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Sample records for optical engineering national

  1. Optics and photonics: essential technologies for our nation (technology & engineering)

    Research, Committee on Harnessing Light: Capitalizing on Optical Science Trends and Challenges for Future; Sciences, Division on Engineering and Physical; Council, National Research

    2013-01-01

    Optics and photonics technologies are ubiquitous: they are responsible for the displays on smart phones and computing devices, optical fiber that carries the information in the internet, advanced precision manufacturing, enhanced defense capabilities, and a plethora of medical diagnostics tools. The opportunities arising from optics and photonics offer the potential for even greater societal impact in the next few decades, including solar power generation and new efficient lighting that could transform the nation's energy landscape and new optical capabilities that will be essential to support the continued exponential growth of the Internet. As described in the National Research Council report Optics and Photonics: Essential Technologies for our Nation, it is critical for the United States to take advantage of these emerging optical technologies for creating new industries and generating job growth. The report assesses the current state of optical science and engineering in the United States and abroad--incl...

  2. Engineering Optics

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2008-01-01

    Engineering Optics is a book for students who want to apply their knowledge of optics to engineering problems, as well as for engineering students who want to acquire the basic principles of optics. It covers such important topics as optical signal processing, holography, tomography, holographic radars, fiber optical communication, electro- and acousto-optic devices, and integrated optics (including optical bistability). As a basis for understanding these topics, the first few chapters give easy-to-follow explanations of diffraction theory, Fourier transforms, and geometrical optics. Practical examples, such as the video disk, the Fresnel zone plate, and many more, appear throughout the text, together with numerous solved exercises. There is an entirely new section in this updated edition on 3-D imaging.

  3. Optical engineering of diamond

    Rabeau, James R

    2013-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive book on the engineering of diamond optical devices. It will give readers an up-to-date account of the properties of optical quality synthetic diamond (single crystal, nanodiamond and polycrystalline) and reviews the large and growing field of engineering of diamond-based optical devices, with applications in quantum computation, nano-imaging, high performance lasers, and biomedicine. It aims to provide scientists, engineers and physicists with a valuable resource and reference book for the design and performance of diamond-based optical devices.

  4. Optics for engineers

    DiMarzio, Charles A

    2011-01-01

    This book is an excellent resource for teaching any student or scientist who needs to use optical systems. I particularly like the addition of MATLAB scripts and functions. Highly recommended.-Professor James C. Wyant, Dean of College of Optical Sciences, University of ArizonaHis book is clear, concise and highly readable. This is an excellent text.-Professor Changhuei Yang, California Institute of TechnologyAt last, a book on optics that is written with the practising engineer in mind. I have been teaching optics to engineers for many years and have often longed for a text aimed at my student

  5. Integrated Optical Circuit Engineering

    Sriram, S.

    1985-04-01

    Implementation of single-mode optical fiber systems depends largely on the availability of integrated optical components for such functions as switching, multiplexing, and modulation. The technology of integrated optics is maturing very rapidly, and its growth justifies the optimism that now exists in the optical community.

  6. Optical engineering: understanding optical system by experiments

    Scharf, Toralf

    2017-08-01

    Students have to be educated in theoretical and practical matters. Only one of them does not allow attacking complex problems in research, development, and management. After their study, students should be able to design, construct and analyze technical problems at highest levels of complexity. Who never experienced the difficulty of setting up measurements will not be able to understand, plan and manage such complex tasks in her/his future career. At EPFL a course was developed for bachelor education and is based on three pillars: concrete actions (enactive) to be done by the students, a synthesis of their work by writing a report (considered as the iconic part) and inputs from the teacher to generalize the findings and link it to a possible complete abstract description (symbolic). Intensive tutoring allowed an intermodal transfer between these categories. This EIS method originally introduced by Jerome Bruner for small children is particular well adapted for engineer education for which theoretical understanding often is not enough. The symbiosis of ex-cathedra lecture and practical work in a classroom-like situation presents an innovative step towards integrated learning that complements perfectly more abstract course principles like online courses.

  7. ATLAST: Optical Systems Engineering & Development

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The selection of the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) by the NRC Decadal Survey as the highest-priority space mission for the 2020s will...

  8. Optical Design Capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Lawson, J.K.

    2002-01-01

    Optical design capabilities continue to play the same strong role at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that they have played in the past. From defense applications to the solid-state laser programs to the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS), members of the optical design group played critical roles in producing effective system designs and are actively continuing this tradition. This talk will explain the role optical design plays at LLNL, outline current capabilities and summarize a few activities in which the optical design team has been recently participating. Among the many optical engineers working at LLNL, a distinct group exists which specializes in optical design issues. The optical design group collectively has a wide range of fields of expertise as well as a diversity of background histories including LLNL, university, industry and aerospace experience. This unique resource has resulted many effective and productive designs for customers at LLNL and outside the lab.

  9. Optical engineering at Los Alamos: a history

    Brixner, B.

    1983-01-01

    Optical engineering at Los Alamos, which began in 1943, has continued because scientific researchers usually want more resolving power than commercially available optical instruments provide. In addition, in-house engineering is often advantageous - when the technology for designing and making improved instrumentation is available locally - because of our remote location and the frequent need for accurate data. As a consequence, a number of improved research cameras and lens systems have been developed locally - especially for explosion and implosion photography, but even for oscilloscope photography. The development of high-speed cameras led to the ultimate in practical high-speed rotating mirrors and to the invention of a rapid, precise, and effective lens design procedure that has produced more than a hundred lens system that gives improved imaging in special conditions of use. Representative examples of this work are described

  10. Optical monitoring system for a turbine engine

    Lemieux, Dennis H; Smed, Jan P; Williams, James P; Jonnalagadda, Vinay

    2013-05-14

    The monitoring system for a gas turbine engine including a viewing tube assembly having an inner end and an outer end. The inner end is located adjacent to a hot gas flow path within the gas turbine engine and the outer end is located adjacent to an outer casing of the gas turbine engine. An aperture wall is located at the inner end of the viewing tube assembly and an optical element is located within the viewing tube assembly adjacent to the inner end and is spaced from the aperture wall to define a cooling and purge chamber therebetween. An aperture is defined in the aperture wall for passage of light from the hot gas flow path to the optical element. Swirl passages are defined in the viewing tube assembly between the aperture wall and the optical element for passage of cooling air from a location outside the viewing tube assembly into the chamber, wherein swirl passages effect a swirling movement of air in a circumferential direction within the chamber.

  11. Large optics for the National Ignition Facility

    Baisden, P.

    2015-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser with its 192 independent laser beams is not only the world's largest laser, it is also the largest optical system ever built. With its 192 independent laser beams, the NIF requires a total of 7648 large-aperture (meter-sized) optics. One of the many challenges in designing and building NIF has been to carry out the research and development on optical materials, optics design, and optics manufacturing and metrology technologies needed to achieve NIF's high output energies and precision beam quality. This paper describes the multiyear, multi-supplier, development effort that was undertaken to develop the advanced optical materials, coatings, fabrication technologies, and associated process improvements necessary to manufacture the wide range of NIF optics. The optics include neodymium-doped phosphate glass laser amplifiers; fused silica lenses, windows, and phase plates; mirrors and polarizers with multi-layer, high-reflectivity dielectric coatings deposited on BK7 substrates; and potassium di-hydrogen phosphate crystal optics for fast optical switches, frequency conversion, and polarization rotation. Also included is a discussion of optical specifications and custom metrology and quality-assurance tools designed, built, and fielded at supplier sites to verify compliance with the stringent NIF specifications. In addition, a brief description of the ongoing program to improve the operational lifetime (i.e., damage resistance) of optics exposed to high fluence in the 351-nm (3ω) is provided.

  12. Large optics for the National Ignition Facility

    Baisden, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-01-12

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser with its 192 independent laser beams is not only the world’s largest laser, it is also the largest optical system ever built. With its 192 independent laser beams, the NIF requires a total of 7648 large-aperture (meter-sized) optics. One of the many challenges in designing and building NIF has been to carry out the research and development on optical materials, optics design, and optics manufacturing and metrology technologies needed to achieve NIF’s high output energies and precision beam quality. This paper describes the multiyear, multi-supplier, development effort that was undertaken to develop the advanced optical materials, coatings, fabrication technologies, and associated process improvements necessary to manufacture the wide range of NIF optics. The optics include neodymium-doped phosphate glass laser amplifiers; fused silica lenses, windows, and phase plates; mirrors and polarizers with multi-layer, high-reflectivity dielectric coatings deposited on BK7 substrates; and potassium di-hydrogen phosphate crystal optics for fast optical switches, frequency conversion, and polarization rotation. Also included is a discussion of optical specifications and custom metrology and quality-assurance tools designed, built, and fielded at supplier sites to verify compliance with the stringent NIF specifications. In addition, a brief description of the ongoing program to improve the operational lifetime (i.e., damage resistance) of optics exposed to high fluence in the 351-nm (3ω) is provided.

  13. Multiphoton quantum optics and quantum state engineering

    Dell' Anno, Fabio [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E. R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno, CNISM and CNR-INFM Coherentia, and INFN Sezione di Napoli, Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, Via S. Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (Saudi Arabia) (Italy)]. E-mail: dellanno@sa.infn.it; De Siena, Silvio [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E. R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno, CNISM and CNR-INFM Coherentia, and INFN Sezione di Napoli, Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, Via S. Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (SA) (Italy)]. E-mail: desiena@sa.infn.it; Illuminati, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E. R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno, CNISM and CNR-INFM Coherentia, and INFN Sezione di Napoli, Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, Via S. Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (SA) (Italy)]. E-mail: illuminati@sa.infn.it

    2006-05-15

    We present a review of theoretical and experimental aspects of multiphoton quantum optics. Multiphoton processes occur and are important for many aspects of matter-radiation interactions that include the efficient ionization of atoms and molecules, and, more generally, atomic transition mechanisms; system-environment couplings and dissipative quantum dynamics; laser physics, optical parametric processes, and interferometry. A single review cannot account for all aspects of such an enormously vast subject. Here we choose to concentrate our attention on parametric processes in nonlinear media, with special emphasis on the engineering of nonclassical states of photons and atoms that are relevant for the conceptual investigations as well as for the practical applications of forefront aspects of modern quantum mechanics. We present a detailed analysis of the methods and techniques for the production of genuinely quantum multiphoton processes in nonlinear media, and the corresponding models of multiphoton effective interactions. We review existing proposals for the classification, engineering, and manipulation of nonclassical states, including Fock states, macroscopic superposition states, and multiphoton generalized coherent states. We introduce and discuss the structure of canonical multiphoton quantum optics and the associated one- and two-mode canonical multiphoton squeezed states. This framework provides a consistent multiphoton generalization of two-photon quantum optics and a consistent Hamiltonian description of multiphoton processes associated to higher-order nonlinearities. Finally, we discuss very recent advances that by combining linear and nonlinear optical devices allow to realize multiphoton entangled states of the electromagnetic field, either in discrete or in continuous variables, that are relevant for applications to efficient quantum computation, quantum teleportation, and related problems in quantum communication and information.

  14. Multiphoton quantum optics and quantum state engineering

    Dell'Anno, Fabio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2006-01-01

    We present a review of theoretical and experimental aspects of multiphoton quantum optics. Multiphoton processes occur and are important for many aspects of matter-radiation interactions that include the efficient ionization of atoms and molecules, and, more generally, atomic transition mechanisms; system-environment couplings and dissipative quantum dynamics; laser physics, optical parametric processes, and interferometry. A single review cannot account for all aspects of such an enormously vast subject. Here we choose to concentrate our attention on parametric processes in nonlinear media, with special emphasis on the engineering of nonclassical states of photons and atoms that are relevant for the conceptual investigations as well as for the practical applications of forefront aspects of modern quantum mechanics. We present a detailed analysis of the methods and techniques for the production of genuinely quantum multiphoton processes in nonlinear media, and the corresponding models of multiphoton effective interactions. We review existing proposals for the classification, engineering, and manipulation of nonclassical states, including Fock states, macroscopic superposition states, and multiphoton generalized coherent states. We introduce and discuss the structure of canonical multiphoton quantum optics and the associated one- and two-mode canonical multiphoton squeezed states. This framework provides a consistent multiphoton generalization of two-photon quantum optics and a consistent Hamiltonian description of multiphoton processes associated to higher-order nonlinearities. Finally, we discuss very recent advances that by combining linear and nonlinear optical devices allow to realize multiphoton entangled states of the electromagnetic field, either in discrete or in continuous variables, that are relevant for applications to efficient quantum computation, quantum teleportation, and related problems in quantum communication and information

  15. Simulation teaching method in Engineering Optics

    Lu, Qieni; Wang, Yi; Li, Hongbin

    2017-08-01

    We here introduce a pedagogical method of theoretical simulation as one major means of the teaching process of "Engineering Optics" in course quality improvement action plan (Qc) in our school. Students, in groups of three to five, complete simulations of interference, diffraction, electromagnetism and polarization of light; each student is evaluated and scored in light of his performance in the interviews between the teacher and the student, and each student can opt to be interviewed many times until he is satisfied with his score and learning. After three years of Qc practice, the remarkable teaching and learning effect is obatined. Such theoretical simulation experiment is a very valuable teaching method worthwhile for physical optics which is highly theoretical and abstruse. This teaching methodology works well in training students as to how to ask questions and how to solve problems, which can also stimulate their interest in research learning and their initiative to develop their self-confidence and sense of innovation.

  16. Computational Study of Stratified Combustion in an Optical Diesel Engine

    Jaasim, Mohammed; Hernandez Perez, Francisco; Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; Johansson, Bengt; Im, Hong G.

    2017-01-01

    Full cycle simulations of KAUST optical diesel engine were conducted in order to provide insights into the details of fuel spray, mixing, and combustion characteristics at different start of injection (SOI) conditions. Although optical diagnostics

  17. Optical measurements in rocket engine liquid sprays

    Feikema, Douglas A.

    1994-01-01

    The performance of liquid propellant rocket engines is dependent upon many elements of the entire system. One of the most fundamental and most critical is the performance of the injector elements. Their characterization is an important part of the development of combustion devices. Optical measurements within these environments have proven to be invaluable tools in quantifying the physical environment of two phase flows. The effort reported herein involves the measurement of drop velocity, drop size, and most importantly mass flux using Phase-Doppler Particle Anemometry within a spray generated by a single swirl injector element operating in atmospheric pressure conditions. The mass flux has been determined and validated by mechanical patternation methods and by profile integration of the mass flux.

  18. Engineering shadows to fabricate optical metasurfaces.

    Nemiroski, Alex; Gonidec, Mathieu; Fox, Jerome M; Jean-Remy, Philip; Turnage, Evan; Whitesides, George M

    2014-11-25

    Optical metasurfaces-patterned arrays of plasmonic nanoantennas that enable the precise manipulation of light-matter interactions-are emerging as critical components in many nanophotonic materials, including planar metamaterials, chemical and biological sensors, and photovoltaics. The development of these materials has been slowed by the difficulty of efficiently fabricating patterns with the required combinations of intricate nanoscale structure, high areal density, and/or heterogeneous composition. One convenient strategy that enables parallel fabrication of periodic nanopatterns uses self-assembled colloidal monolayers as shadow masks; this method has, however, not been extended beyond a small set of simple patterns and, thus, has remained incompatible with the broad design requirements of metasurfaces. This paper demonstrates a technique-shadow-sphere lithography (SSL)-that uses sequential deposition from multiple angles through plasma-etched microspheres to expand the variety and complexity of structures accessible by colloidal masks. SSL harnesses the entire, relatively unexplored, space of shadow-derived shapes and-with custom software to guide multiangled deposition-contains sufficient degrees of freedom to (i) design and fabricate a wide variety of metasurfaces that incorporate complex structures with small feature sizes and multiple materials and (ii) generate, in parallel, thousands of variations of structures for high-throughput screening of new patterns that may yield unexpected optical spectra. This generalized approach to engineering shadows of spheres provides a new strategy for efficient prototyping and discovery of periodic metasurfaces.

  19. Engineering modes in optical fibers with metamaterial

    Yan, Min; Mortensen, Asger; Qiu, Min

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report a preliminary theoretical study on optical fibers with fine material inclusions whose geometrical inhomogeneity is almost indistinguishable by the operating wavelength.We refer to such fibers as metamaterial optical fibers, which can conceptually be considered...... as an extension from the previously much publicized microstructured optical fibers. Metamaterials can have optical properties not obtainable in naturally existing materials, including artificial anisotropy as well as graded material properties. Therefore, incorporation of metamaterial in optical fiber designs can...

  20. Nuclear engineering in the National Polytechnic Institute

    Del Valle G, E.

    2008-12-01

    In the National Polytechnic Institute the bachelor degree in physics and mathematics, consists of 48 subjects in the common trunk. For the nuclear engineering option, from the fifth semester undergoing 9 specific areas within the Nuclear Engineering Department : introduction to nuclear engineering, power cycles thermodynamics, heat transfer, two courses of nuclear reactors theory, two of nuclear engineering, one course of laboratory and other of radiation protection. There is also a master in nuclear engineering aims train human resources in the area of power and research nuclear reactors to meet the needs of the nuclear industry in Mexico, as well as train highly qualified personnel in branches where are used equipment involving radiation and radioisotopes tale as Medicine, Agriculture and Industry. Among its compulsory subjects are: radiation interaction with the matter, measurements laboratory, reactor physics I and II, reactor engineering, reactor laboratory and thesis seminar. Optional, are: engineering of the radiation protection, computers in the nuclear engineering, nuclear systems dynamics, power plants safety, flow in two phases, reliability and risk analysis, nuclear power systems design, neutron transport theory. Many graduates of this degree have been and are involved in various phases of the nuclear project of Laguna Verde. The Nuclear Engineering Department has a subcritical nuclear reactor of light water and natural uranium and one isotopic source of Pu-Be neutrons of 5 Ci. It also has a multichannel analyzers, calibrated sources of alpha, beta and gamma radiation, a gamma spectrometer of high resolution and low background, a specialized library and one data processing center. In relation particularly to radiation protection, it is clear that there is a lack of specialists, as reflected in radiological control problems in areas such as medicine and industry. Given this situation, it is perceived to be required post-graduate studies at Master and Ph

  1. Optical engineering for high power laser applications

    Novaro, M.

    1993-01-01

    Laser facilities for Inertial Confinement Fusion (I.C.F.) experiments require laser and X ray optics able to withstand short pulse conditions. After a brief recall of high power laser system arrangements and of the characteristics of their optics, the authors will present some X ray optical developments

  2. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory site development plan

    1994-09-01

    This plan briefly describes the 20-year outlook for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Missions, workloads, worker populations, facilities, land, and other resources necessary to fulfill the 20-year site development vision for the INEL are addressed. In addition, the plan examines factors that could enhance or deter new or expanded missions at the INEL. And finally, the plan discusses specific site development issues facing the INEL, possible solutions, resources required to resolve these issues, and the anticipated impacts if these issues remain unresolved

  3. Integrated Optical Circuit Engineering For Optical Fiber Gyrocopes

    Bristow, Julian P.; We, Albert C.; Keur, M.; Lukas, Greg; Ott, Daniel M...; Sriram, S.

    1988-03-01

    Fiber optic gyroscopes are of interest for low-cost, high performance rotation sensors. Integrated optical implementations of the processing optics offer the hope of mass-production, and associated cost reductions. The development of a suitable integrated optical system has been reported by other authors at a wavelength of 850nm [1]. Despite strong technical advantages at 1.3μm wavelength [2], no results have yet appeared. This wavelength is preferred for telecommunications applications applications, thus significantly reduced fiber costs may be realized. Lithium niobate is relatively immune from the photorefractive effect at this wavelength, whereas it is not at at 850nm [3].

  4. Personal optical disk library (PODL) for knowledge engineering

    Wang, Hong; Jia, Huibo; Xu, Duanyi

    2001-02-01

    This paper describes the structure of Personal Optical Disk Library (PODL), a kind of large capacity (40 GB) optical storage equipment for personal usage. With the knowledge engineering technology integrated in the PODL, it can be used on knowledge query, knowledge discovery, Computer-Aided Instruction (CAI) and Online Analysis Process (OLAP).

  5. Engineering light-matter interaction for emerging optical manipulation applications

    Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Palima, Darwin; Novitsky, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we explore recent trends in optical micromanipulation by engineering light-matter interaction and controlling the mechanical effects of optical fields. One central theme is exploring the rich phenomena beyond the now established precision measurements based on trapping micro beads...

  6. Implementation of ISO 10110 optics drawing standards for the National Ignition Facility

    Aikens, D. M.; English, R. E.; Wang, D. Y.

    1999-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project elected to implement ISO 10110 standard for the specifications of NIF optics drawings in 1996. More than 7,000 NIF large optics and 20,000 NIF small optics will be manufactured based on ISO 10110 indications. ISO 10110 standard meets many of the needs of the NIF optics specifications. It allows the optical engineer to quantify and clearly communicate the desired optical specifications. While no single drawing standard specifies all the requirements of high energy laser system, a combination of ISO 10110 standard with detailed notes make it possible to apply international drawing standards to the NIF laser system. This paper will briefly describe LLNL's interpretation and implementation of the ISO 10110 drawing standard, present some examples of NIF optics drawings, and discuss pros and cons of the indications from the perspective of this application. Emphasis will be given to the surface imperfection specifications, known as 5/, for the NIF optics

  7. Implementation of ISO 10110 optics drawing standards for the National Ignition Facility

    Wang, David Y.; English, R. Edward, Jr.; Aikens, David M.

    1999-11-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project elected to implement ISO 10110 standard for the specifications of NIF optics drawings in 1996. More than 7,000 NIF large optics and 20,000 NIF small optics will be manufactured based on ISO 10110 indications. ISO 10110 standard meets many of the needs of the NIF optics specifications. It allows the optical engineer to quantify and clearly communicate the desired optical specifications. While no single drawing standard specifies all the requirements of high energy laser system, a combination of ISO 10110 standard with detailed notes make it possible to apply international drawing standards to the NIF laser system. This paper will briefly describe LLNL's interpretation and implementation of the ISO 10110 drawing standard, present some examples of NIF optics drawings, and discuss pros and cons of the indications from the perspective of this application. Emphasis will be given to the surface imperfection specifications, known as 5/, for the NIF optics.

  8. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory installation roadmap document

    1993-01-01

    The roadmapping process was initiated by the US Department of Energy's office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) to improve its Five-Year Plan and budget allocation process. Roadmap documents will provide the technical baseline for this planning process and help EM develop more effective strategies and program plans for achieving its long-term goals. This document is a composite of roadmap assumptions and issues developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by US Department of Energy Idaho Field Office and subcontractor personnel. The installation roadmap discusses activities, issues, and installation commitments that affect waste management and environmental restoration activities at the INEL. The High-Level Waste, Land Disposal Restriction, and Environmental Restoration Roadmaps are also included

  9. Curriculum optimization of College of Optical Science and Engineering

    Wang, Xiaoping; Zheng, Zhenrong; Wang, Kaiwei; Zheng, Xiaodong; Ye, Song; Zhu, Yuhui

    2017-08-01

    The optimized curriculum of College of Optical Science and Engineering is accomplished at Zhejiang University, based on new trends from both research and industry. The curriculum includes general courses, foundation courses such as mathematics and physics, major core courses, laboratory courses and several module courses. Module courses include optical system designing, optical telecommunication, imaging and vision, electronics and computer science, optoelectronic sensing and metrology, optical mechanics and materials, basics and extension. These curricula reflect the direction of latest researches and relates closely with optoelectronics. Therefore, students may combine flexibly compulsory courses with elective courses, and establish the personalized curriculum of "optoelectronics + X", according to their individual strengths and preferences.

  10. Illumination engineering design with nonimaging optics

    Koshel, R John

    2012-01-01

    This book brings together experts in the field who present material on a number of important and growing topics including lighting, displays, solar concentrators. The first chapter provides an overview of the field of nonimagin and illumination optics. Included in this chapter are terminology, units, definitions, and descriptions of the optical components used in illumination systems. The next two chapters provide material within the theoretical domain, including etendue, etendue squeezing, and the skew invariant. The remaining chapters focus on growing applications. This entire field of

  11. Glass-based integrated optical splitters: engineering oriented research

    Hao, Yinlei; Zheng, Weiwei; Yang, Jianyi; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Minghua

    2010-10-01

    Optical splitter is one of most typical device heavily demanded in implementation of Fiber To The Home (FTTH) system. Due to its compatibility with optical fibers, low propagation loss, flexibility, and most distinguishingly, potentially costeffectiveness, glass-based integrated optical splitters made by ion-exchange technology promise to be very attractive in application of optical communication networks. Aiming at integrated optical splitters applied in optical communication network, glass ion-exchange waveguide process is developed, which includes two steps: thermal salts ion-exchange and field-assisted ion-diffusion. By this process, high performance optical splitters are fabricated in specially melted glass substrate. Main performance parameters of these splitters, including maximum insertion loss (IL), polarization dependence loss (PDL), and IL uniformity are all in accordance with corresponding specifications in generic requirements for optic branching components (GR-1209-CORE). In this paper, glass based integrated optical splitters manufacturing is demonstrated, after which, engineering-oriented research work results on glass-based optical splitter are presented.

  12. Two methodologies for optical analysis of contaminated engine lubricants

    Aghayan, Hamid; Yang, Jun; Bordatchev, Evgueni

    2012-01-01

    The performance, efficiency and lifetime of modern combustion engines significantly depend on the quality of the engine lubricants. However, contaminants, such as gasoline, moisture, coolant and wear particles, reduce the life of engine mechanical components and lubricant quality. Therefore, direct and indirect measurements of engine lubricant properties, such as physical-mechanical, electro-magnetic, chemical and optical properties, are intensively utilized in engine condition monitoring systems and sensors developed within the last decade. Such sensors for the measurement of engine lubricant properties can be used to detect a functional limit of the in-use lubricant, increase drain interval and reduce the environmental impact. This paper proposes two new methodologies for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the presence of contaminants in the engine lubricants. The methodologies are based on optical analysis of the distortion effect when an object image is obtained through a thin random optical medium (e.g. engine lubricant). The novelty of the proposed methodologies is in the introduction of an object with a known periodic shape behind a thin film of the contaminated lubricant. In this case, an acquired image represents a combined lubricant–object optical appearance, where an a priori known periodic structure of the object is distorted by a contaminated lubricant. In the object shape-based optical analysis, several parameters of an acquired optical image, such as the gray scale intensity of lubricant and object, shape width at object and lubricant levels, object relative intensity and width non-uniformity coefficient are newly proposed. Variations in the contaminant concentration and use of different contaminants lead to the changes of these parameters measured on-line. In the statistical optical analysis methodology, statistical auto- and cross-characteristics (e.g. auto- and cross-correlation functions, auto- and cross-spectrums, transfer function

  13. Short educational programs in optical design and engineering

    Voznesenskaya, Anna; Romanova, Galina; Bakholdin, Alexey; Tolstoba, Nadezhda; Ezhova, Kseniia

    2016-09-01

    Globalization and diversification of education in optical engineering causes a number of new phenomena in students' learning paths. Many students have an interest to get some courses in other universities, to study in international environment, to broaden not only professional skills but social links and see the sights as well etc. Participation in short educational programs (e.g. summer / winter schools, camps etc.) allows students from different universities to learn specific issues in their or in some neighbor field and also earn some ECTS for the transcript of records. ITMO University provides a variety of short educational programs in optical design and engineering oriented for different background level, such are: Introduction into optical engineering, Introduction into applied and computer optics, Optical system design, Image modeling and processing, Design of optical devices and components. Depending on students' educational background these programs are revised and adopted each time. Usually the short educational programs last 4 weeks and provide 4 ECTS. The short programs utilize a set of out-of date educational technologies like problem-based learning, case-study and distance-learning and evaluation. Practically, these technologies provide flexibility of the educational process and intensive growth of the learning outcomes. Students are satisfied with these programs very much. In their feedbacks they point a high level of practical significance, experienced teaching staff, scholarship program, excellent educational environment, as well as interesting social program and organizational support.

  14. 2012 national state safety engineers and traffic engineers peer-to-peer workshop.

    2013-11-01

    The Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) and the Illinois Center for Transportation (ICT) sponsored and hosted the : 2012 National State Safety Engineers and Traffic Engineers Peer-to-Peer Workshop on November 14 and 15, 2012, at the : Hyatt ...

  15. National Ignition Facility design focuses on optics

    Hogan, W.J.; Atherton, L.J.; Paisner, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Sometime in the year 2002, scientists at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will focus 192 separate high-power ultraviolet laser beams onto a tiny capsule of deuterium and tritium, heating and compressing the material until it ignites and burns with a burst of fusion energy. The mission of NIF, which will contain the largest laser in the world, is to obtain fusion ignition and gain and to use inertial confinement fusion capabilities in nuclear weapons science experiments. The physics data provided by NIF experiments will help scientists ensure nuclear weapons reliability without the need for actual weapons tests; basic sciences such as astrophysics will also benefit. The facility faces stringent weapons-physics user requirements demanding peak pulse powers greater than 750 TW at 0.35 microm (only 500 TW is required for target ignition), pulse durations of 0.1 to 20 ns, beam steering on the order of several degrees, and target isolation from residual 1- and 0.5-microm radiation. Additional requirements include 50% fractional encircled beam energy in a 100-microm-diameter spot, with 95% encircled in a 200-microm spot. The weapons-effects community requires 1- and 0.5-microm light on target, beam steering to widely spaced targets, a target chamber accommodating oversized objects, well-shielded diagnostic areas, and elimination of stray light in the target chamber. The beamline design, amplifier configuration and requirements for optics are discussed here

  16. Advances in engineering nanometrology at the National Physical Laboratory

    Leach, Richard K.; Claverley, James; Giusca, Claudiu; Jones, Christopher W.; Nimishakavi, Lakshmi; Sun, Wenjuan; Tedaldi, Matthew; Yacoot, Andrew

    2012-07-01

    The National Physical Laboratory, UK, has been active in the field of engineering nanometrology for a number of years. A summary of progress over the last five years is presented in this paper and the following research projects discussed in detail. (1) Development of an infrastructure for the calibration of instruments for measuring areal surface topography, along with the development of areal software measurement standards. This work comprises the use of the optical transfer function and a technique for the simultaneous measurement of topography and the phase change on reflection, allowing composite materials to be measured. (2) Development of a vibrating micro-CMM probe with isotropic probing reaction and the ability to operate in a non-contact mode. (3) A review of x-ray computed tomography and its use in dimensional metrology. (4) The further development of a metrology infrastructure for atomic force microscopy and the development of an instrument for the measurement of the effect of the probe-surface interaction. (5) Traceable measurement of displacement using optical and x-ray interferometry to picometre accuracy. (6) Development of an infrastructure for low-force metrology, including the development of appropriate transfer artefacts.

  17. Advances in engineering nanometrology at the National Physical Laboratory

    Leach, Richard K; Claverley, James; Giusca, Claudiu; Jones, Christopher W; Nimishakavi, Lakshmi; Sun, Wenjuan; Tedaldi, Matthew; Yacoot, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The National Physical Laboratory, UK, has been active in the field of engineering nanometrology for a number of years. A summary of progress over the last five years is presented in this paper and the following research projects discussed in detail. (1) Development of an infrastructure for the calibration of instruments for measuring areal surface topography, along with the development of areal software measurement standards. This work comprises the use of the optical transfer function and a technique for the simultaneous measurement of topography and the phase change on reflection, allowing composite materials to be measured. (2) Development of a vibrating micro-CMM probe with isotropic probing reaction and the ability to operate in a non-contact mode. (3) A review of x-ray computed tomography and its use in dimensional metrology. (4) The further development of a metrology infrastructure for atomic force microscopy and the development of an instrument for the measurement of the effect of the probe–surface interaction. (5) Traceable measurement of displacement using optical and x-ray interferometry to picometre accuracy. (6) Development of an infrastructure for low-force metrology, including the development of appropriate transfer artefacts. (paper)

  18. Science & Engineering Indicators 2016. National Science Board

    National Science Foundation, 2016

    2016-01-01

    "Science and Engineering Indicators" (SEI) is first and foremost a volume of record comprising high-quality quantitative data on the U.S. and international science and engineering enterprise. SEI includes an overview and seven chapters that follow a generally consistent pattern. The chapter titles are as follows: (1) Elementary and…

  19. Engineering surface plasmon based fiber-optic sensors

    Dhawan, Anuj; Muth, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Ordered arrays of nanoholes with subwavelength diameters, and submicron array periodicity were fabricated on the tips of gold-coated optical fibers using focused ion beam (FIB) milling. This provided a convenient platform for evaluating extraordinary transmission of light through subwavelength apertures and allowed the implementation of nanostructures for surface plasmon engineered sensors. The fabrication procedure was straightforward and implemented on single mode and multimode optical fibers as well as etched and tapered fiber tips. Control of the periodicity and spacing of the nanoholes allowed the wavelength of operation to be tailored. Large changes in optical transmission were observed at the designed wavelengths, depending on the surrounding refractive index, allowing the devices to be used as fiber-optic sensors

  20. Engineering surface plasmon based fiber-optic sensors

    Dhawan, Anuj [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); Muth, John F. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States)], E-mail: muth@unity.ncsu.edu

    2008-04-15

    Ordered arrays of nanoholes with subwavelength diameters, and submicron array periodicity were fabricated on the tips of gold-coated optical fibers using focused ion beam (FIB) milling. This provided a convenient platform for evaluating extraordinary transmission of light through subwavelength apertures and allowed the implementation of nanostructures for surface plasmon engineered sensors. The fabrication procedure was straightforward and implemented on single mode and multimode optical fibers as well as etched and tapered fiber tips. Control of the periodicity and spacing of the nanoholes allowed the wavelength of operation to be tailored. Large changes in optical transmission were observed at the designed wavelengths, depending on the surrounding refractive index, allowing the devices to be used as fiber-optic sensors.

  1. National association of broadcasters engineering handbook NAB engineering handbook

    Jones, Graham A; Osenkowsky, Thomas G; Williams, Edmund A

    2013-01-01

    The NAB Engineering Handbook provides detailed information on virtually every aspect of the broadcast chain, from news gathering, program production and postproduction through master control and distribution links to transmission, antennas, RF propagation, cable and satellite. Hot topics covered include HD Radio, HDTV, 2 GHz broadcast auxiliary services, EAS, workflow, metadata, digital asset management, advanced video and audio compression, audio and video over IP, and Internet broadcasting. A wide range of related topics that engineers and managers need to understand are also covered, includ

  2. Engineering of automated assembly of beam-shaping optics

    Haag, Sebastian; Sinhoff, Volker; Müller, Tobias; Brecher, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Beam-shaping is essential for any kind of laser application. Assembly technologies for beam-shaping subassemblies are subject to intense research and development activities and their technical feasibility has been proven in recent years while economic viability requires more efficient engineering tools for process planning and production ramp up of complex assembly tasks for micro-optical systems. The work presented in this paper aims for significant reduction of process development and production ramp up times for the automated assembly of micro-optical subassemblies for beam-collimation and beam-tilting. The approach proposed bridges the gap between the product development phase and the realization of automation control through integration of established software tools such as optics simulation and CAD modeling as well as through introduction of novel software tools and methods to efficiently describe active alignment strategies. The focus of the paper is put on the methodological approach regarding the engineering of assembly processes for beam-shaping micro-optics and the formal representation of assembly objectives similar to representation in mechanical assemblies. Main topic of the paper is the engineering methodology for active alignment processes based on the classification of optical functions for beam-shaping optics and corresponding standardized measurement setups including adaptable alignment algorithms. The concepts are applied to industrial use-cases: (1) integrated collimation module for fast- and slow-axis and (2) beam-tilting subassembly consisting of a fast-axis collimator and micro-lens array. The paper concludes with an overview of current limitations as well as an outlook on the next development steps considering adhesive bonding processes.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Research Foundations: Engineering

    Foundations Bioscience Computing & Information Science Electromagnetics Engineering Science Geoscience Mexico Small Business Assistance Program Sandia Science & Technology Park Careers Community Library Events Careers View All Jobs Students & Postdocs Internships & Co-ops Fellowships

  4. National Hispanic Bilingual Engineering Program (NHBEP)

    Cruz, M.

    2000-10-31

    This report describes program goals, activities, processes, benefits for the profession of engineering and for the project participants, coordination, and impact of NHBEP throughout the three years of implementation.

  5. Update on Engine Combustion Research at Sandia National Laboratories

    Jay Keller; Gurpreet Singh

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are to describe the research efforts in diesel engine combustion at Sandia National Laboratories' Combustion Research Facility and to provide recent experimental results. We have four diesel engine experiments supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies: a one-cylinder version of a Cummins heavy-duty engine, a diesel simulation facility, a one-cylinder Caterpillar engine to evaluate combustion of alternative fuels, and a homogeneous-charge, compression ignition (HCCI) engine. Recent experimental results of diesel combustion research will be discussed and a description will be given of our HCCI experimental program and of our HCCI modeling work

  6. Optical approaches to macroscopic and microscopic engineering

    Bartolo, Paulo Jorge da Silva

    2001-01-01

    This research investigates the theoretical basis of a new photo-fabrication system. By this system, optical and thermal effects are used, together or separately, to locally induce a phase change in a liquid resin. This phase change phenomena is used to 'write' three-dimensional shapes. In addition, a thermal-kinetic model has been developed to correctly simulate the physical and chemical changes that occur in the bulk (and surroundings) of the material directly exposed to radiation and/or heat, and the rates at which these changes occur. Through this model, the law of conservation of energy describing the heat transfer phenomena is coupled with a kinetic model describing in detail the cure kinetics in both chemical and diffusion-controlled regimes. The thermal-kinetic model has been implemented using the finite element method. Linear rectangular elements have been considered and the concept of isoparametric formulation used. The Cranck-Nicolson algorithm has been used to integrate the system of equations, resulting from the finite element discretisation, with respect to time. Three different photo-fabrication processes were investigated. The first process uses ultraviolet radiation to cure a thermosetting polymer containing a certain amount of photo-initiator. The radiation generates free radicals by cleavage the initiator molecules, starting the chemical reaction. The second one uses ultraviolet radiation to start the curing reaction of a liquid thermosetting polymer containing a certain amount of photo-initiator. In this case, a heat source is also used to increase the temperature, and consequently, to increase the rate of gel formation and the fractional conversion, decreasing the necessary exposure time. Finally, the third system uses a thermosetting material containing small amounts of both thermal and photo-initiators. In this case ultraviolet radiation and heat are used to simultaneously start two types of chemical reactions: thermal-initiated and photo

  7. Engineering tool for the qualification of optical coatings

    Davi, M.; Perrin, D.; Lequime, M.; Doyle, D.

    2017-11-01

    For the needs of the European Space Agency, SESO is developing in cooperation with the Institut Fresnel an Engineering Tool for the Qualification of Optical Coatings. The goal is to develop a standard methodology for testing the behaviour and stability of optical coatings during the air to vacuum transition. The Engineering Tool is indeed designed to achieve in vacuum reflectance and transmittance measurements between 600 and 1700 nm. It is also designed to evaluate during the vacuum cycle partially the nature of the outgassing elements, using mass spectrometry. We will present in our paper the concept of this equipment and the associated test method. The preliminary characterizations will be done in June 2006 on reflective coatings, one anti reflective coating and dichroic filters.

  8. Nonlinear light-matter interactions in engineered optical media

    Litchinitser, Natalia

    In this talk, we consider fundamental optical phenomena at the interface of nonlinear and singular optics in artificial media, including theoretical and experimental studies of linear and nonlinear light-matter interactions of vector and singular optical beams in metamaterials. We show that unique optical properties of metamaterials open unlimited prospects to ``engineer'' light itself. Thanks to their ability to manipulate both electric and magnetic field components, metamaterials open new degrees of freedom for tailoring complex polarization states and orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light. We will discuss several approaches to structured light manipulation on the nanoscale using metal-dielectric, all-dielectric and hyperbolic metamaterials. These new functionalities, including polarization and OAM conversion, beam magnification and de-magnification, and sub-wavelength imaging using novel non-resonant hyperlens are likely to enable a new generation of on-chip or all-fiber structured light applications. The emergence of metamaterials also has a strong potential to enable a plethora of novel nonlinear light-matter interactions and even new nonlinear materials. In particular, nonlinear focusing and defocusing effects are of paramount importance for manipulation of the minimum focusing spot size of structured light beams necessary for nanoscale trapping, manipulation, and fundamental spectroscopic studies. Colloidal suspensions offer as a promising platform for engineering polarizibilities and realization of large and tunable nonlinearities. We will present our recent studies of the phenomenon of spatial modulational instability leading to laser beam filamentation in an engineered soft-matter nonlinear medium. Finally, we introduce so-called virtual hyperbolic metamaterials formed by an array of plasma channels in air as a result of self-focusing of an intense laser pulse, and show that such structure can be used to manipulate microwave beams in a free space. This

  9. Ultrafast optics. Ultrafast optical control by few photons in engineered fiber.

    Nissim, R; Pejkic, A; Myslivets, E; Kuo, B P; Alic, N; Radic, S

    2014-07-25

    Fast control of a strong optical beam by a few photons is an outstanding challenge that limits the performance of quantum sensors and optical processing devices. We report that a fast and efficient optical gate can be realized in an optical fiber that has been engineered with molecular-scale accuracy. Highly efficient, distributed phase-matched photon-photon interaction was achieved in the fiber with locally controlled, nanometer-scale core variations. A three-photon input was used to manipulate a Watt-scale beam at a speed exceeding 500 gigahertz. In addition to very fast beam control, the results provide a path to developing a new class of sensitive receivers capable of operating at very high rates. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. The history and evolution of optically accessible research engines and their impact on our understanding of engine combustion

    Miles, Paul C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The development and application of optically accessible engines to further our understanding of in-cylinder combustion processes is reviewed, spanning early efforts in simplified engines to the more recent development of high-pressure, high-speed engines that retain the geometric complexities of modern production engines. Limitations of these engines with respect to the reproduction of realistic metal test engine characteristics and performance are identified, as well as methods that have been used to overcome these limitations. Finally, the role of the work performed in these engines on clarifying the fundamental physical processes governing the combustion process and on laying the foundation for predictive engine simulation is summarized.

  11. Chinese National Optical Education Small Private Online Course system

    Zhang, XiaoJie; Lin, YuanFang; Liu, Xu; Liu, XiangDong; Cen, ZhaoFeng; Li, XiaoTong; Zheng, XiaoDong; Wang, XiaoPing

    2017-08-01

    In order to realize the sharing of high quality course resources and promote the deep integration of `Internet+' higher education and talent training, a new on-line to off-line specialized courses teaching mode was explored in Chinese colleges and universities, which emphasized different teaching places, being organized asynchronously and localized. The latest progress of the Chinese National Optical Education Small Private On-line Course (CNOESPOC) system set up by Zhejiang University and other colleges and universities having disciplines in the field of optics and photonics under the guidance of the Chinese National Steering Committee of Optics and Photonics (CNSCOP) was introduced in this paper. The On-line to Off-line (O2O) optical education teaching resource sharing practice offers a new good example for higher education in China under the background of Internet +.

  12. Engineering computations at the national magnetic fusion energy computer center

    Murty, S.

    1983-01-01

    The National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center (NMFECC) was established by the U.S. Department of Energy's Division of Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE). The NMFECC headquarters is located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Its purpose is to apply large-scale computational technology and computing techniques to the problems of controlled thermonuclear research. In addition to providing cost effective computing services, the NMFECC also maintains a large collection of computer codes in mathematics, physics, and engineering that is shared by the entire MFE research community. This review provides a broad perspective of the NMFECC, and a list of available codes at the NMFECC for engineering computations is given

  13. Optical limiting in suspension of detonation nanodiamonds in engine oil

    Mikheev, Konstantin G.; Krivenkov, Roman Yu.; Mogileva, Tatyana N.; Puzyr, Alexey P.; Bondar, Vladimir S.; Bulatov, Denis L.; Mikheev, Gennady M.

    2017-07-01

    The optical limiting (OL) of detonation nanodiamond (DND) suspensions in engine oil was studied at a temperature range of 20°C to 100°C. Oil suspensions were prepared on the basis of the DNDs with an average nanoparticle cluster size in hydrosols (Daver) of 50 and 110 nm. Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the samples. The OL investigation was carried out by the z-scan technique. The fundamental (1064 nm) and second (532 nm) harmonic radiations of YAG:Nd3+ laser with passive Q-switching as an excitation source were used. The OL thresholds for both suspensions at 532 and 1064 nm were determined. It is shown that a decrease in the average nanoparticle cluster size as well as an increase of the wavelength of the incident radiation leads to the OL threshold increase. It is established that the OL performance is not influenced by increasing the temperature from 20°C to 100°C. The results obtained show the possibility of using the DNDs suspensions in engine oil as an optical limiter in a wide temperature range.

  14. Systems engineering and analysis of electro-optical and infrared systems

    Arrasmith, William Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Introduction to Electro-optic and Infrared (EO/IR) Systems Engineering?Radiation in the Visible and Infrared Parts of the Electromagnetic SpectrumRadiation SourcesThe Effect of the Atmosphere on Optical PropagationBasic OpticsOptical ModulationThe Detection of Optical RadiationNoise in the Optical Detection ProcessTechnical Performance Measures and Metrics of Optical DetectorsModern Detectors and their Measures of PerformanceThe Effects of Cooling on Optical Detector NoiseSignal and Image ProcessingElectro-Optic and Infrared Systems AnalysisLaser Imaging Systems?Spectral Imaging?LIDAR and LADA

  15. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: Annual report, 1986

    1986-01-01

    The INEL underwent a year of transition in 1986. Success with new business initiatives, the prospects of even better things to come, and increased national recognition provided the INEL with a glimpse of its promising and exciting future. Among the highlights were: selection of the INEL as the preferred site for the Special Isotope Separation Facility (SIS); the first shipments of core debris from the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor to the INEL; dedication of three new facilities - the Fluorinel Dissolution Process, the Remote Analytical Laboratory, and the Stored Waste Experimental Pilot Plant; groundbreaking for the Fuel Processing Restoration Facility; and the first IR-100 award won by the INEL, given for an innovative machine vision system. The INEL has been assigned project management responsibility for the SDI Office-sponsored Multimegawatt Space Reactor and the Air Force-sponsored Multimegawatt Terrestrial Power Plant Project. New Department of Defense initiatives have been realized in projects involving development of prototype defense electronics systems, materials research, and hazardous waste technology. While some of our major reactor safety research programs have been completed, the INEL continues as a leader in advanced reactor technologies development. In April, successful tests were conducted for the development of the Integral Fast Reactor. Other 1986 highlights included the INEL's increased support to the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management for complying with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. Major INEL activities included managing a cask procurement program, demonstrating fuel assembly consolidation, and testing spent fuel storage casks. In addition, the INEL supplied the Tennessee Valley Authority with management and personnel experienced in reactor technology, increased basic research programs at the Idaho Research Center, and made numerous outreach efforts to assist the economies of Idaho communities

  16. Engineering the development of optical fiber sensors for adverse environments

    Hastings, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    During the last decade, many optical fiber sensors have been developed for particular applications in harsh environments with limited success. Off-the-shelf optical fiber sensors and measurement systems are not available, partly because they have not been engineered to meet tough environmental requirements necessary for applications outside the laboratory. Moreover, no generalized computer-aided tools exist to help advance their development, design, and use. Computer-aided design tools currently being developed are described in this paper. Structural finite element analyses have been coupled with optoelastic analyses of both all-fiber interferometers and serial microbend sensors for distributed measurement of various physical quantities. The combined analyses have been parameterized and implemented on personal computers and work stations for use as design/development tools that can be used to determine the performance of different sensor configurations in various environments. Potentially, these computer-aided tools could be used for failure diagnosis and redesign of existing optical fiber sensors. Performances predicted by the computer simulations are verified with experimental data and numerical analyses from the literature. The long-term goal is to develop user-friendly software packages for both sensor manufacturers and end users

  17. Virtual-reality-based educational laboratories in fiber optic engineering

    Hayes, Dana; Turczynski, Craig; Rice, Jonny; Kozhevnikov, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Researchers and educators have observed great potential in virtual reality (VR) technology as an educational tool due to its ability to engage and spark interest in students, thus providing them with a deeper form of knowledge about a subject. The focus of this project is to develop an interactive VR educational module, Laser Diode Characteristics and Coupling to Fibers, to integrate into a fiber optics laboratory course. The developed module features a virtual laboratory populated with realistic models of optical devices in which students can set up and perform an optical experiment dealing with laser diode characteristics and fiber coupling. The module contains three increasingly complex levels for students to navigate through, with a short built-in quiz after each level to measure the student's understanding of the subject. Seventeen undergraduate students learned fiber coupling concepts using the designed computer simulation in a non-immersive desktop virtual environment (VE) condition. The analysis of students' responses on the updated pre- and post tests show statistically significant improvement of the scores for the post-test as compared to the pre-test. In addition, the students' survey responses suggest that they found the module very useful and engaging. The conducted study clearly demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed instructional technology for engineering education, where both the model of instruction and the enabling technology are equally important, in providing a better learning environment to improve students' conceptual understanding as compared to other instructional approaches.

  18. Current developments in optical engineering and commercial optics; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, Aug. 7-11, 1989

    Fischer, Robert E. (Editor); Pollicove, Harvey M. (Editor); Smith, Warren J. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on current developments in optical engineering and commercial optics are presented. Individual topics addressed include: large optics fabrication technology drivers and new manufacturing techniques, new technology for beryllium mirror production, design examples of hybrid refractive-diffractive lenses, optical sensor designs for detecting cracks in optical materials, retroreflector field-of-view properties for open and solid cube corners, correction of misalignment-dependent aberrations of the HST via phase retrieval, basic radiometry review for seeker test set, radiation effects on visible optical elements, and nonlinear simulation of efficiency for large-orbit nonwiggler FELs.

  19. Optical Propagation Modeling for the National Ignition Facility

    Williams, W H; Auerbach, J M; Henesian, M A; Jancaitis, K S; Manes, K R; Mehta, N C; Orth, C D; Sacks, R A; Shaw, M J; Widmayer, C C

    2004-01-12

    Optical propagation modeling of the National Ignition Facility has been utilized extensively from conceptual design several years ago through to early operations today. In practice we routinely (for every shot) model beam propagation starting from the waveform generator through to the target. This includes the regenerative amplifier, the 4-pass rod amplifier, and the large slab amplifiers. Such models have been improved over time to include details such as distances between components, gain profiles in the laser slabs and rods, transient optical distortions due to the flashlamp heating of laser slabs, measured transmitted and reflected wavefronts for all large optics, the adaptive optic feedback loop, and the frequency converter. These calculations allow nearfield and farfield predictions in good agreement with measurements.

  20. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory decontamination and decommissioning summary

    Chapin, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Topics covered concern the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) work performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during FY 1979 and include both operations and development projects. Briefly presented are the different types of D and D projects planned and the D and D projects completed. The problems encountered on these projects and the development program recommended are discussed

  1. Successful neural network projects at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Cordes, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents recent and current projects at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) that research and apply neural network technology. The projects are summarized in the paper and their direct application to space reactor power and propulsion systems activities is discussed. 9 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    1993-01-01

    This document presents the plans and goals of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for FY 1993--1998. Areas discussed in this document include: INEL strategic view; initiatives; scientific and technical programs; environmental, safety, and health management, technology transfer, science and math education, and community affairs; human resources; site and facilities; and resource projections

  3. Ergonomic assessments of three Idaho National Engineering Laboratory cafeterias

    Ostrom, L.T.; Romero, H.A.; Gilbert, B.G.; Wilhelmsen, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a Department of Energy facility that performs a variety of engineering and research projects. EG G Idaho is the prime contractor for the laboratory and, as such, performs the support functions in addition to technical, research, and development functions. As a part of the EG G Idaho Industrial Hygiene Initiative, ergonomic assessments were conducted at three Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Cafeterias. The purposes of the assessments were to determine whether ergonomic problems existed in the work places and, if so, to make recommendations to improve the work place and task designs. The study showed there were ergonomic problems in all three cafeterias assessed. The primary ergonomic stresses observed included wrist and shoulder stress in the dish washing task, postural stress in the dish washing and food preparation tasks, and back stress in the food handling tasks.

  4. Ergonomic assessments of three Idaho National Engineering Laboratory cafeterias

    Ostrom, L.T.; Romero, H.A.; Gilbert, B.G.; Wilhelmsen, C.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a Department of Energy facility that performs a variety of engineering and research projects. EG&G Idaho is the prime contractor for the laboratory and, as such, performs the support functions in addition to technical, research, and development functions. As a part of the EG&G Idaho Industrial Hygiene Initiative, ergonomic assessments were conducted at three Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Cafeterias. The purposes of the assessments were to determine whether ergonomic problems existed in the work places and, if so, to make recommendations to improve the work place and task designs. The study showed there were ergonomic problems in all three cafeterias assessed. The primary ergonomic stresses observed included wrist and shoulder stress in the dish washing task, postural stress in the dish washing and food preparation tasks, and back stress in the food handling tasks.

  5. National Ignition Facility quality assurance plan for laser materials and optical technology

    Wolfe, C.R.

    1996-05-01

    Quality achievement is the responsibility of the line organizations of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. This subtier Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) applies to activities of the Laser Materials & Optical Technology (LM&OT) organization and its subcontractors. It responds to the NIF Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP, L-15958-2, NIF-95-499) and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5700.6C. This Plan is organized according to 10 Quality Assurance (QA) criteria and subelements of a management system as outlined in the NIF QAPP. This Plan describes how those QA requirements are met. This Plan is authorized by the Associate Project Leader for the LM&OT organization, who has assigned responsibility to the Optics QA engineer to maintain this plan, with the assistance of the NIF QA organization. This Plan governs quality-affecting activities associated with: design; procurement; fabrication; testing and acceptance; handling and storage; and installation of NIF Project optical components into mounts and subassemblies.

  6. Development of the environmental management integrated baseline at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory using systems engineering

    Murphy, J.A.; Caliva, R.M.; Wixson, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is one of many Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories that has been performing environmental cleanup and stabilization, which was accelerated upon the end of the cold war. In fact, the INEL currently receives two-thirds of its scope to perform these functions. However, the cleanup is a highly interactive system that creates an opportunity for systems engineering methodology to be employed. At the INEL, a group called EM (Environmental Management) Integration has been given this charter along with a small core of systems engineers. This paper discusses the progress to date of converting the INEL legacy system into one that uses the systems engineering discipline as the method to ensure that external requirements are met

  7. EDITORIAL: Special issue on optical neural engineering: advances in optical stimulation technology Special issue on optical neural engineering: advances in optical stimulation technology

    Shoham, Shy; Deisseroth, Karl

    2010-08-01

    Neural engineering, itself an 'emerging interdisciplinary research area' [1] has undergone a sea change over the past few years with the emergence of exciting new optical technologies for monitoring, stimulating, inhibiting and, more generally, modulating neural activity. To a large extent, this change is driven by the realization of the promise and complementary strengths that emerging photo-stimulation tools offer to add to the neural engineer's toolbox, which has been almost exclusively based on electrical stimulation technologies. Notably, photo-stimulation is non-contact, can in some cases be genetically targeted to specific cell populations, can achieve high spatial specificity (cellular or even sub-cellular) in two or three dimensions, and opens up the possibility of large-scale spatial-temporal patterned stimulation. It also offers a seamless solution to the problem of cross-talk generated by simultaneous electrical stimulation and recording. As in other biomedical optics phenomena [2], photo-stimulation includes multiple possible modes of interaction between light and the target neurons, including a variety of photo-physical and photo-bio-chemical effects with various intrinsic components or exogenous 'sensitizers' which can be loaded into the tissue or genetically expressed. Early isolated reports of neural excitation with light date back to the late 19th century [3] and to Arvanitaki and Chalazonitis' work five decades ago [4]; however, the mechanism by which these and other direct photo-stimulation, inhibition and modulation events [5-7] took place is yet unclear, as is their short- and long-term safety profile. Photo-chemical photolysis of covalently 'caged' neurotransmitters [8, 9] has been widely used in cellular neuroscience research for three decades, including for exciting or inhibiting neural activity, and for mapping neural circuits. Technological developments now allow neurotransmitters to be uncaged with exquisite spatial specificity (down to

  8. Computational Study of Stratified Combustion in an Optical Diesel Engine

    Jaasim, Mohammed

    2017-03-28

    Full cycle simulations of KAUST optical diesel engine were conducted in order to provide insights into the details of fuel spray, mixing, and combustion characteristics at different start of injection (SOI) conditions. Although optical diagnostics provide valuable information, the high fidelity simulations with matched parametric conditions improve fundamental understanding of relevant physical and chemical processes by accessing additional observables such as the local mixture distribution, intermediate species concentrations, and detailed chemical reaction rates. Commercial software, CONVERGE™, was used as the main simulation tool, with the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence model and the multi-zone (SAGE) combustion model to compute the chemical reaction terms. SOI is varied from late compression ignition (CI) to early partially premixed combustion (PPC) conditions. The simulation results revealed a stronger correlation between fuel injection timing and combustion phasing for late SOI conditions, whereas the combustion phasing starts to decouple from SOI for early SOI cases. The predictions are consistent with the experimental observations, in terms of the overall trends in combustion and emission characteristics, while the high fidelity simulations provided further insights into the effects of mixture stratifications resulting from different SOI conditions.

  9. Enhanced optical coupling and Raman scattering via microscopic interface engineering

    Thompson, Jonathan V.; Hokr, Brett H.; Kim, Wihan; Ballmann, Charles W.; Applegate, Brian E.; Jo, Javier A.; Yamilov, Alexey; Cao, Hui; Scully, Marlan O.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2017-11-01

    Spontaneous Raman scattering is an extremely powerful tool for the remote detection and identification of various chemical materials. However, when those materials are contained within strongly scattering or turbid media, as is the case in many biological and security related systems, the sensitivity and range of Raman signal generation and detection is severely limited. Here, we demonstrate that through microscopic engineering of the optical interface, the optical coupling of light into a turbid material can be substantially enhanced. This improved coupling facilitates the enhancement of the Raman scattering signal generated by molecules within the medium. In particular, we detect at least two-orders of magnitude more spontaneous Raman scattering from a sample when the pump laser light is focused into a microscopic hole in the surface of the sample. Because this approach enhances both the interaction time and interaction region of the laser light within the material, its use will greatly improve the range and sensitivity of many spectroscopic techniques, including Raman scattering and fluorescence emission detection, inside highly scattering environments.

  10. Science and Engineering Alliance: A new resource for the nation

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and four major Historically Black Colleges and Universities with strong research and development capabilities in science, engineering and computer technology have formed the Science and Engineering Alliance. Located in California, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas, each brings to the Alliance a tradition of research and development and educational excellence. This unique consortium is now available to perform research development and training to meet the needs of the public and private sectors. The Alliance was formed to help assure an adequate supply of top-quality minority scientists in the next century, while simultaneously meeting the research and development needs of the public and private sectors.

  11. Nuclear Plant Analyzer development at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Laats, E.T.

    1986-10-01

    The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) is a state-of-the-art safety analysis and engineering tool being used to address key nuclear power plant safety issues. Under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the NPA has been developed to integrate the NRC's computerized reactor behavior simulation codes such as RELAP5, TRAC-BWR and TRAC-PWR, with well-developed computer color graphics programs and large repositories of reactor design and experimental data. An important feature of the NPA is the capability to allow an analyst to redirect a RELAP5 or TRAC calculation as it progresses through its simulated scenario. The analyst can have the same power plant control capabilities as the operator of an actual plant. The NPA resides on the dual Control Data Corporation Cyber 176 mainframe computers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and Cray-1S computers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Kirtland Air Force Weapons Laboratory (KAFWL)

  12. Preliminary systems engineering evaluations for the National Ecological Observatory Network.

    Robertson, Perry J.; Kottenstette, Richard Joseph; Crouch, Shannon M.; Brocato, Robert Wesley; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Osborn, Thor D.; Ivey, Mark D.; Gass, Karl Leslie; Heller, Edwin J.; Dishman, James Larry; Schubert, William Kent; Zirzow, Jeffrey A.

    2008-11-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is an ambitious National Science Foundation sponsored project intended to accumulate and disseminate ecologically informative sensor data from sites among 20 distinct biomes found within the United States and Puerto Rico over a period of at least 30 years. These data are expected to provide valuable insights into the ecological impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species in these various biomes, and thereby provide a scientific foundation for the decisions of future national, regional, and local policy makers. NEON's objectives are of substantial national and international importance, yet they must be achieved with limited resources. Sandia National Laboratories was therefore contracted to examine four areas of significant systems engineering concern; specifically, alternatives to commercial electrical utility power for remote operations, approaches to data acquisition and local data handling, protocols for secure long-distance data transmission, and processes and procedures for the introduction of new instruments and continuous improvement of the sensor network. The results of these preliminary systems engineering evaluations are presented, with a series of recommendations intended to optimize the efficiency and probability of long-term success for the NEON enterprise.

  13. TECHNOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS OF THE MILITARY ENGINEERING TO THE NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    RODRIGO CARO DE KARTZOW

    2018-01-01

    The development of the Chilean military industry is closely related to the growing of the national industry. Similarly to the way the history of the Army and the country are tightly related, the history of the military engineering is an example of organic growth when compared to its civilian counterpart. Collaboration instead of competition is the distinctive seal that best shows the development of weaponry, explosives, cartography and nuclear power. This collaboration have lasted with the ye...

  14. International and national standardisation for quality assurance in nuclear engineering

    Becker, K.

    1992-01-01

    After a summarising description of international developments (ISO 6216, ISO 9000 series, IAEA 50 SG-QA) an overview of the total of around 200 national quality standards and regulations from almost 20 countries is given. Finally the relationships between rules of engineering and the rules of laws, mechanisms and trends in the development of nuclear energy standards with particular consideration of the possibilities for European harmonisation are presented in brief. 1 fig., 5 tabs

  15. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory installation roadmap assumptions document

    1993-05-01

    This document is a composite of roadmap assumptions developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by the US Department of Energy Idaho Field Office and subcontractor personnel as a key element in the implementation of the Roadmap Methodology for the INEL Site. The development and identification of these assumptions in an important factor in planning basis development and establishes the planning baseline for all subsequent roadmap analysis at the INEL

  16. Engineering Gold Nanorod-Based Plasmonic Nanocrystals for Optical Applications

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonic nanocrystals have a unique ability to support localized surface plasmon resonances and exhibit rich and intriguing optical properties. Engineering plasmonic nanocrystals can maximize their potentials for specific applications. In this dissertation, we developed three unprecedented Au nanorod-based plasmonic nanocrystals through rational design of the crystal shape and/or composition, and successfully demonstrated their applications in light condensation, photothermal conversion, and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The “Au nanorod-Au nanosphere dimer” nanocrystal was synthesized via the ligand-induced asymmetric growth of a Au nanosphere on a Au nanorod. This dimeric nanostructure features an extraordinary broadband optical absorption in the range of 400‒1400nm, and it proved to be an ideal black-body material for light condensation and an efficient solar-light harvester for photothermal conversion. The “Au nanorod (core) @ AuAg alloy (shell)” nanocrystal was built through the epitaxial growth of homogeneously alloyed AuAg shells on Au nanorods by precisely controlled synthesis. The resulting core-shell structured, bimetallic nanorods integrate the merits of the AuAg alloy with the advantages of anisotropic nanorods, exhibiting strong, stable and tunable surface plasmon resonances that are essential for SERS applications in a corrosive environment. The “high-index faceted Au nanorod (core) @ AuPd alloy (shell)” nanocrystal was produced via site-specific epitaxial growth of AuPd alloyed horns at the ends of Au nanorods. The AuPd alloyed horns are bound with high-index side facets, while the Au nanorod concentrates an intensive electric field at each end. This unique configuration unites highly active catalytic sites with strong SERS sites into a single entity and was demonstrated to be ideal for in situ monitoring of Pd-catalyzed reactions by SERS. The synthetic strategies developed here are promising towards the fabrication of

  17. 78 FR 24241 - Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology Subcommittee; Committee on Technology, National...

    2013-04-24

    ... OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology.... SUMMARY: The National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO), on behalf of the Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology (NSET) Subcommittee of the Committee on Technology, National Science and...

  18. 77 FR 56681 - Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology Subcommittee; Committee on Technology, National...

    2012-09-13

    ... OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology...: Notice of webinar. SUMMARY: The National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO), on behalf of the Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology (NSET) Subcommittee of the Committee on Technology, National...

  19. 77 FR 61448 - Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Subcommittee Committee on Technology, National...

    2012-10-09

    ... OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Subcommittee...: The National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO), on behalf of the Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology (NSET) Subcommittee of the Committee on Technology, National Science and...

  20. Third Indian National Conference on Harbour and Ocean Engineering (INCHOE - 2004). Proceedings

    Mandal, S.; SanilKumar, V.; Jayakumar, S.

    The two volumes contain 103 scientific papers in the field of harbour and ocean engineering, presented at the Third Indian National Conference on Harbour and Ocean Engineering (INCHOE - 2004), held at National Institute of Oceanography (NIO), Dona...

  1. Optical Beam Deflection Based AFM with Integrated Hardware and Software Platform for an Undergraduate Engineering Laboratory

    Siu Hong Loh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy (AFM has been used extensively in nanoscience research since its invention. Recently, many teaching laboratories in colleges, undergraduate institutions, and even high schools incorporate AFM as an effective teaching tool for nanoscience education. This paper presents an optical beam deflection (OBD based atomic force microscope, designed specifically for the undergraduate engineering laboratory as a teaching instrument. An electronic module for signal conditioning was built with components that are commonly available in an undergraduate electronic laboratory. In addition to off-the-shelf mechanical parts and optics, the design of custom-built mechanical parts waskept as simple as possible. Hence, the overall cost for the setup is greatly reduced. The AFM controller was developed using National Instruments Educational Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Suite (NI ELVIS, an integrated hardware and software platform which can be programmed in LabVIEW. A simple yet effective control algorithm for scanning and feedback control was developed. Despite the use of an educational platform and low-cost components from the undergraduate laboratory, the developed AFM is capable of performing imaging in constant-force mode with submicron resolution and at reasonable scanning speed (approximately 18 min per image. Therefore, the AFM is suitable to be used as an educational tool for nanoscience. Moreover, the construction of the system can be a valuable educational experience for electronic and mechanical engineering students.

  2. Role of nuclear engineering in the national power complex

    Petros'yants, A.M.; Baturov, B.B.

    1981-01-01

    Role of nuclear power in power engineering and fuel-power system of the country in the whole is discussed. Economic advantages of NPP's as compared with thermal power plants for district heating (TPP) are grounded. Advisability of combined production of thermal and electric power at TPP as compared with separate heat generation at NPP for district heating and electric power generation at NPP is reported. Data on perspectives of development of nuclear engineering in the light of ''Main directions of economic and social development of the USSR in 1981-1985 and up to 1990'' are presented. It is concluded that nuclear power introduction into national economy would bring important technical, economic and social consequences. Large-scale NPP construction would result in radical revision of the industry structure in the whole fuel-power system including output and transport on the base of modern technology and recent scientific-technical achievements providing essential economic and national economic effect essentially higher labour productivity in fuel power branches of industry. Besides, nuclear engineering creates conditions for better preservation of environment, reduction of expenditures for power and fuel transport, bringing industry centres nearer to centres of energy consumption as well as pre-conditions for removing threat of the so-called ''power hunger'' [ru

  3. Optical measurements for scientists and engineers a practical guide

    McClelland, Arthur

    2018-01-01

    With this accessible, introductory guide, you will quickly learn how to use and apply optical spectroscopy and optical microscopy techniques. Focusing on day-to-day implementation and offering practical lab tips throughout, it provides step-by-step instructions on how to select the best technique for a particular application, how to set up and customize new optical systems, and how to analyze optical data. You will gain an intuitive understanding of the full range of standard optical techniques, from fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy to super resolution microscopy. Understand how to navigate around an optics lab with clear descriptions of the most common optical components and tools. Including explanations of basic optics and photonics, and easy-to-understand mathematics, this is an invaluable resource for graduate students, instructors, researchers and professionals who use or teach optical measurements in laboratories.

  4. Information engineering

    Hunt, D.N.

    1997-02-01

    The Information Engineering thrust area develops information technology to support the programmatic needs of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s Engineering Directorate. Progress in five programmatic areas are described in separate reports contained herein. These are entitled Three-dimensional Object Creation, Manipulation, and Transport, Zephyr:A Secure Internet-Based Process to Streamline Engineering Procurements, Subcarrier Multiplexing: Optical Network Demonstrations, Parallel Optical Interconnect Technology Demonstration, and Intelligent Automation Architecture.

  5. Universities and national laboratory roles in nuclear engineering

    Sackett, J.I.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear Engineering Education is being significantly challenged in the United States. The decline in enrollment generally and the reduction of the number of nuclear engineering departments has been well documented. These declines parallel a lack of new construction for nuclear power plants and a decline in research and development to support new plant design. Precisely at a time when innovation is is needed to deal with many issues facing nuclear power, the number of qualified people to do so is being reduced. It is important that the University and National Laboratory Communities cooperate to address these issues. The Universities must increasingly identify challenges facing nuclear power that demand innovative solutions and pursue them. To be drawn into the technology the best students must see a future, a need and identify challenges that they can meet. The University community can provide that vision with help from the National Laboratories. It has been a major goal within the reactor development program at Argonne National Laboratory to establish the kind of program that can help accomplish this

  6. Sandia National Laboratories ASCI Applications Software Quality Engineering Practices; TOPICAL

    ZEPPER, JOHN D.; ARAGON, KATHRYN MARY; ELLIS, MOLLY A.; BYLE, KATHLEEN A.; EATON, DONNA SUE

    2002-01-01

    This document provides a guide to the deployment of the software verification activities, software engineering practices, and project management principles that guide the development of Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) applications software at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia). The goal of this document is to identify practices and activities that will foster the development of reliable and trusted products produced by the ASCI Applications program. Document contents include an explanation of the structure and purpose of the ASCI Quality Management Council, an overview of the software development lifecycle, an outline of the practices and activities that should be followed, and an assessment tool. These sections map practices and activities at Sandia to the ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines, a Department of Energy document

  7. Proceedings of the 1991 national conference on hydraulic engineering

    Shane, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the 1991 National Conference of Hydraulic Engineering. The conference was held in conjunction with the International Symposium on Ground Water and a Software Exchange that facilitated exchange of information on recent software developments of interest to hydraulic engineers. Also included in the program were three mini-symposia on the Exclusive Economic Zone, Data Acquisition, and Appropriate Technology. Topics include sedimentation; appropriate technology; exclusive economic zone hydraulics; hydraulic data acquisition and display; innovative hydraulic structures and water quality applications of hydraulic research, including the hydraulics of aerating turbines; wetlands; hydraulic and hydrologic extremes; highway drainage; overtopping protection of dams; spillway design; coastal and estuarine hydraulics; scale models; computation hydraulics; GIS and expert system applications; watershed response to rainfall; probabilistic approaches; and flood control investigations

  8. Band structure engineering for ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices

    Weinberg, Malte

    2014-01-01

    The energy band structure fundamentally influences the physical properties of a periodic system. It may give rise to highly exotic phenomena in yet uncharted physical regimes. Ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices provide an ideal playground for the investigation of a large variety of such intriguing effects. Experiments presented here address several issues that require the systematic manipulation of energy band structures in optical lattices with diverse geometries. These artificial crystals of light, generated by interfering laser beams, allow for an unprecedented degree of control over a wide range of parameters. A major part of this thesis employs time-periodic driving to engineer tunneling matrix elements and, thus, the dispersion relation for bosonic quantum gases in optical lattices. Resonances emerging in the excitation spectrum due to the particularly strong forcing can be attributed to multi-photon transitions that are investigated systematically. By changing the sign of the tunneling, antiferromagnetic spin-spin interactions can be emulated. In a triangular lattice this leads to geometrical frustration with a doubly degenerate ground state as the simultaneous minimization of competing interactions is inhibited. Moreover, complex-valued tunneling matrix elements can be generated with a suitable breaking of time-reversal symmetry in the driving scheme. The associated Peierls phases mimic the presence of an electromagnetic vector gauge potential acting on charged particles. First proof-of-principle experiments reveal an excellent agreement with theoretical calculations. In the weakly interacting superfluid regime, these artificial gauge fields give rise to an Ising-XY model with tunable staggered magnetic fluxes and a complex interplay between discrete and continuous symmetries. A thermal phase transition from an ordered ferromagnetic- to an unordered paramagnetic state could be observed. In the opposite hard-core boson limit of strong interactions

  9. Experiments in Creative Engineering at the Department of Mechanical Engineering in Kurume National College of Technology

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Hashimura, Shinji; Hiroo, Yasuaki

    We present a program to learn ability to solve problems on engineering. This program is called “Experiments in creative engineering” in the department of mechanical engineering in Kurume National College of Technology advanced engineering school. In the program, students have to determine own theme and manufacture experimental devices or some machines by themselves. The students must also perform experiments to valid the function and performance of their devices by themselves. The restriction of the theme is to manufacture a device which function dose not basically exist in the world with limited cost (up to 20,000Yen) . As the results of questionnaire of students, the program would be very effective to the creative education for the students.

  10. Ecological risk assessment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: Overview

    VanHorn, R.; Bensen, T.; Green, T.; Hampton, N.; Staley, C.; Morris, R.; Brewer, R.; Peterson, S.

    1994-01-01

    The paper will present an overview of the methods and results of the screening level ecological risk assessment (ERA) performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL is a site with some distinct characteristics. First it is a large Department of Energy (DOE) laboratory (2,300 km 2 ) having experienced 40 years of nuclear material production operations. Secondly, it is a relatively undisturbed cold desert ecosystem. Neither of these issues have been sufficiently addressed in previous ERAs. It was necessary in many instances to develop methods that differed from those used in other studies. This paper should provide useful methodologies for the ERAs performed at other similar sites

  11. Mixed waste treatment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Larsen, M.M.; Hunt, L.F.; Sanow, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    The Idaho Operations Office of the Department of Energy (DOE) made the decision in 1984 to prohibit the disposal of mixed waste (MW) (combustible waste-toxic metal waste) in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility. As a result of this decision and due to there being no EPA-permitted MW treatment/storage/disposal (T/S/D) facilities, the development of waste treatment methods for MW was initiated and a storage facility was established to store these wastes while awaiting development of treatment systems. This report discusses the treatment systems developed and their status. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  12. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Management Operations Roadmap Document

    Bullock, M.

    1992-04-01

    At the direction of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ), the DOE Idaho Field Office (DOE-ID) is developing roadmaps for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER ampersand WM) activities at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). DOE-ID has convened a select group of contractor personnel from EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. to assist DOE-ID personnel with the roadmapping project. This document is a report on the initial stages of the first phase of the INEL's roadmapping efforts

  13. Robotic applications at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Griebenow, B.E.; Marts, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has several programs and projected programs that involve work in hazardous environments. Robotics/remote handling technology is being considered for an active role in these programs. The most appealing aspect of using robotics is in the area of personnel safety. Any task requiring an individual to enter a hazardous or potentially hazardous environment can benefit substantially from robotics by removing the operator from the environment and having him conduct the work remotely. Several INEL programs were evaluated based on their applications for robotics and the results and some conclusions are discussed in this paper. 1 fig

  14. Optical fiber sensors for medical applications: practical engineering considerations

    Heijmans, J.A.C.; Cheng, L.K.; Wieringa, F.P.

    2008-01-01

    The advantages of optical fibers as medical sensors are recognized world wide nowadays. Insensitivity to electromagnetic disturbances and relative small dimensions are the most well known properties. The advantages of fiber optic sensors are especially valuable within environments with high

  15. Investigation of optical coherence tomography as an imaging modality in tissue engineering

    Yang Ying; Dubois, Arnaud; Qin Xiangpei; Li Jian; Haj, Alicia El; Wang, Ruikang K

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring cell profiles in 3D porous scaffolds presents a major challenge in tissue engineering. In this study, we investigate optical coherence tomography (OCT) as an imaging modality to monitor non-invasively both structures and cells in engineered tissue constructs. We employ time-domain OCT to visualize macro-structural morphology, and whole-field optical coherence microscopy to delineate the morphology of cells and constructs in a developing in vitro engineered bone tissue. The results show great potential for the use of OCT in non-invasive monitoring of cellular activities in 3D developing engineered tissues

  16. TECHNOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS OF THE MILITARY ENGINEERING TO THE NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    RODRIGO CARO DE KARTZOW

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of the Chilean military industry is closely related to the growing of the national industry. Similarly to the way the history of the Army and the country are tightly related, the history of the military engineering is an example of organic growth when compared to its civilian counterpart. Collaboration instead of competition is the distinctive seal that best shows the development of weaponry, explosives, cartography and nuclear power. This collaboration have lasted with the years and we can afirm today that the relationship within civilian professionals and technicians and their military counterparts has reached an state that has never seen before. The governmental policies that fund R&D of initiatives that facilitate the science and technology study and research, come of a futuristic vision, born in the rim of the independent movements, driven naturally by the need of self sustain as sovereign nations.

  17. 75 FR 30874 - National Nanotechnology Coordination Office, Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology...

    2010-06-02

    ... OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY National Nanotechnology Coordination Office, Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Subcommittee, National Science and Technology Council, Committee on Technology; The National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) Strategic Planning Stakeholder Workshop: Public...

  18. Cultivation mode research of practical application talents for optical engineering major

    Liu, Zhiying

    2017-08-01

    The requirements on science and technology graduates are more and higher with modern science progress and society market economy development. Because optical engineering major is with very long practicality, practice should be paid more attention from analysis of optical engineering major and students' foundation. To play role of practice to a large amount, the practice need be systemic and correlation. It should be combination of foundation and profundity. Modern foundation professional knowledge is studied with traditional optical concept and technology at the same time. Systemic regularity and correlation should be embodied in the contents. Start from basic geometrical optics concept, the optical parameter of optical instrument is analyzed, the optical module is built and ray tracing is completed during geometrical optics practice. With foundation of primary aberration calculation, the optical system is further designed and evaluated during optical design practice course. With the optical model and given instrument functions and requirements, the optical-mechanism is matched. The accuracy is calculated, analyzed and distributed in every motion segment. And the mechanism should guarantee the alignment and adjustment. The optical mechanism is designed during the instrument and element design practice. When the optical and mechanism drawings are completed, the system is ready to be fabricated. Students can complete grinding, polishing and coating process by themselves through optical fabricating practice. With the optical and mechanical elements, the system can be assembled and aligned during the thesis practice. With a set of correlated and logical practices, the students can acquire the whole process knowledge about optical instrument. All details are contained in every practice process. These practical experiences provide students working ability. They do not need much adaption anymore when they go to work after graduation. It is favorable to both student

  19. Social Media Programs at the National Optical Astronomy Observatory

    Sparks, Robert T.; Walker, Constance Elaine; Pompea, Stephen M.

    2015-08-01

    Observatories and other science research organizations want to share their research and activities with the public. The last several years, social media has become and increasingly important venue for communicating information about observatory activities, research and education and public outreach.The National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) uses a wide variety of social media to communicate with different audiences. NOAO is active on social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest. Our social media accounts include those for the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Kitt Peak National Observatory and our dark skies conservation program Globe at Night.Our social media programs have a variety of audiences. NOAO uses social media to announce and promote NOAO sponsored meetings, observatory news and proposal deadlines to the professional astronomical community. Social media accounts are used to disseminate NOAO press releases, images from the observatory and other science using data from NOAO telescopes.Social media is important in our Education and Public Outreach programs (EPO). Globe at Night has very active facebook and twitter accounts encouraging people to become involved in preserving dark skies. Social media plays a role in recruiting teachers for professional development workshops such as Project Astro.NOAO produces monthly podcasts for the 365 Days of Astronomy podcast featuring interviews with NOAO astronomers. Each podcast highlights the science of an NOAO astronomer, an NOAO operated telescope or instrument, or an NOAO program. A separate series of podcasts is produced for NOAO’s Dark Skies Education programs. All the podcasts are archived at 365daysofastronomy.org.

  20. Development and Performance Evaluation of Optical Sensors for High Temperature Engine Applications

    Adamovsky, G.; Varga, D.; Floyd, B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses fiber optic sensors designed and constructed to withstand extreme temperatures of aircraft engine. The paper describes development and performance evaluation of fiber optic Bragg grating based sensors. It also describes the design and presents test results of packaged sensors subjected to temperatures up to 1000 C for prolonged periods of time.

  1. An exploration of the biomedical optics course construction of undergraduate biomedical engineering program in medical colleges

    Guo, Shijun; Lyu, Jie; Zhang, Peiming

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, the teaching goals, teaching contents and teaching methods in biomedical optics course construction are discussed. From the dimension of teaching goals, students should master the principle of optical inspection on the human body, diagnosis and treatment of methodology and instruments, through the study of the theory and practice of this course, and can utilize biomedical optics methods to solve practical problems in the clinical medical engineering practice. From the dimension of teaching contents, based on the characteristics of biomedical engineering in medical colleges, the organic integration of engineering aspects, medical optical instruments, and biomedical aspects dispersed in human anatomy, human physiology, clinical medicine fundamental related to the biomedical optics is build. Noninvasive measurement of the human body composition and noninvasive optical imaging of the human body were taken as actual problems in biomedical optics fields. Typical medical applications such as eye optics and laser medicine were also integrated into the theory and practice teaching. From the dimension of teaching methods, referencing to organ-system based medical teaching mode, optical principle and instrument principle were taught by teachers from school of medical instruments, and the histological characteristics and clinical actual need in areas such as digestive diseases and urinary surgery were taught by teachers from school of basic medicine or clinical medicine of medical colleges. Furthermore, clinical application guidance would be provided by physician and surgeons in hospitals.

  2. Integration Mining Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of San Juan

    Berenguer, T.; Salinas, L.; Cascon, R.

    2007-01-01

    This work presents proposals for the mud handling derived from mineralogical processes, trying to maintain a balance between the nature and the sustainable development of the region; it comprises of an investigation project that the authors carry out in the National University of San Juan.In this case particular aspects of problematic the environmental one are approached as the contamination of associated the superficial and underground water to the handling of the mineral remainders, specifically muds.To practices and procedures of engineering are described that offer protection against the faults of the deposits so that the remainders and the water of process are outside the hydrological river basins. (author)

  3. Stabilization of mixed waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Boehmer, A.M.; Gillins, R.L.; Larsen, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    EG and G Idaho, Inc. has initiated a program to develop safe, efficient, cost-effective treatment methods for the stabilization of some of the hazardous and mixed wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Laboratory-scale testing has shown that extraction procedure toxic wastes can be successfully stabilized by solidification, using various binders to produce nontoxic, stable waste forms for safe, long-term disposal as either landfill waste or low-level radioactive waste, depending upon the radioactivity content. This paper presents the results of drum-scale solidification testing conducted on hazardous, low-level incinerator flyash generated at the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility. The drum-scale test program was conducted to verify that laboratory-scale results could be successfully adapted into a production operation

  4. Epidemiologic surveillance. Annual report for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory 1994

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Epidemiologic surveillance at DOE facilities consists of regular and systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data on absences due to illness and injury in the work force. Its purpose is to provide an early warning system for health problems occurring among employees at participating sites. In this annual report, the 1994 morbidity data for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory are summarized. These analyses focus on absences of 5 or more consecutive workdays occurring among workers aged 17-85 years. They are arranged in five sets of tables that present: (1) the distribution of the labor force by occupational category and pay status; (2) the absences per person, diagnoses per absence, and diagnosis rates for the whole work force; (3) diagnosis rates by type of disease or injury; (4) diagnosis rates by occupational category; and (5) relative risks for specific types of disease or injury by occupational category.

  5. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory irradiation facilities and their applications

    Gupta, V.P.; Herring, J.S.; Korenke, R.E.; Harker, Y.D.

    1986-05-01

    Although there is a growing need for neutron and gamma irradiation by governmental and industrial organizations in the United States and in other countries, the number of facilities providing such irradiations are limited. At the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, there are several unique irradiation facilities producing high neutron and gamma radiation environments. These facilities could be readily used for nuclear research, materials testing, radiation hardening studies on electronic components/circuitry and sensors, and production of neutron transmutation doped (NTD) silicon and special radioisotopes. In addition, a neutron radiography unit, suitable for examining irradiated materials and assemblies, is also available. This report provides a description of the irradiation facilities and the neutron radiography unit as well as examples of their unique applications

  6. Radioactive effluent monitoring at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Simpson, O.D.

    1975-01-01

    The Effluent and Radiation Measurements Laboratory at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has recently upgraded capabilities in the field of monitoring and analysis of radioactive airborne and liquid effluents using the techniques of gamma-ray spectrometry. The techniques and equipment used include remotely-operated, computer-based Ge(Li) spectrometers which obtain data on a real-time basis. Permanent record files are maintained of both the effluent release values and the gamma-ray data from which the release values are calculated. Should values for release levels ever be challenged, the gamma-ray spectral information for any measurement can be recalled and analyzed as needed. Daily effluent release reports are provided to operating personnel which contributes to prompt correction of any operational problems. Monthly, quarterly, and annual reports are compiled which provide inventories of the radionuclides released. A description of the effluent monitoring, reporting and records system developed at INEL for this application will be presented

  7. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory installation roadmap document. Revision 1

    1993-05-30

    The roadmapping process was initiated by the US Department of Energy`s office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) to improve its Five-Year Plan and budget allocation process. Roadmap documents will provide the technical baseline for this planning process and help EM develop more effective strategies and program plans for achieving its long-term goals. This document is a composite of roadmap assumptions and issues developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by US Department of Energy Idaho Field Office and subcontractor personnel. The installation roadmap discusses activities, issues, and installation commitments that affect waste management and environmental restoration activities at the INEL. The High-Level Waste, Land Disposal Restriction, and Environmental Restoration Roadmaps are also included.

  8. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory historical dose evaluation: Volume 1

    Francis, S.J.

    1991-08-01

    The methodology and results are presented for an evaluation of potential radiation doses to a hypothetical individual who may have resided at an offsite location with the highest concentration of airborne radionuclides near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Volume 1 contains a summary of methods and results. The years of INEL operations from 1952 to 1989 were evaluated. Radiation doses to an adult, child, and infant were estimated for both operational (annual) and episodic (short-term) airborne releases from INEL facilities. Atmospheric dispersion of operational releases was modeled using annual average meteorological conditions. Dispersion of episodic releases was generally modeled using actual hourly wind speed and direction data at the time of release. 50 refs., 23 figs., 10 tabs

  9. In situ vitrification program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Loehr, C.A.; Merrill, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    A program to demonstrate the viability of in situ vitrification (ISV) technology in remediating a buried mixed transuranic (TRU) waste site is under way at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The application of the technology to buried waste is being evaluated as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) feasibility study. The ISV thermal treatment process converts contaminated soil into a chemically inert and stable glass and crystalline product. The process uses joule heating, accomplished by applying electric potential to electrodes that are placed in the soil to initiate and maintain soil melting. Organic contaminants in the soil are destroyed or removed while inorganic contaminants, including radionuclides, are incorporated into the stable, glass-like product or volatilized. Off-gases are collected in a confinement hood over the melt area and processed through an off-gas treatment system. The paper illustrates and describes the ISV process

  10. Dynamic traffic grooming with Spectrum Engineering (TG-SE) in flexible grid optical networks

    Yu, Xiaosong; Zhao, Yongli; Zhang, Jiawei; Wang, Jianping; Zhang, Guoying; Chen, Xue; Zhang, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Flexible grid has emerged as an evolutionary technology to satisfy the ever increasing demand for higher spectrum efficiency and operational flexibility. To optimize the spectrum resource utilization, this paper introduces the concept of Spectrum Engineering in flex-grid optical networks. The sliceable optical transponder has been proposed to offload IP traffic to the optical layer and reduce the number of IP router ports and transponders. We discuss the impact of sliceable transponder in traffic grooming and propose several traffic-grooming schemes with Spectrum Engineering (TG-SE). Our results show that there is a tradeoff among different traffic grooming policies, which should be adopted based on the network operator's objectives. The proposed traffic grooming with Spectrum Engineering schemes can reduce OPEX as well as increase spectrum efficiency by efficiently utilizing the bandwidth variability and capability of sliceable optical transponders.

  11. The Nigerian Society of Engineers (Electrical Division). National Workshop on Energy Conservation in Buildings. Proceedings

    Esan, A. A.

    2000-03-01

    This is a combined proceedings of the two national workshops held in Abuja and Lagos, by the Electrical Division of the Nigerian Society of Engineers. We wish to thank the Nigerian Society of Engineers for making available this document

  12. Experimental study on distributed optical fiber-based approach monitoring saturation line in levee engineering

    Su, Huaizhi; Li, Hao; Kang, Yeyuan; Wen, Zhiping

    2018-02-01

    Seepage is one of key factors which affect the levee engineering safety. The seepage danger without timely detection and rapid response may likely lead to severe accidents such as seepage failure, slope instability, and even levee break. More than 90 percent of levee break events are caused by the seepage. It is very important for seepage behavior identification to determine accurately saturation line in levee engineering. Furthermore, the location of saturation line has a major impact on slope stability in levee engineering. Considering the structure characteristics and service condition of levee engineering, the distributed optical fiber sensing technology is introduced to implement the real-time observation of saturation line in levee engineering. The distributed optical fiber temperature sensor system (DTS)-based monitoring principle of saturation line in levee engineering is investigated. An experimental platform, which consists of DTS, heating system, water-supply system, auxiliary analysis system and levee model, is designed and constructed. The monitoring experiment of saturation line in levee model is implemented on this platform. According to the experimental results, the numerical relationship between moisture content and thermal conductivity in porous medium is identified. A line heat source-based distributed optical fiber method obtaining the thermal conductivity in porous medium is developed. A DTS-based approach is proposed to monitor the saturation line in levee engineering. The embedment pattern of optical fiber for monitoring saturation line is presented.

  13. Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of the Safety and Health (S ampersand H) Subteam assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site. Four Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA) Teams were assembled for this purpose by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Deputy Assistant Secretary for Safety and Quality Assurance, Office of Safety Appraisals (OSA). Team No. 1 reviewed EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. (EG ampersand G Idaho) and the Department of Energy Field Office, Idaho (ID) Fire Department. Team No. 2 reviewed Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). Team No. 3 reviewed selected contractors at the INEL; specifically, Morrison Knudsen-Ferguson of Idaho Company (MK-FIC), Protection Technology of Idaho, Inc. (PTI), Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL), and Rockwell-INEL. Team No. 4 provided an Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA)-type compliance sitewide assessment of INEL. The S ampersand H Subteam assessment was performed concurrently with assessments conducted by Environmental and Management Subteams. Performance was appraised in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Medical Services, and Firearms Safety

  14. Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    McKenzie, Barbara J.; West, Stephanie G.; Jones, Olga G.; Kerr, Dorothy A.; Bieri, Rita A.; Sanderson, Nancy L.

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of the Safety and Health (S H) Subteam assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site. Four Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA) Teams were assembled for this purpose by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Deputy Assistant Secretary for Safety and Quality Assurance, Office of Safety Appraisals (OSA). Team No. 1 reviewed EG G Idaho, Inc. (EG G Idaho) and the Department of Energy Field Office, Idaho (ID) Fire Department. Team No. 2 reviewed Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). Team No. 3 reviewed selected contractors at the INEL; specifically, Morrison Knudsen-Ferguson of Idaho Company (MK-FIC), Protection Technology of Idaho, Inc. (PTI), Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL), and Rockwell-INEL. Team No. 4 provided an Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA)-type compliance sitewide assessment of INEL. The S H Subteam assessment was performed concurrently with assessments conducted by Environmental and Management Subteams. Performance was appraised in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Medical Services, and Firearms Safety.

  15. Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    1991-08-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) located in Idaho Falls, Idaho. INEL is a multiprogram, laboratory site of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Overall site management is provided by the DOE Field Office, Idaho; however, the DOE Field Office, Chicago has responsibility for the Argonne National Laboratory-West facilities and operations through the Argonne Area Office. In addition, the Idaho Branch Office of the Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office has responsibility for the Naval Reactor Facility (NRF) at the INEL. The assessment included all DOE elements having ongoing program activities at the site except for the NRF. In addition, the Safety and Health Subteam did not review the Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. facilities and operations. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted from June 17 to August 2, 1991, under the auspices of the Office of Special Projects, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, Headquarters, DOE. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing environmental, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) disciplines; management; and contractor and DOE self-assessments. Compliance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal INEL site requirements was assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractors management of ES ampersand H/quality assurance programs was conducted

  16. Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    1991-08-01

    The Management Subteam conducted a management assessment of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES ampersand H) programs and their implementation of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The objectives of the assessment were to: (1) evaluate the effectiveness of existing management functions and processes in terms of ensuring environmental compliance, and the health and safety of workers and the general public; and (2) identify probable root causes for ES ampersand H findings and concerns. Organizations reviewed were DOE-Headquarters: DOE Field Offices, Chicago (CH) and Idaho (ID); Argonne Area Offices, East (AAO-E) and West (AAO-W); Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL); Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. (EG ampersand G); Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO); Rockwell-INEL; MK-Ferguson of Idaho Company (MK-FIC); and Protection Technology of Idaho, Inc. (PTI). The scope of the assessment covered the following ES ampersand H management issues: policies and procedures; roles, responsibilities, and authorities; management commitment; communication; staff development, training, and certification; recruitment; compliance management; conduct of operations; emergency planning and preparedness; quality assurance; self assessment; oversight activities; and cost plus award fee processes

  17. Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Goldberg, Edward S.; Keating, John J.

    1991-08-01

    The Management Subteam conducted a management assessment of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) programs and their implementation of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The objectives of the assessment were to: (1) evaluate the effectiveness of existing management functions and processes in terms of ensuring environmental compliance, and the health and safety of workers and the general public; and (2) identify probable root causes for ES H findings and concerns. Organizations reviewed were DOE-Headquarters: DOE Field Offices, Chicago (CH) and Idaho (ID); Argonne Area Offices, East (AAO-E) and West (AAO-W); Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL); Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); EG G Idaho, Inc. (EG G); Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO); Rockwell-INEL; MK-Ferguson of Idaho Company (MK-FIC); and Protection Technology of Idaho, Inc. (PTI). The scope of the assessment covered the following ES H management issues: policies and procedures; roles, responsibilities, and authorities; management commitment; communication; staff development, training, and certification; recruitment; compliance management; conduct of operations; emergency planning and preparedness; quality assurance; self assessment; oversight activities; and cost plus award fee processes.

  18. Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    1991-08-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) located in Idaho Falls, Idaho. INEL is a multiprogram, laboratory site of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Overall site management is provided by the DOE Field Office, Idaho; however, the DOE Field Office, Chicago has responsibility for the Argonne National Laboratory-West facilities and operations through the Argonne Area Office. In addition, the Idaho Branch Office of the Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office has responsibility for the Naval Reactor Facility (NRF) at the INEL. The assessment included all DOE elements having ongoing program activities at the site except for the NRF. In addition, the Safety and Health Subteam did not review the Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. facilities and operations. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted from June 17 to August 2, 1991, under the auspices of the Office of Special Projects, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, Headquarters, DOE. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing environmental, safety, and health (ES H) disciplines; management; and contractor and DOE self-assessments. Compliance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal INEL site requirements was assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractors management of ES H/quality assurance programs was conducted.

  19. The Environmental Compliance Office at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Cooper, S.C.

    1990-01-01

    The Idaho Operations Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE-ID) has established an Environmental Compliance Office (ECO) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This office has been formed to ensure that INEL operations and activities are in compliance with all applicable environmental state and federal regulations. The ECO is headed by a DOE-ID manager and consists of several teams, each of which is led by a DOE-ID employee with members from DOE-ID, from INEL government contractors, and from DOE-ID consultants. The teams are (a) the negotiated compliance team, (b) the compliance implementation team (CIT), (c) the permits team, (d) the interagency agreement (IAG) team, (e) the consent order and compliance agreement (COCA) oversight team, and (f) the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) team. The last two teams were short term and have already completed their respective assignments. The functions of the teams and the results obtained by each are discussed

  20. Engineered Multifunctional Nanophotonic Materials for Ultrafast Optical Switching

    2012-11-02

    and Co3 + placed at tetrahedral and octahedral sites, respectively. Single -layer thin films of Co3O4 nanoparticles have large optical nonlinearity and...the first two methodologies in systems having weakly resonant structures, including 3-D and/or 1-D photonic crystal structures (i.e. nonlinear Bragg...Nonlinear optical transmission of lead phthalocyanine-doped nematic liquid crystal composites for multiscale nonlinear switching from nanosecond to

  1. National Ignition Facility quality assurance plan for laser materials and optical technology

    Wolfe, C.R.

    1996-05-01

    Quality achievement is the responsibility of the line organizations of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. This subtier Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) applies to activities of the Laser Materials ampersand Optical Technology (LM ampersand OT) organization and its subcontractors. It responds to the NIF Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP, L-15958-2, NIF-95-499) and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5700.6C. This Plan is organized according to 10 Quality Assurance (QA) criteria and subelements of a management system as outlined in the NIF QAPP. This Plan describes how those QA requirements are met. This Plan is authorized by the Associate Project Leader for the LM ampersand OT organization, who has assigned responsibility to the Optics QA engineer to maintain this plan, with the assistance of the NIF QA organization. This Plan governs quality-affecting activities associated with: design; procurement; fabrication; testing and acceptance; handling and storage; and installation of NIF Project optical components into mounts and subassemblies

  2. Evaluation of engineered barriers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Bhatt, R.N.; Porro, I.

    1998-03-01

    Subsurface Disposal (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex serves as the low level waste burial ground at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The low level wastes are buried in trenches, pits, and soil vaults in surficial sediments. A closure/post-closure plan must be written prior to closure of the SDA. The closure plan for the facility must include a design for an engineered barrier closure cover that will meet all applicable regulatory requirements. This paper describes the approach being followed at the INEEL to choose an appropriate cover design for the SDA closure. Regulatory requirements and performance objectives potentially applicable to closure of the SDA were identified. Technical issues related to SDA closure were identified from a literature search of previous arid site engineered barrier studies and from previous SDA closure cover evaluations. Five engineered barrier conceptual design alternatives were identified: (1) a bio/capillary barrier cover, (2) a thin soil cover, (3) a thick soil cover, (4) a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act cover, and (5) a concrete sealed surface cover. Two of these designs were chosen for in situ hydraulic testing, rather than all five, in order to maximize the amount of information generated relative to projected project costs. Testing of these two cover designs provides data to quantify hydrologic model input parameters and for verification of site specific hydrologic models for long term closure cover performance evaluation and detailed analysis of closure cover alternatives. The specific objectives of the field tests are to determine the water balance for the two covers over several years and to determine cover soil physical and hydraulic properties

  3. Development and Performance Verification of Fiber Optic Temperature Sensors in High Temperature Engine Environments

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Mackey, Jeffrey R.; Kren, Lawrence A.; Floyd, Bertram M.; Elam, Kristie A.; Martinez, Martel

    2014-01-01

    A High Temperature Fiber Optic Sensor (HTFOS) has been developed at NASA Glenn Research Center for aircraft engine applications. After fabrication and preliminary in-house performance evaluation, the HTFOS was tested in an engine environment at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center. The engine tests enabled the performance of the HTFOS in real engine environments to be evaluated along with the ability of the sensor to respond to changes in the engine's operating condition. Data were collected prior, during, and after each test in order to observe the change in temperature from ambient to each of the various test point levels. An adequate amount of data was collected and analyzed to satisfy the research team that HTFOS operates properly while the engine was running. Temperature measurements made by HTFOS while the engine was running agreed with those anticipated.

  4. Optics

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Eighth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommended for engineering st

  5. MULTI-CORE AND OPTICAL PROCESSOR RELATED APPLICATIONS RESEARCH AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Barhen, Jacob [ORNL; Kerekes, Ryan A [ORNL; ST Charles, Jesse Lee [ORNL; Buckner, Mark A [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    High-speed parallelization of common tasks holds great promise as a low-risk approach to achieving the significant increases in signal processing and computational performance required for next generation innovations in reconfigurable radio systems. Researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been working on exploiting the parallelization offered by this emerging technology and applying it to a variety of problems. This paper will highlight recent experience with four different parallel processors applied to signal processing tasks that are directly relevant to signal processing required for SDR/CR waveforms. The first is the EnLight Optical Core Processor applied to matched filter (MF) correlation processing via fast Fourier transform (FFT) of broadband Dopplersensitive waveforms (DSW) using active sonar arrays for target tracking. The second is the IBM CELL Broadband Engine applied to 2-D discrete Fourier transform (DFT) kernel for image processing and frequency domain processing. And the third is the NVIDIA graphical processor applied to document feature clustering. EnLight Optical Core Processor. Optical processing is inherently capable of high-parallelism that can be translated to very high performance, low power dissipation computing. The EnLight 256 is a small form factor signal processing chip (5x5 cm2) with a digital optical core that is being developed by an Israeli startup company. As part of its evaluation of foreign technology, ORNL's Center for Engineering Science Advanced Research (CESAR) had access to a precursor EnLight 64 Alpha hardware for a preliminary assessment of capabilities in terms of large Fourier transforms for matched filter banks and on applications related to Doppler-sensitive waveforms. This processor is optimized for array operations, which it performs in fixed-point arithmetic at the rate of 16 TeraOPS at 8-bit precision. This is approximately 1000 times faster than the fastest DSP available today. The optical core

  6. MULTI-CORE AND OPTICAL PROCESSOR RELATED APPLICATIONS RESEARCH AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Barhen, Jacob; Kerekes, Ryan A.; St Charles, Jesse Lee; Buckner, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    High-speed parallelization of common tasks holds great promise as a low-risk approach to achieving the significant increases in signal processing and computational performance required for next generation innovations in reconfigurable radio systems. Researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been working on exploiting the parallelization offered by this emerging technology and applying it to a variety of problems. This paper will highlight recent experience with four different parallel processors applied to signal processing tasks that are directly relevant to signal processing required for SDR/CR waveforms. The first is the EnLight Optical Core Processor applied to matched filter (MF) correlation processing via fast Fourier transform (FFT) of broadband Dopplersensitive waveforms (DSW) using active sonar arrays for target tracking. The second is the IBM CELL Broadband Engine applied to 2-D discrete Fourier transform (DFT) kernel for image processing and frequency domain processing. And the third is the NVIDIA graphical processor applied to document feature clustering. EnLight Optical Core Processor. Optical processing is inherently capable of high-parallelism that can be translated to very high performance, low power dissipation computing. The EnLight 256 is a small form factor signal processing chip (5x5 cm2) with a digital optical core that is being developed by an Israeli startup company. As part of its evaluation of foreign technology, ORNL's Center for Engineering Science Advanced Research (CESAR) had access to a precursor EnLight 64 Alpha hardware for a preliminary assessment of capabilities in terms of large Fourier transforms for matched filter banks and on applications related to Doppler-sensitive waveforms. This processor is optimized for array operations, which it performs in fixed-point arithmetic at the rate of 16 TeraOPS at 8-bit precision. This is approximately 1000 times faster than the fastest DSP available today. The optical core

  7. The National Energy Audit (NEAT) Engineering Manual (Version 6)

    Gettings, M.B.

    2001-04-20

    Government-funded weatherization assistance programs resulted from increased oil prices caused by the 1973 oil embargo. These programs were instituted to reduce US consumption of oil and help low-income families afford the increasing cost of heating their homes. In the summer of 1988, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began providing technical support to the Department of Energy (DOE) Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). A preliminary study found no suitable means of cost-effectively selecting energy efficiency improvements (measures) for single-family homes that incorporated all the factors seen as beneficial in improving cost-effectiveness and usability. In mid-1989, ORNL was authorized to begin development of a computer-based measure selection technique. In November of 1992 a draft version of the program was made available to all WAP state directors for testing. The first production release, Version 4.3, was made available in october of 1993. The Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program has continued funding improvements to the program increasing its user-friendliness and applicability. initial publication of this engineering manual coincides with availability of Version 6.1, November 1997, though algorithms described generally apply to all prior versions. Periodic updates of specific sections in the manual will permit maintaining a relevant document. This Engineering Manual delineates the assumptions used by NEAT in arriving at the measure recommendations based on the user's input of the building characteristics. Details of the actual data entry are available in the NEAT User's Manual (ORNL/Sub/91-SK078/1) and will not be discussed in this manual.

  8. The DOE/NOAA meteorological program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    George, D.H.

    1996-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) has recently upgraded the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Meteorological Measuring Network. This has allowed the entire service system to be modernized

  9. Optical Methods For Automatic Rating Of Engine Test Components

    Pritchard, James R.; Moss, Brian C.

    1989-03-01

    In recent years, increasing commercial and legislative pressure on automotive engine manufacturers, including increased oil drain intervals, cleaner exhaust emissions and high specific power outputs, have led to increasing demands on lubricating oil performance. Lubricant performance is defined by bench engine tests run under closely controlled conditions. After test, engines are dismantled and the parts rated for wear and accumulation of deposit. This rating must be consistently carried out in laboratories throughout the world in order to ensure lubricant quality meeting the specified standards. To this end, rating technicians evaluate components, following closely defined procedures. This process is time consuming, inaccurate and subject to drift, requiring regular recalibration of raters by means of international rating workshops. This paper describes two instruments for automatic rating of engine parts. The first uses a laser to determine the degree of polishing of the engine cylinder bore, caused by the reciprocating action of piston. This instrument has been developed to prototype stage by the NDT Centre at Harwell under contract to Exxon Chemical, and is planned for production within the next twelve months. The second instrument uses red and green filtered light to determine the type, quality and position of deposit formed on the piston surfaces. The latter device has undergone feasibility study, but no prototype exists.

  10. Biophotonics: optical science and engineering for the 21st century

    Shen, Xun; Wijk, Roeland Van

    2005-01-01

    ... in living cells and living organisms. Fluorescence, scattering and penetrating light are frequently used to detect and image the biological systems at molecular, cellular and organismic levels. The light generated by metabolic processes in living organisms also provides a good optical means to reflect the structure and function of the living cells a...

  11. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory release criteria for decontamination and decommissioning

    Dolenc, M.R.; Case, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Criteria have been developed for release of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) facilities and land areas following decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). Decommissioning release criteria in the form of dose guidelines were proposed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission as early as 1980. These criteria were used on an interim basis for INEL D and D projects. However, dose guidelines alone do not adequately cover the criteria necessary to release sites for unrestricted use. In actual practice, other parameters such as pathways analyses, sampling and instrumentation techniques, and implementation procedures are required to develop the basis for unrestricted release of a site. Thus, a rigorous approach for evaluating these other parameters is needed to develop acceptable D and D release criteria. Because of the complex and sensitive nature of the dose and pathways analyses work, a thorough review by experts in those respective fields was desired. Input and support in preparing or reviewing each part of the criteria development task was solicited from several DOE field offices. Experts were identified and contracted to assist in preparing portions of the release criteria, or to serve on a peer-review committee. Thus, the entire release criteria development task was thoroughly reviewed by recognized experts from each DOE field office, to validate technical content of the INEL site-specific document

  12. Thermal treatment technology at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Hillary, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Recent surveys of mixed wastes in interim storage throughout the 30-site Department of Energy complex indicate that only 12 of those sites account for 98% of such wastes by volume. Current inventories at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) account for 38% of total DOE wastes in interim storage, the largest of any single site. For a large percentage of these waste volumes, as well as the substantial amounts of buried and currently generated wastes, thermal treatment processes have been designated as the technologies of choice. Current facilities and a number of proposed strategies exist for thermal treatment of wastes of this nature at the INEL. High-level radioactive waste is solidified in the Waste Calciner Facility at the Idaho Central Processing Plant. Low-level solid wastes until recently have been processed at the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF), a compaction, size reduction, and controlled air incineration facility. WERF is currently undergoing process upgrading and RCRA Part B permitting. Recent systems studies have defined effective strategies, in the form of thermal process sequences, for treatment of wastes of the complex and heterogeneous nature in the INEL inventory. This presentation reviews the current status of operating facilities, active studies in this area, and proposed strategies for thermal treatment of INEL wastes

  13. Raptors of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site

    Craig, T.H.

    1979-04-01

    From 1974 through 1976 base line data were gathered on the raptors which occur on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Site. Thirteen species were observed on the INEL Site during the non-breeding seasons. American Rough-legged Hawks, American Kestrels, Golden Eagles, and Prairie Falcons were the most numerous. Marsh Hawks, Ferruginous Hawks, Redtailed Hawks, Swainson's Hawks, Great Horned Owls, Short-eared Owls, Merlins, Cooper's Hawks, the endangered Bald Eagle, and the endangered Peregrine Falcon were all observed on the INEL Site during the nonbreeding seasons although less frequently. American Rough-legged Hawks and American Kestrels were commonly observed in agricultural lands while Prairie Falcons and Golden Eagles were usually seen in areas of native vegetation. Nesting species of raptors on the INEL Site include American Kestrels, and Long-eared Owls. Ferruginous Hawks, Merlins, Prairie Falcons, Red-tailed Hawks, Swainson's Hawks, Golden Eagles, Great Horned Owls, and Burrowing Owls also nest on or near the INEL Site. The nesting ecology of American Kestrels, Long-eared Owls, Prairie Falcons, Red-tailed Hawks, Swainson's Hawks, Golden Eagles, and Great Horned Owls on the INEL Site are summarized in this report. The decline of nesting Ferruginous Hawks, Golden Eagles, and Red-tailed Hawks on and near the INEL Site is discussed

  14. Lubricant induced pre-ignition in an optical spark-ignition engine

    Dingle, Simon Frederick

    2014-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the award of Doctor of Philosophy and was awarded by Brunel University London This work focuses on the introduction of lubricant into the combustion chamber and the effect that this has on pre-ignition. Apparently for the first time, the work presented provides detailed full-bore optical data for lubricant induced pre-ignition and improves understanding of the super-knock phenomena that affects modern downsized gasoline engines. A new single-cylinder optical r...

  15. Optics in engineering education: stimulating the interest of first-year students

    Blanco-García, Jesús; Vazquez-Dorrío, Benito

    2014-07-01

    The work here presented deals with stimulating the interest for optics in first-year students of an Engineering School, which are not specifically following Optical Engineering studies. Optic-based technologies are nowadays wide spread, and growing, in almost all the engineering fields (from non destructive testing or alignments to power laser applications, fiber optic communications, memory devices, etc.). In general, the first year curriculum doesn't allow a detailed review of the main light properties, least its technical applications. We present in this paper our experience in showing some basic optic concepts and related technologies to the students of our school. Based on the fact that they have a very basic training in this branch of physics, we have designed a series of experimental demonstrations with the dual purpose of making them understand the basic principles of these technologies, and to know the potential of applications to engineering they offer. We assembled these experiments in the laboratory and invited students to pass to get to know them, giving them an explanation in which we focused on the possible range of application of each technique. The response was very good, not only by the number of students who attended the invitation but also by the interest demonstrated by their questions and opinions.

  16. Dispersion-engineered and highly-nonlinear microstructured polymer optical fibres

    Frosz, Michael Henoch; Nielsen, Kristian; Hlubina, Petr

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate dispersion-engineering of microstructured polymer optical fibres (mPOFs) made of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). A significant shift of the total dispersion from the material dispersion is confirmed through measurement of the mPOF dispersion using white-light spectral interferome......We demonstrate dispersion-engineering of microstructured polymer optical fibres (mPOFs) made of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). A significant shift of the total dispersion from the material dispersion is confirmed through measurement of the mPOF dispersion using white-light spectral...

  17. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Hangar 629 -- Photographs, written historical and descriptive data

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The report describes the history of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s Hangar 629. The hangar was built to test the possibility of linking jet engine technology with nuclear power. The history of the project is described along with the development and eventual abandonment of the Flight Engine Test hangar. The report contains historical photographs and architectural drawings.

  18. A National Study of Mathematics Requirements for Scientists and Engineers. Final Report.

    Miller, G. H.

    The National Study of Mathematics Requirements for Scientists and Engineers is concerned with establishing the mathematics experiences desired for the many specializations in science and engineering, such as microbiology, organic chemistry, electrical engineering, and molecular physics. An instruction and course content sheet and a course…

  19. Engineering of Nanoscale Contrast Agents for Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Gordon, Andrew Y; Jayagopal, Ashwath

    2014-01-30

    Optical coherence tomography has emerged as valuable imaging modalityin ophthalmology and other fields by enabling high-resolution three-dimensional imaging of tissue. In this paper, we review recent progress in the field of contrast-enhanced optical coherence tomography (OCT). We discuss exogenous and endogenous sources of OCT contrast, focusing on their use with standard OCT systems as well as emerging OCT-based imaging modalities. We include advances in the processing of OCT data that generate improved tissue contrast, including spectroscopic OCT (SOCT), as well as work utilizing secondary light sources and/or detection mechanisms to create and detect enhanced contrast, including photothermal OCT (PTOCT) and photoacoustic OCT (PAOCT). Finally, we conclude with a discussion of the translational potential of these developments as well as barriers to their clinical use.

  20. Design and engineering of optical diagnostics for COMPASS

    Šesták, David; Weinzettl, Vladimír; Bílková, Petra; Böhm, Petr; Aftanas, Milan; Naydenkova, Diana; Stöckel, Jan; Ďuran, Ivan; Walsh, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 84, 7-11 (2009), s. 1755-1758 ISSN 0920-3796. [Symposium on Fusion Technology(SOFT-25) /25th./. Rostock, 15.09.2008-19.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR GD202/08/H057 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : COMPASS * tokamak * optical diagnostic * Thomson scattering Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.122, year: 2009

  1. Sunlight absorption engineering for thermophotovoltaics: contributions from the optical design.

    Míguez, Hernán

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays, solar thermophotovoltaic systems constitute a platform in which sophisticated optical material designs are put into practice with the aim of achieving the long sought after dream of developing an efficient energy conversion device based on this concept. Recent advances demonstrate that higher efficiencies are at reach using photonic nanostructures amenable to mass production and scale-up. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Concurrent System Engineering and Risk Reduction for Dual-Band (RF/optical) Spacecraft Communications

    Fielhauer, Karl, B.; Boone, Bradley, G.; Raible, Daniel, E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a system engineering approach to examining the potential for combining elements of a deep-space RF and optical communications payload, for the purpose of reducing the size, weight and power burden on the spacecraft and the mission. Figures of merit and analytical methodologies are discussed to conduct trade studies, and several potential technology integration strategies are presented. Finally, the NASA Integrated Radio and Optical Communications (iROC) project is described, which directly addresses the combined RF and optical approach.

  3. Experience of final examination for master's degree in optical engineering

    Ivanova, Tatiana; Ezhova, Kseniia; Bakholdin, Alexey; Tolstoba, Nadezhda; Romanova, Galina

    2015-10-01

    At the end of master program it is necessary to measure students' knowledge and competences. Master thesis is the one way, but it measure deep knowledge in quite narrow area. Another way of measure is additional final examination that includes topics from the most important courses. In Applied and Computer Optics Department of ITMO University such examination includes theoretical questions and practical tasks from several courses in one examination. Theoretical section of examination is written and second section is practical. Practical section takes place in laboratory with real equipment or with computer simulation. In the paper examples of tasks for master programs, and results of examination are presented.

  4. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Source Water Assessment

    Sehlke, G.

    2003-03-17

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 square miles and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL's drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey's Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency's Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a this vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL's Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL's 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-1, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead

  5. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory decontamination and decommissioning robotics development program

    McKay, M.D.

    1993-04-01

    As part of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP) Decontamination ampersand Decommissioning (D ampersand D) robotics program, a task was designed to integrate the plasma arc cutting technology being developed under the Waste Facility Operations (WFO) robotics program into D ampersand D cutting applications. The plasma arc cutting technology is based upon the use of a high energy plasma torch to cut metallic objects. Traditionally, D ampersand D workers removing equipment and processes from a facility have used plasma arc cutting to accomplish this task. The worker is required to don a protective suit to shield from the high electromagnetic energy released from the cutting operation. Additionally, the worker is required to don protective clothing to shield against the radioactive materials and contamination. This protective clothing can become restrictive and cumbersome to work in. Because some of the work areas contain high levels of radiation, the worker is not allowed to dwell in the environment for sustained periods of time. To help alleviate some of the burdens required to accomplish this task, reduce or eliminate the safety hazardous to the worker, and reduce the overall cost of remediation, a program was established though the Office of Technology Development (OTD) to design and develop a robotic system capable of performing cutting operations using a plasma arc torch. Several D ampersand D tasks were identified having potential for use of the plasma arc cutting technology. The tasks listed below were chosen to represent common D ampersand D type activities where the plasma arc cutting technology can be applied

  6. Partnerships in cleanup at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Hula, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    Environmental Restoration activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are currently being conducted under a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFA/CO). The FFA/CO was signed by the US Department of Energy-Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), the Environmental Protection Agency-Region 10 (EPA), and the state of Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (IDHW) in December 1991. The INEL FFA/CO has been successfully implemented due to the coordination, integration and communication among the DOE-ID, IDHW and EPA Project and WAG Managers. Successful implementation of this Tri-party Agreement hinges on one key concept: ownership of the agreement, including the routine and unexpected problems and conflicting schedules typically associated with three separate agencies. Other factors, such as (1) open and frequent communication, (2) trust among all players, (3) ''giving'' in order to ''get,'' (4) clear, concise documentation surrounding key decisions during implementation and (5) little turnover among the implementers of the Agreement, i.e., good institutional knowledge, will enhance implementation of the Agreement, but without ownership, successful implementation of the agreement may be jeopardized. This sense of ownership, as well as a sound professional working relationship between the Project and WAG Managers from each agency, has resulted in avoidance of the need for invoking the formal ''dispute resolution'' process outlined in the INEL Agreement. This facilitates timely decision-making (10 Record of Decisions have been signed to date at the INEL) which has quickly progressed the program from an ''assessment'' phase to a ''cleanup'' phase

  7. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory High-Level Waste Roadmap

    1993-08-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) High-Level Waste (HLW) Roadmap takes a strategic look at the entire HLW life-cycle starting with generation, through interim storage, treatment and processing, transportation, and on to final disposal. The roadmap is an issue-based planning approach that compares ''where we are now'' to ''where we want and need to be.'' The INEL has been effectively managing HLW for the last 30 years. Calcining operations are continuing to turn liquid HLW into a more manageable form. Although this document recognizes problems concerning HLW at the INEL, there is no imminent risk to the public or environment. By analyzing the INEL current business operations, pertinent laws and regulations, and committed milestones, the INEL HLW Roadmap has identified eight key issues existing at the INEL that must be resolved in order to reach long-term objectives. These issues are as follows: A. The US Department of Energy (DOE) needs a consistent policy for HLW generation, handling, treatment, storage, and disposal. B. The capability for final disposal of HLW does not exist. C. Adequate processes have not been developed or implemented for immobilization and disposal of INEL HLW. D. HLW storage at the INEL is not adequate in terms of capacity and regulatory requirements. E. Waste streams are generated with limited consideration for waste minimization. F. HLW is not adequately characterized for disposal nor, in some cases, for storage. G. Research and development of all process options for INEL HLW treatment and disposal are not being adequately pursued due to resource limitations. H. HLW transportation methods are not selected or implemented. A root-cause analysis uncovered the underlying causes of each of these issues

  8. Time Resolved Digital PIV Measurements of Flow Field Cyclic Variation in an Optical IC Engine

    Jarvis, S; Justham, T; Clarke, A; Garner, C P; Hargrave, G K; Halliwell, N A [Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    Time resolved digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) experimental data is presented for the in-cylinder flow field development of a motored four stroke spark ignition (SI) optical internal combustion (IC) engine. A high speed DPIV system was employed to quantify the velocity field development during the intake and compression stroke at an engine speed of 1500 rpm. The results map the spatial and temporal development of the in-cylinder flow field structure allowing comparison between traditional ensemble average and cycle average flow field structures. Conclusions are drawn with respect to engine flow field cyclic variations.

  9. Time Resolved Digital PIV Measurements of Flow Field Cyclic Variation in an Optical IC Engine

    Jarvis, S; Justham, T; Clarke, A; Garner, C P; Hargrave, G K; Halliwell, N A

    2006-01-01

    Time resolved digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) experimental data is presented for the in-cylinder flow field development of a motored four stroke spark ignition (SI) optical internal combustion (IC) engine. A high speed DPIV system was employed to quantify the velocity field development during the intake and compression stroke at an engine speed of 1500 rpm. The results map the spatial and temporal development of the in-cylinder flow field structure allowing comparison between traditional ensemble average and cycle average flow field structures. Conclusions are drawn with respect to engine flow field cyclic variations

  10. Time Resolved Digital PIV Measurements of Flow Field Cyclic Variation in an Optical IC Engine

    Jarvis, S.; Justham, T.; Clarke, A.; Garner, C. P.; Hargrave, G. K.; Halliwell, N. A.

    2006-07-01

    Time resolved digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) experimental data is presented for the in-cylinder flow field development of a motored four stroke spark ignition (SI) optical internal combustion (IC) engine. A high speed DPIV system was employed to quantify the velocity field development during the intake and compression stroke at an engine speed of 1500 rpm. The results map the spatial and temporal development of the in-cylinder flow field structure allowing comparison between traditional ensemble average and cycle average flow field structures. Conclusions are drawn with respect to engine flow field cyclic variations.

  11. Meeting national challenges with science, engineering, and technology

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: national challenges; the Livermore Laboratory; national defense: preserving peace in a rapidly changing world; energy: clean and economic; environment: from the microscopic to the global; health: genetics and biomedicine; economy: bringing laboratory technology to the US market; education: sparking interest in science; and the Livermore Laboratory: a national resource

  12. Distributed optical fiber-based monitoring approach of spatial seepage behavior in dike engineering

    Su, Huaizhi; Ou, Bin; Yang, Lifu; Wen, Zhiping

    2018-07-01

    The failure caused by seepage is the most common one in dike engineering. As to the characteristics of seepage in dike, such as longitudinal extension engineering, the randomness, strong concealment and small initial quantity order, by means of distributed fiber temperature sensor system (DTS), adopting an improved optical fiber layer layout scheme, the location of initial interpolation point of the saturation line is obtained. With the barycentric Lagrange interpolation collocation method (BLICM), the infiltrated surface of dike full-section is generated. Combined with linear optical fiber monitoring seepage method, BLICM is applied in an engineering case, which shows that a real-time seepage monitoring technique is presented in full-section of dike based on the combination method.

  13. A preliminary survey of the National Wetlands Inventory as mapped for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Hampton, N.L.; Rope, R.C.; Glennon, J.M.; Moor, K.S.

    1995-02-01

    Approximately 135 areas within the boundaries of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been mapped as wetland habitat as part of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). A preliminary survey of these wetlands was conducted to examine their general characteristics and status, to provide an estimation of relative ecological importance, to identify additional information needed to complete ecological characterization of important INEL wetlands, and to identify high priority wetland areas on the INEL. The purpose of the survey was to provide information to support the preparation of the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER ampersand WM) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Information characterizing general vegetation, hydrology, wildlife use, and archaeology was collected at 105 sample sites on the INEL. Sites representing NWI palustrine, lacustrine, and riverine wetlands (including manmade), and areas unmapped or unclassified by the NWI were included in the sample. The field information was used to develop a preliminary ranking of relative ecological importance for each wetland visited during this survey. Survey limitations are identified

  14. Launching partnership in optics and photonics education between University of Rochester and Moscow Engineering Physics Institute NRNU MEPhI

    Lukishova, Svetlana G.; Zavestovskaya, Irina N.; Zhang, Xi-Cheng; Aleshchenko, Yury A.; Konov, Vitaly I.

    2017-08-01

    A collaboration in education between the oldest and one of the most comprehensive Optics schools in U.S., the Institute of Optics (IO), University of Rochester (UR), and one of the most recognized Russian university, National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) was started in 2015 by signing an agreement on a double-Master's degree program in optics. It was based on earlier collaboration between research groups in both universities. In summer of 2016, nine UR Optics undergraduate students participated with MEPhI students at the International School on Optics and Laser Physics in MEPhI. During five days they were immersed into the world of cutting edge research, technologies and ideas that Russian, European and U.S. scientists offered them. This School also included tours of MEPhI Nanotechnologies and Lasers Centers and Nano-bioengineering Laboratory as well as of scientific laboratories of the leading institutes in optics, photonics and laser physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences. In December of 2015, one MEPhI Master student visited IO UR for one month for a research project with results presented later at a MEPhI conference. Samples prepared by MEPhI researchers are used in IO students teaching laboratories. One Master student from MEPhI is working now towards the Master's degree at the IO UR. In this paper benefits and pitfalls of a cross-border collaboration are discussed as well as different directions of such a collaboration to provide a high-quality specialization for the students of the 21 century which includes international cooperation.

  15. Optical Study of Flow and Combustion in an HCCI Engine with Negative Valve Overlap

    Wilson, Trevor S [Jaguar Cars Ltd., Whitley Engineering Centre, Coventry. CV3 4LF (United Kingdom); Xu Hongming [Jaguar Cars Ltd., Whitley Engineering Centre, Coventry. CV3 4LF (United Kingdom); Richardson, Steve [Jaguar Cars Ltd., Whitley Engineering Centre, Coventry. CV3 4LF (United Kingdom); Wyszynski, Miroslaw L [University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham. B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Megaritis, Thanos [University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham. B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    One of the most widely used methods to enable Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion is using negative valve overlapping to trap a sufficient quantity of hot residual gas. The characteristics of air motion with specially designed valve events having reduced valve lift and durations associated with HCCI engines and their effect on subsequent combustion are not yet fully understood. In addition, the ignition process and combustion development in such engines are very different from those in conventional spark-ignition or diesel compression ignition engines. Very little data has been reported concerning optical diagnostics of the flow and combustion in the engine using negative valve overlapping. This paper presents an experimental investigation into the in-cylinder flow characteristics and combustion development in an optical engine operating in HCCI combustion mode. PIV measurements have been taken under motored engine conditions to provide a quantitative flow characterisation of negative valve overlap in-cylinder flows. The ignition and combustion process was imaged using a high resolution charge coupled device (CCD) camera and the combustion imaging data was supplemented by simultaneously recorded in-cylinder pressure data which assisted the analysis of the images. It is found that the flow characteristics with negative valve overlapping are less stable and more valve event driven than typical spark ignition in-cylinder flows, while the combustion initiation locations are not uniformly distributed.

  16. Evaluation of the 1997 Joint National Conference, Women in Engineering Program Advocates Network (WEPAN) and National Association of Minority Engineering Program Administrators (NAMEPA)

    Brainard, Suzanne G.

    1997-07-01

    The primary goal of the 1997 Joint National Conference was to unite NAMEPA and WEPAN in a unique collaborative effort to further the cause of increasing the participation of women and minorities in science and engineering. The specific objectives were to: (1) conduct technical and programmatic seminars for institutions desiring to initiate, replicate, or expand women and minorities in engineering program; (2) provide assistance in fundraising and grant writing; (3) profile women in engineering programs of excellence; (4) sponsor inspiring knowledgeable and motivational keynote speakers; and (5) offer a series of workshops focused on a multitude of topics.

  17. 40 CFR 1068.225 - What are the provisions for exempting engines/equipment for national security?

    2010-07-01

    ... engines/equipment for national security? 1068.225 Section 1068.225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...) Manufacturers may request a national security exemption for engines/equipment not meeting the conditions of... applicable): (i) “THIS ENGINE HAS AN EXEMPTION FOR NATIONAL SECURITY UNDER 40 CFR 1068.225.” (ii) “THIS...

  18. The Role of Combat Heavy Engineer Battalions in Nation Assistance.

    1991-06-07

    may offend the cultural norms or religious beliefs of the host nation. The project may deny jobs to a host nation with high unemployment. An effort to...techniques. They must coordinate with 54 a host nation which may have a different language and culture from their own. The project is real. There are...roof work on a community center in Don Diego; water line and PVC pipe installation in Huari - Huari and Apacheta; and 18 86 kilometers of road improvement

  19. Summaries of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radioecology and Ecology Program research projects

    Markham, O.D.

    1987-06-01

    This report provides summaries of individual research projects conducted by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radioecology and Ecology Program. Summaries include projects in various stages, from those that are just beginning, to projects that are in the final publication stage

  20. Optical isolation based on space-time engineered asymmetric photonic band gaps

    Chamanara, Nima; Taravati, Sajjad; Deck-Léger, Zoé-Lise; Caloz, Christophe

    2017-10-01

    Nonreciprocal electromagnetic devices play a crucial role in modern microwave and optical technologies. Conventional methods for realizing such systems are incompatible with integrated circuits. With recent advances in integrated photonics, the need for efficient on-chip magnetless nonreciprocal devices has become more pressing than ever. This paper leverages space-time engineered asymmetric photonic band gaps to generate optical isolation. It shows that a properly designed space-time modulated slab is highly reflective/transparent for opposite directions of propagation. The corresponding design is magnetless, accommodates low modulation frequencies, and can achieve very high isolation levels. An experimental proof of concept at microwave frequencies is provided.

  1. Temperature monitoring of vehicle engine exhaust gases under vibration condition using optical fibre temperature sensor systems

    Zhao, W Z; Suna, T; Grattana, K T V; Shen, Y H; Wei, C L; Al-Shamma'a, A I

    2006-01-01

    Two optical approaches, comprising and contracting both the fluorescence decay lifetime and the fibre Bragg grating (FBG) methods, were developed and evaluated for temperature monitoring of exhaust gases for use on a vehicle engine. The FBGs used in the system were written into specially designed Bi-Ge co-doped photosensitive fibres, to enable them to sustain high temperatures to over 800 0 C, which is far beyond that of FBGs written into most commercial photosensitive fibres. The sensors were subjected to a range of vibration tests, as a part of an optical exhaust monitoring network under development, and results from the test carried out are reported

  2. Design of a single cylinder optical access to the combustion engine Scania D12

    Fuchs, Juergen

    2000-11-01

    In this work a maximum optical access to a diesel engine is developed. The combustion-process in the engine should be representative to the one in a standard engine, so the geometry of the combustion chamber is modified as little as possible. A Scania single cylinder, 2-litre engine was subjected to modifications allowing the optical access. Solutions to these problems are obtained by using the method of Product-Development, mainly based on the literature by Prof Dr.-Ing. Birkhofer at the Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany. An optical engine design of the Bowditch type was the chosen main working principle. This engine contains an extended cylinder, partly made of glass, a glass piston-crown and a mirror placed inside the extended piston. The laser sheet is led into the combustion chamber through the glass part of the cylinder, then gets reflected inside the combustion chamber and is led through the glass piston crown and via the mirror out of the engine. A redesign of the valve-train, using extended push-rods, is necessary. The demand to examine the combustion at Top-Dead-Centre (TDC) and the necessity of supporting the glass, give the reasons to do work on the cylinder head. This in return brings sealing problems, which have been solved. Another problem that occurs with that type of engine is that is has to run without oil-lubrication. Piston rings made of Rylon are used to solve this problem. A special feature of the engine that has been constructed here is that the inner surface of the glass may be cleaned without removing the cylinder head. This is obtained by a construction with a movable cylinder. In cleaning-state the cylinder is driven up and down together with the piston, while the head is supported by an outer structure. When running the engine, the cylinder is fixed to the structure. Furthermore this report contains the necessary calculations and integrity assessments on the critical parts of the construction. All calculations, except the

  3. Assessing the Higher National Diploma Chemical Engineering Programme in Ghana: Students' Perspective

    Boateng, Cyril D.; Bensah, Edem Cudjoe; Ahiekpor, Julius C.

    2012-01-01

    Chemical engineers have played key roles in the growth of the chemical and allied industries in Ghana but indigenous industries that have traditionally been the domain of the informal sector need to be migrated to the formal sector through the entrepreneurship and innovation of chemical engineers. The Higher National Diploma Chemical Engineering…

  4. Proceedings of the national conference on recent trends in materials chemistry and engineering

    2011-01-01

    This national conference focuses on the latest trends in materials chemistry and engineering. Materials chemistry unites the diverse disciplines of science seamlessly and underlines the need for a collaborative research. In today's technologically advanced society, the need to extend the wealth of basic knowledge on materials to the solutions of engineering problems is great. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  5. Thermal, optical, and electrical engineering of an innovative tunable white LED light engine

    Trivellin, Nicola; Meneghini, Matteo; Ferretti, Marco; Barbisan, Diego; Dal Lago, Matteo; Meneghesso, Gaudenzio; Zanoni, Enrico

    2014-02-01

    Color temperature, intensity and blue spectrum of the light affects the ganglion receptors in human brain stimulating the human nervous system. With this work we review different methods for obtaining tunable light emission spectra and propose an innovative white LED lighting system. By an in depth study of the thermal, electrical and optical characteristics of GaN and GaP based compound semiconductors for optoelectronics a specific tunable spectra has been designed. The proposed tunable white LED system is able to achieve high CRI (above 95) in a large CCT range (3000 - 5000K).

  6. Schlieren measurements in the round cylinder of an optically accessible internal combustion engine.

    Kaiser, Sebastian Arnold; Salazar, Victor Manuel; Hoops, Alexandra A

    2013-05-10

    This paper describes the design and experimental application of an optical system to perform schlieren measurements in the curved geometry of the cylinder of an optically accessible internal combustion engine. Key features of the system are a pair of cylindrical positive meniscus lenses, which keep the beam collimated while passing through the unmodified, thick-walled optical cylinder, and a pulsed, high-power light-emitting diode with narrow spectral width. In combination with a high-speed CMOS camera, the system is used to visualize the fuel jet after injection of hydrogen fuel directly into the cylinder from a high-pressure injector. Residual aberrations, which limit the system's sensitivity, are characterized experimentally and are compared to the predictions of ray-tracing software.

  7. Morphology and Optical Properties of Black-Carbon Particles Relevant to Engine Emissions

    Michelsen, H. A.; Bambha, R.; Dansson, M. A.; Schrader, P. E.

    2013-12-01

    Black-carbon particles are believed to have a large influence on climate through direct radiative forcing, reduction of surface albedo of snow and ice in the cryosphere, and interaction with clouds. The optical properties and morphology of atmospheric particles containing black carbon are uncertain, and characterization of black carbon resulting from engines emissions is needed. Refractory black-carbon particles found in the atmosphere are often coated with unburned fuel, sulfuric acid, water, ash, and other combustion by-products and atmospheric constituents. Coatings can alter the optical and physical properties of the particles and therefore change their optical properties and cloud interactions. Details of particle morphology and coating state can also have important effects on the interpretation of optical diagnostics. A more complete understanding of how coatings affect extinction, absorption, and incandescence measurements is needed before these techniques can be applied reliably to a wide range of particles. We have investigated the effects of coatings on the optical and physical properties of combustion-generated black-carbon particles using a range of standard particle diagnostics, extinction, and time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (LII) measurements. Particles were generated in a co-flow diffusion flame, extracted, cooled, and coated with oleic acid. The diffusion flame produces highly dendritic soot aggregates with similar properties to those produced in diesel engines, diffusion flames, and most natural combustion processes. A thermodenuder was used to remove the coating. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used to monitor aggregate sizes; a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA) was used to measure coating mass fractions, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to characterize particle morphologies. The results demonstrate important differences in optical measurements between coated and uncoated particles.

  8. National Educators' Workshop: Update 1991. Standard Experiments in Engineering Materials Science and Technology

    Gardner, J.E.; Jacobs, J.A.; Stiegler, J.O.

    1992-06-01

    Given here is a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 91, held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on November 12-14, 1991. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community

  9. National Educators' Workshop: Update 1988. Standard Experiments in Engineering Materials Science and Technology

    Gardner, James E. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    Presented here is a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 88, held May 10 to 12, 1988 at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersberg, Maryland. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  10. National Educators' Workshop: Update 1989 Standard Experiments in Engineering Materials Science and Technology

    Gardner, James E. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    Presented here is a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 89, held October 17 to 19, 1989 at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, Virginia. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  11. National Educators' Workshop: Update 1991. Standard Experiments in Engineering Materials Science and Technology

    Gardner, James E. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A. (Compiler); Stiegler, James O. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    Given here is a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 91, held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on November 12-14, 1991. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  12. Status of Optical Coatings for the National Ignition Facility

    Stolz, C J; Weinzapfel, C; Rogowski, G T; Smith, D; Rigatti, A; Oliver, J; Taniguchi, J; Gunten, M von; Bevis, R; Smith, M; Ivan, V

    2001-01-01

    Optical coatings are a crucial part of the pulse trapping and extraction in the NIF multipass amplifiers. Coatings also steer the 192 beams from four linear arrays to four converging cones entering the target chamber. There are a total of 1600 physical vapor deposited coatings on NIF consisting of 576 mirrors within the multipass cavity, 192 polarizers that work in tandem with a Pockels cell to create an optical switch, and 832 transport mirrors. These optics are of sufficient size so that they are not aperture-limiting for the 40-cm x 40 cm beams over an incident range of 0 to 56.4 degrees. These coatings must withstand laser fluences up to 25 J/cm 2 at 1053 nm (1 ω) and 3-ns pulse length and are the 1ω fluence-limiting component on NIF. The coatings must have a minimal impact on the beam wavefront and phase to maintain beam focusability, minimize scattered loss, and minimize nonlinear damage mechanisms. This is achieved by specifications ranging from 99.5% and >99% for mirrors and polarizers, respectively, and T>98% for polarizers

  13. Optical Measurement Techniques for Rocket Engine Testing and Component Applications: Digital Image Correlation and Dynamic Photogrammetry

    Gradl, Paul

    2016-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been advancing dynamic optical measurement systems, primarily Digital Image Correlation, for extreme environment rocket engine test applications. The Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technology is used to track local and full field deformations, displacement vectors and local and global strain measurements. This technology has been evaluated at MSFC through lab testing to full scale hotfire engine testing of the J-2X Upper Stage engine at Stennis Space Center. It has been shown to provide reliable measurement data and has replaced many traditional measurement techniques for NASA applications. NASA and AMRDEC have recently signed agreements for NASA to train and transition the technology to applications for missile and helicopter testing. This presentation will provide an overview and progression of the technology, various testing applications at NASA MSFC, overview of Army-NASA test collaborations and application lessons learned about Digital Image Correlation.

  14. Fiber-optic data-transmission system for borehole logging. Final report. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    Gould, G.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the system is to provide signal transmission media for transmission of digital data from a borehole logging probe (and associated processor-electronics) to a borehole logging truck at the surface. This fiber optic transmission system is specifically designed for use on the Bendix Field Engineering Corp. (BFEC) R and D logging truck

  15. Optical Fiber Communication Conference, 2006 and the 2006 National Fiber Optic Engineers Conference. OFC 2006

    Zibar, Darko; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Mulvad, Hans Christian Hansen

    2006-01-01

    The impact of gating timing jitter on a 160 Gb/s demultiplexer is investigated by using two pulse sources with different timing jitter properties. It is found that jitter in the range 20 kHz-10 MHz is essential to minimize....

  16. Computer integration of engineering design and production: A national opportunity

    1984-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), as a purchaser of a variety of manufactured products, including complex space vehicles and systems, clearly has a stake in the advantages of computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM). Two major NASA objectives are to launch a Manned Space Station by 1992 with a budget of $8 billion, and to be a leader in the development and application of productivity-enhancing technology. At the request of NASA, a National Research Council committee visited five companies that have been leaders in using CIM. Based on these case studies, technical, organizational, and financial issues that influence computer integration are described, guidelines for its implementation in industry are offered, and the use of CIM to manage the space station program is recommended.

  17. Nuclear Plant Analyzer development at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Laats, E.T.; Beelman, R.J.; Charlton, T.R.; Hampton, N.L.; Burtt, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) is a state-of-the-art safety analysis and engineering tool being used to address key nuclear power plant safety issues. The NPA has been developed to integrate the NRC's computerized reactor behavior simulation codes such as RELAP5, TRAC-BWR, and TRAC-PWR, with well-developed computer graphics programs and large repositories of reactor design and experimental data. An important feature of the NAP is the capability to allow an analyst to redirect a RELAP5 or TRAC calculation as it progresses through its simulated scenario. The analyst can have the same power plant control capabilities as the operator of an actual plant. The NPA resides on the dual CDS Cyber-176 mainframe computers at the INEL and is being converted to operate on a Cray-1S computer at the LANL. The subject of this paper is the program conducted at the INEL

  18. An optical method for measuring exhaust gas pressure from an internal combustion engine at high speed.

    Leach, Felix C P; Davy, Martin H; Siskin, Dmitrij; Pechstedt, Ralf; Richardson, David

    2017-12-01

    Measurement of exhaust gas pressure at high speed in an engine is important for engine efficiency, computational fluid dynamics analysis, and turbocharger matching. Currently used piezoresistive sensors are bulky, require cooling, and have limited lifetimes. A new sensor system uses an interferometric technique to measure pressure by measuring the size of an optical cavity, which varies with pressure due to movement of a diaphragm. This pressure measurement system has been used in gas turbine engines where the temperatures and pressures have no significant transients but has never been applied to an internal combustion engine before, an environment where both temperature and pressure can change rapidly. This sensor has been compared with a piezoresistive sensor representing the current state-of-the-art at three engine operating points corresponding to both light load and full load. The results show that the new sensor can match the measurements from the piezoresistive sensor except when there are fast temperature swings, so the latter part of the pressure during exhaust blowdown is only tracked with an offset. A modified sensor designed to compensate for these temperature effects is also tested. The new sensor has shown significant potential as a compact, durable sensor, which does not require external cooling.

  19. An optical method for measuring exhaust gas pressure from an internal combustion engine at high speed

    Leach, Felix C. P.; Davy, Martin H.; Siskin, Dmitrij; Pechstedt, Ralf; Richardson, David

    2017-12-01

    Measurement of exhaust gas pressure at high speed in an engine is important for engine efficiency, computational fluid dynamics analysis, and turbocharger matching. Currently used piezoresistive sensors are bulky, require cooling, and have limited lifetimes. A new sensor system uses an interferometric technique to measure pressure by measuring the size of an optical cavity, which varies with pressure due to movement of a diaphragm. This pressure measurement system has been used in gas turbine engines where the temperatures and pressures have no significant transients but has never been applied to an internal combustion engine before, an environment where both temperature and pressure can change rapidly. This sensor has been compared with a piezoresistive sensor representing the current state-of-the-art at three engine operating points corresponding to both light load and full load. The results show that the new sensor can match the measurements from the piezoresistive sensor except when there are fast temperature swings, so the latter part of the pressure during exhaust blowdown is only tracked with an offset. A modified sensor designed to compensate for these temperature effects is also tested. The new sensor has shown significant potential as a compact, durable sensor, which does not require external cooling.

  20. A Review of Distributed Optical Fiber Sensors for Civil Engineering Applications

    Barrias, António; Casas, Joan R.; Villalba, Sergi

    2016-01-01

    The application of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems to civil engineering structures has been a developing studied and practiced topic, that has allowed for a better understanding of structures’ conditions and increasingly lead to a more cost-effective management of those infrastructures. In this field, the use of fiber optic sensors has been studied, discussed and practiced with encouraging results. The possibility of understanding and monitor the distributed behavior of extensive stretches of critical structures it’s an enormous advantage that distributed fiber optic sensing provides to SHM systems. In the past decade, several R & D studies have been performed with the goal of improving the knowledge and developing new techniques associated with the application of distributed optical fiber sensors (DOFS) in order to widen the range of applications of these sensors and also to obtain more correct and reliable data. This paper presents, after a brief introduction to the theoretical background of DOFS, the latest developments related with the improvement of these products by presenting a wide range of laboratory experiments as well as an extended review of their diverse applications in civil engineering structures. PMID:27223289

  1. A Review of Distributed Optical Fiber Sensors for Civil Engineering Applications

    António Barrias

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The application of structural health monitoring (SHM systems to civil engineering structures has been a developing studied and practiced topic, that has allowed for a better understanding of structures’ conditions and increasingly lead to a more cost-effective management of those infrastructures. In this field, the use of fiber optic sensors has been studied, discussed and practiced with encouraging results. The possibility of understanding and monitor the distributed behavior of extensive stretches of critical structures it’s an enormous advantage that distributed fiber optic sensing provides to SHM systems. In the past decade, several R & D studies have been performed with the goal of improving the knowledge and developing new techniques associated with the application of distributed optical fiber sensors (DOFS in order to widen the range of applications of these sensors and also to obtain more correct and reliable data. This paper presents, after a brief introduction to the theoretical background of DOFS, the latest developments related with the improvement of these products by presenting a wide range of laboratory experiments as well as an extended review of their diverse applications in civil engineering structures.

  2. A Review of Distributed Optical Fiber Sensors for Civil Engineering Applications.

    Barrias, António; Casas, Joan R; Villalba, Sergi

    2016-05-23

    The application of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems to civil engineering structures has been a developing studied and practiced topic, that has allowed for a better understanding of structures' conditions and increasingly lead to a more cost-effective management of those infrastructures. In this field, the use of fiber optic sensors has been studied, discussed and practiced with encouraging results. The possibility of understanding and monitor the distributed behavior of extensive stretches of critical structures it's an enormous advantage that distributed fiber optic sensing provides to SHM systems. In the past decade, several R & D studies have been performed with the goal of improving the knowledge and developing new techniques associated with the application of distributed optical fiber sensors (DOFS) in order to widen the range of applications of these sensors and also to obtain more correct and reliable data. This paper presents, after a brief introduction to the theoretical background of DOFS, the latest developments related with the improvement of these products by presenting a wide range of laboratory experiments as well as an extended review of their diverse applications in civil engineering structures.

  3. Optical methods to study the gas exchange processes in large diesel engines

    Gros, S.; Hattar, C. [Wartsila Diesel International Oy, Vaasa (Finland); Hernberg, R.; Vattulainen, J. [Tampere Univ. of Technology, Tampere (Finland). Plasma Technology Lab.

    1996-12-01

    To be able to study the gas exchange processes in realistic conditions for a single cylinder of a large production-line-type diesel engine, a fast optical absorption spectroscopic method was developed. With this method line-of-sight UV-absorption of SO{sub 2} contained in the exhaust gas was measured as a function of time in the exhaust port area in a continuously fired medium speed diesel engine type Waertsilae 6L20. SO{sub 2} formed during the combustion from the fuel contained sulphur was used as a tracer to study the gas exchange as a function of time in the exhaust channel. In this case of a 4-stroke diesel engine by assuming a known concentration of SO{sub 2} in the exhaust gas after exhaust valve opening and before inlet and exhaust valve overlap period, the measured optical absorption was used to determine the gas density and further the instantaneous exhaust gas temperature during the exhaust cycle. (author)

  4. A woman like you: Women scientists and engineers at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Careers in action

    1991-12-31

    This publication by the women in Science and Engineering introduces career possibilities in science and engineering. It introduces what work and home life are like for women who have already entered these fields. Women at Brookhaven National Laboratory work in a variety of challenging research roles -- from biologist and environmental scientist to safety engineer, from patent lawyer to technician. Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi-program laboratory which carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated University, Inc., under contract with the US Department of Energy. Brookhaven and the other national laboratories, because of their enormous research resources, can play a critical role in a education and training of the workforce.

  5. A woman like you: Women scientists and engineers at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Benkovitz, Carmen; Bernholc, Nicole; Cohen, Anita; Eng, Susan; Enriquez-Leder, Rosario; Franz, Barbara; Gorden, Patricia; Hanson, Louise; Lamble, Geraldine; Martin, Harriet; Mastrangelo, Iris; McLane, Victoria; Villela, Maria-Alicia; Vivirito, Katherine; Woodhead, Avril

    1991-01-01

    This publication by the women in Science and Engineering introduces career possibilities in science and engineering. It introduces what work and home life are like for women who have already entered these fields. Women at Brookhaven National Laboratory work in a variety of challenging research roles -- from biologist and environmental scientist to safety engineer, from patent lawyer to technician. Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi-program laboratory which carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated University, Inc., under contract with the US Department of Energy. Brookhaven and the other national laboratories, because of their enormous research resources, can play a critical role in a education and training of the workforce.

  6. Magnetotelluric soundings on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory facility, Idaho

    Stanley, W.D.

    1982-01-01

    The magnetotelluric (MT) method was used as one of several geophysical tools to study part of the Idaho Engineering Laboratory (INEL) facility. The purpose of the geophysical study on INEL was to investigate the facility for a possible site to drill a geothermal exploration well. The initial interpretation of the MT sounding data was done with one-dimensional models consisting of four or five layers, the minimum number required to fit the data. After the test well (INEL-1) was completed, the electric log was used to guide an improved one-dimensional ID interpretation of the MT sounding data. Profile models derived from the well log provided good agreement with velocity models derived from refraction seismic data. A resolution study using generalized inverse techniques shows that the resolution of resistive layers in the lower part of the MT models is poor, as is the definition of a shallow, altered basalt unit. The only major structure observed on the MT data was the faulted contact between the SNRP and basin and range structures on the west. Modeling of the data near this structure with a two-dimensional computer program showed that the MT data near the fault require a model similar to the seismic refraction models and that structure on a deep crustal conductor is also required

  7. Review of Heavy-Duty Engine Combustion Research at Sandia National Laboratories

    Robert W. Carling; Gurpreet Singh

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are to describe the research efforts in diesel engine combustion at Sandia National Laboratories' Combustion Research Facility and to provide recent experimental results. We have four diesel engine experiments supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies: a one-cylinder version of a Cummins heavy-duty engine, a diesel simulation facility, a one-cylinder Caterpillar engine to evaluate combustion of alternative fuels, and a homogeneous-charge, compression-ignition (HCCI) engine facility is under development. Recent experimental results to be discussed are: the effects of injection timing and diluent addition on late-combustion soot burnout, diesel-spray ignition and premixed-burn behavior, a comparison of the combustion characteristics of M85 (a mixture of 85% methanol and 15% gasoline) and DF2 (No.2 diesel reference fuel), and a description of our HCCI experimental program and modeling work

  8. Low level waste management at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Rodgers, A.D.; Truitt, D.J.; Logan, J.A.; Brown, R.M.

    1986-02-01

    EG and G Idaho, Inc. is the lead contractor for the Department of Energy (DOE) National Low Level Waste Management Program, established in 1979. In this role, the company uses its waste management expertise to provide management and technical direction to support the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) in a manner that protects the environment and the public health and safety while improving efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Program activities are divided into two areas: defense-related and commercial nuclear reactor programs. The defense program was established to develop technology improvements, provide technology transfer, and to ensure a more efficient and uniform system for low level waste disposal. To achieve the program's goals, it is necessary to improve, document, and, where necessary, develop new methods for waste generation reduction, waste treatment, shallow-land burial, greater confinement disposal, and measures to correct existing site deficiencies. The commercial low level waste management program provides support to assist the states in developing an effective national low level waste management system and provides technical assistance for siting of regional commercial LLW disposal sites. The program provides technical and informational support to state officials, low level waste generators, managers, and facility operators to resolve low level waste problems and to improve the systems' overall effectiveness. Procedures are developed and documented and made available to commercial users through this program. Additional work is being conducted to demonstrate the stabilization and closure of low level radioactive waste disposal sites and develop the criteria and procedures for acceptance of such sites by the Department of Energy after closure has been completed. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  9. Quantum Optics 6 - Quantum Engineering of Atoms and Photons - Conference Materials

    2005-01-01

    The conference organized by Center for Theoretical Physics, Institute of Physics and Warsaw University, sponsored by European Science Foundation, was held in Krynica (120 km south-east of Cracow), Poland, June 13-18 2005. This was the sixth conference of the cycle, the previous one was held in Koscielisko, Poland in 2001. This time the main subject of the conference was: Quantum Engineering of Atoms and Photons. The meeting was focused on the physics of ultracold quantum gases, which without doubts determines the frontiers of the modern atomic, molecular and optical physics. Special attention was also be given to quantum information processing, both from theoretical and experimental point of view, including possible realizations in ultracold quantum gases. The conference consisted of invited lectures and a poster session. Competition for the best poster was held, sponsored by Journal of Optics B and Journal of Physics B - for more on this, including the results of the competition visit. (author)

  10. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Environmental Technologies Proof-of-Concepts. Final report FY-96

    Barrie, S.L.; Carpenter, G.S.; Crockett, A.B. [and others

    1997-04-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Environmental Technologies Proof-of-Concept Project was initiated for the expedited development of new or conceptual technologies in support of groundwater fate, transport, and remediation; buried waste characterization, retrieval, and treatment; waste minimization/pollution prevention; and spent fuel handling and storage. In Fiscal Year 1996, The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory proposed 40 development projects and the Department of Energy funded 15. The projects proved the concepts of the various technologies, and all the technologies contribute to successful environmental management.

  11. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Environmental Technologies Proof-of-Concepts. Final report FY-96

    Barrie, S.L.; Carpenter, G.S.; Crockett, A.B.

    1997-04-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Environmental Technologies Proof-of-Concept Project was initiated for the expedited development of new or conceptual technologies in support of groundwater fate, transport, and remediation; buried waste characterization, retrieval, and treatment; waste minimization/pollution prevention; and spent fuel handling and storage. In Fiscal Year 1996, The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory proposed 40 development projects and the Department of Energy funded 15. The projects proved the concepts of the various technologies, and all the technologies contribute to successful environmental management

  12. Tuning optical properties of opal photonic crystals by structural defects engineering

    di Stasio, F.; Cucini, M.; Berti, L.; Comoretto, D.; Abbotto, A.; Bellotto, L.; Manfredi, N.; Marinzi, C.

    2009-06-01

    We report on the preparation and optical characterization of three dimensional colloidal photonic crystal (PhC) containing an engineered planar defect embedding photoactive push-pull dyes. Free standing polystyrene films having thickness between 0.6 and 3 mm doped with different dipolar chromophores were prepared. These films were sandwiched between two artificial opals creating a PhC structure with planar defect. The system was characterized by reflectance at normal incidence angle (R), variable angle transmittance (T) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) Evidence of defect states were observed in T and R spectra which allow the light to propagate for selected frequencies within the pseudogap (stop band).

  13. Engineered Quasi-Phase Matching for Nonlinear Quantum Optics in Waveguides

    Van Camp, Mackenzie A.

    Entanglement is the hallmark of quantum mechanics. Quantum entanglement--putting two or more identical particles into a non-factorable state--has been leveraged for applications ranging from quantum computation and encryption to high-precision metrology. Entanglement is a practical engineering resource and a tool for sidestepping certain limitations of classical measurement and communication. Engineered nonlinear optical waveguides are an enabling technology for generating entangled photon pairs and manipulating the state of single photons. This dissertation reports on: i) frequency conversion of single photons from the mid-infrared to 843nm as a tool for incorporating quantum memories in quantum networks, ii) the design, fabrication, and test of a prototype broadband source of polarization and frequency entangled photons; and iii) a roadmap for further investigations of this source, including applications in quantum interferometry and high-precision optical metrology. The devices presented herein are quasi-phase-matched lithium niobate waveguides. Lithium niobate is a second-order nonlinear optical material and can mediate optical energy conversion to different wavelengths. This nonlinear effect is the basis of both quantum frequency conversion and entangled photon generation, and is enhanced by i) confining light in waveguides to increase conversion efficiency, and ii) quasi-phase matching, a technique for engineering the second-order nonlinear response by locally altering the direction of a material's polarization vector. Waveguides are formed by diffusing titanium into a lithium niobate wafer. Quasi-phase matching is achieved by electric field poling, with multiple stages of process development and optimization to fabricate the delicate structures necessary for broadband entangled photon generation. The results presented herein update and optimize past fabrication techniques, demonstrate novel optical devices, and propose future avenues for device development

  14. Soot and liquid-phase fuel distributions in a newly designed optically accessible DI diesel engine

    Dec, J. E.; Espey, C.

    1993-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) laser-sheet imaging has been used to examine the soot and liquid-phase fuel distributions in a newly designed, optically accessible, direct-injection diesel engine of the heavy-duty size class. The design of this engine preserves the intake port geometry and basic dimensions of a Cummins N-series production engine. It also includes several unique features to provide considerable optical access. Liquid-phase fuel and soot distribution studies were conducted at a medium speed (1,200 rpm) using a Cummins closed-nozzle fuel injector. The scattering was used to obtain planar images of the liquid-phase fuel distribution. These images show that the leading edge of the liquid-phase portion of the fuel jet reaches a maximum length of 24 mm, which is about half the combustion bowl radius for this engine. Beyond this point virtually all the fuel has vaporized. Soot distribution measurements were made at a high load condition using three imaging diagnostics: natural flame luminosity, 2-D laser-induced incandescence, and 2-D elastic scattering. This investigation showed that the soot distribution in the combusting fuel jet develops through three stages. First, just after the onset of luminous combustion, soot particles are small and nearly uniformly distributed throughout the luminous region of the fuel jet. Second, after about 2 crank angle degrees a pattern develops of a higher soot concentration of larger sized particles in the head vortex region of the jet and a lower soot concentration of smaller sized particles upstream toward the injector. Third, after fuel injection ends, both the soot concentration and soot particle size increase rapidly in the upstream portion of the fuel jet.

  15. Extractive sampling and optical remote sensing of F100 aircraft engine emissions.

    Cowen, Kenneth; Goodwin, Bradley; Joseph, Darrell; Tefend, Matthew; Satola, Jan; Kagann, Robert; Hashmonay, Ram; Spicer, Chester; Holdren, Michael; Mayfield, Howard

    2009-05-01

    The Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) has initiated several programs to develop and evaluate techniques to characterize emissions from military aircraft to meet increasingly stringent regulatory requirements. This paper describes the results of a recent field study using extractive and optical remote sensing (ORS) techniques to measure emissions from six F-15 fighter aircraft. Testing was performed between November 14 and 16, 2006 on the trim-pad facility at Tyndall Air Force Base in Panama City, FL. Measurements were made on eight different F100 engines, and the engines were tested on-wing of in-use aircraft. A total of 39 test runs were performed at engine power levels that ranged from idle to military power. The approach adopted for these tests involved extractive sampling with collocated ORS measurements at a distance of approximately 20-25 nozzle diameters downstream of the engine exit plane. The emission indices calculated for carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, and several volatile organic compounds showed very good agreement when comparing the extractive and ORS sampling methods.

  16. Proceedings of the two day national workshop on advanced materials for engineering applications

    John Alexis, S.; Jayakumar, S.

    2012-01-01

    The subjects like material preparation, material forming, material properties, materials testing, material mechanics, material structure, metal materials, non-metallic materials, composite materials, medical materials, chemical materials, food materials, electrician/electrical materials, building materials, biological materials, electronic/magnetic/optical materials, advanced materials applications in engineering are included in the workshop. Processing of advanced materials, studies on novel ceramic coatings, high strength, light weight and nanostructured materials are discussed in this proceedings. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  17. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory waste area groups 1--7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram

    O'Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Technology Logic Diagram was developed to provide technical alternatives for environmental restoration projects at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The diagram (three volumes) documents suggested solutions to the characterization, retrieval, and treatment phases of cleanup activities at contaminated sites within 8 of the laboratory's 10 waste area groups. Contaminated sites at the laboratory's Naval Reactor Facility and Argonne National Laboratory-West are not included in this diagram

  18. Operational and engineering developments in the management of low-level radioactive waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Kendall, E.W.; McKinney, J.D.; Wehmann, G.

    1979-01-01

    The Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a site for shallow land disposal and storage of solid radioactive waste. It is currently operated for ERDA by EG and G Idaho, Inc. The facility has accepted radioactive waste since July 1952. Both transuranic and non-transuranic wastes are handled at the complex. This document describes the operational and engineering developments in waste handling and storage practices that have been developed during the 25 years of waste handling operations. Emphasis is placed on above-ground transuranic waste storage, subsurface transuranic waste retrieval, and beta/gamma compaction disposal. The proposed future programs for the RWMC including a Molten Salt Combustion Facility and Production Scale Retrieval Project are described

  19. Ultraviolet Light Generation and Transport in the Final Optics Assembly of the National Ignition Facility

    Wegner, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hackel, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Feit, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Parham, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kozlowski, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Whitman, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-02-12

    The design of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) includes a Final Optics Assembly (FOA) subsystem for ultraviolet (UV) light generation and transport for each of the 192 beamlines. Analytical and experimental work has been done to help understand and predict the performance of FOA.

  20. Optical system for CO and NO gas detection in the exhaust manifold of combustion engines

    Mello, M.; De Vittorio, M.; Passaseo, A.; Lomascolo, M.; De Risi, A.

    2007-01-01

    The experimental characterization of an innovative optical system for detection of carbon monoxide (CO) and nitride oxide (NO) in the exhaust manifold of otto and diesel engines is reported. A photodetector based on gallium nitride (GaN) and an UV light source are integrated in a chamber of analysis and form the detection system. The UV light source, consisting of a spark produced by an arc discharge, induces electronic transitions in the gas molecules flowing between the light source and the GaN photodetector. The transitions modify the fraction of light in the UV spectral region which is detected by the GaN photodetector, as a function of the species concentration. By means of its structural properties, gallium nitride (GaN) allows to operate at high temperature and high speed and to work in situ in the exhaust manifold of combustion engines at temperatures as high as 600 o C, at which the deposited organic residuals on the detector can be oxidized. This assures a clear surface necessary for a real time optical measurement of the species concentration to be used for a closed loop control of the fuel injection process. The system was applied to the detection of CO and NO with concentration between 0% and 2% in a buffer of pure nitrogen gas, showing an increase in the measured photocurrent as a function of the above gases

  1. Towards an innovation culture : what are it's national, corporate, marketing and engineering aspects, some experimental evidence

    Ulijn, J.M.; Weggeman, M.C.D.P.; Cooper, C.L.; Cartwright, S.; Earley, P.C.

    2001-01-01

    This chapter addresses the issue of innovation culture (IC) and proposes and try to answer 5 research questions related to the possible impact of different elements, such as national, corporate and professional (engineering vs marketing) cultures (NC, CC, and PC), their intersection and integration

  2. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory radioecology and ecology programs. 1983 progress report

    Markham, O.D.

    1983-06-01

    Progress is reported in research on: the baseline ecology of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the effects of disturbance on animal and plant communities, and the behavior of radionuclides in the environment surrounding radioactive waste sites. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual reports

  3. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory nonradiological waste management information for 1994 and record to date

    French, D.L.; Lisee, D.J.; Taylor, K.A.

    1995-08-01

    This document provides detailed data and graphics on airborne and liquid effluent releases, fuel oil and coal consumption, water usage, and hazardous and mixed waste generated for calendar year 1994. This report summarizes industrial waste data records compiled since 1971 for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The data presented are from the INEL Nonradiological Waste Management Information System

  4. A summary of the environmental restoration program Retrieval Demonstration Project at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    McQuary, J.

    1991-01-01

    This document summarizes the of retrieval techniques developed to excavate buried transuranic (TRU) mixed waste from the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The SDA is located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). 31 refs., 1 fig

  5. Storage of transuranic contaminated solid wastes at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Wehmann, George

    1975-01-01

    The storage method for low-level transuranic wastes employed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is discussed in detail. The techniques used for wastes containing greater than ten nanocuries of transuranic material per gram of waste as well as the technique for lesser concentrations of transuranic wastes are described. The safety, efficiency and adequacy of these storage methods are presented

  6. Math and science education programs from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    1991-01-01

    This booklet reviews math and science education programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The programs can be categorized into six groups: teacher programs; science laboratories for students; student programs; education outreach programs; INEL Public Affairs Office; and programs for college faculty and students

  7. Air emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1994 emissions report

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This report Presents the 1994 update of the Air Emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  8. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Nonradiological Waste Management Information for 1993 and record to date

    Sims, A.M.; Taylor, K.A.

    1994-08-01

    This document provides detailed data and graphics on airborne and liquid effluent releases, fuel oil and coal consumption, water usage, and hazardous and mixed waste generated for calendar year 1993. This report summarizes industrial waste data records compiled since 1971 for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The data presented are from the INEL Nonradiological Waste Management Information System

  9. Air emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1994 emissions report

    1995-07-01

    This report Presents the 1994 update of the Air Emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources

  10. National Educators' Workshop: Update 95. Standard Experiments in Engineering Materials Science and Technology

    Gardner, James E. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A.; Karnitz, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    This document contains a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 95. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  11. National Educators' Workshop: Update 1993. Standard Experiments in Engineering Materials Science and Technology

    Gardner, James E. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    This document contains a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 93 held at the NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, on November 3-5, 1993. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  12. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory radioecology and ecology programs. 1983 progress report

    Markham, O. D. [ed.

    1983-06-01

    Progress is reported in research on: the baseline ecology of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the effects of disturbance on animal and plant communities, and the behavior of radionuclides in the environment surrounding radioactive waste sites. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual reports. (ACR)

  13. 2003 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Teresa R. Meachum

    2004-02-01

    The 2003 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe the conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operations of the facilities during the 2003 permit year are discussed.

  14. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1999 Emission Report

    Zohner, S.K.

    2000-05-30

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  15. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1998 Emissions Report

    S. K. Zohner

    1999-10-01

    This report presents the 1998 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradiological emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  16. Priority design parameters of industrialized optical fiber sensors in civil engineering

    Wang, Huaping; Jiang, Lizhong; Xiang, Ping

    2018-03-01

    Considering the mechanical effects and the different paths for transferring deformation, optical fiber sensors commonly used in civil engineering have been systematically classified. Based on the strain transfer theory, the relationship between the strain transfer coefficient and allowable testing error is established. The proposed relationship is regarded as the optimal control equation to obtain the optimal value of sensors that satisfy the requirement of measurement precision. Furthermore, specific optimization design methods and priority design parameters of the classified sensors are presented. This research indicates that (1) strain transfer theory-based optimization design method is much suitable for the sensor that depends on the interfacial shear stress to transfer the deformation; (2) the priority design parameters are bonded (sensing) length, interfacial bonded strength, elastic modulus and radius of protective layer and thickness of adhesive layer; (3) the optimization design of sensors with two anchor pieces at two ends is independent of strain transfer theory as the strain transfer coefficient can be conveniently calibrated by test, and this kind of sensors has no obvious priority design parameters. Improved calibration test is put forward to enhance the accuracy of the calibration coefficient of end-expanding sensors. By considering the practical state of sensors and the testing accuracy, comprehensive and systematic analyses on optical fiber sensors are provided from the perspective of mechanical actions, which could scientifically instruct the application design and calibration test of industrialized optical fiber sensors.

  17. System engineering of complex optical systems for mission assurance and affordability

    Ahmad, Anees

    2017-08-01

    Affordability and reliability are equally important as the performance and development time for many optical systems for military, space and commercial applications. These characteristics are even more important for the systems meant for space and military applications where total lifecycle costs must be affordable. Most customers are looking for high performance optical systems that are not only affordable but are designed with "no doubt" mission assurance, reliability and maintainability in mind. Both US military and commercial customers are now demanding an optimum balance between performance, reliability and affordability. Therefore, it is important to employ a disciplined systems design approach for meeting the performance, cost and schedule targets while keeping affordability and reliability in mind. The US Missile Defense Agency (MDA) now requires all of their systems to be engineered, tested and produced according to the Mission Assurance Provisions (MAP). These provisions or requirements are meant to ensure complex and expensive military systems are designed, integrated, tested and produced with the reliability and total lifecycle costs in mind. This paper describes a system design approach based on the MAP document for developing sophisticated optical systems that are not only cost-effective but also deliver superior and reliable performance during their intended missions.

  18. Assessing the Higher National Diploma Chemical Engineering programme in Ghana: students' perspective

    Boateng, Cyril D.; Cudjoe Bensah, Edem; Ahiekpor, Julius C.

    2012-05-01

    Chemical engineers have played key roles in the growth of the chemical and allied industries in Ghana but indigenous industries that have traditionally been the domain of the informal sector need to be migrated to the formal sector through the entrepreneurship and innovation of chemical engineers. The Higher National Diploma Chemical Engineering programme is being migrated from a subject-based to a competency-based curriculum. This paper evaluates the programme from the point of view of students. Data were drawn from a survey conducted in the department and were analysed using SPSS. The survey involved administering questionnaires to students at all levels in the department. Analysis of the responses indicated that the majority of the students had decided to pursue chemical engineering due to the career opportunities available. Their knowledge of the programme learning outcomes was, however, poor. The study revealed that none of the students was interested in developing indigenous industries.

  19. Proceedings of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop

    Dykes, K.

    2014-12-01

    The second National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop was held in Broomfield, Colorado, from January 29 to February 1, 2013. The event included a day-and-a-half workshop exploring a wide variety of topics related to system modeling and design of wind turbines and plants. Following the workshop, 2 days of tutorials were held at NREL, showcasing software developed at Sandia National Laboratories, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Glenn Laboratories, and NREL. This document provides a brief summary of the various workshop activities and includes a review of the content and evaluation results from attendees.

  20. Online quantitative monitoring of live cell engineered cartilage growth using diffuse fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy.

    Bergholt, Mads S; Albro, Michael B; Stevens, Molly M

    2017-09-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) has the potential to improve the outcome for patients with osteoarthritis (OA). The successful clinical translation of this technique as part of a therapy requires the ability to measure extracellular matrix (ECM) production of engineered tissues in vitro, in order to ensure quality control and improve the likelihood of tissue survival upon implantation. Conventional techniques for assessing the ECM content of engineered cartilage, such as biochemical assays and histological staining are inherently destructive. Raman spectroscopy, on the other hand, represents a non-invasive technique for in situ biochemical characterization. Here, we outline current roadblocks in translational Raman spectroscopy in TE and introduce a comprehensive workflow designed to non-destructively monitor and quantify ECM biomolecules in large (>3 mm), live cell TE constructs online. Diffuse near-infrared fiber-optic Raman spectra were measured from live cell cartilaginous TE constructs over a 56-day culturing period. We developed a multivariate curve resolution model that enabled quantitative biochemical analysis of the TE constructs. Raman spectroscopy was able to non-invasively quantify the ECM components and showed an excellent correlation with biochemical assays for measurement of collagen (R 2  = 0.84) and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) (R 2  = 0.86). We further demonstrated the robustness of this technique for online prospective analysis of live cell TE constructs. The fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy strategy developed in this work offers the ability to non-destructively monitor construct growth online and can be adapted to a broad range of TE applications in regenerative medicine toward controlled clinical translation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. The results of an ecological risk assessment screening at the Idaho National Engineering`s waste area group 2

    VanHorn, R.

    1995-11-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in southeastern Idaho and occupies approximately 890 square miles on the northwestern portion of the eastern Snake River Plain. INEL has been devoted to nuclear energy research and related activities since its establishment in 1949. In the process of fulfilling this mission, wastes were generated, including radioactive and hazardous materials. Most materials were effectively stored or disposed of, however, some release of contaminants to the environment has occurred. For this reason, the INEL was listed by the US environmental Protection Agency on the National Priorities List (NPL), in November, 1989. This report describes the results of an ecological risk assessment performed for the Waste Area Groups 2 (WAG 2) at the INEL. It also summarizes the performance of screening level ecological risk assessments (SLERA).

  2. Building an integrated nuclear engineering and nuclear science human resources pipeline at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Sneed, A.; Sikorski, B.; Lineberry, M.; Jolly, J.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In 2002, the US Department of Energy (US DOE) transferred sponsorship of the INEEL and ANL-W to the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology and designated the INEEL and ANL-W as the nation's lead laboratories for nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel cycle research and development. This transfer acknowledged the laboratories' history, infrastructure, expertise and commitment to collaborate broadly in order to fulfill its assigned role as the nation's center for nuclear energy research and development. Key to this role is the availability of well-educated and trained nuclear engineers, professionals from other disciplines of engineering, nuclear scientists, and others with advanced degrees in supporting disciplines such as physics, chemistry, and math. In 2005 the INEEL and ANL-W will be combined into the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). One of US DOE's objectives for the INL will be for it to take a strong role in the revitalization of nuclear engineering and nuclear science education in the US. Responding to this objective for the INL and the national need to rejuvenate nuclear engineering and nuclear science research and education, ISU, University of Idaho (UI), Boise State University, the INEEL, and ANL-W are all supporting a new Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (INSE), initially proposed by and to be administered by ISU. The Institute will rely on the resources of both universities and the INL to create a US center for reactor and fuel cycle research to development and attract outstanding faculty and students to Idaho and to the INL. The Institute and other university based education development efforts represent only one component of a viable Human Resources Pipeline from university to leading edge laboratory researcher. Another critical component is the successful integration of new graduates into the laboratory research environment, the transfer of knowledge from senior researchers, and the development of these individuals into

  3. HISTORICAL AMERICAN ENGINEERING RECORD - IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY, TEST AREA NORTH, HAER NO. ID-33-E

    Susan Stacy; Hollie K. Gilbert

    2005-01-01

    Test Area North (TAN) was a site of the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion (ANP) Project of the U.S. Air Force and the Atomic Energy Commission. Its Cold War mission was to develop a turbojet bomber propelled by nuclear power. The project was part of an arms race. Test activities took place in five areas at TAN. The Assembly and Maintenance area was a shop and hot cell complex. Nuclear tests ran at the Initial Engine Test area. Low-power test reactors operated at a third cluster. The fourth area was for Administration. A Flight Engine Test facility (hangar) was built to house the anticipated nuclear-powered aircraft. Experiments between 1955-1961 proved that a nuclear reactor could power a jet engine, but President John F. Kennedy canceled the project in March 1961. ANP facilities were adapted for new reactor projects, the most important of which were Loss of Fluid Tests (LOFT), part of an international safety program for commercial power reactors. Other projects included NASA's Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power and storage of Three Mile Island meltdown debris. National missions for TAN in reactor research and safety research have expired; demolition of historic TAN buildings is underway

  4. HISTORICAL AMERICAN ENGINEERING RECORD - IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY, TEST AREA NORTH, HAER NO. ID-33-E

    Susan Stacy; Hollie K. Gilbert

    2005-02-01

    Test Area North (TAN) was a site of the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion (ANP) Project of the U.S. Air Force and the Atomic Energy Commission. Its Cold War mission was to develop a turbojet bomber propelled by nuclear power. The project was part of an arms race. Test activities took place in five areas at TAN. The Assembly & Maintenance area was a shop and hot cell complex. Nuclear tests ran at the Initial Engine Test area. Low-power test reactors operated at a third cluster. The fourth area was for Administration. A Flight Engine Test facility (hangar) was built to house the anticipated nuclear-powered aircraft. Experiments between 1955-1961 proved that a nuclear reactor could power a jet engine, but President John F. Kennedy canceled the project in March 1961. ANP facilities were adapted for new reactor projects, the most important of which were Loss of Fluid Tests (LOFT), part of an international safety program for commercial power reactors. Other projects included NASA's Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power and storage of Three Mile Island meltdown debris. National missions for TAN in reactor research and safety research have expired; demolition of historic TAN buildings is underway.

  5. Nation-building Behind the Dike: Dutch Nationalism and the Visual Culture of Hydraulic Engineering

    Ensel, R.

    2017-01-01

    This article charts a crucial chapter in the history of Dutch nationalism, i. e. the topic of ‘water management’, by delving into the debate on the construction of the Afsluitdijk. The closure of the Zuiderzee by the construction of a dike is one of the most significant infrastructural projects of

  6. A Taguchi PCA fuzzy-based approach for the multi-objective extended optimization of a miniature optical engine

    Fan Yichin; Tzeng Yihfong; Li Sixiang

    2008-01-01

    The paper proposes a hybrid approach, integrating a combination of Taguchi methods, principal component analysis (PCA) and fuzzy theory for the extended optimization of multiple quality characteristics in optimization experiments of non-image optics; a miniature light emitting diode pocket-sized projection display system is demonstrated in this research as an optimization sample. Traditionally, the performance of projector optics can be evaluated by modulation transfer function and its optimization method is DLS (damped least square). Comparatively, light efficiency and uniformity play a part in non-image optics where the optimized method is based on the concept of non-sequential rays; for example, in the optical engine of a projector, which demands better light efficiency and uniformity. The DLS method is occasionally employed in the optimization of non-image optics such as optical engines, but it is sometimes sensitive to the number of rays employed and some over-optimization problems. In this research we propose as an alternative method to optimize in an extended way the optical engine of a miniature projector. Control factors were checked and then repeatedly examined before the experiments started. In the experiment, optimization works through an L18 orthogonal array. Finally, this proposed optimization work shows good success for the optimization of non-image optical engines because this method is less sensitive to the number of non-sequential rays. Compared with the initial design, the optimized parameter design is able to improve the luminous flux by 11.46 dB, the illumination uniformity by 3.14 and the packing size by 1.125 dB

  7. Proceedings of the national seminar on advanced construction techniques and geotechnical engineering

    Partheeban, P.; Poornima, C.A.; Guru, V.

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this seminar is to emphasize the need for developing modern construction materials in the era of technology. It also provides a forum for National Research Scholars, Construction Specialists and Professionals, Planners, Faculty, PG and UG Students to discuss and evolve solutions for various difficulties faced during construction. Theme of seminar includes Geotechnical site Investigation, Ground improvement Techniques, Soil Dynamics, Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering, Geo- Environmental Engineering, Self Compacting Concrete, Geopolymer Concrete and Concrete Technology, Cost Effective Construction Techniques, Limit state performance state approach Elastic and Elasto-plastic behavior and Reduction of Corrosion in concrete using Chemical admixtures. Paper relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  8. National research council report and its impact on nuclear engineering education at the University of Michigan

    Martin, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    A recent report by the National Research Council raised a number of important issues that will have an impact on nuclear engineering departments across the country. The report has been reviewed in the context of its relevance to the Department of Nuclear Engineering at the University of Michigan (UM), and some observations and conclusions have been drawn. This paper focuses on those portions of Ref. 1 concerning undergraduate and graduate curricula, research facilities and laboratories, faculty research interests, and funding for research and graduate student support because these topics have a direct impact on current and future directions for the department

  9. 1997 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides. Annual report

    1998-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities, each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1997. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of the INEEL facilities and a brief description of the radioactive materials and processes at the facilities. Section 2 identifies radioactive air effluent release points and diffuse sources at the INEEL and actual releases during 1997. Section 2 also describes the effluent control systems for each potential release point. Section 3 provides the methodology and EDE calculations for 1997 INEEL radioactive emissions

  10. "Simultaneous measurement of flame impingement and piston surface temperatures in an optically accessible spark ignition engine"

    Ding, Carl-Philipp; Honza, Rene; Böhm, Benjamin; Dreizler, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    This paper shows the results of spatially resolved temperature measurements of the piston surface of an optically accessible direct injection spark ignition engine during flame impingement. High-speed thermographic phosphor thermometry (TPT), using Gd3Ga5O12:Cr,Ce, and planar laser-induced fluorescence of the hydroxyl radical (OH-PLIF) were used to investigate the temperature increase and the time and position of flame impingement at the piston surface. Measurements were conducted at two operating cases and showed heating rates of up to 16,000 K/s. The OH-PLIF measurements were used to localize flame impingement and calculate conditioned statistics of the temperature profiles. The TPT coating was characterized and its influence on the temperature measurements evaluated.

  11. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at the National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering in Bucharest

    Stan-Sion, C.; Catana, D.; Plostinaru, D.; Radulescu, M.; Enachescu, M.; Ivascu, M.; Marinescu, L.; Dima, R.

    2000-01-01

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is today the experimental physical method capable to measure the lowest concentration of a particular nuclide in a sample material. Ratios of radionuclides in the range 10 -13 - 10 -15 are normally measured with this technique, corresponding to a sensitivity which makes possible the detection of only 1 Atom in a surrounding material of about 1 Million of Billions of other Atoms. Thus, the AMS has advanced the art of Classical Mass Spectrometry (sensitivity 10 -11 ) to a sensitivity which allows for the first time the performance of special applications in environmental physics, medicine, pharmacology, geology, archaeology, measurements of radio nuclides in the Earth's atmosphere produced by cosmic-rays or by nuclear power plants, applications in astrophysics and in nuclear physics.An Accelerator Mass Spectrometry facility was constructed at the FN - 8 MV tandem accelerator of the National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering . The construction was possible in the frame of a co-operation with the Technical University Munich and with financial support from IAEA-Vienna. It represents the first experimental set-up of this type in the large geographical area of Eastern Europe. The main components of the facility are: the ion injector deck, the AMS beam line and the detector systems. The injector deck is polarized at 50 kV and contains the high current sputtering ion source (spherical ionizer) followed, for beam transport, by electrostatic devices (single lenses, steerers, quadrupole lenses) a double focussing, 90 angle analyzing magnet (Danfysik), a pre-acceleration tube (NEC) and several diagnose and defining elements. The AMS samples are placed in an eight-stack magazine attached to the ion source. On the exit side of the tandem accelerator tank, a velocity filter and the particle detection system are mounted. The beam line, on the high-energy side, is optically achromatic and contains two 90 angle analyzing magnets of

  12. Numerical simulation of optical and electronic properties for multilayer organic light-emitting diodes and its application in engineering education

    Chang, Shu-Hsuan; Chang, Yung-Cheng; Yang, Cheng-Hong; Chen, Jun-Rong; Kuo, Yen-Kuang

    2006-02-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been extensively developed in the past few years. The OLED displays have advantages over other displays, such as CRT, LCD, and PDP in thickness, weight, brightness, response time, viewing angle, contrast, driving power, flexibility, and capability of self-emission. In this work, the optical and electronic properties of multilayer OLED devices are numerically studied with an APSYS (Advanced Physical Model of Semiconductor Devices) simulation program. Specifically, the emission and absorption spectra of the Alq 3, DCM, PBD, and SA light-emitting layers, and energy band diagrams, electron-hole recombination rates, and current-voltage characteristics of the simulated OLED devices, typically with a multilayer structure of metal/Alq 3/EML/TPD/ITO constructed by Lim et al., are investigated and compared to the experimental results. The physical models utilized in this work are similar to those presented by Ruhstaller et al. and Hoffmann et al. The simulated results indicate that the emission spectra of the Alq 3, DCM, PBD, and SA light-emitting layers obtained in this study are in good agreement with those obtained experimentally by Zugang et al. Optimization of the optical and electronic performance of the multilayer OLED devices are attempted. In order to further promote the research results, the whole numerical simulation process for optimizing the design of OLED devices has been applied to a project-based course of OLED device design to enhance the students' skills in photonics device design at the Graduate Institute of Photonics of National Changhua University of Education in Taiwan. In the meantime, the effectiveness of the course has been proved by various assessments. The application of the results is a useful point of reference for the research on photonics device design and engineering education. Therefore, it proffers a synthetic effect between innovation and practical application.

  13. Building an integrated nuclear engineering and nuclear science human resources pipeline at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Sneed, A.; Sikorski, B.; Lineberry, M.; Jolly, J.

    2004-01-01

    In a joint effort with the Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W), the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has assumed the lead role for nuclear energy reactor research for the United States Government. In 2005, these two laboratories will be combined into one entity, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). There are two objectives for the INL: (1) to act as the lead systems integrator for the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy Science and Technology and, (2) to establish a Center for Advanced Energy Studies. Focusing on the Center for Advanced Energy Studies, this paper presents a Human Resources Pipeline Model outlining a nuclear educational pathway that leads to university and industry research partnerships. The pathway progresses from education to employment and into retirement. Key to the model is research and mentoring and their impact upon each stage. The Center's success will be the result of effective and advanced communications, faculty/student involvement, industry support, inclusive broadbased involvement, effective long-term partnering, and increased federal and state support. (author)

  14. Evolution of National University Students' Optical-Science-Technology competition in China

    Liu, Xu; Liu, XiangDong; Wang, XiaoPing; Zheng, XiaoDong; Lin, YuanFang; Wang, Kaiwei

    2017-08-01

    The goal of National University Students' Optical-Science-Technology Competition (NUSOSTC) is to provide a nation-wide platform for students from the colleges and universities, which have majors in the field of optics and photonics, to communicate and learning each other. Meanwhile, it works on pushing forward the popularity of optoelectronic knowledge, cultivating the students' teamwork and innovation ability, promoting higher education personnel training mode and practice teaching reform, and then improving the quality of talent training. The founding, organizational structure development and overall organizational arrangements of NUSOSTC were introduced in this paper. Besides, the competition logo, theme, title, final date, numbers of participating universities, undertaking universities and cities of the five NUSOSTCs held during 2008 to 2016 and the progress had been made were given in detail.

  15. Decision of National and Provincial Highway Asphalt Pavement Structure Based on Value Engineering

    Yingwei Ren

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important that decision of asphalt pavement structure requires overall considerations of the performance and financial investment. To have asphalt pavement structure fulfilling good reliability, the asphalt pavement structure decision was researched based on value engineering theory. According to the national and provincial highway investigation data in Shandong Province during the last decade, the asphalt pavement performance attenuation rules of traffic levels and asphalt layer thicknesses were developed, and then the road performance evaluation method was presented. In addition, the initial investments, the costs of road maintenance, and middle-scale repair in a period were analyzed. For the light traffic and medium traffic example, using the value engineering method, the pavement performance and costs of which thickness varies from 6 cm to 10 cm were calculated and compared. It was concluded that value engineering was an effective method in deciding the asphalt pavement structure.

  16. Research reactor usage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in support of university research and education

    Woodall, D.M.; Dolan, T.J.; Stephens, A.G.

    1990-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a US Department of Energy laboratory which has a substantial history of research and development in nuclear reactor technologies. There are a number of available nuclear reactor facilities which have been incorporated into the research and training needs of university nuclear engineering programs. This paper addresses the utilization of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility (ARMF) and the Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurement Facility (CFRMF) for thesis and dissertation research in the PhD program in Nuclear Science and Engineering by the University of Idaho and Idaho State University. Other reactors at the INEL are also being used by various members of the academic community for thesis and dissertation research, as well as for research to advance the state of knowledge in innovative nuclear technologies, with the EBR-II facility playing an essential role in liquid metal breeder reactor research. 3 refs

  17. Realisation and optical engineering of linear variable bandpass filters in nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals.

    Sukarno; Law, Cheryl Suwen; Santos, Abel

    2017-06-08

    We present the first realisation of linear variable bandpass filters in nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA-LVBPFs) photonic crystal structures. NAA gradient-index filters (NAA-GIFs) are produced by sinusoidal pulse anodisation and used as photonic crystal platforms to generate NAA-LVBPFs. The anodisation period of NAA-GIFs is modified from 650 to 850 s to systematically tune the characteristic photonic stopband of these photonic crystals across the UV-visible-NIR spectrum. Then, the nanoporous structure of NAA-GIFs is gradually widened along the surface under controlled conditions by wet chemical etching using a dip coating approach aiming to create NAA-LVBPFs with finely engineered optical properties. We demonstrate that the characteristic photonic stopband and the iridescent interferometric colour displayed by these photonic crystals can be tuned with precision across the surface of NAA-LVBPFs by adjusting the fabrication and etching conditions. Here, we envisage for the first time the combination of the anodisation period and etching conditions as a cost-competitive, facile, and versatile nanofabrication approach that enables the generation of a broad range of unique LVBPFs covering the spectral regions. These photonic crystal structures open new opportunities for multiple applications, including adaptive optics, hyperspectral imaging, fluorescence diagnostics, spectroscopy, and sensing.

  18. Neutron optics concept for the materials engineering diffractometer at the ESS

    Šaroun, J.; Fenske, J.; Rouijaa, M.; Beran, P.; Navrátil, J.; Lukáš, P.; Schreyer, A.; Strobl, M.

    2016-09-01

    The Beamline for European Materials Engineering Research (BEER) has been recently proposed to be built at the European Spallation Source (ESS). The presented concept of neutron delivery optics for this instrument addresses the problems of bi-spectral beam extraction from a small moderator, optimization of neutron guides profile for long-range neutron transport and focusing at the sample under various constraints. They include free space before and after the guides, a narrow guide section with gaps for choppers, closing of direct line of sight and cost reduction by optimization of the guides cross-section and coating. A system of slits and exchangeable focusing optics is proposed in order to match various wavelength resolution options provided by the pulse shaping and modulation choppers, which permits to efficiently trade resolution for intensity in a wide range. Simulated performance characteristics such as brilliance transfer ratio are complemented by the analysis of the histories of “useful” neutrons obtained by back tracing neutrons hitting the sample, which helps to optimize some of the neutron guide parameters such as supermirror coating.

  19. Neutron optics concept for the materials engineering diffractometer at the ESS

    Šaroun, J; Beran, P; Navrátil, J; Lukáš, P; Fenske, J; Rouijaa, M; Schreyer, A; Strobl, M

    2016-01-01

    The Beamline for European Materials Engineering Research (BEER) has been recently proposed to be built at the European Spallation Source (ESS). The presented concept of neutron delivery optics for this instrument addresses the problems of bi-spectral beam extraction from a small moderator, optimization of neutron guides profile for long-range neutron transport and focusing at the sample under various constraints. They include free space before and after the guides, a narrow guide section with gaps for choppers, closing of direct line of sight and cost reduction by optimization of the guides cross-section and coating. A system of slits and exchangeable focusing optics is proposed in order to match various wavelength resolution options provided by the pulse shaping and modulation choppers, which permits to efficiently trade resolution for intensity in a wide range. Simulated performance characteristics such as brilliance transfer ratio are complemented by the analysis of the histories of “useful” neutrons obtained by back tracing neutrons hitting the sample, which helps to optimize some of the neutron guide parameters such as supermirror coating. (paper)

  20. A VBA Desktop Database for Proposal Processing at National Optical Astronomy Observatories

    Brown, Christa L.

    National Optical Astronomy Observatories (NOAO) has developed a relational Microsoft Windows desktop database using Microsoft Access and the Microsoft Office programming language, Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The database is used to track data relating to observing proposals from original receipt through the review process, scheduling, observing, and final statistical reporting. The database has automated proposal processing and distribution of information. It allows NOAO to collect and archive data so as to query and analyze information about our science programs in new ways.

  1. Evaporation Basin Test Reactor Area, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: Environmental assessment

    1991-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0501, on the construction and operation of the proposed Evaporation Basin at the Test Reactor Area (TRA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact

  2. Elastic strain engineering of quantum dot excitonic emission in nanomembranes and optical resonators

    Ding, Fei; Plumhof, Johannes; Rastelli, Armando; Schmidt, Oliver [Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden (Germany); Singh, Ranber; Zander, Tim; Bester, Gabriel [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    We study the effect of an external biaxial stress on the light emission of single InGaAs/GaAs(001) quantum dots (QD) embedded in a 200 nm-thick-membrane. Reversible and bi-directional spectral tuning of QD excitonic emission is demonstrated via a simple electro-mechanical device. The most intriguing finding is that biaxial strain is a reliable tool to engineer the QD electronic structure and reach color coincidence between exciton and biexciton emission, providing a vital prerequisite for the generation of polarization entangled photon pairs through a time reordering strategy. The physical origin of this new phenomenon is discussed based on the empirical pseudopotential calculations. With similar technique we study the effect of biaxial stress on single QDs embedded in microring resonators. The microrings can be reversibly stretched or squeezed, resulting in a controllable engineering of both QD emissions and optical modes. Our results open up a new tuning strategy to study cQED with semiconductor quantum dots.

  3. Air emissions inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory -- 1995 emissions report

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the 1995 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources. The air contaminants reported include nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, particulates, and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs)

  4. A summary of the environmental restoration program retrieval demonstration project at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    McQuary, J.

    1991-02-01

    This report provides a summary of the Environmental Restoration Program's Retrieval Demonstration Project at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This project developed concepts for demonstrating facilities and equipment for the retrieval of buried transuranic mixed waste at the INEL. Included is a brief assessment of the viability, cost effectiveness, and safety of retrieval based on the developed concept. Changes made in Revision 1 reflect editorial changes only. 31 refs., 1 fig

  5. Environmental resource document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1

    Irving, J.S.

    1993-07-01

    This document contains information related to the environmental characterization of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL is a major US Department of Energy facility in southeastern Idaho dedicated to nuclear research, waste management, environmental restoration, and other activities related to the development of technology. Environmental information covered in this document includes land, air, water, and ecological resources; socioeconomic characteristics and land use; and cultural, aesthetic, and scenic resources.

  6. Quality assurance on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Buried Waste Program

    Rasmussen, T.L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the clean-up of an Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site utilized for disposal of transuranic contaminated waste from 1954 until 1970. The author presents requirements of the environmental protection statutes that have generated quality assurance requirements in addition to those historically implemented as a part of facility design, construction and operation. A hierarchy of program guidance quality documentation and procedures is discussed. Data qualification and computer database management are identified as requirements

  7. Environmental resource document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 2

    Irving, J.S.

    1993-07-01

    This document contains information related to the environmental characterization of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL is a major US Department of Energy facility in southeastern Idaho dedicated to nuclear research, waste management, environmental restoration, and other activities related to the development of technology. Environmental information covered in this document includes land, air, water, and ecological resources; socioeconomic characteristics and land use; and cultural, aesthetic, and scenic resources.

  8. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, 1993 emissions report

    1994-06-01

    This report presents the 1993 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the Air Emission Inventory is to commence the preparation of the permit to operate application for the INEL, as required by the recently promulgated Title V regulations of the Clean Air Act. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL and provides emissions estimates for both mobile and stationary sources.

  9. Air emissions inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory -- 1995 emissions report

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the 1995 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources. The air contaminants reported include nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, particulates, and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs).

  10. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, 1993 emissions report

    1994-06-01

    This report presents the 1993 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the Air Emission Inventory is to commence the preparation of the permit to operate application for the INEL, as required by the recently promulgated Title V regulations of the Clean Air Act. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL and provides emissions estimates for both mobile and stationary sources

  11. 2. National scientific conference on process engineering in environment protection. Conference materials

    1994-01-01

    The national conference on 'Process engineering in environment protection' Jachranka 1994 has been divided into three sessions. Section 1 has been devoted to flue gas purification and collects 13 papers. Section 2 on liquid purification gathered 8 presentation. Section 3 - the poster session with 12 posters on related topics. During the conference 2 lectures and 3 posters have been devoted to the application of nuclear techniques to the solution different problems connected with environment protection

  12. 5th National meeting of the SA Institution of Chemical Engineers: chemical engineering in support of industry and society. V. 1-3

    1988-01-01

    The 5th national meeting of the SA Institution of Chemical Engineering was held from 15-16 August 1988 at Pretoria. The subject scope covered on the meeting include the broad spectrum of work done by the chemical engineer. The main categories include the processing of agricultural products, biotechnology, coal and hydrocarbons, the chemical engineering practice, fluid dynamics, gas treatment, heat and mass transfer, materials of construction, minerals processing, source materials and products, training and education, vapour-liquid equilibrium, and water and effluents. One seminar specifically covers process engineering in the context of nuclear reactors and two other papers cover supported liquid membrane extraction of uranium

  13. A national collaboration process: Finnish engineering education for the benefit of people and environment.

    Takala, A; Korhonen-Yrjänheikki, K

    2013-12-01

    The key stakeholders of the Finnish engineering education collaborated during 2006-09 to reform the system of education, to face the challenges of the changing business environment and to create a national strategy for the Finnish engineering education. The work process was carried out using participatory work methods. Impacts of sustainable development (SD) on engineering education were analysed in one of the subprojects. In addition to participatory workshops, the core part of the work on SD consisted of a research with more than 60 interviews and an extensive literature survey. This paper discusses the results of the research and the work process of the Collaboration Group in the subproject of SD. It is suggested that enhancing systematic dialogue among key stakeholders using participatory work methods is crucial in increasing motivation and commitment in incorporating SD in engineering education. Development of the context of learning is essential for improving skills of engineering graduates in some of the key abilities related to SD: systemic- and life-cycle thinking, ethical understanding, collaborative learning and critical reflection skills. This requires changing of the educational paradigm from teacher-centred to learner-centred applying problem- and project-oriented active learning methods.

  14. Quantum optics

    Agarwal, G. S

    2013-01-01

    .... Focusing on applications of quantum optics, the textbook covers recent developments such as engineering of quantum states, quantum optics on a chip, nano-mechanical mirrors, quantum entanglement...

  15. 1996 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) -- Radionuclides. Annual report

    1997-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1996. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contact concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For calendar year 1996, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 3.14E-02 mrem (3.14E-07 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year)

  16. The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering - a model for university-national laboratory collaboration

    Gammon, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the aims and activities of the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE), from its foundation in 1958 through to 1993. The philosophy, structure and funding of the Institute are briefly reviewed, followed by an account of the development of national research facilities at the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories, with particular emphasis on nuclear techniques of analyses using neutron scattering instruments and particle accelerators. AINSE's program of Grants, fellowships and studentships are explained with many examples given of projects having significance in the context of Australia's national goals. Conference and training programs are also included. The achievements during these years demonstrate that AINSE has been an efficient and cost-effective model for collaboration between universities and a major national laboratory. In recent years, industry, government organisations and the tertiary education system have undergone major re-structuring and rationalization. A new operational structure for AINSE has evolved in response to these changes and is described

  17. Replacement of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Health Physics Instrumentation Laboratory

    1995-05-01

    The DOE-Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the replacement of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Health Physics Instrumentation Laboratory at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of this project is to replace the existing Health Physics Instrumentation Laboratory (HPIL) with a new facility to provide a safe environment for maintaining and calibrating radiation detection instruments used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The existing HPIL facility provides portable health physics monitoring instrumentation and direct reading dosimetry procurement, maintenance and calibration of radiation detection instruments, and research and development support-services to the INEL and others. However, the existing facility was not originally designed for laboratory activities and does not provide an adequate, safe environment for calibration activities. The EA examined the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action and evaluated reasonable alternatives, including the no action alternative in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508). Based on the environmental analysis in the attached EA, the proposed action will not have a significant effect on the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and 40 CFR Parts 1508.18 and 1508.27. The selected action (the proposed alternative) is composed of the following elements, each described or evaluated in the attached EA on the pages referenced. The proposed action is expected to begin in 1997 and will be completed within three years: design and construction of a new facility at the Central Facility Area of the INEL; operation of the facility, including instrument receipt, inspections and repairs, precision testing and calibration, and storage and issuance. The selected action will result in no significant environmental impacts

  18. Dr Pierre Perrolle, Director, Office of International Science and Engineering, National Science Foundation, United States of America

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 01: Dr Pierre Perrolle, Director, Office of International Science and Engineering, National Science Foundation, USA (second from right) in the ATLAS assembly hall with from left to right Randi Ruchti, Peter Jenni and Robert Eisenstein, Senior Science Advisor, National Science Foundation, USA. Photo 02: Dr Pierre Perrolle, Director, Office of International Science and Engineering, National Science Foundation, USA (second from right) in the ATLAS assembly hall with from left to right Randi Ruchti, Robert Eisenstein, Senior Science Advisor, National Science Foundation, USA and Peter Jenni. Photo 03: Dr Pierre Perrolle, Director, Office of International Science and Engineering, National Science Foundation, USA (second from right) in front of the ATLAS End-Cap Toroid vacuum vessel in the ATLAS assembly hall with from left to right Peter Jenni, Robert Eisenstein, Senior Science Advisor, National Science Foundation, USA and Randi Ruchti ________________________________

  19. Trial of Engineer Educating of Manufacturing Field in Kagoshima National College of Technology

    Nakamura, Itaru; Hombu, Mitsuyuki; Kusuhara, Yoshito; Kashine, Kenji; Sakasegawa, Eiichi; Tashima, Daisuke; Fukidome, Hiromi

    In Kagoshima National College of Technology, based on investigation with “the job boost measure investigation work in a power supply area” undertaken in the 2005 fiscal year, we accepted the trust from Kyushu Bureau of Economy, Trade and Industry, and undertook “the small-and-medium-sized-enterprises personnel educating work which utilized the technical college etc.” for three years from the 2006 fiscal year to the 2008 fiscal year. As the trial of engineer educating according to the electrical engineering concept to the manufacturing field based on a conventional result, we act as a professor of the base technique for applying alternative energy (a fuel cell and a solar cell) in which social needs are powerful these days, and aim at aiming at cultivation of the problem-solving type engineer who can contribute to a low carbon society through manufacturing, we undertook this work according to the manufacturing bearer educating work (personnel educating and secured work of the manufacturing field) in the 2009 fiscal year of National Federation of Small Business Associations.

  20. Colloquy and workshops: regional implications of the engineering manpower requirements of the National Energy Program

    Segool, H. D. [ed.

    1979-05-01

    The crucial interrelationships of engineering manpower, technological innovation, productivity and capital re-formaton were keynoted. Near-term, a study has indicated a much larger New England energy demand-reduction/economic/market potential, with a probably larger engineering manpower requirement, for energy-conservation measures characterized by technological innovation and cost-effective capital services than for alternative energy-supply measures. Federal, regional, and state energy program responsibilities described a wide-ranging panorama of activities among many possible energy options which conveyed much endeavor without identifiable engineering manpower demand coefficients. Similarly, engineering manpower assessment data was described as uneven and unfocused to the energy program at the national level, disaggregated data as non-existent at the regional/state levels, although some qualitative inferences were drawn. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 16 individual presentations for the DOE Energy Data Base (EDB); 14 of these were selected for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA) and 2 for Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

  1. Engineered materials for all-optical helicity-dependent magnetic switching

    Fullerton, Eric

    2014-03-01

    The possibilities of manipulating magnetization without applied magnetic fields have attracted growing attention over the last fifteen years. The low-power manipulation of magnetization, preferably at ultra-short time scales, has become a fundamental challenge with implications for future magnetic information memory and storage technologies. Here we explore the optical manipulation of the magnetization of engineered materials and devices using 100 fs optical pulses. We demonstrate that all optical - helicity dependent switching (AO-HDS) can be observed not only in selected rare-earth transition-metal (RE-TM) alloy films but also in a much broader variety of materials, including alloys, multilayers, heterostructures and RE-free Co-Ir-based synthetic ferrimagnets. The discovery of AO-HDS in RE-free TM-based synthetic ferrimagnets can enable breakthroughs for numerous applications since it exploits materials that are currently used in magnetic data storage, memories and logic technologies. In addition, this materials study of AO-HDS offers valuable insight into the underlying mechanisms involved. Indeed the common denominator of the diverse structures showing AO-HDS in this study is that two ferromagnetic sub-lattices exhibit magnetization compensation (and therefore angular momentum compensation) at temperatures near or above room temperature. We are highlighting that compensation plays a major role and that this compensation can be established at the atomic level as in alloys but also over a larger nanometers scale as in the multilayers or in heterostructures. We will also discuss the potential to extend AO-HDS to new classes of magnetic materials. This work was done in collaboration with S. Mangin, M. Gottwald, C-H. Lambert, D. Steil, V. Uhlíř, L. Pang, M. Hehn, S. Alebrand, M. Cinchetti, G. Malinowski, Y. Fainman, and M. Aeschlimann. Supported by the ANR-10-BLANC-1005 ``Friends,'' a grant from the Advanced Storage Technology Consortium, Partner University Fund

  2. Proceedings of chemical engineering in nuclear technology - national seminar on recent advances in fuel cycle technologies: book of abstracts

    2014-01-01

    Kalpakkam Regional Centre of Indian Institute of Chemical Engineers is embarking on conducting a series of national seminars on Chemical Engineering in Nuclear Technology 2014. For CHEMENT-2014 the theme was Seminar on recent advances in fuel cycle technologies. The topics covered included research and development, modeling and simulation and equipment development. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  3. A Study to Improve the Role of Nuclear Energy Technology for the National New Growth Engine

    Kim, H. J.; Oh, K. B.; Chung, W. S.; Yun, S. W.; Jeong, Ik; Lee, J. H.; Won, B. C.

    2006-04-01

    This Paper aimed at looking for the new growth engines in the nuclear R and D field which leads the national prosperity and people's welfare in the 21st Century. As new growth engines in the nuclear R and D field, 17 innovative technologies(eight nuclear energy innovation system technologies and nine radiation fusion technologies) were selected. Selected technologies were evaluated through a expert group's peer review in accordance with criteria such as the aspect of technology, economy, and national strategy. In accordance with the expected commercialization time of the innovative technologies in the leading countries, these were categorized into two or three groups and In the aspect of their technology development level, 20 ∼ 40% technological gaps were shown. According to the business aspect, it was expected that innovative nuclear technologies selected as the new growth engines would have world markets of the range of 0.01 ∼ 100 billion $/year and the sales of 0.001 ∼ 10 billion $/year. Technology development strategy was suggested through colligation of the expert survey and an innovation theory. From the viewpoint of innovation stage, most of new growth engines in the nuclear R and D field were in position of the transitional phase(world) and the adaption stage(home). It was required that process and product technologies should be standardization in accordance with each innovation stage. For the successful commercialization, it was more important that R and D capability in R and D institutions should be improved and that appropriate funding and R and D infra should be well established and supportive. The results of this study will contribute to the establishment of the effective technology development strategy in the nuclear R and D field

  4. Enhanced and tunable optical quantum efficiencies from plasmon bandwidth engineering in bimetallic CoAg nanoparticles

    A. Malasi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic nanoparticles are amongst the most effective ways to resonantly couple optical energy into and out of nanometer sized volumes. However, controlling and/or tuning the transfer of this incident energy to the surrounding near and far field is one of the most interesting challenges in this area. Due to the dielectric properties of metallic silver (Ag, its nanoparticles have amongst the highest radiative quantum efficiencies (η, i.e., the ability to radiatively transfer the incident energy to the surrounding. Here we report the discovery that bimetallic nanoparticles of Ag made with immiscible and plasmonically weak Co metal can show comparable and/or even higher η values. The enhancement is a result of the narrowing of the plasmon bandwidth from these bimetal systems. The phenomenological explanation of this effect based on the dipolar approximation points to the reduction in radiative losses within the Ag nanoparticles when in contact with cobalt. This is also supported by a model of coupling between poor and good conductors based on the surface to volume ratio. This study presents a new type of bandwidth engineering, one based on using bimetal nanostructures, to tune and/or enhance the quality factor and quantum efficiency for near and far-field plasmonic applications.

  5. First principles crystal engineering of nonlinear optical materials. I. Prototypical case of urea

    Masunov, Artëm E.; Tannu, Arman; Dyakov, Alexander A.; Matveeva, Anastasia D.; Freidzon, Alexandra Ya.; Odinokov, Alexey V.; Bagaturyants, Alexander A.

    2017-06-01

    The crystalline materials with nonlinear optical (NLO) properties are critically important for several technological applications, including nanophotonic and second harmonic generation devices. Urea is often considered to be a standard NLO material, due to the combination of non-centrosymmetric crystal packing and capacity for intramolecular charge transfer. Various approaches to crystal engineering of non-centrosymmetric molecular materials were reported in the literature. Here we propose using global lattice energy minimization to predict the crystal packing from the first principles. We developed a methodology that includes the following: (1) parameter derivation for polarizable force field AMOEBA; (2) local minimizations of crystal structures with these parameters, combined with the evolutionary algorithm for a global minimum search, implemented in program USPEX; (3) filtering out duplicate polymorphs produced; (4) reoptimization and final ranking based on density functional theory (DFT) with many-body dispersion (MBD) correction; and (5) prediction of the second-order susceptibility tensor by finite field approach. This methodology was applied to predict virtual urea polymorphs. After filtering based on packing similarity, only two distinct packing modes were predicted: one experimental and one hypothetical. DFT + MBD ranking established non-centrosymmetric crystal packing as the global minimum, in agreement with the experiment. Finite field approach was used to predict nonlinear susceptibility, and H-bonding was found to account for a 2.5-fold increase in molecular hyperpolarizability to the bulk value.

  6. High Definition Seismic and Microseismic Data Acquisition Using Distributed and Engineered Fiber Optic Acoustic Sensors

    Parker, T.; Farhadiroushan, M.; Clarke, A.; Miller, D.; Gillies, A.; Shatalin, S.; Naldrett, G.; Milne, C.

    2017-12-01

    The benefits of Distributed Acoustic Sensors (DAS) have been demonstrated in number of seismic applications. Over the past few years Silixa have successfully used DAS to record microseismic events during hydraulic fracturing and re-fracking operations. Detection has been successful in a number of configurations, where the fibre has been in a horizontal treatment well, horizontal well adjacent to the treatment, or vertical observation well. We will discuss the sensitivity of the measurement, range of measurement, ability to localise the events and characteristics of the microseismic event. In addition to discussing the theory we will present case studies showing the detection and localisation and how these compare to conventional microseismic detection techniques.We also discuss the benefit of the low frequency response of DAS for measuring the strain field induced along the sensing fibre cable during the treatment and while monitoring the adjacent wells. In addition a step change in performance can be offered by the new engineered Carina fibre optic sensing system developed by Silixa. The Carina sensing system is being tested and it has been demonstrated that an improvement in signal-to-noise performance by a factor of hundred (100x) can be achieved. The initial results demonstrate the potential for acquiring high definition seismic data in the most challenging environments beyond the capabilities of current geophones.

  7. Overview of groundwater and surface water standards pertinent to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Revision 3

    Lundahl, A.L.; Williams, S.; Grizzle, B.J.

    1995-09-01

    This document presents an overview of groundwater- and surface water-related laws, regulations, agreements, guidance documents, Executive Orders, and DOE orders pertinent to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This document is a summary and is intended to help readers understand which regulatory requirements may apply to their particular circumstances. However, the document is not intended to be used in lieu of applicable regulations. Unless otherwise noted, the information in this report reflects a summary and evaluation completed July 1, 1995. This document is considered a Living Document, and updates on changing laws and regulations will be provided.

  8. Structural performance of the DOE's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory during the 1983 Borah Peak Earthquake

    Guenzler, R.C.; Gorman, V.W.

    1985-01-01

    The 1983 Borah Peak Earthquake (7.3 Richter magnitude) was the largest earthquake ever experienced by the DOE's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Reactor and plant facilities are generally located about 90 to 110 km (60 miles) from the epicenter. Several reactors were operating normally at the time of the earthquake. Based on detailed inspections, comparisons of measured accelerations with design levels, and instrumental seismograph information, it was concluded that the 1983 Borah Peak Earthquake created no safety problems for INEL reactors or other facilities. 10 references, 16 figures, 2 tables

  9. Solidification of hazardous and mixed radioactive waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Boehmer, A.M.; Larsen, M.M.

    1986-01-01

    EG and G Idaho has initiated a program to develop treatment options for the hazardous and mixed wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This program includes development of solidification methods for some of these wastes. Testing has shown that toxic wastes can be successfully solidified using cement, cement-silicate, or ENVIROSTONE binders to produce nontoxic stable waste forms for safe, long term disposal. This paper presents the results of the solidification development program conducted at the INEL by EG and G Idaho

  10. Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1992-09-01

    In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

  11. Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

  12. Source Release Modeling for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area

    Becker, B.H.

    2002-01-01

    A source release model was developed to determine the release of contaminants into the shallow subsurface, as part of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) evaluation at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (INEEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The output of the source release model is used as input to the subsurface transport and biotic uptake models. The model allowed separating the waste into areas that match the actual disposal units. This allows quantitative evaluation of the relative contribution to the total risk and allows evaluation of selective remediation of the disposal units within the SDA

  13. Development of waste chargeback systems at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

    Piscitella, R.R.

    1996-02-01

    Chargeback systems have been discussed (and cussed), tried, modified, and in some cases, successfully implemented in the DOE complex over the years. With the current emphasis on ''Doing business like a private company,'' there has been renewed interest at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in implementing chargeback systems for waste management activities. The most recent activities relating to chargeback at the INEL started the summer of 1995 with direction from waste operations management to develop and pilot test a chargeback system. This paper presents the results of this effort to date

  14. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Wildland Fire Management Environmental Assessment

    Irving, John S

    2003-04-01

    DOE prepared an environmental assessment (EA)for wildland fire management activities on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (DOE/EA-1372). The EA was developed to evaluate wildland fire management options for pre-fire, fire suppression, and post fire activities. Those activities have an important role in minimizing the conversion of the native sagebrush steppe ecosystem found on the INEEL to non-native weeds. Four alternative management approaches were analyzed: Alternative 1 - maximum fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 3 - protect infrastructure and personnel; and Alternative 4 - no action/traditional fire protection.

  15. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Wildland Fire Management Environmental Assessment - April 2003

    Irving, J.S.

    2003-04-30

    DOE prepared an environmental assessment (EA)for wildland fire management activities on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (DOE/EA-1372). The EA was developed to evaluate wildland fire management options for pre-fire, fire suppression, and post fire activities. Those activities have an important role in minimizing the conversion of the native sagebrush steppe ecosystem found on the INEEL to non-native weeds. Four alternative management approaches were analyzed: Alternative 1 - maximum fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 3 - protect infrastructure and personnel; and Alternative 4 - no action/traditional fire protection.

  16. Ecology studies at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radioactive Waste Management Complex

    Arthur, W.J.; Markham, O.D.

    1978-01-01

    In September 1977 a radioecological research program was initiated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex in the southcentral Idaho. The primary goals of the research are to: (1) determine floral and faunal composition in the area; (2) sample various ecosystem components for radionuclides; (3) determine impacts of small mammal burrowing and vegetation growth on movement of radioactive materials; (4) compare ambient radiation exposures to radiation doses received by animals inhabiting the area; and (5) understand the interrelationships between the organisms and their role in radionuclide transport

  17. 1986 environmental monitoring program report for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site

    Hoff, D.L.; Chew, E.W.; Rope, S.K.

    1987-05-01

    This report presents onsite and offsite data collected in 1986 for the routine environmental monitoring program conducted by the Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL) of the Department of Energy (DOE) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Site. The purpose of this routine program is to monitor radioactive and nonradioactive materials resulting from INEL Site operations which may reach the surrounding offsite environment and population. This report is prepared in accordance with the DOE requirements in draft DOE Order 5484.1 and is not intended to cover the numerous special environmental research programs being conducted at the INEL by RESL and others

  18. 1983 Environmental monitoring program report for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site

    Hoff, D.L.; Chew, E.W.; Dickson, R.L.

    1984-05-01

    The results of the various monitoring programs for 1983 indicated that radioactivity from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Site operations could not be distinguished from worldwide fallout and natural radioactivity in the region surrounding the Site. Although some radioactive materials were discharged during Site operations, concentrations and doses to the surrounding population were of no health consequence and were far less than State of Idaho and Federal health protection guidelines. This report describes the air, water, and foodstuff samples routinely collected at the INEL boundary locations and at locations distant from the INEL Site. 11 figures, 14 tables

  19. 1995 annual epidemiologic surveillance report for Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) conduct of epidemiologic surveillance provides an early warning system for health problems among workers. This program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of five or more consecutive workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers. This report summarizes epidemiologic surveillance data collected from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. The data were collected by a coordinator at INEEL and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and data analyses were carried out

  20. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site environmental report for calendar year 1988

    Hoff, D.L.; Mitchell, R.G.; Moore, R.

    1989-06-01

    This report describes the monitoring program, the collection of foodstuffs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) boundary and distant offsite locations, and the collection of air and water samples at Site locations and offsite boundary and distant locations. The report also compares and evaluates the samples results, discussing implications, if any. Significant environmental activities at the INEL Site during 1988, nonradioactive and radioactive effluent monitoring at the Site, and the US Geological Survey (USGS) ground-water monitoring program are also summarized. 42 refs., 15 figs., 12 tabs

  1. National Educators' Workshop: Update 2002 - Standard Experiments in Engineering, Materials Science, and Technology

    Prior, Edwin J. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A. (Compiler); Chung, W. Richard (Compiler)

    2003-01-01

    This document contains a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 2002 held in San Jose, California, October 13-16,2002. This publication provides experiments and demonstrations that can serve as a valuable guide to faculty who are interested in useful activities for their students. The material was the result of years of research aimed at better methods of teaching technical subjects. The experiments developed by faculty, scientists, and engineers throughout the United States and abroad add to the collection from past workshops. They include a blend of experiments on new materials and traditional materials.

  2. 1995 annual epidemiologic surveillance report for Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) conduct of epidemiologic surveillance provides an early warning system for health problems among workers. This program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of five or more consecutive workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers. This report summarizes epidemiologic surveillance data collected from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. The data were collected by a coordinator at INEEL and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and data analyses were carried out.

  3. Solidification of hazardous and mixed radioactive waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Boehmer, A.M.; Larsen, M.M.

    1986-03-01

    EG and G Idaho has initiated a program to develop treatment options for the hazardous and mixed wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This program includes development of solidification methods for some of these wastes. Testing has shown that toxic wastes can be successfully solidified using cement, cement-silicate, or ENVIROSTONE binders to produce nontoxic stable waste forms for safe, long term disposal. This paper presents the results of the solidification development program conducted at the INEL by EG and G Idaho

  4. Long-term land use future scenarios for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    1995-08-01

    In order to facilitate decision regarding environmental restoration activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the United States Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) conducted analyses to project reasonable future land use scenarios at the INEL for the next 100 years. The methodology for generating these scenarios included: review of existing DOE plans, policy statements, and mission statements pertaining to the INEL; review of surrounding land use characteristics and county developments policies; solicitation of input from local, county, state and federal planners, policy specialists, environmental professionals, and elected officials; and review of environmental and development constraints at the INEL site that could influence future land use

  5. Hazardous and mixed waste solidification development conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Boehmer, A.M.; Larsen, M.M.

    1986-04-01

    EG and G Idaho, Inc., has initiated a program to develop safe, efficient, cost-effective solidification treatment methods for the disposal of some of the hazardous and mixed wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Testing has shown that Extraction Procedure (EP) toxic wastes can be successfully solidified using cement, cement-silicate, or ENVIROSTONE binders to produce nontoxic stable waste forms for safe, long-term disposal as general or low-level waste, depending upon the radioactivity. The results of the solidification development program are presented in this report

  6. Automated damage test facilities for materials development and production optic quality assurance at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Battersby, C.; Dickson, R.; Jennings, R.; Kimmons, J.; Kozlowski, M. R.; Maricle, S.; Mouser, R.; Runkel, M.; Schwartz, S.; Sheehan, L. M.; Weinzapfel, C.

    1998-01-01

    The Laser Program at LLNL has developed automated facilities for damage testing optics up to 1 meter in diameter. The systems were developed to characterize the statistical distribution of localized damage performance across large-aperture National Ignition Facility optics. Full aperture testing is a key component of the quality assurance program for several of the optical components. The primary damage testing methods used are R:1 mapping and raster scanning. Automation of these test methods was required to meet the optics manufacturing schedule. The automated activities include control and diagnosis of the damage-test laser beam as well as detection and characterization of damage events

  7. Educating Next Generation Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineers at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Bess, J.D.; Briggs, J.B.; Garcia, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    One of the challenges in educating our next generation of nuclear safety engineers is the limitation of opportunities to receive significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Such training is generally restricted to on-the-job-training before this new engineering workforce can adequately provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) can provide students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills. The ICSBEP and IRPhEP publish annual handbooks that contain evaluations of experiments along with summarized experimental data and peer-reviewed benchmark specifications to support the validation of neutronics codes, nuclear cross-section data, and the validation of reactor designs. Participation in the benchmark process not only benefits those who use these Handbooks within the international community, but provides the individual with opportunities for professional development, networking with an international community of experts, and valuable experience to be used in future employment. Traditionally students have participated in benchmarking activities via internships at national laboratories, universities, or companies involved with the ICSBEP and IRPhEP programs. Additional programs have been developed to facilitate the nuclear education of students while participating in the benchmark projects. These programs include coordination with the Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) Next Degree Program, the Collaboration with the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office to train nuclear and criticality safety engineers, and student evaluations as the basis for their Master's thesis in nuclear engineering.

  8. Educating Next Generation Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineers at the Idaho National Laboratory

    J. D. Bess; J. B. Briggs; A. S. Garcia

    2011-09-01

    One of the challenges in educating our next generation of nuclear safety engineers is the limitation of opportunities to receive significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Such training is generally restricted to on-the-job-training before this new engineering workforce can adequately provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) can provide students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills. The ICSBEP and IRPhEP publish annual handbooks that contain evaluations of experiments along with summarized experimental data and peer-reviewed benchmark specifications to support the validation of neutronics codes, nuclear cross-section data, and the validation of reactor designs. Participation in the benchmark process not only benefits those who use these Handbooks within the international community, but provides the individual with opportunities for professional development, networking with an international community of experts, and valuable experience to be used in future employment. Traditionally students have participated in benchmarking activities via internships at national laboratories, universities, or companies involved with the ICSBEP and IRPhEP programs. Additional programs have been developed to facilitate the nuclear education of students while participating in the benchmark projects. These programs include coordination with the Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) Next Degree Program, the Collaboration with the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office to train nuclear and criticality safety engineers, and student evaluations as the basis for their Master's thesis in nuclear engineering.

  9. Reverse engineering of B-pillar with 3D optical scanning for manufacturing of non-uniform thickness part

    Islam Md. Tasbirul; Abdullah A.B.; Mahmud Mohamad Zihad

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents reverse engineering (RE) of a complex automobile structural part, B-pillar. As a major part of the automobile body-in white (BiW), B-pillar has substantial opportunity for weight reduction by introducing variable thickness across its sections. To leverage such potential, an existing B-pillar was reverse engineered with a 3D optical scanner and computer aided design (CAD) application. First, digital data (i.e. in meshes) of exiting B-pillar was obtained by the scanner, and ...

  10. Development of a testlet generator in re-engineering the Indonesian physics national-exams

    Mindyarto, Budi Naini; Mardapi, Djemari; Bastari

    2017-08-01

    The Indonesian Physics national-exams are end-of-course summative assessments that could be utilized to support the assessment for learning in physics educations. This paper discusses the development and evaluation of a testlet generator based on a re-engineering of Indonesian physics national exams. The exam problems were dissected and decomposed into testlets revealing the deeper understanding of the underlying physical concepts by inserting a qualitative question and its scientific reasoning question. A template-based generator was built to facilitate teachers in generating testlet variants that would be more conform to students' scientific attitude development than their original simple multiple-choice formats. The testlet generator was built using open source software technologies and was evaluated focusing on the black-box testing by exploring the generator's execution, inputs and outputs. The results showed the correctly-performed functionalities of the developed testlet generator in validating inputs, generating testlet variants, and accommodating polytomous item characteristics.

  11. Final priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers. Final priority.

    2014-07-09

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority under the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). Specifically, we announce a priority for a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (RERC) on Improving the Accessibility, Usability, and Performance of Technology for Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing. The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2014 and later years. We take this action to focus research attention on an area of national need. We intend the priority to contribute to improving the accessibility, usability, and performance of technology for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing.

  12. Buried waste remote survey of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory subsurface disposal area

    Richardson, B.S.; Noakes, M.W.; Griebenow, B.E.; Josten, N.E.

    1991-01-01

    Burial site characterization is an important first step in the restoration of subsurface disposal sites. Testing and demonstration of technology for remote buried waste site characterization were performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by a team from five US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories. The US Army's Soldier Robot Interface Project (SRIP) vehicle, on loan to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was used as a remotely operated sensor platform. The SRIP was equipped with an array of sensors including terrain conductivity meter, magnetometer, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), organic vapor detector, gamma-based radar detector, and spectrum analyzer. The testing and demonstration were successfully completed and provided direction for future work in buried waste site characterization

  13. An overview of environmental surveillance of waste management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Smith, T.H.; Chew, E.W.; Hedahl, T.G.; Mann, L.J.; Pointer, T.F.; Wiersma, G.B.

    1986-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), in southeastern Idaho, is a principal center for nuclear energy development for the Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Navy. Fifty-two reactors have been built at the INEL, with 15 still operable. Extensive environmental surveillance is conducted at the INEL by DOE's Radiological Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), EG&G Idaho, Inc., and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO). Surveillance of waste management facilities radiation is integrated with the overall INEL Site surveillance program. Air, warer, soil, biota, and environmental radiation are monitored or sampled routinely at INEL. Results to date indicate very small or no impacts from INEL on the surrounding environment. Environmental surveillance activities are currently underway to address key environmental issues at the INEL.

  14. Overview of environmental surveillance of waste management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Smith, T.H.; Hedahl, T.G.; Wiersma, G.B.; Chew, E.W.; Mann, L.J.; Pointer, T.F.

    1986-02-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), in southeastern Idaho, is a principal center for nuclear energy development for the Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Nuclear Navy. Fifty-two reactors have been built at the INEL, with 15 still operable. Extensive environmental surveillance is conducted at the INEL by DOE's Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL), the US Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), EG and G Idaho, Inc., and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO). Surveillance of waste management facilities is integrated with the overall INEL Site surveillance program. Air, water, soil, biota, and environmental radiation are monitored or sampled routinely at the INEL. Results to date indicate very small or no impacts from the INEL on the surrounding environment. Environmental surveillance activities are currently underway to address key environmental issues at the INEL. 7 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  15. The status of soil mapping for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Olson, G.L.; Lee, R.D.; Jeppesen, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    This report discusses the production of a revised version of the general soil map of the 2304-km 2 (890-mi 2 ) Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site in southeastern Idaho and the production of a geographic information system (GIS) soil map and supporting database. The revised general soil map replaces an INEL soil map produced in 1978 and incorporates the most current information on INEL soils. The general soil map delineates large soil associations based on National Resources Conservation Services [formerly the Soil Conservation Service (SCS)] principles of soil mapping. The GIS map incorporates detailed information that could not be presented on the general soil map and is linked to a database that contains the soil map unit descriptions, surficial geology codes, and other pertinent information

  16. Harnessing light: optical science and engineering for the 21st century

    Committee on Optical Science and Engineering, National Research Council

    .... Harnessing Light surveys this multitude of applications, as well as the status of the optics industry and of research and education in optics, and identifies actions that could enhance the field's...

  17. In summary: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    Roush, D.; Mitchell, R.G.; Peterson, D.

    1996-08-01

    Every human is exposed to natural radiation. This exposure comes from many sources, including cosmic radiation from outer space, naturally-occurring radon, and radioactivity from substances in our bodies. In addition to natural sources of radiation, humans can also be exposed to man-made sources of radiation. Examples of man-made sources include nuclear medicine, X-rays, nuclear weapons testing, and accidents at nuclear power plants. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research facility that deals, in part, with studying nuclear reactors and storing radioactive materials. Careful handling and rigorous procedures do not completely eliminate the risk of releasing radioactivity. So, there is a remote possibility for a member of the public near the INEL to be exposed to radioactivity from the INEL. Extensive monitoring of the environment takes place on and around the INEL. These programs search for radionuclides and other contaminants. The results of these programs are presented each year in a site environmental report. This document summarizes the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1995

  18. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory materials in inventory natural and enriched uranium management and storage costs

    Nebeker, R.L.

    1995-11-01

    On July 13, 1994, the Office of Environmental Management (EM) was requested to develop a planning process that would result in management policies for dealing with nuclear materials in inventory. In response to this request, EM launched the Materials In Inventory (MIN) Initiative. A Headquarters Working Group was established to develop the broad policy framework for developing MIN management policies. MIN activities cover essentially all nuclear materials within the DOE complex, including such items as spent nuclear fuel, depleted uranium, plutonium, natural and enriched uranium, and other materials. In August 1995, a report discussing the natural and enriched uranium portion of the Initiative for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was published. That report, 'Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Materials-in-Inventory, Natural and Enriched Uranium'.' identified MIN under the control of Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company at the INEL. Later, additional information related to the costs associated with the storage of MIN materials was requested to supplement this report. This report provides the cost information for storing, disposing, or consolidating the natural and enriched uranium portion of the MIN materials at the INEL. The information consists of eight specific tables which detail present management costs and estimated costs of future activities

  19. Optics

    Mathieu, Jean Paul

    1975-01-01

    Optics, Parts 1 and 2 covers electromagnetic optics and quantum optics. The first part of the book examines the various of the important properties common to all electromagnetic radiation. This part also studies electromagnetic waves; electromagnetic optics of transparent isotropic and anisotropic media; diffraction; and two-wave and multi-wave interference. The polarization states of light, the velocity of light, and the special theory of relativity are also examined in this part. The second part is devoted to quantum optics, specifically discussing the classical molecular theory of optical p

  20. Integrated optical circuit engineering IV; Proceedings of the Meeting, Cambridge, MA, Sept. 16, 17, 1986

    Mentzer, Mark A.; Sriram, S.

    The design and implementation of integrated optical circuits are discussed in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include lithium niobate devices, silicon integrated optics, waveguide phenomena, coupling considerations, processing technology, nonlinear guided-wave optics, integrated optics for fiber systems, and systems considerations and applications. Also included are eight papers and a panel discussion from an SPIE conference on the processing of guided-wave optoelectronic materials (held in Los Angeles, CA, on January 21-22, 1986).

  1. National Ignition Facility subsystem design requirements optics assembly building (OAB) SSDR 1.2.2.3

    Kempel, P.; Hands, J.

    1996-01-01

    This Subsystem Design Requirement (SSDR) document establishes the performance, design, and verification requirements 'for the conventional building systems and subsystems of the Optics Assembly Building (OAB). These building system requirements are associated with housing and supporting the operational flow of personnel and materials throughout the OAB for preparing and repairing optical and mechanical components used in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Laser and Target Building (LTAB). This SSDR addresses the following subsystems associated with the OAB: * Structural systems for the building spaces and operational-support equipment and building- support equipment. * Architectural building features associated with housing the space, operational cleanliness, and functional operation of the facility. * Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems for maintaining a clean and thermally stable ambient environment within the facility. * Plumbing systems that provide potable water and sanitary facilities for the occupants and stormwater drainage for transporting rainwater. * Fire Protection systems that guard against fire damage to the facility and its contents. * Material handling equipment for transferring optical assemblies and other materials within building areas and to the LTAB. * Mechanical process piping systems for liquids and gases that provide cooling, cleaning, and other service to optical and mechanical components. * Electrical power and grounding systems that provide service to the building and equipment, including lighting distribution and communications systems for the facilities. * Instrumentation and control systems that ensure the safe operation of conventional facilities systems, such as those listed above. Generic design criteria, such as siting data, seismic requirements, utility availability, and other information that contributes to the OAB design, are not addressed in this document

  2. Review of the Usefulness of Various Rotational Seismometers with Laboratory Results of Fibre-Optic Ones Tested for Engineering Applications

    Leszek R. Jaroszewicz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Starting with descriptions of rotational seismology, areas of interest and historical field measurements, the fundamental requirements for rotational seismometers for seismological and engineering application are formulated. On the above basis, a review of all existing rotational seismometers is presented with a description of the principles of their operation as well as possibilities to fulfill formulated requirements. This review includes mechanical, acoustical, electrochemical and optical devices and shows that the last of these types are the most promising. It is shown that optical rotational seismometer based on the ring-laser gyroscope concept is the best for seismological applications, whereas systems based on fiber-optic gyroscopes demonstrate parameters which are also required for engineering applications. Laboratory results of the Fibre-Optic System for Rotational Events & Phenomena Monitoring using a small 1-D shaking table modified to generate rotational excitations are presented. The harmonic and time-history tests demonstrate its usefulness for recording rotational motions with rates up to 0.25 rad/s.

  3. Department of Energy, highly enriched uranium ES ampersand H vulnerability assessment, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory site assessment team report

    1996-01-01

    In accordance with the February 22, 1996 directive issued by Secretary of Energy O'Leary on the Vulnerability Assessment of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Storage, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory conducted an assessment of the site's HEU holdings and any associated vulnerabilities. The assessment was conducted between April 25 and May 24, 1996. The scope of this assessment, as defined in the Assessment Plan, included all HEU, and any spent fuel not evaluated in the Spent Fuel Vulnerability Assessment. Addressed in this assessment were all of the holdings at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) except any located at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) and the Naval Reactors Facility. Excluded from the assessment were those HEU holdings previously assessed in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Spent Nuclear Fuel Inventory and Vulnerability Site Assessment Report and any HEU holdings evaluated in the Plutonium Vulnerability Assessment Report

  4. Interferometric fiber-optic sensor embedded in a spark plug for in-cylinder pressure measurement in engines.

    Bae, Taehan; Atkins, Robert A; Taylor, Henry F; Gibler, William N

    2003-02-20

    Pressure sensing in an internal combustion engine with an intrinsic fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) integrated with a spark plug is demonstrated for the first time. The spark plug was used for the ignition of the cylinder in which it was mounted. The FFPI element, protected with a copper/gold coating, was embedded in a groove in the spark-plug housing. Gas pressure inthe engine induced longitudinal strain in this housing, which was also experienced by the fiber-optic sensing element. The sensor was monitored with a signal conditioning unit containing a chirped distributed-feedback laser. Pressure sensitivities as high as 0.00339 radians round-trip phase shift per pounds per square inch of pressure were observed. Measured pressure versus time traces showed good agreement with those from a piezoelectric reference sensor mounted in the same engine cylinder.

  5. "Soft-Engineering" Students Learning Math during Project Work on Optical Illusions

    Timcenko, Olga; Triantafyllou, Evangelia

    2015-01-01

    Media Technology is a study line between engineering, art and humanities, situated at Faculty of Engineering and Science of Aalborg University. Although formally students of engineering, Media Technology students show even greater difficulties with entry-level mathematical knowledge than typical ...

  6. Optics

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Ninth Edition Optics: Ninth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommen

  7. GLAS: engineering a common-user Rayleigh laser guide star for adaptive optics on the William Herschel Telescope

    Talbot, Gordon; Abrams, Don Carlos; Apostolakos, Nikolaos; Bassom, Richard; Blackburn, Colin; Blanken, Maarten; Cano Infantes, Diego; Chopping, Alan; Dee, Kevin; Dipper, Nigel; Elswijk, Eddy; Enthoven, Bernard; Gregory, Thomas; ter Horst, Rik; Humphreys, Ron; Idserda, Jan; Jolley, Paul; Kuindersma, Sjouke; McDermid, Richard; Morris, Tim; Myers, Richard; Pico, Sergio; Pragt, Johan; Rees, Simon; Rey, Jürg; Reyes, Marcos; Rutten, René; Schoenmaker, Ton; Skvarc, Jure; Tromp, Niels; Tulloch, Simon; Veninga, Auke

    2006-06-01

    The GLAS (Ground-layer Laser Adaptive-optics System) project is to construct a common-user Rayleigh laser beacon that will work in conjunction with the existing NAOMI adaptive optics system, instruments (near IR imager INGRID, optical integral field spectrograph OASIS, coronagraph OSCA) and infrastructure at the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) on La Palma. The laser guide star system will increase sky coverage available to high-order adaptive optics from ~1% to approaching 100% and will be optimized for scientific exploitation of the OASIS integral-field spectrograph at optical wavelengths. Additionally GLAS will be used in on-sky experiments for the application of laser beacons to ELTs. This paper describes the full range of engineering of the project ranging through the laser launch system, wavefront sensors, computer control, mechanisms, diagnostics, CCD detectors and the safety system. GLAS is a fully funded project, with final design completed and all equipment ordered, including the laser. Integration has started on the WHT and first light is expected summer 2006.

  8. Optical coherence tomography: technology and applications (biological and medical physics, biomedical engineering)

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is the optical analog of ultrasound imaging and is emerging as a powerful imaging technique that enables non-invasive, in vivo, high resolution, cross-sectional imaging in biological tissue. This book introduces OCT technology and applications not only from an optical and technological viewpoint, but also from biomedical and clinical perspectives. The chapters are written by leading research groups, in a style comprehensible to a broad audience.

  9. LIDAR optical rugosity of coral reefs in Biscayne National Park, Florida

    Brock, J.C.; Wright, C.W.; Clayton, T.D.; Nayegandhi, A.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), a temporal waveform-resolving, airborne, green wavelength LIDAR (light detection and ranging), is designed to measure the submeter-scale topography of shallow reef substrates. Topographic variability is a prime component of habitat complexity, an ecological factor that both expresses and controls the abundance and distribution of many reef organisms. Following the acquisition of EAARL coverage over both mid-platform patch reefs and shelf-margin bank reefs within Biscayne National Park in August 2002, EAARL-based optical indices of topographic variability were evaluated at 15 patch reef and bank reef sites. Several sites were selected to match reefs previously evaluated in situ along underwater video and belt transects. The analysis used large populations of submarine topographic transects derived from the examination of closely spaced laser spot reflections along LIDAR raster scans. At all 15 sites, each LIDAR transect was evaluated separately to determine optical rugosity (Rotran), and the average elevation difference between adjacent points (Av(??E ap)). Further, the whole-site mean and maximum values of Ro tran and Av(??Eap) for the entire population of transects at each analysis site, along with their standard deviations, were calculated. This study revealed that the greater habitat complexity of inshore patch reefs versus outer bank reefs results in relative differences in topographic complexity that can be discerned in the laser returns. Accordingly, LIDAR sensing of optical rugosity is proposed as a complementary new technique for the rapid assessment of shallow coral reefs. ?? Springer-Verlag 2004.

  10. Extractive Sampling and Optical Remote Sensing of F-100 Aircraft Engine Emissions (PREPRINT)

    Cowen, Kenneth; Goodwin, Bradley; Satola, Jan; Kagann, Robert; Hashmonay, Ram; Spicer, Chester; Holdren, Michael; Mayfield, Howard T

    2008-01-01

    ... from military aircraft, in order to meet increasingly stringent regulatory requirements. This paper describes the results of a recent field study using extractive and optical remote sensing (ORS...

  11. Mach-Zehnder Fiber-Optic Links for Reaction History Measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Miller, E. Kirk; Herrmann, H.W.; Stoeffl, W.; Horsfield, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    We present the details of the analog fiber-optic data link that will be used in the chamber-mounted Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) located at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in Livermore, California. The system is based on Mach-Zehnder (MZ) modulators integrated into the diagnostic, with the source lasers and bias control electronics located remotely to protect the active electronics. A complete recording system for a single GRH channel comprises two MZ modulators, with the fiber signals split onto four channels on a single digitizer. By carefully selecting the attenuation, the photoreceiver, and the digitizer settings, the dynamic range achievable is greater than 1000:1 at the full system bandwidth of greater than 10 GHz. The system is designed to minimize electrical reflections and mitigate the effects of transient radiation darkening on the fibers.

  12. Cleaning and Decontamination Using Strippable and Protective Coatings at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Tripp, J.; Archibald, K.; Lauerhass, L.; Argyle, M.; Demmer, R.

    1999-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Radioactive Liquid Waste Reduction (RLWR) group is conducting a testing and evaluation program on strippable and protective coatings. The purpose of the program is to determine how and where these coatings can be used to aid in the minimization of liquid waste generation. These coatings have become more important in daily operations because of the increased concern of secondary liquid waste generation at the INEEL. Several different strippable and protective coatings were investigated by the RLWR group, including Pentek 604, Bartlett (TLC), and ALARA 1146. During the tests quantitative data was determined, such as effectiveness at reducing contamination levels, or costs, as well as some qualitative data on issues like ease of application or removal. PENTEK 604 and Bartlett TLC are seen as superior products with slightly different uses

  13. 1996 LMITCO environmental monitoring program report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the calendar year 1996 environmental surveillance and compliance monitoring activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Results of sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance, Site Environmental Surveillance, Drinking Water, Effluent Monitoring, Storm Water Monitoring, Groundwater Monitoring, and Special Request Monitoring Programs are included in this report. The primary purposes of the surveillance and monitoring activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1996 data with program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends.

  14. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1997

    Evans, R.B.; Brooks, R.W.; Roush, D.; Martin, D.B. [Environmental Science and Research Foundation, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lantz, B.S. [Dept. of Energy, Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho Operations Office

    1998-08-01

    To verify that exposures resulting from operations at Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities remain very small, each site at which nuclear activities are conducted operates an environmental surveillance program to monitor the air, water and any other pathway whereby radionuclides from operations might conceivably reach workers and members of the public. Environmental surveillance and monitoring results are reported annually to the DOE-Headquarters. This report presents a compilation of data collected in 1997 for the routine environmental surveillance programs conducted on and around the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The results of the various monitoring programs for 1997 indicated that radioactivity from the INEEL operations could generally not be distinguished from worldwide fallout and natural radioactivity in the region surrounding the INEEL. Although some radioactive materials were discharged during INEEL operations, concentrations in the offsite environment and doses to the surrounding population were far less than state of Idaho and federal health protection guidelines.

  15. 1996 LMITCO environmental monitoring program report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the calendar year 1996 environmental surveillance and compliance monitoring activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Results of sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance, Site Environmental Surveillance, Drinking Water, Effluent Monitoring, Storm Water Monitoring, Groundwater Monitoring, and Special Request Monitoring Programs are included in this report. The primary purposes of the surveillance and monitoring activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1996 data with program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends

  16. Vapor vacuum extraction treatability study at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Herd, M.D.; Matthern, G.; Michael, D.L.; Spang, N.; Downs, W.; Weidner, J.; Cleary, P.

    1993-01-01

    During the 1960s and early 1970s, barreled mixed waste containing volatile organic compounds (VOCS) and radioactive waste was buried at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Over time, some of the barrels have deteriorated allowing, VOC vapors to be released into the vadose zone. The primary VOC contaminates of concern are CCl 4 and trichloroethylene; however, chloroform, tetrachloroethylene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane have also been detected. Vapor Vacuum Extraction (VVE) is one alternative being considered for remediation of the RWMC SDA vadose zone. A proposed pilot-scale treatability study (TS) will provide operation and maintenance costs for the design of the potential scale-up of the system

  17. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    Mitchell, R.G.; Peterson, D.; Hoff, D.L.

    1996-08-01

    This report presents a compilation of data collected in 1995 for the routine environmental surveillance programs conducted on and around the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). During 1995, the offsite surveillance program was conducted by the Environmental Science and Research Foundation. Onsite surveillance was performed by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO). Ground-water monitoring, both on and offsite, was performed by the US Geological Survey (USGS). This report also presents summaries of facility effluent monitoring data collected by INEL contractors. This report, prepared in accordance with the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, is not intended to cover the numerous special environmental research programs being conducted at the INEL by the Foundation, LITCO, USGS, and others

  18. Mixed waste treatment options for wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Garcia, E.C.

    1991-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has generated mixed wastes (MWs) during its daily operations. MWs contain both radioactive and hazardous components, as defined by the Department of Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency. Treatment and disposal of stored MWs, as well as future generated MWs, are required to meet all regulations specified by the regulating agencies. This report reviews proven and emerging technologies that can treat MWs. It also provides a method for selection of the appropriate technology for treatment of a particular waste stream. The report selects for further consideration various treatments that can be used to treat MWs that fall under Land Disposal Restrictions. The selection methodology was used to arrive at these treatments. 63 refs., 7 figs., 23 tabs

  19. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1992 emissions report

    Stirrup, T.S.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the 1992 Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Originally, this report was in response to the Environmental Oversight and Monitoring Agreement in 1989 between the State of Idaho and the Department of Energy Idaho Field Office, and a request from the Idaho Air Quality Bureau. The current purpose of the Air Emission Inventory is to provide the basis for the preparation of the INEL Permit-to-Operate (PTO) an Air Emission Source Application, as required by the recently promulgated Title V regulations of the Clean Air Act. This report includes emissions calculations from 1989 to 1992. The Air Emission Inventory System, an ORACLE-based database system, maintains the emissions inventory

  20. Low-level waste incineration at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Gillins, R.L.; Davis, J.N.; Maughan, R.Y.; Logan, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    A facility for the incineration of low-level beta/gamma contaminated combustible waste has been constructed at the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The incineration facility was established to: (1) reduce the volume of currently generated contaminated combustible waste being disposed at the INEL's radioactive waste disposal site and thereby prolong the site's useful life; and (2) develop waste processing technology by providing a facility where full-size processes and equipment can be demonstrated and proven during production-scale operations. Cold systems testing has been completed, and contaminated operations began in September of 1984. Currently the facility is processing waste packaged in 2 x 2 x 2 ft cardboard boxes and measuring <10mR/h at contact. 3 figs

  1. Vadose zone monitoring at the radioactive waste management complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    McElroy, D.L.; Hubbell, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    A network of vadose zone instruments was installed in surficial sediments and sedimentary interbeds beneath the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The network of instruments monitor moisture movement in a heterogeneous geologic system comprised of sediments which overlie and are intercalated with basalt flows. The general range of matric potentials in the surficial sediments (0 to 9.1 m) was from saturation to -3 bars. The basalt layer beneath the surficial sediments impedes downward water movement. The general range of matric potentials in the 9-, 34- and 73-m interbeds was from -0.3 to 1.7 bars. Preliminary results indicated downward moisture movement through the interbeds. 8 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  2. Waste minimization value engineering workshop for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Omega West Reactor Decommissioning Project

    Hartnett, S.; Seguin, N.; Burns, M.

    1995-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Pollution Prevention Program Office sponsored a Value Engineering (VE) Workshop to evaluate recycling options and other pollution prevention and waste minimization (PP/WMin) practices to incorporate into the decommissioning of the Omega West Reactor (OWR) at the laboratory. The VE process is an organized, systematic approach for evaluating a process or design to identify cost saving opportunities, or in this application, waste reduction opportunities. This VE Workshop was a facilitated process that included a team of specialists in the areas of decontamination, decommissioning, PP/WMin, cost estimating, construction, waste management, recycling, Department of Energy representatives, and others. The uniqueness of this VE Workshop was that it used an interdisciplinary approach to focus on PP/WMin practices that could be included in the OWR Decommissioning Project Plans and specifications to provide waste reduction. This report discusses the VE workshop objectives, summarizes the OWR decommissioning project, and describes the VE workshop activities, results, and lessons learned

  3. Environmental monitoring for EG and G Idaho facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Tkachyk, J.W.; Wright, K.C.; Wilhelmsen, R.N.

    1990-08-01

    This report describes the 1989 environmental-monitoring activities of the Environmental Monitoring Unit of EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., at EG ampersand G-operated facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The major facilities monitored include the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility, the Mixed Waste Storage Facility, and two surplus facilities. Additional monitoring activities performed by Environmental Monitoring are also discussed, including drinking-water monitoring and nonradiological liquid-effluent monitoring, as well as data management. The primary purposes of monitoring are to evaluate environmental conditions and to provide and interpret data, in compliance with applicable regulations, to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1989 environmental-monitoring data with derived concentration guides and with data from previous years. This report also presents results of sampling performed by the Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory and by the United States Geological Survey. 17 refs., 49 figs., 11 tabs

  4. Safety research experiment facilities, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. Final environmental impact statement

    Liverman, J.L.

    1977-09-01

    This environmental statement was prepared for the Safety Research Experiment Facilities (SAREF) Project. The purpose of the proposed project is to modify some existing facilities and provide a new test facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for conducting fast breeder reactor (FBR) safety experiments. The SAREF Project proposal has been developed after an extensive study which identified the FBR safety research needs requiring in-reactor experiments and which evaluated the capability of various existing and new facilities to meet these needs. The proposed facilities provide for the in-reactor testing of large bundles of prototypical FBR fuel elements under a wide variety of conditions, ranging from those abnormal operating conditions which might be expected to occur during the life of an FBR power plant to the extremely low probability, hypothetical accidents used in the evaluation of some design options and in the assessment of the long-term potential risk associated with wide-acale deployment of the FBR

  5. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1997

    Evans, R.B.; Brooks, R.W.; Roush, D.; Martin, D.B.; Lantz, B.S.

    1998-08-01

    To verify that exposures resulting from operations at Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities remain very small, each site at which nuclear activities are conducted operates an environmental surveillance program to monitor the air, water and any other pathway whereby radionuclides from operations might conceivably reach workers and members of the public. Environmental surveillance and monitoring results are reported annually to the DOE-Headquarters. This report presents a compilation of data collected in 1997 for the routine environmental surveillance programs conducted on and around the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The results of the various monitoring programs for 1997 indicated that radioactivity from the INEEL operations could generally not be distinguished from worldwide fallout and natural radioactivity in the region surrounding the INEEL. Although some radioactive materials were discharged during INEEL operations, concentrations in the offsite environment and doses to the surrounding population were far less than state of Idaho and federal health protection guidelines

  6. AMS at the National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering in Bucharest

    Stan-Sion, C.; Ivascu, M.; Plostinaru, D.; Catana, D.; Marinescu, L.; Radulescu, M.; Nolte, E.

    2000-01-01

    A new beam line and injector deck for AMS measurements have been built at the 8 MV tandem accelerator of the National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering, Bucharest, Romania. The main components on the low-energy side are a high-current cesium sputter source, a 90 deg. injection magnet and a pre-acceleration stage. At the high-energy side the beam line is achromatic, consisting of two 90 deg. analysing magnets with mass energy product 120 MeV amu and a gas-filled ionization chamber. The system will be complete with a Wien filter and a multi-anode gas detector with time-of-flight discrimination. Presently, the AMS facility is undergoing tests and routine measurements are expected to start soon

  7. AMS at the National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering in Bucharest

    Stan-Sion, C. E-mail: stansion@ifin.nipne.ro; Ivascu, M.; Plostinaru, D.; Catana, D.; Marinescu, L.; Radulescu, M.; Nolte, E

    2000-10-01

    A new beam line and injector deck for AMS measurements have been built at the 8 MV tandem accelerator of the National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering, Bucharest, Romania. The main components on the low-energy side are a high-current cesium sputter source, a 90 deg. injection magnet and a pre-acceleration stage. At the high-energy side the beam line is achromatic, consisting of two 90 deg. analysing magnets with mass energy product 120 MeV amu and a gas-filled ionization chamber. The system will be complete with a Wien filter and a multi-anode gas detector with time-of-flight discrimination. Presently, the AMS facility is undergoing tests and routine measurements are expected to start soon.

  8. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of transuranic wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides radiological, physical and chemical characterization data for transuranic radioactive wastes and transuranic radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program (PSPI). Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 139 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 39,380 3 corresponding to a total mass of approximately 19,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats Plant generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification

  9. Low-level waste incineration: experience at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Bohrer, H.A.; Dalton, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) is a low level radioactive waste treatment facility being operated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A key component of the facility is a dual chambered controlled air incinerator with a dry off-gas treatment system. The incinerator began processing radioactive waste in September, 1984. Limited operations continued from that data until October, 1985, at which time all INEL generators began shipping combustible waste for incineration. The incinerator is presently processing all available INEL combustible Dry Active Waste (DAW) (approximately 1700 m 3 per year) operating about five days per month. Performance to date has demonstrated the effectiveness, viability and safety of incineration as a volume reduction method of DAW. 3 figures

  10. Thickness of surficial sediment at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    Anderson, S.R.; Liszewski, M.J.; Ackerman, D.J.

    1996-06-01

    Thickness of surficial sediment was determined from natural-gamma logs in 333 wells at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in eastern Idaho to provide reconnaissance data for future site-characterization studies. Surficial sediment, which is defined as the unconsolidated clay, silt, sand, and gravel that overlie the uppermost basalt flow at each well, ranges in thickness from 0 feet in seven wells drilled through basalt outcrops east of the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant to 313 feet in well Site 14 southeast of the Big Lost River sinks. Surficial sediment includes alluvial, lacustrine, eolian, and colluvial deposits that generally accumulated during the past 200 thousand years. Additional thickness data, not included in this report, are available from numerous auger holes and foundation borings at and near most facilities

  11. Boiling water reactor containment modeling and analysis at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Holcomb, E.E. III; Wilson, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    Under the auspices of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, severe accidents are being studied at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The boiling water reactor (BWR) studies have focused on postulated anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) accidents which might contribute to severe core damage or containment failure. A summary of the containment studies is presented in the context of the analytical tools (codes) used, typical transient simulation results and the need for prototypical containment data. All of these are related to current and future analytical capabilities. It is shown that torus temperatures during the ATWS depart from limiting conditions for BWR T-quencher operation, outside of which stable steam condensation has not been proven

  12. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1992 emissions report

    Stirrup, T.S.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the 1992 Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Originally, this report was in response to the Environmental Oversight and Monitoring Agreement in 1989 between the State of Idaho and the Department of Energy Idaho Field Office, and a request from the Idaho Air Quality Bureau. The current purpose of the Air Emission Inventory is to provide the basis for the preparation of the INEL Permit-to-Operate (PTO) an Air Emission Source Application, as required by the recently promulgated Title V regulations of the Clean Air Act. This report includes emissions calculations from 1989 to 1992. The Air Emission Inventory System, an ORACLE-based database system, maintains the emissions inventory.

  13. Commercial disposal options for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory low-level radioactive waste

    Porter, C.L.; Widmayer, D.A.

    1995-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned, contractor-operated site. Significant quantities of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) have been generated and disposed of onsite at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The INEL expects to continue generating LLW while performing its mission and as aging facilities are decommissioned. An on-going Performance Assessment process for the RWMC underscores the potential for reduced or limited LLW disposal capacity at the existing onsite facility. In order to properly manage the anticipated amount of LLW, the INEL is investigating various disposal options. These options include building a new facility, disposing the LLW at other DOE sites, using commercial disposal facilities, or seeking a combination of options. This evaluation reports on the feasibility of using commercial disposal facilities

  14. 1985 Environmental Monitoring Program report for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory site

    Hoff, D.L.; Chew, E.W.; Rope, S.K.

    1986-05-01

    The results of the various monitoring programs for 1985 indicated that radioactivity from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Site operations could not be distinguished from worldwide fallout and natural radioactivity in the region surrounding the Site. Although some radioactive materials were discharged during Site operations, concentrations and doses to the surrounding population were of no health consequence and were far less than State of Idaho and Federal health protection guidelines. This report describes the air, water, and foodstuff samples routinely collected at the INEL boundary locations and at locations distant from the INEL Site. It compares and evaluates the sample results, discussing implications, if any. Included for the first time this year are data from air and water samples routinely collected from onsite locations. The report also summarizes significant environmental activities at the INEL Site during 1985, nonradioactive and radioactive effluent monitoring at the Site, and the US Geological Survey (USGS) groundwater monitoring program

  15. Incinerator development program for processing transuranic waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Hedahl, T.G.

    1982-01-01

    In the fall of 1981, two short-term tests were conducted on a controlled air and a rotary kiln incinerator to assess their potential for processing transuranic (TRU) contaminated waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The primary purpose of the test program was a proof-of-principle verification that the incinerators could achieve near-complete combustion of the combustible portion of the waste, while mixed with high percentages of noncombustible and metal waste materials. Other important test objectives were to obtain system design information including off-gas and end-product characteristics and incinerator operating parameters. Approximately 7200 kg of simulated (non-TRU) waste from the INEL were processed during the two tests

  16. Seismic engineering for an expanded tritium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Volkman, D.E.; Olive, W.B.; Endebrocid, E.E.; Khan, P.K.; Rebillet, W.R.

    1997-10-01

    An existing complex of three single story concrete and masonry shear wall buildings will be integrated into an expanded tritium facility for neutron tube target loading. Known as the NTTL Project, the expanded plant is a major element of the Department of Energy's tritium program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This paper describes seismic evaluation and upgrade modifications for the 1950's concrete shear wall building; drift analyses of two 1980's CMU [concrete masonry unit] shear wall buildings; design of a new CMU shear wall building linking existing structures and providing personnel change room services; and design of a new steel frame building housing HVAC and electrical power and communication equipment for the complex. All buildings are closely adjacent and drift analysis to establish separation to prevent pounding is a major seismic engineering concern for the project

  17. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1997

    R. B. Evans; D. Roush; R. W. Brooks; D. B. Martin

    1998-08-01

    The results of the various monitoring programs for 1997 indicated that radioactivity from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) operations could generally not be distinguished from worldwide fallout and natural radioactivity in the region surrounding the INEEL. Although some radioactive materials were discharged during INEEL operations, concentrations in the offsite environment and doses to the surrounding population were far less than state of Idaho and federal health protection guidelines. The maximum potential population dose from submersion, ingestion, inhalation, and deposition to the approximately 121,500 people residing within an 80-km (50-mi) radius from the geographical center of the INEEL was estimated to be 0.2 person-rem (2 x 10-3 person-Sv) using the MDIFF air dispersion model. This population dose is less than 0.0005% of the estimated 43,700 person-rem (437 person-Sv) population dose from background radioactivity.

  18. A multispectral scanner survey of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Hanford Reservation

    Brewster, S.B. Jr.; Howard, M.E.; Shines, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    An airborne multispectral scanner survey of selected sites on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Hanford Reservation was performed in mid-November 1993. Aerial multispectral scanner and photography data were acquired coincidentally with the Big O experiment at both locations. To illustrate two potential applications, the multispectral scanner data were digitally enhanced to facilitate the detection of soil disturbance and evidence of surface water transport. The main conclusion of this study was that multispectral data acquired under these conditions can be useful for soil disturbance detection. The imagery did not prove as useful, however, for direct indications of surface water transport. It was possible to infer some water transport patterns from dry water beds, but only if surface indications were present

  19. Waste minimization value engineering workshop for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Omega West Reactor Decommissioning Project

    Hartnett, S.; Seguin, N. [Benchmark Environmental Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burns, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Pollution Prevention Program Office sponsored a Value Engineering (VE) Workshop to evaluate recycling options and other pollution prevention and waste minimization (PP/WMin) practices to incorporate into the decommissioning of the Omega West Reactor (OWR) at the laboratory. The VE process is an organized, systematic approach for evaluating a process or design to identify cost saving opportunities, or in this application, waste reduction opportunities. This VE Workshop was a facilitated process that included a team of specialists in the areas of decontamination, decommissioning, PP/WMin, cost estimating, construction, waste management, recycling, Department of Energy representatives, and others. The uniqueness of this VE Workshop was that it used an interdisciplinary approach to focus on PP/WMin practices that could be included in the OWR Decommissioning Project Plans and specifications to provide waste reduction. This report discusses the VE workshop objectives, summarizes the OWR decommissioning project, and describes the VE workshop activities, results, and lessons learned.

  20. Mineralogy of selected sedimentary interbeds at or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    Reed, M.F.; Bartholomay, R.C.

    1994-08-01

    The US Geological Survey's (USGS) Project Office at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) analyzed 66 samples from sedimentary interbed cores during a 38-month period beginning in October 1990 to determine bulk and clay mineralogy. These cores had been collected from 19 sites in the Big Lost River Basin, 2 sites in the Birch Creek Basin, and 1 site in the Mud Lake Basin, and were archived at the USGS lithologic core library at the INEL. Mineralogy data indicate that core samples from the Big Lost River Basin have larger mean and median percentages of quartz, total feldspar, and total clay minerals, but smaller mean and median percentages of calcite than the core samples from the Birch Creek Basin. Core samples from the Mud Lake Basin have abundant quartz, total feldspar, calcite, and total clay minerals. Identification of the mineralogy of the Snake River Plain is needed to aid in the study of the hydrology and geochemistry of subsurface waste disposal

  1. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    Mitchell, R.G.; Peterson, D.; Hoff, D.L.

    1996-08-01

    This report presents a compilation of data collected in 1995 for the routine environmental surveillance programs conducted on and around the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). During 1995, the offsite surveillance program was conducted by the Environmental Science and Research Foundation. Onsite surveillance was performed by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO). Ground-water monitoring, both on and offsite, was performed by the US Geological Survey (USGS). This report also presents summaries of facility effluent monitoring data collected by INEL contractors. This report, prepared in accordance with the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, is not intended to cover the numerous special environmental research programs being conducted at the INEL by the Foundation, LITCO, USGS, and others.

  2. 1975 progress report: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory site radioecology--ecology programs

    Markham, O.D.

    1976-06-01

    Results are reported from measurements of the content of various radionuclides in the tissues of wild animals on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sampled during 1975. Tissue samples from antelope, waterfowl, rodents, rabbits, and doves were analyzed for 13 radionuclides, including 134 Cs, 137 Cs, 95 Zr, 95 Nb, 103 Ru, 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 90 Sr, 131 I, and 60 Co which were responsible for the largest amounts of radioactivity. Measurements were also made of the content of 238 Pu, 239 Pu, and 241 Am in soil samples and the radioactivity in tumbling weeds at the radioactive waste management site. Data are included from studies on the ecology of the pygmy rabbit, Salvilagus idahoensis, amphibians, reptiles, birds of prey, rodents, and coyotes, and vegetation in relation to land use at the site. Seasonal variations in the deposition and retention of 141 Ce and 134 Cs on sagebrush and bottlebrush grass were compared

  3. Simulated performance of the optical Thomson scattering diagnostic designed for the National Ignition Facility

    Ross, J. S., E-mail: ross36@llnl.gov; Datte, P.; Divol, L.; Galbraith, J.; Hatch, B.; Landen, O.; Manuel, A. M.; Molander, W.; Moody, J. D.; Swadling, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Froula, D. H.; Katz, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Kilkenny, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Montgomery, D. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Weaver, J. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    An optical Thomson scattering diagnostic has been designed for the National Ignition Facility to characterize under-dense plasmas. We report on the design of the system and the expected performance for different target configurations. The diagnostic is designed to spatially and temporally resolve the Thomson scattered light from laser driven targets. The diagnostic will collect scattered light from a 50 × 50 × 200 μm volume. The optical design allows operation with different probe laser wavelengths. A deep-UV probe beam (λ{sub 0} = 210 nm) will be used to Thomson scatter from electron plasma densities of ∼5 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} while a 3ω probe will be used for plasma densities of ∼1 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}. The diagnostic package contains two spectrometers: the first to resolve Thomson scattering from ion acoustic wave fluctuations and the second to resolve scattering from electron plasma wave fluctuations. Expected signal levels relative to background will be presented for typical target configurations (hohlraums and a planar foil).

  4. The National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and Post-war Japanese Optical Astronomy

    Tajima, Toshiyuki

    This paper depicts some aspects of the formative process of the Japanese optical and infrared astronomical community in the post-war period, featuring the transition of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan(NAOJ). We take up three cases of telescope construction, examining their background and their contribution to the Japanese astronomical community. Through these cases, the characteristics of traditions and cultures of optical and infrared astronomy in Japan are considered. Although the Tokyo Astronomical Observatory (TAO) of the University of Tokyo, the predecessor of NAOJ, was originally founded as an agency for practical astronomical observation such as time and almanac service, it has become an international centre for all types of astrophysical research. Research and development of telescopes and observational instruments have become an important part of the astronomers' practice. Now, however, a number of Japanese universities are planning to have their own large to middle-sized telescopes, and a new style of astronomical research is emerging involving astrophysical studies utilising data acquired from the Virtual Observatory, so there is a distinct possibility that the status of the NAOJ will change even further in the future.

  5. The Engineering Strong Ground Motion Network of the National Autonomous University of Mexico

    Velasco Miranda, J. M.; Ramirez-Guzman, L.; Aguilar Calderon, L. A.; Almora Mata, D.; Ayala Hernandez, M.; Castro Parra, G.; Molina Avila, I.; Mora, A.; Torres Noguez, M.; Vazquez Larquet, R.

    2014-12-01

    The coverage, design, operation and monitoring capabilities of the strong ground motion program at the Institute of Engineering (IE) of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) is presented. Started in 1952, the seismic instrumentation intended initially to bolster earthquake engineering projects in Mexico City has evolved into the largest strong ground motion monitoring system in the region. Today, it provides information not only to engineering projects, but also to the near real-time risk mitigation systems of the country, and enhances the general understanding of the effects and causes of earthquakes in Mexico. The IE network includes more than 100 free-field stations and several buildings, covering the largest urban centers and zones of significant seismicity in Central Mexico. Of those stations, approximately one-fourth send the observed acceleration to a processing center in Mexico City continuously, and the rest require either periodic visits for the manual recovery of the data or remote interrogation, for later processing and cataloging. In this research, we document the procedures and telecommunications systems used systematically to recover information. Additionally, we analyze the spatial distribution of the free-field accelerographs, the quality of the instrumentation, and the recorded ground motions. The evaluation criteria are based on the: 1) uncertainty in the generation of ground motion parameter maps due to the spatial distribution of the stations, 2) potential of the array to provide localization and magnitude estimates for earthquakes with magnitudes greater than Mw 5, and 3) adequacy of the network for the development of Ground Motion Prediction Equations due to intra-plate and intra-slab earthquakes. We conclude that the monitoring system requires a new redistribution, additional stations, and a substantial improvement in the instrumentation and telecommunications. Finally, we present an integral plan to improve the current network

  6. Enhancements to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory motor-operated valve assessment software

    Holbrook, M.R.; Watkins, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    In January 1991, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) commenced Part 1 inspections to review licensee's motor-operated valve (MOV) programs that were developed to address Generic Letter 89-10, open-quotes Safety-Related Motor-Operated Valve Testing and Surveillanceclose quotes. In support, of this effort, the Isolation Valve Assessment (IVA) software, Version 3.10, was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to enable rapid in-depth review of MOV sizing and torque switch setting calculations. In 1994, the USNRC commenced Part 2 inspections, which involve a more in-depth review of MOV in situ testing relative to design-basis assumptions. The purpose of this paper is to describe the latest INEL and industry research that has been incorporated into Version 4.00 of the IVA software to support the latest round of inspections. Major improvements include (a) using dynamic and static test results to determine MOV performance parameters and validate design-basis engineering assumptions, (b) determining the stem/stem-nut coefficient of friction using new research-based techniques, (c) adding the ability to evaluate globe valves, and (d) incorporating new methods to account for the effects of high ambient temperature on the output torque of alternating current (ac) motors

  7. Remedial design and remedial action guidance for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    1993-10-01

    The US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), the US Environmental Protection Agency, Region X (EPA), and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (IDHW) have developed this guidance on the remedial design and remedial action (RD/RA) process. This guidance is applicable to activities conducted under the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFA/CO) and Action Plan. The INEL FFA/CO and Action Plan provides the framework for performing environmental restoration according to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The guidance is intended for use by the DOE-ID, the EPA, and the IDHW Waste Area Group (WAG) managers and others involved in the planning and implementation of CERCLA environmental restoration activities. The scope of the guidance includes the RD/RA strategy for INEL environmental restoration projects and the approach to development and review of RD/RA documentation. Chapter 2 discusses the general process, roles and responsibilities, and other elements that define the RD/RA strategy. Chapters 3 through 7 describe the RD/RA documents identified in the FFA/CO and Action Plan. Chapter 8 provides examples of how this guidance can be applied to restoration projects. Appendices are included that provide excerpts from the FFA/CO pertinent to RD/RA (Appendix A), a applicable US Department of Energy (DOE) orders (Appendix B), and an EPA Engineering ''Data Gaps in Remedial Design'' (Appendix C)

  8. Band Engineering Small Bandgap p-Type Semiconductors: Investigations of their Optical and Photoelectrochemical Properties

    Zoellner, Brandon

    Mixed-metal oxides containing Mn(II), Cu(I), Ta(V), Nb(V), and V(V) were investigated for their structures and properties as new p-type semiconductors and in the potential applications involving the photocatalytic conversion of water into hydrogen and oxygen. Engineering of the bandgaps was achieved by combining metal cations that have halffilled (Mn 3d5) or filled (Cu 3d10) d-orbitals together with metal cations that have empty (V/Nb/Ta 3/4/5 d0) d-orbitals. The research described herein focuses on the synthesis, optical, electronic, and photocatalytic properties of the metal-oxide semiconductors MnV2O6, Cu3VO 4, CuNb1-xTaxO3, and Cu5(Ta1-xNbx)11O30. Powder X-ray diffraction was used to probe their phase purity as well as atomic-level crystallographic details, i.e. shifts of lattice parameters, chemical compositions, and changes in local bonding environments. Optical measurements revealed visible-light bandgap sizes of ˜1.17 eV (Cu3VO4), ˜1.45 eV (MnV2O6), ˜1.89-1.97 eV (CuNb1-xTa xO3), and ˜1.97-2.50 eV (Cu5(Ta1-xNb x)11O30). The latter two were found to systematically vary as a function of composition. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements of MnV2O6 and Cu3VO 4 provided the first experimental characterization of the energetic positions of the valence and conduction bands with respect to the water oxidation and reduction potentials, as well as confirmed the p-type nature of each semiconductor. The valence and conduction band energies were found to be suitable for driving either one or both of the water-splitting half reaction (i.e. 2H+ → H2 and 2H2O → O2 + 4H+). Photoelectrochemical measurements on polycrystalline films of the Cu(I)-based semiconductors under visible-light irradiation produced cathodic currents indicative of p-type semiconductor character and chemical reduction at their surfaces in the electrolyte solution. The stability of the photocurrents was increased by the addition of CuO oxide particles either externally deposited or

  9. Design for improved maintenance of the fiber-optic cable system (As carried out in a concurrent engineering environment)

    Tremoulet, P. C.

    The author describes a number of maintenance improvements in the Fiber Optic Cable System (FOCS). They were achieved during a production phase pilot concurrent engineering program. Listed in order of importance (saved maintenance time and material) by maintenance level, they are: (1) organizational level: improved fiber optic converter (FOC) BITE; (2) Intermediate level: reduced FOC adjustments from 20 to 2; partitioned FOC into electrical and optical parts; developed cost-effective fault isolation test points and test using standard test equipment; improved FOC chassis to have lower mean time to repair; and (3) depot level: revised test requirements documents (TRDs) for common automatic test equipment and incorporated ATE testability into circuit and assemblies and application-specific integrated circuits. These improvements met this contract's tailored logistics MIL-STD 1388-1A requirements of monitoring the design for supportability and determining the most effective support equipment. Important logistics lessons learned while accomplishing these maintainability and supportability improvements on the pilot concurrent engineering program are also discussed.

  10. Spray Processes in Optical Diesel Engines - Air-Entrainement and Emissions

    Chartier, Clement

    2012-01-01

    Internal combustion engines have been an important technological field for more than a century. It has had an important impact on society through improved transportation and industrial applications. However, concerns about environmental effects of exhaust gases and utilization of oil resources have pushed development of combustion engines towards cleaner combustion and higher efficiencies. The diesel engine is today an interesting solution in terms of fuel economy. However, emissions ...

  11. Engineers' Role in the Management of Working Environment in Danish Enterprises: Results of a National Survey

    Broberg, Ole; Hansen, Nanette Juhler; Høgsbo, Mette Maribo

    1998-01-01

    training at engineering schools are very limited. As the engineers find it very important to teach working environment at engineering schools it must be considered what kind of curriculum would be most effective for the engineering career. Finally, the engineers do not perceive that management or others......This study confirms that many engineers are not aware that they influence the working environment of other people through their engineering. Also, it indicates that the extent of influence dependends on engineering domain and task content. Many engineers and enterprises have an espoused theory...... expressing a positive attitude towards working environment considerations in engineering. However, the theory-in-action seems to be quite different. Engineers do not know what to do in relation to working environment considerations. They mainly point to solidifying their knowledge in the area combined...

  12. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1989

    Hoff, D.L.; Mitchell, R.G.; Bowman, G.C.; Moore, R.

    1990-06-01

    To verify that exposures resulting from operations at the Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities have remained very small, each site at which nuclear activities are underway operates an environmental surveillance program to monitor the air, water and any other pathway where radionuclides from operations might conceivably reach workers or members of the public. This report presents data collected in 1989 for the routine environmental surveillance program conducted by the Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL) of DOE and the US Geological Survey (USGS) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site. The environmental surveillance program for the INEL and vicinity for 1989 included the collection and analysis of samples from potential exposure pathways. Three basic groups of samples were collected. Those collected within the INEL boundaries will be referred to as onsite samples. Samples collected outside, but near, the Site boundaries will be referred to as boundary samples or part of a group of offsite samples. Samples collected from locations considerably beyond the Site boundaries will be referred to as distant samples or part of the offsite group. With the exception of Craters of the Moon National Monument, the distant locations are sufficiently remote from the Site to ensure that detectable radioactivity is primarily due to natural background sources or sources other than INEL operations. 35 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs

  13. A case study for evaluating ecological risks at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

    Peterson, S.; Brewer, R.; Morris, R.; VanHorn, R.

    1994-01-01

    A case study was conducted as a component of the development of guidance for ecological risk assessment at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL is a large facility in southeastern Idaho, encompassing expanses of sagebrush-steppe that harbor numerous wildlife species. Nuclear research and waste disposal activities have resulted in releases of radionuclides at various sites. Due to the size and number of potentially contaminated areas, a cost-effective method was needed to evaluate ecological risks and to identify data needs for remedial investigations. Screening-level assessment approaches were developed to evaluate data collected from previous site investigations. Above-background concentrations of radionuclides and other contaminants in media were compared to risk-based criteria, which were derived from sources such as recent publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). Site-specific risks to plants and wildlife were estimated for contaminants exceeding criteria. Dose rates derived using various estimation methods were compared to reference doses for wildlife obtained from IAEA, NCRP, and other publications

  14. Safety Research Experiment Facilities, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. Draft environmental statement

    1977-01-01

    This environmental statement was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) in support of the Energy Research and Development Administration's (ERDA) proposal for legislative authorization and appropriations for the Safety Research Experiment Facilities (SAREF) Project. The purpose of the proposed project is to modify some existing facilities and provide a new test facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for conducting fast breeder reactor (FBR) safety experiments. The SAREF Project proposal has been developed after an extensive study which identified the FBR safety research needs requiring in-reactor experiments and which evaluated the capability of various existing and new facilities to meet these needs. The proposed facilities provide for the in-reactor testing of large bundles of prototypical FBR fuel elements under a wide variety of conditions, ranging from those abnormal operating conditions which might be expected to occur during the life of an FBR power plant to the extremely low probability, hypothetical accidents used in the evalution of some design options and in the assessment of the long-term potential risk associated with wide-scale deployment of the FBR

  15. Special isotope separation project, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho

    1988-02-01

    Construction and operation of a Special Isotope Separation (SIS) project using the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) process technology at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho are proposed. The SIS project would process fuel-grade plutonium administered by the Department of Energy (DOE) into weapon-grade plutonium using AVLIS and supporting chemical processes. The SIS project would require construction and operation of a Laser Support Facility to house the laser system and a Plutonium Processing Facility. The SIS project would be integrated with existing support and waste management facilities at the selected site. The SIS project would provide DOE with the capability of segregating the isotopes of DOE-owned plutonium into specific isotopic concentrations. This capability would provide redundancy in production capacity, technological diversity, and flexibility in DOE's production of nuclear materials for national defense. Use of the INEL site would impact 151,350 square meters (37.4 acres) of land, of which more than 70% has been previously disturbed. During construction, plant and animal habitat associated with a sagebrush vegetation community would be lost. During operation of the SIS facilities, unavoidable radiation exposures would include occupational exposures and exposures to the public from normal atmospheric releases of radioactive materials that would be minimal compared to natural background radiation

  16. Development of feature extraction analysis for a multi-functional optical profiling device applied to field engineering applications

    Han, Xu; Xie, Guangping; Laflen, Brandon; Jia, Ming; Song, Guiju; Harding, Kevin G.

    2015-05-01

    In the real application environment of field engineering, a large variety of metrology tools are required by the technician to inspect part profile features. However, some of these tools are burdensome and only address a sole application or measurement. In other cases, standard tools lack the capability of accessing irregular profile features. Customers of field engineering want the next generation metrology devices to have the ability to replace the many current tools with one single device. This paper will describe a method based on the ring optical gage concept to the measurement of numerous kinds of profile features useful for the field technician. The ring optical system is composed of a collimated laser, a conical mirror and a CCD camera. To be useful for a wide range of applications, the ring optical system requires profile feature extraction algorithms and data manipulation directed toward real world applications in field operation. The paper will discuss such practical applications as measuring the non-ideal round hole with both off-centered and oblique axes. The algorithms needed to analyze other features such as measuring the width of gaps, radius of transition fillets, fall of step surfaces, and surface parallelism will also be discussed in this paper. With the assistance of image processing and geometric algorithms, these features can be extracted with a reasonable performance. Tailoring the feature extraction analysis to this specific gage offers the potential for a wider application base beyond simple inner diameter measurements. The paper will present experimental results that are compared with standard gages to prove the performance and feasibility of the analysis in real world field engineering. Potential accuracy improvement methods, a new dual ring design and future work will be discussed at the end of this paper.

  17. Mapping rice extent map with crop intensity in south China through integration of optical and microwave images based on google earth engine

    Zhang, X.; Wu, B.; Zhang, M.; Zeng, H.

    2017-12-01

    Rice is one of the main staple foods in East Asia and Southeast Asia, which has occupied more than half of the world's population with 11% of cultivated land. Study on rice can provide direct or indirect information on food security and water source management. Remote sensing has proven to be the most effective method to monitoring the cropland in large scale by using temporary and spectral information. There are two main kinds of satellite have been used to mapping rice including microwave and optical. Rice, as the main crop of paddy fields, the main feature different from other crops is flooding phenomenon at planning stage (Figure 1). Microwave satellites can penetrate through clouds and efficiency on monitoring flooding phenomenon. Meanwhile, the vegetation index based on optical satellite can well distinguish rice from other vegetation. Google Earth Engine is a cloud-based platform that makes it easy to access high-performance computing resources for processing very large geospatial datasets. Google has collected large number of remote sensing satellite data around the world, which providing researchers with the possibility of doing application by using multi-source remote sensing data in a large area. In this work, we map rice planting area in south China through integration of Landsat-8 OLI, Sentienl-2, and Sentinel-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. The flowchart is shown in figure 2. First, a threshold method the VH polarized backscatter from SAR sensor and vegetation index including normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and enhanced vegetation index (EVI) from optical sensor were used the classify the rice extent map. The forest and water surface extent map provided by earth engine were used to mask forest and water. To overcome the problem of the "salt and pepper effect" by Pixel-based classification when the spatial resolution increased, we segment the optical image and use the pixel- based classification results to merge the object

  18. Development of a cumulative risk assessment for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's waste area group 2

    Burns, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    In 1989, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was added to the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Priorities List of Superfund sites. A Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFA/CO) for the INEL was signed by the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), EPA, and the State of Idaho in December 1991. The goal of this agreement is to ensure that potential or actual INEL releases of hazardous substances to the environment are thoroughly investigated in accordance with the National Contingency Plan (NCP) and that appropriate response actions are taken as necessary to protect human health and the environment. The Test Reactor Area (TRA) is included as Waste Area Group (WAG) 2 of ten INEL WAGs identified in the FFA/CO. WAG 2 consists of 13 operable units (OUs) which include pits, tanks, rubble piles, ponds, cooling towers, wells, french drains, perched water and spill areas. OU 2-13 is the Comprehensive Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) for WAG 2. The study presented here is a preliminary evaluation of the comprehensive risk for WAG-2. This investigation will be used as the basis of the WAG-2 comprehensive baseline risk assessment (BRA), and it will serve as a model for other INEL comprehensive risk assessments. The WAG-2 preliminary risk evaluation consisted of two broad phases. These phases were (1) a site and contaminant screening that was intended to support the identification of COPCs and risk assessment data gaps, and (2) an exposure pathway analysis that evaluated the comprehensive human health risks associated with WAG-2. The primary purposes of the investigation were to screen WAG-2 release sites and contaminants, and to identify risk assessment data gaps, so the investigation will be referred to as the WAG-2 Screening and Data Gap Analysis (SDGA) for the remainder of this report

  19. Engineering Design in the Primary School: Applying STEM Concepts to Build an Optical Instrument

    King, Donna; English, Lyn D.

    2016-01-01

    Internationally there is a need for research that focuses on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) education to equip students with the skills needed for a rapidly changing future. One way to do this is through designing engineering activities that reflect real-world problems and contextualise students' learning of STEM concepts.…

  20. Floquet Engineering of Optical Solenoids and Quantized Charge Pumping along Tailored Paths in Two-Dimensional Chern Insulators

    Wang, Botao; Ünal, F. Nur; Eckardt, André

    2018-06-01

    The insertion of a local magnetic flux, as the one created by a thin solenoid, plays an important role in gedanken experiments of quantum Hall physics. By combining Floquet engineering of artificial magnetic fields with the ability of single-site addressing in quantum gas microscopes, we propose a scheme for the realization of such local solenoid-type magnetic fields in optical lattices. We show that it can be employed to manipulate and probe elementary excitations of a topological Chern insulator. This includes quantized adiabatic charge pumping along tailored paths inside the bulk, as well as the controlled population of edge modes.

  1. Schlieren-based temperature measurement inside the cylinder of an optical spark ignition and homogeneous charge compression ignition engine.

    Aleiferis, Pavlos; Charalambides, Alexandros; Hardalupas, Yannis; Soulopoulos, Nikolaos; Taylor, A M K P; Urata, Yunichi

    2015-05-10

    Schlieren [Schlieren and Shadowgraphy Techniques (McGraw-Hill, 2001); Optics of Flames (Butterworths, 1963)] is a non-intrusive technique that can be used to detect density variations in a medium, and thus, under constant pressure and mixture concentration conditions, measure whole-field temperature distributions. The objective of the current work was to design a schlieren system to measure line-of-sight (LOS)-averaged temperature distribution with the final aim to determine the temperature distribution inside the cylinder of internal combustion (IC) engines. In a preliminary step, we assess theoretically the errors arising from the data reduction used to determine temperature from a schlieren measurement and find that the total error, random and systematic, is less than 3% for typical conditions encountered in the present experiments. A Z-type, curved-mirror schlieren system was used to measure the temperature distribution from a hot air jet in an open air environment in order to evaluate the method. Using the Abel transform, the radial distribution of the temperature was reconstructed from the LOS measurements. There was good agreement in the peak temperature between the reconstructed schlieren and thermocouple measurements. Experiments were then conducted in a four-stroke, single-cylinder, optical spark ignition engine with a four-valve, pentroof-type cylinder head to measure the temperature distribution of the reaction zone of an iso-octane-air mixture. The engine optical windows were designed to produce parallel rays and allow accurate application of the technique. The feasibility of the method to measure temperature distributions in IC engines was evaluated with simulations of the deflection angle combined with equilibrium chemistry calculations that estimated the temperature of the reaction zone at the position of maximum ray deflection as recorded in a schlieren image. Further simulations showed that the effects of exhaust gas recirculation and air

  2. Parallel Multi-cycle LES of an Optical Pent-roof DISI Engine Under Motored Operating Conditions

    Van Dam, Noah; Sjöberg, Magnus; Zeng, Wei; Som, Sibendu

    2017-10-15

    The use of Large-eddy Simulations (LES) has increased due to their ability to resolve the turbulent fluctuations of engine flows and capture the resulting cycle-to-cycle variability. One drawback of LES, however, is the requirement to run multiple engine cycles to obtain the necessary cycle statistics for full validation. The standard method to obtain the cycles by running a single simulation through many engine cycles sequentially can take a long time to complete. Recently, a new strategy has been proposed by our research group to reduce the amount of time necessary to simulate the many engine cycles by running individual engine cycle simulations in parallel. With modern large computing systems this has the potential to reduce the amount of time necessary for a full set of simulated engine cycles to finish by up to an order of magnitude. In this paper, the Parallel Perturbation Methodology (PPM) is used to simulate up to 35 engine cycles of an optically accessible, pent-roof Directinjection Spark-ignition (DISI) engine at two different motored engine operating conditions, one throttled and one un-throttled. Comparisons are made against corresponding sequential-cycle simulations to verify the similarity of results using either methodology. Mean results from the PPM approach are very similar to sequential-cycle results with less than 0.5% difference in pressure and a magnitude structure index (MSI) of 0.95. Differences in cycle-to-cycle variability (CCV) predictions are larger, but close to the statistical uncertainty in the measurement for the number of cycles simulated. PPM LES results were also compared against experimental data. Mean quantities such as pressure or mean velocities were typically matched to within 5- 10%. Pressure CCVs were under-predicted, mostly due to the lack of any perturbations in the pressure boundary conditions between cycles. Velocity CCVs for the simulations had the same average magnitude as experiments, but the experimental data showed

  3. Harnessing light: optical science and engineering for the 21st century

    Committee on Optical Science and Engineering, National Research Council

    .... Night-vision equipment and satellite surveillance are changing how wars are fought. Industry uses optical methods in everything from the production of computer chips to the construction of tunnels...

  4. Tribute to Emil Wolf: Science and Engineering Legacy of Physical Optics

    2004-09-23

    1983; his Ph.D. research examined a novel nonimag - ing solar thermal collector with Prof. Roland Winston. While at NRL, Dr. Snail has published more...advanced illumination systems, sensors, and nonimaging optical devices. This SPIE Press book pays tribute to Emil Wolf (see Fig. 1) for his pio- neering...who described the effect of nonimage forming optical systems and scattering media in terms of the Mueller formalism; Edwin H. Land,† who invented the

  5. Optically powered and interrogated rotary position sensor for aircraft engine control applications

    Spillman, W. B.; Crowne, D. H.; Woodward, D. W.

    A throttle level angle (TLA) sensing system is described that utilizes a capacitance based rotary position transducer that is powered and interrogated via light from a single multimode optical fiber. The system incorporates a unique GaAs device that serves as both a power converter and optical data transmitter. Design considerations are discussed, and the fabrication and performance of the sensor system are detailed.

  6. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram

    O'Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II (this volume) describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Specific INEL problem areas/contaminants are identified along with technology solutions, the status of the technologies, precise science and technology needs, and implementation requirements. Volume III provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are referenced by a TEDS codenumber in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II

  7. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram

    O'Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Volume III (this volume) provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are reference by a TEDS code number in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II. Data sheets are arranged alphanumerically by the TEDS code number in the upper right corner of each sheet

  8. Supplemental investigations in support of environmental assessments by the Idaho INEL Oversight Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    1992-01-01

    This document reports on the status of supplemental investigations in support of environmental assessments by the Idaho INEL Oversight Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included is information on hydrology studies in wells open through large intervals, unsaturated zone contamination and transport processes, surface water-groundwater interactions, regional groundwater flow, and independent testing of air quality data

  9. Site-specific probabilistic seismic hazard analyses for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 2: Appendices

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The identification of seismic sources is often based on a combination of geologic and tectonic considerations and patterns of observed seismicity; hence, a historical earthquake catalogue is important. A historical catalogue of earthquakes of approximate magnitude (M) 2.5 and greater for the time period 1850 through 1992 was compiled for the INEL region. The primary data source used was the Decade of North American Geology (DNAG) catalogue for the time period from about 1800 through 1985 (Engdahl and Rinehart, 1988). A large number of felt earthquakes, especially prior to the 1970`s, which were below the threshold of completeness established in the DNAG catalogue (Engdahl and Rinehart, 1991), were taken from the state catalogues compiled by Stover and colleagues at the National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) and combined with the DNAG catalogue for the INEL region. The state catalogues were those of Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming. NEIC`s Preliminary Determination of Epicenters (PDE) and the state catalogues compiled by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI), and the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR) were also used to supplement the pre-1986 time period. A few events reanalyzed by Jim Zollweg (Boise State University, written communication, 1994) were also modified in the catalogue. In the case of duplicate events, the DNAG entry was preferred over the Stover et al. entry for the period 1850 through 1985. A few events from Berg and Baker (1963) were also added to the catalogue. This information was and will be used in determining the seismic risk of buildings and facilities located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory.

  10. Preliminary draft: environmental impact statement for Hot Engineering Test Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Boyle, J.W.; Baxter, B.J.; Carpenter, J.A.

    1978-08-01

    The project considered is the Hot Engineering Test Project (HETP), which is to be located in largely existing facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The project is a part of the National High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Fuel Recycle Program, which seeks to demonstrate the technological feasibility of the recycle processes. The HETP will attempt to confirm the operability of the processes (proven feasible in cold or nonradioactive, benchtop experimentation) under the more realistic radioactive condition. As such, the operation will involve the reprocessing and refabrication of spent HTGR fuel rods obtained from the Fort St. Vrain reactor. The reference fuel is highly enriched uranium. No significant radiological impacts are expected from routine operation of the facility to any biota or ecosystem. Concentrations of one or more radionuclides in Whiteoak Lake will increase as a result of the combination of HETP wastes with other ORNL wastes. Nonradiological effects from construction activities and routine operation should be insignificant on land and water use and on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. No significant socioeconomic impacts should occur from either construction or operation of the facility. Some conservative accident scenarios depict significant releases of radioactivity. Effects should be localized and would not be severe for all but the most unlikely of such incidents. No significant long-term commitment of resources is expected to be required for the project. Nor are any large quantities of scarce or critical resources likely to be irreversibly or irretrievably committed to the project. Principal alternatives considered were: relocation of the project site, postponement of the project schedule, project cancellation, and chemical process variations

  11. Preliminary characterizations study on three soil samples from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory warm waste pond

    Burchett, R.T.; Richardson, W.S.; Hay, S.

    1994-01-01

    Three soil samples (Soil 1,2,and 3) from the Warm Waste Pond (WWP) system at the Test Reactor Area (TRA) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) were sent to the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory (NAREL) in Montgomery, Alabama, for soil characterization and analysis. Each sample was vigorously washed and separated by particle size using wet sieving and vertical-column hydroclassification. The resulting fractions were analyzed for radioactivity by gamma spectroscopy. The following conclusions are based on the results of these analyses: (1) The three samples examined are dissimilar in many characteristics examined in the study. (2) The optimal parameters for vigorously washing the soil samples are a washing time of 30 min 350 rpm using a liquid-to-solid ratio of 4/1 (volume of water/volume of soil). (3) The only size fraction from Soil 1 that is below the 690 picocuries per gram (pCi/g) cesium-137 Record of Division (ROD) criterion is the +25.4-mm(+1-in) fraction, which represents 17 percent of the total soil. (4) There is no size fraction from Soil 2 that is below the 690 pCi/g cesium-137 criterion. (5) At optimal conditions, at least 66 percent of Soil 3 can be recovered with a cesium-137 activity level below the 690 pCi/g criterion. (6) For Soil 3, lowering the liquid-to-solid ratio from 4/1 to 2/1 during vigorous washing produces a higher weight-percent recovery of soil below the 690 pCi/g criterion. At a liquid-to-solid ratio of 2/1, 76 percent of the soil can be recovered with a concentration below the removal criterion, indicating that attrition followed by particle-size separation represents a potential method for remediation

  12. Site-specific probabilistic seismic hazard analyses for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 2: Appendices

    1996-05-01

    The identification of seismic sources is often based on a combination of geologic and tectonic considerations and patterns of observed seismicity; hence, a historical earthquake catalogue is important. A historical catalogue of earthquakes of approximate magnitude (M) 2.5 and greater for the time period 1850 through 1992 was compiled for the INEL region. The primary data source used was the Decade of North American Geology (DNAG) catalogue for the time period from about 1800 through 1985 (Engdahl and Rinehart, 1988). A large number of felt earthquakes, especially prior to the 1970's, which were below the threshold of completeness established in the DNAG catalogue (Engdahl and Rinehart, 1991), were taken from the state catalogues compiled by Stover and colleagues at the National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) and combined with the DNAG catalogue for the INEL region. The state catalogues were those of Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming. NEIC's Preliminary Determination of Epicenters (PDE) and the state catalogues compiled by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI), and the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR) were also used to supplement the pre-1986 time period. A few events reanalyzed by Jim Zollweg (Boise State University, written communication, 1994) were also modified in the catalogue. In the case of duplicate events, the DNAG entry was preferred over the Stover et al. entry for the period 1850 through 1985. A few events from Berg and Baker (1963) were also added to the catalogue. This information was and will be used in determining the seismic risk of buildings and facilities located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

  13. Wave front engineering by means of diffractive optical elements for applications in microscopy

    Cojoc, Dan; Ferrari, Enrico; Garbin, Valeria; Cabrini, Stefano; Carpentiero, Alessandro; Prasciolu, Mauro; Businaro, Luca; Kaulich, Burchard; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2006-05-01

    We present a unified view regarding the use of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) for microscopy applications a wide range of electromagnetic spectrum. The unified treatment is realized through the design and fabrication of DOE through which wave front beam shaping is obtained. In particular we show applications ranging from micromanipulation using optical tweezers to X-ray differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. We report some details on the design and physical implementation of diffractive elements that beside focusing perform also other optical functions: beam splitting, beam intensity and phase redistribution or mode conversion. Laser beam splitting is used for multiple trapping and independent manipulation of spherical micro beads and for direct trapping and manipulation of biological cells with non-spherical shapes. Another application is the Gauss to Laguerre-Gaussian mode conversion, which allows to trap and transfer orbital angular momentum of light to micro particles with high refractive index and to trap and manipulate low index particles. These experiments are performed in an inverted optical microscope coupled with an infrared laser beam and a spatial light modulator for DOEs implementation. High resolution optics, fabricated by means of e-beam lithography, are demonstrated to control the intensity and the phase of the sheared beams in X-ray DIC microscopy. DIC experiments with phase objects reveal a dramatic increase in image contrast compared to bright-field X-ray microscopy.

  14. resolution of the first national conference of engin·eers and architects

    including Codes or Practices for the construction trades; .... The Ethiopian Cement Corporation. The Research Department ... Authority. SAUTJ - Consulting Engineers (Rome). The 1971 graduating class of Electrical and Civil. Engineers at the ...

  15. An aerosol optical depth climatology for NOAA's national surface radiation budget network (SURFRAD)

    Augustine, John A.; Hodges, Gary B.; Dutton, Ellsworth G.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Cornwall, Christopher R.

    2008-06-01

    A series of algorithms developed to process spectral solar measurements for aerosol optical depth (AOD) for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) national surface radiation budget network (SURFRAD) is summarized, and decadal results are presented. AOD is a measure of the extinction of the Sun's beam due to aerosols. Daily files of AOD for five spectral measurements in the visible and near-infrared have been produced for 1997-2006. Comparisons of SURFRAD daily AOD averages to NASA's Aerosol Robotic Network product at two of the stations were generally good. An AOD climatology for each SURFRAD station is presented as an annual time series of composite monthly means that represents a typical intra-annual AOD variation. Results are similar to previous U.S. climatologies in that the highest AOD magnitude and greatest variability occur in summer, the lowest AOD levels are in winter, and geographically, the highest-magnitude AOD is in the eastern United States. Springtime Asian dust intrusions show up as a secondary maximum at the western stations. A time series of nationwide annual means shows that 500-nm AOD has decreased over the United States by about 0.02 AOD units over the 10-year period. However, this decline is not statistically significant nor geographically consistent within the country. The eastern U.S. stations and westernmost station at Desert Rock, Nevada, show decreasing AOD, whereas the other two western stations show an increase that is attributed to an upsurge in wildfire activity in the last half of the decade.

  16. 1997 LMITCO Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Andersen, B.; Street, L.; Wilhelmsen, R.

    1998-09-01

    This report describes the calendar year 1997 environmental surveillance and compliance monitoring activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance, Site Environmental Surveillance, Drinking Water, Effluent Monitoring, Storm Water Monitoring, Groundwater Monitoring, and Special Request Monitoring Programs and compares 1997 data with program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the surveillance and monitoring activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standard, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends indicating a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. With the exception of one nitrogen sample in the disposal pond effluent stream and iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal pond, compliance with permits and applicable regulations was achieved. Data collected by the Environmental Monitoring Program demonstrate that public health and the environment were protected.

  17. 1998 Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    L. V. Street

    1999-09-01

    This report describes the calendar year 1998 compliance monitoring and environmental surveillance activities of the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Environmental Monitoring Program performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report includes results of sampling performed by the Drinking Water, Effluent, Storm Water, Groundwater Monitoring, and Environmental Surveillance Programs. This report compares the 1998 results to program-specific regulatory guidelines and past data to evaluate trends. The primary purposes of the monitoring and surveillance activities are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of public health and the environment. Surveillance of environmental media did not identify any previously unknown environmental problems or trends, which would indicate a loss of control or unplanned releases from facility operations. The INEEL complied with permits and applicable regulations, with the exception of nitrogen samples in a disposal pond effluent stream and iron and total coliform bacteria in groundwater downgradient from one disposal pond. Data collected by the Environmental Monitoring Program demonstrate that the public health and environment were protected.

  18. Grout testing and characterization for shallow-land burial trenches at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Tallent, O.K.; Sams, T.L.; Tamura, T.; Godsey, T.T.; Francis, C.L.; McDaniel, E.W.

    1986-10-01

    An investigation was conducted to develop grout formulations suitable for in situ stabilization of low-level and transuranic (TRU) waste in shallow-land burial trenches at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The acceptabilities of soil, ordinary particulate, and fine particulate grouts were evaluated based on phase separation, compressive strength, freeze/thaw, penetration resistance, rheological, water permeability, column, and other tests. Soil grouts with soil-to-cement weight ratios from 0.91 to 1.60 were found to be suitable for open trench or drum disposal. Ordinary particulate grouts containing type I,II Portland cement, class C fly ash, bentonite, water, and a fluidizer were formulated to fill large voids within the soil/waste matrix of a closed shallow-land burial trench. Fine particulate grouts containing fine (mean particle size, 9.6 m) cement and water were formulated to fill smaller voids and to establish a grout-soil barrier to prevent water intrusion into the grouted waste trench. Solution, or chemical grouts, were evaluated as possible substitutes for the fine particulate grouts

  19. Addressing earthquakes strong ground motion issues at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Wong, I.G.; Silva, W.J.; Stark, C.L.; Jackson, S.; Smith, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    In the course of reassessing seismic hazards at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), several key issues have been raised concerning the effects of the earthquake source and site geology on potential strong ground motions that might be generated by a large earthquake. The design earthquake for the INEL is an approximate moment magnitude (M w ) 7 event that may occur on the southern portion of the Lemhi fault, a Basin and Range normal fault that is located on the northwestern boundary of the eastern Snake River Plain and the INEL, within 10 to 27 km of several major facilities. Because the locations of these facilities place them at close distances to a large earthquake and generally along strike of the causative fault, the effects of source rupture dynamics (e.g., directivity) could be critical in enhancing potential ground shaking at the INEL. An additional source issue that has been addressed is the value of stress drop to use in ground motion predictions. In terms of site geology, it has been questioned whether the interbedded volcanic stratigraphy beneath the ESRP and the INEL attenuates ground motions to a greater degree than a typical rock site in the western US. These three issues have been investigated employing a stochastic ground motion methodology which incorporates the Band-Limited-White-Noise source model for both a point source and finite fault, random vibration theory and an equivalent linear approach to model soil response

  20. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site environmental report for calendar Year 1990

    Hoff, D.L.; Mitchell, R.G.; Moore, R.; Shaw, R.M.

    1991-06-01

    The results of the various monitoring programs for 1990 indicate that most radioactivity from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) operations could not be distinguished from worldwide fallout and natural radioactivity in the region surrounding the INEL Site. Although some radioactive materials were discharged during Site operations, concentrations and doses to the surrounding population were of no health consequence and were far less than State of Idaho and Federal health protection guidelines. The first section of the report summarizes Calendar Year 1990 and January 1 through April 1, 1991, INEL activities related to compliance with environmental regulations and laws. The balance of the report describes the surveillance program, the collection of foodstuffs at the INEL boundary and distant offsite locations, and the collection of air and water samples at onsite locations and offsite boundary and distant locations. The report also compares and evaluates the sample results and discusses implications, if any. Nonradioactive and radioactive effluent monitoring at the Site, and the US Geological Survey (USGS) ground-water monitoring program are also summarized. 33 refs., 18 figs., 29 tabs

  1. American Indians, hunting and fishing rates, risk, and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Burger, J.

    1999-01-01

    Hunting, fishing, and recreational rates of 276 American Indians attending a festival at Fort Hall, near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), were examined. Nearly half of the sample lived on the Fort Hall Reservation, and half were American Indians from elsewhere in the western United States. An additional 44 White people attending the festival were also interviewed. The hypothesis that there are differences in hunting, fishing, and recreational rates as a function of tribal affiliation, educational level, gender, and age was examined. Information on hunting and fishing rates are central for understanding potential exposure scenarios for American Indians if the Department of Energy's INEEL lands are ever opened to public access, and the data are important because of the existence of tribal treaties that govern the legal and cultural rights of the Shoshone-Bannock regarding INEEL lands. Variations in hunting, fishing, and photography rates were explained by tribal affiliation (except fishing), gender, age, and schooling. Hunting rates were significantly higher for Indians (both those living on Fort Hall and others) than Whites. Men engaged in significantly higher rates of outdoor activities than women (except for photography). Potential and current hunting and fishing on and adjacent to INEEL was more similar among the local Whites and Fort Hall Indians than between these two groups and other American Indians

  2. Earthquake strong ground motion studies at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Wong, Ivan; Silva, W.; Darragh, R.; Stark, C.; Wright, D.; Jackson, S.; Carpenter, G.; Smith, R.; Anderson, D.; Gilbert, H.; Scott, D.

    1989-01-01

    Site-specific strong earthquake ground motions have been estimated for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory assuming that an event similar to the 1983 M s 7.3 Borah Peak earthquake occurs at epicentral distances of 10 to 28 km. The strong ground motion parameters have been estimated based on a methodology incorporating the Band-Limited-White-Noise ground motion model coupled with Random Vibration Theory. A 16-station seismic attenuation and site response survey utilizing three-component portable digital seismographs was also performed for a five-month period in 1989. Based on the recordings of regional earthquakes, the effects of seismic attenuation in the shallow crust and along the propagation path and local site response were evaluated. This data combined with a detailed geologic profile developed for each site based principally on borehole data, was used in the estimation of the strong ground motion parameters. The preliminary peak horizontal ground accelerations for individual sites range from approximately 0.15 to 0.35 g. Based on the authors analysis, the thick sedimentary interbeds (greater than 20 m) in the basalt section attenuate ground motions as speculated upon in a number of previous studies

  3. UNSAT-H infiltration model calibration at the Subsurface Disposal Area, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Martian, P.

    1995-10-01

    Soil moisture monitoring data from the expanded neutron probe monitoring network located at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) were used to calibrate numerical infiltration models for 15 locations within and near the SDA. These calibrated models were then used to simulate infiltration into the SDA surficial sediments and underlying basalts for the entire operational period of the SDA (1952--1995). The purpose of performing the simulations was to obtain a time variant infiltration source term for future subsurface pathway modeling efforts as part of baseline risk assessment or performance assessments. The simulation results also provided estimates of the average recharge rate for the simulation period and insight into infiltration patterns at the SDA. These results suggest that the average aquifer recharge rate below the SDA may be at least 8 cm/yr and may be as high as 12 cm/yr. These values represent 38 and 57% of the average annual precipitation occurring at the INEL, respectively. The simulation results also indicate that the maximum evaporative depth may vary between 28 and 148 cm and is highly dependent on localized lithology within the SDA

  4. Geophysical surveys for buried waste detection at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Sandness, G.A.; Rising, J.L.; Kimbrough, J.R.

    1979-12-01

    This report describes a series of geophysical surveys performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The main purpose of the surveys was to evaluate techniques, principally ground-penetrating radar, for detecting and mapping radioactive wastes buried in shallow trenches and pits. A second purpose was to determine the feasibility of using ground-penetrating radar to measure the depth of basalt bedrock. A prototype geophyscal survey system developed by the US Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest Laboratory was used for this study. Radar, magnetometer, and metal detector measurements were made at three sites in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at INEL. Radar measurements were made at fourth site adjacent to the RWMC. The combination of three geophysical methods was shown to provide considerable information about the distribution of buried waste materials. The tests confirmed the potential effectiveness of the radar method, but they also pointed out the need for continued research and development in ground-penetrating radar technology. The radar system tested in this study appears to be capable of measuring the depth to basalt in the vicinity of the RWMC

  5. Expansion of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Research Center: Environmental assessment

    1994-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to expand and upgrade facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Research Center (IRC) by constructing a research laboratory addition on the northeast corner of existing laboratory building; upgrading the fume hood system in the existing laboratory building; and constructing a hazardous waste handling facility and a chemical storage building. The DOE also proposes to expand the capabilities of biotechnology research programs by increasing use of radiolabeled compounds to levels in excess of current facility limits for three radionuclides (carbon-14, sulfur-35, and phosphorus-32). This Environmental assessment identifies the need for the new facilities, describes the proposed projects and environmental setting, and evaluates the potential environmental effects. Impacts associated with current operation are discussed and established as a baseline. Impacts associated with the proposed action and cumulative impacts are described against this background. Alternatives to the proposed action (No action; Locating proposed facilities at a different site) are discussed and a list of applicable regulations is provided. The no action alternative is continuation of existing operations at existing levels as described in Section 4 of this EA. Proposed facilities could be constructed at a different location, but these facilities would not be useful or practical since they are needed to provide a support function for IRC operations. Further, the potential environmental impacts would not be reduced if a different site was selected

  6. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1993

    Mitchell, R.G.

    1994-07-01

    Results of the various environmental monitoring programs for 1993 are presented from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) operations. Although some radioactive materials were discharged during Site operations, concentrations and doses to the surrounding population were of no health consequence and were far less than State of Idaho and Federal health protection guidelines. Chapter 2 summarizes INEL activities related to compliance with environmental regulations and laws for Calendar Year 1993. The major portion of the report summarizes results of the environmental surveillance program conducted by the DOE Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory, which includes the collection of foodstuffs at the INEL boundary and distant offsite locations, and the collection of air and water samples at onsite locations and offsite boundary and distant locations. The report also compares and evaluates the sample results to appropriate federal regulations and standards and discusses implications, if any. The US Geological Survey (USGS) ground-water monitoring program is briefly summarized and data are included in maps showing the spread of contaminants. Effluent monitoring and nonradiological drinking water monitoring are discussed briefly and data are summarized

  7. Final report for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Central Facilities Area Landfill 2

    Doornbos, M.H.; Morgan, M.E.; Hubbell, J.M.

    1991-04-01

    This report summarize activities completed during FY-88 through FY-91 for the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Central Facilities Area (CFA) Landfill 2. The objectives of this program are to demonstrate new technologies or innovative uses of existing technologies for the identification and remediation of hazardous wastes within a municipal-type landfill. The site was chosen as a candidate site because it represents a problem typical of both DOE and public landfills. The HAZWRAP Technology Demonstration Project began at the INEL CFA Landfill 2 in 1987. During characterization and identification activities, several organic ''hotspots'' or anomalies were identified. Proposals were then solicited from the private sector for innovative technologies to remediate the isolated areas. Remediation was planned to be implemented using horizontal wells installed underneath a portion of the landfill. These innovative technologies and the well installation were planned to support the current goals of the DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency to treat hazardous waste in place. 2 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Small mammal density and movement on the SL-1 disposal area, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Filipovich, M.A.; Keller, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    This study was initiated to examine the population composition, density and food habits of small mammals on a radioactive waste disposal area. Population parameters of small mammals were studied at 3-month intervals on and adjacent to the SL-1 radioactive waste disposal area (1.4 ha) and a 0.3 ha control area between August 1981 and February 1982 with mark-release methods. Both areas have crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum) stands surrounded by sagebrush steppe. Species composition on the SL-1 and control area was similar to that found on the Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Considerable use by small mammals of the perimeter of the crested wheatgrass stands was found on both the SL-1 and control area. Additionally, deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) and Ord's kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ordii) that frequent the crested wheatgrass stands of the SL-1 and control area were often captured over 100 m from the crested wheatgrass stands. Thus, future research efforts will focus on examining the intensity of perimeter use and food habits of rodents residing on and adjacent to the SL-1. Results of this study will be used to evaluate ecological conditions that affect small mammal use of radioactive waste disposal areas

  9. Mercury removal at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's New Waste Calcining Facility

    S. C. Ashworth

    2000-02-27

    Technologies were investigated to determine viable processes for removing mercury from the calciner (NWCF) offgas system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Technologies for gas phase and aqueous phase treatment were evaluated. The technologies determined are intended to meet EPA Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) requirements under the Clean Air Act and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Currently, mercury accumulation in the calciner off-gas scrubbing system is transferred to the tank farm. These transfers lead to accumulation in the liquid heels of the tanks. The principal objective for aqueous phase mercury removal is heel mercury reduction. The system presents a challenge to traditional methods because of the presence of nitrogen oxides in the gas phase and high nitric acid in the aqueous scrubbing solution. Many old and new technologies were evaluated including sorbents and absorption in the gas phase and ion exchange, membranes/sorption, galvanic methods, and UV reduction in the aqueous phase. Process modifications and feed pre-treatment were also evaluated. Various properties of mercury and its compounds were summarized and speciation was predicted based on thermodynamics. Three systems (process modification, NOxidizer combustor, and electrochemical aqueous phase treatment) and additional technology testing were recommended.

  10. Mercury Removal at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's New Waste Calcining Facility

    Ashworth, Samuel Clay; Wood, R. A.; Taylor, D. D.; Sieme, D. D.

    2000-03-01

    Technologies were investigated to determine viable processes for removing mercury from the calciner (NWCF) offgas system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Technologies for gas phase and aqueous phase treatment were evaluated. The technologies determined are intended to meet EPA Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) requirements under the Clean Air Act and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Currently, mercury accumulation in the calciner off-gas scrubbing system is transferred to the tank farm. These transfers lead to accumulation in the liquid heels of the tanks. The principal objective for aqueous phase mercury removal is heel mercury reduction. The system presents a challenge to traditional methods because of the presence of nitrogen oxides in the gas phase and high nitric acid in the aqueous scrubbing solution. Many old and new technologies were evaluated including sorbents and absorption in the gas phase and ion exchange, membranes/sorption, galvanic methods, and UV reduction in the aqueous phase. Process modifications and feed pre-treatment were also evaluated. Various properties of mercury and its compounds were summarized and speciation was predicted based on thermodynamics. Three systems (process modification, NOxidizer combustor, and electrochemical aqueous phase treatment) and additional technology testing were recommended.

  11. The electromagnetic integrated demonstration at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory cold test pit

    Pellerin, L.; Alumbaugh, D.L.; Pfeifer, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    The electromagnetic integrated demonstration (EMID) is a baseline study in electromagnetic (EM) exploration of the shallow subsurface (< 10 m). Eleven distinct EM systems, covering the geophysical spectrum, acquired data on a grid over the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Cold Test Pit (CTP). The systems are investigated and evaluated for the purpose of identifying and reviewing existing geophysical characterization instrumentation (commercial and experimental), integrating those technologies with multi-dimensional interpretational algorithms, and identifying gaps in shallow subsurface EM imaging technology. The EMID data, are valuable for testing and evaluating new interpretational software, and developing techniques for integrating multiple datasets. The experimental field techniques shows how the acquisition of data in a variety of array configurations can considerably enhance interpretation. All data are available on the world wide web. Educators and students are encouraged to use the data for both classroom and graduate studies. The purpose of this paper is to explain why, where, how and what kind of data were collected. It is left to the reader to assess the value of a given system for their particular application. Information about the EMID is organized into two general categories: survey description and system evaluation

  12. Mercury removal at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's New Waste Calciner Facility

    Ashworth, S.C.

    2000-01-01

    Technologies were investigated to determine viable processes for removing mercury from the calciner (NWCF) offgas system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Technologies for gas phase and aqueous phase treatment were evaluated. The technologies determined are intended to meet EPA Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) requirements under the Clean Air Act and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Currently, mercury accumulation in the calciner off-gas scrubbing system is transferred to the tank farm. These transfers lead to accumulation in the liquid heels of the tanks. The principal objective for aqueous phase mercury removal is heel mercury reduction. The system presents a challenge to traditional methods because of the presence of nitrogen oxides in the gas phase and high nitric acid in the aqueous scrubbing solution. Many old and new technologies were evaluated including sorbents and absorption in the gas phase and ion exchange, membranes/sorption, galvanic methods, and UV reduction in the aqueous phase. Process modifications and feed pre-treatment were also evaluated. Various properties of mercury and its compounds were summarized and speciation was predicted based on thermodynamics. Three systems (process modification, NOxidizer combustor, and electrochemical aqueous phase treatment) and additional technology testing were recommended

  13. Incineration of DOE offsite mixed waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Harris, J.D.; Harvego, L.A.; Jacobs, A.M.; Willcox, M.V.

    1998-01-01

    The Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) incinerator at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is one of three incinerators in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Complex capable of incinerating mixed low-level waste (MLLW). WERF has received MLLW from offsite generators and is scheduled to receive more. The State of Idaho supports receipt of offsite MLLW waste at the WERF incinerator within the requirements established in the (INEEL) Site Treatment Plan (STP). The incinerator is operating as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Interim Status Facility, with a RCRA Part B permit application currently being reviewed by the State of Idaho. Offsite MLLW received from other DOE facilities are currently being incinerated at WERF at no charge to the generator. Residues associated with the incineration of offsite MLLW waste that meet the Envirocare of Utah waste acceptance criteria are sent to that facility for treatment and/or disposal. WERF is contributing to the treatment and reduction of MLLW in the DOE Complex

  14. Active waste disposal monitoring at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Hubbell, J.M.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes an active waste disposal monitoring system proposed to be installed beneath the low-level radioactive disposal site at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. The monitoring instruments will be installed while the waste is being disposed. Instruments will be located adjacent to and immediately beneath the disposal area within the unsaturated zone to provide early warning of contaminant movement before contaminants reach the Snake River Plain Aquifer. This study determined the optimum sampling techniques using existing monitoring equipment. Monitoring devices were chosen that provide long-term data for moisture content, movement of gamma-emitting nuclides, and gas concentrations in the waste. The devices will allow leachate collection, pore-water collection, collection of gasses, and access for drilling through and beneath the waste at a later time. The optimum monitoring design includes gas sampling devices above, within, and below the waste. Samples will be collected for methane, tritium, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and volatile organic compounds. Access tubes will be utilized to define the redistribution of radionuclides within, above, and below the waste over time and to define moisture content changes within the waste using spectral and neutron logging, respectively. Tracers will be placed within the cover material and within waste containers to estimate transport times by conservative chemical tracers. Monitoring the vadose zone below, within, and adjacent to waste while it is being buried is a viable monitoring option. 12 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab

  15. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory institutional plan -- FY 2000--2004

    Enge, R.S.

    1999-12-01

    In this first institutional plan prepared by Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC, for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, the INEEL will focus its efforts on three strategic thrusts: (1) Environmental Management stewardship for DOE-EM, (2) Nuclear reactor technology for DOE-Nuclear Energy (NE), and (3) Energy R and D, demonstration, and deployment (initial focus on biofuels and chemicals from biomass). The first strategic thrust focuses on meeting DOE-EMs environmental cleanup and long-term stewardship needs in a manner that is safe, cost-effective, science-based, and approved by key stakeholders. The science base at the INEEL will be further used to address a grand challenge for the INEEL and the DOE complex--the development of a fundamental scientific understanding of the migration of subsurface contaminants. The second strategic thrust is directed at DOE-NEs needs for safe, economical, waste-minimized, and proliferation-resistant nuclear technologies. As NE lead laboratories, the INEEL and ANL will pursue specific priorities. The third strategic thrust focuses on DOE's needs for clean, efficient, and renewable energy technology. As an initial effort, the INEEL will enhance its capability in biofuels, bioprocessing, and biochemicals. The content of this institutional plan is designed to meet basic DOE requirements for content and structure and reflect the key INEEL strategic thrusts. Updates to this institutional plan will offer additional content and resource refinements.

  16. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    Hoff, D.L.; Mitchell, R.G.; Moore, R.; Bingham, L.

    1992-09-01

    The results of the various monitoring programs for 1991 indicate that most radioactivity from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) operations could not be distinguished from worldwide fallout and natural radioactivity in the region surrounding the INEL Site. Although some radioactive materials were discharged during Site operations, concentrations and doses to the surrounding population were of no health consequence and were far less than State of Idaho and Federal health protection guidelines. The first section of the report summarizes Calendar Year 1991 and January 1 through June 1, 1992, INEL activities related to compliance with environmental regulations and laws. The major portion of the report summarizes results of the RESL environmental surveillance program, which includes the collection of foodstuffs at the INEL boundary and distant offsite locations, and the collection of air and water samples at onsite locations and offsite boundary and distant locations. The report also compares and evaluates the sample results to appropriate federal regulations and standards and discusses implications, if any. The US Geological Survey (USGS) groundwater monitoring program is briefly summarized and data from USGS reports are included in tables and maps showing the spread of contaminants. Effluent monitoring and nonradiological drinking water monitoring performed by INEL contractors are discussed briefly and data are summarized in tables

  17. Decommissioning of the MTR-605 process water building at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Final report

    Browder, J.H.; Wills, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    Decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the unused radioactively contaminated portions of the MTR-605 building at the Test Reactor Area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has been completed; this final report describes the D and D project. The building is a two-story concrete structure that was used to house piping systems to channel and control coolant water flow for the Materials Testing Reactor (MTR), a 40 MW (thermal) light water test reactor that was operated from 1952 until 1970 and then deactivated. D and D project objectives were to reduce potential environmental and radioactive contamination hazards to levels as low a reasonably achievable. Primary tasks of the D and D project were: to remove contaminated piping (about 400 linear ft of 36- and 30-in.-dia stainless steel pipe) and valves from the primary coolant pipe tunnels, to remove a primary coolant pump and piping, and to remove the three 8-ft-dia by 25-ft-long evaporators from the building second floor

  18. Transuranic waste examination quality assurance at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Bower, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Since 1954, defense-generated transuranic (TRU) waste has been received at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A major objective of the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Waste Management Programs is the proper management of the defense-generated TRU waste. The Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) is providing nondestructive examination and assay of retrievably stored contact handled TRU waste in order to certify it to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Acceptance Crtieria (WIPP-WAC). SWEPP's capabilities for certifying contact handled waste containers include weighing, real-time radiographic examination, fissile material assay examination, container integrity examination, radiological surveys and labeling of waste containers. These processes involve not only instrument accuracy but also a wide range of technician interpretation from moderate on the assay to 100% on the radiograph. This, therefore, requires a variety of quality assurance techniques to ensure that the examinations and certifications are being performed correctly. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the methods utilized by SWEPP for checking on the examination process and to ensure that waste certifications are being properly performed. Included is the application of the quality assurance techniques to each examination system, the management of the data generated by the examination, and the verifications to ensure accurate certification. 1 ref

  19. In summary: Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1997

    Mitchell, R.G.; Roush, D.E. Jr.; Evans, R.B.

    1998-10-01

    Every human is exposed to natural radiation. This exposure comes from many sources, including cosmic radiation from outer space, naturally-occurring radon, and radioactivity from substances in the body. In addition to natural sources of radiation, humans can also be exposed to human-generated sources of radiation. Some examples of these sources include nuclear medicine, X-rays, nuclear weapons testing, and accidents at nuclear power plants. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) research facility that deals, in part, with studying nuclear reactors and the storage and cleanup of radioactive materials. Careful handling and rigorous procedures do not completely eliminate the risk of releasing radioactivity. So, there is a possibility for a member of the public near the INEEL to be exposed to radioactivity from the INEEL. Extensive monitoring of the environment takes place one and around the INEEL. These programs search for radionuclides and other contaminants. The results of these programs are presented each year in a site environmental report. This document summarizes the INEEL site environmental report for 1997

  20. Description of the Sandia National Laboratories science, technology & engineering metrics process.

    Jordan, Gretchen B.; Watkins, Randall D.; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Burns, Alan Richard; Oelschlaeger, Peter

    2010-04-01

    There has been a concerted effort since 2007 to establish a dashboard of metrics for the Science, Technology, and Engineering (ST&E) work at Sandia National Laboratories. These metrics are to provide a self assessment mechanism for the ST&E Strategic Management Unit (SMU) to complement external expert review and advice and various internal self assessment processes. The data and analysis will help ST&E Managers plan, implement, and track strategies and work in order to support the critical success factors of nurturing core science and enabling laboratory missions. The purpose of this SAND report is to provide a guide for those who want to understand the ST&E SMU metrics process. This report provides an overview of why the ST&E SMU wants a dashboard of metrics, some background on metrics for ST&E programs from existing literature and past Sandia metrics efforts, a summary of work completed to date, specifics on the portfolio of metrics that have been chosen and the implementation process that has been followed, and plans for the coming year to improve the ST&E SMU metrics process.

  1. Environmental assessment: Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility (CPP-633), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to close the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF). The WCF is a surplus DOE facility located at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Six facility components in the WCF have been identified as Resource Conservation and Recovery Ace (RCRA)-units in the INEL RCRA Part A application. The WCF is an interim status facility. Consequently, the proposed WCF closure must comply with Idaho Rules and Standards for Hazardous Waste contained in the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA) Section 16.01.05. These state regulations, in addition to prescribing other requirements, incorporate by reference the federal regulations, found at 40 CFR Part 265, that prescribe the requirements for facilities granted interim status pursuant to the RCRA. The purpose of the proposed action is to reduce the risk of radioactive exposure and release of hazardous constituents and eliminate the need for extensive long-term surveillance and maintenance. DOE has determined that the closure is needed to reduce potential risks to human health and the environment, and to comply with the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) requirements

  2. Spent fuel storage cask testing and operational experience at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Eslinger, L.E.; Schmitt, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Spent-fuel storage cask research, development, and demonstration activities are being performed for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) as a part of the storage cask testing program. The cask testing program at federal sites and other locations supports the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) and DOE objectives for cooperative demonstrations with the cask vendors and utilities for development of at-reactor dry cask storage capabilities for spent nuclear fuel assemblies. One research and development program for the storage cask performance testing of metal storage cask was initiated through a cooperative agreement between Virginia Power and DOE in 1984. The performance testing was conducted for the DOE and the Electric Power Research Institute by the Pacific Northwest laboratory, operated for DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), operated for DOE by EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. In 1988 a cooperative agreement was entered into by DOE with Pacific Sierra Nuclear Associates (PSN) for performance testing of the PSN concrete Ventilated Storage Cask. Another closely related activity involving INEL is a transportable storage cask project identified as the Nuclear Fuel Services Spent-Fuel Shipping/Storage Cask Demonstration Project. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility of packing, transporting, and storing commercial spent fuel in dual-purpose transport/storage casks

  3. Preliminary report of biological intrusion studies at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory subsurface disposal area

    Reynolds, T.D.; Arthur, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    As part of a larger study on the effects of biological intrusion of plants and animals into the soil cover placed over low-level radioactive wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA), research was initiated in the summer of 1982 to determine the burrow characteristics and movement patterns of several small mammal species, and the rooting depths of various plants. The depth, length, and volume of burrows were determined for four small mammal species: deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), Ord's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ordii), montane vole (Microtus montanus), and Townsend's ground squirrel (Spermophilis townsendii). The latter species excavated the greatest mean burrow depth (39 cm), length (404 cm), and volume (14.8 1). Movement patterns of three species were determined by radiotelemetry. The mean area of use for P. maniculatus, D. ordii, and M. montanus was 2.3, 1.5, and 1.2 ha respectively. Limited data on rooting depths of various native and introduced plant species at the SDA were obtained by literature review and excavation. During FY-83, experiments will be conducted, using the information obtained from the first year of this study, to evaluate the impact of burrowing mammals and root intrusion on the integrity of the soil cover currently existing at the SDA. Details of these experimental studies are presented

  4. Ultradense, Deep Subwavelength Nanowire Array Photovoltaics As Engineered Optical Thin Films

    Tham, Douglas

    2010-11-10

    A photovoltaic device comprised of an array of 20 nm wide, 32 nm pitch array of silicon nanowires is modeled as an optical material. The nanowire array (NWA) has characteristic device features that are deep in the subwavelength regime for light, which permits a number of simplifying approximations. Using photocurrent measurements as a probe of the absorptance, we show that the NWA optical properties can be accurately modeled with rigorous coupled-wave analysis. The densely structured NWAs behave as homogeneous birefringent materials into the ultraviolet with effective optical properties that are accurately modeled using the dielectric functions of bulk Si and SiO 2, coupled with a physical model for the NWA derived from ellipsometry and transmission electron microscopy. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  5. A review of fiber-optic corrosion sensor in civil engineering

    Luo, Dong; Li, Junnan; Li, Yuanyuan

    2018-05-01

    Fiber-optical corrosion sensor (FOCS) is the research hotspot of corrosion monitoring sensor in recent years. It has the advantages of lightness, simplicity, anti-electromagnetic interference and distributed measurement, so it has an attractive application prospect. In this paper, the mechanism of metal corrosion is introduced. Several common methods for detecting optical fiber corrosion sensors are presented, and the latest progress of optical fiber corrosion sensors in recent years is described. We need to design a set of sensor devices that can directly monitor the corrosion of reinforcing steel bars directly, and propose a method of time dependent reliability assessment based on monitoring data, so as to form a complete research path.

  6. Tuning electro-optic susceptibity via strain engineering in artificial PZT multilayer films for high-performance broadband modulator

    Zhu, Minmin; Du, Zehui; Li, Hongling; Chen, Bensong; Jing, Lin; Tay, Roland Ying Jie; Lin, Jinjun; Tsang, Siu Hon; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    2017-12-01

    A series of Pb(Zr1-xTix)O3 multilayer films alternatively stacked by Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 and Pb(Zr0.35Ti0.65)O3 layers have been deposited on corning glass by magnetron sputtering. The films demonstrate pure perovskite structure and good crystallinity. A large tetragonality (c/a) of ∼1.061 and a shift of ∼0.08 eV for optical bandgap were investigated at layer engineered films. In addition, these samples exhibited a wild tunable electro-optic behavior from tens to ∼250.2 pm/V, as well as fast switching time of down to a few microseconds. The giant EO coefficient was attribute the strain-polarization coupling effect and also comparable to that of epitaxial (001) single crystal PZT thin films. The combination of high transparency, large EO effect, fast switching time, and huge phase transition temperature in PZT-based thin films show the potential on electro-optics from laser to information telecommunication.

  7. Observing proposals on the Web at the National Optical Astronomy Observatories

    Pilachowski, Catherine A.; Barnes, Jeannette; Bell, David J.

    1998-07-01

    Proposals for telescope time at facilities available through the National Optical Astronomy Observatories can now be prepared and submitted via the WWW. Investigators submit proposal information through a series of HTML forms to the NOAO server, where the information is processed by Perl CGI scripts. PostScript figures and ASCII files may be attached by investigators for inclusion in their proposals using their browser's upload feature. Proposal information is saved on the server so that investigators can return in later sessions to continue work on a proposal and so that collaborators can participate in writing the proposal if they have access to the proposal account name and password. The system provides on-line verification of LATEX syntax and a spellchecker, and confirms that all sections of the proposal are filled out. Users can request a LATEX or PostScript copy of their proposal by e-mail, or view the proposal on line. The advantages of the Web-based process for our users are convenience, access to on-line documentation, and the simple interface which avoids direct confrontation with LATEX. From the NOAO point of view, the advantage is the use of standardized formats and syntax, particularly as we begin to receive proposals for the Gemini telescopes and some independent observatories.

  8. The design of the optical Thomson scattering diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility.

    Datte, P S; Ross, J S; Froula, D H; Daub, K D; Galbraith, J; Glenzer, S; Hatch, B; Katz, J; Kilkenny, J; Landen, O; Manha, D; Manuel, A M; Molander, W; Montgomery, D; Moody, J; Swadling, G F; Weaver, J

    2016-11-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 laser beam facility designed to support the Stockpile Stewardship, High Energy Density and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) programs. We report on the design of an Optical Thomson Scattering (OTS) diagnostic that has the potential to transform the community's understanding of NIF hohlraum physics by providing first principle, local, time-resolved measurements of under-dense plasma conditions. The system design allows operation with different probe laser wavelengths by manual selection of the appropriate beam splitter and gratings before the shot. A deep-UV probe beam (λ 0 -210 nm) will be used to optimize the scattered signal for plasma densities of 5 × 10 20 electrons/cm 3 while a 3ω probe will be used for experiments investigating lower density plasmas of 1 × 10 19 electrons/cm 3 . We report the phase I design of a two phase design strategy. Phase I includes the OTS telescope, spectrometer, and streak camera; these will be used to assess the background levels at NIF. Phase II will include the design and installation of a probe laser.

  9. Beyond access to transformations: A cross-national analysis of women in science and engineering education, 1970--2000

    Wotipka, Christine Min

    2001-12-01

    Over the years, attention to the issue of women in science has tended to focus on individual and organizational efforts to encourage women's greater participation in science and engineering fields of study and occupations. With more intense globalization processes that increasingly shape and are shaped by science, national- and global-level understandings of the situation of women in science and engineering as well as methods to boost their greater and more equal participation in these fields are necessary. This study is a cross-national and longitudinal study of women's participation in science and engineering fields of study at the higher education level. In order to explain the growth in women's participation in these fields of study between 1972--1992, I use a world society theoretical perspective to argue that national linkages to global models regarding women's educational equality and women in science may positively influence their participation in these fields. In multivariate statistical analyses, women's participation in higher education, measured as female enrollment in non-science and non-engineering fields of study, exerted a positive effect on women in science and engineering as did male enrollment in science and engineering higher education. The fact that linkage variables and those measuring women's status and other national-level factors were not found to be influential suggests that world-level factors may be contributing to women's greater participation in these fields. To better understand processes at this level, I use feminist critiques of science to examine the efforts made by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), and the World Bank to address women in science and engineering education over a thirty year time period. My examination of their publications as well as conference declarations and platforms of action from ten international conferences finds a

  10. Project Management Plan for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Experimental Test Program

    Connolly, M.J.; Sayer, D.L.

    1993-11-01

    EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) are participating in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL's) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program (WETP). The purpose of the INEL WET is to provide chemical, physical, and radiochemical data on transuranic (TRU) waste to be stored at WIPP. The waste characterization data collected will be used to support the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA), development of the disposal No-Migration Variance Petition (NMVP), and to support the WIPP disposal decision. The PA is an analysis required by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 191 (40 CFR 191), which identifies the processes and events that may affect the disposal system (WIPP) and examines the effects of those processes and events on the performance of WIPP. A NMVP is required for the WIPP by 40 CFR 268 in order to dispose of land disposal restriction (LDR) mixed TRU waste in WIPP. It is anticipated that the detailed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste characterization data of all INEL retrievably-stored TRU waste to be stored in WIPP will be required for the NMVP. Waste characterization requirements for PA and RCRA may not necessarily be identical. Waste characterization requirements for the PA will be defined by Sandia National Laboratories. The requirements for RCRA are defined in 40 CFR 268, WIPP RCRA Part B Application Waste Analysis Plan (WAP), and WIPP Waste Characterization Program Plan (WWCP). This Project Management Plan (PMP) addresses only the characterization of the contact handled (CH) TRU waste at the INEL. This document will address all work in which EG ampersand G Idaho is responsible concerning the INEL WETP. Even though EG ampersand G Idaho has no responsibility for the work that ANL-W is performing, EG ampersand G Idaho will keep a current status and provide a project coordination effort with ANL-W to ensure that the INEL, as a whole, is effectively and

  11. Quantum state engineering, purification, and number-resolved photon detection with high-finesse optical cavities

    Nielsen, Anne E. B.; Muschik, Christine A.; Giedke, Geza

    2010-01-01

    We propose and analyze a multifunctional setup consisting of high-finesse optical cavities, beam splitters, and phase shifters. The basic scheme projects arbitrary photonic two-mode input states onto the subspace spanned by the product of Fock states |n>|n> with n=0,1,2,.... This protocol does no...... is especially attractive as a generalization to many modes allows for distribution and purification of entanglement in networks. In an alternative working mode, the setup allows for quantum nondemolition number resolved photodetection in the optical domain....

  12. New teaching methods in use at UC Irvine's optical engineering and instrument design programs

    Silberman, Donn M.; Rowe, T. Scott; Jo, Joshua; Dimas, David

    2012-10-01

    New teaching methods reach geographically dispersed students with advances in Distance Education. Capabilities include a new "Hybrid" teaching method with an instructor in a classroom and a live WebEx simulcast for remote students. Our Distance Education Geometric and Physical Optics courses include Hands-On Optics experiments. Low cost laboratory kits have been developed and YouTube type video recordings of the instructor using these tools guide the students through their labs. A weekly "Office Hour" has been developed using WebEx and a Live Webcam the instructor uses to display his live writings from his notebook for answering students' questions.

  13. National Ingition Facility subsystem design requirements optics subsystems SSDR 1.6

    English, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    This Subsystems Design Requirement (SSDR) document specifies the functions to be performed and the subsystems design requirements for the major optical components. These optical components comprise those custom designed and fabricated for amplification and transport of the full aperture NIF beam and does not include those off-the-shelf components that may be part of other optical sub-systems (i.e. alignment or diagnostic systems). This document also describes the optical component processing requirements and the QA/damage testing necessary to ensure that the optical components meet or exceed the requirements

  14. Reassessing the English Course Offered to Computer Engineering Students at the National School of Applied Sciences of Al-Hoceima in Morocco: An Action Research Project

    Dahbi, M.

    2015-01-01

    In computer engineering education, specific English language practices are needed to enable computer engineering students to succeed in professional settings. This study was conducted for two purposes. First, it aimed at investigating to what extent the English courses offered to computer engineering students at the National School of Applied…

  15. Hierarchy curriculum for practical skills training in optics and photonics

    Zheng, XiaoDong; Wang, XiaoPing; Liu, Xu; Liu, XiangDong; Lin, YuanFang

    2017-08-01

    The employers in optical engineering fields hope to recruit students who are capable of applying optical principles to solve engineering problems and have strong laboratory skills. In Zhejiang University, a hierarchy curriculum for practical skill training has been constructed to satisfy this demand. This curriculum includes "Introductive practicum" for freshmen, "Opto-mechanical systems design", "Engineering training", "Electronic system design", "Student research training program (SRTP)", "National University Students' Optical-Science-Technology Competition game", and "Offcampus externship". Without cutting optical theory credit hours, this hierarchy curriculum provides a step-by-step solution to enhance students' practical skills. By following such a hierarchy curriculum, students can smoothly advance from a novice to a qualified professional expert in optics. They will be able to utilize optical engineering tools to design, build, analyze, improve, and test systems, and will be able to work effectively in teams to solve problems in engineering and design.

  16. Applications of in situ optical measurements in ecological and biogeochemical studies - a framework for a user-driven national network

    Bergamaschi, B. A.; Pellerin, B. A.; Downing, B. D.; Saraceno, J.; Aiken, G.; Stumpner, P.

    2010-12-01

    A critical challenge for understanding the dynamics between water quality, and ecological processes is obtaining data at time scales in which changes occur. Traditional, discrete sampling, approaches for data collection are often limited by analytical and field costs, site access, and logistical challenges, for long-term sampling at a large number of sites. The timescales of change, however, are often minutes, hours, or years. In situ optical (absorbance and fluorescence) instruments offer opportunities to help overcome these difficulties by directly or indirectly measuring constituents of interest. In situ optical instrumentation have been in use in oceanographic studies for well over 50 years, and as advances in the science, engineering and technology of these sensors have improved, optical sensors have become more commercially viable and available for research. We present several examples that highlight applications of in situ optical measurements for understanding dynamics in stream, river, and estuary systems. Examples illustrate the utility of in situ optical sensors for studies over short-duration events of days to weeks (diurnal cycles, tidal cycles, storm events and snowmelt periods) as well as longer-term continuous monitoring for months to years. We also highlight applied in situ optical measurements as proxies for constituents that are difficult and expensive to measure at high spatiotemporal resolution, for example, dissolved organic carbon, dissolved organic nitrogen, mercury and methylmercury, trihalomethane precursors, harmful algal blooms, and others. We propose that relatively simple absorbance and fluorescence measurements made in situ could be incorporated into short and long-term ecological research and monitoring programs, resulting in advanced understanding of sources that contribute to water quality improvements or degradation, contaminant and carbon cycling, and the occurrence and persistence of harmful algal blooms. Linking these efforts

  17. Ultradense, Deep Subwavelength Nanowire Array Photovoltaics As Engineered Optical Thin Films

    Tham, Douglas; Heath, James R.

    2010-01-01

    A photovoltaic device comprised of an array of 20 nm wide, 32 nm pitch array of silicon nanowires is modeled as an optical material. The nanowire array (NWA) has characteristic device features that are deep in the subwavelength regime for light

  18. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Site Report on the Production and Use of Recycled Uranium

    L. C. Lewis; D. C. Barg; C. L. Bendixsen; J. P. Henscheid; D. R. Wenzel; B. L. Denning

    2000-09-01

    Recent allegations regarding radiation exposure to radionuclides present in recycled uranium sent to the gaseous diffusion plants prompted the Department of Energy to undertake a system-wide study of recycled uranium. Of particular interest, were the flowpaths from site to site operations and facilities in which exposure to plutonium, neptunium and technetium could occur, and to the workers that could receive a significant radiation dose from handling recycled uranium. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory site report is primarily concerned with two locations. Recycled uranium was produced at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant where highly enriched uranium was recovered from spent fuel. The other facility is the Specific Manufacturing Facility (SMC) where recycled, depleted uranium is manufactured into shapes for use by their customer. The SMC is a manufacturing facility that uses depleted uranium metal as a raw material that is then rolled and cut into shapes. There are no chemical processes that might concentrate any of the radioactive contaminant species. Recyclable depleted uranium from the SMC facility is sent to a private metallurgical facility for recasting. Analyses on the recast billets indicate that there is no change in the concentrations of transuranics as a result of the recasting process. The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant was built to recover high-enriched uranium from spent nuclear fuel from test reactors. The facility processed diverse types of fuel which required uniquely different fuel dissolution processes. The dissolved fuel was passed through three cycles of solvent extraction which resulted in a concentrated uranyl nitrate product. For the first half of the operating period, the uranium was shipped as the concentrated solution. For the second half of the operating period the uranium solution was thermally converted to granular, uranium trioxide solids. The dose reconstruction project has evaluated work exposure and

  19. HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK CLOSURE PROJECT AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY

    Quigley, K.D.; Wessman, D.

    2003-01-01

    The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is in the process of closing two underground high-level waste (HLW) storage tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to meet Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations and Department of Energy orders. Closure of these two tanks is scheduled for 2004 as the first phase in closure of the eleven 1.14 million liter (300,000 gallon) tanks currently in service at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). The INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF) Closure sequence consists of multiple steps to be accomplished through the existing tank riser access points. Currently, the tank risers contain steam and process waste lines associated with the steam jets, corrosion coupons, and liquid level indicators. As necessary, this equipment will be removed from the risers to allow adequate space for closure equipment and activities. The basic tank closure sequence is as follows: Empty the tank to the residual heel using the existing jets; Video and sample the heel; Replace steam jets with new jet at a lower position in the tank, and remove additional material; Flush tank, piping and secondary containment with demineralized water; Video and sample the heel; Evaluate decontamination effectiveness; Displace the residual heel with multiple placements of grout; and Grout piping, vaults and remaining tank volume. Design, development, and deployment of a remotely operated tank cleaning system were completed in June 2002. The system incorporates many commercially available components, which have been adapted for application in cleaning high-level waste tanks. The system is cost-effective since it also utilizes existing waste transfer technology (steam jets), to remove tank heel solids from the tank bottoms during the cleaning operations. Remotely operated directional spray nozzles, automatic rotating wash balls, video monitoring equipment, decontamination spray-rings, and

  20. Tank Closure Progress at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Tank Farm Facility

    Butterworth, St.W.; Shaw, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    Significant progress continued at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with the completion of the closure process to empty, clean and close radioactive liquid waste storage tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Tank Farm Facility (TFF). The TFF includes eleven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) underground stainless steel storage tanks and four smaller, 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) stainless steel tanks, along with tank vaults, interconnecting piping, and ancillary equipment. The TFF tanks had historically been used to store a variety of radioactive liquid waste, including wastes associated with past spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Four of the large storage tanks remain in use for waste storage while the other seven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks and the four 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks have been emptied of waste, cleaned and filled with grout. Recent issuance of an Amended Record of Decision (ROD) in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, and a Waste Determination complying with Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2005, allowed commencement of grouting activities on the cleaned tanks. The first three 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks were grouted in the Fall of 2006 and the fourth tank and the seven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks were filled with grout in 2007 to provide long-term stability. During 2008 over seven miles of underground process piping along with associated tank valve boxes and secondary containment systems was stabilized with grout. Lessons learned were compiled and implemented during the closure process and will be utilized on the remaining four 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) underground stainless steel storage tanks. Significant progress has been made to clean and close emptied tanks at the INTEC TFF. Between 2002 and 2005, seven of the eleven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks and all four 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks were cleaned and prepared

  1. Calculating the shrapnel generation and subsequent damage to first wall and optics components for the National Ignition Facility

    Tokheim, R.E.; Seaman, L.; Cooper, T.; Lew, B.; Curran, D.R.; Sanchez, J.; Anderson, A.; Tobin, M.

    1996-01-01

    This study computationally assesses the threat from shrapnel generation on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) first wall, final optics, and ultimately other target chamber components. Motion of the shrapnel is determined both by particle velocities resulting from the neutron deposition and by x-ray and ionic debris loading arising from explosion of the hohlraum. Material responses of different target area components are computed from one-dimensional and two-dimensional stress wave propagation codes. Well developed rate-dependent spall computational models are used for stainless steel spall and splitting. Severe cell distortion is accounted for in shine-shield and hohlraum-loading computations. Resulting distributions of shrapnel particles are traced to the first wall and optics and damage is estimated for candidate materials. First wall and optical material damage from shrapnel includes crater formation and associated extended cracking. 5 refs., 10 figs

  2. Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

  3. Developments in radiography and tomography of waste containers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Roney, T.J.; Allemeier, R.T.; Galbraith, S.G.; Tow, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (IN-F-L) has been inspecting containers (boxes and drums) of nuclear waste materials using real-time radiography (RTR) for the past ten years. Requirements governing characterization of containerized waste for short-term storage, treatment, transportation, and disposal have become more stringent. These new requirements, and the need to reduce inspection times to increase throughput, necessitate improvements in the information obtained by radiographic methods. RTR provides a qualitative view of container contents, whereas quantitative information is often required. Two projects at the INEL are converting the present qualitative radiographic inspection to the more quantitative digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT) methods, while retaining the RTR function. The first project is modifying, the RTR hardware at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) to allow rapid processing of analog RTR images. The digital RTR (DRTR) system described here can digitize, process, and redisplay RTR images at video frame rates allowing for real-time image improvement features such as edge detection, contrast enhancement, frame subtraction, frame averaging, and a variety of digital filtering options. The second project is developing a complete radiographic and tomographic capability that allows for greater sophistication in data acquisition and processing as the operator and/or requirements demand. The approach involves modification of an industrial CT scanner with the capability to acquire radiographic and tomographic data in several modes, including conventional RTR, DR, and CT with a linear detector for high spatial resolution, and DR and CT with an area detector for high throughput. Improvements in image quality and quantitative digital radiographic capabilities of the DRTR system are shown. Status and plans for the modified CT scanner (presently under development) are also presented

  4. Development of criteria for release of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sites following decontamination and decommissioning

    Kirol, L.

    1986-08-01

    Criteria have been developed for release of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) facilities and land areas following decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). Although these facilities and land areas are not currently being returned to the public domain, and no plans exist for doing so, criteria suitable for unrestricted release to the public were desired. Midway through this study, the implementation of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2, Radioactive Waste Management, required development of site specific release criteria for use on D and D projects. These criteria will help prevent remedial actions from being required if INEL reuse considerations change in the future. Development of criteria for release of INEL facilities following D and D comprised four study areas: pathways analysis, dose and concentration guidelines, sampling and instrumentation, and implementation procedures. Because of the complex and sensitive nature of the first three categories, a thorough review by experts in those respective fields was desired. Input and support in preparing or reviewing each part of the criteria development task was solicited from several DOE field offices. Experts were identified and contracted to assist in preparing portions of the release criteria, or to serve on a peer-review committee. Thus, the entire release criteria development task was thoroughly reviewed by recognized experts from contractors at several DOE field offices, to validate technical content of the document. Each of the above four study areas was developed originally as an individual task, and a report was generated from each. These reports are combined here to form this document. This release criteria document includes INEL-specific pathways analysis, instrumentation requirements, sampling procedures, the basis for selection of dose and concentration guidelines, and cost-risk-benefit procedures

  5. Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria

  6. Geologic aspects of seismic hazards assessment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, southeastern Idaho

    Smith, R.P.; Hackett, W.R.; Rodgers, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), located on the northwestern side of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), lies in an area influenced by two distinct geologic provinces. The ESRP province is a northeast-trending zone of late Tertiary and Quaternary volcanism which transects the northwest-trending, block-fault mountain ranges of the Basin and Range province. An understanding of the interaction of these two provinces is important for realistic geologic hazards assessment. Of particular importance for seismic hazards analysis is the relationship of volcanic rift zones on the ESRP to basin-and-range faults north of the plain. The Arco Rift Zone, a 20-km-long belt of deformation and volcanism on the plain just west of the INEL, is colinear with the basin-and-range Lost River fault. Recent field studies have demonstrated that Arco Rift Zone deformation is typical of that induced by dike injection in other volcanic rift zones. The deformation is characterized by a predominance of dilational fissuring with less extensive development of faults and grabens. Cumulative vertical displacements over the past 0.6 Ma are an order of magnitude lower than those associated with the Arco Segment of the Lost River fault to the northwest. The evidence suggests that the northeast-directed extension that produces the block fault mountains of the Basin and Range is expressed by dike injection and volcanic rift zone development in the ESRP. Seismicity associated with dike injection during rift zone development is typically of low magnitude and would represent only minor hazard compared to that associated with the block faulting. Since the ESRP responds to extension in a manner distinct from basin-and-range faulting, it is not appropriate to consider the volcanic rift zones as extensions of basin-and-range faults for seismic hazard analysis

  7. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF)

    1995-09-01

    The Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF) is a facility safety reference document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) environmental restoration activities. The BSAF contains information and guidance for safety analysis documentation required by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for environmental restoration (ER) activities, including: Characterization of potentially contaminated sites. Remedial investigations to identify and remedial actions to clean up existing and potential releases from inactive waste sites Decontamination and dismantlement of surplus facilities. The information is INEL-specific and is in the format required by DOE-EM-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports. An author of safety analysis documentation need only write information concerning that activity and refer to BSAF for further information or copy applicable chapters and sections. The information and guidance provided are suitable for: sm-bullet Nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480-23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) with hazards that meet the Category 3 threshold (DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) sm-bullet Radiological facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94, Hazard Baseline Documentation) Nonnuclear facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94) that are classified as open-quotes lowclose quotes hazard facilities (DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System). Additionally, the BSAF could be used as an information source for Health and Safety Plans and for Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) for nuclear facilities with hazards equal to or greater than the Category 2 thresholds, or for nonnuclear facilities with open-quotes moderateclose quotes or open-quotes highclose quotes hazard classifications

  8. Volcanic hazards of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and adjacent areas

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1994-12-01

    Potential volcanic hazards are assessed, and hazard zone maps are developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and adjacent areas. The basis of the hazards assessment and mapping is the past volcanic history of the INEL region, and the apparent similarity of INEL volcanism with equivalent, well-studied phenomena in other regions of active volcanism, particularly Hawaii and Iceland. The most significant hazards to INEL facilities are associated with basaltic volcanism, chiefly lava flows, which move slowly and mainly threaten property by inundation or burning. Related hazards are volcanic gases and tephra, and ground disturbance associated with the ascent of magma under the volcanic zones. Several volcanic zones are identified in the INEL area. These zones contain most of the volcanic vents and fissures of the region and are inferred to be the most probable sites of future INEL volcanism. Volcanic-recurrence estimates are given for each of the volcanic zones based on geochronology of the lavas, together with the results of field and petrographic investigations concerning the cogenetic relationships of INEL volcanic deposits and associated magma intrusion. Annual probabilities of basaltic volcanism within the INEL volcanic zones range from 6.2 x 10 -5 per year (average 16,000-year interval between eruptions) for the axial volcanic zone near the southern INEL boundary and the Arco volcanic-rift zone near the western INEL boundary, to 1 x 10 -5 per year (average 100,000-year interval between eruptions) for the Howe-East Butte volcanic rift zone, a geologically old and poorly defined feature of the central portion of INEL. Three volcanic hazard zone maps are developed for the INEL area: lava flow hazard zones, a tephra (volcanic ash) and gas hazard zone, and a ground-deformation hazard zone. The maps are useful in land-use planning, site selection, and safety analysis

  9. Hydrologic conditions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho - emphasis: 1974-1978

    Barraclough, J.T.; Lewis, B.D.; Jensen, R.G.

    1982-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site covers about 890 square miles of the eastern Snake River Plain and overlies the Snake River Plain aquifer. Low concentrations of aqueous chemical and radioactive wastes have been discharged to shallow ponds and to shallow or deep wells on the site since 1952. A large body of perched ground water has formed in the basalt underlying the waste disposal ponds in the Test Reactor Area. This perched zone contains tritium, chromium-51, cobalt-60, strontium-90, and several nonradioactive ions. Tritium is the only mappable waste constituent in that portion of the Snake River Plain aquifer directly underlying this perched zone. Low concentrations of chemical and low-level radioactive wastes enter directly into the Snake River Plain aquifer through the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) disposal well. Tritium has been discharged to the well since 1953 and has formed the largest waste plume, about 28 square miles in area, in the regional aquifer, and minute concentrations have migrated downgradient a horizontal distance of 7.5 miles. Other waste plumes south of the ICPP contain sodium, chloride, nitrate, and the resultant specific conductance. These plumes have similar configurations and flow southward; the contaminants are in general laterally dispersed in that portion of the aquifer underlying the INEL. Other waste plumes, containing strontium-90 and iodine-129, cover small areas near their points of discharge because strontium-90 is sorbed from solution as it moves through the aquifer and iodine-129 is discharged in very low quantities. Cesium-137 is also discharged through the well but it is strongly sorbed from solution and has never been detected in a sample of ground water at the INEL

  10. ICPP injection well alternative project, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Final report

    1980-10-01

    The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) portion of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been obtaining water needed for its operations from the Snake River aquifer, which occupies the entire region underlying the site. Most of this water has been used for cooling operating equipment, while a small portion has found various process uses. After passing through the ICPP process area, these waters are then returned to the aquifer. A small portion (about 1%) of the returned stream contains measurable amounts of radioactivity derived from the miscellaneous process users. This report and the recommendations contained herein are based upon stream flows projected for 1985 as supplied by DOE for the ICPP. 26 different alternatives for handling cooling water, chemical, and low level radioactive water disposal are examined. These cases are considered from technical, environmental, safety, and economic points of view. The level of detail is sufficient to eliminate non-viable cases, and to identify those which offer improvements over present practice. The Environmental/Safety Risk Factors were evaluated on a qualitative comparison basis only. Before a recommended improvement is incorporated into the waste disposal system, a conceptual design study should be made which would evaluate all those secondary effects and environmental factors that, by the very nature of the screening process, this study has not provided. Certain synergistic combinations have been noted and are discussed. This report does note whether the operations considered are in regulatory compliance, or are likely to be capable of providing lasting improvement to the waste water system. Qualitative comparisons were made between the various alternatives to confirm their relationship with applicable standards

  11. Risk evaluations of transuranic waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Smith, T.H.; Keneshea, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Approximately 75% of the defense low-level transuranic (TRU) waste stored in the United States and 25% of the buried TRU waste is located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Studies have been performed to identify and evaluate technical alternatives for the long-term management of this waste. (The alternatives range from leaving the waste in place as is to reviewing, processing, and shipping it to an offsite geological repository.) Among the evalations that have been performed were preliminary risk evaluations. The dose commitment and risk of hypothetical, near-term, accidental or uncontrolled releases of radionuclides have been evaluated for each alternative. The following potential causes of radionuclide release have been studied: process and handling accidents, shipping accidents, natural events (e.g., earthquakes), man-caused events (e.g., airplane crashes), and future intrusion by individuals or small populations after loss of societal control over the waste. The hypothetical releases have been evaluated, in terms of dose commitment and (if pertinent) probability and risk, for all operational steps making up each concept. The dominant scanerios in terms of near-term risk are (1) lava flow up through or over the waste, leading to airbone releases; (2) an explosion or a criticality accident in the waste-processing facility; and (3) a tornado strike or a fire during waste retrieval. The dominant long-term releases are (1) volcanic action; and (2) intrusion of people on the waste site.Although substantial dose commitments to individual members of the public were calculated for the lava flow and intrusion scenarios, no prompt health effects would be expected from the exposures. The effects would be in the form of a slightly increased likelihood of latent cancer induction

  12. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1998

    T. R. Saffle; R. G. Mitchell; R. B. Evans; D. B. Martin

    2000-07-01

    The results of the various monitoring programs for 1998 indicated that radioactivity from the DOE's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) operations could generally not be distinguished from worldwide fallout and natural radioactivity in the region surrounding the INEEL. Although some radioactive materials were discharged during INEEL operations, concentrations in the offsite environment and doses to the surrounding population were far less than state of Idaho and federal health protection guidelines. Gross alpha and gross beta measurements, used as a screening technique for air filters, were investigated by making statistical comparisons between onsite or boundary location concentrations and the distant community group concentrations. Gross alpha activities were generally higher at distant locations than at boundary and onsite locations. Air samples were also analyzed for specific radionuclides. Some human-made radionuclides were detected at offsite locations, but most were near the minimum detectable concentration and their presence was attributable to natural sources, worldwide fallout, and statistical variations in the analytical results rather than to INEEL operations. Low concentrations of 137Cs were found in muscle tissue and liver of some game animals and sheep. These levels were mostly consistent with background concentrations measured in animals sampled onsite and offsite in recent years. Ionizing radiation measured simultaneously at the INEEL boundary and distant locations using environmental dosimeters were similar and showed only background levels. The maximum potential population dose from submersion, ingestion, inhalation, and deposition to the approximately 121,500 people residing within an 80-km (50-mi) radius from the geographical center of the INEEL was estimated to be 0.08 person-rem (8 x 10-4 person-Sv) using the MDIFF air dispersion model. This population dose is less than 0.0002 percent of the estimated 43,7 00

  13. Long-range plan for buried transuranic waste studies at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Low, J.O.

    1985-12-01

    This document presents a plan to perform detailed studies of alternatives considered for the long-term management of buried transuranic waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The studies will provide the technical basis for DOE to make a decision on the future management of that waste. Although the waste is currently being handled in an acceptable manner, new solutions are continually being researched to improve management techniques. Three alternatives are being considered: (a) leave the waste as is; (b) improve in situ confinement of the waste; and (c) retrieve, process, and certify the waste for disposal at a federal repository. Fourteen studies are described in this plan for Alternatives 2 and 3. The leave-as-is alternative involves continuing present procedures for managing the buried waste. An ongoing environmental surveillance program, a low-level-waste stabilization program, and enhanced subsurface migration studies begun in FY-1984 at the INEL will provide data for the decision-making process for the INEL buried TRU waste. These ongoing studies for the leave-as-is alternative are summarized in this plan in limited detail. The improved-confinement alternative involves leaving the waste in place, but providing additional protection against wind, water penetration, erosion, and plant and animal intrusion. Several studies proposed under this alternative will examine special techniques to immobilize or encapsulate the buried waste. An in situ grouting study was implemented at the INEL starting in FY-1985 and will be completed at the end of FY-1986 with the grouting of a simulated INEL buried TRU waste trench. Studies of the third alternative will investigate improved retrieval, processing, and certification techniques. New equipment, such as industrial manipulators and excavating machinery, will be tested in the retrieval studies. Processing and certification studies will examine rapidly changing or new technologies

  14. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF) is a facility safety reference document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) environmental restoration activities. The BSAF contains information and guidance for safety analysis documentation required by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for environmental restoration (ER) activities, including: Characterization of potentially contaminated sites. Remedial investigations to identify and remedial actions to clean up existing and potential releases from inactive waste sites Decontamination and dismantlement of surplus facilities. The information is INEL-specific and is in the format required by DOE-EM-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports. An author of safety analysis documentation need only write information concerning that activity and refer to BSAF for further information or copy applicable chapters and sections. The information and guidance provided are suitable for: {sm_bullet} Nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480-23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) with hazards that meet the Category 3 threshold (DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) {sm_bullet} Radiological facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94, Hazard Baseline Documentation) Nonnuclear facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94) that are classified as {open_quotes}low{close_quotes} hazard facilities (DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System). Additionally, the BSAF could be used as an information source for Health and Safety Plans and for Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) for nuclear facilities with hazards equal to or greater than the Category 2 thresholds, or for nonnuclear facilities with {open_quotes}moderate{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} hazard classifications.

  15. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory High-Level Waste Roadmap. Revision 2

    1993-08-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) High-Level Waste (HLW) Roadmap takes a strategic look at the entire HLW life-cycle starting with generation, through interim storage, treatment and processing, transportation, and on to final disposal. The roadmap is an issue-based planning approach that compares ``where we are now`` to ``where we want and need to be.`` The INEL has been effectively managing HLW for the last 30 years. Calcining operations are continuing to turn liquid HLW into a more manageable form. Although this document recognizes problems concerning HLW at the INEL, there is no imminent risk to the public or environment. By analyzing the INEL current business operations, pertinent laws and regulations, and committed milestones, the INEL HLW Roadmap has identified eight key issues existing at the INEL that must be resolved in order to reach long-term objectives. These issues are as follows: A. The US Department of Energy (DOE) needs a consistent policy for HLW generation, handling, treatment, storage, and disposal. B. The capability for final disposal of HLW does not exist. C. Adequate processes have not been developed or implemented for immobilization and disposal of INEL HLW. D. HLW storage at the INEL is not adequate in terms of capacity and regulatory requirements. E. Waste streams are generated with limited consideration for waste minimization. F. HLW is not adequately characterized for disposal nor, in some cases, for storage. G. Research and development of all process options for INEL HLW treatment and disposal are not being adequately pursued due to resource limitations. H. HLW transportation methods are not selected or implemented. A root-cause analysis uncovered the underlying causes of each of these issues.

  16. Fiber Optic Chemical Nanosensors Based on Engineered Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    M. Consales

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, a review of the development of high-performance optochemical nanosensors based on the integration of carbon nanotubes with the optical fiber technology is presented. The paper first provide an overview of the amazing features of carbon nanotubes and their exploitation as highly adsorbent nanoscale materials for gas sensing applications. Successively, the attention is focused on the operating principle, fabrication, and characterization of fiber optic chemosensors in the Fabry-Perot type reflectometric configuration, realized by means of the deposition of a thin layer of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs upon the distal end of standard silica optical fibers. This is followed by an extensive review of the excellent sensing capabilities of the realized SWCNTs-based chemical nanosensors against volatile organic compounds and other pollutants in different environments (air and water and operating conditions (room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. The experimental results reported here reveal that ppm and sub-ppm chemical detection limits, low response times, as well as fast and complete recovery of the sensor responses have been obtained in most of the investigated cases. This evidences the great potentialities of the proposed photonic nanosensors based on SWCNTs to be successfully employed for practical environmental monitoring applications both in liquid and vapor phase as well as for space. Furthermore, the use of novel SWCNTs-based composites as sensitive fiber coatings is proposed to enhance the sensing performance and to improve the adhesion of carbon nanotubes to the fiber surface. Finally, new advanced sensing configurations based on the use of hollow-core optical fibers coated and partially filled by carbon nanotubes are also presented.

  17. Model-based software engineering for an optical navigation system for spacecraft

    Franz, T.; Lüdtke, D.; Maibaum, O.; Gerndt, A.

    2018-06-01

    The project Autonomous Terrain-based Optical Navigation (ATON) at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) is developing an optical navigation system for future landing missions on celestial bodies such as the moon or asteroids. Image data obtained by optical sensors can be used for autonomous determination of the spacecraft's position and attitude. Camera-in-the-loop experiments in the Testbed for Robotic Optical Navigation (TRON) laboratory and flight campaigns with unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) are performed to gather flight data for further development and to test the system in a closed-loop scenario. The software modules are executed in the C++ Tasking Framework that provides the means to concurrently run the modules in separated tasks, send messages between tasks, and schedule task execution based on events. Since the project is developed in collaboration with several institutes in different domains at DLR, clearly defined and well-documented interfaces are necessary. Preventing misconceptions caused by differences between various development philosophies and standards turned out to be challenging. After the first development cycles with manual Interface Control Documents (ICD) and manual implementation of the complex interactions between modules, we switched to a model-based approach. The ATON model covers a graphical description of the modules, their parameters and communication patterns. Type and consistency checks on this formal level help to reduce errors in the system. The model enables the generation of interfaces and unified data types as well as their documentation. Furthermore, the C++ code for the exchange of data between the modules and the scheduling of the software tasks is created automatically. With this approach, changing the data flow in the system or adding additional components (e.g., a second camera) have become trivial.

  18. Model-based software engineering for an optical navigation system for spacecraft

    Franz, T.; Lüdtke, D.; Maibaum, O.; Gerndt, A.

    2017-09-01

    The project Autonomous Terrain-based Optical Navigation (ATON) at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) is developing an optical navigation system for future landing missions on celestial bodies such as the moon or asteroids. Image data obtained by optical sensors can be used for autonomous determination of the spacecraft's position and attitude. Camera-in-the-loop experiments in the Testbed for Robotic Optical Navigation (TRON) laboratory and flight campaigns with unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) are performed to gather flight data for further development and to test the system in a closed-loop scenario. The software modules are executed in the C++ Tasking Framework that provides the means to concurrently run the modules in separated tasks, send messages between tasks, and schedule task execution based on events. Since the project is developed in collaboration with several institutes in different domains at DLR, clearly defined and well-documented interfaces are necessary. Preventing misconceptions caused by differences between various development philosophies and standards turned out to be challenging. After the first development cycles with manual Interface Control Documents (ICD) and manual implementation of the complex interactions between modules, we switched to a model-based approach. The ATON model covers a graphical description of the modules, their parameters and communication patterns. Type and consistency checks on this formal level help to reduce errors in the system. The model enables the generation of interfaces and unified data types as well as their documentation. Furthermore, the C++ code for the exchange of data between the modules and the scheduling of the software tasks is created automatically. With this approach, changing the data flow in the system or adding additional components (e.g., a second camera) have become trivial.

  19. Activity status and future plans for the Optical Laboratory of the National Astronomical Research Institute of Thailand

    Buisset, Christophe; Poshyachinda, Saran; Soonthornthum, Boonrucksar; Prasit, Apirat; Alagao, Mary Angelie; Choochalerm, Piyamas; Wanajaroen, Weerapot; Lepine, Thierry; Rabbia, Yves; Aukkaravittayapun, Suparerk; Leckngam, Apichat; Thummasorn, Griangsak; Ngernsujja, Surin; Inpan, Anuphong; Kaewsamoet, Pimon; Lhospice, Esther; Meemon, Panomsak; Artsang, Pornapa; Suwansukho, Kajpanya; Sirichote, Wichit; Paenoi, Jitsupa

    2018-03-01

    The National Astronomical Research Institute of Thailand (NARIT) has developed since June 2014 an optical laboratory that comprises all the activities and facilities related to the research and development of new instruments in the following areas: telescope design, high dynamic and high resolution imaging systems and spectrographs. The facilities include ZEMAX and Solidwork software for design and simulation activities as well as an optical room with all the equipment required to develop optical setup with cutting-edge performance. The current projects include: i) the development of a focal reducer for the 2.3 m Thai National Telescope (TNT), ii) the development of the Evanescent Wave Coronagraph dedicated to the high contrast observations of star close environment and iii) the development of low resolution spectrographs for the Thai National Telescope and for the 0.7 m telescopes of NARIT regional observatories. In each project, our activities start from the instrument optical and mechanical design to the simulation of the performance, the development of the prototype and finally to the final system integration, alignment and tests. Most of the mechanical parts are manufactured by using the facilities of NARIT precision mechanical workshop that includes a 3-axis Computer Numerical Control (CNC) to machine the mechanical structures and a Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) to verify the dimensions. In this paper, we give an overview of the optical laboratory activities and of the associated facilities. We also describe the objective of the current projects, present the specifications and the design of the instruments and establish the status of development and we present our future plans.

  20. Integrated Photonic Engine for Miniaturized Fiber Optics Sensor Interrogators, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Structural health monitoring is critical capability for NASA, and it is required for launch vehicles, space vehicles, re-entry vehicles, vehicle pressure systems,...

  1. Improved non-invasive Optical Coherence Tomography detection of different engineered nanoparticles in food-mimicking matrices.

    Grombe, Ringo; Kirsten, Lars; Mehner, Mirko; Linsinger, Thomas P J; Koch, Edmund

    2016-12-01

    Food industry and regulators require fast and reliable analytical methods for quality control. This especially counts for the detection of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in food products. Respective EU regulation is in force, but the development of appropriate methods is still underway. This paper updates the scope of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) for ENM/food matrix analysis. A range of nanomaterials and composites - Au@SiO2, Ag, Ag@SiO2 and SiO2 - in a simplified food matrix was investigated. The earlier finding of linear dependencies between concentration in the dispersion and light responses could be reproduced. Being able to analyse non-invasively for a relevant industrial compound such as SiO2, makes OCT an excellent candidate for screening purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Realisation and advanced engineering of true optical rugate filters based on nanoporous anodic alumina by sinusoidal pulse anodisation

    Santos, Abel; Yoo, Jeong Ha; Rohatgi, Charu Vashisth; Kumeria, Tushar; Wang, Ye; Losic, Dusan

    2016-01-01

    This study is the first realisation of true optical rugate filters (RFs) based on nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA) by sinusoidal waves. An innovative and rationally designed sinusoidal pulse anodisation (SPA) approach in galvanostatic mode is used with the aim of engineering the effective medium of NAA in a sinusoidal fashion. A precise control over the different anodisation parameters (i.e. anodisation period, anodisation amplitude, anodisation offset, number of pulses, anodisation temperature and pore widening time) makes it possible to engineer the characteristic reflection peaks and interferometric colours of NAA-RFs, which can be finely tuned across the UV-visible-NIR spectrum. The effect of the aforementioned anodisation parameters on the photonic properties of NAA-RFs (i.e. characteristic reflection peaks and interferometric colours) is systematically assessed in order to establish for the first time a comprehensive rationale towards NAA-RFs with fully controllable photonic properties. The experimental results are correlated with a theoretical model (Looyenga-Landau-Lifshitz - LLL), demonstrating that the effective medium of these photonic nanostructures can be precisely described by the effective medium approximation. NAA-RFs are also demonstrated as chemically selective photonic platforms combined with reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIfS). The resulting optical sensing system is used to assess the reversible binding affinity between a model drug (i.e. indomethacin) and human serum albumin (HSA) in real-time. Our results demonstrate that this system can be used to determine the overall pharmacokinetic profile of drugs, which is a critical aspect to be considered for the implementation of efficient medical therapies.This study is the first realisation of true optical rugate filters (RFs) based on nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA) by sinusoidal waves. An innovative and rationally designed sinusoidal pulse anodisation (SPA) approach in galvanostatic

  3. Optical design of the National Ignition Facility main laser and switchyard/target area beam transport systems

    Miller, John L.; English, R. Edward, Jr.; Korniski, Ronald J.; Rodgers, J. Michael

    1999-07-01

    The optical design of the main laser and transport mirror sections of the National Ignition Facility are described. For the main laser the configuration, layout constraints, multiple beam arrangement, pinhole layout and beam paths, clear aperture budget, ray trace models, alignment constraints, lens designs, wavefront performance, and pupil aberrations are discussed. For the transport mirror system the layout, alignment controls and clear aperture budget are described.

  4. Investigation of split injection in a single cylinder optical diesel engine

    Díez Rodríguez, Álvaro

    2009-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. Over the last decade, the diesel engine has made dramatic progress in its performance and market penetration. However, in order to meet future emissions legislations, Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions will need to be reduced simultaneously. Nowadays researchers are focused on different combustion modes like homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion and...

  5. An Optical Method for Measuring Injection Timing in Diesel Engines, Using a Single Port

    2014-09-01

    injection, naturally aspirated marine diesel engine with mechanical unit injectors and showed satisfactory results with blends ranging from 25% HRD/75... injector technology, they further concluded that the mechanical unit injectors found throughout the naval fleet and on the Detroit Diesel 3–53 in the...injection timing in a pump-line- nozzle system of blending Fischer- Tropsch derived diesel fuel with low sulfur, ultra-low sulfur and biodiesel fuels. The

  6. In situ vitrification application to buried waste: Interim report of intermediate field tests at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Callow, R.A.; Weidner, J.R.; Thompson, L.E.

    1991-02-01

    This report describes the two in situ vitrification field tests conducted in June and July 1990 at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In situ vitrification, an emerging technology for in- place conversion of contaminated soils into a durable glass and crystalline waste form, is being investigated as a potential remediation technology for buried waste. The overall objective of the two tests was to assess the general suitability of the process to remediate waste structures representative of buried waste found at Idaho National engineering Laboratory. In particular, these tests, as part of a treatability study, were designed to provide essential information on the field performance of the process under conditions of significant combustible and metal wastes and to test a newly developed electrode feed technology. The tests were successfully completed, and the electrode feed technology successfully processed the high metal content waste, indicating the process is a feasible technology for application to buried waste

  7. In situ vitrification application to buried waste: Interim report of intermediate field tests at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Callow, R.A.; Weidner, J.R.; Thompson, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the two in situ vitrification field tests conducted in July and July 1990 at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In situ vitrification, an emerging technology for in-place conversion of contaminated soils into a durable glass and crystalline waste form, is being investigated as a potential remediation technology for buried waste. The overall objective of the two tests was to assess the general suitability of the process to remediate waste structures representative of buried waste found at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In particular, these tests, as part of a treatability study, were designed to provide essential information field performance of the process under conditions of significant combustible and metal wastes and to test a newly developed electrode feed technology. The tests were successfully completed, and the electrode feed technology successfully processed the high metal content waste, indicating the process is a feasible technology for application to buried waste. 8 refs., 91 figs., 13 tabs

  8. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1989, volume 2

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers.

  9. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1988, volume 2

    Bannerot, Richard B.; Goldstein, Stanley H.

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JCS. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and in 1964 nationally, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers.

  10. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1989, volume 1

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers.

  11. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1988, volume 1

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and in 1964 nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers.

  12. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1992, volume 2

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters Washington, DC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document contains reports 13 through 24.

  13. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1992, volume 1

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, Washington, DC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document is a compilation of the final reports 1 through 12.

  14. Direct-injection strategies for a hydrogen-fueled engine : an optical and numerical investigation

    Kaiser, S.; Salazar, V. [Sandia National Labs, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Scarcelli, R.; Wallner, T. [Argonne National Lab, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Vehicles with hydrogen-fueled engines are competitive with systems based on fuel cells. There is a lack of fundamental knowledge about in-cylinder processes in hydrogen direct injection engines. This presentation discussed a study that used a variety of injector configurations to establish a broad database. A light-load conditions that can profit from stratification was investigated. Several results were presented, including the 5-hole nozzle produced an asymmetric jet pattern which may be good for late injection. Very lean regions in the wake of the transient jets were found to be similar to those found in diesel injection. The 13-hole nozzle demonstrated complete jet collapse, consistent with Schlieren imaging by Petersen. Stratification made efficiency sensitive to the targeting of the single-hole injector. Computational fluid dynamics with a commercially available code aimed to improve the process of design optimization. The simulation predicted less fuel dispersion than was experimentally measured. Details of the fuel penetration were captured. It was concluded that for the single-hole nozzle, the pre-spark fuel distribution is consistent with results from the fired engine. tabs., figs.

  15. Implementation of Case Studies in an Introduction to Engineering Course for "LITEE National Dissemination Grant Competition"

    Le, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the year 2008 and the 2009 results of implementing the Laboratory for Innovative Technology and Engineering Education (LITEE) case studies in an engineering class at Hampton University (HU), a HBCU. Questionnaires were administered at the conclusion of the experiment. The goal of this research is to investigate the relevance…

  16. Development of American and Foreign-National Female Graduate Students in Engineering at Research Universities

    Morrison, Briana Marie Keafer

    2013-01-01

    Women continue to be underrepresented among engineering faculty despite decades of reform and intervention. To understand why more graduate women do not pursue careers in academia, this mixed methods study focuses on the experiences of women currently in graduate engineering programs, and how the graduate culture shapes their development and…

  17. International Conference on Integrated Optical Circuit Engineering, 1st, Cambridge, MA, October 23-25, 1984, Proceedings

    Ostrowsky, D. B.; Sriram, S.

    Aspects of waveguide technology are explored, taking into account waveguide fabrication techniques in GaAs/GaAlAs, the design and fabrication of AlGaAs/GaAs phase couplers for optical integrated circuit applications, ion implanted GaAs integrated optics fabrication technology, a direct writing electron beam lithography based process for the realization of optoelectronic integrated circuits, and advances in the development of semiconductor integrated optical circuits for telecommunications. Other subjects examined are related to optical signal processing, optical switching, and questions of optical bistability and logic. Attention is given to acousto-optic techniques in integrated optics, acousto-optic Bragg diffraction in proton exchanged waveguides, optical threshold logic architectures for hybrid binary/residue processors, integrated optical modulation and switching, all-optic logic devices for waveguide optics, optoelectronic switching, high-speed photodetector switching, and a mechanical optical switch.

  18. Reverse engineering of B-pillar with 3D optical scanning for manufacturing of non-uniform thickness part

    Islam Md. Tasbirul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents reverse engineering (RE of a complex automobile structural part, B-pillar. As a major part of the automobile body-in white (BiW, B-pillar has substantial opportunity for weight reduction by introducing variable thickness across its sections. To leverage such potential, an existing B-pillar was reverse engineered with a 3D optical scanner and computer aided design (CAD application. First, digital data (i.e. in meshes of exiting B-pillar was obtained by the scanner, and subsequently, this information was utilized in developing a complete 3D CAD model. CATIA V5 was used in the modeling where some of the essential work benches were “Digitized Shape Editor”, “Quick Surface Reconstruction”, “Wireframe and Surface Design”, “Freestyle”, “Generation Shape Design” and “Part design”. In the final CAD design, five different thicknesses were incorporated successfully in order to get a B-pillar with non-uniform sections. This research opened opportunities for thickness optimization and mold tooling design in real time manufacturing.

  19. Optical sensor system for time-resolved quantification of methane densities in CH4-fueled spark ignition engines.

    Golibrzuch, Kai; Digulla, Finn-Erik; Bauke, Stephan; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Thiele, Olaf; Berg, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    We present the development and the first application of an optical sensor system that allows single-cycle determination of methane (CH 4 ) concentration inside internal combustion (IC) engines. We use non-dispersive infrared absorption spectroscopy to detect the CH 4 density with a time resolution up to 33 μs at acquisition rates of 30 kHz. The measurement scheme takes advantage of the strong temperature dependence of the absorption band applying two detection channels for CH 4 that detect different spectral regions of the ν 3 anti-symmetric C-H-stretch absorption. The strategy allows the simultaneous determination of fuel concentration as well as gas temperature. We show the proof-of-concept by validation of the measurement strategy in static pressure cell experiments as well as its application to a methane-fueled IC engine using a modified spark plug probe. Our results clearly demonstrate that it is crucial to determine the CH 4 temperature in the probe volume. Due to thermal influences of the sensor probe, the temperature needed to calculate the desired quantities (fuel density, fuel concentration) significantly differs from the gas phase temperature in the rest of the combustion chamber and estimations from standard thermodynamic models, e.g., polytropic compression, will fail.

  20. Fundamental Investigation of Jet Fuel Spray and Ignition Process in an Optically Accessible Piston Engine

    2015-01-16

    pressures up to 5 MPa using a single-hole common-rail diesel injector with high-speed imaging. The authors found that for the initial period during the...total nozzle flow area or decreasing the injection pressure increases the ramp-up period. This type of injector operates by using the fuel injection...design of Almy engines. Tests were perf01med using #2 diesel fuel, jet fuel (JP8), and a hydroprocessed renewable jet fuel (HRJ). Ambient the1modynamic

  1. Structural, thermal, optical properties and cytotoxicity of PMMA/ZnO fibers and films: Potential application in tissue engineering

    Balen, Rodrigo; Vidotto da Costa, Wilian; Lara Andrade, Jéssica de; Piai, Juliana Francis; Muniz, Edvani Curti; Companhoni, Mychelle Vianna; Nakamura, Tânia Ueda

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Films and fibers of PMMA/ZnO nanocomposite were prepared. • ZnO NPs incorporated into PMMA fibers reduces their diameter and beads presence. • PMMA films containing ZnO exhibit higher thermal stability than pure polymer. • PMMA/ZnO nanocomposites show improved optical properties compared to pure polymer. • PMMA/ZnO shows potential for applications in tissue engineering. - Abstract: Films and fibers of PMMA/ZnO nanocomposites (100/0, 99/01, 97/03, 95/05, 90/10, and 85/15 wt.%) were produced by casting and electrospinning, respectively. Their structural, thermal, and optical properties were investigated by XRD, SEM, TGA, PAS, and PL. The incorporation of ZnO NPs reduced the diameter of PMMA fibers and the presence of beads. The surfaces of the fibers exhibited greater hydrophobicity, compared to the films, with contact angles of around 120° and 94°, respectively. PMMA films containing ZnO exhibited higher thermal stability than the pure polymer, while the corresponding fibers did not show any changes in thermal stability. The dispersion of the ZnO NPs at the surface and in the bulk of the nanocomposites appeared to be relatively homogeneous. ZnO improved the optical properties of the PMMA, with an intense absorption band near 370 nm observed for all the nanocomposites, which also exhibited luminescence with emission in the near-UV region, both attributed to ZnO. Biological tests demonstrated that fibers and films with up to 1% of ZnO exhibited good performance in the proliferation of fibroblast cells, indicating their potential for applications in tissue engineering. The fibers provided higher cell viability than the films, presumably due to their greater surface area and/or more suitable surface morphology. Nanocomposites with 15% ZnO inhibited cell proliferation, due to the cytotoxicity of the ZnO NPs. Although several applications of PMMA have been suggested by biomedical researchers, until now there have been no reports on the specific

  2. Structural, thermal, optical properties and cytotoxicity of PMMA/ZnO fibers and films: Potential application in tissue engineering

    Balen, Rodrigo; Vidotto da Costa, Wilian; Lara Andrade, Jéssica de; Piai, Juliana Francis [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Química, Departamento de Química, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900, Zona Sete, Maringá, PR (Brazil); Muniz, Edvani Curti [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Química, Departamento de Química, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900, Zona Sete, Maringá, PR (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biotecnologia Aplicada à Agricultura, Universidade Paranaense (UNIPAR), 87502-210, Umuarama, PR (Brazil); Programa de Pós- Graduação em Ciências de Materiais & Engenharia, Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná (UTFPR-LD), 86036-370, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Companhoni, Mychelle Vianna; Nakamura, Tânia Ueda [Departamento de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900, Zona Sete, Maringá, PR (Brazil); and others

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Films and fibers of PMMA/ZnO nanocomposite were prepared. • ZnO NPs incorporated into PMMA fibers reduces their diameter and beads presence. • PMMA films containing ZnO exhibit higher thermal stability than pure polymer. • PMMA/ZnO nanocomposites show improved optical properties compared to pure polymer. • PMMA/ZnO shows potential for applications in tissue engineering. - Abstract: Films and fibers of PMMA/ZnO nanocomposites (100/0, 99/01, 97/03, 95/05, 90/10, and 85/15 wt.%) were produced by casting and electrospinning, respectively. Their structural, thermal, and optical properties were investigated by XRD, SEM, TGA, PAS, and PL. The incorporation of ZnO NPs reduced the diameter of PMMA fibers and the presence of beads. The surfaces of the fibers exhibited greater hydrophobicity, compared to the films, with contact angles of around 120° and 94°, respectively. PMMA films containing ZnO exhibited higher thermal stability than the pure polymer, while the corresponding fibers did not show any changes in thermal stability. The dispersion of the ZnO NPs at the surface and in the bulk of the nanocomposites appeared to be relatively homogeneous. ZnO improved the optical properties of the PMMA, with an intense absorption band near 370 nm observed for all the nanocomposites, which also exhibited luminescence with emission in the near-UV region, both attributed to ZnO. Biological tests demonstrated that fibers and films with up to 1% of ZnO exhibited good performance in the proliferation of fibroblast cells, indicating their potential for applications in tissue engineering. The fibers provided higher cell viability than the films, presumably due to their greater surface area and/or more suitable surface morphology. Nanocomposites with 15% ZnO inhibited cell proliferation, due to the cytotoxicity of the ZnO NPs. Although several applications of PMMA have been suggested by biomedical researchers, until now there have been no reports on the specific

  3. National Educators' Workshop: Update 1998. Standard Experiments in Engineering, Materials Science, and Technology

    Arrington, Ginger L. F. (Compiler); Gardner, James E. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A. (Compiler); Swyler, Karl J. (Compiler); Fine, Leonard W. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This document contains a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the National Educators' Workshop: Update 98. held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York on November 1-4, 1998.

  4. Concrete release protocol case studies for decommissioning work at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Kamboj, S.; Arnish, J.; Chen, S-Y; Parker, F. L.; Phillips, A. M.; Tripp, J. L.; Meservey, R. H.

    2000-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.5, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment'' contains provisions pertinent to releasing potentially radioactive materials from DOE facilities for reuse or recycle. A process of authorized release for materials recovered from radiation areas is permitted under Order 5400.5 and the proposed rule in Title 10, Part 834, of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 834). A generic disposition protocol to facilitate release of concrete under these provisions has been developed. This report analyzes the application of that generic protocol to site-specific cases at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The potential radiological doses and costs for several concrete disposition alternatives for the sewage treatment plant (STP) at the Central Facilities Area (CFA) of INEEL were evaluated in this analysis. Five disposition alternatives were analyzed for the concrete: (A) decontaminate, crush, and reuse; (B) crush and reuse without decontamination; (C) decontaminate, demolish, and dispose of at a nonradiological landfill; (D) demolish and dispose of at a nonradiological landfill without decontamination; and (E) demolish and dispose of at a low-level radioactive waste (LLW) facility. The analysis was performed for disposition of concrete from four INEEL structures: (1) trickle filter, (2) primary clarifier, (3) secondary clarifier, and (4) CFA-691 pumphouse for a generic case (based on default parameters from the disposition protocol) and an INEEL-specific case (based on INEEL-specific parameters). The results of the analysis indicated that Alternatives B and D would incur the lowest cost and result in a dose less than 1 mrem/yr (except for the trickle filter, the dose for which was estimated at 1.9 mrem/yr) for nonradiological workers. The analysis indicated that the main contributor to the radiological dose would be cobalt-60 contamination in the concrete. A characterization conducted

  5. Nuclear decontamination and decommissioning operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL)

    Meservey, R.H.; Kenoyer, D.J.; Frazee, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Idaho National engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is home of the largest concentration of nuclear reactors in the world. In addition to the reactors, many fuel reprocessing, laboratory, and other nuclear support facilities have been operated at the INEEL. Many have already been decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) and many more are in the planning stages for such activities. A full time D and D program has been in existence at the INEEL for the past 20 years. Starting with a long range plan for D and D of all surplus contaminated facilities at the INEEL, and ending with the verification of the free release of those facilities after decommissioning, all aspects of D and D activities are covered. Topics covered in this paper include the INEEL D and D Long Range Plan, the D and D Porject Managers Handbook, the use of ASTM Standard Guides in decommissioning operations, and the INEEL D and D Technology Logic Diagrams. The identification and preparation of safety plans, environmental documentation, and operational procedures will also be covered in the presentation. The selection and use of advanced technologies to improve safety, reduce costs, and shorten D and D schedules is very important to the nuclear industry. In addition to a discussion of the D and D Technology Logic Diagrams, a discussion of new and improved technologies in use at the INEEL and other department of energy facilities will be presented. This will include brief discussions of work being performed at three Department of Energy Large Scale D and D Technology Demonstration projects. These include technology demonstrations at a Test Reactor, Uranium Fabrication Plant, and a large Production Reactor. Unique technologies which have been developed and tested at the INEEL will also be covered in the presentation. These include the biological decontamination of concrete, a laser enhanced zero added waste cutting, abraiding, and drilling technology, and the development of an

  6. Integrated optical circuit engineering V; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, Aug. 17-20, 1987

    Mentzer, Mark A.

    Recent advances in the theoretical and practical design and applications of optoelectronic devices and optical circuits are examined in reviews and reports. Topics discussed include system and market considerations, guided-wave phenomena, waveguide devices, processing technology, lithium niobate devices, and coupling problems. Consideration is given to testing and measurement, integrated optics for fiber-optic systems, optical interconnect technology, and optical computing.

  7. Defense Horizons. The Science and Engineering Workforce and National Security. April 2004, Number 39

    Marshall, Michael

    2004-01-01

    .... Especially worrisome are the following: (1) a general lack of interest among American-born youth in pursuing education in the physical sciences, mathematics, environmental sciences, and engineering at the undergraduate and graduate levels; (2...

  8. National Educators' Workshop. Update 92: Standard Experiments in Engineering Materials Science and Technology

    Gardner, James E. (Compiler); Jacobs, James A. (Compiler); Craig, Douglas F. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This document contains a collection of experiments presented and demonstrated at the workshop. The experiments related to the nature and properties of engineering materials and provided information to assist in teaching about materials in the education community.

  9. A portable magneto-optical trap with prospects for atom interferometry in civil engineering

    Hinton, A.; Perea-Ortiz, M.; Winch, J.; Briggs, J.; Freer, S.; Moustoukas, D.; Powell-Gill, S.; Squire, C.; Lamb, A.; Rammeloo, C.; Stray, B.; Voulazeris, G.; Zhu, L.; Kaushik, A.; Lien, Y.-H.; Niggebaum, A.; Rodgers, A.; Stabrawa, A.; Boddice, D.; Plant, S. R.; Tuckwell, G. W.; Bongs, K.; Metje, N.; Holynski, M.

    2017-06-01

    The high precision and scalable technology offered by atom interferometry has the opportunity to profoundly affect gravity surveys, enabling the detection of features of either smaller size or greater depth. While such systems are already starting to enter into the commercial market, significant reductions are required in order to reach the size, weight and power of conventional devices. In this article, the potential for atom interferometry based gravimetry is assessed, suggesting that the key opportunity resides within the development of gravity gradiometry sensors to enable drastic improvements in measurement time. To push forward in realizing more compact systems, techniques have been pursued to realize a highly portable magneto-optical trap system, which represents the core package of an atom interferometry system. This can create clouds of 107 atoms within a system package of 20 l and 10 kg, consuming 80 W of power. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'.

  10. Synthesis of focused beam with controllable arbitrary homogeneous polarization using engineered vectorial optical fields.

    Rui, Guanghao; Chen, Jian; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gu, Bing; Cui, Yiping; Zhan, Qiwen

    2016-10-17

    The propagation and focusing properties of light beams continue to remain a research interest owning to their promising applications in physics, chemistry and biological sciences. One of the main challenges to these applications is the control of polarization distribution within the focal volume. In this work, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a method for generating a focused beam with arbitrary homogeneous polarization at any transverse plane. The required input field at the pupil plane of a high numerical aperture objective lens can be found analytically by solving an inverse problem with the Richard-Wolf vectorial diffraction method, and can be experimentally created with a vectorial optical field generator. Focused fields with various polarizations are successfully generated and verified using a Stokes parameter measurement to demonstrate the capability and versatility of proposed technique.

  11. National Ignition Facility Incorporates P2/E2 in Aqueous Parts Cleaning of Optics Hardware

    Gabor, K

    2001-01-01

    When completed, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be the world's largest laser with experimental capabilities applicable to stockpile stewardship, energy research, science and astrophysics. As construction of the conventional facilities nears completion, operations supporting the installation of specialized laser equipment have come online. Playing a critical role in the precision cleaning of mechanical parts from the NIF beamline are three pieces of aqueous cleaning equipment. Housed in the Optics Assembly Building (OAB), adjacent to NIF's laser bay, are the large mechanical parts gross cleaner (LMPGC), the large mechanical parts precision cleaner (LMPPC), and the small mechanical parts gross and precision cleaner (SMPGPC). These aqueous units, designed and built by Sonic Systems, Inc., of Newtown, Pennsylvania, not only accommodate parts that vary greatly in size, weight, geometry, surface finish and material, but also produce cleaned parts that meet the stringent NIF cleanliness standards (MIL-STD-1246C Level 83 for particles and A/10 for non-volatile residue). Each unit was designed with extensive water- and energy-conserving features, and the technology used minimizes hazardous waste generation associated with solvent wipe cleaning, the traditional method for cleaning laser mechanical components. The LMPGC provides preliminary gross cleaning for large mechanical parts. Collection, filtration and reuse of the wash and primary rinse water in the LMPGC limit its routine discharge to the volume of the low-pressure, deionized secondary rinse. After an initial gross cleaning in the LMPGC, a large mechanical part goes to the LMPPC. This piece of equipment, unique because of its size, consists of four 2700-gallon tanks. Parts held securely on specialized metal pallets (jointly weighing up to 1500 pounds) move through the tanks on an automated system. Operators program all movement, speeds and process times to

  12. Contributions of university nuclear engineering departments to the national research agenda

    Peddicord, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    The history and character of university nuclear engineering departments have enabled them to play unique roles in higher education and to make valuable contributions in numerous important research fields. Nuclear engineering programs have several distinguishing and noteworthy characteristics. These characteristics include quality, diversity, and effectiveness. However, the continued viability of these programs is in question, and the importance of these programs may only be recognized after the capability has been lost. To recover this capability may well prove to be an impossibility

  13. Transient states analysis of CI engine injectors with the use of optical methods

    Skowron, M.; Pielecha, I.; Wisłocki, K.

    2016-09-01

    The main aim of research was to define real injection time delay against the time of electrical control signal for piezoelectric and electromagnetic diesel fuel injectors. The second objective of this work was the evaluation of influence of typical injection parameters on this delay. The analysis was focused on the occurrence of appropriate control signals recorded with the use of fast-varying data acquisition system and compared with the data recorded by high speed camera. The tests were conducted in constant volume chamber for different injector types used in combustion engines with direct injection of diesel fuel. The tests were performed under variable conditions: different fuel pressure, air back-pressure and injection duration time.

  14. Tunable axial gauge fields in engineered Weyl semimetals: semiclassical analysis and optical lattice implementations

    Roy, Sthitadhi; Kolodrubetz, Michael; Goldman, Nathan; Grushin, Adolfo G.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we describe a toolbox to realize and probe synthetic axial gauge fields in engineered Weyl semimetals. These synthetic electromagnetic fields, which are sensitive to the chirality associated with Weyl nodes, emerge due to spatially and temporally dependent shifts of the corresponding Weyl momenta. First, we introduce two realistic models, inspired by recent cold-atom developments, which are particularly suitable for the exploration of these synthetic axial gauge fields. Second, we describe how to realize and measure the effects of such axial fields through center-of-mass observables, based on semiclassical equations of motion and exact numerical simulations. In particular, we suggest realistic protocols to reveal an axial Hall response due to the axial electric field \

  15. Status on Technology Development of Optic Fiber-Coupled Laser Ignition System for Rocket Engine Applications

    Trinh, Huu P.; Early, Jim; Osborne, Robin; Thomas, Matthew; Bossard, John

    2003-01-01

    To pursue technology developments for future launch vehicles, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is examining vortex chamber concepts for liquid rocket engine applications. Past studies indicated that the vortex chamber schemes potentially have a number of advantages over conventional chamber methods. Due to the nature of the vortex flow, relatively cooler propellant streams tend to flow along the chamber wall. Hence, the thruster chamber can be operated without the need of any cooling techniques. This vortex flow also creates strong turbulence, which promotes the propellant mixing process. Consequently, the subject chamber concept: not only offer system simplicity, but also enhance the combustion performance. Test results have shown that chamber performance is markedly high even at a low chamber length-to-diameter ratio. This incentive can be translated to a convenience in the thrust chamber packaging.

  16. 1995 Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs): Radionuclides. Annual report

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H (National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities), each DOE facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at INEL for CY 1995. For that year, airborne radionuclide emissions from INEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 1.80E-02 mrem (1.80E-07 Sievert), well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

  17. 1995 Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs): Radionuclides. Annual report

    1996-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H (National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities), each DOE facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at INEL for CY 1995. For that year, airborne radionuclide emissions from INEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 1.80E-02 mrem (1.80E-07 Sievert), well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year)

  18. Integrating undergraduate research into the electro-optics and laser engineering technology program at Indiana University of Pennsylvania

    Zhou, Andrew F.

    2014-07-01

    Bringing research into an undergraduate curriculum is a proven and powerful practice with many educational benefits to students and the professional rewards to faculty mentors. In recent years, undergraduate research has gained national prominence as an effective problem-based learning strategy. Developing and sustaining a vibrant undergraduate research program of high quality and productivity is an outstanding example of the problem-based learning. To foster student understanding of the content learned in the classroom and nurture enduring problem-solving and critical-thinking abilities, we have created a collaborative learning environment by building research into the Electro-Optics curriculum for the first- and second-year students. The teaching methodology is described and examples of the research projects are given. Such a research-integrated curriculum effectively enhances student learning and critical thinking skills, and strengthens the research culture for the first- and second-year students.

  19. Transformation optics and metamaterials at infrared wavelength: engineering of permittivity and permeability

    Ghasemi, Rasta; Degiron, Aloyse; Leroux, Xavier; Lupu, Anatole; de Lustrac, André

    2013-05-01

    The transformation optics was introduced by J. Pendry and U. Leonhardt in 2006 [1,2]. In this method an initial space is transformed into a new space and this transformed space can be materialized by a material, which the electromagnetic parameters can be deduced from the metric of the transformed space. In the general case the electromagnetic parameters are anisotropic tensors. At microwave frequencies these materials can be realized using classical metamaterials like SRR form J. Pendry or ELC from D. Smith [3]. At infrared wavelengths this realization is a challenge because the dimensions of the metamaterials are much smaller than the wavelength and become nanometric. Then the design of these metamaterials must be simplified and original methods must be developed to allow the realization of these metamaterials with controlled electromagnetic properties. In this paper we describe the realization of a multilayer metamaterial working at infrared wavelength, which the permittivity and the permeability can be adjusted separately. We give some examples of realized multilayer materials operating around 150THz, with a comparison between the results of full wave simulations of these materials and their characterizations using a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer.

  20. A portable magneto-optical trap with prospects for atom interferometry in civil engineering.

    Hinton, A; Perea-Ortiz, M; Winch, J; Briggs, J; Freer, S; Moustoukas, D; Powell-Gill, S; Squire, C; Lamb, A; Rammeloo, C; Stray, B; Voulazeris, G; Zhu, L; Kaushik, A; Lien, Y-H; Niggebaum, A; Rodgers, A; Stabrawa, A; Boddice, D; Plant, S R; Tuckwell, G W; Bongs, K; Metje, N; Holynski, M

    2017-08-06

    The high precision and scalable technology offered by atom interferometry has the opportunity to profoundly affect gravity surveys, enabling the detection of features of either smaller size or greater depth. While such systems are already starting to enter into the commercial market, significant reductions are required in order to reach the size, weight and power of conventional devices. In this article, the potential for atom interferometry based gravimetry is assessed, suggesting that the key opportunity resides within the development of gravity gradiometry sensors to enable drastic improvements in measurement time. To push forward in realizing more compact systems, techniques have been pursued to realize a highly portable magneto-optical trap system, which represents the core package of an atom interferometry system. This can create clouds of 10 7 atoms within a system package of 20 l and 10 kg, consuming 80 W of power.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) Research at Argonne National Laboratory. A Report

    Gupta, Sreenath [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Biruduganti, Muni [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bihari, Bipin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sekar, Raj [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The goals of these experiments were to determine the potential of employing spectral measurements to deduce combustion metrics such as HRR, combustion temperatures, and equivalence ratios in a natural gas-fired reciprocating engine. A laser-ignited, natural gas-fired single-cylinder research engine was operated at various equivalence ratios between 0.6 and 1.0, while varying the EGR levels between 0% and maximum to thereby ensure steady combustion. Crank angle-resolved spectral signatures were collected over 266-795 nm, encompassing chemiluminescence emissions from OH*, CH*, and predominantly by CO2* species. Further, laser-induced gas breakdown spectra were recorded under various engine operating conditions.

  2. National symposium and workshop on optical platforms, Huntsville, AL, June 12-14, 1984, Proceedings

    Wyman, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    The conference is concerned with space-based observatories (including future systems), interplanetary observation platforms, Space Station optical utilization, orbital earth viewing systems, and Spacelab's use as an observations platform. Attention is given to the pointing system for the space telescope, the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, the conceptual definition of the Space IR Telescope Facility's spacecraft, satellite servicing in light of the Solar Maximum Repair Mission, a large deployable reflector telescope concept, moon-based astronomical observatories, Space Station-based remote sensing of the earth, optical systems is geosynchronous orbit, multispectral linear array detector technology, Spacelab-based space plasma and materials processing investigations, and space construction technology for large space observatories. Also discussed are military optical platforms for sea, land and air stationing

  3. Role of Cu in engineering the optical properties of SnO2 nanostructures: Structural, morphological and spectroscopic studies

    Kumar, Virender; Singh, Kulwinder; Jain, Megha; Manju; Kumar, Akshay; Sharma, Jeewan; Vij, Ankush; Thakur, Anup

    2018-06-01

    We have carried out a systematic study to investigate the effect of Cu doping on the optical properties of SnO2 nanostructures synthesized by chemical route. Synthesized nanostructures were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, UV-visible and Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The Rietveld refinement analysis of XRD patterns of Cu-doped SnO2 samples confirmed the formation of single phase tetragonal rutile structure, however some localized distortion was observed for 5 mol% Cu-doped SnO2. Crystallite size was found to decrease with increase in dopant concentration. FE-SEM images indicated change in morphology of samples with doping. HR-TEM images revealed that synthesized nanostructures were nearly spherical and average crystallite size was in the range 12-21 nm. Structural defects, crystallinity and size effects on doping were investigated by Raman spectroscopy and results were complemented by FTIR spectroscopy. Optical band gap of samples was estimated from reflectance spectra. We have shown that band gap of SnO2 can be engineered from 3.62 to 3.82 eV by Cu doping. PL emission intensity increased as the doping concentration increased, which can be attributed to the development of defect states in the forbidden transition region of band gap of SnO2 with doping. We have also proposed a band model owing to defect states in SnO2 to explain the observed PL in Cu doped SnO2 nanostructures.

  4. Cost estimate of grouting the proposed test pits at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory using the ORNL-recommended grouts

    Spence, R.D.

    1987-08-01

    EG and G Idaho will construct three experimental pits to simulate the TRU waste trenches at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Two of these pits will be grouted and then one will be destructively examined as soon as the grout cures and the other will be monitored for 10 years. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is evaluating grouts and will recommend a grout to EG and G Idaho to reduce the permeability of the pit, fill the large voids, and encapsulate the waste. A previous ORNL report (ORNL/TM-9881) discusses the grouts evaluated and the grout recommended based on those evaluations. This report evaluates the economics of grouting the experimental pits. The cost of double grouting two of the EG and G Idaho design pits at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory using lance injection was estimated to be $100,000. Jet grouting the same two pits was estimated to cost $85,000. Both should be tried as part of the test EG and G Idaho is conducting

  5. Hydrology of the solid waste burial ground as related to potential migration of radionuclides, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Barraclough, Jack T.; Robertson, J.B.; Janzer, V.J.; Saindon, L.G.

    1976-01-01

    A study was made (1970-1974) to evaluate the geohydrologic and geochemical controls on subsurface migration of radionuclides from pits and trenches in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) solid waste burial ground and to determine the existence and extent of radionuclide migration from the burial ground. A total of about 1,700 sediment, rock, and water samples were collected from 10 observation wells drilled in and near the burial ground of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, formerly the National Reactor Testing Station (NRTS). Within the burial ground area, the subsurface rocks are composed principally of basalt. Wind- and water-deposited sediments occur at the surface and in beds between the thicker basalt zones. Two principal sediment beds occur at about 110 feet and 240 feet below the land surface. The average thickness of the surficial sedimentary layer is about 15 feet while that of the two principal subsurface layers is 13 and 14 feet, respectively. The water table in the aquifer beneath the burial ground is at a depth of about 580 feet. Fission, activation, and transuranic elements were detected in some of the samples from the 110- and 240-foot sedimentary layers. (Woodard-USGS)

  6. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1987, volume 2

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The 1987 Johnson Space Center (JCS) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of ASEE. The basic objectives of the program are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects done by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1987.

  7. Safety analysis report for the mixed waste storage facility and portable storage units at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Peatross, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Mixed Waste Storage Facility (MWSF) including the Portable Storage Units (PSUs) is a government-owned contractor-operated facility located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO) is the current operating contractor and facility Architect/Engineer as of September 1996. The operating contractor is referred to as open-quotes the Companyclose quotes or open-quotes Companyclose quotes throughout this document. Oversight of MWSF is provided by the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID). The MWSF is located in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) Waste Reduction Operations Complex (WROC) Area, approximately 10.6 km (6.6 mi) from the southern INEL boundary and 4 km (2.5 mi) from U.S. Highway 20

  8. SAFETY ENGINEERING FOR THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER AT THE BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Musolino, S.V.; Kane, S.F.; Levesque, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    THERE ARE ONLY A FEW OTHER HIGH ENERGY PARTICLE ACCELERATORS LIKE RHIC IN THE WORLD. THEREFORE, THE DESIGNERS OF THE MACHINE DO NOT ALWAYS HAVE CONSENSUS DESIGN STANDARDS AND REGULATORY GUIDANCE AVAILABLE TO ESTABLISH THE ENGINEERING PARAMETERS FOR SAFETY. SOME OF THE AREAS WHERE STANDARDS ARE NOT AVAILABLE RELATE TO THE CRYOGENIC SYSTEM, CONTAINMENT OF LARGE VOLUMES OF FLAMMABLE GAS IN FRAGILE VESSELS IN THE EXPERIMENTAL APPARATUS AND MITIGATION OF A DESIGN BASIS ACCIDENT WITH A STORED PARTICLE BEAM. UNIQUE BUT EQUIVALENT SAFETY ENGINEERING MUST BE DETERMINED. SPECIAL DESIGN CRITERIA FOR PROMPT RADIATION WERE DEVELOPED TO PROVIDE GUIDANCE FOR THE DESIGN OF RADIATION SHIELDING

  9. Critical issues in water and wastewater treatment. Proceedings of the 1994 national conference on environmental engineering

    Ryan, J.N.; Edwards, M.

    1994-01-01

    This proceedings, Critical Issues in Water and Wastewater, contains short versions of most of the 114 papers presented at the 1994 Specialty Conference on Environmental Engineering held in Boulder, Colorado on July 11 to 13, 1994. These papers are organized into 23 distinct sessions that focus primarily on water treatment, water distribution, and wastewater treatment. Some of the topics discussed concern microbes in drinking water, contaminated groundwater remediation, and the effects of floods on hazardous waste sites. To summarize, this proceedings provides a practical and timely reference for engineers interested in the current state of water and wastewater concerns

  10. Application of database management system for data-ware of work on power engineering problems in the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan

    Afanas'eva, T.Yu.

    2001-01-01

    In this article there are some development tendencies of state-of-art data management system. Also it describes databases on the status of the world power engineering and power engineering in Kazakhstan created in the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan. (author)

  11. The effect of ethanol blending on mixture formation, combustion and soot emission studied in an optical DISI engine

    Storch, Michael; Hinrichsen, Florian; Wensing, Michael; Will, Stefan; Zigan, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Catalyst heating points were analyzed using optical measurement techniques. • E20 shows stronger soot radiation and higher soot concentration as isooctane. • Different mixing formation of isooctane and E20 was determined. • Strong mixture stratification was identified for both fuels. • Remaining droplets and fuel rich regions are the main source for soot formation. - Abstract: In various research studies, ethanol blended fuels have shown reduced particulate matter (PM) emissions in comparison to gasoline and its surrogate fuels in direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) engines. However, there are also studies reporting increased particulate concentration for fuels with low ethanol content. In this work the mixture formation and sooting combustion behavior of isooctane and the mixture E20 (20 vol% of ethanol in isooctane) is analyzed for catalyst heating operation. These operating conditions are critical as they strongly contribute to overall soot emissions in driving cycles. Simultaneous high speed imaging of OH ∗ –chemiluminescence and natural soot luminosity measurements are performed in combination with primary particle concentration measurements using a laser induced incandescence (LII) sensor in the engine exhaust duct. At these operating conditions E20 exhibits a higher sooting tendency as compared to isooctane. In order to identify the reason for increased soot formation, the mixture formation process is analyzed by planar laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements. The results show that soot was formed in fuel rich regions with incomplete evaporated fuel droplets remaining from the injection event. A different evaporation process of E20 fuel spray and mixing behavior is indicated showing a more compact rich mixture cloud with surrounding lean areas near the spark plug region. This mixture stratification is characterized by higher cyclic variations and constitutes a significant source of soot formation

  12. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville vicinity, Butte County, Idaho -- Photographs, written historical and descriptive data. Historical American engineering record

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This report describes the history of the Old Waste Calcining Facility. It begins with introductory material on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, the Materials Testing Reactor fuel cycle, and the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. The report then describes management of the wastes from the processing plant in the following chapters: Converting liquid to solid wastes; Fluidized bed waste calcining process and the Waste Calcining Facility; Waste calcining campaigns; WCF gets a new source of heat; New Waste Calcining Facility; Last campaign; Deactivation and the RCRA cap; Significance/context of the old WCF. Appendices contain a photo key map for HAER photos, a vicinity map and neighborhood of the WCF, detailed description of the calcining process, and chronology of WCF campaigns.

  13. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville vicinity, Butte County, Idaho -- Photographs, written historical and descriptive data. Historical American engineering record

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the history of the Old Waste Calcining Facility. It begins with introductory material on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, the Materials Testing Reactor fuel cycle, and the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. The report then describes management of the wastes from the processing plant in the following chapters: Converting liquid to solid wastes; Fluidized bed waste calcining process and the Waste Calcining Facility; Waste calcining campaigns; WCF gets a new source of heat; New Waste Calcining Facility; Last campaign; Deactivation and the RCRA cap; Significance/context of the old WCF. Appendices contain a photo key map for HAER photos, a vicinity map and neighborhood of the WCF, detailed description of the calcining process, and chronology of WCF campaigns

  14. Los Alamos National Security, LLC Request for Information from industrial entities that desire to commercialize Laboratory-developed Extremely Low Resource Optical Identifier (ELROI) tech

    Erickson, Michael Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-10

    Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) is the manager and operator of the Los Alamos National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LANS is a mission-centric Federally Funded Research and Development Center focused on solving the most critical national security challenges through science and engineering for both government and private customers.

  15. National Strategies for Staff and Faculty Development in Engineering Education in Denmark

    Vinther, Ole; Kolmos, Anette

    2002-01-01

    Increasing emphasis is being placed on establishing teaching and learninge centres at the institutional level with the stated objective of improving the quality of teaching and education. The article describes Denmark´s IPN, which consists of five engineering colleges and three universities...

  16. The National Evaluation of NASA's Science, Engineering, Mathematics and Aerospace Academy (SEMAA) Program

    Martinez, Alina; Cosentino de Cohen, Clemencia

    2010-01-01

    This report presents findings from a NASA requested evaluation in 2008, which contains both implementation and impact modules. The implementation study investigated how sites implement Science, Engineering, Mathematics, and Aerospace Academy (SEMAA) and the contextual factors important in this implementation. The implementation study used data…

  17. Spray-combustion process characterization in a common rail diesel engine fuelled with butanol-diesel blends by conventional methods and optical diagnostics

    Simona Silvia Merola

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The target of a sustainable mobility has led to investigate advanced combustion modes and fuels technologies. On the other side, the increasing global energy demand and the decreasing fossil-energy resources are enhancing the interest in the use of renewable alternative fuels for compression ignition engines with the target of near-zero emission levels. Although performance and emissions of alternative-fuel within light-duty diesel engines have been extensively investigated, results of fuel chemical composition impact on combustion by integrated optical methodologies are lacking. In order to meet this challenge, one of the main objectives of the research efforts is to characterize the combustion and species evolution. In this investigation, conventional tests and optical diagnostics were employed to enhance the comprehension of the combustion process and chemical markers in a common rail compression ignition engine powered by butanol-diesel blends. The investigation was focused on the effect of the injection strategy and blend composition on in-cylinder spray combustion and soot formation, through UV-visible digital imaging and natural emission spectroscopy. Experiments were performed in an optically accessible single cylinder high swirl compression ignition engine, equipped with a common rail multi-jets injection system. UV-visible emission spectroscopy was used to follow the evolution of the combustion process chemical markers. Spectral features of OH were identified and followed during the spray combustion process examining different pilot-main dwell timings. Soot spectral evidence in the visible wavelength range was correlated to soot engine out emissions. In this work, conventional and optical data related to diesel fuel blended with 40 % of n-butanol will be presented.

  18. National Ignition Facility subsystem design requirements final optics assembly subsystem SSDR 1.8.7

    Adams, C.

    1996-01-01

    This SSDR establishes the performance, design, development and test requirements for the Final Optic Assembly (FOA). The FOA (WBS 1.8.7) as part of the Target Experimental System (1.8) includes vacuum windows, frequency conversion crystals, focus lens, debris shields and supporting mechanical equipment

  19. Standard testing procedures for optical fiber and unshielded twisted pair at Sandia National Laboratories

    Adams, R.L.

    1993-11-01

    This document will establish a working standard for testing optical fiber and unshielded twisted pair cables included in the Lab-wide telecommunications cabling system. The purpose of these standard testing procedures is to deliver to all Sandians a reliable, low-maintenance, state-of-the-art, ubiquitous telecommunications cabling infrastructure capable of satisfying all current and future telecommunication needs.

  20. Chlorine-36 in the Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: Origin and implications

    Beasley, T.M.; Cecil, L.D.; Mann, L.J.; Sharma, P.; Fehn, U.; Gove, H.E.; Kubik, P.W.

    1993-01-01

    Between 1952 and 1984, low-level radioactive waste was introduced directly into the Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho Falls, Idaho. These wastes were generated, principally, at the nuclear fuel reprocessing facility on the site. The measurements of 36 Cl in monitoring and production well waters, downgradient from disposal wells and seepage ponds, found easily detectable, nonhazardous concentrations of this radionuclide from the point of injection to the INEL southern site boundary. Comparisons are made between 3 H and 36 Cl concentrations in aquifer water and the advantages of 36 Cl as a tracer of subsurface-water dynamics at the site are discussed