gerrit; Mohana, Giriram K; Lee, Hyun-Keun; Roignant, Jean-Yves; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2016-06-01

    Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM) is a recently emerged optical imaging method that was shown to achieve a resolution in the order of tens of nanometers in intact cells. Novel high resolution imaging methods might be crucial for understanding of how the chromatin, a complex of DNA and proteins, is arranged in the eukaryotic cell nucleus. Such an approach utilizing switching of a fluorescent, DNA-binding dye Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Violet has been previously demonstrated by us (Żurek-Biesiada et al., 2015) [1]. Here we provide quantitative information on the influence of the chemical environment on the behavior of the dye, discuss the variability in the DNA-associated signal density, and demonstrate direct proof of enhanced structural resolution. Furthermore, we compare different visualization approaches. Finally, we describe various opportunities of multicolor DNA/SMLM imaging in eukaryotic cell nuclei.

  17. Determination of electric field at and near the focus of a cylindrical lens for applications in fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhajit B. Purnapatra

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We present an explicit computable integral solution of the electric field generated at the focal region of a cylindrical lens. This representation is based on vectorial diffraction theory and further enables the computation of the system point spread function of a cylindrical lens. It is assumed that there is no back-scattering and the contribution from the evanescent field is negligible. Stationary phase approximation along with the Fresnel transmission coefficients are employed for evaluating the polarization dependent electric field components. Studies were carried out to determine the polarization effects and to calculate the system resolution. The effect of s −, p − and randomly polarized light is studied on the fixed sample (electric dipole is fixed in space. Proposed approach allows better understanding of electric field effects at the focus of a cylindrical aplanatic system. This opens up future developments in the field of fluorescence microscopy and optical imaging.

  18. Construction of a BioFluorescence Optical Particle Counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaney, R.

    2009-04-01

    A bioaerosol fluorescence detection system is being constructed using an ellipsoid reflector based optical particle counter. The flux measuring device is to size submicron marine spray aerosol particles smaller than 100 nm in diameter. It will simultaneously non-destructively excite and detect fluorescence from organic matter contained in the aerosol. Chlorophyll-a is the primary fluorophor target, used as a marker for detecting phytoplankton (or derivatives thereof) in the particles. Particles have been sized to 167 nm in diameter and fluorescence detection testing is underway. The device will aid the quantification and identification of this organic material contained in marine spray aerosols, providing improved inputs into climate models and air quality assessments.

  19. Fluorescent optical fibre chemosensor for the detection of mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T. Hien; Wren, Stephen P.; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

    2016-11-01

    This work aims to develop a stable, compact and portable fibre optic sensing system which is capable of real time detection of the mercury ion (II), Hg2+. A novel fluorescent polymeric material for Hg2+ detection, based on a coumarin derivative (acting as the fluorophore) and an azathia crown ether moiety (acting as the mercury ion receptor), has been designed and synthesized. The material was covalently attached to the distal end of an optical fibre and exhibited a significant increase in fluorescence intensity in response to Hg2+ in the μM concentration range via a photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism. The sensor has also demonstrated a high selectivity for Hg2+ over other metal ions. A washing protocol was identified for sensor regeneration, allowing the probe to be re-used. The approach developed in this work can also be used for the preparation of sensors for other heavy metals.

  20. Imaging of membrane proteins using antenna-based optical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeppener, Christiane; Novotny, Lukas [Institute of Optics and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States)], E-mail: novotny@optics.rochester.edu

    2008-09-24

    The localization and identification of individual proteins is of key importance for the understanding of biological processes on the molecular scale. Here, we demonstrate near-field fluorescence imaging of single proteins in their native cell membrane. Incident laser radiation is localized and enhanced with an optical antenna in the form of a spherical gold particle attached to a pointed dielectric tip. Individual proteins can be identified with a diffraction-unlimited spatial resolution of {approx}50 nm. Besides determining the concentration and distribution of specific membrane proteins, this approach makes it possible to study the colocalization of different membrane proteins. Moreover, it enables a simultaneous recording of the membrane topology. Protein distributions can be correlated with the local membrane topology, thereby providing important information on the chemical and structural organization of cellular membranes.

  1. Field portable mobile phone based fluorescence microscopy for detection of Giardia lamblia cysts in water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan Koydemir, Hatice; Gorocs, Zoltan; McLeod, Euan; Tseng, Derek; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-03-01

    Giardia lamblia is a waterborne parasite that causes an intestinal infection, known as giardiasis, and it is found not only in countries with inadequate sanitation and unsafe water but also streams and lakes of developed countries. Simple, sensitive, and rapid detection of this pathogen is important for monitoring of drinking water. Here we present a cost-effective and field portable mobile-phone based fluorescence microscopy platform designed for automated detection of Giardia lamblia cysts in large volume water samples (i.e., 10 ml) to be used in low-resource field settings. This fluorescence microscope is integrated with a disposable water-sampling cassette, which is based on a flow-through porous polycarbonate membrane and provides a wide surface area for fluorescence imaging and enumeration of the captured Giardia cysts on the membrane. Water sample of interest, containing fluorescently labeled Giardia cysts, is introduced into the absorbent pads that are in contact with the membrane in the cassette by capillary action, which eliminates the need for electrically driven flow for sample processing. Our fluorescence microscope weighs ~170 grams in total and has all the components of a regular microscope, capable of detecting individual fluorescently labeled cysts under light-emitting-diode (LED) based excitation. Including all the sample preparation, labeling and imaging steps, the entire measurement takes less than one hour for a sample volume of 10 ml. This mobile phone based compact and cost-effective fluorescent imaging platform together with its machine learning based cyst counting interface is easy to use and can even work in resource limited and field settings for spatio-temporal monitoring of water quality.

  2. Hyperspectral Dark Field Optical Microscopy of Single Silver Nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Joly, Alan G.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2016-04-07

    We record spectrally (400 nm ≤ λ ≤ 675 nm, Δλ < 4.69 nm) and spatially (diffraction-limited, sampled at 85 nm2/pixel) resolved dark field (DF) scattering from single silver nanospheres of 100 nm in diameter. Hyperspectral DF optical microscopy is achieved by coupling a hyperspectral detector to an optical microscope, whereby spectrally resolved diffraction-limited images of hundreds of silver nanoparticles can be recorded in ~30 seconds. We demonstrate how the centers and edges of individual particles can be localized in 2D to within a single pixel (85 nm2), using a statistical method for examining texture based on a co-occurrence matrix. Subsequently, spatial averaging of the spectral response in a 3x3 pixel area around the particle centers affords ample signal-to-noise to resolve the plasmon resonance of a single silver nanosphere. A close inspection of the scattering spectra of 31 different nanospheres reveals that each particle has its unique (i) relative scattering efficiency, and (ii) plasmon resonance maximum and dephasing time. These observations are suggestive of nanometric structural variations over length scales much finer than the spatial resolution attainable using the all-optical technique described herein.

  3. Toward optical-tweezers-based force microscopy for airborne microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Rory M; Burnham, Daniel R; Reid, Jonathan P

    2014-12-20

    Optical tweezers have found widespread application in biological and colloidal physics for the measurement of pN forces over nanometer to micrometer length scales. Similar aerosol-phase measurements of interparticle force have not been reported in spite of the potential to better resolve particle coagulation kinetics. Various refractive index mismatches in the beam path as well as the need to explicitly account for gravity and inertial particle motion provide a number of challenges that must be overcome to make such measurements tractable. In this regard, we demonstrate schemes by which the particle position and trap stiffness may be unambiguously measured using bright-field microscopy with resolution comparable with analogous condensed-phase measurements. Moreover, some of the challenges of working with highly dynamic aqueous particles are introduced and exploited to observe size-dependent phenomena in aerosol optical tweezers. Notably, when combined with cavity-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, this provides a unique opportunity to explore trapping forces over a continuum of particle size and refractive index. It is expected that the methods developed will provide a basis for the measurement of pairwise interaction forces in aerosol optical tweezers while providing a probe of fundamental airborne particle trapping dynamics.

  4. Miniature fiber optic sensor based on fluorescence energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, David L.; Schultz, Jerome S.

    1992-04-01

    Optical fiber biosensors based on fluorescence assays have several distinct advantages when measuring biological analytes such as metabolites, cofactors, toxins, etc. Not only are optical signals immune to electronic interferences, but the polychromatic nature of most fluorochemical assays provides more potentially useful data about the system being studied. One of the most common difficulties normally encountered with optical biosensors is the inability to routinely recalibrate the optical and electronic components of the system throughout the life of the sensor. With this in mind, we present an optical fiber assay system for glucose based on a homogeneous singlet/singlet energy transfer assay along with the electronic instrumentation built to support the sensor system. In the sensor probe, glucose concentrations are indirectly measured from the level of fluorescence quenching caused by the homogeneous competition assay between TRITC labeled concanavalin A (receptor) and FITC labeled Dextran (ligand). The FITC signal is used to indicate glucose concentrations and the TRITC signal is used for internal calibration. Data is also presented on a protein derivatization procedure that was used to prevent aggregation of the receptor protein in solution. Also, a molecular model is described for the singlet/singlet energy transfer interactions that can occur in a model system composed of a monovalent ligand (FITC labeled papain) and a monovalent receptor (TRITC labeled concanavalin A).

  5. Bow-tie optical antenna probes for single-emitter scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahani, Javad N [Nano-Optics Group, National Center of Competence for Research in Nanoscale Science, Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Eisler, Hans-Juergen [Nano-Optics Group, National Center of Competence for Research in Nanoscale Science, Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Pohl, Dieter W [Nano-Optics Group, National Center of Competence for Research in Nanoscale Science, Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Pavius, Michael [Center of MicroNanoTechnology (CMI), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Flueckiger, Philippe [Center of MicroNanoTechnology (CMI), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Gasser, Philippe [EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Electronics/Metrology Laboratory, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Hecht, Bert [Nano-Optics Group, National Center of Competence for Research in Nanoscale Science, Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2007-03-28

    A method for the fabrication of bow-tie optical antennas at the apex of pyramidal Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} atomic force microscopy tips is described. We demonstrate that these novel optical probes are capable of sub-wavelength imaging of single quantum dots at room temperature. The enhanced and confined optical near-field at the antenna feed gap leads to locally enhanced photoluminescence (PL) of single quantum dots. Photoluminescence quenching due to the proximity of metal is found to be insignificant. The method holds promise for single quantum emitter imaging and spectroscopy at spatial resolution limited by the engineered antenna gap width exclusively.

  6. Localization and movement of mineral oil in plants by fluorescence and confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, B L; Sarafis, V; Beattie, G A C; White, R; Darley, E M; Spooner-Hart, R

    2005-10-01

    Fluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy were explored to investigate the movement and localization of mineral oils in citrus. In a laboratory experiment, fluorescence microscopy observation indicated that when a 'narrow' distillation fraction of an nC23 horticultural mineral oil was applied to adaxial and opposing abaxial leaf surfaces of potted orange [Citrus x aurantium L. (Sapindales: Rutaceae)] trees, oil penetrated steadily into treated leaves and, subsequently, moved to untreated petioles of the leaves and adjacent untreated stems. In another experiment, confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to visualize the penetration into, and the subsequent cellular distribution of, an nC24 agricultural mineral oil in C. trifoliata L. seedlings. Oil droplets penetrated or diffused into plants via both stomata and the cuticle of leaves and stems, and then moved within intercellular spaces and into various cells including phloem and xylem. Oil accumulated in droplets in intercellular spaces and within cells near the cell membrane. Oil entered cells without visibly damaging membranes or causing cell death. In a field experiment with mature orange trees, droplets of an nC23 horticultural mineral oil were observed, by fluorescence microscopy, in phloem sieve elements in spring flush growth produced 4-5 months and 16-17 months after the trees were sprayed with oil. These results suggest that movement of mineral oil in plants is both apoplastic via intercellular spaces and symplastic via plasmodesmata. The putative pattern of the translocation of mineral oil in plants and its relevance to oil-induced chronic phytotoxicity are discussed.

  7. New hardware and workflows for semi-automated correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy/tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorb, Martin; Gaechter, Leander; Avinoam, Ori; Sieckmann, Frank; Clarke, Mairi; Bebeacua, Cecilia; Bykov, Yury S; Sonnen, Andreas F-P; Lihl, Reinhard; Briggs, John A G

    2017-02-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy allows features of interest defined by fluorescence signals to be located in an electron micrograph of the same sample. Rare dynamic events or specific objects can be identified, targeted and imaged by electron microscopy or tomography. To combine it with structural studies using cryo-electron microscopy or tomography, fluorescence microscopy must be performed while maintaining the specimen vitrified at liquid-nitrogen temperatures and in a dry environment during imaging and transfer. Here we present instrumentation, software and an experimental workflow that improves the ease of use, throughput and performance of correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy. The new cryo-stage incorporates a specially modified high-numerical aperture objective lens and provides a stable and clean imaging environment. It is combined with a transfer shuttle for contamination-free loading of the specimen. Optimized microscope control software allows automated acquisition of the entire specimen area by cryo-fluorescence microscopy. The software also facilitates direct transfer of the fluorescence image and associated coordinates to the cryo-electron microscope for subsequent fluorescence-guided automated imaging. Here we describe these technological developments and present a detailed workflow, which we applied for automated cryo-electron microscopy and tomography of various specimens. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fluorescence microscopy methods for determining the viability of bacteria in association with mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M Brittany; Criss, Alison K

    2013-09-05

    Central to the field of bacterial pathogenesis is the ability to define if and how microbes survive after exposure to eukaryotic cells. Current protocols to address these questions include colony count assays, gentamicin protection assays, and electron microscopy. Colony count and gentamicin protection assays only assess the viability of the entire bacterial population and are unable to determine individual bacterial viability. Electron microscopy can be used to determine the viability of individual bacteria and provide information regarding their localization in host cells. However, bacteria often display a range of electron densities, making assessment of viability difficult. This article outlines protocols for the use of fluorescent dyes that reveal the viability of individual bacteria inside and associated with host cells. These assays were developed originally to assess survival of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in primary human neutrophils, but should be applicable to any bacterium-host cell interaction. These protocols combine membrane-permeable fluorescent dyes (SYTO9 and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole [DAPI]), which stain all bacteria, with membrane-impermeable fluorescent dyes (propidium iodide and SYTOX Green), which are only accessible to nonviable bacteria. Prior to eukaryotic cell permeabilization, an antibody or fluorescent reagent is added to identify extracellular bacteria. Thus these assays discriminate the viability of bacteria adherent to and inside eukaryotic cells. A protocol is also provided for using the viability dyes in combination with fluorescent antibodies to eukaryotic cell markers, in order to determine the subcellular localization of individual bacteria. The bacterial viability dyes discussed in this article are a sensitive complement and/or alternative to traditional microbiology techniques to evaluate the viability of individual bacteria and provide information regarding where bacteria survive in host cells.

  9. Phase filter enhanced STED-4Pi fluorescence microscopy: theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyba, M; Keller, J; Hell, S W [Department of NanoBiophotonics, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, D-37070 Goettingen (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    We study the point-spread and optical transfer-function (OTF) of a stimulated emission depletion (STED)-4Pi fluorescence microscope that provides diffraction unlimited resolution along the optic axis. Our calculations take into account the orientation of the linear transition dipole moment of the fluorescent molecules with respect to that of the focal field. We demonstrate a subdiffraction axial resolution of 44-48 nm for water-immersion lenses, corresponding to a 7-8-fold expansion of the OTF beyond the diffraction barrier of a single lens confocal microscope, which is in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions for the conditions applied. Furthermore, we study phase modifications of the wavefront of the stimulating beam that strengthen weakly transferred frequencies within the OTF support. The enlarged bandwidth enables the separation of objects at 76 nm axial distance.

  10. Interrogating Surface Functional Group Heterogeneity of Activated Thermoplastics Using Super-Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ONeil, Colleen E; Jackson, Joshua M; Shim, Sang-Hee; Soper, Steven A

    2016-04-01

    We present a novel approach for characterizing surfaces utilizing super-resolution fluorescence microscopy with subdiffraction limit spatial resolution. Thermoplastic surfaces were activated by UV/O3 or O2 plasma treatment under various conditions to generate pendant surface-confined carboxylic acids (-COOH). These surface functional groups were then labeled with a photoswitchable dye and interrogated using single-molecule, localization-based, super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to elucidate the surface heterogeneity of these functional groups across the activated surface. Data indicated nonuniform distributions of these functional groups for both COC and PMMA thermoplastics with the degree of heterogeneity being dose dependent. In addition, COC demonstrated relative higher surface density of functional groups compared to PMMA for both UV/O3 and O2 plasma treatment. The spatial distribution of -COOH groups secured from super-resolution imaging were used to simulate nonuniform patterns of electroosmotic flow in thermoplastic nanochannels. Simulations were compared to single-particle tracking of fluorescent nanoparticles within thermoplastic nanoslits to demonstrate the effects of surface functional group heterogeneity on the electrokinetic transport process.

  11. [Intensity loss of two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy images of mouse oocyte chromosomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng-Ying; Wu, Hong-Xin; Chen, Die-Yan; Ma, Wan-Yun

    2014-07-01

    As an optical microscope with high resolution, two-photon excitation (TPE) fluorescence microscope is widely used in noninvasive 3D optical imaging of biological samples. Compared with confocal laser scanning microscope, TPE fluorescence microscope provides a deeper detecting depth. In spite of that, the image quality of sample always declines as the detecting depth increases when a noninvasive 3D optical imaging of thicker samples is performed. Mouse oocytes with a large diameter, which play an important role in clinical and biological fields, have obvious absorption and scattering effects. In the present paper, we performed compensation for two-photon fluorescence images of mouse oocyte chromosomes. Using volume as a parameter, the attenuation degree of these chromosomes was also studied. The result of our data suggested that there exists a severe axial intensity loss in two-photon microscopic images of mouse oocytes due to the absorption and scattering effects. It is necessary to make compensation for these images of mouse oocyte chromosomes obtained from two-photon microscopic system. It will be specially needed in studying the quantitative three-dimensional information of mouse oocytes.

  12. Nonlinear optical microscopy for histology of fresh normal and cancerous pancreatic tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease with a 5-year survival rate of only 1-5%. The acceleration of intraoperative histological examination would be beneficial for better management of pancreatic cancer, suggesting an improved survival. Nonlinear optical methods based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF and second harmonic generation (SHG of intrinsic optical biomarkers show the ability to visualize the morphology of fresh tissues associated with histology, which is promising for real-time intraoperative evaluation of pancreatic cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to investigate whether the nonlinear optical imaging methods have the ability to characterize pancreatic histology at cellular resolution, we studied different types of pancreatic tissues by using label-free TPEF and SHG. Compared with other routine methods for the preparation of specimens, fresh tissues without processing were found to be most suitable for nonlinear optical imaging of pancreatic tissues. The detailed morphology of the normal rat pancreas was observed and related with the standard histological images. Comparatively speaking, the preliminary images of a small number of chemical-induced pancreatic cancer tissues showed visible neoplastic differences in the morphology of cells and extracellular matrix. The subcutaneous pancreatic tumor xenografts were further observed using the nonlinear optical microscopy, showing that most cells are leucocytes at 5 days after implantation, the tumor cells begin to proliferate at 10 days after implantation, and the extracellular collagen fibers become disordered as the xenografts grow. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study, nonlinear optical imaging was used to characterize the morphological details of fresh pancreatic tissues for the first time. We demonstrate that it is possible to provide real-time histological evaluation of pancreatic cancer by the nonlinear optical methods, which present an

  13. Micron-scale resolution optical tomography of entire mouse brains with confocal light sheet microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Ludovico; Bria, Alessandro; Costantini, Irene; Sacconi, Leonardo; Peng, Hanchuan; Iannello, Giulio; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2013-10-08

    Understanding the architecture of mammalian brain at single-cell resolution is one of the key issues of neuroscience. However, mapping neuronal soma and projections throughout the whole brain is still challenging for imaging and data management technologies. Indeed, macroscopic volumes need to be reconstructed with high resolution and contrast in a reasonable time, producing datasets in the TeraByte range. We recently demonstrated an optical method (confocal light sheet microscopy, CLSM) capable of obtaining micron-scale reconstruction of entire mouse brains labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Combining light sheet illumination and confocal detection, CLSM allows deep imaging inside macroscopic cleared specimens with high contrast and speed. Here we describe the complete experimental pipeline to obtain comprehensive and human-readable images of entire mouse brains labeled with fluorescent proteins. The clearing and the mounting procedures are described, together with the steps to perform an optical tomography on its whole volume by acquiring many parallel adjacent stacks. We showed the usage of open-source custom-made software tools enabling stitching of the multiple stacks and multi-resolution data navigation. Finally, we illustrated some example of brain maps: the cerebellum from an L7-GFP transgenic mouse, in which all Purkinje cells are selectively labeled, and the whole brain from a thy1-GFP-M mouse, characterized by a random sparse neuronal labeling.

  14. Absolute Position Total Internal Reflection Microscopy with an Optical Tweezer

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Lulu; Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Capasso, Federico

    2014-01-01

    A non-invasive, in-situ calibration method for Total Internal Reflection Microscopy (TIRM) based on optical tweezing is presented which greatly expands the capabilities of this technique. We show that by making only simple modifications to the basic TIRM sensing setup and procedure, a probe particle's absolute position relative to a dielectric interface may be known with better than 10 nm precision out to a distance greater than 1 $\\mu$m from the surface. This represents an approximate 10x improvement in error and 3x improvement in measurement range over conventional TIRM methods. The technique's advantage is in the direct measurement of the probe particle's scattering intensity vs. height profile in-situ, rather than relying on calculations or inexact system analogs for calibration. To demonstrate the improved versatility of the TIRM method in terms of tunability, precision, and range, we show our results for the hindered near-wall diffusion coefficient for a spherical dielectric particle.

  15. Application of the fluorescence light microscopy in the textural study of portland cement clinker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montoto San Miguel, Modesto

    1987-03-01

    Full Text Available The application of fluorescence light microscopy in the textural study of Portland cement clinker, specially its porosity, is presented. Principles and types of the technique are commented and the suggested sample preparation method is described. The use of fluorescence microscopy allows an easier study of the clinker porosity, and very proper images for automated quantification can be obtained. Besides, the samples can also be observed by reflected-light polarizing microscopy.

    Se presenta la utilidad de la microscopía óptica de fluorescencia para el estudio textural del clínker de cemento Portland, especialmente su porosidad. Se comentan los fundamentos y modalidades de la técnica, y se describe el método recomendado de preparación de muestras. La utilización de la microscopía de fluorescencia permite un estudio más fácil de la porosidad, obteniéndose imágenes muy apropiadas para su cuantificación mediante técnicas automatizadas. Además, las muestras para fluorescencia pueden ser estudiadas complementariamente por microscopía óptica de polarización por luz reflejada.

  16. High-Speed Fluorescence Microscopy: Lifetime Imaging in the Biomedical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Ammasi; Wang, Xue F.; Wodnick, Pawel; Gordon, Gerald W.; Kwon, Seongwook; Diliberto, Pamela A.; Herman, Brian

    1995-02-01

    The ability to observe the behavior of living cells and tissues provides unparalleled access to information regarding the organization and dynamics of complex cellular structures. While great strides have been made over the past 30 to 40 years in the design and application of a variety of novel optical microscopic techniques, until recently, it has not been possible to image biological phenomena that occur over very short time periods (nanosecond to millisecond) or over short distances (10 to 1000 [Angstrom capital A, ring]). However, the recent combination of (1) very rapidly gated and sensitive image intensifiers and (2) the ability to deliver fluorescence excitation energy to intact living biological specimens in a pulsed or sinusoidally modulated fashion has allowed such measurements to become a reality through the imaging of the lifetimes of fluorescent molecules. This capability has resulted in the ability to observe the dynamic organization and interaction of cellular components on a spatial and temporal scale previously not possible using other microscopic techniques. This paper discusses the implementation of a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope (FLIM) and provides a review of some of the applications of such an instrument. These include measurements of receptor topography and subunit interactions using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), fluorescence anisotropy of phospholipids in cell membranes, cytosolic free calcium (Ca2+)i and the detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in clinical cervicovaginal smears.

  17. Non-linear optical microscopy sheds light on cardiovascular disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Caorsi

    Full Text Available Many cardiac diseases have been associated with increased fibrosis and changes in the organization of fibrillar collagen. The degree of fibrosis is routinely analyzed with invasive histological and immunohistochemical methods, giving a limited and qualitative understanding of the tissue's morphological adaptation to disease. Our aim is to quantitatively evaluate the increase in fibrosis by three-dimensional imaging of the collagen network in the myocardium using the non-linear optical microscopy techniques Two-Photon Excitation microscopy (TPE and Second Harmonic signal Generation (SHG. No sample staining is needed because numerous endogenous fluorophores are excited by a two-photon mechanism and highly non-centrosymmetric structures such as collagen generate strong second harmonic signals. We propose for the first time a 3D quantitative analysis to carefully evaluate the increased fibrosis in tissue from a rat model of heart failure post myocardial infarction. We show how to measure changes in fibrosis from the backward SHG (B(SHG alone, as only backward-propagating SHG is accessible for true in vivo applications. A 5-fold increase in collagen I fibrosis is detected in the remote surviving myocardium measured 20 weeks after infarction. The spatial distribution is also shown to change markedly, providing insight into the morphology of disease progression.

  18. Non-Linear Optical Microscopy Sheds Light on Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caorsi, Valentina; Toepfer, Christopher; Sikkel, Markus B.; Lyon, Alexander R.; MacLeod, Ken; Ferenczi, Mike A.

    2013-01-01

    Many cardiac diseases have been associated with increased fibrosis and changes in the organization of fibrillar collagen. The degree of fibrosis is routinely analyzed with invasive histological and immunohistochemical methods, giving a limited and qualitative understanding of the tissue's morphological adaptation to disease. Our aim is to quantitatively evaluate the increase in fibrosis by three-dimensional imaging of the collagen network in the myocardium using the non-linear optical microscopy techniques Two-Photon Excitation microscopy (TPE) and Second Harmonic signal Generation (SHG). No sample staining is needed because numerous endogenous fluorophores are excited by a two-photon mechanism and highly non-centrosymmetric structures such as collagen generate strong second harmonic signals. We propose for the first time a 3D quantitative analysis to carefully evaluate the increased fibrosis in tissue from a rat model of heart failure post myocardial infarction. We show how to measure changes in fibrosis from the backward SHG (BSHG) alone, as only backward-propagating SHG is accessible for true in vivo applications. A 5-fold increase in collagen I fibrosis is detected in the remote surviving myocardium measured 20 weeks after infarction. The spatial distribution is also shown to change markedly, providing insight into the morphology of disease progression. PMID:23409139

  19. A new method of assessing the surgical margin in rectal carcinoma—using nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lianhuang; Chen, Zhifen; Kang, Deyong; Deng, Tongxin; Jiang, Liwei; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Xing; Jiang, Weizhong; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Guan, Guoxian; Chi, Pan; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, surgical resection is still the most effective treatment strategy for rectal carcinoma and one of the most important factors affecting whether the operation is successful or not is the surgical margin determination, especially in the distal rectal carcinoma which should take the sphincter-preserving issue into consideration. However, until recently no reliable evaluation method has been developed for this purpose. There are some shortcomings in intraoperative negative surgical margin assessment such as either lack of enough detailed information of biological tissues or the fact that it is time-consuming. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM)—nonlinear optical microscopy, which is based on the nonlinear optical process two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), has the ability to label freely and noninvasively visualize tissue micro-architecture at the sub-cellular level. The advantage of providing high contrast and high resolution biomedical image in real time makes MPM have a wide range of applications in life sciences. In this study, we introduced MPM to identify the boundary between normal and abnormal rectal tissues. MPM images clearly exhibit biological tissue microstructure and its morphological changes in the regions of our interest, which enable it to determine the surgical margin in rectal carcinoma. It can be foreseen that once MPM imaging system is used in clinical examination, it will greatly improve the accuracy of surgical resection.

  20. Imaging arterial cells, atherosclerosis, and restenosis by multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han-Wei; Simianu, Vlad; Locker, Matthew J.; Sturek, Michael; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2008-02-01

    By integrating sum-frequency generation (SFG), and two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) on a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscope platform, multimodal nonlinear optical (NLO) imaging of arteries and atherosclerotic lesions was demonstrated. CARS signals arising from CH II-rich membranes allowed visualization of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells in a carotid artery. Additionally, CARS microscopy allowed vibrational imaging of elastin and collagen fibrils which are rich in CH II bonds in their cross-linking residues. The extracellular matrix organization was further confirmed by TPEF signals arising from elastin's autofluorescence and SFG signals arising from collagen fibrils' non-centrosymmetric structure. The system is capable of identifying different atherosclerotic lesion stages with sub-cellular resolution. The stages of atherosclerosis, such as macrophage infiltration, lipid-laden foam cell accumulation, extracellular lipid distribution, fibrous tissue deposition, plaque establishment, and formation of other complicated lesions could be viewed by our multimodal CARS microscope. Collagen percentages in the region adjacent to coronary artery stents were resolved. High correlation between NLO and histology imaging evidenced the validity of the NLO imaging. The capability of imaging significant components of an arterial wall and distinctive stages of atherosclerosis in a label-free manner suggests the potential application of multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy to monitor the onset and progression of arterial diseases.

  1. Real-time detection of an airborne microorganism using inertial impaction and mini-fluorescent microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joon Sang; Lee, Kang Soo; Kim, Sang Soo; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Jung, Jae Hee

    2014-01-07

    To achieve successful real-time detection of airborne pathogenic microorganisms, the problem must be considered in terms of their physical size and biological characteristics. We developed an airborne microorganism detection chip to realize the detection of microorganisms, ensuring compactness, sensitivity, cost-efficiency, and portability, using three key components: an inertial impaction system, a cartridge-type impaction plate, and a mini-fluorescent microscope. The inertial impaction system was used to separate microorganisms in terms of their aerodynamic particle size, and was fabricated with three impaction stages. Numerical analysis was performed to design the system; the calculated cutoff diameter at each impaction stage was 2.02 (first stage), 0.88 (second stage), and 0.54 μm (third stage). The measured cutoff diameters were 2.24, 0.91, and 0.49 μm, respectively. A cartridge-type impaction plate was used, composed of molded polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and an actual impaction region made of a SYBR green I dye-stained agar plate. A mini-fluorescent microscope was used to distinguish microbes from non-biological particles. Images of the microorganisms deposited at the impaction zone were obtained via mini-fluorescent microscopy, and fluorescent intensities of the images were calculated using in-house image-processing software. The results showed that the developed system successfully identified aerosolized biological particles from non-biological particles in real time.

  2. Exploring the Dynamics of Cell Processes through Simulations of Fluorescence Microscopy Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiolini, Juan; Plachta, Nicolas; Mocskos, Esteban; Levi, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) methods are powerful tools for unveiling the dynamical organization of cells. For simple cases, such as molecules passively moving in a homogeneous media, FCS analysis yields analytical functions that can be fitted to the experimental data to recover the phenomenological rate parameters. Unfortunately, many dynamical processes in cells do not follow these simple models, and in many instances it is not possible to obtain an analytical function through a theoretical analysis of a more complex model. In such cases, experimental analysis can be combined with Monte Carlo simulations to aid in interpretation of the data. In response to this need, we developed a method called FERNET (Fluorescence Emission Recipes and Numerical routines Toolkit) based on Monte Carlo simulations and the MCell-Blender platform, which was designed to treat the reaction-diffusion problem under realistic scenarios. This method enables us to set complex geometries of the simulation space, distribute molecules among different compartments, and define interspecies reactions with selected kinetic constants, diffusion coefficients, and species brightness. We apply this method to simulate single- and multiple-point FCS, photon-counting histogram analysis, raster image correlation spectroscopy, and two-color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy. We believe that this new program could be very useful for predicting and understanding the output of fluorescence microscopy experiments. PMID:26039162

  3. Probing DNA-Protein Interactions on Surfaces Using Spectral Self-interference Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Mehmet; Droge, Peter; Swan, Anna K.; Unlu, Selim; Goldberg, Bennett B.

    2007-03-01

    We are probing the interactions between double-stranded DNA and integration host factor (IHF) proteins [1] on surfaces using Spectral Self-interference Fluorescence Microscopy (SSFM) [2].The probing technique utilizes the spectral fringes produced by interference of direct and reflected emission from fluorescent molecules. The modified spectrum provides a unique signature of the axial position of the fluorophores. Using the SSFM technique, we probe the average location of the fluorescent markers attached to the DNA molecules to study the conformational changes in double-stranded DNA tethered to SiO2 surfaces. In the presence of IHF, a DNA bending protein, we observe reduction in the vertical position of fluorescent molecules suggesting the formation of IHF-DNA complex and IHF-induced DNA bending. We also discuss the results with different IHF strains and different binding conditions. [1] Q. Bao et. al., Gene, Vol.343 pp.99-106 (2004) [2] L.A. Moiseev et. al., Journal of Applied Physics, Vol.96, pp. 5311-5315 (2004)

  4. Fluorescence Dynamics in the Endoplasmic Reticulum of a Live Cell: Time-Resolved Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shirsendu; Nandi, Somen; Ghosh, Catherine; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2016-09-19

    Fluorescence dynamics in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of a live non-cancer lung cell (WI38) and a lung cancer cell (A549) are studied by using time-resolved confocal microscopy. To selectively study the organelle, ER, we have used an ER-Tracker dye. From the emission maximum (λmaxem) of the ER-Tracker dye, polarity (i.e. dielectric constant, ϵ) in the ER region of the cells (≈500 nm in WI38 and ≈510 nm in A549) is estimated to be similar to that of chloroform (λmaxem =506 nm, ϵ≈5). The red shift by 10 nm in λmaxem in the cancer cell (A549) suggests a slightly higher polarity compared to the non-cancer cell (WI38). The fluorescence intensity of the ER-Tracker dye exhibits prolonged intermittent oscillations on a timescale of 2-6 seconds for the cancer cell (A549). For the non-cancer cell (WI38), such fluorescence oscillations are much less prominent. The marked fluorescence intensity oscillations in the cancer cell are attributed to enhanced calcium oscillations. The average solvent relaxation time () of the ER region in the lung cancer cell (A549, 250±50 ps) is about four times faster than that in the non-cancer cell (WI38, 1000±50 ps).

  5. Diagnostic efficacy of Ziehl-Neelsen method against fluorescent microscopy in detection of acid fast bacilli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soham Gupta; Vishnu Prasad Shenoy; Indira Bairy; MuralidharanS

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the application of Ziehl-Neelsen (Z-N) and fluorescent microscopy in detection of acid fast bacilli (AFB).Methods: Duplicate smears were prepared from 260 sputum samples and stained with Z-N and fluorescent staining (FS) methods. The efficiency of both methods in primary diagnosis of tuberculosis were evaluated.Results:The smears were positive for AFB in 15 (5.77%) samples by Z-N staining method and in 16 (6.15%) samples by FS method. The sensitivity and specificity of Z-N staining method against FS method were 93.75% and 100% respectively.Conclusions: Though lesser cost-effective than Z-N, FS method is a more sensitive and better case finding tool in detection of AFB.

  6. Advanced Time-Resolved Fluorescence Microscopy Techniques for the Investigation of Peptide Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Neil R.

    The ubiquitous cross beta sheet peptide motif is implicated in numerous neurodegenerative diseases while at the same time offers remarkable potential for constructing isomorphic high-performance bionanomaterials. Despite an emerging understanding of the complex folding landscape of cross beta structures in determining disease etiology and final structure, we lack knowledge of the critical initial stages of nucleation and growth. In this dissertation, I advance our understanding of these key stages in the cross-beta nucleation and growth pathways using cutting-edge microscopy techniques. In addition, I present a new combined time-resolved fluorescence analysis technique with the potential to advance our current understanding of subtle molecular level interactions that play a pivotal role in peptide self-assembly. Using the central nucleating core of Alzheimer's Amyloid-beta protein, Abeta(16 22), as a model system, utilizing electron, time-resolved, and non-linear microscopy, I capture the initial and transient nucleation stages of peptide assembly into the cross beta motif. In addition, I have characterized the nucleation pathway, from monomer to paracrystalline nanotubes in terms of morphology and fluorescence lifetime, corroborating the predicted desolvation process that occurs prior to cross-beta nucleation. Concurrently, I have identified unique heterogeneous cross beta domains contained within individual nanotube structures, which have potential bionanomaterials applications. Finally, I describe a combined fluorescence theory and analysis technique that dramatically increases the sensitivity of current time-resolved techniques. Together these studies demonstrate the potential for advanced microscopy techniques in the identification and characterization of the cross-beta folding pathway, which will further our understanding of both amyloidogenesis and bionanomaterials.

  7. Full-color structured illumination optical sectioning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jia; Lei, Ming; Dan, Dan; Yao, Baoli; Zhou, Xing; Yang, Yanlong; Yan, Shaohui; Min, Junwei; Yu, Xianghua

    2015-09-01

    In merits of super-resolved resolution and fast speed of three-dimensional (3D) optical sectioning capability, structured illumination microscopy (SIM) has found variety of applications in biomedical imaging. So far, most SIM systems use monochrome CCD or CMOS cameras to acquire images and discard the natural color information of the specimens. Although multicolor integration scheme are employed, multiple excitation sources and detectors are required and the spectral information is limited to a few of wavelengths. Here, we report a new method for full-color SIM with a color digital camera. A data processing algorithm based on HSV (Hue, Saturation, and Value) color space is proposed, in which the recorded color raw images are processed in the Hue, Saturation, Value color channels, and then reconstructed to a 3D image with full color. We demonstrated some 3D optical sectioning results on samples such as mixed pollen grains, insects, micro-chips and the surface of coins. The presented technique is applicable to some circumstance where color information plays crucial roles, such as in materials science and surface morphology.

  8. IMAGING WOOD PULP FIBRE SURFACE LIGNIN BY FLUORESCENCE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kecheng Li; Douglas W. Reeve

    2004-01-01

    A novel methodology for imaging wood pulp fibre surface lignin by fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy was developed. Various imaging modes and imaging conditions were explored for quantitative analysis. Acridine Orange was used for labelling lignin and the orthochromatic labelling condition was developed. Withthe thusly established methodology, the distribution of lignin across the fibre wall was clearly imaged. It was found that surface lignin concentration is about 2-4 times higher than bulk lignin concentration, and that high concentration of lignin was also found on the fibre lumen surfaces and pit borders.

  9. IMAGING WOOD PULP FIBRE SURFACE LIGNIN BY FLUORESCENCE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KechengLi; DouglasW.Reeve

    2004-01-01

    A novel methodology for imaging wood pulp fibre surface lignin by fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy was developed. Various imaging modes and imaging conditions were explored for quantitative analysis. Acridine Orange was used for labelling lignin and the orthochromatic labelling condition was developed. With the thusly established methodology, the distribution of lignin across the fibre wall was clearly imaged. It was found that surface lignin concentration is about 2-4 times higher than bulk lignin concentration and that high concentration of lignin was also found on the fibre lumen surfaces and pit borders.

  10. Scanning near-field optical microscopy on rough surfaces: applications in chemistry, biology, and medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Shear-force apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM with very sharp uncoated tapered waveguides relies on the unexpected enhancement of reflection in the shear-force gap. It is the technique for obtaining chemical (materials contrast in the optical image of “real world” surfaces that are rough and very rough without topographical artifacts, and it is by far less complicated than other SNOM techniques that can only be used for very flat surfaces. The experimental use of the new photophysical effect is described. The applications of the new technique are manifold. Important mechanistic questions in solid-state chemistry (oxidation, diazotization, photodimerization, surface hydration, hydrolysis are answered with respect to simultaneous AFM (atomic force microscopy and detailed crystal packing. Prehistoric petrified bacteria and concomitant pyrite inclusions are also investigated with local RAMAN SNOM. Polymer beads and unstained biological objects (rabbit heart, shrimp eye allow for nanoscopic analysis of cell organelles. Similarly, human teeth and a cancerous tissue are analyzed. Bladder cancer tissue is clearly differentiated from healthy tissue without staining and this opens a new highly promising diagnostic tool for precancer diagnosis. Industrial applications are demonstrated at the corrosion behavior of dental alloys (withdrawal of a widely used alloy, harmless substitutes, improvement of paper glazing, behavior of blood bags upon storage, quality assessment of metal particle preparations for surface enhanced RAMAN spectroscopy, and determination of diffusion coefficient and light fastness in textile fiber dyeing. The latter applications include fluorescence SNOM. Local fluorescence SNOM is also used in the study of partly aggregating dye nanoparticles within resin/varnish preparations. Unexpected new insights are obtained in all of the various fields that cannot be obtained by other techniques.

  11. Identification of calcifications in intracranial neoplasms using two photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Peihua; Wang, Xingfu; Wu, Zanyi; Fang, Na; Li, Lianhuang; Kang, Dezhi; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-10-01

    Calcifications within brain tumors may be an indicator of a relatively long survival because a long time is required for the formation of calcium deposits, and may present a novel biomarker associated with response and improved outcome of therapy. In this paper, we describe the use of two-photon excitation fluorescent (TPEF) microscopy combined second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy for high-resolution imaging that can be applied in identification of intratumoral calcifications. Our results demonstrate that the calcification has stronger TPEF signal than the area around it and the emission spectra shows the difference between the two areas clearly. The TPEF image of calcified region corresponds well with the corresponding H&E stained image. In this work, we present that the label-free imaging technique is able to distinguish the calcified mass lesions in intracranial neoplasms reliably.

  12. Observation of Insulin Exocytosis by a Pancreatic (3 Cell Line with Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-ying Fu; Ya-ping Wang; Yu Chen

    2011-01-01

    @@ INSULIN secretion was traditionally measured with biochemical and immunological methods such as enzyme linked immunosorbant assay and radio-immunoassay.However,these methods can only tell the amount of insulin secreted; they give no information about the secretion process or mechanism of exocytosis.In recent years,an imaging technique known as total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy has been employed to study insulin secretion.1-4 This imaging technique can explore events taking place near or on live cell membrane,such as secretory granule movement,exocytosis,vesicle content release,and membrane fusion.5-10 In the present paper,we applied TIRF microscopy to the observation of insulin exocytosis by the pancreatic β cell line Ins-1.

  13. Two-photon scanning microscopy of in vivo sensory responses of cortical neurons genetically encoded with a fluorescent voltage sensor in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt F Ahrens

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A fluorescent voltage sensor protein Flare was created from a Kv1.4 potassium channel with YFP situated to report voltage-induced conformational changes in vivo. The RNA virus Sindbis introduced Flare into neurons in the binocular visual crescent in rat. Injection sites were selected based on intrinsic optical imaging. Expression of Flare occurred in the cell bodies and dendritic processes. Neurons imaged in vivo using two-photon scanning microscopy typically revealed the soma best, discernable against the background labeling of the neuropil. Somatic fluorescence changes were correlated with flashed visual stimuli; however, averaging was essential to observe these changes. This study demonstrates that the genetic modification of single neurons to express a fluorescent voltage sensor can be used to assess neuronal activity in vivo.

  14. Two-photon scanning microscopy of in vivo sensory responses of cortical neurons genetically encoded with a fluorescent voltage sensor in rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Kurt F.; Heider, Barbara; Lee, Hanson; Isacoff, Ehud Y.; Siegel, Ralph M.

    2012-01-01

    A fluorescent voltage sensor protein “Flare” was created from a Kv1.4 potassium channel with YFP situated to report voltage-induced conformational changes in vivo. The RNA virus Sindbis introduced Flare into neurons in the binocular region of visual cortex in rat. Injection sites were selected based on intrinsic optical imaging. Expression of Flare occurred in the cell bodies and dendritic processes. Neurons imaged in vivo using two-photon scanning microscopy typically revealed the soma best, discernable against the background labeling of the neuropil. Somatic fluorescence changes were correlated with flashed visual stimuli; however, averaging was essential to observe these changes. This study demonstrates that the genetic modification of single neurons to express a fluorescent voltage sensor can be used to assess neuronal activity in vivo. PMID:22461770

  15. LED-fluorescence microscopy for diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis under programmatic conditions in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lord Wasim Reza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Light-emitting diode fluorescence microscopy (LED-FM has been shown to be more sensitive than conventional bright field microscopy using Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN stain in detecting sputum smear positive tuberculosis in controlled laboratory conditions. In 2012, Auramine O staining based LED-FM replaced conventional ZN microscopy in 200 designated microscopy centres (DMC of medical colleges operating in collaboration with India's Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme. We aimed to assess the impact of introduction of LED-FM services on sputum smear positive case detection under program conditions. METHODS: This was a before and after comparison study. In 15 randomly selected medical college DMCs, all presumptive TB patients who underwent sputum smear examination in the years 2011 (before LED-FM and 2012 (after LED-FM were compared. An additional 15 comparable DMCs that implemented conventional ZN sputum smear microscopy were also selected for comparison between 2011 and 2012. RESULTS: The proportion of presumptive TB patients (PTPfound sputum smear positive increased by 30%- from 13.6% (3432/25159 in 2011 to 17.8% (4706/26426 in 2012 (P value <0.01 in the sites that implemented LED-FM microscopy, whereas in DMCs where the ZN staining procedure is followed the proportion of sputum smear positive had remained unchanged (13.0%versus 12.6%;P value0.31. CONCLUSION: Use of LED-FM significantly increased the proportion of smear positive cases among presumptive TB patients under routine program conditions in high workload laboratories. The study provides operational evidence needed to scale-up the use of LED-FM in similar settings in India and beyond.

  16. Super-resolved fluorescence microscopy: Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 for Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William E. Moerner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möckl, Leonhard; Lamb, Don C; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2014-12-15

    A big honor for small objects: The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 was jointly awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William E. Moerner "for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy". This Highlight describes how the field of super-resolution microscopy developed from the first detection of a single molecule in 1989 to the sophisticated techniques of today.

  17. Uptake and localization of fluorescent labelled gold nanoparticles in living zebrafish (Danio rerio) using Light Sheet Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjolding, Lars Michael; Asmonaite, G.; Jolk, R.

    2015-01-01

    and localization of fluorescent labelled nanoparticles in living whole organisms with minimal sample preparation. Two strains of D. rerio (wildtype AB and transparent Casper) were exposed to 50 nm PEG coated gold nanoparticles (Au NP) synthesized with 1% of a fluorescent probe (FITC). The fish were exposed...... and determine localization on a whole organism level. Furthermore, methods used to identify nanoparticle uptake have been associated with artefacts induced by sample preparation including staining methods for electron microscopy.  This study used Fluorescent Light Sheet Microscopy (FLSM) to determine uptake...... the suitability for whole imaging of living organisms using FLSM....

  18. Multibeam fluorescence diffuse optical tomography using upconverting nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haichun; Xu, Can T; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2010-03-01

    Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is a biomedical imaging modality that can be used for localization and quantification of fluorescent molecules inside turbid media. In this ill-posed problem, the reconstruction quality is directly determined by the amount and quality of the information obtained from the boundary measurements. Regularly, more information can be obtained by increasing the number of excitation positions in an FDOT system. However, the maximum number of excitation positions is limited by the finite size of the excitation beam. In the present work, we demonstrate a method in FDOT to exploit the unique nonlinear power dependence of upconverting nanoparticles to further increase the amount of information in a raster-scanning setup by including excitation with two beams simultaneously. We show that the additional information can be used to obtain more accurate reconstructions.

  19. Pump-probe microscopy of respiratory chain pigments: towards non-fluorescent label-free metabolic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingue, Scott R.; Chicco, Adam J.; Bartels, Randy A.; Wilson, Jesse W.

    2017-02-01

    Current label-free metabolic microscopy techniques are limited to obtaining contrast from fluorescent molecules NAD(P)H and FAD+, and are unable to determine redox state along the mitochondrial respiratory chain itself. The respiratory chain electron carriers do not fluoresce, but some are heme proteins that have redox-dependent absorption spectra. The most prominent of these, cytochrome c, has been extensively characterized by transient absorption spectroscopy, which suggests that pump-probe measurements in the vicinity of 450 - 600 nm can provide strong contrast between its redox states. Motivated by the success of pump-probe microscopy targeting another heme protein, hemoglobin, we seek to extend the technique to the cytochromes, with the ultimate goal of dissecting respiratory chain function of individual cells in live tissue. To that end, we have developed a new optical system producing ultrafast, visible, independently-tunable pulse pairs via sum-frequency generation of nonlinearly broadened pulses in periodically-poled lithium niobate. The system is pumped by a homebuilt fiber-based oscillator/amplifier emitting 1060 nm pulses at 1.3 W (63 MHz repetition rate), and produces tunable pulses in the vicinity of 488 and 532 nm. Pump-probe spectroscopy of cytochrome c with this source reveals differences in excited-state absorption relaxation times between redox states. Though redox contrast is weak with this setup, we argue that this can be improved with a resonant galvo-scanning microscope. Moreover, pump-probe images were acquired of brown adipose tissue (which contains dense mitochondria), demonstrating label-free contrast from excited-state absorption in respiratory chain hemes.

  20. Does super-resolution fluorescence microscopy obsolete previous microscopic approaches to protein co-localization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Laura; Baldini, Giulia; Storrie, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional microscopy techniques, namely, the confocal microscope or deconvolution processes, are resolution limited to approximately 200-250 nm by the diffraction properties of light as developed by Ernst Abbe in 1873. This diffraction limit is appreciably above the size of most multi-protein complexes, which are typically 20-50 nm in diameter. In the mid-2000s, biophysicists moved beyond the diffraction barrier by structuring the illumination pattern and then applying mathematical principles and algorithms to allow a resolution of approximately 100 nm, sufficient to address protein subcellular co-localization questions. This "breaking" of the diffraction barrier, affording resolution beyond 200 nm, is termed super-resolution microscopy. More recent approaches include single-molecule localization (such as photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM)/stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM)) and point spread function engineering (such as stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy). In this review, we explain basic principles behind currently commercialized super-resolution setups and address advantages and considerations in applying these techniques to protein co-localization in biological systems.

  1. Effects of coherence and vector properties of the light on the resolution limit in stimulated emission depletion fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wanrong

    2008-06-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence microscopy is a diffraction-unlimited microscopy. We report a method of analyzing the intensity distribution in the focal region. The method takes both the coherence and the vector properties of the light into account. By using the Gaussian Schell model to describe the cross-spectral density function of the incident beam, we show that the coherence that exists between the electric field at any two points is one of the factors that limit further increase of the spatial resolution in STED fluorescence microscopy.

  2. Conventional fluorescence microscopy below the diffraction limit with simultaneous capture of two fluorophores in DNA origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Ben J.

    2016-02-01

    A conventional fluorescence microscope was previously constructed for simultaneous imaging of two colors to gain sub-diffraction localization. The system is predicated on color separation of overlapping Airy discs, construction of matrices of Cartesian coordinates to determine locations as well as centers of the point spread functions of fluorophores. Quantum dots that are separated by as little as 10 nm were resolved in the x-y coordinates. Inter-fluorophore distances that vary by 10 nm could also be distinguished. Quantum dots are bright point light source emitters that excite with a single laser and can serve as a label for many biomolecules. Here, alterations in the method are described to test the ability to resolve Atto 488 and Atto 647 dyes attached to DNA origami at ~40 nm spacing intervals. Dual laser excitation is used in tandem with multi-wavelength bandpass filters. Notwithstanding challenges from reduced intensity in Atto labeled DNA origami helical bundles compared to quantum dots, preliminary data show a mean inter-fluorophore distance of 56 nm with a range (14-148 nm). The range closely matches published results with DNA origami with other methods of subdiffraction microscopy. Sub-diffraction simultaneous two-color imaging fluorescence microscopy acronymically christened (SSTIFM) is a simple, readily accessible, technique for measurement of inter-fluorophore distances in compartments less than 40 nm. Preliminary results with so called nanorulers are encouraging for use with other biomolecules.

  3. New light on ion channel imaging by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisao Yamamura

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels play pivotal roles in a wide variety of cellular functions; therefore, their physiological characteristics, pharmacological responses, and molecular structures have been extensively investigated. However, the mobility of an ion channel itself in the cell membrane has not been examined in as much detail. A total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscope allows fluorophores to be imaged in a restricted region within an evanescent field of less than 200 nm from the interface of the coverslip and plasma membrane in living cells. Thus the TIRF microscope is useful for selectively visualizing the plasmalemmal surface and subplasmalemmal zone. In this review, we focused on a single-molecule analysis of the dynamic movement of ion channels in the plasma membrane using TIRF microscopy. We also described two single-molecule imaging techniques under TIRF microscopy: fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET for the identification of molecules that interact with ion channels, and subunit counting for the determination of subunit stoichiometry in a functional channel. TIRF imaging can also be used to analyze spatiotemporal Ca2+ events in the subplasmalemma. Single-molecule analyses of ion channels and localized Ca2+ signals based on TIRF imaging provide beneficial pharmacological and physiological information concerning the functions of ion channels.

  4. Correlative fluorescence and scanning transmission electron microscopy of quantum dot-labeled proteins on whole cells in liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckys, Diana B; Bandmann, Vera; de Jonge, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence microscopy combined with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of cells fully immersed in liquid is a new methodology with many application areas. Proteins, in live cells immobilized on microchips, are labeled with fluorescent quantum dot nanoparticles. In this protocol, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is labeled. The cells are fixed after a selected labeling time, for example, 5 min as needed to form EGFR dimers. The microchip with cells is then imaged with fluorescence microscopy. Thereafter, STEM can be accomplished in two ways. The microchip with the labeled cells and one microchip with a spacer are assembled into a special microfluidic device and imaged with dedicated high-voltage STEM. Alternatively, thin edges of cells can be studied with environmental scanning electron microscopy with a STEM detector, by placing a microchip with cells in a cooled wet environment.

  5. Label-free separation of human embryonic stem cells and their differentiating progenies by phasor fluorescence lifetime microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringari, Chiara; Sierra, Robert; Donovan, Peter J.; Gratton, Enrico

    2012-04-01

    We develop a label-free optical technique to image and discriminate undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) from their differentiating progenies in vitro. Using intrinsic cellular fluorophores, we perform fluorescence lifetime microscopy (FLIM) and phasor analysis to obtain hESC metabolic signatures. We identify two optical biomarkers to define the differentiation status of hESCs: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and lipid droplet-associated granules (LDAGs). These granules have a unique lifetime signature and could be formed by the interaction of reactive oxygen species and unsaturated metabolic precursor that are known to be abundant in hESC. Changes in the relative concentrations of these two intrinsic biomarkers allow for the discrimination of undifferentiated hESCs from differentiating hESCs. During early hESC differentiation we show that NADH concentrations increase, while the concentration of LDAGs decrease. These results are in agreement with a decrease in oxidative phosphorylation rate. Single-cell phasor FLIM signatures reveal an increased heterogeneity in the metabolic states of differentiating H9 and H1 hESC colonies. This technique is a promising noninvasive tool to monitor hESC metabolism during differentiation, which can have applications in high throughput analysis, drug screening, functional metabolomics and induced pluripotent stem cell generation.

  6. Visualizing heterogeneity of photosynthetic properties of plant leaves with two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iermak, Ievgeniia; Vink, Jochem; Bader, Arjen N; Wientjes, Emilie; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2016-09-01

    Two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) was used to analyse the distribution and properties of Photosystem I (PSI) and Photosystem II (PSII) in palisade and spongy chloroplasts of leaves from the C3 plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the C4 plant Miscanthus x giganteus. This was achieved by separating the time-resolved fluorescence of PSI and PSII in the leaf. It is found that the PSII antenna size is larger on the abaxial side of A. thaliana leaves, presumably because chloroplasts in the spongy mesophyll are "shaded" by the palisade cells. The number of chlorophylls in PSI on the adaxial side of the A. thaliana leaf is slightly higher. The C4 plant M. x giganteus contains both mesophyll and bundle sheath cells, which have a different PSI/PSII ratio. It is shown that the time-resolved fluorescence of bundle sheath and mesophyll cells can be analysed separately. The relative number of chlorophylls, which belong to PSI (as compared to PSII) in the bundle sheath cells is at least 2.5 times higher than in mesophyll cells. FLIM is thus demonstrated to be a useful technique to study the PSI/PSII ratio and PSII antenna size in well-defined regions of plant leaves without having to isolate pigment-protein complexes.

  7. Endocytosis as a biological response in receptor pharmacology: evaluation by fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Víctor M; Capilla, Almudena; Varela, María J; de la Rocha, Arlet M Acanda; Fernandez-Troyano, Juan C; Barreiro, R Belén; Lopez-Gimenez, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    The activation of G-protein coupled receptors by agonist compounds results in diverse biological responses in cells, such as the endocytosis process consisting in the translocation of receptors from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm within internalizing vesicles or endosomes. In order to functionally evaluate endocytosis events resulted from pharmacological responses, we have developed an image analysis method -the Q-Endosomes algorithm- that specifically discriminates the fluorescent signal originated at endosomes from that one observed at the plasma membrane in images obtained from living cells by fluorescence microscopy. Mu opioid (MOP) receptor tagged at the carboxy-terminus with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and permanently expressed in HEK293 cells was used as experimental model to validate this methodology. Time-course experiments performed with several agonists resulted in different sigmoid curves depending on the drug used to initiate MOP receptor endocytosis. Thus, endocytosis resulting from the simultaneous activation of co-expressed MOP and serotonin 5-HT2C receptors by morphine plus serotonin was significantly different, in kinetics as well as in maximal response parameters, from the one caused by DAMGO, sufentanyl or methadone. Therefore, this analytical tool permits the pharmacological characterization of receptor endocytosis in living cells with functional and temporal resolution.

  8. Energy transfer in PPV-based conjugated polymers: a defocused widefield fluorescence microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooley, E N; Tilley, A J; White, J M; Ghiggino, K P; Bell, T D M

    2014-04-21

    Both pendant and main chain conjugated MEH-PPV based polymers have been studied at the level of single chains using confocal and widefield fluorescence microscopy techniques. In particular, defocused widefield fluorescence is applied to reveal the extent of energy transfer in these polymers by identifying whether they act as single emitters. For main chain conjugated MEH-PPV, molecular weight and the surrounding matrix play a primary role in determining energy transport processes and whether single emitter behaviour is observed. Surprisingly in polymers with a saturated backbone but containing the same pendant MEH-PPV oligomer on each repeating unit, intra-chain energy transfer to a single emitter is also apparent. The results imply there is chromophore heterogeneity that can facilitate energy funneling to the emitting site. Both main chain conjugated and pendant MEH-PPV polymers exhibit changes in orientation of the emission dipole during a fluorescence trajectory of many seconds, whereas a model MEH-PPV oligomer does not. The results suggest that, in the polymers, the nature of the emitting chromophores can change during the time trajectory.

  9. Endocytosis as a biological response in receptor pharmacology: evaluation by fluorescence microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor M Campa

    Full Text Available The activation of G-protein coupled receptors by agonist compounds results in diverse biological responses in cells, such as the endocytosis process consisting in the translocation of receptors from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm within internalizing vesicles or endosomes. In order to functionally evaluate endocytosis events resulted from pharmacological responses, we have developed an image analysis method -the Q-Endosomes algorithm- that specifically discriminates the fluorescent signal originated at endosomes from that one observed at the plasma membrane in images obtained from living cells by fluorescence microscopy. Mu opioid (MOP receptor tagged at the carboxy-terminus with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP and permanently expressed in HEK293 cells was used as experimental model to validate this methodology. Time-course experiments performed with several agonists resulted in different sigmoid curves depending on the drug used to initiate MOP receptor endocytosis. Thus, endocytosis resulting from the simultaneous activation of co-expressed MOP and serotonin 5-HT2C receptors by morphine plus serotonin was significantly different, in kinetics as well as in maximal response parameters, from the one caused by DAMGO, sufentanyl or methadone. Therefore, this analytical tool permits the pharmacological characterization of receptor endocytosis in living cells with functional and temporal resolution.

  10. Studying Biological Tissue with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging: Microscopy, Endoscopy, and Complex Decay Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Jan; Elson, Daniel S.; Webb, Stephen E. D.; Lee, K. C. Benny; Vlandas, Alexis; Gambaruto, Giovanni L.; Léveque-Fort, Sandrine; Lever, M. John; Tadrous, Paul J.; Stamp, Gordon W. H.; Wallace, Andrew L.; Sandison, Ann; Watson, Tim F.; Alvarez, Fernando; French, Paul M. W.

    2003-06-01

    We have applied fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to the autofluorescence of different kinds of biological tissue in vitro , including animal tissue sections and knee joints as well as human teeth, obtaining two-dimensional maps with functional contrast. We find that fluorescence decay profiles of biological tissue are well described by the stretched exponential function (StrEF), which can represent the complex nature of tissue. The StrEF yields a continuous distribution of fluorescence lifetimes, which can be extracted with an inverse Laplace transformation, and additional information is provided by the width of the distribution. Our experimental results from FLIM microscopy in combination with the StrEF analysis indicate that this technique is ready for clinical deployment, including portability that is through the use of a compact picosecond diode laser as the excitation source. The results obtained with our FLIM endoscope successfully demonstrated the viability of this modality, though they need further optimization. We expect a custom-designed endoscope with optimized illumination and detection efficiencies to provide significantly improved performance.

  11. [Evaluation of the Fluo-RAL (RAL) kit for the identification of mycobacteria by fluorescence microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérôme, P; Fabre, M; Soler, C

    2011-10-01

    This study has examined the sensitivity of a commercially available fluorochrome stain, the Fluo-RAL kit (RAL), in comparison to the Degommier's stain as gold standard. Hundred and thirty-three twin smears, made directly from samples or after their decontamination with N-acetyl-L-cysteine NaOH, were stained, the first slide with the Degommier's method and the second with the Fluo-RAL kit. The samples were 58 sputums, 31 broncho-aspirations, nine gastric lavages, 11 bronchoalveolar lavages, six pleural fluids, two cerebro-spinal fluids, 11 biopsies, two blood cultures and two deep pus. They were examined with 400 × objective under standard fluorescence UV filter by two laboratory technicians independently. The results were expressed with semi-quantitative mean from 0 to 4+. Hundred and thirty-two results were agreed in grading between the two methods: 73 negative smears, nine quantified as rare (1+), 11 as few (2+), 32 as moderate (3+) and seven as numerous (4+). The only discrepant result had concerned a positive smear quantified as 1+ with the Degommier's stain and as 2+ with the Fluo-RAL kit. This discrepancy was confirmed after a second examination. After this study, the Fluo-RAL kit was considered as agreed for its daily use in our laboratory. It improves the standardisation of fluorescence microscopy without additional cost or waste of time and reduces the chemical risk in the laboratory. This test, associated with reading using light-emitting diodes, could allow the development of fluorescence microscopy, the higher sensitive method for direct diagnosis of tuberculosis, in poor-resource countries where tuberculosis is a public health problem. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiation induced chromatin conformation changes analysed by fluorescent localization microscopy, statistical physics, and graph theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Máté, Gabriell; Müller, Patrick; Hillebrandt, Sabina; Krufczik, Matthias; Bach, Margund; Kaufmann, Rainer; Hausmann, Michael; Heermann, Dieter W

    2015-01-01

    It has been well established that the architecture of chromatin in cell nuclei is not random but functionally correlated. Chromatin damage caused by ionizing radiation raises complex repair machineries. This is accompanied by local chromatin rearrangements and structural changes which may for instance improve the accessibility of damaged sites for repair protein complexes. Using stably transfected HeLa cells expressing either green fluorescent protein (GFP) labelled histone H2B or yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) labelled histone H2A, we investigated the positioning of individual histone proteins in cell nuclei by means of high resolution localization microscopy (Spectral Position Determination Microscopy = SPDM). The cells were exposed to ionizing radiation of different doses and aliquots were fixed after different repair times for SPDM imaging. In addition to the repair dependent histone protein pattern, the positioning of antibodies specific for heterochromatin and euchromatin was separately recorded by SPDM. The present paper aims to provide a quantitative description of structural changes of chromatin after irradiation and during repair. It introduces a novel approach to analyse SPDM images by means of statistical physics and graph theory. The method is based on the calculation of the radial distribution functions as well as edge length distributions for graphs defined by a triangulation of the marker positions. The obtained results show that through the cell nucleus the different chromatin re-arrangements as detected by the fluorescent nucleosomal pattern average themselves. In contrast heterochromatic regions alone indicate a relaxation after radiation exposure and re-condensation during repair whereas euchromatin seemed to be unaffected or behave contrarily. SPDM in combination with the analysis techniques applied allows the systematic elucidation of chromatin re-arrangements after irradiation and during repair, if selected sub-regions of nuclei are

  13. An approach to estimate spatial distribution of analyte within cells using spectrally-resolved fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Dharmendar Kumar; Irfanullah, Mir; Basu, Santanu Kumar; Madhu, Sheri; De, Suman; Jadhav, Sameer; Ravikanth, Mangalampalli; Chowdhury, Arindam

    2017-03-01

    While fluorescence microscopy has become an essential tool amongst chemists and biologists for the detection of various analyte within cellular environments, non-uniform spatial distribution of sensors within cells often restricts extraction of reliable information on relative abundance of analytes in different subcellular regions. As an alternative to existing sensing methodologies such as ratiometric or FRET imaging, where relative proportion of analyte with respect to the sensor can be obtained within cells, we propose a methodology using spectrally-resolved fluorescence microscopy, via which both the relative abundance of sensor as well as their relative proportion with respect to the analyte can be simultaneously extracted for local subcellular regions. This method is exemplified using a BODIPY sensor, capable of detecting mercury ions within cellular environments, characterized by spectral blue-shift and concurrent enhancement of emission intensity. Spectral emission envelopes collected from sub-microscopic regions allowed us to compare the shift in transition energies as well as integrated emission intensities within various intracellular regions. Construction of a 2D scatter plot using spectral shifts and emission intensities, which depend on the relative amount of analyte with respect to sensor and the approximate local amounts of the probe, respectively, enabled qualitative extraction of relative abundance of analyte in various local regions within a single cell as well as amongst different cells. Although the comparisons remain semi-quantitative, this approach involving analysis of multiple spectral parameters opens up an alternative way to extract spatial distribution of analyte in heterogeneous systems. The proposed method would be especially relevant for fluorescent probes that undergo relatively nominal shift in transition energies compared to their emission bandwidths, which often restricts their usage for quantitative ratiometric imaging in

  14. Cellular mechanisms of alpha herpesvirus egress: live cell fluorescence microscopy of pseudorabies virus exocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian B Hogue

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Egress of newly assembled herpesvirus particles from infected cells is a highly dynamic process involving the host secretory pathway working in concert with viral components. To elucidate the location, dynamics, and molecular mechanisms of alpha herpesvirus egress, we developed a live-cell fluorescence microscopy method to visualize the final transport and exocytosis of pseudorabies virus (PRV particles in non-polarized epithelial cells. This method is based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy to selectively image fluorescent virus particles near the plasma membrane, and takes advantage of a virus-encoded pH-sensitive probe to visualize the precise moment and location of particle exocytosis. We performed single-particle tracking and mean squared displacement analysis to characterize particle motion, and imaged a panel of cellular proteins to identify those spatially and dynamically associated with viral exocytosis. Based on our data, individual virus particles travel to the plasma membrane inside small, acidified secretory vesicles. Rab GTPases, Rab6a, Rab8a, and Rab11a, key regulators of the plasma membrane-directed secretory pathway, are present on the virus secretory vesicle. These vesicles undergo fast, directional transport directly to the site of exocytosis, which is most frequently near patches of LL5β, part of a complex that anchors microtubules to the plasma membrane. Vesicles are tightly docked at the site of exocytosis for several seconds, and membrane fusion occurs, displacing the virion a small distance across the plasma membrane. After exocytosis, particles remain tightly confined on the outer cell surface. Based on recent reports in the cell biological and alpha herpesvirus literature, combined with our spatial and dynamic data on viral egress, we propose an integrated model that links together the intracellular transport pathways and exocytosis mechanisms that mediate alpha herpesvirus egress.

  15. Fluorescent Polystyrene Microbeads as Invisible Security Ink and Optical Vapor Sensor for 4-Nitrotoluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonawane, Swapnil L; Asha, S K

    2016-04-27

    Color-tunable solid-state emitting polystyrene (PS) microbeads were developed by dispersion polymerization, which showed excellent fluorescent security ink characteristics along with sensitive detection of vapors of nitro aromatics like 4-nitro toluene (4-NT). The fluorophores pyrene and perylenebisimide were incorporated into the PS backbone as acrylate monomer and acrylate cross-linker, respectively. Solid state quantum yields of 94 and 20% were observed for the pyrene and perylenebisimide, respectively, in the PS/Py and PS/PBI polymers. The morphology and solid state fluorescence was measured by SEM, fluorescence microscopy, and absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The ethanol dispersion of the polymer could be used directly as a fluorescent security "invisible" ink, which became visible only under ultraviolet light. The color of the ink could be tuned depending on the amounts of the pyrene and perylenebisimide incorporated with blue and orange-green for pyrene alone or perylenebisimide alone beads respectively and various shades in between including pure white for beads incorporating both the fluorophores. More than 80% quenching of pyrene emission was observed upon exposure of the polymer in the form of powder or as spin-coated films to the vapors of 4-NT while the emission of perylenebisimide was unaffected. The limit of detection was estimated at 10(-5) moles (2.7 ppm) of 4-NT vapors. The ease of synthesis of the material along with its invisible ink characteristics and nitro aromatic vapor detection opens up new opportunities for exploring the application of these PS-based materials as optical sensors and fluorescent ink for security purposes.

  16. All-optical photoacoustic microscopy using a MEMS scanning mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sung-Liang; Xie, Zhixing; Ling, Tao; Wei, Xunbin; Guo, L. Jay; Wang, Xueding

    2013-03-01

    It has been studied that a potential marker to obtain prognostic information about bladder cancer is tumor neoangiogenesis, which can be quantified by morphometric characteristics such as microvascular density. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) can render sensitive three-dimensional (3D) mapping of microvasculature, providing promise to evaluate the neoangiogenesis that is closely related to the diagnosis of bladder cancer. To ensure good image quality, it is desired to acquire bladder PAM images from its inside via the urethra, like conventional cystoscope. Previously, we demonstrated all-optical PAM systems using polymer microring resonators to detect photoacoustic signals and galvanometer mirrors for laser scanning. In this work, we build a miniature PAM system using a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanning mirror, demonstrating a prototype of an endoscopic PAM head capable of high imaging quality of the bladder. The system has high resolutions of 17.5 μm in lateral direction and 19 μm in the axial direction at a distance of 5.4 mm. Images of printed grids and the 3D structure of microvasculature in animal bladders ex vivo by the system are demonstrated.

  17. Ex vivo imaging of human thyroid pathology using integrated optical coherence tomography and optical coherence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chao; Wang, Yihong; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Cohen, David W.; Connolly, James L.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical coherence microscopy (OCM) for imaging of benign and malignant thyroid lesions ex vivo using intrinsic optical contrast. 34 thyroid gland specimens are imaged from 17 patients, covering a spectrum of pathology ranging from normal thyroid to benign disease/neoplasms (multinodular colloid goiter, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and follicular adenoma) and malignant thyroid tumors (papillary carcinoma and medullary carcinoma). Imaging is performed using an integrated OCT and OCM system, with sections. Characteristic features that suggest malignant lesions, such as complex papillary architecture, microfollicules, psammomatous calcifications, or replacement of normal follicular architecture with sheets/nests of tumor cells, can be identified from OCT and OCM images and are clearly differentiable from normal or benign thyroid tissues. With further development of needle-based imaging probes, OCT and OCM could be promising techniques to use for the screening of thyroid nodules and to improve the diagnostic specificity of fine needle aspiration evaluation.

  18. Multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy improves the accuracy of early diagnosis of squamous intraepithelial neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Seng Khoon; Zheng, Wei; Li, Shuxia; Li, Dong; Zeng, Yan; Yang, Yanqi; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2013-03-01

    We explore diagnostic utility of a multicolor excitation multimodal nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopy for noninvasive detection of squamous epithelial precancer in vivo. The 7,12-dimenthylbenz(a)anthracene treated hamster cheek pouch was used as an animal model of carcinogenesis. The NLO microscope system employed was equipped with the ability to collect multiple tissue endogenous NLO signals such as two-photon excited fluorescence of keratin, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, collagen, and tryptophan, and second harmonic generation of collagen in spectral and time domains simultaneously. A total of 34 (11 controlled and 23 treated) Golden Syrian hamsters with 62 in vivo spatially distinct measurement sites were assessed in this study. High-resolution label-free NLO images were acquired from stratum corneum, stratum granulosum-stratum basale, and stroma for all tissue measurement sites. A total of nine and eight features from 745 and 600 nm excitation wavelengths, respectively, involving tissue structural and intrinsic biochemical properties were found to contain significant diagnostic information for precancers detection (p<0.05). Particularly, 600 nm excited tryptophan fluorescence signals emanating from stratum corneum was revealed to provide remarkable diagnostic utility. Multivariate statistical techniques confirmed the integration of diagnostically significant features from multicolor excitation wavelengths yielded improved diagnostic accuracy as compared to using the individual wavelength alone.

  19. Improved "optical highlighter" probes derived from discosoma red fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lisbeth C; Marchant, Jonathan S

    2005-02-01

    The tetrameric red fluorescent protein, DsRed, undergoes a rapid red to green color change evoked by short wavelength (lambda highlighter" probe for tracking live cells, organelles, and fusion proteins. This color change results from selective bleaching of the "mature" red-emitting species of DsRed and an enhancement of emission from the "immature" green species, likely caused by dequenching of fluorescence resonance energy transfer occurring within the protein tetramer. Here, we have examined the role of residues known to influence the rate and completeness of chromophore maturation on the cellular and biophysical properties of DsRed mutants. Surprisingly, a single amino acid mutation (N42Q) with increased basal green emission yet rapid chromophore maturation displayed a multiphoton-evoked color change that was brighter, more consistent, more vivid, and easier to evoke than DsRed, despite the larger proportion of green chromophores. Rapidly maturing mutants with more complete chromophore maturation, exhibited little color change and increased resistance to multiphoton bleaching. We describe improved optical and cell biological properties for two DsRed-derived variants which we showcase in photolabeling studies, and discuss these data in terms of implications for fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based probes.

  20. Numerical study of super-resolved optical microscopy with partly staggered beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinping; Wang, Nan; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2016-12-01

    The resolving power of optical microscopy involving two or even more beams, such as pump-probe microscopy and nonlinear optical microscopy, can be enhanced both laterally and longitudinally with partly staggered beams. A numerical study of the new super-resolution imaging technology is performed with vector diffraction theory. The influence of polarization is discussed. A resolving power of sub-100 nm and sub-300 nm in the lateral and longitudinal directions, respectively, is achievable.

  1. Context based mixture model for cell phase identification in automated fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xiaobo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automated identification of cell cycle phases of individual live cells in a large population captured via automated fluorescence microscopy technique is important for cancer drug discovery and cell cycle studies. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy images provide an important method to study the cell cycle process under different conditions of perturbation. Existing methods are limited in dealing with such time-lapse data sets while manual analysis is not feasible. This paper presents statistical data analysis and statistical pattern recognition to perform this task. Results The data is generated from Hela H2B GFP cells imaged during a 2-day period with images acquired 15 minutes apart using an automated time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. The patterns are described with four kinds of features, including twelve general features, Haralick texture features, Zernike moment features, and wavelet features. To generate a new set of features with more discriminate power, the commonly used feature reduction techniques are used, which include Principle Component Analysis (PCA, Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA, Maximum Margin Criterion (MMC, Stepwise Discriminate Analysis based Feature Selection (SDAFS, and Genetic Algorithm based Feature Selection (GAFS. Then, we propose a Context Based Mixture Model (CBMM for dealing with the time-series cell sequence information and compare it to other traditional classifiers: Support Vector Machine (SVM, Neural Network (NN, and K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN. Being a standard practice in machine learning, we systematically compare the performance of a number of common feature reduction techniques and classifiers to select an optimal combination of a feature reduction technique and a classifier. A cellular database containing 100 manually labelled subsequence is built for evaluating the performance of the classifiers. The generalization error is estimated using the cross validation technique. The

  2. Correlative nonlinear optical microscopy and infrared nanoscopy reveals collagen degradation in altered parchments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latour, Gaël; Robinet, Laurianne; Dazzi, Alexandre; Portier, François; Deniset-Besseau, Ariane; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-19

    This paper presents the correlative imaging of collagen denaturation by nonlinear optical microscopy (NLO) and nanoscale infrared (IR) spectroscopy to obtain morphological and chemical information at different length scales. Such multiscale correlated measurements are applied to the investigation of ancient parchments, which are mainly composed of dermal fibrillar collagen. The main issue is to characterize gelatinization, the ultimate and irreversible alteration corresponding to collagen denaturation to gelatin, which may also occur in biological tissues. Key information about collagen and gelatin signatures is obtained in parchments and assessed by characterizing the denaturation of pure collagen reference samples. A new absorbing band is observed near the amide I band in the IR spectra, correlated to the onset of fluorescence signals in NLO images. Meanwhile, a strong decrease is observed in Second Harmonic signals, which are a structural probe of the fibrillar organization of the collagen at the micrometer scale. NLO microscopy therefore appears as a powerful tool to reveal collagen degradation in a non-invasive way. It should provide a relevant method to assess or monitor the condition of collagen-based materials in museum and archival collections and opens avenues for a broad range of applications regarding this widespread biological material.

  3. Fluorescent microscopy and Ziehl-Neelsen staining of bronchoalveolar lavage, bronchial washings, bronchoscopic brushing and post bronchoscopic sputum along with cytological examination in cases of suspected tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Bodal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Ever since the discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in 1882, many diagnostic methods have been developed. However "The gold standard" for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB is still the demonstration of acid fast Bacilli (AFB by microscopic examination of smear or bacteriological confirmation by culture method. Materials and Methods: In suspected 75 patients with active pulmonary TB, the materials obtained bronchoscopically, were bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL, bronchial brushings, bronchial washings and post bronchoscopic sputum. Four smears were made from each of the specimen. Fluorescent Staining, Ziehl–Neelsen (ZN, Pap and May Grunwald-Giemsa (MGG stains were carried out for cytological examination. Results: Fluorescent stain yielded maximum AFB positivity in all the methods, that is 36 (48% in post fibre-optic bronchoscopy (FOB sputum and 19 (25.33% by fluorescence microscopy in both bronchial brushings and bronchial washings. Maximum yield of AFB with ZN staining 12 (16% was equal to the post FOB sputum and bronchial brushings samples. It was followed by 6 cases (8% in BAL and 4 (5.3% in bronchial washings. The cytological examination was suggestive of TB in only 8 (10.66% cases in bronchial washings and 6 (8% cases in post FOB collection. It was equal in BAL and Bronchial brushings each that is 5 (6.67%. Conclusion: Bronchoscopy is a useful diagnostic tool and fluorescent microscopy is more sensitive than ZN and cytology. On X-ray examination, other diseases like malignancy or fungus can also mimick TB. So apart from ZN staining or fluorescence microscopy, Pap and MGG stain will be worthwhile to identify other microorganisms.

  4. Hybrid Microfluidic Platform for Multifactorial Analysis Based on Electrical Impedance, Refractometry, Optical Absorption and Fluorescence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pereira, Fábio; Bernacka-Wojcik, Iwona; Ribeiro, Rita; Lobato, Maria; Fortunato, Elvira; Martins, Rodrigo; Igreja, Rui; Jorge, Pedro; Águas, Hugo; Oliva, Abel

    2016-01-01

    ...: electrical impedance, refractometry, optical absorption and fluorescence. We present the rationale for the design and the details of the microfabrication of this multifactorial hybrid microfluidic chip...

  5. Fluorescent Rhodamines and Fluorogenic Carbopyronines for Super-Resolution STED Microscopy in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkevich, Alexey N; Mitronova, Gyuzel Yu; Sidenstein, Sven C; Klocke, Jessica L; Kamin, Dirk; Meineke, Dirk N H; D'Este, Elisa; Kraemer, Philip-Tobias; Danzl, Johann G; Belov, Vladimir N; Hell, Stefan W

    2016-03-01

    A range of bright and photostable rhodamines and carbopyronines with absorption maxima in the range of λ=500-630 nm were prepared, and enabled the specific labeling of cytoskeletal filaments using HaloTag technology followed by staining with 1 μm solutions of the dye-ligand conjugates. The synthesis, photophysical parameters, fluorogenic behavior, and structure-property relationships of the new dyes are discussed. Light microscopy with stimulated emission depletion (STED) provided one- and two-color images of living cells with an optical resolution of 40-60 nm.

  6. Non-degenerate 2-photon excitation in scattering medium for fluorescence microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Mu-Han; Saisan, Payam A; Tian, Peifang; Ferri, Christopher G L; AnnaDevor,; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2016-01-01

    Non-degenerate 2-photon excitation (ND-2PE) of a fluorophore with two laser beams of different photon energies offers an independent degree of freedom in tuning of the photon flux for each beam. This feature takes advantage of the infrared wavelengths used in 3-photon microscopy to achieve an increased penetration depth, while preserving a relatively high degenerate 2-photon excitation (D-2PE) cross section, exceeding that achievable with 3-photon excitation. Here, using spatially and temporally aligned Ti:Sapphire laser and optical parametric oscillator beams operating at near infrared (NIR) and short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) optical frequencies, respectively, we provide a practical demonstration that the emission intensity of a fluorophore excited in the non-degenerate regime in a scattering medium is more efficient than the commonly used D-2PE.

  7. Analysis of cancer cell morphology in fluorescence microscopy image exploiting shape descriptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Kim, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Sudong; Ryu, Gyu Ha; Kim, Myoung-Hee

    2016-04-01

    Cancer cell morphology is closely related to their phenotype and activity. These characteristics are important in drug-response prediction for personalized cancer therapeutics. We used multi-channel fluorescence microscopy images to analyze the morphology of highly cohesive cancer cells. First, we detected individual nuclei regions in single-channel images using advanced simple linear iterative clustering. The center points of the nuclei regions were used as seeds for the Voronoi diagram method to extract spatial arrangement features from cell images. Human cancer cell populations form irregularly shaped aggregates, making their detection more difficult. We overcame this problem by identifying individual cells using an image-based shape descriptor. Finally, we analyzed the correlation between cell agglutination and cell shape.

  8. Fluorescence microscopy, observation of self-organized microstructure formed by a rare earth compound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The morphologies of monolayers containing Eu(TTA)3Phen (TTA = thenoyltrifluoroace tone, Phen = 1, 10-phenanthroline) were studied at the air/liquid interface on different subphases by fluorescence microscopy (FM). The composite subphase was the basic premise for the stable existence of the rare earth compound at air/liquid interface. The process that rare earth compound phase changes from liquid expanded state to liquid condensed state corresponded to a plateau in the π-A isotherm. In the pure Eu(TTA)3Phen monolayer, rod domains of Eu(TTA)3Phen formed and packed with no order. In the mixed monolayers with stearic acid (SA), phase transition of SA oc curred first and formed domains with an electric gradient field, which induced the rare earth com pound to form luminescent ring domains. Influence of intermolecular interaction on the self-organized microstructure was revealed.

  9. Infection Counter: Automated Quantification of in Vitro Virus Replication by Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siân Culley

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability to accurately and reliably quantify viral infection is essential to basic and translational virology research. Here, we describe a simple and robust automated method for using fluorescence microscopy to estimate the proportion of virally infected cells in a monolayer. We provide details of the automated analysis workflow along with a freely available open-source ImageJ plugin, Infection Counter, for performing image quantification. Using hepatitis C virus (HCV as an example, we have experimentally verified our method, demonstrating that it is equivalent, if not better, than the established focus-forming assay. Finally, we used Infection Counter to assess the anti-HCV activity of SMBz-CsA, a non-immunosuppressive cyclosporine analogue.

  10. Structured illumination fluorescence microscopy with distorted excitations using a filtered blind-SIM algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuk, R; Giovannini, H; Jost, A; Mudry, E; Girard, J; Mangeat, T; Sandeau, N; Heintzmann, R; Wicker, K; Belkebir, K; Sentenac, A

    2013-11-15

    Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) is a powerful technique for obtaining super-resolved fluorescence maps of samples, but it is very sensitive to aberrations or misalignments affecting the excitation patterns. Here, we present a reconstruction algorithm that is able to process SIM data even if the illuminations are strongly distorted. The approach is an extension of the recent blind-SIM technique, which reconstructs simultaneously the sample and the excitation patterns without a priori information on the latter. Our algorithm was checked on synthetic and experimental data using distorted and nondistorted illuminations. The reconstructions were similar to that obtained by up-to-date SIM methods when the illuminations were periodic and remained artifact-free when the illuminations were strongly distorted.

  11. Imaging Early Steps of Sindbis Virus Infection by Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youling Gu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sindbis virus (SINV is an alphavirus that has a broad host range and has been widely used as a vector for recombinant gene transduction, DNA-based vaccine production, and oncolytic cancer therapy. The mechanism of SINV entry into host cells has yet to be fully understood. In this paper, we used single virus tracking under total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM to investigate SINV attachment to cell surface. Biotinylated viral particles were labeled with quantum dots, which retained viral viability and infectivity. By time-lapse imaging, we showed that the SINV exhibited a heterogeneous dynamics on the surface of the host cells. Analysis of SINV motility demonstrated a two-step attachment reaction. Moreover, dual color TIRFM of GFP-Rab5 and SINV suggested that the virus was targeted to the early endosomes after endocytosis. These findings demonstrate the utility of quantum dot labeling in studying the early steps and behavior of SINV infection.

  12. Single Molecule Fluorescence Microscopy and Machine Learning for Rhesus D Antigen Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgmann, Daniela M.; Mayr, Sandra; Polin, Helene; Schaller, Susanne; Dorfer, Viktoria; Obritzberger, Lisa; Endmayr, Tanja; Gabriel, Christian; Winkler, Stephan M.; Jacak, Jaroslaw

    2016-09-01

    In transfusion medicine, the identification of the Rhesus D type is important to prevent anti-D immunisation in Rhesus D negative recipients. In particular, the detection of the very low expressed DEL phenotype is crucial and hence constitutes the bottleneck of standard immunohaematology. The current method of choice, adsorption-elution, does not provide unambiguous results. We have developed a complementary method of high sensitivity that allows reliable identification of D antigen expression. Here, we present a workflow composed of high-resolution fluorescence microscopy, image processing, and machine learning that - for the first time - enables the identification of even small amounts of D antigen on the cellular level. The high sensitivity of our technique captures the full range of D antigen expression (including D+, weak D, DEL, D-), allows automated population analyses, and results in classification test accuracies of up to 96%, even for very low expressed phenotypes.

  13. Imaging lipid domains in cell membranes: the advent of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan Myers Owen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The lipid bilayer of model membranes, liposomes reconstituted from cell lipids, and plasma membrane vesicles and spheres can separate into two distinct liquid phases to yield lipid domains with liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered properties. These observations are the basis of the lipid raft hypothesis that postulates the existence of cholesterol-enriched ordered-phase lipid domains in cell membranes that could regulate protein mobility, localization and interaction. Here we review the evidence that nano-scaled lipid complexes and meso-scaled lipid domains exist in cell membranes and how new fluorescence microscopy techniques that overcome the diffraction limit provide new insights into lipid organization in cell membranes.

  14. Motion Analysis of Live Objects by Super-Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Yao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Motion analysis plays an important role in studing activities or behaviors of live objects in medicine, biotechnology, chemistry, physics, spectroscopy, nanotechnology, enzymology, and biological engineering. This paper briefly reviews the developments in this area mostly in the recent three years, especially for cellular analysis in fluorescence microscopy. The topic has received much attention with the increasing demands in biomedical applications. The tasks of motion analysis include detection and tracking of objects, as well as analysis of motion behavior, living activity, events, motion statistics, and so forth. In the last decades, hundreds of papers have been published in this research topic. They cover a wide area, such as investigation of cell, cancer, virus, sperm, microbe, karyogram, and so forth. These contributions are summarized in this review. Developed methods and practical examples are also introduced. The review is useful to people in the related field for easy referral of the state of the art.

  15. Measurement of buried undercut structures in microfluidic devices by laser fluorescent confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Shiguang; Liu Jing; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Fang Zhongping; Yoon, Soon Fatt

    2009-11-20

    Measuring buried, undercut microstructures is a challenging task in metrology. These structures are usually characterized by measuring their cross sections after physically cutting the samples. This method is destructive and the obtained information is incomplete. The distortion due to cutting also affects the measurement accuracy. In this paper, we first apply the laser fluorescent confocal microscopy and intensity differentiation algorithm to obtain the complete three-dimensional profile of the buried, undercut structures in microfluidic devices, which are made by the soft lithography technique and bonded by the oxygen plasma method. The impact of material wettability and the refractive index (n) mismatch among the liquid, samples, cover layer, and objective on the measurement accuracy are experimentally investigated.

  16. DMD-based LED-illumination Super-resolution and optical sectioning microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Dan, Dan; Ming LEI; Yao, Baoli; Wang, Wen; Winterhalder, Martin; Zumbusch, Andreas; Qi, Yujiao; Xia, Liang; Yan, Shaohui; Yang, Yanlong; Gao, Peng; Ye, Tong; Zhao,Wei

    2013-01-01

    Super-resolution three-dimensional (3D) optical microscopy has incomparable advantages over other high-resolution microscopic technologies, such as electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, in the study of biological molecules, pathways and events in live cells and tissues. We present a novel approach of structured illumination microscopy (SIM) by using a digital micromirror device (DMD) for fringe projection and a low-coherence LED light for illumination. The lateral resolution of 90 ...

  17. Correlative atomic force and confocal fluorescence microscopy: single molecule imaging and force induced spectral shifts (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basché, Thomas; Hinze, Gerald; Stöttinger, Sven

    2016-09-01

    A grand challenge in nanoscience is to correlate structure or morphology of individual nano-sized objects with their photo-physical properties. An early example have been measurements of the emission spectra and polarization of single semiconductor quantum dots as well as their crystallographic structure by a combination of confocal fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy.[1] Recently, the simultaneous use of confocal fluorescence and atomic force microscopy (AFM) has allowed for correlating the morphology/conformation of individual nanoparticle oligomers or molecules with their photo-physics.[2, 3] In particular, we have employed the tip of an AFM cantilever to apply compressive stress to single molecules adsorbed on a surface and follow the effect of the impact on the electronic states of the molecule by fluorescence spectroscopy.[3] Quantum mechanical calculations corroborate that the spectral changes induced by the localized force can be associated to transitions among the different possible conformers of the adsorbed molecule.

  18. Ultrafast random-access scanning in two-photon microscopy using acousto-optic deflectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomé, R; Kremer, Y; Dieudonné, S; Léger, J-F; Krichevsky, O; Wyart, C; Chatenay, D; Bourdieu, L

    2006-06-30

    Two-photon scanning microscopy (TPSM) is a powerful tool for imaging deep inside living tissues with sub-cellular resolution. The temporal resolution of TPSM is however strongly limited by the galvanometric mirrors used to steer the laser beam. Fast physiological events can therefore only be followed by scanning repeatedly a single line within the field of view. Because acousto-optic deflectors (AODs) are non-mechanical devices, they allow access at any point within the field of view on a microsecond time scale and are therefore excellent candidates to improve the temporal resolution of TPSM. However, the use of AOD-based scanners with femtosecond pulses raises several technical difficulties. In this paper, we describe an all-digital TPSM setup based on two crossed AODs. It includes in particular an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) placed at 45 degrees with respect to the AODs to pre-compensate for the large spatial distortions of femtosecond pulses occurring in the AODs, in order to optimize the spatial resolution and the fluorescence excitation. Our setup allows recording from freely selectable point-of-interest at high speed (1kHz). By maximizing the time spent on points of interest, random-access TPSM (RA-TPSM) constitutes a promising method for multiunit recordings with millisecond resolution in biological tissues.

  19. Real-time monitoring of NKCC2 endocytosis by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaykumar, Ankita Bachhawat; Caceres, Paulo S; Sablaban, Ibrahim; Tannous, Bakhos A; Ortiz, Pablo A

    2016-01-15

    The apical Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) mediates NaCl reabsorption by the thick ascending limb (TAL). The amount of NKCC2 at the apical membrane of TAL cells is determined by exocytic delivery, recycling, and endocytosis. Surface biotinylation allows measurement of NKCC2 endocytosis, but it has low time resolution and does not allow imaging of the dynamic process of endocytosis. We hypothesized that total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy imaging of labeled NKCC2 would allow monitoring of NKCC2 endocytosis in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) and TAL cells. Thus we generated a NKCC2 construct containing a biotin acceptor domain (BAD) sequence between the transmembrane domains 5 and 6. Once expressed in polarized MDCK or TAL cells, surface NKCC2 was specifically biotinylated by exogenous biotin ligase (BirA). We also demonstrate that expression of a secretory form of BirA in TAL cells induces metabolic biotinylation of NKCC2. Labeling biotinylated surface NKCC2 with fluorescent streptavidin showed that most apical NKCC2 was located within small discrete domains or clusters referred to as "puncta" on the TIRF field. NKCC2 puncta were observed to disappear from the TIRF field, indicating an endocytic event which led to a decrease in the number of surface puncta at a rate of 1.18 ± 0.16%/min in MDCK cells, and a rate 1.09 ± 0.08%/min in TAL cells (n = 5). Treating cells with a cholesterol-chelating agent (methyl-β-cyclodextrin) completely blocked NKCC2 endocytosis. We conclude that TIRF microscopy of labeled NKCC2 allows the dynamic imaging of individual endocytic events at the apical membrane of TAL cells.

  20. Visualizing and Calculating Tip-Substrate Distance in Nanoscale Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy Using 3-Dimensional Super-Resolution Optical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, Vignesh; Marchuk, Kyle; Yu, Yun; Titus, Eric J; Wilson, Andrew J; Armstrong, Chadd M; Zhang, Bo; Willets, Katherine A

    2017-01-03

    We report a strategy for the optical determination of tip-substrate distance in nanoscale scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) using three-dimensional super-resolution fluorescence imaging. A phase mask is placed in the emission path of our dual SECM/optical microscope, generating a double helix point spread function at the image plane, which allows us to measure the height of emitting objects relative to the focus of the microscope. By exciting both a fluorogenic reaction at the nanoscale electrode tip as well as fluorescent nanoparticles at the substrate, we are able to calculate the tip-substrate distance as the tip approaches the surface with precision better than 25 nm. Attachment of a fluorescent particle to the insulating sheath of the SECM tip extends this technique to nonfluorogenic electrochemical reactions. Correlated electrochemical and optical determination of tip-substrate distance yielded excellent agreement between the two techniques. Not only does super-resolution imaging offer a secondary feedback mechanism for measuring the tip-sample gap during SECM experiments, it also enables facile tip alignment and a strategy for accounting for electrode tilt relative to the substrate.

  1. Application of synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microscopy to the study of multi-metal oxide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, D.L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). G.T. Seaborg Inst. for Transactinium Science; McHugo, S.; Thompson, A.C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1998-12-31

    Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microscopy has been used to study multi-metal oxide ceramics that have been designed to sequester radioactive actinide elements for long-term storage and disposal. X-ray fluorescent lines for the various elements have been used for lateral elemental mapping of the materials, and the heterogeneity of the samples is discussed with respect to the elements in the crystallographic phases that have previously been documented by other means of structural and chemical analyses.

  2. Development of fast two-dimensional standing wave microscopy using acousto-optic deflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliko, Olga; Reddy, Duemani G.; Brownell, William E.; Saggau, Peter

    2008-02-01

    A novel scheme for two-dimensional (2D) standing wave fluorescence microscopy (SWFM) using acousto-optic deflectors (AODs) is proposed. Two laser beams were coupled into an inverted microscope and focused at the back focal plane of the objective lens. The position of each of two beams at the back focal plane was controlled by a pair of AODs. This resulted in two collimated beams that interfered in the focal plane, creating a lateral periodic excitation pattern with variable spacing and orientation. The phase of the standing wave pattern was controlled by phase delay between two RF sinusoidal signals driving the AODs. Nine SW patterns of three different orientations about the optical axis and three different phases were generated. The excitation of the specimen using these patterns will result in a SWFM image with enhanced 2D lateral resolution with a nearly isotropic effective point-spread function. Rotation of the SW pattern relative to specimen and varying the SW phase do not involve any mechanical movements and are only limited by the time required for the acoustic wave to fill the aperture of AOD. The resulting total acquisition time can be as short as 100 µs and is only further limited by speed and sensitivity of the employed CCD camera. Therefore, this 2D SWFM can provide a real time imaging of subresolution processes such as docking and fusion of synaptic vesicles. In addition, the combination of 2D SWFM with variable angle total internal reflection (TIR) can extend this scheme to fast microscopy with enhanced three-dimensional (3D) resolution.

  3. Comparing in vivo pump-probe and multiphoton fluorescence microscopy of melanoma and pigmented lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Degan, Simone; Gainey, Christina S.; Mitropoulos, Tanya; Simpson, Mary Jane; Zhang, Jennifer Y.; Warren, Warren S.

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate a multimodal approach that combines a pump-probe with confocal reflectance and multiphoton autofluorescence microscopy. Pump-probe microscopy has been proven to be of great value in analyzing thin tissue sections of pigmented lesions, as it produces molecular contrast which is inaccessible by other means. However, the higher optical intensity required to overcome scattering in thick tissue leads to higher-order nonlinearities in the optical response of melanin (e.g., two-photon pump and one-photon probe) that present additional challenges for interpreting the data. We show that analysis of pigment composition in vivo must carefully account for signal terms that are nonlinear with respect to the pump and probe intensities. We find that pump-probe imaging gives useful contrast for pigmented structures over a large range of spatial scales (100 μm to 1 cm), making it a potentially useful tool for tracking the progression of pigmented lesions without the need to introduce exogenous contrast agents.

  4. Multimodal super-resolution optical microscopy visualizes the close connection between membrane and the cytoskeleton in liver sinusoidal endothelial cell fenestrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönkemöller, Viola; Øie, Cristina; Hübner, Wolfgang; Huser, Thomas; McCourt, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) act as a filter between blood and the hepatocytes. LSECs are highly fenestrated cells; they contain transcellular pores with diameters between 50 to 200 nm. The small sizes of the fenestrae have so far prohibited any functional analysis with standard and advanced light microscopy techniques. Only the advent of super-resolution optical fluorescence microscopy now permits the recording of such small cellular structures. Here, we demonstrate the complementary use of two different super-resolution optical microscopy modalities, 3D structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) and single molecule localization microscopy in a common optical platform to obtain new insights into the association between the cytoskeleton and the plasma membrane that supports the formation of fenestrations. We applied 3D-SIM to multi-color stained LSECs to acquire highly resolved overviews of large sample areas. We then further increased the spatial resolution for imaging fenestrations by single molecule localization microscopy applied to select small locations of interest in the same sample on the same microscope setup. We optimized the use of fluorescent membrane stains for these imaging conditions. The combination of these techniques offers a unique opportunity to significantly improve studies of subcellular ultrastructures such as LSEC fenestrations.

  5. Elasticity Maps of Living Neurons Measured by Combined Fluorescence and Atomic Force Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Spedden, Elise; Naumova, Elena N; Kaplan, David L; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of mechanical parameters such as cell elasticity, stiffness of the growth substrate, or traction stresses generated during axonal extensions is essential for understanding the mechanisms that control neuronal growth. Here we combine Atomic Force Microscopy based force spectroscopy with Fluorescence Microscopy to produce systematic, high-resolution elasticity maps for three different types of live neuronal cells: cortical (embryonic rat), embryonic chick dorsal root ganglion, and P-19 (mouse embryonic carcinoma stem cells) neurons. We measure how the stiffness of neurons changes both during neurite outgrowth and upon disruption of microtubules of the cell. We find reversible local stiffening of the cell during growth, and show that the increase in local elastic modulus is primarily due to the formation of microtubules. We also report that cortical and P-19 neurons have similar elasticity maps, with elastic moduli in the range 0.1-2 kPa, with typical average values of 0.4 kPa (P-19) and 0.2 k...

  6. Virtual unfolding of light sheet fluorescence microscopy dataset for quantitative analysis of the mouse intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candeo, Alessia; Sana, Ilenia; Ferrari, Eleonora; Maiuri, Luigi; D'Andrea, Cosimo; Valentini, Gianluca; Bassi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has proven to be a powerful tool to image fixed and chemically cleared samples, providing in depth and high resolution reconstructions of intact mouse organs. We applied light sheet microscopy to image the mouse intestine. We found that large portions of the sample can be readily visualized, assessing the organ status and highlighting the presence of regions with impaired morphology. Yet, three-dimensional (3-D) sectioning of the intestine leads to a large dataset that produces unnecessary storage and processing overload. We developed a routine that extracts the relevant information from a large image stack and provides quantitative analysis of the intestine morphology. This result was achieved by a three step procedure consisting of: (1) virtually unfold the 3-D reconstruction of the intestine; (2) observe it layer-by-layer; and (3) identify distinct villi and statistically analyze multiple samples belonging to different intestinal regions. Even if the procedure has been developed for the murine intestine, most of the underlying concepts have a general applicability.

  7. Mapping of hemoglobin in erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts using two photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukara, Katarina; Jovanić, Svetlana; Drvenica, Ivana T.; Stančić, Ana; Ilić, Vesna; Rabasović, Mihailo D.; Pantelić, Dejan; Jelenković, Branislav; Bugarski, Branko; Krmpot, Aleksandar J.

    2017-02-01

    The present study describes utilization of two photon excitation fluorescence (2PE) microscopy for visualization of the hemoglobin in human and porcine erythrocytes and their empty membranes (i.e., ghosts). High-quality, label- and fixation-free visualization of hemoglobin was achieved at excitation wavelength 730 nm by detecting visible autofluorescence. Localization in the suspension and spatial distribution (i.e., mapping) of residual hemoglobin in erythrocyte ghosts has been resolved by 2PE. Prior to the 2PE mapping, the presence of residual hemoglobin in the bulk suspension of erythrocyte ghosts was confirmed by cyanmethemoglobin assay. 2PE analysis revealed that the distribution of hemoglobin in intact erythrocytes follows the cells' shape. Two types of erythrocytes, human and porcine, characterized with discocyte and echinocyte morphology, respectively, showed significant differences in hemoglobin distribution. The 2PE images have revealed that despite an extensive washing out procedure after gradual hypotonic hemolysis, a certain amount of hemoglobin localized on the intracellular side always remains bound to the membrane and cannot be eliminated. The obtained results open the possibility to use 2PE microscopy to examine hemoglobin distribution in erythrocytes and estimate the purity level of erythrocyte ghosts in biotechnological processes.

  8. Accumulative difference image protocol for particle tracking in fluorescence microscopy tested in mouse lymphonodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Carlo E; Caccia, Michele; Sironi, Laura; D'Alfonso, Laura; Collini, Maddalena; Rivolta, Ilaria; Miserocchi, Giuseppe; Gorletta, Tatiana; Zanoni, Ivan; Granucci, Francesca; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2010-08-17

    The basic research in cell biology and in medical sciences makes large use of imaging tools mainly based on confocal fluorescence and, more recently, on non-linear excitation microscopy. Substantially the aim is the recognition of selected targets in the image and their tracking in time. We have developed a particle tracking algorithm optimized for low signal/noise images with a minimum set of requirements on the target size and with no a priori knowledge of the type of motion. The image segmentation, based on a combination of size sensitive filters, does not rely on edge detection and is tailored for targets acquired at low resolution as in most of the in-vivo studies. The particle tracking is performed by building, from a stack of Accumulative Difference Images, a single 2D image in which the motion of the whole set of the particles is coded in time by a color level. This algorithm, tested here on solid-lipid nanoparticles diffusing within cells and on lymphocytes diffusing in lymphonodes, appears to be particularly useful for the cellular and the in-vivo microscopy image processing in which few a priori assumption on the type, the extent and the variability of particle motions, can be done.

  9. Accumulative difference image protocol for particle tracking in fluorescence microscopy tested in mouse lymphonodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo E Villa

    Full Text Available The basic research in cell biology and in medical sciences makes large use of imaging tools mainly based on confocal fluorescence and, more recently, on non-linear excitation microscopy. Substantially the aim is the recognition of selected targets in the image and their tracking in time. We have developed a particle tracking algorithm optimized for low signal/noise images with a minimum set of requirements on the target size and with no a priori knowledge of the type of motion. The image segmentation, based on a combination of size sensitive filters, does not rely on edge detection and is tailored for targets acquired at low resolution as in most of the in-vivo studies. The particle tracking is performed by building, from a stack of Accumulative Difference Images, a single 2D image in which the motion of the whole set of the particles is coded in time by a color level. This algorithm, tested here on solid-lipid nanoparticles diffusing within cells and on lymphocytes diffusing in lymphonodes, appears to be particularly useful for the cellular and the in-vivo microscopy image processing in which few a priori assumption on the type, the extent and the variability of particle motions, can be done.

  10. Adhesion of living cells revealed by variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso Dos Santos, Marcelina; Vézy, Cyrille; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2016-02-01

    Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRFM) is a widespread technique to study cellular process occurring near the contact region with the glass substrate. In this field, determination of the accurate distance from the surface to the plasma membrane constitutes a crucial issue to investigate the physical basis of cellular adhesion process. However, quantitative interpretation of TIRF pictures regarding the distance z between a labeled membrane and the substrate is not trivial. Indeed, the contrast of TIRF images depends on several parameters more and less well known (local concentration of dyes, absorption cross section, angular emission pattern…). The strategy to get around this problem is to exploit a series of TIRF pictures recorded at different incident angles in evanescent regime. This technique called variable-angle TIRF microscopy (vaTIRFM), allowing to map the membrane-substrate separation distance with a nanometric resolution (10-20 nm). vaTIRFM was developed by Burmeister, Truskey and Reichert in the early 1990s with a prism-based TIRF setup [Journal of Microscopy 173, 39-51 (1994)]. We propose a more convenient prismless setup, which uses only a rotatable mirror to adjust precisely the laser beam on the back focal plane of the oil immersion objective (no azimuthal scanning is needed). The series of TIRF images permit us to calculate accurately membrane-surface distances in each pixel. We demonstrate that vaTIRFM are useful to quantify the adhesion of living cells for specific and unspecific membrane-surface interactions, achieved on various functionalized substrates with polymers (BSA, poly-L-lysin) or extracellular matrix proteins (collagen and fibronectin).

  11. Multimodal microscopy and the stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence of melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhenhua

    The author's work is divided into three aspects: multimodal microscopy, stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, and customized-profile lenses (CPL) for on-axis laser scanners, which will be introduced respectively. A multimodal microscope provides the ability to image samples with multiple modalities on the same stage, which incorporates the benefits of all modalities. The multimodal microscopes developed in this dissertation are the Keck 3D fusion multimodal microscope 2.0 (3DFM 2.0), upgraded from the old 3DFM with improved performance and flexibility, and the multimodal microscope for targeting small particles (the "Target" system). The control systems developed for both microscopes are low-cost and easy-to-build, with all components off-the-shelf. The control system have not only significantly decreased the complexity and size of the microscope, but also increased the pixel resolution and flexibility. The SMPAF of melanin, activated by a continuous-wave (CW) mode near-infrared (NIR) laser, has potential applications for a low-cost and reliable method of detecting melanin. The photophysics of melanin SMPAF has been studied by theoretical analysis of the excitation process and investigation of the spectra, activation threshold, and photon number absorption of melanin SMPAF. SMPAF images of melanin in mouse hair and skin, mouse melanoma, and human black and white hairs are compared with images taken by conventional multi-photon fluorescence microscopy (MPFM) and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM). SMPAF images significantly increase specificity and demonstrate the potential to increase sensitivity for melanin detection compared to MPFM images and CRM images. Employing melanin SMPAF imaging to detect melanin inside human skin in vivo has been demonstrated, which proves the effectiveness of melanin detection using SMPAF for medical purposes. Selective melanin ablation with micrometer resolution has been presented using the Target system

  12. Simultaneous X-ray fluorescence and scanning X-ray diffraction microscopy at the Australian Synchrotron XFM beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Michael W. M.; Phillips, Nicholas W.; van Riessen, Grant A.; Abbey, Brian; Vine, David J.; Nashed, Youssef S. G.; Mudie, Stephen T.; Afshar, Nader; Kirkham, Robin; Chen, Bo; Balaur, Eugeniu; de Jonge, Martin D.

    2016-08-11

    Owing to its extreme sensitivity, quantitative mapping of elemental distributionsviaX-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) has become a key microanalytical technique. The recent realisation of scanning X-ray diffraction microscopy (SXDM) meanwhile provides an avenue for quantitative super-resolved ultra-structural visualization. The similarity of their experimental geometries indicates excellent prospects for simultaneous acquisition. Here, in both step- and fly-scanning modes, robust, simultaneous XFM-SXDM is demonstrated.

  13. High refractive index silicone gels for simultaneous total internal reflection fluorescence and traction force microscopy of adherent cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Gutierrez

    Full Text Available Substrate rigidity profoundly impacts cellular behaviors such as migration, gene expression, and cell fate. Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF microscopy enables selective visualization of the dynamics of substrate adhesions, vesicle trafficking, and biochemical signaling at the cell-substrate interface. Here we apply high-refractive-index silicone gels to perform TIRF microscopy on substrates with a wide range of physiological elastic moduli and simultaneously measure traction forces exerted by cells on the substrate.

  14. Near-Field Optical Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Pointed Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    metal nanostructure can be viewed as an optical antenna . Of course, the efficiency depends on the material composition and the geometry of the...nanostructure. A simple form of optical antenna is a single ellipsoidal particle. This particle ex- hibits a distinct resonance for which the field...Grober RD, Schoelkopf RJ, Prober DE. 1997. Optical antenna : towards a unity efficiency near-field optical probe. Appl. Phys. Lett. 70:1354 54. Farahani

  15. Optical characterication of probes for photon scanning tunnelling microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    The photon scanning tunnelling microscope is a well-established member of the family of scanning near-field optical microscopes used for optical imaging at the sub-wavelength scale. The quality of the probes, typically pointed uncoated optical fibres, used is however difficult to evaluate...

  16. Second-harmonic scanning optical microscopy of semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, B.; Bozhevolnyi, S.I.; Pedersen, K.;

    2001-01-01

    Second-harmonic (SH) optical imaging of self-assembled InAlGaAs quantum dots (QD's) grown on a GaAs(0 0 1) substrate has been accomplished at room temperature by use of respectively a scanning far-field optical microscope in reflection mode and a scanning near-field optical microscope...

  17. High-resolution 3D reconstruction of microtubule structures by quantitative multi-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Luhong; Wu, Jian; Xiu, Peng; Fan, Jiannan; Hu, Miao; Kuang, Cuifang; Xu, Yingke; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Liu, Xu

    2017-07-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) has been widely used in biomedical research to visualize cellular processes near the cell surface. In this study, a novel multi-angle ring-illuminated TIRFM system, equipped with two galvo mirrors that are on conjugate plan of a 4f optical system was developed. Multi-angle TIRFM generates images with different penetration depths through the controlled variation of the incident angle of illuminating laser. We presented a method to perform three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of microtubules from multi-angle TIRFM images. The performance of our method was validated in simulated microtubules with variable signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and the axial resolution and accuracy of reconstruction were evaluated in selecting different numbers of illumination angles or in different SNR conditions. In U373 cells, we reconstructed the 3-D localization of microtubules near the cell surface with high resolution using over a hundred different angles. Theoretically, the presented TIRFM setup and 3-D reconstruction method can achieve 40 nm axial resolution in experimental conditions where SNR is as low as 2, with 35 different illumination angles. Moreover, our system and reconstruction method have the potential to be used in live cells to track membrane dynamics in 3-D.

  18. Fluorescence microscopy techniques for quantitative evaluation of organic biocide distribution in antifouling paint coatings: application to model antifouling coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodes, L R; Dennington, S P; Schuppe, H; Wharton, J A; Bakker, M; Klijnstra, J W; Stokes, K R

    2012-01-01

    A test matrix of antifouling (AF) coatings including pMMA, an erodible binder and a novel trityl copolymer incorporating Cu₂O and a furan derivative (FD) natural product, were subjected to pontoon immersion and accelerated rotor tests. Fluorescence and optical microscopy techniques were applied to these coatings for quantification of organic biocide and pigment distribution. Total leaching of the biocide from the novel copolymer binder was observed within 6 months of rotor immersion, compared to 35% from the pMMA coating. In pontoon immersions, 61% of the additive was lost from the pMMA coating, and 53% from the erodible binder. Profiles of FD content in the binders revealed an accelerated loss of additive from the surface of the CDP resulting from rosin degradation, compared to even depletion from pMMA. In all samples, release of the biocide was inhibited beyond the Cu₂O front, corresponding to the leached layer in samples where Cu₂O release occurred.

  19. Preservation of protein fluorescence in embedded human dendritic cells for targeted 3D light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhn, K; Fuchs, J; Fröber, A; Kirmse, R; Glass, B; Anders-Össwein, M; Walther, P; Kräusslich, H-G; Dietrich, C

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we present a correlative microscopy workflow to combine detailed 3D fluorescence light microscopy data with ultrastructural information gained by 3D focused ion beam assisted scanning electron microscopy. The workflow is based on an optimized high pressure freezing/freeze substitution protocol that preserves good ultrastructural detail along with retaining the fluorescence signal in the resin embedded specimens. Consequently, cellular structures of interest can readily be identified and imaged by state of the art 3D confocal fluorescence microscopy and are precisely referenced with respect to an imprinted coordinate system on the surface of the resin block. This allows precise guidance of the focused ion beam assisted scanning electron microscopy and limits the volume to be imaged to the structure of interest. This, in turn, minimizes the total acquisition time necessary to conduct the time consuming ultrastructural scanning electron microscope imaging while eliminating the risk to miss parts of the target structure. We illustrate the value of this workflow for targeting virus compartments, which are formed in HIV-pulsed mature human dendritic cells. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  20. A comparative study of metabolic state of stem cells during osteogenic and adipogenic differentiations via fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Ou, Meng-Hsin; Kuo, Jean-Cheng; Chiou, Arthur

    2016-10-01

    Cellular metabolic state can serve as a biomarker to indicate the differentiation potential of stem cells into other specialized cell lineages. In this study, two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2P-FLIM) was applied to determine the fluorescence lifetime and the amounts of the auto-fluorescent metabolic co-factor reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) to elucidate the cellular metabolism of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation processes. 2P-FLIM provides the free to protein-bound NADH ratio which can serve as the indicator of cellular metabolic state. We measured NADH fluorescence lifetime at 0, 7, and 14 days after hMSCs were induced for either osteogenesis or adipogenesis. In both cases, the average fluorescence lifetime increased significantly at day 14 (P stem cells into other specialized cell lineages.